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Sample records for volcanic debris avalanches

  1. Hummock alignment in Japanese volcanic debris avalanches controlled by pre-avalanche slope of depositional area

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    Yoshida, Hidetsugu

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigates the relationship of hummock orientation to the flow dynamics of volcanic debris avalanches. There are opposing views on whether hummocks are systematically aligned along debris avalanche paths, or not. To investigate this geomorphologically fundamental question, I investigated hummock orientation for six Japanese debris avalanches of two simple styles: four "freely spreading" debris avalanches, and two "valley-filling" debris avalanches. Quantitative GIS-based data analysis revealed that hummock orientation along the avalanche flow path alternated between dominantly parallel to and dominantly perpendicular to the flow direction. These changes of alignment reflect dynamic changes of the local stress field within the avalanche, alternating between extensional and compressional in response to changes of the slope of the pre-avalanche ground surface. Changes of hummock alignment from perpendicular to parallel indicate that the local stress regime has changed from compressional to extensional. Conversely, changes of hummock alignment from parallel to perpendicular indicate that the local stress regime has changed from extensional to compressional. Thus, this research demonstrated a clear relationship between hummock orientation and dynamic changes of stress regime within avalanches that are related to changes of the slope of the pre-avalanche ground surface.

  2. Syn and post- emplacement transformations of the Misti (Peru) volcanic debris avalanches into lahars

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    Bernard, K.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.; Thouret, J.

    2012-12-01

    We identify stratigraphic, sedimentological and structural variations in lithofacies of debris-avalanche deposits from El Misti volcano in the Quebrada San Lazaro and Río Chili Valley, near the city of Arequipa (south Peru), to determine lithofacies transformations. We describe the internal process associated to the external conditions acting on debris-avalanche deposits in order to assess stages of transformations from the proximal to distal debris-avalanche deposits and the associated epiclastic deposits. Syn-emplacement transformations inside the volcanic debris-avalanche deposits in the upper course of the Rio Chili Valley: within a few meters, the proximal block facies of the sheared debris-avalanche deposit is transformed at the contact of the ash-rich alluvial deposits in thick units comprising a strongly sheared base of the deposit, then stratified matrix dominated beds with normally sorted boulders aligned with the beds. This is interpreted as the effect of strong shearing inside the confined and proximal debris avalanche during motion, which generated a localised stretching near the base of the deposit and the bulking of the thin water saturated basal layers: the bearing capacity of the matrix debris- avalanche is modified, the block facies has been transformed in a stratified matrix facies. The transformations by bulking along a strong sheared contact contribute to reduce the run-out distance of the debris avalanches in the Río Chili valley. Post-deposition evolutions of the debris-avalanche deposits in the Quebrada San Lazaro: in the upper course of the valley, the landslides in the debris- avalanche deposits related to water circulation destabilise the covering scree and volcanic colluvium dipping at 70°. The fragmentation and sorting due to gravity and water are the external processes which separate matrix and block elements; This is the first stage of transformation. The remobilisation of these separated fractions into lahars transforms this

  3. Debris Avalanches and Debris Flows Transformed from Collapses in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, México.

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    Capra, L.; Macias, J.; Scott, K.; Abrams, M.; Garduño, V.

    2001-12-01

    Volcanoes of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) have yielded numerous sector and flank collapses during Pleistocene and Holocene time. Sector collapses associated with magmatic activity have yielded debris avalanches with generally limited runout extent (e.g. Popocatépetl, Jocotitlán, and Colima volcanoes). In contrast, flank collapses (smaller failures not involving the volcano summit), both associated and unassociated with magmatic activity and correlated with intense hydrothermal alteration in ice-capped volcanoes, commonly have yielded highly mobile cohesive debris flows (e.g. Pico de Orizaba and Nevado de Toluca volcanoes). Collapse orientation in the TMVB is preferentially to the south and north-east, probably reflecting the tectonic regime of active E-W and NNW faults. The different mobilities of the flows transformed from collapses have important implications for hazard assessment. Both sector and flank collapse can yield highly mobile debris flows, but this transformation is more common in the case of the smaller failures. High mobility is related to factors such as water and clay content of the failed material, the paleotopography, and the extent of entrainment of sediment during flow (bulking). Both debris-avalanches and debris-flows are volcanic hazards that occur from both active volcanoes, as well as those that are inactive or dormant volcanoes, and may by triggered by earthquakes, precipitation, or simple gravity. There will be no precursory warning in such non-volcanic cases.

  4. Volcanic debris avalanche transport and emplacement: water content and fragmentation vs disaggregation

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    Roverato, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic Debris Avalanches are voluminous, heterogeneous mass-flows of poorly sorted sediments (micron - 10's m) that move downslope under the effect of gravity. They travel with extremely high velocity for long distances with very potential high destructive power. These flows may reach initial velocities as high as 100m/s, travel for several tens of kilometers, and spread over broad sectors. They are commonly considered as inertial dry grain flows where particle-particle interaction can be within a frictional and/or collisional regime. It is largely assumed that fragmentation of particles within a debris avalanche occurs primarily at the moment of the edifice failure, due to sudden material decompression and dilation. Following failure, the dislodged mass starts to slide or glide downslope, and progressive disaggregation begins. Only minimal fragmentation is thought to occur during flow due to grain-grain contact. Thus, the main process responsible for generating an interclast matrix during transport is the disaggregation of already fractured clasts and megaclasts, particularly those that are already diamictons. However, data obtained from the Pungarehu volcanic debris avalanche deposit (VDAD) illustrate that fragmentation of intact rock may also occur during debris avalanche motion and through collisional and frictional grain-grain contacts experienced during long-runout flow. More, depending on their water and clay content, these granular and block-sliding flows may transform into a debris flow with distance from source, changing completely their flow behaviour and enhancing their run-out and hazard impacts. Pungarehu VDAD (ca. 25 Ka cal.) was emplaced by the largest known collapse of the Taranaki volcano (New Zealand) occurred near the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), with snow and ice cover, fluids circulation, hydrothermal alteration and substantial groundwater present. This VDAD appears to encompass a range of flow behaviour from proximal unsaturated and unmixed

  5. The Montesbelos mass-flow (southern Amazonian craton, Brazil): a Paleoproterozoic volcanic debris avalanche deposit?

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    Roverato, M.

    2016-07-01

    The present contribution documents the extremely well-preserved Paleoproterozoic architecture of the Montesbelos breccia (named here for the first time), which is interpreted as a rare example of a subaerial paleoproterozoic (>1.85 Ga) granular-dominated mass-flow deposit, few of which are recorded in the literature. Montesbelos deposit is part of the andesitic Sobreiro Formation located in the São Felix do Xingu region, southern Amazonian craton, northern Brazil. The large volume, high variability of textural features, presence of broken clasts, angular low sphericity fragments, mono- to heterolithic character, and the size of the outcrops point to a volcanic debris avalanche flow. Fluviatile sandy material and debris flows are associated with the deposit as a result of post-depositional reworking processes.

  6. Debris avalanches and debris flows transformed from collapses in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Mexico - behavior, and implications for hazard assessment

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    Capra, L.; Macías, J. L.; Scott, K. M.; Abrams, M.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.

    2002-03-01

    Volcanoes of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) have yielded numerous sector and flank collapses during Pleistocene and Holocene times. Sector collapses associated with magmatic activity have yielded debris avalanches with generally limited runout extent (e.g. Popocatépetl, Jocotitlán, and Colima volcanoes). In contrast, flank collapses (smaller failures not involving the volcano summit), both associated and unassociated with magmatic activity and correlating with intense hydrothermal alteration in ice-capped volcanoes, commonly have yielded highly mobile cohesive debris flows (e.g. Pico de Orizaba and Nevado de Toluca volcanoes). Collapse orientation in the TMVB is preferentially to the south and northeast, probably reflecting the tectonic regime of active E-W and NNW faults. The differing mobilities of the flows transformed from collapses have important implications for hazard assessment. Both sector and flank collapse can yield highly mobile debris flows, but this transformation is more common in the cases of the smaller failures. High mobility is related to factors such as water content and clay content of the failed material, the paleotopography, and the extent of entrainment of sediment during flow (bulking). The ratio of fall height to runout distance commonly used for hazard zonation of debris avalanches is not valid for debris flows, which are more effectively modeled with the relation inundated area to failure or flow volume coupled with the topography of the inundated area.

  7. Debris flow, debris avalanche and flood hazards at and downstream from Mount Rainier, Washington

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    Scott, Kevin M.; Vallance, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Mount Rainier volcano has produced many large debris flows and debris avalanches during the last 10,000 years. These flows have periodically traveled more than 100 kilometers from the volcano to inundate parts of the now-populated Puget Sound Lowland. Meteorological floods also have caused damage, but future effects will be partly mitigated by reservoirs. Mount Rainier presents the most severe flow risks of any volcano in the United States. Volcanic debris flows (lahars) are of two types: (1) cohesive, relatively high clay flows originating as debris avalanches, and (2) noncohesive flows with less clay that begin most commonly as meltwater surges. Three case histories represent important subpopulations of flows with known magnitudes and frequencies. The risks of each subpopulation may be considered for general planning and design. A regional map illustrates the extent of inundation by the case-history flows, the largest of which originated as debris avalanches and moved from Mount Rainier to Puget Sound. The paleohydrologic record of these past flows indicates the potential for inundation by future flows from the volcano. A map of the volcano and its immediate vicinity shows examples of smaller debris avalanches and debris flows in the 20th century.

  8. Landsat Thematic Mapper observations of debris avalanche deposits in the Central Andes

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    Francis, P. W.; Wells, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    Remote sensing with the Landsat Thematic Mapper of debris avalanche deposits in the Central Andes between 18 and 27 deg S revealed, for the first time, the presence of 28 breached volcanic cones and 11 major volcanic debris avalanche deposits, several of which cover areas in excess of 100 sq km. It is concluded that such avalanche deposits are normal products of the evolution of large composite volcanoes, comparable with lava and pyroclastic flow deposits. A statistical survey of 578 composite volcanoes in the same area indicated that a majority of cones which achieve edifice heights between 2000 and 3000 m may undergo sector collapse. The paper describes morphological criteria for identifying breached composite cones and volcanic debris avalanches using orbital images.

  9. Transport and emplacement mechanisms of channelised long-runout debris avalanches, Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand

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    Tost, M.; Cronin, S. J.; Procter, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The steep flanks of composite volcanoes are prone to collapse, producing debris avalanches that completely reshape the landscape. This study describes new insights into the runout of large debris avalanches enhanced by topography, using the example of six debris avalanche deposits from Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand. Individual large flank collapses (>1 km3) produced all of these units, with four not previously recognised. Five major valleys within the highly dissected landscape surrounding Mount Ruapehu channelled the debris avalanches into deep gorges (≥15 m) and resulted in extremely long debris avalanche runouts of up to 80 km from source. Classical sedimentary features of debris avalanche deposits preserved in these units include the following: very poor sorting with a clay-sand matrix hosting large subrounded boulders up to 5 m in diameter, jigsaw-fractured clasts, deformed clasts and numerous rip-up clasts of late-Pliocene marine sediments. The unusually long runouts led to unique features in distal deposits, including a pervasive and consolidated interclast matrix, and common rip-up clasts of Tertiary mudstone, as well as fluvial gravels and boulders. The great travel distances can be explained by the debris avalanches entering deep confined channels (≥15 m), where friction was minimised by a reduced basal contact area along with loading of water-saturated substrates which formed a basal lubrication zone for the overlying flowing mass. Extremely long-runout debris avalanches are most likely to occur in settings where initially partly saturated collapsing masses move down deep valleys and become thoroughly liquified at their base. This happens when pore water is available within the base of the flowing mass or in the sediments immediately below it. Based on their H/L ratio, confined volcanic debris avalanches are two to three times longer than unconfined, spreading flows of similar volume. The hybrid qualities of the deposits, which have some similarities to

  10. New advances for modelling the debris avalanches

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    Cuomo, Sabatino; Cascini, Leonardo; Pastor, Manuel; Castorino, Giuseppe Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Flow-like landslides are a major global hazard and they occur worldwide causing a large number of casualties, significant structural damages to property and infrastructures as well as economic losses. When involving open slopes, these landslides often occur in triangular source areas where initial slides turn into avalanches through further failures and/or eventual soil entrainment. This paper deals with the numerical modelling of the propagation stage of debris avalanches which provides information such as the propagation pattern of the mobilized material, its velocity, thickness and run-out distance. In the paper, a "depth integrated" model is used which allows: i) adequately taking into account the irregular topography of real slopes which greatly affect the propagation stage and ii) using a less time consuming model than fully 3D approaches. The used model is named "GeoFlow_SPH" and it was formerly applied to theoretical, experimental and real case histories (Pastor et al., 2009; Cascini et al., 2012). In this work the behavior of debris avalanches is analyzed with special emphasis on the apical angle, one of the main features of this type of landslide, in relation to soil rheology, hillslope geometry and features of triggering area. Furthermore, the role of erosion has been investigated with reference to the uppermost parts of open slopes with a different steepness. These analyses are firstly carried out for simplified benchmark slopes, using both water-like materials (with no shear strength) and debris type materials. Then, three important case studies of Campania region (Cervinara, Nocera Inferiore e Sarno) are analyzed where debris avalanches involved pyroclastic soils originated from the eruptive products of Vesusius volcano. The results achieved for both benchmark slopes and real case histories outline the key role played by the erosion on the whole propagation stage of debris avalanches. The results are particularly satisfactory since they indicate the

  11. The Tancitaro Debris Avalanche: Characterization, propagation and modeling

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    Morelli, Stefano; Monroy, Victor Hugo Garduño; Gigli, Giovanni; Falorni, Giacomo; Rocha, Eleazar Arreygue; Casagli, Nicola

    2010-06-01

    The Tancitaro volcano (3860 m) is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano located in the western portion of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt within the state of Michoacán (Mexico). The tectonic activity of this area has likely contributed to a large sector collapse of the volcano. The first findings of a multidisciplinary investigation into this debris avalanche are presented here. Geomorphological analyses, based on the interpretation of orthophotos, satellite imagery and on GIS elaborations, had the objective of determining the main morphometric features of the landslide. The collapse structure is an east-facing horseshoe-shaped crater (4 km wide and 5.3 km long), while the deposit forms a large fan that is 66 km long, covers an area of approximately 1155 km 2 and has an estimated volume of 18 km 3. Event volume was established by reconstructing the paleo-edifice in a GIS and taking into account volumetric expansion. Cross sections measured in the field were also used for this purpose. Field investigations also highlighted the presence of two texturally distinct units, which are referred to as the "block facies" and the "matrix facies", respectively. The first is responsible for the typical hummock morphologies found in the proximal area. A transitional zone contains a "mixed block and matrix facies" while in the distal portion blocks and megablocks, some of which have a jigsaw puzzle texture, gradually decrease in size until they disappear entirely. A number of matrix samples were collected to conduct direct shear tests, granulometric analyses and classification of the materials. The data and analyses described above were used to discuss the mechanism controlling the long runout of the avalanche. Based on the comparison between the Tancitaro debris avalanche and similar events we propose that mechanical fluidization was the mechanism responsible for the remarkable mobility of the landslide. The predisposing factors leading to the collapse were also considered. Field

  12. Hummocks: how they form and evolve in debris avalanches (Invited)

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    Paguican, E. R.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Lagmay, A.

    2013-12-01

    Hummocks are topographic features of large landslides and rockslide-debris avalanches common in volcanic settings. We use scaled analog models to study hummock formation and explore their importance in understanding landslide kinematics and dynamics. The models are designed to replicate large-scale volcanic collapses but are relevant also to non-volcanic settings. We characterize hummocks in terms of their evolution, spatial distribution, and internal structure from slide initiation to final arrest. Hummocks initially form by extensional faulting as a landslide begins to move. During motion, individual large blocks develop and spread, creating an initial distribution, with small hummocks at the landslide front and larger ones at the back. As the mass spreads, hummocks remain as discrete entities. They can get wider but may decrease in height, break up, or merge to form bigger and long anticlinal hummocks when confined. In areas of transverse movement within a landslide, elongate hummocks develop between strike-slip flower structures. Absence of hummocks and fault-like features in the deposit may imply a more fluidal flow of emplacement or very low cohesion of lithologies. Hummock size depends on their position in the initial mass, modified by subsequent breakup or coalescence. Hummock size, shape and spatial distribution vary between and within deposits. Such a universal structure with clear connection to the deformation process should provide a framework with which to study avalanche emplacement dynamics and conditions. We study well-preserved and well-sectioned hummocks in the Mt Iriga rockslide-debris avalanches (Philippines), to characterise the internal structure and relate hummocks to the landslide-avalanche behaviour. All the model structures are consistent with field observations and suggest a general brittle-slide emplacement for most landslide avalanches. The upper and outer hummock surface is destabilised by minor slumps and scree formation forming a

  13. Anthropogenic effect on avalanche and debris flow activity

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    S. A. Sokratov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents examples of the change in snow avalanches and debris flows activity due to the anthropogenic pressure on vegetation and relief. The changes in dynamical characteristics of selected snow avalanches and debris flows due to the anthropogenic activity are quantified. The conclusion is made that the anthropogenic effects on the snow avalanches and debris flows activity are more pronounced than the possible effects of the climate change. The necessity is expressed on the unavoidable changes of the natural environment as the result of a construction and of use of the constructed infrastructure to be account for in corresponding planning of the protection measures.

  14. A mineralogical and granulometric study of Cayambe volcano debris avalanche deposit

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    Detienne, M.; Delmelle, P.; Guevara, A.; Samaniego, P.; Bustillos, J.; Sonnet, P.; Opfergelt, S.

    2013-12-01

    Volcano flank/sector collapse represents one of the most catastrophic volcanic hazards. Various volcanic and non-volcanic processes are known to decrease the stability of a volcanic cone, eventually precipitating its gravitational failure. Among them, hydrothermal alteration of volcanic rocks leading to clay mineral formation is recognized as having a large negative impact on rock strength properties. Furthermore, the presence of hydrothermal clays in the collapsing mass influences the behavior of the associated volcanic debris avalanche. In particular, clay-containing debris avalanches seem to travel farther and spread more widely than avalanches of similar volume but which do not incorporate hydrothermally-altered materials. However, the relationship between hydrothermal alteration, flank collapse and debris avalanche behavior is not well understood. The objective of this study is to better determine the volume and composition of hydrothermal clay minerals in the poorly characterized debris avalanche deposit (DAD) of Cayambe composite volcano, located in a densely populated area ~70 km northeast of Quito, Ecuador. Cayambe DAD originated from a sector collapse, which occurred less than 200 ka ago. The DAD is 10-20 m thick and has an estimated total volume of ~0.85 Km3. The H/L ratio (where H is the vertical drop and L is the travel distance of the avalanche) for Cayambe DAD is ~0.095, suggesting a high mobility. In the medial-distal zone, at 9-20 km from its source, the DAD consists of an unstratified and unsorted matrix supporting millimetric to metric clasts. It has a matrix facies (i.e. rich in particles < 2 mm) enriched in hydrothermally-altered materials. Preliminary results of granulometry measurements indicate that the matrix corresponds to ~55 wt.% of the deposit and suggest that the DAD behaved as a cohesive debris flow. Analysis of 13 matrix samples reveals a large variability in particle size distribution. This may reflect poor mixing of the collapsed

  15. The Costa Rican Central Valley Lavina Formation: Lahar or Debris Avalanche?

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    Hidalgo, P. J.; Alvarado Induni, G. E.; Linkimer, L.

    2005-12-01

    The Lavina Formation of the Central Valley of Costa Rica consists of lava blocks floating in a volcanic mud matrix. Different authors have interpreted this deposit genetically as a lahar or debris flow deposit. Based on geomorphologic, textural, and morphometric evidence, we conclude that the origin of this deposit is a debris avalanche event that transformed into a debris flow on its path down the valley. Using aerial photographs, many debris avalanche amphitheaters are found in the western sector of the Irazu volcanic complex. However, textural and morphometric characteristics of the deposit are consistent with the source of the sector collapse being located on the west flank of the Cabeza de Vaca volcano. Three-dimensional modeling of the Lavina Formation was done using data from 213 drill cores distributed along the Central Valley area. Maps of isopaches and isohipses of the roof and floor of this stratum were created. These allowed for qualification of morphometry of the stratigraphic surfaces, characterization of the paleoslopes, and quantification of the compacted deposit volume. The data derived form the isopach and isohipse contour maps indicate that abrupt changes in the thickness of the stratum are common. Also, it illustrates the morphological differences between the roof, elongated hills in the direction of the flux, and the floor of the stratum, smooth and uniform. The morphometric, geomorphologic, and textural evidence, were used to conclude that the Lavina deposit originated as a debris avalanche event in the Cabeza de Vaca Volcano. The debris avalanche was eventually fluidized into a debris flow that spread extensively (130 km2) along the Central Valley of Costa Rica.

  16. Formation and failure of volcanic debris dams in the Chakachatna River valley associated with eruptions of the Spurr volcanic complex, Alaska

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    Waythomas, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of lahars and a debris avalanche during Holocene eruptions of the Spurr volcanic complex in south-central Alaska have led to the development of volcanic debris dams in the Chakachatna River valley. Debris dams composed of lahar and debris-avalanche deposits formed at least five times in the last 8000-10,000 years and most recently during eruptions of Crater Peak vent in 1953 and 1992. Water impounded by a large debris avalanche of early Holocene (?) age may have destabilized an upstream glacier-dammed lake causing a catastrophic flood on the Chakachatna River. A large alluvial fan just downstream of the debris-avalanche deposit is strewn with boulders and blocks and is probably the deposit generated by this flood. Application of a physically based dam-break model yields estimates of peak discharge (Qp) attained during failure of the debris-avalanche dam in the range 104 debris dams were in the range 103 debris dams have formed at other volcanoes in the Cook Inlet region, Aleutian arc, and Wrangell Mountains but apparently did not fail rapidly or result in large or catastrophic outflows. Steep valley topography and frequent eruptions at volcanoes in this region make for significant hazards associated with the formation and failure of volcanic debris dams. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Internal structural variations in a debris-avalanche deposit from ancestral Mount Shasta, California, USA

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    Ui, T.; Glicken, H.

    1986-01-01

    Various parameters of the internal structure of a debris-avalanche deposit from ancestral Mount Shasta (size and percentage of block facies in each exposure, number and width of jigsaw cracks, and number of rounded clasts in matrix facies) were measured in order to study flow and emplacement mechanisms. Three types of coherent blocks were identified: blocks of massive or brecciated lava flows or domes, blocks of layered volcaniclastic deposits, and blocks of accidental material, typically from sedimentary units underlying Shasta Valley. The mean maximum dimension of the three largest blocks of layered volcaniclastic material is 220 m, and that of the lava blocks, 110 m. This difference may reflect plastic deformation of blocks of layered volcaniclastic material; blocks of massive or brecciated volcanic rock deformated brittly and may have split into several smaller blocks. The blocks in the deposit are one order of magnitude larger, and the height of collapse 1100 m higher, than the Pungarehu debris-avalanche deposit at Mount Egmont, New Zealand, although the degree of fracturing is about the same.This suggests either that the Shasta source material was less broken, or that the intensity of any accompanying explosion was smaller at ancestral Mount Shasta. The Shasta debris-avalanche deposit covered the floor of a closed basin; the flanks of the basin may have retarded the opening of jigsaw cracks and the formation of stretched and deformed blocks such as those of the Pungarehu debris-avalanche deposit. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  18. The extreme mobility of debris avalanches: A new model of transport mechanism

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    Perinotto, Hélène; Schneider, Jean-Luc; Bachèlery, Patrick; Le Bourdonnec, François-Xavier; Famin, Vincent; Michon, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    Large rockslide-debris avalanches, resulting from flank collapses that shape volcanoes and mountains on Earth and other object of the solar system, are rapid and dangerous gravity-driven granular flows that travel abnormal distances. During the last 50 years, numerous physical models have been put forward to explain their extreme mobility. The principal models are based on fluidization, lubrication, or dynamic disintegration. However, these processes remain poorly constrained. To identify precisely the transport mechanisms during debris avalanches, we examined morphometric (fractal dimension and circularity), grain size, and exoscopic characteristics of the various types of particles (clasts and matrix) from volcanic debris avalanche deposits of La Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). From these data we demonstrate for the first time that syn-transport dynamic disintegration continuously operates with the increasing runout distance from the source down to a grinding limit of 500 µm. Below this limit, the particle size reduction exclusively results from their attrition by frictional interactions. Consequently, the exceptional mobility of debris avalanches may be explained by the combined effect of elastic energy release during the dynamic disintegration of the larger clasts and frictional reduction within the matrix due to interactions between the finer particles.

  19. Facies volcánicas del depósito de avalancha de detritos del volcán Tata Sabaya, Andes Centrales Volcanic facies of the debris avalanche deposit of Tata Sabaya Volcano, Central Andes

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    Benigno Godoy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Las avalanchas de detritos, asociadas a colapsos parciales de edificios volcánicos, son fenómenos comunes en la evolución de un volcán. Este tipo de flujos son por inestabilidades, que pueden deberse a factores tales como la existencia de zonas afectadas por alteración hidrotermal, cambios climáticos, terremotos, intrusión de magmas en zonas superficiales (criptodomos y/o diques y/o movimiento de fallas bajo el edificio volcánico o cercanas a él. El producto final de estos flujos -denominado depósito de avalancha de detritos (DAD- presenta morfologías típicas de cerrillos y drenajes cerrados. En los Andes Centrales se han reconocido, al menos, 14 centros volcánicos con depósitos de avalancha asociados, entre los que está el volcán Tata Sabaya (Bolivia. El colapso que ha dado origen a este depósito podría haberse generado por una combinación de actividad sísmica y magmática en el volcán. El depósito asociado al colapso parcial de este volcán se distribuye sobre la parte baja del flanco sur del volcán y sobre la parte noroccidental de la cuenca del salar de Coipasa. Cubre una superficie de más de 230 km² y tiene un volumen estimado de 6±1 km³. Sobre la base de las composiciones litológicas, se ha establecido que el depósito está constituido por 6 tipos distintos de cerrillos, los cuales son: lávicos, piroclásticos, sedimentarios mixtos, brecha piroclástica y andesítico-basálticos. Considerando el tipo predominante de cerrillos y su distribución espacial dentro del depósito, se ha definido 6 facies diferentes (Facies de Bloques Toreva, Facies de Cerrillos Volcánicos, Facies Central, Facies de Cerrillos Sedimentarios, Facies Mixta y Facies de Cerrillos de Brecha Piroclástica. Tomando en cuenta la distribución espacial de estas facies, se propone la estructura del paleovolcán previa a su colapso parcial.Debris avalanches associated with partial sector collapse of volcanic edifices are common phenomena in the

  20. Dynamic implications of ridges on a debris avalanche deposit at Tutupaca volcano (southern Peru)

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    Valderrama, Patricio; Roche, Olivier; Samaniego, Pablo; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Bernard, Karine; Mariño, Jersy

    2016-02-01

    Catastrophic volcanic landslides can involve different parts of a volcano that can be incorporated into any resulting debris avalanche. The different material properties may influence the mechanical behaviour and, hence, the emplacement mechanisms of the different avalanche units. We present data from a coupled hydrothermal- and magmatic-related volcanic landslide at Tutupaca volcano (Peru). Around ad 1802, the hydrothermal system under Tutupaca's growing dacite dome failed, creating a debris avalanche that triggered a large explosive eruption. A typical debris avalanche hummocky unit is found, formed out of rock from the dome foot and the underlying hydrothermally altered lavas. It is covered by a more widespread and remarkable deposit that contains remnants of the hot dome core and the inner hydrothermal material. This deposit has ridges 20-500-m long, 10-30-m wide and 1-5-m high, regularly spaced and that fan slightly outward. Cross sections exposed within the ridges reveal coarser cores and finer troughs, suggesting grain size segregation during emplacement. Ridge morphology and granulometry are consistent with fingering known to occur in granular flows. The ridges are also associated with large blocks that have evidence of differential movement compared with the rest of the flowing mass. The presence of both ridged and hummocky deposits in the same event shows that, as different lithologies combine and collapse sequentially, materials with different mechanical properties can coexist in one landslide, leading to contrasting emplacement dynamics. The different structures thus highlight the complexity of such hazardous volcanic events and show the difficulty we face with modelling them.

  1. Geological history and within-island diversity: a debris avalanche and the Tenerife lizard Gallotia galloti.

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    Brown, Richard P; Hoskisson, Paul A; Welton, John-Henry; Báez, Marcos

    2006-10-01

    Several processes have been described that could explain geographical variation and speciation within small islands, including fragmentation of populations through volcanic eruptions. Massive landslides, or debris avalanches, could cause similar effects. Here we analyse the potential impact of the 0.8 million-year-ago (Ma) Güimar valley debris avalanche on the phylogeography of the lizard Gallotia galloti on the Canary Island of Tenerife. Distributions of mitochondrial DNA lineages (based on cytochrome b sequences) were analysed on a 60-km southeastern coast transect centred on this area. Three main clades were detected, which can be divided into northern (one clade) and southern (two clades) groups that introgress across the valley. Maximum-likelihood estimates of migration rates (scaled for mutation rate) revealed highly asymmetric patterns, indicating that long-term gene flow into this region from both the northern and the southern populations greatly exceeded that in the opposite directions, consistent with recolonization of the area. The ancestral Tenerife node on the G. galloti tree is estimated at 0.80 Ma, matching closely with the geological estimate for the debris avalanche. Morphological variation (body dimensions and scalation) was also analysed and indicated a stepped cline in female scalation across the valley, although the patterns for male scalation and male and female body dimensions were not as clear. Together these findings provide support for the hypothesis that the debris avalanche has shaped the phylogeography of G. galloti and may even have been a primary cause of the within-island cladogenesis through population fragmentation and isolation. Current estimates of timing of island unification mean that the original hypothesis that within-island diversity is explained by the secondary contact of populations from the two ancient precursor islands of Teno and Anaga is less plausible for this and some other Tenerife species. Large-scale landslides

  2. Contrasting origin of two clay-rich debris flows at Cayambe Volcanic Complex, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detienne, M.; Delmelle, P.; Guevara, A.; Samaniego, P.; Opfergelt, S.; Mothes, P. A.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the sedimentological and mineralogical properties of a debris flow deposit west of Cayambe Volcanic Complex, an ice-clad edifice in Ecuador. The deposit exhibits a matrix facies containing up to 16 wt% of clays. However, the stratigraphic relationship of the deposit with respect to the Canguahua Formation, a widespread indurated volcaniclastic material in the Ecuadorian inter-Andean Valley, and the deposit alteration mineralogy differ depending on location. Thus, two different deposits are identified. The Río Granobles debris flow deposit ( 1 km3) is characterised by the alteration mineral assemblage smectite + jarosite, and sulphur isotopic analyses point to a supergene hydrothermal alteration environment. This deposit probably derives from a debris avalanche initiated before 14-21 ka by collapse of a hydrothermally altered rock mass from the volcano summit. In contrast, the alteration mineralogy of the second debris flow deposit, which may itself comprise more than one unit, is dominated by halloysite + smectite and relates to a shallower and more recent (3200 m) volcanic soils. Our study reinforces the significance of hydrothermal alteration in weakening volcano flanks and in favouring rapid transformation of a volcanic debris avalanche into a clay-rich debris flow. It also demonstrates that mineralogical analysis provides crucial information for resolving the origin of a debris flow deposit in volcanic terrains. Finally, we posit that slope instability, promoted by ongoing subglacial hydrothermal alteration, remains a significant hazard at Cayambe Volcanic Complex.

  3. The Large-Scale Debris Avalanche From The Tancitaro Volcano (Mexico): Characterization And Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, S.; Gigli, G.; Falorni, G.; Garduno Monroy, V. H.; Arreygue, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Tancitaro is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano located in the Michoacán Guanajuato volcanic field within the west-central portion of the trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The volcanism in this area is characterized by two composite volcanoes, the highest of which is the Tancitaro volcanic edifice (3840 m), some low angle lava cones and more than 1,000 monogenetic cinder cones. The distribution of the cinder cones is controlled by NE-SW active faults, although there are also additional faults with NNW-SSE trends along which some cones are aligned. The Tancitaro stratovolcano is located at the intersection of the tectonical structures that originate these alignments. All this geological activity has contributed to the gravitational instability of the volcano, leading to a huge sector collapse which produced the investigated debris avalanche. The collapse structure is an east-facing horseshoe-shaped crater (4 km wide and 5.3 km long), related with a large fan that was deposited within the Tepalcatepec depression. The deposit starts only 7 km downslope from the failure scar, it is 66 km long and covers an area of approximately 1155 km2. The landslide magnitude is about 20 km3 and it was firstly determined by the reconstruction of the paleo-edifice using a GIS software and then validated by the observation of significant outcrops. The fan was primarily formed by the deposit of this huge debris avalanche and subsequently by debris flow and fluvial deposits. Field investigations on the fan area highlighted the presence of two texturally distinct parts, which are referred to the 'block facies' and the 'matrix facies'. The first sedimentary structure is responsible for the typical hummock morphologies in the proximal area, as seen in many other debris avalanche deposits. Instead in the distal zones, the deposit is made up by the 'mixed block and matrix facies'. Blocks and megablocks, some of which are characterized by a jigsaw puzzle texture, gradually decrease in size

  4. Catastrophic debris avalanche deposit of Socompa volcano, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, P. W.; Gardeweg, M.; Ramirez, C. F.; Rothery, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Between 10,000 and 500 yr ago the Socompa volcano in northern Chile experienced a catastrophic collapse of a 70 deg sector of the original cone, causing a debris avalanche that descended nearly 3000 m vertically and traveled more than 35 km from the volcano. The deposits cover some 490 sq km and have a minimum volume of 15 cu km. Parts of the original cone slumped in a nearly coherent form and are now preserved as large blocks more than 400 m high. The primary avalanche traveled northwestward over sloping ground before coming to rest transiently, forming a prominent marginal ridge, and then slid away northeastward to form a secondary flow, overriding much of the primary avalanche deposit. Abundant, prismatic, jointed dacite blocks within the debris avalanche deposit and a thin, fine-grained pumiceous deposit beneath it suggest that the collapse was triggered by magmatic activity and may have been accompanied by a violent lateral blast. Collapse was followed by eruption of pumiceous pyroclastic flows and extrusion of voluminous dacite domes.

  5. Numerical modeling of debris avalanches at Nevado de Toluca (Mexico): implications for hazard evaluation and mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, F.; Capra, L.; Groppelli, G.; Norini, G.

    2007-05-01

    The present study concerns the numerical modeling of debris avalanches on the Nevado de Toluca Volcano (Mexico) using TITAN2D simulation software, and its application to create hazard maps. Nevado de Toluca is an andesitic to dacitic stratovolcano of Late Pliocene-Holocene age, located in central México near to the cities of Toluca and México City; its past activity has endangered an area with more than 25 million inhabitants today. The present work is based upon the data collected during extensive field work finalized to the realization of the geological map of Nevado de Toluca at 1:25,000 scale. The activity of the volcano has developed from 2.6 Ma until 10.5 ka with both effusive and explosive events; the Nevado de Toluca has presented long phases of inactivity characterized by erosion and emplacement of debris flow and debris avalanche deposits on its flanks. The largest epiclastic events in the history of the volcano are wide debris flows and debris avalanches, occurred between 1 Ma and 50 ka, during a prolonged hiatus in eruptive activity. Other minor events happened mainly during the most recent volcanic activity (less than 50 ka), characterized by magmatic and tectonic-induced instability of the summit dome complex. According to the most recent tectonic analysis, the active transtensive kinematics of the E-W Tenango Fault System had a strong influence on the preferential directions of the last three documented lateral collapses, which generated the Arroyo Grande and Zaguàn debris avalanche deposits towards E and Nopal debris avalanche deposit towards W. The analysis of the data collected during the field work permitted to create a detailed GIS database of the spatial and temporal distribution of debris avalanche deposits on the volcano. Flow models, that have been performed with the software TITAN2D, developed by GMFG at Buffalo, were entirely based upon the information stored in the geological database. The modeling software is built upon equations

  6. 五大连池老黑山、火烧山火山岩屑崩落堆积的发现及其喷发历史和模式的重塑%Discovery of Volcanic Debris-Avalanche Deposits in Laohei and Huoshao Volcanoes, Wudalianchi World Geopark, and Ascertaining the Volcanoes' History and Eruptive Model Again

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘祥; 郎建军

    2011-01-01

    large debris avalanche blocks should be the block facies of the debris avalanche deposits and the blocks consist of grey-purple basaltic volcanic agglomerate and volcanic breccia that as same as that of the rocks exposed in the base of the cones of Laohei Mountain and Huoshao Mountain, which indicate that these deposit resulted from the avalanche event happened in the two volcanoes. Most of the debris avalanche blocks were shattered strongly, but is partial preservation of primary edifice stratigraphy occasionally. These blocks were highly fractured and often with small fauts. During period of 1720 ~ 1721 AD the Laohei Mountain volcano formed in the Middle Pleistocene (0. 16Ma) and Huoshao Mountain volcano erupted again. The eruption model is: debris-avalanche ( debris-avalanche deposits and hummocky terrain ) -lava flows ( aa-lava and pahoehoe-lava)-Strombolian column (scoria cones of both Laohei Mountain and Huoshao Mountain and tepra sheets around the cones). Hazards derived from the avalanche themselves, as well as from associated pyroclastic flow and lahar that exceed damage beyond the debris avalanche deposits have been discussed.

  7. Geological and geotechnical characterization of the debris avalanche and pyroclastic deposits of Cotopaxi Volcano (Ecuador). A contribute to instability-related hazard studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, L.; Apuani, T.; Corazzato, C.; Uttini, A.

    2017-02-01

    The huge volcanic debris avalanche occurred at 4.5 ka is a major event in the evolution of the Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador. The present volcanic hazard in the Cotopaxi region is related to lahars generated by volcanic eruptions and concurrent ice melting. This paper presents the geological and geotechnical field and laboratory characterization of the 4.5 ka Cotopaxi debris avalanche deposit and of the younger unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits, representing the probable source of future shallow landslides. The debris avalanche formed a deposit with a well-developed hummocky topography, and climbed a difference in height of about 260 m along the slopes of the adjacent Sincholagua volcano. The debris avalanche deposit includes four lithofacies (megablock, block, mixed, and sheared facies) that represent different flow regimes and degrees of substratum involvement. The facies distribution suggests that, in the proximal area, the debris avalanche slid predominantly confined to the valleys along the N and NE flank of the volcanic cone, emplacing a stack of megablocks. When the flow reached the break in slope at the base of the edifice, it became unconfined and spread laterally over most of the area of the Rio Pita valley. A dynamic block fragmentation and dilation occurred during the debris avalanche transport, emplacing the block facies. The incorporation of the older Chalupas Ignimbrite is responsible for the mixed facies and the sheared facies. Geotechnical results include a full-range grain size characterization, which enabled to make broader considerations on possible variability among the sampled facies. Consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, carried out on the fine fraction Failure surfaces are always well developed, indicating that the poorly consolidated pyroclastic cover could undergo failure leading to the formation of a gravity driven instability phenomena, like granular or debris flows, which are mainly controlled by the fine fraction. This work

  8. Avalanche Debris Detection Using Satellite- and Drone Based Radar and Optical Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerstorfer, M.; Malnes, E.; Vickers, H.; Solbø, S. A.; Tøllefsen, A.

    2014-12-01

    The mountainous fjord landscape in the county of Troms, around its capital Tromsø in Northern Norway is prone to high avalanche activity during the snow season. Large avalanches pose a hazard to infrastructure, such as buildings and roads, located between the steep mountainsides and the fjords. A prolonged cold spell during January and February 2014 was followed by rapid new-snow loading during March 2014, inducing a significant avalanche cycle with many spontaneous, size D4 avalanches that affected major transport veins. During and shortly after the avalanche cycle of March 2014, we obtained 11 Radarsat-2 Ultrafine mode scenes, chosen according to reported avalanche activity. We further collected four Radarsat-2 ScanSAR mode scenes and two Landsat-8 scenes covering the entire county of Troms. For one particular avalanche, we obtained a drone-based orthophoto, from which a DEM of the avalanche debris surface was derived, using structure-from-motion photogrammetry. This enabled us to calculate the debris volume accurately. We detected avalanche debris in the radar images visually, by applying two detection algorithms that make use of the increased backscatter in avalanche debris. This backscatter increase is a product of increased snow water equivalent and surface roughness, roughly of the order of 3 dB. In addition, we applied a multi-temporal approach by repeatedly detecting avalanche debris at different acquisition times, as well as a multi-sensor approach, covering similar areas with different sensors. This multi-temporal and multi-sensor approach enabled us to map the spatial extent and magnitude of the March 2014 avalanche cycle in the county Troms. With ESA's Sentinel-1 satellite, providing high-resolution, large swath radar images with a short repeat cycle, a complete avalanche record for a forecasting region could become feasible. In this first test season, we detected more than 550 avalanches that were released during a one-month period over an area of

  9. Alteration history of Mount Epomeo Green Tuff and a related polymictic breccia, Ischia Island, Italy: evidence for debris avalanche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaner, S.; Demosthenous, C.; Pozzuoli, A.; Rolandi, G.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents mineralogical, chemical, and textural data for the Mount Epomeo Green Tuff and an associated polymictic breccia on Ischia Island, Italy with the purpose of defining the alteration history of the two units and the emplacement origin of the polymictic breccia. Our results indicate that the Green Tuff trachytic ignimbrite experienced three alteration events that produced the following mineral assemblages: (1) phillipsite, randomly interstratified (R0) illite/smectite (I/S), Fe-illite, and smectite (in situ Green Tuff); (2) chabazite, phillipsite, R0 I/S, and Fe-illite (proximal facies Green Tuff at Scarrupata di Barano); and (3) analcime, authigenic K-feldspar, Fe-illite, R0 I/S, and smectite (clasts of Green Tuff in polymictic breccia). Phillipsite, chabazite, and R0 I/S within the in situ and proximal facies Green Tuff indicate low-temperature alteration ( T 70 °C) alteration within a mostly closed chemical system. These data suggest that the polymictic breccia represents a debris avalanche deposit created by a catastrophic volcanic collapse, which was associated with low-temperature hydrothermal alteration and thus structural weakening of the volcano. The debris avalanche that produced the polymictic breccia on Ischia may be related to nearby massive debris avalanche deposits recently discovered offshore of southern Ischia. The young age of the polymictic breccia (5.7-8.6 ka) and the possibility of its catastrophic emplacement indicate an additional volcanic hazard for Ischia Island.

  10. Reevaluation of tsunami formation by debris avalanche at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, C.F.

    2000-01-01

    Debris avalanches entering the sea at Augustine Volcano, Alaska have been proposed as a mechanism for generating tsunamis. Historical accounts of the 1883 eruption of the volcano describe 6- to 9-meter-high waves that struck the coastline at English Bay (Nanwalek), Alaska about 80 kilometers east of Augustine Island. These accounts are often cited as proof that volcanigenic tsunamis from Augustine Volcano are significant hazards to the coastal zone of lower Cook Inlet. This claim is disputed because deposits of unequivocal tsunami origin are not evident at more than 50 sites along the lower Cook Inlet coastline where they might be preserved. Shallow water (Augustine Island, in the run-out zone for debris avalanches, limits the size of an avalanche-caused wave. If the two most recent debris avalanches, Burr Point (A.D. 1883) and West Island (Augustine Volcano appears minor, unless a very large debris avalanche occurs at high tide.

  11. A two-fluid model for avalanche and debris flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, E Bruce; Le, Long

    2005-07-15

    Geophysical mass flows--debris flows, avalanches, landslides--can contain O(10(6)-10(10)) m(3) or more of material, often a mixture of soil and rocks with a significant quantity of interstitial fluid. These flows can be tens of meters in depth and hundreds of meters in length. The range of scales and the rheology of this mixture presents significant modelling and computational challenges. This paper describes a depth-averaged 'thin layer' model of geophysical mass flows containing a mixture of solid material and fluid. The model is derived from a 'two-phase' or 'two-fluid' system of equations commonly used in engineering research. Phenomenological modelling and depth averaging combine to yield a tractable set of equations, a hyperbolic system that describes the motion of the two constituent phases. If the fluid inertia is small, a reduced model system that is easier to solve may be derived.

  12. ALS-based hummock size-distance relationship assessment of Mt Shasta debris avalanche deposit, Northern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortini, Riccardo; Carn, Simon; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    The failure of destabilized volcano flanks is a likely occurrence during the lifetime of a stratovolcano, generating large debris avalanches and drastically changing landforms around volcanoes. The significant hazards associated with these events in the Cascade range were demonstrated, for example, by the collapse of Mt St Helens (WA), which triggered its devastating explosive eruption in 1980. The rapid modification of the landforms due to these events makes it difficult to estimate the magnitude of prehistoric avalanches. However, the widespread preservation of hummocks along the course of rockslide-debris avalanches is highly significant for understanding the physical characteristics of these landslides. Mt Shasta is a 4,317 m high, snow-capped, steep-sloped stratovolcano located in Northern California. The current edifice began forming on the remnants of an ancestral Mt Shasta that collapsed ~300-380k years ago producing one of the largest debris avalanches known on Earth. The debris avalanche deposit (DAD) covers a surface of ~450 km2 across the Shasta valley, with an estimated volume of ~26 km3. We analyze ALS data on hummocks from the prehistoric Shasta valley DAD in northern California (USA) to derive the relationship between hummock size and distance from landslide source, and interpret the geomorphic significance of the intercept and slope coefficients of the observed functional relationships. Given the limited extent of the ALS survey (i.e. 40 km2), the high-resolution dataset is used for validation of the morphological parameters extracted from freely available, broader coverage DTMs such as the National Elevation Dataset (NED). The ALS dataset also permits the identification of subtle topographic features not apparent in the field or in coarser resolution datasets, including a previously unmapped fault, of crucial importance for both seismic and volcanic hazard assessment in volcanic areas. We present evidence from the Shasta DAD of neotectonic

  13. 3D modeling of the Buhi debris avalanche deposit of Iriga Volcano, Philippines by integrating shallow-seismic reflection and geological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minimo, Likha G.; Lagmay, Alfredo Mahar Francisco A.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical models for simulating volcanic debris avalanches commonly lack a critical initiation parameter, the source volume, which is difficult to estimate without data on the deposit thickness. This, in turn, limits how rheology can be characterized for simulating flow. Leapfrog Geo, a 3D geological modeling software, was used to integrate shallow-seismic reflection profiles with field and borehole data to determine the volume of the Buhi debris avalanche and the pre-collapse structure of Iriga Volcano. Volumes of the deposit calculated in this way are 34-71% larger than previous estimates. This technique may improve models of debris avalanches elsewhere in the world, and more precisely depict landslide runout and lateral extent, thus improving disaster prevention and mitigation for the many cities located near volcanoes.

  14. Catastrophic debris flows transformed from landslides in volcanic terrains : mobility, hazard assessment and mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kevin M.; Macias, Jose Luis; Naranjo, Jose Antonio; Rodriguez, Sergio; McGeehin, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Communities in lowlands near volcanoes are vulnerable to significant volcanic flow hazards in addition to those associated directly with eruptions. The largest such risk is from debris flows beginning as volcanic landslides, with the potential to travel over 100 kilometers. Stratovolcanic edifices commonly are hydrothermal aquifers composed of unstable, altered rock forming steep slopes at high altitudes, and the terrain surrounding them is commonly mantled by readily mobilized, weathered airfall and ashflow deposits. We propose that volcano hazard assessments integrate the potential for unanticipated debris flows with, at active volcanoes, the greater but more predictable potential of magmatically triggered flows. This proposal reinforces the already powerful arguments for minimizing populations in potential flow pathways below both active and selected inactive volcanoes. It also addresses the potential for volcano flank collapse to occur with instability early in a magmatic episode, as well as the 'false-alarm problem'-the difficulty in evacuating the potential paths of these large mobile flows. Debris flows that transform from volcanic landslides, characterized by cohesive (muddy) deposits, create risk comparable to that of their syneruptive counterparts of snow and ice-melt origin, which yield noncohesive (granular) deposits, because: (1) Volcano collapses and the failures of airfall- and ashflow-mantled slopes commonly yield highly mobile debris flows as well as debris avalanches with limited runout potential. Runout potential of debris flows may increase several fold as their volumes enlarge beyond volcanoes through bulking (entrainment) of sediment. Through this mechanism, the runouts of even relatively small collapses at Cascade Range volcanoes, in the range of 0.1 to 0.2 cubic kilometers, can extend to populated lowlands. (2) Collapse is caused by a variety of triggers: tectonic and volcanic earthquakes, gravitational failure, hydrovolcanism, and

  15. A method for automated snow avalanche debris detection through use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, H.; Eckerstorfer, M.; Malnes, E.; Larsen, Y.; Hindberg, H.

    2016-11-01

    Avalanches are a natural hazard that occur in mountainous regions of Troms County in northern Norway during winter and can cause loss of human life and damage to infrastructure. Knowledge of when and where they occur especially in remote, high mountain areas is often lacking due to difficult access. However, complete, spatiotemporal avalanche activity data sets are important for accurate avalanche forecasting, as well as for deeper understanding of the link between avalanche occurrences and the triggering snowpack and meteorological factors. It is therefore desirable to develop a technique that enables active mapping and monitoring of avalanches over an entire winter. Avalanche debris can be observed remotely over large spatial areas, under all weather and light conditions by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellites. The recently launched Sentinel-1A satellite acquires SAR images covering the entire Troms County with frequent updates. By focusing on a case study from New Year 2015 we use Sentinel-1A images to develop an automated avalanche debris detection algorithm that utilizes change detection and unsupervised object classification methods. We compare our results with manually identified avalanche debris and field-based images to quantify the algorithm accuracy. Our results indicate that a correct detection rate of over 60% can be achieved, which is sensitive to several algorithm parameters that may need revising. With further development and refinement of the algorithm, we believe that this method could play an effective role in future operational monitoring of avalanches within Troms and has potential application in avalanche forecasting areas worldwide.

  16. The Whangaehu Formation: Debris-avalanche and lahar deposits from ancestral Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keigler, Rébecca; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Hodgson, Katherine A.; Neall, Vincent E.; Lecointre, Jérôme A.; Procter, Jonathan N.; Cronin, Shane J.

    2011-10-01

    In the North Island of New Zealand, the andesitic Tongariro Volcanic Centre encompasses the Tongariro complex, the Mt. Ngauruhoe cone, and the country's largest stratovolcano, Mt. Ruapehu. This volcano is surrounded by an equally large volume of Late Quaternary volcaniclastic deposits, forming a circular 'ring plain'. In the southern portions of the ring plain, the Whangaehu Formation provides a critical record of the early Ruapehu activity because such deposits are not preserved on the present Mt. Ruapehu cone. We re-interpret the previously described Whangaehu Formation deposits and their emplacement mechanisms, providing new data to support this through the analysis of key stratigraphic sections, sedimentary structures and features, grain-size distributions, lithologic components, and SEM studies of volcaniclastic material. The Formation in the middle course of the Whangaehu River Valley comprises three principal stratigraphic units representing an estimated volume of c. 1 km 3. The Lower Member comprises a coarse, clast-supported, ungraded, megaclast-rich breccia, with oblique to sub-horizontal fractures indicating that shearing occurred at its base. The Lower Member also contains rip-up clasts from the underlying Tertiary siltstones. An indurated and sheared clast mixture of angular to subangular cobbles and pebbles supports large boulders at the base of the breccias, with fracturing concentrated near the base of this stratum. Pockets of shattered clasts representing monolithological domains, and boulders showing jigsaw fractures indicate collision effects during transportation from source. The breccia is interpreted as a debris-avalanche deposit resulting from a collapse of the southern flank of Ruapehu some time between 180 ka and 45 ka. The Middle Member suggests fluvial reworking of the debris-avalanche deposit interspersed with post-collapse lahar deposits on the ancestral Ruapehu ring plain. The Upper Member reflects an aggradation phase on the southern

  17. Estimating the avalanche contribution to the mass balance of debris covered glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Avalanche from high head walls dominates the net accumulation in many debris covered glaciers in the Himalaya. These avalanche contributions are difficult to directly measure and may cause a systematic bias in glaciological mass balance measurements. In this paper we develop a method to estimate the avalanche contribution using available data, within the context of an idealised flowline model of the glacier. We focus on Hamtah glacier in Western Himalaya and estimate the magnitude of the avalanche accumulation to its specific mass balance profile. Our estimate explains the reported discrepancy between values of recent glaciological and geodetic net mass balance for this glacier. Model estimate of accumulation area ratio (AAR for this glacier is small (0.1 even at a steady state. This shows that empirical mass balance–AAR relationships derived from glaciers which do not have a significant avalanche contribution will not apply to a large region containing a significant fraction avalanche fed ones.

  18. The disastrous 17 February 2006 rockslide-debris avalanche on Leyte Island, Philippines: a catastrophic landslide in tropical mountain terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Evans

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In February 2006, a disastrous rockslide-debris avalanche occurred in tropical mountain terrain, on Leyte Island, Central Philippines. Over 1100 people perished when the village of Guinsaugon was overwhelmed directly in the path of the landslide. The landslide was initiated by the failure of a 450 m high rock slope within the damage zone of the Philippine Fault where the rock mass consisted of sheared and brecciated volcanic, sedimentary and volcaniclastic rocks. Tectonic weakening of the failed rock mass had resulted from active strike-slip movements along the Philippine Fault which have been estimated by other workers at 2.5 cm/year. The landslide involved a total volume of 15 Mm3, including significant entrainment from its path, and ran out a horizontal distance of 3800 m over a vertical distance of 810 m, equivalent to a fahrböschung of 12°. Run-out distance was enhanced by friction reduction due to undrained loading when the debris encountered flooded paddy fields in the valley bottom at a path distance of 2600 m. A simulation of the event using the dynamic analysis model DAN indicated a mean velocity of 35 m/s and demonstrated the contribution of the paddy field effect to total run-out distance. There was no direct trigger for the landslide but the landslide did follow a period of very heavy rainfall with a lag time of four days. The rockslide-debris avalanche is one of several disastrous landslides to have occurred in the Philippines in the last twenty years. In terms of loss of life, the Guinsaugon event is the most devastating single-event landslide to have occurred worldwide since the Casita Volcano rock avalanche-debris flow which was triggered by Hurricane Mitch in Nicaragua in 1998.

  19. The disastrous 17 February 2006 rockslide-debris avalanche on Leyte Island, Philippines: a catastrophic landslide in tropical mountain terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S. G.; Guthrie, R. H.; Roberts, N. J.; Bishop, N. F.

    2007-01-01

    In February 2006, a disastrous rockslide-debris avalanche occurred in tropical mountain terrain, on Leyte Island, Central Philippines. Over 1100 people perished when the village of Guinsaugon was overwhelmed directly in the path of the landslide. The landslide was initiated by the failure of a 450 m high rock slope within the damage zone of the Philippine Fault where the rock mass consisted of sheared and brecciated volcanic, sedimentary and volcaniclastic rocks. Tectonic weakening of the failed rock mass had resulted from active strike-slip movements along the Philippine Fault which have been estimated by other workers at 2.5 cm/year. The landslide involved a total volume of 15 Mm3, including significant entrainment from its path, and ran out a horizontal distance of 3800 m over a vertical distance of 810 m, equivalent to a fahrböschung of 12°. Run-out distance was enhanced by friction reduction due to undrained loading when the debris encountered flooded paddy fields in the valley bottom at a path distance of 2600 m. A simulation of the event using the dynamic analysis model DAN indicated a mean velocity of 35 m/s and demonstrated the contribution of the paddy field effect to total run-out distance. There was no direct trigger for the landslide but the landslide did follow a period of very heavy rainfall with a lag time of four days. The rockslide-debris avalanche is one of several disastrous landslides to have occurred in the Philippines in the last twenty years. In terms of loss of life, the Guinsaugon event is the most devastating single-event landslide to have occurred worldwide since the Casita Volcano rock avalanche-debris flow which was triggered by Hurricane Mitch in Nicaragua in 1998.

  20. A debris avalanche at Süphan stratovolcano (Turkey) and implications for hazard evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Yavuz; Akkaya, İsmail; Oyan, Vural; Kelfoun, Karim

    2016-02-01

    The Quaternary Süphan debris avalanche deposit is located in Eastern Anatolia, Turkey. The avalanche formed by the sector collapse of a major stratovolcano towards the north, possibly during a single catastrophic event. The deposit has an estimated volume of 4 km3 and ran out over 25 km to cover an area of approximately 200 km2. Products of the collapse are overlain by younger eruptive units from the Süphan volcano. We have tested the numerical code VolcFlow to first reproduce the emplacement of the Quaternary Süphan debris avalanche and then to develop a hazard assessment for potential future sector collapses and subsequent emplacement of debris avalanches and associated tsunami. The numerical model captures the main features of the propagation process, including travel distance, lateral spread, and run up. The best fit obtained for the existing flow has a constant retarding stress of 50 kPa and a collapse scar volume of 4 km3. Analysis of potential future collapse scenarios reveals that northern sector debris avalanches (up to 6 km3) could affect several towns. In the case of a sector collapse towards the south, a tsunami will reach the city of Van and several of the biggest towns on the southern shoreline of Lake Van. Cities most affected by the larger amplitude waves would be Van, Edremit, Gevaş, Tatvan, and, to a lesser extent, Erciş, with wave amplitudes (first waves after the onset of the collapse) between 8 and 10 m.

  1. Morphological analysis of hummocks in debris avalanche deposits using UAS-derived high-definition topographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Obanawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hidetsugu; Naruhashi, Ryutaro; Okumura, Koji; Zaiki, Masumi

    2016-04-01

    Debris avalanche caused by sector collapse of a volcanic mountain often forms depositional landforms with characteristic surface morphology comprising hummocks. Geomorphological and sedimentological analyses of debris avalanche deposits (DAD) at the northeastern face of Mt. Erciyes in central Turkey have been performed to investigate the mechanisms and processes of the debris avalanche. The morphometry of hummocks provides an opportunity to examine the volumetric and kinematic characteristics of the DAD. Although the exact age has been unknown, the sector collapse of this DAD was supposed to have occurred in the late Pleistocene (sometime during 90-20 ka), and subsequent sediment supply from the DAD could have affected ancient human activities in the downstream basin areas. In order to measure detailed surface morphology and depositional structures of the DAD, we apply structure-from-motion multi-view stereo (SfM-MVS) photogrammetry using unmanned aerial system (UAS) and a handheld camera. The UAS, including small unmanned aerial vehicle (sUAV) and a digital camera, provides low-altitude aerial photographs to capture surface morphology for an area of several square kilometers. A high-resolution topographic data, as well as an orthorectified image, of the hummocks were then obtained from the digital elevation model (DEM), and the geometric features of the hummocks were examined. A handheld camera is also used to obtain photographs of outcrop face of the DAD along a road to support the seimentological investigation. The three-dimensional topographic models of the outcrop, with a panoramic orthorectified image projected on a vertical plane, were obtained. This data enables to effectively describe sedimentological structure of the hummock in DAD. The detailed map of the DAD is also further examined with a regional geomorphological map to be compared with other geomorphological features including fluvial valleys, terraces, lakes and active faults.

  2. Rockslide-debris avalanche of May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens Volcano, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicken, Harry

    1996-01-01

    This report provides a detailed picture of the rockslide-debris avalanche of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano. It provides a characterization of the deposit, a reinterpretation of the details of the first minutes of the eruption of May 18, and insight into the transport mechanism of the mass movement. Details of the rockslide event, as revealed by eyewitness photographs, are correlated with features of the deposit. The photographs show three slide blocks in the rockslide movement. Slide block I was triggered by a magnitude 5.1 earthquake at 8:32 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time (P.D.T.). An exploding cryptodome burst through slide block II to produce the 'blast surge.' Slide block III consisted of many discrete failures that were carried out in continuing pyroclastic currents generated from the exploding cryptodome. The cryptodome continued to depressurize after slide block III, producing a blast deposit that rests on top of the debris-avalanche deposit. The hummocky 2.5 cubic kilometer debris-avalanche deposit consists of block facies (pieces of the pre-eruption Mount St. Helens transported relatively intact) and matrix facies (a mixture of rocks from the old mountain and cryptodome dacite). Block facies is divided into five lithologic units. Matrix facies was derived from the explosively generated current of slide block III as well as from disaggregation and mixing of debris-avalanche blocks. The mean density of the old cone was measured to be abut 20 percent greater than the mean density of the avalanche deposit. Density in the deposit does not decrease with distance which suggests that debris-avalanche blocks were dilated at the mountain, rather than during transport. Various grain-size parameters that show that clast size converges about a mean with distance suggest mixing during transport. The debris-avalanche flow can be considered a grain flow, where particles -- either debris-avalanche blocks or the clasts within the blocks -- collided and

  3. Textural analysis of particles from El Zaguán debris avalanche deposit, Nevado de Toluca volcano, Mexico: Evidence of flow behavior during emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Lizeth; Capra, Lucia

    2011-02-01

    El Zaguán deposit originated at 28,000 yrs. B.P. from the flank collapse of Nevado de Toluca, a dacitic stratovolcano of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt. Scanning Electron Microprobe analyses (SEM) were performed on some particles from this deposit to observe microtextures produced during transport and emplacement of the debris avalanche flow. Particles from 2ϕ (250 μm), 0ϕ (1 mm) and - 2ϕ (4 mm) granulometric classes were randomly selected at different outcrops, and their surface textures were described. The observed textures are divided in two groups, Basal and Upper textures, each one indicating different clast interactions. Basal textures are observed predominantly in the lower part of the deposit and consist of parallel ridges, parallel grooves, scratches and lips. Upper textures are mainly present in the upper part of the deposit and consisted of fractures, percussion marks, and broken or grinded crystals. These characteristics, coupled with field observations such as the presence of clastic dikes and deformed lacustrine mega-blocks, indicate that the basal part of the debris avalanche was moving in a partially liquefied state. By contrast, the particles in the upper part were able to move freely, interacting by collision. These microscopic textures are in agreement with previously described emplacement behaviors in debris avalanches of volcanic origin, suggesting a stratified flow dominated by different transport and depositional mechanisms depending upon flow depth and possible fluid content at their base.

  4. Sem Analysis of particles from the 28, 000 B.P El Zaguan debris avalanche deposit, Nevado de Toluca volcano, Central Mexico: evidences of flow behavior during emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2008-12-01

    The Zaguan deposit originated at 28, 000 yr. B.P from the flank collapse of the Nevado de Toluca volcano, a dacitic stratovolcano of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt. A Scanning Electron Microprobe analysis (SEM) was made to some clasts of this deposit to observe microtextures produced during transport and emplacement of the debris avalanche flow. Particles from 2, 0 and -2 Φ granulometric classes were randomly selected and their surface textures were described. The textures observed were divided in two groups, collision and shear structures indicating different clast interaction. Shear textures were observed predominantly on the basal part of the deposit and consisted of parallel ridges, parallel grooves, scratches and lips. Collision textures were mainly present in the upper part of the deposit and consisted of fractures, percussion marks, and broken or grinded crystals. These characteristics, coupled with field observation, like the presence of clast dikes and deformed lacustrine megaclasts, indicate that the basal part of the debris avalanche was moving in a partially liquefied state, were particles were not able to move freely because of the confinement exerted by the upper part of the flow, so shear stresses dominated. On the contrary, the particles in the upper part were able to move freely so the principal mechanism of interaction between particles was collision. These microscopic textures are in agreement with previously described behavior of emplacement of debris avalanches of volcanic origin, that suggest a stratified flow dominated by different transport and depositional mechanism depending on flow depth and possible fluid content at their base.

  5. Plant succession on the Mount St. Helens debris-avalanche deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia H. Dale; Daniel R. Campbell; Wendy M. Adams; Charles M. Crisafulli; Virginia I. Dains; Peter M. Frenzen; Robert F. Holland

    2005-01-01

    Debris avalanches occasionally occur with the partial collapse of a volcano, and their ecological impacts have been studied worldwide. Examples include Mt. Taranaki in New Zealand (Clarkson 1990), Ksudach in Russia (Grishin et al. 19961, the Ontake volcano in Japan (Nakashizuka et al. 1993), and Mount Katmai in the state of Alaska in the United States (Griggs 1918a,b,...

  6. Volcanic Debris Flows in the Elysium Region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, E. H.; Ryan, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Photogeologic studies of the Elysium volcanic province appear to provide a specific example of the importance of volcanic-ice interaction to produce the channels of Hrad and Granicus Valles. In addition, these studies shows that the channels lie on the surface of a large sedimentary deposit which is interpreted as an accumulation of volcanic debris flows or lahars. In spite of some similarities with Martian outflow channels, this latter difference may distinguish the Elysium channels from other types of Martian channels. Geologic relations are described which demonstrate that the debris flows formed amidst other volcanic activity in the Elysium region thereby suggesting that the magmatism was important to the generation of the mobilizing liquid. The lahars resulted from the melting of ground ice and liquefaction of subsurface materials. The intersection of this fluid reservoir with the regional fracture system lead to the rapid expulsion of a muddy slurry down the steep western slope of the province.

  7. Mobility statistics and automated hazard mapping for debris flows and rock avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Julia P.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Power-law equations that are physically motivated and statistically tested and calibrated provide a basis for forecasting areas likely to be inundated by debris flows, rock avalanches, and lahars with diverse volumes. The equations A=α1V2/3 and B=α2V2/3 are based on the postulate that the maximum valley cross-sectional area (A) and total valley planimetric area (B) likely to be inundated by a flow depend only on its volume (V) and the topography of the flow path. Testing of these equations involves determining whether or not they fit data for documented flows satisfactorily, and calibration entails determining best-fit values of the coefficients α1 and α2 for debris flows, rock avalanches, and lahars. This report describes statistical testing and calibration of the equations by using field data compiled from many sources, and it describes application of the equations to delineation of debris-flow hazard zones. Statistical results show that for each type of flow (debris flows, rock avalanches, and lahars), the dependence of A and B on V is described well by power laws with exponents equal to 2/3. This value of the exponent produces fits that are effectively indistinguishable from the best fits obtained by using adjustable power-law exponents. Statistically calibrated values of the coefficients α1 and α2 provide scale-invariant indices of the relative mobilities of rock avalanches (α1 = 0.2, α2 = 20), nonvolcanic debris flows (α1 = 0.1, α2 = 20), and lahars (α1 = 0.05, α2 = 200). These values show, for example, that a lahar of specified volume can be expected to inundate a planimetric area ten times larger than that inundated by a rock avalanche or nonvolcanic debris flow of the same volume. The utility of the calibrated debris-flow inundation equations A=0.1V2/3 and B=20V2/3 is demonstrated by using them within the GIS program LAHARZ to delineate nested hazard zones for future debris flows in an area bordering the Umpqua River in the south-central Oregon

  8. Stellar Winds and Dust Avalanches in the AU Mic Debris Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Eugene; Fung, Jeffrey

    2017-10-01

    We explain the fast-moving, ripple-like features in the edge-on debris disk orbiting the young M dwarf AU Mic. The bright features are clouds of submicron dust repelled by the host star’s wind. The clouds are produced by avalanches: radial outflows of dust that gain exponentially more mass as they shatter background disk particles in collisional chain reactions. The avalanches are triggered from a region a few au across—the “avalanche zone”—located on AU Mic’s primary “birth” ring at a true distance of ∼35 au from the star but at a projected distance more than a factor of 10 smaller: the avalanche zone sits directly along the line of sight to the star, on the side of the ring nearest Earth, launching clouds that disk rotation sends wholly to the southeast, as observed. The avalanche zone marks where the primary ring intersects a secondary ring of debris left by the catastrophic disruption of a progenitor up to Varuna in size, less than tens of thousands of years ago. Only where the rings intersect are particle collisions sufficiently violent to spawn the submicron dust needed to seed the avalanches. We show that this picture works quantitatively, reproducing the masses, sizes, and velocities of the observed escaping clouds. The Lorentz force exerted by the wind’s magnetic field, whose polarity reverses periodically according to the stellar magnetic cycle, promises to explain the observed vertical undulations. The timescale between avalanches, about 10 yr, might be set by time variability of the wind mass loss rate or, more speculatively, by some self-regulating limit cycle.

  9. Submarine evidence of a debris avalanche deposit on the eastern slope of Santorini volcano, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Katherine Lynn Croff; Carey, Steven N.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2013-06-01

    Hummocky seafloor features were discovered on the eastern flank of Santorini volcano, Greece. Multibeam bathymetric mapping, airgun seismic profiling, side scan sonar survey, and remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives have been carried out to characterize the nature of the hummocks. These hummocks appear to be composed of several tens of blocks that are up to several hundred meters in diameter, and are the surface expression of a much larger deposit than is observed in the bathymetry. The sidescan and airgun data show that the deposit covers an area of approximately 6 km wide by 20 km long, and is up to 75 m thick. We estimate the total volume of the deposit to be approximately 4.4 × 109 m3. Sampling of these blocks show they are composed of pyroclastic flow deposits produced during the Minoan eruption of Santorini (ca. 3600 BP). We propose that the deposit is the result of a multi-stage landslide event that was caused by one of the several large earthquakes or volcanic eruptions that have occurred in the vicinity of Santorini since the Minoan eruption. One or more of these events likely triggered the destabilization of a part of the eastern flank of Santorini, which led to a debris avalanche, depositing blocks and forming a hummocky terrain at the base of the island's slope. The mass movement later evolved into a turbulent suspension flow that traveled 20 km or more from the presumed initial failure. Given the size of the landslide deposit, it might have a tsunami potentially affecting the islands across the southern Aegean Sea. The understanding of earthquake-landslide dynamics has important implications for hazard assessment in this seismically active, historical, and highly populated region of the world.

  10. A terrestrial record of Last Interglacial climate preserved by voluminous debris avalanche inundation in Taranaki, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, Rewi; Alloway, Brent

    2004-03-01

    At Airedale Reef, western North Island, New Zealand, a ca. 4 m thick volcanogenic debris avalanche deposit has facilitated the preservation of an enveloping sequence of peats with interbedded andesitic tephras spanning marine isotope (MIS) 5. The sequence closely overlies a wave-cut terrace correlated to MIS 5e and, in turn, is overlain by andic beds with tephra interbeds including the Rotoehu and Kawakawa tephras deposited during early MIS 3 and mid-MIS 2, respectively. Pollen analysis of the organic sequence shows a coherent pattern of fluctuating climate for the Last Interglacial-Last Glacial transition that corresponds with marine isotope stratigraphy and supports the contention that orbital variations were a primary factor in late Quaternary southern mid-latitude climate change. A five-stage subdivision of MIS 5 is clearly recognised, with marine isotope substage (MISS) 5b drier than MISS 5d, and the cooling transition from 5a to MIS 4 also may have been comparatively dry and characterised by natural fire, perhaps associated with volcanism. Several other examples of volcanic impact on vegetation and the landscape are evident. The Airedale Reef sequence exhibits strong similarities with fragmentary MIS 5 pollen records preserved elsewhere in New Zealand and enables the proxy record of southern mid-latitude climatic variability during the Last Interglacial-Glacial cycle to be extended. Copyright

  11. Change in snow avalanche and debris flow hazards in the region of Krasnaya Polyana as the result of anthropogenic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnyparkov, A. L.; Seliverstov, Y. G.; Sokratov, S. A.; Koltermann, K. P.

    2012-04-01

    The first evaluations of the snow avalanches and debris flow danger in the region of Krasnaya Polyana (Winter Olympic Games 2014 site) were made by the staff of LSADF in 1960s. In those times the danger was estimated as medium and low. Active development of the region started in 2000, when the ski (mountain climatic health) resort Alpika Service was constructed at the north slope of Aibga mountain range. Then the Alpine resorts Rosa Khutor and Gornaya Karusel [Mountain Carousel] were put into operation on the same slope. OAO Gazprom was also developing its own ski resort at the neighbouring Psekhako ridge. As the result of deforestation the quantity of small snow avalanches increased on the Aibga slopes. Skiers were caught several times by avalanches initiated by them in the reported avalanche events. The construction of ski runs, motorways, roads, as well as building of other related infrastructure has resulted in considerable change in relief. The sediment capping was dumped into stream canals, which resulted in the formation of debris flows, threatening the infrastructure of the ski resorts. The relief change related to the on going Olympic constructions is especially pronounced, when newly formed landfilling on some slopes becomes the material for landslides and debris flows and beds for avalanches. Thus, the degree of snow avalanche and debris flows danger increased considerably in the recent years, requiring originally unplanned mitigation measures.

  12. Stratigraphic reconstruction of two debris avalanche deposits at Colima Volcano (Mexico): Insights into pre-failure conditions and climate influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roverato, M.; Capra, L.; Sulpizio, R.; Norini, G.

    2011-10-01

    Throughout its history, Colima Volcano has experienced numerous partial edifice collapses with associated emplacement of debris avalanche deposits of contrasting volume, morphology and texture. A detailed stratigraphic study in the south-eastern sector of the volcano allowed the recognition of two debris avalanche deposits, named San Marcos (> 28,000 cal yr BP, V = ~ 1.3 km 3) and Tonila (15,000-16,000 cal yr BP, V = ~ 1 km 3 ). This work sheds light on the pre-failure conditions of the volcano based primarily on a detailed textural study of debris avalanche deposits and their associated pyroclastic and volcaniclastic successions. Furthermore, we show how the climate at the time of the Tonila collapse influenced the failure mechanisms. The > 28,000 cal yr BP San Marcos collapse was promoted by edifice steep flanks and ongoing tectonic and volcanotectonic deformation, and was followed by a magmatic eruption that emplaced pyroclastic flow deposits. In contrast, the Tonila failure occurred just after the Last Glacial Maximum (22,000-18,000 cal BP) and, in addition to the typical debris avalanche textural characteristics (angular to sub-angular clasts, coarse matrix, jigsaw fit) it shows a hybrid facies characterized by debris avalanche blocks embedded in a finer, homogenous and partially cemented matrix, a texture more characteristic of debris flow deposits. The Tonila debris avalanche is directly overlain by a 7-m thick hydromagmatic pyroclastic succession. Massive debris flow deposits, often more than 10 m thick and containing large amounts of tree trunk logs, represent the top unit in the succession. Fluvial deposits also occur throughout all successions; these represent periods of highly localized stream reworking. All these lines of evidence point to the presence of water in the edifice prior to the Tonila failure, suggesting it may have been a weakening factor. The Tonila failure appears to represent an anomalous event related to the particular climatic

  13. Effects of ground freezing and snow avalanche deposits on debris flows in alpine environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bardou

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Debris flows consist of a mixture of water and sediments of various sizes. Apart from few exceptions, the water is usually contributed directly from precipitation. In a high mountain environment like the Alps, it appears necessary to consider infiltration of water into the ground during rainfall events, the runoff characteristics and the potential supply of sediment as a function of a multitude of climatic and hydrogeological factors. This paper outlines several new processes - either linked to ice formation in the ground before an event, or to the presence of snow avalanche deposits - that change the probability of observing an event. These processes were identified during field observations connected with extreme weather events that occurred recently in the Valais Alps (south-western Switzerland: they can be seen as factors either amplifying or reducing the potential of slope instability caused by the precipitation event. An intense freezing of the ground during the week preceding the exceptional rainfall event in mid-October 2000 amplified the probability of triggering debris flows between roughly 1800 and 2300m asl. Both growth of ice needles and superficial ground freezing destroyed soil aggregates (increasing the availability of sediments and/or, a deeper ground freezing resulted in decreased infiltration rate (increased runoff during the first hours of heavy rainfall. The presence of snow avalanche deposits in a gully could be simultaneously an amplifying factor (the snow deposits increase the base flow and create a sliding plane for the sediments, mainly at the time of summer storms or a reducing factor (reduction in the impact energy of the raindrops, mainly at the time of winter storms of the risk of triggering debris flows. If it is not currently possible to establish rainfall threshold values for debris flow triggering, the knowledge and the implementation of these processes in the analysis of the potential triggering (for example by

  14. Managing the effects of accelerated glacial melting on volcanic collapse and debris flows: Planchon-Peteroa Volcano, Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormey, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Glaciated mountains are among the most sensitive environments to climatic changes, and recent work has shown that large-scale glacial melting, including at the end of the Pleistocene, caused a significant increase in the incidence of large volcanic sector collapse and debris flows on then-active volcanoes. With current accelerated rates of glacial melting, glaciated active volcanoes are at an increasing risk of sector collapse, debris flow and landslide. These catastrophic events are Earth's most damaging erosion phenomenon, causing extensive property damage and loss of life. This paper illustrates these effects in well-studied settings, focusing on the end-Pleistocene to Holocene glaciovolcanic growth and destruction of the cone of the active volcano Planchon-Peteroa in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone at latitude 35° 15' S, along the border between Chile and Argentina. The development of the volcano over the last 14,000 years illustrates how glacial melting and magmatic activity can trigger landslides and sector collapses. Planchon had a large sector collapse that produced a highly mobile and erosive debris avalanche 11,000 years BP, and other slope instabilities during the end-Pleistocene/early Holocene deglaciation. The summit amphitheater left after the sector collapse was subject to alternating periods of glaciation and melting-induced lake formation. Breaching of the moraine dams then formed lahars and landslides originating at the western edge of the summit amphitheater, and the deposits are preserved along the western flank of the volcano. Deep incision of moraine deposits further down the western slope of the volcano indicates that the lahars and landslides were water-rich and had high erosive power. As illustrated by Planchon-Peteroa, the interplay among glacial growth and melting, magmatic activity, and slope stability is complex, but must be accounted for in volcanic hazard assessment. Planchon-Peteroa currently has the southernmost temperate zone

  15. Elementary theory of bed-sediment entrainment by debris flows and avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of mass and momentum exchange between a debris flow or avalanche and an underlying sediment layer aid interpretations and predictions of bed-sediment entrainment rates. A preliminary analysis assesses the behavior of a Coulomb slide block that entrains bed material as it descends a uniform slope. The analysis demonstrates that the block's momentum can grow unstably, even in the presence of limited entrainment efficiency. A more-detailed, depth-integrated continuum analysis of interacting, deformable bodies identifies mechanical controls on entrainment efficiency, and shows that entrainment rates satisfy a jump condition that involves shear-traction and velocity discontinuities at the flow-bed boundary. Explicit predictions of the entrainment rateEresult from making reasonable assumptions about flow velocity profiles and boundary shear tractions. For Coulomb-friction tractions, predicted entrainment rates are sensitive to pore fluid pressures that develop in bed sediment as it is overridden. In the simplest scenario the bed sediment liquefies completely, and the entrainment-rate equation reduces toE = 2μ1gh1 cos θ(1 − λ1)/ , where θ is the slope angle, μ1 is the flow's Coulomb friction coefficient, h1 is its thickness, λ1 is its degree of liquefaction, and is its depth-averaged velocity. For values ofλ1ranging from 0.5 to 0.8, this equation predicts entrainment rates consistent with rates of 0.05 to 0.1 m/s measured in large-scale debris-flow experiments in which wet sediment beds liquefied almost completely. The propensity for bed liquefaction depends on several factors, including sediment porosity, permeability, and thickness, and rates of compression and shear deformation that occur when beds are overridden.

  16. The giant Ruatoria debris avalanche on the northern Hikurangi margin, New Zealand: Result of oblique seamount subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collot, Jean-Yves; Lewis, Keith; Lamarche, Geoffroy; Lallemand, Serge

    2001-09-01

    Despite convergent margins being unstable systems, most reports of huge submarine slope failure have come from oceanic volcanoes and passive margins. Swath bathymetry and seismic profiles of the northern Hikurangi subduction system, New Zealand, show a tapering 65-30 km wide by 65 km deep margin indentation, with a giant, 3150±630 km3, blocky, debris avalanche deposit projecting 40 km out across horizontal trench fill, and a debris flow deposit projecting over 100 km. Slide blocks are well-bedded, up to 18 km across and 1.2 km high, the largest being at the avalanche deposit's leading edge. Samples dredged from them are mainly Miocene shelf calc-mudstones similar to those outcropping around the indentation. Cores from cover beds suggest that failure occurred ˜170±40 ka, possibly synchronously with a major extension collapse in the upper indentation. However, the northern part of the indentation is much older. The steep, straight northern wall is close to the direction of plate convergence and probably formed around 2.0-0.16 Ma as a large seamount subducted, leaving in its wake a deep groove obliquely across the margin and an unstable triangle of fractured rock in the 60° angle between groove and oversteepened margin front. The triangle collapsed as a blocky avalanche, leaving a scalloped southern wall and probably causing a large tsunami. Tentative calculations of compacted volumes suggest that the indentation is over 600 km3 larger than the avalanche, supporting a two-stage origin that includes subduction erosion. Since failure, convergence has carried the deposits ˜9 km back toward the margin, causing internal compression. The eventual subduction/accretion of the Ruatoria avalanche explains the scarcity of such features on active margins and perhaps the nature of olistostromes in fold belts.

  17. Volcanic debris flows in developing countries - The extreme need for public education and awareness of debris-flow hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; ,

    2003-01-01

    In many developing countries, volcanic debris flows pose a significant societal risk owing to the distribution of dense populations that commonly live on or near a volcano. At many volcanoes, modest volume (up to 500,000 m 3) debris flows are relatively common (multiple times per century) and typically flow at least 5 km along established drainages. Owing to typical debris-flow velocities there is little time for authorities to provide effective warning of the occurrence of a debris flow to populations within 10 km of a source area. Therefore, people living, working, or recreating along channels that drain volcanoes must learn to recognize potentially hazardous conditions, be aware of the extent of debris-flow hazard zones, and be prepared to evacuate to safer ground when hazardous conditions develop rather than await official warnings or intervention. Debris-flow-modeling and hazard-assessment studies must be augmented with public education programs that emphasize recognizing conditions favorable for triggering landslides and debris flows if effective hazard mitigation is to succeed. ?? 2003 Millpress,.

  18. Cold seeps associated with a submarine debris avalanche deposit at Kick'em Jenny volcano, Grenada (Lesser Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Steven; Ballard, Robert; Bell, Katherine L. C.; Bell, Richard J.; Connally, Patrick; Dondin, Frederic; Fuller, Sarah; Gobin, Judith; Miloslavich, Patricia; Phillips, Brennan; Roman, Chris; Seibel, Brad; Siu, Nam; Smart, Clara

    2014-11-01

    Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) exploration at the distal margins of a debris avalanche deposit from Kick'em Jenny submarine volcano in Grenada has revealed areas of cold seeps with chemosynthetic-based ecosystems. The seeps occur on steep slopes of deformed, unconsolidated hemipelagic sediments in water depths between 1952 and 2042 m. Two main areas consist of anastomosing systems of fluid flow that have incised local sediments by several tens of centimeters. No temperature anomalies were observed in the vent areas and no active flow was visually observed, suggesting that the venting may be waning. An Eh sensor deployed on a miniature autonomous plume recorder (MAPR) recorded a positive signal and the presence of live organisms indicates at least some venting is still occurring. The chemosynthetic-based ecosystem included giant mussels (Bathymodiolus sp.) with commensal polychaetes (Branchipolynoe sp.) and cocculinid epibionts, other bivalves, Siboglinida (vestimentiferan) tubeworms, other polychaetes, and shrimp, as well as associated heterotrophs, including gastropods, anemones, crabs, fish, octopods, brittle stars, and holothurians. The origin of the seeps may be related to fluid overpressure generated during the collapse of an ancestral Kick'em Jenny volcano. We suggest that deformation and burial of hemipelagic sediment at the front and base of the advancing debris avalanche led to fluid venting at the distal margin. Such deformation may be a common feature of marine avalanches in a variety of geological environments especially along continental margins, raising the possibility of creating large numbers of ephemeral seep-based ecosystems.

  19. The Devdorak ice-rock avalanche and consequent debris flow from the slope of Mt. Kazbek (Caucasus, Georgia) in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomorets, Sergey; Savernyuk, Elena; Petrakov, Dmitry; Dokukin, Mikhail; Gotsiridze, George; Gavardashvili, Givi; Drobyshev, Valery; Tutubalina, Olga; Zaporozhchenko, Eduard; Kamenev, Nikolay; Kamenev, Vladimir; Kääb, Andreas; Kargel, Jeffrey; Huggel, Christian

    2016-04-01

    We have studied catastrophic glacial events of 2014 in the Kazbek-Dzhimaray massif, Caucasus Mts., Georgia. The first event is a so called "Kazbek blockage" of the Georgian Military Road, on 17 May 2014, which formed as a result of an ice-rock avalanche onto the Devdorak Glacier, and is similar to blockages which occurred in the same location in the 18th-19th century. The second event is a consequent debris flow on 20 August 2014. In May, June 2014 and September 2015 we conducted three field investigations of the disaster zone, which includes Devdorak Glacier, Amilishka and Kabakhi river valleys, the Terek River valley near the Kabakhi River mouth, and a temporary lake.We analyzed field research data, interpreted SPOT 6, Landsat-8 OLI, Terra ASTER, and Pleiades satellite imagery, as well as post-disaster helicopter imagery. To assess dynamic features of the ice-rock flow on 17 May 2014, we measured valley crossections with Bushnell laser ranger. In 2015 we have marked a 180-m baseline for ground stereosurvey and made a stereopair of the Devdorak glacier terminus from a distance of 700 m. The 17 May 2014 ice-rock avalanche initiated at 4500 m. a.s.l. It collapsed onto the tongue of the Devdorak Glacier which reaches down to 2300 m a.s.l. Downstream of the tongue, the avalanche transformed into an ice-rock "avalanche flow" which blocked the Terek River valley. The traffic on Military Georgian Road (part of E117 highway) which connects Russia with Georgia was stopped. 7 people were killed in their vehicles. The total length of the ice-rock avalanche and the subsequent flow was over 10 km. A temporary lake formed in the Terek river valley, reaching 300 m in length, and over 10 m in depth. For several hours, the lake was threatening another debris flow downstream the Terek river valley. According to field estimates at the Devdorak glacier tongue and in Amilishka, Kabakhi and Terek river valleys, the volume of the transported ice-rock avalanche mass, which deposited in

  20. Edifice growth and collapse of the Pliocene Mt. Kenya: Evidence of large scale debris avalanches on a high altitude glaciated volcano

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoorl, J.M.; Veldkamp, A.; Claessens, L.F.G.; Gorp, van W.; Wijbrans, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic growth and destruction of the Late Cenozoic Stratovolcano Mt. Kenya have been reconstructed for its southeastern segment. At least three major debris avalanche deposits have been reconstructed and dated. The oldest deposits indicate an edifice collapse around 4.9 Ma (40Ar/39Ar), followed

  1. Edifice growth and collapse of the Pliocene Mt. Kenya : Evidence of large scale debris avalanches on a high altitude glaciated volcano

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoorl, J. M.; Veldkamp, A.; Claessens, L.; van Gorp, W.; Wijbrans, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic growth and destruction of the Late Cenozoic Stratovolcano Mt. Kenya have been reconstructed for its southeastern segment. At least three major debris avalanche deposits have been reconstructed and dated. The oldest deposits indicate an edifice collapse around 4.9 Ma (Ar-40/Ar-39), followe

  2. A viscoplastic lubrication model for entrainment by avalanches and debris flows, and comparison with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Belinda; Ancey, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Recently, experiments were designed and carried out examining how a viscoplastic avalanche begins to entrain a shallow layer of identical fluid lying in its path, much like a snow avalanche or mud flow which suddenly encounters an entrainable layer, described as a yield stress material. This represents a simplified problem, investigated in order to gain some physical insight into entrainment by avalanches. These experiments serve as a test for mathematical models of entraining gravity currents. Two classes of entrainment behaviour were observed: either the avalanche ``glided'' out over the entrainable bed, immediately shearing it in the downstream direction and progressively incorporating fluid down to the rigid base, or the avalanche seemed to ``roll'' out onto the entrainable bed, with strong motion in the slope-normal direction in the bed after yield. This difference in behaviour was dictated by the magnitude of the flume's slope. For the steeper flows studied (20 and 24 degrees), entrainment was principally in the former class, whereas for shallower slope angle (12 and 16 degrees) entrainment more closely resembled the latter type. This would suggest that there is a competition between the normal and shear stresses exerted on the bed, with bed-yield and entrainment occurring when these stresses exceed a critical value. An interesting phenomenon that was observed in all cases was a sort of buckling of the bed, downstream of the avalanche front. This was far more significant in the flows down shallower slopes, and regular waves were created in the bed with wavelength dependent on the flow depth. Based on theoretical comparisons with non-entraining Herschel Bulkley flows, the physics of entraining flows are investigated numerically for shallow viscoplastic gravity currents on different slopes. The predictions are compared with the experimental values for velocity field and surface height. The model was successful in reproducing velocities of the correct order, but

  3. La Lavina del Valle Central (Costa Rica): ¿lahar o Debris Avalanche?

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo, Paulo J.; Guillermo E. Alvarado; Linkimer, Lepolt

    2011-01-01

    La denominada lavina del Valle Central, constituida por bloques de lava mal seleccionados y flo-tantes en una matriz de lodos volcánicos, había sido interpretada genéticamente como un debris flow (lahar). Este trabajo trata de discutir algunas características que sugieren que el depósito se originó en un debris avalancheque se transformó en un debris flow (lahar). Se identificaron anfiteatros de avalancha en los estratovolcanes extintos del sector occidental del macizo del Irazú, en donde la ...

  4. Automated, reproducible delineation of zones at risk from inundation by large volcanic debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Steve P.; Iverson, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Large debris flows can pose hazards to people and property downstream from volcanoes. We have developed a rapid, reproducible, objective, and inexpensive method to delineate distal debris-flow hazard zones. Our method employs the results of scaling and statistical analyses of the geometry of volcanic debris flows (lahars) to predict inundated valley cross-sectional areas (A) and planimetric areas (B) as functions of lahar volume. We use a range of specified lahar volumes to evaluate A and B. In a Geographic Information System (GIS) we employ the resulting range of predicted A and B to delineate gradations in inundation hazard, which is highest near the volcano and along valley thalwegs and diminishes as distances from the volcano and elevations above valley floors increase. Comparison of our computer-generated hazard maps with those constructed using traditional, field-based methods indicates that our method can provide an accurate means of delineating lahar hazard zones.

  5. Discrete element modeling of the mass movement and loose material supplying the gully process of a debris avalanche in the Bayi Gully, Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia-wen; Huang, Kang-xin; Shi, Chong; Hao, Ming-hui; Guo, Chao-xu

    2015-03-01

    The dynamic process of a debris avalanche in mountainous areas is influenced by the landslide volume, topographical conditions, mass-material composition, mechanical properties and other factors. A good understanding of the mass movement and loose material supplying the gully process is very important for understanding the dynamic properties of debris avalanches. Three-dimensional particle flow code (PFC3D) was used to simulate a debris avalanche in Quaternary deposits at the Bayi Gully, Southwest China. FORTRAN and AutoCAD were used for the secondary development to display the mass movement process and to quantitatively describe the mass movement and loose material supplying the gully process. The simulated results show that after the landslide is initiated, the gravitational potential energy is converted into kinetic energy with a variation velocity for the sliding masses. Two stages exist for the average-movement velocity: the acceleration stage and the slowdown stage, which are influenced by the topographical conditions. For the loose materials supplying the gully process, the cumulative volume of the sliding masses into the gully gradually increases over the time. When the landslide volume is not large enough, the increasing landslide volume does not obviously influence the movement process of the sliding masses. The travel distance and movement velocity increase with the decreasing numerical parameters, and the mass-movement process is finished more quickly using low-value parameters. The deposition area of the sliding masses decreases with the increasing numerical parameters and the corresponding deposition thickness increases. The mass movement of the debris avalanche is not only influenced by the mechanical parameters but is also controlled by the topographical conditions.

  6. Volcano Instability Induced by Resurgence at the Ischia Island Caldera (Italy), and the Tsunamigenic Potential of the Related Debris Avalanche Deposits: a Complex Source of Hazard at Land-sea Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, S.; Zaniboni, F.; Pagnoni, G.; Marotta, E.; Della Seta, M.; de Vita, S.; Orsi, G.; Sansivero, F.; Fredi, P.

    2009-05-01

    Slope instability is a common feature in the evolution of active volcanic areas. The occurrence of mass movements is doubly linked to volcanism and volcano-tectonism, which act as either preparing factor (through increased topographic gradients or emplacement of unconsolidated deposits on slopes) or triggering factor (through earthquakes and/or eruptions). Debris avalanches and lahars in active volcanic areas are an additional factor of hazard, due to their high destructive power. Moreover, volcanoes located in coastal areas or on islands, may experience lateral collapses with the potential to generate large tsunamis. Ischia is an active volcanic island in the Gulf of Naples. Volcanism begun prior to 150 ka and continued, with periods of quiescence, until the last eruption in 1302 A.D. It has been dominated by a caldera-forming eruption (55 ka), which was followed by resurgence of the caldera floor. Volcanism and gravitational mass movements have been coeval to resurgence, which generated a maximum net uplift of about 900 m over the past 33 ka. Resurgence occurred through intermittent uplifting and tectonic quietness phases. During uplift, volcanism and generation of mass movements were very active. The resurgent area is composed of differentially displaced blocks and has a poligonal shape, resulting from reactivation of regional faults and activation of faults directly related to volcano-tectonism. The western sector is bordered by inward-dipping, high-angle reverse faults, cut by late outward-dipping normal faults due to gravitational readjustment of the slopes. The north-eastern and the south-western sides are bordered by vertical faults with right transtensive and left transpressive movements, respectively. The area located to the east of the most uplifted block is displaced by outward- dipping normal faults. Some giant landslides and their relationships with volcano-tectonism have been recognized at Ischia. Their deposits are intercalated with primary

  7. Multiphase flow above explosion sites in debris-filled volcanic vents: Insights from analogue experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Pierre-Simon; White, James D. L.; Zimanowski, Bernd; Büttner, Ralf

    2008-11-01

    Discrete explosive bursts are known from many volcanic eruptions. In maar-diatreme eruptions, they have occurred in debris-filled volcanic vents when magma interacted with groundwater, implying that material mobilized by such explosions passed through the overlying and enclosing debris to reach the surface. Although other studies have addressed the form and characteristics of craters formed by discrete explosions in unconsolidated material, no details are available regarding the structure of the disturbed debris between the explosion site and the surface. Field studies of diatreme deposits reveal cross-cutting, steep-sided zones of non-bedded volcaniclastic material that have been inferred to result from sedimentation of material transported by "debris jets" driven by explosions. In order to determine the general processes and deposit geometry resulting from discrete, explosive injections of entrained particles through a particulate host, we ran a series of analogue experiments. Specific volumes of compressed (0.5-2.5 MPa) air were released in bursts that drove gas-particle dispersions through a granular host. The air expanded into and entrained coloured particles in a small crucible before moving upward into the host (white particles). Each burst drove into the host an expanding cavity containing air and coloured particles. Total duration of each run, recorded with high-speed video, was approximately 0.5-1 s. The coloured beads sedimented into the transient cavity. This same behaviour was observed even in runs where there was no breaching of the surface, and no coloured beads ejected. A steep-sided body of coloured beads was left that is similar to the cross-cutting pipes observed in deposits filling real volcanic vents, in which cavity collapse can result not only from gas escape through a granular host as in the experiments, but also through condensation of water vapour. A key conclusion from these experiments is that the geometry of cross-cutting volcaniclastic

  8. Kinematic simulations of the rainfall-triggered Shiaolin debris avalanche, southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M.-J.; Chiang, Y.-L.; Chang*, K.-J.

    2012-04-01

    The Taiwan Island, caused of situated on an active orogenic belt possesses high seismicity and high relief, and situated on the most common trajectory of typhoons in northwest Pacific Ocean, is then frequent been struck by the natural hazards. Among the natural hazards, landslides in one of the most frequent disasters in Taiwan. Typhoon Morakot attacked Taiwan on August 7-9, 2009. During these days, the rainfall near Shiaolin village in southern Taiwan exceeded 1800mm almost equals to the annual precipitation, and caused serious disasters. The hills behind Shiaolin village were collapsed, buried the village, and create a landslide dam. Moreover, more than four hundred villagers were buried alive. In this study, both the Digital Terrain Model (DTMs) before and after landslide is been integrates to estimate the volume of the slid materials, the zone of initiation, the zone of accumulation, the shape of the deposit and the impact area. Meanwhile, the seismometer record at neighboring regions is also been included. Finally, by using 3D Distinct Element Method (DEM) Partical Flow Code (PFC3D) software, taking into account different material property, different parameters and the pore water pressure, etc., the kinematic processes of the debris flow in Shiaolin is been analyzed. In order to taking into account the effect of the pore water pressure, the ball elements are thus subject to gradient-perpendicular buoyancy. Each group of parameters both tested with and without pore water pressure. The consequence shows that the pore water pressure plays an essential factor to triggered landslides. Several groups of parameters reveals the best-fit result, by comparing the shape of the accumulation with the reality, indicating the friction coefficient should as low as 0.1. The friction coefficient of the surface of separation determines the shape and the region of the deposits. According to the numerical simulation, the process of the landslide is been explored. The total

  9. Database for volcanic processes and geology of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntire, Jacqueline; Ramsey, David W.; Thoms, Evan; Waitt, Richard B.; Beget, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Augustine Island (volcano) in lower Cook Inlet, Alaska, has erupted repeatedly in late-Holocene and historical times. Eruptions typically beget high-energy volcanic processes. Most notable are bouldery debris avalanches containing immense angular clasts shed from summit domes. Coarse deposits of these avalanches form much of Augustine's lower flanks. This geologic map at 1:25,000 scale depicts these deposits, these processes.

  10. Rock avalanches on glaciers

    OpenAIRE

    Shugar, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This thesis examines relations between rock avalanches and the glaciers on which they are deposited. I have attempted to understand a geophysical phenomenon from two viewpoints: sedimentology and glaciology. The contributions are both methodological, and practical. I have used a GIS to quantify debris sheet geomorphology. A thorough characterization of rock avalanche debris is a necessary step in understanding the flow mechanics of large landslide. I have also developed a technique for solvin...

  11. Geomorphological evidence of the influence of pre-volcanic basement structure on emplacement and deformation of volcanic edifices at the Cofre de Perote Pico de Orizaba chain and implications for avalanche generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha-Dimas, Aline; Cerca, Mariano; Rodríguez, Sergio R.; Watters, Robert J.

    2005-12-01

    Pre-volcanic structure of the basement influences volcanism distribution and avalanche generation in volcanic edifices. Therefore, systematic studies of basement structure below volcanic chains are necessary to understand the deformation effects observed in the surface and vice versa. Based on a compilation of pre-existing data, interpretation of aerial photographs and satellite images, and a collection of structural data we analyzed morphological and structural features of the Cofre de Perote-Pico de Orizaba (CP-PO) volcanic chain and its basement. We have identified three sets of regional lineaments that are related to basement trends. (1) NW 55° SE fractures are parallel to anticline folds observed in Cretaceous rocks that originated during Laramide shortening. These folds present an abrupt morphology observed only in the eastern flank but that is likely to continue below the volcanic chain. (2) NE 55° SW fractures are parallel to normal faults at the basement. We infer that these basement faults confine the CP-PO chain within a stepped graben with a total normal displacement of about 400 m. These faults have been active through time since they have affected volcanic deposits and induced the emplacement of monogenetic vents. Notably, lineaments of monogenetic vents concentrate where the basement is relatively shallow. (3) Another set of faults, oriented N-S, has been observed affecting the scarce basement outcrops at the western flank of the chain covered by lacustrine deposits. Lineaments measured in the volcanic edifice of Pico de Orizaba correlate with the regional trends. In particular, the NE 55° SW alignment of monogenetic vents and fractures at Pico de Orizaba suggest that the same dike trend exists within the volcanic edifice. A normal fault with similar orientation was documented at the NE continuation of an alignment crossing the volcanic edifice along the Jamapa canyon. In the absence of magmatic activity related to collapses, the displacement of

  12. Flash Floods and Storm-Triggered Debris Avalanches in the Appalachians and Possible Trends in a Future Warming Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, D.; Hong, Y.; Lynch, M. J.; Shen, X.; Leslie, L. M.; Mahmood, R.; Duan, Q.; Rappin, E.; Li, Y.; Luo, J.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes storm-triggered landslides in the US Appalachians, in the current geological setting. Concave valleys that favor the convergence of surface runoff are the primary locales for landslides. If the slopes are weathered to the same degree and have the same vegetation coverage, slope orientation (azimuthal) is not critical for slope stability. However, it is found that for the region south of the Black Mountains (North Carolina), north-facing slopes are more prone to slide, because the northern slopes usually are grass slopes for the regions not limited by annual precipitation (water availability). For the slopes of the Blue Ridge Mountains, south facing slopes are more prone to slide. Deforestation and topsoil erosion are critical contributors to the massive sizes of the debris flows. Gravity measurements over the past decade reveal that geological conditions, the chute system and underground cracks over the region are stable, and sliding material is plentiful. Future changes in storm-triggered landslide frequency are primarily controlled by changes in extreme precipitation. Thus, a series of ensemble climate model experiments is carried out of possible changes in future extreme precipitation events, using the WRF model forced by temperature perturbations. The focus is the impact on storm-triggered landslides, and over 50 locations are identified as prone to future landslides. In a future warmer climate, more severe extreme precipitation events are projected because of increased vapor content and more frequent passage of tropical cyclone remnants. There also is a likely shift of tropical cyclone tracks and associated extreme precipitation, and the Appalachians scarps cluster center is expected to move westward. The remote sensing way of detecting unstable regions are applicable to other regions of interest. We further examine the following regions (except the Fuji Mount) recently (since 1900) experienced volcanic eruption: Pelee, Agung, Elchichon

  13. The disastrous 17 February 2006 rockslide-debris avalanche on Leyte Island, Philippines: a catastrophic landslide in tropical mountain terrain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evans, S. G; Guthrie, R. H; Roberts, N. J; Bishop, N. F

    2007-01-01

    .... The landslide was initiated by the failure of a 450 m high rock slope within the damage zone of the Philippine Fault where the rock mass consisted of sheared and brecciated volcanic, sedimentary...

  14. Volcanic Debris Flows of the Latest Paleozoic Arbasay Formation: Geomorphological Characters and Paleoenvironment Reconstruction of Northern Tian Shan, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W.; Liu, D.; Guo, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Texturally well-preserved volcanic debris flows (also called lahars) are exposed in the Latest Paleozoic Arbasay Formation, Northern Tian Shan. LA-ICP-MS zircon dating of the intercalated fallout tuff sample provided an age of 314.4±3.4 Ma (MSWD=1.6), suggesting they were deposited at Latest Carboniferous. The lahars consist primarily of two lithofacies: massive, poorly lithified diamictites and stratified, moderately lithified gravelly sandstones. The diamictites can be generally divided into two subfacies, i.e., the matrix-supported and the clast-supported diamictites. Most diamictites are structureless and nongraded. They are thick in beds and contain large clasts up to 3 m in dimension. The gravelly sandstones display much finer particle size and have wedge or lenticular geometries. Large clasts are absent within them and the sorting characters are much better than the diamictites. Despite the different size grading, the matrix and the clasts of the two lithofacies appear to be homogeneous. The matrix is generally sandy mudstone. The clasts comprise rhyolites, dacites, andesites, andesitic basalts and basalts, same to the co-existing volcanic rocks, suggesting they originate from the cognate volcanics. The disorganized diamictites are supposed to deposit from a turbulent flood or pyroclastic surge. The gravelly sandstone lithofacies are interpreted as sand-rich flood flows or hyperconcentrated flood flows during the waning stage of a mass-flow event. The overall characteristics of the deposits suggest a mass-flow dominated alluvial fan environment. It's noteable that several syn- sedimentary normal faults occurred within these lahar deposits, indicating that the Southern Junggar Basin was in an extensional regime during the lahars' deposition. Structure is dominated by normal faulting, allowing the existence of relatively small, highly compartmentalized depocenters. This is also supported by geochemistry and detrital zircon studies.

  15. Monitoring of a debris-covered and avalanche-fed glacier in the Eastern Italian Alps using ground-based SfM-MVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Livia; Carturan, Luca; Cazorzi, Federico; Colucci, Renato R.; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo; Forte, Emanuele

    2015-04-01

    The Montasio Occidentale glacier is a 0.07 km2 wide, avalanche-fed glacier located at very low-altitude (1860-2050 m a.s.l.) in the Eastern Italian Alps. The glacier is still active and shows a detectable mass transfer from the accumulation area to the lower ablation area, which is covered by a thick debris mantle. Geometric changes and mass balance have been monitored starting in 2010, combining glaciological methods and high-resolution geodetic surveying with a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). The TLS technique has proved to be very effective in determining the volume change of this glacier, but presents several limitations as high costs, high level of specialized training and low portability. On the other hand, the recent improvements in close-range photogrammetric techniques like the Structure from Motion (SfM), combined with dense image matching algorithms as Multi View Stereo (MVS), make them competitive for high quality 3D models production. The purpose of this work was to apply ground-based photogrammetric surveys for the monitoring of the annual mass balance and surface processes of Montasio Occidentale glacier. A consumer-grade SLR camera and the SfM-MVS software PhotoScan were used to detect the changes in the surface topography of the glacier from 2012 to 2014. Different data acquisition settings were tested, in order to optimize the quality and the spatial coverage of the 3D glacier model. The accuracy of the image-based 3D models was estimated in stable areas outside the glacier, using the TLS 3D model as reference. A ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey was carried out in 2014, simultaneously to the photogrammetric survey, that was used to compare the snow height estimations obtained by photogrammetry with those obtained by geophysics. The achieved results indicate that the resolution and accuracy of the 3D models generated by the SfM-MVS technique are comparable with those obtained from TLS surveys. Consequently, almost identical volumetric changes

  16. Borobudur, a basin under volcanic influence: 361,000 years BP to present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, C.; Janin, M.; Lavigne, F.; Gertisser, R.; Charbonnier, S.; Lahitte, P.; Hadmoko, S. R.; Fort, M.; Wassmer, P.; Degroot, V.; Murwanto, H.

    2010-10-01

    Borobudur basin is located in Central Java (Indonesia), 30 km to the North of Yogyakarta City. The basin is famous for its UNESCO world heritage temple and for one of the world's most active volcanoes, Merapi, located to the East of Borobudur basin. Merapi is one of the three andesitic volcanoes that surround the basin: Merapi, Merbabu and Sumbing volcanoes. Therefore, volcanic activity has strongly influenced the evolution of Borobudur basin. The object of this contribution is to present the evolution of Borobudur basin over the last 161,000 years in the light of volcanic influence. The methodology and tools developed for this research span over different areas of expertise, from geochemistry, geology and geomorphology to remote sensing, GIS and archeology. Results highlight the following points: Two major volcanic events deposited volcaniclastic materials up to tens of meters thick ~ 119,000 years BP and ~ 31,000 years BP. in the Southern part of the Borobudur basin. The second volcanic event could correspond to the collapse of the older Ancient Merapi ( Camus et al., 2000) or Proto-Merapi Stage ( Newhall et al., 2000). There is no trace in the Borobudur basin of a large debris avalanche debris avalanche inferred in the literature for Merapi Volcano was either too small to reach 20 km from the actual summit of Merapi; or, despite the orientation of the avalanche caldera rim on Merapi Volcano, the debris avalanche was deposited more towards the South, completely eroded or covered by younger deposits. There are several generations of paleolakes in the Borobudur basin. The latest one has shrunk until historical times, corroborating the theory of Newhall et al. (2000) and Murwanto et al. (2004) that Borobudur Temple was standing by a water body. Most of these paleolakes were impounded following volcanic events. Paleolakes most probably originated from the blockage of the hydrographic network by volcanic material. Borobudur temple was never buried under volcanic

  17. Flank collapse at Mount Wrangell, Alaska, recorded by volcanic mass-flow deposits in the Copper River lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, C.F.; Wallace, K.L.

    2002-01-01

    An areally extensive volcanic mass-flow deposit of Pleistocene age, known as the Chetaslina volcanic mass-flow deposit, is a prominent and visually striking deposit in the southeastern Copper River lowland of south-central Alaska. The mass-flow deposit consists of a diverse mixture of colorful, variably altered volcanic rocks, lahar deposits, glaciolacustrine diamicton, and till that record a major flank collapse on the southwest flank of Mount Wrangell. The deposit is well exposed near its presumed source, and thick, continuous, stratigraphic exposures have permitted us to study its sedimentary characteristics as a means of better understanding the origin, significance, and evolution of the deposit. Deposits of the Chetaslina volcanic mass flow in the Chetaslina River drainage are primary debris-avalanche deposits and consist of two principal facies types, a near-source block facies and a distal mixed facies. The block facies is composed entirely of block-supported, shattered and fractured blocks with individual blocks up to 40 m in diameter. The mixed facies consists of block-sized particles in a matrix of poorly sorted rock rubble, sand, and silt generated by the comminution of larger blocks. Deposits of the Chetaslina volcanic mass flow exposed along the Copper, Tonsina, and Chitina rivers are debris-flow deposits that evolved from the debris-avalanche component of the flow and from erosion and entrainment of local glacial and glaciolacustrine diamicton in the Copper River lowland. The debris-flow deposits were probably generated through mixing of the distal debris avalanche with the ancestral Copper River, or through breaching of a debris-avalanche dam across the ancestral river. The distribution of facies types and major-element chemistry of clasts in the deposit indicate that its source was an ancestral volcanic edifice, informally known as the Chetaslina vent, on the southwest side of Mount Wrangell. A major sector collapse of the Chetaslina vent initiated

  18. Evidence of Multiple Flank Collapse at Volcan Baru, Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, J. A.; Rose, W. I.

    2009-12-01

    Michigan Tech's Peace Corps Master's International program (PCMI) in Geological Hazards has enabled several long-term investigations of active volcanoes in Latin America. To contribute to volcanic hazard assessments in Panama and achieve the goals defined by the PCMI program, we developed this debris avalanche project to address outstanding questions regarding Volcan Baru's most devastating event - massive slope failure of the western flank. Relying on basic mapping tools as well as the 2007 USGS Open-File Report focusing on hazard assessments of Panama's youngest and potentially active volcano, identification of the debris avalanche deposits (DAD) required detailed field investigations to determine the limits of the units. Extending across an area larger than 600 km2, field strategies were developed based on outcrop exposures within drainages and road-cuts. Aerial photos and DEMs of Baru's nested craters were interpreted by earlier scientists as the remains of two collapsed flanks. The results from in-depth field traverses provide several important discoveries: paleosols and sharp contacts within the stratigraphy indicate multiple DAD, deeply weathered hummocks red-flag the deposits more than 50-km away from Baru's crater, and high-quality radiocarbon samples (up to 45-cm long fragments of entrained wood) lie in the distal reaches of the debris flow area. During the 2008-2009 field seasons, we received assistance from the University of Panama, Civil Protection, and Panama's National Institute of Geography. Support from local experts and feedback from professional scientists of the Smithsonian Institution and Costa Rica's Institute of Electricity were invaluable. The 2-year investment in volcanic hazard studies has brought together resources from several countries as well as fresh data that will benefit the residents and emergency management officials of Panama. Jigsaw fractured clasts lie within Volcan Baru's debris avalanche deposits more than 28 km south of the

  19. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic modeling of volcanic debris flows: Application to Huiloac Gorge lahars (Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Bouchra; Palacios, David; Pastor, Manuel; Zamorano, José Juan

    2016-09-01

    Lahars are among the most catastrophic volcanic processes, and the ability to model them is central to mitigating their effects. Several lahars recently generated by the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) moved downstream through the Huiloac Gorge towards the village of Santiago Xalitzintla. The most dangerous was the 2001 lahar, in which the destructive power of the debris flow was maintained throughout the extent of the flow. Identifying the zone of hazard can be based either on numerical or empirical models, but a calibration and validation process is required to ensure hazard map quality. The Geoflow-SPH depth integrated numerical model used in this study to reproduce the 2001 lahar was derived from the velocity-pressure version of the Biot-Zienkiewicz model, and was discretized using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The results of the calibrated SPH model were validated by comparing the simulated deposit depth with the field depth measured at 16 cross sections distributed strategically along the gorge channel. Moreover, the dependency of the results on topographic mesh resolution, initial lahar mass shape and dimensions is also investigated. The results indicate that to accurately reproduce the 2001 lahar flow dynamics the channel topography needed to be discretized using a mesh having a minimum 5 m resolution, and an initial lahar mass shape that adopted the source area morphology. Field validation of the calibrated model showed that there was a satisfactory relationship between the simulated and field depths, the error being less than 20% for 11 of the 16 cross sections. This study demonstrates that the Geoflow-SPH model was able to accurately reproduce the lahar path and the extent of the flow, but also reproduced other parameters including flow velocity and deposit depth.

  20. Numerical simulation of tsunami generation by cold volcanic mass flows at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, C.F.; Watts, P.; Walder, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Many of the world's active volcanoes are situated on or near coastlines. During eruptions, diverse geophysical mass flows, including pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches, and lahars, can deliver large volumes of unconsolidated debris to the ocean in a short period of time and thereby generate tsunamis. Deposits of both hot and cold volcanic mass flows produced by eruptions of Aleutian arc volcanoes are exposed at many locations along the coastlines of the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean, and Cook Inlet, indicating that the flows entered the sea and in some cases may have initiated tsunamis. We evaluate the process of tsunami generation by cold granular subaerial volcanic mass flows using examples from Augustine Volcano in southern Cook Inlet. Augustine Volcano is the most historically active volcano in the Cook Inlet region, and future eruptions, should they lead to debris-avalanche formation and tsunami generation, could be hazardous to some coastal areas. Geological investigations at Augustine Volcano suggest that as many as 12-14 debris avalanches have reached the sea in the last 2000 years, and a debris avalanche emplaced during an A.D. 1883 eruption may have initiated a tsunami that was observed about 80 km east of the volcano at the village of English Bay (Nanwalek) on the coast of the southern Kenai Peninsula. Numerical simulation of mass-flow motion, tsunami generation, propagation, and inundation for Augustine Volcano indicate only modest wave generation by volcanic mass flows and localized wave effects. However, for east-directed mass flows entering Cook Inlet, tsunamis are capable of reaching the more populated coastlines of the southwestern Kenai Peninsula, where maximum water amplitudes of several meters are possible.

  1. Technological advances in avalanche survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwin, Martin I; Grissom, Colin K

    2002-01-01

    Over the last decade, a proliferation of interest has emerged in the area of avalanche survival, yielding both an improved understanding of the pathophysiology of death after avalanche burial and technological advances in the development of survival equipment. The dismal survival statistics born out of the modern era of winter recreation unmistakably reveal that elapsed time and depth of burial are the most critical variables of survival and the focus of newer survival devices on the market. Although blunt trauma may kill up to one third of avalanche victims, early asphyxiation is the predominant mechanism of death, and hypothermia is rare. A survival plateau or delay in asphyxiation may be seen in those buried in respiratory communication with an air pocket until a critical accumulation of CO2 or an ice lens develops. The newest survival devices available for adjunctive protection, along with a transceiver and shovel, are the artificial air pocket device (AvaLung), the avalanche air bag system (ABS), and the Avalanche Ball. The artificial air pocket prolongs adequate respiration during snow burial and may improve survival by delaying asphyxiation. The ABS, which forces the wearer to the surface of the avalanche debris by inverse segregation to help prevent burial, has been in use in Europe for the last 10 years with an impressive track record. Finally, the Avalanche Ball is a visual locator device in the form of a spring-loaded ball attached to a tether, which is released from a fanny pack by a rip cord. Despite the excitement surrounding these novel technologies, avalanche avoidance through knowledge and conservative judgment will always be the mainstay of avalanche survival, never to be replaced by any device.

  2. Avalanche ecology and large magnitude avalanche events: Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagre, Daniel B.; Peitzsch, Erich H.

    2010-01-01

    Large magnitude snow avalanches play an important role ecologically in terms of wildlife habitat, vegetation diversity, and sediment transport within a watershed. Ecological effects from these infrequent avalanches can last for decades. Understanding the frequency of such large magnitude avalanches is also critical to avalanche forecasting for the Going-to-the-Sun Road (GTSR). In January 2009, a large magnitude avalanche cycle occurred in and around Glacier National Park, Montana. The study site is the Little Granite avalanche path located along the GTSR. The study is designed to quantify change in vegetative cover immediately after a large magnitude event and document ecological response over a multi-year period. GPS field mapping was completed to determine the redefined perimeter of the avalanche path. Vegetation was inventoried using modified U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis plots, cross sections were taken from over 100 dead trees throughout the avalanche path, and an avalanche chronology was developed. Initial results indicate that the perimeter of this path was expanded by 30%. The avalanche travelled approximately 1200 vertical meters and 3 linear kilometers. Stands of large conifers as old as 150 years were decimated by the avalanche, causing a shift in dominant vegetation types in many parts of the avalanche path. Woody debris is a major ground cover up to 3 m in depth on lower portions of the avalanche path and will likely affect tree regrowth. Monitoring and measuring the post-avalanche vegetation recovery of this particular avalanche path provides a unique dataset for determining the ecological role of avalanches in mountain landscapes.

  3. Volcanic hazards from Bezymianny- and Bandai-type eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, L.; Glicken, H.; Ui, T.

    1987-01-01

    Major slope failures are a significant degradational process at volcanoes. Slope failures and associated explosive eruptions have resulted in more than 20 000 fatalities in the past 400 years; the historic record provides evidence for at least six of these events in the past century. Several historic debris avalanches exceed 1 km3 in volume. Holocene avalanches an order of magnitude larger have traveled 50-100 km from the source volcano and affected areas of 500-1500 km2. Historic eruptions associated with major slope failures include those with a magmatic component (Bezymianny type) and those solely phreatic (Bandai type). The associated gravitational failures remove major segments of the volcanoes, creating massive horseshoe-shaped depressions commonly of caldera size. The paroxysmal phase of a Bezymianny-type eruption may include powerful lateral explosions and pumiceous pyroclastic flows; it is often followed by construction of lava dome or pyroclastic cone in the new crater. Bandai-type eruptions begin and end with the paroxysmal phase, during which slope failure removes a portion of the edifice. Massive volcanic landslides can also occur without related explosive eruptions, as at the Unzen volcano in 1792. The main potential hazards from these events derive from lateral blasts, the debris avalanche itself, and avalanche-induced tsunamis. Lateral blasts produced by sudden decompression of hydrothermal and/or magmatic systems can devastate areas in excess of 500km2 at velocities exceeding 100 m s-1. The ratio of area covered to distance traveled for the Mount St. Helens and Bezymianny lateral blasts exceeds that of many pyroclastic flows or surges of comparable volume. The potential for large-scale lateral blasts is likely related to the location of magma at the time of slope failure and appears highest when magma has intruded into the upper edifice, as at Mount St. Helens and Bezymianny. Debris avalanches can move faster than 100 ms-1 and travel tens of

  4. 东河口高速远程滑坡-碎屑流全程动力特性模拟%NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF DONGHEKOU ROCKSLIDE-DEBRIS AVALANCHE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐超; 邢爱国; 殷跃平; 李滨

    2012-01-01

    The rockslide-debris avalanche is a geological disaster of great danger and always causes disastrous ca tastrophes because of its high velocity and unexpected long runout. Scholars in China had made a lot of forward-loo king results for the high-speed rockslide-debris flows after Wenchuan Earthquake. A majority of the research results on this field have not been widely accepted due to itself complication. This paper takes the Donghekou rockslide-debris avalanche in Qingchuan County triggered by Wenchuan Earthquake as example to reveal the moving mecha nism of rockslide-debris avalanches. The dynamic analysis software of DAN-W is applied to the creation of threedifferent rheological models. They are Friction model, Voellray model and" F-V" model to simulate on the motion be havior of flow slides and put an emphasis on the travel distance, speed characteristics at different intervals, distri bution of the deposits. The volume and duration are estimated. The results reveal that applying different rheological models to different moving stages have reasonable results. The Friction model is better to simulate the landslide at set-out phase and short-runout phase. The Voellmy model has advantages of simulating flow debris at long run-out phase. The two-rheological model "F-V "provides the best simulation of the Donghekou rockslide-debris avalanche movement. The best fitting rheological parameters friction angle φ= 18°,friction coefficient μ = 0. 1 and turbulence parameter ξ = 400m·s‐ 2 have been found by the back analysis.%高速远程滑坡-碎屑流具有速度快、滑程远、冲击破坏力强等特点,是一种危害性极大的地质灾害,往往会造成严重的生命财产损失.汶川地震后,国内学者对高速远程滑坡-碎屑流的研究取得了大量前瞻性成果,但由于此类滑坡自身的复杂性,目前为止尚未取得公认的研究成果.为了进一步揭示高速远程-碎屑流效应机理,本文以汶川地震触发的青川东

  5. Submarine record of volcanic island construction and collapse in the Lesser Antilles arc: First scientific drilling of submarine volcanic island landslides by IODP Expedition 340

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Friant, A.; Ishizuka, O.; Boudon, G.; Palmer, M. R.; Talling, P. J.; Villemant, B.; Adachi, T.; Aljahdali, M.; Breitkreuz, C.; Brunet, M.; Caron, B.; Coussens, M.; Deplus, C.; Endo, D.; Feuillet, N.; Fraas, A. J.; Fujinawa, A.; Hart, M. B.; Hatfield, R. G.; Hornbach, M.; Jutzeler, M.; Kataoka, K. S.; Komorowski, J.-C.; Lebas, E.; Lafuerza, S.; Maeno, F.; Manga, M.; Martínez-Colón, M.; McCanta, M.; Morgan, S.; Saito, T.; Slagle, A.; Sparks, S.; Stinton, A.; Stroncik, N.; Subramanyam, K. S. V.; Tamura, Y.; Trofimovs, J.; Voight, B.; Wall-Palmer, D.; Wang, F.; Watt, S. F. L.

    2015-02-01

    IODP Expedition 340 successfully drilled a series of sites offshore Montserrat, Martinique and Dominica in the Lesser Antilles from March to April 2012. These are among the few drill sites gathered around volcanic islands, and the first scientific drilling of large and likely tsunamigenic volcanic island-arc landslide deposits. These cores provide evidence and tests of previous hypotheses for the composition and origin of those deposits. Sites U1394, U1399, and U1400 that penetrated landslide deposits recovered exclusively seafloor sediment, comprising mainly turbidites and hemipelagic deposits, and lacked debris avalanche deposits. This supports the concepts that i/ volcanic debris avalanches tend to stop at the slope break, and ii/ widespread and voluminous failures of preexisting low-gradient seafloor sediment can be triggered by initial emplacement of material from the volcano. Offshore Martinique (U1399 and 1400), the landslide deposits comprised blocks of parallel strata that were tilted or microfaulted, sometimes separated by intervals of homogenized sediment (intense shearing), while Site U1394 offshore Montserrat penetrated a flat-lying block of intact strata. The most likely mechanism for generating these large-scale seafloor sediment failures appears to be propagation of a decollement from proximal areas loaded and incised by a volcanic debris avalanche. These results have implications for the magnitude of tsunami generation. Under some conditions, volcanic island landslide deposits composed of mainly seafloor sediment will tend to form smaller magnitude tsunamis than equivalent volumes of subaerial block-rich mass flows rapidly entering water. Expedition 340 also successfully drilled sites to access the undisturbed record of eruption fallout layers intercalated with marine sediment which provide an outstanding high-resolution data set to analyze eruption and landslides cycles, improve understanding of magmatic evolution as well as offshore sedimentation

  6. Genesis and Characteristics of Debris Flow Ocurred in 2013 in the Atenquique Ravine, Located on the Eastern Slope of the Colima Volcanic Complex, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Flores-Pena, S.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Arreola-Ochoa, L. C.; Suarez-Gonzalez, B. V.

    2014-12-01

    Hurricane Manuel affected the Pacific coast of Mexico on September 15 and 16, 2013 causing heavy rainfall of about 240 mm in a 24 hour period in the area of the Volcanic Complex (VC). Heavy rainfall led to the beginning of a significant flow of mud and rocks draining from the Atenquique Creek, located on the eastern slope of the VC in a west east direction. The result of this flow was the heavy damage sustained by the local paper plant located next to the town of Atenquique in the distal part of the basin where the stream is gathered by the Tuxpan River. Damages totaling over 15 million dollars affected a large part in their recycled fibers factory, resulting in an 18-month full stoppage of the factory. This in turn caused a heavy setback of the economy located within a large region of the southern state of Jalisco. Once again on November 25, debris flow occurred only at a lower volume than the September rains, without causing any damage. Both flows contained a viscous and solid liquid flow that left deposits of silt-sandy clasts and other abundant materials of reverse gradation. The first flow reached a thickness of 4.5 m in the Tuxpan riverbed over a length of about 15 km, while the November flow left behind 1.3 m of fine materials and few clasts. The Atenquique ravine historically has had debris flow caused by heavy rainfall from hurricanes. On October 1955 debris flow claimed many deaths and heavy damage to the town and local paper mill. These flows are generated in the summer and they are associated to several factors such as weather, steep slopes, unstable volcanic strata, these elements add an important environmental history in the area, as is the use of continuous deforestation. The current land use has resulted in a positive change from forest to intensive agriculture; but having constant wildfires on the high slopes of the VC and the combination of many other factors such as changes on the soil of the slopes and movement of geological material "scarps and

  7. Generation of pyroclastic flows and surges by hot-rock avalanches from the dome of Mount St. Helens volcano, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellors, R.A.; Waitt, R.B.; Swanson, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Several hot-rock avalanches have occurred during the growth of the composite dome of Mount St. Helens, Washington between 1980 and 1987. One of these occurred on 9 May 1986 and produced a fan-shaped avalanche deposit of juvenile dacite debris together with a more extensive pyroclastic-flow deposit. Laterally thinning deposits and abrasion and baking of wooden and plastic objects show that a hot ash-cloud surge swept beyond the limits of the pyroclastic flow. Plumes that rose 2-3 km above the dome and vitric ash that fell downwind of the volcano were also effects of this event, but no explosion occurred. All the facies observed originated from a single avalanche. Erosion and melting of craterfloor snow by the hot debris caused debris flows in the crater, and a small flood that carried juvenile and other clasts north of the crater. A second, broadly similar event occured in October 1986. Larger events of this nature could present a significant volcanic hazard. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Thermography of volcanic areas on Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island : Mapping surface properties and possible detection of convective air flow within volcanic debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, R.; Baratoux, D.; Rabinowicz, M.; Saracco, G.; Bachelery, P.; Staudacher, T.; Fontaine, F.

    2007-12-01

    We report on the detection of air convection in a couple of quasi circular cavities forming the 300 years old volcanically inactive cone of Formica Leo (Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island) [1]. Infrared thermal images of the cone have been acquired in 2006 from a hand held camera at regular time interval during a complete diurnal cycle. During night and dawn, the data display hot rims and cold centers. Both the conductivity contrasts of the highly porous soils filling the cavities and their 30° slopes are unable to explain the systematic rim to center temperature drop. Accordingly, this signal could be attributed to an air convection dipping inside the highly porous material at the center of each cavity, then flowing upslope along the base of the soil layer, before exiting it along the rims. Anemometrical and electrical data acquired in 2007 allow for the first time the direct detection of this air flow on the field: dipping gas velocities are measured at the center of the cone and self-potentials anomalies [2] generated by the humid air flow in the porous medium are detected. To quantify this process, we present 2D/3D numerical models of air convection in a sloped volcanic soil with a surface temperature evolving between day and night and taking into account electrical phenomena created by the air flow. At this present stage, this work constitutes a first step to investigate the deep structure of the active caldera of Bory-Dolomieu. The detection of the air flow at the surface could be of paramount importance for the understanding of volcanic hazards of the Reunion volcano. [1] Antoine et. al, submitted to G-Cubed [2] Darnet, PhD, Université Louis Pasteur (2003)

  9. Successive collapses of the El Estribo volcanic complex in the Pátzcuaro Lake, Michoacán, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pola, A.; Macías, J. L.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Osorio-Ocampo, S.; Cardona-Melchor, S.

    2014-12-01

    The El Estribo volcanic complex is located in the north-central part of Michoacán State (Mexico) within the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field. It consists of a ~ 126 kr shield volcano crowned by a cinder cone, separated by a paleosol dated at 28,360 ± 170 BP. The shield volcano has been cut by the E-W normal Pátzcuaro fault that exposes 200-m of piled up lavas flows. Our field reconstruction suggests that two collapses have been originated from this fault. Two debris avalanche deposits with hummocky topography are exposed between this fault and the southern shore of the Pátzcuaro Lake. The basal debris avalanche deposit (BDAD) covers lacustrine sediments and is covered by a paleosol that at 28,110 ± 720 yr BP yielding a minimum age for the event. It had a maximum run out of 3.2 km with a H/L of 0.0062. The upper debris avalanche deposit (UDAD) is overlain by a paleosol dated at 14,110 ± 60 yr BP that yields a minimum age of the event. It had a maximum run out of 2.3 km with a H/L of 0.0086. No pyroclastic deposits have been found in association with these debris avalanches and the shield volcano rocks show signs of intense hydrothermal alteration or abundant clay minerals for which we assume that failure was triggered by seismic-tectonic activity. The older debris avalanche was more mobile because it moved on water and on top of water-saturated sediments deforming them and likely originating a tsunami across the lake. Instead, the younger debris avalanche moved across the previous rugged hummocky topography of the basal avalanche resulting in a more restricted dispersion. These collapse events of El Estribo, the morphology of the scarp and historic and modern seismicity indicate that a future failure represents a serious threat to the surrounding communities of the Pátzcuaro Lake. Consequently, some preventive measurements as seismic and deformation rate monitoring are necessary. Today five villages with circa 1500 inhabitants live upon the mass waste

  10. Validation of TITAN2D flow model code for pyroclastic flows and debris avalanches at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, BWI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiwijayanti, C.; Voight, B.; Hidayat, D.; Patra, A.; Pitman, E.

    2004-12-01

    Soufrière Hills Volcano (SHV), Montserrat, has experienced numerous episodes of dome collapses since 1996. They range from relatively small rockfalls to major dome collapses, several >10x106 m3, and one >100x106 m3 (Calder, Luckett, Sparks and Voight 2002; Voight et al. 2002). The hazard implications for such events are significant at both local and regional scales, and include pyroclastic surges, explosions, and tsunami. Problems arise in forecasting and hazards mitigation, particularly in zoning for populated areas. Determining the likely extent of flow deposits is important for hazard zonation. For this, detailed mapping (topography of source areas and paths, material properties, structure, track roughness and erosion) has an important role, giving clues on locations of future collapse and runout paths. Here we present an application of a numerical computation model of geophysical mass flow using the TITAN2D code (Patra et al. 2004; Pitman et al. 2004), to simulate dome collapses at SHV. The majority of collapse-type pyroclastic flows at SHV are consistent with an initiation by gravitational collapse of oversteepened flanks of the dome. If the gravity controls the energy for such processes, then the flow tracks can be predicted on the basis of topography, and friction influences runout. TITAN2D is written to simulate this type of volcanic flow, and the SHV database is used to validate the code and provide calibrated data on friction properties. The topographic DEM was successively updated by adding flow deposit thicknesses for previous collapses. Simulation results were compared to observed flow parameters, including flow path, deposit volume, duration, velocity, and runout distance of individual flows, providing calibration data on internal and bed friction, and demonstrating the validity and limitations of such modeling for practical volcanic hazard assessment.

  11. Aging Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Paczuski, Maya

    1997-03-01

    We have shown that in an analytically solvable model of Self-Organized Criticality (SOC)(S. Boettcher & M. Paczuski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 348 (1996). the evolving avalanche is governed by an equation of motion with a memory term that ranges over all past events.(S. Boettcher & M. Paczuski, Phys. Rev. E 54), 1082 (1996). The solution for the propagator shows sub-diffusive behavior with a broad exponential tail. Numerical studies of the temporal correlations during avalanches in a variety of SOC systems indicate that history dependence and hierarchical structures are generic features which emerge dynamically from simple local update rules. In particular, we find(S. Boettcher & M. Paczuski, ``Off-Equilibrium Behavior and Aging in Self-Organized Criticality'', (in preparation).) ``aging'' similar to the slow relaxation behavior in disordered systems that move through ``rugged landscapes'' in phase space, such as spin glasses.

  12. The 23,500 y 14C BP White Pumice Plinian eruption and associated debris avalanche and Tochimilco lava flow of Popocatépetl volcano, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebe, Claus; Salinas, Sergio; Arana-Salinas, Lilia; Macías, José Luis; Gardner, James; Bonasia, Rosanna

    2017-03-01

    The White Pumice (WP) is one of the thickest and most voluminous Plinian fallouts produced by Popocatépetl volcano in central Mexico during the Late Pleistocene-Holocene. Its eruption 23,500 14C y BP (27,800 cal BP) was triggered by the catastrophic failure of the SW flank of the volcano. The resulting debris avalanche was highly mobile reaching 72 km from the cone with an apparent coefficient of friction (L/H) of 0.06. The deposit covers an area of 1200 km2, and has a volume of 10.4 km3. This gigantic landslide, characterized by exceptionally large proximal hummocks (> 400 m) provoked the sudden decompression of the hydrothermal and magmatic systems, which produced an initial blast followed by the rise of a Plinian column that reached an altitude of 33 km. The isopach map allows the recognition of a dispersal axis pointing toward the south, where an area of 2490 km2 was covered by > 10 cm of pumice and ash. The total volume of the pumice fallout was estimated at 1.9 km3 DRE (Dense Rock Equivalent). Pumice clasts are dacitic (62-66 wt.% SiO2, anhydrous basis), highly vesicular (55-88 vol.%) and display a seriate texture with phenocrysts of plagioclase + hornblende + augite + hypersthene + oxides (Ti-magnetite and ilmenite) + apatite. As the eruption advanced, discharge rates became more intermittent and the height of the column fluctuated and finally collapsed, generating pumice-and-ash flows that were emplaced around the volcano. This short but intense activity was followed during subsequent years by rain-induced lahars that reached great distances from the volcano. At the same time, more degassed andesitic-dacitic (61-65 wt.% SiO2) magma was erupted effusively (4.4 km3, DRE) in the new horseshoe-shaped 5 km-wide crater from which the Tochimilco lava flow descended toward the SSE, where it inundated an area of 68 km2 and reached as far as 22 km from its source. Since then, multiple eruptions have reconstructed the summit cone, almost completely obliterating the

  13. VOLCANIC TSUNAMI GENERATING SOURCE MECHANISMS IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, volcanic island flank failures and underwater slides have generated numerous destructive tsunamis in the Caribbean region. Convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity caused primarily from the eastward movement of the Caribbean Plate in relation to the North American, Atlantic and South American Plates, is responsible for zones of subduction in the region, the formation of island arcs and the evolution of particular volcanic centers on the overlying plate. The inter-plate tectonic interaction and deformation along these marginal boundaries result in moderate seismic and volcanic events that can generate tsunamis by a number of different mechanisms. The active geo-dynamic processes have created the Lesser Antilles, an arc of small islands with volcanoes characterized by both effusive and explosive activity. Eruption mechanisms of these Caribbean volcanoes are complex and often anomalous. Collapses of lava domes often precede major eruptions, which may vary in intensity from Strombolian to Plinian. Locally catastrophic, short-period tsunami-like waves can be generated directly by lateral, direct or channelized volcanic blast episodes, or in combination with collateral air pressure perturbations, nuéss ardentes, pyroclastic flows, lahars, or cascading debris avalanches. Submarine volcanic caldera collapses can also generate locally destructive tsunami waves. Volcanoes in the Eastern Caribbean Region have unstable flanks. Destructive local tsunamis may be generated from aerial and submarine volcanic edifice mass edifice flank failures, which may be triggered by volcanic episodes, lava dome collapses, or simply by gravitational instabilities. The present report evaluates volcanic mechanisms, resulting flank failure processes and their potential for tsunami generation. More specifically, the report evaluates recent volcanic eruption mechanisms of the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat, of Mt. Pel

  14. [Avalanche accidents and treatment of avalanche victims].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaiaa, Sven Christjar; Thomassen, Øyvind

    2016-03-15

    Avalanches may be provoked spontaneously or as a result of human activity, and they trigger the need for considerable rescue resources. Avalanche search and rescue operations are complex and characterised by physical and mental stress. The guidelines for resuscitation of avalanche victims may be perceived as complex and abstruse, which can lead to suboptimal treatment and an increased strain on rescue teams. The purpose of this article is to summarise the principles for medical treatment of avalanche victims.

  15. Geomorphological Characterization of Atenquique Basin in the Eastern Sector of the Volcan-Nevado-Colima, Jalisco, Mexico, As an Input to the Risk Assessment of Debris Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Pena, S.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Atenquique river basin drains the eastern sector of the Volcanic Complex (VC) Volcan-Nevado de Colima, located on the border of the states of Jalisco and Colima. To use the digital geomorphological analysis 1:50000 scale mapping provided by INEGI and Landsat images, manipulating it in ArcGIS 10.2 developing the DEM that was the basis for morphometric characterization. The results show that the basin is divided into five sub-basins, with the main Atenquique (SAT) and Arroyo Seco (SAS), calculating the compactness coefficient (Kc) and the coefficient of sinuosity indicate that SAT is the most prone to floods due to straight and slightly sinuous channels. However, the density of dissection shows a more developed drainage network on the SAT, with slopes up to 84° and 600 m deep. The drainage basin has its source at an altitude of 4260 m and its mouth is in the Tuxpan River at 1040 m, which has a relative height of 2800 m; has a funnel-shaped elongated west-east, its outstanding average in the sector are Mountain 44° and 10° the piedmont. The SAT has a total area of 81.8 km2, with a dendritic river network, where the first order streams reach an 82.99%, and second order streams are the 13.4% of the total, these values show that most of the slopes of the basin have incipient development valleys and steep slopes. The basin has had 3 debris flows in recent 58 years; these are formed by large volumes of rock and mud that covered the town of Atenquique and paper mill located at the mouth of the Tuxpan River, caused deaths and significant economic damage. Its genesis is associated with the end of the summer rainy season, so he also worked in the hydrological analysis in order to determine the volume of runoff in the basin. The results of this work are used as input for the determining the risk levels in the study area, and may also be used by the municipality of Tuxpan, in order to define policies to manage risk and reduce future risks to the industrial town of

  16. Volcanic rock properties control sector collapse events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amy; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Hornby, Adrian; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes constructed by superimposed layers of varying volcanic materials are inherently unstable structures. The heterogeneity of weak and strong layers consisting of ash, tephra and lavas, each with varying coherencies, porosities, crystallinities, glass content and ultimately, strength, can promote volcanic flank and sector collapses. These volcanoes often exist in areas with complex regional tectonics adding to instability caused by heterogeneity, flank overburden, magma movement and emplacement in addition to hydrothermal alteration and anomalous geothermal gradients. Recent studies conducted on the faulting properties of volcanic rocks at variable slip rates show the rate-weakening dependence of the friction coefficients (up to 90% reduction)[1], caused by a wide range of factors such as the generation of gouge and frictional melt lubrication [2]. Experimental data from experiments conducted on volcanic products suggests that frictional melt occurs at slip rates similar to those of plug flow in volcanic conduits [1] and the bases of mass material movements such as debris avalanches from volcanic flanks [3]. In volcanic rock, the generation of frictional heat may prompt the remobilisation of interstitial glass below melting temperatures due to passing of the glass transition temperature at ˜650-750 ˚C [4]. In addition, the crushing of pores in high porosity samples can lead to increased comminution and strain localisation along slip surfaces. Here we present the results of friction tests on both high density, glass rich samples from Santaguito (Guatemala) and synthetic glass samples with varying porosities (0-25%) to better understand frictional properties underlying volcanic collapse events. 1. Kendrick, J.E., et al., Extreme frictional processes in the volcanic conduit of Mount St. Helens (USA) during the 2004-2008 eruption. J. Structural Geology, 2012. 2. Di Toro, G., et al., Fault lubrication during earthquakes. Nature, 2011. 471(7339): p. 494-498. 3

  17. Growth, destruction and volcanic facies architecture of three volcanic centres in the Miocene Uşak-Güre basin, western Turkey: Subaqueous-subaerial volcanism in a lacustrine setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoğlu, Özgür; Helvacı, Cahit

    2012-11-01

    Early to Mid-Miocene extension in western Anatolia, related to plate tectonic motions, resulted in the development of a number of normal fault-bounded sedimentary basins as well as different styles and compositions of volcanic activity. The Uşak and Güre basins accumulated a thick fluvio-lacustrine fill in which three distinct volcanic edifices (Elmadağ, İtecektepe and Beydağı) and their deposits can overlap with each other and with the sediments produced by the background sedimentation. In addition, complete facies architectures of small-volume (monogenetic) volcanoes have been recognised in association with the three large complex (polygenetic) volcanoes providing a complex mixed siliciclastic and volcaniclastic basin infill in the respective basins where volcanism took place. All three volcanic centres display a complex succession of effusive and explosive volcanisms and their reworked deposits, with abundant evidences of magma-water interaction such as peperites for non-explosive magma-water interaction with the lacustrine water-saturated sediment and standing water body in a large alkaline lake. During the constructive phase, proximal successions of pyroclastic flows, pyroclastic falls, and rarely surge deposits are associated with distally-emplaced debris flow deposits, sometimes of mixed volcanogenic and terrestrial origins, and are interbedded with lacustrine sediments of the Inay Group. All three volcanic centres then experienced a phase of volcano growth and degradation between 17 and 15 Ma ago, most likely related to a combination of tectonic movements on NE-SW-trending basement faults, which triggered multiple flank collapses and volcanic debris avalanches (Elmadağ), and voluminous ignimbrite eruptions that triggered caldera formation (İtecektepe and Beydağı volcanic centres). Lacustrine conditions persisted during the destruction and post-destruction stages of the volcano's evolution, as evidenced by indications of magma-water interactions

  18. Slope instability induced by volcano-tectonics as an additional source of hazard in active volcanic areas: the case of Ischia island (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Seta, Marta; Marotta, Enrica; Orsi, Giovanni; de Vita, Sandro; Sansivero, Fabio; Fredi, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Ischia is an active volcanic island in the Gulf of Naples whose history has been dominated by a caldera-forming eruption (ca. 55 ka) and resurgence phenomena that have affected the caldera floor and generated a net uplift of about 900 m since 33 ka. The results of new geomorphological, stratigraphical and textural investigations of the products of gravitational movements triggered by volcano-tectonic events have been combined with the information arising from a reinterpretation of historical chronicles on natural phenomena such as earthquakes, ground deformation, gravitational movements and volcanic eruptions. The combined interpretation of all these data shows that gravitational movements, coeval to volcanic activity and uplift events related to the long-lasting resurgence, have affected the highly fractured marginal portions of the most uplifted Mt. Epomeo blocks. Such movements, mostly occurring since 3 ka, include debris avalanches; large debris flows (lahars); smaller mass movements (rock falls, slumps, debris and rock slides, and small debris flows); and deep-seated gravitational slope deformation. The occurrence of submarine deposits linked with subaerial deposits of the most voluminous mass movements clearly shows that the debris avalanches impacted on the sea. The obtained results corroborate the hypothesis that the behaviour of the Ischia volcano is based on an intimate interplay among magmatism, resurgence dynamics, fault generation, seismicity, slope oversteepening and instability, and eruptions. They also highlight that volcano-tectonically triggered mass movements are a potentially hazardous phenomena that have to be taken into account in any attempt to assess volcanic and related hazards at Ischia. Furthermore, the largest mass movements could also flow into the sea, generating tsunami waves that could impact on the island's coast as well as on the neighbouring and densely inhabited coast of the Neapolitan area.

  19. Composition, geometry, and emplacement dynamics of a large volcanic island landslide offshore Martinique: From volcano flank-collapse to seafloor sediment failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Morgane; Le Friant, Anne; Boudon, Georges; Lafuerza, Sara; Talling, Peter; Hornbach, Matthew; Ishizuka, Osamu; Lebas, Elodie; Guyard, Hervé

    2016-03-01

    Landslides are common features in the vicinity of volcanic islands. In this contribution, we investigate landslides emplacement and dynamics around the volcanic island of Martinique based on the first scientific drilling of such deposits. The evolution of the active Montagne Pelée volcano on this island has been marked by three major flank-collapses that removed much of the western flank of the volcano. Subaerial collapse volumes vary from 2 to 25 km3 and debris avalanches flowed into the Grenada Basin. High-resolution seismic data (AGUADOMAR-1999, CARAVAL-2002, and GWADASEIS-2009) is combined with new drill cores that penetrate up to 430 m through the three submarine landslide deposits previously associated to the aerial flank-collapses (Site U1399, Site U1400, Site U1401, IODP Expedition 340, Joides Resolution, March-April 2012). This combined geophysical and core data provide an improved understanding of landslide processes offshore a volcanic island. The integrated analysis shows a large submarine landslide deposit, without debris avalanche deposits coming from the volcano, comprising up to 300 km3 of remobilized seafloor sediment that extends for 70 km away from the coast and covers an area of 2100 km2. Our new data suggest that the aerial debris avalanche deposit enter the sea but stop at the base of submarine flank. We propose a new model dealing with seafloor sediment failures and landslide propagation mechanisms, triggered by volcanic flank-collapse events affecting Montagne Pelée volcano. Newly recognized landslide deposits occur deeper in the stratigraphy, suggesting the recurrence of large-scale mass-wasting processes offshore the island and thus, the necessity to better assess the associated tsunami hazards in the region.

  20. Climatic fluctuations as a significant contributing factor for volcanic collapses. Evidence from Mexico during the Late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, L.; Bernal-Uruchurtu, J. P.; Carrasco, G.

    2013-05-01

    Climate oscillations have significantly contributed to the planet's evolution, including volcanic activity. Major glaciations have been considered not only as a triggering mechanism for large magmatic eruptions but also inducing volcano instability. Generally, volcano instability can be inferred from detailed volcanological and structural studies of a volcano and its associated depositional sequence, but the triggering mechanism has been always difficult to infer. In this paper, we present evidence of how climatic variations during the Late Pleistocene could have forced sector collapses of the main Mexican stratovolcanoes and enhanced the mobility of associated massive flows inducing the transformation of debris avalanche into debris flows. In particular, the climatic record based on atmospheric moisture content from robustly dated lake record from Guatemala and a U/Th dated speleothem from New Mexico are used here as indicators of summer and winter precipitation. Depositional sequences associated with Late Pleistocene sector collapses of Volcan de Colima, Nevado de Toluca, Citlaltepetl (Pico de Orizaba) and Cofre de Perote volcanoes are here analyzed. Comparing the timing of the event with the climatic record, a combination of summer and/or winter pluvial conditions could have forced and triggered the failure of already unstable volcanoes, even during glacier advances (as for the Citlaltepetl event). Independently of the main cause of the volcano instability (magmatic or tectonic) it is important to highlight that the climatic factor played an important role in enhancing the volcano instability and promoted the lateral transformation of debris avalanches, which under dry conditions would have affected more limited areas.

  1. Negative feedback avalanche diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzler, Mark Allen (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A single-photon avalanche detector is disclosed that is operable at wavelengths greater than 1000 nm and at operating speeds greater than 10 MHz. The single-photon avalanche detector comprises a thin-film resistor and avalanche photodiode that are monolithically integrated such that little or no additional capacitance is associated with the addition of the resistor.

  2. Rock avalanches: significance and progress (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    1. The probability distribution of landslide volumes follows a power-law indicating that large rock avalanches dominate the terrestrial sediment supply from mountains, and that their source area morphologies dominate mountain topography. 2. Large rock slope failures (~ 106 m3 or greater) often mobilise into rock avalanches, which can travel extraordinarily long distances with devastating effect. This hypermobility has been the subject of many investigations; we have demonstrated that it can be explained quantitatively and accurately by considering the energetics of the intense rock fragmentation that always occurs during motion of a large rock mass. 3. Study of rock avalanche debris psd shows that the energy used in creating new rock surface area during fragmentation is not lost to surface energy, but is recycled generating a high-frequency elastic energy field that reduces the frictional resistance to motion during runout. 4. Rock avalanches that deposit on glaciers can eventually form large terminal moraines that have no connection with any climatic event; unless these are identified as rock-avalanche-influenced they can confuse palaeoclimatic inferences drawn from moraine ages. Rock-avalanche-derived fines, however, can be identified in moraine debris up to ten thousand years old by the characteristic micron-scale agglomerates that form during intense fragmentation, and which are absent from purely climatically-induced moraines; there is thus a strong case for re-examining existing palaeoclimatic databases to eliminate potentially rock-avalanche-influenced moraine ages. 5. Rock avalanches (especially coseismic ones) are a serious hazard, being very destructive in their own right; they also block river valleys, forming landslide dams and potentially devastating dambreak floods, and subsequent severe decade-scale aggradation of downstream fans and floodplains. Rock avalanches falling into lakes or fiords can cause catastrophic tsunami that pose a serious risk to

  3. Avalanche speed in thin avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, D. S.; Rees, G. J.; David, J. P. R.

    2003-04-01

    The duration of the avalanche multiplication process in thin GaAs avalanche photodiodes is investigated using a full band Monte Carlo (FBMC) model. The results are compared with those of a simple random path length (RPL) model which makes the conventional assumptions of a displaced exponential for the ionization path length probability distribution function and that carriers always travel at their saturated drift velocities. We find that the avalanche duration calculated by the RPL model is almost twice of that predicted by the FBMC model, although the constant drift velocities used in the former model are estimated using the latter. The faster response predicted by FBMC model arises partly from the reduced dead space but mainly from the velocity overshoot of ionizing carriers. While the feedback multiplication processes forced by the effects of dead space extend the avalanche duration in short structures, the effects of velocity overshoot in the realistic model more than compensate, significantly improving multiplication bandwidth.

  4. Quantitative physical models of volcanic phenomena for hazards assessment of critical infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic hazards may have destructive effects on economy, transport, and natural environments at both local and regional scale. Hazardous phenomena include pyroclastic density currents, tephra fall, gas emissions, lava flows, debris flows and avalanches, and lahars. Volcanic hazards assessment is based on available information to characterize potential volcanic sources in the region of interest and to determine whether specific volcanic phenomena might reach a given site. Volcanic hazards assessment is focussed on estimating the distances that volcanic phenomena could travel from potential sources and their intensity at the considered site. Epistemic and aleatory uncertainties strongly affect the resulting hazards assessment. Within the context of critical infrastructures, volcanic eruptions are rare natural events that can create severe hazards. In addition to being rare events, evidence of many past volcanic eruptions is poorly preserved in the geologic record. The models used for describing the impact of volcanic phenomena generally represent a range of model complexities, from simplified physics based conceptual models to highly coupled thermo fluid dynamical approaches. Modelling approaches represent a hierarchy of complexity, which reflects increasing requirements for well characterized data in order to produce a broader range of output information. In selecting models for the hazard analysis related to a specific phenomenon, questions that need to be answered by the models must be carefully considered. Independently of the model, the final hazards assessment strongly depends on input derived from detailed volcanological investigations, such as mapping and stratigraphic correlations. For each phenomenon, an overview of currently available approaches for the evaluation of future hazards will be presented with the aim to provide a foundation for future work in developing an international consensus on volcanic hazards assessment methods.

  5. Practical methods for using vegetation patterns to estimate avalanche frequency and magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, S.; Fassnacht, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Practitioners working in avalanche terrain may never witness an extreme event, but understanding extreme events is important for categorizing avalanches that occur within a given season. Historical records of avalanche incidents and direct observations are the most reliable evidence of avalanche activity, but patterns in vegetation can be used to further quantify and map the frequency and magnitude of past events. We surveyed published literature to synthesize approaches for using vegetation sampling to characterize avalanche terrain, and developed examples to identify the benefits and caveats of using different practical field methods to estimate avalanche frequency and magnitude. Powerful avalanches can deposit massive piles of snow, rocks, and woody debris in runout zones. Large avalanches (relative to the path) can cut fresh trimlines, widening their tracks by uprooting, stripping, and breaking trees. Discs and cores can be collected from downed trees to detect signals of past avalanche disturbance recorded in woody plant tissue. Signals of disturbance events recorded in tree rings can include direct impact scars from the moving snow and wind blast, development of reaction wood in response to tilting, and abrupt variation in the relative width of annual growth rings. The relative ages of trees in avalanche paths and the surrounding landscape can be an indicator of the area impacted by past avalanches. Repeat photography can also be useful to track changes in vegetation over time. For Colorado, and perhaps elsewhere, several vegetation ecology methods can be used in combination to accurately characterize local avalanche frequency and magnitude.

  6. Morphometric and meteorological controls of snow avalanche distribution and activity at hillslopes in steep mountain valleys in western Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laute, Katja; Beylich, Achim A.

    2013-04-01

    Snow avalanches are common phenomena in Norway due to the interactions between the prevalent climatic factors and local topography. Research on snow avalanches provides insights into possible effects of predicted climate change on avalanche activity and connected sediment transport in mountain areas. This study focuses on (i) controlling factors of avalanche distribution and activity, and (ii) their relative importance regarding mass transfers in two steep, parabolic-shaped and glacier-connected tributary valleys (Erdalen and Bødalen) in western Norway. Mapping of distribution, extension and run-out distances of avalanches is combined with spatial data analysis of morphometric controls. Based on correlation of climate data with monitored avalanche events the timing and frequency of avalanches is explored and debris mass transfer on hillslopes caused by avalanches is estimated. The denudative effect of snow avalanches occurs in two steps: firstly throughout erosion directly on the surface of the rockwall and secondly due to their transport ability which causes significant remobilization and transport of available debris further downslope. The spatial distribution of snow avalanches depends on the valley orientation, slope aspect and rockwall morphometry. Especially distinct laterally convex-shaped leeside upper rockwall areas allow a high accumulation rate of snow during winter which is then released as avalanches during spring. The timing and frequency of avalanches in both valleys depend mainly on snowfall intensity, periods with strong winds combined with a stable wind direction or sudden air temperature changes. Snow avalanche activity leads in some valley areas to significant hillslope-channel coupling because debris is transported far enough by avalanches to reach channels. Snow avalanches represent one of the dominant denudational processes and have a high relative importance regarding mass transfer within the sedimentary budgets of the entire valleys.

  7. Discrimination of hot versus cold avalanche deposits: Implications for hazard assessment at Mount Meager, B.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, M. L.; Russell, J. K.; Hickson, C. J.

    The surficial deposits surrounding the Mount Meager volcanic complex include numerous avalanche deposits. These deposits share many attributes: (a) they are nearly monolithologic and comprise mainly intermediate volcanic rock clasts, (b) they lack internal structure, and (c) they are very poorly sorted. Despite these similarities, the avalanche deposits represent two distinct processes. Mass wasting of the Mount Meager volcanic edifice has produced cold rock avalanche deposits, whereas gravitational collapse of active lava domes and flows has produced hot block and ash avalanche deposits. The ability to discriminate between these "hot" and "cold" avalanche deposits is a critical component in the assessment of hazards in volcanic terranes. Hot block and ash avalanche deposits can be distinguished by the presence of radially-oriented joints, breadcrust textures, and incipient welding, which are features indicative of high emplacement temperatures. Conversely, rock avalanche deposits resulting from mass wasting events may be distinguished by the presence of clasts that preserve pre-depositional weathering and jointing surfaces. Volcanic avalanches are mechanically similar to rock avalanches but pose a greater hazard due to high temperatures, increased fluidization from degassing and the potential to decouple highly mobile elutriated ash clouds. The increasing use of hazardous regions such as the Lillooet River valley requires more reliable risk assessment in order to minimize losses from future hazardous events.

  8. Discrimination of hot versus cold avalanche deposits: Implications for hazard assessment at Mount Meager, B.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Stewart

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The surficial deposits surrounding the Mount Meager volcanic complex include numerous avalanche deposits. These deposits share many attributes: (a they are nearly monolithologic and comprise mainly intermediate volcanic rock clasts, (b they lack internal structure, and (c they are very poorly sorted. Despite these similarities, the avalanche deposits represent two distinct processes. Mass wasting of the Mount Meager volcanic edifice has produced cold rock avalanche deposits, whereas gravitational collapse of active lava domes and flows has produced hot block and ash avalanche deposits. The ability to discriminate between these "hot" and "cold" avalanche deposits is a critical component in the assessment of hazards in volcanic terranes. Hot block and ash avalanche deposits can be distinguished by the presence of radially-oriented joints, breadcrust textures, and incipient welding, which are features indicative of high emplacement temperatures. Conversely, rock avalanche deposits resulting from mass wasting events may be distinguished by the presence of clasts that preserve pre-depositional weathering and jointing surfaces. Volcanic avalanches are mechanically similar to rock avalanches but pose a greater hazard due to high temperatures, increased fluidization from degassing and the potential to decouple highly mobile elutriated ash clouds. The increasing use of hazardous regions such as the Lillooet River valley requires more reliable risk assessment in order to minimize losses from future hazardous events.

  9. Volcanic Processes and Geology of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitt, Richard B.; Beget, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Augustine Island (volcano) in lower Cook Inlet, Alaska, has erupted repeatedly in late-Holocene and historical times. Eruptions typically beget high-energy volcanic processes. Most notable are bouldery debris avalanches containing immense angular clasts shed from summit domes. Coarse deposits of these avalanches form much of Augustine's lower flanks. A new geologic map at 1:25,000 scale depicts these deposits, these processes. We correlate deposits by tephra layers calibrated by many radiocarbon dates. Augustine Volcano began erupting on the flank of a small island of Jurassic clastic-sedimentary rock before the late Wisconsin glaciation (late Pleistocene). The oldest known effusions ranged from olivine basalt explosively propelled by steam, to highly explosive magmatic eruptions of dacite or rhyodacite shed as pumice flows. Late Wisconsin piedmont glaciers issuing from the mountainous western mainland surrounded the island while dacitic eruptive debris swept down the south volcano flank. Evidence is scant for eruptions between the late Wisconsin and about 2,200 yr B.P. On a few south-flank inliers, thick stratigraphically low pumiceous pyroclastic-flow and fall deposits probably represent this period from which we have no radiocarbon dates on Augustine Island. Eruptions between about 5,350 and 2,200 yr B.P. we know with certainty by distal tephras. On Shuyak Island 100 km southeast of Augustine, two distal fall ashes of Augustinian chemical provenance (microprobe analysis of glass) date respectively between about 5,330 and 5,020 yr B.P. and between about 3,620 and 3,360 yr B.P. An Augustine ash along Kamishak Creek 70 km southwest of Augustine dates between about 3,850 and 3,660 yr B.P. A probably Augustinian ash lying within peat near Homer dates to about 2,275 yr B.P. From before 2,200 yr B.P. to the present, Augustine eruptive products abundantly mantle the island. During this period, numerous coarse debris avalanches swept beyond Augustine's coast, most

  10. Global Volcano Model: progress towards an international co-ordinated network for volcanic hazard and risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughlin, Susan

    2013-04-01

    GVM is a growing international collaboration that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk. GVM is a network that aims to co-ordinate and integrate the efforts of the international volcanology community. Major international initiatives and partners such as the Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program, State University of New York at Buffalo - VHub, Earth Observatory of Singapore - WOVOdat and many others underpin GVM. Activities currently include: design and development of databases of volcano data, volcanic hazards, vulnerability and exposure with internationally agreed metadata standards; establishment of methodologies for analysis of the data (e.g. hazard and exposure indices) to inform risk assessment; development of complementary hazards models and create relevant hazards and risk assessment tools. GVM acts through establishing task forces to deliver explicit deliverables in finite periods of time. GVM has a task force to deliver a global assessment of volcanic risk for UN ISDR, a task force for indices, and a task force for volcano deformation from satellite observations. GVM is organising a Volcano Best Practices workshop in 2013. A recent product of GVM is a global database on large magnitude explosive eruptions. There is ongoing work to develop databases on debris avalanches, lava dome hazards and ash hazard. GVM aims to develop the capability to anticipate future volcanism and its consequences.

  11. Sediment Transport by Spring Avalanches in the Southern Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egloff, J. M.; Hunziker, M.; Moore, J. R.; Christen, M.

    2010-12-01

    Dense wet-snow avalanches breaking through to the base of the snow pack or overriding snow-free surfaces can entrain basal material and act as important agents of sediment transport in steep Alpine catchments. As part of an ongoing study, we investigated two debris fans in the Matter Valley of southern Switzerland during spring 2009 and 2010, with emphasis on quantifying avalanche sediment transport. Deposited debris ranged from soil parcels and plant material to cobbles and boulders greater than 1 m3. Large boulders were generally angular and fresh with clear signs of recent impacts. The seasonal sediment load transported by avalanches was estimated at one fan by sampling the debris content within a number of representative areas, and then extrapolating the cumulative volume. Results reveal a total transported sediment volume of ~150 m3 in 2009 and ~15 m3 in 2010, which likely reflects varying snowfall and avalanche frequency between years. When distributed over the deposition area on the fan, these results imply an average accumulated sediment thickness of 12 mm in 2009 and 3 mm in 2010. Calculated catchment-wide erosion rates are ~0.1 mm/yr for 2009 and ~0.01 mm/yr for 2010. Cross-sections through avalanche debris revealed that transported sediment generally resides on top of the snow surface. As the avalanches melt, entrained sediment is set down gently, often resulting in precariously balanced boulders and rows of blocks perched on the walls of the fan’s channels. In flat lying areas, snowmelt resulted in sparse sediment deposits with no clear structure or sorting. Observations show that the fan surface is usually protected from erosion by snow and older avalanche deposits, which provide a smooth gliding plane for new events. Within the bedrock gulley adjacent to the fan, and in the avalanche source region above, signs of abrasive wear were evident on exposed bedrock surfaces. These include rounded and scoured bedrock, fresh signs of boulder impacts, and

  12. How to associate with volcanoes. Mitigation of volcanic hazards; Kazan tono tsukiaikata. Kazan saigai wo doyatte herasuka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabe, Y. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes how to deal with volcanic hazards. Basaltic lave such as in the Kilauea volcano flows quickly, while andesite lava such as in Mt. Asama and Mt. Sakurajima in Japan flows slowly. The pyroclastic flow in the Unzen area was a flow of high-temperature lava, pumice stones and gas driven to a high speed by gravity. The flow is so dangerous as it flows so quickly as allowing no time to escape from. Pyroclastic fall-outs and volcanic gases also give damages of different forms. Mountain collapse and debris avalanche in which a volcanic mountain collapses by eruption and earthquake acting as a trigger can also cause a large disaster. A debris flow may also do the same. Knowing the history of volcanic activities by making geological surveys may help judge what type of eruptive activities is prone to occur. On the other hand, the current conditions must be kept observed by performing seismic observations. Eruption itself, a large-scale lava flow and a pyroclastic flow cannot be prevented by using any hardware technique. Software measures are important to utilize more adequately areas and soil natures with high risks. The National Land Agency has prepared recently a guideline for making hazard prediction maps. It is important that both the administration and general residents utilize this guideline. 11 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Initiation processes for run-off generated debris flows in the Wenchuan earthquake area of China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, W.; Dong, X. J.; Xu, Q.; Wang, G. H.; van Asch, T. W J; Hicher, P. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of huge debris flows greatly increased in the epicenter area of the Wenchuan earthquake. Field investigation revealed that runoff during rainstorm played a major role in generating debris flows on the loose deposits, left by coseismic debris avalanches. However, the mechanisms of these

  14. Relating rock avalanche morphology to emplacement processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Anja; Prager, Christoph; Bösmeier, Annette

    2015-04-01

    The morphology, structure and sedimentological characteristics of rock avalanche deposits reflect both internal emplacement processes and external influences, such as runout path characteristics. The latter is mainly predisposed by topography, substrate types, and hydrogeological conditions. Additionally, the geological setting at the source slope controls, e.g. the spatial distribution of accumulated lithologies and hence material property-related changes in morphology, or the maximum clast size and amount of fines of different lithological units. The Holocene Tschirgant rock avalanche (Tyrol, Austria) resulted from failure of an intensely deformed carbonate rock mass on the southeast face of a 2,370-m-high mountain ridge. The initially sliding rock mass rapidly fragmented as it moved towards the floor of the Inn River valley. Part of the 200-250 x 106 m3 (Patzelt 2012) rock avalanche debris collided with and moved around an opposing bedrock ridge and flowed into the Ötz valley, reaching up to 6.3 km from source. Where the Tschirgant rock avalanche spread freely it formed longitudinal ridges aligned along motion direction as well as smaller hummocks. Encountering high topography, it left runup ridges, fallback patterns (i.e. secondary collapse), and compressional morphology (successively elevated, transverse ridges). Further evidence for the mechanical landslide behaviour is given by large volumes of mobilized valley-fill sediments (polymict gravels and sands). These sediments indicate both shearing and compressional faulting within the rock avalanche mass (forming their own morphological units through, e.g. in situ bulldozing or as distinctly different hummocky terrain), but also indicate extension of the spreading landslide mass (i.e. intercalated/injected gravels encountered mainly in morphological depressions between hummocks). Further influences on its morphology are given by the different lithological units. E.g. the transition from massive dolomite

  15. Debris-flow runout predictions based on the average channel slope (ACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, A.B.; Santi, P.M.; Higgins, J.D.; Cannon, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of the runout distance of a debris flow is an important element in the delineation of potentially hazardous areas on alluvial fans and for the siting of mitigation structures. Existing runout estimation methods rely on input parameters that are often difficult to estimate, including volume, velocity, and frictional factors. In order to provide a simple method for preliminary estimates of debris-flow runout distances, we developed a model that provides runout predictions based on the average channel slope (ACS model) for non-volcanic debris flows that emanate from confined channels and deposit on well-defined alluvial fans. This model was developed from 20 debris-flow events in the western United States and British Columbia. Based on a runout estimation method developed for snow avalanches, this model predicts debris-flow runout as an angle of reach from a fixed point in the drainage channel to the end of the runout zone. The best fixed point was found to be the mid-point elevation of the drainage channel, measured from the apex of the alluvial fan to the top of the drainage basin. Predicted runout lengths were more consistent than those obtained from existing angle-of-reach estimation methods. Results of the model compared well with those of laboratory flume tests performed using the same range of channel slopes. The robustness of this model was tested by applying it to three debris-flow events not used in its development: predicted runout ranged from 82 to 131% of the actual runout for these three events. Prediction interval multipliers were also developed so that the user may calculate predicted runout within specified confidence limits. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Detecting debris flows using ground vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHusen, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    Debris flows are rapidly flowing mixtures of rock debris, mud, and water that originate on steep slopes. During and following volcanic eruptions, debris flows are among the most destructive and persistent hazards. Debris flows threaten lives and property not only on volcanoes but far downstream in valleys that drain volcanoes where they arrive suddenly and inundate entire valley bottoms. Debris flows can destroy vegetation and structures in their path, including bridges and buildings. Their deposits can cover roads and railways, smother crops, and fill stream channels, thereby reducing their flood-carrying capacity and navigability.

  17. Multiple edifice-collapse events in the Eastern Mexican Volcanic Belt: The role of sloping substrate and implications for hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Nunez, Gerardo; Diaz-Castellon, Rodolfo; Siebert, L.; Hubbard, B.; Sheridan, M.F.; Rodriguez, Sergio R.

    2006-01-01

    The Citlalte??petl-Cofre de Perote volcanic chain forms an important physiographic barrier that separates the Central Altiplano (2500??masl) from the Gulf Coastal Plain (GCP) (1300??masl). The abrupt eastward drop in relief between these provinces gives rise to unstable conditions and consequent gravitational collapse of large volcanic edifices built at the edge of the Altiplano. Eastward sloping substrate, caused by the irregular configuration of the basement rocks, is the dominant factor that controls the direction of collapsing sectors in all major volcanoes in the region to be preferentially towards the GCP. These collapses produced voluminous debris avalanches and lahars that inundated the well-developed drainages and clastic aprons that characterize the Coastal Plain. Large catastrophic collapses from Citlalte??petl, Las Cumbres, and Cofre de Perote volcanoes are well documented in the geologic record. Some of the avalanches and transformed flows have exceptionally long runouts and reach the Gulf of Mexico traveling more than 120??km from their source. So far, no direct evidence has been found for magmatic activity associated with the initiation of these catastrophic flank-collapses. Apparently, instability of the volcanic edifices has been strongly favored by very intense hydrothermal alteration, abrupt topographic change, and intense fracturing. In addition to the eastward slope of the substrate, the reactivation of pre-volcanic basement structures during the Late Tertiary, and the E-W to ENE-SSW oriented regional stress regimes may have played an important role in the preferential movement direction of the avalanches and flows. In addition to magmatic-hydrothermal processes, high amounts of rainfall in the area is another factor that enhances alteration and eventually weakens the rocks. It is very likely that seismic activity may be the principal triggering mechanism that caused the flank collapse of large volcanic edifices in the Eastern Mexican Volcanic

  18. Paleo-tsunami and Tephrochronologic Investigations into the Late Holocene Volcanic History of Augustine Volcano on the Southwest Coast of the Kenai Peninsula, Lower Cook Inlet Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharrey, J. Z.; Beget, J. E.; Wallace, K.

    2014-12-01

    Augustine Volcano, a small island volcano located in Cook Inlet, Alaska has produced approximately 11 flank-failure debris-avalanches over the last 2,000 yrs (BP) that were large enough to reach the coast of the island and enter the sea. Each debris avalanche conceivably could have triggered a tsunami. In 1883, a tsunami generated by an eruption and flank-failure of Augustine inundated the indigenous Alaskan village of Nanwalek (previously English Bay) with 8 meters of runup. Nanwalek is geographically located atop a coastal headland on the southwest coast of the Kenai Peninsula approximately 85 kilometers due east of Augustine (Beget et al., 2008). Current research in Nanwalek is focused on describing a peat exposure situated on the shoreward edge of the English Bay headland. We present new data from this locality on the sedimentology, tephrochronology, radiocarbon dating, and field stratigraphy. The exposure is basally dated to approximately 7,100 yr BP and includes exotic units of volcanic ash, sand, and gravel. We correlate 19 tephra layers to late Holocene eruptions of Augustine and several Cook Inlet and northern Alaska Peninsula volcanoes. We interpret the non-volcanic clastic sediment horizons in the peat as prehistoric tsunami-inundation events of the English Bay headland. Augustine volcanic-ash deposits found within the tsunami deposits allow correlation to prehistoric coeval flank-failure debris-avalanche deposits exposed on Augustine (Waitt and Beget, 2009). We correlate three tsunami deposits associated with Augustine tephra marker horizons H, I, and G of Waitt and Beget (2009) each of which were erupted approximately 1,400 yr BP, 1,700 yr BP, and 2,100 yr BP. Additionally, we present new tephra and sedimentological evidence for a 4,100 yr BP paleo-tsunami inundation event at Nanwalek that we correlate to a previously unidentified flank-failure debris-avalanche event at Augustine Volcano. The recognition of this new deposit extends the age record for

  19. Stratigraphy, petrology, and geochemistry of the Spurr Volcanic Complex, eastern Aleutian Arc, Alaska. [(Appendix for geothermal fluid chemistry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, C.J.

    1987-12-01

    The Spurr Volcanic Complex (SVC) is a calcalkaline, medium-K, sequence of andesites erupted over the last quarter of a million years by the easternmost currently active volcanic center in the Aleutian Arc. The ancestral Mt. Spurr was built mostly of andesites of uniform composition (58 to 60% SiO/sub 2/), although andesite production was episodically interrupted by the introduction of new batches of more mafic magma. Near the end of the Pleistocene the ancestral Mt. Spurr underwent Bezyianny-type avalanche caldera formation, resulting in the production of a volcanic debris avalanche with overlying ashflows. Immediately afterward, a large dome (the present Mt. Spurr) was emplaced in the caldera. Both the ashflows and dome are made of acid andesite more silicic than any analyzed lavas from the ancestral Mt. Spurr (60 to 63% SiO/sub 2/), yet contain olivine and amphibole xenocrysts derived from more mafic magma. The mafic magma (53 to 57% SiO/sub 2/) erupted during and after dome emplacement, forming proto-Crater Peak and Crater Peak. Hybrid pyroclastic flows and lavas were also produced. Proto-Crater Peak underwent glacial dissection prior to the formation of Crater Peak in approximately the same location. Appendices II through VIII contain a summary of mineral compositions; Appendix I contains geochemical data. Appendix IX by R.J. Motyka and C.J. Nye describes the chemistry of geothermal fluids. 78 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Forensic Analysis of the May 2014 West Salt Creek Rock Avalanche in Western Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, J. A.; Baum, R. L.; Allstadt, K.; Kochevar, B. F.; Schmitt, R. G.; Morgan, M. L.; White, J. L.; Stratton, B. T.; Hayashi, T. A.; Kean, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The rain-on-snow induced West Salt Creek rock avalanche occurred on May 25, 2014 on the northern flank of Grand Mesa. The avalanche was rare for the contiguous U.S. because of its large size (59 M m3) and high mobility (Length/Height=7.2). To understand the avalanche failure sequence, mechanisms, and mobility, we conducted a forensic analysis using large-scale (1:1000) structural mapping and seismic data. We used high-resolution, Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) imagery as a base for our field mapping and analyzed seismic data from 22 broadband stations (distances avalanche exerted on the earth and tracked these forces using curves in the avalanche path. Our results revealed that the rock avalanche was a cascade of landslide events, rather than a single massive failure. The sequence began with a landslide/debris flow that started about 10 hours before the main avalanche. The main avalanche lasted just over 3 minutes and traveled at average velocities ranging from 15 to 36 m/s. For at least two hours after the avalanche ceased movement, a central, hummock-rich, strike-slip bound core continued to move slowly. Following movement of the core, numerous shallow landslides, rock slides, and rock falls created new structures and modified topography. Mobility of the main avalanche and central core were likely enhanced by valley floor material that liquefied from undrained loading by the overriding avalanche. Although the base was likely at least partially liquefied, our mapping indicates that the overriding avalanche internally deformed predominantly by sliding along discrete shear surfaces in material that was nearly dry and had substantial frictional strength. These results indicate that the West Salt Creek avalanche, and probably other long-traveled avalanches, could be modeled as two layers: a liquefied basal layer; and a thicker and stronger overriding layer.

  1. The geomorphological effect of cornice fall avalanches in the Longyeardalen valley, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerstorfer, M.; Christiansen, H. H.; Rubensdotter, L.; Vogel, S.

    2013-09-01

    The study of snow avalanches and their geomorphological effect in the periglacial parts of the cryosphere is important for enhanced geomorphological process understanding as well as hazard-related studies. Only a few field studies, and particularly few in the High Arctic, have quantified avalanche sedimentation. Snow avalanches are traditionally ranked behind rockfall in terms of their significance for mass-wasting processes of rockslopes. Cornice fall avalanches are at present the most dominant snow avalanche type at two slope systems, called Nybyen and Larsbreen, in the valley Longyeardalen in central Svalbard. Both slope systems are on northwest-facing lee slopes underneath a large summit plateau, with annual cornices forming on the top. High-frequency and magnitude cornice fall avalanching is observed by daily automatic time-lapse photography. In addition, rock debris sedimentation by cornice fall avalanches was measured directly in permanent sediment traps or by snow inventories. The results from a maximum of seven years of measurements in a total of 13 catchments show maximum mean rock debris sedimentation rates ranging from 8.2 to 38.7 kg m-2 at Nybyen, and from 0.8 to 55.4 kg m-2 at Larsbreen. Correspondingly, avalanche fan surfaces accreted from 2.6 to 8.8 mm yr-1 at Nybyen, and from 0.2 to 13.9 mm yr-1 at Larsbreen. This comparably efficient rockslope mass wasting is due to collapsing cornices producing cornice fall avalanches containing large amounts of rock debris throughout the entire winter. The rock debris of different origin stems from the plateau crests, the adjacent free rock face and the transport pathway, accumulating distinct avalanche fans at both slope systems. Cornice fall avalanche sedimentation also contributed to the development of a rock glacier at the Larsbreen site during the Holocene. We have recorded present maximum rockwall retreat rates of 0.9 mm yr-1 at Nybyen, but as much as 6.7 mm yr-1 at Larsbreen, while average Holocene

  2. The geomorphological effect of cornice fall avalanches in the Longyeardalen valley, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Eckerstorfer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of snow avalanches and their geomorphological effect in the periglacial parts of the cryosphere is important for enhanced geomorphological process understanding as well as hazard-related studies. Only a few field studies, and particularly few in the High Arctic, have quantified avalanche sedimentation. Snow avalanches are traditionally ranked behind rockfall in terms of their significance for mass-wasting processes of rockslopes. Cornice fall avalanches are at present the most dominant snow avalanche type at two slope systems, called Nybyen and Larsbreen, in the valley Longyeardalen in central Svalbard. Both slope systems are on northwest-facing lee slopes underneath a large summit plateau, with annual cornices forming on the top. High-frequency and magnitude cornice fall avalanching is observed by daily automatic time-lapse photography. In addition, rock debris sedimentation by cornice fall avalanches was measured directly in permanent sediment traps or by snow inventories. The results from a maximum of seven years of measurements in a total of 13 catchments show maximum mean rock debris sedimentation rates ranging from 8.2 to 38.7 kg m−2 at Nybyen, and from 0.8 to 55.4 kg m−2 at Larsbreen. Correspondingly, avalanche fan surfaces accreted from 2.6 to 8.8 mm yr−1 at Nybyen, and from 0.2 to 13.9 mm yr−1 at Larsbreen. This comparably efficient rockslope mass wasting is due to collapsing cornices producing cornice fall avalanches containing large amounts of rock debris throughout the entire winter. The rock debris of different origin stems from the plateau crests, the adjacent free rock face and the transport pathway, accumulating distinct avalanche fans at both slope systems. Cornice fall avalanche sedimentation also contributed to the development of a rock glacier at the Larsbreen site during the Holocene. We have recorded present maximum rockwall retreat rates of 0.9 mm yr−1 at Nybyen, but as much as 6.7 mm yr−1 at

  3. Rescue missions for totally buried avalanche victims: conclusions from 12 years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohlrieder, Matthias; Thaler, Stephanie; Wuertl, Walter; Voelckel, Wolfgang; Ulmer, Hanno; Brugger, Hermann; Mair, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The planning and execution of avalanche rescue missions to search for totally buried avalanche victims are mostly based on personal experience and preference, as evidence-based information from literature is almost completely missing. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify major factors determining the survival probability of totally buried victims during avalanche rescue missions carried out by organized rescue teams (Austrian Mountain Rescue Service, Tyrol). During the 12-year period studied, 109 totally buried persons (56 off-piste, 53 backcountry), were rescued or recovered; 18.3% survived to hospital discharge. Median depth of burial was 1.25 m; median duration of burial was 85 min. The majority (61.6%) of the rescue missions were conducted under considerably dangerous avalanche conditions. The probability of survival was highest when located visually and lowest for those located by avalanche transceiver; survival did not significantly differ between those found by rescue dogs and those located with avalanche probes. Multivariate analysis revealed short duration of burial and off-piste terrain to be the two independent predictors of survival. Whenever companion rescue fails, snow burial in an avalanche is associated with extraordinarily high mortality. Searching the avalanche debris with probe lines seems to be equally effective as compared to searching with rescue dogs. The potential hazard for rescuers during avalanche rescue missions comes mainly from self-triggered avalanches, hence thorough mission planning and critical risk-benefit assessment are of utmost importance for risk reduction.

  4. Frequency-dependent seismic coda-attenuation imaging of volcanic geomorphology: from debris flows at Mount St. Helens volcano to cross-faulting at Campi Flegrei caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Siena, Luca; Gabrielli, Simona; Spagnolo, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    The stochastic loss of energy measured using the later portion of seismic recordings (coda) can be used to image and monitor geomorphology in volcanoes, once appropriate sensitivity kernels for the application of attenuation tomography have been developed. The use of this advanced seismic method with GIS/InSAR techniques is an unexplored field, which is receiving increasing attention in volcano-seismology. By using this integrated approach we can image structure and monitor dynamics of the debris flow that followed the 1980 explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens (US) volcano at resolution similar to that of remote sensing data, and depths of Italy, the results provide a novel perspective on the links between deep fluid migration and surface structures. The implications of the proposed approach on volcano monitoring are evident.

  5. A revision of the Haiming rock avalanche (Eastern Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Anja; Ostermann, Marc; Kelfoun, Karim; Ring, Max; Asam, Dario; Prager, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The carbonate Haiming rock avalanche is directly neighbouring the larger Tschirgant rock avalanche deposit, both located in the upper Inn valley (Tyrol, Austria). Based on detailed morpho-lithologic mapping of the deposit, which has not been done at Haiming before, the sedimentology of the Holocene landslide debris is characterised. Structural-tectonic elements of the bedrock units at the scarp area are supplemented with borehole data from drillings at the source area giving valuable insights into the complex geological bedrock composition and structure. New source and runout reconstructions allow updated volumetric calculations, which are subsequently integrated into numerical runout modelling. Haiming is one of few topographically unobstructed rock avalanches, yet its morphology was greatly influenced by fluvial terraces, which are still discernible through the deposit on LiDAR hillshade images. We also address the influence of the rock avalanche on the valley floor and local river system as a short-lived dam and its interaction with fluvial incision. Finally, we discuss the Haiming rock avalanche in view of the other massive rock slope failures in the area ("Fernpass cluster"), their spatio-temporal distribution, and point out further highlights of this simple(?) rock avalanche deposit.

  6. Quaternary volcanism in the Acambay graben, Mexican Volcanic Belt: Re-evaluation for potential volcanic danger in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Pedrazzi, D.; Lacan, P.; Roldan-Quintana, J.; Ortuňo, M.; Zuniga, R. R.; Laurence, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) is best known for the major active stratovolcanoes, such as Popocatépetl, Citlaltépetl and Colima. The most common stratovolcanoes in this province are modest-size cones with heights of 800 to 1000 m. Examples are Tequila, Sangangüey, Las Navajas, Culiacán, La Joya, El Zamorano, Temascalcingo and Altamirano; these last two were formed within the Acambay Graben in central MVB. The Acambay graben (20 x 70 km) is 100 km to the NW of Mexico City, with E-W trending seismically active normal faults; in particular the Acambay-Tixmadejé fault related to a mB =7 earthquake in 1912. Within the graben there are many volcanic structures, including calderas, domes, cinder cones and stratovolcanoes; Temascalcingo and Altamirano are the largest, with about 800 and 900 m heights, respectively. Temascalcingo is mostly composed of dacitic lavas and block and ash flow deposits. Includes a 3 x 2.5 km summit caldera and a magmatic sector collapse event with the associated debris avalanche deposit. 14C ages of 37-12 ka correspond to the volcano's latest phases that produced pyroclastic deposits. A major plinian eruption formed the San Mateo Pumice with an age of <20 Ka. Altamirano volcano is poorly studied; it is andesitic-dacitic, composed of lavas, pyroclastic flow deposits, and pumice fallouts. Morphologically is better preserved than Temascalcingo, and it should be younger. 14C ages of 4.0-2.5 ka were performed in charcoal within pyroclastic flow deposits that apparently were erupted from Altamirano. An undated 3 m thick pumice fallout on the flanks of Altamirano volcano could be also Holocene. It represents a major explosive event. The relatively young ages found in volcanic deposits within the Acambay graben raise the volcanic danger level in this area, originally thought as an inactive volcanic zone. The two major volcanoes, Temascalcingo and Altamirano, should be considered as dormant volcanoes that could restart activity at any time. We

  7. Geology of the Ugashik-Mount Peulik Volcanic Center, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    The Ugashik-Mount Peulik volcanic center, 550 km southwest of Anchorage on the Alaska Peninsula, consists of the late Quaternary 5-km-wide Ugashik caldera and the stratovolcano Mount Peulik built on the north flank of Ugashik. The center has been the site of explosive volcanism including a caldera-forming eruption and post-caldera dome-destructive activity. Mount Peulik has been formed entirely in Holocene time and erupted in 1814 and 1845. A large lava dome occupies the summit crater, which is breached to the west. A smaller dome is perched high on the southeast flank of the cone. Pyroclastic-flow deposits form aprons below both domes. One or more sector-collapse events occurred early in the formation of Mount Peulik volcano resulting in a large area of debris-avalanche deposits on the volcano's northwest flank. The Ugashik-Mount Peulik center is a calcalkaline suite of basalt, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite, ranging in SiO2 content from 51 to 72 percent. The Ugashik-Mount Peulik magmas appear to be co-genetic in a broad sense and their compositional variation has probably resulted from a combination of fractional crystallization and magma-mixing. The most likely scenario for a future eruption is that one or more of the summit domes on Mount Peulik are destroyed as new magma rises to the surface. Debris avalanches and pyroclastic flows may then move down the west and, less likely, east flanks of the volcano for distances of 10 km or more. A new lava dome or series of domes would be expected to form either during or within some few years after the explosive disruption of the previous dome. This cycle of dome disruption, pyroclastic flow generation, and new dome formation could be repeated several times in a single eruption. The volcano poses little direct threat to human population as the area is sparsely populated. The most serious hazard is the effect of airborne volcanic ash on aircraft since Mount Peulik sits astride heavily traveled air routes connecting the U

  8. The role of cornice fall avalanche sedimentation in the valley Longyeardalen, Central Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Eckerstorfer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In arctic and alpine high relief landscapes snow avalanches are traditionally ranked behind rockfall in terms of their significance for mass wasting processes of rock slopes. Cornice fall avalanches are at present the most dominant snow avalanche type at two slope systems, called Nybyen and Larsbreen, in the valley Longyeardalen in Central Svalbard. Both slope systems are situated on NW-facing lee slopes underneath large summit plateau, where cornices form annually, and high frequency and magnitude cornice fall avalanching is observed by daily automatic time-lapse photography. In addition, rock debris sedimentation by these cornice fall avalanches was measured directly in either permanent sediment traps or by snow inventories. The results from a maximum of 7 yr of measurements in a total of 13 catchments show maximum avalanche sedimentation rates ranging from 8.2 to 38.7 kg m−2 at Nybyen and from 0.8 to 55.4 kg m−2 at Larsbreen. Correspondingly, the avalanche fan-surfaces accreted annually in a~maximum range from 3.7 to 13 mm yr−1 at Nybyen and from 0.3 to 21.4 mm yr−1 at Larsbreen. This comparably efficient rock slope mass wasting is due to collapsing cornices producing cornice fall avalanche with high rock debris content throughout the entire winter. The rock debris of different origin stems from the plateau crests, the adjacent free rock face and the transport pathway, accumulating distinct avalanche fans at both slope systems and contributing to the development of a rock glacier at the Larsbreen slope system.

  9. Snow Avalanche Disturbance Ecology: Examples From the San Juan Mountains, Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, S.; Fassnacht, S. R.

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated landscape ecology approaches to characterize snow avalanche paths based on patterns of plant species composition and evidence of disturbance. Historical records of avalanche incidents, patterns in the annual growth layers of woody plants, and distributions of plant species can be used to quantify and map the frequency and magnitude of snow slide events. Near Silverton, Colorado, a series of snow storms in January of 2005 resulted in many avalanche paths running full track at 30 and 100 year return frequency. Many avalanches cut fresh trimlines, widening their tracks by uprooting, stripping, and breaking mature trees. Powerful avalanches deposited massive piles of snow, rocks, and woody debris in their runout zones. We used cross-section discs and cores of representative downed trees to detect dendro-ecological signals of past snow avalanche disturbance. Avalanche signals included impact scars from the moving snow and associated wind blast, relative width of annual growth rings, and development of reaction wood in response to tilting. Initial measurements of plant diversity and disturbance along the elevation gradient of an avalanche path near Silverton indicate that avalanche activity influences patterns of forest cover, contributes to the high local plant species diversity, and provides opportunities for new seedling establishment.

  10. Saturated logistic avalanche model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aielli, G.; Camarri, P.; Cardarelli, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Liberti, B.; Paoloni, A.; Santonico, R.

    2003-08-01

    The search for an adequate avalanche RPC working model evidenced that the simple exponential growth can describe the electron multiplication phenomena in the gas with acceptable accuracy until the external electric field is not perturbed by the growing avalanche. We present here a model in which the saturated growth induced by the space charge effects is explained in a natural way by a constant coefficient non-linear differential equation, the Logistic equation, which was originally introduced to describe the evolution of a biological population in a limited resources environment. The RPCs, due to the uniform and intense field, proved to be an ideal device to test experimentally the presented model.

  11. Dune Avalanche Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    05 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows large, low albedo (dark) sand dunes in Kaiser Crater near 47.2oS, 340.4oW. The dunes are--ever so slowly--moving east to west (right to left) as sand avalanches down the steeper, slip face slopes of each. Avalanching sand in the Kaiser dune field has left deep scars on these slopes, suggesting that the sand is not loose but is instead weakly cemented. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  12. Rock-avalanche dynamics revealed by large-scale field mapping and seismic signals at a highly mobile avalanche in the West Salt Creek valley, western Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Jeffrey A.; Baum, Rex L.; Allstadt, Kate; Kochevar, Bernard; Schmitt, Robert G.; Morgan, Matthew L.; White, Jonathan L.; Stratton, Benjamin T.; Hayashi, Timothy A.; Kean, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    On 25 May 2014, a rain-on-snow–induced rock avalanche occurred in the West Salt Creek valley on the northern flank of Grand Mesa in western Colorado (United States). The avalanche mobilized from a preexisting rock slide in the Green River Formation and traveled 4.6 km down the confined valley, killing three people. The avalanche was rare for the contiguous United States because of its large size (54.5 Mm3) and high mobility (height/length = 0.14). To understand the avalanche failure sequence, mechanisms, and mobility, we conducted a forensic analysis using large-scale (1:1000) structural mapping and seismic data. We used high-resolution, unmanned aircraft system imagery as a base for field mapping, and analyzed seismic data from 22 broadband stations (distances avalanche exerted on the earth and tracked these forces using curves in the avalanche path. Our results revealed that the rock avalanche was a cascade of landslide events, rather than a single massive failure. The sequence began with an early morning landslide/debris flow that started ∼10 h before the main avalanche. The main avalanche lasted ∼3.5 min and traveled at average velocities ranging from 15 to 36 m/s. For at least two hours after the avalanche ceased movement, a central, hummock-rich core continued to move slowly. Since 25 May 2014, numerous shallow landslides, rock slides, and rock falls have created new structures and modified avalanche topography. Mobility of the main avalanche and central core was likely enhanced by valley floor material that liquefied from undrained loading by the overriding avalanche. Although the base was likely at least partially liquefied, our mapping indicates that the overriding avalanche internally deformed predominantly by sliding along discrete shear surfaces in material that was nearly dry and had substantial frictional strength. These results indicate that the West Salt Creek avalanche, and probably other long-traveled avalanches, could be modeled as two

  13. Hydrogeomorphic effects of explosive volcanic eruptions on drainage basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Thomas C.; Major, Jon J.

    2014-01-01

    Explosive eruptions can severely disturb landscapes downwind or downstream of volcanoes by damaging vegetation and depositing large volumes of erodible fragmental material. As a result, fluxes of water and sediment in affected drainage basins can increase dramatically. System-disturbing processes associated with explosive eruptions include tephra fall, pyroclastic density currents, debris avalanches, and lahars—processes that have greater impacts on water and sediment discharges than lava-flow emplacement. Geo-morphic responses to such disturbances can extend far downstream, persist for decades, and be hazardous. The severity of disturbances to a drainage basin is a function of the specific volcanic process acting, as well as distance from the volcano and magnitude of the eruption. Postdisturbance unit-area sediment yields are among the world's highest; such yields commonly result in abundant redeposition of sand and gravel in distal river reaches, which causes severe channel aggradation and instability. Response to volcanic disturbance can result in socioeconomic consequences more damaging than the direct impacts of the eruption itself.

  14. Abelian avalanches and Tutte polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielov, Andrei

    1993-04-01

    We introduce a class of deterministic lattice models of failure, Abelian avalanche (AA) models, with continuous phase variables, similar to discrete Abelian sandpile (ASP) models. We investigate analytically the structure of the phase space and statistical properties of avalanches in these models. We show that the distributions of avalanches in AA and ASP models with the same redistribution matrix and loading rate are identical. For an AA model on a graph, statistics of avalanches is linked to Tutte polynomials associated with this graph and its subgraphs. In the general case, statistics of avalanches is linked to an analog of a Tutte polynomial defined for any symmetric matrix.

  15. Reuyl Crater Dust Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 May 2002) The Science The rugged, arcuate rim of the 90 km crater Reuyl dominates this THEMIS image. Reuyl crater is at the southern edge of a region known to be blanketed in thick dust based on its high albedo (brightness) and low thermal inertia values. This thick mantle of dust creates the appearance of snow covered mountains in the image. Like snow accumulation on Earth, Martian dust can become so thick that it eventually slides down the face of steep slopes, creating runaway avalanches of dust. In the center of this image about 1/3 of the way down is evidence of this phenomenon. A few dozen dark streaks can be seen on the bright, sunlit slopes of the crater rim. The narrow streaks extend downslope following the local topography in a manner very similar to snow avalanches on Earth. But unlike their terrestrial counterparts, no accumulation occurs at the bottom. The dust particles are so small that they are easily launched into the thin atmosphere where they remain suspended and ultimately blow away. The apparent darkness of the avalanche scars is due to the presence of relatively dark underlying material that becomes exposed following the passage of the avalanche. Over time, new dust deposition occurs, brightening the scars until they fade into the background. Although dark slope streaks had been observed in Viking mission images, a clear understanding of this dynamic phenomenon wasn't possible until the much higher resolution images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed the details. MOC images also showed that new avalanches have occurred during the time MGS has been in orbit. THEMIS images will allow additional mapping of their distribution and frequency, contributing new insights about Martian dust avalanches. The Story The stiff peaks in this image might remind you of the Alps here on Earth, but they really outline the choppy edge of a large Martian crater over 50 miles wide (seen in the context image at right). While these aren

  16. Debris Flow Dam Formation in Southeast Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zunlan; WU Jishan; GENG Xueyong

    2005-01-01

    Glaciers with their deposits abound in the alpine areas of Southeast Tibet. Large debris flows occur frequently from these deposits and form dams that block streams. In this paper, 3 events of large debris flows reported in Peilong Valley located in Southeast Tibet, and which resulted 2 blocking dams resulted, are discussed in details, focusing on the major factors controlling dam formation. The results shows that the first surge group caused by snow and ice avalanches, ice-lake breaks, and large-scale landslides, with a high peak discharge and high velocity, and an abundance of boulders, are most likely to form blocking dams.

  17. Volcanic hazards and aviation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Thomas J.; Thompson, Theodore B.; Ewert, John W.; ,

    1996-01-01

    An aeronautical chart was developed to determine the relative proximity of volcanoes or ash clouds to the airports and flight corridors that may be affected by volcanic debris. The map aims to inform and increase awareness about the close spatial relationship between volcanoes and aviation operations. It shows the locations of the active volcanoes together with selected aeronautical navigation aids and great-circle routes. The map mitigates the threat that volcanic hazards pose to aircraft and improves aviation safety.

  18. Statistical theory of hierarchical avalanche ensemble

    OpenAIRE

    Olemskoi, Alexander I.

    1999-01-01

    The statistical ensemble of avalanche intensities is considered to investigate diffusion in ultrametric space of hierarchically subordinated avalanches. The stationary intensity distribution and the steady-state current are obtained. The critical avalanche intensity needed to initiate the global avalanche formation is calculated depending on noise intensity. The large time asymptotic for the probability of the global avalanche appearance is derived.

  19. Morphology, volcanism, and mass wasting in Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, C.R.; Gardner, J.V.; Mayer, L.A.; Buktenica, M.W.; Dartnell, P.; Ramsey, D.W.; Robinson, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    Crater Lake was surveyed nearly to its shoreline by high-resolution multibeam echo sounding in order to define its geologic history and provide an accurate base map for research and monitoring surveys. The bathymetry and acoustic backscatter reveal the character of landforms and lead to a chronology for the concurrent filling of the lake and volcanism within the ca. 7700 calibrated yr B.P. caldera. The andesitic Wizard Island and central-plattform volcanoes are composed of sequences of lava deltas that record former lake levels and demonstrate simultaneous activity at the two vents. Wizard Island eruptions ceased when the lake was ~80 m lower than at present. Lava streams from prominent channels on the surface of the central platform descended to feed extensive subaqueous flow fields on the caldera floor. The Wizard Island and central-platform volcanoes, andesitic Merriam Cone, and a newly discovered probable lava flow on the eastern floor of the lake apparently date from within a few hundred years of caldera collapse, whereas a small rhydacite dome was emplaced on the flank of Wizard Island at ca. 4800 cal. yr B.P. Bedrock outcrops on the submerged caldera walls are shown in detail and, in some cases, can be correlated with exposed geologic units of Mount Mazama. Fragmental debris making up the walls elsewhere consists of narrow talus cones forming a dendritic pattern that leads to fewer, wider ridges downslope. Hummocky topography and scattered blocks up to ~280 m long below many of the embayments in the caldera wall mark debris-avalanche deposits that probably formed in single events and commonly are affected by secondary failures. The flat-floored, deep basins contain relatively fine-grained sediment transported from the debris aprons by sheet-flow turbidity currents. Crater Lake apparently filled rapidly (ca. 400-750 yr) until reaching a permeable layer above glaciated lava identified by the new survey in the northeast caldera wall at ~1845 m elevation

  20. AVALANCHES - EXTREME WINTER EVENTS. MONITORING AND AVALANCHE RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NARCISA MILIAN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the avalanches monitored by the National Meteorological Administration within the nivo-meteorological program since february 2004. Daily observations and weekly snow measurements are made at the weather stations from Bucegi Mountains - Vârful Omu (2504 m, Sinaia (1500 m şi Predeal (1100m and Făgăraş Mountains – Bâlea-Lac (2055m, to provide data for avalanche risk estimation using the european avalanche danger scale. Increasing winter sport activities had led to several avalanche accidents, some of them fatal.

  1. Conceptual Development of a National Volcanic Hazard Model for New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Stirling

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We provide a synthesis of a workshop held in February 2016 to define the goals, challenges and next steps for developing a national probabilistic volcanic hazard model for New Zealand. The workshop involved volcanologists, statisticians, and hazards scientists from GNS Science, Massey University, University of Otago, Victoria University of Wellington, University of Auckland, and University of Canterbury. We also outline key activities that will develop the model components, define procedures for periodic update of the model, and effectively articulate the model to end-users and stakeholders. The development of a National Volcanic Hazard Model is a formidable task that will require long-term stability in terms of team effort, collaboration, and resources. Development of the model in stages or editions that are modular will make the process a manageable one that progressively incorporates additional volcanic hazards over time, and additional functionalities (e.g., short-term forecasting. The first edition is likely to be limited to updating and incorporating existing ashfall hazard models, with the other hazards associated with lahar, pyroclastic density currents, lava flow, ballistics, debris avalanche, and gases/aerosols being considered in subsequent updates.

  2. Local to global: a collaborative approach to volcanic risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Eliza; Loughlin, Sue; Barsotti, Sara; Bonadonna, Costanza; Jenkins, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic risk assessments at all scales present challenges related to the multitude of volcanic hazards, data gaps (hazards and vulnerability in particular), model representation and resources. Volcanic hazards include lahars, pyroclastic density currents, lava flows, tephra fall, ballistics, gas dispersal and also earthquakes, debris avalanches, tsunamis and more ... they can occur in different combinations and interact in different ways throughout the unrest, eruption and post-eruption period. Volcanoes and volcanic hazards also interact with other natural hazards (e.g. intense rainfall). Currently many hazards assessments consider the hazards from a single volcano but at national to regional scales the potential impacts of multiple volcanoes over time become important. The hazards that have the greatest tendency to affect large areas up to global scale are those transported in the atmosphere: volcanic particles and gases. Volcanic ash dispersal has the greatest potential to directly or indirectly affect the largest number of people worldwide, it is currently the only volcanic hazard for which a global assessment exists. The quantitative framework used (primarily at a regional scale) considers the hazard at a given location from any volcano. Flow hazards such as lahars and floods can have devastating impacts tens of kilometres from a source volcano and lahars can be devastating decades after an eruption has ended. Quantitative assessment of impacts is increasingly undertaken after eruptions to identify thresholds for damage and reduced functionality. Some hazards such as lava flows could be considered binary (totally destructive) but others (e.g. ash fall) have varying degrees of impact. Such assessments are needed to enhance available impact and vulnerability data. Currently, most studies focus on physical vulnerability but there is a growing emphasis on social vulnerability showing that it is highly variable and dynamic with pre-eruption socio

  3. Characteristics of avalanche accidents and a overview of avalanche equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Biela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Avalanches are one of the most spectacular phenomena which may occur in the mountains. Unfortunately they are often caused by humans and pose for him a big danger. In the Polish Tatras alone they represent 18% of all causes of death among 1996-2013. One fourth of the people caught by an avalanche dies, and their chances of survival depends on the depth of burial, burial time, the presence of an air pocket and the degree of injuries. The most common cause of death is asphyxiation, the next is injuries and hypothermia is the rarest cause of death. The fate of the buried people depends on their equipment such as avalanche transceiver, ABS backpack and AvaLung, and also from the equipment of the people who are seeking (avalanche probes, avalanche transceiver and shovels, which has been proven in practice and research.

  4. Abrupt climatic changes as triggering mechanisms of massive volcanic collapses: examples from Mexico (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, L.

    2010-12-01

    Climate changes have been considered to be a triggering mechanism for large magmatic eruptions. However they can also trigger volcanic collapses, phenomena that cause the destruction of the entire sector of a volcano, including its summit. During the past 30 ka, major volcanic collapses occurred just after main glacial peaks that ended with a rapid deglaciation. Glacial debuttressing, load discharge and fluid circulation coupled with the post-glacial increase of humidity and heavy rains can activate the failure of unstable edifices. Looking at the synchronicity of the maximum glaciations during the late Pleistocene and Holocene in the northern and southern hemispheres it is evident that several volcanic collapses are absent during a glacial climax, but start immediately after it during a period of rapid retreat. Several examples can be detected around the world and Mexico is not an exception. The 28 ka Nevado de Toluca volcanic collapse occurred during an intraglacial stage, under humid conditions as evidenced by paleoclimatic studies on lacustrine sediments of the area. The debris avalanche deposit associated to this event clearly shows evidence of a large amount of water into the mass previous to the failure that enhanced its mobility. It also contains peculiar, plastically deformed, m-sized fragment of lacustrine sediments eroded from glacial berms. The 17 ka BP collapse of the Colima Volcano corresponds to the initial stage of glacial retreat in Mexico after the Last Glacial Maximum (22-17.5ka). Also in this case the depositional sequence reflects high humidity conditions with voluminous debris flow containing a large amount logs left by pine trees. The occurrence of cohesive debris flows originating from the failure of a volcanic edifice can also reflect the climatic conditions, indicating important hydrothermal alteration and fluid circulation from ice-melting at an ice-capped volcano, as observed for example at the Pico de Orizaba volcano for the Tetelzingo

  5. Numerical modelling of collapsing volcanic edifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana; Marques, Fernando; Kaus, Boris

    2017-04-01

    The flanks of Oceanic Volcanic Edifice's (OVEs) can occasionally become unstable. If that occurs, they can deform in two different modes: either slowly along localization failure zones (slumps) or catastrophically as debris avalanches. Yet the physics of this process is incompletely understood, and the role of factors such as the OVE's strength (viscosity, cohesion, friction angle), dimensions, geometry, and existence of weak layers remain to be addressed. Here we perform numerical simulations to study the interplay between viscous and plastic deformation on the gravitational collapse of an OVE (diffuse deformation vs. localization of failure along discrete structures). We focus on the contribution of the edifice's strength parameters for the mode of deformation, as well as on the type of basement. Tests were performed for a large OVE (7.5 km high, 200 km long) and either purely viscous (overall volcano edifice viscosities between 1019-1023 Pa.s), or viscoplastic rheology (within a range of cohesion and friction angle values). Results show that (a) for a strong basement (no slip basal boundary condition), the deformation pattern suggests wide/diffuse "listric" deformation within the volcanic edifice, without the development of discrete plastic failure zones; (b) for a weak basement (free slip basal boundary condition), rapid collapse of the edifice through the propagation of plastic failure structures within the edifice occurs. Tests for a smaller OVE (4.5 km by 30 km) show that failure localization along large-scale listric structures occurs more readily for different combinations of cohesion and friction angles. In these tests, high cohesion values combined with small friction angles lead to focusing of deformation along a narrower band. Tests with a weak layer underlying part of the volcanic edifice base show deformation focused along discrete structures mainly dipping towards the distal sector of the volcano. These tests for a small OVE constitute a promising

  6. Avalanches in UGe 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotel, E.; Paulsen, C.; Huxley, A. D.

    2004-05-01

    In UGe 2 ferromagnetism and superconductivity co-exist for pressures in the range 1.0- 1.6 GPa. The magnetic state, however, has several unusual properties. Here we report measurements of hysteresis loops for fields parallel to the easy-axis at low temperature and ambient pressure, measured for two separate UGe 2 single crystals. Steps in the magnetization as the field is changed at low temperature are observed for both crystals. The general phenomenology associated with the steps strongly suggests that they correspond to avalanches of domain-wall motion.

  7. Integrated avalanche photodiode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Eric S.

    2015-07-07

    The present disclosure includes devices for detecting photons, including avalanche photon detectors, arrays of such detectors, and circuits including such arrays. In some aspects, the detectors and arrays include a virtual beveled edge mesa structure surrounded by resistive material damaged by ion implantation and having side wall profiles that taper inwardly towards the top of the mesa structures, or towards the direction from which the ion implantation occurred. Other aspects are directed to masking and multiple implantation and/or annealing steps. Furthermore, methods for fabricating and using such devices, circuits and arrays are disclosed.

  8. The physics of debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    permeability of the debris. Realistic models of debris flows therefore require equations that simulate inertial motion of surges in which high-resistance fronts dominated by solid forces impede the motion of low-resistance tails more strongly influenced by fluid forces. Furthermore, because debris flows characteristically originate as nearly rigid sediment masses, transform at least partly to liquefied flows, and then transform again to nearly rigid deposits, acceptable models must simulate an evolution of material behavior without invoking preternatural changes in material properties. A simple model that satisfies most of these criteria uses depth-averaged equations of motion patterned after those of the Savage-Hutter theory for gravity-driven flow of dry granular masses but generalized to include the effects of viscous pore fluid with varying pressure. These equations can describe a spectrum of debris flow behaviors intermediate between those of wet rock avalanches and sediment-laden water floods. With appropriate pore pressure distributions the equations yield numerical solutions that successfully predict unsteady, nonuniform motion of experimental debris flows.

  9. Causes and mobility of large volcanic landslides: application to Tenerife, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hürlimann, M.; Garcia-Piera, J. O.; Ledesma, A.

    2000-12-01

    Giant volcanic landslides are one of the most hazardous geological processes due to their volume and velocity. Since the 1980 eruption and associated debris avalanche of Mount St. Helens hundreds of similar events have been recognised worldwide both on continental volcanoes and volcanic oceanic islands. However, the causes and mobility of these enormous mass movements remain unresolved. Tenerife exhibits three voluminous subaerial valleys and a wide offshore apron of landslide debris produced by recurrent flank failures with ages ranging from Upper Pliocene to Middle Pleistocene. We have selected the La Orotava landslide for analysis of its causes and mobility using a variety of simple numerical models. First, the causes of the landslide have been evaluated using Limit Equilibrium Method and 2D Finite Difference techniques. Conventional parameters including hydrostatic pore pressure and material strength properties, together with three external processes, dike intrusion, caldera collapse and seismicity, have been incorporated into the stability models. The results indicate that each of the external mechanism studied is capable of initiating slope failures. However, we propose that a combination of these processes may be the most probable cause for giant volcanic landslides. Second, we have analysed the runout distance of the landslide using a simple model treating both the subaerial and submarine parts of the sliding path. The effect of the friction coefficient, drag forces and hydroplaning has been incorporated into the model. The results indicate that hydroplaning particularly can significantly increase the mobility of the landslide, which may reach runout distances greater than 70 km. The models presented are not considered definite and have mainly a conceptual purpose. However, they provide a physical basis from which to better interpret these complex geologic phenomena and should be taken into account in the prediction of future events and the assessment of

  10. Deconvolving the process-origin of sediments on volcanic mountains and implications for paleoclimatic reconstruction: Mt Ruapehu area, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Martin; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Glaciation on the central North Island of New Zealand is limited to the volcanoes of Tongariro National Park, including Mt Ruapehu, the largest and most active andesitic stratovolcano on the North Island. At 2797 m asl, Mt Ruapehu represents the only peak in the North Island to currently intercept the permanent snowline, with small cirque glaciers descending to an altitude of ~2300 m. During the last glacial maximum (LGM), small ice-caps existed on Mt Ruapehu and the Tongariro Massif (15 km to the NNE of Ruapehu), with a series of small (cirque glaciers, consists mainly of incorporated fluvial material. Following deposition, reworking is mainly by proglacial streams, debris flows and lahars. Within the vicinity of glaciers, the dominant facies appear to be: (i) bouldery gravel with angular clasts on steep slopes surrounding glaciers, (ii) silty-sandy boulder gravel, with mainly subangular clasts, forming lateral moraines, (iii) boulder/cobble gravel with mainly subrounded clasts and associated laminated sediments representing fluvially-reworked material; and (iv) debris-avalanche deposits including fragmental rock clasts with an unsorted inter-clast matrix. As some of these deposits appear to include unambiguous indicators of glacial transport, interpretation of unconsolidated debris ridges on volcanic mountains should not necessarily exclude the contribution of glacial processes.

  11. The role of initial coherence and path materials in the dynamics of three rock avalanche case histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Jordan; McDougall, Scott; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Hungr, Oldrich

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundRock avalanches are flow-like landslides that can travel at extremely rapid velocities and impact surprisingly large areas. The mechanisms that lead to the unexpected mobility of these flows are unknown and debated. Mechanisms proposed in the literature can be broadly classified into those that rely on intrinsic characteristics of the rock avalanche material, and those that rely on extrinsic factors such as path material. In this work a calibration-based numerical model is used to back-analyze three rock avalanche case histories. The results of these back-analyses are then used to infer factors that govern rock avalanche motionResultsOur study has revealed two key insights that must be considered when analyzing rock avalanches. Results from two of the case histories demonstrate the importance of accounting for the initially coherent phase of rock avalanche motion. Additionally, the back-analyzed basal resistance parameters, as well as the best-fit rheology, are different for each case history. This suggests that the governing mechanisms controlling rock avalanche motion are unlikely to be intrinsic. The back-analyzed strength parameters correspond well to those that would be expected by considering the path material that the rock avalanches overran.ConclusionOur results show that accurate simulation of rock avalanche motion must account for the initially coherent phase of movement, and that the mechanisms governing rock avalanche motion are unlikely to be intrinsic to the failed material. Interaction of rock avalanche debris with path materials is the likely mechanism that governs the motion of many rock avalanches.

  12. Monitoring and modeling ice-rock avalanches from ice-capped volcanoes: A case study of frequent large avalanches on Iliamna Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggel, C.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Waythomas, C.F.; Wessels, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Iliamna is an andesitic stratovolcano of the Aleutian arc with regular gas and steam emissions and mantled by several large glaciers. Iliamna Volcano exhibits an unusual combination of frequent and large ice-rock avalanches in the order of 1 ?? 106??m3 to 3 ?? 107??m3 with recent return periods of 2-4??years. We have reconstructed an avalanche event record for the past 45??years that indicates Iliamna avalanches occur at higher frequency at a given magnitude than other mass failures in volcanic and alpine environments. Iliamna Volcano is thus an ideal site to study such mass failures and its relation to volcanic activity. In this study, we present different methods that fit into a concept of (1) long-term monitoring, (2) early warning, and (3) event documentation and analysis of ice-rock avalanches on ice-capped active volcanoes. Long-term monitoring methods include seismic signal analysis, and space-and airborne observations. Landsat and ASTER satellite data was used to study the extent of hydrothermally altered rocks and surface thermal anomalies at the summit region of Iliamna. Subpixel heat source calculation for the summit regions where avalanches initiate yielded temperatures of 307 to 613??K assuming heat source areas of 1000 to 25??m2, respectively, indicating strong convective heat flux processes. Such heat flow causes ice melting conditions and is thus likely to reduce the strength at the base of the glacier. We furthermore demonstrate typical seismic records of Iliamna avalanches with rarely observed precursory signals up to two hours prior to failure, and show how such signals could be used for a multi-stage avalanche warning system in the future. For event analysis and documentation, space- and airborne observations and seismic records in combination with SRTM and ASTER derived terrain data allowed us to reconstruct avalanche dynamics and to identify remarkably similar failure and propagation mechanisms of Iliamna avalanches for the past 45??years

  13. Debris flow hazards and risks on Cheekye Fan, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, M.

    2009-04-01

    Natural hazard and risk assessments hinge fundamentally on a detailed understanding of the relationship between frequency and magnitude of the hazardous process under investigation. When information is sought from the deep past (i.e. several thousand years), continuous event records do not exist and the researcher has to rely on proxy data to develop the F-M model. Such work is often prohibitively expensive and few well researched examples for mass movement are available worldwide. Cheekye fan is a desirable location for land development and has a depth and breadth of previous research unprecedented on any debris flow fan in Canada. We pursued two principal strains of research to formulate a reliable frequency-magnitude relationship. The first focuses on stratigraphic analyses combined with radiometric dating and dendrochronology to reconstruct a comprehensive picture of Holocene debris flow activity. The second approach examines hydrological limitations of rock avalanche evolution into debris flows through either entrainment of saturated sediments or by failure of a landslide-generated dam and upstream impoundment. We thus hypothesize that debris flows from Cheekye River can be separated into two quasi homogenous populations: those that are typically triggered by relatively small debris avalanches, slumps or rock falls or simply by progressive bulking of in-stream erodible sediments; and those that are thought to result from transformation of rock avalanches. Our work suggests that debris flows exceeding some 3 million cubic metres in volume are unlikely to reach Cheekye fan due to limited water available to fully fluidize a rock avalanche. This analysis has also demonstrated that in order to arrive at reasonable estimates for the frequency and magnitude of debris flows on a complex alluvial fan, significant multidisciplinary efforts are required. As a second step in the analysis, we model the design debris flow using a two-dimensional debris flow runout model

  14. Composition, Geometry and Emplacement Dynamics of a Large Volcanic Island Landslide Offshore Martinique, Lesser Antilles: New Insights from IODP Expedition 340

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, M.; Le Friant, A.; Boudon, G.; Lafuerza, S.; Talling, P. J.; Hornbach, M. J.; Ishizuka, O.; Lebas, E.; Guyard, H.

    2015-12-01

    Landslides are common features in the vicinity of volcanic islands. In this contribution, we investigate landslides emplacement and dynamics around the volcanic island of Martinique based on the first scientific drilling of such deposits. The evolution of the active Montagne Pelée volcano on Martinique has been marked by three major flank-collapses that removed much of the western flank of the volcano. Subaerial collapse volumes vary from 2 to 25 km3 and debris avalanches flowed into the Grenada Basin. High-resolution seismic data (AGUADOMAR - 1999, CARAVAL - 2002 and GWADASEIS - 2009) is combined with new drill cores that penetrate up to 430 m through the three submarine landslide deposits (Site U1399, Site U1400, Site U1401, IODP Expedition 340, Joides Resolution, March-April 2012). This combined geophysical and core data provide an improved understanding of landslide processes offshore a volcanic island. The integrated analysis shows a large submarine landslide deposit, comprising up to 300 km3 of remobilized seafloor sediment that extends for 70 km away from the coast and covers an area of 2100 km2. We propose a new model dealing with seafloor sediment failures and down-slope slide propagation mechanisms, triggered by volcanic flank-collapse events affecting Montagne Pelée volcano. Newly recognized landslide deposits occur deeper in the stratigraphy, suggesting the recurrence of large-scale mass-wasting processes offshore the island and thus, the necessity to better assess the associated tsunami hazards in the region.

  15. Neuronal avalanches and learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangelis, Lucilla de, E-mail: dearcangelis@na.infn.it [Department of Information Engineering and CNISM, Second University of Naples, 81031 Aversa (Italy)

    2011-05-01

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behaviour of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behaviour is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. Spontaneous neuronal activity has recently shown features in common to other complex systems. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. These avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behaviour. In this contribution we discuss a statistical mechanical model for the complex activity in a neuronal network. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. Then, we discuss the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules, in particular the exclusive OR (XOR) and a random rule with three inputs. The learning dynamics exhibits universal features as function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  16. Rockfalls and Avalanches from Little Tahoma Peak on Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, Dwight Raymond; Fahnestock, Robert K.

    1965-01-01

    In December 1963 rockfalls from Little Tahoma Peak on the east side of Mount Rainier volcano fell onto Emmons Glacier and formed avalanches of rock debris that traveled about 4 miles down the glacier and the White River valley. In this distance, the rock debris descended as much as 6,200 feet in altitude. Minor lithologic differences and crosscutting relations indicate that the rockfalls caused at least seven separate avalanches, having an estimated total volume of 14 million cubic yards. The initial rockfall may have been caused by a small steam explosion near the base of Little Tahoma Peak. During movement, some of the avalanches were deflected from one side of the valley to the other. Calculations based on the height to which the avalanches rose on the valley walls suggest that their velocity reached at least 80 or 90 miles per hour. The unusually long distance some of the avalanches were transported is attributed to a cushion of trapped and compressed air at their base, which buoyed them up amid reduced friction.

  17. Automatic detection of avalanches in seismic data using Hidden Markov Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Matthias; Hammer, Conny; van Herwijnen, Alec; Schweizer, Jürg; Fäh, Donat

    2017-04-01

    Seismic monitoring systems are well suited for the remote detection of mass movements, such as landslides, rockfalls and debris flows. For snow avalanches, this has been known since the 1970s and seismic monitoring could potentially provide valuable information for avalanche forecasting. We thus explored continuous seismic data from a string of vertical component geophones in an avalanche starting zone above Davos, Switzerland. The overall goal is to automatically detect avalanches with a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), a statistical pattern recognition tool widely used for speech recognition. A HMM uses a classifier to determine the likelihood that input objects belong to a finite number of classes. These classes are obtained by learning a multidimensional Gaussian mixture model representation of the overall observable feature space. This model is then used to derive the HMM parameters for avalanche waveforms using a single training sample to build the final classifier. We classified data from the winter seasons of 2010 and compared the results to several hundred avalanches manually identified in the seismic data. First results of a classification of a single day have shown, that the model is good in terms of probability of detection while having a relatively low false alarm rate. We further implemented a voting based classification approach to neglect events detected only by one sensor to further improve the model performance. For instance, on 22 March 2010, a day with particular high avalanche activity, 17 avalanches were positively identified by at least three sensors with no false alarms. These results show, that the automatic detection of avalanches in seismic data is feasible, bringing us one step closer to implementing seismic monitoring system in operational forecasting.

  18. Spreading and Deposit Characteristics of a Rapid Dry Granular Avalanche Across 3D Topography: Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Feng; Xu, Qiang; Cheng, Qian-Gong; Li, Yan; Luo, Zhong-Xu

    2016-11-01

    Aiming to understand the propagation and deposit behaviours of a granular avalanche along a 3D complex basal terrain, a new 3D experimental platform in 1/400 scale was developed according to the natural terrain of the Xiejiadianzi rock avalanche, with a series of laboratory experiments being conducted. Through the conduction of these tests, parameters, including the morphological evolution of sliding mass, run-outs and velocities of surficial particles, thickness contour and centre of final deposit, equivalent frictional coefficient, and energy dissipation, are documented and analysed, with the geomorphic control effect, material grain size effect, drop angle effect, and drop distance effect on rock avalanche mobility being discussed primarily. From the study, some interesting conclusions for a better understanding of rock avalanche along a 3D complex basal topography are reached. (1) For the granular avalanche tested in this study, great differences between the evolutions of the debris along the right and left branch valleys were observed, with an obvious geomorphic control effect on avalanche mobility presented. In addition, some other interesting features, including groove-like trough and superelevation, were also observed under the control of the topographic interferences. (2) The equivalent frictional coefficients of the granular avalanches tested here range from 0.48 to 0.57, which is lower than that reached with a set-up composed of an inclined chute and horizontal plate and higher than that reached using a set-up composed of only an inclined chute. And the higher the drop angle and fine particle content, the higher the equivalent frictional coefficient. The effect of drop distance on avalanche mobility is minor. (3) For a granular avalanche, momentum transfer plays an important role in the motion of mass, which can accelerate the mobility of the front part greatly through delivering the kinetic energy of the rear part to the front.

  19. Imaging findings of avalanche victims

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, Alexandra B.; Grosse, Claudia A.; Anderson, Suzanne [University Hospital of Berne, Inselspital, Department of Diagnostic, Pediatric and Interventional Radiology, Berne (Switzerland); Steinbach, Lynne S. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Zimmermann, Heinz [University Hospital of Berne, Inselspital, Department of Trauma and Emergency Medicine, Berne (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    Skiing and hiking outside the boundaries remains an attractive wilderness activity despite the danger of avalanches. Avalanches occur on a relatively frequent basis and may be devastating. Musculoskeletal radiologists should be acquainted with these injuries. Fourteen avalanche victims (11 men and 3 women; age range 17-59 years, mean age 37.4 years) were air transported to a high-grade trauma centre over a period of 2 years. Radiographs, CT and MR images were prospectively evaluated by two observers in consensus. Musculoskeletal findings (61%) were more frequent than extraskeletal findings (39%). Fractures were most commonly seen (36.6%), involving the spine (14.6%) more frequently than the extremities (9.8%). Blunt abdominal and thoracic trauma were the most frequent extraskeletal findings. A wide spectrum of injuries can be found in avalanche victims, ranging from extremity fractures to massive polytrauma. Asphyxia remains the main cause of death along with hypoxic brain injury and hypothermia. (orig.)

  20. Nanopillar Optical Antenna Avalanche Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-30

    68 , (11), 10. 51. Adachi, S., Properties of aluminium gallium ...bandwidth products > 100 GHz. 2 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles Nanopillar Optical Antenna Avalanche Detectors A dissertation... products > 100 GHz. 6 iii The dissertation of Pradeep

  1. Rock-avalanche geomorphological and hydrological impact on an alpine watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattini, P.; Riva, F.; Crosta, G. B.; Scotti, R.; Greggio, L.; Brardinoni, F.; Fusi, N.

    2016-06-01

    Rock avalanches are large flow-like movements of fragmented rock that can cause extensive and rapid topographic changes, for which very few quantitative data are available. This paper analyses the geomorphological and hydrological impact of the 3 million m3 Thurwieser rock avalanche (2004, Italian Central Alps) by using Terrestrial Laser Scanner, airborne Lidar and GNSS data collected from 2005 to 2014. Sediment yield with respect to the normal valley regime, the dynamic and mass balance of affected glaciers, and the reorganization of superficial and groundwater flow networks are quantified. In the middle portion of the avalanche deposit, a natural sediment trap collected sediments from a new stream channel developed along the upper portion of the deposit and from a lateral drainage basin. This made possible to assess the 10-year impact of the rock avalanche on the sediment yield, which increased from about 120 to about 400 t km- 2·a- 1. The rock avalanche partially covered a glacier with a shallow debris layer that acted as a thermal insulator, limiting ice ablation and producing a 10-m high scarp between the free surface of the glacier and the debris-covered portion. A reduction of 75% of ice ablation was observed due to thermal insulation. The rock avalanche filled a tributary valley, splitting the original drainage basin in two. Under ordinary flows, seepage occurs within the avalanche deposit along the old valley axis. During high flow conditions, a new stream channel is activated along the middle and lower margin of the deposit, which has produced a new alluvial fan on the main valley floor. The fan evolution is described up to the present volume of about 2000 m3.

  2. Analogue modelling of rock avalanches and structural analysis of the deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longchamp, C.; Charrière, M.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    Rock avalanches are catastrophic events in which granular masses of rock debris flow at high speeds, commonly with unusual runout. A great volume of material (>106 m3) is involved and the flowing mass can reach velocities up to ten meters per second. Rock avalanches can travel long distances on the order of kilometres and covering an area over 0.1 km2. These are extremely destructive and uncontrollable events. Due to the rarity of these events, analogue modelling plays a fundamental role in the understanding of the behaviour such events. The main objective of this research is to link the granular physics with the modelling of rock avalanches. Firstly, we attempt to model the debris avalanche and its spreading on a slope with different substratum to understand the relationship between the volume and the reach angle, or Fahrböschung, i.e. angle of the line joining the top of the scar and the end of the deposit. For a better understanding of the sliding mass motion and its spreading, the deposit is scanned with a micro Lidar Minolta. The different datasets are compared in order to see how the grainsize and volume influence a debris avalanche. In a general way, the travel distance is greater with coarse material and varies between 32° for the coarser grainsize and 37° for the finer one. It is interesting to note that the highest Fahrböschung, 41°, is reached for the highest slope angle (60°) and varies between 32 and 34.5° for a slope of 40°. Secondly, a detailed structural analysis of the deposit is performed in order to understand how the sliding mass stops. Several authors (e.g. Shea and van Wyk de Vries (2008)) highlighted that faults and folds are present in rock avalanches deposits and reproduced these features in analogue modelling. Our experiments are recorded by a height speed precision camera to see the development of these structures during the flowing of the mass. The most important impacts of this study is a better understanding of the effects of

  3. Catastrophic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  4. Mapping Weak, Altered Zones and Perched Water With Aerogeophysical Measurements at Mount Adams, Washington: Implications for Volcanic Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, C. A.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Anderson, E. D.; Horton, R.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrothermally altered rocks, particularly if water saturated, can weaken stratovolcanoes. This increases the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to destructive debris flows. Evaluating the hazards associated with such alteration is difficult, because alteration has been mapped on few active volcanoes and the distribution and intensity of subsurface alteration and location of perched water tables are largely unknown on any active volcano. At Mount Adams, some Holocene debris flows contain abundant hydrothermal minerals derived from collapse of an altered edifice. Intense hydrothermal alteration can significantly reduce the resistivity (from hundreds to tens ohm-m) and magnetization of volcanic rocks. These changes can be identified with helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic measurements and visualized in 3D. 100 m is the greatest depth that the lowest frequency electromagnetic data could penetrate into the low resistivity, altered zones; outside the altered zones, the depth of penetration was up to 300 m. Total-field magnetic data can detect magnetization variations to several thousand meters depth. Electromagnetic and magnetic data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of appreciable thicknesses of hydrothermally altered rock in the central core of Mount Adams north of the summit. We identify steep cliffs at the western edge of this zone as the likely source for future large debris flows. Water, and perhaps melted ice, is needed as a lubricant to transform debris avalanches into lahars. Therefore, knowing the distribution of both is important for hazard assessments. Over the low resistivity summit, the electromagnetic data detected ice with a thickness of 0 to about 80 m and an estimated volume of up to 0.1 km3. Over resistive ridges ice thicknesses could not be determined. The electromagnetic data also identified perched water tables in the brecciated core of the upper 300 m of the volcano

  5. Avalanche effects near nanojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandigana, Vishal V. R.; Aluru, N. R.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we perform a computational investigation of a nanopore connected to external fluidic reservoirs of asymmetric geometries. The asymmetry between the reservoirs is achieved by changing the cross-sectional areas, and the reservoirs are designated as the micropore reservoir and macropore reservoir. When an electric field is applied, which is directed from the macropore towards the micropore reservoir, we observe local nonequilibrium chaotic current oscillations. The current oscillations originate at the micropore-nanopore interface owing to the local cascade of ions; we refer to this phenomenon as the "avalanche effects." We mathematically quantify chaos in terms of the maximum Lyapunov exponent. The maximum Lyapunov exponent exhibits a monotonic increase with the applied voltage and the macropore reservoir diameter. The temporal power spectra maps of the chaotic currents depict a low-frequency "1 /f "-type dynamics for the voltage chaos and "1 /f2 "-type dynamics for the macropore reservoir chaos. The results presented here offer avenues to manipulate ionic diodes and fluidic pumps.

  6. Ultraviolet avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2015-08-01

    The III-Nitride material system is rapidly maturing; having proved itself as a material for LEDs and laser, and now finding use in the area of UV photodetectors. However, many UV applications are still dominated by the use of photomultiplier tubes (PMT). PMTs are capable of obtaining very high sensitivity using internal electron multiplication gain (typically ~106). It is highly desirable to develop a compact semiconductor-based photodetector capable of realizing this level of sensitivity. In principle, this can be obtained in III-Nitrides by taking advantage of avalanche multiplication under high electric fields - typically 2.7 MV/cm, which with proper design can correspond to an external reverse bias of less than 100 volts. In this talk, we review the current state-of-the-art in III-Nitride solar- and visible-blind APDs, and present our latest results on GaN APDs grown on both conventional sapphire and low dislocation density free-standing c- and m-plane GaN substrates. Leakage current, gain, and single photon detection efficiency (SPDE) of these APDs were compared. The spectral response and Geiger-mode photon counting performance of UV APDs are studied under low photon fluxes, with single photon detection capabilities as much as 30% being demonstrated in smaller devices. Geiger-mode operation conditions are optimized for enhanced SPDE.

  7. Particle-size segregation in dense granular avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John Mark Nicholas Timm; Gajjar, Parmesh; Kokelaar, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Particles of differing sizes are notoriously prone to segregate, which is a chronic problem in the manufacture of a wide variety of products that are used by billions of people worldwide every day. Segregation is the single most important factor in product non-uniformity, which can lead to significant handling problems as well as complete batches being discarded at huge financial loss. It is generally regarded that the most important mechanism for segregation is the combination of kinetic sieving and squeeze expulsion in shallow granular avalanches. These free-surface flows are more common than one might expect, often forming part of more complicated flows in drums, heaps and silos, where there is mass exchange with underlying regions of static or slowly moving grains. The combination of segregation and solid-fluid granular phase transitions creates incredibly complicated and beautiful patterns in the resulting deposits, but a full understanding of such effects lies beyond our capabilities at present. This paper reviews recent advances in our ability to model the basic segregation processes in a single avalanche (without mass exchange) and the subtle feedback effects that they can have on the bulk flow. This is particularly important for geophysical applications, where segregation can spontaneously self-channelize and lubricate the flow, significantly enhancing the run-out of debris-flows, pyroclastic flows, rock-falls and snow-slab avalanches.

  8. The influence of volcanic activity in the Campi Flegrei coastal depositional system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante, Crescenzo; Esposito, Eliana; Molisso, Flavia; Porfido, Sabina; Sacchi, Marco

    2010-05-01

    The Campi Flegrei coastal area includes the bay of Pozzuoli, Procida and Ischia islands, characterized by active tectonics and volcanism since the Pleistocene. Numerous monogenic volcanoes occur close to the shoreline and volcanic debris interpreted as submarine counterpart of subaerial flows and surges, have been detected offshore. In the Pozzuoli area the most recent eruptive volcanic activity occurred from 10.0 to 8.0 ky B.P and 4.5 to 3.7 ky B.P. followed by the September 1538 Monte Nuovo eruption. Here magma-related activity is testified by extensive hydrothermalism, and recent episodes (1970-71 and 1982-84 on Pozzuoli coast) of shallow seismicity and ground deformation, exceeding rates of 100 cm/year in the years 1983-1984. The most recent volcanic activity on Ischia island starts around 10.0 ky B.P. to which associates several eruptive centres mostly located in the western sector. The last eruption dates back to Arso flow in 1302. Nevertheless the landscape of Ischia is dominated by Mount Epomeo in the central part of the island, which is the highest peak (788 m). It is a volcano-tectonic structure that raised above sea level between 33 and 28 ka BP, due to the intrusion of magma at shallow depth. Procida island is composed of five monogenic Volcanoes (Vivara, Terra Murata, Pozzo Vecchio, Fiumicello and Solchiaro) that have been active over the last 80 ky producing pyroclastic deposits and a lava dome. A sixth volcanic structure has been reported recently off P.ta Serra by marine investigations and confirmed by airborne magnetic surveys. The emplacement of large amount of volcanoclastic material from volcanic and volcano-tectonic activity in the Campi Flegrei coastal area produced extensive avalanche deposits off Ischia island, seafloor instabilities in the form of creep/slump, channelled sediment flow and deep sedimentary fans, and is largely responsible for aggradation/progradation of the coastal area during the Quaternary. Moreover, numerous volcanic bank

  9. Avalanche risk assessment in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, Anton; Seliverstov, Yury; Sokratov, Sergey; Glazovskaya, Tatiana; Turchaniniva, Alla

    2017-04-01

    The avalanche prone area covers about 3 million square kilometers or 18% of total area of Russia and pose a significant problem in most mountain regions of the country. The constant growth of economic activity, especially in the North Caucasus region and therefore the increased avalanche hazard lead to the demand of the large-scale avalanche risk assessment methods development. Such methods are needed for the determination of appropriate avalanche protection measures as well as for economic assessments during all stages of spatial planning of the territory. The requirement of natural hazard risk assessments is determined by the Federal Law of Russian Federation. However, Russian Guidelines (SP 11-103-97; SP 47.13330.2012) are not clearly presented concerning avalanche risk assessment calculations. A great size of Russia territory, vast diversity of natural conditions and large variations in type and level of economic development of different regions cause significant variations in avalanche risk values. At the first stage of research the small scale avalanche risk assessment was performed in order to identify the most common patterns of risk situations and to calculate full social risk and individual risk. The full social avalanche risk for the territory of country was estimated at 91 victims. The area of territory with individual risk values lesser then 1×10(-6) covers more than 92 % of mountain areas of the country. Within these territories the safety of population can be achieved mainly by organizational activities. Approximately 7% of mountain areas have 1×10(-6) - 1×10(-4) individual risk values and require specific mitigation measures to protect people and infrastructure. Territories with individual risk values 1×10(-4) and above covers about 0,1 % of the territory and include the most severe and hazardous mountain areas. The whole specter of mitigation measures is required in order to minimize risk. The future development of such areas is not recommended

  10. Two early Holocene rock avalanches in the Bernese Alps (Rinderhorn, Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grämiger, Lorenz M.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Vockenhuber, Christof; Aaron, Jordan; Hajdas, Irka; Ivy-Ochs, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Large rock avalanches constitute a critical process modulating the evolution of alpine landscapes; however, the relatively infrequent occurrence of these high-magnitude events makes identifying underlying process controls challenging. Here we describe two rock avalanches in the Rinderhorn area of the Bernese Alps, Switzerland, providing new mapping of rock avalanche source areas and deposits, refined volume estimates for each event, runout modeling back-analyses, and absolute age constraint from cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating. Results reveal that the Daubensee rock avalanche released ~ 4 million m3 of limestone sliding from the western crest of the Rinderhorn. Debris ran out across a Lateglacial moraine before reaching the valley bottom and spreading, leaving thin (on average 7 m) deposits across a broad area. The runout resulted in a Fahrböschung angle of 21°. Part of the deposit now lies beneath Lake Daubensee. The Klein Rinderhorn rock avalanche released ~ 37 million m3 of limestone along a dip-slope sliding plane, with a maximum runout distance of 4.3 km and estimated Fahrböschung angle of 14°. Deposits bulked to ~ 47 million m3 running up the opposing slope, with distinct hummocky morphology in the proximal area and a distal longitudinal flow ridge. These deposits were later modified and partly obscured by ice avalanches from the nearby Altels peak. Cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating revealed nearly coincident ages for both rock avalanches of 9.8 ± 0.5 ka. The large lag time between local deglaciation and failure suggests that the events were not directly triggered by deglaciation. Rather, the concurrent exposure ages, also coinciding with the nearby Kander valley rock avalanche as well as paleoseismic records from nearby lakes, strongly suggest seismic triggering.

  11. Comparison of risk assessment methods: multiple perspectives of flood and avalanche hazards in North East France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacona, Florie; Eleuterio, Julian

    2010-05-01

    Mountainous areas are exposed to several natural hazards such as snow avalanches, debris flows or floods. Such processes may be more frequent and intense in high mountains but they occur in medium-high mountains as well causing loss of life and materials. Thus, the Vosges range, a medium-high mountain located in the north-east of France, is concerned by two kind of natural hazards namely avalanches and floods. While the avalanches constitute the most murderous natural risk in Alsace, its management is paradoxically not a priority. Because it causes more material damages and affects larger places with multiple and complex consequences, the flood risk is more worrying for the administrators. They didn't have the same approach toward these two kinds of risk. So, two different approaches used to assess risk and two study cases are presented: flood risk in the river Bruche (located in the north of the Vosges range, Alsace) and avalanche risk in the Vosges range. The first one is mainly focused on economic aspects of risk. Flood risk analyses are discussed from a hydro-economical perspective. The second one focuses the analysis on human, material and environmental vulnerabilities. Avalanche risk analysis is discussed from a geo-historical point of view. About 300 avalanche events have been reported since the end of the 18th century. The two approaches that we describe illustrate the complementarity of human and physical science to improve the understanding and assessment of hazardous processes in medium-high mountain range. On the one hand, the geo-historical method developed for the avalanche risk could be extended to the flood hazard. Indeed, contrary to high mountains, no service is in charge of the systematic inventory of floods and avalanches in the Vosges mountains. The geo-historical approach could address this lack of data. On the other hand, the methods of damages assessment and vulnerability characterization could be a good tool for the human science.

  12. Observations and modelling of snow avalanche entrainment

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    In this paper full scale avalanche dynamics measurements from the Italian Pizzac and Swiss Vallée de la Sionne test sites are used to develop a snowcover entrainment model. A detailed analysis of three avalanche events shows that snowcover entrainment at the avalanche front appears to dominate over bed erosion at the basal sliding surface. Furthermore, the distribution of mass within the avalanche body is primarily a function of basal fric...

  13. Correlations in avalanche critical points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, Benedetta; Vives, Eduard

    2009-07-01

    Avalanche dynamics and related power-law statistics are ubiquitous in nature, arising in phenomena such as earthquakes, forest fires, and solar flares. Very interestingly, an analogous behavior is associated with many condensed-matter systems, such as ferromagnets and martensites. Bearing it in mind, we study the prototypical random-field Ising model at T=0 . We find a finite correlation between waiting intervals and the previous avalanche size. This correlation is not found in other models for avalanches but it is experimentally found in earthquakes and in forest fires. Our study suggests that this effect occurs in critical points that are at the end of a first-order discontinuity separating two regimes: one with high activity from another with low activity.

  14. Frequency and magnitude of debris flows on Cheekye River, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, M.; Friele, P.

    2010-01-01

    Natural hazard and risk assessments are predicated on a detailed understanding of the relationship between frequency and magnitude of the hazardous process under investigation. When information is sought from the deep past (i.e., several thousand years), continuous event records do not exist and the researcher has to rely on proxy data to develop the frequency-magnitude ( F- M) model. Such work is often prohibitively expensive and few well-researched examples for mass movement are available worldwide. The Cheekye fan is a desirable location for land development and has a depth and breadth of previous research unprecedented on any debris-flow fan in Canada. We pursued two principal strains of research to formulate a reliable F- M relationship. The first focuses on stratigraphic analyses combined with radiometric dating and dendrochronology to reconstruct a comprehensive picture of Holocene debris-flow activity. The second approach examines hydrological limitations of rock avalanche evolution into debris flows through either entrainment of saturated sediments or by failure of a landslide-generated dam and upstream impoundment. We thus hypothesize that debris flows from Cheekye River can be separated into two quasi-homogenous populations: those that are typically triggered by relatively small debris avalanches, slumps, or rock falls or simply by progressive bulking of in-stream erodible sediments; and those that are thought to result from transformation of rock avalanches. Our work suggests that debris flows exceeding some 3 million m 3 in volume are unlikely to reach the Cheekye fan as a result of limited water available to fully fluidize a rock avalanche. This analysis has also demonstrated that in order to arrive at reasonable estimates for the frequency and magnitude of debris flows on a complex alluvial fan significant multidisciplinary efforts are required. Without the significant precursor investigations and the additional efforts of this study, life and

  15. Caldera resurgence as a possible cause of slope failure in volcanic areas: the Ischia island case history

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vita, Sandro; Seta Marta, Della; Paola, Fredi; Enrica, Marotta; Giovanni, Orsi; Fabio, Sansivero

    2010-05-01

    Slope instability in active volcanic areas is a factor of major hazard to be considered. Due to their rapid growth and deformation, active volcanoes experience gravitational disequilibrium and periodical structural failures. Depending on the geodynamic framework of a volcano, nature, style of activity and climatic conditions, slope instability occurs at different scales, from relatively small-volume mass movements to huge lahars and debris avalanches. Moreover, volcanoes located in coastal areas or islands, may experience lateral collapses with the potential to generate large tsunamis. Although there is very little literature on the relationships among caldera resurgence, volcanism and slope instability, recently also the caldera resurgence has been suggested as a possible cause of slope failure, as for the southern flank of the island of Ischia in the Southern Tyrrhenian sea (Italy). Ischia island gives a good opportunity to investigate such phenomena and related effects, as it is the only documented example of resurgent caldera in which, during uplift, volcanism and generation of mass movements have been very active and linked to each other in a sort of cyclical behaviour. The island of Ischia is one of the most impressive examples of resurgent calderas in the world. This caldera formed in response to a complex explosive eruption that, about 55 ka B.P., produced the Mt. Epomeo Green Tuff ignimbritic deposit. Starting from at least 30 ka B.P. the caldera floor has been uplifted of about 900 m, due to a resurgent phenomenon, which occurred through intermittent uplifting, likely triggered by the intrusion of new magma into the system, and tectonic quietness phases. During uplift, volcanism and generation of mass movements were very active. The resurgent area is composed of differentially displaced blocks and has a poligonal shape, resulting from reactivation of regional faults and activation of faults directly related to volcano-tectonism. The western sector is

  16. Southwest-facing slopes control the formation of debris-covered glaciers in the Bhutan Himalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nagai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To understand the formation conditions of debris-covered glaciers, we examined the dimension and shape of debris-covered areas and potential debris-supply (PDS slopes of 213 glaciers in the Bhutan Himalaya. This was undertaken using satellite images with 2.5 m spatial resolution for manual delineation of debris-covered areas and PDS slopes. The most significant correlation exists between surface area of southwest-facing PDS slopes and debris-covered area. This result suggests that the southwest-facing PDS slopes supply the largest quantity of debris mantle. The shape of debris-covered areas is also an important variable, quantitatively defined using a geometric index. Elongate or stripe-like debris-covered areas on north-flowing glaciers are common throughout the Bhutan Himalaya. In contrast, south-flowing glaciers have large ablation zones, entirely covered by debris. Our findings suggest that this difference is caused by effective diurnal freeze–thaw cycles rather than seasonal freeze–thaw cycles, permafrost degradation, or snow avalanches. In terms of geographic setting, local topography also contributes to glacier debris supply and the proportion of debris cover on the studied glaciers is suppressed by the arid Tibetan climate, whereas the north-to-south asymmetric topography of the Bhutan Himalaya has less influence on the proportion of debris cover.

  17. Numerical modeling of the debris flows runout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Francesco; Cesali, Chiara

    2017-06-01

    Rapid debris flows are identified among the most dangerous of all landslides. Due to their destructive potential, the runout length has to be predicted to define the hazardous areas and design safeguarding measures. To this purpose, a continuum model to predict the debris flows mobility is developed. It is based on the well known depth-integrated avalanche model proposed by Savage and Hutter (S&H model) to simulate the dry granular materials flows. Conservation of mass and momentum equations, describing the evolving geometry and the depth averaged velocity distribution, are re-written taking into account the effects of the interstitial pressures and the possible variation of mass along the motion due to erosion/deposition processes. Furthermore, the mechanical behaviour of the debris flow is described by a recently developed rheological law, which allows to take into account the dissipative effects of the grain inelastic collisions and friction, simultaneously acting within a `shear layer', typically at the base of the debris flows. The governing PDEs are solved by applying the finite difference method. The analysis of a documented case is finally carried out.

  18. Lumped transmission line avalanche pulser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Rex

    1995-01-01

    A lumped linear avalanche transistor pulse generator utilizes stacked transistors in parallel within a stage and couples a plurality of said stages, in series with increasing zener diode limited voltages per stage and decreasing balanced capacitance load per stage to yield a high voltage, high and constant current, very short pulse.

  19. Avalanche dynamics on a rough inclined plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Halsey, Thomas C; Ecke, Robert E

    2008-07-01

    The avalanche behavior of gravitationally forced granular layers on a rough inclined plane is investigated experimentally for different materials and for a variety of grain shapes ranging from spherical beads to highly anisotropic particles with dendritic shape. We measure the front velocity, area, and height of many avalanches and correlate the motion with the area and height. We also measure the avalanche profiles for several example cases. As the shape irregularity of the grains is increased, there is a dramatic qualitative change in avalanche properties. For rough nonspherical grains, avalanches are faster, bigger, and overturning in the sense that individual particles have down-slope speeds u p that exceed the front speed uf as compared with avalanches of spherical glass beads that are quantitatively slower and smaller and where particles always travel slower than the front speed. There is a linear increase of three quantities: (i) dimensionless avalanche height, (ii) ratio of particle to front speed, and (iii) the growth rate of avalanche speed with increasing avalanche size with increasing tan theta r where theta r is the bulk angle of repose, or with increasing beta P, the slope of the depth averaged flow rule, where both theta r and beta P reflect the grain shape irregularity. These relations provide a tool for predicting important dynamical properties of avalanches as a function of grain shape irregularity. A relatively simple depth-averaged theoretical description captures some important elements of the avalanche motion, notably the existence of two regimes of this motion.

  20. Numerical simulation of the tsunami generated by a past catastrophic landslide on the volcanic island of Ischia, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, Stefano; Chiocci, Francesco Latino; Zaniboni, Filippo; Pagnoni, Gianluca; de Alteriis, Giovanni

    2011-03-01

    The island of Ischia, Gulf of Naples, Italy, like many other volcanic islands is affected by mass failures, that are mainly related to secondary volcanic processes such as slope steepening and seismic shaking. The block resurgence of its main relief, Mount Epomeo, has been recognised to contribute cyclically to mass instability and cause landslides, that occasionally may reach the sea and start tsunamis. In this work we explore the consequences of the Ischia Debris Avalanche (IDA), a flank collapse that occurred in historical times, and involved the whole Mount Epomeo edifice including its submarine portion, and that may have caused gigantic sea waves affecting all the coasts of Ischia and of the Gulf of Naples. The IDA and the generated tsunami have been taken as the worst-case scenario for the occurrence of a new tsunami in the area. They have been simulated through numerical codes developed and maintained by the University of Bologna. The simulation shows that the IDA-induced tsunami attacks severely all the coasts of the Gulf of Naples with the highest waves obtained for the island of Ischia, the island of Capri and the peninsula of Sorrento. The propagation pattern of the IDA tsunami can be used to get hints on the impact that such an event may have had on early populations habiting Gulf of Naples, but also to get clues on the area that could be most severely hit by a tsunami generated by a smaller-scale landslide that may occur in the same source zone.

  1. STUDY ON SIMULATION METHOD OF AVALANCHE : FLOW ANALYSIS OF AVALANCHE USING PARTICLE METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, modeling for the simulation of the avalanche by a particle method is discussed. There are two kinds of the snow avalanches, one is the surface avalanche which shows a smoke-like flow, and another is the total-layer avalanche which shows a flow like Bingham fluid. In the simulation of the surface avalanche, the particle method in consideration of a rotation resistance model is used. The particle method by Bingham fluid is used in the simulation of the total-layer avalanche. At t...

  2. Avalanche hazard and control in Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Blagoveshchensky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Kazakhstan, area of 124 thousand km2 is prone to the avalanche hazard. Avalanches are released down in mountain regions situated along the eastern boundary of Kazakhstan. Systematic studies of avalanches here were started in 1958 by explorer I.S. Sosedov; later on, I.V. Seversky continued these investigations in Institute of Geography of the Kazakh Soviet Republic. Actually, he founded the Kazakh school of the avalanche studies. In 1970–1980s, five snow-avalanche stations operated in Kazakhstan: two in Il’ Alatau, two in Zhetysu Alatau, and one in the Altai. At the present time, only two stations and two snow-avalanche posts operate, and all of them are located in Il’ Alatau.Since 1951 to 2013, 75 avalanches took place in Kazakhstan, releases of them caused significant damages. For this period 172 people happened to be under avalanches, among them 86 perished. Large avalanche catastrophes causing human victims and destructions took place in Altai in 1977 and in Karatau in 1990. In spring of 1966, only in Il’ Alatau avalanches destroyed more 600 ha of mature fir (coniferous forest, and the total area of forest destroyed here by avalanches amounts to 2677 ha or 7% of the total forest area.For 48 years of the avalanche observations, there were 15 winters with increased avalanche activity in the river Almatinka basin when total volume of released snow exceeded annual mean value of 147 thousand m3. During this period, number of days with winter avalanches changed from three (in season of 1973/1974 to 28 (1986/1987, the average for a year is 16 days for a season. Winter with the total volume of snow 1300 thousand m3 occur once in 150 years. Individual avalanches with maximal volume of 350 thousand m3 happen once in 80 years.Preventive avalanche releases aimed at protection of roads and settlements are used in Kazakhstan since 1974. These precautions are taken in Il’ Alatau, Altai, and on Kalbinsky Range. Avalanches are released with the

  3. Evaluating avalanche generation by 2-D finite element analysis at Pico de Orizaba, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha Dimas, A.; Watters, R. J.

    2003-04-01

    Pico de Orizaba, at the eastern Mexican Volcanic Belt, has collapse twice during its evolution (250 ka and 20 ka ago). In case of collapse of the present day cone, the run out distance of the moving mass represents a hazard for the surrounding population. We evaluate, by using finite element, two geological aspects that have been recognized in the present cone of Pico de Orizaba as possible triggering mechanisms for avalanches: 1) Extensive hydrothermal alteration (argillic), and 2) normal faulting at the volcano basement. Two dimensional finite element analyses were carried out in a profile trending NE40SW, perpendicular to the trend of dikes and volcanic flank eruptions. We evaluate effects of extension of hydrothermal alteration and amount of fault displacement needed for triggering the avalanche. We compare the shape of failure surface (which reflects the volume of the resulting failing mass) through distribution of velocity contours and displacement vectors.

  4. Orbital Debris-Debris Collision Avoidance

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, James; Marshall, William; Levit, Creon

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using a medium-powered (5kW) ground-based laser combined with a ground-based telescope to prevent collisions between debris objects in low-Earth orbit (LEO), for which there is no current, effective mitigation strategy. The scheme utilizes photon pressure alone as a means to perturb the orbit of a debris object. Applied over multiple engagements, this alters the debris orbit sufficiently to reduce the risk of an upcoming conjunction. We employ standard assumptions for atmospheric conditions and the resulting beam propagation. Using case studies designed to represent the properties (e.g. area and mass) of the current debris population, we show that one could significantly reduce the risk of more than half of all debris-debris collisions using only one such laser/telescope facility. We speculate on whether this could mitigate the debris fragmentation rate such that it falls below the natural debris re-entry rate due to atmospheric drag, and thus whether continuous long-term ope...

  5. The prehospital management of avalanche victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhall, Daniel K; Martens-Nielsen, Julie

    2016-12-01

    Avalanche accidents are frequently lethal events with an overall mortality of 23%. Mortality increases dramatically to 50% in instances of complete burial. With modern day dense networks of ambulance services and rescue helicopters, health workers often become involved during the early stages of avalanche rescue. Historically, some of the most devastating avalanche accidents have involved military personnel. Armed forces are frequently deployed to mountain regions in order to train for mountain warfare or as part of ongoing conflicts. Furthermore, military units are frequently called to assist civilian organised rescue in avalanche rescue operations. It is therefore important that clinicians associated with units operating in mountain regions have an understanding of, the medical management of avalanche victims, and of the preceding rescue phase. The ensuing review of the available literature aims to describe the pathophysiology particular to avalanche victims and to outline a structured approach to the search, rescue and prehospital medical management.

  6. Controls and geomorphic effects of a high-magnitude/low-frequency snow avalanche event in the proglacial area of the Bødalsbreen glacier, Nordfjord, western Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laute, Katja; Beylich, Achim A.

    2014-05-01

    Due to the interactions between the prevalent climatic factors and the local topography snow avalanches are a common phenomena especially in western and northern Norway. Compared to the annually occurring snow avalanches (low-magnitude/high-frequency events) so-called extreme snow avalanches (high-magnitude/low-frequency) are more difficult to record as they are characterized by recurrence intervals often larger than a decade. During the winter-spring period 2011/2012 an extreme snow avalanche occurred within the upper valley part of a steep mountain catchment (Bødalen) in western Norway. The snow avalanche run-out zone was located directly in front of the Bødalsbreen glacier which had a substantial effect with respect to the reworking and remobilization of exposed sediment and debris within the proglacial area. Due to the ongoing glacier retreat of the Bødalsbreen glacier freshly exposed areas are enlarged which e.g. exhibit a comparably higher sediment availability enabling active sediment reworking and re-deposition by secondary transfers (e.g. by snow avalanches or fluvial processes). This study focuses on (i) morphometric and meteorological controls of this specific snow avalanche extreme event and (ii) its related relative role in mass transport as compared to the annually monitored snow avalanche activity within the Bødalen valley. Mapping of the extension and run-out distance of this extreme snow avalanche event is combined with spatial data analysis of possible morphometric controls. The timing and meteorological controls of this event are explored based on meteorological data from two different climate stations located nearby. The volume of the entire snow avalanche, its speed and possible pressure effects are estimated and the total transferred sediment mass is calculated. First results show that this extreme snow avalanche was initiated by a large breakup of the snowpack developed along the cliff of an E-facing rockwall located above the B

  7. Density Estimations in Laboratory Debris Flow Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Kulisch, Helmut; Malcherek, Andreas; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2016-04-01

    Bulk density and its variation is an important physical quantity to estimate the solid-liquid fractions in two-phase debris flows. Here we present mass and flow depth measurements for experiments performed in a large-scale laboratory set up. Once the mixture is released and it moves down the inclined channel, measurements allow us to determine the bulk density evolution throughout the debris flow. Flow depths are determined by ultrasonic pulse reflection, and the mass is measured with a total normal force sensor. The data were obtained at 50 Hz. The initial two phase material was composed of 350 kg debris with water content of 40%. A very fine pebble with mean particle diameter of 3 mm, particle density of 2760 kg/m³ and bulk density of 1400 kg/m³ in dry condition was chosen as the solid material. Measurements reveal that the debris bulk density remains high from the head to the middle of the debris body whereas it drops substantially at the tail. This indicates lower water content at the tail, compared to the head and the middle portion of the debris body. This means that the solid and fluid fractions are varying strongly in a non-linear manner along the flow path, and from the head to the tail of the debris mass. Importantly, this spatial-temporal density variation plays a crucial role in determining the impact forces associated with the dynamics of the flow. Our setup allows for investigating different two phase material compositions, including large fluid fractions, with high resolutions. The considered experimental set up may enable us to transfer the observed phenomena to natural large-scale events. Furthermore, the measurement data allows evaluating results of numerical two-phase mass flow simulations. These experiments are parts of the project avaflow.org that intends to develop a GIS-based open source computational tool to describe wide spectrum of rapid geophysical mass flows, including avalanches and real two-phase debris flows down complex natural

  8. A mechanical model for phase-separation in debris flow

    CERN Document Server

    Pudasaini, Shiva P

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phase-separation between solid and fluid phases as a mixture mass moves down slope is a long-standing challenge. Here, we propose an extension of the two phase mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012) by including a new mechanism, called separation-flux, that leads to strong phase-separation in avalanche and debris flows while balancing the enhanced solid flux with the reduced fluid flux. The separation flux mechanism is capable of describing the dynamically evolving phase-separation and levee formation in a multi-phase, geometrically three-dimensional debris flow. These are often observed phenomena in natural debris flows and industrial processes that involve the transportation of particulate solid-fluid mixture material. The novel separation-flux model includes several dominant physical and mechanical aspects such as pressure gradients, volume fractions of solid and fluid phases and their gradients, shear-rates, flow depth, material friction, viscosity, material densities, topographic ...

  9. [Avalanche emergencies. Review of the current situation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paal, P; Beikircher, W; Brugger, H

    2006-03-01

    In North America and Europe around 140 persons die every year due to avalanches, approximately 35 in North America, 100 in the European Alps, and 5 in other parts of Europe. Most of the victims are skiers and snowboarders. This article outlines the specific pathophysiology of avalanche burials, such as hypoxia, hypercapnia, and hypothermia and also other factors which influence survival. Strategies to minimize the mortality due to avalanches and the on-site treatment of buried persons are discussed. Finally, possibilities to reduce the number of avalanche deaths are pointed out.

  10. Modelling debris flows down general channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Pudasaini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an extension of the single-phase cohesionless dry granular avalanche model over curved and twisted channels proposed by Pudasaini and Hutter (2003. It is a generalisation of the Savage and Hutter (1989, 1991 equations based on simple channel topography to a two-phase fluid-solid mixture of debris material. Important terms emerging from the correct treatment of the kinematic and dynamic boundary condition, and the variable basal topography are systematically taken into account. For vanishing fluid contribution and torsion-free channel topography our new model equations exactly degenerate to the previous Savage-Hutter model equations while such a degeneration was not possible by the Iverson and Denlinger (2001 model, which, in fact, also aimed to extend the Savage and Hutter model. The model equations of this paper have been rigorously derived; they include the effects of the curvature and torsion of the topography, generally for arbitrarily curved and twisted channels of variable channel width. The equations are put into a standard conservative form of partial differential equations. From these one can easily infer the importance and influence of the pore-fluid-pressure distribution in debris flow dynamics. The solid-phase is modelled by applying a Coulomb dry friction law whereas the fluid phase is assumed to be an incompressible Newtonian fluid. Input parameters of the equations are the internal and bed friction angles of the solid particles, the viscosity and volume fraction of the fluid, the total mixture density and the pore pressure distribution of the fluid at the bed. Given the bed topography and initial geometry and the initial velocity profile of the debris mixture, the model equations are able to describe the dynamics of the depth profile and bed parallel depth-averaged velocity distribution from the initial position to the final deposit. A shock capturing, total variation diminishing numerical scheme is implemented to

  11. Remote detection of artificially triggered avalanches below a fixed avalanche control installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Herwijnen, Alec; Simioni, Stephan; Schweizer, Juerg

    2014-05-01

    Avalanche control by explosives is widely used as a temporary preventive measure to reduce avalanche hazard. The goal is to artificially trigger smaller less destructive avalanches, by detonating charges either above or on the snow surface. Hand charges are most often used, whereby the explosives are deployed by manually hand tossing or lowering onto the snow slope. Given the inherent dangers and limitations of this type of avalanche control, fixed avalanche control installations are increasingly used. These consist of strategically placed remote controlled installations that generate an explosion above the snow pack in an avalanche starting zone. While fixed installations can be used at any time and minimize the risk to avalanche control personnel, visual confirmation is still required to verify if an avalanche released. In order to remotely detect artificially triggered avalanches, we therefore developed a low-cost seismic monitoring system. We deployed the monitoring system in a ski area above the town of Davos , in the eastern Swiss Alps, below a Gazex installation, a remote controlled installation that generates an air blast by detonating a fuel-air explosive above the snow pack. The monitoring system consists of three vertical component geophones inserted in the ground at approximately 14, 27 and 46 meters from the Gazex installation. Our results show that, despite the relatively low precision of the monitoring equipment, both the detonation and the resulting avalanches can clearly be identified in the seismic data. Specifically, detonations are characterized by short, high amplitude broadband signals, while avalanches generate much longer, low frequency signals. Furthermore, information on the size of the artificially triggered avalanches is also obtained as it directly relates to the duration of the generated seismic signal. The overall goal is to assess the effectiveness of the fixed avalanche control installation with regards to yield (i.e. number of

  12. On the temporal organization of neuronal avalanches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Fabrizio; Herrmann, Hans J; Plenz, Dietmar; De Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous activity of cortex in vitro and in vivo has been shown to organize as neuronal avalanches. Avalanches are cascades of neuronal activity that exhibit a power law in their size and duration distribution, typical features of balanced systems in a critical state. Recently it has been shown that the distribution of quiet times between consecutive avalanches in rat cortex slice cultures displays a non-monotonic behavior with a power law decay at short time scales. This behavior has been attributed to the slow alternation between up and down-states. Here we further characterize the avalanche process and investigate how the functional behavior of the quiet time distribution depends on the fine structure of avalanche sequences. By systematically removing smaller avalanches from the experimental time series we show that size and quiet times are correlated and highlight that avalanche occurrence exhibits the characteristic periodicity of θ and β/γ oscillations, which jointly emerge in most of the analyzed samples. Furthermore, our analysis indicates that smaller avalanches tend to be associated with faster β/γ oscillations, whereas larger ones are associated with slower θ and 1-2 Hz oscillations. In particular, large avalanches corresponding to θ cycles trigger cascades of smaller ones, which occur at β/γ frequency. This temporal structure follows closely the one of nested θ - β/γ oscillations. Finally we demonstrate that, because of the multiple time scales characterizing avalanche dynamics, the distributions of quiet times between avalanches larger than a certain size do not collapse onto a unique function when rescaled by the average occurrence rate. However, when considered separately in the up-state and in the down-state, these distributions are solely controlled by the respective average rate and two different unique function can be identified.

  13. Monitoring and behavior of unsaturated volcanic pyroclastic in the Metropolitan Area of San Salvador, El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, José Alexander; Landaverde, José; Landaverde, Reynaldo López; Tejnecký, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Field monitoring and laboratory results are presented for an unsaturated volcanic pyroclastic. The pyroclastic belongs to the latest plinian eruption of the Ilopango Caldera in the Metropolitan Area of San Salvador, and is constantly affected by intense erosion, collapse, slab failure, sand/silt/debris flowslide and debris avalanche during the rainy season or earthquakes. Being the flowslides more common but with smaller volume. During the research, preliminary results of rain threshold were obtained of flowslides, this was recorded with the TMS3 (a moisture sensor device using time domain transmission) installed in some slopes. TMS3 has been used before in biology, ecology and soil sciences, and for the first time was used for engineering geology in this research. This device uses electromagnetic waves to obtain moisture content of the soil and a calibration curve is necessary. With the behavior observed during this project is possible to conclude that not only climatic factors as rain quantity, temperature and evaporation are important into landslide susceptibility but also information of suction-moisture content, seepage, topography, weathering, ground deformation, vibrations, cracks, vegetation/roots and the presence of crust covering the surface are necessary to research in each site. Results of the field monitoring indicates that the presence of biological soil crusts a complex mosaic of soil, green algae, lichens, mosses, micro-fungi, cyanobacteria and other bacteria covering the slopes surface can protect somehow the steep slopes reducing the runoff process and mass wasting processes. The results obtained during the assessment will help explaining the mass wasting problems occurring in some pyroclastic soils and its possible use in mitigation works and early warning system.

  14. An empirical method for estimating travel times for wet volcanic mass flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    Travel times for wet volcanic mass flows (debris avalanches and lahars) can be forecast as a function of distance from source when the approximate flow rate (peak discharge near the source) can be estimated beforehand. The near-source flow rate is primarily a function of initial flow volume, which should be possible to estimate to an order of magnitude on the basis of geologic, geomorphic, and hydrologic factors at a particular volcano. Least-squares best fits to plots of flow-front travel time as a function of distance from source provide predictive second-degree polynomial equations with high coefficients of determination for four broad size classes of flow based on near-source flow rate: extremely large flows (>1 000 000 m3/s), very large flows (10 000–1 000 000 m3/s), large flows (1000–10 000 m3/s), and moderate flows (100–1000 m3/s). A strong nonlinear correlation that exists between initial total flow volume and flow rate for "instantaneously" generated debris flows can be used to estimate near-source flow rates in advance. Differences in geomorphic controlling factors among different flows in the data sets have relatively little effect on the strong nonlinear correlations between travel time and distance from source. Differences in flow type may be important, especially for extremely large flows, but this could not be evaluated here. At a given distance away from a volcano, travel times can vary by approximately an order of magnitude depending on flow rate. The method can provide emergency-management officials a means for estimating time windows for evacuation of communities located in hazard zones downstream from potentially hazardous volcanoes.

  15. A Convolutional Neural Network Approach for Assisting Avalanche Search and Rescue Operations with UAV Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesay Belete Bejiga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Following an avalanche, one of the factors that affect victims’ chance of survival is the speed with which they are located and dug out. Rescue teams use techniques like trained rescue dogs and electronic transceivers to locate victims. However, the resources and time required to deploy rescue teams are major bottlenecks that decrease a victim’s chance of survival. Advances in the field of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs have enabled the use of flying robots equipped with sensors like optical cameras to assess the damage caused by natural or manmade disasters and locate victims in the debris. In this paper, we propose assisting avalanche search and rescue (SAR operations with UAVs fitted with vision cameras. The sequence of images of the avalanche debris captured by the UAV is processed with a pre-trained Convolutional Neural Network (CNN to extract discriminative features. A trained linear Support Vector Machine (SVM is integrated at the top of the CNN to detect objects of interest. Moreover, we introduce a pre-processing method to increase the detection rate and a post-processing method based on a Hidden Markov Model to improve the prediction performance of the classifier. Experimental results conducted on two different datasets at different levels of resolution show that the detection performance increases with an increase in resolution, while the computation time increases. Additionally, they also suggest that a significant decrease in processing time can be achieved thanks to the pre-processing step.

  16. Potential collapse of the Cumbre Vieja's volcanic edifice (Canary Island; Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riss, Joelle; Tric, Emmanuel; Fabre, Richard; Lebourg, Thomas; Abadie, S.

    2010-05-01

    The younger south part of the La Palma island (Cumbre Nueva) has been growing rapidly southwards and continues to do so to this day; historical volcanic eruptions has occurred during years 1585, 1646, 1677, 1712, 1949 1971. Should a new landslide potentially dangerous happen in the near future? That is the reason we are concerned with modeling the rock slope stability of the south-west flank of the Cumbre Vieja. This scenario of collapse is discussed by Ward and Day (2001) and Day (1999) in the central and south part of Island: the Cumbre Vieja. These authors estimate the potential volume of a future Cumbre Vieja collapse, dropping 150 to 500 km3 of rock in the form of debris avalanche into the Atlantic Ocean, inducing the tsunami wave. In the work we examine the slope instability of the western flank of La Palma Island using the both FDM and FEM numerical codes, respectively Finite Different Method and Finite Element method. This report examines the potential instability of Cumbre Vieja volcanoes with exclusively variation of Mohr-Coulomb criterions and groundwater height into the volcanoes (geotechnical parameters). The calculation model is utilized to predict the behaviour of a potentially massive flank failure at Cumbre Vieja volcano on the La Palma Island. In this contribution, we present an application of the 2D numerical approach of stability of western flank of La Palma, using both numerical codes of calculation: Finite different method (FDM; 2D FLAC Slope version) and Finite elements method (FEM; ADELI computer code calculation). In this contribution the mechanical characterisation of the volcanic rocks of Cumbre Vieja are partially deduced to the laboratory tests (density, porosity, Young modulus) and by the authors working to the Canary Islands (c', φ'): it's the Mohr-Coulomb criterions. From of field geological investigations, a west east cross section through the Montana del Fuego has been chosen for mechanical modelling and stability calculations

  17. Triaging multiple victims in an avalanche setting: the Avalanche Survival Optimizing Rescue Triage algorithmic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogle, Lee B; Boyd, Jeff J; McLaughlin, Kyle A

    2010-03-01

    As winter backcountry activity increases, so does exposure to avalanche danger. A complicated situation arises when multiple victims are caught in an avalanche and where medical and other rescue demands overwhelm resources in the field. These mass casualty incidents carry a high risk of morbidity and mortality, and there is no recommended approach to patient care specific to this setting other than basic first aid principles. The literature is limited with regard to triaging systems applicable to avalanche incidents. In conjunction with the development of an electronic avalanche rescue training module by the Canadian Avalanche Association, we have designed the Avalanche Survival Optimizing Rescue Triage algorithm to address the triaging of multiple avalanche victims to optimize survival and disposition decisions.

  18. Geophysics of Volcanic Landslide Hazards: The Inside Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, C.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Bedrosian, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    alteration, pore fluids and partial ice volumes on the volcanoes helps identify likely sources for future alteration-related debris flows, including the Sunset Amphitheater region at Mount Rainier, steep cliffs at the western edge of the central altered zone at Mount Adams, south and north flanks of Mount Baker, and central Mount Iliamna. The water saturated shattered fresh dome material in the crater of Mount St. Helens may have served as part of the slip surface for the 1980 debris avalanche.

  19. Silicon Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mazzillo; S. Billotta; G. Bonanno; A. Campisi; L. Cosentino; P. Finocchiaro; F. Musumeci; S.Privitera; S. Tudisco; G. Condorelli; D. Sanfilippo; G. Fallica; E. Sciacca; S. Aurite; S. Lombardo; E. Rlmini; M. Belluso

    2007-01-01

    In this letter we present the results regarding the electrical and optical characterization of Geiger mode silicon avalanche photodiodes (GMAP) fabricated by silicon standard planar technology. Low dark count rates, negligible afterpulsing effects,good timing resolution and high quantum detection efficiency in all the visible range have been measured. The very good electro-optical performances of our photodiodes make them attractive for the fabrication of arrays with a large number of GMAP to be used both in the commercial and the scientific fields, as telecommunications and nuclear medical imaging.

  20. Avalanche!--Teachable Moments in Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Shayne

    2005-01-01

    Rarely do outdoor educators get the opportunity to safely incorporate an avalanche while the topic of the day is actually avalanche awareness and forecasting. Many similar possibilities exist in the expeditionary context, but even brief excursions may result in incredible learning experiences. These "teachable moments" occur regularly in the…

  1. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A. [Department of Geodynamics and Geophysics, Steinmann Institute, University of Bonn Nussallee 8, D-53115, Bonn (Germany)

    2012-09-26

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the

  2. Systems and Sensors for Debris-flow Monitoring and Warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arattano, Massimo; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2008-04-04

    Debris flows are a type of mass movement that occurs in mountain torrents. They consist of a high concentration of solid material in water that flows as a wave with a steep front. Debris flows can be considered a phenomenon intermediate between landslides and water floods. They are amongst the most hazardous natural processes in mountainous regions and may occur under different climatic conditions. Their destructiveness is due to different factors: their capability of transporting and depositing huge amounts of solid materials, which may also reach large sizes (boulders of several cubic meters are commonly transported by debris flows), their steep fronts, which may reach several meters of height and also their high velocities. The implementation of both structural and nonstructural control measures is often required when debris flows endanger routes, urban areas and other infrastructures. Sensor networks for debris-flow monitoring and warning play an important role amongst non-structural measures intended to reduce debris-flow risk. In particular, debris flow warning systems can be subdivided into two main classes: advance warning and event warning systems. These two classes employ different types of sensors. Advance warning systems are based on monitoring causative hydrometeorological processes (typically rainfall) and aim to issue a warning before a possible debris flow is triggered. Event warning systems are based on detecting debris flows when these processes are in progress. They have a much smaller lead time than advance warning ones but are also less prone to false alarms. Advance warning for debris flows employs sensors and techniques typical of meteorology and hydrology, including measuring rainfall by means of rain gauges and weather radar and monitoring water discharge in headwater streams. Event warning systems use different types of sensors, encompassing ultrasonic or radar gauges, ground vibration sensors, videocameras, avalanche pendulums, photocells

  3. Systems and Sensors for Debris-flow Monitoring and Warning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Marchi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Debris flows are a type of mass movement that occurs in mountain torrents. They consist of a high concentration of solid material in water that flows as a wave with a steep front. Debris flows can be considered a phenomenon intermediate between landslides and water floods. They are amongst the most hazardous natural processes in mountainous regions and may occur under different climatic conditions. Their destructiveness is due to different factors: their capability of transporting and depositing huge amounts of solid materials, which may also reach large sizes (boulders of several cubic meters are commonly transported by debris flows, their steep fronts, which may reach several meters of height and also their high velocities. The implementation of both structural and nonstructural control measures is often required when debris flows endanger routes, urban areas and other infrastructures. Sensor networks for debris-flow monitoring and warning play an important role amongst non-structural measures intended to reduce debris-flow risk. In particular, debris flow warning systems can be subdivided into two main classes: advance warning and event warning systems. These two classes employ different types of sensors. Advance warning systems are based on monitoring causative hydrometeorological processes (typically rainfall and aim to issue a warning before a possible debris flow is triggered. Event warning systems are based on detecting debris flows when these processes are in progress. They have a much smaller lead time than advance warning ones but are also less prone to false alarms. Advance warning for debris flows employs sensors and techniques typical of meteorology and hydrology, including measuring rainfall by means of rain gauges and weather radar and monitoring water discharge in headwater streams. Event warning systems use different types of sensors, encompassing ultrasonic or radar gauges, ground vibration sensors, videocameras, avalanche

  4. Contrasting carbonatite volcanism at the Kerimasi and Oldoinyo Lengai volcanoes, northern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Hannes B.; Bosshard-Stadlin, Sonja A.; Weidendorfer, Daniel; Balashova, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The two neighboring volcanoes, Kerimasi and Oldoinyo Lengai, located 12 km apart in the eastern branch of the East African Rift in northern Tanzania display many similarities but also significant differences in terms of the types of magmas being erupted. The carbonatites of Kerimasi have a rather large compositional span (MgO=0-14 wt.% and CaO=32-56 wt.%). This is in sharp contrast to the very uniform Na-carbonatites typically erupted at Oldoinyo Lengai. As a result of this the Kerimasi carbonatites classify as Ca-carbonatites and they are all virtually devoid of alkalis. The trace elements patterns are rather uniform for the Kerimasi carbonatites and the patterns are similar to Ca-carbonatites found elsewhere. They differ to the natrocarbonatites by having considerable higher Zr and Hf concentrations. The slope of the REE ([La/Yb]N) are considerably flatter for the Kerimasi rocks (12 to 45) in comparison to natrocarbonatites (>1000) or even Ca-carbonatite dykes from Oldoinyo Lengai (~100). Interestingly, the Trig Point Hill debris avalanche deposit of Kerimasi is dominated by carbonatitic material in the form of blocks comprising intrusions, cumulates and vesicular lava flows (calculated to have a total volume of approximately 0.6 to 1.2 km3). This strongly indicates that the collapsed part of volcanic edifice at Kerimasi is in fact dominated by carbonatitic material with only minor amounts of silicate rocks. At Oldoinyo Lengai the carbonatitic material mainly occur inside the summit crater as small lava flows (with a combined volume of collapses but none of the resulting debris avalanche deposits contain lithics of carbonatitic material. This discrepancy is noteworthy, as the location of magma chamber is supposedly shallower at Oldoinyo Lengai (i.e., at a few km depth inside the volcano). Yet none of this is reflected in resulting deposits. Although much has been learned since Barry Dawson's discovery of the magmatic nature of the natrocarbonatites at Oldoinyo

  5. Observations and modelling of snow avalanche entrainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sovilla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper full scale avalanche dynamics measurements from the Italian Pizzac and Swiss Vallée de la Sionne test sites are used to develop a snowcover entrainment model. A detailed analysis of three avalanche events shows that snowcover entrainment at the avalanche front appears to dominate over bed erosion at the basal sliding surface. Furthermore, the distribution of mass within the avalanche body is primarily a function of basal friction. We show that the mass distribution in the avalanche changes the flow dynamics significantly. Two different dynamical models, the Swiss Voellmy-fluid model and the Norwegian NIS model, are used to back calculate the events. Various entrainment methods are investigated and compared to measurements. We demon-strate that the Norwegian NIS model is clearly better able to simulate the events once snow entrainment has been included in the simulations.

  6. Modelling the hydrological response of debris-free and debris-covered glaciers to present climatic conditions in the semiarid Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James; Vivero, Sebastián; Campos, Cristián; Egli, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the main contributors to runoff of a 62 km2 glacierized catchment in the semiarid Andes of central Chile, where both debris-free and debris-covered glaciers are present, combining an extensive set of field measurements, remote sensing products and an advanced glacio-hydrological model (TOPKAPI-ETH). The catchment contains two debris-free glaciers reaching down to 3900 m asl (Bello and Yeso Glaciers) and one debris-covered avalanche-fed glacier reaching to 3200 m asl (Piramide Glacier). A unique dataset of field measurements collected in the ablation seasons 2013-14 and 2014-15 included four automatic weather stations, manual measurements of snow depth and debris cover thickness, discharge measurements at glaciers outlets, photographic monitoring of surface albedo as well as ablation stakes measurements and snow pits. TOPKAPI-ETH combines physically-oriented parameterizations of snow and ice ablation, gravitational distribution of snow, snow albedo evolution, glacier dynamics, runoff routing and the ablation of debris-covered ice.We obtained the first detailed estimation of mass balance and runoff contribution of debris-covered glaciers in this mountainous region. Results show that while the mass balance of Bello and Yeso Glaciers is mostly controlled by air temperature lapse rates, the mass balance of Piramide Glacier is governed by debris thickness and avalanches. In fact, gravitational distribution by avalanching on wet years plays a key role and modulates the mass balance gradient of all glaciers in the catchment and can turn local mass balance from negative to positive. This is especially the case for Piramide Glacier, which shows large amounts of snow accumulation below the steep walls surrounding its upper area. Despite the thermal insulation effect of the debris cover, the contribution to runoff from debris-free and debris-covered glaciers is similar, mainly due to elevation differences. At the catchment scale, snowmelt represents more than 60

  7. Thermal energy in dry snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkogler, W.; Sovilla, B.; Lehning, M.

    2015-09-01

    Avalanches can exhibit many different flow regimes from powder clouds to slush flows. Flow regimes are largely controlled by the properties of the snow released and entrained along the path. Recent investigations showed the temperature of the moving snow to be one of the most important factors controlling the mobility of the flow. The temperature of an avalanche is determined by the temperature of the released and entrained snow but also increases by frictional processes with time. For three artificially released avalanches, we conducted snow profiles along the avalanche track and in the deposition area, which allowed quantifying the temperature of the eroded snow layers. This data set allowed to calculate the thermal balance, from release to deposition, and to discuss the magnitudes of different sources of thermal energy of the avalanches. For the investigated dry avalanches, the thermal energy increase due to friction was mainly depending on the effective elevation drop of the mass of the avalanche with a warming of approximately 0.3 °C per 100 vertical metres. Contrarily, the temperature change due to entrainment varied for the individual avalanches, from -0.08 to 0.3 °C, and depended on the temperature of the snow along the path and the erosion depth. Infrared radiation thermography (IRT) was used to assess the surface temperature before, during and just after the avalanche with high spatial resolution. This data set allowed to identify the warmest temperatures to be located in the deposits of the dense core. Future research directions, especially for the application of IRT, in the field of thermal investigations in avalanche dynamics are discussed.

  8. Thermal energy in dry snow avalanches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Steinkogler

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Avalanches can exhibit many different flow regimes from powder clouds to slush flows. Flow regimes are largely controlled by the properties of the snow released and entrained along the path. Recent investigations showed the temperature of the moving snow to be one of the most important factors controlling the mobility of the flow. The temperature of an avalanche is determined by the temperature of the released and entrained snow but also increases by frictional and collisional processes with time. For three artificially released avalanches, we conducted snow profiles along the avalanche track and in the deposition area, which allowed quantifying the temperature of the eroded snow layers. Infrared radiation thermography (IRT was used to assess the surface temperature before, during and just after the avalanche with high spatial resolution. This data set allowed to calculate the thermal balance, from release to deposition, and to discuss the magnitudes of different sources of thermal energy of the avalanches. We could confirm that, for the investigated dry avalanches, the thermal energy increase due to friction was mainly depending on the elevation drop of the avalanche with a warming of approximately 0.5 °C per 100 height meters. Contrary, warming due to entrainment was very specific to the individual avalanche and depended on the temperature of the snow along the path and the erosion depth ranging from nearly no warming to a maximum observed warming of 1 °C. Furthermore, we could observe the warmest temperatures are located in the deposits of the dense core. Future research directions, especially for the application of IRT, in the field of thermal investigations in avalanche dynamics are discussed.

  9. Equilibrium avalanches in spin glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Müller, Markus; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2012-06-01

    We study the distribution of equilibrium avalanches (shocks) in Ising spin glasses which occur at zero temperature upon small changes in the magnetic field. For the infinite-range Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model, we present a detailed derivation of the density ρ(ΔM) of the magnetization jumps ΔM. It is obtained by introducing a multicomponent generalization of the Parisi-Duplantier equation, which allows us to compute all cumulants of the magnetization. We find that ρ(ΔM)˜ΔM-τ with an avalanche exponent τ=1 for the SK model, originating from the marginal stability (criticality) of the model. It holds for jumps of size 1≪ΔMmodel. For finite-range models, using droplet arguments, we obtain the prediction τ=(df+θ)/dm where df,dm, and θ are the fractal dimension, magnetization exponent, and energy exponent of a droplet, respectively. This formula is expected to apply to other glassy disordered systems, such as the random-field model and pinned interfaces. We make suggestions for further numerical investigations, as well as experimental studies of the Barkhausen noise in spin glasses.

  10. Segregation induced fingering instabilities in granular avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Mark; Thornton, Anthony; Johnson, Chris; Kokelaar, Pete; Gray, Nico

    2013-04-01

    It is important to be able to predict the distance to which a hazardous natural granular flows (e.g. snow slab avalanches, debris-flows and pyroclastic flows) might travel, as this information is vital for accurate assessment of the risks posed by such events. In the high solids fraction regions of these flows the large particles commonly segregate to the surface, where they are transported to the margins to form bouldery flow fronts. In many natural flows these bouldery margins experience a much greater frictional force, leading to frontal instabilities. These instabilities create levees that channelize the flow vastly increasing the run-out distance. A similar effect can be observed in dry granular experiments, which use a combination of small round and large rough particles. When this mixture is poured down an inclined plane, particle size segregation causes the large particles to accumulate near the margins. Being rougher, the large particles experience a greater friction force and this configuration (rougher material in front of smoother) can be unstable. The instability causes the uniform flow front to break up into a series of fingers. A recent model for particle size-segregation has been coupled to existing avalanche models through a particle concentration dependent friction law. In this talk numerical solutions of this coupled system are presented and compared to both large scale experiments carried out at the USGS flume and more controlled small scale laboratory experiments. The coupled depth-averaged model captures the accumulation of large particles at the flow front. We show this large particle accumulation at the head of the flow can lead to the break-up of the initially uniform front into a series of fingers. However, we are unable to obtain a fully grid-resolved numerical solution; the width of the fingers decreases as the grid is refined. By considering the linear stability of a steady, fully-developed, bidisperse granular layer it is shown that

  11. A voluminous avalanche-induced lahar from Citlaltépetl volcano, Mexico: Implications for hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo; Vallance, James W.; Rose, William I.

    1993-12-01

    During the late Pleistocene the ancestral edifice of Citlaltépetl volcano (also known as Pico de Orizaba) collapsed to form a clay-rich deposit that extends 85 km from its source, has a volume of 1.8 km 3, and covers an area of 143 km 2 east of the volcano. The deposit has clay content ranging from 10 to 16% and contains secondary alteration minerals such as smectite and kaolinite. The deposit's features suggest that it had an origin as a sector collapse of hydrothermally altered rock that transformed from a debris avalanche to a cohesive lahar very close to its source. The presence of glacier ice and a hydrothermal system during late Pleistocene times apparently provided a source of pore water which enhanced the hydrothermal alteration of the summit of Citlaltépetl and was the origin of most of the water for the lahar. This deposit and several others suggest that glaciated volcanoes are sites where hydrothermal alteration and resulting cohesive lahars are most likely. Although cohesive lahars and debris avalanches both have origins as sector collapses, cohesive lahars are more mobile than similar-sized debris avalanches. Thus potential hazard of edifice collapse at glaciated volcanoes, especially those with large volumes of hydrothermally altered rock, includes the possibility of large-volume cohesive lahars.

  12. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  13. Exploiting Maximum Entropy method and ASTER data for assessing debris flow and debris slide susceptibility for the Giampilieri catchment (north-eastern Sicily, Italy).

    KAUST Repository

    Lombardo, L.

    2016-07-18

    This study aims at evaluating the performance of the Maximum Entropy method in assessing landslide susceptibility, exploiting topographic and multispectral remote sensing predictors. We selected the catchment of the Giampilieri stream, which is located in the north-eastern sector of Sicily (southern Italy), as test site. On 1/10/2009, a storm rainfall triggered in this area hundreds of debris flow/avalanche phenomena causing extensive economical damage and loss of life. Within this area a presence-only-based statistical method was applied to obtain susceptibility models capable of distinguish future activation sites of debris flow and debris slide, which where the main source failure mechanisms for flow or avalanche type propagation. The set of predictors used in this experiment comprised primary and secondary topographic attributes, derived by processing a high resolution digital elevation model, CORINE land cover data and a set of vegetation and mineral indices obtained by processing multispectral ASTER images. All the selected data sources are dated before the disaster. A spatially random partition technique was adopted for validation, generating fifty replicates for each of the two considered movement typologies in order to assess accuracy, precision and reliability of the models. The debris slide and debris flow susceptibility models produced high performances with the first type being the best fitted. The evaluation of the probability estimates around the mean value for each mapped pixel shows an inverted relation, with the most robust models corresponding to the debris flows. With respect to the role of each predictor within the modelling phase, debris flows appeared to be primarily controlled by topographic attributes whilst the debris slides were better explained by remotely sensed derived indices, particularly by the occurrence of previous wildfires across the slope. The overall excellent performances of the two models suggest promising perspectives for

  14. Temporal correlations in neuronal avalanche occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, F.; Herrmann, H. J.; Plenz, D.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing cortical activity consists of sequences of synchronized bursts, named neuronal avalanches, whose size and duration are power law distributed. These features have been observed in a variety of systems and conditions, at all spatial scales, supporting scale invariance, universality and therefore criticality. However, the mechanisms leading to burst triggering, as well as the relationship between bursts and quiescence, are still unclear. The analysis of temporal correlations constitutes a major step towards a deeper understanding of burst dynamics. Here, we investigate the relation between avalanche sizes and quiet times, as well as between sizes of consecutive avalanches recorded in cortex slice cultures. We show that quiet times depend on the size of preceding avalanches and, at the same time, influence the size of the following one. Moreover we evidence that sizes of consecutive avalanches are correlated. In particular, we show that an avalanche tends to be larger or smaller than the following one for short or long time separation, respectively. Our analysis represents the first attempt to provide a quantitative estimate of correlations between activity and quiescence in the framework of neuronal avalanches and will help to enlighten the mechanisms underlying spontaneous activity.

  15. Temporal correlations in neuronal avalanche occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, F; Herrmann, H J; Plenz, D; de Arcangelis, L

    2016-04-20

    Ongoing cortical activity consists of sequences of synchronized bursts, named neuronal avalanches, whose size and duration are power law distributed. These features have been observed in a variety of systems and conditions, at all spatial scales, supporting scale invariance, universality and therefore criticality. However, the mechanisms leading to burst triggering, as well as the relationship between bursts and quiescence, are still unclear. The analysis of temporal correlations constitutes a major step towards a deeper understanding of burst dynamics. Here, we investigate the relation between avalanche sizes and quiet times, as well as between sizes of consecutive avalanches recorded in cortex slice cultures. We show that quiet times depend on the size of preceding avalanches and, at the same time, influence the size of the following one. Moreover we evidence that sizes of consecutive avalanches are correlated. In particular, we show that an avalanche tends to be larger or smaller than the following one for short or long time separation, respectively. Our analysis represents the first attempt to provide a quantitative estimate of correlations between activity and quiescence in the framework of neuronal avalanches and will help to enlighten the mechanisms underlying spontaneous activity.

  16. Avalanche Initiaition Mechanism - A Finite-element Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Senthil

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Himalayas, the longest chain of mountains in the world, experiences extensive snowfall and avalanche activity during winter. Some of these areas are densely populated, and death and destruction on large scale due to avalanche activity has been reported in these areas. One of the ways of reducing the loss of life and material due to avalanches is through prediction of avalanches. An understanding of weather forecasting, terrain, and avalanche initiation mechanism is a prerequisite for avalanche prediction. In the present paper mathematical modelling of avalanche initiation mechanism has been discussed.

  17. Full-depth avalanches and soil erosion: an experimental site in NW Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceaglio, Elisabetta; Freppaz, Michele; Maggioni, Margherita; Filippa, Gianluca; Godone, Danilo; Zanini, Ermanno

    2010-05-01

    In the future the combined effect of changes in climate and land use could contribute to the intensification of soil erosion, related to snowpack movements as snow gliding and full-depth avalanches. Often, with particular meteorological conditions, the snow movement along a slope is associated with erosion and transport of the upper soil horizons, with the release of significant amount of material in the runout zone. Moreover the chemical composition of the snow in the deposition zone is usually different from the snow in the starting zone, revealing a potential release of ionic species mainly by the organic debris transported by the avalanche itself. The aim of this work is to characterize the quantity and quality of the material released by full-depth avalanches in the deposition zone. The study area is located in Aosta Valley (NW-Italy), on a SW exposed avalanche path, running from 2000 m a.s.l. of the triggering zone to 1200 m a.s.l. of the deposition zone. At this site, snow gliding and glide cracks, generally followed by full-depth avalanches, have been frequently observed. In the starting area, two plots located at the same elevation, slope and aspect, but with different soil moisture content, are equipped with moisture and temperature sensors, located at different depth in the soil, at the snow-soil interface and in the basal snowpack layer, and with glide shoes. The recorded data are related to the snow physical properties, measured by periodical investigations. In the deposition area, after a full-depth avalanche event occurred in March 2009, the mixed material was collected through snow avalanche coring, and a snow pit was dug in the deposit, in order to evaluate the quantity and the distribution of the material transported by the avalanche. First results show that the average density of the snow in the deposition zone was 624 kg m-3. The solid material was distributed mainly in the upper 5 cm of the avalanche deposit, with a mean concentration of the

  18. Pilot study on tracing the rapidly buried rock avalanche deposits within the accumulation zone of glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznichenko, Natalya; Dunning, Stuart; Rosser, Nick; McColl, Sam

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies shown that large mass failure events significantly contribute to the glacial sediment budget and affect its final deposition. However, in accumulation zone these events are exceptionally fast subsumed by snowfall and become ingested into the glacier with no evident surface expression. This leads to poor understanding of the magnitude-frequency of these events and their contribution to the sediment budget of the glaciers. The buried rock avalanches travel as englacial load within the ice that becomes the unique geomorphic horizon, which may constitute a major fraction of total glacial debris supplied to supraglacial cover of many debris-covered glaciers, but usually re-emerging in ablation zones not in a form usable to reconstruct the magnitude-frequency of these events. Here we present a first attempt to detect the rock avalanche deposit within the ice that becomes the unique geomorphic horizon or isochrones. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) was applied over the large deposit of well documented in January 2013 Mt. Haast/Dixon rock avalanche in Southern Alps of New Zealand, one year after emplacement. The large deposit 2 x 106 m3 of rock, snow and ice travelled 2.9 km over the northern margins of the Grand Plateau, just 200 m west of Plateau Hut, stalling close to the top of the Hochstetter Icefall, Aoraki/ Mt. Cook. The large deposit was lost to conventional remote sensing within 3 month after the event. In April 2014, at the time of the survey the deposit was entirely buried beneath the snow/firn cover, leaving no topographic expression of the deposit at the snow surface. The buried deposit was visible in crevasses, in the Hochstetter Ice Fall, in the Grand Plateau, and the icefall beneath Mt Haast, at depths estimated to be in the order of 5-10 m. Our subsurface data shows a good preservation of a rock avalanche deposit under about 3-5 m of snow and firn with the thickness broadly consistent along the length of the transect (1-2 m), with a thicker (5

  19. Source characteristics of long runout rock avalanches triggered by the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shengwen; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Bing; Zhou, Yuande; Lan, Hengxing; Li, Lihui

    2011-03-01

    The May 12, 2008 Wenchuan, China Earthquake which measured M w = 8.3 according to Chinese Earthquake Administration - CEA ( M w = 7.9 according to the USGS) directly triggered many landslides, which caused about 20,000 deaths, a quarter of the total. Rock avalanches were among the most destructive landslides triggered by this seismic event, and have killed more people than any other type of landslide in this earthquake. The Donghekou rock avalanche, one example of a catastrophic avalanche triggered by the Wenchuan earthquake, occurred in Qingchuan and buried one primary school and 184 houses, resulting in more than 780 deaths, and in addition, caused the formation of two landslide dams, which formed barrier lakes. Combining aerial images (resolution of 0.5 m) with field investigations, this paper lists some parameters of 66 cases in one table, and details source characteristics of six typical cases. It has been found that most of the long runout rock avalanches have source areas with high relief and steep inclination, causing the debris in the travel courses to accelerate. There was also a large amount of saturated Holocene-age loose deposits formed by a river or gully that existed in the travel courses. Comparison studies indicate that saturated Holocene loose deposits in the travel courses could be the most important factor for the causes of the long runout characteristic of the rock avalanches especially when they traveled over gentle or even flat ground surfaces. Furthermore, the relationships among the relief slope gradient, runout and covered area are investigated, and a threshold line for predicting the maximum horizontal runout distance under certain change in elevation is presented.

  20. Volcanic Catastrophes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The big news from 20th century geophysics may not be plate tectonics but rather the surprise return of catastrophism, following its apparent 19th century defeat to uniformitarianism. Divine miracles and plagues had yielded to the logic of integrating observations of everyday change over time. Yet the brilliant interpretation of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary iridium anomaly introduced an empirically based catastrophism. Undoubtedly, decades of contemplating our own nuclear self-destruction played a role in this. Concepts of nuclear winter, volcanic winter, and meteor impact winter are closely allied. And once the veil of threat of all-out nuclear exchange began to lift, we could begin to imagine slower routes to destruction as "global change". As a way to end our world, fire is a good one. Three-dimensional magma chambers do not have as severe a magnitude limitation as essentially two-dimensional faults. Thus, while we have experienced earthquakes that are as big as they get, we have not experienced volcanic eruptions nearly as great as those preserved in the geologic record. The range extends to events almost three orders of magnitude greater than any eruptions of the 20th century. Such a calamity now would at the very least bring society to a temporary halt globally, and cause death and destruction on a continental scale. At maximum, there is the possibility of hindering photosynthesis and threatening life more generally. It has even been speculated that the relative genetic homogeneity of humankind derives from an evolutionary "bottleneck" from near-extinction in a volcanic cataclysm. This is somewhat more palatable to contemplate than a return to a form of Original Sin, in which we arrived at homogeneity by a sort of "ethnic cleansing". Lacking a written record of truly great eruptions, our sense of human impact must necessarily be aided by archeological and anthropological investigations. For example, there is much to be learned about the influence of

  1. Modeling debris-covered glaciers: response to steady debris deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Leif S.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2016-05-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are common in rapidly eroding alpine landscapes. When thicker than a few centimeters, surface debris suppresses melt rates. If continuous debris cover is present, ablation rates can be significantly reduced leading to increases in glacier length. In order to quantify feedbacks in the debris-glacier-climate system, we developed a 2-D long-valley numerical glacier model that includes englacial and supraglacial debris advection. We ran 120 simulations on a linear bed profile in which a hypothetical steady state debris-free glacier responds to a step increase of surface debris deposition. Simulated glaciers advance to steady states in which ice accumulation equals ice ablation, and debris input equals debris loss from the glacier terminus. Our model and parameter selections can produce 2-fold increases in glacier length. Debris flux onto the glacier and the relationship between debris thickness and melt rate strongly control glacier length. Debris deposited near the equilibrium-line altitude, where ice discharge is high, results in the greatest glacier extension when other debris-related variables are held constant. Debris deposited near the equilibrium-line altitude re-emerges high in the ablation zone and therefore impacts melt rate over a greater fraction of the glacier surface. Continuous debris cover reduces ice discharge gradients, ice thickness gradients, and velocity gradients relative to initial debris-free glaciers. Debris-forced glacier extension decreases the ratio of accumulation zone to total glacier area (AAR). Our simulations reproduce the "general trends" between debris cover, AARs, and glacier surface velocity patterns from modern debris-covered glaciers. We provide a quantitative, theoretical foundation to interpret the effect of debris cover on the moraine record, and to assess the effects of climate change on debris-covered glaciers.

  2. Traking of Laboratory Debris Flow Fronts with Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Kulisch, Helmut; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Scheidl, Christian; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2015-04-01

    Image analysis technique is applied to track the time evolution of rapid debris flow fronts and their velocities in laboratory experiments. These experiments are parts of the project avaflow.org that intends to develop a GIS-based open source computational tool to describe wide spectrum of rapid geophysical mass flows, including avalanches and real two-phase debris flows down complex natural slopes. The laboratory model consists of a large rectangular channel 1.4m wide and 10m long, with adjustable inclination and other flow configurations. The setup allows investigate different two phase material compositions including large fluid fractions. The large size enables to transfer the results to large-scale natural events providing increased measurement accuracy. The images are captured by a high speed camera, a standard digital camera. The fronts are tracked by the camera to obtain data in debris flow experiments. The reflectance analysis detects the debris front in every image frame; its presence changes the reflectance at a certain pixel location during the flow. The accuracy of the measurements was improved with a camera calibration procedure. As one of the great problems in imaging and analysis, the systematic distortions of the camera lens are contained in terms of radial and tangential parameters. The calibration procedure estimates the optimal values for these parameters. This allows us to obtain physically correct and undistorted image pixels. Then, we map the images onto a physical model geometry, which is the projective photogrammetry, in which the image coordinates are connected with the object space coordinates of the flow. Finally, the physical model geometry is rewritten in the direct linear transformation form, which allows for the conversion from one to another coordinate system. With our approach, the debris front position can then be estimated by combining the reflectance, calibration and the linear transformation. The consecutive debris front

  3. Monitoring and modelling snow avalanches in Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humlum, O.; Christiansen, H.; Neumann, U.; Eckerstorfer, M.; Sjöblom, A.; Stalsberg, K.; Rubensdotter, L.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring and modelling snow avalanches in Svalbard Ole Humlum 1,3, Hanne H. Christiansen 1, Ulrich Neumann 1, Markus Eckerstorfer 1, Anna Sjöblom 1, Knut Stalsberg 2 and Lena Rubensdotter 2. 1: The University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS). 2: Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) 3: University of Oslo Ground based transportation in Svalbard landscape all takes place across mountainous terrain affected by different geomorphological slope processes. Traffic in and around the Svalbard settlements is increasing, and at the same time global climate models project substantial increases in temperature and precipitation in northern high latitudes for coming century. Therefore improved knowledge on the effect of climatic changes on slope processes in such high arctic landscapes is becoming increasingly important. Motivated by this, the CRYOSLOPE Svalbard research project since 2007 has carried out field observations on snow avalanche frequency and associated meteorological conditions. Snow avalanches are important geomorphic agents of erosion and deposition, and have long been a source of natural disasters in many mid-latitude mountain areas. Avalanches as a natural hazard has thereby been familiar to inhabitants of the Alps and Scandinavia for centuries, while it is a more recent experience in high arctic Svalbard. In addition, overall climate, topography and especially high winter wind speeds makes it difficult to apply snow avalanche models (numerical or empirical) developed for use at lower latitudes, e.g. in central Europe. In the presentation we examplify results from the ongoing (since winter 2006-07) monitoring of snow avalanches in Svalbard along a 70 km long observational route in the mountains. In addition, we present observations on the geomorphological impact of avalanches, with special reference to the formation of rock glaciers. Finally, we also present some initial results from numerical attempts of snow avalanche risk modelling within the study area.

  4. Statistics of Electron Avalanches and Streamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ficker

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the severe systematic deviations of populations of electron avalanches from the Furry distribution, which has been held to be the statistical law corresponding to them, and a possible explanation has been sought. A  new theoretical concept based on fractal avalanche multiplication has been proposed and is shown to be a convenient candidate for explaining these deviations from Furry statistics. 

  5. Catastrophic avalanches and methods of their control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Volodicheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Definition of such phenomenon as “catastrophic avalanche” is presented in this arti-cle. Several situations with releases of catastrophic avalanches in mountains of Caucasus, Alps, and Central Asia are investigated. Materials of snow-avalanche ob-servations performed since 1960s at the Elbrus station of the Lomonosov Moscow State University (Central Caucasus were used for this work. Complex-valued measures of engineering protection demonstrating different efficiencies are consid-ered.

  6. Evolution of the average avalanche shape with the universality class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurson, Lasse; Illa, Xavier; Santucci, Stéphane; Tore Tallakstad, Ken; Måløy, Knut Jørgen; Alava, Mikko J

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of systems ranging from the Barkhausen effect in ferromagnetic materials to plastic deformation and earthquakes respond to slow external driving by exhibiting intermittent, scale-free avalanche dynamics or crackling noise. The avalanches are power-law distributed in size, and have a typical average shape: these are the two most important signatures of avalanching systems. Here we show how the average avalanche shape evolves with the universality class of the avalanche dynamics by employing a combination of scaling theory, extensive numerical simulations and data from crack propagation experiments. It follows a simple scaling form parameterized by two numbers, the scaling exponent relating the average avalanche size to its duration and a parameter characterizing the temporal asymmetry of the avalanches. The latter reflects a broken time-reversal symmetry in the avalanche dynamics, emerging from the local nature of the interaction kernel mediating the avalanche dynamics.

  7. Pleistocene cohesive debris flows at Nevado de Toluca Volcano, central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, L.; Macías, J. L.

    2000-10-01

    During the Pleistocene, intense hydrothermal alteration promoted a flank failure of the southern portion of Nevado de Toluca volcano. This event produced a debris avalanche that transformed into a cohesive debris flow (Pilcaya deposit) owing to water saturation and weakness of the altered pre-avalanche rocks. The Pilcaya debris flow traveled along a narrow tectonic depression up to a distance of 40 km and then spread over a flat plain reaching up to 55 km from the volcano summit. This transition zone corresponds with a sudden break in slope from 5 to 0.5° that caused a rapid reduction in velocity and thickening of the flow that consequently reduced its competence to transport large particles. The resulting deposit thickens from 15 to 40 m, and contains boulders up to 15 m in diameter that form hummocky morphology close to the transitional zone. Sometime after the emplacement of the Pilcaya debris flow, heavy rains and superficial drainage contributed to remobilize the upper portions of the deposit causing two secondary lahars. These debris flows called El Mogote, traveled up to 75 km from the volcano. The edifice collapse generated lahars with a total volume of 2.8 km 3 that devastated an approximate area of 250 km 2. The area versus volume plot for both deposits shows that the magnitude of the event is comparable to other cohesive debris flows such as the Teteltzingo lahar (Pico de Orizaba, Mexico) and the Osceola mudflow (Mount Rainier, Wa). The Pilcaya debris flow represents additional evidence of debris flow transformed from a flank failure, a potentially devastating phenomenon that could threaten distant areas from the volcano previously considered without risk.

  8. Decompressional Volcanism Following Giant Landslide Events at a Miocene Shield- Volcano, Teno, Tenerife: Evidence From Field Observations, Augite and Olivine Chemistry, and Chemical Thermobarometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansteen, T. H.; Longpré, M.; Troll, V. R.; Walter, T. R.

    2006-12-01

    Giant landslides play a major role in the evolution of large oceanic shield-volcanoes around the globe. The removal of a significant portion of the volcanic edifice due to lateral collapse is thought to supersede the effect of erosion and subsidence in the process of island decay. On the other hand, rapid constructional phases appear to frequently follow giant mass-wasting and are generally concentrated in the region affected by the collapse (e.g. Réunion, La Palma, Fogo). The rapid unloading of up to thousands of km3 of near-surface rocks must decompress parts of the volcanic edifice, which in turn may affect the magmatic system [1,2]. Located in north-western Tenerife, Teno is a deeply eroded Miocene shield-volcano which has suffered at least two giant lateral collapses between 5-6 Ma [3]. Incised valleys dissect the structure of the old volcano and expose ancient landslide scars. Extensive debris avalanche deposits typically include juvenile pyroclastic material, suggesting that explosive volcanic activity was contemporaneous with landsliding. Moreover, post- collapse stratigraphy is marked by numerous thick ultramafic lava flows (basanites, ankaramites, picrites, SiO2 volcano may have disrupted any shallow magma reservoir existing prior to the collapse, resulting in pyroclastic activity. The decompression effect may also have triggered the rapid ascent of mafic melts stored at mantle depth, causing mixing of multiple magma batches and the aggregation of their crystal populations. The very steep normal zonation at the rims of many augite and olivine crystals may be attributed to a rapid change in the P-T conditions and/or the melt chemical composition. [1] Presley et al. 1997, Bull Volcanol. [2] Pinet & Jaupart 2005, JVGR. [3] Walter & Schmincke 2002, Int J Earth Sci.[4] Putirka et al. 2003, Am Min.

  9. Implementation of the RAMMS DEBRIS FLOW to Italian case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennari, Carmela; Mc Ardell, Brian; Parise, Mario; Santangelo, Nicoletta; Santo, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    RAMMS (RApid Mass MovementS) Debris Flow runout model solves 2D shallow-water equation using the Voellmy friction law. The model has been developed by the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL), and the Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research (SLF). It requires as input the following data: topography, release area or hydrograph, and the friction parameters μ and ξ. Deposition height, velocity, pressure and momentum are the most important outcomes, also in terms of Max values. The model was applied primarily in Alpine catchments to simulate debris flow runout. Beside the Alps, alluvial events are very common even in torrential catchments of the Southern Apennines of Italy, and contribute to build alluvial fans mainly located at the foothill of carbonate and volcanic mountains. During the last decades several events occurred in these areas, often highly populated, and caused serious damage to society and to people. Several case studies have been selected from a database on alluvial events in torrential catchments of Campania region, aimed at applying the RAMMS model to back-analyze the documented events, and to simulate future similar scenarios in different triggering conditions. In order to better understand the obtained data and choose the best results, field data are mandatories. For this reason we focused our attention on torrential events for which field data concerning deposition area and deposition height were available. We simulated different scenarios, with variable peak discharge and friction parameters, reproducing also the influence of anthropogenic structures. To choose the best results, observed data and predicted data were compared in an objective way, by means of a quantitative analysis. Predicted and observed deposition areas were compared in a GIS environment, and the best test was evaluated by computing several statistics accuracy derived from the confusion matrix, including the sensitivity, that

  10. Special Report Debris - Race

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Marine debris degrades ocean habitats, endangers marine and coastal wildlife, causes navigation hazards, results in economic losses to industry and governments, and...

  11. Disaster Debris Recovery Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 3,500 composting facilities, demolition contractors, haulers, transfer...

  12. Planetesimals in Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Youdin, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    Planetesimals form in gas-rich protoplanetary disks around young stars. However, protoplanetary disks fade in about 10 Myr. The planetesimals (and also many of the planets) left behind are too dim to study directly. Fortunately, collisions between planetesimals produce dusty debris disks. These debris disks trace the processes of terrestrial planet formation for 100 Myr and of exoplanetary system evolution out to 10 Gyr. This chapter begins with a summary of planetesimal formation as a prelude to the epoch of planetesimal destruction. Our review of debris disks covers the key issues, including dust production and dynamics, needed to understand the observations. Our discussion of extrasolar debris keeps an eye on similarities to and differences from Solar System dust.

  13. Roll Call Debris - Race

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Marine debris degrades ocean habitats, endangers marine and coastal wildlife, causes navigation hazards, results in economic losses to industry and governments, and...

  14. LEGACY - EOP Marine Debris

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data contains towed diver surveys of and weights of marine debris removed from the near shore environments of the NWHI.

  15. Fleet Debris Levels

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Marine debris degrades ocean habitats, endangers marine and coastal wildlife, causes navigation hazards, results in economic losses to industry and governments, and...

  16. Collaborative studies target volcanic hazards in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Gregg J. S.; Rose, William I.

    Central America is the second-most consistently active volcanic zone on Earth, after Indonesia. Centuries of volcanic activity have produced a spectacular landscape of collapsed calderas, debris flows, and thick blankets of pyroclastic materials. Volcanic activity dominates the history, culture, and daily life of Central American countries.January 2002 marked the third consecutive year in which a diverse group of volcanologists and geophysicists conducted focused field studies in Central America. This type of multi-institutional collaboration reflects the growing involvement of a number of U.S. and non-U.S. universities, and of other organizations, in Guatemala and El Salvador (Table 1).

  17. Application of Geographical Information Systems to Lahar Hazard Assessment on an Active Volcanic System

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Lahars (highly dynamic mixtures of volcanic debris and water) have been responsible for some of the most serious volcanic disasters and have killed tens of thousands of people in recent decades. Despite considerable lahar model development in the sciences, many research tools have proved wholly unsuitable for practical application on an active volcanic system where it is difficult to obtain field measurements. In addition, geographic information systems are tools that offer a great potenti...

  18. The Osceola Mudflow from Mount Rainier: Sedimentology and hazard implications of a huge clay-rich debris flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, J.W.; Scott, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    The 3.8 km3 Osceola Mudflow began as a water-saturated avalanche during phreatomagmatic eruptions at the summit of Mount Rainier about 5600 years ago. It filled valleys of the White River system north and northeast of Mount Rainier to depths of more than 100 m, flowed northward and westward more than 120 km, covered more than 200 km2 of the Puget Sound lowland, and extended into Puget Sound. The lahar had a velocity of ???19 m/s and peak discharge of ???2.5 ?? 106 m3/s, 40 to 50 km downstream, and was hydraulically dammed behind a constriction. It was coeval with the Paradise lahar, which flowed down the south side of Mount Rainier, and was probably related to it genetically. Osceola Mudflow deposits comprise three facies. The axial facies forms normally graded deposits 1.5 to 25 m thick in lowlands and valley bottoms and thinner ungraded deposits in lowlands; the valley-side facies forms ungraded deposits 0.3 to 2 m thick that drape valley slopes; and the hummocky facies, interpreted before as a separate (Greenwater) lahar, forms 2-10-m-thick deposits dotted with numerous hummocks up to 20 m high and 60 m in plan. Deposits show progressive downstream improvement in sorting, increase in sand and gravel, and decrease in clay. These downstream progressions are caused by incorporation (bulking) of better sorted gravel and sand. Normally graded axial deposits show similar trends from top to bottom because of bulking. The coarse-grained basal deposits in valley bottoms are similar to deposits near inundation limits. Normal grading in deposits is best explained by incremental aggradation of a flow wave, coarser grained at its front than at its tail. The Osceola Mudflow transformed completely from debris avalanche to clay-rich (cohesive) lahar within 2 km of its source because of the presence within the preavalanche mass of large volumes of pore water and abundant weak hydrothermally altered rock. A survey of cohesive lahars suggests that the amount of hydrothermally

  19. A new experimental site for the study of snow avalanches in the Aosta Valley (NW-Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segor, Valerio; Barbero, Monica; Barpi, Fabrizio; Borri Brunetto, Mauro; Bovet, Eloise; Brulport, Antoine; Ceaglio, Elisabetta; Chiaia, Bernardino; Fassin, Daniele; Freppaz, Michele; Frigo, Barbara; Godone, Danilo; Maggioni, Margherita; Pallara, Oronzo; Torretta, Franco; Viglietti, Davide; Welf, Arnoldo

    2010-05-01

    Within the Operational programme 'Italy - France (Alps - ALCOTRA)', Project "DynAval - Dynamique des avalanches: départ et interactions écoulement/obstacles", a new experimental site is proposed in the Aosta Valley (NW-Italy) to study small-medium size snow avalanches. In the past the attention has been mainly posed over extreme events, which can destroy villages and infrastructures and modify the landscape; scientists tried to understand their dynamics and potential destructive effects. Only recently the scientific world has started to study more in details the dynamics of smaller avalanches, which might be characterized by different relevant processes than those typical of extreme events. The paper describes the new experimental site that will be built to study the behavior of this kind of snow avalanches from several points of view. The test site is located in Aosta Valley (North-western Italian Alps) within the MonterosaSki resort (410171, 5078440) on the Monte Rosa Massif. The slope, with an altitude difference of about 300 m (from 2300 to 2570 m a.s.l.), has a dip direction of 350° and a mean dip of about 38°. The rock mass is constituted of a surface debris layer about 10 m thick on a highly fractured bedrock. Two instability phenomena can occur in the slope: superficial sliding in the debris layer and rock falls. The main objectives of the studies are: 1. the dynamics of small-medium size avalanches; 2. the interaction between avalanche flows and obstacles; 3. the mass balance of avalanches; 4. the characteristics of the snow in the deposition zone compared to those of the release zone; 5. the release process produced by explosives. To achieve the objectives, from winter 2009-2010, it is planned to artificially release avalanches along the slope according to the snow and weather conditions. In that occasion, the research team records the event measuring different variables of the avalanche. It is planned to film the event from the opposite side of the

  20. Characterization of Debris from the DebriSat Hypervelocity Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, M.; Kleespies, J.; Patankar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    The DebriSat project is an effort by NASA and the DoD to update the standard break-up model for objects in orbit. The DebriSat object, a 56 kg representative LEO satellite, was subjected to a hypervelocity impact in April 2014. For the hypervelocity test, the representative satellite was suspended within a "soft-catch" arena formed by polyurethane foam panels to minimize the interactions between the debris generated from the hypervelocity impact and the metallic walls of the test chamber. After the impact, the foam panels and debris not caught by the panels were collected and shipped to the University of Florida where the project has now advanced to the debris characterization stage. The characterization effort has been divided into debris collection, measurement, and cataloguing. Debris collection and cataloguing involves the retrieval of debris from the foam panels and cataloguing the debris in a database. Debris collection is a three-step process: removal of loose debris fragments from the surface of the foam panels; X-ray imaging to identify/locate debris fragments embedded within the foam panel; extraction of the embedded debris fragments identified during the X-ray imaging process. As debris fragments are collected, they are catalogued into a database specifically designed for this project. Measurement involves determination of size, mass, shape, material, and other physical properties and well as images of the fragment. Cataloguing involves a assigning a unique identifier for each fragment along with the characterization information.

  1. Rapid motions of free-surface avalanches down curved and twisted channels and their numerical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P; Wang, Yongqi; Hutter, Kolumban

    2005-07-15

    This paper presents a new model and discussions about the motion of avalanches from initiation to run-out over moderately curved and twisted channels of complicated topography and its numerical simulations. The model is a generalization of a well established and widely used depth-averaged avalanche model of Savage & Hutter and is published with all its details in Pudasaini & Hutter (Pudasaini & Hutter 2003 J. Fluid Mech. 495, 193-208). The intention was to be able to describe the flow of a finite mass of snow, gravel, debris or mud, down a curved and twisted corrie of nearly arbitrary cross-sectional profile. The governing equations for the distribution of the avalanche thickness and the topography-parallel depth-averaged velocity components are a set of hyperbolic partial differential equations. They are solved for different topographic configurations, from simple to complex, by applying a high-resolution non-oscillatory central differencing scheme with total variation diminishing limiter. Here we apply the model to a channel with circular cross-section and helical talweg that merges into a horizontal channel which may or may not become flat in cross-section. We show that run-out position and geometry depend strongly on the curvature and twist of the talweg and cross-sectional geometry of the channel, and how the topography is shaped close to run-out zones.

  2. Eruptive History of the Rhyolitic Guangoche Volcano, Los Azufres Volcanic Field, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel Granados, E.; Arce, J. L.; Macias, J. L.; Layer, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Guangoche is a rhyolitic and polygenetic volcano with a maximum elevation of 2,760 meters above sea level. It is situated to the southwest of the Los Azufres Volcanic Field (LAVF), in the central sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Guangoche volcano is the youngest volcano described within the LAVF. It shows a horseshoe shaped crater open to the south, with a central lava dome. Its eruptive history during late Pleistocene has been intense with six explosive eruptions that consists of: 1) A southwards sector collapse of the volcano that generated a debris avalanche deposit with megablocks of heterogenous composition; 2) A plinian-type eruption that generated a pumice fall deposit and pyroclastic density currents by column collapse at 30.6 ka; 3) A plinian-type eruption "White Pumice Sequence" (29 ka) that developed a 22-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 7.0 x 107 kg/s (vol. = 0.53 km3); 4) A dome-destruction event, "Agua Blanca Pyroclastic Sequence" at 26.7 ka, that deposited a block-and-ash flow deposit; 5) A subplinian-plinian type eruption "Ochre Pyroclastic Sequence" (<26 ka) with an important initial phreatomagmatic phase, that generated pyroclastic density currents and pumice fallouts. The subplinian-plinian event generated a 16-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 1.9 x 107 kg/s, and magma volume of 0.38 km3; 6) The eruptive history ended with a subplinian eruption (<<26 ka), that generated a multilayered fall deposit, that developed a 11-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 2.9 x 106 kg/s and a magma volume of 0.26 km3. Volcanic activity at Guangoche volcano has been intense and future activity should not be discarded. Unfortunately, the last two events have not been dated yet. Guangoche rhyolitic magma is characterized by low-Ba contents suggesting crystal mush extraction for their genesis.

  3. Electron avalanches in liquid argon mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.G.; Dardin, S.M.; Kadel, R.W.; Kadyk, J.A.; Wenzel, W.B.; Peskov, V.

    2004-03-19

    We have observed stable avalanche gain in liquid argon when mixed with small amounts of xenon in the high electric field (>7 MV/cm) near the point of a chemically etched needle in a point-plane geometry. We identify two gain mechanisms, one pressure dependent, and the other independent of the applied pressure. We conclude that the pressure dependent signals are from avalanche gain in gas bubbles at the tip of the needle, while the pressure independent pulses are from avalanche gain in liquid. We measure the decay time spectra of photons from both types of avalanches. The decay times from the pressure dependent pulses decrease (increase) with the applied pressure (high voltage), while the decay times from the pressure independent pulses are approximately independent of pressure or high voltage. For our operating conditions, the collected charge distribution from avalanches is similar for 60 keV or 122 keV photon sources. With krypton additives, instead of Xe, we measure behavior consistent with only the pressure dependent pulses. Neon and TMS were also investigated as additives, and designs for practical detectors were tested.

  4. Deterministically Driven Avalanche Models of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul; Joseph, Richard; Pirot, Dorian

    2014-08-01

    We develop and discuss the properties of a new class of lattice-based avalanche models of solar flares. These models are readily amenable to a relatively unambiguous physical interpretation in terms of slow twisting of a coronal loop. They share similarities with other avalanche models, such as the classical stick-slip self-organized critical model of earthquakes, in that they are driven globally by a fully deterministic energy-loading process. The model design leads to a systematic deficit of small-scale avalanches. In some portions of model space, mid-size and large avalanching behavior is scale-free, being characterized by event size distributions that have the form of power-laws with index values, which, in some parameter regimes, compare favorably to those inferred from solar EUV and X-ray flare data. For models using conservative or near-conservative redistribution rules, a population of large, quasiperiodic avalanches can also appear. Although without direct counterparts in the observational global statistics of flare energy release, this latter behavior may be relevant to recurrent flaring in individual coronal loops. This class of models could provide a basis for the prediction of large solar flares.

  5. Deterministically Driven Avalanche Models of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, Antoine; Joseph, Richard; Pirot, Dorian

    2014-01-01

    We develop and discuss the properties of a new class of lattice-based avalanche models of solar flares. These models are readily amenable to a relatively unambiguous physical interpretation in terms of slow twisting of a coronal loop. They share similarities with other avalanche models, such as the classical stick--slip self-organized critical model of earthquakes, in that they are driven globally by a fully deterministic energy loading process. The model design leads to a systematic deficit of small scale avalanches. In some portions of model space, mid-size and large avalanching behavior is scale-free, being characterized by event size distributions that have the form of power-laws with index values, which, in some parameter regimes, compare favorably to those inferred from solar EUV and X-ray flare data. For models using conservative or near-conservative redistribution rules, a population of large, quasiperiodic avalanches can also appear. Although without direct counterparts in the observational global st...

  6. High Resolution Radar Measurements of Snow Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwaine, Jim; Sovilla, Betty; Vriend, Nathalie; Brennan, Paul; Ash, Matt; Keylock, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Geophysical mass flows, such as snow avalanches, are a major hazard in mountainous areas and have a significant impact on the infrastructure, economy and tourism of such regions. Obtaining a thorough understanding of the dynamics of snow avalanches is crucial for risk assessment and the design of defensive structures. However, because the underlying physics is poorly understood there are significant uncertainties concerning current models, which are poorly validated due to a lack of high resolution data. Direct observations of the denser core of a large avalanche are particularly difficult, since it is frequently obscured by the dilute powder cloud. We have developed and installed a phased array FMCW radar system that penetrates the powder cloud and directly images the dense core with a resolution of around 1 m at 50 Hz over the entire slope. We present data from recent avalanches at Vallee de la Sionne that show a wealth of internal structure and allow the tracking of individual fronts, roll waves and surges down the slope for the first time. We also show good agreement between the radar results and existing measurement systems that record data at particular points on the avalanche track.

  7. Space Debris & its Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Sourabh; Arora, Nishant

    2012-07-01

    Space debris has become a growing concern in recent years, since collisions at orbital velocities can be highly damaging to functioning satellites and can also produce even more space debris in the process. Some spacecraft, like the International Space Station, are now armored to deal with this hazard but armor and mitigation measures can be prohibitively costly when trying to protect satellites or human spaceflight vehicles like the shuttle. This paper describes the current orbital debris environment, outline its main sources, and identify mitigation measures to reduce orbital debris growth by controlling these sources. We studied the literature on the topic Space Debris. We have proposed some methods to solve this problem of space debris. We have also highlighted the shortcomings of already proposed methods by space experts and we have proposed some modification in those methods. Some of them can be very effective in the process of mitigation of space debris, but some of them need some modification. Recently proposed methods by space experts are maneuver, shielding of space elevator with the foil, vaporizing or redirecting of space debris back to earth with the help of laser, use of aerogel as a protective layer, construction of large junkyards around international space station, use of electrodynamics tether & the latest method proposed is the use of nano satellites in the clearing of the space debris. Limitations of the already proposed methods are as follows: - Maneuvering can't be the final solution to our problem as it is the act of self-defence. - Shielding can't be done on the parts like solar panels and optical devices. - Vaporizing or redirecting of space debris can affect the human life on earth if it is not done in proper manner. - Aerogel has a threshold limit up to which it can bear (resist) the impact of collision. - Large junkyards can be effective only for large sized debris. In this paper we propose: A. The Use of Nano Tubes by creating a mesh

  8. Avalanche dynamics in silicon avalanche single- and few-photon sensitive photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazej, J; Prochazka, I, E-mail: blazej@fjfi.cvut.c [Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic)

    2009-11-15

    We are presenting the results of the study of the Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) avalanche pulse response rise-time and its dependence on several key parameters. We were investigating the unique properties of K14 type SPAD with its high delay uniformity of 200 {mu}m active area, the character of avalanche, and the correlation between the avalanche build-up time and the photon number involved in the avalanche trigger. The detection chip was operated with bias higher then breakdown voltage, ie. in Geiger mode. The detection chip was operated in a passive quenching circuit with active gating. This set-up enabled us to monitor both the diode reverse current using an electrometer and a fast digitizing oscilloscope. The electrometer reading enabled to estimate the photon number per detection event, the avalanche build up was recorded on the oscilloscope and processed by custom designed waveform analysis package. The correlation of avalanche build up to the photon number, bias above break, photon absorption location, optical pulse length and photon energy was investigated in detail. The experimental results are presented.

  9. The Massive Compound Cofre de Perote Shield Volcano: a Volcanological Oddity in the Eastern Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, L.; Carrasco-Nunez, G.; Diaz-Castellon, R.; Rodriguez, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    Cofre de Perote volcano anchors the northern end of the easternmost of several volcanic chains orthogonal to the E-W trend of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB). Its structure, geochemistry, and volcanic history diverge significantly from that of the large dominantly andesitic stratovolcanoes that have been the major focus of research efforts in the MVB. Andesitic-trachyandesitic to dacitic-trachydacitic effusive activity has predominated at Cofre de Perote, forming a massive low-angle compound shield volcano that dwarfs the more typical smaller shield volcanoes of the central and western MVB. The 4282-m-high volcano overlooking Xalapa, the capital city of the State of Veracruz, has a diameter of about 30 km and rises more than 3000 m above the coastal plain to the east. Repeated edifice collapse has left massive horseshoe-shaped scarps that truncate the eastern side of the edifice. Five major evolutionary stages characterize the growth of this compound volcano: 1) emplacement of a multiple-vent dome complex forming the basal structure of Cofre de Perote around 1.9-1.3 Ma; 2) construction of the basal part of the compound shield volcano from at least two main upper-edifice vents at about 400 ka; 3) effusion of the summit dome-like lavas through multiple vents at ca. 240 ka; 4) eruption of a large number of geochemically diverse, alkaline and calc-alkaline Pleistocene-to-Holocene monogenetic cones (likely related to regional volcanism) through the flanks of the Cofre de Perote edifice; 5) late-stage, large-volume edifice collapse on at least two occasions (ca. 40 ka and ca. 10 ka), producing long-runout debris avalanches that traveled to the east. An undated tephra layer from Cofre de Perote overlies deposits likely of the youngest collapse. Cofre de Perote is one of several volcanoes in the roughly N-S-trending chain that has undergone major edifice collapse. As with Citlaltepetl (Pico de Orizaba) and Las Cumbres volcanoes, Cofre de Perote was constructed at the

  10. Water fact sheet, history of landslides and debris flows at Mount Rainier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, K.M.; Vallance, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Many landslides and debris flows have originated from Mount Rainier since the retreat of glaciers from Puget Sound about 10,000 years ago. The recurrent instability is due to several factors--height of the steep-sided volcanic cone, frequent volcanic activity, continuous weakening of rock by steam and hot, chemical-laden water, and exposure of unstable areas as the mountains glaciers have receded. The landslide scars and deposits tell a fascinating story of the changing shape of the volcano. Landslides occur when part of the volcano "collapses" or fails and slides away from the rest of the volcano. The failed mass rapidly breaks up into a jumble of disaggregated pieces that flow at high velocity like a fluid. Clay and water in the debris cause further change to a liquid slurry known as a debris flow or mudflow. Volcanic debris flows are also widely known by the Indonesian term "lahar." Although the largest debris flows at Rainier form from landslides, many smaller flows are caused by volcanic eruptions, intense rainfall, and glacial-outburst floods.

  11. Initiation processes for run-off generated debris flows in the Wenchuan earthquake area of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, W.; Dong, X. J.; Xu, Q.; Wang, G. H.; van Asch, T. W. J.; Hicher, P. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of huge debris flows greatly increased in the epicenter area of the Wenchuan earthquake. Field investigation revealed that runoff during rainstorm played a major role in generating debris flows on the loose deposits, left by coseismic debris avalanches. However, the mechanisms of these runoff-generated debris flows are not well understood due to the complexity of the initiation processes. To better understand the initiation mechanisms, we simulated and monitored the initiation process in laboratory flume test, with the help of a 3D laser scanner. We found that run-off incision caused an accumulation of material down slope. This failed as shallow slides when saturated, transforming the process into debris in a second stage. After this initial phase, the debris flow volume increased rapidly by a chain of subsequent cascading processes starting with collapses of the side walls, damming and breaching, leading to a rapid widening of the erosion channel. In terms of erosion amount, the subsequent mechanisms were much more important than the initial one. The damming and breaching were found to be the main reasons for the huge magnitude of the debris flows in the post-earthquake area. It was also found that the tested material was susceptible to excess pore pressure and liquefaction in undrained triaxial, which may be a reason for the fluidization in the flume tests.

  12. Assessment of the Perchertal avalanche in Tyrol, Austria

    OpenAIRE

    KURT, Tayfun

    2014-01-01

    The present study has been conducted to analyze the Perchertal avalanche area near Bärenkopf Mountain, which has several avalanche-prone areas on its slopes, within the area of Pertisau, Tyrol, in Austria. The main focus is on identifying the characteristics of the avalanche process itself to determine the potential risk to endangered objects, which include an important road and a hotel. Another focus is to evaluate the current local hazard map. Based on the dynamic avalanche models (Samos-AT...

  13. Quantitative reconstruction of late Holocene surface evolution on an alpine debris-flow fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürch, Peter; Densmore, Alexander L.; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Rosser, Nick J.; Kober, Florian; Schlunegger, Fritz; McArdell, Brian; Alfimov, Vasili

    2016-12-01

    Debris-flow fans form a ubiquitous record of past debris-flow activity in mountainous areas, and may be useful for inferring past flow characteristics and consequent future hazard. Extracting information on past debris flows from fan records, however, requires an understanding of debris-flow deposition and fan surface evolution; field-scale studies of these processes have been very limited. In this paper, we document the patterns and timing of debris-flow deposition on the surface of the large and exceptionally active Illgraben fan in southwestern Switzerland. We use terrain analysis, radiocarbon dating of sediment fill in the Illgraben catchment, and cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl exposure dating of debris-flow deposits on the fan to constrain the temporal evolution of the sediment routing system in the catchment and on the fan during the past 3200 years. We show that the fan surface preserves a set of debris-flow lobes that were predominantly deposited after the occurrence of a large rock avalanche near the fan apex at about 3200 years ago. This rock avalanche shifted the apex of the fan and impounded sediment within the Illgraben catchment. Subsequent evolution of the fan surface has been governed by both lateral and radial shifts in the active depositional lobe, revealed by the cosmogenic radionuclide dates and by cross-cutting geometrical relationships on the fan surface. This pattern of frequent avulsion and fan surface occupation provides field-scale evidence of the type of large-scale compensatory behavior observed in experimental sediment routing systems.

  14. Volcanic hazard management in dispersed volcanism areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Traditional volcanic hazard methodologies were developed mainly to deal with the big stratovolcanoes. In such type of volcanoes, the hazard map is an important tool for decision-makers not only during a volcanic crisis but also for territorial planning. According to the past and recent eruptions of a volcano, all possible volcanic hazards are modelled and included in the hazard map. Combining the hazard map with the Event Tree the impact area can be zoned and defining the likely eruptive scenarios that will be used during a real volcanic crisis. But in areas of disperse volcanism is very complex to apply the same volcanic hazard methodologies. The event tree do not take into account unknown vents, because the spatial concepts included in it are only related with the distance reached by volcanic hazards. The volcanic hazard simulation is also difficult because the vent scatter modifies the results. The volcanic susceptibility try to solve this problem, calculating the most likely areas to have an eruption, but the differences between low and large values obtained are often very small. In these conditions the traditional hazard map effectiveness could be questioned, making necessary a change in the concept of hazard map. Instead to delimit the potential impact areas, the hazard map should show the expected behaviour of the volcanic activity and how the differences in the landscape and internal geo-structures could condition such behaviour. This approach has been carried out in La Palma (Canary Islands), combining the concept of long-term hazard map with the short-term volcanic scenario to show the expected volcanic activity behaviour. The objective is the decision-makers understand how a volcanic crisis could be and what kind of mitigation measurement and strategy could be used.

  15. DEM modeling of flexible structures against granular material avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Stéphane; Albaba, Adel; Nicot, François; Chareyre, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    This article presents the numerical modeling of flexible structures intended to contain avalanches of granular and coarse material (e.g. rock slide, a debris slide). The numerical model is based on a discrete element method (YADE-Dem). The DEM modeling of both the flowing granular material and the flexible structure are detailed before presenting some results. The flowing material consists of a dry polydisperse granular material accounting for the non-sphericity of real materials. The flexible structure consists in a metallic net hanged on main cables, connected to the ground via anchors, on both sides of the channel, including dissipators. All these components were modeled as flexible beams or wires, with mechanical parameters defined from literature data. The simulation results are presented with the aim of investigating the variability of the structure response depending on different parameters related to the structure (inclination of the fence, with/without brakes, mesh size opening), but also to the channel (inclination). Results are then compared with existing recommendations in similar fields.

  16. Snow Mass Quantification and Avalanche Victim Search By Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaedicke, C.

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems can be used in many applications of snow and ice research. The information from the GPR is interpreted to identify layers, ob- ject and different structures in the snow. A commercially available GPR system was further developed to work in the rough environment of snow and ice. The applied GPR is a 900 MHz system that easily reaches snow depths of ten meters. The system is cal- ibrated by several manual snow depth measurements during each survey. The depth resolution is depending on the snow type and ranges around +/- 0.1 m. The GPR sys- tem carried along a line of interest and is triggered by an odometer wheel at regular adjustable steps. All equipment is mounted in a sledge and is moved by a snow mo- bile over the surface. This setup allows the efficient coverage of several kilometers of profiles. The radar profiles give a real time two-dimensional impression of structures and objects and the interface between snow and underlying ground. The actual radar profile is shown on a screen on the sledge allowing the immediate marking of objects and structures. During the past three years the instrument was successfully used for the study of snow distributions, for the detection of glacier crevasses under the snow cover and for the search of avalanche victims in avalanche debris. The results show the capability of the instrument to detect persons and objects in the snow cover. In the future this could be new tool for avalanche rescue operations. Today the size and weight of the system prevents the access to very steep slopes and areas not accessible for snowmobile. Further development will decrease the size of the system and make it a valuable tool to quantify the snow mass in avalanche release zones and run out areas.

  17. Adjoint method and runaway electron avalanche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Brennan, Dylan P.; Boozer, Allen H.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-02-01

    The adjoint method for the study of runaway electron dynamics in momentum space Liu et al (2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 010702) is rederived using the Green’s function method, for both the runaway probability function (RPF) and the expected loss time (ELT). The RPF and ELT obtained using the adjoint method are presented, both with and without the synchrotron radiation reaction force. The adjoint method is then applied to study the runaway electron avalanche. Both the critical electric field and the growth rate for the avalanche are calculated using this fast and novel approach.

  18. The 2002 rock/ice avalanche at Kolka/Karmadon, Russian Caucasus: assessment of extraordinary avalanche formation and mobility, and application of QuickBird satellite imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Huggel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A massive rock/ice avalanche of about 100x106m3 volume took place on the northern slope of the Kazbek massif, North Ossetia, Russian Caucasus, on 20 September 2002. The avalanche started as a slope failure, that almost completely entrained Kolka glacier, traveled down the Genaldon valley for 20km, was stopped at the entrance of the Karmadon gorge, and was finally succeeded by a distal mudflow which continued for another 15km. The event caused the death of ca. 140 people and massive destruction. Several aspects of the event are extraordinary, i.e. the large ice volume involved, the extreme initial acceleration, the high flow velocity, the long travel distance and particularly the erosion of a valley-type glacier, a process not known so far. The analysis of these aspects is essential for process understanding and worldwide glacial hazard assessments. This study is therefore concerned with the analysis of processes and the evaluation of the most likely interpretations. The analysis is based on QuickBird satellite images, field observations, and ice-, flow- and thermo-mechanical considerations. QuickBird is currently the best available satellite sensor in terms of ground resolution (0.6 m and opens new perspectives for assessment of natural hazards. Evaluation of the potential of QuickBird images for assessment of high-mountain hazards shows the feasibility for detailed avalanche mapping and analysis of flow dynamics, far beyond the capabilities of conventional satellite remote sensing. It is shown that the avalanche was characterized by two different flows. The first one was comparable to a hyperconcentrated flow and was immediately followed by a flow with a much lower concentration of water involving massive volumes of ice. The high mobility of the avalanche is likely related to fluidization effects at the base of the moving ice/debris mass with high pore pressures and a continuous supply of water due to frictional melting of ice. The paper

  19. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-03-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity.

  20. Global Assessment of Volcanic Debris Hazards from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Hazard (slope stability) assessment for different sectors of volcano edifices was successfully obtained from volcanoes in North and South America. The assessment entailed Hyperion images to locate portions of the volcano that were hydrothermally altered to clay rich rocks with zones that were also rich in alunite and other minerals. The identified altered rock zones were field checked and sampled. The rock strength of these zones was calculated from the field and laboratory measurements. Volcano modeling utilizing the distinct element method and limit equilibrium technique, with the calculated strength data was used to assess stability and deformation of the edifice. Modeling results give indications of possible failure volumes, velocities and direction. The models show the crucial role hydrothermally weak rock plays in reducing the strength o the volcano edifice and the rapid identification of weak rock through remote sensing techniques. Volcanoes were assessed in the Cascade Range (USA), Mexico, and Chile (ongoing).

  1. Assessing the importance of terrain parameters on glide avalanche release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, Erich H.; Hendrikx, Jordy; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Glide snow avalanches are dangerous and difficult to predict. Despite recent research there is still a lack of understanding regarding the controls of glide avalanche release. Glide avalanches often occur in similar terrain or the same locations annually and observations suggest that topography may be critical. Thus, to gain an understanding of the terrain component of these types of avalanches we examined terrain parameters associated with glide avalanche release as well as areas of consistent glide crack formation but no subsequent avalanches. Glide avalanche occurrences visible from the Going-to-the-Sun Road corridor in Glacier National Park, Montana from 2003-2013 were investigated using an avalanche database derived of daily observations each year from April 1 to June 15. This yielded 192 glide avalanches in 53 distinct avalanche paths. Each avalanche occurrence was digitized in a GIS using satellite, oblique, and aerial imagery as reference. Topographical parameters such as area, slope, aspect, elevation and elevation were then derived for the entire dataset utilizing GIS tools and a 10m DEM. Land surface substrate and surface geology were derived from National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring maps and U.S. Geological Survey surface geology maps, respectively. Surface roughness and glide factor were calculated using a four level classification index. . Then, each avalanche occurrence was aggregated to general avalanche release zones and the frequencies were compared. For this study, glide avalanches released in elevations ranging from 1300 to 2700 m with a mean aspect of 98 degrees (east) and a mean slope angle of 38 degrees. The mean profile curvature for all glide avalanches was 0.15 and a plan curvature of -0.01, suggesting a fairly linear surface (i.e. neither convex nor concave). The glide avalanches occurred in mostly bedrock made up of dolomite and limestone slabs and talus deposits with very few occurring in alpine meadows. However, not all glide

  2. Volcanic hazard assessment in monogenetic volcanic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolini, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    [eng] One of the most important tasks of modern volcanology, which represents a significant socio-economic implication, is to conduct hazard assessment in active volcanic systems. These volcanological studies are aimed at hazard that allows to constructing hazard maps and simulating different eruptive scenarios, and are mainly addressed to contribute to territorial planning, definition of emergency plans or managing volcanic crisis. The impact of a natural event, as a volcanic eruption, can s...

  3. High temperature and wavelength dependence of avalanche gain of AlAsSb avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandall, Ian C; Xie, Shiyu; Xie, Jingjing; Tan, Chee Hing

    2011-11-01

    The evolution of the dark currents and breakdown at elevated temperatures of up to 450  K are studied using thin AlAsSb avalanche regions. While the dark currents increase rapidly as the temperature is increased, the avalanche gain is shown to only have a weak temperature dependence. Temperature coefficients of breakdown voltage of 0.93 and 1.93  mV/K were obtained from the diodes of 80 and 230  nm avalanche regions (i-regions), respectively. These values are significantly lower than for other available avalanche materials at these temperatures. The wavelength dependence of multiplication characteristics of AlAsSb p-i-n diodes has also been investigated, and it was found that the ionization coefficients for electrons and holes are comparable within the electric field and wavelength ranges measured.

  4. Nano-multiplication region avalanche photodiodes and arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinyu (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An avalanche photodiode with a nano-scale reach-through structure comprising n-doped and p-doped regions, formed on a silicon island on an insulator, so that the avalanche photodiode may be electrically isolated from other circuitry on other silicon islands on the same silicon chip as the avalanche photodiode. For some embodiments, multiplied holes generated by an avalanche reduces the electric field in the depletion region of the n-doped and p-doped regions to bring about self-quenching of the avalanche photodiode. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  5. Space Debris Mitigation Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of national and international space debris mitigation guides is to promote the preservation of near-Earth space for applications and exploration missions far into the future. To accomplish this objective, the accumulation of objects, particularly in long-lived orbits, must be eliminated or curtailed.

  6. The avalanche-mode superjunction LED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutta, Satadal; Steeneken, Peter G.; Agarwal, Vishal Vishal; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Annema, Anne J.; Hueting, Raymond Josephus Engelbart

    2017-01-01

    Avalanche-mode light-emitting diodes (AMLEDs) in silicon (Si) are potential light sources to enable monolithic optical links in standard CMOS technology, due to the large overlap of their electroluminescent (EL) spectra with the responsivity of Si photodiodes. These EL spectra depend on the reverse

  7. Measuring acoustic emissions in an avalanche slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of acoustic emissions are a common technique for monitoring damage and predicting imminent failure of a material. Within natural hazards it has already been used to successfully predict the break-off of a hanging glacier. To explore the applicability of the acoustic emission (AE) technique for avalanche prediction, we installed two acoustic sensors (with 30 kHz and 60 kHz resonance frequency) in an avalanche prone slope at the Mittelgrat in the Parsenn ski area above Davos, Switzerland. The slope is north-east facing, frequently wind loaded, and approximately 35° steep. The AE signals - in particular the event energy and waiting time distributions - were compared with slope stability. The latter was determined by observing avalanche activity. The results of two winter's measurements yielded that the exponent β of the inverse cumulative distribution of event energy showed a significant drop (from a value of 3.5 to roughly 2.5) at very unstable conditions, i.e. on the three days during our measurement periods when spontaneous avalanches released on our study slope.

  8. Simulations of avalanche breakdown statistics: probability and timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jo Shien; Tan, Chee Hing; David, John P. R.

    2010-04-01

    Important avalanche breakdown statistics for Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs), such as avalanche breakdown probability, dark count rate, and the distribution of time taken to reach breakdown (providing mean time to breakdown and jitter), were simulated. These simulations enable unambiguous studies on effects of avalanche region width, ionization coefficient ratio and carrier dead space on the avalanche statistics, which are the fundamental limits of the SPADs. The effects of quenching resistor/circuit have been ignored. Due to competing effects between dead spaces, which are significant in modern SPADs with narrow avalanche regions, and converging ionization coefficients, the breakdown probability versus overbias characteristics from different avalanche region widths are fairly close to each other. Concerning avalanche breakdown timing at given value of breakdown probability, using avalanche material with similar ionization coefficients yields fast avalanche breakdowns with small timing jitter (albeit higher operating field), compared to material with dissimilar ionization coefficients. This is the opposite requirement for abrupt breakdown probability versus overbias characteristics. In addition, by taking band-to-band tunneling current (dark carriers) into account, minimum avalanche region width for practical SPADs was found to be 0.3 and 0.2 μm, for InP and InAlAs, respectively.

  9. Chemical Classification of Space Debris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunlai; ZUO Wei; LIU Jianjun; OUYANG Ziyuan

    2004-01-01

    Space debris, here referring to all non-operating orbital objects, has steadily increased in number so that it has become a potential barrier to the exploration of space. The ever-increasing number of space debris pieces in space has created an increasingly threatening hazard to all on-the-orbit spacecraft, and all future space exploration activities have to be designed and operated with respect to the increasing threat posed by space debris. Generally, space debris is classified as large, medium and small debris pieces based on their sizes. The large debris piece is easily catalogued, but medium to small debris pieces are very difficult to track and also quite different in damage mechanisms from the large ones. In this paper, a scheme of chemical classification of space debris is developed. In our scheme, the first-order classification is employed to divide space debris into two groups: natural micrometeoroids and artificial space debris.The second-order classification is based on their chemical patterns and compositions. The natural micrometeoroids are further divided into three types, namely maric, metal and phyllosilicate micrometeorites, while the artificial space debris is divided into seven types, which are polymers, non-metal debris, metals and their alloys, oxides, sulphides and their analogs, halides and carbides. Of the latter seven types, some can also be further divided into several sub-types. Chemical classification of space debris is very useful for the study of the chemical damage mechanism of small debris pieces, and also is of great significance in constraining the origin and source of space debris and assessing their impact on spacecraft and human space activities.

  10. Evaluating Titan2D mass-flow model using the 1963 Little Tahoma Peak avalanches, Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, M. F.; Stinton, A. J.; Patra, A.; Pitman, E. B.; Bauer, A.; Nichita, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    The Titan2D geophysical mass-flow model is evaluated by comparing its simulation results and those obtained from another flow model, FLOW3D, with published data on the 1963 Little Tahoma Peak avalanches on Mount Rainier, Washington. The avalanches, totaling approximately 10×10 6 m 3 of broken lava blocks and other debris, traveled 6.8 km horizontally and fell 1.8 km vertically ( H/ L=0.246). Velocities calculated from runup range from 24 to 42 m/s and may have been as high as 130 m/s while the avalanches passed over Emmons Glacier. Titan2D is a code for an incompressible Coulomb continuum; it is a depth-averaged, 'shallow-water', granular-flow model. The conservation equations for mass and momentum are solved with a Coulomb-type friction term at the basal interface. The governing equations are solved on multiple processors using a parallel, adaptive mesh, Godunov scheme. Adaptive gridding dynamically concentrates computing power in regions of special interest; mesh refinement and coarsening key on the perimeter of the moving avalanche. The model flow initiates as a pile defined as an ellipsoid by a height ( z) and an elliptical base defined by radii in the x and y planes. Flow parameters are the internal friction angle and bed friction angle. Results from the model are similar in terms of velocity history, lateral spreading, location of runup areas, and final distribution of the Little Tahoma Peak deposit. The avalanches passed over the Emmons Glacier along their upper flow paths, but lower in the valley they traversed stream gravels and glacial outwash deposits. This presents difficulty in assigning an appropriate bed friction angle for the entire deposit. Incorporation of variable bed friction angles into the model using GIS will help to resolve this issue.

  11. X-ray imaging using avalanche multiplication in amorphous selenium: investigation of depth dependent avalanche noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, D C; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Rowlands, J A

    2007-03-01

    The past decade has seen the swift development of the flat-panel detector (FPD), also known as the active matrix flat-panel imager, for digital radiography. This new technology is applicable to other modalities, such as fluoroscopy, which require the acquisition of multiple images, but could benefit from some improvements. In such applications where more than one image is acquired less radiation is available to form each image and amplifier noise becomes a serious problem. Avalanche multiplication in amorphous selenium (a-Se) can provide the necessary amplification prior to read out so as to reduce the effect of electronic noise of the FPD. However, in direct conversion detectors avalanche multiplication can lead to a new source of gain fluctuation noise called depth dependent avalanche noise. A theoretical model was developed to understand depth dependent avalanche noise. Experiments were performed on a direct imaging system implementing avalanche multiplication in a layer of a-Se to validate the theory. For parameters appropriate for a diagnostic imaging FPD for fluoroscopy the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was found to drop by as much as 50% with increasing electric field, as predicted by the theoretical model. This drop in DQE can be eliminated by separating the collection and avalanche regions. For example by having a region of low electric field where x rays are absorbed and converted into charge that then drifts into a region of high electric field where the x-ray generated charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. This means quantum noise limited direct conversion FPD for low exposure imaging techniques are a possibility.

  12. Nearest neighbour models for local and regional avalanche forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gassner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two avalanche forecasting applications NXD2000 and NXD-REG which were developed at the Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Re-search (SLF. Even both are based on the nearest neighbour method they are targeted to different scales. NXD2000 is used to forecast avalanches on a local scale. It is operated by avalanche forecasters responsible for snow safety at snow sport areas, villages or cross country roads. The area covered ranges from 10 km2 up to 100 km2 depending on the climatological homogeneity. It provides the forecaster with ten most similar days to a given situation. The observed avalanches of these days are an indication of the actual avalanche danger. NXD-REG is used operationally by the Swiss avalanche warning service for regional avalanche forecasting. The Nearest Neighbour approach is applied to the data sets of 60 observer stations. The results of each station are then compiled into a map of current and future avalanche hazard. Evaluation of the model by cross-validation has shown that the model can reproduce the official SLF avalanche forecasts in about 52% of the days.

  13. Historical Account to the State of the Art in Debris Flow Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2013-04-01

    In this contribution, I present a historical account of debris flow modelling leading to the state of the art in simulations and applications. A generalized two-phase model is presented that unifies existing avalanche and debris flow theories. The new model (Pudasaini, 2012) covers both the single-phase and two-phase scenarios and includes many essential and observable physical phenomena. In this model, the solid-phase stress is closed by Mohr-Coulomb plasticity, while the fluid stress is modeled as a non-Newtonian viscous stress that is enhanced by the solid-volume-fraction gradient. A generalized interfacial momentum transfer includes viscous drag, buoyancy and virtual mass forces, and a new generalized drag force is introduced to cover both solid-like and fluid-like drags. Strong couplings between solid and fluid momentum transfer are observed. The two-phase model is further extended to describe the dynamics of rock-ice avalanches with new mechanical models. This model explains dynamic strength weakening and includes internal fluidization, basal lubrication, and exchanges of mass and momentum. The advantages of the two-phase model over classical (effectively single-phase) models are discussed. Advection and diffusion of the fluid through the solid are associated with non-linear fluxes. Several exact solutions are constructed, including the non-linear advection-diffusion of fluid, kinematic waves of debris flow front and deposition, phase-wave speeds, and velocity distribution through the flow depth and through the channel length. The new model is employed to study two-phase subaerial and submarine debris flows, the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes/oceans, and rock-ice avalanches. Simulation results show that buoyancy enhances flow mobility. The virtual mass force alters flow dynamics by increasing the kinetic energy of the fluid. Newtonian viscous stress substantially reduces flow deformation, whereas non-Newtonian viscous stress may change the

  14. Orbital debris issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, D. J.

    Orbital debris issues fall into three major topics: Environment Definition, Spacecraft Hazard, and Space Object Management. The major issue under Environment Definition is defining the debris flux for sizes smaller (10 cm in diameter) than those tracked by the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Sources for this size debris are fragmentation of larger objects, either by explosion or collision, and solid rocket motor products. Modeling of these sources can predict fluxes in low Earth orbit which are greater than the meteoroid environment. Techniques to measure the environment in the size interval between 1 mm and 10 cm are being developed, including the use of telescopes and radar both on the ground and in space. Some impact sensors designed to detect meteoroids may have detected solid rocket motor products. Once the environment is defined, it can be combined with hypervelocity impact data and damage criteria to evaluate the Spacecraft Hazard. Shielding may be required to obtain an acceptable damage level. Space Object Management includes techniques to control the environment and the desired policy to effectively minimize the hazard to spacecraft. One control technique - reducing the likelihood of future explosions in space - has already been implemented by NASA. The effectiveness of other techniques has yet to be evaluated.

  15. Avalanches in functional materials and geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Avadh; Planes, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    This book provides the state-of-the art of the present understanding of avalanche phenomena in both functional materials and geophysics. The main emphasis of the book is analyzing these apparently different problems within the common perspective of out-of-equilibrium phenomena displaying spatial and temporal complexity that occur in a broad range of scales. Many systems, when subjected to an external force, respond intermittently in the form of avalanches that often span over a wide range of sizes, energies and durations. This is often related to a class of critical behavior characterized by the absence of characteristic scales. Typical examples are magnetization processes, plastic deformation and failure occuring in functional materials. These phenomena share many similarities with seismicity arising from the earth crust failure due to stresses that originate from plate tectonics.

  16. Fractal properties of LED avalanche breakdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina S. Shashkina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The conventional model of the processes occurring in the course of a p–n-junction's partial avalanche breakdown has been analyzed in this paper. Microplasma noise spectra of industrially produced LEDs were compared with those predicted by the model. It was established that the data obtained experimentally on reverse-biased LEDs could not be described in terms of this model. The degree to which the fractal properties were pronounced was shown to be variable by changing the reverse voltage. The discovered fractal properties of microplasma noise can serve as the basis for further studies which are bound to explain the breakdown characteristics of real LEDs and to correct the conventional model of p–n-junction's avalanche breakdown.

  17. Single electron multiplication distribution in GEM avalanches

    CERN Document Server

    Laszlo, Andras; Kiss, Gabor; Varga, Dezso

    2016-01-01

    In this paper measurement results and experimental methodology is presented on the determination of multiplication distributions of avalanches in GEM foils initiated by a single electron. The measurement relies on the amplification of photoelectrons by the GEM under study, which is subsequently amplified in an MWPC. The intrinsic detector resolution, namely the sigma over mean ratio of this distribution is also elaborated. Small gain dependence of the avalanche size is observed in the range of net effective gain of 15 to 100. The distribution has an exponentially decaying tail at large amplitudes, whereas the applied working gas is seen to have a well visible effect on the shape of the multiplication distribution at low amplitudes; or equivalently, the working gas has an influence on the intrinsic detector resolution of GEMs via suppression of the low amplitude responses. A sigma over mean ratio down to 0.75 was reached using neon based mixture, whereas other gases provided an intrinsic detector resolution cl...

  18. Do Neural Avalanches Indicate Criticality After All?

    CERN Document Server

    Dehghani, Mohammad; Shahbazi, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Neural avalanches in size and duration exhibit a power law distribution illustrating as a straight line when plotted on the logarithmic scales. The power-law exponent is interpreted as the signature of criticality and it is assumed that the resting brain operates near criticality. However, there is no clear evidence that supports this assumption, and even there are extensive research studies conflicting one another. The model of the current paper is an extension of a previous publication wherein we used an integrate-and-fire model on a regular lattice with periodic boundary conditions and introduced the temporal complexity as a genuine signature of criticality. However, in that model the power-law distribution of neural avalanches were manifestation of super-criticality rather than criticality. Here, however, we show that replacing the discrete noise in the model with a Gaussian noise and continuous time solution of the equation leads to coincidence of temporal complexity and spatiotemporal patterns of neural...

  19. Debris flow early warning systems in Norway: organization and tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleivane, I.; Colleuille, H.; Haugen, L. E.; Alve Glad, P.; Devoli, G.

    2012-04-01

    In Norway, shallow slides and debris flows occur as a combination of high-intensity precipitation, snowmelt, high groundwater level and saturated soil. Many events have occurred in the last decades and are often associated with (or related to) floods events, especially in the Southern of Norway, causing significant damages to roads, railway lines, buildings, and other infrastructures (i.e November 2000; August 2003; September 2005; November 2005; Mai 2008; June and Desember 2011). Since 1989 the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) has had an operational 24 hour flood forecasting system for the entire country. From 2009 NVE is also responsible to assist regions and municipalities in the prevention of disasters posed by landslides and snow avalanches. Besides assisting the municipalities through implementation of digital landslides inventories, susceptibility and hazard mapping, areal planning, preparation of guidelines, realization of mitigation measures and helping during emergencies, NVE is developing a regional scale debris flow warning system that use hydrological models that are already available in the flood warning systems. It is well known that the application of rainfall thresholds is not sufficient to evaluate the hazard for debris flows and shallow slides, and soil moisture conditions play a crucial role in the triggering conditions. The information on simulated soil and groundwater conditions and water supply (rain and snowmelt) based on weather forecast, have proved to be useful variables that indicate the potential occurrence of debris flows and shallow slides. Forecasts of runoff and freezing-thawing are also valuable information. The early warning system is using real-time measurements (Discharge; Groundwater level; Soil water content and soil temperature; Snow water equivalent; Meteorological data) and model simulations (a spatially distributed version of the HBV-model and an adapted version of 1-D soil water and energy balance

  20. Electrothermal simulation of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Francesco; Najafi, Faraz; Herder, Charles; Berggren, Karl K.

    2011-02-01

    We developed an electrothermal model of NbN superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs) on sapphire substrates. SNAPs are single-photon detectors consisting of the parallel connection of N superconducting nanowires. We extrapolated the physical constants of the model from experimental data and we simulated the time evolution of the device resistance, temperature and current by solving two coupled electrical and thermal differential equations describing the nanowires. The predictions of the model were in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Shot noise suppression in avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Feng; Wang, Shuling; Campbell, Joe C

    2005-10-21

    We identify a new shot noise suppression mechanism in a thin (approximately 100 nm) heterostructure avalanche photodiode. In the low-gain regime the shot noise is suppressed due to temporal correlations within amplified current pulses. We demonstrate in a Monte Carlo simulation that the effective excess noise factors can be < 1, and reconcile the apparent conflict between theory and experiments. This shot noise suppression mechanism is independent of known mechanisms such as Coulomb interaction, or reflection at heterojunction interfaces.

  2. Neuronal avalanches in spontaneous activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Gerald; Petermann, Thomas; Havenith, Martha N; Yu, Shan; Singer, Wolf; Plenz, Dietmar; Nikolic, Danko

    2010-12-01

    Many complex systems give rise to events that are clustered in space and time, thereby establishing a correlation structure that is governed by power law statistics. In the cortex, such clusters of activity, called "neuronal avalanches," were recently found in local field potentials (LFPs) of spontaneous activity in acute cortex slices, slice cultures, the developing cortex of the anesthetized rat, and premotor and motor cortex of awake monkeys. At present, it is unclear whether neuronal avalanches also exist in the spontaneous LFPs and spike activity in vivo in sensory areas of the mature brain. To address this question, we recorded spontaneous LFPs and extracellular spiking activity with multiple 4 × 4 microelectrode arrays (Michigan Probes) in area 17 of adult cats under anesthesia. A cluster of events was defined as a consecutive sequence of time bins Δt (1-32 ms), each containing at least one LFP event or spike anywhere on the array. LFP cluster sizes consistently distributed according to a power law with a slope largely above -1.5. In two thirds of the corresponding experiments, spike clusters also displayed a power law that displayed a slightly steeper slope of -1.8 and was destroyed by subsampling operations. The power law in spike clusters was accompanied with stronger temporal correlations between spiking activities of neurons that spanned longer time periods compared with spike clusters lacking power law statistics. The results suggest that spontaneous activity of the visual cortex under anesthesia has the properties of neuronal avalanches.

  3. Edge effect on the power law distribution of granular avalanches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Kinga A; Wijngaarden, Rinke J

    2007-10-01

    Many punctuated phenomena in nature are claimed [e.g., by the theory of self-organized criticality (SOC)] to be power-law distributed. In our experiments on a three-dimensional pile of long-grained rice, we find that by only changing the boundary condition of the system, we switch from such power-law-distributed avalanche sizes to quasiperiodic system-spanning avalanches. Conversely, by removing ledges the incidence of system-spanning avalanches is significantly reduced. This may offer a perspective on new avalanche prevention schemes. In addition, our findings may help to explain why the archetype of SOC, the sandpile, was found to have power-law-distributed avalanches in some experiments, while in other experiments quasiperiodic system-spanning avalanches were found.

  4. Monte Carlo investigation of avalanche multiplication process in thin InP avalanche photodiodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gang; MA YuXiang

    2009-01-01

    An ensemble Monte Carlo simulation is presented to investigate the avalanche multiplication process in thin InP avalanche photodiodes (APDs). Analytical band structures are applied to the description of the conduction and valence band, and impact ionization is treated as an additional scattering mecha-nism with the Keldysh formula. Multiplication gain and excess noise factor of InP p~+-i-n~+ APDs aresimulated and obvious excess noise reduction is found in the thinner devices. The effect of dead space on excess noise in thin APD structures is investigated by the distribution of impact ionization events within the multiplication region. It is found that the dead space can suppress the feedback ionization events resulting in a more deterministic avalanche multiplication process and reduce the excess noise in thinner APDs.

  5. DEBRIS FLOWS AND HYPERCONCENTRATED STREAMFLOWS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.

    1986-01-01

    Examination of recent debris-flow and hyperconcentrated-streamflow events in the western United States reveals (1) the topographic, geologic, hydrologic, and vegetative conditions that affect initiation of debris flows and (2) the wide ranging climatic conditions that can trigger debris flows. Recognition of these physiographic and climatic conditions has aided development of preliminary methods for hazard evaluation. Recent developments in the application of electronic data gathering, transmitting, and processing systems shows potential for real-time hazard warning.

  6. Modelling avalanche danger and understanding snow depth variability

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This thesis addresses the causes of avalanche danger at a regional scale. Modelled snow stratigraphy variables were linked to [1] forecasted avalanche danger and [2] observed snowpack stability. Spatial variability of snowpack parameters in a region is an additional important factor that influences the avalanche danger. Snow depth and its change during individual snow fall periods are snowpack parameters which can be measured at a high spatial resolution. Hence, the spatial distribution of sn...

  7. Determining avalanche modelling input parameters using terrestrial laser scanning technology

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    International audience; In dynamic avalanche modelling, data about the volumes and areas of the snow released, mobilized and deposited are key input parameters, as well as the fracture height. The fracture height can sometimes be measured in the field, but it is often difficult to access the starting zone due to difficult or dangerous terrain and avalanche hazards. More complex is determining the areas and volumes of snow involved in an avalanche. Such calculations require high-resolution spa...

  8. Correcting for accidental correlations in saturated avalanche photodiodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grieve, J A; Chandrasekara, R; Tang, Z; Cheng, C; Ling, A

    2016-01-01

    .... As an example, we provide a detailed high-level model for the behaviour of passively quenched avalanche photodiodes, and demonstrate effective background subtraction at rates commonly associated...

  9. Observing and characterizing avalanche activity in the Khumbu Himal, Nepal, using Pleiades and airborne HDR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah; Nicholson, Lindsey; Klug, Christoph; Rieg, Lorenzo; Sailer, Rudolf; Bucher, Tilman; Brauchle, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    In the high, steep terrain of the Khumbu Himal, Nepal, snow avalanches play an important role in glacier mass balance, and rockfall supplies much of the rock material that forms the extensive debris covers on glaciers in the region. Information on the frequency and size of gravitational mass movements is helpful for understanding current and future glacier behaviour but currently lacking. In this study we use a combination of high resolution Pleiades optical satellite imagery in conjunction with airborne HDR imagery of slopes in deep shadow or overexposed snow slopes, provided by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) MACS system (see Brauchle et al., MM3.2/GI2.12/GMPV6.4/HS11.13/NH8.9/SSS12.24), to undertake a qualitative observational study of the gravitational processes evident in these sets of imagery. We classify the features found and discuss their likely frequency in the context of previously published research findings. Terrain analysis based upon digital terrain models derived from the same Pleiades imagery is used to investigate the slope angle, degree of confinement, curvature and aspect of observed avalanche and rock fall tracks. This work presents a first overview of the types of gravitational slides affecting glaciers of the Khumbu Himal. Subsequent research efforts will focus on attempting to quantify volumes of mass movement using repeat satellite imagery.

  10. Interpreting subsurface volcanic structures using geologically constrained 3-D gravity inversions: Examples of maar-diatremes, Newer Volcanics Province, southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaikie, T. N.; Ailleres, L.; Betts, P. G.; Cas, R. A. F.

    2014-04-01

    We present results and a method to geophysically image the subsurface structures of maar volcanoes to better understand eruption mechanisms and risks associated with maar-forming eruptions. High-resolution ground gravity and magnetic data were acquired across several maar volcanoes within the Newer Volcanics Province of southeastern Australia, including the Ecklin maar, Red Rock Volcanic Complex, and Mount Leura Volcanic Complex. The depth and geometry of subsurface volcanic structures were determined by interpretation of gridded geophysical data and constrained 2.5-D forward and 3-D inverse modeling techniques. Bouguer gravity lows identified across the volcanic craters reflect lower density lake sediments and pyroclastic debris infilling the underlying maar-diatremes. These anomalies were reproduced during modeling by shallow coalesced diatremes. Short-wavelength positive gravity and magnetic anomalies identified within the center of the craters suggest complex internal structures. Modeling identified feeder vents, consisting of higher proportions of volcanic debris, intrusive dikes, and ponded magma. Because potential field models are nonunique, sensitivity analyses were undertaken to understand where uncertainty lies in the interpretations, and how the models may vary between the bounds of the constraints. Rather than producing a single "ideal" model, multiple models consistent with available geologic information are created using different inversion techniques. The modeling technique we present focuses on maar volcanoes, but there are wider implications for imaging the subsurface of other volcanic systems such as kimberlite pipes, scoria cones, tuff rings, and calderas.

  11. Space debris executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.; Judd, O.; Naka, R.F.

    1996-09-01

    Spacecraft, boosters, and fragments are potential hazards to space vehicles, and it is argued that collisions between them could produce a cascade that could preclude activity in LEO in 25 to 50 years. That has generated pressure for constraints on military space operations, so the AF SAB performed a study of technical aspects of the debris problem. The Study was independent of the efforts of the Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) as well as those of and NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which is the principal advocate for cascades and constraints. Most work on space debris has been performed by AFSPC and JSC, so the Study was in part an assessment of their efforts, in which both have been cooperative. The Study identified the main disagreements and quantified their impacts. It resolved some issues and provided bounds for the rest. It treated radar and optical observations; launch, explosion, and decay rates; and the number and distribution of fragments from explosions and collisions. That made it possible to address hazard to manned spacecraft at low altitudes and the possibility of cascading at higher altitudes, both of which now appear less likely.

  12. The 6 August 2010 Mount Meager rock slide-debris flow, Coast Mountains, British Columbia: characteristics, dynamics, and implications for hazard and risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, R. H.; Friele, P.; Allstadt, K.; Roberts, N.; Evans, S. G.; Delaney, K. B.; Roche, D.; Clague, J. J.; Jakob, M.

    2012-05-01

    A large rock avalanche occurred at 03:27:30 PDT, 6 August 2010, in the Mount Meager Volcanic Complex southwest British Columbia. The landslide initiated as a rock slide in Pleistocene rhyodacitic volcanic rock with the collapse of the secondary peak of Mount Meager. The detached rock mass impacted the volcano's weathered and saturated flanks, creating a visible seismic signature on nearby seismographs. Undrained loading of the sloping flank caused the immediate and extremely rapid evacuation of the entire flank with a strong horizontal force, as the rock slide transformed into a debris flow. The disintegrating mass travelled down Capricorn Creek at an average velocity of 64 m s-1, exhibiting dramatic super-elevation in bends to the intersection of Meager Creek, 7.8 km from the source. At Meager Creek the debris impacted the south side of Meager valley, causing a runup of 270 m above the valley floor and the deflection of the landslide debris both upstream (for 3.7 km) and downstream into the Lillooet River valley (for 4.9 km), where it blocked the Lillooet River river for a couple of hours, approximately 10 km from the landslide source. Deposition at the Capricorn-Meager confluence also dammed Meager Creek for about 19 h creating a lake 1.5 km long. The overtopping of the dam and the predicted outburst flood was the basis for a night time evacuation of 1500 residents in the town of Pemberton, 65 km downstream. High-resolution GeoEye satellite imagery obtained on 16 October 2010 was used to create a post-event digital elevation model. Comparing pre- and post-event topography we estimate the volume of the initial displaced mass from the flank of Mount Meager to be 48.5 × 106 m3, the height of the path (H) to be 2183 m and the total length of the path (L) to be 12.7 km. This yields H/L = 0.172 and a fahrböschung (travel angle) of 9.75°. The movement was recorded on seismographs in British Columbia and Washington State with the initial impact, the debris flow

  13. The 6 August 2010 Mount Meager rock slide-debris flow, Coast Mountains, British Columbia: characteristics, dynamics, and implications for hazard and risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Guthrie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A large rock avalanche occurred at 03:27:30 PDT, 6 August 2010, in the Mount Meager Volcanic Complex southwest British Columbia. The landslide initiated as a rock slide in Pleistocene rhyodacitic volcanic rock with the collapse of the secondary peak of Mount Meager. The detached rock mass impacted the volcano's weathered and saturated flanks, creating a visible seismic signature on nearby seismographs. Undrained loading of the sloping flank caused the immediate and extremely rapid evacuation of the entire flank with a strong horizontal force, as the rock slide transformed into a debris flow. The disintegrating mass travelled down Capricorn Creek at an average velocity of 64 m s−1, exhibiting dramatic super-elevation in bends to the intersection of Meager Creek, 7.8 km from the source. At Meager Creek the debris impacted the south side of Meager valley, causing a runup of 270 m above the valley floor and the deflection of the landslide debris both upstream (for 3.7 km and downstream into the Lillooet River valley (for 4.9 km, where it blocked the Lillooet River river for a couple of hours, approximately 10 km from the landslide source. Deposition at the Capricorn–Meager confluence also dammed Meager Creek for about 19 h creating a lake 1.5 km long. The overtopping of the dam and the predicted outburst flood was the basis for a night time evacuation of 1500 residents in the town of Pemberton, 65 km downstream. High-resolution GeoEye satellite imagery obtained on 16 October 2010 was used to create a post-event digital elevation model. Comparing pre- and post-event topography we estimate the volume of the initial displaced mass from the flank of Mount Meager to be 48.5 × 106 m3, the height of the path (H to be 2183 m and the total length of the path (L to be 12.7 km. This yields H/L = 0.172 and a fahrböschung (travel angle of 9.75°. The movement was recorded on seismographs in British

  14. A real-world application of Monte Carlo procedure for debris flow risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, B.; Savi, F.

    2009-05-01

    A method for formal risk analysis in debris flow-prone areas is proposed. In this paper risk is defined as the mean annual probability for buildings located in hazardous areas to be damaged by a debris flow. As is well known, specific risk assessment involves the evaluation of both hazard and vulnerability. To quantify debris flow hazard, a Monte Carlo procedure is applied that randomly selects the input variables of mathematical models simulating triggering, propagation and stoppage of debris flows. This allows to estimate the probability density function of the output variables characterizing the destructive power of debris flow (for instance total force, sum of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces) at each point of the alluvial fan. Three different vulnerability functions are adopted: two of them are derived from assessments of different types of natural risk, such as snow avalanches and flood waves. The third vulnerability function is obtained from structural analysis of buildings damaged during a mudflow that occurred in Sarno, Italy. The proposed procedure is applied to assess specific risk on the alluvial fan of Ardenno, located in the Valtellina valley, Italian Alps, and the effect that the use of different vulnerability functions has on the risk maps is explored and discussed.

  15. Space Debris Mitigation CONOPS Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Yoshikawa, T. (2003). Space debris capture by a joint compliance controlled robot . Paper presented at the Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics , 2003. AIM...80 Robotic Arm ............................................................................................................. 80 Tethers...than 10 centimeters 79 xi Figure 34 Robotic Arm Space Debris Removal Servicer with Joint Compliance Control82 Figure 35 Prototype of brush

  16. Space debris; challenges and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Beurden, E.; Prins, C.

    2013-01-01

    Space debris has been a hot topic for the last few decades, ever since the space industry started growing exponentially. Everyone agrees that space debris is a growing problem and the saturation point has almost been reached. With a big risk of a chain reaction, called the Kessler syndrome, billions

  17. Catastrophic debris flows on 13 August 2010 in the Qingping area, southwestern China: The combined effects of a strong earthquake and subsequent rainstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C.; van Asch, T. W. J.; Chang, M.; Chen, G. Q.; Zhao, X. H.; Huang, X. C.

    2012-02-01

    In the Wenchuan area in SW China, an abundance of loose co-seismic landslide debris was present on the slopes after the Wenchuan earthquake, which in later years served as source material for rainfall-induced debris flows or shallow landslides. Slopes composed of Cambrian sandstones and siltstones intercalated with slates appeared to be most susceptible to co-seismic landsliding. A total of 20 debris flows are described in this paper; all were triggered by heavy rainfall on 13th of August 2010. Field reconnaissance and measurements, supported by aerial photo interpretation, were conducted to identify the locations and morphological characteristics of the debris flow gullies in order to obtain information about surface area and volume of landslides and the debris flows. The debris flows in the study area were initiated by two processes: a) run-off erosion on co-seismic landslide material, and concentrated erosion of landslide debris in steep channels; b) new landslides that transform into debris flows. The volume of debris flow deposits on individual fans varies by many orders of magnitude. The smallest deposit has a volume of from 5760 to 3.1 million m 3. A comparison of the measured volumes, deposited on the fan with the volumes of debris stored in the catchment shows the huge potential for future debris flow activity. Whilst there is a weakly significant positive correlation between these two volumes, no significant statistical correlation could be established between volumes of debris flow deposits and other morphometric parameters of the catchment. A catastrophic debris flow catchment (the Wenjia catchment) was selected as an extreme case to show in detail the mechanism of debris flow formation as a result of intensive erosion in loose material, which was deposited by a rock avalanche during the 2008 Earthquake event. Analyses of the meteorological conditions that triggered these debris flows show one day antecedent precipitation varying between 67.7 and 137

  18. Space debris: modeling and detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, C.; Lorenz, J.; Radtke, J.; Kebschull, C.; Horstmann, A.; Stoll, E.

    2017-01-01

    High precision orbit determination is required for the detection and removal of space debris. Knowledge of the distribution of debris objects in orbit is necessary for orbit determination by active or passive sensors. The results can be used to investigate the orbits on which objects of a certain size at a certain frequency can be found. The knowledge of the orbital distribution of the objects as well as their properties in accordance with sensor performance models provide the basis for estimating the expected detection rates. Comprehensive modeling of the space debris environment is required for this. This paper provides an overview of the current state of knowledge about the space debris environment. In particular non-cataloged small objects are evaluated. Furthermore, improvements concerning the update of the current space debris model are addressed. The model of the space debris environment is based on the simulation of historical events, such as fragmentations due to explosions and collisions that actually occurred in Earth orbits. The orbital distribution of debris is simulated by propagating the orbits considering all perturbing forces up to a reference epoch. The modeled object population is compared with measured data and validated. The model provides a statistical distribution of space objects, according to their size and number. This distribution is based on the correct consideration of orbital mechanics. This allows for a realistic description of the space debris environment. Subsequently, a realistic prediction can be provided concerning the question, how many pieces of debris can be expected on certain orbits. To validate the model, a software tool has been developed which allows the simulation of the observation behavior of ground-based or space-based sensors. Thus, it is possible to compare the results of published measurement data with simulated detections. This tool can also be used for the simulation of sensor measurement campaigns. It is

  19. An Introduction to Space Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2008-04-01

    Space debris is any human-made object in orbit that no longer serves a useful purpose, including defunct satellites, discarded equipment and rocket stages, and fragments from the breakup of satellites and rocket stages. It is a concern because--due to its very high speed in orbit--even relatively small pieces can damage or destroy satellites in a collision. Since debris at high altitudes can stay in orbit for decades or longer, it accumulates as more is produced and the risk of collisions with satellites grows. Since there is currently no effective way to remove large amounts of debris from orbit, controlling the production of debris is essential for preserving the long-term use of space. Today there are 860 active satellites in orbit, supporting a wide range of civil and military uses. The 50 years of space activity since the launch of Sputnik 1 has also resulted in well over half a million pieces of orbiting debris larger than 1 cm in size. There are two main sources of space debris: (1) routine space activity and the accidental breakup of satellites and stages placed in orbit by such activity, and (2) the testing or use of destructive anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons that physically collide with satellites at high speed. The international community is attempting to reduce the first category by developing strict guidelines to limit the debris created as a result of routine space activities. However, the destruction of a single large spy satellite by an ASAT weapon could double the total amount of large debris in low earth orbit, and there are currently no international restrictions on these systems. This talk will give an introduction to what's in space, the origins of space debris, efforts to stem its growth, the threat it poses to satellites in orbit, and the long-term evolution of the debris population.

  20. Radiation damage effect on avalanche photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Baccaro, S; Cavallari, F; Da Ponte, V; Deiters, K; Denes, P; Diemoz, M; Kirn, Th; Lintern, A L; Longo, E; Montecchi, M; Musienko, Y; Pansart, J P; Renker, D; Reucroft, S; Rosi, G; Rusack, R; Ruuska, D; Stephenson, R; Torbet, M J

    1999-01-01

    Avalanche Photodiodes have been chosen as photon sensors for the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at the LHC. These sensors should operate in the 4T magnetic field of the experiment. Because of the high neutron radiation in the detector extensive studies have been done by the CMS collaboration on the APD neutron radiation damage. The characteristics of these devices after irradiation have been analized, with particular attention to the quantum efficiency and the dark current. The recovery of the radiation induced dark current has been studied carefully at room temperature and at slightly lower and higher temperatures. The temperature dependence of the defects decay-time has been evaluated.

  1. Photon detection with cooled avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. L.; Metscher, B. D.

    1987-01-01

    Commercial avalanche photodiodes have been operated as single-photon detectors at an optimum operating temperature and bias voltage. These detectors were found to be 1.5-3 times more sensitive than presently available photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Both single-photon detection probability and detector noise increase with bias voltage; detection probabilities greater than twice that of a PMT were obtained with detector noise levels below 100 counts per second. Higher probabilities were measured at higher noise levels. The sources of noise and their dependence on temperature and bias voltage are discussed.

  2. Cooled avalanche photodiode used for photon detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Deborah L.; Metscher, Brian D.

    1987-01-01

    Commercial avalanche photodiodes have been operated as single-photon detectors at an optimum operating temperature and bias voltage. These detectors were found to be 1.5 to 3 times more sensitive than presently-available photomultiplier tubes (PPMTs). Both single-photon detection probability and detector noise increase with bias voltage; detection probabilities greater than 25 percent were obtained with detector noise levels comparable to the noise of a PMT; higher probabilities were measured at higher noise levels. The sources of noise and their dependence on temperature and bias voltage are discussed.

  3. Avalanche Photodiode Arrays for Optical Communications Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, M.; Vilnrotter, V.

    2001-01-01

    An avalanche photodiode (APD) array for ground-based optical communications receivers is investigated for the reception of optical signals through the turbulent atmosphere. Kolmogorov phase screen simulations are used to generate realistic spatial distributions of the received optical field. It is shown that use of an APD array for pulse-position modulation detection can improve performance by up to 4 dB over single APD detection in the presence of turbulence, but that photon-counting detector arrays yield even greater gains.

  4. Avalanches in UGe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lhotel, E. E-mail: lhotel@grenoble.cnrs.fr; Paulsen, C.; Huxley, A.D

    2004-05-01

    In UGe{sub 2} ferromagnetism and superconductivity co-exist for pressures in the range 1.0-1.6 GPa. The magnetic state, however, has several unusual properties. Here we report measurements of hysteresis loops for fields parallel to the easy-axis at low temperature and ambient pressure, measured for two separate UGe{sub 2} single crystals. Steps in the magnetization as the field is changed at low temperature are observed for both crystals. The general phenomenology associated with the steps strongly suggests that they correspond to avalanches of domain-wall motion.

  5. TCAD simulation of Low Gain Avalanche Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Ranjeet; Jain, Geetika; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Ranjan, Kirti

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, detailed simulation using Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) tool, Silvaco for non-irradiated and irradiated LGAD (Low Gain Avalanche Detector) devices has been carried out. The effects of different design parameters and proton irradiation on LGAD operation are discussed in detail. An already published effective two trap bulk damage model is used to simulate the radiation damage without implementing any acceptor removal term. The TCAD simulation for irradiated LGAD devices produce decreasing gain with increasing fluence, similar to the measurement results. The space charge density and electric field distribution are used to illustrate the possible reasons for the degradation of gain of the irradiated LGAD devices.

  6. Avalanche Effect in Improperly Initialized CAESAR Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ukrop

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryptoprimitives rely on thorough theoretical background, but often lack basic usability features making them prone to unintentional misuse by developers. We argue that this is true even for the state-of-the-art designs. Analyzing 52 candidates of the current CAESAR competition has shown none of them have an avalanche effect in authentication tag strong enough to work properly when partially misconfigured. Although not directly decreasing their security profile, this hints at their security usability being less than perfect. Paper details available at crcs.cz/papers/memics2016

  7. Bilayer avalanche spin-diode logic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Joseph S., E-mail: joseph.friedman@u-psud.fr; Querlioz, Damien [Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France); Fadel, Eric R. [Department of Materials Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wessels, Bruce W. [Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Sahakian, Alan V. [Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A novel spintronic computing paradigm is proposed and analyzed in which InSb p-n bilayer avalanche spin-diodes are cascaded to efficiently perform complex logic operations. This spin-diode logic family uses control wires to generate magnetic fields that modulate the resistance of the spin-diodes, and currents through these devices control the resistance of cascaded devices. Electromagnetic simulations are performed to demonstrate the cascading mechanism, and guidelines are provided for the development of this innovative computing technology. This cascading scheme permits compact logic circuits with switching speeds determined by electromagnetic wave propagation rather than electron motion, enabling high-performance spintronic computing.

  8. Rapid ice-rock avalanches versus gradual glacial processes? Implications for the natural hazard potential in the Karakoram Mountains (Pakistan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturrizaga, Lasafam

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing concern about extreme mass movements from combined ice-rock avalanches in glaciated environments areas in the light of increasing settlement activities in mountains and their forelands. Recent devastating events, such as those from Huascaran (Peru) in 1970 or Kolka (Caucasus) in 2002, have been an eye-opener in terms of the large run-out-distances and their hazard potential. At the same time there is a variety of topographic settings and distinct triggers of ice and rock failures, which leads in turn to a broad spectrum of multi-phase processes, such as the possible propagation of rock-ice-masses onto glacial surfaces with subsequent debris flows. These events are often not directly observable, and a sound interpretation of the sedimentary record is needed. However, the origin and process dynamics of giant debris accumulations in different mountain regions of the world is discussed increasingly controversially. In the last decade a lot of debris accumulations, which were classified formerly as moraines, were reinterpreted as products of mass movements. In this context, the study presented here, focuses on a case example from the upper Chapursan Valley at the Afghan-Pakistan border (Karakoram Range, Pakistan). The Chapursan Valley floor and the adjacent sediment cones are covered with an outstanding hummocky debris landscape over a length of about 10 km and a width of up to 1 km with individual hummocks reaching about 10 m in height. These landforms overlap with the zone of permanent settlement. According to local legends and reports of early travelers in this region, one of the largest settlement concentrations formerly occurred in the upper Chapursan Valley and was destroyed by a natural disaster. Geomorphological field investigations, sedimentological studies, a comparison of satellite images, an analysis of historical data and interviews with the local inhabitants were carried out to unravel the origin of the hummocky terrain. The results show

  9. A cooled avalanche photodiode with high photon detection probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. L.; Metscher, B. D.

    1986-01-01

    An avalanche photodiode has been operated as a photon-counting detector with 2 to 3 times the sensitivity of currently-available photomultiplier tubes. APD (avalanche photodiodes) detection probabilities that exceed 27% and approach 50% have been measured at an optimum operating temperature which minimizes noise. The sources of noise and their dependence on operating temperature and bias voltage are discussed.

  10. Radiation and Temperature Hard Multi-Pixel Avalanche Photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak (Inventor); Starikov, David (Inventor); Pillai, Rajeev (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The structure and method of fabricating a radiation and temperature hard avalanche photodiode with integrated radiation and temperature hard readout circuit, comprising a substrate, an avalanche region, an absorption region, and a plurality of Ohmic contacts are presented. The present disclosure provides for tuning of spectral sensitivity and high device efficiency, resulting in photon counting capability with decreased crosstalk and reduced dark current.

  11. Validation of DEM prediction for granular avalanches on irregular terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Stuart R.; Cleary, Paul W.

    2015-09-01

    Accurate numerical simulation can provide crucial information useful for a greater understanding of destructive granular mass movements such as rock avalanches, landslides, and pyroclastic flows. It enables more informed and relatively low cost investigation of significant risk factors, mitigation strategy effectiveness, and sensitivity to initial conditions, material, or soil properties. In this paper, a granular avalanche experiment from the literature is reanalyzed and used as a basis to assess the accuracy of discrete element method (DEM) predictions of avalanche flow. Discrete granular approaches such as DEM simulate the motion and collisions of individual particles and are useful for identifying and investigating the controlling processes within an avalanche. Using a superquadric shape representation, DEM simulations were found to accurately reproduce transient and static features of the avalanche. The effect of material properties on the shape of the avalanche deposit was investigated. The simulated avalanche deposits were found to be sensitive to particle shape and friction, with the particle shape causing the sensitivity to friction to vary. The importance of particle shape, coupled with effect on the sensitivity to friction, highlights the importance of quantifying and including particle shape effects in numerical modeling of granular avalanches.

  12. Avalanche Statistics of Driven Granular Slides in a Miniature Mound

    CERN Document Server

    Juanico, D E; Batac, R; Monterola, C

    2008-01-01

    We examine avalanche statistics of rain- and vibration-driven granular slides in miniature soil mounds using experimental and numerical approaches. A crossover from power-law to non power-law avalanche-size statistics is demonstrated as a generic driving rate $\

  13. Avalanches mediate crystallization in a hard-sphere glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Eduardo; Valeriani, Chantal; Zaccarelli, Emanuela; Poon, Wilson C K; Cates, Michael E; Pusey, Peter N

    2014-01-07

    By molecular-dynamics simulations, we have studied the devitrification (or crystallization) of aged hard-sphere glasses. First, we find that the dynamics of the particles are intermittent: Quiescent periods, when the particles simply "rattle" in their nearest-neighbor cages, are interrupted by abrupt "avalanches," where a subset of particles undergo large rearrangements. Second, we find that crystallization is associated with these avalanches but that the connection is not straightforward. The amount of crystal in the system increases during an avalanche, but most of the particles that become crystalline are different from those involved in the avalanche. Third, the occurrence of the avalanches is a largely stochastic process. Randomizing the velocities of the particles at any time during the simulation leads to a different subsequent series of avalanches. The spatial distribution of avalanching particles appears random, although correlations are found among avalanche initiation events. By contrast, we find that crystallization tends to take place in regions that already show incipient local order.

  14. The Online GVP/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report: Providing Timely Information About Worldwide Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, G. C.; Guffanti, M. C.; Luhr, J. F.; Venzke, E. A.; Wunderman, R. L.

    2001-12-01

    The awesome power and intricate inner workings of volcanoes have made them a popular subject with scientists and the general public alike. About 1500 known volcanoes have been active on Earth during the Holocene, approximately 50 of which erupt per year. With so much activity occurring around the world, often in remote locations, it can be difficult to find up-to-date information about current volcanism from a reliable source. To satisfy the desire for timely volcano-related information the Smithsonian Institution and US Geological Survey combined their strengths to create the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report. The Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) has developed a network of correspondents while reporting worldwide volcanism for over 30 years in their monthly Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network. The US Geological Survey's Volcano Hazards Program studies and monitors volcanoes in the United States and responds (upon invitation) to selected volcanic crises in other countries. The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is one of the most popular sites on both organization's websites. The core of the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is the brief summaries of current volcanic activity around the world. In addition to discussing various types of volcanism, the summaries also describe precursory activity (e.g. volcanic seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions), secondary activity (e.g. debris flows, mass wasting, and rockfalls), volcanic ash hazards to aviation, and preventative measures. The summaries are supplemented by links to definitions of technical terms found in the USGS photoglossary of volcano terms, links to information sources, and background information about reported volcanoes. The site also includes maps that highlight the location of reported volcanoes, an archive of weekly reports sorted by volcano and date, and links to commonly used acronyms. Since the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report's inception in November 2000, activity has been reported at

  15. Avalanche behavior of power MOSFETs under different temperature conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Jiang; Wang Lixin; Lu Shuojin; Wang Xuesheng; Han Zhengsheng

    2011-01-01

    The ability of high-voltage power MOSFETs to withstand avalanche events under different temperature conditions are studied by experiment and two-dimensional device simulation. The experiment is performed to investigate dynamic avalanche failure behavior of the domestic power MOSFETs which can occur at the rated maximum operation temperature range (-55 to 150 ℃). An advanced ISE TCAD two-dimensional mixed mode simulator with thermodynamic non-isothermal model is used to analyze the avalanche failure mechanism. The unclamped inductive switching measurement and simulation results show that the parasitic components and thermal effect inside the device will lead to the deterioration of the avalanche reliability of power MOSFETs with increasing temperature. The main failure mechanism is related to the parasitic bipolar transistor activity during the occurrence of the avalanche behavior.

  16. Problems of Small Debris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Zelentsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the exploration of outer space (as of 1/1 2011 6853 was launched spacecraft (SC are successful 6264, representing 95% of the total number of starts. The most intensively exploited space Russia (USSR (3701 starts, 94% successful, USA (2774 starts, 90% successful, China (234 starts, 96% successful and India (89 starts, 90% successful. A small part of running the spacecraft returned to Earth (manned spacecraft and transport, and the rest remained in orbit. Some of them are descended from orbit and burned up in the atmosphere, the rest remained in the OCP and turned into space debris (SD.The composition of the Cabinet is diverse: finish the job spacecraft; boosters and the last stage of launch vehicles left in orbit after SC injection; technological waste arising during the opening drop-down structures and fragments of the destroyed spacecraft. The resulting explosion orbital SD forms ellipsoidal region which orbits blasted object. Then, as a result of precession, is the distribution of objects in orbit explosion exploding spacecraft.The whole Cabinet is divided into two factions: the observed (larger than 100 mm and not observed (less than 100 mm. Observed debris katalogalizirovan and 0.2% of the total number of SD, there was no SD is the bulk - 99.8%.SC meeting working with a fragment observed SD predictable and due to changes in altitude spacecraft avoids a possible meeting. Contact spacecraft with large fragment lead to disaster (which took place at a meeting of the Russian communications satellite "Cosmos-2251" and the American machine "Iridium". Meeting with small SD is not predictable, especially if it was formed by an explosion or collision fragments together. Orbit that KM is not predictable, and the speed can be up to 10 km / s. Meeting with small particle SD no less dangerous for the spacecraft. The impact speed of spacecraft with space debris particles can reach up to 10 ... 15 km / s at such speeds the breakdown probability thin

  17. Cosmogenic Nuclide Exposure Dating of the Tiltill Rock Avalanche, Yosemite National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, K. R.; Pluhar, C. J.; Stone, J. O.; Stock, G. M.; Zimmerman, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Yosemite National Park serves as an excellent natural laboratory for studying rock falls and rock avalanches because these are the main processes modifying the nearly vertical slopes of this recently glaciated landscape. Mass wasting represents a significant hazard in the region and the database of previous rock falls and other mass wasting events in Yosemite is extensive, dating back to the mid-1800s. However, this record is too short to capture the recurrence characteristics and triggering mechanisms of the very largest events, necessitating studies of the geologic record of mass wasting. Rock falls and rock avalanches are readily dated by cosmogenic nuclide methods due to their instantaneous formation, and results can be tied to triggering events such as seismic activity (e.g. Stock et al., 2009). Here, we apply exposure dating to the Holocene Tiltill rock avalanche north of Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. The deposit comprises what appear to be two separate lobes of rock and debris, yielding a total volume of ~3.1 x 106 m3. Assuming an erosion rate of 0.0006 cm/yr and neglecting snowpack shielding, preliminary data suggest a mean exposure age of 11,000 + 600 year B.P. for both deposits, indicating that they were emplaced in a single event. The age of the Tiltill 'slide' is similar to earthquakes on the Owens Valley Fault between 10,800 + 600 and 10,200 + 200 cal year B.P. (Bacon, 2007) and the White Mountain Fault, ~10,000 cal year B.P. (Reheis, 1996; DePolo, 1989). Given that movement on the Owens Valley fault in 1872 caused a number of rock falls in Yosemite and the coincidence of ages between the Tiltill 'slide' and paleoseismic events, a large earthquake in Eastern Sierra Nevada may have triggered this event. Other trigger events are also possibilities, but only through compilation of a database of large rock avalanches can statistically significant groupings of events begin to demonstrate whether seismic triggering is a dominant process.

  18. Developing International Guidelines on Volcanic Hazard Assessments for Nuclear Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Charles

    2014-05-01

    tremendous challenge in quantitative volcanic hazard assessments to encompass alternative conceptual models, and to create models that are robust to evolving understanding of specific volcanic systems by the scientific community. A central question in volcanic hazards forecasts is quantifying rates of volcanic activity. Especially for long-dormant volcanic systems, data from the geologic record may be sparse, individual events may be missing or unrecognized in the geologic record, patterns of activity may be episodic or otherwise nonstationary. This leads to uncertainty in forecasting long-term rates of activity. Hazard assessments strive to quantify such uncertainty, for example by comparing observed rates of activity with alternative parametric and nonparametric models. Numerical models are presented that characterize the spatial distribution of potential volcanic events. These spatial density models serve as the basis for application of numerical models of specific phenomena such as development of lava flow, tephra fallout, and a host of other volcanic phenomena. Monte Carlo techniques (random sampling, stratified sampling, importance sampling) are methods used to sample vent location and other key eruption parameters, such as eruption volume, magma rheology, and eruption column height for probabilistic models. The development of coupled scenarios (e.g., the probability of tephra accumulation on a slope resulting in subsequent debris flows) is also assessed through these methods, usually with the aid of event trees. The primary products of long-term forecasts are a statistical model of the conditional probability of the potential effects of volcanism, should an eruption occur, and the probability of such activity occurring. It is emphasized that hazard forecasting is an iterative process, and board consideration must be given to alternative conceptual models of volcanism, weighting of volcanological data in the analyses, and alternative statistical and numerical models

  19. Active Space Debris Removal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele GUERRA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the space era, more than 5000 launches have been carried out, each carrying satellites for many disparate uses, such as Earth observation or communication. Thus, the space environment has become congested and the problem of space debris is now generating some concerns in the space community due to our long-lived belief that “space is big”. In the last few years, solutions to this problem have been proposed, one of those is Active Space Debris Removal: this method will reduce the increasing debris growth and permit future sustainable space activities. The main idea of the method proposed below is a drag augmentation system: use a system capable of putting an expanded foam on a debris which will increase the area-to-mass ratio to increase the natural atmospheric drag and solar pressure. The drag augmentation system proposed here requires a docking system; the debris will be pushed to its release height and then, after un-docking, an uncontrolled re-entry takes place ending with a burn up of the object and the foam in the atmosphere within a given time frame. The method requires an efficient way to change the orbit between two debris. The present paper analyses such a system in combination with an Electric Propulsion system, and emphasizes the choice of using two satellites to remove five effective rockets bodies debris within a year.

  20. The earth orbiting space debris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The space debris population is similar to the asteroid belt, since it is subject to a process of high-velocity mutual collisions that affects the long-term evolution of its size distribution. Presently, more than 10 000 artificial debris particles with diameters larger than 10 cm (and more than 300 000 with diameters larger than 1 cm are orbiting the Earth, and are monitored and studied by a large network of sensors around the Earth. Many objects of different kind compose the space debris population, produced by different source mechanisms ranging from high energy fragmentation of large spacecraft to slow diffusion of liquid metal. The impact against a space debris is a serious risk that every spacecraft must face now and it can be evaluated with ad-hoc algorithms. The long term evolution of the whole debris population is studied with computer models allowing the simulation of all the known source and sink mechanisms. One of these codes is described in this paper and the evolution of the debris environment over the next 100 years, under different traffic scenarios, is shown, pointing out the possible measures to mitigate the growth of the orbital debris population. .

  1. Recent Sand Avalanching on Rabe Crater Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Dark streaks on the steep, down-wind slopes of sand dunes in Rabe Crater are seen at several locations in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. These streaks indicate relatively recent (i.e., in the past few years or less) movement of sand down these slopes.Sand dunes move forward by the combined action of wind that drives sand up the shallow slope on the windward side of the dune (in this case, the slopes that face toward the lower right) and the avalanching of this sand down the steeper, lee-side slope. The steep slope is also known as the slip face. The dark streaks indicated by arrows are evidence for sand avalanches that occurred within a few months or years of the time when the picture was taken in March 1999. Other streaks which are seen criss-crossing the dunes may be the result of passing dust devils. This image is illuminated from the upper left and located in Rabe Crater of the Hellespontus-Noachis region near 44.2oS, 325.6oW.

  2. Volcanic hazards at Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, Dwight Raymond; Mullineaux, Donal Ray

    1967-01-01

    clearly are valid only if the past behavior is, as we believe, a reliable guide. The purpose of this report is to infer the events recorded by certain postglacial deposits at Mount Rainier and to suggest what bearing similar events in the future might have on land use within and near the park. In addition, table 2 (page 22) gives possible warning signs of an impending eruption. We want to increase man's understanding of a possibly hazardous geologic environment around Mount Rainier volcano, yet we do not wish to imply for certain that the hazards described are either immediate or inevitable. However, we do believe that hazards exist, that some caution is warranted, and that some major hazards can be avoided by judicious planning. Most of the events with which we are concerned are sporadic phenomena that have resulted directly or indirectly from volcanic eruptions. Although no eruptions (other than steam emission) of the volcano in historic time are unequivocally known (Hopson and others, 1962), pyroclastic (air-laid) deposits of pumice and rock debris attest to repeated, widely spaced eruptions during the 10,000 years or so of postglacial time. In addition, the constituents of some debris flows indicate an origin during eruptions of molten rock; other debris flows, because of their large size and constituents, are believed to have been caused by steam explosions. Some debris flows, however, are not related to volcanism at all.

  3. Sedimentology, Behavior, and Hazards of Debris Flows at Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, K.M.; Vallance, J.W.; Pringle, P.T.

    1995-01-01

    Mount Rainier is potentially the most dangerous volcano in the Cascade Range because of its great height, frequent earthquakes, active hydrothermal system, and extensive glacier mantle. Many debris flows and their distal phases have inundated areas far from the volcano during postglacial time. Two types of debris flows, cohesive and noncohesive, have radically different origins and behavior that relate empirically to clay content. The two types are the major subpopulations of debris flows at Mount Rainier. The behavior of cohesive flows is affected by the cohesion and adhesion of particles; noncohesive flows are dominated by particle collisions to the extent that particle cataclasis becomes common during near-boundary shear. Cohesive debris flows contain more than 3 to 5 percent of clay-size sediment. The composition of these flows changed little as they traveled more than 100 kilometers from Mount Rainier to inundate parts of the now-populated Puget Sound lowland. They originate as deep-seated failures of sectors of the volcanic edifice, and such failures are sufficiently frequent that they are the major destructional process of Mount Rainier's morphologic evolution. In several deposits of large cohesive flows, a lateral, megaclast-bearing facies (with a mounded or hummocky surface) contrasts with a more clay-rich facies in the center of valleys and downstream. Cohesive flows at Mount Rainier do not correlate strongly with volcanic activity and thus can recur without warning, possibly triggered by non-magmatic earthquakes or by changes in the hydrothermal system. Noncohesive debris flows contain less than 3 to 5 percent clay-size sediment. They form most commonly by bulking of sediment in water surges, but some originate directly or indirectly from shallow slope failures that do not penetrate the hydrothermally altered core of the volcano. In contrast with cohesive flows, most noncohesive flows transform both from and to other flow types and are, therefore, the

  4. Volcanic signals in oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2009-08-22

    Sulfate aerosols resulting from strong volcanic explosions last for 2–3 years in the lower stratosphere. Therefore it was traditionally believed that volcanic impacts produce mainly short-term, transient climate perturbations. However, the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds over a wide range of time scales. The associated processes, especially ocean heat uptake, play a key role in ongoing climate change. However, they are not well constrained by observations, and attempts to simulate them in current climate models used for climate predictions yield a range of uncertainty. Volcanic impacts on the ocean provide an independent means of assessing these processes. This study focuses on quantification of the seasonal to multidecadal time scale response of the ocean to explosive volcanism. It employs the coupled climate model CM2.1, developed recently at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration\\'s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, to simulate the response to the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1815 Tambora eruptions, which were the largest in the 20th and 19th centuries, respectively. The simulated climate perturbations compare well with available observations for the Pinatubo period. The stronger Tambora forcing produces responses with higher signal-to-noise ratio. Volcanic cooling tends to strengthen the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Sea ice extent appears to be sensitive to volcanic forcing, especially during the warm season. Because of the extremely long relaxation time of ocean subsurface temperature and sea level, the perturbations caused by the Tambora eruption could have lasted well into the 20th century.

  5. 14 CFR 417.211 - Debris analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Debris analysis. 417.211 Section 417.211... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.211 Debris analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a debris analysis. For an orbital or suborbital launch, a debris...

  6. Debris Engine: A Potential Thruster for Space Debris Removal

    CERN Document Server

    Lan, Lei; Baoyin, Hexi

    2015-01-01

    We present a design concept for a space engine that can continuously remove the orbit debris by using the debris as a propellant. Space robotic cleaner is adopted to capture the targeting debris and to transfer them into the engine. Debris with larger size is first disintegrated into small pieces by using a mechanical method. The planetary ball mill is then adopted to grind the pieces into micrometer or smaller powder. The energy needed in this process is get from the nuclear and solar power. By the effect of gamma-ray photoelectric or the behavior of tangently rub of tungsten needles, the debris powered is charged. This behavior can be used to speed up the movement of powder in a tandem electrostatic particle accelerator. By ejecting the high-temperture and high-pressure charged powered from the nozzle of the engine,the continuously thrust is obtained. This thrust can be used to perform orbital maneuver and debris rendezvous for the spacecraft and robotic cleaner. The ejected charged particle will be blown a...

  7. Rock-avalanche and ocean-resurge deposits in the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure: Evidence from the ICDP-USGS Eyreville cores, Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohn, G.S.; Powars, D.S.; Dypvik, H.; Edwards, L.E.

    2009-01-01

    An unusually thick section of sedimentary breccias dominated by target-sediment clasts is a distinctive feature of the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure. A cored 1766-m-deep section recovered from the central part of this marine-target structure by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP)-U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) drilling project contains 678 m of these breccias and associated sediments and an intervening 275-m-thick granite slab. Two sedimentary breccia units consist almost entirely of Cretaceous nonmarine sediments derived from the lower part of the target sediment layer. These sediments are present as coherent clasts and as autoclastic matrix between the clasts. Primary (Cretaceous) sedimentary structures are well preserved in some clasts, and liquefaction and fluidization structures produced at the site of deposition occur in the clasts and matrix. These sedimentary breccias are interpreted as one or more rock avalanches from the upper part of the transient-cavity wall. The little-deformed, unshocked granite slab probably was transported as part of an extremely large slide or avalanche. Water-saturated Cretaceous quartz sand below the slab was transported into the seafloor crater prior to, or concurrently with, the granite slab. Two sedimentary breccia units consist of polymict diamictons that contain cobbles, boulders, and blocks of Cretaceous nonmarine target sediments and less common shocked-rock and melt ejecta in an unsorted, unstratified, muddy, fossiliferous, glauconitic quartz matrix. Much of the matrix material was derived from Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene marine target sediments. These units are interpreted as the deposits of debris flows initiated by the resurge of ocean water into the seafloor crater. Interlayering of avalanche and debris-flow units indicates a partial temporal overlap of the earlier avalanche and later resurge processes. A thin unit of stratified turbidite deposits and overlying laminated

  8. Effects of basal debris on glacier flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Neal R; Cohen, Denis; Hooyer, Thomas S; Fischer, Urs H; Jackson, Miriam; Moore, Peter L; Lappegard, Gaute; Kohler, Jack

    2003-07-04

    Glacier movement is resisted partially by debris, either within glaciers or under glaciers in water-saturated layers. In experiments beneath a thick, sliding glacier, ice containing 2 to 11% debris exerted shear traction of 60 to 200 kilopascals on a smooth rock bed, comparable to the total shear traction beneath glaciers and contrary to the usual assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible. Imposed pore-water pressure that was 60 to 100% of the normal stress in a subglacial debris layer reduced shear traction on the debris sufficiently to halt its deformation and cause slip of ice over the debris. Slip resistance was thus less than debris shearing resistance.

  9. Disordered artificial spin ices: Avalanches and criticality (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Cynthia J. Olson, E-mail: cjrx@lanl.gov; Chern, Gia-Wei; Reichhardt, Charles [Center for Nonlinear Studies and Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Libál, Andras [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Babes-Bolyai University, RO-400591 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-05-07

    We show that square and kagome artificial spin ices with disconnected islands exhibit disorder-induced nonequilibrium phase transitions. The critical point of the transition is characterized by a diverging length scale and the effective spin reconfiguration avalanche sizes are power-law distributed. For weak disorder, the magnetization reversal is dominated by system-spanning avalanche events characteristic of a supercritical regime, while at strong disorder, the avalanche distributions have subcritical behavior and are cut off above a length scale that decreases with increasing disorder. The different type of geometrical frustration in the two lattices produces distinct forms of critical avalanche behavior. Avalanches in the square ice consist of the propagation of locally stable domain walls separating the two polarized ground states, and we find a scaling collapse consistent with an interface depinning mechanism. In the fully frustrated kagome ice, however, the avalanches branch strongly in a manner reminiscent of directed percolation. We also observe an interesting crossover in the power-law scaling of the kagome ice avalanches at low disorder. Our results show that artificial spin ices are ideal systems in which to study a variety of nonequilibrium critical point phenomena as the microscopic degrees of freedom can be accessed directly in experiments.

  10. Weak avalanche discrimination for gated-mode single-photon avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seok-Beom; Kang, Sae-Kyoung

    2011-09-12

    The after-pulsing effect is a common problem that needs to be overcome for high-speed single-photon detection based on gated-mode single-photon avalanche photodiodes (SPADs). This paper presents a simple and practical method for suppression of the after-pulsing probability using an auxiliary signal to discriminate quite weak avalanches. The detection efficiency and after-pulse probability of an InGaAs/InP SPAD are investigated with a 10 MHz gating for conventional and proposed methods, and a sharp decrease of after-pulse probability is demonstrated with the application of the proposed method. At a gating frequency of 100 MHz, a detection efficiency of 10.4% is achieved with an after-pulse probability of 5.6% without dead time.

  11. NASA Orbital Debris Baseline Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created high fidelity populations of the debris environment. The populations include objects of 1 cm and larger in Low Earth Orbit through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. They were designed for the purpose of assisting debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment is derived directly from the newest ORDEM model populations which include a background derived from LEGEND, as well as specific events such as the Chinese ASAT test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, the RORSAT sodium-potassium droplet releases, and other miscellaneous events. It is the most realistic ODPO debris population to date. In this paper we present the populations in chart form. We describe derivations of the background population and the specific populations added on. We validate our 1 cm and larger Low Earth Orbit population against SSN, Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  12. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Recovery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations,...

  13. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Landfills

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations,...

  14. Large rock avalanches in southern Perù: the Cerro Caquilluco - Cerrillos Negros rock slide - avalanche (Tacna, Tomasiri, Perù)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, G.; Hermanns, R. L.; Murillo, P. V.

    2012-04-01

    The Andean bent which coincides with the Peruvian-Chilean border region is characterised by one of the largest relief contrasts on earth with depth of the subduction trench ranging from 5000 to 6000 m below sea level and mountain tops ranging from 5500 to 6300 m a.s.l.. The western flank of the Andes is subdivided in 4 major geologic zones (i.e. Coastal Cordillera, longitudinal Basin or depression, the Precordillera or western escarpment and western Cordillera). Local relief contrasts are also pronounced due to the incision of deep canyons into several million old uplifted surfaces, preserved because of the extremely dry climate with precipitation averaging a few mm and less per year. The Lluta collapse (minimum age of 2.5 Ma; volume 26 km3) is one of the largest non-volcanic non-marine landslides on Earth and has been mapped in that area (Wörner et al., 2002). Systematic mapping in northern Chile and Southern Peru has revealed that this is not the only gigantic landslide in the area but that further landslides of similar size occurred in the area, located both along the canyon slopes and along the western escarpment of the Cordillera. This suggests that landsliding has been a major factor in controlling erosion. This contribution describes first results on mapping a giant landslide complex in southern Perù called the Cerro Caquilluco - Cerrillos Negros Tomasiri rock slide - avalanche complex. The systematic mapping we have carried out in the area is presented in a further contribution to this conference. The Cerro Caquilluco - Cerrillos Negros Tomasiri rock slide - avalanche complex affected the upper part of a SW dipping paleosurface (8° to 9°) cut by a disconnected and regular primitive drainage network organized in a series of SW trending parallel valleys. This network developed within the lower Miocene pinkish tuffaceous deposits of the Huaylillas formation, whereas the main landslide scarp lies within the conglomerates of the Upper Moquegua formation

  15. Statistical analyses support power law distributions found in neuronal avalanches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Klaus

    Full Text Available The size distribution of neuronal avalanches in cortical networks has been reported to follow a power law distribution with exponent close to -1.5, which is a reflection of long-range spatial correlations in spontaneous neuronal activity. However, identifying power law scaling in empirical data can be difficult and sometimes controversial. In the present study, we tested the power law hypothesis for neuronal avalanches by using more stringent statistical analyses. In particular, we performed the following steps: (i analysis of finite-size scaling to identify scale-free dynamics in neuronal avalanches, (ii model parameter estimation to determine the specific exponent of the power law, and (iii comparison of the power law to alternative model distributions. Consistent with critical state dynamics, avalanche size distributions exhibited robust scaling behavior in which the maximum avalanche size was limited only by the spatial extent of sampling ("finite size" effect. This scale-free dynamics suggests the power law as a model for the distribution of avalanche sizes. Using both the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic and a maximum likelihood approach, we found the slope to be close to -1.5, which is in line with previous reports. Finally, the power law model for neuronal avalanches was compared to the exponential and to various heavy-tail distributions based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance and by using a log-likelihood ratio test. Both the power law distribution without and with exponential cut-off provided significantly better fits to the cluster size distributions in neuronal avalanches than the exponential, the lognormal and the gamma distribution. In summary, our findings strongly support the power law scaling in neuronal avalanches, providing further evidence for critical state dynamics in superficial layers of cortex.

  16. Statistical analyses support power law distributions found in neuronal avalanches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Andreas; Yu, Shan; Plenz, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    The size distribution of neuronal avalanches in cortical networks has been reported to follow a power law distribution with exponent close to -1.5, which is a reflection of long-range spatial correlations in spontaneous neuronal activity. However, identifying power law scaling in empirical data can be difficult and sometimes controversial. In the present study, we tested the power law hypothesis for neuronal avalanches by using more stringent statistical analyses. In particular, we performed the following steps: (i) analysis of finite-size scaling to identify scale-free dynamics in neuronal avalanches, (ii) model parameter estimation to determine the specific exponent of the power law, and (iii) comparison of the power law to alternative model distributions. Consistent with critical state dynamics, avalanche size distributions exhibited robust scaling behavior in which the maximum avalanche size was limited only by the spatial extent of sampling ("finite size" effect). This scale-free dynamics suggests the power law as a model for the distribution of avalanche sizes. Using both the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic and a maximum likelihood approach, we found the slope to be close to -1.5, which is in line with previous reports. Finally, the power law model for neuronal avalanches was compared to the exponential and to various heavy-tail distributions based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance and by using a log-likelihood ratio test. Both the power law distribution without and with exponential cut-off provided significantly better fits to the cluster size distributions in neuronal avalanches than the exponential, the lognormal and the gamma distribution. In summary, our findings strongly support the power law scaling in neuronal avalanches, providing further evidence for critical state dynamics in superficial layers of cortex.

  17. IFKIS a basis for organizational measures in avalanche risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bründl, M.; Etter, H.-J.; Klingler, Ch.; Steiniger, M.; Rhyner, J.; Ammann, W.

    2003-04-01

    The avalanche winter 1999 in Switzerland showed that the combination of protection measures like avalanche barriers, hazard zone mapping, artificial avalanche release and organisational measures (closure of roads, evacuation etc.) proved to perform well. However, education as well as information and communication between the involved organizations proved to be a weak link in the crisis management. In the first part of the project IFKIS we developed a modular education and training course program for security responsibles of settlements and roads. In the second part an information system was developed which improves on the one hand the information fluxes between the national center for avalanche forecasting, the Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF, and the local forecasters. On the other hand the communication between the avalanche security services in the communities can be enhanced. During the last two years an information system based on Internet technology has been developed for this purpose. This system allows the transmission of measured data and observations to a central database at SLF and visualization of the data for different users. It also provides the possibility to exchange information on organizational measures like closure of roads, artificial avalanche release etc. on a local and regional scale. This improves the information fluxes and the coordination of safety-measures because all users, although at different places, are on the same information level. Inconsistent safety-measures can be avoided and information and communication concerning avalanche safety becomes much more transparent for all persons involved in hazard management. The training program as well the concept for the information-system are important basics for an efficient avalanche risk management but also for other natural processes and catastrophes.

  18. Collisional Grooming of Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchner, Marc J

    2009-01-01

    Debris disk images show clumps, rings, warps, and other structures, many of which have been interpreted as perturbations from hidden planets. But so far, no models of these structures have properly accounted for collisions between dust grains. We have developed new steady-state 3D models of debris disks that self-consistently incorporate grain-grain collisions. We summarize our algorithm and use it to illustrate how collisions interact with resonant trapping in the presence of a planet.

  19. Hydraulic System Wear Debris Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-03

    drawn. Each one-=L sample was drawn with a clean plastic pipette of one-mL capacity. The samples were placed in clean Ferrogram preparation bottles ...and from cavities in a block which held linear seals into sampling bottles . Several photographs of this debris , which was deposited on Ferro- grams...silicon in the glass overshadowed the elements of the wear debris . To overcome this difficulty, the Ferrogram should be pre- pared on a carbon-filled

  20. Removing Orbital Debris with Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude R; Bradford, Brian; George, E Victor; Libby, Stephen B; Liedahl, Duane A; Marcovici, Bogdan; Olivier, Scot S; Pleasance, Lyn D; Reilly, James P; Rubenchik, Alexander; Strafford, David N; Valley, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Orbital debris in low Earth orbit (LEO) are now sufficiently dense that the use of LEO space is threatened by runaway collisional cascading. A problem predicted more than thirty years ago, the threat from debris larger than about 1 cm demands serious attention. A promising proposed solution uses a high power pulsed laser system on the Earth to make plasma jets on the objects, slowing them slightly, and causing them to re-enter and burn up in the atmosphere. In this paper, we reassess this approach in light of recent advances in low-cost, light-weight modular design for large mirrors, calculations of laser-induced orbit changes and in design of repetitive, multi-kilojoule lasers, that build on inertial fusion research. These advances now suggest that laser orbital debris removal (LODR) is the most cost-effective way to mitigate the debris problem. No other solutions have been proposed that address the whole problem of large and small debris. A LODR system will have multiple uses beyond debris removal. Internat...

  1. III-V alloy heterostructure high speed avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, H. D.; Nakano, K.; Tomasetta, L. R.

    1979-01-01

    Heterostructure avalanche photodiodes have been successfully fabricated in several III-V alloy systems: GaAlAs/GaAs, GaAlSb/GaAlSb, and InGaAsP/InP. These diodes cover optical wavelengths from 0.4 to 1.8 micron. Early stages of development show very encouraging results. High speed response of less than 35 ps and high quantum efficiency more than 95 percent have been obtained. The dark currents and the excess avalanche noise are also dicussed. A direct comparison of GaAlSb, GaAlAsSb, and In GaAsP avalanche photodiodes is given.

  2. Characterization of avalanche photodiodes for lidar atmospheric return signal detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antill, C. W., Jr.; Holloway, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from tests to characterize noise, dark current, overload, and gain versus bias, relationships of ten avalanche photodiodes. The advantages of avalanche photodiodes over photomultiplier tubes for given laser wavelengths and return signal amplitudes are outlined. The relationship between responsivity and temperature and dark current and temperature are examined. Also, measurements of the noise equivalent power, the excess noise factor, and linearity are given. The advantages of using avalanche photodiodes in the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment and the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment are discussed.

  3. Seeded excitation avalanches in off-resonantly driven Rydberg gases

    CERN Document Server

    Simonelli, Cristiano; Masella, Guido; Asteria, Luca; Arimondo, Ennio; Ciampini, Donatella; Morsch, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the facilitated excitation dynamics in off-resonantly driven Rydberg gases by separating the initial off-resonant excitation phase from the facilitation phase, in which successive facilitation events lead to excitation avalanches. We achieve this by creating a controlled number of initial seed excitations. Greater insight into the avalanche mechanism is obtained from an analysis of the full counting distributions. We also present simple mathematical models and numerical simulations of the excitation avalanches that agree well with our experimental results.

  4. Volcanic Rocks and Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. The...

  5. Effects of catastrophic floods and debris flows on the sediment retention structure, North Fork Toutle River, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Roger P.

    2012-01-01

    The eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980 produced a debris avalanche that flowed down the upper reaches of the North Fork Toutle River in southwestern Washington, clogging this drainage with sediment. In response to continuous anomalously high sediment flux into the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers resulting from this avalanche and associated debris flows, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed a Sediment Retention Structure (SRS) on the North Fork Toutle River in May 1989. For one decade, the SRS effectively blocked most of the sediment transport down the Toutle River. In 1999, the sediment level behind the SRS reached the elevation of the spillway base. Since then, a higher percentage of sediment has been passing the SRS and increasing the flood risk in the Cowlitz River. Currently (2012), the dam is filling with sediment at a rate that cannot be sustained for its original design life, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is concerned with the current ability of the SRS to manage floods. This report presents an assessment of the ability of the dam to pass large flows from three types of scenarios (it is assumed that no damage to the spillway will occur). These scenarios are (1) a failure of the debris-avalanche blockage forming Castle Lake that produces a dambreak flood, (2) a debris flow from failure of that blockage, or (3) a debris flow originating in the crater of Mount St. Helens. In each case, the flows are routed down the Toutle River and through the SRS using numerical models on a gridded domain produced from a digital elevation model constructed with existing topography and dam infrastructure. The results of these simulations show that a structurally sound spillway is capable of passing large floods without risk of overtopping the crest of the dam. In addition, large debris flows originating from Castle Lake or the crater of Mount St. Helens never reach the SRS. Instead, debris flows fill the braided channels upstream of the dam and reduce its storage

  6. Avalanche of particles in evaporating coffee drops

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Alvaro G; Snoeijer, Jacco; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    The pioneering work of Deegan et al. [Nature 389, (1997)] showed how a drying sessile droplet suspension of particles presents a maximum evaporating flux at its contact line which drags liquid and particles creating the well known coffee stain ring. In this Fluid Dynamics Video, measurements using micro Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking clearly show an avalanche of particles being dragged in the last moments, for vanishing contact angles and droplet height. This explains the different characteristic packing of the particles in the layers of the ring: the outer one resembles a crystalline array, while the inner one looks more like a jammed granular fluid. Using the basic hydrodynamic model used by Deegan et al. [Phys. Rev. E 62, (2000)] it will be shown how the liquid radial velocity diverges as the droplet life comes to an end, yielding a good comparison with the experimental data.

  7. Photon counting techniques with silicon avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautet, H; Deschamps, P; Dion, B; Macgregor, A D; Macsween, D; McIntyre, R J; Trottier, C; Webb, P P

    1993-07-20

    The properties of avalanche photodiodes and associated electronics required for photon counting in the Geiger and the sub-Geiger modes are reviewed. When the Geiger mode is used, there are significant improvements reported in overall photon detection efficiencies (approaching 70% at 633 nm), and a timing jitter (under 200 ps) is achieved with passive quenching at high overvoltages (20-30 V). The results obtained by using an active-mode fast quench circuit capable of switching overvoltages as high as 15 V (giving photon detection efficiencies in the 50% range) with a dead time of less than 50 ns are reported. Larger diodes (up to 1 mm in diameter) that are usable in the Geiger mode and that have quantum efficiencies over 80% in the 500-800-nm range are also reported.

  8. Avalanche photodiodes now and possible developments

    CERN Document Server

    Britvitch, I; Ingram, Q; Kuznetsov, A; Musienko, Y; Renker, D; Reucroft, S; Sakhelashvili, T M; Swain, J

    2004-01-01

    Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs) are now out of their infancy and are used in large numbers in the electromagnetic calorimeter of CMS where they have to stand the extremely hostile environment of LHC. This type - with smaller sensitive area and arranged in monolithic arrays - is an excellent candidate for the read out of scintillating crystals in medical imaging and a PET scanner operates already successfully since more than 3 years. We present the properties of the device used in CMS and possible improvements of the structure, which could open the door for new applications. Operating APDs at low temperatures or in Geiger mode will allow single photon counting and in future they could replace photomultiplier tubes.

  9. Overspill avalanching in a dense reservoir network

    CERN Document Server

    Mamede, G L; Schneider, C M; de Araújo, J C; Herrmann, H J

    2012-01-01

    Sustainability of communities, agriculture, and industry is strongly dependent on an effective storage and supply of water resources. In some regions the economic growth has led to a level of water demand which can only be accomplished through efficient reservoir networks. Such infrastructures are not always planned at larger scale but rather made by farmers according to their local needs of irrigation during droughts. Based on extensive data from the upper Jaguaribe basin, one of the world's largest system of reservoirs, located in the Brazilian semiarid northeast, we reveal that surprisingly it self-organizes into a scale-free network exhibiting also a power-law in the distribution of the lakes and avalanches of discharges. With a new self-organized-criticality-type model we manage to explain the novel critical exponents. Implementing a flow model we are able to reproduce the measured overspill evolution providing a tool for catastrophe mitigation and future planning.

  10. Lautaret avalanche test site: outcomes from the 11th april 2012 event

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The Lautaret full-scale avalanche test site has been used by Cemagref-Irstea since the early 70's. The first studies were dedicated to avalanche released systems. Later, experiments focused on avalanche dynamics and avalanche impact pressures both in relation with the fundamental knowledge of snow flow rheology and the engineering of defense structures and avalanche hazard zoning. Recent instrumentation developments now provide rich-documented in situ measurements of a...

  11. Snow and ice perturbation during historical volcanic eruptions and the formation of lahars and floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jon J.; Newhall, Christopher G.

    1989-10-01

    Historical eruptions have produced lahars and floods by perturbing snow and ice at more than 40 volcanoes worldwide. Most of these volcanoes are located at latitudes higher than 35°; those at lower latitudes reach altitudes generally above 4000 m. Volcanic events can perturb mantles of snow and ice in at least five ways: (1) scouring and melting by flowing pyroclastic debris or blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris, (2) surficial melting by lava flows, (3) basal melting of glacial ice or snow by subglacial eruptions or geothermal activity, (4) ejection of water by eruptions through a crater lake, and (5) deposition of tephra fall. Historical records of volcanic eruptions at snow-clad volcanoes show the following: (1) Flowing pyroclastic debris (pyroclastic flows and surges) and blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris are the most common volcanic events that generate lahars and floods; (2) Surficial lava flows generally cannot melt snow and ice rapidly enough to form large lahars or floods; (3) Heating the base of a glacier or snowpack by subglacial eruptions or by geothermal activity can induce basal melting that may result in ponding of water and lead to sudden outpourings of water or sediment-rich debris flows; (4) Tephra falls usually alter ablation rates of snow and ice but generally produce little meltwater that results in the formation of lahars and floods; (5) Lahars and floods generated by flowing pyroclastic debris, blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris, or basal melting of snow and ice commonly have volumes that exceed 105 m3. The glowing lava (pyroclastic flow) which flowed with force over ravines and ridges...gathered in the basin quickly and then forced downwards. As a result, tremendously wide and deep pathways in the ice and snow were made and produced great streams of water (Wolf 1878).

  12. Snow and ice perturbation during historical volcanic eruptions and the formation of lahars and floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jon J.; Newhall, Christopher G.

    1989-01-01

    Historical eruptions have produced lahars and floods by perturbing snow and ice at more than 40 volcanoes worldwide. Most of these volcanoes are located at latitudes higher than 35°; those at lower latitudes reach altitudes generally above 4000 m. Volcanic events can perturb mantles of snow and ice in at least five ways: (1) scouring and melting by flowing pyroclastic debris or blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris, (2) surficial melting by lava flows, (3) basal melting of glacial ice or snow by subglacial eruptions or geothermal activity, (4) ejection of water by eruptions through a crater lake, and (5) deposition of tephra fall. Historical records of volcanic eruptions at snow-clad volcanoes show the following: (1) Flowing pyroclastic debris (pyroclastic flows and surges) and blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris are the most common volcanic events that generate lahars and floods; (2) Surficial lava flows generally cannot melt snow and ice rapidly enough to form large lahars or floods; (3) Heating the base of a glacier or snowpack by subglacial eruptions or by geothermal activity can induce basal melting that may result in ponding of water and lead to sudden outpourings of water or sediment-rich debris flows; (4) Tephra falls usually alter ablation rates of snow and ice but generally produce little meltwater that results in the formation of lahars and floods; (5) Lahars and floods generated by flowing pyroclastic debris, blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris, or basal melting of snow and ice commonly have volumes that exceed 105 m3.The glowing lava (pyroclastic flow) which flowed with force over ravines and ridges...gathered in the basin quickly and then forced downwards. As a result, tremendously wide and deep pathways in the ice and snow were made and produced great streams of water (Wolf 1878).

  13. Low-Temperature Volcanism and Pyroclastic Flows on Comet Tempel 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosh, H. J.; Belton, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Deep Impact mission discovered several smooth terrains and repetitive outbursts on comet 9P/Tempel 1 suggestive of cryo-volcanic activity in its interior. We present new measurements of the extent of the smooth terrains, the slopes along their centerlines, and the areas of their likely source regions and vents. Our analysis of these features indicates that they may be only a few orbits old and the result of an ongoing process. Based on the source locations of repetitive outbursts, we propose that the smooth terrains originate from different regimes of fluidization and gas transport in a weakly bound particulate mixture of ice and dust above an amorphous to crystalline water ice phase transformation boundary where CO and/or CO2 is released. The stresses due to gas pressure extrude, at low velocity, fluidized and dilated, gas-laden cometary material onto the surface leading to downhill flow and subsequent collapse of the evacuated cavity. The most prominent smooth terrain is longitudinally striated and slopes monotonically downward from an apparent source crater with an average gradient of about 3 deg. It resembles terrestrial catastrophic rock avalanches such as the Alaskan Sherman Glacier landslide of 1964. However, in the case of Tempel 1 the fluidizing agent is CO or CO2 gas. The gas-charged material erupted onto the surface and, as the gas slowly diffused out of the moving mass, moved downslope as a mobile debris flow, similar in concept to terrestrial mudflows that are fluidized by water (the pressure in both obeys precisely the same equation, but this differs from a terrestrial pyroclastic flow). The mass of material that remains on the surface comprises about 10E10 kg of fine particulates in the best-imaged example. Due to their high density and thus relatively high viscosity, these flows traveled in a laminar regime and halted abruptly as the fluidizing gas escaped, leaving a steep terminal scarp. Nevertheless, the flow viscosity was not high enough to

  14. Debris flow evolution and the activation of an explosive hydrothermal system; Te Maari, Tongariro, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, J. N.; Cronin, S. J.; Zernack, A. V.; Lube, G.; Stewart, R. B.; Nemeth, K.; Keys, H.

    2014-10-01

    Analysis of the pre- and post-eruption topography, together with observations of the avalanche deposition sequence, yields a triggering mechanism for the 6 August 2012 eruption of Upper Te Maari. The avalanche was composed of a wedge of c. 683 000-774 000 m3 of coarse breccia, spatter and clay-rich tuffs and diamictons which slid from the western flanks of the Upper Te Maari Crater, the failure plane is considered to be a hydrothermally altered clay layer. This landslide led to a pressure drop of up to 0.5 MPa, enough to generate an explosive eruption from the hydrothermal system below, which had been activated over the months earlier by additional heat and gas from a shallow intrusion. The landslide transformed after c. 700 m into a clay-rich cohesive debris flow, eroding soils from steep, narrow stretches of channel, before depositing on intermediate broad flatter reaches. After each erosive reach, the debris flow contained greater clay and mud contents and became more mobile. At c. 2 km flow distance, however, the unsaturated flow stopped, due to a lack of excess pore pressure. This volume controlled flow deposited thick, steep sided lobes behind an outer levee, accreting inward and upward to form a series of curved surface ridges.

  15. Space Debris Environment Remediation Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Klinkrad, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    Long-term projections of the space debris environment indicate that even drastic measures, such as an immediate, complete halt of launch and release activities, will not result in a stable environment of man-made space objects. Collision events between already existing space hardware will within a few decades start to dominate the debris population, and result in a net increase of the space debris population, also in size regimes which may cause further catastrophic collisions. Such a collisional cascading will ultimately lead to a run-away situation ("Kessler syndrome"), with no further possibility of human intervention. The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) has been investigating the status and the stability of the space debris environment in several studies by first looking into space traffic management possibilities and then investigating means of mitigating the creation of space debris. In an ongoing activity, an IAA study group looks at ways of active space debris environment remediation. In contrast to the former mitigation study, the current activity concentrates on the active removal of small and large objects, such as defunct spacecraft, orbital stages, and mission-related objects, which serve as a latent mass reservoir that fuels initial catastrophic collisions and later collisional cascading. The paper will outline different mass removal concepts, e.g. based on directed energy, tethers (momentum exchange or electrodynamic), aerodynamic drag augmentation, solar sails, auxiliary propulsion units, retarding surfaces, or on-orbit capture. Apart from physical principles of the proposed concepts, their applicability to different orbital regimes, and their effectiveness concerning mass removal efficiency will be analyzed. The IAA activity on space debris environment remediation is a truly international project which involves more than 23 contributing authors from 9 different nations.

  16. SiC Avalanche Photodiodes and Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aymont Technology, Inc. (Aymont) will demonstrate the feasibility of SiC p-i-n avalanche photodiodes (APD) arrays. Aymont will demonstrate 4 x 4 arrays of 2 mm2 APDs...

  17. Relative degradation of near infrared avalanche photodiodes from proton irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heidi; Johnston, Allan H.

    2004-01-01

    InGaAs and Ge avalanche photodiodes are compared for the effects of 63-MeV protons on dark current. Differences in displacement damage factors are discussed as they relate to structural differences between devices.

  18. Relative degradation of near infrared avalanche photodiodes from proton irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heidi; Johnston, Allan H.

    2004-01-01

    InGaAs and Ge avalanche photodiodes are compared for the effects of 63-MeV protons on dark current. Differences in displacement damage factors are discussed as they relate to structural differences between devices.

  19. Non-linear behaviour of large-area avalanche photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, L M P; Monteiro, C M B; Santos, J M; Morgado, R E

    2002-01-01

    The characterisation of photodiodes used as photosensors requires a determination of the number of electron-hole pairs produced by scintillation light. One method involves comparing signals produced by X-ray absorptions occurring directly in the avalanche photodiode with the light signals. When the light is derived from light-emitting diodes in the 400-600 nm range, significant non-linear behaviour is reported. In the present work, we extend the study of the linear behaviour to large-area avalanche photodiodes, of Advanced Photonix, used as photosensors of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) scintillation light produced by argon (128 nm) and xenon (173 nm). We observed greater non-linearities in the avalanche photodiodes for the VUV scintillation light than reported previously for visible light, but considerably less than the non-linearities observed in other commercially available avalanche photodiodes.

  20. Dynamic intermittency in discrete erodible-bed avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arran, Matthew; Vriend, Nathalie

    2016-11-01

    The coexistence of fluid-like and solid-like behaviour in granular matter allows avalanches of grains to flow on the surface of a static but erodible bed. For sufficiently slow inflow, these avalanches are discrete, with previous experimentalists reporting that avalanche fronts pass a given point quasi-periodically. We report instead observations of dynamic intermittency between two regimes, one in which avalanches occur quasi-periodically and another in which the intervals between them are irregular. Finding the first regime consistent with existing models, we introduce a model for the second regime within the framework of Self-Organised Criticality, and describe the transition between the regimes with reference to the state of the erodible bed.

  1. Avalanche statistics from data with low time resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Michael; Nawano, Aya; Wright, Wendelin J; Gu, Xiaojun; Uhl, J T; Dahmen, Karin A

    2016-11-01

    Extracting avalanche distributions from experimental microplasticity data can be hampered by limited time resolution. We compute the effects of low time resolution on avalanche size distributions and give quantitative criteria for diagnosing and circumventing problems associated with low time resolution. We show that traditional analysis of data obtained at low acquisition rates can lead to avalanche size distributions with incorrect power-law exponents or no power-law scaling at all. Furthermore, we demonstrate that it can lead to apparent data collapses with incorrect power-law and cutoff exponents. We propose new methods to analyze low-resolution stress-time series that can recover the size distribution of the underlying avalanches even when the resolution is so low that naive analysis methods give incorrect results. We test these methods on both downsampled simulation data from a simple model and downsampled bulk metallic glass compression data and find that the methods recover the correct critical exponents.

  2. UNIQUENESS OF SOLUTIONS FOR SEMICONDUCTOR EQUATIONS WITH AVALANCHE TERM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Jiasheng; Wang Yuanming

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the initial and mixed boundary value problems for the semiconductor equations with avalanche term, the uniqueness of the weak solution for the semiconductor equation has been proved.

  3. Adaptive optics for laser space debris removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennet, Francis; Conan, Rodolphe; D'Orgeville, Celine; Dawson, Murray; Paulin, Nicolas; Price, Ian; Rigaut, Francois; Ritchie, Ian; Smith, Craig; Uhlendorf, Kristina

    2012-07-01

    Space debris in low Earth orbit below 1500km is becoming an increasing threat to satellites and spacecrafts. Radar and laser tracking are currently used to monitor the orbits of thousands of space debris and active satellites are able to use this information to manoeuvre out of the way of a predicted collision. However, many satellites are not able to manoeuvre and debris-on debris collisions are becoming a signicant contributor to the growing space debris population. The removal of the space debris from orbit is the preferred and more denitive solution. Space debris removal may be achieved through laser ablation, whereby a high power laser corrected with an adaptive optics system could, in theory, allow ablation of the debris surface and so impart a remote thrust on the targeted object. The goal of this is to avoid collisions between space debris to prevent an exponential increase in the number of space debris objects. We are developing an experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of laser ablation for space debris removal. This laser ablation demonstrator utilises a pulsed sodium laser to probe the atmosphere ahead of the space debris and the sun re ection of the space debris is used to provide atmospheric tip{tilt information. A deformable mirror is then shaped to correct an infrared laser beam on the uplink path to the debris. We present here the design and the expected performance of the system.

  4. Geiger-Mode Avalanche Photodiodes in Particle Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Vilella, E.; Alonso, O.; Trenado, J.; Vilà, A.; De Vos, M.; Garrido, L.; Diéguez, A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that avalanche photodiodes operated in the Geiger mode above the breakdown voltage offer a virtually infinite sensitivity and time accuracy in the picosecond range that can be used for single photon detection. However, their performance in particle detection remains still unexplored. In this contribution, we are going to expose the different steps that we have taken in order to prove the efficiency of Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes in the aforementioned field. In particula...

  5. Wavelength dependence of silicon avalanche photodiode fabricated by CMOS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed Napiah, Zul Atfyi Fauzan; Hishiki, Takuya; Iiyama, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    Avalanche photodiodes fabricated by CMOS process (CMOS-APDs) have features of high avalanche gain below 10 V, wide bandwidth over 5 GHz, and easy integration with electronic circuits. In CMOS-APDs, guard ring structure is introduced for high-speed operation by canceling photo-generated carriers in the substrate at the sacrifice of the responsivity. We describe here wavelength dependence of the responsivity and the bandwidth of the CMOS-APDs with shorted and opened guard ring structure.

  6. Influence of snow-cover properties on avalanche dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkogler, W.; Sovilla, B.; Lehning, M.

    2012-04-01

    Snow avalanches with the potential of reaching traffic routes and settlements are a permanent winter threat for many mountain communities. Snow safety officers have to take the decision whether to close a road, a railway line or a ski slope. Those decisions are often very difficult as they demand the ability to interpret weather forecasts, to establish their implication for the stability and the structure of the snow cover and to evaluate the influence of the snow cover on avalanche run-out distances. In the operational programme 'Italy-Switzerland, project STRADA' we focus on the effects of snow cover on avalanche dynamics, and thus run-out distance, with the aim to provide a better understanding of this influence and to ultimately develop tools to support snow safety officers in their decision process. We selected five avalanches, measured at the Vallée de la Sionne field site, with similar initial mass and topography but different flow dynamics and run-out distances. Significant differences amongst the individual avalanches could be observed for front and internal velocities, impact pressures, flow regimes, deposition volumes and run-out distances. For each of these avalanches, the prevailing snow conditions at release were reconstructed using field data from local snowpits or were modeled with SNOWPACK. Combining flow dynamical data with snow cover properties shows that erodible snow depth, snow density and snow temperature in the snow pack along the avalanche track are among the decisive variables that appear to explain the observed differences. It is further discussed, how these influencing factors can be quantified and used for improved predictions of site and time specific avalanche hazard.

  7. Effect of volume fraction on granular avalanche dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravish, Nick; Goldman, Daniel I

    2014-09-01

    We study the evolution and failure of a granular slope as a function of prepared volume fraction, ϕ(0). We rotated an initially horizontal layer of granular material (0.3-mm-diam glass spheres) to a 45° angle while we monitor the motion of grains from the side and top with high-speed video cameras. The dynamics of grain motion during the tilt process depended sensitively on ϕ(0)∈[0.58-0.63] and differed above or below the granular critical state, ϕ(c), defined as the onset of dilation as a function of increasing volume fraction. For ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)avalanche. Precursor compaction events began at an initial angle θ(0)=7.7±1.4° and occurred intermittently prior to the onset of an avalanche. Avalanches occurred at the maximal slope angle θ(m)=28.5±1.0°. Granular material at ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)>0 did not experience precursor compaction prior to avalanche flow, and instead experienced a single dilational motion at θ(0)=32.1±1.5° prior to the onset of an avalanche at θ(m)=35.9±0.7°. Both θ(0) and θ(m) increased with ϕ(0) and approached the same value in the limit of random close packing. The angle at which avalanching grains came to rest, θ(R)=22±2°, was independent of ϕ(0). From side-view high-speed video, we measured the velocity field of intermittent and avalanching flow. We found that flow direction, depth, and duration were affected by ϕ(0), with ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)0. Our study elucidates how initial conditions-including volume fraction-are important determinants of granular slope stability and the onset of avalanches.

  8. Avalanche Phenomenon of Runaway Electrons During Additional Fuelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨进蔚; 曹建勇; 曾庆希; 张炜; 唐年益; 董贾福; 邓中朝; 肖正贵; 姚良骅

    2002-01-01

    During pellet injection and supersonic molecular beam injection, we have observed the increase of electron density and the enhancement of hard x-ray radiation, but the runaway electrons normally decrease without additional fuelling when the density of plasma increases. This phenomenon may come from the synergetic effects of Dreicer and avalanche runaway electrons. The experimental results are consistent with the calculation based on the theory of avalanche runaway in the HL-1M tokamak.

  9. Avalanche robustness of SiC Schottky diode

    OpenAIRE

    Dchar, Ilyas; Buttay, Cyril; Morel, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Reliability is one of the key issues for the application of Silicon carbide (SiC) diode in high power conversion systems. For instance, in high voltage direct current (HVDC) converters, the devices can be submitted to high voltage transients which yield to avalanche. This paper presents the experimental evaluation of SiC diodes submitted to avalanche, and shows that the energy dissipation in the device can increase quickly and will not be uniformly distributed across t...

  10. Susceptibility assessment of debris flows using the analytic hierarchy process method-A case study in Subao river valley, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingzhang Chen; Hui Chen; Yong You; Jinfeng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Many debris flows have occurred in the areas surrounding the epicenter of the Wenchuan earthquake. Susceptibility assessment of debris flows in this area is especially important for disaster prevention and mitigation. This paper studies one of the worst hit areas, the Subao river valley, and the susceptibility assessment of debris flows is performed based on field surveys and remote sensing interpretation. By investigating the formation conditions of debris flows in the valley, the following assessment factors are selected: mixture density of landslides and rock avalanches, distance to the seismogenic fault, stratum lithology, ground roughness, and hillside angle. The weights of the assessment factors are determined by the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method. Each of the assessment factors is further divided into five grades. Then, the assessment model is built using the multifactor superposition method to assess the debris flow susceptibility. Based on the assessment results, the Subao river valley is divided into three areas: high susceptibility areas, medium susceptibility areas, and low susceptibility areas. The high susceptibility areas are concentrated in the middle of the valley, accounting for 17.6%of the valley area. The medium susceptibility areas are in the middle and lower reaches, most of which are located on both sides of the high susceptibility areas and account for 45.3% of the valley area. The remainders are clas-sified as low susceptibility areas. The results of the model are in accordance with the actual debris flow events that occurred after the earthquake in the valley, confirming that the proposed model is capable of assessing the debris flow susceptibility. The results can also provide guidance for reconstruction planning and debris flow prevention in the Subao river valley.

  11. Stability Evaluation Of Previous Volcanic Edifice Collapse At Pico De Orizaba Volcano, Mexico, Using Geotechnical Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha-Dimas, A.; Watters, R. J.

    2001-12-01

    Pico de Orizaba volcano has collapsed twice during its geologic evolution (Carrasco-Nuñez, 1997). The initial stage of evolution for this volcano is known as the Torrecillas cone that collapsed 0.21 Ma b.p., and the related deposits formed the Jamapa avalanche which traveled eastward 75 km. A second, superimposed constructional stage is the Espolón de Oro cone that also ended with a collapse 20 000 years b.p., forming the Tetelzingo avalanche-lahar that traveled 85 km. Samples from the remains of old summit cores and their corresponding collapse deposits were collected and tested in order to obtain strength parameters of altered rock from old volcanic edifices. Hydrothermal alteration and variations of strength of the two avalanche deposits were correlated with the strength values and alterations from the in situ corresponding sources. Strength values: Hoek and Brown's parameters, Uniaxial Compressive Strength (50-300 kPa), cohesion (480-2000 kPa), angle of friction (6° - 35° ); and degree of alteration give insights of rock mass quality and maximum intact rock strengths of the edifice rock mass. These values provide the upper limits for numerical model input parameter values for evaluation of flank stability. Rock strength from numerical model of previous failures can be compared with those obtained for the rock mass and intact rock of the actual edifice. This would permit the assessment of future avalanche hazards.

  12. Spatio-temporal avalanche forecasting with Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pozdnoukhov

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the use of the Support Vector Machine (SVM as a data exploration tool and a predictive engine for spatio-temporal forecasting of snow avalanches. Based on the historical observations of avalanche activity, meteorological conditions and snowpack observations in the field, an SVM is used to build a data-driven spatio-temporal forecast for the local mountain region. It incorporates the outputs of simple physics-based and statistical approaches used to interpolate meteorological and snowpack-related data over a digital elevation model of the region. The interpretation of the produced forecast is discussed, and the quality of the model is validated using observations and avalanche bulletins of the recent years. The insight into the model behaviour is presented to highlight the interpretability of the model, its abilities to produce reliable forecasts for individual avalanche paths and sensitivity to input data. Estimates of prediction uncertainty are obtained with ensemble forecasting. The case study was carried out using data from the avalanche forecasting service in the Locaber region of Scotland, where avalanches are forecast on a daily basis during the winter months.

  13. Repertoires of spike avalanches are modulated by behavior and novelty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Lins Ribeiro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal avalanches measured as consecutive bouts of thresholded field potentials represent a statistical signature that the brain operates near a critical point. In theory, criticality optimizes stimulus sensitivity, information transmission, computational capability and mnemonic repertoires size. Field potential avalanches recorded via multielectrode arrays from cortical slice cultures are repeatable spatiotemporal activity patterns. It remains unclear whether avalanches of action potentials observed in forebrain regions of freely-behaving rats also form recursive repertoires, and whether these have any behavioral relevance. Here we show that spike avalanches, recorded from hippocampus and sensory neocortex of freely-behaving rats, constitute distinct families of recursive spatiotemporal patterns. A significant number of those patterns were specific to a behavioral state. Although avalanches produced during sleep were mostly similar to others that occurred during waking, the repertoire of patterns recruited during sleep differed significantly from that of waking. More importantly, exposure to novel objects increased the rate at which new patterns arose, also leading to changes in post-exposure repertoires, which were significantly different from those before the exposure. A significant number of families occurred exclusively during periods of whisker contact with objects, but few were associated with specific objects. Altogether, the results provide original evidence linking behavior and criticality at the spike level: spike avalanches form repertoires that emerge in waking, recur during sleep, are diversified by novelty and contribute to object representation.

  14. Repertoires of Spike Avalanches Are Modulated by Behavior and Novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Tiago L; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured as consecutive bouts of thresholded field potentials represent a statistical signature that the brain operates near a critical point. In theory, criticality optimizes stimulus sensitivity, information transmission, computational capability and mnemonic repertoires size. Field potential avalanches recorded via multielectrode arrays from cortical slice cultures are repeatable spatiotemporal activity patterns. It remains unclear whether avalanches of action potentials observed in forebrain regions of freely-behaving rats also form recursive repertoires, and whether these have any behavioral relevance. Here, we show that spike avalanches, recorded from hippocampus (HP) and sensory neocortex of freely-behaving rats, constitute distinct families of recursive spatiotemporal patterns. A significant number of those patterns were specific to a behavioral state. Although avalanches produced during sleep were mostly similar to others that occurred during waking, the repertoire of patterns recruited during sleep differed significantly from that of waking. More importantly, exposure to novel objects increased the rate at which new patterns arose, also leading to changes in post-exposure repertoires, which were significantly different from those before the exposure. A significant number of families occurred exclusively during periods of whisker contact with objects, but few were associated with specific objects. Altogether, the results provide original evidence linking behavior and criticality at the spike level: spike avalanches form repertoires that emerge in waking, recur during sleep, are diversified by novelty and contribute to object representation.

  15. Avalanches, plasticity, and ordering in colloidal crystals under compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, D; Reichhardt, C J Olson; Reichhardt, C

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical simulations we examine colloids with a long-range Coulomb interaction confined in a two-dimensional trough potential undergoing dynamical compression. As the depth of the confining well is increased, the colloids move via elastic distortions interspersed with intermittent bursts or avalanches of plastic motion. In these avalanches, the colloids rearrange to minimize their colloid-colloid repulsive interaction energy by adopting an average lattice constant that is isotropic despite the anisotropic nature of the compression. The avalanches take the form of shear banding events that decrease or increase the structural order of the system. At larger compression, the avalanches are associated with a reduction of the number of rows of colloids that fit within the confining potential, and between avalanches the colloids can exhibit partially crystalline or anisotropic ordering. The colloid velocity distributions during the avalanches have a non-Gaussian form with power-law tails and exponents that are consistent with those found for the velocity distributions of gliding dislocations. We observe similar behavior when we subsequently decompress the system, and find a partially hysteretic response reflecting the irreversibility of the plastic events.

  16. Avalanches and hysteresis in frustrated superconductors and XY spin glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Auditya; Andreanov, Alexei; Müller, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We study avalanches along the hysteresis loop of long-range interacting spin glasses with continuous XY symmetry, which serves as a toy model of granular superconductors with long-range and frustrated Josephson couplings. We identify sudden jumps in the T=0 configurations of the XY phases as an external field is increased. They are initiated by the softest mode of the inverse susceptibility matrix becoming unstable, which induces an avalanche of phase updates (or spin alignments). We analyze the statistics of these events and study the correlation between the nonlinear avalanches and the soft mode that initiates them. We find that the avalanches follow the directions of a small fraction of the softest modes of the inverse susceptibility matrix, similarly as was found in avalanches in jammed systems. In contrast to the similar Ising spin glass (Sherrington-Kirkpatrick) studied previously, we find that avalanches are not distributed with a scale-free power law but rather have a typical size which scales with the system size. We also observe that the Hessians of the spin-glass minima are not part of standard random matrix ensembles as the lowest eigenvector has a fractal support.

  17. Hydroplaning and submarine debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blasio, Fabio V.; Engvik, Lars; Harbitz, Carl B.; ElverhøI, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Examination of submarine clastic deposits along the continental margins reveals the remnants of holocenic or older debris flows with run-out distances up to hundreds of kilometers. Laboratory experiments on subaqueous debris flows, where typically one tenth of a cubic meter of material is dropped down a flume, also show high velocities and long run-out distances compared to subaerial debris flows. Moreover, they show the tendency of the head of the flow to run out ahead of the rest of the body. The experiments reveal the possible clue to the mechanism of long run-out. This mechanism, called hydroplaning, begins as the dynamic pressure at the front of the debris flow becomes of the order of the pressure exerted by the weight of the sediment. In such conditions a layer of water can intrude under the sediment with a lubrication effect and a decrease in the resistance forces between the sediment and the seabed. A physical-mathematical model of hydroplaning is presented and investigated numerically. The model is applied to both laboratory- and field-scale debris flows. Agreement with laboratory experiments makes us confident in the extrapolation of our model to natural flows and shows that long run-out distances can be naturally attained.

  18. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  19. Submarine Volcanic Morphology of Santorini Caldera, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, P.; Croff Bell, K.; Carey, S.; Bejelou, K.; Parks, M.; Antoniou, V.

    2012-04-01

    the area that lies between the town of Fira on the main island of Santorini and Nea Kammeni has been revealed. The lower slopes were covered with landslide debris which consisted of lava blocks mostly mantled with soft sediment. At the upper slopes an abrupt cliff face was exposed that was highly indurated by biologic material. At the top of a volcanic dome, a crater with its deepest part at 43m, its rim at about 34m with an approximately 8m diameter was also found. Shimmery water with temperatures as much as 25°C above ambient was observed there but the source of venting has not yet been found. The combination of ROV video footage and multibeam data provide new information about the main morphological characteristics of Santorini Caldera which demonstrates the intense geodynamic processes occurring at the central part of the active Hellenic volcanic arc. These results will be useful for the interpretation of understanding the offshore volcanic area and its linkage with the onshore structures.

  20. Modeling of snow avalanches for protection measures designing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchaninova, Alla; Lazarev, Anton; Loginova, Ekaterina; Seliverstov, Yuri; Glazovskaya, Tatiana; Komarov, Anton

    2017-04-01

    Avalanche protection structures such as dams have to be designed using well known standard engineering procedures that differ in different countries. Our intent is to conduct a research on structural avalanche protection measures designing and their reliability assessment during the operation using numerical modeling. In the Khibini Mountains, Russia, several avalanche dams have been constructed at different times to protect settlements and mining. Compared with other mitigation structures dams are often less expensive to construct in mining regions. The main goal of our investigation was to test the capabilities of Swiss avalanche dynamics model RAMMS and Russian methods to simulate the interaction of avalanches with mitigation structures such as catching and reflecting dams as well as to reach the observed runout distances after the transition through a dam. We present the RAMMS back-calculation results of an artificially triggered and well-documented catastrophic avalanche occurred in the town of Kirovsk, Khibini Mountains in February 2016 that has unexpectedly passed through a system of two catching dams and took the lives of 3 victims. The estimated volume of an avalanche was approximately 120,000 m3. For the calculation we used a 5 m DEM including catching dams generated from field measurements in summer 2015. We simulated this avalanche (occurred below 1000 m.a.s.l.) in RAMMS having taken the friction parameters (µ and ζ) from the upper altitude limit (above 1500 m.a.s.l.) from the table recommended for Switzerland (implemented into RAMMS) according to the results of our previous research. RAMMS reproduced the observed avalanche behavior and runout distance. No information is available concerning the flow velocity; however, calculated values correspond in general to the values measured in this avalanche track before. We applied RAMMS using an option of adding structures to DEM (including a dam in GIS) in other to test other operating catching dams in

  1. Fractal Structure of Debris Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; LIU Jingjing; HU Kaiheng; CHEN Xiaoqing

    2007-01-01

    One of the most remarkable characteristics of debris flow is the competence for supporting boulders on the surface of flow, which strongly suggests that there should be some structure in the fluid body. This paper analyzed the grain compositions from various samples of debris flows and then revealed the fractal structure. Specifically, the fractality holds in three domains that can be respectively identified as the slurry, matrix, and the coarse content. Furthermore, the matrix fractal, which distinguishes debris flow from other kinds of flows, involves a hierarchical structure in the sense that it might contain ever increasing grains while the total range of grain size increases. It provides a possible mechanism for the boulder suspension.

  2. Atomic gas in debris discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Antonio S.; Barlow, M. J.; Crawford, I. A.; Casassus, S.

    2017-04-01

    We have conducted a search for optical circumstellar absorption lines in the spectra of 16 debris disc host stars. None of the stars in our sample showed signs of emission line activity in either Hα, Ca II or Na I, confirming their more evolved nature. Four stars were found to exhibit narrow absorption features near the cores of the photospheric Ca II and Na I D lines (when Na I D data were available). We analyse the characteristics of these spectral features to determine whether they are of circumstellar or interstellar origins. The strongest evidence for circumstellar gas is seen in the spectrum of HD 110058, which is known to host a debris disc observed close to edge-on. This is consistent with a recent ALMA detection of molecular gas in this debris disc, which shows many similarities to the β Pictoris system.

  3. Skier triggering of backcountry avalanches with skilled route selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinickas, Alexandra; Haegeli, Pascal; Jamieson, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Jamieson (2009) provided numerical estimates for the baseline probabilities of triggering an avalanche by a backcountry skier making fresh tracks without skilled route selection as a function of the North American avalanche danger scale (i.e., hazard levels Low, Moderate, Considerable, High and Extreme). Using the results of an expert survey, he showed that triggering probabilities while skiing directly up, down or across a trigger zone without skilled route selection increase roughly by a factor of 10 with each step of the North American avalanche danger scale (i.e. hazard level). The objective of the present study is to examine the effect of skilled route selection on the relationship between triggering probability and hazard level. To assess the effect of skilled route selection on triggering probability by hazard level, we analysed avalanche hazard assessments as well as reports of skiing activity and triggering of avalanches from 11 Canadian helicopter and snowcat operations during two winters (2012-13 and 2013-14). These reports were submitted to the daily information exchange among Canadian avalanche safety operations, and reflect professional decision-making and route selection practices of guides leading groups of skiers. We selected all skier-controlled or accidentally triggered avalanches with a destructive size greater than size 1 according to the Canadian avalanche size classification, triggered by any member of a guided group (guide or guest). These operations forecast the avalanche hazard daily for each of three elevation bands: alpine, treeline and below treeline. In contrast to the 2009 study, an exposure was defined as a group skiing within any one of the three elevation bands, and consequently within a hazard rating, for the day (~4,300 ratings over two winters). For example, a group that skied below treeline (rated Moderate) and treeline (rated Considerable) in one day, would receive one count for exposure to Moderate hazard, and one count for

  4. The Herschel Cold Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspar, Andras

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel "DUst around NEarby Stars (DUNES)" survey has found a number of debris disk candidates that are apparently very cold, with temperatures near 22K. It has proven difficult to fit their spectral energy distributions with conventional models for debris disks. Given this issue we carefully examine the alternative explanation, that the detections arise from confusion with IR cirrus and/or background galaxies that are not physically associated with the foreground star. We find that such an explanation is consistent with all of these detections.

  5. Precambrian Lunar Volcanic Protolife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Green

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Five representative terrestrial analogs of lunar craters are detailed relevant to Precambrian fumarolic activity. Fumarolic fluids contain the ingredients for protolife. Energy sources to derive formaldehyde, amino acids and related compounds could be by flow charging, charge separation and volcanic shock. With no photodecomposition in shadow, most fumarolic fluids at 40 K would persist over geologically long time periods. Relatively abundant tungsten would permit creation of critical enzymes, Fischer-Tropsch reactions could form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble volcanic polyphosphates would enable assembly of nucleic acids. Fumarolic stimuli factors are described. Orbital and lander sensors specific to protolife exploration including combined Raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrocsopy are evaluated.

  6. Avalanches in a granular stick-slip experiment: detection using wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed Zadeh, Aghil; Barés, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert P.

    2017-06-01

    Avalanches have been experimentally investigated in a wide range of physical systems from granular physics to friction. Here, we measure and detect avalanches in a 2D granular stick-slip experiment. We discuss the conventional way of signal processing for avalanche extraction and how statistics depend on several parameters that are chosen in the analysis process. Then, we introduce another way of detecting avalanches using wavelet transformations that can be applied in many other systems. We show that by using this method and measuring Lipschitz exponents, we can intelligently detect noise in a signal, which leads to a better avalanche extraction and more reliable avalanche statistics.

  7. Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act legally establishes the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Marine Debris Program. The...

  8. Space Debris Elimination (SpaDE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The amount of debris in low Earth orbit (LEO) has increased rapidly over the last twenty years. This prevalence of debris increases the likelihood of cascading...

  9. An Evolution Model of Space Debris Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Various types of models including engineering models andevolution models have been developed to understand space debris environment since 1960s. Evolution model, consisting of a set of supporting models such as Launch Model, Breakup Model and Atmosphere Model, can reliably predicts the evolution of space debris environment. Of these supporting models, Breakup Model is employed to describe the distribution of debris and debris cloud during a explosion or collision case which is one of the main factors affecting the amount of total space debris. An analytical orbit debris environment model referred to as the “Particles-In-Boxes" model has been introduced. By regarding the orbit debris as the freedom particles running in the huge volume, the sources and sinks mechanism is established. Then the PIB model is expanded to the case of multiple-species in multiple-tier system. Combined with breakup model, the evolution of orbit debris environment is predicted.

  10. NASA Orbital Debris Requirements and Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Limitation of orbital debris accumulation is an international and national concern, reflectedin NASA debris limitation requirements. These requirements will be reviewed, along with some practices that can be employed to achieve the requirements.

  11. DebriSat Project Update and Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, M.; Krisko, P. H.

    2016-01-01

    DebriSat Reporting Topics: DebriSat Fragment Analysis Calendar; Near-term Fragment Extraction Strategy; Fragment Characterization and Database; HVI (High-Velocity Impact) Considerations; Requirements Document.

  12. First approximations in avalanche model validations using seismic information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig Lafon, Pere; Suriñach, Emma; Bartelt, Perry; Pérez-Guillén, Cristina; Tapia, Mar; Sovilla, Betty

    2017-04-01

    Avalanche dynamics modelling is an essential tool for snow hazard management. Scenario based numerical modelling provides quantitative arguments for decision-making. The software tool RAMMS (WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF) is one such tool, often used by government authorities and geotechnical offices. As avalanche models improve, the quality of the numerical results will depend increasingly on user experience on the specification of input (e.g. release and entrainment volumes, secondary releases, snow temperature and quality). New model developments must continue to be validated using real phenomena data, for improving performance and reliability. The avalanches group form University of Barcelona (RISKNAT - UB), has studied the seismic signals generated from avalanches since 1994. Presently, the group manages the seismic installation at SLF's Vallée de la Sionne experimental site (VDLS). At VDLS the recorded seismic signals can be correlated to other avalanche measurement techniques, including both advanced remote sensing methods (radars, videogrammetry) and obstacle based sensors (pressure, capacitance, optical sender-reflector barriers). This comparison between different measurement techniques allows the group to address the question if seismic analysis can be used alone, on more additional avalanche tracks, to gain insight and validate numerical avalanche dynamics models in different terrain conditions. In this study, we aim to add the seismic data as an external record of the phenomena, able to validate RAMMS models. The seismic sensors are considerable easy and cheaper to install than other physical measuring tools, and are able to record data from the phenomena in every atmospheric conditions (e.g. bad weather, low light, freezing make photography, and other kind of sensors not usable). With seismic signals, we record the temporal evolution of the inner and denser parts of the avalanche. We are able to recognize the approximate position

  13. Avalanche outbreaks emerging in cooperative contagions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weiran; Chen, Li; Ghanbarnejad, Fakhteh; Grassberger, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The spreading of contagions can exhibit a percolation transition, which separates transitory prevalence from outbreaks that reach a finite fraction of the population. Such transitions are commonly believed to be continuous, but empirical studies have shown more violent spreading modes when the participating agents are not limited to one type. Striking examples include the co-epidemic of the Spanish flu and pneumonia that occurred in 1918 (refs , ), and, more recently, the concurrent prevalence of HIV/AIDS and a host of diseases. It remains unclear to what extent an outbreak in the presence of interacting pathogens differs from that due to an ordinary single-agent process. Here we study a mechanistic model for understanding contagion processes involving inter-agent cooperation. Our stochastic simulations reveal the possible emergence of a massive avalanche-like outbreak right at the threshold, which is manifested as a discontinuous phase transition. Such an abrupt change arises only if the underlying network topology supports a bottleneck for cascaded mutual infections. Surprisingly, all these discontinuous transitions are accompanied by non-trivial critical behaviours, presenting a rare case of hybrid transition. The findings may imply the origin of catastrophic occurrences in many realistic systems, from co-epidemics to financial contagions.

  14. The structure of powder snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovilla, Betty; McElwaine, Jim N.; Louge, Michel Y.

    2015-01-01

    Powder snow avalanches (PSAs) can be hundreds of metres high and descend at astonishing speeds. This review paints a composite picture of PSAs from data acquired at the Vallée de la Sionne test site in Switzerland, including time-histories of snow cover thickness from buried RADAR and, at several elevations on a pylon, impact pressures from load cells, air pressure, particle velocity from optical sensors, and cloud density and particle cluster size from capacitance probes. PSAs feature distinct flow regions with stratification in mean density. At the head, highly fluctuating impact pressures weaken with elevation, while vertical velocity profiles evolve rapidly along the flow, suggesting that surface snow layers of light, cold, cohesionless snow erupt into a turbulent, inhomogeneous, recirculating frontal cloud region. For hundreds of metres behind the head, cloud stratification sharpens with the deposition of suspended cloud particles, while a denser basal flow of increasing thickness forms as deeper, warmer and heavier parts of the weakened snow cover are entrained. Toward the tail, vertical velocity profiles are more uniform, impact pressures become lower and steadier as the flow becomes thinner, and snow pack entrainment is negligible.

  15. Granular avalanches down inclined and vibrated planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudel, Naïma; Kiesgen de Richter, Sébastien; Louvet, Nicolas; Jenny, Mathieu; Skali-Lami, Salaheddine

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we study granular avalanches when external mechanical vibrations are applied. We identify conditions of flow arrest and compare with the ones classically observed for nonvibrating granular flows down inclines [Phys. Fluids 11, 542 (1999), 10.1063/1.869928]. We propose an empirical law to describe the thickness of the deposits with the inclination angle and the vibration intensity. The link between the surface velocity and the depth of the flow highlights a competition between gravity and vibrations induced flows. We identify two distinct regimes: (a) gravity-driven flows at large angles where vibrations do not modify dynamical properties but the deposits (scaling laws in this regime are in agreement with the literature for nonvibrating granular flows) and (b) vibrations-driven flows at small angles where no flow is possible without applied vibrations (in this last regime, the flow behavior can be properly described by a vibration induced activated process). We show, in this study, that granular flows down inclined planes can be finely tuned by external mechanical vibrations.

  16. Lung problems and volcanic smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... releases gases into the atmosphere. Volcanic smog can irritate the lungs and make existing lung problems worse. ... deep into the lungs. Breathing in volcanic smog irritates the lungs and mucus membranes. It can affect ...

  17. Infrasonic monitoring of snow avalanches in the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, E.; Ulivieri, G.; Ripepe, M.; Chiambretti, I.; Segor, V.

    2012-04-01

    Risk assessment of snow avalanches is mostly related to weather conditions and snow cover. However a robust risk validation requires to identify all avalanches occurring, in order to compare predictions to real effects. For this purpose on December 2010 we installed a permanent 4-element, small aperture (100 m), infrasound array in the Alps, after a pilot experiment carried out in Gressonay during the 2009-2010 winter season. The array has been deployed in the Ayas Valley, at an elevation of 2000 m a.s.l., where natural avalanches are expected and controlled events are regularly performed. The array consists into 4 Optimic 2180 infrasonic microphones, with a sensitivity of 10-3 Pa in the 0.5-50 Hz frequency band and a 4 channel Guralp CMG-DM24 A/D converter, sampling at 100 Hz. Timing is achieved with a GPS receiver. Data are transmitted to the Department of Earth Sciences of the University of Firenze, where data is recorded and processed in real-time. A multi-channel semblance is carried out on the continuous data set as a function of slowness, back-azimuth and frequency of recorded infrasound in order to detect all avalanches occurring from the back-ground signal, strongly affected by microbarom and mountain induced gravity waves. This permanent installation in Italy will allow to verify the efficiency of the system in short-to-medium range (2-8 km) avalanche detection, and might represent an important validation to model avalanches activity during this winter season. Moreover, the real-time processing of infrasonic array data, might strongly contribute to avalanche risk assessments providing an up-to-description of ongoing events.

  18. Avalanches in a stochastic model of spiking neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Benayoun

    Full Text Available Neuronal avalanches are a form of spontaneous activity widely observed in cortical slices and other types of nervous tissue, both in vivo and in vitro. They are characterized by irregular, isolated population bursts when many neurons fire together, where the number of spikes per burst obeys a power law distribution. We simulate, using the Gillespie algorithm, a model of neuronal avalanches based on stochastic single neurons. The network consists of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, first with all-to-all connectivity and later with random sparse connectivity. Analyzing our model using the system size expansion, we show that the model obeys the standard Wilson-Cowan equations for large network sizes ( neurons. When excitation and inhibition are closely balanced, networks of thousands of neurons exhibit irregular synchronous activity, including the characteristic power law distribution of avalanche size. We show that these avalanches are due to the balanced network having weakly stable functionally feedforward dynamics, which amplifies some small fluctuations into the large population bursts. Balanced networks are thought to underlie a variety of observed network behaviours and have useful computational properties, such as responding quickly to changes in input. Thus, the appearance of avalanches in such functionally feedforward networks indicates that avalanches may be a simple consequence of a widely present network structure, when neuron dynamics are noisy. An important implication is that a network need not be "critical" for the production of avalanches, so experimentally observed power laws in burst size may be a signature of noisy functionally feedforward structure rather than of, for example, self-organized criticality.

  19. Avalanches in a stochastic model of spiking neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benayoun, Marc; Cowan, Jack D; van Drongelen, Wim; Wallace, Edward

    2010-07-08

    Neuronal avalanches are a form of spontaneous activity widely observed in cortical slices and other types of nervous tissue, both in vivo and in vitro. They are characterized by irregular, isolated population bursts when many neurons fire together, where the number of spikes per burst obeys a power law distribution. We simulate, using the Gillespie algorithm, a model of neuronal avalanches based on stochastic single neurons. The network consists of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, first with all-to-all connectivity and later with random sparse connectivity. Analyzing our model using the system size expansion, we show that the model obeys the standard Wilson-Cowan equations for large network sizes ( neurons). When excitation and inhibition are closely balanced, networks of thousands of neurons exhibit irregular synchronous activity, including the characteristic power law distribution of avalanche size. We show that these avalanches are due to the balanced network having weakly stable functionally feedforward dynamics, which amplifies some small fluctuations into the large population bursts. Balanced networks are thought to underlie a variety of observed network behaviours and have useful computational properties, such as responding quickly to changes in input. Thus, the appearance of avalanches in such functionally feedforward networks indicates that avalanches may be a simple consequence of a widely present network structure, when neuron dynamics are noisy. An important implication is that a network need not be "critical" for the production of avalanches, so experimentally observed power laws in burst size may be a signature of noisy functionally feedforward structure rather than of, for example, self-organized criticality.

  20. A Search for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American...Examples are the results from the European Space Debris Facility in the Canary Islands, MODEST (the Michigan orbital DEbris Survey Telescope at Cerro ...filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American

  1. Using thermal remanent magnetisation (TRM) to distinguish block and ash flow and debris flow deposits, and to estimate their emplacement temperature: 1991-1995 lava dome eruption at Mt. Unzen Volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, D.; Cas, R. A. F.; Folkes, C.; Takarada, S.; Oda, H.; Porreca, M.

    2015-09-01

    The 1991-1995 Mt. Unzen eruption (Kyushu, Japan) produced 13 lava domes, approximately 9400 block and ash pyroclastic flows (BAF) resulting from lava dome collapse events and syn- and post-dome collapse debris flow (DF) events. In the field, it can be very difficult to distinguish from field facies characteristics which deposits are primary hot BAF, cold BAF or rock avalanche, or secondary DF deposits. In this study we use a combination of field observations and thermal remanent magnetisation (TRM) analysis of juvenile, lava dome derived clasts from seven deposits of the 1991-1995 Mt. Unzen eruption in order to distinguish between primary BAF deposits and secondary DF deposits and to determine their emplacement temperature. Four major TRM patterns were identified: (1) Type I: clasts with a single magnetic component oriented parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at time and site of emplacement. This indicates that these deposits were deposited at very high temperature, between the Curie temperature of magnetite (~ 540 °C) and the glass transition temperature of the lava dome (~ 745 °C). These clasts are found in high temperature BAF deposits. (2) Type II: clasts with two magnetic components of magnetisation. The lower temperature magnetic components are parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at time of the Unzen eruption. Temperature estimations for these deposits can range from 80 to 540 °C. We found this paleomagnetic behaviour in moderate temperature BAF or warm DF deposits. (3) Type III: clasts with three magnetic components, with a lower temperature component oriented parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at Unzen. The individual clast temperatures estimated for this kind of deposit are usually less than 300 °C. We interpret this paleomagnetic behaviour as the effect of different thermal events during their emplacement history. There are several interpretations for this paleomagnetic behaviour including remobilisation of moderate temperature BAF, warm DF

  2. Volcanism and Oil & Gas In Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Xuanlong

    2000-01-01

    Based on study on the relation with volcanic rock and oil & gas in Songliao Basin and Liaohe Basin in northeast China, author proposes that material from deep by volcanism enrichs the resources in basins, that heat by volcanism promotes organic matter transforming to oil and gas, that volcanic reservoir is fracture, vesicular, solution pore, intercrystal pore.Lava facies and pyroclastic facies are favourable reservoir. Mesozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of intermediate, acid rock,but Cenozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of basalt. Types of oil and gas pool relating to volcanic rock include volcanic fracture pool, volcanic unconformity pool, volcanic rock - screened pool, volcanic darpe structural pool.

  3. Applying Knowledge from Terrestrial Debris-Covered Glaciers to Constrain the Evolution of Martian Debris-Covered Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutnik, M. R.; Pathare, A. V.; Todd, C.; Waddington, E.; Christian, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    We will discuss the application of terrestrial knowledge on debris emplacement, the effects of debris on glacier-surface topography, debris transport by ice flow, deformation of debris-laden ice, and atmosphere-glacier feedbacks to Mars ice.

  4. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard...

  5. Descartes region - Evidence for Copernican-age volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J. W., III; Goetz, A. F. H.

    1972-01-01

    A model that suggests that the high-albedo central region of the Descartes Formation was formed by Copernican-age volcanism was developed from Orbiter photography, Apollo 12 multispectral photography, earth-based spectrophotometry, and thermal IR and radar data. The bright surface either is abundant in centimeter-sized rocks or is formed from an insulating debris layer overlying a surface with an abundance of rocks in the 1- to 20-cm size range. On the basis of these data, the bright unit is thought to be a young pyroclastic deposit mantling older volcanic units of the Descartes Formation. Since the Apollo 16 target point is only 50 km NW of the central part of this unit, evidence for material associated with this unique highland formation should be searched for in returned soil and rock samples.

  6. Implications of Grainfall for Avalanches and Barchan Dune Morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nield, J. M.; Wiggs, G.; Baddock, M. C.; Hipondoka, M.

    2016-12-01

    Sediment accumulation on aeolian dunes is predominately though avalanching (or grainflow). This grainflow is initiated by the accumulation of grainfall deposits, close to the dune brink. When the accumulation, or `bulge', exceeds an angle of repose, avalanches are initiated and sediment is transported down the lee of the dune. The location of sediment accumulation, or avalanche initiation point, is determined by the distance that grainfall can travel from the dune brink. While previous studies have focused on determining angles at which avalanches occur, along with depositional flux rates, technical constraints have limited the testing of models to predict grainfall zone dynamics under varying wind conditions. Here we use terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to measure both grainfall distance and associated lee slope surface change of a 5 m high barchan dune under variable wind speeds, on the Skeleton Coast, Namibia. We find that under stronger winds, the distance that grainfall can travel from the brink expands (by up to 0.45 m for a 3 m/s increase in wind speed). Along with this expansion of the grainfall distance there is an increase in saltation flux over the brink. The increased grainfall distance shifts sand further from the brink resulting in dominant avalanche initiation point locations expanding from 0.3 m to 0.4 m for wind speeds above 6 m/s. This shift also corresponds to the appearance of secondary avalanches, which are initiated by primary avalanche lobe deposits extending outside of the main grainfall zone. Ultimately, under stronger winds the expansion of the grainfall distance contributes to the destabilisation and movement of increased sediment volumes down the lee slope. Avalanches under stronger wind speeds, therefore, increase in thickness, width and length, while during weaker wind speeds, most of the grainfall and grainflow is limited to the upper section of the lee slope. The implication of this dual avalanche behaviour under variable wind

  7. Dynamics of the Bingham Canyon rock avalanches (Utah, USA) resolved from topographic, seismic, and infrasound data: Bingham Canyon Rock Avalanches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Jeffrey R. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City Utah USA; Pankow, Kristine L. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City Utah USA; Ford, Sean R. [Atmospheric, Earth, and Energy Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California USA; Koper, Keith D. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City Utah USA; Hale, J. Mark [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City Utah USA; Aaron, Jordan [Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver British Columbia Canada; Larsen, Chris F. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks Alaska USA

    2017-03-01

    The 2013 Bingham Canyon Mine rock avalanches represent one of the largest cumulative landslide events in recorded U.S. history and provide a unique opportunity to test remote analysis techniques for landslide characterization. Here we combine aerial photogrammetry surveying, topographic reconstruction, numerical runout modeling, and analysis of broadband seismic and infrasound data to extract salient details of the dynamics and evolution of the multiphase landslide event. Our results reveal a cumulative intact rock source volume of 52 Mm3, which mobilized in two main rock avalanche phases separated by 1.5 h. We estimate that the first rock avalanche had 1.5–2 times greater volume than the second. Each failure initiated by sliding along a gently dipping (21°), highly persistent basal fault before transitioning to a rock avalanche and spilling into the inner pit. The trajectory and duration of the two rock avalanches were reconstructed using runout modeling and independent force history inversion of intermediate-period (10–50 s) seismic data. Intermediate- and shorter-period (1–50 s) seismic data were sensitive to intervals of mass redirection and constrained finer details of the individual slide dynamics. Back projecting short-period (0.2–1 s) seismic energy, we located the two rock avalanches within 2 and 4 km of the mine. Further analysis of infrasound and seismic data revealed that the cumulative event included an additional 11 smaller landslides (volumes ~104–105 m3) and that a trailing signal following the second rock avalanche may result from an air-coupled Rayleigh wave. Our results demonstrate new and refined techniques for detailed remote characterization of the dynamics and evolution of large landslides.

  8. Solid-state flat panel imager with avalanche amorphous selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Howansky, Adrian; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Levéille, Sébastien; Tanioka, K.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have become the dominant detector technology for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. For low dose imaging, electronic noise from the amorphous silicon thin film transistor (TFT) array degrades imaging performance. We have fabricated the first prototype solid-state AMFPI using a uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor to amplify the signal to eliminate the effect of electronic noise. We have previously developed a large area solid-state avalanche a-Se sensor structure referred to as High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) capable of achieving gains of 75. In this work we successfully deposited this HARP structure onto a 24 x 30 cm2 TFT array with a pixel pitch of 85 μm. An electric field (ESe) up to 105 Vμm-1 was applied across the a-Se layer without breakdown. Using the HARP layer as a direct detector, an X-ray avalanche gain of 15 +/- 3 was achieved at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. In indirect mode with a 150 μm thick structured CsI scintillator, an optical gain of 76 +/- 5 was measured at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. Image quality at low dose increases with the avalanche gain until the electronic noise is overcome at a constant exposure level of 0.76 mR. We demonstrate the success of a solid-state HARP X-ray imager as well as the largest active area HARP sensor to date.

  9. Snow avalanche friction relation based on extended kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauter, Matthias; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Fellin, Wolfgang; Kofler, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Rheological models for granular materials play an important role in the numerical simulation of dry dense snow avalanches. This article describes the application of a physically based model from the field of kinetic theory to snow avalanche simulations. The fundamental structure of the so-called extended kinetic theory is outlined and the decisive model behavior for avalanches is identified. A simplified relation, covering the basic features of the extended kinetic theory, is developed and implemented into an operational avalanche simulation software. To test the obtained friction relation, simulation results are compared to velocity and runout observations of avalanches, recorded from different field tests. As reference we utilize a classic phenomenological friction relation, which is commonly applied for hazard estimation. The quantitative comparison is based on the combination of normalized residuals of different observation variables in order to take into account the quality of the simulations in various regards. It is demonstrated that the extended kinetic theory provides a physically based explanation for the structure of phenomenological friction relations. The friction relation derived with the help of the extended kinetic theory shows advantages to the classic phenomenological friction, in particular when different events and various observation variables are investigated.

  10. Solitary granular avalanches: stability, fingering and theoretical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloggi, Florent; Andreotti, Bruno; Clément, Eric; Aronson, Igor; Tsimring, Lev

    2008-03-01

    Avalanching processes do not only occur in the air as we know of snow avalanches, mud flows and land-slides. Such events frequently happen below the see level as they take many forms from turbidity currents to thick sediment waves. In this study we report results on laboratory scale avalanche experiments taking place both in the air and under-water. In both cases a family of stable solitary erosion/deposition waves is observed [1]. At higher inclination angles, we show the existence of a long wavelength transverse instability followed by a coarsening and the onset of a fingering pattern. While the experiments strongly differ by the spatial and time scales, the agreement between the stability diagrams, the wavelengths selection and the avalanche morphology suggest a common erosion/deposition scenario. We also use these erosion/deposition waves to investigate the dynamics of granular flow and jamming in the frame work of the Partial Fluidization Theory (PFT) proposed by Aronson et al. to describe the dynamics of granular matter near jamming [2]. [1] F. Malloggi et al. Europhysics Letters, 2006, Erosion waves: Transverse instabilities and fingering 75, 825-831 [2] I. S. Aranson et al.. Transverse instability of avalanches in granular flows down an incline. Physical Review E, 2006, 73, 050302; I.S.Aronson et al., Non rheological properties of granular flows: exploring the near jamming limit, preprint (2007).

  11. Infrasound monitoring of snow avalanches in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Marchetti, Emanuele; Chiambretti, Igor; Segor, Valerio; Pitet, Luca

    2010-05-01

    Risk assessment of snow avalanches is mostly related to weather conditions and snow cover. However a robust risk validation requires to identify all avalanches occurring, in order to compare predictions to real effects. For this purpose on December 2009 we installed a temporary 4-element, small aperture (100 m), infrasound array in the Alps. The array has been deployed south of Mt. Rosa, at an elevation of 2000 m a.s.l. in the valley of Gressoney, where natural avalanches are expected and triggered ones are regularly programmed. The array consists into 4 absolute pressure transducers with a sensitivity of 0.01 Pa in the 0.1-50 Hz frequency band and a 7 channel Guralp CMG-DM24 A/D converter, sampling at 100 Hz. Timing is achieved with a GPS receiver. The array is completely buried in snow. Gel cell batteries and 200 W solar panels provide the array power requirements (~3 W) and should allow a continuous operation during the winter season. A multi-channel semblance is carried out on the continuous data set as a function of slowness, back-azimuth and frequency of recorded infrasound in order to detect all avalanches occurring from the back-ground signal, strongly affected by microbarom and mountain induced gravity waves. This pilot experiment in Italy will allow to verify the efficiency of the system, and might represent an important validation to modeled avalanches activity during this winter season.

  12. The effectiveness of mean-field theory for avalanche distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edward; Raju, Archishman; Sethna, James

    We explore the mean-field theory of the pseudogap found in avalanche systems with long-range anisotropic interactions using analytical and numerical tools. The pseudogap in the density of low-stability states emerges from the competition between stabilizing interactions between spins in an avalanche and the destabilizing random movement towards the threshold caused by anisotropic couplings. Pazmandi et al. have shown that for the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, the pseudogap scales linearly and produces a distribution of avalanche sizes with exponent t=1 in contrast with that predicted from RFIM t=3/2. Lin et al. have argued that the scaling exponent ? of the pseudogap depends on the tail of the distribution of couplings and on non-universal values like the strain rate and the magnitude of the coupling strength. Yet others have argued that the relationship between the pseudogap scaling and the distribution of avalanche sizes is dependent on dynamical details. Despite the theoretical arguments, the class of RFIM mean-field models is surprisingly good at predicting the distribution of avalanche sizes in a variety of different magnetic systems. We investigate these differences with a combination of theory and simulation.

  13. 1d Numerical Simulation of A Swiss Debris Flow: Comparison of Flow Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdell, B. W.; Graf, Ch.; Naef, D.; Rickenmann, D.

    Efforts to numerically model debris flows have been limited by a lack of appropriate numerical tools. Here we report on our efforts to systematically evaluate different flow laws using a numerical tool under development at our institute. The model, DFEM, is a finite element solution of the shallow water equations in one or two dimensions and is based on the FEMTOOL libraries from Rutschmann (1993). Debris flow constitu- tive relations or flow laws include turbulent (e.g. Manning, Chézy, Voellmy), laminar (Bingham, Newtonian laminar), and inertial formulations (dilatant/grain shearing) as well as combinations of flow laws when appropriate. The model is applied to a recent debris flow event from the Schipfenbach torrent, Switzerland (Hürlimann, submitted), where we maintain an automated debris flow observation station. Observations include flow depth measurements from ultrasonic depth measurement devices, reach-averaged velocities estimated from the travel time between ultrasonic gages and geophones, velocity and flow behavior from video cam- eras situated near the flow retention basin on the fan, and post-event field surveys. Preliminary results suggest that the flow of debris in the steep reaches of the torrent channel can be reasonably described by a simple turbulent flow law (e.g. Manning- Strickler or Chézy) with a large overall flow resistance, and that both the flow in the channel and the deposition on the fan can be satisfactorily simulated using the Voellmy fluid approach. The results using the Voellmy fluid approach are in agree- ment with results calculated from the AVAL-1D snow avalanche simulation code and input parameters for debris instead of snow, corroborating the implementation in the DFEM model. The AVAL-1D code is commercially available, providing another tool that may be used by workers in the natural hazards field for debris flow routing in torrent channels and on alluvial fans. References: Hürlimann, M., Rickenmann, D. and Graf, Ch., Field

  14. Response of Himalayan debris-covered glaciers to climate warming: from observations to predictive modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, D.; Lefeuvre, P.; Ng, F.; Nicholson, L. I.

    2012-12-01

    Field observations and remote-sensing studies have shown that Himalayan debris-covered glaciers tend to follow distinctive evolutionary pathways during periods of negative mass balance. Initially, debris-covered glacier tongues downwaste rather than retreat, resulting in thinning and a reduction of ice surface gradient. Reduced driving stresses lead to lower velocities and eventual stagnation of the tongue. These geometrical and dynamic changes reduce the efficiency of the hydrological system, leading to increased retention of meltwater and the formation of ephemeral supraglacial lakes. High ablation rates around lakes and internal ablation in association with englacial conduits serve to accelerate mass loss and downwasting. In some cases, this evolutionary cascade results in the formation of moraine-dammed lakes, which can present significant outburst flood risks if large lake volumes coincide with weak moraine dams . While this evolutionary sequence has been observed on numerous glaciers, numerical prediction of future glacier behavior requires quantification or parameterization of several complex processes. In addition, system behavior is highly non-linear with multiple process thresholds, creating considerable modeling challenges. An essential first step is to develop robust mass-balance models, including patterns of snow accumulation in extreme terrain and the effects of both debris and climate on melting. Accumulation models need to incorporate vertical variations in precipitation as well as redistribution by wind and avalanching. Newly available precipitation estimates from satellite data can provide important model input. Ablation modeling can be done using a range of approaches, including degree-day and full energy balance models. Mass balance gradients calculated using the latter approach indicate ablation maxima some distance above the glacier termini, where debris cover is relatively thin. Mass balance modeling also indicates that in monsoonal regions

  15. Analyzing turbidity, suspended-sediment concentration, and particle-size distribution resulting from a debris flow on Mount Jefferson, Oregon, November 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrich, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    A debris flow and sediment torrent occurred on the flanks of Mt Jefferson in Oregon on November 6, 2006, inundating 150 acres of forest. The massive debris flow was triggered by a rock and snow avalanche from the Milk Creek glaciers and snowfields during the early onset of an intense storm originating near the Hawaiian Islands. The debris flow consisted of a heavy conglomerate of large boulders, cobbles, and coarse-grained sediment that was deposited at depths of up to 15 ft and within 3 mi of the glaciers, and a viscous slurry that deposited finer-grained sediments at depths of 0.5 to 3 ft. The muddy slurry coated standing trees within the lower reaches of Milk Creek as it moved downslope.

  16. An Experimental Study on the Nuclear Fuel Debris Filtering Efficiency Using Wire Debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon-Kyoo; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Lee, Tae-Kwon; Park, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Jae-Ik [KEPCO NF, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    If this debris vibrates over a long period of time, the cladding tubes could wear out. Especially, the wire types of debris from the tools during the plant maintenance operations can induce worn hole or wear scar on the fuel rods and may be make severe damage. Most of failures due to debris are observed under the first grid from the bottom of fuel assembly. In order to mitigate this defect, the fuel vendor have developed various anti-debris grids, such as protective grid or debris filtering bottom grid, which is located just above the bottom nozzle. The vendors have performed the debris filtering test to evaluate the efficiency of these grids. KEPCO NF (KEPCO Nuclear fuel) also has carried out the debris filtering test for the fuel assembly with protective grid. Some major design parameters, such as the maximum debris passable size or grid axial location, which affect the debris filtering capacity are found out thorough the test. This paper will discuss the filtering efficiency according to the relative dimensions of wire debris specimens and the effects of the specimen dimensions through simulation tests. The relative dimensions could be useful to develop the debris filtering grid. This study discussed the filtering efficiency according to the relative dimensions of wire debris specimens through simulation tests. The wire debris is used since the debris is more useful to evaluate debris filtering efficiency.

  17. Precision Blasting Techniques For Avalanche Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kevin M.

    Experimental firings sponsored by the Center For Snow Science at Alta, Utah have demonstrated the potential of a unique prototype shaped charge device designed to stimulate snow pack and ice. These studies, conducted against stable snow pack, demonstrated a fourfold increase in crater volume yield and introduced a novel application of Shock Tube technology to facilitate position control, detonation and dud recovery of manually deployed charges. The extraordinary penetration capability of the shaped charge mechanism has been exploited in many non-military applications to meet a wide range of rapidpiercing and/or cutting requirements. The broader exploitation of the potential of the shaped charge mechanism has nevertheless remained confined to defence based applications. In the studies reported in this paper, the inimitable ability of the shaped charge mechanism to project shock energy, or a liner material, into a highly focussed energetic stream has been applied uniquely to the stimulation of snow pack. Recent research and development work, conducted within the UK, has resulted in the integration of shaped charge technology into a common Avalauncher and hand charge device. The potential of the common charge configuration and spooled Shock Tube fire and control system to improve the safety and cost effectiveness of explosives used in avalanche control operations was successfully demonstrated at Alta in March 2001. Future programmes of study will include focussed shock/blast mechanisms for suspended wire traverse techniques, application of the shaped charge mechanism to helibombing, and the desig n and development of non-fragmenting shaped charge ammunition formilitary artillery gun systems.

  18. Evaluation on the Implementation of Early Warning System for Debris Flow in Merapi Area (Case Study at Boyong River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Cahyadi Achmad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available One of disasters caused by volcanic activity of Mount Merapi is secondary disaster. The disaster usually occurs after eruption and this volcanic activity produces volcanic and pyroclastic material deposit around the top of the mountain as a result of previous eruption. This material might collapse downward in the form of debris flow as it is affected by natural event such as high intensity rainfall. Therefore, a research is needed to analyze whether existing forecasting and early warning system are capable to provide information for the people living in hazardous area before the debris flood occur. This research was carried out using field survey, observation and interview method. Data analysis used qualitative descriptive method by making description of actual condition of the researched location general condition and qualitative analysis of telemetry system installed on Mount Merapi. The qualitative analysis of telemetry system covers network, hardware, software, power supply, security system, operation and maintenance, also human resources. Research analysis used primary and secondary data. Research results revealed that mean rainfall intensity above of 60 mm/hour might trigger debris flood. Early warning should be given at the rainfall intensity level of 50-55 mm/hour, and debris flood time travel from the upstream to the observed location in Pulowatu Village is 45 minute. Based on the analysis of the present forecasting and early warning system, it is known that some of the equipment is not well functioned, so that debris flow cannot be predicted and detected. This is caused by the lack of human resource quality of the officers in operating and maintaining the equipment. Concerning that matter, it is necessary to conduct some improvement to achieve better forecasting and early warning system in order to give information regarding occurrence of debris flow.

  19. Sedimentology and clast fabric of subaerial debris flow facies in a glacially-influenced alluvial fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, N.; Kocsis, S.

    1988-09-01

    A large alluvial fan (2 km 2), constructed between 11,000 and 7000 years B.P. at the mouth of Cinquefoil Creek in interior British Columbia, Canada, is identified as "glacially-influenced, debris flow-dominated". The fan was rapidly constructed during and immediately after deglaciation when large volumes of glacial debris were resedimented downslope; fans of this type are widespread in the glaciated portion of the North American Cordillera. Diamict facies, deposited as debris flows, account for 48% of the fan volume, sheetflodd gravels 37%, and other facies 15%. Diamicts show three facies types; crudely-bedded facies containing rafts of soft sediment that are attributed to downslope collapse and mixing of heterogeneous glacial deposits. These occur within the core of the fan. Massive and weakly graded (inverse to normal) diamict facies, derived from the downslope flow of weathered volcanic bedrock, occur within a well-defined bed that can be traced across the entire fan. The occurrence of weakly graded facies as lateral equivalents to massive facies within the same bed, implies the partial development of turbulent, high-velocity "streams" within a viscous debris flow moving over a slope of 6°. Clast fabrics in these facies show weakly-clustered a-axes dipping up and downslope comparable to other debris flows and lahars. The Cinquefoil fan, its internal structure and facies, provides a good "modern" analogue for ancient diamictite sequences deposited in areas of active uplift, rifting and glaciation.

  20. Estimation of Supraglacial Dust and Debris Geochemical Composition via Satellite Reflectance and Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kimberly Ann; Kaab, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate spectral estimation of supraglacial dust, debris, ash and tephra geochemical composition from glaciers and ice fields in Iceland, Nepal, New Zealand and Switzerland. Surface glacier material was collected and analyzed via X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for geochemical composition and mineralogy. In situ data was used as ground truth for comparison with satellite derived geochemical results. Supraglacial debris spectral response patterns and emissivity-derived silica weight percent are presented. Qualitative spectral response patterns agreed well with XRF elemental abundances. Quantitative emissivity estimates of supraglacial SiO2 in continental areas were 67% (Switzerland) and 68% (Nepal), while volcanic supraglacial SiO2 averages were 58% (Iceland) and 56% (New Zealand), yielding general agreement. Ablation season supraglacial temperature variation due to differing dust and debris type and coverage was also investigated, with surface debris temperatures ranging from 5.9 to 26.6 C in the study regions. Applications of the supraglacial geochemical reflective and emissive characterization methods include glacier areal extent mapping, debris source identification, glacier kinematics and glacier energy balance considerations.

  1. Estimation of Supraglacial Dust and Debris Geochemical Composition via Satellite Reflectance and Emissivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Casey

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate spectral estimation of supraglacial dust, debris, ash and tephra geochemical composition from glaciers and ice fields in Iceland, Nepal, New Zealand and Switzerland. Surface glacier material was collected and analyzed via X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF and X-ray diffraction (XRD for geochemical composition and mineralogy. In situ data was used as ground truth for comparison with satellite derived geochemical results. Supraglacial debris spectral response patterns and emissivity-derived silica weight percent are presented. Qualitative spectral response patterns agreed well with XRF elemental abundances. Quantitative emissivity estimates of supraglacial SiO2 in continental areas were 67% (Switzerland and 68% (Nepal, while volcanic supraglacial SiO2 averages were 58% (Iceland and 56% (New Zealand, yielding general agreement. Ablation season supraglacial temperature variation due to differing dust and debris type and coverage was also investigated, with surface debris temperatures ranging from 5.9 to 26.6 C in the study regions. Applications of the supraglacial geochemical reflective and emissive characterization methods include glacier areal extent mapping, debris source identification, glacier kinematics and glacier energy balance considerations.

  2. A Probabilistic View of Debris Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; SU Pengcheng; CUI Peng; HU Kaiheng

    2008-01-01

    Most debris flows occur in valleys of area smaller than 50 km2. While associated with a valley, debris flow is by no means a full-valley event but originates from parts of the valley, i.e., the tributary sources. We propose that debris flow develops by extending from tributaries to the mainstream. The debris flow observed in the mainstream is the confluence of the tributary flows and the process of the confluence can be considered as a combination of the tributary elements. The frequency distribution of tributaries is found subject to the Weibull form (or its generalizations). And the same distribution form applies to the discharge of debris flow. Then the process of debris flow is related to the geometric structure of the valley. Moreover, viewed from a large scale of water system, all valleys are tributaries, which have been found to assume the same distribution. With each valley corresponding to a debris flow, the distribution can be taken as the frequency distribution of debris flow and therefore provides a quantitative description of the fact that debris flow is inclined to occur at valley of small size. Furthermore, different parameters appear in different regions, suggesting the regional differentials of debris flow potential. We can use the failure rate, instead of the size per se, to describe the risk of a valley of a given area. Finally we claim that the valleys of debris flow in different regions are in the similar episode of evolution.

  3. Modeling and monitoring avalanches caused by rain-on-snow events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, S.; Marshall, H. P.; Trisca, G. O.; Johnson, J. B.; Nicholson, B.

    2014-12-01

    Direct-action avalanches occur during large storm cycles in mountainous regions, when stresses on the snowpack increase rapidly due to the load of new snow and outpace snow strengthening due to compaction. If temperatures rise above freezing during the storm and snowfall turns to rain, the near-surface snow undergoes rapid densification caused by the introduction of liquid water. This shock to the snowpack, if stability is near critical, can cause widespread immediate avalanching due to the large induced strain rates in the slab, followed by secondary delayed avalanches due to both the increased load as well as water percolation to the depth of a weak layer. We use the semi-empirical SNOow Slope Stability model (SNOSS) to estimate the evolution of stability prior to large avalanches during rain-on-snow events on Highway 21 north of Boise, Idaho. We have continuously monitored avalanche activity using arrays of infrasound sensors in the avalanche-prone section of HW21 near Stanley, in collaboration with the Idaho Transportation Department's avalanche forecasting program. The autonomous infrasound avalanche monitoring system provides accurate timing of avalanche events, in addition to capturing avalanche dynamics during some major releases adjacent to the array. Due to the remote location and low winter traffic volume, the highway is typically closed for multiple days during major avalanche cycles. Many major avalanches typically release naturally and reach the road, but due the complex terrain and poor visibility, manual observations are often not possible until several days later. Since most avalanche programs typically use explosives on a regular basis to control slope stability, the infrasound record of avalanche activity we have recorded on HW21 provides a unique opportunity to study large naturally triggered avalanches. We use a first-order physically based stability model to estimate the importance of precipitation phase, amount, and rate during major rain

  4. Towards an automated detection of avalanche deposits using their directional properties

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Snow avalanches killed more people in the Swiss alpine area during the past decades than any other natural hazard. To further improve the avalanche prediction and the protection of people and infrastructure, information about the occurrence and the distribution of avalanche activity is crucial. Nevertheless this information is missing for large parts of the Alpine area. The surface roughness of avalanche deposits differs considerably from the adjacent undisturbed snow cover and is an impor...

  5. Elementary excitations and avalanches in the Coulomb glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palassini, Matteo; Goethe, Martin

    2012-07-01

    We study numerically the statistics of elementary excitations and charge avalanches in the classical Coulomb glass model of localized charges with unscreened Coulomb interaction and disorder. We compute the single-particle density of states with an energy minimization algorithm for systems of up to 1003 sites. The shape of the Coulomb gap is consistent with a power-law with exponent δ simeq 2.4 and marginally consistent with exponential behavior. The results are also compared with a recently proposed self-consistent approach. We then analyze the size distribution of the charge avalanches produced by a small perturbation of the system. We show that the distribution decays as a power law in the limit of large system size, and explain this behavior in terms of the elementary excitations. Similarities and differences with the scale-free avalanches observed in mean-field spin glasses are discussed.

  6. Studies of Electron Avalanche Behavior in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J G; Jackson, K H; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J A; Peskov, Vladimir; Wenzel, W A

    2002-01-01

    Electron avalanching in liquid argon is being studied as a function of voltage, pressure, radiation intensity, and the concentrations of certain additives, especially xenon. The avalanches produced in an intense electric field at the tip of a tungsten needle are initiated by ionization from a moveable americium (241Am) gamma ray source. Photons from xenon excimers are detected as photomultiplier signals in coincidence with the current pulse from the needle. In pure liquid argon the avalanche behavior is erratic, but the addition of even a small amount of xenon (>100ppm) stabilizes the performance. Similar attempts with neon (30%) as an additive to argon have been unsuccessful. Tests with higher energy gamma rays (57Co) yield spectra and other performance characteristics quite similar to those using the 241Am source. Two types of signal pulses are commonly observed: a set of pulses that are sensitive to ambient pressure, and a set of somewhat smaller pulses that are not pressure dependent.

  7. Precise method for determining avalanche breakdown voltage of silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirikov-Zorin, I.

    2017-07-01

    A physically motivated method is proposed for determining the avalanche breakdown voltage of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). The method is based on measuring the dependence of the relative photon detection efficiency (PDErel) on the bias voltage when one type of carriers (electron or hole) is injected into the avalanche multiplication zone of the p-n junction. The injection of electrons or holes from the base region of the SiPM semiconductor structure is performed using short-wave or long-wave light. At a low overvoltage (1-2 V) the detection efficiency is linearly dependent on the bias voltage; therefore, extrapolation to zero PDErel value determines the SiPM avalanche breakdown voltage with an accuracy within a few millivolts.

  8. Model of single-electron performance of micropixel avalanche photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Sadygov, Z; Akhmedov, G; Akhmedov, F; Khorev, S; Mukhtarov, R; Sadigov, A; Sidelev, A; Titov, A; Zerrouk, F; Zhezher, V

    2014-01-01

    An approximate iterative model of avalanche process in a pixel of micropixel avalanche photodiode initiated by a single photoelectron is presented. The model describes development of the avalanche process in time, taking into account change of electric field within the depleted region caused by internal discharge and external recharge currents. Conclusions obtained as a result of modelling are compared with experimental data. Simulations show that typical durations of the front and rear edges of the discharge current have the same magnitude of less than 50 ps. The front of the external recharge current has the same duration, however duration of the rear edge depends on value of the quenching micro-resistor. It was found that effective capacitance of the pixel calculated as the slope of linear dependence of the pulse charge on bias voltage exceeds its real capacitance by a factor of two.

  9. Controlling avalanche criticality in 2D nano arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Y C; Yochelis, S; Dahmen, K A; Jung, G; Paltiel, Y

    2013-01-01

    Many physical systems respond to slowly changing external force through avalanches spanning broad range of sizes. Some systems crackle even without apparent external force, such as bursts of neuronal activity or charge transfer avalanches in 2D molecular layers. Advanced development of theoretical models describing disorder-induced critical phenomena calls for experiments probing the dynamics upon tuneable disorder. Here we show that isomeric structural transitions in 2D organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) exhibit critical dynamics with experimentally tuneable disorder. The system consists of field effect transistor coupled through SAM to illuminated semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). Charges photoinduced in NCs are transferred through SAM to the transistor surface and modulate its conductivity. Avalanches of isomeric structural transitions are revealed by measuring the current noise I(t) of the transistor. Accumulated surface traps charges reduce dipole moments of the molecules, decrease their coupling, and thus decrease the critical disorder of the SAM enabling its tuning during experiments.

  10. [Death by avalanche in the minor mountain range].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisenberger, Dorothee; Kramer, Lena; Pircher, Rebecca; Pollak, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    On 30 Jan 2015, two avalanche accidents happened in the Black Forest (at the foot of the 1493 m high Feldberg and the Herzogenhorn situated next to it), in which experienced ski tourers--a 58-year-old woman and a 20-year-old man--were completely buried by snow masses. Both victims were recovered dead after nearly 2 hours under the snow. The avalanches were promoted by strong snowfalls, snowdrift by the wind and steep downwind slopes. One of the victims, the 20-year-old man, underwent a forensic autopsy. The findings suggested death by protracted asphyxiation with agonal hypothermia. A mechanical traumatization with internal injuries suspected by the emergency doctor at the scene could not be confirmed at autopsy. The possible causes of death in the avalanche are discussed using the reported case as an example and in reference to the relevant literature.

  11. Flux avalanches in Nb superconducting shifted strip arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Y.; Mawatari, Y.; Ibuka, J.; Tada, S.; Pyon, S.; Nagasawa, S.; Hidaka, M.; Maezawa, M.; Tamegai, T.

    2013-09-01

    Flux penetrations into three-dimensional Nb superconducting strip arrays, where two layers of strip arrays are stacked by shifting a half period, are studied using a magneto-optical imaging method. Flux avalanches are observed when the overlap between the top and bottom layers is large even if the width of each strip is well below the threshold value. In addition, anomalous linear avalanches perpendicular to the strip are observed in the shifted strip array when the overlap is very large and the thickness of the superconductor is greater than the penetration depth. We discuss possible origins for the flux avalanches, including linear ones, by considering flux penetration calculated by the Campbell method assuming the Bean model.

  12. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  13. The fast debris evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, H. G.; Swinerd, G. G.; Newland, R. J.; Saunders, A.

    2009-09-01

    The 'particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] removed the need for computer-intensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FADE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects ⩾10 cm are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FADE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FADE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using JavaScript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FADE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ⩾10 cm LEO debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model

  14. Experimental method to predict avalanches based on neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Zhdanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of experimental use of currently available statistical methods to classify the avalanche‑dangerous precipitations and snowfalls in the Kishi Almaty river basin. The avalanche service of Kazakhstan uses graphical methods for prediction of avalanches developed by I.V. Kondrashov and E.I. Kolesnikov. The main objective of this work was to develop a modern model that could be used directly at the avalanche stations. Classification of winter precipitations into dangerous snowfalls and non‑dangerous ones was performed by two following ways: the linear discriminant function (canonical analysis and artificial neural networks. Observational data on weather and avalanches in the gorge Kishi Almaty in the gorge Kishi Almaty were used as a training sample. Coefficients for the canonical variables were calculated by the software «Statistica» (Russian version 6.0, and then the necessary formula had been constructed. The accuracy of the above classification was 96%. Simulator by the authors L.N. Yasnitsky and F.М. Cherepanov was used to learn the neural networks. The trained neural network demonstrated 98% accuracy of the classification. Prepared statistical models are recommended to be tested at the snow‑avalanche stations. Results of the tests will be used for estimation of the model quality and its readiness for the operational work. In future, we plan to apply these models for classification of the avalanche danger by the five‑point international scale.

  15. Spectral method for characterization of avalanche photodiode working as single-photon detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Maria Daniela Santabaia; Mendonça, Fábio Alencar; Ramos, Rubens Viana

    2011-09-01

    In this Letter, a new method for avalanche photodiode characterization, based on the spectral analysis of the photocurrent produced during an avalanche, is proposed. The theory is developed, and an experimental characterization of an avalanche photodiode working in the Geiger mode with CW laser is performed.

  16. SNOW AVALANCHE ACTIVITY IN PARÂNG SKI AREA REVEALED BY TREE-RINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. MESEȘAN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Snow Avalanche Activity in Parâng Ski Area Revealed by Tree-Rings. Snow avalanches hold favorable conditions to manifest in Parâng Mountains but only one event is historically known, without destructive impact upon infrastructure or fatalities and this region wasn’t yet the object of avalanche research. The existing ski infrastructure of Parâng resort located in the west of Parâng Mountains is proposed to be extended in the steep slopes of subalpine area. Field evidence pinpoints that these steep slopes were affected by snow avalanches in the past. In this study we analyzed 11 stem discs and 31 increment cores extracted from 22 spruces (Picea abies (L. Karst impacted by avalanches, in order to obtain more information about past avalanches activity. Using the dendrogeomorphological approach we found 13 avalanche events that occurred along Scărița avalanche path, since 1935 until 2012, nine of them produced in the last 20 years. The tree-rings data inferred an intense snow avalanche activity along this avalanche path. This study not only calls for more research in the study area but also proves that snow avalanches could constitute an important restrictive factor for the tourism infrastructure and related activities in the area. It must be taken into consideration by the future extension of tourism infrastructure. Keywords: snow avalanche, Parâng Mountains, dendrogeomorphology, ski area.

  17. Progress in simulations of micropattern gas avalanche detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cwetanski, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Helpful for a better understanding of the intrinsic processes in the various gas avalanche detectors are simulations, involving three- dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) field map computations in order to describe the more and more complex geometries. Drift, multiplication and attachment procedures are simulated using Monte Carlo techniques. Recent results show a remarkable agreement with gain and energy resolution measurements thanks to the refined computations of gas transport properties and improved avalanching models. As examples the influence of wire eccentricity on gas gain and energy resolution in the ATLAS TRT straws is shown as well as performed studies of the Micromegas detector. 8 Refs.

  18. High gain multigap avalanche detectors for Cerenkov ring imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, R.S.; Lavender, W.M.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Williams, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    We report on a continuing study of multigap parallel plate avalanche chambers, primarily as photoelectron detectors for use with Cerenkov ring imaging counters. By suitable control of the fields in successive gaps and by introducing screens to reduce photon feedback to the cathode the gain many be increased considerably. We have obtained gains in excess of 6 x 10/sup 7/ for photoelectrons with a good pulse height spectrum and expect to increase this further. We discuss the use of resistive anodes to give avalanche positions in two dimensions by charge division.

  19. Geiger-Mode Avalanche Photodiodes in Particle Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Vilella, E; Trenado, J; Vila, A; Vos, M; Garrido, L; Dieguez, A

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that avalanche photodiodes operated in the Geiger mode above the breakdown voltage offer a virtually infinite sensitivity and time accuracy in the picosecond range that can be used for single photon detection. However, their performance in particle detection remains still unexplored. In this contribution, we are going to expose the different steps that we have taken in order to prove the efficiency of Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes in the aforementioned field. In particular, we will present an array of pixels of 1mmx1mm fabricated with a standard CMOS technology for characterization in a test beam.

  20. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  1. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  2. Test of BESⅢ RPC in the avalanche mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Ji-Feng; ZHANG Jia-Wen; CHEN Jin; ZHANG Qing-Min; LIU Qian; XIE Yu-Guang; QIAN Sen; MA Lie-Hua

    2008-01-01

    The installation of the BESⅢ RPC system has been completed.Cosmic ray test results show that they perform very well in streamer mode and meet the BESⅢ requirements.We have tested several RPCs in the avalanche mode with the addition of extra SF6 in the gas mixture.We find an efficiency plateau that reaches~95%.and a time resolution of 1.8 ns.This demonstrates that the BESⅢ-type RPC can work in the avalanche mode as well.

  3. Magnetar Outbursts from Avalanches of Hall Waves and Crustal Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xinyu; Belovorodov, Andrei M

    2016-01-01

    We explore the interaction between Hall waves and mechanical failures inside a magnetar crust, using detailed one-dimentional models that consider temperature-sensitive plastic flow, heat transport and cooling by neutrino emission, as well as the coupling of the crustal motion to the magnetosphere. We find that the dynamics is enriched and accelerated by the fast, short-wavelength Hall waves that are emitted by each failure. The waves propagate and cause failures elsewhere, triggering avalanches. We argue that these avalanches are the likely sources of outbursts in transient magnetars.

  4. Assessing risk based on uncertain avalanche activity patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler, Antonia; Fromm, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    Avalanches may affect critical infrastructure and may cause great economic losses. The planning horizon of infrastructures, e.g. hydropower generation facilities, reaches well into the future. Based on the results of previous studies on the effect of changing meteorological parameters (precipitation, temperature) and the effect on avalanche activity we assume that there will be a change of the risk pattern in future. The decision makers need to understand what the future might bring to best formulate their mitigation strategies. Therefore, we explore a commercial risk software to calculate risk for the coming years that might help in decision processes. The software @risk, is known to many larger companies, and therefore we explore its capabilities to include avalanche risk simulations in order to guarantee a comparability of different risks. In a first step, we develop a model for a hydropower generation facility that reflects the problem of changing avalanche activity patterns in future by selecting relevant input parameters and assigning likely probability distributions. The uncertain input variables include the probability of avalanches affecting an object, the vulnerability of an object, the expected costs for repairing the object and the expected cost due to interruption. The crux is to find the distribution that best represents the input variables under changing meteorological conditions. Our focus is on including the uncertain probability of avalanches based on the analysis of past avalanche data and expert knowledge. In order to explore different likely outcomes we base the analysis on three different climate scenarios (likely, worst case, baseline). For some variables, it is possible to fit a distribution to historical data, whereas in cases where the past dataset is insufficient or not available the software allows to select from over 30 different distribution types. The Monte Carlo simulation uses the probability distribution of uncertain variables

  5. Exploring Hawaiian Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-02-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai`i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO's founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists' understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  6. Exploring Hawaiian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai‘i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO’s founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists’ understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  7. Comparison of space debris estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.; Judd, O.P.; Naka, R.F.

    1996-10-01

    Debris is thought to be a hazard to space systems through impact and cascading. The current environment is assessed as not threatening to defense systems. Projected reductions in launch rates to LEO should delay concerns for centuries. There is agreement between AFSPC and NASA analyses on catalogs and collision rates, but not on fragmentation rates. Experiments in the laboratory, field, and space are consistent with AFSPC estimates of the number of fragments per collision. A more careful treatment of growth rates greatly reduces long-term stability issues. Space debris has not been shown to be an issue in coming centuries; thus, it does not appear necessary for the Air Force to take additional steps to mitigate it.

  8. Debris flow study in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrin Jaafar, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    The phenomenon of debris flow occurs in Malaysia occasionally. The topography of Peningsular Malysia is characterized by the central mountain ranges running from south to north. Several parts of hilly areas with steep slopes, combined with high saturation of soil strata that deliberately increase the pore water pressure underneath the hill slope. As a tropical country Malaysia has very high intensity rainfall which is triggered the landslide. In the study area where the debris flow are bound to occur, there are a few factors that contribute to this phenomenon such as high rainfall intensity, very steep slope which an inclination more than 35 degree and sandy clay soil type which is easily change to liquidity soil. This paper will discuss the study of rainfall, mechanism, modeling and design of mitigation measure to avoid repeated failure in future in same area.

  9. Subdiffusion of volcanic earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study is performed on volcanic seismicities at Mt.Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland and Mt. Etna in Sicily, Italy, from the viewpoint of science of complex systems, and the discovery of remarkable similarities between them regarding their exotic spatio-temporal properties is reported. In both of the volcanic seismicities as point processes, the jump probability distributions of earthquakes are found to obey the exponential law, whereas the waiting-time distributions follow the power law. In particular, a careful analysis is made about the finite size effects on the waiting-time distributions, and accordingly, the previously reported results for Mt. Etna [S. Abe and N. Suzuki, EPL 110, 59001 (2015)] are reinterpreted. It is shown that spreads of the volcanic earthquakes are subdiffusive at both of the volcanoes. The aging phenomenon is observed in the "event-time-averaged" mean-squared displacements of the hypocenters. A comment is also made on presence/absence of long term memories in the context of t...

  10. DebriSat Laboratory Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-05

    Semiquantitative elemental composition. – Elemental mapping and line scans. • Fourier Transform Infrared ( FTIR ) spectroscopy – Identification of chemical...Transform Infrared ( FTIR ) spectroscopy – Nicolet 6700 spectrometer. – Harrick Scientific “praying mantis” diffuse reflectance accessory. • Qualitative...VIS-NIR Spectroscopy Dianna Alaan © The Aerospace Corporation 2015 DebriSat Laboratory Analyses 5 January, 2015 Paul M. Adams1, Zachary Lingley2

  11. Landscape evolution within a retreating volcanic arc, Costa Rica, Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jeffrey S.; Idleman, Bruce D.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Fisher, Donald M.

    2003-05-01

    Subduction of hotspot-thickened seafloor profoundly affects convergent margin tectonics, strongly affecting upper plate structure, volcanism, and landscape evolution. In southern Central America, low-angle subduction of the Cocos Ridge and seamount domain largely controls landscape evolution in the volcanic arc. Field mapping, stratigraphic correlation, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology for late Cenozoic volcanic rocks of central Costa Rica provide new insights into the geomorphic response of volcanic arc landscapes to changes in subduction parameters (slab thickness, roughness, dip). Late Neogene volcanism was focused primarily along the now-extinct Cordillera de Aguacate. Quaternary migration of the magmatic front shifted volcanism northeastward to the Caribbean slope, creating a new topographic divide and forming the Valle Central basin. Stream capture across the paleo Aguacate divide led to drainage reversal toward the Pacific slope and deep incision of reorganized fluvial networks. Pleistocene caldera activity generated silicic ash flows that buried the Valle Central and descended the Tárcoles gorge to the Orotina debris fan at the coast. Growth of the modern Cordillera Central accentuated relief along the new divide, establishing the Valle Central as a Pacific slope drainage basin. Arc migration, relocation of the Pacific-Caribbean drainage divide, and formation of the Valle Central basin resulted from slab shallowing as irregular, hotspot-thickened crust entered the subduction zone. The geomorphic evolution of volcanic arc landscapes is thus highly sensitive to changes in subducting plate character.

  12. Land use and Hydrological Characteristics of Volcanic Urban Soils for Flood Susceptibility Modeling, Ciudad de Colima (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Gonzalez, M. L.; Capra, L.; Borselli, L.; Ortiz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The fast population rate growth and the unplanned urban development has created an increase of urban floods in the City of Colima. Land use change has transformed the hydrological behavior of the watersheds that participates on the runoff-infiltration processes that governs the pluvial concentrations. After the urban areas enlargement, 13% from 2010 to 2015, rainfall has caused significant damages to the downtown community. Therefore it is important to define the main hydraulic properties of the soils surrounding the city. The soil of the region is derived from the debris avalanche deposits of the Volcano of Colima. The volcanic soil cover is only 10 to 15 cm depth. To test the soils of the region, sampling locations were chosen after making a land use map from a Landsat image. The map was done by selecting and dividing similar surface images patterns into three main classifications: Natural (N1), Agricultural (N5) and Urban (N4) surfaces. Thirty-Three soil samples were collected and grouped in nine out of ten land use subdivisions. The 10thsubdivision, represents the completed urbanized area. The land use model is made using spot 4 1A images from the year 2010 up to year 2015. This land use evolutionary analysis will be a base to evaluate the change of the runoff-infiltration rate, direction, and concentration areas for the future flood susceptibility model. To get the parameters above, several soil analysis were performed. The results were that all the soil samples tested were classified as sandy soils. The water content values were from 7% (N4) to 45% (N1) while bulk density values for the same sample were form 0.65 (N1) to 1.50 (N4) g/cm3. The particle density and the porosity values were from 1.65 g/cm3 /5.5% (N4) - 2.65 g/cm3/ 75.40% (N1). The organic matter content was around 0.1% for urban soils and up to 6% on natural and agricultural soils. Some other test like electric conductivity and pH were performed. The obtained parameters were used to get other

  13. Debris-flow Dynamics Inferred From Aggregated Results of 28 Large-scale Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, R. M.; Logan, M.; Lahusen, R. G.; Berti, M.

    2008-12-01

    (water + suspended mud) of the debris. Indeed, our results indicate that the chief role of mud in debris flows consisting mostly of coarse sediment is to aid retention of high (greater than hydrostatic) fluid pressures. Such pressures reduce intergranular friction, promote flow mobility, and produce the characteristic behavior that distinguishes debris flows from granular avalanches.

  14. Electric field distribution and simulation of avalanche formation due to the passage of heavy ions in a parallel grid avalanche counter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Kanjilal; S Saha

    2009-05-01

    Electric field distributions and their role in the formation of avalanche due to the passage of heavy ions in parallel grid avalanche type wire chamber detectors are evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation. The relative merits and demerits of parallel and crossed wire grid configurations are studied. It is found that the crossed grid geometry has marginally higher gain at larger electric fields close to the avalanche region. The spatial uniformity of response in the two wire grid configurations is also compared.

  15. Gridded snow maps supporting avalanche forecasting in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K.; Humstad, T.; Engeset, R. V.; Andersen, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present gridded maps indicating key parameters for avalanche forecasting with a 1 km x 1 km resolution. Based on the HBV hydrology model, snow parameters are modeled based on observed and interpolated precipitation and temperature data. Modeled parameters include for example new snow accumulated the last 24 and 72 hours, snow-water equivalent, and snow-water content. In addition we use meteorological parameters from the UK weather prediction model "Unified Model" such as wind and radiation to model snow-pack properties. Additional loading in lee-slopes by wind-transport is modeled based on prevailing wind conditions, snow-water content and snow age. A depth hoar index accounts for days with considerable negative temperature gradients in the snow pack. A surface hoar index based on radiation and humidity is currently under development. The maps are tested against field reports from avalanche observers throughout Norway. All data is available via a web-platform that combines maps for geo-hazards such as floods, landslides and avalanches. The maps are used by the Norwegian avalanche forecasting service, which is currently in a test phase. The service will be operational by winter 2012/2013.

  16. High quantum efficiency GaP avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Dion; Zhou, Qiugui; Chen, Yaojia; Campbell, Joe C

    2011-09-26

    Gallium Phosphide (GaP) reach-through avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are reported. The APDs exhibited dark current less than a pico-ampere at unity gain. A quantum efficiency of 70% was achieved with a recessed window structure; this is almost two times higher than previous work. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  17. Electron avalanche structure determined by random walk theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    A self-consistent avalanche solution which accounts for collective long range Coulomb interactions as well as short range elastic and inelastic collisions between electrons and background atoms is made possible by a random walk technique. Results show that the electric field patterns in the early formation stages of avalanches in helium are close to those obtained from theory based on constant transport coefficients. Regions of maximum and minimum induced electrostatic potential phi are located on the axis of symmetry and within the volume covered by the electron swarm. As formation time continues, however, the region of minimum phi moves to slightly higher radii and the electric field between the extrema becomes somewhat erratic. In the intermediate formation periods the avalanche growth is slightly retarded by the high concentration of ions in the tail which oppose the external electric field. Eventually the formation of ions and electrons in the localized regions of high field strength more than offset this effect causing a very abrupt increase in avalanche growth.

  18. Hybrid phase transition into an absorbing state: Percolation and avalanches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Deokjae; Choi, S; Stippinger, M; Kertész, J; Kahng, B

    2016-04-01

    Interdependent networks are more fragile under random attacks than simplex networks, because interlayer dependencies lead to cascading failures and finally to a sudden collapse. This is a hybrid phase transition (HPT), meaning that at the transition point the order parameter has a jump but there are also critical phenomena related to it. Here we study these phenomena on the Erdős-Rényi and the two-dimensional interdependent networks and show that the hybrid percolation transition exhibits two kinds of critical behaviors: divergence of the fluctuations of the order parameter and power-law size distribution of finite avalanches at a transition point. At the transition point global or "infinite" avalanches occur, while the finite ones have a power law size distribution; thus the avalanche statistics also has the nature of a HPT. The exponent β_{m} of the order parameter is 1/2 under general conditions, while the value of the exponent γ_{m} characterizing the fluctuations of the order parameter depends on the system. The critical behavior of the finite avalanches can be described by another set of exponents, β_{a} and γ_{a}. These two critical behaviors are coupled by a scaling law: 1-β_{m}=γ_{a}.

  19. Avalanches in dry and saturated disordered media at fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Enrico; Yılmaz, Okan; Molinari, Jean-François; Schrefler, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes fracturing in inhomogeneous media under dry and fully saturated conditions. We adopt a central force model with continuous damage to study avalanche behavior in a two-dimensional truss lattice undergoing dilation. Multiple fractures can develop at once and a power-law distribution of the avalanche size is observed. The values for the power-law exponent are compared with the ones found in the literature and scale-free behavior is suggested. The fracture evolves intermittently in time because only some avalanches correspond to fracture advancement. A fully saturated model with continuous damage based on the extended Biot's theory is developed and avalanche behavior is studied in the presence of fluid, varying the fluid boundary conditions. We show that power-law behavior is destroyed when the fluid flux governs the problem. Fluid pressure behavior during intermittent crack tip advancement is studied for the continuous-damage fully saturated model. It is found that when mechanical loading prevails, the pressure rises when the crack advances, while when fluid loading prevails, the pressure drops when the crack advances.

  20. Group Dynamics and Decision Making: Backcountry Recreationists in Avalanche Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Leslie Shay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and determine the prevalence of decision-making characteristics of recreational backcountry groups when making a decision of where to travel and ride in avalanche terrain from the perspective of individuals. Decision-making characteristics encompassed communication, decision-making processes, leadership,…

  1. Teaching Avalanche Safety Courses: Instructional Techniques and Field Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Ron

    This paper discusses course structure, teaching techniques, and field exercises for enhancing winter travelers' avalanche knowledge and skills. In two class sessions, the course typically consists of a historical perspective; a section on snow physics (clouds, types of snow crystals, effects of riming, identification of precipitated snow crystals,…

  2. Reducing the Odds: Backcountry Powder Skiing in Avalanche Terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffern, Tony

    This paper provides information and strategies to reduce the risk of encountering an avalanche when skiing or climbing on steep slopes. Skiers must recognize that the risk exists, be aware of their own tolerance for risk, and not allow companions to pressure them into taking more risk than they can tolerate. Ideally, one should ski with a small…

  3. THE SNOW CONDITION, THE AVALANCHES CAUSED AND THE DYNAMIC OF THE AVALANCHES CORRIDORS DURING THE WINTER 2007-2008. CASE STUDY, PADINILE FRUMOASE (PIATRA CRAIULUI MOUNTAINS, ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANCA MUNTEANU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The snow condition, the avalanches caused and the dynamic of the avalanches corridors during the winter 2007-2008. Case study, Padinile Frumoase (Piatra Craiului Mountains, Romania. In this paper we aim to present in detail the situations generated by meteorological and morphological parameters, which determined the generation of avalanches of different intensities, on five avalanches corridors in the winter 2007-2008. These are situated in the area named Padinile Frumoase, in the north-eastern part of the Piatra Craiului Mountains, which are situated in the central part of Romania and which belong to the Meridional Carpathians. The relief is represented by a calcareous- conglomeratic ridge, in the high part, the peak reaches over 2000 m altitude. Local conditions determine the forming of avalanches, which are oriented on well defined corridors, along the temporary hydrographic network. By studying the evolution of meteorological parameters and their overlapping with local morphological parameters, the existence of some favourable conditions for the apparition of avalanches were detected. There were noticed both active corridors with traces of avalanches, and inactive corridors on which it was not noticed the manifestation of these phenomena. The material adds up to the data base about the avalanches from this massif, being the second situation of analysed avalanches for this mountainous space totally situated in the National Park Piatra Craiului.

  4. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  5. Rock avalanches clusters along the northern Chile coastal scarp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, G. B.; Hermanns, R. L.; Dehls, J.; Lari, S.; Sepulveda, S.

    2017-07-01

    Rock avalanche clusters can be relevant indicators of the evolution of specific regions. They can be used to define: the type and intensity of triggering events, their recurrence and potential probability of occurrence, the progressive damage of the rock mass, the mechanisms of transport and deposition, as well as the environmental conditions at the time of occurrence. This paper tackles these subjects by analyzing two main clusters of rock avalanches (each event between 0.6 and 30 Mm3), separated by few kilometers and located along the coastal scarp of Northern Chile, south of Iquique. It lies, hence, within a seismic area characterized by a long seismic gap that ended on April 1st, 2014 with a Mw 8.2 earthquake. The scar position, high along the coastal cliff, supports seismic triggering for these clusters. The deposits' relative positions are used to obtain the sequence of rock avalanching events for each cluster. The progressive decrease of volume in the sequence of rock avalanches forming each cluster fits well the theoretical models for successive slope failures. These sequences seem to agree with those derived by dating the deposits with ages spanning between 4 kyr and 60 kyr. An average uplift rate of 0.2 mm/yr in the last 40 kyr is estimated for the coastal plain giving a further constraint to the rock avalanche deposition considering the absence of reworking of the deposits. Volume estimates and datings allow the estimation of an erosion rate contribution of about 0.098-0.112 mm km- 2 yr- 1 which is well comparable to values presented in the literature for earthquake induced landslides. We have carried out numerical modeling in order to analyze the mobility of the rock avalanches and examine the environmental conditions that controlled the runout. In doing so, we have considered the sequence of individual rock avalanches within the specific clusters, thus including in the models the confining effect caused by the presence of previous deposits. Bingham

  6. Single and few photon avalanche photodiode detection process study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazej, Josef; Prochazka, Ivan

    2009-07-01

    We are presenting the results of the study of the Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) pulse response risetime and its dependence on several key parameters. We were investigating the unique properties of K14 type SPAD with its high delay uniformity of 200 μm active area and the correlation between the avalanche buildup time and the photon number involved in the avalanche trigger. The detection chip was operated in a passive quenching circuit with active gating. This setup enabled us to monitor the diode reverse current using an electrometer, a fast digitizing oscilloscope, and using a custom design comparator circuit. The electrometer reading enabled to estimate the photon number per detection event, independently on avalanche process. The avalanche build up was recorded on the oscilloscope and processed by custom designed waveform analysis package. The correlation of avalanche build up to the photon number, bias above break, photon absorption location, optical pulse length and photon energy was investigated in detail. The experimental results are presented. The existing solid state photon counting detectors have been dedicated for picosecond resolution and timing stability of single photon events. However, the high timing stability is maintained for individual single photons detection, only. If more than one photon is absorbed within the detector time resolution, the detection delay will be significantly affected. This fact is restricting the application of the solid state photon counters to cases where single photons may be guaranteed, only. For laser ranging purposes it is highly desirable to have a detector, which detects both single photon and multi photon signals with picoseconds stability. The SPAD based photon counter works in a purely digital mode: a uniform output signal is generated once the photon is detected. If the input signal consists of several photons, the first absorbed one triggers the avalanche. Obviously, for multiple photon signals, the

  7. Snow avalanche detection and identification for near real-time application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, S.; Johnson, J. B.; Marshall, H.; Nicholson, B.; Trisca, G. O.

    2013-12-01

    A near real-time avalanche detection system will provide highway avalanche forecasters with a tool to remotely monitor major avalanche paths and provide information about regional avalanche activity and timing. For the last three winters, a network of infrasound arrays has been remotely monitoring both avalanche and non-avalanche events along a 10 mile section of Highway 21 in Idaho. To provide the best results to avalanche forecasters, the system must be robust and detect all major avalanche events of interest that affect the highway. Over the last three winters, the infrasound arrays recorded multiple avalanche cycles and we explore different methods of event detection for both large dry avalanches (strong infrasound signal) and small wet avalanches (weak infrasound signal). We compare the F-statistic and cross-correlation techniques (i.e. PMCC) to determine the most robust method and develop computationally efficient algorithms to implement in near-real time using parallel processing and GPU computing. Once an event has been detected, we use the artificial intelligence method of recursive neural networks to classify based on similar characteristics to past known signals.

  8. Dealing with the white death: avalanche risk management for traffic routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinberger, Christoph M; Bründl, Michael; Rhyner, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses mitigation strategies to protect traffic routes from snow avalanches. Up to now, mitigation of snow avalanches on many roads and railways in the Alps has relied on avalanche sheds, which require large initial investments resulting in high opportunity costs. Therefore, avalanche risk managers have increasingly adopted organizational mitigation measures such as warning systems and closure policies instead. The effectiveness of these measures is, however, greatly dependent on human decisions. In this article, we present a method for optimizing avalanche mitigation for traffic routes in terms of both their risk reduction impact and their net benefit to society. First, we introduce a generic framework for assessing avalanche risk and for quantifying the impact of mitigation. This allows for sound cost-benefit comparisons between alternative mitigation strategies. Second, we illustrate the framework with a case study from Switzerland. Our findings suggest that site-specific characteristics of avalanche paths, as well as the economic importance of a traffic route, are decisive for the choice of optimal mitigation strategies. On routes endangered by few avalanche paths with frequent avalanche occurrences, structural measures are most efficient, whereas reliance on organizational mitigation is often the most appropriate strategy on routes endangered by many paths with infrequent or fuzzy avalanche risk. Finally, keeping a traffic route open may be very important for tourism or the transport industry. Hence, local economic value may promote the use of a hybrid strategy that combines organizational and structural measures to optimize the resource allocation of avalanche risk mitigation.