WorldWideScience

Sample records for volcanic ash dust

  1. On the visibility of airborne volcanic ash and mineral dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzierl, B.; Sauer, D. N.; Minikin, A.; Reitebuch, O.; Dahlkötter, F.; Mayer, B. C.; Emde, C.; Tegen, I.; Gasteiger, J.; Petzold, A.; Veira, A.; Kueppers, U.; Schumann, U.

    2012-12-01

    After the eruption of the Eyjafjalla volcano (Iceland) in April 2010 which caused the most extensive restrictions of the airspace over Europe since the end of World War II, the aviation safety concept of avoiding "visible ash", i.e. volcanic ash that can be seen by the human eye, was recommended. However so far, no clear definition of "visible ash" and no relation between the visibility of an aerosol layer and related aerosol mass concentrations are available. The goal of our study is to assess whether it is possible from the pilot's perspective in flight to detect the presence of volcanic ash and to distinguish between volcanic ash and other aerosol layers just by sight. In our presentation, we focus the comparison with other aerosols on aerosol types impacting aviation: Besides volcanic ash, dust storms are known to be avoided by aircraft. We use in-situ and lidar data as well photographs taken onboard the DLR research aircraft Falcon during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiments (SAMUM) in 2006 and 2008 and during the Eyjafjalla volcanic eruption in April/May 2010. We complement this analysis with numerical modelling, using idealized radiative transfer simulations with the 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code MYSTIC for a variety of selected viewing geometries. Both aerosol types, Saharan mineral dust and volcanic ash, show an enhanced coarse mode (> 1 μm) aerosol concentration, but volcanic ash aerosol additionally contains a significant number of Aitken mode particles (Volcanic ash is slightly more absorbing than mineral dust, and the spectral behaviour of the refractive index is slightly different. According to our simulations, these differences are not detectable just by human eye. Furthermore, our data show, that it is difficult to define a lower threshold for the visibility of an aerosol layer because the visual detectability depends on many parameters, including the thickness of the aerosol layer, the brightness and color contrast between the airborne

  2. Dust, Volcanic Ash, and the Evolution of the South Pacific Gyre through the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S.; Higgins, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dust and volcanic ash play a critical role in past global climate by affecting cloud cover and ocean nutrients as well as responding to changes in tectonics, aridity, and wind. Because the eolian fluxes in the Southern Hemisphere are so low, subtle changes in the absolute flux of dust and volcanic ash may have a disproportionally large impact on climate. Our multi-site record of eolian dust and volcanic ash accumulation in pelagic clay of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG), gathered during IODP Expedition 329, shows that eolian fluxes varied by an order of magnitude over the Cenozoic and correlate with changes of tectonic processes and global climate. We analyzed the concentrations of 37 elements in 138 bulk pelagic clay samples from 6 sites drilled throughout the SPG. Using multivariate statistical modeling of the geochemical dataset (e.g. Q-mode factor analysis and multiple linear regression) and a cobalt-based age model, we quantified the mass accumulation rate (MAR) of 6 end-members that comprise the SPG pelagic clay: dust, rhyolite, altered basalt, Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides, excess Si, and apatite. Our record shows that Australian dust MAR begins at the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum ~50 Ma as global temperatures began to cool and Australia began to tectonically separate from Antarctica. The mid-Miocene has noticeably higher MAR of dust and ash at multiple sites. While a simultaneous increase in production is possible (i.e., more aridity and volcanic activity), the synchronicity may be more indicative of stronger winds in the Southern Hemisphere and increased material in the atmosphere during this time. Heavier Mg isotopes occur at Site U1366 in samples that are composed primarily of hydrothermal deposition, excess Si, and volcanic ash. The Mg isotopic enrichment suggests that these components have undergone alterations to form authigenic aluminosilicates.

  3. Impact of Icelandic dust and volcanic ash on snow and ice

    OpenAIRE

    Wittmann, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Located on the mid-Atlantic ridge, Iceland has the largest volcaniclastic desert on Earth, created by glacio-fluvial processes and frequent volcanic eruptions. Due to its location along the North Atlantic Storm track, Iceland frequently experiences high winds. With an abundance of loose dust (particulate matter) from sandur plains and high winds, Icelandic glaciers are exposed to dust storms and redistributed ash. Deposited material is influencing glacier albedo and therefore the surface ener...

  4. On the visibility of airborne volcanic ash and mineral dust from the pilot’s perspective in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzierl, Bernadett; Sauer, Daniel; Minikin, Andreas; Reitebuch, Oliver; Dahlkötter, Florian; Mayer, Bernhard; Emde, Claudia; Tegen, Ina; Gasteiger, Josef; Petzold, Andreas; Veira, Andreas; Kueppers, Ulrich; Schumann, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In April 2010, volcanic ash from the Eyjafjalla volcano in Iceland strongly impacted aviation in Europe. In order to prevent a similar scenario in the future, a threshold value for safe aviation based on actual mass concentrations was introduced (2 mg m-3 in Germany). This study contrasts microphysical and optical properties of volcanic ash and mineral dust and assesses the detectability of potentially dangerous ash layers (mass concentration larger than 2 mg m-3) from a pilot’s perspective during a flight. Also the possibility to distinguish between volcanic ash and other aerosols is investigated. The visual detectability of airborne volcanic ash is addressed based on idealized radiative transfer simulations and on airborne observations with the DLR Falcon gathered during the Eyjafjalla volcanic ash research flights in 2010 and during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiments in 2006 and 2008. Mineral dust and volcanic ash aerosol both show an enhanced coarse mode (>1 μm) aerosol concentration, but volcanic ash aerosol additionally contains a significant number of Aitken mode particles (potentially dangerous (mass concentration larger or smaller than 2 mg m-3). Different appearances due to microphysical differences of both aerosol types are not detectable by the human eye. Nonetheless, as ash concentrations can vary significantly over distances travelled by an airplane within seconds, this visual threat evaluation may contribute greatly to the short-term response of pilots in ash-contaminated air space.

  5. Global Distribution of Dust, Smoke, Volcanic Ash, and Pollutant Aerosols Seen from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Jay R.; Hsu, Christina; Krotkov, Nickolay; Torres, Omar

    1998-01-01

    New technique for observing aerosols from space, using ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, have been developed during the past three years. The chief benefit from observing aerosols in the UV is that they are easily visible over both land and water. While there is presently more than one satellite that can observe aerosols in the UV, only Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) has a long-term record (since 1979) and adequate spatial resolutions (50 to 100 km) to observe the seasonal and interannual variations, and to locate some of the land sources of dust, smoke, volcanic ash and sulfate pollutants. The data has been assembled into daily images of the atmospheric aerosol loading in terms of optical depth and UV transmittance. For the major sources of aerosols, it is common for at least 50% of the total UV to be absorbed underneath aerosol plumes. This is particularly true for the spectacular smoke plumes originating from the recent Indonesian and Mexican fires, as well as under the huge African dust plumes. The sulfate pollutants are mostly present in the Northern Hemisphere and are associated with regions of high industrial activity. The location and seasonal dependence of these aerosol plumes over Europe and North America will be contrasted with the relatively clean Southern Hemisphere. Because of the success of this technique, it has formed the basis for a new generation of space-borne aerosol detection instruments. These new instruments combine the UV observations with the more traditional visible-wavelength data to obtain a more comprehensive characterization of aerosols that is possible with either UV or visible techniques by themselves.

  6. Validation of a continuous flow method for the determination of soluble iron in atmospheric dust and volcanic ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonella, Lucio E; Gaiero, Diego M; Palomeque, Miriam E

    2014-10-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for phytoplankton growth and is supplied to the remote areas of the ocean mainly through atmospheric dust/ash. The amount of soluble Fe in dust/ash is a major source of uncertainty in modeling-Fe dissolution and deposition to the surface ocean. Currently in the literature, there exist almost as many different methods to estimate fractional solubility as researchers in the field, making it difficult to compare results between research groups. Also, an important constraint to evaluate Fe solubility in atmospheric dust is the limited mass of sample which is usually only available in micrograms to milligrams amounts. A continuous flow (CF) method that can be run with low mass of sediments (<10mg) was tested against a standard method which require about 1g of sediments (BCR of the European Union). For validation of the CF experiment, we run both methods using South American surface sediment and deposited volcanic ash. Both materials tested are easy eroded by wind and are representative of atmospheric dust/ash exported from this region. The uncertainty of the CF method was obtained from seven replicates of one surface sediment sample, and shows very good reproducibility. The replication was conducted on different days in a span of two years and ranged between 8 and 22% (i.e., the uncertainty for the standard method was 6-19%). Compared to other standardized methods, the CF method allows studies of dissolution kinetic of metals and consumes less reagents and time (<3h). The method validated here is suggested to be used as a standardized method for Fe solubility studies on dust/ash. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2016-03-02

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  8. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-03-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  9. Emergency Hospital Visits in Association with Volcanic Ash, Dust Storms and Other Sources of Ambient Particles: A Time-Series Study in Reykjavík, Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne Krage Carlsen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash contributed significantly to particulate matter (PM in Iceland following the eruptions in Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and Grímsvötn 2011. This study aimed to investigate the association between different PM sources and emergency hospital visits for cardiorespiratory causes from 2007 to 2012. Indicators of PM10 sources; “volcanic ash”, “dust storms”, or “other sources” (traffic, fireworks, and re-suspension on days when PM10 exceeded the daily air quality guideline value of 50 µg/m3 were entered into generalized additive models, adjusted for weather, time trend and co-pollutants. The average number of daily emergency hospital visits was 10.5. PM10 exceeded the air quality guideline value 115 out of 2191 days; 20 days due to volcanic ash, 14 due to dust storms (two days had both dust storm and ash contribution and 83 due to other sources. High PM10 levels from volcanic ash tended to be significantly associated with the emergency hospital visits; estimates ranged from 4.8% (95% Confidence Interval (CI: 0.6, 9.2% per day of exposure in unadjusted models to 7.3% (95% CI: −0.4, 15.5% in adjusted models. Dust storms were not consistently associated with daily emergency hospital visits and other sources tended to show a negative association. We found some evidence indicating that volcanic ash particles were more harmful than particles from other sources, but the results were inconclusive and should be interpreted with caution.

  10. Aerosols upwind of Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign: regional scale biomass burning, dust and volcanic ash from aircraft measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkermann, W.; Steinbrecher, R.

    2009-04-01

    During the MILAGRO Campaign March/April 2006 a series of aircraft flights with the FZK microlight D-MIFU were performed in the area southeast of Mexico City starting from Puebla airport, circling the national park area of Ixtachiuatl and Popocatepetl and scanning the Chalco valley down to Cuautla in the Cuernavaca province. All flights were combined with vertical profiles up to 4500 m a.s.l. in several locations, typically north of volcano Ixtachiuatl on the Puebla side, above Chalco or Tenago del Aire and south of volcano Popocatepetl, either at Cuautla or Atlixco. In Tenango del Aire a ceilometer was additionally operated continuously for characterization of the planetary boundary layer. The aircraft carried a set of aerosol instrumentation, fine and coarse particles and size distributions as well as a 7 wavelength aethalometer. Additionally meteorological parameters, temperature and dewpoint, global radiation and actinic radiation balance, respectively photolysis rates, and ozone concentrations were measured. The instrumentation allowed to characterize the aerosol according to their sources and also their impact on radiation transfer. Biomass burning aerosol, windblown dust and volcanic ash were identified within the upwind area of Mexico City with large differences between the dry season in the first weeks of the campaign and the by far cleaner situation after beginning thunderstorm activity towards the end of the campaign. Also the aerosol characteristics inside and outside the Mexico City basin were often completely different. With wind speeds of ~ 5 m/sec from southerly directions in the Chalco valley the aerosol mixture can reach the City within ~ 2 h. Rural aerosol mixtures from the Cuernavaca plain were mixed during the transport with dust from the MC basin. Very high intensity biomass burning plumes normally reached higher altitudes and produced pyrocumulus clouds. These aerosols were injected mainly into the free troposphere. Within the MC basin a large

  11. Hygroscopic properties of volcanic ash

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T. L. Lathem; P. Kumar; A. Nenes; J. Dufek; I. N. Sokolik; M. Trail; A. Russell

    2011-01-01

      Volcanic ash is hygroscopic Water vapor adsorption is the main proceess controlling ash hygroscopicity The results can be parameterized in a simple correlation for use in models Limited observational...

  12. Volcanic ash as fertiliser for the surface ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Langmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron is a key limiting micro-nutrient for marine primary productivity. It can be supplied to the ocean by atmospheric dust deposition. Volcanic ash deposition into the ocean represents another external and so far largely neglected source of iron. This study demonstrates strong evidence for natural fertilisation in the iron-limited oceanic area of the NE Pacific, induced by volcanic ash from the eruption of Kasatochi volcano in August 2008. Atmospheric and oceanic conditions were favourable to generate a massive phytoplankton bloom in the NE Pacific Ocean which for the first time strongly suggests a connection between oceanic iron-fertilisation and volcanic ash supply.

  13. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard...

  14. Melting Behavior of Volcanic Ash relevant to Aviation Ash Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash is one of the major hazards caused by volcanic eruptions. In particular, the threat to aviation from airborne volcanic ash has been widely recognized and documented. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in-flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The primary cause of engine thrust loss is that the glass in volcanic ash particles is generated at temperatures far lower than the temperatures in the combustion chamber of a jet engine ( i.e. > 1600 oC) and when the molten volcanic ash particles leave this hottest section of the engine, the resolidified molten volcanic ash particles will be accumulated on the turbine nozzle guide vanes, which reduced the effective flow of air through the engine ultimately causing failure. Thus, it is essential to investigate the melting process and subsequent deposition behavior of volcanic ash under gas turbine conditions. Although few research studies that investigated the deposition behavior of volcanic ash at the high temperature are to be found in public domain, to the best our knowledge, no work addresses the formation of molten volcanic ash. In this work, volcanic ash produced by Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala in November 8, 2012 was selected for study because of their recent activity and potential hazard to aircraft safety. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the sintering and fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by using characteristic temperatures by means of hot stage microscope (HSM), different thermal analysis (DTA) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) to

  15. Volcanic Ash Advisory Database, 1983-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanic ash is a significant hazard to aviation and can also affect global climate patterns. To ensure safe navigation and monitor possible climatic impact, the...

  16. Volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas M.; Stewart, Carol; Sword-Daniels, Victoria; Leonard, Graham S.; Johnston, David M.; Cole, Jim W.; Wardman, Johnny; Wilson, Grant; Barnard, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can produce a wide range of hazards. Although phenomena such as pyroclastic flows and surges, sector collapses, lahars and ballistic blocks are the most destructive and dangerous, volcanic ash is by far the most widely distributed eruption product. Although ash falls rarely endanger human life directly, threats to public health and disruption to critical infrastructure services, aviation and primary production can lead to significant societal impacts. Even relatively small eruptions can cause widespread disruption, damage and economic loss. Volcanic eruptions are, in general, infrequent and somewhat exotic occurrences, and consequently in many parts of the world, the management of critical infrastructure during volcanic crises can be improved with greater knowledge of the likely impacts. This article presents an overview of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure, other than aviation and fuel supply, illustrated by findings from impact assessment reconnaissance trips carried out to a wide range of locations worldwide by our international research group and local collaborators. ‘Critical infrastructure’ includes those assets, frequently taken for granted, which are essential for the functioning of a society and economy. Electricity networks are very vulnerable to disruption from volcanic ash falls. This is particularly the case when fine ash is erupted because it has a greater tendency to adhere to line and substation insulators, where it can cause flashover (unintended electrical discharge) which can in turn cause widespread and disruptive outages. Weather conditions are a major determinant of flashover risk. Dry ash is not conductive, and heavy rain will wash ash from insulators, but light rain/mist will mobilise readily-soluble salts on the surface of the ash grains and lower the ash layer’s resistivity. Wet ash is also heavier than dry ash, increasing the risk of line breakage or tower/pole collapse. Particular issues for water

  17. On the visibility of airborne volcanic ash and other aerosols from the pilot's perspective in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzierl, B.; Sauer, D.; Minikin, A.; Reitebuch, O.; Dahlkötter, F.; Mayer, B.; Emde, C.; Tegen, I.; Gasteiger, J.; Petzold, A.; Veira, A.; Kueppers, U.; Schumann, U.

    2012-04-01

    In April 2010, the volcanic ash cloud from the Eyjafjalla volcano in Iceland strongly impacted aviation in Europe: more than 100 000 flights were cancelled affecting more than 10 million passengers. Several incidents in the past have shown that volcanic ash may have severe consequences on aviation. Therefore, one operational problem is whether a pilot has the means to avoid flying through potentially dangerous volcanic ash just by visual observation of the sky out of the cockpit of an aircraft. The goal of our study is to assess whether it is possible from the pilot's perspective in flight to detect the presence of volcanic ash and to distinguish between volcanic ash and other aerosols just by sight. In our presentation, we focus the comparison with other aerosols on aerosol types impacting aviation. Besides volcanic ash, dust storms are known to be avoided by aircraft. We approach the question on the visibility of volcanic ash and other aerosol layers in flight starting from the inspection of photographs taken during the Eyjafjalla volcanic ash research flights with the DLR Falcon in April/May 2010 and mass concentrations measured during those flights. Furthermore we use airborne data from the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiments (SAMUM) in 2006 and 2008. We complement this analysis with idealized radiative transfer simulations with libRadtran for a variety of selected viewing geometries. Both aerosol types, Saharan mineral dust and volcanic ash, show an enhanced coarse mode (> 1 µm) aerosol concentration, but volcanic ash aerosol additionally contains a significant number of Aitken mode particles (human eye. The consequences of our study for aircraft operation are the following: under clear sky conditions volcanic ash is visible already at concentrations far below what is currently considered as dangerous for an aircraft engine (2 mg m-3). However, the presence of a grayish-brown layer in the atmosphere does not unambiguously indicate the presence of volcanic ash

  18. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    The National Aviation Weather Program Strategic Plan (1997) and the National Aviation Weather Initiatives (1999) both identified volcanic ash as a high-priority informational need to aviation services. The risk to aviation from airborne volcanic ash is known and includes degraded engine performance (including flameout), loss of visibility, failure of critical navigational and operational instruments, and, in the worse case, loss of life. The immediate costs for aircraft encountering a dense plume are potentially major—damages up to $80 million have occurred to a single aircraft. Aircraft encountering less dense volcanic ash clouds can incur longer-term costs due to increased maintenance of engines and external surfaces. The overall goal, as stated in the Initiatives, is to eliminate encounters with ash that could degrade the in-flight safety of aircrews and passengers and cause damage to the aircraft. This goal can be accomplished by improving the ability to detect, track, and forecast hazardous ash clouds and to provide adequate warnings to the aviation community on the present and future location of the cloud. To reach this goal, the National Aviation Weather Program established three objectives: (1) prevention of accidental encounters with hazardous clouds; (2) reduction of air traffic delays, diversions, or evasive actions when hazardous clouds are present; and (3) the development of a single, worldwide standard for exchange of information on airborne hazardous materials. To that end, over the last several years, based on numerous documents (including an OFCMsponsored comprehensive study on aviation training and an update of Aviation Weather Programs/Projects), user forums, and two International Conferences on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety (1992 and 2004), the Working Group for Volcanic Ash (WG/VA), under the OFCM-sponsored Committee for Aviation Services and Research, developed the National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation and Support of the

  19. Volcanic Ash Nephelometer Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes may enable unprecedented observations of...

  20. International Database of Volcanic Ash Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, K.; Cameron, C.; Wilson, T. M.; Jenkins, S.; Brown, S.; Leonard, G.; Deligne, N.; Stewart, C.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash creates extensive impacts to people and property, yet we lack a global ash impacts catalog to organize, distribute, and archive this important information. Critical impact information is often stored in ephemeral news articles or other isolated resources, which cannot be queried or located easily. A global ash impacts database would improve 1) warning messages, 2) public and lifeline emergency preparation, and 3) eruption response and recovery. Ashfall can have varying consequences, such as disabling critical lifeline infrastructure (e.g. electrical generation and transmission, water supplies, telecommunications, aircraft and airports) or merely creating limited and expensive inconvenience to local communities. Impacts to the aviation sector can be a far-reaching global issue. The international volcanic ash impacts community formed a committee to develop a database to catalog the impacts of volcanic ash. We identify three user populations for this database: 1) research teams, who would use the database to assist in systematic collection, recording, and storage of ash impact data, and to prioritize impact assessment trips and lab experiments 2) volcanic risk assessment scientists who rely on impact data for assessments (especially vulnerability/fragility assessments); a complete dataset would have utility for global, regional, national and local scale risk assessments, and 3) citizen science volcanic hazard reporting. Publication of an international ash impacts database will encourage standardization and development of best practices for collecting and reporting impact information. Data entered will be highly categorized, searchable, and open source. Systematic cataloging of impact data will allow users to query the data and extract valuable information to aid in the development of improved emergency preparedness, response and recovery measures.

  1. Cumulative effects of volcanic ash on the food preferences of two Orthopteran species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Arhex, Valeria; Amadio, Maria E; Bruzzone, Octavio A

    2017-08-01

    Inert dusts are an early form of insecticide which is still in use. One of the most common inert dusts is volcanic ash. In order to study the reaction of rangeland grasshoppers, Dichroplus vittigerum (Acrididae) and a katydid, Burgilis mendosensis (Phaneropteridae), to the presence of volcanic ash in their food sources and how this reaction changed as a function of time, we conducted paired preference tests between clean leaves of their preferred host plant and leaves exposed to volcanic ash of different grain size. The behavioral response was measured as the rating on the Thurstonian preference scale of leaves with ash in relation to clean leaves. The results showed that the avoidance of volcanic ash increased as a function of time in both species. Both species studied are occasionally exposed to volcanic activity, and come from an area in which a volcanic eruption had recently occurred. As their populations did not decrease after the ash fall, we propose that some behavioral responses such as avoidance of places with ash, works as tolerance mechanism to inert dusts exposure. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  2. Insight of the fusion behavior of volcanic ash: Implications for Volcanic ash Hazards to Aircraft Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Küppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Cimarelli, Corrado; Lavallée, Yan; Sohyun, Park; Gattermann, Ulf; Müller, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2014-05-01

    The interaction of volcanic ash with jet turbines during via ingestion of ash into engines operating at supra-volcanic temperatures is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for jet aircraft. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The fusibility of volcanic ash is believed to impact strongly its deposition in the hotter parts of jet engines. Despite this, explicit investigation of ash sintering using standardized techniques is in its infancy. Volcanic ash may vary widely in its physical state and chemical composition between and even within explosive volcanic eruptions. Thus a comparative study of the fusibility of ash which involves a standard recognized techniques would be highly desirable. In this work, nine samples of fine ash, deposited from co-pyroclastic offrom nine different volcanoes which cover a broad range of chemical composition, were investigated. Eight of them were collected from 2001-2009 eruptions. Because of the currently elevated level of eruptive activity and its potential hazards to aircraft safety and the remaining one sample was collected from a 12,121 ± 114 yr B.P. eruption. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by defining four characteristic temperatures (shrinkage temperature, deformation temperature, hemispherical temperature, and flow temperature) by means of heating microscope instrument and different thermal analysis methods. Here, we find that there are similar sticking ability and flow behavior of

  3. Improving volcanic ash forecasts with ensemble-based data assimilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, Guangliang

    2017-01-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption had serious consequences to civil aviation. This has initiated a lot of research on volcanic ash forecasting in recent years. For forecasting the volcanic ash transport after eruption onset, a volcanic ash transport and diffusion model (VATDM) needs to be

  4. Assessing quality in volcanic ash soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry L. Craigg; Steven W. Howes

    2007-01-01

    Forest managers must understand how changes in soil quality resulting from project implementation affect long-term productivity and watershed health. Volcanic ash soils have unique properties that affect their quality and function; and which may warrant soil quality standards and assessment techniques that are different from other soils. We discuss the concept of soil...

  5. AVAL - The ASTER Volcanic Ash Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic ash is a rich data source for understanding the causal mechanisms behind volcanic eruptions. Petrologic and morphometric information can provide direct information on the characteristics of the parent magma. Understanding how erupted ash interacts with the atmosphere can help quantify the effect that explosive volcanism has on the local to regional climate, whereas a measure of the particle size distribution enables more accurate modeling of plume propagation. Remote sensing is regularly employed to monitor volcanic plumes using a suite of high temporal/low spatial resolution sensors. These methods employ radiative transfer modeling with assumptions of the transmissive properties of infrared energy through the plume to determine ash density, particle size and sulfur dioxide content. However, such approaches are limited to the optically-transparent regions, and the low spatial resolution data are only useful for large-scale trends. In a new approach, we are treating the infrared-opaque regions of the plume in a similar way to a solid emitting surface. This allows high spatial resolution orbital thermal infrared data from the dense proximal plume to be modeled using a linear deconvolution approach coupled with a spectral library to extract the particle size and petrology. The newly created ASTER Volcanic Ash Library (AVAL) provides the end member spectral suite, and is comprised of laboratory emission measurements of volcanic ash taken from a variety of different volcanic settings, to obtain a wide range of petrologies. These samples have been further subdivided into particle size fractions to account for spectral changes due to diffraction effects. Once mapped to the ASTER sensor's spectral resolution, this library is applied to image data and the plume deconvolved to estimate composition and particle size. We have analyzed eruptions at the Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, Chaitén and Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, both Chile, and Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

  6. Aggregation of volcanic ash in explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, J. W.; Dufek, J.

    2009-12-01

    We present the result of a recent experimental and numerical investigation of ash aggregation in volcanic plumes. Eruption dynamics are sensitive to microphysical processes, like ash aggregation, yet are difficult to parameterize based on dynamics simulations of whole eruption columns due to the lack of sufficient resolution. Here we present the results of experiments that develop a probabilistic relationship for ash aggregation based on impact velocity and atmospheric conditions (water vapor and atmospheric pressure). The probabilistic relationship can be integrated, in conjunction with a reconstructed velocity distribution of the ash in the column, and then can be readily incorporated in large-scale simulations of eruption column behavior. We also conduct detailed Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations at the scale of our experiment as a test of the ash aggregation relationship. The physical experiment was carried out in a contained tank designed to allow for the control of ‘atmospheric’ conditions. The tank can be depressurized as needed, using the gas inlet and the attached vacuum pump, and the ambient humidity can be altered by adjusting the gas mixture at the inlet. Image data is recorded with a high speed camera and post-processed to determine the number of collisions, energy of collisions and probability of aggregation. We will present the results of aggregation probability and the effects of incorporating these results into a multiphase model of a three-dimensional eruption column, where the effects of ash aggregation are especially important in regions of high shear and high granular temperature.

  7. Ash aggregation in explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, J. W.; Dufek, J.

    2010-12-01

    We present the result of a recent experimental and numerical investigation of ash aggregation in volcanic plumes. Eruption dynamics are sensitive to microphysical processes, like ash aggregation, yet are difficult to parameterize based on dynamics simulations of whole eruption columns due to the lack of sufficient resolution. Here we present the results of experiments that develop a probabilistic relationship for ash aggregation based on particle size, collisional energy and atmospheric water vapor. These relationships can be integrated into large-scale simulations of eruption column behavior in conjunction with a reconstructed velocity distribution of the ash in the column. The physical experiment was carried out in a contained tank designed to allow for the control of atmospheric water vapor. Image data is recorded with a high speed camera and post-processed to determine the number of collisions, energy of collisions and probability of aggregation. We will present the results of aggregation probability and the effects of incorporating these results into a multiphase model of a three-dimensional eruption column, where the effects of ash aggregation are especially important in regions of high shear and high granular temperature.

  8. Detecting Volcanic Ash Plumes with GNSS Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, N.; Larson, K. M.; Palo, S. E.; Mattia, M.; Rossi, M.; Coltelli, M.; Roesler, C.; Fee, D.

    2016-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers are commonly placed near volcanic sites to measure ground deformation. In addition to the carrier phase data used to measure ground position, these receivers also record Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) data. Larson (2013) showed that attenuations in SNR data strongly correlate with ash emissions at a series of eruptions of Redoubt Volcano. This finding has been confirmed at eruptions for Tongariro, Mt Etna, Mt Shindake, and Sakurajima. In each of these detections, very expensive geodetic quality GNSS receivers were used. If low-cost GNSS instruments could be used instead, a networked array could be deployed and optimized for plume detection and tomography. The outputs of this sensor array could then be used by both local volcanic observatories and Volcano Ash Advisory Centers. Here we will describe progress in developing such an array. The sensors we are working with are intended for navigation use, and thus lack the supporting power and communications equipment necessary for a networked system. Reliably providing those features is major challenge for the overall sensor design. We have built prototypes of our Volcano Ash Plume Receiver (VAPR), with solar panels, lithium-ion batteries and onboard data storage for preliminary testing. We will present results of our field tests of both receivers and antennas. A second critical need for our array is a reliable detection algorithm. We have tested our algorithm on data from recent eruptions and have incorporated the noise characteristics of the low-cost GNSS receiver. We have also developed a simulation capability so that the receivers can be deployed to optimize vent crossing GNSS signals.

  9. Mazama and Glacier Peak Volcanic Ash Layers: Relative Ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryxell, R

    1965-03-12

    Physiographic and stratigraphic evidence supports the regional correlation of two volcanic ash layers with extinct Mount Mazama at Crater Lake, Oregon, and Glacier Peak in the northern Cascade Range of Washington. A radiocarbon age of 12,000 +/- 310 years confirms geological evidence that ash derived from the Glacier Peak eruption is substantially older than ash from the Mazama eruption of 6600 years ago.

  10. Wetting and Spreading of Molten Volcanic Ash in Jet Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-04-20

    A major hazard to jet engines posed by volcanic ash is linked to the wetting and spreading of molten ash droplets on engine component surfaces. Here, using the sessile drop method, we study the evolution of the wettability and spreading of volcanic ash. We employ rapid temperature changes up to 1040-1450 °C, to replicate the heating conditions experienced by volcanic ash entering an operating jet engine. In this scenario, samples densify as particles coalesce under surface tension until they form a large system-sized droplet (containing remnant gas bubbles and crystals), which subsequently spreads on the surface. The data exhibit a transition from a heterogeneous to a homogeneous wetting regime above 1315 °C as crystals in the drops are dissolved in the melt. We infer that both viscosity and microstructural evolution are key controls on the attainment of equilibrium in the wetting of molten volcanic ash droplets.

  11. Volcanic ash plume identification using polarization lidar: Augustine eruption, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhu, Jiang; Webley, Peter W.; Dean, K.; Cobb, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    During mid January to early February 2006, a series of explosive eruptions occurred at the Augustine volcanic island off the southern coast of Alaska. By early February a plume of volcanic ash was transported northward into the interior of Alaska. Satellite imagery and Puff volcanic ash transport model predictions confirm that the aerosol plume passed over a polarization lidar (0.694 mm wavelength) site at the Arctic Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. For the first time, lidar linear depolarization ratios of 0.10 – 0.15 were measured in a fresh tropospheric volcanic plume, demonstrating that the nonspherical glass and mineral particles typical of volcanic eruptions generate strong laser depolarization. Thus, polarization lidars can identify the volcanic ash plumes that pose a threat to jet air traffic from the ground, aircraft, or potentially from Earth orbit.

  12. [Characteristics of zero point of charge of volcanic ash soils in Changbaishan and Wudalianchi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lanpo; Yang, Xueming; Liu, Wei

    2003-10-01

    The characteristics of the zero point of charge (ZPC) of volcanic ash soil profiles in Changbaishan and Wudalianchi was studied and discussed by means of potentiometric titration curves. The results showed that the two volcanic ash soils had not only a little variable charg, but also a little permanent charge. The clay fractions of the volcanic ash soils carried both variable and permanent charges. The ZPC of eeach layer in both soil profiles all lied in the acid side of titration curve, and increased with increasing soil depth. However, the ZPC displacements (sigma i) decreased with increasing soil depth. The ZPC of surface layer in both soil profiles was lower than that of the volcanic ash soils in foreign countries, but obviously higher than that of Loess soil in the Northwest and of black soil in the Northeast China. The variation of ZPC and delta i was affected not only by the deposition of long-rang tropospheric eolian dust from the Asian continent, but also by the accumulation of soil organic matter. Their combined effect was the main reason to the decrease of ZPC and sigma i the increase of sigma i in Changbaishan and Wudalianchi volcanic ash soils.

  13. Volcanic Ash Detection Using Raman LIDAR: "VADER" Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Volcanic ash is a significant hazard to aircraft engine and electronics and has caused damage to unwary aircraft and disrupted air travel for thousands of travelers,...

  14. Solid State Multiwavelength LIDAR for Volcanic Ash Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. proposes to develop a compact, multiwavelength LIDAR with polarization analysis capability that will be able to identify volcanic ash clouds...

  15. Correlating Remotely-Sensed Ocean Productivity Variations to Volcanic Ash Deposition Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, J. A.; Gonzalez, P.; Delmelle, P.

    2008-12-01

    Similar to wet and dry atmospheric deposition of mineral dust, ash deposition from large volcanic eruptions has been hypothesized to release sufficient iron (Fe) to stimulate surface ocean primary production, providing a plausible link between intense volcanism and abrupt climate changes in the past. There is, however, very little information on the atmospheric deposition flux of volcanic ash or the subsequent seawater dissolution of ash associated Fe in the surface ocean, although a few recent laboratory studies have demonstrated that substantial amounts of macro- and micro-nutrients can be released from ash within 1-2 h. One way to test the idea that volcanic ash can naturally enrich the ocean acting as a source of micronutrients for marine organisms is by monitoring chlorophyll-a, an accepted proxy for phytoplankton concentration. Chlorophyll-a is accurately estimated from routinely-collected ocean color sensor imagery. Through the study of a readily-available MODIS data set, we carried out a systematic investigation of localized anomalous chlorophyll-a responses that could be correlated to recent volcanic ash deposition events. Previous works have shown that phytoplankton response to artificial and natural iron fertilization is most apparent in high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions. The focus of this study is on the known HNLC region of the Northern Pacific Ocean which was the chosen site for earlier large-scale Fe fertilization experiments (SEEDS and SERIES), and is also conveniently near to Kamchatka, Japan, and Alaska volcanoes. MODIS images corresponding to periods before and after ash deposition for 25 eruptions were systematically investigated for chlorophyll response. Our findings thus far have not shown a reliably detectable effect in relation to ash deposition. We provide a discussion on the possible reasons for these findings.

  16. Chemical conversion of sulphur dioxide on Eyjafjallajökull's volcanic ash from the 2010 eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupart, Yoan; Burel, Laurence; Delichere, Pierre; George, Christian; D'Anna, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions induce important climatic and weather modifications. When volcanic ashes are emitted into the atmosphere they can travel for several weeks according to their size distribution and altitude of the emission. Eyjafjallajökull eruption, between April 14th and May 23th, is considered as a medium-size eruption. The upper level winds advected ashes over the UK and continental Europe. During volcanic eruptions high amounts of SO2 were injected into the atmosphere (from 50 to 200 ppbv)[1]. Previous works showed that SO2 could be convert into sulfate on mineral dust surfaces under dark conditions[2]. However, no conversion has been studied with real volcanic ashes and under day conditions (light exposure). For this study, real Eyjafjallajökull's ashes samples, collected on the 2010.04.18 at Seljavellir, were used. The ashes were deposited on a horizontal cylindrical coated-wall flow tube reactor surrounded by 5 fluorescent lamps (340-420 nm). The kinetic studies revealed that the presence of UV-A irradiation enhanced the conversion of SO2 on ashes samples. Moreover chemical analyses as XPS, Ion Chromatography and SEM were performed on volcanic ashes before and after exposition to SO2. XPS and ion chromatography analyzes showed that the presence of light increase the SO2 uptake on ashes surfaces and convert it into ions sulphate. Beside SEM analyses disclosed that the conversion takes place systematically on an iron oxide site . By combining kinetics and chemical analysis we are able to propose a new mechanism for the SO2 conversion on mineral surfaces under light conditions. 1. Self, S., et al., Volatile fluxes during flood basalt eruptions and potential effects on the global environment: A Deccan perspective. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 2006. 248(1-2): p. 518-532. 2. Zhang et al., Heterogeneous Reactions of Sulfur Dioxide on Typical Mineral Particles, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2006

  17. Remote Sensing of Volcanic ASH at the Met Office

    OpenAIRE

    Marenco F.; Kent J.; Adam M; Buxmann J.; Francis P.; Haywood J.

    2016-01-01

    The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 has triggered the rapid development of volcanic ash remote sensing activities at the Met Office. Volcanic ash qualitative and quantitative mapping have been achieved using lidar on board the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) research aircraft, and using improved satellite retrieval algorithms. After the eruption, a new aircraft facility, the Met Office Civil Contingencies Aircraft (MOCCA), has been set up to enable a rapid response,...

  18. Optical properties of volcanic ash: improving remote sensing observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelley, Patrick; Colarco, Peter; Aquila, Valentina; Krotkov, Nickolay; Bleacher, Jake; Garry, Brent; Young, Kelsey; Rocha Lima, Adriana; Martins, Vanderlei; Carn, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Many times each year explosive volcanic eruptions loft ash into the atmosphere. Global travel and trade rely on aircraft vulnerable to encounters with airborne ash. Volcanic ash advisory centers (VAACs) rely on dispersion forecasts and satellite data to issue timely warnings. To improve ash forecasts model developers and satellite data providers need realistic information about volcanic ash microphysical and optical properties. In anticipation of future large eruptions we can study smaller events to improve our remote sensing and modeling skills so when the next Pinatubo 1991 or larger eruption occurs, ash can confidently be tracked in a quantitative way. At distances >100km from their sources, drifting ash plumes, often above meteorological clouds, are not easily detected from conventional remote sensing platforms, save deriving their quantitative characteristics, such as mass density. Quantitative interpretation of these observations depends on a priori knowledge of the spectral optical properties of the ash in UV (>0.3μm) and TIR wavelengths (>10μm). Incorrect assumptions about the optical properties result in large errors in inferred column mass loading and size distribution, which misguide operational ash forecasts. Similarly, simulating ash properties in global climate models also requires some knowledge of optical properties to improve aerosol speciation.

  19. Volcanic Ash Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Murine and Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Damby

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash is a heterogeneous mineral dust that is typically composed of a mixture of amorphous (glass and crystalline (mineral fragments. It commonly contains an abundance of the crystalline silica (SiO2 polymorph cristobalite. Inhalation of crystalline silica can induce inflammation by stimulating the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic receptor complex that plays a critical role in driving inflammatory immune responses. Ingested material results in the assembly of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 with subsequent secretion of the interleukin-1 family cytokine IL-1β. Previous toxicology work suggests that cristobalite-bearing volcanic ash is minimally reactive, calling into question the reactivity of volcanically derived crystalline silica, in general. In this study, we target the NLRP3 inflammasome as a crystalline silica responsive element to clarify volcanic cristobalite reactivity. We expose immortalized bone marrow-derived macrophages of genetically engineered mice and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs to ash from the Soufrière Hills volcano as well as representative, pure-phase samples of its primary componentry (volcanic glass, feldspar, cristobalite and measure NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We demonstrate that respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash induces the activation of caspase-1 with subsequent release of mature IL-1β in a NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent manner. Macrophages deficient in NLRP3 inflammasome components are incapable of secreting IL-1β in response to volcanic ash ingestion. Cellular uptake induces lysosomal destabilization involving cysteine proteases. Furthermore, the response involves activation of mitochondrial stress pathways leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species. Considering ash componentry, cristobalite is the most reactive pure-phase with other components inducing only low-level IL-1β secretion. Inflammasome activation mediated by inhaled ash and its potential relevance in

  20. Volcanic ash activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in murine and human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damby, David; Horwell, Claire J.; Baxter, Peter J.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Schnurr, Max; Dingwell, Donald B.; Duewell, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Volcanic ash is a heterogeneous mineral dust that is typically composed of a mixture of amorphous (glass) and crystalline (mineral) fragments. It commonly contains an abundance of the crystalline silica (SiO2) polymorph cristobalite. Inhalation of crystalline silica can induce inflammation by stimulating the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic receptor complex that plays a critical role in driving inflammatory immune responses. Ingested material results in the assembly of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 with subsequent secretion of the interleukin-1 family cytokine IL-1β. Previous toxicology work suggests that cristobalite-bearing volcanic ash is minimally reactive, calling into question the reactivity of volcanically derived crystalline silica, in general. In this study, we target the NLRP3 inflammasome as a crystalline silica responsive element to clarify volcanic cristobalite reactivity. We expose immortalized bone marrow-derived macrophages of genetically engineered mice and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to ash from the Soufrière Hills volcano as well as representative, pure-phase samples of its primary componentry (volcanic glass, feldspar, cristobalite) and measure NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We demonstrate that respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash induces the activation of caspase-1 with subsequent release of mature IL-1β in a NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent manner. Macrophages deficient in NLRP3 inflammasome components are incapable of secreting IL-1β in response to volcanic ash ingestion. Cellular uptake induces lysosomal destabilization involving cysteine proteases. Furthermore, the response involves activation of mitochondrial stress pathways leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species. Considering ash componentry, cristobalite is the most reactive pure-phase with other components inducing only low-level IL-1β secretion. Inflammasome activation mediated by inhaled ash and its potential relevance in chronic pulmonary

  1. Volcanic Ash from the 1999 Eruption of Mount Cameroon Volcano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volcanic ash from the 1999 eruption of Mount Cameroon volcano has been characterized for its particle size and shape (by scanning electron microscopy, SEM), and mineralogy (by X-ray diffractometry, XRD). Also the total fluorine (F) content of the ash was determined by the selective ion electrode method. The results ...

  2. The impact of the characteristics of volcanic ash on forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Frances; Hort, Matthew; Millington, Sarah; Stevenson, John; Witham, Claire

    2013-04-01

    The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull during April - May 2010 and Grímsvötn in May 2011, Iceland, caused the widespread dispersion of volcanic ash across the NE Atlantic, and ultimately into UK and European airspace. This resulted in thousands of flights to and from affected countries across Europe to be cancelled. The Met Office, UK, is the home of the London VAAC, a Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre, and as such is responsible for providing reports and forecasts for the movement of volcanic ash clouds covering the UK, Iceland and the north-eastern part of the North Atlantic ocean. To forecast the dispersion of volcanic ash requires that the sedimentation of ash particles through the atmosphere is effectively modelled. The settling velocity of an ash particle is a function of its size, shape and density, plus the density and viscosity of the air through which it is falling. We consider the importance of characterising the physical properties of ash when modelling the long range dispersion of ash particles through the atmosphere. Using the Reynolds number dependent scheme employed by NAME, the Lagrangian particle model used operationally by the Met Office, we calculate the settling velocity and thus the maximum travel distance of an ash particle through an idealised atmosphere as a function of its size, shape and density. The results are compared to measured particle sizes from deposits across Europe following the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010. Further, the particle size distribution (PSD) of ash in a volcanic cloud with time is modelled using NAME: the particle density distribution and particle shape factor are varied and the modelled PSD compared to the PSD measured in the ash cloud during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 by the FAAM research aircraft. The influence of the weather on PSD is also considered by comparing model output using an idealised atmosphere to output using NWP driven meteorological fields. We discuss the sensitivity of forecasts of

  3. Geochemical evidence for African dust and volcanic ash inputs to terra rossa soils on carbonate reef terraces, northern Jamaica, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of red or reddish-brown, clay-rich, "terra rossa" soils on limestone has been debated for decades. A traditional qualitative explanation for their formation has been the accumulation of insoluble residues as the limestone is progressively dissolved over time. However, this mode of formation often requires unrealistic or impossible amounts of carbonate dissolution. Therefore, where this mechanism is not viable and where local fluvial or colluvial inputs can be ruled out, an external source or sources must be involved in soil formation. On the north coast of the Caribbean island of Jamaica, we studied a sequence of terra rossa soils developed on emergent limestones thought to be of Quaternary age. The soils become progressively thicker, redder, more Fe- and Al-rich and Si-poor with elevation. Furthermore, although kaolinite is found in all the soils, the highest and oldest soils also contain boehmite. Major and trace element geochemistry shows that the host limestones and local igneous rocks are not likely source materials for the soils. Other trace elements, including the rare earth elements (REE), show that tephra from Central American volcanoes is not a likely source either. However, trace element geochemistry shows that airborne dust from Africa plus tephra from the Lesser Antilles island arc are possible source materials for the clay-rich soils. A third, as yet unidentified, source may also contribute to the soils. We hypothesize that older, more chemically mature Jamaican bauxites may have had a similar origin. The results add to the growing body of evidence of the importance of multiple parent materials, including far-traveled dust, to soil genesis.

  4. Improved prediction and tracking of volcanic ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Larry G.; Webley, Peter

    2009-01-01

    During the past 30??years, more than 100 airplanes have inadvertently flown through clouds of volcanic ash from erupting volcanoes. Such encounters have caused millions of dollars in damage to the aircraft and have endangered the lives of tens of thousands of passengers. In a few severe cases, total engine failure resulted when ash was ingested into turbines and coating turbine blades. These incidents have prompted the establishment of cooperative efforts by the International Civil Aviation Organization and the volcanological community to provide rapid notification of eruptive activity, and to monitor and forecast the trajectories of ash clouds so that they can be avoided by air traffic. Ash-cloud properties such as plume height, ash concentration, and three-dimensional ash distribution have been monitored through non-conventional remote sensing techniques that are under active development. Forecasting the trajectories of ash clouds has required the development of volcanic ash transport and dispersion models that can calculate the path of an ash cloud over the scale of a continent or a hemisphere. Volcanological inputs to these models, such as plume height, mass eruption rate, eruption duration, ash distribution with altitude, and grain-size distribution, must be assigned in real time during an event, often with limited observations. Databases and protocols are currently being developed that allow for rapid assignment of such source parameters. In this paper, we summarize how an interdisciplinary working group on eruption source parameters has been instigating research to improve upon the current understanding of volcanic ash cloud characterization and predictions. Improved predictions of ash cloud movement and air fall will aid in making better hazard assessments for aviation and for public health and air quality. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Variational data assimilation of satellite observations to estimate volcanic ash emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, S.

    2017-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions release a large amount of volcanic ash, which can pose hazard to human and animal health, land transportation, and aviation safety. Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion (VATD) models are critical tools to provide advisory information and timely volcanic ash forecasts. Due to the

  6. Ecological and Topographic Features of Volcanic Ash-Influenced Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Kimsey; Brian Gardner; Alan Busacca

    2007-01-01

    Volcanic ash distribution and thickness were determined for a forested region of north-central Idaho. Mean ash thickness and multiple linear regression analyses were used to model the effect of environmental variables on ash thickness. Slope and slope curvature relationships with volcanic ash thickness varied on a local spatial scale across the study area. Ash...

  7. Depositional and Immersion-Mode Ice Nucleation of Fine-Grained Volcanic Ash Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloer, S.; Woods, T.; Genareau, K. D.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic lightning is a common phenomenon during explosive eruptions; occurring as vent discharges, near-vent discharges, and plume lightning. Plume lightning is most similar to thunderstorm lightning, where volcanic ash may act as ice nuclei. Volcanic ash samples derived from eight volcanoes: Augustine, Crater Peak, Katmai, Okmok, Redoubt (Alaska, U.S.A.), Lathrop Well (Nevada, U.S.A.), Taupo (New Zealand), and Valles Caldera (New Mexico, U.S.A.); were used to determine what roles ash mineralogy, particularly Fe-oxide-bearing minerals and silica-enriched minerals, grain shape, and grain size have in the nucleation of ice, which can generate plume lightning. Depositional and immersion-mode ice nucleation experiments were performed using a Nicolet Almega XR Dispersive Raman spectrometer, following the methods of Schill et al. (2015), where samples were shaken for 24 h prior to experiments in ultra-pure water, then nebulized to super micron droplets. Depositional nucleation experiments were conducted from 225-235 K, and immersion-mode nucleation experiments were conducted from 233-278 K. A JEOL JSM 6010 Plus/LA scanning electron microscope (SEM), along with Image-J freeware, was used to quantify the number density of Fe-oxide mineral phases in backscattered electron images, with an x-ray diffractometer (XRD) used to determine bulk mineral abundance and an x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer to determine bulk ash composition. Based on previous studies, we hypothesize that all ash samples will efficiently form depositional ice nuclei; however, certain mineral phases will dictate the efficiency of immersion-mode ice nucleation including K or Na / Ca feldspars, which have been shown to be efficient nuclei, and Fe-oxide-bearing minerals. These results will shed new light on volcanic cloud dynamics and add new parameters for atmospheric models, which currently only address effects of mineral dust as ice nuclei and overlook the potential role of volcanic ash.

  8. Stability of volcanic ash aggregates and break-up processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sebastian B; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ametsbichler, Jonathan; Cimarelli, Corrado; Merrison, Jonathan P; Poret, Matthieu; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-08-07

    Numerical modeling of ash plume dispersal is an important tool for forecasting and mitigating potential hazards from volcanic ash erupted during explosive volcanism. Recent tephra dispersal models have been expanded to account for dynamic ash aggregation processes. However, there are very few studies on rates of disaggregation during transport. It follows that current models regard ash aggregation as irrevocable and may therefore overestimate aggregation-enhanced sedimentation. In this experimental study, we use industrial granulation techniques to artificially produce aggregates. We subject these to impact tests and evaluate their resistance to break-up processes. We find a dependence of aggregate stability on primary particle size distribution and solid particle binder concentration. We posit that our findings could be combined with eruption source parameters and implemented in future tephra dispersal models.

  9. Nephelometric Dropsonde for Volcanic Ash Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes could enable unprecedented observations of...

  10. Automatic volcanic ash detection from MODIS observations using a back-propagation neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Gray

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the climate effects and aviation threats of volcanic eruptions, it is important to accurately locate ash in the atmosphere. This study aims to explore the accuracy and reliability of training a neural network to identify cases of ash using observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS. Satellite images were obtained for the following eruptions: Kasatochi, Aleutian Islands, 2008; Okmok, Aleutian Islands, 2008; Grímsvötn, northeastern Iceland, 2011; Chaitén, southern Chile, 2008; Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, central Chile, 2011; Sangeang Api, Indonesia, 2014; and Kelut, Indonesia, 2014. The Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model was used to obtain ash concentrations for the same archived eruptions. Two back-propagation neural networks were then trained using brightness temperature differences as inputs obtained via the following band combinations: 12–11, 11–8.6, 11–7.3, and 11 μm. Using the ash concentrations determined via HYSPLIT, flags were created to differentiate between ash (1 and no ash (0 and SO2-rich ash (1 and no SO2-rich ash (0 and used as output. When neural network output was compared to the test data set, 93 % of pixels containing ash were correctly identified and 7 % were missed. Nearly 100 % of pixels containing SO2-rich ash were correctly identified. The optimal thresholds, determined using Heidke skill scores, for ash retrieval and SO2-rich ash retrieval were 0.48 and 0.47, respectively. The networks show significantly less accuracy in the presence of high water vapor, liquid water, ice, or dust concentrations. Significant errors are also observed at the edge of the MODIS swath.

  11. Automatic volcanic ash detection from MODIS observations using a back-propagation neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T. M.; Bennartz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the climate effects and aviation threats of volcanic eruptions, it is important to accurately locate ash in the atmosphere. This study aims to explore the accuracy and reliability of training a neural network to identify cases of ash using observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Satellite images were obtained for the following eruptions: Kasatochi, Aleutian Islands, 2008; Okmok, Aleutian Islands, 2008; Grímsvötn, northeastern Iceland, 2011; Chaitén, southern Chile, 2008; Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, central Chile, 2011; Sangeang Api, Indonesia, 2014; and Kelut, Indonesia, 2014. The Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to obtain ash concentrations for the same archived eruptions. Two back-propagation neural networks were then trained using brightness temperature differences as inputs obtained via the following band combinations: 12-11, 11-8.6, 11-7.3, and 11 μm. Using the ash concentrations determined via HYSPLIT, flags were created to differentiate between ash (1) and no ash (0) and SO2-rich ash (1) and no SO2-rich ash (0) and used as output. When neural network output was compared to the test data set, 93 % of pixels containing ash were correctly identified and 7 % were missed. Nearly 100 % of pixels containing SO2-rich ash were correctly identified. The optimal thresholds, determined using Heidke skill scores, for ash retrieval and SO2-rich ash retrieval were 0.48 and 0.47, respectively. The networks show significantly less accuracy in the presence of high water vapor, liquid water, ice, or dust concentrations. Significant errors are also observed at the edge of the MODIS swath.

  12. Reference data set of volcanic ash physicochemical and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, A.; Diplas, S.; Durant, A. J.; Azar, A. S.; Sunding, M. F.; Rose, W. I.; Sytchkova, A.; Bonadonna, C.; Krüger, K.; Stohl, A.

    2017-09-01

    Uncertainty in the physicochemical and optical properties of volcanic ash particles creates errors in the detection and modeling of volcanic ash clouds and in quantification of their potential impacts. In this study, we provide a data set that describes the physicochemical and optical properties of a representative selection of volcanic ash samples from nine different volcanic eruptions covering a wide range of silica contents (50-80 wt % SiO2). We measured and calculated parameters describing the physical (size distribution, complex shape, and dense-rock equivalent mass density), chemical (bulk and surface composition), and optical (complex refractive index from ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths) properties of the volcanic ash and classified the samples according to their SiO2 and total alkali contents into the common igneous rock types basalt to rhyolite. We found that the mass density ranges between ρ = 2.49 and 2.98 g/cm3 for rhyolitic to basaltic ash types and that the particle shape varies with changing particle size (d λ = 300 nm and 1500 nm depend systematically on the composition of the samples. The real part values vary from n = 1.38 to 1.66 depending on ash type and wavelength and the imaginary part values from k = 0.00027 to 0.00268. We place our results into the context of existing data and thus provide a comprehensive data set that can be used for future and historic eruptions, when only basic information about the magma type producing the ash is known.

  13. Volcanic ash - danger to aircraft in the north Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Casadevall, Thomas J.; Miller, Thomas P.; Hendley, James W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    1997-01-01

    The world's busy air traffic corridors pass over hundreds of volcanoes capable of sudden, explosive eruptions. In the United States alone, aircraft carry many thousands of passengers and millions of dollars of cargo over volcanoes each day. Volcanic ash can be a serious hazard to aviation even thousands of miles from an eruption. Airborne ash can diminish visibility, damage flight control systems, and cause jet engines to fail. USGS and other scientists with the Alaska Volcano Observatory are playing a leading role in the international effort to reduce the risk posed to aircraft by volcanic eruptions.

  14. A robust method to forecast volcanic ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Roger P.; Pavolonis, Mike; Sieglaff, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Ash clouds emanating from volcanic eruption columns often form trails of ash extending thousands of kilometers through the Earth's atmosphere, disrupting air traffic and posing a significant hazard to air travel. To mitigate such hazards, the community charged with reducing flight risk must accurately assess risk of ash ingestion for any flight path and provide robust forecasts of volcanic ash dispersal. In response to this need, a number of different transport models have been developed for this purpose and applied to recent eruptions, providing a means to assess uncertainty in forecasts. Here we provide a framework for optimal forecasts and their uncertainties given any model and any observational data. This involves random sampling of the probability distributions of input (source) parameters to a transport model and iteratively running the model with different inputs, each time assessing the predictions that the model makes about ash dispersal by direct comparison with satellite data. The results of these comparisons are embodied in a likelihood function whose maximum corresponds to the minimum misfit between model output and observations. Bayes theorem is then used to determine a normalized posterior probability distribution and from that a forecast of future uncertainty in ash dispersal. The nature of ash clouds in heterogeneous wind fields creates a strong maximum likelihood estimate in which most of the probability is localized to narrow ranges of model source parameters. This property is used here to accelerate probability assessment, producing a method to rapidly generate a prediction of future ash concentrations and their distribution based upon assimilation of satellite data as well as model and data uncertainties. Applying this method to the recent eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland, we show that the 3 and 6 h forecasts of ash cloud location probability encompassed the location of observed satellite-determined ash cloud loads, providing an

  15. Experimental aggregation of volcanic ash: the role of liquid bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S.; Kueppers, U.; Jacob, M.; Ayris, P. M.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions may release vast quantities of ash. Because of its size, it has the greatest dispersal potential and can be distributed globally. Ash may pose severe risks for 1) air traffic, 2) human and animal health, 3) agriculture and 4) infrastructure. Such ash particles can however cluster and form ash aggregates that range in size from millimeters to centimeters. During their growth, weight and aerodynamic properties change. This leads to significantly changed transport and settling behavior. The physico-chemical processes involved in aggregation are quantitatively poorly constrained. We have performed laboratory ash aggregation experiments using the ProCell Lab System® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH. Solid particles are set into motion in a fluidized bed over a range of well-controlled boundary conditions (e.g., air flow rate, gas temperature, humidity, liquid composition). In this manner we simulate the variable gas-particle flow conditions expected in eruption plumes and pyroclastic density currents. We have used 1) soda-lime glass beads as an analogue material and 2) natural volcanic ash from Laacher See Volcano (Germany). In order to influence form, size, stability and the production rate of aggregates, a range of experimental conditions (e.g., particle concentration, degree of turbulence, temperature and moisture in the process chamber and the composition of the liquid phase) have been employed. We have successfully reproduced several features of natural ash aggregates, including round, internally structured ash pellets up to 3 mm in diameter. These experimental results help to constrain the boundary conditions required for the generation of spherical, internally-structured ash aggregates that survive deposition and are preserved in the volcanological record. These results should also serve as input parameters for models of ash transport and ash mass distribution.

  16. Volcanic ash layers in blue ice fields (Beardmore Glacier Area, Antarctica): Iridium enrichments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Christian

    Dust bands on blue ice fields in Antarctica have been studied and have been identified to originate from two main sources: bedrock debris scraped up from the ground by the glacial movement (these bands are found predominantly at fractures and shear zones in the ice near moraines), and volcanic debris deposited on and incorporated in the ice by large-scale eruptions of Antarctic (or sub-Antractic) volcanoes. Ice core studies have revealed that most of the dust layers in the ice cores are volcanic (tephra) deposits which may be related to some specific volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have to be related to some specific volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have to be relatively recent (a few thousand years old) since ice cores usually incorporate younger ice. In contrast, dust bands on bare blue ice fields are much older, up to a few hundred thousand years, which may be inferred from the rather high terrestrial age of meteorites found on the ice and from dating the ice using the uranium series method. Also for the volcanic ash layers found on blue ice fields correlations between some specific volcanoes (late Cenozoic) and the volcanic debris have been inferred, mainly using chemical arguments. During a recent field expedition samples of several dust bands found on blue ice fields at the Lewis Cliff Ice Tongue were taken. These dust band samples were divided for age determination using the uranium series method, and chemical investigations to determine the source and origin of the dust bands. The investigations have shown that most of the dust bands found at the Ice Tongue are of volcanic origin and, for chemical and petrological reasons, may be correlated with Cenozoic volcanoes in the Melbourne volcanic province, Northern Victoria Land, which is at least 1500 km away. Major and trace element data have been obtained and have been used for identification and correlation purposes. Recently, some additional trace elements were determined in some of the dust band

  17. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, A.W.; Lu, S.; Segers, AJ; Weber, Konradin; Lin, H.X.

    2016-01-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 ...

  18. Quantitative shape measurements of distal volcanic ash

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colleen M. Riley; William I. Rose; Gregg J. S. Bluth

    2003-01-01

    ...‐shaped particles affect transport processes and radiative transfer measurements. In this study, a methodology was developed to characterize particle shapes, sizes, and terminal velocities for three ash samples of different compositions...

  19. An accelerated data assimilation approach for volcanic ash forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangliang; Lin, Haixiang; Heemink, Arnold; Segers, Arjo; Lu, Sha

    2016-04-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption had serious consequences to civil aviation. This has initiated a lot of research on volcanic ash forecast in recent years. Ensemble-based data assimilation uses the observation data to improve the parameter and state estimation and subsequently the volcanic ash forecast accuracy. Due to the computational complexity of ensemble-based algorithms and the large scale of real-life applications, application of these methods usually introduces a large computational cost, particularly in the analysis step of assimilation processes. Because the other time-consuming part in the single CPU case, the forecast step, can be efficiently and easily parallelized. In this study, we focus on speeding up of the analysis step. For volcanic ash assimilation of aircraft-based measurements, the most time-consuming part in the analysis step has been shown to be the computation of the Kalman gain matrix. After a careful study on the characteristics of ensemble ash states, we propose a model-reduced Kalman gain (MR-Gain) approach which transforms the ensemble state matrix into a low-rank matrix by a multiplication with an index matrix which recorded the sparsity information of the ensemble state matrix, and thus the computational cost of all the ensemble-related matrix multiplications are reduced. After the computation of Kalman gain, using the previously recorded state index, the full analyzed ensemble states are reconstructed. The result shows the MR-Gain approach is exact, which can be used to replace the original full matrix with a much low computation cost. Computer experiments show that the computing time for the analysis step with the new approach is a factor of ten times faster than the conventional analysis step. The result also shows that with the accelerated analysis step in volcanic ash assimilation system, the total amount of computing time for volcanic ash forecast can be significantly reduced by up to a factor of 5.

  20. Assimilating aircraft-based measurements to improve forecast accuracy of volcanic ash transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, G.; Lin, H.X.; Heemink, A.W.; Segers, A.J.; Lu, S.; Palsson, T.

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption had serious consequences to civil aviation. This has initiated a lot of research on volcanic ash transport forecast in recent years. For forecasting the volcanic ash transport after eruption onset, a volcanic ash transport and diffusion model (VATDM) needs

  1. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, G.; Heemink, A.; Lu, S.; Segers, A.; Weber, K.; Lin, H.X.

    2016-01-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain,

  2. Assimilating aircraft-based measurements to improve forecast accuracy of volcanic ash transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, G.; Lin, H.X.; Heemink, A.W.; Segers, A.J.; Lu, S.; Palsson, T.

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption had serious consequences to civil aviation. This has initiated a lot of research on volcanic ash transport forecast in recent years. For forecasting the volcanic ash transport after eruption onset, a volcanic ash transport and diffusion model (VATDM) needs

  3. Atmospheric ice nuclei in the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bingemer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have sampled atmospheric ice nuclei (IN and aerosol in Germany and in Israel during spring 2010. IN were analyzed by the static vapor diffusion chamber FRIDGE, as well as by electron microscopy. During the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption of April 2010 we have measured the highest ice nucleus number concentrations (>600 l−1 in our record of 2 yr of daily IN measurements in central Germany. Even in Israel, located about 5000 km away from Iceland, IN were as high as otherwise only during desert dust storms. The fraction of aerosol activated as ice nuclei at −18 °C and 119% rhice and the corresponding area density of ice-active sites per aerosol surface were considerably higher than what we observed during an intense outbreak of Saharan dust over Europe in May 2008.

    Pure volcanic ash accounts for at least 53–68% of the 239 individual ice nucleating particles that we collected in aerosol samples from the event and analyzed by electron microscopy. Volcanic ash samples that had been collected close to the eruption site were aerosolized in the laboratory and measured by FRIDGE. Our analysis confirms the relatively poor ice nucleating efficiency (at −18 °C and 119% ice-saturation of such "fresh" volcanic ash, as it had recently been found by other workers. We find that both the fraction of the aerosol that is active as ice nuclei as well as the density of ice-active sites on the aerosol surface are three orders of magnitude larger in the samples collected from ambient air during the volcanic peaks than in the aerosolized samples from the ash collected close to the eruption site. From this we conclude that the ice-nucleating properties of volcanic ash may be altered substantially by aging and processing during long-range transport in the atmosphere, and that global volcanism deserves further attention as a potential source of atmospheric ice nuclei.

  4. On the Role of Climate Forcing by Volcanic Sulphate and Volcanic Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baerbel Langmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is overall agreement that volcanic sulphate aerosols in the stratosphere can reduce solar radiation reaching the earth’s surface for years, thereby reducing surface temperatures, affecting global circulation patterns and generally the global climate system. However, the response of the climate system after large volcanic eruptions is not fully understood and global climate models have difficulties to reproduce the observed variability of the earth system after large volcanic eruptions until now. For geological timescales, it has been suggested that, in addition to the stratospheric climate forcing by volcanic sulphate aerosols, volcanic ash affects climate by modifying the global carbon cycle through iron fertilising the surface ocean and stimulating phytoplankton growth. This process has recently also been observed after the eruption of the volcano Kasatochi on the Aleutian Islands in summer 2008. To trigger future research on the effect of volcanic ash on the climate system via ocean iron fertilisation, this review paper describes the formation processes and atmospheric life cycles of volcanic sulphate and volcanic ash, contrasts their impact on climate, and emphasises current limitations in our understanding.

  5. The United States national volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albersheim, Steven; Guffanti, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic-ash clouds are a known hazard to aviation, requiring that aircraft be warned away from ash-contaminated airspace. The exposure of aviation to potential hazards from volcanoes in the United States is significant. In support of existing interagency operations to detect and track volcanic-ash clouds, the United States has prepared a National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation to strengthen the warning process in its airspace. The US National Plan documents the responsibilities, communication protocols, and prescribed hazard messages of the Federal Aviation Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Geological Survey, and Air Force Weather Agency. The plan introduces a new message format, a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation, to provide clear, concise information about volcanic activity, including precursory unrest, to air-traffic controllers (for use in Notices to Airmen) and other aviation users. The plan is online at http://www.ofcm.gov/p35-nvaopa/pdf/FCM-P35-2007-NVAOPA.pdf. While the plan provides general operational practices, it remains the responsibility of the federal agencies involved to implement the described procedures through orders, directives, etc. Since the plan mirrors global guidelines of the International Civil Aviation Organization, it also provides an example that could be adapted by other countries.

  6. Ash production by attrition in volcanic conduits and plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T J; Russell, J K

    2017-07-17

    Tephra deposits result from explosive volcanic eruption and serve as indirect probes into fragmentation processes operating in subsurface volcanic conduits. Primary magmatic fragmentation creates a population of pyroclasts through volatile-driven decompression during conduit ascent. In this study, we explore the role that secondary fragmentation, specifically attrition, has in transforming primary pyroclasts upon transport in volcanic conduits and plumes. We utilize total grain size distributions from a suite of natural and experimentally produced tephra to show that attrition is likely to occur in all explosive volcanic eruptions. Our experimental results indicate that fine ash production and surface area generation is fast (eruption column stability, tephra dispersal, aggregation, volcanic lightening generation, and has concomitant effects on aviation safety and Earth's climate.

  7. Hail formation triggers rapid ash aggregation in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eaton, Alexa R; Mastin, Larry G; Herzog, Michael; Schwaiger, Hans F; Schneider, David J; Wallace, Kristi L; Clarke, Amanda B

    2015-08-03

    During explosive eruptions, airborne particles collide and stick together, accelerating the fallout of volcanic ash and climate-forcing aerosols. This aggregation process remains a major source of uncertainty both in ash dispersal forecasting and interpretation of eruptions from the geological record. Here we illuminate the mechanisms and timescales of particle aggregation from a well-characterized 'wet' eruption. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, incorporated water from the surface (in this case, a glacier), which is a common occurrence during explosive volcanism worldwide. Observations from C-band weather radar, fall deposits and numerical modelling demonstrate that hail-forming processes in the eruption plume triggered aggregation of ∼95% of the fine ash and stripped much of the erupted mass out of the atmosphere within 30 min. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanism of hail-like ash aggregation that contributes to the anomalously rapid fallout of fine ash and occurrence of concentrically layered aggregates in volcanic deposits.

  8. Volcanic ash hazards and aviation risk: Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, Marianne C.; Tupper, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    The risks to safe and efficient air travel from volcanic-ash hazards are well documented and widely recognized. Under the aegis of the International Civil Aviation Organization, globally coordinated mitigation procedures are in place to report explosive eruptions, detect airborne ash clouds and forecast their expected movement, and issue specialized messages to warn aircraft away from hazardous airspace. This mitigation framework is based on the integration of scientific and technical capabilities worldwide in volcanology, meteorology, and atmospheric physics and chemistry. The 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland, which led to a nearly week-long shutdown of air travel into and out of Europe, has prompted the aviation industry, regulators, and scientists to work more closely together to improve how hazardous airspace is defined and communicated. Volcanic ash will continue to threaten aviation and scientific research will continue to influence the risk-mitigation framework.

  9. Disposal of domestic sludge and sludge ash on volcanic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudey, Mauricio; Förster, Juan E; Becerra, Juan P; Quinteros, Magdalena; Torres, Justo; Arancibia, Nicolas; Galindo, Gerardo; Chang, Andrew C

    2007-01-31

    Column leaching experiments were conducted to test the ability of Chilean volcanic soils in retaining the mineral constituents and metals in sewage sludge and sludge ash that were incorporated into the soils. Small or negligible amounts of the total content of Pb, Fe, Cr, Mn, Cd, and Zn (0 to soils and leached with 12 pore volumes of water over a 3 month period of time, less than 0.1% of the total amount of heavy metals and PO4 in the sludge and sludge ash were collected in the drainage water. Cation exchange selectivity, specific anion adsorption and solubility are the processes that cause the reduction of leaching. The volcanic soils were capable of retaining the mineral constituents, P, and metals in applied sewage sludge and sludge ash and gradually released them as nutrients for plant growth.

  10. Agricultural Fragility Estimates Subjected to Volcanic Ash Fall Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, H. J.; Lee, S.; Choi, S. H.; Yun, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural Fragility Estimates Subjected to Volcanic Ash Fall Hazards Hee Jung Ham1, Seung-Hun Choi1, Woo-Seok Yun1, Sungsu Lee2 1Department of Architectural Engineering, Kangwon National University, Korea 2Division of Civil Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Korea ABSTRACT In this study, fragility functions are developed to estimate expected volcanic ash damages of the agricultural sector in Korea. The fragility functions are derived from two approaches: 1) empirical approach based on field observations of impacts to agriculture from the 2006 eruption of Merapi volcano in Indonesia and 2) the FOSM (first-order second-moment) analytical approach based on distribution and thickness of volcanic ash observed from the 1980 eruption of Mt. Saint Helens and agricultural facility specifications in Korea. Fragility function to each agricultural commodity class is presented by a cumulative distribution function of the generalized extreme value distribution. Different functions are developed to estimate production losses from outdoor and greenhouse farming. Seasonal climate influences vulnerability of each agricultural crop and is found to be a crucial component in determining fragility of agricultural commodities to an ash fall. In the study, the seasonality coefficient is established as a multiplier of fragility function to consider the seasonal vulnerability. Yields of the different agricultural commodities are obtained from Korean Statistical Information Service to create a baseline for future agricultural volcanic loss estimation. Numerically simulated examples of scenario ash fall events at Mt. Baekdu volcano are utilized to illustrate the application of the developed fragility functions. Acknowledgements This research was supported by a grant 'Development of Advanced Volcanic Disaster Response System considering Potential Volcanic Risk around Korea' [MPSS-NH-2015-81] from the Natural Hazard Mitigation Research Group, Ministry of Public Safety and Security of

  11. Spatial evaluation of volcanic ash forecasts using satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Harvey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The decision to close airspace in the event of a volcanic eruption is based on hazard maps of predicted ash extent. These are produced using output from volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD models. In this paper the fractions skill score has been used for the first time to evaluate the spatial accuracy of VATD simulations relative to satellite retrievals of volcanic ash. This objective measure of skill provides more information than traditional point-by-point metrics, such as success index and Pearson correlation coefficient, as it takes into the account spatial scale over which skill is being assessed. The FSS determines the scale over which a simulation has skill and can differentiate between a "near miss" and a forecast that is badly misplaced. The idealized scenarios presented show that even simulations with considerable displacement errors have useful skill when evaluated over neighbourhood scales of 200–700 (km2. This method could be used to compare forecasts produced by different VATDs or using different model parameters, assess the impact of assimilating satellite-retrieved ash data and evaluate VATD forecasts over a long time period.

  12. Airborne volcanic ash; a global threat to aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Guffanti, Marianne C.

    2010-01-01

    The world's busy air traffic corridors pass over or downwind of hundreds of volcanoes capable of hazardous explosive eruptions. The risk to aviation from volcanic activity is significant - in the United States alone, aircraft carry about 300,000 passengers and hundreds of millions of dollars of cargo near active volcanoes each day. Costly disruption of flight operations in Europe and North America in 2010 in the wake of a moderate-size eruption in Iceland clearly demonstrates how eruptions can have global impacts on the aviation industry. Airborne volcanic ash can be a serious hazard to aviation even hundreds of miles from an eruption. Encounters with high-concentration ash clouds can diminish visibility, damage flight control systems, and cause jet engines to fail. Encounters with low-concentration clouds of volcanic ash and aerosols can accelerate wear on engine and aircraft components, resulting in premature replacement. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with national and international partners, is playing a leading role in the international effort to reduce the risk posed to aircraft by volcanic eruptions.

  13. Towards probabilistic forecasts of volcanic ash transport in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidikheri, M. J.; Dare, R.; Potts, R.; Lucas, C.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite based remote sensing techniques are the primary means of identifying the location of volcanic ash during eruption events. This information is then used to initialize ash dispersion models, which employ meteorological fields to forecast the future locations of ash. Remote sensing of ash in tropical regions is especially challenging due to the difficulty of demarcating ash from the ice and water in convective clouds which results in frequent missed and false detections of ash. Dispersion models also contain uncertainties that arise from uncertainties in the meteorological fields and the source term such the height of the ash column. Communicating forecasting uncertainties is becoming increasingly important to stakeholders for the purposes of improved risk management. For these reasons the Bureau of Meteorology is engaged in research with the aim of providing probabilistic forecasts of ash in the near future based on ensembles of dispersion model simulations. The ensembles are constructed to reflect two fundamental uncertainties. Firstly, uncertainties in the meteorological fields are incorporated by the use of the Bureau's ensemble model system which issues a set of 24 meteorological forecasts representing possible states of the atmosphere. Secondly, uncertainties in the model parameters such as the ash column height are also incorporated. This is accomplished by running a suite of dispersion model simulations, each with a different value of the model parameter. Pattern correlations are then used to quantify the match between the model and observations. The model parameters which provide the best matches between model and observations are then employed in the ensemble to issue probabilistic forecasts of ash. This process can also ameliorate errors due to incorrect or missing model physics. The efficacy of these techniques shall be demonstrated by the use of several case studies.

  14. Vertical Profiling of Volcanic Ash from the 2011 Puyehue Cordón Caulle Eruption Using IASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwinten Maes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash is emitted by most eruptions, sometimes reaching the stratosphere. In addition to its climate effect, ash may have a significant impact on civilian flights. Currently, the horizontal distribution of ash aerosols is quite extensively studied, but not its vertical profile, while of high importance for both applications mentioned. Here, we study the sensitivity of the thermal infrared spectral range to the altitude distribution of volcanic ash, based on similar work that was undertaken on mineral dust. We use measurements by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI instruments onboard the MetOp satellite series. The retrieval method that we develop for the ash vertical profile is based on the optimal estimation formalism. This method is applied to study the eruption of the Chilean volcano Puyehue, which started on the 4th of June 2011. The retrieved profiles agree reasonably well with Cloud-Aerosol LiDAR with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP measurements, and our results generally agree with literature studies of the same eruption. The retrieval strategy presented here therefore is very promising for improving our knowledge of the vertical distribution of volcanic ash and obtaining a global 3D ash distribution twice a day. Future improvements of our retrieval strategy are also discussed.

  15. Remote Sensing of Volcanic ASH at the Met Office

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marenco F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 has triggered the rapid development of volcanic ash remote sensing activities at the Met Office. Volcanic ash qualitative and quantitative mapping have been achieved using lidar on board the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM research aircraft, and using improved satellite retrieval algorithms. After the eruption, a new aircraft facility, the Met Office Civil Contingencies Aircraft (MOCCA, has been set up to enable a rapid response, and a network of ground-based remote sensing sites with lidars and sunphotometers is currently being developed. Thanks to these efforts, the United Kingdom (UK will be much better equipped to deal with such a crisis, should it happen in the future.

  16. Remote Sensing of Volcanic ASH at the Met Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenco, F.; Kent, J.; Adam, M.; Buxmann, J.; Francis, P.; Haywood, J.

    2016-06-01

    The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 has triggered the rapid development of volcanic ash remote sensing activities at the Met Office. Volcanic ash qualitative and quantitative mapping have been achieved using lidar on board the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) research aircraft, and using improved satellite retrieval algorithms. After the eruption, a new aircraft facility, the Met Office Civil Contingencies Aircraft (MOCCA), has been set up to enable a rapid response, and a network of ground-based remote sensing sites with lidars and sunphotometers is currently being developed. Thanks to these efforts, the United Kingdom (UK) will be much better equipped to deal with such a crisis, should it happen in the future.

  17. Using Volcanic Ash to Remove Dissolved Uranium and Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, David S.; Cuero, Raul G.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have shown that significant fractions of uranium, lead, and possibly other toxic and/or radioactive substances can be removed from an aqueous solution by simply exposing the solution, at ambient temperature, to a treatment medium that includes weathered volcanic ash from Pu'u Nene, which is a cinder cone on the Island of Hawaii. Heretofore, this specific volcanic ash has been used for an entirely different purpose: simulating the spectral properties of Martian soil. The treatment medium can consist of the volcanic ash alone or in combination with chitosan, which is a natural polymer that can be produced from seafood waste or easily extracted from fungi, some bacteria, and some algae. The medium is harmless to plants and animals and, because of the abundance and natural origin of its ingredient( s), is inexpensive. The medium can be used in a variety of ways and settings: it can be incorporated into water-filtration systems; placed in contact or mixed with water-containing solids (e.g., soils and sludges); immersed in bodies of water (e.g., reservoirs, lakes, rivers, or wells); or placed in and around nuclear power plants, mines, and farm fields.

  18. Magmatic and fragmentation controls on volcanic ash surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayris, Paul M.; Diplas, Spyros; Damby, David E.; Hornby, Adrian J.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Delmelle, Pierre; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    The chemical effects of silicate ash ejected by explosive volcanic eruptions on environmental systems are fundamentally mediated by ash particle surfaces. Ash surfaces are a composite product of magmatic properties and fragmentation mechanisms, as well as in-plume and atmospheric alteration processes acting upon those surfaces during and after the eruption. Recent attention has focused on the capacity of alteration processes to shape ash surfaces; most notably, several studies have utilised X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a technique probing the elemental composition and coordination state of atoms within the top 10 nm of ash surfaces, to identify patterns of elemental depletions and enrichments relative to bulk ash chemical composition. Under the presumption of surface and bulk equivalence, any disparities have been previously attributed to surface alteration processes, but the ubiquity of some depletions (e.g., Ca, Fe) across multiple ash studies, irrespective of eruptive origin, could suggest these to be features of the surface produced at the instant of magma fragmentation. To investigate this possibility further, we conducted rapid decompression experiments at different pressure conditions and at ambient and magmatic temperature on porous andesitic rocks. These experiments produced fragmented ash material untouched by secondary alteration, which were compared to particles produced by crushing of large clasts from the same experiments. We investigated a restricted size fraction (63-90 μm) from both fragmented and crushed materials, determining bulk chemistry and mineralogy via XRF, SEM-BSE and EPMA, and investigated the chemical composition of the ash surface by XPS. Analyses suggest that fragmentation under experimental conditions partitioned a greater fraction of plagioclase-rich particles into the selected size fraction, relative to particles produced by crushing. Trends in surface chemical composition in fragmented and crushed particles mirror that

  19. Volcanic ash supply to the surface ocean – remote sensing of biological responses and their wider biogeochemical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Browning

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient micronutrient enrichment of the surface ocean can enhance phytoplankton growth rates and alter microbial community structure with an ensuing spectrum of biogeochemical feedbacks. Strong phytoplankton responses to micronutrients supplied by volcanic ash have been reported recently. Here we: (i synthesize findings from these recent studies; (ii report the results of a new remote sensing study of ash fertilization; and (iii calculate theoretical bounds of ash-fertilized carbon export. Our synthesis highlights that phytoplankton responses to ash do not always simply mimic that of iron amendment; the exact mechanisms for this are likely biogeochemically important but are not yet well understood. Inherent optical properties of ash-loaded seawater suggest rhyolitic ash biases routine satellite chlorophyll-a estimation upwards by more than an order of magnitude for waters with 0.5 mg chlorophyll-a m-3. For this reason post-ash-deposition chlorophyll-a changes in oligotrophic waters detected via standard Case 1 (open ocean algorithms should be interpreted with caution. Remote sensing analysis of historic events with a bias less than a factor of 2 provided limited stand-alone evidence for ash-fertilization. Confounding factors were poor coverage, incoherent ash dispersal, and ambiguity ascribing biomass changes to ash supply over other potential drivers. Using current estimates of iron release and carbon export efficiencies, uncertainty bounds of ash-fertilized carbon export for 3 events are presented. Patagonian iron supply to the Southern Ocean from volcanic eruptions is less than that of windblown dust on thousand year timescales but can dominate supply at shorter timescales. Reducing uncertainties in remote sensing of phytoplankton response and nutrient release from ash are avenues for enabling assessment of the oceanic response to large-scale transient nutrient enrichment.

  20. Volcanic Ash -Aircraft Encounter Damages: in Volcanological Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydar, Erkan; Aladaǧ, Çaǧdaş Hakan; Menteş, Turhan

    2017-04-01

    The jet era or age began at 1930 and 40's in aviation sector, with the production of first jet engine for the aircrafts. Since 1950's, the commercial aviation with regular flights were established. Civil aviation and air-transport drastically increased due to intensive demand, and declared at least 10 fold since 1970 by IATA report. Parallelly to technological and economical developpement, the commercial jets became more comfortable, secure and rapid, bringing the world smaller, the countries closer. On the other hand, according to Global Volcanism Program Catalogues of Smithsonian Institute, about 1,500 volcanoes have erupted in the Holocene, 550 of them have had historical eruptions and considered as active. Besides an average of 55-60 volcanoes erupt each year, and about 8-10 of these eruptions produce ash clouds that reach aircraft flight altitudes (Salinas and Watt, 2004). Volcanic ash can be expected to be in air routes at altitudes greater than 9 km (30,000 ft) for roughly 20 days per year worldwide (Miller &Casadeval, 2000). A precious compilation of incidents due to encounters of aircrafts with volcanic ash clouds covering the years between 1953 and 2009 was used in this work (Guffanti et al., 2010-USGS Report) with an additional information on Eyfjallajökull-2010 eruption. According to this compilation,129 incidents happened within the concerned time interval. The damages, in general, fall in second and third class of Severity index, indicating the damages are limited on airframe of the planes, or some abrasions in jet engine, windblast etc.. We focused on fourth class of severity index involving the damages on jet engine of aircraft (engine fail) due to ingestion of volcanic ash and investigate eruption style and caused damage relationships. During the eruptive sequences of Mts Saint Helen (USA), Galunggung (Indonesia, 2 incidents), Redoubt (USA), Pinatubo (Philipinnes), Unzen (Japan), Manam (Papua New Guinea), Soufriere Hills (Lesser Antilles), Chaiten

  1. Volcanic ash and meteorological clouds detection by neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchiani, Matteo; Del Frate, Fabio; Stefano, Corradini; Piscini, Alessandro; Merucci, Luca; Chini, Marco

    2014-05-01

    interpreted considering the information of the visible and infrared channels. The comparison shows that the proposed methodology achieves very promising performances, indeed an overall accuracy greater than 87% can be iteratively obtained classifying new images without human interactions. References: Corradini, S., Spinetti, C., Carboni, E., Tirelli, C., Buongiorno, M. F., Pugnaghi, S., and Gangale, G..; "Mt. Etna tropospheric ash retrieval and sensitivity analysis using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer measurements". J, Atmosph. Rem. Sens., 2, 023550, DOI:10.1117/12.823215, 2008. Prata A. J., "Infrared radiative transfer calculations for volcanic ash clouds", Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 16, No. 11, pp. 1293-1296, 1989. Picchiani, M., Chini, M., Corradini, S., Merucci, L., Sellitto, P., Del Frate, F. and Stramondo, S., "Volcanic ash detection and retrievals from MODIS data by means of Neural Networks", Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 2619-2631, doi:10.5194/amt-4-2619-2011, 2011.

  2. The NASA Applied Sciences Program: Volcanic Ash Observations and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John J.; Fairlie, Duncan; Green, David; Haynes, John; Krotkov, Nickolai; Meyer, Franz; Pavolonis, Mike; Trepte, Charles; Vernier, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Since 2000, the NASA Applied Sciences Program has been actively transitioning observations and research to operations. Particular success has been achieved in developing applications for NASA Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) sensors, integrated observing systems, and operational models for volcanic ash detection, characterization, and transport. These include imager applications for sensors such as the MODerate resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) on NASA Terra and Aqua satellites, and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite; sounder applications for sensors such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on Suomi NPP; UV applications for the Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI) on the NASA Aura Satellite and the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) on Suomi NPP including Direct readout capabilities from OMI and OMPS in Alaska (GINA) and Finland (FMI):; and lidar applications from the Caliop instrument coupled with the imaging IR sensor on the NASA/CNES CALIPSO satellite. Many of these applications are in the process of being transferred to the Washington and Alaska Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) where they support operational monitoring and advisory services. Some have also been accepted, transitioned and adapted for direct, onboard, automated product production in future U.S. operational satellite systems including GOES-R, and in automated volcanic cloud detection, characterization and alerting tools at the VAACs. While other observations and applications remain to be developed for the current constellation of NASA EOS sensors and integrated with observing and forecast systems, future requirements and capabilities for volcanic ash observations and applications are also being developed. Many of these are based on technologies currently being tested on NASA aircraft, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) and balloons. All of these efforts and the potential advances

  3. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, Arnold; Lu, Sha; Segers, Arjo; Weber, Konradin; Lin, Hai-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system combined with a volcanic ash transport model to investigate the potential improvement on the forecast accuracy with regard to the distal volcanic ash plume. We show that the error of the analyzed volcanic ash state can be significantly reduced through assimilating real-life in situ measurements. After a continuous assimilation, it is shown that the aviation advice for Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg can be significantly improved. We suggest that with suitable aircrafts measuring once per day across the distal volcanic ash plume, the description and prediction of volcanic ash clouds in these areas can be greatly improved.

  4. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system combined with a volcanic ash transport model to investigate the potential improvement on the forecast accuracy with regard to the distal volcanic ash plume. We show that the error of the analyzed volcanic ash state can be significantly reduced through assimilating real-life in situ measurements. After a continuous assimilation, it is shown that the aviation advice for Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg can be significantly improved. We suggest that with suitable aircrafts measuring once per day across the distal volcanic ash plume, the description and prediction of volcanic ash clouds in these areas can be greatly improved.

  5. Ice nucleation properties of volcanic ash from Eyjafjallajökull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hoyle

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation ability of volcanic ash particles collected close to the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull during its eruptions in April and May 2010 is investigated experimentally, in the immersion and deposition modes, and applied to atmospheric conditions by comparison with airborne measurements and microphysical model calculations. The number of ash particles which are active as ice nuclei (IN is strongly temperature dependent, with a very small minority being active in the immersion mode at temperatures of 250–263 K. Average ash particles show only a moderate effect on ice nucleation, by inducing freezing at temperatures between 236 K and 240 K (i.e. approximately 3–4 K higher than temperatures required for homogeneous ice nucleation, measured with the same instrument. By scaling the results to aircraft and lidar measurements of the conditions in the ash plume days down wind of the eruption, and by applying a simple microphysical model, it was found that the IN active in the immersion mode in the range 250–263 K generally occurred in atmospheric number densities at the lower end of those required to have an impact on ice cloud formation. However, 3–4 K above the homogeneous freezing point, immersion mode IN number densities a few days down wind of the eruption were sufficiently high to have a moderate influence on ice cloud formation. The efficiency of IN in the deposition mode was found to be poor except at very cold conditions (<238 K, when they reach an efficiency similar to that of mineral dust with the onset of freezing at 10 % supersaturation with respect to ice, and with the frozen fraction nearing its maximum value at a supersaturation 20 %. In summary, these investigations suggest volcanic ash particles to have only moderate effects on atmospheric ice formation.

  6. Evaluation of quantitative satellite-based retrievals of volcanic ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. J.; Pavolonis, M. J.; Bojinski, S.; Siddans, R.; Thomas, G.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash clouds are a serious hazard to aviation, and mitigation requires a robust system of volcano monitoring, eruption detection, characterization of cloud properties, forecast of cloud movement, and communication of warnings. Several research groups have developed quantitative satellite-based volcanic ash products and some of these are in operational use by Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers around the world to aid in characterizing cloud properties and forecasting regions of ash hazard. The algorithms applied to the satellite data utilize a variety of techniques, and thus produce results that differ. The World Meteorological Organization has recently sponsored an intercomparison study of satellite-based retrievals with four goals: 1) to establish a validation protocol for satellite-based volcanic ash products, 2) to quantify and understand differences in products, 3) to develop best practices, and 4) to standardize volcanic cloud geophysical parameters. Six volcanic eruption cases were considered in the intercomparison: Eyjafallajökull, Grimsvötn, Kelut, Kirishimayama, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, and Sarychev Peak. Twenty-four algorithms were utilized, which retrieved parameters including: ash cloud top height, ash column mass loading, ash effective radius, and ash optical depth at visible and thermal-infrared wavelengths. Results were compared to space-based, airborne, and ground-based lidars; complementary satellite retrievals; and manual "expert evaluation" of ash extent. The intercomparison results will feed into the International Civil Aviation Organization "Roadmap for International Airways Volcano Watch", which integrates volcanic meteorological information into decision support systems for aircraft operations.

  7. Spreading dynamic of viscous volcanic ash in stimulated jet engine conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    song, wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado

    2016-04-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash is widely recognised as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The volcanic ash deposition process in a jet turbine is potentially complex. Volcanic ash in the air stream enters the inner liners of the combustors and partially or completely melts under the flames up to 2000 °C, at which point part of the ash deposits in the combustor fuel nozzle. Molten volcanic particles within high energy airflow escape the combustor to enter the turbine and impact the stationary (e.g., inlet nozzle guide vanes) and rotating airfoils (e.g., first stage high-pressure turbine blades) at high speed (up to Mach 1.25) in different directions, with the result that ash may stick, flow and remain liquid or solidify. Thus, the wetting behaviour of molten volcanic ash particle is fundamental to investigate impingement phenomena of ash droplet on the surface of real jet engine operation. The topic of wetting has received tremendous interest from both fundamental and applied points of view. However, due to the interdisciplinary gap between jet engine engineering and geology science, explicit investigation of wetting behaviour of volcanic ash at high temperature is in its infancy. We have taken a big step towards meeting this challenge. Here, we experimentally and theoretically investigate the wetting behaviour of viscous volcanic ash over a wide temperature range from 1100 to 1550 °C using an improved sessile-drop method. The results of our experiment demonstrate that temperature and viscosity play a critical role in determining the wetting possibility and governing the spreading kinetics of volcanic ash at high temperatures. Our systemic analysis of spreading of molten volcanic ash systems allows us to report on the fundamental differences between the mechanisms controlling spreading of organic liquids at room temperature and molten volcanic ash droplets.

  8. Geoethics implications in volcanic hazards in Argentina: 24 years of uninterrupted ash-fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovere, Elizabeth I.; Violante, Roberto A.; Uber, Silvia M.; Vázquez Herrera, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    The impact of falling ash reaches all human activities, has effects on human and animal health and is subject to climate and ecosystem of the affected regions. From 1991 until 2015 (24 years), more than 5 eruptions with VEI ≥ 4 in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes occurred; pyroclastic, dust and volcanic ash were deposited (mostly) in Argentina. A recurring situation during eruptions of Hudson (1991), Chaiten (2008), Puyehue-Cordon Caulle (2011) and Calbuco (2015) volcanoes was the accumulation, storage and dump of volcanic ash in depressed areas, beaches, lakes, ditches, storm drains, areas of landfills and transfer stations. The issues that this practice has taken are varied: pollution of aquifers, changes in geomorphology and water courses, usually in "inconspicuous" zones, often in places where there are precarious population or high poverty settlements. The consequences are not immediate but the effects in the mid and long term bring serious drawbacks. On the contrary, a good example of intelligent management of the volcanic impact occurred many years before, during the eruption of Descabezado Grande (Quizapu) volcano in 1932. In that case, and as an example, the city of Trenque Lauquen, located nearly 770 km east of the volcano, decided a communitarian task of collection and burial of the ashfall in small areas, this was a very successful performance. The Quizapu ash plumes transported by the Westerlies (winds) covered with a blanket of volcanic ash the city, ashfall also reached the capital cities of Argentina (Buenos Aires) and Uruguay (Montevideo). Also, the bagging process of volcanic ash with reinforced plastics was an example of Good Practice in the management of the emergency. This allowed the entire affected community to take advantage of this "mineral resource" and contributes to achieving collective and participatory work leading to commercialization and sustainability of these products availed as fertilizers, granular base for ceramics and

  9. Aerosol properties and meteorological conditions in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina, during the resuspension of volcanic ash from the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciela Ulke, Ana; Torres Brizuela, Marcela M.; Raga, Graciela B.; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2016-09-01

    The eruption in June 2011 of the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex in Chile impacted air traffic around the Southern Hemisphere for several months after the initial ash emissions. The ash deposited in vast areas of the Patagonian Steppe was subjected to the strong wind conditions prevalent during the austral winter and spring experiencing resuspension over various regions of Argentina. In this study we analyze the meteorological conditions that led to the episode of volcanic ash resuspension which impacted the city of Buenos Aires and resulted in the closure of the two main airports in Buenos Aires area (Ezeiza and Aeroparque) on 16 October 2011. A relevant result is that resuspended material (volcanic ash plus dust) imprints a distinguishable feature within the atmospheric thermodynamic vertical profiles. The thermodynamic soundings show the signature of "pulses of drying" in layers associated with the presence of hygroscopic ash in the atmosphere that has already been reported in similar episodes after volcanic eruptions in other parts of the world. This particular footprint can be used to detect the probable existence of volcanic ash layers. This study also illustrates the utility of ceilometers to detect not only cloud base at airports but also volcanic ash plumes at the boundary layer and up to 7 km altitude. Aerosol properties measured in the city during the resuspension episode indicate the presence of enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the boundary layer along with spectral signatures in the measurements at the Buenos Aires AERONET site typical of ash plus dust advected towards the city. The mandatory aviation reports from the National Weather Service about airborne and deposited volcanic ash at the airport near the measurement site (Aeroparque) correlate in time with the enhanced concentrations. The presence of the resuspended material was detected by the CALIOP lidar overpassing the region. Since the dynamics of ash resuspension and

  10. Estimation of volcanic ash emissions using trajectory-based 4D-Var data assimilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, S.; Lin, X.; Heemink, A.W.; Fu, G.; Segers, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic ash forecasting is a crucial tool in hazard assessment and operational volcano monitoring. Emission parameters such as plume height, total emission mass, and vertical distribution of the emission plume rate are essential and important in the implementation of volcanic ash models. Therefore,

  11. Selective extraction methods for aluminium, iron and organic carbon from montane volcanic ash soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, B.; Tonneijck, F.H.; Verstraten, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Montane volcanic ash soils contain disproportionate amounts of soil organic carbon and thereby play an often underestimated role in the global carbon cycle. Given the central role of Al and Fe in stabilizing organic matter in volcanic ash soils, we assessed various extraction methods of Al, Fe, and

  12. Juvenile tree growth on some volcanic ash soils disturbed by prior forest harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Michael Geist; John W. Hazard; Kenneth W. Seidel

    2008-01-01

    The effects of mechanical disturbance from traditional ground-based logging and site preparation on volcanic ash soil and associated tree growth were investigated by using two study approaches in a retrospective study. This research was conducted on volcanic ash soils within previously harvested units in the Blue Mountains of northeast Oregon and southwest Washington....

  13. Data assimilation for volcanic ash plumes using a satellite observational operator : A case study on the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, Guangliang; Prata, Fred; Lin, H.X.; Heemink, A.W.; Segers, AJ; Lu, S.

    2017-01-01

    Using data assimilation (DA) to improve model forecast accuracy is a powerful approach that requires available observations. Infrared satellite measurements of volcanic ash mass loadings are often used as input observations for the assimilation scheme. However, because these primary

  14. Laboratory simulations of volcanic ash charging and conditions for volcanic lightning on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, Martin; Warriner-Bacon, Elliot; Aplin, Karen

    2017-04-01

    Lightning may be important in the emergence of life on Earth and elsewhere, as significant chemical reactions occur in the superheated region around the lightning channel. This, combined with the availability of phosphates in volcanic clouds, suggests that volcanic lightning could have been the catalyst for the formation of biological compounds on the early Earth [1]. In addition to meteorological lightning, volcanic activity also generates electrical discharges within charged ash plumes, which can be a significant contributor to atmospheric electricity on geologically active planets. The physical properties of other planetary atmospheres, such as that of Venus, have an effect on the processes that lead to the generation of volcanic lightning. Volcanism is known to have occurred on Venus in the past, and recent observations made by ESA's Venus Express satellite have provided evidence for currently active volcanism [2-4], and lightning discharges [e.g. 5]. Venusian lightning could potentially be volcanic in origin, since no meteorological mechanisms are known to separate charge effectively in its clouds [6]. The hunt for further evidence for lightning at Venus is ongoing, for example by means of the Lightning and Airglow Camera (LAC) [7] on Akatsuki, the current JAXA mission at Venus. Our laboratory experiments simulate ash generation and measure electrical charging of the ash under typical atmospheric conditions on Earth and Venus. The study uses a 1 litre chamber, which, when pressurised and heated, can simulate the high-pressure, high-temperature, carbon dioxide-dominated atmosphere of Venus at 10 km altitude ( 5 MPa, 650 K). A key finding of previous work [8] is that ash plume-forming eruptions are more likely to occur at higher altitudes such as these on Venus. The chamber contains temperature/pressure monitoring and logging equipment, a rock collision apparatus (based on [9]) to generate the charged rock fragments, and charge measurement electrodes connected

  15. Monitoring presence and streaming patterns of Icelandic volcanic ash during its arrival to Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gao

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano starting on 14 April 2010 resulted in the spreading of volcanic ash over most parts of Europe. In Slovenia, the presence of volcanic ash was monitored using ground-based in-situ measurements, lidar-based remote sensing and airborne in-situ measurements. Volcanic origin of the detected aerosols was confirmed by subsequent spectral and chemical analysis of the collected samples. The initial arrival of volcanic ash to Slovenia was first detected through the analysis of precipitation, which occurred on 17 April 2010 at 01:00 UTC and confirmed by satellite-based remote sensing. At this time, the presence of low clouds and occasional precipitation prevented ash monitoring using lidar-based remote sensing. The second arrival of volcanic ash on 20 April 2010 was detected by both lidar-based remote sensing and airborne in-situ measurements, revealing two or more elevated atmospheric aerosol layers. The ash was not seen in satellite images due to lower concentrations. The identification of aerosol samples from ground-based and airborne in-situ measurements based on energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that a fraction of particles were volcanic ash from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption. To explain the history of the air masses bringing volcanic ash to Slovenia, we analyzed airflow trajectories using ECMWF and HYSPLIT models.

  16. Lipid peroxidation and cytotoxicity induced by respirable volcanic ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera, E-mail: jcervini@correo.cua.uam.mx [Departamento de Procesos y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Cuajimalpa, México City (Mexico); Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Nieto-Camacho, Antonio [Laboratorio de Pruebas Biológicas, Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, México City (Mexico); Gomez-Vidales, Virginia [Laboratorio de Resonancia Paramagnética Electrónica, Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, México City (Mexico); Ramirez-Apan, María Teresa [Laboratorio de Pruebas Biológicas, Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, México City (Mexico); Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención [Dirección de Investigación y Posgrado, Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo (Mexico); Kaufhold, Stephan [BGR Bundesansaltfür Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); and others

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Respirable volcanic ash induces oxidative degradation of lipids in cell membranes. • Respirable volcanic ash triggers cytotoxicity in murin monocyle/macrophage cells. • Oxidative stress is surface controlled but not restricted by surface- Fe{sup 3+}. • Surface Fe{sup 3+} acts as a stronger inductor in allophanes vs phyllosilicates or oxides. • Registered cell-viability values were as low as 68.5 ± 6.7%. - Abstract: This paper reports that the main component of respirable volcanic ash, allophane, induces lipid peroxidation (LP), the oxidative degradation of lipids in cell membranes, and cytotoxicity in murin monocyle/macrophage cells. Naturally-occurring allophane collected from New Zealand, Japan, and Ecuador was studied. The quantification of LP was conducted using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) assay. The cytotoxic effect was determined by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay. Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) determinations of naturally-occurring allophane confirmed the incorporation in the structure and clustering of structural Fe{sup 3+}, and nucleation and growth of small-sized Fe (oxyhydr)oxide or gibbsite. LP induced by allophane varied with time, and solid concentration and composition, reaching 6.7 ± 0.2 nmol TBARS mg prot{sup −1}. LP was surface controlled but not restricted by structural or surface-bound Fe{sup 3+}, because redox processes induced by soluble components other than perferryl iron. The reactivity of Fe{sup 3+} soluble species stemming from surface-bound Fe{sup 3+} or small-sized Fe{sup 3+} refractory minerals in allophane surpassed that of structural Fe{sup 3+} located in tetrahedral or octahedral sites of phyllosilicates or bulk iron oxides. Desferrioxamine B mesylate salt (DFOB) or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) inhibited LP. EDTA acted as a more effective inhibitor, explained by multiple electron transfer pathways. Registered cell

  17. Volcanic ash supports a diverse bacterial community in a marine mesocosm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verena Witt,; Paul M Ayris,; Damby, David; Corrado Cimarelli,; Ulrich Kueppers,; Donald B Dingwell,; Gert Wörheide,

    2017-01-01

    Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems, particularly those already impaired by anthropogenic pressures, may be highly sensitive to disturbances from natural catastrophic events, such as volcanic eruptions. Explosive volcanic eruptions expel large quantities of silicate ash particles into the atmosphere, which can disperse across millions of square kilometres and deposit into coral reef ecosystems. Following heavy ash deposition, mass mortality of reef biota is expected, but little is known about the recovery of post-burial reef ecosystems. Reef regeneration depends partly upon the capacity of the ash deposit to be colonised by waterborne bacterial communities and may be influenced to an unknown extent by the physiochemical properties of the ash substrate itself. To determine the potential for volcanic ash to support pioneer bacterial colonisation, we exposed five well-characterised volcanic and coral reef substrates to a marine aquarium under low light conditions for 3 months: volcanic ash, synthetic volcanic glass, carbonate reef sand, calcite sand and quartz sand. Multivariate statistical analysis of Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) fingerprinting data demonstrates clear segregation of volcanic substrates from the quartz and coral reef substrates over 3 months of bacterial colonisation. Overall bacterial diversity showed shared and substrate-specific bacterial communities; however, the volcanic ash substrate supported the most diverse bacterial community. These data suggest a significant influence of substrate properties (composition, granulometry and colour) on bacterial settlement. Our findings provide first insights into physicochemical controls on pioneer bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash and highlight the potential for volcanic ash deposits to support bacterial diversity in the aftermath of reef burial, on timescales that could permit cascading effects on larval settlement.

  18. Volcanic ash supports a diverse bacterial community in a marine mesocosm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, V; Ayris, P M; Damby, D E; Cimarelli, C; Kueppers, U; Dingwell, D B; Wörheide, G

    2017-05-01

    Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems, particularly those already impaired by anthropogenic pressures, may be highly sensitive to disturbances from natural catastrophic events, such as volcanic eruptions. Explosive volcanic eruptions expel large quantities of silicate ash particles into the atmosphere, which can disperse across millions of square kilometres and deposit into coral reef ecosystems. Following heavy ash deposition, mass mortality of reef biota is expected, but little is known about the recovery of post-burial reef ecosystems. Reef regeneration depends partly upon the capacity of the ash deposit to be colonised by waterborne bacterial communities and may be influenced to an unknown extent by the physiochemical properties of the ash substrate itself. To determine the potential for volcanic ash to support pioneer bacterial colonisation, we exposed five well-characterised volcanic and coral reef substrates to a marine aquarium under low light conditions for 3 months: volcanic ash, synthetic volcanic glass, carbonate reef sand, calcite sand and quartz sand. Multivariate statistical analysis of Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) fingerprinting data demonstrates clear segregation of volcanic substrates from the quartz and coral reef substrates over 3 months of bacterial colonisation. Overall bacterial diversity showed shared and substrate-specific bacterial communities; however, the volcanic ash substrate supported the most diverse bacterial community. These data suggest a significant influence of substrate properties (composition, granulometry and colour) on bacterial settlement. Our findings provide first insights into physicochemical controls on pioneer bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash and highlight the potential for volcanic ash deposits to support bacterial diversity in the aftermath of reef burial, on timescales that could permit cascading effects on larval settlement. © 2017 The Authors. Geobiology Published by John Wiley

  19. Ash aggregation enhanced by deposition and redistribution of salt on the surface of volcanic ash in eruption plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sebastian B; Ayris, Paul M; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Kueppers, Ulrich; Casas, Ana S; Delmelle, Pierre; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Jacob, Michael; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-03-31

    Interactions with volcanic gases in eruption plumes produce soluble salt deposits on the surface of volcanic ash. While it has been postulated that saturation-driven precipitation of salts following the dissolution of ash surfaces by condensed acidic liquids is a primary mechanism of salt formation during an eruption, it is only recently that this mechanism has been subjected to detailed study. Here we spray water and HCl droplets into a suspension of salt-doped synthetic glass or volcanic ash particles, and produce aggregates. Deposition of acidic liquid droplets on ash particles promotes dissolution of existing salts and leaches cations from the underlying material surface. The flow of liquid, due to capillary forces, will be directed to particle-particle contact points where subsequent precipitation of salts will cement the aggregate. Our data suggest that volcanically-relevant loads of surface salts can be produced by acid condensation in eruptive settings. Several minor and trace elements mobilised by surface dissolution are biologically relevant; geographic areas with aggregation-mediated ash fallout could be "hotspots" for the post-deposition release of these elements. The role of liquids in re-distributing surface salts and cementing ash aggregates also offers further insight into the mechanisms which preserve well-structured aggregates in some ash deposits.

  20. Episodic eruptions of volcanic ash trigger a reversible cascade of nuisance species outbreaks in pristine coral habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Schils

    Full Text Available Volcanically active islands abound in the tropical Pacific and harbor complex coral communities. Whereas lava streams and deep ash deposits are well-known to devastate coral communities through burial and smothering, little is known about the effect of moderate amounts of small particulate ash deposits on reef communities. Volcanic ash contains a diversity of chemical compounds that can induce nutrient enrichments triggering changes in benthic composition. Two independently collected data sets on the marine benthos of the pristine and remote reefs around Pagan Island, Northern Mariana Islands, reveal a sudden critical transition to cyanobacteria-dominated communities in 2009-2010, which coincides with a period of continuous volcanic ash eruptions. Concurrently, localized outbreaks of the coral-killing cyanobacteriosponge Terpios hoshinota displayed a remarkable symbiosis with filamentous cyanobacteria, which supported the rapid overgrowth of massive coral colonies and allowed the sponge to colonize substrate types from which it has not been documented before. The chemical composition of tephra from Pagan indicates that the outbreak of nuisance species on its reefs might represent an early succession stage of iron enrichment (a.k.a. "black reefs" similar to that caused by anthropogenic debris like ship wrecks or natural events like particulate deposition from wildfire smoke plumes or desert dust storms. Once Pagan's volcanic activity ceased in 2011, the cyanobacterial bloom disappeared. Another group of well-known nuisance algae in the tropical Pacific, the pelagophytes, did not reach bloom densities during this period of ash eruptions but new species records for the Northern Mariana Islands were documented. These field observations indicate that the study of population dynamics of pristine coral communities can advance our understanding of the resilience of tropical reef systems to natural and anthropogenic disturbances.

  1. Environmental and anthropogenic factors affecting the respiratory toxicity of volcanic ash in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašek, Ines; Horwell, Claire J.; Damby, David E.; Ayris, Paul M.; Barošová, Hana; Geers, Christoph; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J. D.

    2016-04-01

    Human exposure to inhalable volcanic ash particles following an eruption is a health concern, as respirable-sized particles can potentially contribute towards adverse respiratory health effects, such as the onset or exacerbation of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Although there is substantial information on the mineralogical properties of volcanic ash that may influence its biological reactivity, knowledge as to how external factors, such as air pollution, contribute to and augment the potential reactivity is limited. To determine the respiratory effects of volcanic particle interactions with anthropogenic pollution and volcanic gases we will experimentally assess: (i) physicochemical characteristics of volcanic ash relevant to respiratory toxicity; (ii) the effects of simultaneously inhaling anthropogenic pollution (i.e. diesel exhaust particles (DEP)) and volcanic ash (of different origins); (iii) alteration of volcanic ash toxicity following interaction with volcanic gases. In order to gain a first understanding of the biological impact of the respirable fraction of volcanic ash when inhaled with DEP in vitro, we used a sophisticated 3D triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar epithelial tissue barrier. The multi-cellular system was exposed to DEP [0.02 mg/mL] and then exposed to either a single or repeated dose of well-characterised respirable volcanic ash (0.26 ± 0.09 or 0.89 ± 0.29 μg/cm2, respectively) from the Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat for a period of 24 hours using a pseudo-air liquid interface approach. Cultures were subsequently assessed for adverse biological endpoints including cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and (pro)-inflammatory responses. Results indicated that the combination of DEP and respirable volcanic ash at sub-lethal concentrations incited a significant release of pro-inflammatory markers that was greater than the response for either DEP or volcanic ash, independently. Further work is planned, to determine if

  2. Surface reactivity of volcanic ash from the eruption of Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat, West Indies with implications for health hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwell, Claire J; Fenoglio, Ivana; Vala Ragnarsdottir, K; Sparks, R Steve J; Fubini, Bice

    2003-10-01

    The fine-grained character of volcanic ash generated in the long-lived eruption of the Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat, West Indies, raises the issue of its possible health hazards. Surface- and free-radical production has been closely linked to bioreactivity of dusts within the lung. In this study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques have been used, for the first time, on volcanic ash to measure the production of radicals from the surface of particles. Results show that concentrations of hydroxyl radicals (HO*) in respirable ash are two to three times higher than a toxic quartz standard. The dome-collapse ash contains cristobalite, a crystalline silica polymorph that may cause adverse health effects. EPR experiments indicate, however, that cristobalite in the ash does not contribute to HO* generation. Our results show that the main cause of reactivity is removable divalent iron (Fe2+), which is present in abundance on the surfaces of the particles and is very reactive in the lung. Our analyses show that fresh ash generates more HO* than weathered ash (which has undergone progressive oxidation and leaching of iron from exposed surfaces), an effect replicated experimentally by incubating fresh ash in dilute acid. HO* production experiments also indicate that iron-rich silicate minerals are responsible for surface reactivity in the Soufrière Hills ash.

  3. Assimilation of satellite-retrieved data to improve forecasts of volcanic ash concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangliang; Lin, Haixiang; Heemink, Arnold; Segers, Arjo; Lu, Sha

    2016-04-01

    Since the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption caused a big problem to aviation and economy, improvement on volcanic ash forecast has been put onto the research agenda. Satellite-based measurements are considered as the most common and cheapest type of volcanic ash observations. However, due to its intrinsic functionality, satellite-retrived two-dimensional data can not be easily and directly combined with a three-dimensional volcanic ash model to improve volcanic ash forecasts continuously. Here we propose a satellite observational operator to transfer 2D volcanic ash mass loadings to 3D concentrations. The uncertainties of reconstructed 3D ash concentrations are also quantified. Sequential data assimilation is used to continuously assimilate the reconstructed volcanic ash concentrations. The results are evaluated in a multi-observational network including satellite-based measurements and aircraft in-situ measurements. Here we show for long-time assimilating satellite-based measurements, Ensemble Squre Root Filter (EnSR), as a common sequential data assimilation technique, is more efficient than Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) because the ensemble size required for EnSR is considerable less than the ensemble size of EnKF for a comparable assimilation performance. Moreover, the forecast after assimilation is validated to be accurate and valid within 15 hours.

  4. Volcanic Ash Impacts on Air Traffic from the 2009 Mt. Redoubt Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J. J.; Matus, A. V.; Hudnall, L. A.; Krueger, A. J.; Haynes, J. A.; Pippin, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    The dispersion of volcanic ash during the March 2009 eruption of Mt. Redoubt created the potential for major problems for aviation. Mt. Redoubt is located 110 km west-southwest of Alaska Airlines hub in Anchorage. It last erupted in 1990 and caused an estimated $101 million cost to the aviation industry (Waythomas, 1998). This study was conducted to assist in improving warning systems, policy and procedures for addressing the impact of volcanic ash on aviation. The study had two primary components. First, the altitude and extent of SO2 dispersion was determined through analysis of synoptic meteorological conditions and satellite imagery. Second, impacts on aviation from the volcanic ash dispersion were investigated. OMI SO2 column measurements were employed to assess the altitude and extent of SO2 dispersion of volcanic ash. To accomplish this, OMI data were assimilated with CALIPSO backscatter profiles, geopotential height plots, and HYSPLIT forward model trajectories. Volcanic Ash Advisories were compared to airport and pilot reports to assess aviation impacts. The eruption produced a complex dispersion of volcanic ash. Volcanic ash altitudes estimated for 23 March 2009 indicate that the majority of the plume remained at approximately 8 km, although reports indicate that the initial plume may have reached as high as18 km (60,000 ft). A low pressure system which passed over the eruption area appears to have entrained most of the ash at approximately 8 km, however the CALIPSO satellite indicates that dispersion also extended to 10 km and 16 km. Atmospheric patterns suggest dispersion at approximately 3 km near Hudson Bay. Analysis of 25 March 2009 indicates that much of the ash plume was dispersed at higher altitudes, where CALIPSO data locates the stratospheric ash plume at approximately 14 km above mean sea level. By the time the eruptions had subsided in April, Alaska Airlines had cancelled 295 flights and disrupted the flights of over 20,000 passengers. This

  5. Artificial cloud test confirms volcanic ash detection using infrared spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, A. J.; Dezitter, F.; Davies, I.; Weber, K.; Birnfeld, M.; Moriano, D.; Bernardo, C.; Vogel, A.; Prata, G. S.; Mather, T. A.; Thomas, H. E.; Cammas, J.; Weber, M.

    2016-05-01

    Airborne volcanic ash particles are a known hazard to aviation. Currently, there are no means available to detect ash in flight as the particles are too fine (radii ash clouds are difficult or impossible to detect by eye. The economic cost and societal impact of the April/May 2010 Icelandic eruption of Eyjafjallajökull generated renewed interest in finding ways to identify airborne volcanic ash in order to keep airspace open and avoid aircraft groundings. We have designed and built a bi-spectral, fast-sampling, uncooled infrared camera device (AVOID) to examine its ability to detect volcanic ash from commercial jet aircraft at distances of more than 50 km ahead. Here we report results of an experiment conducted over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of France, confirming the ability of the device to detect and quantify volcanic ash in an artificial ash cloud created by dispersal of volcanic ash from a second aircraft. A third aircraft was used to measure the ash in situ using optical particle counters. The cloud was composed of very fine ash (mean radii ~10 μm) collected from Iceland immediately after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption and had a vertical thickness of ~200 m, a width of ~2 km and length of between 2 and 12 km. Concentrations of ~200 μg m-3 were identified by AVOID at distances from ~20 km to ~70 km. For the first time, airborne remote detection of volcanic ash has been successfully demonstrated from a long-range flight test aircraft.

  6. Artificial cloud test confirms volcanic ash detection using infrared spectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, A J; Dezitter, F; Davies, I; Weber, K; Birnfeld, M; Moriano, D; Bernardo, C; Vogel, A; Prata, G S; Mather, T A; Thomas, H E; Cammas, J; Weber, M

    2016-05-09

    Airborne volcanic ash particles are a known hazard to aviation. Currently, there are no means available to detect ash in flight as the particles are too fine (radii ash clouds are difficult or impossible to detect by eye. The economic cost and societal impact of the April/May 2010 Icelandic eruption of Eyjafjallajökull generated renewed interest in finding ways to identify airborne volcanic ash in order to keep airspace open and avoid aircraft groundings. We have designed and built a bi-spectral, fast-sampling, uncooled infrared camera device (AVOID) to examine its ability to detect volcanic ash from commercial jet aircraft at distances of more than 50 km ahead. Here we report results of an experiment conducted over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of France, confirming the ability of the device to detect and quantify volcanic ash in an artificial ash cloud created by dispersal of volcanic ash from a second aircraft. A third aircraft was used to measure the ash in situ using optical particle counters. The cloud was composed of very fine ash (mean radii ~10 μm) collected from Iceland immediately after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption and had a vertical thickness of ~200 m, a width of ~2 km and length of between 2 and 12 km. Concentrations of ~200 μg m(-3) were identified by AVOID at distances from ~20 km to ~70 km. For the first time, airborne remote detection of volcanic ash has been successfully demonstrated from a long-range flight test aircraft.

  7. Characterization of fine volcanic ash from explosive eruption from Sakurajima volcano, South Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayama, F.; Furukawa, R.; Ishizuka, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Geshi, N.; Oishi, M.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can affect infrastructure and ecosystem by their dispersion of the volcanic particle. Characterization of volcanic particle expelled by explosive eruption is crucial for evaluating for quantitative hazard assessment by future volcanic eruption. Especially for fine volcanic ash less than 64 micron in diameter, it can disperse vast area from the source volcano and be easily remobilized by surface wind and precipitation after the deposition. As fine volcanic ash is not preserved well at the earth surface and in strata except for enormously large scale volcanic eruption. In order to quantify quantitative characteristics of fine volcanic ash particle, we sampled volcanic ash directly falling from the eruption cloud from Showa crater, the most active vent of Sakurajima volcano, just before landing on ground. We newly adopted high precision digital microscope and particle grain size analyzer to develop hazard evaluation method of fine volcanic ash particle. Field survey was performed 5 sequential days in January, 2013 to take tamper-proof volcanic ash samples directly obtained from the eruption cloud of the Sakurajima volcano using disposable paper dishes and plastic pails. Samples were taken twice a day with time-stamp in 40 localities from 2.5 km to 43 km distant from the volcano. Japan Meteorological Agency reported 16 explosive eruptions of vulcanian style occurred during our survey and we took 140 samples of volcanic ash. Grain size distribution of volcanic ash was measured by particle grain size analyzer (Mophologi G3S) detecting each grain with parameters of particle diameter (0.3 micron - 1 mm), perimeter, length, area, circularity, convexity, solidity, and intensity. Component of volcanic ash was analyzed by CCD optical microscope (VHX-2000) which can take high resolution optical image with magnifying power of 100-2500. We discriminated each volcanic ash particle by color, texture of surface, and internal structure. Grain size

  8. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, A.W; Lu, S; Segers, AJ; Weber, Konradin; Lin, H.X

    2016-01-01

    ... volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system...

  9. Some aspects of volcanic ash layers in the Central Indian Basin.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sukumaran, N.P.; Banerjee, R.; Borole, D.V.; Gupta, S.M.

    morphological structures and activation of seamounts during the geological past. The tentative correlation between depositional ages of the ash layer horizons and the period of global climatic cooling events reinforces the hypothesis that the suboceanic volcanic...

  10. Effect of Particle Non-Sphericity on Satellite Monitoring of Drifting Volcanic Ash Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, Nicholay A.; Flittner, D. E.; Krueger, A. J.; Kostinski, A.; Riley, C.; Rose, W.

    1998-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions loft gases and ash particles into the atmosphere and produce effects that are both short term (aircraft hazards, interference with satellite measurements) and long term (atmospheric chemistry, climate). Large (greater than 0.5mm) ash particles fall out in minutes [Rose et al, 1995], but fine ash particles can remain in the atmosphere for many days. This fine volcanic ash is a hazard to modem jet aircraft because the operating temperatures of jet engines are above the solidus temperature of volcanic ash, and because ash causes abrasion of windows and airframe, and disruption of avionics. At large distances(10(exp 2)-10(exp 4) km or more) from their source, drifting ash clouds are increasingly difficult to distinguish from meteorological clouds, both visually and on radar [Rose et al., 1995]. Satellites above the atmosphere are unique platforms for viewing volcanic clouds on a global basis and measuring their constituents and total mass. Until recently, only polar AVHRR and geostationary GOES instruments could be used to determine characteristics of drifting volcanic ash clouds using the 10-12 micron window [Prata 1989; Wen and Rose 1994; Rose and Schneider 1996]. The NASA Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments aboard the Nimbus-7, Meteor3, ADEOS, and Earth Probe satellites have produced a unique data set of global SO2 volcanic emissions since 1978 (Krueger et al., 1995). Besides SO2, a new technique has been developed which uses the measured spectral contrast of the backscattered radiances in the 330-380nm spectral region (where gaseous absorption is negligible) in conjunction with radiative transfer models to retrieve properties of volcanic ash (Krotkov et al., 1997) and other types of absorbing aerosols (Torres et al., 1998).

  11. FINE-GRAINED THE FIBER CONCRETE WITH APPLICATION VOLCANIC ASH, REINFORCED BY THE BASALT FIBRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Dzugulov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The compositions of fine-grained concrete with the application of volcanic ash are developed. Are investigated compositions and properties of fine-grained fiber concrete with the volcanic ash with the application of methods of the mathematical planning of experiment. It is revealed, that the reinforcement of finegrained concrete by basaltic fibers substantially increases their strength with the bend. 

  12. Meteorological conditions leading to volcanic ash cloud bifurcation and a reduction in forecast skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacre, Helen; Harvey, Natalie

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic ash poses an ongoing risk to the safety of airspace worldwide. The accuracy with which we can forecast volcanic ash dispersion however depends on the atmospheric conditions. In certain meteorological situations the position of ash clouds with residence time less than 24 hours only are correctly simulated whereas in other situations the position of ash particles with residence times longer than 72 hours can be accurately simulated. In this study we use meteorological ensemble forecasts as input to a volcanic ash transport and dispersion model to explore the synoptic-scale conditions which control this predictability. Results indicate that when ash particles encounter regions of large horizontal flow separation in the atmosphere their future trajectories are very sensitive to their position at that time. Nearby ash particle trajectories can rapidly diverge causing the ash cloud to bifurcate. This situation generally leads to a decrease in forecast accuracy for deterministic forecasts which do not represent variability in wind fields at the synoptic-scale. This validates the use of meteorological ensemble forecasting to fully encompass ash cloud distributions, particularly if forecasts contain ash particles with residence times greater than 24 hours.

  13. Data assimilation for volcanic ash plumes using a satellite observational operator: a case study on the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Guangliang; Prata, Fred; Lin, Hai Xiang; Heemink, Arnold; SEGERS Arjo; Lu, Sha

    2017-01-01

    Using data assimilation (DA) to improve model forecast accuracy is a powerful approach that requires available observations. Infrared satellite measurements of volcanic ash mass loadings are often used as input observations for the assimilation scheme. However, because these primary satellite-retrieved data are often two-dimensional (2-D) and the ash plume is usually vertically located in a narrow band, directly assimilating the 2-D ash mass loadings in a three-dimensional (3-D) volcanic ash ...

  14. Hydration kinetics and morphology of cement pastes with pozzolanic volcanic ash studied via synchrotron-based techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Chin, Stephanie; Ilavsky, Jan; Andrews, Ross N.; Bumajdad, Ali; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2017-10-13

    This study investigates the early ages of hydration behavior when basaltic volcanic ash was used as a partial substitute to ordinary Portland cement using ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The mix design consisted of 10, 30 and 50% substitution of Portland cement with two different-sized volcanic ashes. The data showed that substitution of volcanic ash above 30% results in excess unreacted volcanic ash, rather than additional pozzolanic reactions along longer length scales. WAXS studies revealed that addition of finely ground volcanic ash facilitated calcium-silicate-hydrate related phases, whereas inclusion of coarser volcanic ash caused domination by calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate and unreacted MgO phases, suggesting some volcanic ash remained unreacted throughout the hydration process. Addition of more than 30% volcanic ash leads to coarser morphology along with decreased surface area and higher intensity of scattering at early-age hydration. This suggests an abrupt dissolution indicated by changes in surface area due to the retarding gel formation that can have implication on early-age setting influencing the mechanical properties of the resulting cementitious matrix. The findings from this work show that the concentration of volcanic ash influences the specific surface area and morphology of hydration products during the early age of hydration. Hence, natural pozzolanic volcanic ashes can be a viable substitute to Portland cement by providing environmental benefits in terms of lower-carbon footprint along with long-term durability.

  15. Adsorption of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid onto Volcanic Ash Soils:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ei Ei Mon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of the linear adsorption coefficient (Kd for soils plays a vital role to predict fate and transport of pesticides in the soil-water environment. In this study, we measured Kd values for 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D adsorption onto Japanese volcanic ash soils with different amount of soil organic matter (SOM in batch experiments under different pH conditions. All measurements followed well both linear and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. Strong correlations were found between measured Kd values and pH as well as SOM. The 2,4-D adsorption increased with decreasing pH and with increasing SOM. Based on the data, a predictive Kd equation for volcanic ash soils, log (Kd = 2.04 - 0.37 pH + 0.91 log (SOM, was obtained by the multiple regression analysis. The predictive Kd equation was tested against measured 2,4-D sorption data for other volcanic ash soils and normal mineral soils from literature. The proposed Kd equation well predicted Kd values for other volcanic ash soils and slightly over- or under-predicted Kd values for normal mineral soils. The proposed Kd equation performed well against volcanic ash soils from different sites and countries, and is therefore recommended for predicting Kd values at different pH and SOM conditions for volcanic ash soils when calculating and predicting 2,4-D mobility and fate in soil and groundwater.

  16. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, T P; Atkinson, J D; Neuberg, J W; O'Sullivan, D; Wilson, T W; Whale, T F; Neve, L; Umo, N S; Malkin, T L; Murray, B J

    2017-01-01

    Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry.

  17. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T P Mangan

    Full Text Available Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry.

  18. Filling the Gaps: The Synergistic Application of Satellite Data for the Volcanic Ash Threat to Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Pavolonis, Michael; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Lindsay, Francis; Haynes, John

    2013-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in recent years, estimating volcanic ash concentration for the full extent of the airspace affected by volcanic ash remains a challenge. No single satellite, airborne or ground observing system currently exists which can sufficiently inform dispersion models to provide the degree of accuracy required to use them with a high degree of confidence for routing aircraft in and near volcanic ash. Toward this end, the detection and characterization of volcanic ash in the atmosphere may be substantially improved by integrating a wider array of observing systems and advancements in trajectory and dispersion modeling to help solve this problem. The qualitative aspect of this effort has advanced significantly in the past decade due to the increase of highly complementary observational and model data currently available. Satellite observations, especially when coupled with trajectory and dispersion models can provide a very accurate picture of the 3-dimensional location of ash clouds. The accurate estimate of the mass loading at various locations throughout the entire plume, however improving, remains elusive. This paper examines the capabilities of various satellite observation systems and postulates that model-based volcanic ash concentration maps and forecasts might be significantly improved if the various extant satellite capabilities are used together with independent, accurate mass loading data from other observing systems available to calibrate (tune) ash concentration retrievals from the satellite systems.

  19. Potentially harmful elements released by volcanic ashes: Examples from the Mediterranean area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangemi, Marianna; Speziale, Sergio; Madonia, Paolo; D'Alessandro, Walter; Andronico, Daniele; Bellomo, Sergio; Brusca, Lorenzo; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-05-01

    We have performed leaching experiments on the fine (drinking water in all the materials under investigation. We defined a tolerable ash intake index (TAI) to evaluate the impact of ash ingestion, and we find that 0.2 g and 12 g of ingested fine ash from Vesuvius and Vulcano are enough to exceed the safety limits for Pb and As. Six grams of fine ashes from Stromboli are sufficient to overstep the safety limits for As. Based on our mineralogical characterisation of the particulate, we expect that the submillimetric ash fraction, with a higher surface/volume ratio, releases a greater relative amount of trace metals, which are concentrated in the thin surface layer produced by the reaction of the pristine volcanic particles with coexisting volcanic gases. This means that our measurements represent lower bounds to the actual amount of metal released in aqueous solutions by the volcanic ashes from the locations under investigation. Our results place the first constraints on the mobilisation of toxic elements from volcanic ash, which are necessary to assess the associated potential health risk of volcanic areas.

  20. Testing exposure of a jet engine to a dilute volcanic-ash cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mastin, L. G.; Schneider, D. J.; Holliday, C. R.; Murray, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    An experiment to test the effects of volcanic-ash ingestion by a jet engine is being planned for 2014 by a consortium of U.S. Government agencies and engine manufacturers, under the auspices of NASA's Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research Program. The experiment, using a 757-type engine, will be an on-ground, on-wing test carried out at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The experiment will involve the use of advanced jet-engine sensor technology for detecting and diagnosing engine health. A primary test objective is to determine the effect on the engine of many hours of exposure to ash concentrations (1 and 10 mg/cu m) representative of ash clouds many 100's to >1000 km from a volcanic source, an aviation environment of great interest since the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, eruption. A natural volcanic ash will be used; candidate sources are being evaluated. Data from previous ash/aircraft encounters, as well as published airborne measurements of the Eyjafjallajökull ash cloud, suggest the ash used should be composed primarily of glassy particles of andesitic to rhyolitic composition (SiO2 of 57-77%), with some mineral crystals, and a few tens of microns in size. Collected ash will be commercially processed less than 63 microns in size with the expectation that the ash particles will be further pulverized to smaller sizes in the engine during the test. For a nominally planned 80 hour test at multiple ash-concentration levels, the test will require roughly 500 kg of processed (appropriately sized) ash to be introduced into the engine core. Although volcanic ash clouds commonly contain volcanic gases such as sulfur dioxide, testing will not include volcanic gas or aerosol interactions as these present complex processes beyond the scope of the planned experiment. The viscous behavior of ash particles in the engine is a key issue in the experiment. The small glassy ash particles are expected to soften in the engine's hot combustion chamber, then stick to cooler

  1. Size limits for rounding of volcanic ash particles heated by lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Fabian B; Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Edward W; Genareau, Kimberly; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-03-01

    Volcanic ash particles can be remelted by the high temperatures induced in volcanic lightning discharges. The molten particles can round under surface tension then quench to produce glass spheres. Melting and rounding timescales for volcanic materials are strongly dependent on heating duration and peak temperature and are shorter for small particles than for large particles. Therefore, the size distribution of glass spheres recovered from ash deposits potentially record the short duration, high-temperature conditions of volcanic lightning discharges, which are hard to measure directly. We use a 1-D numerical solution to the heat equation to determine the timescales of heating and cooling of volcanic particles during and after rapid heating and compare these with the capillary timescale for rounding an angular particle. We define dimensionless parameters-capillary, Fourier, Stark, Biot, and Peclet numbers-to characterize the competition between heat transfer within the particle, heat transfer at the particle rim, and capillary motion, for particles of different sizes. We apply this framework to the lightning case and constrain a maximum size for ash particles susceptible to surface tension-driven rounding, as a function of lightning temperature and duration, and ash properties. The size limit agrees well with maximum sizes of glass spheres found in volcanic ash that has been subjected to lightning or experimental discharges, demonstrating that the approach that we develop can be used to obtain a first-order estimate of lightning conditions in volcanic plumes.

  2. Volcanic Ashes Intercalated with Cultural Vestiges at Archaeological Sites from the Piedmont to the Amazon, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Viviana; Mothes, Patricia; Andrade, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    A mineralogical analysis was done on 70 volcanic ashes; 9 corresponding to proximal samples of seven volcanoes: Cotopaxi (4500 yBP), Guagua Pichincha (3300 yBP, 1000 yBP and 1660 yAD), Cuicocha (3100 yBP), Pululahua (2400 yBP), Ninahuilca (2350 yBP and 4600 yBP) and 61 to distal ashes collected at eight archaeological sites in the Coastal, Sierra and Amazon regions of Ecuador. Cultural vestiges are from Pre-ceramic, Formative, Regional Development and Integration periods, with the exception of a site denominated Hacienda Malqui, which also has Inca vestiges. The sampling process was done in collaboration with various archaeologists in 2011-2013. The volcanic ashes were washed, dried and divided in order to obtain a representative fraction and their later analysis with binocular microscope. The microscope analysis allowed determination of the characteristics of each component of volcanic ash. These main elements are: pumice fragments, minerals, volcanic glass, lithics and exogenous material (non volcanic). The petrographic analysis of distal volcanic ash layers at each archaeological site was correlated by their components and characteristics with proximal volcanic ashes of source volcanoes. Some correlations permitted obtaining a relative age for the layers of distal volcanic ash in the archaeological sites. The petrographic analysis showed a correlation between the archaeological sites of Las Mercedes - Los Naranjos, Rumipamba and El Condado (located west of Quito) with the eruptive activity of Guagua Pichincha volcano (3300 yBP, 1000 yBP and 1660 yAD) and Pululahua volcano (2400 yBP). Also, a correlation with eruptive activity of Ninahuilca (2350 yBP), Cotopaxi (4500 yBP) and Quilotoa (800 yBP) volcanoes at Hda. Malqui (60 km west of Latacunga) was provided by mineralogy of the respective ashes expulsed by these volcanoes. The ash layers at Cuyuja (50 km east of Quito) are mostly superficial; they are associated with Quilotoa's 800 yBP plinian. Finally at the

  3. Susceptibility of volcanic ash-influenced soil in northern Idaho to mechanical compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    1993-01-01

    Timber harvesting and mechanical site preparation can reduce site productivity if they excessively disturb or compact the soil. Volcanic ash-influenced soils with low undisturbed bulk densities and rock content are particularly susceptible. This study evaluates the effects of harvesting and site preparation on changes in the bulk density of ash-influenced forest soils...

  4. Testing hypotheses for the use of Icelandic volcanic ashes as low cost, natural fertilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, W.; Edwards, B.

    2012-04-01

    Andisols are soils derived from tephra/volcanic bedrock and are generally considered to be fertile for plant growth (cf. University of Hawaii at Manoa, CTAHR). However, few studies have been published examining the immediate effects of the addition of volcanic ash to soils immediately after an eruption. Our research is motivated by unpublished accounts from Icelandic farmers that the growing season following the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption ended with unusually high yields in areas that were covered by ash from the eruption early in the spring. To test the hypothesis that addition of volcanic ash to soil would have no immediate effect on plant growth, we conducted a ~6 week growth experiment in at controlled environment at the Dickinson College Farm. The experiment used relatively fast growing grain seeds as a test crop, controlled watering, known quantities of peat as an organic base, and the following general experimental design: peat was mixed in known but systematically differing proportions with 1) commercial quartz sand, 2) basaltic ash from the 2004 Grimsvötn eruption, and 3) trachyandesite ash from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. For all experiments, the seeds growing in the simulated soil created with the two different composition volcanic ash had higher germination rates, higher growth rates, and produced plants that were healthier in appearance than the soil made from peat mixed with quartz sand. Some differences were also noted between the germination and grow rates between the basaltic and trachyandesitic ash experiments as well. Working hypotheses to explain these results include (1) shard shapes and vesicles from volcanic ash provide better water retention than quartz, allowing water to be stored longer and increasing average soil moisture, and (2) chemical nutrients from the ash facilitate germination and growth of plants. Documenting the potential benefits of fresh volcanic ash as a fertilizer is important as use of fresh ash fertlizer

  5. Scattering matrices of volcanic ash particles of Mount St. Helens, Redoubt, and Mount Spurr Volcanoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muñoz, O.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J.W.; Veihelmann, B.; van der Zande, W.J.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; Rose, W.I.

    2004-01-01

    We present measurements of the whole scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle at a wavelength of 632.8 nm in the scattering angle range 3°-174° of randomly oriented particles taken from seven samples of volcanic ashes corresponding to four different volcanic eruptions: the 18 May 1980

  6. Scattering matrices of volcanic ash particles of Mount St. Helens, Redoubt, and Mount Spurr Volcanoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz, O.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J.W.; Veihelmann, B.; Zande, W.J. van der; Waters, L.; Rose, W.I.

    2004-01-01

    [1] We present measurements of the whole scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle at a wavelength of 632.8 nm in the scattering angle range 3degrees - 174degrees of randomly oriented particles taken from seven samples of volcanic ashes corresponding to four different volcanic

  7. Respiratory health effects of volcanic ash with special reference to Iceland. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    Volcano eruptions occur around the world and can have an impact on health in many ways both locally and on a global scale as a result of airborne dispersion of gases and ash or as impact on climate. In this review, a recent volcanic eruption in Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland is described and its effects on aviation around the globe and on respiratory health in those exposed to the volcanic ash in Iceland. Also, the effects of a large volcano eruption in Iceland in 1789 are described that also had effect on a global scale by causing air pollution. The available studies reviewed here suggest that the acute and chronic health effects of volcanic ash depend on particle size (how much respirable), mineralogical composition (crystalline silica content) and the physico-chemical properties of the surfaces of ash particles. These can vary between volcanoes and even between eruptions, making comparison difficult. Acute respiratory symptoms suggesting asthma and bronchitis have been well described. Exacerbations of pre-existing lung and heart disease are common after inhalation of volcanic ash. Limited information is available on increase in mortality from recent eruptions but historical evidence is well described. No long-term effects on lung function have been found after exposure to volcanic ash. There are concerns for the long-term risks of silicosis from chronic exposure to volcanic ash but no cases have been described. Acute respiratory symptoms after exposure to volcanic ash are well described but no long-term effects have been found. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Improving volcanic ash predictions with the HYSPLIT dispersion model by assimilating MODIS satellite retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Tianfeng; Crawford, Alice; Stunder, Barbara; Pavolonis, Michael J.; Draxler, Roland; Stein, Ariel

    2017-02-01

    Currently, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) runs the HYSPLIT dispersion model with a unit mass release rate to predict the transport and dispersion of volcanic ash. The model predictions provide information for the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) to issue advisories to meteorological watch offices, area control centers, flight information centers, and others. This research aims to provide quantitative forecasts of ash distributions generated by objectively and optimally estimating the volcanic ash source strengths, vertical distribution, and temporal variations using an observation-modeling inversion technique. In this top-down approach, a cost functional is defined to quantify the differences between the model predictions and the satellite measurements of column-integrated ash concentrations weighted by the model and observation uncertainties. Minimizing this cost functional by adjusting the sources provides the volcanic ash emission estimates. As an example, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite retrievals of the 2008 Kasatochi volcanic ash clouds are used to test the HYSPLIT volcanic ash inverse system. Because the satellite retrievals include the ash cloud top height but not the bottom height, there are different model diagnostic choices for comparing the model results with the observed mass loadings. Three options are presented and tested. Although the emission estimates vary significantly with different options, the subsequent model predictions with the different release estimates all show decent skill when evaluated against the unassimilated satellite observations at later times. Among the three options, integrating over three model layers yields slightly better results than integrating from the surface up to the observed volcanic ash cloud top or using a single model layer. Inverse tests also show that including the ash-free region to constrain the model is not

  9. Rapid releases of metal salts and nutrients following the deposition of volcanic ash into aqueous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Morgan T.; Gislason, Sigurður R.

    2008-08-01

    Deposition of volcanic ash into aqueous environments leads to dissolution of adsorbed metal salts and aerosols, increasing the bioavailability of key nutrients. Volcanogenic fertilization events could increase marine primary productivity, leading to a drawdown of atmospheric CO 2. Here we conduct flow-through experiments on unhydrated volcanic ash samples from a variety of locations and sources, measuring the concentrations and fluxes of elements into de-ionized water and two contrasting ocean surface waters. Comparisons of element fluxes show that dissolution of adsorbed surface salts and aerosols dominates over glass dissolution, even in sustained low pH conditions. These surface ash-leachates appear unstable, decaying in situ even if kept unhydrated. Volcanic ash from recent eruptions is shown to have a large fertilization potential in both fresh and saline water. Fluorine concentrations are integral to bulk dissolution rates and samples with high F concentrations display elevated fluxes of some nutrients, particularly Fe, Si, and P. Bio-limiting micronutrients are released in large quantities, suggesting that subsequent biological growth will be limited by macronutrient availability. Importantly, acidification of surface waters and high fluxes of toxic elements highlights the potential of volcanic ash-leachates to poison aqueous environments. In particular, large pH changes can cause undersaturation of CaCO 3 polymorphs, damaging populations of calcifying organisms. Deposition of volcanic ash can both fertilize and/or poison aqueous environments, causing significant changes to surface water chemistry and biogeochemical cycles.

  10. Assimilating aircraft-based measurements to improve forecast accuracy of volcanic ash transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, G.; Lin, H. X.; Heemink, A. W.; Segers, A. J.; Lu, S.; Palsson, T.

    2015-08-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption had serious consequences to civil aviation. This has initiated a lot of research on volcanic ash transport forecast in recent years. For forecasting the volcanic ash transport after eruption onset, a volcanic ash transport and diffusion model (VATDM) needs to be run with Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) such as plume height and mass eruption rate as input, and with data assimilation techniques to continuously improve the initial conditions of the forecast. Reliable and accurate ash measurements are crucial for providing a successful ash clouds advice. In this paper, simulated aircraft-based measurements, as one type of volcanic ash measurements, will be assimilated into a transport model to identify the potential benefit of this kind of observations in an assimilation system. The results show assimilating aircraft-based measurements can significantly improve the state of ash clouds, and further providing an improved forecast as aviation advice. We also show that for advice of aeroplane flying level, aircraft-based measurements should be preferably taken from this level to obtain the best performance on it. Furthermore it is shown that in order to make an acceptable advice for aviation decision makers, accurate knowledge about uncertainties of ESPs and measurements is of great importance.

  11. Reference dataset of volcanic ash physicochemical and optical properties for atmospheric measurement retrievals and transport modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Andreas; Durant, Adam; Sytchkova, Anna; Diplas, Spyros; Bonadonna, Costanza; Scarnato, Barbara; Krüger, Kirstin; Kylling, Arve; Kristiansen, Nina; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions emit up to 50 wt.% (total erupted mass) of fine ash particles (quantitative assessment of measurement uncertainties of ash properties to provide realistic ash forecast uncertainty. Currently, information on volcanic ash physicochemical and optical properties is derived from a small number of somewhat dated publications. In this study, we provide a reference dataset for physical (size distribution and shape), chemical (bulk vs. surface chemistry) and optical properties (complex refractive index in the UV-vis-NIR range) of a representative selection of volcanic ash samples from 10 different volcanic eruptions covering the full variability in silica content (40-75 wt.% SiO2). Through the combination of empirical analytical methods (e.g., image analysis, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and UV/Vis/NIR/FTIR Spectroscopy) and theoretical models (e.g., Bruggeman effective medium approach), it was possible to fully capture the natural variability of ash physicochemical and optical characteristics. The dataset will be applied in atmospheric measurement retrievals and atmospheric transport modelling to determine the sensitivity to uncertainty in ash particle characteristics.

  12. Selective preservation of carbohydrates in volcanic ash soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaal, J.; Buurman, P.; Nierop, K. G. J.; Piccolo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic soils (Andosols) are formed in volcanic ash and depending on environmental and climatic factors they develop to two main forms, either allophanic Andosols (dominated by amorphous minerals) or non-allophanic Andosols (dominated by Al/Fe organic matter complexes). Andosols contain the largest amounts of organic carbon of all mineral soil orders. In recent studies using analytical pyrolysis techniques on the soil organic matter (SOM) of allophanic soils from the Azores Islands (Portugal) there was no indication of preservation of plant-derived organic matter by allophane or Al3+, but the presence of large amounts of (microbial) polysaccharides and chitin suggested that secondary organic matter products were stabilized. In the present study we used 13C NMR to further explore the organic matter of the Andosols of the Azores, and applied a molecular mixing model (MMM; ascribing characteristic resonances to the main biocomponent classes carbohydrate, protein, lipid, lignin and char) to the quantified NMR spectra to allow for a quantitative comparison with pyrolysis-GC/MS. The dominance of O-alkyl and di-O-alkyl C in the NMR spectra and carbohydrate contribution to the predictions made by the MMM (50 ± 8%) confirms that the majority of the SOM can still be recognised as carbohydrate. The accumulation of secondary/microbial carbohydrates (and, to a lesser extent, secondary proteinaceous matter and chitins) is thus a key characteristic of these Andosols. NMR-MMM and pyrolysis-GC/MS were in rough agreement. However, NMR does not recognise chitin (N-containing carbohydrate-like material) and chitin-associated protein, nor can it be used to estimate the degree of degradation of the carbohydrates. Therefore, NMR (as applied here) has a very limited capacity for characterisation of the SOM particularly in the Andosols studied. On the other hand, large peaks from carboxylic and amidic functional groups detected by NMR were not observed by pyrolysis-GC/MS. It is therefore

  13. Elemental characterization of Mt. Sinabung volcanic ash, Indonesia by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmartini, I.; Syahfitri, W. Y. N.; Kurniawati, S.; Lestiani, D. D.; Santoso, M.

    2017-06-01

    Mount Sinabung is a volcano located in North Sumatera, Indonesia which has been recorded not erupted since 1600. However in 2013 it has been erupted and cause of black thick smog, rain sand and volcanic ash. Volcanic ash containing trace elements material that can be utilized in various applications but still has potential danger of heavy metals. In order to obtain an elemental composition data of volcanic ash, the characterization of volcanic ash were carried out using Neutron Activation Analysis. The volcanic ash was taken from Mt. Sinabung eruption. Samples were irradiated at the rabbit system in the reactor G.A Siwabessy facilities with neutron flux ˜ 1013 n.cm-2.s-1 and then counted using HPGe detector. Method validation was carried out by SRM NIST Coal Fly Ash 1633b and NIST 2711a Montana II Soil with recovery values were in the range of 96-108% and 95-106% respectively. The results showed that major elements; Al, Na, Ca and Fe, concentrations were 8.7, 1.05, 2.98 and 7.44 %, respectively, minor elements K, Mg, Mn, Ti, V and Zn were 0.87%, 0.78%, 0.18%, 0.62%, 197.13 ppm and 109.35 ppm, respectively, heavy metals; As, Cr, Co and Sb, contents were 4.48, 11.75, 17.13 and 0.35 ppm, respectively while rare earth elements such as Ce, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Yb were 45.33, 1.22, 19.63, 20.34, 3.86, and 2.57 ppm respectively. The results of the elemental contents of volcanic ash that has been obtained can be used as the scientific based data for volcanic material utilization by considering the economic potential of elements contained and also the danger of the heavy metals content.

  14. Satellite Derived Volcanic Ash Product Inter-Comparison in Support to SCOPE-Nowcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddans, Richard; Thomas, Gareth; Pavolonis, Mike; Bojinski, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    In support of aeronautical meteorological services, WMO organized a satellite-based volcanic ash retrieval algorithm inter-comparison activity, to improve the consistency of quantitative volcanic ash products from satellites, under the Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Nowcasting (SCOPEe Nowcasting) initiative (http:/ jwww.wmo.int/pagesjprogjsatjscopee nowcasting_en.php). The aims of the intercomparison were as follows: 1. Select cases (Sarychev Peak 2009, Eyjafyallajökull 2010, Grimsvötn 2011, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle 2011, Kirishimayama 2011, Kelut 2014), and quantify the differences between satellite-derived volcanic ash cloud properties derived from different techniques and sensors; 2. Establish a basic validation protocol for satellite-derived volcanic ash cloud properties; 3. Document the strengths and weaknesses of different remote sensing approaches as a function of satellite sensor; 4. Standardize the units and quality flags associated with volcanic cloud geophysical parameters; 5. Provide recommendations to Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) and other users on how to best to utilize quantitative satellite products in operations; 6. Create a "road map" for future volcanic ash related scientific developments and inter-comparison/validation activities that can also be applied to SO2 clouds and emergent volcanic clouds. Volcanic ash satellite remote sensing experts from operational and research organizations were encouraged to participate in the inter-comparison activity, to establish the plans for the inter-comparison and to submit data sets. RAL was contracted by EUMETSAT to perform a systematic inter-comparison of all submitted datasets and results were reported at the WMO International Volcanic Ash Inter-comparison Meeting to held on 29 June - 2 July 2015 in Madison, WI, USA (http:/ /cimss.ssec.wisc.edujmeetings/vol_ash14). 26 different data sets were submitted, from a range of passive imagers and spectrometers and

  15. Biomimetic thermal barrier coating in jet engine to resist volcanic ash deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Major, Zsuzsanna; Schulz, Uwe; Muth, Tobias; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    The threat of volcanic ash to aviation safety is attracting extensive attention when several commercial jet aircraft were damaged after flying through volcanic ash clouds from the May 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helen in Washington, U.S. and especially after the air traffic disruption in 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. A major hazard presented by volcanic ash to aircraft is linked to the wetting and spreading of molten ash droplets on engine component surfaces. Due to the fact ash has a lower melting point, around 1100 °C, than the gas temperature in the hot section (between 1400 to 2000 °C), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components (e.g., combustor and turbine blades), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components of the engine creating, substantial damage or even engine failure after ingestion. Here, inspiring form the natural surface of lotus leaf (exhibiting extreme water repellency, known as 'lotus effect'), we firstly create the multifunctional surface thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by producing a hierarchical structure with femtosecond laser pulses. In detail, we investigate the effect of one of primary femtosecond laser irradiation process parameter (scanning speed) on the hydrophobicity of water droplets onto the two kinds of TBCs fabricated by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and air plasma spray (APS), respectively as well as their corresponding to morphology. It is found that, comparison with the original surface (without femtosecond laser ablation), all of the irradiated samples demonstrate more significant hydrophobic properties due to nanostructuring. On the basis of these preliminary room-temperature results, the wettability of volcanic ash droplets will be analysed at the high temperature to constrain the potential impact of volcanic ash on the jet engines.

  16. Transport and transformation of Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash layers (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzierl, B.; Baumann, R.; Minikin, A.; Gross, S.; Sauer, D. N.; Reitebuch, O.; Kox, S.; Graf, K.; Scheibe, M.; Lichtenstern, M.; Schlager, H.; Schumann, U.; Freudenthaler, V.; Wiegner, M.; Ansmann, A.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne volcanic ash can pose a severe hazard to aviation. Within the past decade more than 120 planes inadvertently entered ash layers from volcanic eruptions and in nine encounters more than one engine temporarily failed. The severity of ash encounters depends critically on the ash mass concentration of the plume entered and on the time spent in an ash plume. The ash mass concentration is dominated by the number of coarse mode particles present. Therefore it is important to investigate the transformation of volcanic ash properties during transport. In this work we use data from the flights with the DLR research aircraft Falcon performed during the Eyjafjalla eruption period in April/May 2010 together with ground-based lidar measurements at Munich and Leipzig. We combine our data with HYSPLIT dispersion model simulations and spaceborne measurements of SEVIRI aboard MSG to investigate the transport and transformation of Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash layers. During the Eyjafjallajökull eruption period, the DLR research aircraft Falcon was equipped with a suite of aerosol in-situ instruments for aerosol size distribution, particle volatility and absorption measurements and with a nadir-looking 2-μm wind lidar. Furthermore, trace gases such as O3, CO, SO2, H2O and meteorological parameters were measured. Altogether, the DLR Falcon performed 17 research flights in young (up to 7 h) plumes close to the volcano in Iceland and in aged (up to 120 h) volcanic ash plumes over Central and Western Europe. When possible, the Falcon overflew ground-based lidar stations in Munich and Leipzig. Those lidars in Munich and Leipzig recorded the aerosol backscatter coefficient, the particle linear depolarization ratio, and the lidar ratio at 355 and 532 nm. Volcanic ash layers were detected mainly below 6 km altitude with a vertical depth between 0.1 and 3 km. We will focus at the modification of the size distribution during transport and discuss cases where we observed the

  17. MORPHOLOGICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MT. KELUD VOLCANIC ASH REINFORCED POLYESTER AND EPOXY COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henny Pratiwi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of suitable waste products as raw materials has become an interesting matter in composite industry nowadays due to the environmental issues. Volcanic ash is one of the waste materials containing a high number of silica. The aim of this study is to examine the morphological and mechanical properties of Mt. Kelud volcanic ash reinforced polyester and epoxy composites. The volcano ash was dried and sieved into 50 mesh then mixed with polyester or epoxy manually for 10 minutes. The ash added into the matrix was varied by 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% from matrix volume content. For epoxy matrix, the composite with 40 vol. % particles has the highest tensile strength. However, for the polyester/ash composites, the tensile strength continues to decrease with the addition of particles. There is a significant increasing of 47.04 % for polyester and 5.62 % for epoxy in impact strength when 40 vol. % of volcanic ash added into both polymers. The Scanning Electron Microscopy result shows that there is void and agglomeration contained in epoxy/ash composites and crack propagation along the surface of polyester/ash composites that could be the cause of the failure.

  18. Hazards posed by distal ash transport and sedimentation from extreme volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahagian, D. L.; Proussevitch, A. A.; White, C. M.; Klewicki, J.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic ash injected into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere poses a significant hazard to aviation and human security as a result of extreme, explosive eruptions. These have occurred in the recent geologic past, and are expected to occur again, now that modern society and its infrastructure is far more vulnerable than ever before. Atmospheric transport, dispersion, and sedimentation of Ash particles is controlled by fundamentally different processes than control other particles normally transported in the atmosphere due to their complex internal and external morphology. It is thus necessary to elucidate the fundamental processes of particle-fluid interactions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, where most air traffic resides, and thereby enhance the capability of volcanic ash transport models to predict the ash concentration in distal regions that pose aviation and other hazards. Current Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion (VATD) models use simplistic stokes settling velocities for larger ash particles, and treat smaller ash particles (that are a large part of the hazard) merely as passive tracers. By incorporating the dynamics of fine ash particle-atmosphere interactions into existing VATD models provides the foundation for a much more accurate assessment framework applied to the hazard posed by specific future extreme eruptions, and thus dramatically reduce both the risk to air traffic and the cost of airport and flight closures, in addition to human health, water quality, agricultural, infrastructure hazards, as well as ice cap albedo and short term climate impacts.

  19. Lipid peroxidation and cytotoxicity induced by respirable volcanic ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Antonio-Nieto-Camacho; Gomez-Vidales, Virginia; Ramirez-Apan, María Teresa; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención; Kaufhold, Stephan; Abidin, Zeanal; Theng, Benny K G

    2014-06-15

    This paper reports that the main component of respirable volcanic ash, allophane, induces lipid peroxidation (LP), the oxidative degradation of lipids in cell membranes, and cytotoxicity in murin monocyle/macrophage cells. Naturally-occurring allophane collected from New Zealand, Japan, and Ecuador was studied. The quantification of LP was conducted using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) assay. The cytotoxic effect was determined by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay. Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) determinations of naturally-occurring allophane confirmed the incorporation in the structure and clustering of structural Fe(3+), and nucleation and growth of small-sized Fe (oxyhydr)oxide or gibbsite. LP induced by allophane varied with time, and solid concentration and composition, reaching 6.7 ± 0.2 nmol TBARS mg prot(-1). LP was surface controlled but not restricted by structural or surface-bound Fe(3+), because redox processes induced by soluble components other than perferryl iron. The reactivity of Fe(3+) soluble species stemming from surface-bound Fe(3+) or small-sized Fe(3+) refractory minerals in allophane surpassed that of structural Fe(3+) located in tetrahedral or octahedral sites of phyllosilicates or bulk iron oxides. Desferrioxamine B mesylate salt (DFOB) or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) inhibited LP. EDTA acted as a more effective inhibitor, explained by multiple electron transfer pathways. Registered cell-viability values were as low as 68.5 ± 6.7%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Volcanic Ash fall Impact on Vegetation, Colima 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M. G.; Martin, A.; Fonseca, R.; Nieto, A.; Radillo, R.; Armienta, M.

    2007-05-01

    An ash sampling network was established arround Colima Volcano in 2005. Ash fall was sampled on the North, Northeast, East, Southeast, South, Southwest and West of the volcano. Samples were analyzed for ash components, geochemistry and leachates. Ash fall ocurred on April (12), May (10, 23), June (2, 6, 9, 10, 12, 14), July (27), September (27), October (23) and November (24). Most of the ash is made of andesitic dome-lithics but shows diferences in crystal, juvenile material and lithic content. In May, some samples contained grey and dark pumice (scoria). Texture varies from phi >4 to phi 0. Leachate concentration were low: SO4 (7.33-54.19) Cl- (2.29-4.97) and F- (0.16-0.37). During 2005, Colima Volcano's ash fall rotted some of the guava and peach fruits and had a drying effect on spearment and epazote plants. Even these small ash amounts could have hindered sugar cane and agave growth.

  1. Calibration of microbolometer infrared cameras for measuring volcanic ash mass loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Russell C.

    Small spacecraft with thermal infrared (TIR) imaging capabilities are needed to detect dangerous levels of volcanic ash that can severely damage jet aircraft engines and must be avoided. Grounding aircraft after a volcanic eruption may cost the airlines millions of dollars per day, while accurate knowledge of volcanic ash density might allow for safely routing aircraft around dangerous levels of volcanic ash. There are currently limited numbers of satellites with TIR imaging capabilities so the elapsed time between revisits can be large, and these instruments can only resolve total mass loading along the line-of-sight. Multiple small satellites could allow for decreased revisit times as well as multiple viewing angles to reveal the three-dimensional structure of the ash cloud through stereoscopic techniques. This paper presents the design and laboratory evaluation of a TIR imaging system that is designed to fit within the resource constraints of a multi-unit CubeSat to detect volcanic ash mass loading. The laboratory prototype of this TIR imaging system uses a commercial off-the shelf (COTS) camera with an uncooled microbolometer sensor, two narrowband filters, a black body source and a custom filter wheel. The infrared imaging system detects the difference in attenuation of volcanic ash at 11 mum and 12 mum by measuring the brightness temperature at each band. The brightness temperature difference method is used to measure the column mass loading. Multi-aspect images and stereoscopic techniques are needed to estimate the mass density from the mass loading, which is the measured mass per unit area. Laboratory measurements are used to characterize the noise level and thermal stability of the sensor. A calibration technique is developed to compensate for sensor temperature drift. The detection threshold of volcanic ash density of this TIR imaging system is found to be from 0.35 mg/m3 to 26 mg/m3 for ash clouds that have thickness of 1 km, while ash cloud densities

  2. Atmospheric fate and transport of fine volcanic ash: Does particle shape matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. M.; Allard, M. P.; Klewicki, J.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Mulukutla, G.; Genareau, K.; Sahagian, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash presents hazards to infrastructure, agriculture, and human and animal health. In particular, given the economic importance of intercontinental aviation, understanding how long ash is suspended in the atmosphere, and how far it is transported has taken on greater importance. Airborne ash abrades the exteriors of aircraft, enters modern jet engines and melts while coating interior engine parts causing damage and potential failure. The time fine ash stays in the atmosphere depends on its terminal velocity. Existing models of ash terminal velocities are based on smooth, quasi-spherical particles characterized by Stokes velocity. Ash particles, however, violate the various assumptions upon which Stokes flow and associated models are based. Ash particles are non-spherical and can have complex surface and internal structure. This suggests that particle shape may be one reason that models fail to accurately predict removal rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. The present research seeks to better parameterize predictive models for ash particle terminal velocities, diffusivity, and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer. The fundamental hypothesis being tested is that particle shape irreducibly impacts the fate and transport properties of fine volcanic ash. Pilot studies, incorporating modeling and experiments, are being conducted to test this hypothesis. Specifically, a statistical model has been developed that can account for actual volcanic ash size distributions, complex ash particle geometry, and geometry variability. Experimental results are used to systematically validate and improve the model. The experiments are being conducted at the Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH. Terminal velocities and dispersion properties of fine ash are characterized using still air drop experiments in an unconstrained open space using a homogenized mix of source particles. Dispersion and sedimentation dynamics are quantified using particle image

  3. D Visualization of Volcanic Ash Dispersion Prediction with Spatial Information Open Platform in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, J.; Kim, T.

    2016-06-01

    Visualization of disaster dispersion prediction enables decision makers and civilian to prepare disaster and to reduce the damage by showing the realistic simulation results. With advances of GIS technology and the theory of volcanic disaster prediction algorithm, the predicted disaster dispersions are displayed in spatial information. However, most of volcanic ash dispersion predictions are displayed in 2D. 2D visualization has a limitation to understand the realistic dispersion prediction since its height could be presented only by colour. Especially for volcanic ash, 3D visualization of dispersion prediction is essential since it could bring out big aircraft accident. In this paper, we deals with 3D visualization techniques of volcanic ash dispersion prediction with spatial information open platform in Korea. First, time-series volcanic ash 3D position and concentrations are calculated with WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model and Modified Fall3D algorithm. For 3D visualization, we propose three techniques; those are 'Cube in the air', 'Cube in the cube', and 'Semi-transparent plane in the air' methods. In the 'Cube in the Air', which locates the semitransparent cubes having different color depends on its particle concentration. Big cube is not realistic when it is zoomed. Therefore, cube is divided into small cube with Octree algorithm. That is 'Cube in the Cube' algorithm. For more realistic visualization, we apply 'Semi-transparent Volcanic Ash Plane' which shows the ash as fog. The results are displayed in the 'V-world' which is a spatial information open platform implemented by Korean government. Proposed techniques were adopted in Volcanic Disaster Response System implemented by Korean Ministry of Public Safety and Security.

  4. 3D VISUALIZATION OF VOLCANIC ASH DISPERSION PREDICTION WITH SPATIAL INFORMATION OPEN PLATFORM IN KOREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Youn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Visualization of disaster dispersion prediction enables decision makers and civilian to prepare disaster and to reduce the damage by showing the realistic simulation results. With advances of GIS technology and the theory of volcanic disaster prediction algorithm, the predicted disaster dispersions are displayed in spatial information. However, most of volcanic ash dispersion predictions are displayed in 2D. 2D visualization has a limitation to understand the realistic dispersion prediction since its height could be presented only by colour. Especially for volcanic ash, 3D visualization of dispersion prediction is essential since it could bring out big aircraft accident. In this paper, we deals with 3D visualization techniques of volcanic ash dispersion prediction with spatial information open platform in Korea. First, time-series volcanic ash 3D position and concentrations are calculated with WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting model and Modified Fall3D algorithm. For 3D visualization, we propose three techniques; those are 'Cube in the air', 'Cube in the cube', and 'Semi-transparent plane in the air' methods. In the 'Cube in the Air', which locates the semitransparent cubes having different color depends on its particle concentration. Big cube is not realistic when it is zoomed. Therefore, cube is divided into small cube with Octree algorithm. That is 'Cube in the Cube' algorithm. For more realistic visualization, we apply 'Semi-transparent Volcanic Ash Plane' which shows the ash as fog. The results are displayed in the 'V-world' which is a spatial information open platform implemented by Korean government. Proposed techniques were adopted in Volcanic Disaster Response System implemented by Korean Ministry of Public Safety and Security.

  5. Optical characterization of volcanic ash using diffuse reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, D. Kelly; Falcón, Nelsón; Narea, Freddy J.; Muñoz, Rafael A.; Muñoz, Aaron A.

    2013-11-01

    The determination of the optical parameters are important for remote sensing and aircraft, in this case allow the difference between a cloud composed solely of water and water plus ash. Therefore, this research is intended to determine the optical properties of the ash four active volcanoes, by studying the spectral resolution reflectance interpreting the results in the approximation of Kubelka - Munk equation through the transfer equation radiative. The results allow classifying these ashes depending on their place of origin.

  6. Thermal properties and unfrozen water content of frozen volcanic ash as a modelling input parameters in mountainous volcanic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, E.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are one of the major causes of the burial of ice and snow in volcanic areas. This has been demonstrated on volcanoes, e.g. in Iceland, Russia, USA and Chile, where the combination of a permafrost-favorable climate and a thin layer of tephra is sufficient to reduce the sub-tephra layer snow ablation substantially, even to zero, causing ground ice formation and permafrost aggradation. Many numerical models that have been used to investigate and predict the evolution of cold regions as the result of climatic changes are lacking the accurate data of the thermal properties —thermal conductivity, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity—of soils or debris layers involved. The angular shape of the fragments that make up ash and scoria makes it inappropriate to apply existing models to estimate bulk thermal conductivity. The lack of experimental data on the thermal conductivity of volcanic deposits will hinder the development of realistic models. The decreasing thermal conductivity of volcanic ash in the frozen state is associated with the development and presence of unfrozen water films that may have a direct mechanical impact on the movement or slippage between ice and particle, and thus, change the stress transfer. This becomes particularly significant during periods of climate change when enhanced temperatures and associated melting could weaken polythermal glaciers and affect areas with warm and discontinuous permafrost, and induce ice or land movements, perhaps on a catastrophic scale. In the presentation, we will summarize existing data regarding: (i) the thermal properties and unfrozen water content in frozen volcanic ash and cinder, (ii) the effects of cold temperatures on weathering processes of volcanic glass, (iii) the relationship between the mineralogy of frozen volcanic deposits and their thermal properties —and then discusses their significance in relation to the numerical modelling of glaciers and permafrost's thermal behavior.

  7. Changes in the As solid speciation during weathering of volcanic ashes: A XAS study on Patagonian ashes and Chacopampean loess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bia, G.; García, M. G.; Borgnino, L.

    2017-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to determine the oxidation state of As, local chemical coordination and the relative proportion of different As species in recent and ancient Andean volcanic ashes, as well as in Chaco Pampean loess. As K edge XANES analysis indicates that in loess sediments the dominant species is As(V) (i.e., >91%). Conversely, As(III) is dominant in all ash samples. In the Puyehue sample, only As(III) species were determined, while in both, the Chaitén and the ancient tephra samples, As(III) species accounts for 66% of the total As. The remaining 34% corresponds to As(-1) in the Chaitén sample and to As(V) in the weathered tephra. The proposed EXAFS models fit well with the experimental data, suggesting that in ancient and recent volcanic ashes, As(III) is likely related to As atoms present as impurities within the glass structure, forming hydroxide species bound to the Al-Si network. In addition, the identified As(-1) species is related to arsenian pyrite, while in the ancient volcanic ash, As(V) was likely a product of incipient weathering. In loess sediments, the identified As(V) species represents arsenate ions adsorbed onto Fe oxy(hydr)oxides, forming inner-sphere surface complexes, in a bidentate binuclear configuration.

  8. Toward quantitative forecasts of volcanic ash dispersal: Using satellite retrievals for optimal estimation of source terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidikheri, Meelis J.; Lucas, Christopher; Potts, Rodney J.

    2017-08-01

    Airborne volcanic ash is a hazard to aviation. There is an increasing demand for quantitative forecasts of ash properties such as ash mass load to allow airline operators to better manage the risks of flying through airspace likely to be contaminated by ash. In this paper we show how satellite-derived mass load information at times prior to the issuance of the latest forecast can be used to estimate various model parameters that are not easily obtained by other means such as the distribution of mass of the ash column at the volcano. This in turn leads to better forecasts of ash mass load. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach using several case studies.

  9. Experimental Constraints on the Respiratory Health Hazard Posed by Crystalline Silica-bearing Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damby, D. E.; Horwell, C. J.; Baxter, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    Since volcanic ash from the 1980 eruption of Mount St Helens, USA, impacted on a million inhabitants in the Pacific Northwest, it is known that a substantial fraction of volcanic ejecta is respirable and therefore capable of being a human health hazard. Exacerbation of airway problems, such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, due to an increase in ambient particulate matter following the eruption, was an expected finding; however, a significant amount of cristobalite, a toxic mineral, in the ash was unforeseen and led to repeated toxicological testing of the ash to establish the hazard posed to human health. Those results together with studies on cristobalite-bearing ash from other major eruptions suggest that volcanic cristobalite is minimally reactive relative to pure phase standards. This finding adheres to a well-established thesis on the variable pathogenicity of crystalline silica, whereby intrinsic characteristics and extrinsic modifications of the crystalline silica govern reactivity. Indeed, chemical impurities (up to 4 wt% aluminum) and substantial structural defects have been implicated in the reduced potency of volcanic cristobalite. However, whilst not overtly toxic, volcanic ash exposure can initiate a sample-dependent inflammatory response in macrophages, a cell type that provides a first line of defense against inhaled particles. Inflammation plays a pivotal role in crystal-driven disease progression and can be observed in patients with particle-induced lung disease. We demonstrate that ash can induce inflammation by stimulating the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic receptor complex that drives the inflammatory response to several endo- and exogenous crystalline materials. The impact of inflammasome activation mediated by inhaled ash particles and its potential relevance in chronic pulmonary diseases was confirmed in primary human cells; however, it is not yet known whether the response resolves in vivo. The NLRP3 inflammasome as an ash

  10. Volcanic ash-based geopolymer cements/concretes: the current state of the art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djobo, Jean Noël Yankwa; Elimbi, Antoine; Tchakouté, Hervé Kouamo; Kumar, Sanjay

    2017-02-01

    The progress achieved with the use of volcanic ash for geopolymer synthesis has been critically reviewed in this paper. This consists of an overview of mineralogy and chemistry of volcanic ash. The role of chemical composition and mineral contents of volcanic ash on their reactivity during geopolymerization reaction and, consequently, mechanical properties have been accessed. An attempt has been made to establish a relationship between synthesis factors and final properties. A critical assessment of some synthesis conditions has been addressed and some practical recommendations given along with suggestions of future works that have to be done. All this has shown that there are still many works such as durability tests (carbonation, freeze-thaw, resistance, etc.), life cycle analysis, etc. that need to be done in order to satisfy both suitability and sustainability criteria for a large-scale or industrial application.

  11. SO2 as a possible proxy for volcanic ash in aviation hazard avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, T. M.; Thomas, G. E.; Carboni, E.; Smith, A. J. A.; Grainger, R. G.

    2013-06-01

    Airborne volcanic ash poses a significant danger to aircraft, but is difficult to quantify accurately using satellite data, while sulphur dioxide is much easier to detect accurately, but is much less of a direct hazard to aviation. This paper investigates the reliability of using SO2 as a proxy for the location of volcanic ash, using an SO2 retrieval from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and ash detections from IASI and the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). Using a numerical "missed ash fraction" applied to the eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 and Puyehue-Cordón Caulle in 2011 reveals that the SO2 flag typically misses ˜30% of the detectable ash. Furthermore, the missed ash fraction is found to be highly variable, both between the two eruptions and over the course of each eruption, with values of over 80% found on some days. The detection threshold of the AATSR ash flag is also investigated using radiative transfer calculations, allowing the threshold of the IASI flag to be inferred, and these are related to the ash contamination levels.

  12. The influence of volcanic ash on GPS SNR signals through a laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranzulla, Massimo; Cannavo', Flavio; Scollo, Simona; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies carried out in different worldwide volcanoes (e.g. Mt. Redoubt in Alaska, Mt. Etna in Italy) have shown the capability to detect volcanic plumes by using GNSS Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). Those studies are based on the direct satellite signal measured by the SNR. For the GNSS frequency bands, the SNR signal should not be sensitive to water vapour variations, and the direct signal can be only attenuated in presence of anomalies. In order to further investigate the interaction between GNSS SNR and volcanic ash, to constrain the limitations of the proposed approach, a laboratory experiment was conducted. In particular, the experiment set-up was designed to measure the interaction among the GPS L1, L2 carriers and volcanic ash and consisted of: i) n. 2 identical high-frequency GNSS receivers; ii) n. 1 weather station; iii) n. 1 container; iv) n. 1 ground humidity sensor. A conical container having the same length, width and height of 1 m was used to hold the volcanic ash having two different particle sizes (namely fine and coarse classes). The container was built using a material transparent to the GPS L1 and L2 carriers. The container shape was a truncated cone with a vertex angle of 100°able to contain a volume of about 60 dm3. One receiver was placed below the container while the other one, used as reference, was located nearby in free air. The differences between the L1 and L2 signals of the two receivers was used to study the contribution of the volcanic ash.. We performed different type of measurements: i) in absence of ash (bottom); ii) changing the height of the 'fine' ash inside the container in steps of quarter-wave; iii) changing the height of the 'coarse' ash inside the container in steps of quarter-wave. Preliminary important results are here shown and described.

  13. Impact of Volcanic Ash on Road and Airfield Surface Skid Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Blake

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash deposited on paved surfaces during volcanic eruptions often compromises skid resistance, which is a major component of safety. We adopt the British pendulum test method in laboratory conditions to investigate the skid resistance of road asphalt and airfield concrete surfaces covered by volcanic ash sourced from various locations in New Zealand. Controlled variations in ash characteristics include type, depth, wetness, particle size and soluble components. We use Stone Mastic Asphalt (SMA for most road surface experiments but also test porous asphalt, line-painted road surfaces, and a roller screed concrete mix used for airfields. Due to their importance for skid resistance, SMA surface macrotexture and microtexture are analysed with semi-quantitative image analysis, microscopy and a standardised sand patch volumetric test, which enables determination of the relative effectiveness of different cleaning techniques. We find that SMA surfaces covered by thin deposits (~1 mm of ash result in skid resistance values slightly lower than those observed on wet uncontaminated surfaces. At these depths, a higher relative soluble content for low-crystalline ash and a coarser particle size results in lower skid resistance. Skid resistance results for relatively thicker deposits (3–5 mm of non-vesiculated basaltic ash are similar to those for thin deposits. There are similarities between road asphalt and airfield concrete, although there is little difference in skid resistance between bare airfield surfaces and airfield surfaces covered by 1 mm of ash. Based on our findings, we provide recommendations for maintaining road safety and effective cleaning techniques in volcanic ash environments.

  14. Chemical changes induced by pH manipulations of volcanic ash-influenced soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah Page-Dumroese; Dennis Ferguson; Paul McDaniel; Jodi Johnson-Maynard

    2007-01-01

    Data from volcanic ash-influenced soils indicates that soil pH may change by as much as 3 units during a year. The effects of these changes on soil chemical properties are not well understood. Our study examined soil chemical changes after artificially altering soil pH of ash-influenced soils in a laboratory. Soil from the surface (0-5 cm) and subsurface (10-15 cm)...

  15. Signal to Noise Ratio Estimations for a Volcanic ASH Detection Lidar. Case Study: The Met Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoussis, George; Adam, Mariana; Avdikos, George

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we calculate the Signal-to-Noise (SNR) ratio of a 3-channel commercial (Raymetics) volcanic ash detection system, (LR111-D300), already operating under Met Office organization. The methodology for the accurate estimation is presented for day and nighttime conditions. The results show that SNR values are higher than 10 for ranges up to 13 km for both nighttime and daytime conditions. This is a quite good result compared with other values presented in bibliography and proves that such system is able to detect volcanic ash over a range of 20 km.

  16. Signal to Noise Ratio Estimations for a Volcanic ASH Detection Lidar. Case Study: The Met Office

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgoussis George

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we calculate the Signal-to-Noise (SNR ratio of a 3-channel commercial (Raymetics volcanic ash detection system, (LR111-D300, already operating under Met Office organization. The methodology for the accurate estimation is presented for day and nighttime conditions. The results show that SNR values are higher than 10 for ranges up to 13 km for both nighttime and daytime conditions. This is a quite good result compared with other values presented in bibliography and proves that such system is able to detect volcanic ash over a range of 20 km.

  17. Stratospheric volcanic ash emissions from the 13 February 2014 Kelut eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Prata, A. J.; Stohl, A.; Carn, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Mount Kelut (Indonesia) erupted explosively around 15:50 UT on 13 February 2014 sending ash and gases into the stratosphere. Satellite ash retrievals and dispersion transport modeling are combined within an inversion framework to estimate the volcanic ash source term and to study ash transport. The estimated source term suggests that most of the ash was injected to altitudes of 16-17 km, in agreement with space-based lidar data. Modeled ash concentrations along the flight track of a commercial aircraft that encountered the ash cloud indicate that it flew under the main ash cloud and encountered maximum ash concentrations of 9 ± 3 mg m-3, mean concentrations of 2 ± 1 mg m-3over a period of 10-11 min of the flight, giving a dosage of 1.2 ± 0.3 g s m-3. Satellite data could not be used directly to observe the ash cloud encountered by the aircraft, whereas inverse modeling revealed its presence.

  18. Volcanic ash layers illuminate the resilience of Neanderthals and early modern humans to natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John; Barton, Nick; Blockley, Simon; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Cullen, Victoria L.; Davies, William; Gamble, Clive; Grant, Katharine; Hardiman, Mark; Housley, Rupert; Lane, Christine S.; Lee, Sharen; Lewis, Mark; MacLeod, Alison; Menzies, Martin; Müller, Wolfgang; Pollard, Mark; Price, Catherine; Roberts, Andrew P.; Rohling, Eelco J.; Satow, Chris; Smith, Victoria C.; Stringer, Chris B.; Tomlinson, Emma L.; White, Dustin; Albert, Paul; Arienzo, Ilenia; Barker, Graeme; Borić, Dušan; Carandente, Antonio; Civetta, Lucia; Ferrier, Catherine; Guadelli, Jean-Luc; Karkanas, Panagiotis; Koumouzelis, Margarita; Müller, Ulrich C.; Orsi, Giovanni; Pross, Jörg; Rosi, Mauro; Shalamanov-Korobar, Ljiljiana; Sirakov, Nikolay; Tzedakis, Polychronis C.

    2012-01-01

    Marked changes in human dispersal and development during the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition have been attributed to massive volcanic eruption and/or severe climatic deterioration. We test this concept using records of volcanic ash layers of the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption dated to ca. 40,000 y ago (40 ka B.P.). The distribution of the Campanian Ignimbrite has been enhanced by the discovery of cryptotephra deposits (volcanic ash layers that are not visible to the naked eye) in archaeological cave sequences. They enable us to synchronize archaeological and paleoclimatic records through the period of transition from Neanderthal to the earliest anatomically modern human populations in Europe. Our results confirm that the combined effects of a major volcanic eruption and severe climatic cooling failed to have lasting impacts on Neanderthals or early modern humans in Europe. We infer that modern humans proved a greater competitive threat to indigenous populations than natural disasters. PMID:22826222

  19. Volcanic ash layers illuminate the resilience of Neanderthals and early modern humans to natural hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John; Barton, Nick; Blockley, Simon; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Cullen, Victoria L; Davies, William; Gamble, Clive; Grant, Katharine; Hardiman, Mark; Housley, Rupert; Lane, Christine S; Lee, Sharen; Lewis, Mark; MacLeod, Alison; Menzies, Martin; Müller, Wolfgang; Pollard, Mark; Price, Catherine; Roberts, Andrew P; Rohling, Eelco J; Satow, Chris; Smith, Victoria C; Stringer, Chris B; Tomlinson, Emma L; White, Dustin; Albert, Paul; Arienzo, Ilenia; Barker, Graeme; Boric, Dusan; Carandente, Antonio; Civetta, Lucia; Ferrier, Catherine; Guadelli, Jean-Luc; Karkanas, Panagiotis; Koumouzelis, Margarita; Müller, Ulrich C; Orsi, Giovanni; Pross, Jörg; Rosi, Mauro; Shalamanov-Korobar, Ljiljiana; Sirakov, Nikolay; Tzedakis, Polychronis C

    2012-08-21

    Marked changes in human dispersal and development during the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition have been attributed to massive volcanic eruption and/or severe climatic deterioration. We test this concept using records of volcanic ash layers of the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption dated to ca. 40,000 y ago (40 ka B.P.). The distribution of the Campanian Ignimbrite has been enhanced by the discovery of cryptotephra deposits (volcanic ash layers that are not visible to the naked eye) in archaeological cave sequences. They enable us to synchronize archaeological and paleoclimatic records through the period of transition from Neanderthal to the earliest anatomically modern human populations in Europe. Our results confirm that the combined effects of a major volcanic eruption and severe climatic cooling failed to have lasting impacts on Neanderthals or early modern humans in Europe. We infer that modern humans proved a greater competitive threat to indigenous populations than natural disasters.

  20. Estimation of optimal dispersion model source parameters using satellite detections of volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidikheri, Meelis J.; Lucas, Christopher; Potts, Rodney J.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how parameters describing the geometry of the volcanic ash source for a particular volcanic ash dispersion model (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT)) may be inferred by the use of satellite data and multiple trial simulations. The areas of space likely to be contaminated by ash are identified with the aid of various remote sensing techniques, and polygons are drawn around these areas as they would be in an operational setting. Dispersion model simulations are initialized by either a cylindrical source or a specified ash distribution depending on the context. Parameters of interest such as the base and top height, diameter, and optimal release time of the cylindrical source or the height of the specified ash distribution are inferred by forming a parameter grid and running multiple simulations for each parameter grid point value. Optimal values of the parameter values are identified by calculating spatial correlations between the model simulations and observations. We demonstrate that the methodology can be used to correctly infer various model parameters and improve volcanic ash forecasts in various eruption case studies.

  1. Volcanic ash detection and retrievals using MODIS data by means of neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Picchiani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash clouds detection and retrieval represent a key issue for aviation safety due to the harming effects on aircraft. A lesson learned from the recent Eyjafjallajokull eruption is the need to obtain accurate and reliable retrievals on a real time basis.

    In this work we have developed a fast and accurate Neural Network (NN approach to detect and retrieve volcanic ash cloud properties from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data in the Thermal InfraRed (TIR spectral range. Some measurements collected during the 2001, 2002 and 2006 Mt. Etna volcano eruptions have been considered as test cases.

    The ash detection and retrievals obtained from the Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD algorithm are used as training for the NN procedure that consists in two separate steps: ash detection and ash mass retrieval. The ash detection is reduced to a classification problem by identifying two classes: "ashy" and "non-ashy" pixels in the MODIS images. Then the ash mass is estimated by means of the NN, replicating the BTD-based model performances. A segmentation procedure has also been tested to remove the false ash pixels detection induced by the presence of high meteorological clouds. The segmentation procedure shows a clear advantage in terms of classification accuracy: the main drawback is the loss of information on ash clouds distal part.

    The results obtained are very encouraging; indeed the ash detection accuracy is greater than 90%, while a mean RMSE equal to 0.365 t km−2 has been obtained for the ash mass retrieval. Moreover, the NN quickness in results delivering makes the procedure extremely attractive in all the cases when the rapid response time of the system is a mandatory requirement.

  2. Data assimilation for volcanic ash plumes using a satellite observational operator: a case study on the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangliang; Prata, Fred; Lin, Hai Xiang; Heemink, Arnold; Segers, Arjo; Lu, Sha

    2017-01-01

    Using data assimilation (DA) to improve model forecast accuracy is a powerful approach that requires available observations. Infrared satellite measurements of volcanic ash mass loadings are often used as input observations for the assimilation scheme. However, because these primary satellite-retrieved data are often two-dimensional (2-D) and the ash plume is usually vertically located in a narrow band, directly assimilating the 2-D ash mass loadings in a three-dimensional (3-D) volcanic ash model (with an integral observational operator) can usually introduce large artificial/spurious vertical correlations.In this study, we look at an approach to avoid the artificial vertical correlations by not involving the integral operator. By integrating available data of ash mass loadings and cloud top heights, as well as data-based assumptions on thickness, we propose a satellite observational operator (SOO) that translates satellite-retrieved 2-D volcanic ash mass loadings to 3-D concentrations. The 3-D SOO makes the analysis step of assimilation comparable in the 3-D model space.Ensemble-based DA is used to assimilate the extracted measurements of ash concentrations. The results show that satellite DA with SOO can improve the estimate of volcanic ash state and the forecast. Comparison with both satellite-retrieved data and aircraft in situ measurements shows that the effective duration of the improved volcanic ash forecasts for the distal part of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano is about 6 h.

  3. Automatic Estimation of Volcanic Ash Plume Height using WorldView-2 Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, David; Thompson, David R.; Davies, Ashley G.; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Chien, Steve

    2012-01-01

    We explore the use of machine learning, computer vision, and pattern recognition techniques to automatically identify volcanic ash plumes and plume shadows, in WorldView-2 imagery. Using information of the relative position of the sun and spacecraft and terrain information in the form of a digital elevation map, classification, the height of the ash plume can also be inferred. We present the results from applying this approach to six scenes acquired on two separate days in April and May of 2010 of the Eyjafjallajokull eruption in Iceland. These results show rough agreement with ash plume height estimates from visual and radar based measurements.

  4. Deposition or not? The fate of volcanic ash after aggregation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sebastian B.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Ayris, Paul M.; Casas, Ana S.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Ametsbichler, Jonathan; Delmelle, Pierre; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Jacob, Michael; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    In the course of explosive volcanic eruptions, large amounts of ash are released into the atmosphere and may subsequently pose a threat to infrastructure, such as aviation industry. Ash plume forecasting is therefore a crucial tool for volcanic hazard mitigation but may be significantly affected by aggregation, altering the aerodynamic properties of particles. Models struggle with the implementation of aggregation since external conditions promoting aggregation have not been completely understood; in a previous study we have shown the rapid generation of ash aggregates through liquid bonding via the use of fluidization bed technology and further defined humidity and temperature ranges necessary to trigger aggregation. Salt (NaCl) was required for the recovery of stable aggregates, acting as a cementation agent and granting aggregate cohesion. A numerical model was used to explain the physics behind particle aggregation mechanisms and further predicted a dependency of aggregation efficiency on liquid binder viscosity. In this study we proof the effect of viscosity on particle aggregation. HCl and H2SO4 solutions were diluted to various concentrations resulting in viscosities between 1 and 2 mPas. Phonolitic and rhyolitic ash samples as well as soda-lime glass beads (serving as analogue material) were fluidized in the ProCell Lab® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH and treated with the acids via a bottom-spray technique. Chemically driven interaction between acid liquids and surfaces of the three used materials led to crystal precipitation. Salt crystals (e.g. NaCl) have been confirmed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and leachate analysis. Both volcanic ash samples as well as the glass beads showed a clear dependency of aggregation efficiency on viscosity of the sprayed HCl solution. Spraying H2SO4 provoked a collapse of the fluidized bed and no aggregation has been observed. This is accounted by the high hygroscopicity of H2SO4. Dissolving CaCl2 (known to be

  5. Effects of Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash on innate immune system responses and bacterial growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monick, Martha M; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Powers, Linda S; Borcherding, Jennifer A; Caraballo, Juan C; Mudunkotuwa, Imali; Peate, David W; Walters, Katherine; Thompson, Jay M; Grassian, Vicki H; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Comellas, Alejandro P

    2013-06-01

    On 20 March 2010, the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull erupted for the first time in 190 years. Despite many epidemiological reports showing effects of volcanic ash on the respiratory system, there are limited data evaluating cellular mechanisms involved in the response to ash. Epidemiological studies have observed an increase in respiratory infections in subjects and populations exposed to volcanic eruptions. We physicochemically characterized volcanic ash, finding various sizes of particles, as well as the presence of several transition metals, including iron. We examined the effect of Eyjafjallajökull ash on primary rat alveolar epithelial cells and human airway epithelial cells (20-100 µg/cm(2)), primary rat and human alveolar macrophages (5-20 µg/cm(2)), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) growth (3 µg/104 bacteria). Volcanic ash had minimal effect on alveolar and airway epithelial cell integrity. In alveolar macrophages, volcanic ash disrupted pathogen-killing and inflammatory responses. In in vitro bacterial growth models, volcanic ash increased bacterial replication and decreased bacterial killing by antimicrobial peptides. These results provide potential biological plausibility for epidemiological data that show an association between air pollution exposure and the development of respiratory infections. These data suggest that volcanic ash exposure, while not seriously compromising lung cell function, may be able to impair innate immunity responses in exposed individuals.

  6. The identification and tracking of volcanic ash using the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeger, A. R.; Christopher, S. A.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we develop an algorithm based on combining spectral, spatial, and temporal thresholds from the geostationary Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) daytime measurements to identify and track different aerosol types, primarily volcanic ash. Contemporary methods typically do not use temporal information to identify ash. We focus not only on the identification and tracking of volcanic ash during the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption period beginning in 14 April and ending 17 May 2010 but also on a pixel-level classification method for separating various classes in the SEVIRI images. Three case studies on 13, 16, and 17 May are analyzed in extensive detail with other satellite data including from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe146 aircraft data to verify the aerosol spatial distribution maps generated by the SEVIRI algorithm. Our results indicate that the SEVIRI algorithm is able to track volcanic ash when the solar zenith angle is lower than about 65°. Furthermore, the BAe146 aircraft data show that the SEVIRI algorithm detects nearly all ash regions when AOD > 0.2. However, the algorithm has higher uncertainties when AOD is ash spatial distributions provided by this algorithm can be used as a critical input and validation for atmospheric dispersion models simulated by Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs). Identifying volcanic ash is an important first step before quantitative retrievals of ash concentration can be made.

  7. Multi-Partner Experiment to Test Volcanic-Ash Ingestion by a Jet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekki, John; Lyall, Eric; Guffanti, Marianne; Fisher, John; Erlund, Beth; Clarkson, Rory; van de Wall, Allan

    2013-01-01

    A research team of U.S. Government agencies and engine manufacturers are designing an experiment to test volcanic-ash ingestion by a NASA owned F117 engine that was donated by the U.S. Air Force. The experiment is being conducted under the auspices of NASA s Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) Program and will take place in early 2014 at Edwards AFB in California as an on-ground, on-wing test. The primary objectives are to determine the effect on the engine of several hours of exposure to low to moderate ash concentrations, currently proposed at 1 and 10 mg/m3 and to evaluate the capability of engine health management technologies for detecting these effects. A natural volcanic ash will be used that is representative of distal ash clouds many 100's to approximately 1000 km from a volcanic source i.e., the ash should be composed of fresh glassy particles a few tens of microns in size. The glassy ash particles are expected to soften and become less viscous when exposed to the high temperatures of the combustion chamber, then stick to the nozzle guide vanes of the high-pressure turbine. Numerous observations and measurements of the engine s performance and degradation will be made during the course of the experiment, including borescope and tear-down inspections. While not intended to be sufficient for rigorous certification of engine performance when ash is ingested, the experiment should provide useful information to aircraft manufacturers, airline operators, and military and civil regulators in their efforts to evaluate the range of risks that ash hazards pose to aviation.

  8. Comparative analyses of glass fragments from brittle fracture experiments and volcanic ash particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürig, Tobias; Mele, Daniela; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2012-04-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are characterized by the rapid fragmentation of a magmatic melt into ash particles. In order to describe the energy dissipation during fragmentation it is important to understand the mechanism of material failure. A quantitative description of fragmentation is only possible under controlled laboratory conditions. Industrial silicate glasses have a high structural affinity with magmatic melts and have the advantage of being transparent, which allows the study of the evolution of fractures by optical methods on a time scale relevant for explosive volcanism. With this aim, a series of low speed edge-on hammer impact experiments on silicate glass targets has been conducted, leading to the generation of fragments in the grain-size spectra of volcanic ash. In order to verify the general transferability of the experimentally generated fragmentation dynamics to volcanic processes, the resulting products were compared, by means of statistical particle-shape analyses, to particles produced by standardized magma fragmentation experiments and to natural ash particles coming from deposits of basaltic and rhyolitic compositions from the 2004 Grimsvötn and the Quaternary Tepexitl tuff-ring eruptions, respectively. Natural ash particles from both Grimsvötn and Tepexitl show significant similarities with experimental fragments of thermally pre-stressed float glasses, indicating a dominant influence of preexisting stresses on particle shape and suggesting analogous fragmentation processes within the studied materials.

  9. Volcanic Ash Soils: Sustainable Soil Management Practices, With Examples of Harvest Effects and Root Disease Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike Curran; Pat Green; Doug Maynard

    2007-01-01

    Sustainability protocols recognize forest soil disturbance as an important issue at national and international levels. At regional levels continual monitoring and testing of standards, practices, and effects are necessary for successful implementation of sustainable soil management. Volcanic ash-cap soils are affected by soil disturbance and changes to soil properties...

  10. The future of volcanic ash-aircraft interactions from technical and policy perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, T. J.; Guffanti, M.

    2010-12-01

    Since the advent of jet-powered flight in the 1960s, the threat of volcanic ash to aviation operations has become widely recognized and the mitigation of this threat has received concerted international attention. At the same time the susceptibility to operational disruption has grown. Technical improvements to airframes, engines, and avionic systems have been made in response to the need for improved fuel efficiency and the demand for increased capacity for passenger and freight traffic. Operational demands have resulted in the growth of extended overseas flight operations (ETOPS), increased flight frequency on air traffic routes, and closer spacing of aircraft on heavily traveled routes. The net result has been great advances in flight efficiency, but also increased susceptibility to flight disruption, especially in heavily traveled regions such as North Atlantic-Europe, North America, and the North Pacific. Advances in ash avoidance procedures, pilot and air manager training, and in detection of ash-related damage and maintenance of aircraft and engines have been spurred by noteworthy eruptions such as Galunggung, Indonesia, 1982; Redoubt, Alaska, 1989-1990; and Pinatubo, Philippines, 1991. Comparable advances have been made in the detection and tracking of volcanic ash clouds using satellite-based remote sensing and numerical trajectory forecast models. Following the April 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland, the global aviation community again focused attention on the issue of safe air operations in airspace affected by volcanic ash. The enormous global disruption to air traffic in the weeks after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption has placed added emphasis for the global air traffic management system as well as on the equipment manufacturers to reevaluate air operations in ash-affected airspace. Under the leadership of the International Civil Aviation Organization and the World Meteorological Organization, efforts are being made to address this

  11. Development of Soil Bacterial Communities in Volcanic Ash Microcosms in a Range of Climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfahi, Dorsaf; Tateno, Ryunosuke; Takahashi, Koichi; Cho, HyunJun; Kim, Hyoki; Adams, Jonathan M

    2017-05-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding the processes of microbial development in volcanic ash. We tested the predictions that there would be (1) a distinctive bacterial community associated with soil development on volcanic ash, including groups previously implicated in weathering studies; (2) a slower increase in bacterial abundance and soil C and N accumulation in cooler climates; and (3) a distinct communities developing on the same substrate in different climates. We set up an experiment, taking freshly fallen, sterilized volcanic ash from Sakurajima volcano, Japan. Pots of ash were positioned in multiple locations, with mean annual temperature (MAT) ranging from 18.6 to -3 °C. Within 12 months, bacteria were detectable by qPCR in all pots. By 24 months, bacterial copy numbers had increased by 10-100 times relative to a year before. C and N content approximately doubled between 12 and 24 months. HiSeq and MiSeq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed a distinctive bacterial community, different from developed vegetated soils in the same areas, for example in containing an abundance of unclassified bacterial groups. Community composition also differed between the ash pots at different sites, while showing no pattern in relation to MAT. Contrary to our predictions, the bacterial abundance did not show any relation to MAT. It also did not correlate to pH or N, and only C was statistically significant. It appears that bacterial community development on volcanic ash can be a rapid process not closely sensitive to temperature, involving distinct communities from developed soils.

  12. Data assimilation for volcanic ash plumes using a satellite observational operator: A case study on the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, G.; Prata, F.; Xiang Lin, H.; Heemink, A.; Segers, A.; Lu, S.

    2017-01-01

    Using data assimilation (DA) to improve model forecast accuracy is a powerful approach that requires available observations. Infrared satellite measurements of volcanic ash mass loadings are often used as input observations for the assimilation scheme. However, because these primary

  13. Dispersed Ash in Marine Sediment: An Overview Towards Unraveling the 'Missing Volcanic Record'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R. W.; Scudder, R.; Kutterolf, S.; Schindlbeck, J.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash occurs in marine sediment both as discrete layers as well as isolated grains and shards dispersed throughout the bulk sediment, and with highly variable grain sizes. The study of this dispersed component has lagged behind the sophisticated petrographic, sedimentologic, geochemical, and isotopic assessment of the ash layer record. For example, while decades of smear-slide studies of bulk sediment in volcanic-rich regimes have presented visual estimations of the abundance of 'volcanic glass', 'shards', and/or other components, the quantitative importance of the dispersed ash and/or the cryptotephra component remains largely unconstrained on local, regional, and global scales. Chemical and isotopic characterization of this dispersed component has remained elusive. Building on earlier work, research in the 1970s began documenting the importance of dispersed ash and its alteration products. This dispersed ash is the result of the bioturbation of pre-existing discrete layers, the settling of airborne ash, distribution from subaqueous eruptions, and other mechanisms. Compared to the often visually stunning ash layer records, which in certain settings can leave single layers with thicknesses of 10s of cm, the dispersed ash component and cryptotephra layers are unable to be visually differentiated from detrital clay. Furthermore, its extremely fine grain size is an additional hindrance to quantification of its abundance and the identification of source. More completely characterizing the total ash inventory (that is, the dispersed ash in addition to the ash layers) will contribute significantly to studies of marine and terrestrial volcanism at many scales, geochemical mass balances, arc evolution, hydration of marine sediment during alteration, atmospheric circulation, putative relationships between volcanism and climate, and other key components of the earth-ocean-atmosphere system. Beginning with work in the Caribbean Sea and progressing to the northwest

  14. MODIS volcanic ash retrievals vs FALL3D transport model: a quantitative comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Folch, A.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite retrievals and transport models represents the key tools to monitor the volcanic clouds evolution. Because of the harming effects of fine ash particles on aircrafts, the real-time tracking and forecasting of volcanic clouds is key for aviation safety. Together with the security reasons also the economical consequences of a disruption of airports must be taken into account. The airport closures due to the recent Icelandic Eyjafjöll eruption caused millions of passengers to be stranded not only in Europe, but across the world. IATA (the International Air Transport Association) estimates that the worldwide airline industry has lost a total of about 2.5 billion of Euro during the disruption. Both security and economical issues require reliable and robust ash cloud retrievals and trajectory forecasting. The intercomparison between remote sensing and modeling is required to assure precise and reliable volcanic ash products. In this work we perform a quantitative comparison between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals of volcanic ash cloud mass and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) with the FALL3D ash dispersal model. MODIS, aboard the NASA-Terra and NASA-Aqua polar satellites, is a multispectral instrument with 36 spectral bands operating in the VIS-TIR spectral range and spatial resolution varying between 250 and 1000 m at nadir. The MODIS channels centered around 11 and 12 micron have been used for the ash retrievals through the Brightness Temperature Difference algorithm and MODTRAN simulations. FALL3D is a 3-D time-dependent Eulerian model for the transport and deposition of volcanic particles that outputs, among other variables, cloud column mass and AOD. Three MODIS images collected the October 28, 29 and 30 on Mt. Etna volcano during the 2002 eruption have been considered as test cases. The results show a general good agreement between the retrieved and the modeled volcanic clouds in the first 300 km from the vents. Even if the

  15. A Multi-Sensor Approach for Volcanic Ash Cloud Retrieval and Eruption Characterization: The 23 November 2013 Etna Lava Fountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Corradini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic activity is observed worldwide with a variety of ground and space-based remote sensing instruments, each with advantages and drawbacks. No single system can give a comprehensive description of eruptive activity, and so, a multi-sensor approach is required. This work integrates infrared and microwave volcanic ash retrievals obtained from the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG-Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI, the polar-orbiting Aqua-MODIS and ground-based weather radar. The expected outcomes are improvements in satellite volcanic ash cloud retrieval (altitude, mass, aerosol optical depth and effective radius, the generation of new satellite products (ash concentration and particle number density in the thermal infrared and better characterization of volcanic eruptions (plume altitude, total ash mass erupted and particle number density from thermal infrared to microwave. This approach is the core of the multi-platform volcanic ash cloud estimation procedure being developed within the European FP7-APhoRISM project. The Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy volcano lava fountaining event of 23 November 2013 was considered as a test case. The results of the integration show the presence of two volcanic cloud layers at different altitudes. The improvement of the volcanic ash cloud altitude leads to a mean difference between the SEVIRI ash mass estimations, before and after the integration, of about the 30%. Moreover, the percentage of the airborne “fine” ash retrieved from the satellite is estimated to be about 1%–2% of the total ash emitted during the eruption. Finally, all of the estimated parameters (volcanic ash cloud altitude, thickness and total mass were also validated with ground-based visible camera measurements, HYSPLIT forward trajectories, Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI satellite data and tephra deposits.

  16. Volcanic Ash from the 1999 Eruption of Mount Cameroon Volcano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-10-21

    Oct 21, 2008 ... Economic Geology Unit, Department of Geology and Environmental Science, University of Buea, P.O. Box 63, Buea, South ..... mars 1999. Health Science and Disease 3, 62-63. Araya, O., Wittwer, F. and Villa, A., (1993): Evolution of fluoride concentrations in cattle and grass following a volcanic eruption.

  17. Distinguishing Remobilized Ash From Erupted Volcanic Plumes Using Space-Borne Multiangle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Verity J. B.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    2017-10-01

    Volcanic systems are composed of a complex combination of ongoing eruptive activity and secondary hazards, such as remobilized ash plumes. Similarities in the visual characteristics of remobilized and erupted plumes, as imaged by satellite-based remote sensing, complicate the accurate classification of these events. The stereo imaging capabilities of the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) were used to determine the altitude and distribution of suspended particles. Remobilized ash shows distinct dispersion, with particles distributed within 1.5 km of the surface. Particle transport is consistently constrained by local topography, limiting dispersion pathways downwind. The MISR Research Aerosol retrieval algorithm was used to assess plume particle microphysical properties. Remobilized ash plumes displayed a dominance of large particles with consistent absorption and angularity properties, distinct from emitted plumes. The combination of vertical distribution, topographic control, and particle microphysical properties makes it possible to distinguish remobilized ash flows from eruptive plumes, globally.

  18. Electrical interaction between atmospheric volcanic ash and aircraft in flight:mechanisms and application for hazard detection

    OpenAIRE

    Malton, Bryce

    2015-01-01

    The charging of aircraft surfaces in flight by ice and other particulates has been studied since the 1940’s, and volcanic ash suspended within dispersed plumes has been a hazard to aviation since the advent of commercial jet airliners in the 1960s. This study examines the interaction of volcanic ash particles with metallic surfaces likely to be found on an aircraft, and its ability to charge those surfaces by impact. We do this by directing a high-pressure jet of mixed air and volcanic ash, s...

  19. Investigation of the spectral refractive indices of volcanic ash materials using satellite infrared sounder measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, H.; Hayashi, Y.

    2016-12-01

    In the IR window region with wavenumber range of 700-1250 cm-1, a volcanic ash cloud shows a typical spectral signature in the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data and in the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) data. The spectral signature depends on the Si-O bond characteristics of the erupted silicate material and therefore it is correlated with the mineral type and SiO2 content. In this work, brightness temperature (BT) spectrums of the volcanic ash clouds in the IR window region has been simulated in detail from the radiative transfer calculations by taking into account the appropriate atmospheric profiles, sea surface temperature/emissivity, atmospheric gas absorptions, and ash-scattering properties. From iterative least-square calculations using measured and simulated BTs, we made estimations of the ash refractive index (RI) as well as the ash cloud parameters (optical depth, particles effective radius, and ash cloud pressure heights). Some estimated RIs were consistent with the reported rock types of the volcanoes, which had been previously classified by compositional analyses in the literature. Furthermore, weak absorptions likely due to Si-O and/or Al-O vibrations, which have been proposed in reports from previous laboratory FTIR experiments for some silicate glass samples were identified. These results suggest that the BT features can potentially allow a diagnosis of the rock type from the measurement of ash clouds. The spectral RI estimated from the analyses of data from a satellite infrared sounder can be used to analyze other satellite measurements. In particular, information for the detailed RI in the infrared region contribute to ash cloud quantification and monitoring from measurements by next-generation geostationary satellites, such as the Japanese HIMAWARI-8.

  20. Initial fate of fine ash and sulfur from large volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Self

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Large volcanic eruptions emit huge amounts of sulfur and fine ash into the stratosphere. These products cause an impact on radiative processes, temperature and wind patterns. In simulations with a General Circulation Model including detailed aerosol microphysics, the relation between the impact of sulfur and fine ash is determined for different eruption strengths and locations, one in the tropics and one in high Northern latitudes. Fine ash with effective radii between 1 μm and 15 μm has a lifetime of several days only. Nevertheless, the strong absorption of shortwave and long-wave radiation causes additional heating and cooling of ±20 K/day and impacts the evolution of the volcanic cloud. Depending on the location of the volcanic eruption, transport direction changes due to the presence of fine ash, vortices develop and temperature anomalies at ground increase. The results show substantial impact on the local scale but only minor impact on the evolution of sulfate in the stratosphere in the month after the simulated eruptions.

  1. Volcanic Ash and Aviation - the 2014 Eruptions of Kelut and Sangeang Api, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupper, A. C.; Jansons, E.

    2014-12-01

    Two significant eruptions in Indonesia during the first part of 2014 have highlighted the continuing challenges of safe air traffic management around volcanic ash clouds. The stratospheric eruption of Kelut (also known as Kelud) in Java late on 13 February 2014 resulted in widespread aviation disruption over Indonesia and at least one serious volcanic ash encounter from an international airline. An upper-tropospheric eruption of Sangeang Api in the Lesser Sunda Islands on 30 May 2014 did not result in any known aircraft encounters, but did result in many delays and flight cancellations between Indonesia and Australia. In both cases, the eruption and resultant ash clouds were relatively well observed, if subject to the usual issues in characterising such clouds. For example, as tropical eruptions frequently reach 15 km amsl and above due to the height of the tropical tropopause, it is frequently very difficult to provide an accurate estimation of conditions at the cruising levels of aircraft, at 10-11 km (or lower for shorter domestic routes). More critically, the challenge of linking operational results from two scientific professions (volcanology and meteorology) with real-time aviation users remains strongly evident. Situational awareness of domestic and international airlines, ground-based monitoring and communications prior to and during the eruption, receiving and sharing pilot reports of volcanic ash, and appropriate flight responses all remain inadequate even in relatively fine conditions, with an unacceptable ongoing risk of serious aviation encounters should improvements not be made. Despite the extensive efforts of the International Civil Aviation Organization, World Meteorological Organization, and all partners in the International Airways Volcano Watch, and despite the acceleration of work on the issue since 2010, volcanic ash management remains sub-optimal.

  2. Computation of probabilistic hazard maps and source parameter estimation for volcanic ash transport and dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madankan, R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pouget, S. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Singla, P., E-mail: psingla@buffalo.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Bursik, M. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Dehn, J. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States); Jones, M. [Center for Computational Research, University at Buffalo (United States); Patra, A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pavolonis, M. [NOAA-NESDIS, Center for Satellite Applications and Research (United States); Pitman, E.B. [Department of Mathematics, University at Buffalo (United States); Singh, T. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Webley, P. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Volcanic ash advisory centers are charged with forecasting the movement of volcanic ash plumes, for aviation, health and safety preparation. Deterministic mathematical equations model the advection and dispersion of these plumes. However initial plume conditions – height, profile of particle location, volcanic vent parameters – are known only approximately at best, and other features of the governing system such as the windfield are stochastic. These uncertainties make forecasting plume motion difficult. As a result of these uncertainties, ash advisories based on a deterministic approach tend to be conservative, and many times over/under estimate the extent of a plume. This paper presents an end-to-end framework for generating a probabilistic approach to ash plume forecasting. This framework uses an ensemble of solutions, guided by Conjugate Unscented Transform (CUT) method for evaluating expectation integrals. This ensemble is used to construct a polynomial chaos expansion that can be sampled cheaply, to provide a probabilistic model forecast. The CUT method is then combined with a minimum variance condition, to provide a full posterior pdf of the uncertain source parameters, based on observed satellite imagery. The April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland is employed as a test example. The puff advection/dispersion model is used to hindcast the motion of the ash plume through time, concentrating on the period 14–16 April 2010. Variability in the height and particle loading of that eruption is introduced through a volcano column model called bent. Output uncertainty due to the assumed uncertain input parameter probability distributions, and a probabilistic spatial-temporal estimate of ash presence are computed.

  3. Modernization of the International Volcanic Ash Website - a global resource for ashfall preparedness and impact guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, K.; Leonard, G.; Stewart, C.; Wilson, T. M.; Randall, M.; Stovall, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    The internationally collaborative volcanic ash website (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/ash/) has been an important global information resource for ashfall preparedness and impact guidance since 2004. Recent volcanic ashfalls with significant local, regional, and global impacts highlighted the need to improve the website to make it more accessible and pertinent to users worldwide. Recently, the Volcanic Ash Impacts Working Group (Cities and Volcanoes Commission of IAVCEI) redesigned and modernized the website. Improvements include 1) a database-driven back end, 2) reorganized menu navigation, 3) language translation, 4) increased downloadable content, 5) addition of ash-impact case studies, 7) expanded and updated references , 8) an image database, and 9) inclusion of cooperating organization's logos. The database-driven platform makes the website more dynamic and efficient to operate and update. New menus provide information about specific impact topics (buildings, transportation, power, health, agriculture, water and waste water, equipment and communications, clean up) and updated content has been added throughout all topics. A new "for scientists" menu includes information on ash collection and analysis. Website translation using Google translate will significantly increase user base. Printable resources (e.g. checklists, pamphlets, posters) provide information to people without Internet access. Ash impact studies are used to improve mitigation measures during future eruptions, and links to case studies will assist communities' preparation and response plans. The Case Studies menu is intended to be a living topic area, growing as new case studies are published. A database of all images from the website allows users to access larger resolution images and additional descriptive details. Logos clarify linkages among key contributors and assure users that the site is authoritative and science-based.

  4. International collaboration between Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers: Geospatially enabled tools to ensure forecast harmonization across global air routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiensky, J. M.; Moore, D.; Kibler, J.; Bensimon, D.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic plumes and drifting ash clouds pose a risk to flight operations somewhere across the globe every day. Airborne ash plumes pose a significant hazard to aircraft and timely and accurate forecasts greatly help mitigate the risk of an encounter. The world's nine (9) Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) provide products and services to address the volcanic ash hazard to aviation. These nine centers are operated by the meteorological authority within the state in which they are located. Each VAAC has its unique set of tools and procedures on how the data will be captured, displayed, analyzed and turned into a suite of products. The end products (e.g. Volcanic Ash Advisories (VAA) and Volcanic Ash Graphic (VAG)) are standardized through the International Civil Aviation Organization's International Airways Volcano Watch Operations Group (ICAO IAVWOPSG). Improvements in methods of collaboration between the VAACs are needed to allow for a seamless global harmonization of volcanic ash products. A geospatially enabled tool would allow for a common operating platform, data sharing, and situational awareness. The North American VAACs have been testing a capability to provide this environment to make forecast collaboration simple across the globe. This presentation highlights work that has been done to demonstrate this capability.

  5. The relation between pre-eruptive bubble size distribution, ash particle morphology, and their internal density: Implications to volcanic ash transport and dispersion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Parameterization of volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models strongly depends on particle morphology and their internal properties. Shape of ash particles affects terminal fall velocities (TFV) and, mostly, dispersion. Internal density combined with particle size has a very strong impact on TFV and ultimately on the rate of ash cloud thinning and particle sedimentation on the ground. Unlike other parameters, internal particle density cannot be measured directly because of the micron scale sizes of fine ash particles, but we demonstrate that it varies greatly depending on the particle size. Small simple type ash particles (fragments of bubble walls, 5-20 micron size) do not contain whole large magmatic bubbles inside and their internal density is almost the same as that of volcanic glass matrix. On the other side, the larger compound type ash particles (>40 microns for silicic fine ashes) always contain some bubbles or the whole spectra of bubble size distribution (BSD), i.e. bubbles of all sizes, bringing their internal density down as compared to simple ash. So, density of the larger ash particles is a function of the void fraction inside them (magmatic bubbles) which, in turn, is controlled by BSD. Volcanic ash is a product of the fragmentation of magmatic foam formed by pre-eruptive bubble population and characterized by BSD. The latter can now be measured from bubble imprints on ash particle surfaces using stereo-scanning electron microscopy (SSEM) and BubbleMaker software developed at UNH, or using traditional high-resolution X-Ray tomography. In this work we present the mathematical and statistical formulation for this problem connecting internal ash density with particle size and BSD, and demonstrate how the TFV of the ash population is affected by variation of particle density.

  6. Ash dust co-centration in the vicinity of the ash disposal site depending on the size of the pond (“Water Mirror”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Gršić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power plants Nikola Tesla “A” and “B” are large sources of ash from their ashes/slag deposit sites. Total sizes of ashes/slag depots are 600ha and 382ha, with active cassettes having dimensions ∼200 ha and ∼130 ha. The active cassettes of the disposal sites are covered by rather large waste ponds, the sizes of vary depending on the working condition of a sluice system and on meteorological conditions. Modeling of ash lifting was attempted using results from the dust lifting research. The relation between sizes of ponds and air dust concentration in the vicinity of ash disposal sites was analyzed. As expected, greater sizes of dried disposal site surfaces in combination with stronger winds gave greater dust emission and greater air dust concentration.

  7. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Volcanic Ash Detection and Height Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of volcanic ash from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer (VIIRS) instrument...

  8. Volcanic ash modeling with the online NMMB/BSC-ASH-v1.0: A novel multiscale meteorological model for operational forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Alejandro; Folch, Arnau; Jorba, Oriol; Janjic, Zavisa

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash forecast became a research priority and a social concern as a consequence of the severe air-traffic disruptions caused by the eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland, 2010) and Cordón Caulle (Chile, 2011) volcanoes. Significant progress has taken place in the aftermath of these dramatic events to improve the accuracy of Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersal (VATD) models and lessen its associated uncertainties. Various levels of uncertainties affect both the quantification of the source term and the driving meteorological inputs. Substantial research is being performed to reduce and quantify epistemic and aleatoric uncertainties affecting the source term. However, uncertainties arising from the driving NWPMs and its coupling offline with the VATDMs have received little attention, even if the experience from other communities (e.g. air quality) highlights the importance of coupling online dispersal and meteorological modeling. Consequently, the need for integrated predictions to represent these two-way feedback effects of the volcanic pollutants on local-scale meteorology is timely. The aim of this talk is to present the NMMB/BSC-ASH, a new on-line multi-scale meteorological model to simulate the emission, transport and deposition of tephra particles released from volcanic eruptions. The model builds on the NMMB/BSC Chemical Transport Model (NMMB/BSC-CTM), which we have modified to account for the specifics of volcanic particles. The final objective in developing the NMMB/BSC-ASH model is two-fold. On one hand, at a research level, we aim at studying the differences between the online/offline approaches and quantify the two-way feedback effect of dense volcanic ash clouds on the radiative budget and regional meteorology. On the other hand, at an operational level, the low computational cost of the NMMB dynamic core suggests that NMMB/BSC-ASH could be applied in a future for more accurate online operational forecasting of volcanic ash clouds.

  9. Carbothermal reduction process of silica formed from shirasu volcanic ash using solar furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatakeyama Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallurgical grade silicon was formed using Shirasu volcanic ash as starting material with solar furnace. The solar furnace was composed of two parts: Fresnel lens and reacting furnace. The reacting furnace was composed of a cylindrical vacuum chamber and quartz glass plate functioning to guide the concentrated sunlight into the furnace, and was placed at the focal point of the Fresnel lens. The sample was made from a mixture of silica formed from Shirasu volcanic ash and carbon, and placed in the carbon crucible inside the reacting furnace. The sample was irradiated for 3 hours, and the furnace was left until it cooled down to room temperature. After the cooling process, the sample was mixed and placed in the carbon crucible, and it was irradiated and cooled with the same processes again. After the experiment, the sample was evaluated by X-ray diffraction and the production of silicon was confirmed.

  10. Formation of Silicon Carbide Using Volcanic Ash as Starting Material and Concentrated Sunlight as Energy Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke Nishioka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available SiC was formed using volcanic ash as starting material and concentrated sunlight as energy resource. The solar furnace was composed of two parts: Fresnel lens and reacting furnace. The reacting furnace was composed of a cylindrical vacuum chamber and quartz glass plate functioning to guide the concentrated sunlight into the furnace and was placed at the focal point of the Fresnel lens. The sample was made from the mixture of silica formed from volcanic ash and graphite and placed in the carbon crucible inside the reacting furnace. The temperature in the carbon crucible reached more than 1500°C. After the reaction using concentrated light, β-SiC was formed. The weight % of formed SiC was 90.5%.

  11. Case Study on Combined Lidar-Photometer Retrieval of Volcanic ASH Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasteiger Josef

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the benefit of considering sun-/skyphotometer measurements in a microphysical lidar retrieval. Furthermore, to assess the importance of the aerosol model employed by the retrieval, we compare results obtained using a spheroid aerosol model with results using an advanced aerosol model that considers irregular particle shapes. Preliminary results are shown for the massextinction conversion factor and the single scattering albedo during a measurement case of long-range-transported volcanic ash.

  12. Volcanic ash and daily mortality in Sweden after the Icelandic volcano eruption of May 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudin, Anna; Carlsen, Hanne K; Forsberg, Bertil; Johansson, Christer

    2013-12-10

    In the aftermath of the Icelandic volcano Grimsvötn's eruption on 21 May 2011, volcanic ash reached Northern Europe. Elevated levels of ambient particles (PM) were registered in mid Sweden. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the Grimsvötn eruption had an effect on mortality in Sweden. Based on PM measurements at 16 sites across Sweden, data were classified into an ash exposed data set (Ash area) and an unexposed data set (No ash area). Data on daily all-cause mortality were obtained from Statistics Sweden for the time period 1 April through 31 July 2011. Mortality ratios were calculated as the ratio between the daily number of deaths in the Ash area and the No ash area. The exposure period was defined as the week following the days with elevated particle concentrations, namely 24 May through 31 May. The control period was defined as 1 April through 23 May and 1 June through 31 July. There was no absolute increase in mortality during the exposure period. However, during the exposure period the mean mortality ratio was 2.42 compared with 2.17 during the control period, implying a relatively higher number of deaths in the Ash area than in the No ash area. The differences in ratios were mostly due to a single day, 31 May, and were not statistically significant when tested with a Mann-Whitney non-parametric test (p > 0.3). The statistical power was low with only 8 days in the exposure period (24 May through 31 May). Assuming that the observed relative differences were not due to chance, the results would imply an increase of 128 deaths during the exposure period 24-31 May. If 31 May was excluded, the number of extra deaths was reduced to 20. The results of the present study are contradicting and inconclusive, but may indicate that all-cause mortality was increased by the ash-fall from the Grimsvötn eruption. Meta-analysis or pooled analysis of data from neighboring countries might make it possible to reach sufficient statistical power to study effects

  13. Assimilating Aircraft-based measurements to improve the State of Distal Volcanic Ash Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangliang; Lin, Hai Xiang; Heemink, Arnold; Segers, Arjo; Lu, Sha; Palsson, Thorgeir

    2015-04-01

    The sudden eruption at the 1666 m high, ice-capped Eyjafjallajökull volcano, in south Iceland during 14 April to 23 May 2010, had caused an unprecedented closure of the European and North Atlantic airspace resulting in global economic losses of US5 billion. This has initiated a lot of research on how to improve aviation advice after eruption onset. Good estimation of both the state of volcanic ash cloud and the emission of volcano are crucial for providing a successful aviation advice. Currently most of the approaches, employing satellite-based and ground-based measurements, are in the focus of improving the definition of Eruption Source Parameters (ESPs) such as plume height and mass eruption rate, which are certainly very important for estimating volcano emission and state of volcanic ash cloud near to the volcano. However, for ash cloud state in a far field, these approaches can hardly make improvements. This is mainly because the influence of ESPs on the ash plume becomes weaker as the distance to the volcano is getting farther, thus for a distal plume the information of ESPs will have little influence. This study aims to find an efficient way to improve the state of distal volcanic ash cloud. We use real-life aircraft-based observations, measured along Dutch border between Borken and Twist during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an data assimilation system combining with a transport model to identify the potential benefit of this kind of observations and the influence on the ash state around Dutch border. We show that assimilating aircraft-based measurements can significantly improve the state of distal ash clouds, and further provide an improved aviation advice on distal ash plume. We compare the performances of different sequential data assimilation methods. The results show standard Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) works better than others, which is because of the strong nonlinearity of the dynamics and the EnKF's resampling Gaussianity nature

  14. Comparison of TOMS and AVHRR volcanic ash retrievals from the August 1992 eruption of Mt. Spurr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, N.A.; Torres, O.; Seftor, C.; Krueger, A.J.; Kostinski, A.; Rose, William I.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Schneider, D.; Schaefer, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    On August 19, 1992, the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard NOAA-12 and NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) onboard the Nimbus-7 satellite simultaneously detected and mapped the ash cloud from the eruption of Mt. Spurr, Alaska. The spatial extent and geometry of the cloud derived from the two datasets are in good agreement and both AVHRR split window IR (11-12??m brightness temperature difference) and the TOMS UV Aerosol Index (0.34-0.38??m ultraviolet backscattering and absorption) methods give the same range of total cloud ash mass. Redundant methods for determination of ash masses in drifting volcanic clouds offer many advantages for potential application to the mitigation of aircraft hazards.

  15. Volcanic-ash-derived forest soils of the inland Northwest: Properties and implications for management and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah Page-Dumroese; Richard Miller; Jim Mital; Paul McDaniel; Dan Miller

    2007-01-01

    Volcanic ash from the eruption of Mt. Mazama ~7,700 years ago has a strong influence on many forested landscapes of the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain regions of the USA and Canada. Because of the unique biological, physical and chemical properties of the ash, it is closely tied to plant communities and forest productivity, and should therefore be considered as a...

  16. Triboelectric charging of volcanic ash from the 2011 Grímsvötn eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Isobel M P; Aplin, Karen L; Nicoll, Keri A

    2013-09-13

    The plume from the 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn was highly electrically charged, as shown by the considerable lightning activity measured by the United Kingdom Met Office's low-frequency lightning detection network. Previous measurements of volcanic plumes have shown that ash particles are electrically charged up to hundreds of kilometers away from the vent, which indicates that the ash continues to charge in the plume [R. G. Harrison, K. A. Nicoll, Z. Ulanowski, and T. A. Mather, Environ. Res. Lett. 5, 024004 (2010); H. Hatakeyama J. Meteorol. Soc. Jpn. 27, 372 (1949)]. In this Letter, we study triboelectric charging of different size fractions of a sample of volcanic ash experimentally. Consistently with previous work, we find that the particle size distribution is a determining factor in the charging. Specifically, our laboratory experiments demonstrate that the normalized span of the particle size distribution plays an important role in the magnitude of charging generated. The influence of the normalized span on plume charging suggests that all ash plumes are likely to be charged, with implications for remote sensing and plume lifetime through scavenging effects.

  17. Volcanic degassing and secondary hydration of volcanic ash and scoria: Implications for paleoaltimetry and paleoclimate studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2013-12-01

    The use of δD of ash as a reliable recorder of δD (and δ18O) values of paleoprecipitation in paleoclimate and paleoaltimetry research still requires experimental verification and testing. It is currently assumed that ash is deposited with a water content of no significance, and that within a few thousand years it becomes sufficiently (up to 4 wt.% H2O) hydrated, although the rate of hydration and whether or not the initial isotopic signature is held, are not well understood. We report analyses of δD and H2O of distal ash from recent eruptions (1980 Mount St. Helens, 1992 Mt. Spurr, and 1974 Volcán de Fuego) that were collected syneruption, in addition to scoria ranging in age from ~50 to 7300 years old from Klyuchevskoy volcano (Kamchatka, Russia), using the TC/EA - MAT 253 continuous flow system. Natural variability of studied samples in wt.% H2O (δD in ‰), with errors represented as 1 s.d. for the average, for recent ash eruptions, range from 0.1 × 0.07 (-102 × 4.7) for Volcán de Fuego up to 0.7 × 0.10 (-104 × 3.5) for Mount St. Helens. Ash from the Mt. Spurr eruption averaged 0.4 × 0.04 (-109 × 4.0), and we plan to also analyze ash from Mt. Pinatubo. The δD values are consistent with a magmatic degassing trend, where the last remaining water is depleted in deuterium, suggesting ash may be deposited with up to 0.7 wt.% H2O as primary magmatic water. Klyuchevskoy scoria (basaltic andesite) shows a general trend of increasing wt.% H2O with increasing age: the youngest samples (Yellowstone). These results show water-glass fractionations between -11.5 and -12.7 for experimental glasses and -2.2 to -11.4 for natural ash. We are looking into using δ18Owater in glass as a more robust and retentive proxy of past environmental waters for paleoclimate and paleoaltimetry research.

  18. The Role of Grain Size and Shape on the Electrical Conductivity of Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, T.; Genareau, K. D.; Cloer, S.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic lightning is a common, yet understudied, phenomenon. The exact mechanisms of electric charge generation and transmission in explosive eruption plumes are poorly understood. Ash is a probable charge carrier, and thus, the physical properties of ash may factor into charge generation and transmission. Specifically, the shape and size of ash grains, volatiles bound within the grains, and the efficiency of grains to act as ice nuclei may be contributing factors. To examine the relationship between conductivity and grain size/shape, this research compares conductivity measurements to grain size distribution and shape from five minimally processed ash samples collected from explosive eruptions in Alaska, U.S.A. (Katmai, 1912; Crater Peak, 1992; Augustine, 2006; Okmok, 2008; Redoubt, 2009) that produced volcanic lightning and a set of homogenized (with respect to grain size and shape) ash samples from Lathrop Wells (Nevada, U.S.A.), Taupo (New Zealand), and the Valles Caldera (New Mexico, U.S.A.). Grain size distribution was measured using a laser diffractometer particle size analyzer and grain shapes (aspect ratios, concavity indices) were characterized using backscattered electron images that were processed with ImageJ freeware. The resistance of minimally compressed samples was measured using a current amplifier and converted to conductivity. A general effective media (GEM) equation was then applied using the assumption that the grains are oblate ellipsoids under the influence of minimal compaction. Preliminary analyses suggest that compaction, and therefore shape and contact points, controls ash conductivity and not bulk composition, as homogenized samples provide variable resistance measurements from 1.6 x 10-3 to 9.9 x 10-1 S/m. Non-homogenized Alaskan samples are hypothesized to have higher concavity indices and conductivities when compared to the homogenized samples, due to wider variations in grain size and shape, and these data will be presented.

  19. Quantifying potential aircraft tephra exposure using a volcanic ash dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R. A.; Dean, K.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling the long-range atmospheric transport and sedimentation of volcanic ash is a formidable task due to the large spatial and temporal scales over which atmospheric conditions vary dramatically. Dispersion models are efficient tools for forecasting the trajectories and evolution of ash clouds by avoiding the complex feedbacks to the meteorology of large eruptions (e.g. 1991 Pinatubo), and tracking tracer particles within the atmosphere. In light of this limitation, dispersion models have proven to be very useful in providing forecasts very quickly, which is crucial for aircraft and emergency responders in the event of an eruption. Because dispersion models predict the 3-dimensional structure of an evolving ash cloud in time, we have developed a technique to quantitatively predict the potential exposure to tephra an in-flight aircraft will experience. The numerical technique involves integrating the ash cloud concentration along the aircraft route through space and time. This method is efficient and the thousands of different air routes each day can be easily analyzed in near real-time. We have looked at applications that may be used in the present, past, and future. (1) For in- flight aircraft near an existing ash cloud, a cost-benefit analysis for a range of route deviations can be quickly performed. (2) A post-event analysis can indicate aircraft that may have been exposed to low-levels of volcanic ash and may require additional maintenance. (3) The potential hazard of a future eruption to an existing air- traffic corridor can be quantified and assessed.

  20. Operational prediction of ash concentrations in the distal volcanic cloud from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, H. N.; Thomson, D. J.; Johnson, B. T.; Heard, I. P. C.; Turnbull, K.; Marenco, F.; Kristiansen, N. I.; Dorsey, J.; Minikin, A.; Weinzierl, B.; Schumann, U.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Loughlin, S. C.; Hort, M. C.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Devenish, B. J.; Manning, A. J.; Witham, C. S.; Haywood, J. M.; Golding, B. W.

    2012-10-01

    During the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, improvements were made to the modeling procedure at the Met Office, UK, enabling peak ash concentrations within the volcanic cloud to be estimated. In this paper we describe the ash concentration forecasting method, its rationale and how it evolved over time in response to new information and user requirements. The change from solely forecasting regions of ash to also estimating peak ash concentrations required consideration of volcanic ash emission rates, the fraction of ash surviving near-source fall-out, and the relationship between predicted mean and local peak ash concentrations unresolved by the model. To validate the modeling procedure, predicted peak ash concentrations are compared against observations obtained by ground-based and research aircraft instrumentation. This comparison between modeled and observed peak concentrations highlights the many sources of error and the uncertainties involved. Despite the challenges of predicting ash concentrations, the ash forecasting method employed here is found to give useful guidance on likely ash concentrations. Predicted peak ash concentrations lie within about one and a half orders of magnitude of the observed peak concentrations. A significant improvement in the agreement between modeled and observed values is seen if a buffer zone, accounting for positional errors in the predicted ash cloud, is used. Sensitivity of the predicted ash concentrations to the source properties (e.g., the plume height and the vertical distribution of ash at the source) is assessed and in some cases, seemingly minor uncertainties in the source specification have a large effect on predicted ash concentrations.

  1. A first hazard analysis of the Harrat Ash Shamah volcanic field, Syria-Jordan Borderline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnan, Zehra; Akkar, Sinan; Moghimi, Saed

    2017-04-01

    The northernmost part of the Saudi Cenozoic Volcanic Fields, the 100,000 km2 Harrat Ash Shamah has hosted some of the most recent volcanic eruptions along the Syria-Jordan borderline. With rapid growth of the cities in this region, exposure to any potential renewed volcanism increased considerably. We present here a first-order probabilistic hazard analysis related to new vent formation and subsequent lava flow from Harrat Ash Shamah. The 733 visible eruption vent sites were utilized to develop a probability density function for new eruption sites using Gaussian kernel smoothing. This revealed a NNW striking zone of high spatial hazard surrounding the cities Amman and Irbid in Jordan. The temporal eruption recurrence rate is estimated to be approximately one vent per 3500 years, but the temporal record of the field is so poorly constrained that the lower and upper bounds for the recurrence interval are 17,700 yrs and 70 yrs, respectively. A Poisson temporal model is employed within the scope of this study. In order to treat the uncertainties associated with the spatio-temporal models as well as size of the area affected by the lava flow, the logic tree approach is adopted. For the Syria-Jordan borderline, the spatial variation of volcanic hazard is computed as well as uncertainty associated with these estimates.

  2. Petrological Monitoring of the AD 2011–2012 Volcanic Ash from Sakurajima Volcano, Southern Kyushu, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idham Andri Kurniawan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sakurajima in Japan is one of the world’s most active volcanoes. This paper presents the results of a petrological study of the Showa Crater volcanic ash samples ejected from January 2011 to November 2012 from Sakurajima. The aim of this paper is to reconstruct the evolution in time of the conduit magma system, based on the compositions and physical properties of the studied volcanic ash. We analyzed the composition of interstitial glass and microcrystal of Black Volcanic Rock (BVR and Black Vesicular Volcanic Rock (BVVR in order to estimate the magma ascent rate. The results show that SiO2 content of interstitial glass and crystallinity of the BVR is generally higher than for BVVR. The different types of juvenile material likely resulted from cooling-induced crystallization and decompression-induced crystallization in the conduit. The conditions of magma transit within the conduit from 2011 to 2012 differ: in 2011, the decompression rate and magma ascent rate of BVR were higher than for BVVR, but, in 2012, the decompression rate and magma ascent rate between BVR and BVVR were similar. As such, monitoring the petrological features of dated eruptive materials could provide useful information for evaluating ongoing eruptive activity.

  3. Atmospheric processes affecting the separation of volcanic ash and SO2 in volcanic eruptions: inferences from the May 2011 Grímsvötn eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Fred; Woodhouse, Mark; Huppert, Herbert E.; Prata, Andrew; Thordarson, Thor; Carn, Simon

    2017-09-01

    The separation of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas is sometimes observed during volcanic eruptions. The exact conditions under which separation occurs are not fully understood but the phenomenon is of importance because of the effects volcanic emissions have on aviation, on the environment, and on the earth's radiation balance. The eruption of Grímsvötn, a subglacial volcano under the Vatnajökull glacier in Iceland during 21-28 May 2011 produced one of the most spectacular examples of ash and SO2 separation, which led to errors in the forecasting of ash in the atmosphere over northern Europe. Satellite data from several sources coupled with meteorological wind data and photographic evidence suggest that the eruption column was unable to sustain itself, resulting in a large deposition of ash, which left a low-level ash-rich atmospheric plume moving southwards and then eastwards towards the southern Scandinavian coast and a high-level predominantly SO2 plume travelling northwards and then spreading eastwards and westwards. Here we provide observational and modelling perspectives on the separation of ash and SO2 and present quantitative estimates of the masses of ash and SO2 that erupted, the directions of transport, and the likely impacts. We hypothesise that a partial column collapse or sloughing fed with ash from pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) occurred during the early stage of the eruption, leading to an ash-laden gravity intrusion that was swept southwards, separated from the main column. Our model suggests that water-mediated aggregation caused enhanced ash removal because of the plentiful supply of source water from melted glacial ice and from entrained atmospheric water. The analysis also suggests that ash and SO2 should be treated with separate source terms, leading to improvements in forecasting the movement of both types of emissions.

  4. Atmospheric processes affecting the separation of volcanic ash and SO2 in volcanic eruptions: inferences from the May 2011 Grímsvötn eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Prata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The separation of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide (SO2 gas is sometimes observed during volcanic eruptions. The exact conditions under which separation occurs are not fully understood but the phenomenon is of importance because of the effects volcanic emissions have on aviation, on the environment, and on the earth's radiation balance. The eruption of Grímsvötn, a subglacial volcano under the Vatnajökull glacier in Iceland during 21–28 May 2011 produced one of the most spectacular examples of ash and SO2 separation, which led to errors in the forecasting of ash in the atmosphere over northern Europe. Satellite data from several sources coupled with meteorological wind data and photographic evidence suggest that the eruption column was unable to sustain itself, resulting in a large deposition of ash, which left a low-level ash-rich atmospheric plume moving southwards and then eastwards towards the southern Scandinavian coast and a high-level predominantly SO2 plume travelling northwards and then spreading eastwards and westwards. Here we provide observational and modelling perspectives on the separation of ash and SO2 and present quantitative estimates of the masses of ash and SO2 that erupted, the directions of transport, and the likely impacts. We hypothesise that a partial column collapse or sloughing fed with ash from pyroclastic density currents (PDCs occurred during the early stage of the eruption, leading to an ash-laden gravity intrusion that was swept southwards, separated from the main column. Our model suggests that water-mediated aggregation caused enhanced ash removal because of the plentiful supply of source water from melted glacial ice and from entrained atmospheric water. The analysis also suggests that ash and SO2 should be treated with separate source terms, leading to improvements in forecasting the movement of both types of emissions.

  5. Volcanic ash modeling with the online NMMB-MONARCH-ASH v1.0 model: model description, case simulation, and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Alejandro; Folch, Arnau; Jorba, Oriol; Janjic, Zavisa

    2017-03-01

    Traditionally, tephra transport and dispersal models have evolved decoupled (offline) from numerical weather prediction models. There is a concern that inconsistencies and shortcomings associated with this coupling strategy might lead to errors in the ash cloud forecast. Despite this concern and the significant progress in improving the accuracy of tephra dispersal models in the aftermath of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull and 2011 Cordón Caulle eruptions, to date, no operational online dispersal model is available to forecast volcanic ash. Here, we describe and evaluate NMMB-MONARCH-ASH, a new online multi-scale meteorological and transport model that attempts to pioneer the forecast of volcanic aerosols at operational level. The model forecasts volcanic ash cloud trajectories, concentration of ash at relevant flight levels, and the expected deposit thickness for both regional and global configurations. Its online coupling approach improves the current state-of-the-art tephra dispersal models, especially in situations where meteorological conditions are changing rapidly in time, two-way feedbacks are significant, or distal ash cloud dispersal simulations are required. This work presents the model application for the first phases of the 2011 Cordón Caulle and 2001 Mount Etna eruptions. The computational efficiency of NMMB-MONARCH-ASH and its application results compare favorably with other long-range tephra dispersal models, supporting its operational implementation.

  6. Irreversibility of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Sorption onto a Volcanic Ash Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, E.; Kawamoto, K.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2008-12-01

    Pesticide sorption and desorption in soils are key processes governing fate and transport of pesticides in the soil environment. The irreversibility (or hysteresis) in the processes of pesticide sorption and desorption needs to be known to accurately predict behavior of pesticides in soil systems. 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is a widely used pesticide in agriculture fields. However, only few studies of 2,4-D adsorption onto Andosols (volcanic ash soils) have been published, and the knowledge of 2,4-D desorption onto Andosols is very limited. In this study, a volcanic ash soil sampled from a pasture site in Nishi-Tokyo, Japan was used as a sorbent in order to investigate the irreversibility of 2,4-D sorption. For comparison, a pure clay mineral (kaolinite) obtained from Clay Science Society of Japan (CSSJ) was also used. 2,4-D solutions with three concentrations (0.011, 0.022 and 0.045 mmol/L) were prepared in artificial rain water (ARW= 0.085mM NaCl + 0.015mM CaCl2) to simulate field conditions. To prepare the sample solutions, the solid mass/liquid volume ratio of 1:10 was used for both sorbents (volcanic ash soil and kaolinite). The experiments were conducted in triplicate using a batch method under different pH conditions to examine the effect of pH. Desorption was measured during a equilibration procedure: After removal of 7 mL of supernatant in the sorption step, 7 mL of ARW excluding 2,4-D was added to the sample solution after which, it was equilibrated and centrifuged. The procedure was performed sequentially three or four times to obtain a desorption isotherm. Sorption and desorption generally followed Freundlich isotherms. The results showed markedly effects of pH on 2,4-D sorption and desorption in both the soil and kaolinite, with the percentage of sorption increasing with decreasing pH whereas the percentage of desorption decreased. There was a larger adsorption-desorption hysteresis in the volcanic ash soil as compared to kaolinite

  7. Properties of concrete modified with waste Low Density Polyethylene and saw dust ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimanikandan, P.; Sreenath, S.

    2017-07-01

    The increase in industrialization creates need for disposal of large quantity of by-products. To overcome the difficulty of disposal, these by-products can be used as a replacement for raw material. In this concern, non-conventional industrial wastes such as plastic bags, PET bottles, pulverized waste Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) and biological waste such as saw-dust ash, coconut coir were used as a replacement in concrete. In this project, saw-dust ash and pulverized waste LDPE were introduced as the partial replacement for cement and fine aggregates respectively. 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% of sand by volume was replaced with LDPE and 0%, 1%, 3%, 5% and 10% of cement by volume was replaced with saw dust ash. Standard cube, cylinder and prism specimens were cast to assess the compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength of modified concrete after 28 days of curing. Optimum percentage of replacement was found by comparing the test results. The mix with 5% of LDPE and 3% of saw dust ash showed a better result among the other mixes.

  8. The identification and tracking of volcanic ash using the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager (SEVIRI)

    OpenAIRE

    A. R. Naeger; S. A. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we develop an algorithm based on combining spectral, spatial, and temporal thresholds from the geostationary Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) daytime measurements to identify and track different aerosol types, primarily volcanic ash. Contemporary methods typically do not use temporal information to identify ash. We focus not only on the identification and tracking of volcanic ash during the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption period beginning 14 April 2010 ...

  9. Spain as an emergency air traffic hub during volcanic air fall events? Evidence of past volcanic ash air fall over Europe during the late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Mark; Lane, Christine; Blockley, Simon P. E.; Moreno, Ana; Valero-Garcés, Blas; Ortiz, José E.; Torres, Trino; Lowe, John J.; Menzies, Martin A.

    2010-05-01

    Past volcanic eruptions often leave visible ash layers in the geological record, for example in marine or lake sedimentary sequences. Recent developments, however, have shown that non-visible volcanic ash layers are also commonly preserved in sedimentary deposits. These augment the record of past volcanic events by demonstrating that past ash dispersals have been more numerous and widely disseminated in Europe than previously appreciated. The dispersal ‘footprints' of some large late Pleistocene European eruptions are examined here in the light of the recent Eyjafjallajökull eruption. For example, the Vedde Ash which was erupted from Iceland around 12 thousand years ago, delivered distal (and non-visible) glass deposits as far south as Switzerland and as far east as the Ural Mountains in Russia, with an overall European distribution remarkably similar to the dominant tracks of the recent Eyjafjallajökull plumes. The Eyjafjallajökull eruption has demonstrated that relatively small amounts of distal volcanic ash in the atmosphere can seriously disrupt aviation activity, with attendant economic and other consequences. It has raised fundamental questions about the likelihood of larger or more prolonged volcanic activity in the near future, and the possibility of even more serious consequences than those experienced recently. Given that there are several other volcanic centres that could cause such disruption in Europe (e.g. Campania and other volcanic centres in Italy; Aegean volcanoes), a key question is whether there are parts of Europe less prone to ash plumes and which could therefore operate as emergency air traffic hubs during times of ash dispersal. Although not generated to answer this question, the recent geological record might provide a basis for seeking the answer. For example, four palaeo-records covering the time frame of 8 - 40 Ka BP that are geographically distributed across Spain have been examined for non-visible distal ash content. All four have

  10. Uncertainty propagation analysis applied to volcanic ash dispersal at Mt. Etna by using a Lagrangian model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Pardini, Federica; Spanu, Antonio; Neri, Augusto; Vittoria Salvetti, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic ash clouds represent a major hazard for populations living nearby volcanic centers producing a risk for humans and a potential threat to crops, ground infrastructures, and aviation traffic. Lagrangian particle dispersal models are commonly used for tracking ash particles emitted from volcanic plumes and transported under the action of atmospheric wind fields. In this work, we present the results of an uncertainty propagation analysis applied to volcanic ash dispersal from weak plumes with specific focus on the uncertainties related to the grain-size distribution of the mixture. To this aim, the Eulerian fully compressible mesoscale non-hydrostatic model WRF was used to generate the driving wind, representative of the atmospheric conditions occurring during the event of November 24, 2006 at Mt. Etna. Then, the Lagrangian particle model LPAC (de' Michieli Vitturi et al., JGR 2010) was used to simulate the transport of mass particles under the action of atmospheric conditions. The particle motion equations were derived by expressing the Lagrangian particle acceleration as the sum of the forces acting along its trajectory, with drag forces calculated as a function of particle diameter, density, shape and Reynolds number. The simulations were representative of weak plume events of Mt. Etna and aimed to quantify the effect on the dispersal process of the uncertainty in the particle sphericity and in the mean and variance of a log-normal distribution function describing the grain-size of ash particles released from the eruptive column. In order to analyze the sensitivity of particle dispersal to these uncertain parameters with a reasonable number of simulations, and therefore with affordable computational costs, response surfaces in the parameter space were built by using the generalized polynomial chaos technique. The uncertainty analysis allowed to quantify the most probable values, as well as their pdf, of the number of particles as well as of the mean and

  11. Toward an Integrated Solution to Mitigate the Impact of Volcanic Ash to Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John J.; Dezitter, Fabien; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Krotkov, Nickolay; Lekki, John; Lindsay, Francis; Pavolonis, Mike; Pieri, David; Prata, Fred; Vernier, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    The science community is making a concerted effort to improve the reliability of dispersion models for the forecasting of volcanic ash plumes. Toward this end, it has been observed that the assimilation of diverse, accurate and frequent surface, airborne and satellite observations of the source and distal ash plumes may hold the key. Various international research organizations and operational agencies make these observations using a variety of active and passive remote sensing systems and use them to initialize atmospheric trajectory and dispersion models. These observation systems range from surface LIDAR and ceilometers, to airborne radiometers and nephelometers, to satellite radiometers, multi-spectral imagers, LIDAR and UV-photometers. None of these systems alone is a panacea, however, their synergistic application holds great promise toward solving this complex problem. Additionally, the aeronautical and science communities are working to better understand the quantitative thresholds and tolerances of aviation systems to volcanic ash to better inform scientists of the accuracy requirements for dispersion model forecasts. A number of the most recent and promising efforts in all of these area are discussed in this presentation.

  12. Study of Volcanic-Ash-Impregnated-Bacteria Filler to the Compressive Strength of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwanto Hendry Anjar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Technology of concrete has been advanced recently to improve the properties of concrete. Utilization of ash as the substitute of cement or filler of concrete also indicates good result in compressive strength concrete in certain amount. Harnessing the bacteria for self-healing concrete has also been successfully performed in order to maintain the destruction of the concrete by itself. Past research indicated that bacteria can be beneficiary to improve the compressive strength, absorption, permeability, and so on. In this paper, Bacillus Altitudinis was extracted from the karst (source from the limestone mountain and bred through liquid media to be impregnated inside the volcanic ash. The impregnated bacteria in volcanic ash were used as the filler to the concrete mixture with the proportion of filler varied from 1%, 1.5% and 2% to the weight of cement. Mechanical properties of the concrete specimen showed that the compressive strength reached its best when the filler proportion was 1.5%. The absorption referred analogously to the increment of compressive strength due to the success of filling the void inside the concrete. Based on compression test to all the concrete specimens, there was enhancement about 18% and the average absorption can be abated around 23%. Future research due to some drawbacks turning up is the need of developing another media for bacteria to live and making sure the exact amount of bacteria impregnated to the media so that the desired advance of concrete compressive strength can be acquired.

  13. Stereoscopic Estimation of Volcanic Ash Cloud-Top Height from Two Geostationary Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Merucci

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of volcanic ash clouds released into the atmosphere during explosive eruptions includes cloud height as a fundamental physical parameter. A novel application is proposed of a method based on parallax data acquired from two geostationary instruments for estimating ash cloud-top height (ACTH. An improved version of the method with a detailed discussion of height retrieval accuracy was applied to estimate ACTH from two datasets acquired by two satellites in favorable positions to fully exploit the parallax effect. A combination of MSG SEVIRI (HRV band; 1000 m nadir spatial resolution, 5 min temporal resolution and Meteosat-7 MVIRI (VIS band, 2500 m nadir spatial resolution, 30 min temporal resolution was implemented. Since MVIRI does not acquire data at exactly the same time as SEVIRI, a correction procedure enables compensation for wind advection in the atmosphere. The method was applied to the Mt. Etna, Sicily, Italy, eruption of 23 November 2013. The height of the volcanic cloud was tracked with a top height of ~8.5 km. The ash cloud estimate was applied to the visible channels to show the potential accuracy that will soon be achievable also in the infrared range using the next generation of multispectral imagers. The new constellation of geostationary meteorological satellites will enable full exploitation of this technique for continuous global ACTH monitoring.

  14. Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards: Part I. Validation of satellite-derived Volcanic Ash Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukouli, MariLiza; Balis, Dimitris; Simopoulos, Spiros; Siomos, Nikos; Clarisse, Lieven; Carboni, Elisa; Wang, Ping; Siddans, Richard; Marenco, Franco; Mona, Lucia; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Spinetti, Claudia; Theys, Nicolas; Tampellini, Lucia; Zehner, Claus

    2014-05-01

    The 2010 eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull attracted the attention of the public and the scientific community to the vulnerability of the European airspace to volcanic eruptions. Major disruptions in European air traffic were observed for several weeks surrounding the two eruptive episodes, which had a strong impact on the everyday life of many Europeans as well as a noticable economic loss of around 2-3 billion Euros in total. The eruptions made obvious that the decision-making bodies were not informed properly and timely about the commercial aircraft capabilities to ash-leaden air, and that the ash monitoring and prediction potential is rather limited. After the Eyjafjallajökull eruptions new guidelines for aviation, changing from zero tolerance to newly established ash threshold values, were introduced. Within this spirit, the European Space Agency project Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards, called for the creation of an optimal End-to-End System for Volcanic Ash Plume Monitoring and Prediction . This system is based on improved and dedicated satellite-derived ash plume and sulphur dioxide level assessments, as well as an extensive validation using auxiliary satellite, aircraft and ground-based measurements. The validation of volcanic ash levels extracted from the sensors GOME-2/MetopA, IASI/MetopA and MODIS/Terra and MODIS/Aqua is presented in this work with emphasis on the ash plume height and ash optical depth levels. Co-located aircraft flights, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation [CALIPSO] soundings and well as European Aerosol Research Lidar Network [EARLINET] measurements were compared to the different satellite estimates for the those two eruptive episodes. The validation results are extremely promising with most satellite sensors performing quite well and within the estimated uncertainties compared to the comparative datasets. The findings are

  15. Determination of time- and height-resolved volcanic ash emissions and their use for quantitative ash dispersion modeling: the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The April–May, 2010 volcanic eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland caused significant economic and social disruption in Europe whilst state of the art measurements and ash dispersion forecasts were heavily criticized by the aviation industry. Here we demonstrate for the first time that large improvements can be made in quantitative predictions of the fate of volcanic ash emissions, by using an inversion scheme that couples a priori source information and the output of a Lagrangian dispersion model with satellite data to estimate the volcanic ash source strength as a function of altitude and time. From the inversion, we obtain a total fine ash emission of the eruption of 8.3 ± 4.2 Tg for particles in the size range of 2.8–28 μm diameter. We evaluate the results of our model results with a posteriori ash emissions using independent ground-based, airborne and space-borne measurements both in case studies and statistically. Subsequently, we estimate the area over Europe affected by volcanic ash above certain concentration thresholds relevant for the aviation industry. We find that during three episodes in April and May, volcanic ash concentrations at some altitude in the atmosphere exceeded the limits for the "Normal" flying zone in up to 14 % (6–16 %, 2 % (1–3 % and 7 % (4–11 %, respectively, of the European area. For a limit of 2 mg m−3 only two episodes with fractions of 1.5 % (0.2–2.8 % and 0.9 % (0.1–1.6 % occurred, while the current "No-Fly" zone criterion of 4 mg m−3 was rarely exceeded. Our results have important ramifications for determining air space closures and for real-time quantitative estimations of ash concentrations. Furthermore, the general nature of our method yields better constraints on the distribution and fate of volcanic ash in the Earth system.

  16. Aviation response to a widely dispersed volcanic ash and gas cloud from the August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi, Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Schneider, David J.; Wallace, Kristi L.; Hall, Tony; Bensimon, Dov R.; Salinas, Leonard J.

    2010-01-01

    The extensive volcanic cloud from Kasatochi's 2008 eruption caused widespread disruptions to aviation operations along Pacific oceanic, Canadian, and U.S. air routes. Based on aviation hazard warnings issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, the Federal Aviation Administration, and Meteorological Service of Canada, air carriers largely avoided the volcanic cloud over a 5 day period by route modifications and flight cancellations. Comparison of time coincident GOES thermal infrared (TIR) data for ash detection with Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) ultraviolet data for SO2 detection shows congruent areas of ash and gas in the volcanic cloud in the 2 days following onset of ash production. After about 2.5 days, the area of SO2 detected by OMI was more extensive than the area of ash indicated by TIR data, indicating significant ash depletion by fall out had occurred. Pilot reports of visible haze at cruise altitudes over Canada and the northern United States suggested that SO2 gas had converted to sulfate aerosols. Uncertain about the hazard potential of the aging cloud, airlines coped by flying over, under, or around the observed haze layer. Samples from a nondamaging aircraft encounter with Kasatochi's nearly 3 day old cloud contained volcanic silicate particles, confirming that some fine ash is present in predominantly gas clouds. The aircraft's exposure to ash was insufficient to cause engine damage; however, slightly damaging encounters with volcanic clouds from eruptions of Reventador in 2002 and Hekla in 2000 indicate the possibility of lingering hazards associated with old and/or diffuse volcanic clouds.

  17. Volcanic-Ash Hazards to Aviation—Changes and Challenges since the 2010 Eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Tupper, A.; Mastin, L. G.; Lechner, P.

    2012-12-01

    In response to the severe disruptions to civil aviation that resulted from atmospheric transport of ash from the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland in April and May 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) quickly formed the International Volcanic Ash Task Force (IVATF), charging it to support the accelerated development of a global risk-management framework for volcanic-ash hazards to aviation. Recognizing the need for scientifically based advice on best methods to detect ash in the atmosphere and depict zones of hazardous airspace, the IVATF sought input from the global scientific community, primarily by means of the Volcanic Ash Scientific Advisory Group which was established in May 2010 by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics to serve as a scientific resource for ICAO. The IVATF finished its work in June 2012 (see http://www.icao.int/safety/meteorology/ivatf/Pages/default.aspx for a record of its results). A major science-based outcome is that production of charts depicting areas of airspace expected to have specific ash-concentration values (e.g. 4 mg/cu. m) will not be required of the world's nine Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs). The VAACs are responsible for issuing warning information to the aviation sector regarding ash-cloud position and expected movement. Forecast concentrations in these charts are based primarily on dispersion models that have at least an order of magnitude in uncertainty in their output and therefore do not delineate hazardous airspace with the level of confidence needed by the aviation sector. The recommended approach to improving model-forecast accuracy is to assimilate diverse observations (e.g., satellite thermal-infrared measurements, lidar, radar, direct airborne sampling, visual sightings, etc.) into model simulations; doing that during an eruption in the demanding environment of aviation operations is a substantial challenge. A

  18. The visibility of airborne volcanic ash from the flight deck of an aircraft - The effect of clouds in the field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Daniel; Gasteiger, Josef; Emde, Claudia; Buras, Robert; Mayer, Bernhard; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2013-05-01

    In April 2010, the volcanic ash cloud from the Eyjafjalla volcano in Iceland strongly impacted aviation in Europe. Several other incidents in the past have shown that volcanic ash can have severe consequences on aviation. One operational necessity is, therefore, to determine whether a pilot has the means to avoid flying through potentially dangerous volcanic ash just by visual observation of the sky from the cockpit of an aircraft. Here we investigate how clouds affect the visibility of a volcanic ash aerosol layer for an observer in the cockpit of an aircraft using a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer model MYSTIC. This study builds on the results of a previous study on the visibility of airborne volcanic ash in Weinzierl et al. (2012) where we considered the cloud-free case. With clouds, the discernibility of ash layers is substantially reduced. Even layers with comparably high mass concentrations of 2 mg m-3 might not be visible for uninformed observers.

  19. Validation of the FALL3D ash dispersion model using observations of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Basart, S.

    2012-03-01

    During April-May 2010 volcanic ash clouds from the Icelandic Eyjafjallajökull volcano reached Europe causing an unprecedented disruption of the EUR/NAT region airspace. Civil aviation authorities banned all flight operations because of the threat posed by volcanic ash to modern turbine aircraft. New quantitative airborne ash mass concentration thresholds, still under discussion, were adopted for discerning regions contaminated by ash. This has implications for ash dispersal models routinely used to forecast the evolution of ash clouds. In this new context, quantitative model validation and assessment of the accuracies of current state-of-the-art models is of paramount importance. The passage of volcanic ash clouds over central Europe, a territory hosting a dense network of meteorological and air quality observatories, generated a quantity of observations unusual for volcanic clouds. From the ground, the cloud was observed by aerosol lidars, lidar ceilometers, sun photometers, other remote-sensing instruments and in-situ collectors. From the air, sondes and multiple aircraft measurements also took extremely valuable in-situ and remote-sensing measurements. These measurements constitute an excellent database for model validation. Here we validate the FALL3D ash dispersal model by comparing model results with ground and airplane-based measurements obtained during the initial 14-23 April 2010 Eyjafjallajökull explosive phase. We run the model at high spatial resolution using as input hourly-averaged observed heights of the eruption column and the total grain size distribution reconstructed from field observations. Model results are then compared against remote ground-based and in-situ aircraft-based measurements, including lidar ceilometers from the German Meteorological Service, aerosol lidars and sun photometers from EARLINET and AERONET networks, and flight missions of the German DLR Falcon aircraft. We find good quantitative agreement, with an error similar to

  20. Volcanic-ash hazard to aviation during the 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Ewert, J.W.; Gallina, G.M.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Swanson, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    Within the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Anatahan is one of nine active subaerial volcanoes that pose hazards to major air-traffic routes from airborne volcanic ash. The 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano affected the region's aviation operations for 3 days in May 2003. On the first day of the eruption (10 May 2003), two international flights from Saipan to Japan were cancelled, and several flights implemented ash-avoidance procedures. On 13 May 2003, a high-altitude flight through volcanic gas was reported, with no perceptible damage to the aircraft. TOMS and MODIS analysis of satellite data strongly suggests that no significant ash and only minor amounts of SO2 were involved in the incident, consistent with crew observations. On 23 May 2003, airport operations were disrupted when tropical-cyclone winds dispersed ash to the south, dusting Saipan with light ashfall and causing flight cancellations there and at Guam 320 km south of the volcano. Operational (near-real-time) monitoring of ash clouds produced by Anatahan has been conducted since the first day of the eruption on 10 May 2003 by the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC). The VAAC was among the first groups outside of the immediate area of the volcano to detect and report on the unexpected eruption of Anatahan. After being contacted about an unusual cloud by National Weather Service forecasters in Guam at 1235 UTC on 10 May 2003, the VAAC analyzed GOES 9 images, confirming Anatahan as the likely source of an ash cloud and estimating that the eruption began at about 0730 UTC. The VAAC issued its first Volcanic Ash Advisory for Anatahan at 1300 UTC on 10 May 2003 more than 5 h after the start of the eruption, the delay reflecting the difficulty of detecting and confirming a surprise eruption at a remote volcano with no in situ real-time geophysical monitoring. The initial eruption plume reached 10.7-13.4 km (35,000-44,000 ft), well into jet cruise altitudes

  1. Environmental hazards of fluoride in volcanic ash: a case study from Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Shane J.; Neall, V. E.; Lecointre, J. A.; Hedley, M. J.; Loganathan, P.

    2003-03-01

    The vent-hosted hydrothermal system of Ruapehu volcano is normally covered by a c. 10 million m 3 acidic crater lake where volcanic gases accumulate. Through analysis of eruption observations, granulometry, mineralogy and chemistry of volcanic ash from the 1995-1996 Ruapehu eruptions we report on the varying influences on environmental hazards associated with the deposits. All measured parameters are more dependent on the eruptive style than on distance from the vent. Early phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruption phases from crater lakes similar to that on Ruapehu are likely to contain the greatest concentrations of environmentally significant elements, especially sulphur and fluoride. These elements are contained within altered xenolithic material extracted from the hydrothermal system by steam explosions, as well as in residue hydrothermal fluids adsorbed on to particle surfaces. In particular, total F in the ash may be enriched by a factor of 6 relative to original magmatic contents, although immediately soluble F does not show such dramatic increases. Highly soluble NaF and CaSiF 6 phases, demonstrated to be the carriers of 'available' F in purely magmatic eruptive systems, are probably not dominant in the products of phreatomagmatic eruptions through hydrothermal systems. Instead, slowly soluble compounds such as CaF 2, AlF 3 and Ca 5(PO 4) 3F dominate. Fluoride in these phases is released over longer periods, where only one third is leached in a single 24-h water extraction. This implies that estimation of soluble F in such ashes based on a single leach leads to underestimation of the F impact, especially of a potential longer-term environmental hazard. In addition, a large proportion of the total F in the ash is apparently soluble in the digestive system of grazing animals. In the Ruapehu case this led to several thousand sheep deaths from fluorosis.

  2. Terpenoid marker compounds derived from biogenic precursors in volcanic ash from Mount St. Helens, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.

    1983-01-01

    A volcanic-ash sample obtained after the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, was analyzed for cyclic terpenoid organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-computer techniques. Various tricyclic diterpenoid acids and hydrocarbons were identified including dehydroabietic acid, dehydroabietin, dehydroabietane, simonellite, and retene. Preliminary evidence indicates that these compounds were derived from forest soils or atmospheric aerosols or both in the vicinity of coniferous forests. A diagenetic scheme involving three possible pathways for the conversion of abietic acid to retene is presented. ?? 1983.

  3. Volcanic Ash Hazards and Risk in Argentina: Scientific and Social Collaborative Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovere, E. I., II; Violante, R. A.; Vazquez Herrera, M. D.; Martinez Fernandez, M. D. L. P.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the absence of alerts or volcanic impacts during 60 years (from 1932, Quizapu-Descabezado Grande -one of the major eruptions of the XX Century- until 1991 Hudson eruption) there was mild remembrance of volcanic hazards in the collective memory of the Argentina citizens. Since then and until April 2015, the social perception changed according to different factors: age, location, education, culture, vulnerability. This variability produces a maze of challenges that go beyond the scientific knowledge. Volcanic health hazards began to be understood in 2008 after the eruption of Chaiten volcano. The particle size of ashfall (New Zealand ash plumes forced airlines to cancel local and international flights for several weeks. The fear of another eruption did not wait long when Calbuco volcano started activity in April 2015, it came at a time when Villarrica volcano was also in an eruptive phase, and the SERNAGEOMIN Chile, through the Observatory OVDAS of the Southern Andes, faced multiple natural disasters at the same time, 3 volcanoes in activity, lahars, pyroclastic flows and floods in the North. In Argentina, critical infrastructure, farming, livestock and primary supplies were affected mainly in the western region. Copahue volcano, is increasing unstability on seismic and geochemistry data since 2012. Caviahue resort village, distant only 8 Km. from the active vent happens to be a high vulnerable location. In 2014 GEVAS (Geology, Volcanoes, Environment and Health) Network ARGENTINA Civil Association started collaborative activities with SEGEMAR and in 2015 with the IAPG (Geoethics, Argentina), intending to promote Best Practices in volcanic and geological hazards. Geoscientists and the volcano vulnerable population are aware about the governmental commitment to assume a strategic planning for mitigation, facing a volcanic emergency. Recently, university undergraduate students from Chile and Argentina are networking to acquire the skills needed for a better

  4. Sinabung Volcanic Ash Utilization As The Additive for Paving Block Quality A and B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembiring, I. S.; Hastuty, I. P.

    2017-03-01

    Paving block is one of the building materials used as the top layer of the road structure besides asphalt and concrete. Paving block is made of mixed materials such as portland cement or other adhesive materials, water and aggregate. In this research, the material used as the additive of cement and concrete is volcanic ash from Mount Sinabung, it is based on the results of the material testing, Sinabung ash contains 74.3% silica (SiO2). The purpose of this research aims to analyze the behavior of the paving blocks quality A and B with and without a mixture of Sinabung ash, to analyze the workability of fresh concrete using Sinabung ash as an additive in concrete, and to compare the test results of paving blocks with and without using Sinabung ash. The samples that we made consist of four variations of the concrete mix to experiment a mixture of normal sample without additive, samples which are mixed with the addition of Sinabung ash 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% of the volume of concrete/m3. Each variation consists of 10 samples of the concrete with 28 days curing time period. We will do the compressive strength and water absorption test to the samples to determine whether the samples are in accordance with the type needed. According to the test result, paving blocks with Sinabung ash and curing time reach quality A at 0%, 5% and 10% mixture with the compressive strength of each 50.14 MPa, 46.20 MPa and 1.49Mpa, and reach quality B at 15%, 20 %,25% mixture with curing time and 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% mixture without curing time. According to the absorption values we got from the test which are 6.66%, 6.73%, 6.88%, 7.03%, 7.09% and 7.16%, the entire sample have average absorption exceeding SNI standardization which is above 6% and reach quality C. Based on compressive strength and absorption data obtained Sinabung ash can’t fully replace cement as the binder because of the low CaO content.

  5. Fractionation and Mobility of Thallium in Volcanic Ashes after Eruption of Eyjafjallajökull (2010) in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowska, Bozena; Zembrzuski, Wlodzimierz

    2016-07-01

    Volcanic ash contains thallium (Tl), which is highly toxic to the biosphere. The aim of this study was to determine the Tl concentration in fractions of volcanic ash samples originating from the Eyjafjallajökull volcano. A sequential extraction scheme allowed for a study of element migration in the environment. Differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry using a flow measuring system was selected as the analytical method to determine Tl content. The highest average content of Tl in volcanic ash was determined in the fraction entrapped in the aluminosilicate matrix (0.329 µg g(-1)), followed by the oxidizable fraction (0.173 µg g(-1)). The lowest content of Tl was found in the water soluble fraction (0.001 µg g(-1)); however, this fraction is important due to the fact that Tl redistribution among all the fractions occurs through the aqueous phase.

  6. Peralkaline ash flow tuffs and calderas of the McDermitt volcanic field, southeast Oregon and north central Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytuba, J.J.; McKee, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    This volcanic field covers an area of 20 000 km2 and consists of seven large-volume ash-flow sheets that vented 16.1-15 m.y. ago. The volcanic field is characterized by peralkaline, high-silica rhyolite, and all but one of the sheets are comendites. Each ash-flow sheet resulted in the formation of a large collapse caldera. Thickening of the ash-flow sheets, monoclinal warping outside the caldera ring-fault and tilting-in towards the caldera of blocks bounded by curvilinear faults all indicate regional subsidence prior to caldera collapse. The McDermitt caldera complex is highly mineralized; it contains ore deposits of Hg, Sb, Cs, Li and U. The peralkaline tuffs have high contents of these elements and were the source rocks from which metals were leached by hydrothermal systems developed during the last stage of caldera-related volcanism. (Following abstract) -W.H.B.

  7. Ground-based microwave radar and optical lidar signatures of volcanic ash plumes: models, observations and retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereu, Luigi; Marzano, Frank; Mori, Saverio; Montopoli, Mario; Cimini, Domenico; Martucci, Giovanni

    2013-04-01

    The detection and quantitative retrieval of volcanic ash clouds is of significant interest due to its environmental, climatic and socio-economic effects. Real-time monitoring of such phenomena is crucial, also for the initialization of dispersion models. Satellite visible-infrared radiometric observations from geostationary platforms are usually exploited for long-range trajectory tracking and for measuring low level eruptions. Their imagery is available every 15-30 minutes and suffers from a relatively poor spatial resolution. Moreover, the field-of-view of geostationary radiometric measurements may be blocked by water and ice clouds at higher levels and their overall utility is reduced at night. Ground-based microwave radars may represent an important tool to detect and, to a certain extent, mitigate the hazard from the ash clouds. Ground-based weather radar systems can provide data for determining the ash volume, total mass and height of eruption clouds. Methodological studies have recently investigated the possibility of using ground-based single-polarization and dual-polarization radar system for the remote sensing of volcanic ash cloud. A microphysical characterization of volcanic ash was carried out in terms of dielectric properties, size distribution and terminal fall speed, assuming spherically-shaped particles. A prototype of volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR) algorithm for single-polarization systems was proposed and applied to S-band and C-band weather radar data. The sensitivity of the ground-based radar measurements decreases as the ash cloud is farther so that for distances greater than about 50 kilometers fine ash might be not detected anymore by microwave radars. In this respect, radar observations can be complementary to satellite, lidar and aircraft observations. Active remote sensing retrieval from ground, in terms of detection, estimation and sensitivity, of volcanic ash plumes is not only dependent on the sensor specifications, but also on

  8. Encounters of aircraft with volcanic ash clouds; A compilation of known incidents, 1953-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Casadevall, Thomas J.; Budding, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Information about reported encounters of aircraft with volcanic ash clouds from 1953 through 2009 has been compiled to document the nature and scope of risks to aviation from volcanic activity. The information, gleaned from a variety of published and other sources, is presented in database and spreadsheet formats; the compilation will be updated as additional encounters occur and as new data and corrections come to light. The effects observed by flight crews and extent of aircraft damage vary greatly among incidents, and each incident in the compilation is rated according to a severity index. Of the 129 reported incidents, 94 incidents are confirmed ash encounters, with 79 of those having various degrees of airframe or engine damage; 20 are low-severity events that involve suspected ash or gas clouds; and 15 have data that are insufficient to assess severity. Twenty-six of the damaging encounters involved significant to very severe damage to engines and (or) airframes, including nine encounters with engine shutdown during flight. The average annual rate of damaging encounters since 1976, when reporting picked up, has been approximately 2 per year. Most of the damaging encounters occurred within 24 hours of the onset of ash production or at distances less than 1,000 kilometers from the source volcanoes. The compilation covers only events of relatively short duration for which aircraft were checked for damage soon thereafter; documenting instances of long-term repeated exposure to ash (or sulfate aerosols) will require further investigation. Of 38 source volcanoes, 8 have caused 5 or more encounters, of which the majority were damaging: Augustine (United States), Chaiten (Chile), Mount St. Helens (United States), Pacaya (Guatemala), Pinatubo (Philippines), Redoubt (United States), Sakura-jima (Japan), and Soufriere Hills (Montserrat, Lesser Antilles, United Kingdom). Aircraft have been damaged by eruptions ranging from small, recurring episodes to very large

  9. Identification and characterization of individual airborne volcanic ash particles by Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivleva, Natalia P; Huckele, Susanne; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph; Baumann, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    We present for the first time the Raman microspectroscopic identification and characterization of individual airborne volcanic ash (VA) particles. The particles were collected in April/May 2010 during research aircraft flights, which were performed by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt in the airspace near the Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption and over Europe (between Iceland and Southern Germany). In addition, aerosol particles were sampled by an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor in Munich, Germany. As references for the Raman analysis, we used the spectra of VA collected at the ground near the place of eruption, of mineral basaltic rock, and of different minerals from a database. We found significant differences in the spectra of VA and other aerosol particles (e.g., soot, nitrates, sulfates, and clay minerals), which allowed us to identify VA among other atmospheric particulate matter. Furthermore, while the airborne VA shows a characteristic Raman pattern (with broad band from ca. 200 to ca. 700 cm(-1) typical for SiO₂ glasses and additional bands of ferric minerals), the differences between the spectra of aged and fresh particles were observed, suggesting differences in their chemical composition and/or structure. We also analyzed similarities between Eyjafjallajökull VA particles collected at different sampling sites and compared the particles with a large variety of glassy and crystalline minerals. This was done by applying cluster analysis, in order to get information on the composition and structure of volcanic ash.

  10. Aerosols Monitoring Network to Create a Volcanic ASH Risk Management System in Argentina and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quel, Eduardo; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Otero, Lidia; Jin, Yoshitaka; Ristori, Pablo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; González, Francisco; Papandrea, Sebastián; Shimizu, Atsushi; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Two main decisions were made in Argentina to mitigate the impact of the recent volcanic activity in de country basically affected by the presence of volcanic ash in the air and deposited over the Argentinean territory. The first one was to create a risk management commission were this risk between others were studied, and second to develop new ground based remote sensing technologies to be able to identify and inform the risk close to the airports. In addition the Japanese government program for Science and Technology joint Research Partnership between Argentina, Chile and Japan for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) accepted to fund this cooperation due to the potential future utilization of the research outcomes to the benefit of the society. This work present the actual achievements and expected advance of these projects that try to joint efforts between national and international agencies as well as countries on behalf of a better understanding of the risks and a joint collaboration on the mitigation of suspended ashes impact over the aerial navigation.

  11. Aerosols Monitoring Network to Create a Volcanic ASH Risk Management System in Argentina and Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quel Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two main decisions were made in Argentina to mitigate the impact of the recent volcanic activity in de country basically affected by the presence of volcanic ash in the air and deposited over the Argentinean territory. The first one was to create a risk management commission were this risk between others were studied, and second to develop new ground based remote sensing technologies to be able to identify and inform the risk close to the airports. In addition the Japanese government program for Science and Technology joint Research Partnership between Argentina, Chile and Japan for Sustainable Development (SATREPS accepted to fund this cooperation due to the potential future utilization of the research outcomes to the benefit of the society. This work present the actual achievements and expected advance of these projects that try to joint efforts between national and international agencies as well as countries on behalf of a better understanding of the risks and a joint collaboration on the mitigation of suspended ashes impact over the aerial navigation.

  12. Effect of aggregate structure on VOC gas adsorption onto volcanic ash soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Seki, Katsutoshi; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi

    2009-07-15

    The understanding of the gaseous adsorption process and the parameters of volatile organic compounds such as organic solvents or fuels onto soils is very important in the analysis of the transport or fate of these chemicals in soils. Batch adsorption experiments with six different treatments were conducted to determine the adsorption of isohexane, a gaseous aliphatic, onto volcanic ash soil (Tachikawa loam). The measured gas adsorption coefficient for samples of Tachikawa loam used in the first three treatments, Control, AD (aggregate destroyed), and AD-OMR (aggregate destroyed and organic matter removed), implied that the aggregate structure of volcanic ash soil as well as organic matter strongly enhanced gas adsorption under the dry condition, whereas under the wet condition, the aggregate structure played an important role in gas adsorption regardless of the insolubility of isohexane. In the gas adsorption experiments for the last three treatments, soils were sieved in different sizes of mesh and were separated into three different aggregate or particle size fractions (2.0-1.0mm, 1.0-0.5mm, and less than 0.5mm). Tachikawa loam with a larger size fraction showed higher gas adsorption coefficient, suggesting the higher contributions of macroaggregates to isohexane gas adsorption under dry and wet conditions.

  13. Volcanic and stratospheric dust-like particles produced by experimental water-melt interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohletz, K.H.; McQueen, R.G.

    1984-10-01

    Commercially available Thermit (Al + Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/) was ignited, forming a molten mixture of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ + Fe. The subsequent mixing of this melt with water in steel containers produced explosive interactions that were used to model hydrovolcanic activity. Debris collected from the experiments consisted of quenched Thermit particles ranging in size from < 1 ..mu..m to centimeters. Scanning electron microscopy of the debris showed spheroidal, irregular aggregates and blocky particle shapes that are very similar to hydrovolcanic ash, as well as some types of stratospheric dust and industrial fly ash. 27 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  14. An oscillating microbalance for meteorological measurements of ice and volcanic ash accumulation from a weather balloon platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, Martin; Harrison, Giles; Nicoll, Keri; Williams, Paul; Marlton, Graeme

    2017-04-01

    A new, low cost, instrument has been developed for meteorological measurements of the accumulation of ice and volcanic ash that can be readily deployed using commercial radiosondes and weather balloons. It is based on principles used by [1], an instrument originally developed to measure supercooled liquid water profiles in clouds. This new instrument introduces numerous improvements in terms of reduced complexity and cost. It uses the oscillating microbalance principle, whereby a wire vibrating at its natural frequency is subjected to increased loading of the property to be measured. The increase in mass modifies the wire properties such that its natural frequency of oscillation changes. By measuring this frequency, the increase in mass can be inferred and transmitted to a ground base station through the radiosonde's UHF antenna via the PANDORA interface [2], which has been previously developed to provide power and connection to the radiosonde telemetry. The device consists of a simple circuit board controlled by an ATMEGA microcontroller. For calibration, the controller is capable of driving the wire at specified frequencies via excitation by a piezo sounder upon which the wire is mounted. The same piezo sounder is also used during active operation to measure the frequency of the wire in its non-driven state in order to infer the mass change on the wire. A phase-locked loop implemented on the board identifies when resonance occurs and the measured frequency is stable, prompting the microcontroller to send the measurement through the data interface. The device may be used for any application that requires the measurement of incremental mass variation e.g. ice accumulation, frosting, or particle accumulation such as dust and volcanic ash. For the solid particle accumulation, a low temperature, high-tack, adhesive may be applied to the wire prior to deployment to collect the material. In addition, the same instrument may be used for ground-based applications, such as

  15. Adsorption of glyphosate on variable-charge, volcanic ash-derived soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Jensen, L; Gan, J; Báez, M; Fuentes, R; Escudey, M

    2009-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonometylglycine) is widely used due to its broad spectrum of activity and nonselective mode of action. In Chile it is the most used herbicide, but its adsorption behavior in the abundant and widespread variable charge soils is not well understood. In this study, three volcanic ash-derived soils were selected, including Andisols (Nueva Braunau and Diguillin) and Ultisols (Collipulli), to evaluate the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium isotherms, and the effect of pH in glyphosate adsorption. The influence of glyphosate on soil phosphorus retention was also studied. Glyphosate was rapidly and strongly adsorbed on the selected soils, and adsorption isotherms were well described by the Freundlich relationship with strong nonlinearity (n(fads) soils without the addition of glyphosate had similar mean K(ads) values for Nueva Braunau (5.68) and Diguillin (7.38). Collipulli had a mean K(ads) value of 31.58. During the successive desorption steps, glyphosate at the highest level increased K(ads) values for phosphate in the Andisol soils but had little effect in the Ultisol soil. This different behavior was probably due to the irreversible occupation of some adsorption sites by glyphosate in the Ultisol soil attributed to the dominant Kaolinite mineral. Results from this study suggest that in the two types of volcanic soils, different mechanisms are involved in glyphosate and phosphate adsorption and that long-term use of glyphosate may impose different effects on the retention and availability of phosphorus. Volcanic ash-derived soils have a particular environmental behavior in relation to the retention of organic contaminants, representing an environmental substrate that may become highly polluted over time due to intensive agronomic uses.

  16. Volcanic ash ingestion by a large gas turbine aeroengine: fan-particle interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Andreas; Clarkson, Rory; Durant, Adam; Cassiani, Massimo; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Airborne particles from explosive volcanic eruptions are a major safety threat for aviation operations. The fine fraction of the emitted particles (aircraft encounters with drifting volcanic ash clouds. Particles ingested into the engine cause erosion of upstream surfaces of compressor fan blades and rotor-path components, and can also cause contamination or blockage of electrical systems and the fuel system such as fuel nozzles and air bleed filters. Ash particles that enter the hot-section of the engine (combustor and turbine stages; temperature between 1400-1800°C) are rapidly heated above the glass transition temperature (about 650-1000°C) and become soft (or form a melt) and can stick as re-solidified deposits on nozzle guide vanes. The glass deposits change the internal aerodynamic airflow in the engine and can affect the cooling capability of the different components by clogging the cooling inlets/outlets, which can lead to a loss of power or flame-out. The nature of volcanic ash ingestion is primarily influenced by the fan at the front of the engine which produces the thrust that drives the aircraft. The ingested air is split between the core (compressor/combustor/turbine) and bypass (thrust) at a ratio of typically between, 1:5-10 on modern engines. Consequently, the ash particles are fractionated between the core and bypass by the geometry and dynamics of the fan blades. This study uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of particle-laden airflows into a turbofan engine under different atmospheric and engine operation conditions. The main aim was to investigate the possible centrifugal effect of the fan blades as a function of particle size, and to relate this to the core intake concentration. We generated a generic 3D axial high-bypass turbofan engine using realistic dimensions of the turbofan, engine intake and other aerodynamically relevant parts. The CFD experiments include three scenarios of aircraft performance (climb, cruise and

  17. The identification and tracking of volcanic ash using the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager (SEVIRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeger, A. R.; Christopher, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we develop an algorithm based on combining spectral, spatial, and temporal thresholds from the geostationary Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) daytime measurements to identify and track different aerosol types, primarily volcanic ash. Contemporary methods typically do not use temporal information to identify ash. We focus not only on the identification and tracking of volcanic ash during the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption period beginning 14 April 2010 to May but a pixel level classification method for separating various classes in the SEVIRI images. Three case studies on 19 April, 16 May, and 17 May are analyzed in extensive detail with other satellite data including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), and Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe146 aircraft data to verify the aerosol spatial distribution maps generated by the SEVIRI algorithm. Our results indicate that the SEVIRI algorithm is able to track volcanic ash even at these high latitudes. Furthermore, the BAe146 aircraft data shows that the SEVIRI algorithm detects nearly all ash regions when AOD > 0.2. However, the algorithm has higher uncertainties when AOD is ash spatial distributions provided by this algorithm can be used as a critical input and validation for atmospheric dispersion models simulated by Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs). Identifying volcanic ash is an important first step before quantitative retrievals of ash concentration can be made.

  18. The operational eEMEP model version 10.4 for volcanic SO2 and ash forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensen, Birthe M.; Schulz, Michael; Wind, Peter; Valdebenito, Álvaro M.; Fagerli, Hilde

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a new version of the EMEP MSC-W model called eEMEP developed for transportation and dispersion of volcanic emissions, both gases and ash. EMEP MSC-W is usually applied to study problems with air pollution and aerosol transport and requires some adaptation to treat volcanic eruption sources and effluent dispersion. The operational set-up of model simulations in case of a volcanic eruption is described. Important choices have to be made to achieve CPU efficiency so that emergency situations can be tackled in time, answering relevant questions of ash advisory authorities. An efficient model needs to balance the complexity of the model and resolution. We have investigated here a meteorological uncertainty component of the volcanic cloud forecast by using a consistent ensemble meteorological dataset (GLAMEPS forecast) at three resolutions for the case of SO2 emissions from the 2014 Barðarbunga eruption. The low resolution (40 × 40 km) ensemble members show larger agreement in plume position and intensity, suggesting that the ensemble here does not give much added value. To compare the dispersion at different resolutions, we compute the area where the column load of the volcanic tracer, here SO2, is above a certain threshold, varied for testing purposes between 0.25 and 50 Dobson units. The increased numerical diffusion causes a larger area (+34 %) to be covered by the volcanic tracer in the low resolution simulations than in the high resolution ones. The higher resolution (10 × 10 km) ensemble members show higher column loads farther away from the volcanic eruption site in narrower clouds. Cloud positions are more varied between the high resolution members, and the cloud forms resemble the observed clouds more than the low resolution ones. For a volcanic emergency case this means that to obtain quickly results of the transport of volcanic emissions, an individual simulation with our low resolution is sufficient; however, to forecast peak

  19. MODIFICATION OF KELUD VOLCANIC ASH 2014 AS SELECTIVE ADSORBENT MATERIAL FOR COPPER(II METAL ION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susila Kristianingrum

    2017-01-01

      This research aims to prepare an adsorbent from Kelud volcanic ash for better Cu(II adsorption efficiency than Kiesel gel 60G E'Merck. Adsorbent synthesis was done by dissolving 6 grams of volcanic ash activated 700oC 4 hours and washed with HCl 0.1 M into 200 ml of 3M sodium hydroxide with stirring and heating of 100 °C for 1 hour. The filtrate sodium silicate was then neutralized using sulfuric acid. The mixture was allowed to stand for 24 hours then filtered and washed with aquaDM, then dried and crushed. The procedure is repeated for nitric acid, acetic acid and formic acid with a contact time of 24 hours. The products were then characterized using FTIR and XRD, subsequently determined acidity, moisture content, and tested for its adsorption of the ion Cu (II with AAS. The results showed that the type of acid that produced highest rendemen is AK-H2SO4-3M ie 36.93%, acidity of the adsorbent silica gel synthesized similar to Kiesel gel 60G E'Merck ie adsorbent AK-CH3COOH-3M and the water content of the silica gel adsorbent synthesized similar to Kiesel gel 60G E'Merck ie adsorbent AK-H2SO4-2 M. The character of the functional groups of silica gel synthesized all have similarities with Kiesel gel 60G E'Merck as a comparison. Qualitative analysis by XRD for all modified adsorbent showed a dominant peak of SiO2 except adsorbent AK-H2SO4 amorphous and chemical bonds with FTIR indicates that it has formed a bond of Si-O-Si and Si-OH. The optimum adsorption efficiency of the metal ions Cu(II obtained from AK-H2SO4-5M adsorbent that is equal to 93.2617% and the optimum adsorption capacity of the Cu(II metal ions was obtained from the adsorbent AK-CH3COOH-3M is equal to 2.4919 mg/ g.   Keywords: adsorbents, silica gel, adsorption, kelud volcanic ash

  20. Impacts of Dust on Tropical Volcanic Soil Formation: Insights from Strontium and Uranium-Series Isotopes in Soils from Basse-Terre Island, French Guadeloupe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Y.; Ma, L.; Sak, P. B.; Gaillardet, J.; Buss, H. L.; Brantley, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Dust inputs play an important role in soil formation, especially for thick soils developed on tropical volcanic islands. In these regions, soils are highly depleted due to intensive chemical weathering, and mineral nutrients from dusts have been known to be important in sustaining soil fertility and productivity. Tropical volcanic soils are an ideal system to study the impacts of dust inputs on the ecosystem. Sr and U-series isotopes are excellent tracers to identify sources of materials in an open system if the end-members have distinctive isotope signatures. These two isotope systems are particularly useful to trace the origin of atmospheric inputs into soils and to determine rates and timescales of soil formation. This study analyzes major elemental concentrations, Sr and U-series isotope ratios in highly depleted soils in the tropical volcanic island of Basse-Terre in French Guadeloupe to determine atmospheric input sources and identify key soil formation processes. We focus on three soil profiles (8 to 12 m thick) from the Bras-David, Moustique Petit-Bourg, and Deshaies watersheds; and on the adjacent rivers to these sites. Results have shown a significant depletion of U, Sr, and major elements in the deep profile (12 to 4 m) attributed to rapid chemical weathering. The top soil profiles (4 m to the surface) all show addition of elements such as Ca, Mg, U, and Sr due to atmospheric dust. More importantly, the topsoil profiles have distinct Sr and U-series isotope compositions from the deep soils. Sr and U-series isotope ratios of the top soils and sequential extraction fractions confirm that the sources of the dust are from the Saharan dessert, through long distance transport from Africa to the Caribbean region across the Atlantic Ocean. During the transport, some dust isotope signatures may also have been modified by local volcanic ashes and marine aerosols. Our study highlights that dusts and marine aerosols play important roles in element cycles and

  1. Study on Strength of Hybrid Mortar Synthesis with Epoxy Resin, Fly Ash and Quarry Dust Under Extreme Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheer, P.; Muni Reddy, M. G., Dr.; Adiseshu, S., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Blend and characterization of Bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether based thermosetting polymer mortar comprising an epoxy resin, Fly ash and Quarry dust are presented here for the strength study. The specimens have been prepared by means of an innovative process in Extreme conditions of commercial epoxy resin, Fly ash and Quarry dust based paste. In this way, thermosetting based hybrid mortars characterized by a different contents of normalized Fly ash and Quarry dust by a homogeneous distribution of the resin have been attained. Once hardened, these new composite materials show improved compressive strength and toughness in respect to both the Fly ash and Rock sand pastes since the Resin provides a more cohesive microstructure, with a reduced number of micro cracks. The micro structural characterization allows pointing out the presence of an Interfacial Transition Zone similar to that observed in cement based mortars. A correlation between micro-structural features and mechanical properties of the mortar has also been studied in Extreme conditions.

  2. Radiolarian zonation and volcanic ash layers in two Quaternary sediment cores from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.

    and redistribution of Pliocene taxa by a bottom water current (probably Antarctic Bottom Water Current). Volcanic ash layers of apparently about 20,000; 30,000 - 40,000; 80,000; 340,000 and younger than 4000,000 years are also recognised, which suggest suboceanic...

  3. The Detection, Characterization and Tracking of Recent Aleutian Island Volcanic Ash Plumes and the Assessment of Their Impact on Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John J.; Hudnall, L. A.; Matus, A.; Krueger, A. J.; Trepte, C. r.

    2010-01-01

    The Aleutian Islands of Alaska are home to a number of major volcanoes which periodically present a significant hazard to aviation. During summer of 2008, the Okmok and Kasatochi volcanoes experienced moderate eruptive events. These were followed a dramatic, major eruption of Mount Redoubt in late March 2009. The Redoubt case is extensively covered in this paper. Volcanic ash and SO2 from each of these eruptions dispersed throughout the atmosphere. This created the potential for major problems for air traffic near the ash dispersions and at significant distances downwind. The NASA Applied Sciences Weather Program implements a wide variety of research projects to develop volcanic ash detection, characterization and tracking applications for NASA Earth Observing System and NOAA GOES and POES satellites. Chemistry applications using NASA AURA satellite Ozone Monitoring System (OMI) retrievals produced SO2 measurements to trace the dispersion of volcanic aerosol. This work was complimented by advanced multi-channel imager applications for the discrimination and height assignment of volcanic ash using NASA MODIS and NOAA GOES and POES imager data. Instruments similar to MODIS and OMI are scheduled for operational deployment on NPOESS. In addition, the NASA Calipso satellite provided highly accurate measurements of aerosol height and dispersion for the calibration and validation of these algorithms and for corroborative research studies. All of this work shortens the lead time for transition to operations and ensures that research satellite data and applications are operationally relevant and utilized quickly after the deployment of operational satellite systems. Introduction

  4. Impacts of forest harvest on active carbon and microbial properties of a volcanic ash cap soil in northern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Matt D. Busse; Steven T. Overby; Brian D. Gardner; Joanne M. Tirocke

    2015-01-01

    Soil quality assessments are essential for determining impacts on belowground microbial community structure and function. We evaluated the suitability of active carbon (C), a rapid field test, as an indicator of soil biological quality in five paired forest stands (clear cut harvested 40 years prior and unharvested) growing on volcanic ash-cap soils in northern Idaho....

  5. Volcanic Ash and SO2 retrievals using synthetic MODIS TIR data: comparison between inversion procedures and sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Corradini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work the volcanic ash and SO2 retrievals obtained by applying three different procedures (LUT - Look Up Table, NN - Neural Network and VPR - Volcanic Plume Removal on MODIS Thermal InfraRed (TIR synthetic measurements have been compared. The synthetic measurements are generated using MODTRAN Radiative Transfer Model (RTM for defined volcanic cloud configurations. The results, presented as the percentage difference between the retrieved ash and SO2 total masses and the true values used for the synthetic data generation, indicate maximum differences of +/- 15% and +/- 10% for all the procedures and for ash and SO2 retrievals respectively. A sensitivity analysis has been also realized to investigate the influence of volcanic cloud altitude and water vapour profile on SO2 retrievals at 7.3 and 8.6 μm. Results confirm the high sensitivity of the 7.3 μm retrieval to the volcanic cloud altitude and show that the SO2 total masses estimated at 7.3 and 8.6 μm separately can be used to improve the information on the plume height. Finally, the water vapour profile is used to compute the minimum altitude over which the 7.3 μm retrieval is effective. 

  6. Retrieving simulated volcanic, desert dust and sea-salt particle properties from two/three-component particle mixtures using UV-VIS polarization lidar and T matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. David

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During transport by advection, atmospheric nonspherical particles, such as volcanic ash, desert dust or sea-salt particles experience several chemical and physical processes, leading to a complex vertical atmospheric layering at remote sites where intrusion episodes occur. In this paper, a new methodology is proposed to analyse this complex vertical layering in the case of a two/three-component particle external mixtures. This methodology relies on an analysis of the spectral and polarization properties of the light backscattered by atmospheric particles. It is based on combining a sensitive and accurate UV-VIS polarization lidar experiment with T-matrix numerical simulations and air mass back trajectories. The Lyon UV-VIS polarization lidar is used to efficiently partition the particle mixture into its nonspherical components, while the T-matrix method is used for simulating the backscattering and depolarization properties of nonspherical volcanic ash, desert dust and sea-salt particles. It is shown that the particle mixtures' depolarization ratio δ p differs from the nonspherical particles' depolarization ratio δns due to the presence of spherical particles in the mixture. Hence, after identifying a tracer for nonspherical particles, particle backscattering coefficients specific to each nonspherical component can be retrieved in a two-component external mixture. For three-component mixtures, the spectral properties of light must in addition be exploited by using a dual-wavelength polarization lidar. Hence, for the first time, in a three-component external mixture, the nonsphericity of each particle is taken into account in a so-called 2β + 2δ formalism. Applications of this new methodology are then demonstrated in two case studies carried out in Lyon, France, related to the mixing of Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash with sulfate particles (case of a two-component mixture and to the mixing of dust with sea-salt and water-soluble particles

  7. Orographic effects on the transport and deposition of volcanic ash: A case study of Mount Sakurajima, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulidis, Alexandros P.; Takemi, Tetsuya; Iguchi, Masato; Renfrew, Ian A.

    2017-09-01

    Volcanic ash is a major atmospheric hazard that has a significant impact on local populations and international aviation. The topography surrounding a volcano affects the transport and deposition of volcanic ash, but these effects have not been studied in depth. Here we investigate orographic impacts on ash transport and deposition in the context of the Sakurajima volcano in Japan, using the chemistry-resolving version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Sakurajima is an ideal location for such a study because of the surrounding mountainous topography, frequent eruptions, and comprehensive observing network. At Sakurajima, numerical experiments reveal that across the 2-8ϕ grain size range, the deposition of "medium-sized" ash (3-5ϕ) is most readily affected by orographic flows. The direct effects of resolving fine-scale orographic phenomena are counteracting: mountain-induced atmospheric gravity waves can keep ash afloat, while enhanced downslope winds in the lee of mountains (up to 50% stronger) can force the ash downward. Gravity waves and downslope winds were seen to have an effect along the dispersal path, in the vicinity of both the volcano and other mountains. Depending on the atmospheric conditions, resolving these orographic effects means that ash can be transported higher than the initial injection height (especially for ash finer than 2ϕ), shortly after the eruption (within 20 min) and close to the vent (within the first 10 km), effectively modifying the input plume height used in an ash dispersal model—an effect that should be taken into account when initializing simulations.

  8. Future developments in modelling and monitoring of volcanic ash clouds: outcomes from the first IAVCEI-WMO workshop on Ash Dispersal Forecast and Civil Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, Costanza; Folch, Arnau; Loughlin, Susan; Puempel, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the serious consequences of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption (Iceland) on civil aviation, 52 volcanologists, meteorologists, atmospheric dispersion modellers and space and ground-based monitoring specialists from 12 different countries (including representatives from 6 Volcanic Ash Advisory Centres and related institutions) gathered to discuss the needs of the ash dispersal modelling community, investigate new data-acquisition strategies (i.e. quantitative measurements and observations) and discuss how to improve communication between the research community and institutions with an operational mandate. Based on a dedicated benchmark exercise and on 3 days of in-depth discussion, recommendations have been made for future model improvements, new strategies of ash cloud forecasting, multidisciplinary data acquisition and more efficient communication between different communities. Issues addressed in the workshop include ash dispersal modelling, uncertainty, ensemble forecasting, combining dispersal models and observations, sensitivity analysis, model variability, data acquisition, pre-eruption forecasting, first simulation and data assimilation, research priorities and new communication strategies to improve information flow and operational routines. As a main conclusion, model developers, meteorologists, volcanologists and stakeholders need to work closely together to develop new and improved strategies for ash dispersal forecasting and, in particular, to: (1) improve the definition of the source term, (2) design models and forecasting strategies that can better characterize uncertainties, (3) explore and identify the best ensemble strategies that can be adapted to ash dispersal forecasting, (4) identify optimized strategies for the combination of models and observations and (5) implement new critical operational strategies.

  9. A computer model for volcanic ash fallout and assessment of subsequent hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedonio, G.; Costa, A.; Longo, A.

    2005-08-01

    HAZMAP is a FORTRAN code for the solution of the equations of diffusion, transport and sedimentation of small particles, in order to model the dispersion of ash generated by a convective column. The model was developed simplifying the advection-diffusion-sedimentation equation for volcanic ash transport in the atmosphere from three to two dimensions and using a semi-analytical computational method to greatly reduce the required computer time and memory. HAZMAP can be used either to simulate the mass distribution of the deposit if a wind profile is given ("deposit mode"), or to define the probability of a given accumulation of mass on the ground if a statistical set of wind profiles is provided ("probability mode"). The model needs the definition of the physical system (spatial distribution of the point sources, total erupted mass, settling velocity distribution, wind velocity profile, atmospheric turbulent diffusion coefficients), and of a computational grid. The output values of mass accumulation on the ground or the probability of mass accumulation are computed on a regular grid, suitable for further analysis.

  10. Forecasting volcanic ash dispersal and coeval resuspension during the April-May 2015 Calbuco eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckziegel, F.; Bustos, E.; Mingari, L.; Báez, W.; Villarosa, G.; Folch, A.; Collini, E.; Viramonte, J.; Romero, J.; Osores, S.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric dispersion of volcanic ash from explosive eruptions or from subsequent fallout deposit resuspension causes a range of impacts and disruptions on human activities and ecosystems. The April-May 2015 Calbuco eruption in Chile involved eruption and resuspension activities. We overview the chronology, effects, and products resulting from these events, in order to validate an operational forecast strategy for tephra dispersal. The modelling strategy builds on coupling the meteorological Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF/ARW) model with the FALL3D dispersal model for eruptive and resuspension processes. The eruption modelling considers two distinct particle granulometries, a preliminary first guess distribution used operationally when no field data was available yet, and a refined distribution based on field measurements. Volcanological inputs were inferred from eruption reports and results from an Argentina-Chilean ash sample data network, which performed in-situ sampling during the eruption. In order to validate the modelling strategy, results were compared with satellite retrievals and ground deposit measurements. Results indicate that the WRF-FALL3D modelling system can provide reasonable forecasts in both eruption and resuspension modes, particularly when the adjusted granulometry is considered. The study also highlights the importance of having dedicated datasets of active volcanoes furnishing first-guess model inputs during the early stages of an eruption.

  11. Synthesis of zeolitic materials from volcanic ash in presence and absence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanhueza N, V. M.; Bennun T, L. D., E-mail: vsanhuez@udec.cl [Universidad de Concepcion, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Edmundo Larenas 129, Region del Biobio (Chile)

    2015-07-01

    Zeolitic materials as Na-phillipsite, Na-K-phillipsite-like zeolites and the mixtures of zeolites (phillipsite+analcime and phillipsite+chabazite+analcime) were synthesized from volcanic ash, either in presence and absence of cetiltrimetilamonium bromide (CTAB). The ash sample used in the laboratory experiments contains 75.36% SiO{sub 2} and 14.11% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, abundances. The reaction time as well as the influence of CTAB were studied in the zeolitic materials crystallization. The experiments were carried out under hydrothermal conditions, autogenic pressure and temperature of 150 grades C, as well as reaction time from 8 to 116 h. Products from this hydrothermal treatment were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (Sem-EDS). Of the zeolitic materials obtained the Na-K-phillipsite-like zeolite was found to be the most effective for the retention of cations Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+}. (Author)

  12. High resolution 3D confocal microscope imaging of volcanic ash particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, David; Gillmore, Gavin; Gill, Ian; Petford, Nick

    2017-07-15

    We present initial results from a novel high resolution confocal microscopy study of the 3D surface structure of volcanic ash particles from two recent explosive basaltic eruptions, Eyjafjallajökull (2010) and Grimsvötn (2011), in Iceland. The majority of particles imaged are less than 100μm in size and include PM10s, known to be harmful to humans if inhaled. Previous studies have mainly used 2D microscopy to examine volcanic particles. The aim of this study was to test the potential of 3D laser scanning confocal microscopy as a reliable analysis tool for these materials and if so to what degree high resolution surface and volume data could be obtained that would further aid in their classification. First results obtained using an Olympus LEXT scanning confocal microscope with a ×50 and ×100 objective lens are highly encouraging. They reveal a range of discrete particle types characterised by sharp or concave edges consistent with explosive formation and sudden rupture of magma. Initial surface area/volume ratios are given that may prove useful in subsequent modelling of damage to aircraft engines and human tissue where inhalation has occurred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Lidar ratios of stratospheric volcanic ash and sulfate aerosols retrieved from CALIOP measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Andrew T.; Young, Stuart A.; Siems, Steven T.; Manton, Michael J.

    2017-07-01

    We apply a two-way transmittance constraint to nighttime CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) observations of volcanic aerosol layers to retrieve estimates of the particulate lidar ratio (Sp) at 532 nm. This technique is applied to three volcanic eruption case studies that were found to have injected aerosols directly into the stratosphere. Numerous lidar observations permitted characterization of the optical and geometric properties of the volcanic aerosol layers over a time period of 1-2 weeks. For the volcanic ash-rich layers produced by the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle eruption (June 2011), we obtain mean and median particulate lidar ratios of 69 ± 13 sr and 67 sr, respectively. For the sulfate-rich aerosol layers produced by Kasatochi (August 2008) and Sarychev Peak (June 2009), the means of the retrieved lidar ratios were 66 ± 19 sr (median 60 sr) and 63 ± 14 sr (median 59 sr), respectively. The 532 nm layer-integrated particulate depolarization ratios (δp) observed for the Puyehue layers (δp = 0.33 ± 0.03) were much larger than those found for the volcanic aerosol layers produced by the Kasatochi (δp = 0.09 ± 0.03) and Sarychev (δp = 0.05 ± 0.04) eruptions. However, for the Sarychev layers we observe an exponential decay (e-folding time of 3.6 days) in δp with time from 0.27 to 0.03. Similar decreases in the layer-integrated attenuated colour ratios with time were observed for the Sarychev case. In general, the Puyehue layers exhibited larger colour ratios (χ' = 0.53 ± 0.07) than what was observed for the Kasatochi (χ' = 0.35 ± 0.07) and Sarychev (χ' = 0.32 ± 0.07) layers, indicating that the Puyehue layers were generally composed of larger particles. These observations are particularly relevant to the new stratospheric aerosol subtyping classification scheme, which has been incorporated into version 4 of the level 2 CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) data products.

  14. Parameterization of volcanic ash remobilization by wind-tunnel erosion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Merrison, Jonathan; Alois, Stefano; Iversen, Jens Jacob; Scarlato, Piergiorgio

    2017-04-01

    The remobilization of volcanic ash from the ground is one of the many problems posing threat to life and infrastructures during and after the course of an explosive volcanic eruption. A proper management of the risks connected to this problem requires a thorough understanding of the factors that influence and promote the dispersal of particles over large distances. Towards this target, we conducted a series of experiments aimed at defining first-order processes controlling the remobilization threshold of ash particles by wind erosion. In the framework of the EU-funded Europlanet project, we joinly used the environmental wind tunnel facility at Aarhus University (DK) and the state-of-the art high-speed imaging equipment of INGV experimental lab (Italy) to capture at unparalleled temporal and spatial resolution the removal dynamics of ash-sized (half-millimetre to micron-sized) particles. A homogenous layer of particles was set at on a plate placed downwind a boundary layer setup. Resuspension processes were filmed at 2000 fps and 50 micron pixel resolution, and the plate weighted pre and post-experiment. Explored variables include: 1) wind speed (from ca. 1 to 7 m/s) and boundary layer structure; 2) particle grain size (from 32-63 to 90-125 micron), and sample sorting); 3) chemical and textural features, using basalt and trachyte samples from Campi Flegrei (Pomici Principali,10 ka) and Eyjafjallajökull (May 2010) eruptions; and 4) temperature and humidity, by conducting experiments either at ambient conditions or with a heated sample. We found that the grain size distribution exerts a strong control on the fundamental dynamics of gas-particle coupling. Particles > 90 micron detach from the particles layer individually, also entering the gas flow individually. Conversely, removal < 63 micron particles occurs in clumps of aggregates. These clumps, once taken in charge by the gas flow, are frequently disaggregated and dispersed rapidly (order of few milliseconds). Our

  15. Two pools of old carbon in a volcanic-ash soil revealed by sequential density fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, R.; Shirato, Y.; Uchida, M.; Hiradate, S.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanic-ash soils are often darker and hold significantly greater amounts of organic matter (OM) than non-volcanic soils presumably because inorganic constituents unique to such soil (e.g., poorly-crystalline minerals and dissolved aluminum) have high capacity to stabilize OM. It has been shown that carbon (C) in Japanese volcanic-ash soils can be quite old (>1000 yr) even at surface horizons. Yet little information is available on how the old C is stabilized in soil matrix. Fractionation of soil according to particle density is an effective approach to distinguish the OM of different degrees of mineral associations and to elucidate SOM stabilization processes. Here we examined a surface (Ap) horizon of an allophanic Andisol in central Japan by isolating six density fractions (from F1: 2.5 g/cc). Almost half of total C was distributed to F4 (2.0-2.25 g/cc), 26% of total C to F3 (1.8-2.0 g/cc), 10-12% to F2 (1.6-1.8 g/cc) and F5 (2.25-2.5 g/cc), and 3-4% to F1 and F6, respectively. The concentration of allophane was also highest in F4 then F3, implying that allophane-OM association is the main form of OM present in this soil. In accord with the reports on other soil types, C-14 age generally increased with particle density from F1 (modern) to F5 (1300 yr libby age) and slightly declined to F6 (1000 yr). The clear exception to this trend was the old C age (1300 yr) of 1.6-1.8 g/cc fraction. Following results suggested the presence of char in this fraction: (i) C:N ratio was the highest (22), (ii) aromatic-C:O-alkyl-C ratio nearly doubled from F1 to F2, and (iii) large numbers of small, dark fragments were microscopically observed along with plant detritus fragments. In contrast to F2, equally-old C in F5 (2.25-2.5 g/cc) appear to be strongly altered by microbial process and bound to mineral particles. F5 had lower C:N ratio of 9.7 and was more enriched in N-15 (+5 per mill) and C-13 (+2 per mill) compared to F2. The presence of contrasting forms of old C suggest

  16. Identifying the Volcanic Source of Disconnected Ash Clouds using the HYSPLIT Dispersion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D.; Ramsey, M. S.; Karimi, B.

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring of volcanic systems and their eruptive products can provide key insights into their hazard state and the processes occurring at depth. However, a large proportion of volcanic centers around the world are not actively monitored, especially those in remote regions. Some of these volcanoes are capable of producing devastating eruptions that emit ash plumes in excess of 10 km with little warning. Once erupted, these plumes can quickly become disconnected from their source making it difficult to determine their origin and assess the risk of continued activity, as well as creating ash-rich clouds that pose a serious risk to any aircraft in the region. Furthermore, some eruptions are not preceded by increased thermal activity (or these thermal anomalies are obscured by the plume) rendering traditional spaceborne thermal monitoring less effective. However, it may be possible to identify the source of the cloud using remote sensing data and trajectory modeling. Results could then be used to trigger imaging by higher spatial resolution sensors such as the Advanced Spacebourne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) to detect activity. We attempt to trace ash cloud trajectories from three known eruptions (Chaiten, Kliuchevskoi, and Anatahan) with the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model using the backward trajectory function. Ash cloud detection was obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) using the Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD) technique. Areas of high density within the cloud were assigned based on the BTD values, and were then classified. A grid of coordinate points from the cloud was made and each coordinate associated with the average density of its grid cell. Those cells with the highest average density were assigned a greater importance, and were the input coordinates for the HYSPLIT model. Three height levels were also chosen, associated with the troposphere, tropopause

  17. Long-range volcanic ash transport and fallout during the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Adam J.; Villarosa, Gustavo; Rose, William I.; Delmelle, Pierre; Prata, Alfred J.; Viramonte, José G.

    2012-01-01

    The May 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Chile, provided a rare opportunity to measure the long-range transport of volcanic emissions and characteristics of a widely-dispersed terrestrial ash deposit. Airborne ash mass, quantified using thermal infrared satellite remote sensing, ranged between 0.2 and 0.4 Tg during the period 3-7 May 2008. A high level of spatiotemporal correspondence was observed between cloud trajectories and changes in surface reflectivity, which was inferred to indicate ash deposition. The evolution of the deposit was mapped for the first time using satellite-based observations of surface reflectivity. The distal (>80 km) ash deposit was poorly sorted and fine grained, and mean particle size varied very little beyond a distance >300 km. There were three particle size subpopulations in fallout at distances >300 km which mirror those identified in fallout from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, known to have a high propensity for aggregation. Discrete temporal sampling and characterisation of fallout demonstrated contributions from specific eruptive phases. Samples collected at the time of deposition were compared to bulk samples collected months after deposition and provided some evidence for winnowing. Experimentally-derived ash leachates had near-neutral pH values and charge balance which indicates minimal quantities of adsorbed acids. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed surface enrichments in Ca, Na and Fe and the presence of coatings of mixed Ca-, Na- and Fe-rich salts on ash particles prior to deposition. Low S:Cl ratios in leachates indicate that the eruption had a low S content, and high Cl:F ratios imply gas-ash interaction within a Cl-rich environment. We estimate that ash fallout had potential to scavenge ∼42% of total S released into the atmosphere prior to deposition. XPS analyses also revealed ash particle surfaces were strongly enriched in Fe (in contrast to the results from bulk leachate

  18. The bioreactivity of the sub-10 μm component of volcanic ash: Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Timothy; Bérubé, Kelly

    2011-10-30

    With the recent eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyafallajökull and resulting ash cloud over much of Europe there was considerable concern about possible respiratory hazards. Volcanic ash can contain minerals that are known human respiratory health hazards such as cristobalite. Short-term ash exposures can cause skin sores, respiratory and ocular irritations and exacerbation of pre-existing lung conditions such as asthma. Long-term occupational level exposures to crystalline silicon dioxide can cause lung inflammation, oedema, fibrosis and cancer. The potential health effects would be dependent on factors including mineralogy, surface chemistry, size, and levels and duration of exposure. Bulk ash from the Soufrière Hills volcano was sourced and inhalable (<2.5 μm) ash samples prepared and physicochemically characterised. The fine ash samples were tested for bioreactivity by SDS-PAGE which determined the strength of binding between mineral grains and lung proteins. Selected proteins bound tightly to cristobalite, and bound loosely to other ash components. A positive correlation was seen between the amount of SiO(2) in the sample and the strength of the binding. The strength of binding is a function of the mineral's bioreactivity, and therefore, a potential geo-biomarker of respiratory risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Volcanic ash and aviation–The challenges of real-time, global communication of a natural hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Peter; Tupper, Andrew C.; Guffanti, Marianne C.; Loughlin, Sue; Casadevall, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    More than 30 years after the first major aircraft encounters with volcanic ash over Indonesia in 1982, it remains challenging to inform aircraft in flight of the exact location of potentially dangerous ash clouds on their flight path, particularly shortly after the eruption has occurred. The difficulties include reliably forecasting and detecting the onset of significant explosive eruptions on a global basis, observing the dispersal of eruption clouds in real time, capturing their complex structure and constituents in atmospheric transport models, describing these observations and modelling results in a manner suitable for aviation users, delivering timely warning messages to the cockpit, flight planners and air traffic management systems, and the need for scientific development in order to undertake operational enhancements. The framework under which these issues are managed is the International Airways Volcano Watch (IAVW), administered by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). ICAO outlines in its standards and recommended practices (International Civil Aviation Organization, 2014) the basic volcanic monitoring and communication that is necessary at volcano observatories in Member States (countries). However, not all volcanoes are monitored and not all countries with volcanoes have mandated volcano observatories or equivalents. To add to the efforts of volcano observatories, a system of Meteorological Watch Offices, Air Traffic Management Area Control Centres, and nine specialist Volcanic Ash Advisory Centres (VAACs) are responsible for observing, analysing, forecasting and communicating the aviation hazard (airborne ash), using agreed techniques and messages in defined formats. Continuous improvement of the IAVW framework is overseen by expert groups representing the operators of the system, the user community, and the science community. The IAVW represents a unique marriage of two scientific disciplines - volcanology and meteorology - with the

  20. Sustained effects of volcanic ash on biofilm stoichiometry, enzyme activity and community composition in North- Patagonia streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Uara; Díaz-Villanueva, Verónica; Modenutti, Beatriz

    2017-11-25

    Volcanic eruptions are extreme perturbations that affect ecosystems. These events can also produce persistent effects in the environment for several years after the eruption, with increased concentrations of suspended particles and the introduction of elements in the water column. On 4th June 2011, the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex (40.59°S-72.11°W, 2200m.a.s.l.) erupted explosively in southern Chile. The area affected by the volcano was devastated; a thick layer of volcanic ash (up to 30cm) was deposited in areas 50 km east of the volcano towards Argentina. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of volcanic ash deposits on stream ecosystems four years after the eruption, comparing biofilm stoichiometry, alkaline phosphatase activity, and primary producer's assemblage in streams which were severely affected by the volcano with unaffected streams. We confirmed in the laboratory that ash deposited in the catchment of affected streams still leach phosphorus (P) into the water four years after eruption. Results indicate that affected streams still receive volcanic particles and that these particles release P, thus stream water exhibits high P concentration. Biofilm P content was higher and the C:P ratio lower in affected streams compared to unaffected streams. As a consequence of less P in unaffected streams, the alkaline phosphatase activity was higher compared to affected streams. Cyanobacteria increased their abundances (99.9% of total algal biovolume) in the affected streams suggesting that the increase in P may positively affect this group. On the contrary, unaffected streams contained a diatom dominant biofilm. In this way, local heterogeneity was created between sub-catchments located within 30 km of each other. These types of events should be seen as opportunities to gather valuable ecological information about how severe disturbances, like volcanic eruptions, shape landscapes and lotic systems for several years after the event

  1. Soil Properties Affecting the Reductive Capacity of Volcanic Ash Soils in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, C.; Ahn, J.; Kim, K.; Park, K.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanic ash soils or Andisols have distinct chemical and mineralogical properties. The unique chemical properties of Andisols are due to their Al-rich elemental composition, the highly reactive nature of their colloidal fractions, and their large surface area. The soils that developed from volcanic ash on Jeju Island, Korea, were classified as typical Andisols. The soils had an acidic pH, high water content, high organic matter, and clay-silty texture. The crystalline minerals in the samples were mainly ferromagnesian minerals, such as olivine and pyroxene, and iron oxides, such as magnetite and hematite derived from basaltic materials. A large amount of gibbsite was found in the subsurface horizon as a secondary product of the migration of excess Al. In addition, we found that considerable amounts of poorly ordered minerals like allophane and ferrihydrite were present in the Jeju soils. The SiO2 contents were lower than those of other soil orders, while the Al2O3 and Fe2O3 contents were higher. These results reflect some of the important chemical properties of Andisols. The chromium (VI/III) redox couple was used in the reductive capacity measurement. The mean reductive capacity of the Jeju soils was 6.53 mg/L reduced Cr(VI), which is 5.1 times higher than that of non-volcanic ash soils from inland Korea. The reductive capacity of the inland soils was correlated with the total carbon content. Such a high capacity for the reduction of soluble Cr(VI) must also be due to the relatively high carbon contents of the Jeju soils. Nevertheless, despite having 20 times higher total carbon contents, there was no correlation between the reductive capacity of the Jeju soils and the carbon content. These results imply that the reductive capacity of Jeju soils is not only controlled by the carbon content, but is also affected by other soil properties. Correlations of the reductive capacity with major elements showed that Al and Fe were closely connected to the reductive

  2. Influence of management practices on C stabilization pathways in agricultural volcanic ash soils (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Zulimar; María Álvarez, Ana; Carral, Pilar; de Figueiredo, Tomas; Almendros, Gonzalo

    2014-05-01

    Although C stabilization mechanisms in agricultural soils are still controversial [1], a series of overlapped pathways has been suggested [2] such as: i) insolubilization of low molecular weight precursors of soil organic matter (SOM) with reactive minerals through physical and chemical bonding, ii) selective accumulation of biosynthetic substances which are recalcitrant because of its inherent chemical composition, and iii) preservation and furter diagenetic transformation of particulate SOM entrapped within resistant microaggregates, where diffusion of soil enzymes is largely hampered. In some environments where carbohydrate and N compounds are not readily biodegraded, e.g., with water saturated micropores, an ill-known C stabilization pathway may involve the formation of Maillard's reaction products [3]. In all cases, these pathways converge in the formation of recalcitrant macromolecular substances, sharing several properties with the humic acid (HA) fraction [4]. In template forests, the selective preservation and further microbial reworking of plant biomass has been identified as a prevailing mechanism in the accumulation of recalcitrant SOM forms [5]. However, in volcanic ash soils with intense organomineral interactions, condensation reactions of low molecular weight precursors with short-range minerals may be the main mechanism [6]. In order to shed some light about the effect of agricultural management on soil C stabilization processes on volcanic ash soils, the chemical composition of HA and some structural proxies of SOM informing on its origin and potential resistance to biodegradation, were examined in 30 soils from Canary Islands (Spain) by visible, infrared (IR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, elementary analysis and pyrolytic techniques. The results of multivariate treatments, suggested at least three simultaneous C stabilization biogeochemical trends: i) diagenetic alteration of plant biomacromolecules in soils receiving

  3. Requirements and Implementation Feasibility for a CubeSat Thermal Infrared Imaging System to Monitor the Structure of Volcanic Ash Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, D.; Carroll, R.; Webley, P.; Hawkins, J.

    2014-12-01

    The 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland caused the cancellation of approximately 108,000 flights over an 8-day period, disrupted air traffic worldwide, and cost the airline industry more than $400 million per day. The inconvenience and economic impact of this and similar events, such as Puyehue-Cordon-Caulle in 2011, have heightened the interest in developing improved satellite remote sensing techniques for monitoring volcanic plumes and drifting clouds. For aviation safety, the operational/research community has started to move towards classifying the concentrations within volcanic plumes and clouds. Additionally, volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models are often used for forecasting ash cloud locations and they require knowledge of the structure of the erupting column to improve their ash simulations and also downwind 3-D maps of the ash cloud to calibrate/validate their modeling output. Existing remote sensing satellites utilize a brightness temperature method with thermal infrared (TIR) measurements from 10 - 12 μm to determine mass loading of volcanic ash along a single line of sight, but they have infrequent revisit times and they cannot resolve the three-dimensional structure of the ash clouds. A cluster of CubeSats dedicated to the monitoring of volcanic ash and plumes could provide both more frequent updates and the multi-aspect images needed to resolve the density structure of volcanic ash clouds and plumes. In this presentation, we discuss the feasibility and requirements for a CubeSat TIR imaging system and the associated on-board image processing that would be required to monitor the structure of volcanic ash clouds from Low Earth Orbit.

  4. Design and construction of a testbed for the application of real volcanic ash from the Eyjafjallajökull and Grimsvötn eruptions to microgas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Konradin; Fischer, Christian; Lange, Martin; Schulz, Uwe; Naraparaju, Ravisankar; Kramer, Dietmar

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that volcanic ash clouds emitted from erupting volcanoes pose a considerable threat to the aviation. The volcanic ash particles can damage the turbine blades and their thermal barrier coatings as well as the bearings of the turbine. For a detailed investigation of this damaging effect a testbed was designed and constructed, which allowed to study the damaging effects of real volcanic ash to an especially for these investigations modified microgas turbine. The use of this microgas turbine had the advantage that it delivers near reality conditions, using kerosene and operating at similar temperatures as big turbines, but at a very cost effective level. The testbed consisted out of a disperser for the real volcanic ash and all the equipment needed to control the micro gas turbine. Moreover, in front and behind the microgas turbine the concentration and the distribution of the volcanic ash were measured online by optical particle counters (OPCs). The particle concentration and size distribution of the volcanic ash particles in the intake in front of the microgas turbine was measured by an optical particle counter (OPC) combined with an isokinetic intake. Behind the microgas turbine in the exhaust gas additionally to the measurement with a second OPC ash particles were caught with an impactor, in order to enable the later analysis with an electron microscope concerning the morphology to verify possible melting processes of the ash particles. This testbed is of high importance as it allows detailed investigations of the impact of volcanic ash to jet turbines and appropriate countermeasures.

  5. Assessment of the potential respiratory hazard of volcanic ash from future Icelandic eruptions: A study of archived basaltic to rhyolitic ash samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damby, David; Horwell, Claire J.; Larsen, Gudrun; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Tomatis, Maura; Fubini, Bice; Donaldson, Ken

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundThe eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull (2010) and Grímsvötn (2011), Iceland, triggered immediate, international consideration of the respiratory health hazard of inhaling volcanic ash, and prompted the need to estimate the potential hazard posed by future eruptions of Iceland’s volcanoes to Icelandic and Northern European populations. MethodsA physicochemical characterization and toxicological assessment was conducted on a suite of archived ash samples spanning the spectrum of past eruptions (basaltic to rhyolitic magmatic composition) of Icelandic volcanoes following a protocol specifically designed by the International Volcanic Health Hazard Network. ResultsIcelandic ash can be of a respirable size (up to 11.3 vol.% cell-membrane damage. ConclusionsThe primary particle-specific concern is the potential for future eruptions of Iceland’s volcanoes to generate fine, respirable material and, thus, to increase ambient PM concentrations. This particularly applies to highly explosive silicic eruptions, but can also hold true for explosive basaltic eruptions or discrete events associated with basaltic fissure eruptions.

  6. Effects of agricultural practices on the hydrodynamics of a deep tilled hardened volcanic ash-soil (Cangahua) in Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Podwojewski, Pascal; Janeau, Jean-Louis; Leroux, Yann

    2008-01-01

    The rehabilitation of indurate pyroclastic formations of the Ecuadorian Sierra (cangahua) paves the way for the development of new agricultural areas. The material derived from the fragmentation of the hardened volcanic ashes is strongly prone to pluvial erosion, essentially because it has a fine silty-sandy texture, and because contains no organic matter and no clay minerals. Rainfall simulation was implemented before and after three cycles of cultivation to asses the evolution of soil struc...

  7. Application of organic matter and biofertilizer to improve growth and yield of maize on soil damaged by volcanic ash of Mount Kelud in East Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hardianita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Kelud in 2014 damaged some agricultural areas grown with maize in Malang of East Java. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of organic fertilizers and biological fertilizers on growth and yield of maize on soils damaged by volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Kelud. A pot experiment was conducted in the glasshouse of Balitkabi, Kendalpayak, Malang from July 2014 to February 2015. The treatments tested in this study were combinations of three mixtures of soil and volcanic ash (90%:10%, 80%:20%, and 70%:30%, and two doses of biofertilizer (25 and 35 kg / ha. Each treatment was added with 5 t organic matter/ha. A total of 10 kg of each mixture of soil and volcanic ash was placed in a 15 kg plastic pot. Each treatment received 100 kg inorganic fertilizer / kg containing 15% N, 15% P, and 15% K. Three seeds of maize (NK33 variety were planted in each pot and thin to one plant after one week. The experiment was conducted for 14 weeks. The results showed that application of organic matter and biofertilizer did not significantly improve fertility of soil mixed with volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Kelud. Yield of maize was not significantly improved by the application of organic matter and biofertilizer on soil mixed with volcanic ash. The contents of carbohydrates and proteins in maize seeds were also not affected by application of organic matter and biofertilizer.

  8. The influence of using quicklime and volcanic ash as stabilizing materials in clay viewed from CBR value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastuty, Ika Puji; Sofyan, Tri Alby; Roesyanto

    2017-11-01

    The condition of the soil in Indonesia in varied, viewed from its bearing capacity. The soil is one of the materials which plays a very important role in a construction or foundation so that it is very necessary to have soil with its adequate technical properties. In reality, often founding inadequate soil properties such as in its compressibility, permeability, and plasticity. The objective of the research was to find out the physical properties, technical properties, CBR value, and stabilization of clay by adding quicklime and volcanic ash as stabilizing materials. The mixing combination is 2%, 4% quicklime, and 2%-24% volcanic ash. The value of Water Content for original soil was 34.33% and Specific Gravity original soil was 2.65. The result of the research showed that the stabilizing materials from quicklime and volcanic ash could improve the physical and mechanical properties of clay. The value of Atterberg Limits decreased from 29.88% to 11.33% in the variation of 4% Q+24% VA, while the most maximal value of CBR was found in the variation of 4% Q+8% VA at 9.01%.

  9. The Characteristic and Genesis of Volcanic Ash Soil in the North Slope Toposequence of Kawi Mountain in Malang Regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Putra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The volcanic ash soil in Kawi Mountain is composed by the amorphous materials consist of allophane, imogolite and ferrihydrite. Results of previous study showed that the phosphate retention in all soil profiles of northern slope toposequence of Kawimountain was less than 85%, yet the phosphate retention of volcanic ash soils is usually > 85 %. This raised a question that there is a different characteristics of soil in the northern slope tosequence of the Kawi Mountain compared to the other places. This research was conducted to study soil characteristics, mineral contents, and genesis processessoccuring in soil on the northern slope toposequence of Kawi Mountain. 5 pedons between high elevation and low elevation (P1, P2, P3, P4 and P5 to identified the soil characteristics. The Al, Fe, and Si extracted by acid oxalate, natrium pyrophosphate, and dithionite citrate to calculate the amorphous mineral content. The results show that. The results showed that there is a different in terms of the thickness of the A horizon, the C organic content and the soil acidity level that mainly found in P3 and P4 profiles. The most important soil genesis processess in the formation of the volcanic ash soils were likely clay illuviation (P5, melanization and braunification (P3, littering (P1 and the reduction of andic soil properties from the upper slope (P1 profile up to the lower slope (P5 profile.

  10. A retrospective study on acute health effects due to volcanic ash exposure during the eruption of Mount Etna (Sicily) in 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Daniele; Ciancio, Nicola; Campisi, Raffaele; Di Maria, Annalisa; Bivona, Laura; Poletti, Venerino; Mistretta, Antonio; Biggeri, Annibale; Di Maria, Giuseppe

    2013-08-07

    Mount Etna, located in the eastern part of Sicily (Italy), is the highest and most active volcano in Europe. During the sustained eruption that occurred in October-November 2002 huge amounts of volcanic ash fell on a densely populated area south-east of Mount Etna in Catania province. The volcanic ash fall caused extensive damage to infrastructure utilities and distress in the exposed population. This retrospective study evaluates whether or not there was an association between ash fall and acute health effects in exposed local communities. We collected the number and type of visits to the emergency department (ED) for diseases that could be related to volcanic ash exposure in public hospitals of the Province of Catania between October 20 and November 7, 2002. We compared the magnitude of differences in ED visits between the ash exposure period in 2002 and the same period of the previous year 2001. We observed a significant increase of ED visits for acute respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, and ocular disturbances during the ash exposure time period. There was a positive association between exposure to volcanic ash from the 2002 eruption of Mount Etna and acute health effects in the Catania residents. This study documents the need for public health preparedness and response initiatives to protect nearby populations from exposure to ash fall from future eruptions of Mount Etna.

  11. Water purification using porous ceramics prepared by recycling volcanic ash and waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tomohiro; Fujita, Yuki; Kakinaga, Mayu; Oka, Nobuto; Nishida, Tetsuaki

    2017-11-01

    Water purification was examined using porous ceramics prepared by sintering a powder mixture of volcanic ash, waste glass and a small amount of wood charcoal. The porous ceramics had cross-linked 3D-channels of which the diameter ranged from several nm to several μm. Three kilograms of porous ceramics placed in 90 L of circulating artificial seawater, in which several tropical fishes were actually living under aeration, caused a decrease in COD from 23.8 to 13.1 mg L-1 in a week. The number of coliform bacteria was almost constant in a range of 52-65 mL-1 despite that a lot of excrements were discharged frequently. The number of the coliform bacteria in the seawater examined "without the tropical fishes" decreased from 900 to 1 mL-1 in 2 weeks, and COD decreased from 37.9 to 7.9 mg L-1. It proved that several aerobic bacteria proliferating in the macropores inside the porous ceramics could effectively decompose several organic materials.

  12. Transfer factors of radioiodine from volcanic-ash soil (Andosol) to crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban-Nai, Tadaaki; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Environmental and Toxicological Sciences Research Group

    2003-03-01

    In order to obtain soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs) of radioiodine from volcanic-ash soil to agricultural crops, we carried out radiotracer experiments. The mean values of TFs (on a wet weight basis) of radioiodine from Andosol to edible parts of crops were as follows: water dropwort, 0.24; lettuce, 0.00098; onion, 0.0011; radish, 0.0044; turnip, 0.0013 and eggplant, 0.00010. The mean value of the TFs of radioiodine for edible parts of wheat (on a dry weight basis) was 0.00015. We also studied the distributions of iodine in crops. There was a tendency for the TFs of leaves to be higher than those of tubers, fruits and grains. A very high TF was found for water dropwort, because this plant was cultivated under a waterlogged condition, in which iodine desorbed from soil into soil solution with a drop in the Eh value. The data obtained in this study should be helpful to assess the long-lived {sup 129}I (half life: 1.57 x l0{sup 7} yr) pathway related to the fuel cycle. (author)

  13. Sulfate adsorption and surface precipitation on a volcanic ash soil (allophanic andisol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Makino, Tomoyuki; Hattori, Yasunobu

    2006-08-15

    Sulfate strongly adsorbs on metal oxides and soils with variable charges. However, its surface precipitation has not been clearly evaluated and its adsorption mechanism has been in dispute. In the present study, an allophanic andisol, a typical volcanic ash soil having both negative and positive variable charges, was used to identify the adsorption mechanism of sulfate. Sulfate adsorption isotherms were obtained by a batch method at pH values of 4, 5, 6, and 7 in a wide range of concentrations in an Na-H-SO(4)-OH system. Theoretical isotherms were applied to the measured values for the evaluation. The surface precipitation was detected by the measured adsorption isotherms, and the BET isotherm confirmed the presence of multilayer adsorption. Stronger and weaker adsorption sites were suggested by using the Langmuir isotherm for the monolayer adsorption. The adsorption energies obtained from the Langmuir equation and recent spectroscopic analysis suggested that the stronger adsorption corresponded to an inner-sphere surface complex and that the weaker adsorption corresponded to outer-sphere surface complexation. The BET and Langmuir equations showed three types of adsorption mechanisms for the sulfate adsorption on the soil.

  14. Removal of phosphorus from water by using volcanic ash soil (VAS): batch and column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy Van; Maeda, Morihiro

    2016-09-01

    Using low-cost and naturally available materials is considered an optimal adsorbent for removing phosphorus (P) from water due to its simplicity and economic efficiency. This study examined the removal of P from water using volcanic ash soil (VAS) by batch and column experiments. The maximum adsorption capacity of P was 2.94 mg g -1 , estimated from the batch experiment according to a Langmuir isotherm. The column study showed a higher adsorption capacity of 5.57 mg g -1 . The breakthrough curve showed that influent water containing 2 mg L -1 P was completely purified by VAS within 1,230 pore volumes (PV). The breakthrough and saturation points of the curves were 3,100 PV and 14,875 PV, respectively. After an adsorption column was loaded with 20,508 PV, a regeneration procedure was developed to determine whether an ion exchange of P with chloride occurred or adsorbed P in the columns could be eluted. Approximately 20% of P was recovered from columns by desorption tests, regardless of NaCl solution or deionized water. Specific surface area and mineral concentrations are both important characteristics that improve the adsorption capacity of VAS. The present study suggests that VAS is a promising adsorbent to remove P in water.

  15. Mechanistic Study on the Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings Induced by Volcanic Ash Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masayuki

    2017-08-01

    Thermal stress generated on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by volcanic ash (VA) deposition was assessed measuring the tip deflection of a multilayered beam structure as a function of temperature. The TBC in this study was deposited onto the surface of a blade utilized in a land-based gas turbine which is composed of 8 wt.%Y2O3-ZrO2/CoNiCrAlY on a Ni-based superalloy. The VA-deposited TBC sample was heated at 1453 K, and the effect of VA deposition on TBC delamination was examined in comparison with a TBC sample without VA deposition as a reference. On the basis of the VA attack damage mechanism which was investigated via the tip deflection measurement and a comprehensive microstructure examination, a damage-coupled constitutive model was proposed. The proposed model was based on the infiltration of the molten VA inside pores and phase transformations of yttria -tabilized zirconia in the TBC system. The numerical analysis results, which were simulated utilizing the finite element code installing the developed constitutive model, showed us that VA attack on the TBC sample induced near-interfacial cracks because of a significant increasing in the coating stress.

  16. A great volcanic eruption around AD 1300 recorded in lacustrine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hekla, Iceland, 1341. Note: We referred to Lavigne et al. (2013) for the AD 1257 Samalas volcanic eruption. in eolian dust (Liu et al. 2014). Thus, the Sr and Nd isotope values clearly show that volcanic ash is the primary contributor of the Ti, Al and. Fe2O3 content anomaly at ∼AD 1300. Isotope com- position analysis is ...

  17. Rising from the ashes: Changes in salmonid fish assemblages after 30 months of the Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcanic eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallement, Mailén; Macchi, Patricio J; Vigliano, Pablo; Juarez, Santiago; Rechencq, Magalí; Baker, Matthew; Bouwes, Nicolaas; Crowl, Todd

    2016-01-15

    Events such as volcanic eruptions may act as disturbance agents modifying the landscape spatial diversity and increasing environmental instability. On June 4, 2011 the Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcanic complex located on Chile (2236 m.a.s.l., 40° 02' 24" S- 70° 14' 26" W) experience a rift zone eruption ejecting during the first day 950 million metric tons into the atmosphere. Due to the westerly winds predominance, ash fell differentially upon 24 million ha of Patagonia Argentinean, been thicker deposits accumulated towards the West. In order to analyze changes on stream fish assemblages we studied seven streams 8, 19 and 30 months after the eruption along the ash deposition gradient, and compare those data to pre eruption ones. Habitat features and structure of the benthic macroinvertebrate food base of fish was studied. After the eruption, substantial environmental changes were observed in association with the large amount of ash fallout. In western sites, habitat loss due to ash accumulation, changes in the riparian zone and morphology of the main channels were observed. Turbidity was the water quality variable which reflected the most changes throughout time, with NTU values decreasing sharply from West to East sites. In west sites, increased Chironomid densities were recorded 8 months after the initial eruption as well as low EPT index values. These relationships were reversed in the less affected streams farther away from the volcano. Fish assemblages were greatly influenced both by habitat and macroinvertebrate changes. The eruption brought about an initial sharp decline in fish densities and the almost total loss of young of the year in the most western streams affecting recruitment. This effect diminished rapidly with distance from the emission center. Thirty months after the eruption, environmental changes are still occurring as a consequence of basin wide ash remobilization and transport.

  18. Volcanic Ash from Mount Mazama (Crater Lake) and from Glacier Peak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, H A; Wilcox, R E

    1964-06-12

    New petrographic and chemical data indicate that the great Mount Mazama eruption at Crater Lake, Oregon, about 6600 years ago was the source of most ash which has been called "Glacier Peak" and of some ash called "Galata." Glacier Peak volcano in Washington was itself the source of an older ash deposit, perhaps very late glacial or early postglacial in age.

  19. Development process for the stabilization of incinerator bottom ash and sizing baghouse dust material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, L.F.; Boehmer, A.M.

    1987-04-01

    EG G Idaho Inc. has initiated a program to develop safe, efficient, cost-effective treatment methods for the stabilization and subsequent disposal of some of the hazardous and mixed wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Lab-scale testing has shown that Extraction Procedure (EP) toxic wastes can be successfully stabilized by solidification, using various binders to produce nontoxic, stable waste forms for safe, long-term disposal. The purpose of this report is to present the results of drum-scale testing of WERF incinerator bottom ash and WERF sizing baghouse dust. The drum-scale test program was conducted to determine if a production procedure that would produce a waste form which was suitable for disposal as a low-level radioactive waste could be developed. The use of 71-gallon square drums for solidification processing were also evaluated. During the test program, eleven drums of ash material were solidified. All of the samples from all of the drums passed the EPA leach test criteria. Although there is a distinct weight addition associated with the solidification process, there is no relative volume increase. 4 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Waste stabilization/solidification of an electric arc furnace dust using fly ash-based geopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Fernandez Pereira; Y. Luna; X. Querol; D. Antenucci; J. Vale [University of Seville, Seville (Spain). School of Industrial Engineering

    2009-07-15

    The stabilization/solidification (S/S) of a carbon steel electric arc furnace (EAF) dust containing hazardous metals such as Pb, Cd, Cr or Zn using geopolymerization technology is described in this paper. Different reagents such as sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate, potassium silicate, kaolinite, metakaolinite and blast furnace slag have been used. Mixtures of EAF waste with these geopolymeric materials and class F fly ash have been processed for studying the potential of geopolymers as waste immobilizing agents. Compressive strength tests and leaching tests for determining the efficiency of heavy metal immobilisation have been carried out. Comparison of fly ash-based geopolymer systems with classic Portland cement stabilization methods has also been accomplished. Compressive strength values far better than those achieved by hydraulic S/S methods were easily obtained by geopolymer solids at 28 days. Regarding leachability, the geopolymer S/S solids also manifested in general a better behaviour, showing very promising results. 40 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  1. The use of volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Kelud in East Java for improving yield of sweet potato grown on a sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Melsandi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Kelud and compost on the soil properties and production of sweet potato on a sandy soil. The treatments of this study were (a a combination of and volcanic ash with the proportion of 100: 0, 90:10, 80:20, and 70:30 (% weight, (b the addition of compost (2.5 and 5 t / ha, and (c two varieties of sweet potato (Manohara and Ayamurazaki. The soil used in this study is the topsoil (0-30 cm Psament or sandy Entisol obtained from sweet potato cultivation location in Sumber Pasir Village of Pakis District, South Malang. Ten kilograms of planting medium (soil + volcanic ash for each treatment was placed in a 15 kg plastic pot. Sixteen treatments arranged in a factorial completely randomized design with three replications. The results showed that application of Mount Kelud volcanic ash and compost was able to improve soil permeability, soil pH, organic C, and K-total, but did not significantly affect total N content, available P and K total land. The highest fresh tuber weights of 373.51 g / plant or 19.92 t / ha and 393.09 g / plant or 20.96 t / ha for Manohara and Ayumurazaki varieties, respectively, were observed in the treatment of 10% volcanic ash + 5 t compost / ha. The carbohydrate content of Manohara variety was higher than that of Ayamurazaki variety at each treatment. The highest carbohydrate content of the Manohara variety (23.52% was obtained through application of 20% volcanic ash + 2.5 t compost/ha, while that of the Ayamurazaki variety (22.42% was obtained through application of 30% volcanic ash + 2.5 t/ha.

  2. Application of volcanic ash particles for protein affinity purification with a minimized silica-binding tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Mohamed A A; Ikeda, Takeshi; Motomura, Kei; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Ishida, Takenori; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-11-01

    We recently reported that the spore coat protein, CotB1 (171 amino acids), from Bacillus cereus mediates silica biomineralization and that the polycationic C-terminal sequence of CotB1 (14 amino acids), designated CotB1p, serves as a silica-binding tag when fused to other proteins. Here, we reduced the length of this silica-binding tag to only seven amino acids (SB7 tag: RQSSRGR) while retaining its affinity for silica. Alanine scanning mutagenesis indicated that the three arginine residues in the SB7 tag play important roles in binding to a silica surface. Monomeric l-arginine, at concentrations of 0.3-0.5 M, was found to serve as a competitive eluent to release bound SB7-tagged proteins from silica surfaces. To develop a low-cost, silica-based affinity purification procedure, we used natural volcanic ash particles with a silica content of ∼70%, rather than pure synthetic silica particles, as an adsorbent for SB7-tagged proteins. Using green fluorescent protein, mCherry, and mKate2 as model proteins, our purification method achieved 75-90% recovery with ∼90% purity. These values are comparable to or even higher than that of the commonly used His-tag affinity purification. In addition to low cost, another advantage of our method is the use of l-arginine as the eluent because its protein-stabilizing effect would help minimize alteration of the intrinsic properties of the purified proteins. Our approach paves the way for the use of naturally occurring materials as adsorbents for simple, low-cost affinity purification. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characteristics of zircons from volcanic ash-derived tonsteins in Late Permian coal fields of eastern Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Ren, Y.; Tang, D.; Bohor, B.

    1994-01-01

    Kaolinitic tonsteins of altered synsedimentary volcanic ash-fall origin are well developed in the Late Permian coal-bearing formations of eastern Yunnan Province. Because of their unique origin, wide lateral extent, relatively constant thickness and sharp contacts with enclosing strata, great importance has been attached to these isochronous petrographic markers. In order to compare tonsteins with co-existing, non-cineritic claystones and characterize the individuality of tonsteins from different horizons for coal bed correlation, a semi-quantitative method was developed that is based on statistical analyses of the concentration and morphology of zircons and their spatial distribution patterns. This zircon-based analytical method also serves as a means for reconstructing volcanic ash-fall dispersal patterns. The results demonstrate that zircons from claystones of two different origins (i.e., tonstein and non-cineritic claystone) differ greatly in their relative abundances, crystal morphologies and spatial distribution patterns. Tonsteins from the same area but from different horizons are characterized by their own unique statistical patterns in terms of zircon concentration values and morphologic parameters (crystal length, width and the ratio of these values), thus facilitating stratigraphic correlation. Zircons from the same tonstein horizon also show continuous variation in these statistical patterns as a function of areal distribution, making it possible to identify the main path and direction in which the volcanic source materials were transported by prevailing winds. ?? 1994.

  4. Inexpensive Instrument for In Situ Characterization of Particulate Matter in Volcanic Ash Plumes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Volcanic research is a significant part of the "Earth Surface & Interior" focus area of the NASA Earth Science program. After a volcanic eruption, the...

  5. Airborne lidar observations of volcanic ash during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Spring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenco, F.; Johnson, B.; Turnbull, K.; Haywood, J.; Newman, S.; Webster, H.; Cooke, M.; Dorsey, J.; Ricketts, H.; Clarisse, L.

    2012-04-01

    The London Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC), based at the Met Office, provided forecast guidance for the Civil Aviation Authority during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in April-May 2010. Besides providing daily forecasts using the Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME), a series of observational activities were carried out by the Met Office, involving ground-based lidars, the exploitation of satellite data, and research flights using the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements BAe-146 research aircraft (FAAM, www.faam.ac.uk), on which this talk is focused. Due to safety restrictions, aircraft sampling has only been performed in areas where ash concentrations where forecasted to be less than 2000 μg/m3. Volcanic ash layers were observed using an elastic backscatter lidar on-board the FAAM aircraft operating at 355 nm, which allowed detailed mapping of the plumes. A flight on 4 May overpassed the ground-based lidar in Aberystwyth a few times. This provided ground truth validation of the on-board lidar and of its data inversion procedure. The ash layer during this flight was found to be in patches of short horizontal extent, but despite the strong horizontal inhomogeneity the two lidars showed excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement. Moreover, radiative transfer computations using the lidar-derived profiles of aerosol extinction led to a good reconstruction of observed radiance spectra with on-board spectrometers. Aircraft in situ measurements of the particle size-distribution permitted the evaluation of a coarse extinction fraction (ranging 0.5-1) and a coarse mode specific extinction (0.6-0.9 m2/g) for six research flights. These quantities were then used to convert the lidar-derived aerosol extinction to ash concentration (with an estimated uncertainty of a factor of two). The combination of lidar and in-situ sampling of aerosol properties has thus offered us the opportunity to compile a dataset of the airborne

  6. Aircraft observations and model simulations of concentration and particle size distribution in the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacre, H. F.; Grant, A. L. M.; Johnson, B. T.

    2013-02-01

    The Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland emitted a cloud of ash into the atmosphere during April and May 2010. Over the UK the ash cloud was observed by the FAAM BAe-146 Atmospheric Research Aircraft which was equipped with in-situ probes measuring the concentration of volcanic ash carried by particles of varying sizes. The UK Met Office Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME) has been used to simulate the evolution of the ash cloud emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano during the period 4-18 May 2010. In the NAME simulations the processes controlling the evolution of the concentration and particle size distribution include sedimentation and deposition of particles, horizontal dispersion and vertical wind shear. For travel times between 24 and 72 h, a 1/t relationship describes the evolution of the concentration at the centre of the ash cloud and the particle size distribution remains fairly constant. Although NAME does not represent the effects of microphysical processes, it can capture the observed decrease in concentration with travel time in this period. This suggests that, for this eruption, microphysical processes play a small role in determining the evolution of the distal ash cloud. Quantitative comparison with observations shows that NAME can simulate the observed column-integrated mass if around 4% of the total emitted mass is assumed to be transported as far as the UK by small particles (< 30 μm diameter). NAME can also simulate the observed particle size distribution if a distal particle size distribution that contains a large fraction of < 10 μm diameter particles is used, consistent with the idea that phraetomagmatic volcanoes, such as Eyjafjallajökull, emit very fine particles.

  7. Aircraft observations and model simulations of concentration and particle size distribution in the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. Dacre

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland emitted a cloud of ash into the atmosphere during April and May 2010. Over the UK the ash cloud was observed by the FAAM BAe-146 Atmospheric Research Aircraft which was equipped with in-situ probes measuring the concentration of volcanic ash carried by particles of varying sizes. The UK Met Office Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME has been used to simulate the evolution of the ash cloud emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano during the period 4–18 May 2010. In the NAME simulations the processes controlling the evolution of the concentration and particle size distribution include sedimentation and deposition of particles, horizontal dispersion and vertical wind shear. For travel times between 24 and 72 h, a 1/t relationship describes the evolution of the concentration at the centre of the ash cloud and the particle size distribution remains fairly constant. Although NAME does not represent the effects of microphysical processes, it can capture the observed decrease in concentration with travel time in this period. This suggests that, for this eruption, microphysical processes play a small role in determining the evolution of the distal ash cloud. Quantitative comparison with observations shows that NAME can simulate the observed column-integrated mass if around 4% of the total emitted mass is assumed to be transported as far as the UK by small particles (< 30 μm diameter. NAME can also simulate the observed particle size distribution if a distal particle size distribution that contains a large fraction of < 10 μm diameter particles is used, consistent with the idea that phraetomagmatic volcanoes, such as Eyjafjallajökull, emit very fine particles.

  8. Volcanic ash leaching as a means of tracing the environmental impact of the 2011 Grímsvötn eruption, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabré, J; Aulinas, M; Rejas, M; Fernandez-Turiel, J L

    2016-07-01

    The Grímsvötn volcanic eruption, from 21 to 28 May, 2011, was the largest eruption of the Grímsvötn Volcanic System since 1873, with a Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) of magnitude 4. The main geochemical features of the potential environmental impact of the volcanic ash-water interaction were determined using two different leaching methods as proxies (batch and vertical flow-through column experiments). Ash consists of glass with minor amounts of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, diopside, olivine and iron sulphide; this latter mineral phase is very rare in juvenile ash. Ash grain morphology and size reflect the intense interaction of magma and water during eruption. Batch and column leaching tests in deionised water indicate that Na, K, Ca, Mg, Si, Cl, S and F had the highest potential geochemical fluxes to the environment. Release of various elements from volcanic ash took place immediately through dissolution of soluble salts from the ash surface. Element solubilities of Grímsvötn ash regarding bulk ash composition were <1 %. Combining the element solubilities and the total estimated mass of tephra (7.29 × 10(14) g), the total inputs of environmentally important elements were estimated to be 8.91 × 10(9) g Ca, 7.02 × 10(9) g S, 1.10 × 10(9) g Cl, 9.91 × 10(8) g Mg, 9.91 × 10(8) g Fe and 1.45 × 10(8) g P The potential environmental problems were mainly associated with the release of F (5.19 × 10(9) g).

  9. Evaluation of rainfall infiltration characteristics in a volcanic ash soil by time domain reflectometry method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hasegawa

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Time domain reflectometry (TDR was used to monitor soil water conditions and to evaluate infiltration characteristics associated with rainfall into a volcanic-ash soil (Hydric Hapludand with a low bulk density. Four 1 m TDR probes were installed vertically along a 6 m line in a bare field. Three 30 cm and one 60 cm probes were installed between the 1 m probes. Soil water content was measured every half or every hour throughout the year. TDR enabled prediction of the soil water content precisely even though the empirical equation developed by Topp et al. (1980 underestimated the water content. Field capacity, defined as the amount of water stored to a depth of 1 m on the day following heavy rainfall, was 640 mm. There was approximately 100 mm difference in the amount of water stored between field capacity and the driest period. Infiltration characteristics of rainfall were investigated for 36 rainfall events exceeding 10 mm with a total amount of rain of 969 mm out of an annual rainfall of 1192 mm. In the case of 25 low intensity rainfall events with less than 10 mm h-1 on to dry soils, the increase in the amount of water stored to a depth of 1 m was equal to the cumulative rainfall. For rain intensity in excess of 10 mm h-1, non-uniform infiltration occurred. The increase in the amount of water stored at lower elevation locations was 1.4 to 1.6 times larger than at higher elevation locations even though the difference in ground height among the 1 m probes was 6 cm. In the two instances when rainfall exceeded 100 mm, including the amount of rain in a previous rainfall event, the increase in the amount of water stored to a depth of 1 m was 65 mm lower than the total quantity of rain on the two occasions (220 mm; this indicated that 65 mm of water or 5.5% of the annual rainfall had flowed away either by surface runoff or bypass flow. Hence, approximately 95% of the annual rainfall was absorbed by the soil matrix but it is not possible to simulate

  10. Evaluating long-range volcanic ash hazard using supercomputing facilities: application to Somma-Vesuvius (Italy), and consequences for civil aviation over the Central Mediterranean Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, A.; Sulpizio, R.

    2010-11-01

    Volcanic ash causes multiple hazards. One hazard of increasing importance is the threat posed to civil aviation, which occurs over proximal to long-range distances. Ash fallout disrupts airport operations, while the presence of airborne ash at low altitudes near airports affects visibility and the safety of landing and take-off operations. Low concentrations of ash at airplane cruise levels are sufficient to force re-routing of in-flight aircrafts. Volcanic fallout deposits spanning large distances have been recognized from the Somma-Vesuvius volcano for several Holocene explosive eruptions. Here we develop hazard and isochron maps for distal ash fallout from the Somma-Vesuvius, as well as hazard maps for critical ash concentrations at relevant flight levels. Maps are computed by coupling a meteorological model with a fully numeric tephra dispersal model that can account for ash aggregation processes, which are relevant to the dispersion dynamics of fine ash. The simulations were carried out using supercomputing facilities, spanning on entire meteorological year that is statistically representative of the local meteorology during the last few decades. Seasonal influences are also analyzed. The eruptive scenario is based on a Subplinian I-type eruption, which is within the range of the maximum expected event for this volcano. Results allow us to quantify the impact that an event of this magnitude and intensity would have on the main airports and aerial corridors of the Central Mediterranean Area.

  11. Advances in Monitoring, Modelling and Forecasting Volcanic Ash Plumes over the Past 5 Years and the Impact on Preparedness from the London VAAC Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D. S.; Lisk, I.

    2015-12-01

    Hosted and run by the Met Office, the London VAAC (Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre) is responsible for issuing advisories on the location and likely dispersion of ash clouds originating from volcanoes in the North East Atlantic, primarily from Iceland. These advisories and additional guidance products are used by the civil aviation community to make decisions on airspace flight management. London VAAC has specialist forecasters who use a combination of volcano source data, satellite-based, ground-based and aircraft observations, weather forecast models and dispersion models. Since the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, which resulted in the decision by many northern European countries to impose significant restrictions on the use of their airspace, London VAAC has been active in further developing its volcanic ash monitoring, modelling and forecasting capabilities, collaborating with research organisations, industry, other VAACs, Meteorological Services and the Volcano Observatory in Iceland. It has been necessary to advance operational capabilities to address evolving requirements, including for more quantitative assessments of volcanic ash in the atmosphere. Here we summarise advances in monitoring, modelling and forecasting of volcanic ash plumes over the past 5 years from the London VAAC perspective, and the realization of science into operations. We also highlight the importance of collaborative activities, such as the 'VAAC Best Practice' Workshop, where information is exchanged between all nine VAACs worldwide on the operational practices in monitoring and forecasting volcanic ash, with the aim of working toward a more harmonized service for decision makers in the aviation community. We conclude on an evaluation of how better we are prepared for the next significant ash-rich Icelandic eruption, and the challenges still remaining.

  12. Experimental investigation of rates and mechanisms of isotope exchange (O, H) between volcanic ash and isotopically-labeled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Gary S.; Bindeman, Ilya N.

    2013-06-01

    The hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in hydrous minerals and volcanic glass are routinely used as paleo-proxies to infer the isotopic values of meteoric waters and thus paleo-climatic conditions. We report a series of long-term exposure experiments of distal 7700 BP Mt. Mazama ash (-149‰ δ2H, +7‰ δ18O, 3.8 wt.% H2O) with isotopically-labeled water (+650‰ δ2H, +56‰ δ18O). Experiments were done at 70, 40 and 20 °C, and ranged in duration from 1 to 14454 h (˜20 months), to evaluate the rates of deuterium and 18O exchange, and investigate the relative role of exchange and diffusion. We also investigate the effect of drying on H2Otot and δ2H in native and reacted ash that can be used in defining the protocols for natural sample preparation. We employ Thermal Conversion Elemental Analyzer (TCEA) mass spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis and a KBr pellet technique with infrared spectroscopy to measure the evolution of δ2H, total water, and OH water peaks in the course of exposure experiments, and in varying lengths of vacuum drying. Time series experiments aided by infrared measurements demonstrate the following new results: (i) It wasobserved that from 5 to >100‰ δ2H increases with time, with faster deuterium exchange at higher temperatures. Times at 15% of theoretical "full δ2H exchange" are: 15.8 years at 20 °C, 5.2 years at 40 °C, and 0.4 years at 70 °C. (ii) Even at extended exposure durations experiments show no net increase in water weight percent nor in δ18O in ash; water released from ash rapidly by thermal decomposition is not enriched in δ18O. This observation clearly suggests that it is hydrogen exchange, and not water addition or oxygen exchange that characterizes the process. (iii) Our time series drying, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)-KBr and Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) analyses collectively suggest a simple mechanistic view that there are three kinds of "water" in ash: water (mostly H2O) that is less strongly bonded

  13. Effect of long-term different fertilization on bacterial community structures and diversity in citrus orchard soil of volcanic ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joa, Jae Ho; Weon, Hang Yeon; Hyun, Hae Nam; Jeun, Young Chull; Koh, Sang Wook

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to assess bacterial species richness, diversity and community distribution according to different fertilization regimes for 16 years in citrus orchard soil of volcanic ash. Soil samples were collected and analyzed from Compost (cattle manure, 2,000 kg/10a), 1/2 NPK+compost (14-20-14+2,000 kg/10a), NPK+compost (28-40-28+2,000 kg/10a), NPK (28-40-28 kg/10a), 3 NPK (84-120-84 kg/10a), and Control (no fertilization) plot which have been managed in the same manners with compost and different amount of chemical fertilization. The range of pyrosequencing reads and OTUs were 4,687-7,330 and 1,790-3,695, respectively. Species richness estimates such as Ace, Chao1, and Shannon index were higher in 1/2 NPK+compost than other treatments, which were 15,202, 9,112, 7.7, respectively. Dominant bacterial groups at level of phylum were Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Those were occupied at 70.9% in 1/2 NPK+compost. Dominant bacterial groups at level of genus were Pseudolabrys, Bradyrhizobium, and Acidobacteria. Those were distributed at 14.4% of a total of bacteria in Compost. Soil pH displayed significantly closely related to bacterial species richness estimates such as Ace, Chao1 (psoil was affected by fertilization management, soil pH changes and characteristics of volcanic ash.

  14. Volcanic Ash Cloud Observation using Ground-based Ka-band Radar and Near-Infrared Lidar Ceilometer during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S. Marzano

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Active remote sensing techniques can probe volcanic ash plumes, but their sensitivity at a given distance depends upon the sensor transmitted power, wavelength and polarization capability. Building on a previous numerical study at centimeter wavelength, this work aims at i simulating the distal ash particles polarimetric response of millimeter-wave radar and multi-wavelength optical lidar; ii developing and applying a model-based statistical retrieval scheme using a multi-sensor approach. The microphysical electromagnetic forward model of volcanic ash particle distribution, previously set up at microwaves, is extended to include non-spherical particle shapes, vesicular composition, silicate content and orientation phenomena for both millimeter and optical bands. Monte Carlo generation of radar and lidar signatures are driven by random variability of volcanic particle main parameters, using constraints from available data and experimental evidences. The considered case study is related to the ground-based observation of the Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland volcanic ash plume on May 15, 2010, carried out by the Atmospheric Research Station at Mace Head (Ireland with a 35-GHz Ka-band Doppler cloud radar and a 1064-nm ceilometer lidar. The detection and estimation of ash layer presence and composition is carried out using a Bayesian approach, which is trained by the Monte Carlo model-based dataset. Retrieval results are corroborated exploiting auxiliary data such as those from a ground-based microwave radiometer also positioned at Mace Head.

  15. Particle dispersion at road building using fly ash - model review, investigation of influence of humidity content for dust emission and fly ash particle characterisation; Partikelspriding vid byggnation av vaeg med aska - modelloeversikt, undersoekning av fuktighetsgradens betydelse foer damning och karaktaerisering av partiklar fraan flygaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Mats; Wik, Ola; Frogner-Kockum, Paul

    2009-03-15

    Ashes from incineration may have very good properties, such as building materials in roads. This use assumes that the ashes do not have serious environmental and health effects. Since ash might generate large amounts of dust in handling the issue on the extent of dusting and dust properties has proved to be important to assess the risks of environmental impacts during use. Inhalable particles in the ambient air are a problem that has attracted much attention and is regarded as one of the most serious health related air pollutants. The present project has aimed to: describe appropriate models for calculating the emission and dispersion of dust in the air during the construction of ash containing roads, evaluate a new method to examine the importance of moisture for dusting from fly ash and investigate the properties of fly ash, making it possible to identify ash in samples of airborne particles. The target audience is ash manufacturers, contractors and consultants with a need for knowledge of ash dusting. Project modules have included: a literature review to identify appropriate modelling tools to describe the emission and dispersion of dust from road building with ash a method study in which a piece of equipment called Duster, have been evaluated for assessing the significance of the ash humidity to dusting, and an electron microscope study where morphology and composition of some ashes, cement and Merit have been studied to find ways to identify ash particles in dust samples. The results show that there is a lack of overall model tools that can describe the emissions from all the management operations of ashes at road building and that existing models sometimes lack key variables. Also, because of high silt content of ashes, some models are deemed inferior compared to when used for ordinary mineral material. Furthermore, attempts with the Duster shows that the method works, but with limited precision, and that dusting from the ash samples was reduced significantly

  16. Observation of volcanic ash from Puyehue–Cordón Caulle with IASI

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klüser, L; Erbertseder, T; Meyer-Arnek, J

    2013-01-01

    .... Observations of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) flown on board of the MetOp satellite have been exploited to analyze the evolution of the ash plume around the Southern Hemisphere...

  17. Large-magnitude Middle Ordovician volcanic ash falls in North America and Europe: Dimensions, emplacement and post-emplacement characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, W.D.; Kolata, Dennis R.; Bergstrom, Stig M.; Zhang, Y.-S.

    1996-01-01

    Middle Ordovician K-bentonites represent some of the largest known fallout ash deposits in the Phanerozoic Era. They cover minimally 2.2 ?? 106 km2 in eastern North America and 6.9 ?? 105 km2 in northwestern Europe, and represents the coeval accumulation of plinian and co-ignimbrite ash on both Laurentia and Baltica during the closure of the Iapetus Ocean. The three most widespread beds are the Deicke and Millbrig K-bentonites in North America and the Kinnekulle K-bentonite in northwestern Europe. The vents were located near the Laurentian margin of Iapetus on an arc or microplate undergoing collision with Laurentia. The volume of ash preserved in the stratigraphic record converted to dense rock equivalent (DRE) of silicic magma is minimally estimated to be 943 km3 for the Deicke, 1509 km3 for the Millbrig and 972 km3 for the Kinnekulle. The Millbrig and Kinnekulle beds are coeval and possibly equivalent, yielding a combined DRE volume of nearly 2500 km3. Some unknown but probably large amount of additional ash fell into oceanic regions of the Iapetus, but these areas became subducted and the ash is not preserved in the geologic record. The symmetry of the thickness contours is suggestive that one or more ash clouds interacting with equatorial stratospheric and tropospheric wind patterns dispersed pyroclastic material to both the northwest and southeast in terms of Ordovician paleogeography. Based on grain size measurements and thickness/area1/2 plots we conclude the three beds were each formed from co-ignimbrite or possibly phreatoplinian eruption columns. Analyses of melt inclusions in primary quartz crystals indicate the parental magma contained approximately 4% dissolved water at the time of the eruption. This water provided the explosive energy during the initial gas thrust phase. The implied fragmentation pressure on the magma would have reduced much of the ejecta to small particles, forming a deposit composed largely of single crystals and glassy dust

  18. Dynamics of volcanic ash remobilisation by wind through the Patagonian steppe after the eruption of Cordón Caulle, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Juan E; Mendez, Mariano J; Buschiazzo, Daniel E; Bran, Donaldo; Gaitán, Juan J

    2017-03-28

    Wind erosion of freshly-deposited volcanic ash causes persistent storms, strongly affecting ecosystems and human activity. Wind erosion of the volcanic ash was measured up to 17 months after the ash deposition, at 7 sites located within the ash-deposition area. The mass flux was measured up to 1.5 m above ground level. Mass transport rates were over 125 times the soil wind-erosion rates observed before the ash deposition, reaching up to 6.3 kg m-1 day-1. Total mass transport of ash during the 17 months ranged between 113.6 and 969.9 kg m-1 depending on topographic location and wind exposure. The vertical distribution of the mass flux at sites with higher vegetation cover was generally inverted as compared to sites with lower vegetation cover. This situation lasted 7 months and then a shift towards a more uniform vertical distribution was observed, in coincidence with the beginning of the decline of the mass transport rates. Decay rates differed between sites. Despite changes over time, an inverse linear correlation between the mass transports and the mass-flux gradients was found. Both the mass-flux gradients and the average mass-transport rates were not linked with shear-stress partition parameters, but with the ratio: ash-fall thickness to total vegetation cover.

  19. Sulphur dioxide as a volcanic ash proxy during the April–May 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The volcanic ash cloud from the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in April and May 2010 resulted in unprecedented disruption to air traffic in Western Europe causing significant financial losses and highlighting the importance of efficient volcanic cloud monitoring. The feasibility of using SO2 as a tracer for the ash released during the eruption is investigated here through comparison of ash retrievals from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI with SO2 measurements from a number of infrared and ultraviolet satellite-based sensors. Results demonstrate that the eruption can be divided into an initial ash-rich phase, a lower intensity middle phase and a final phase where considerably greater quantities both ash and SO2 were released. Comparisons of ash-SO2 dispersion indicate that despite frequent collocation of the two species, there are a number of instances throughout the eruption where separation is observed. This separation occurs vertically due to the more rapid settling rate of ash compared to SO2, horizontally through wind shear and temporally through volcanological controls on eruption style. The potential for the two species to be dispersed independently has consequences in terms of aircraft hazard mitigation and highlights the importance of monitoring both species concurrently.

  20. Chemical signature of two Permian volcanic ash deposits within a bentonite bed from Melo, Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane M. Calarge

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A Permian bentonite deposit at Melo, Uruguay is composed of a calcite-cemented sandstone containing clay pseudomorphs of glass shards (0-0.50 m overlying a pink massive clay deposit (0.50-2.10m. The massive bed is composed of two layers containing quartz and smectite or pure smectite respectively. The smectite is remarkably homogeneous throughout the profile: it is a complex mixed layer composed of three layer types whose expandability with ethylene glycol (2EG 1EG or 0EG sheets in the interlayer zone which correspond to low-, medium- and high-charge layers respectively varies with the cation saturating the interlayer zone. The smectite homogeneity through the profile is the signature of an early alteration process in a lagoonal water which was over saturated with respect to calcite. Compaction during burial has made the bentonite bed a K-depleted closed system in which diagenetic illitization was inhibited. Variations in major, REE and minor element abundances throughout the massive clay deposit suggest that it originated from two successive ash falls. The incompatible element abundances are consistent with that of a volcanic glass fractionated from a rhyolite magma formed in a subduction/collision geological context.Um depósito Permiano de bentonita em Melo, Uruguai,é composto por um arenito com cimento calcítico contendo pseudomorfos de argila sobre detritos vítreos(0-0.50 m superpostos a um deposito maciço de argila rosado (0.50-2.10 m. A camada maciça é composta por dois níveis contendo quartzo e esmectita ou esmectita pura, respectivamente. A homogeneidade de esmectita ao longo do perfil é notável: trata-se de um interestratificado composto de três tipos de camadas, cuja expansibilidade com etileno-glicol (folhas 2EG, 1EG ou 0EG na zona interfoliar correspondentes a camadas com baixa, média e alta carga, respectivamente variam com o tipo de cátion que satura a zona interfoliar. A homogeneidade da esmectita ao longo do perfil

  1. Characterization of a volcanic ash episode in southern Finland caused by the Grimsvötn eruption in Iceland in May 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.-M. Kerminen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The volcanic eruption of Grimsvötn in Iceland in May 2011 affected surface-layer air quality at several locations in Northern Europe. In Helsinki, Finland, the main pollution episode lasted for more than 8 h around the noon of 25 May. We characterized this episode by relying on detailed physical, chemical and optical aerosol measurements. The analysis was aided by air mass trajectory calculations, satellite measurements, and dispersion model simulations. During the episode, volcanic ash particles were present at sizes from less than 0.5 μm up to sizes >10 μm. The mass mean diameter of ash particles was a few μm in the Helsinki area, and the ash enhanced PM10 mass concentrations up to several tens of μg m−3. Individual particle analysis showed that some ash particles appeared almost non-reacted during the atmospheric transportation, while most of them were mixed with sea salt or other type of particulate matter. Also sulfate of volcanic origin appeared to have been transported to our measurement site, but its contribution to the aerosol mass was minor due the separation of ash-particle and sulfur dioxide plumes shortly after the eruption. The volcanic material had very little effect on PM1 mass concentrations or sub-micron particle number size distributions in the Helsinki area. The aerosol scattering coefficient was increased and visibility was slightly decreased during the episode, but in general changes in aerosol optical properties due to volcanic aerosols seem to be difficult to be distinguished from those induced by other pollutants present in a continental boundary layer. The case investigated here demonstrates clearly the power of combining surface aerosol measurements, dispersion model simulations and satellite measurements in analyzing surface air pollution episodes caused by volcanic eruptions. None of these three approaches alone would be sufficient to forecast, or even to unambiguously identify

  2. Estimation of ash injection in the atmosphere by basaltic volcanic plumes: The case of the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, E.; Tait, S.; Ferrucci, F.; Martet, M.; Hirn, B.; Husson, P.

    2011-09-01

    During explosive eruptions, volcanic plumes inject ash into the atmosphere and may severely affect air traffic, as illustrated by the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. Quantitative estimates of ash injection can be deduced from the height reached by the volcanic plume on the basis of scaling laws inferred from models of powerful Plinian plumes. In less explosive basaltic eruptions, there is a partitioning of the magma influx between the atmospheric plume and an effusive lava flow on the ground. We link the height reached by the volcanic plume with the rate of ash injection in the atmosphere via a refined plume model that (1) includes a recently developed variable entrainment law and (2) accounts for mass partitioning between ground flow and plume. We compute the time evolution of the rate of injection of ash into the atmosphere for the Eyjafjallajökull eruption on the basis of satellite thermal images and plume heights and use the dispersion model of the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center of Toulouse to translate these numbers into hazard maps. The classical Plinian model would have overestimated ash injection by about 20% relative to the refined estimate, which does not jeopardize risk assessment. This small error was linked to effective fragmentation by intense interactions of magma with water derived from melting of ice and hence strong mass partitioning into the plume. For a less well fragmented basaltic dry eruption, the error may reach 1 order of magnitude and hence undermine the prediction of ash dispersion, which demonstrates the need to monitor both plume heights and ground flows during an explosive eruption.

  3. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Quaternary volcanic ashes by multi-collection noble gas mass spectrometry: protocols, precision and intercalibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storey, Michael; Rivera, Tiffany; Flude, Stephanie

    -calibration and instrument mass fractionation using argon from a calibrated air pipette; (ii) precision and long-term data reproducibility; and (iii) results from inter-calibration experiments of 40Ar/39Ar ages on Quaternary volcanic ashes with the U-Pb, astronomical and historical chronometers....

  4. Ground-based radar monitoring of volcanic ash: a novel approach for the estimation of the bulk microphysical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulpiani, Gianfranco; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    The detection and quantitative retrieval of ash plumes is of significant interest due to the environmental, climatic, and socioeconomic effects of ash fallout which might cause hardship and damages in areas surrounding volcanoes, representing a serious hazard to aircrafts. Real-time monitoring of such phenomena is crucial for initializing ash dispersion models. Ground-based and space-borne remote sensing observations provide essential information for scientific and operational applications. Satellite visible-infrared radiometric observations from geostationary platforms are usually exploited for long-range trajectory tracking and for measuring low-level eruptions. Their imagery is available every 10-30 min and suffers from a relatively poor spatial resolution. Moreover, the field of view of geostationary radiometric measurements may be blocked by water and ice clouds at higher levels and the observations' overall utility is reduced at night. Ground-based microwave weather radars may represent an important tool for detecting and, to a certain extent, mitigating the hazards presented by ash clouds. The possibility of monitoring in all weather conditions at a fairly high spatial resolution (less than a few hundred meters) and every few minutes after the eruption is the major advantage of using ground-based microwave radar systems. Ground-based weather radar systems can also provide data for estimating the ash volume, total mass, and height of eruption clouds. Previous methodological studies have investigated the possibility of using ground-based single- and dual-polarization radar system for the remote sensing of volcanic ash cloud. In the present work, methodology was revised to overcome some limitations related to the assumed microphysics. New scattering simulations based on the T-matrix solution technique were used to set up the parametric algorithms adopted to estimate the mass concentration and ash mean diameter. Furthermore, because quantitative estimation of

  5. VolcLab: A balloon-borne instrument package to measure ash, gas, electrical, and turbulence properties of volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, Martin; Harrison, Giles; Nicoll, Keri; Williams, Paul; Marlton, Graeme

    2017-04-01

    Release of volcanic ash into the atmosphere poses a significant hazard to air traffic. Exposure to appreciable concentrations (≥4 mg m-3) of ash can result in engine shutdown, air data system loss, and airframe damage, with sustained lower concentrations potentially causing other long-term detrimental effects [1]. Disruption to flights also has a societal impact. For example, the closure of European airspace following the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull resulted in global airline industry losses of order £1100 million daily and disruption to 10 million passengers. Accurate and effective measurement of the mass of ash in a volcanic plume along with in situ characterisation of other plume properties such as charge, turbulence, and SO2 concentration can be used in combination with plume dispersion modelling, remote sensing, and more sophisticated flight ban thresholds to mitigate the impact of future events. VolcLab is a disposable instrument package that may be attached to a standard commercial radiosonde, for rapid emergency deployment on a weather balloon platform. The payload includes a newly developed gravimetric sensor using the oscillating microbalance principle to measure mass directly without assumptions about particles' optical properties. The package also includes an SO2 gas detector, an optical sensor to detect ash and cloud backscatter from an LED source [2], a charge sensor to characterise electrical properties of the plume [3], and an accelerometer to measure in-plume turbulence [4]. VolcLab uses the established PANDORA interface [5], to provide data exchange and power from the radiosonde. In addition to the VolcLab measurements, the radiosonde provides standard meteorological data of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity, and GPS location. There are several benefits of using this instrument suite in this design and of using this method of deployment. Firstly, this is an all-in-one device requiring minimal expertise on the part of the end

  6. P retention and cation exchange as affected by nanoparticle of volcanic ash and application of phosphate solubilizing bacteria on Andisol Ciater, West Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitriatin, Betty Natalie; Arifin, Mahfud; Devnita, Rina; Yuniarti, Anni; Haryanto, Rachmat; Setiabudi, Mariska Amalia

    2018-02-01

    Andisols is a soil with high retention of phosphate and cannot be absorbed by plants. Some of soil bacteria have the ability to solubilize P and make it available to growing plants are known phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB). The research aims to study the effect of nanoparticle volcanic ash and phosphate solubilising bacteria (PSB) on P retention and cation exchangeable (CEC) in Andisol Ciater, West Java. This research was conducted from October 2016 to March 2017. The design of the analysis used was a complete randomized factorial design with two factors. The first factor was nanoparticle volcanic ash (a) consists of four dosages based on weight percentage (0%, 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5%) and the second factor was PSB (h) consists of two dosages (without biofertilizer and with biofertilizer 1 g/Kg soil). The combination treatments replicated three times were incubated for 4 months. Soil samples were analyzed at first month and fourth month after incubation. The results showed that all dosages of nanoparticle volcanic ash and application of PSB decreased P retention by 75-77% at the first month after incubation. Nanoparticle volcanic ash dosage decreased to 7.5% the P retention reaches 90.36% in the fourth month after incubation. The nanoparticle of volcanic ash dosage 7.5% increased with CEC (24.787 cmol.kg-1 and 16.555 cmol.kg-1) at the first and fourth months after incubation. The application of PSB increased the CEC (28.606 cmol.kg-1) in the first month after incubation.

  7. Runoff and Erosion Effects after Prescribed Fire and Wildfire on Volcanic Ash-Cap Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. R. Robichaud; F. B. Pierson; R. E. Brown

    2007-01-01

    After prescribed burns at three locations and one wildfire, rainfall simulations studies were completed to compare postfire runoff rates and sediment yields on ash-cap soil in conifer forest regions of northern Idaho and western Montana. The measured fire effects were differentiated by burn severity (unburned, low, moderate, and high). Results...

  8. Ash from the Toba supereruption in Lake Malawi shows no volcanic winter in East Africa at 75 ka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Christine S; Chorn, Ben T; Johnson, Thomas C

    2013-05-14

    The most explosive volcanic event of the Quaternary was the eruption of Mt. Toba, Sumatra, 75,000 y ago, which produced voluminous ash deposits found across much of the Indian Ocean, Indian Peninsula, and South China Sea. A major climatic downturn observed within the Greenland ice cores has been attributed to the cooling effects of the ash and aerosols ejected during the eruption of the Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT). These events coincided roughly with a hypothesized human genetic bottleneck, when the number of our species in Africa may have been reduced to near extinction. Some have speculated that the demise of early modern humans at that time was due in part to a dramatic climate shift triggered by the supereruption. Others have argued that environmental conditions would not have been so severe to have such an impact on our ancestors, and furthermore, that modern humans may have already expanded beyond Africa by this time. We report an observation of the YTT in Africa, recovered as a cryptotephra layer in Lake Malawi sediments, >7,000 km west of the source volcano. The YTT isochron provides an accurate and precise age estimate for the Lake Malawi paleoclimate record, which revises the chronology of past climatic events in East Africa. The YTT in Lake Malawi is not accompanied by a major change in sediment composition or evidence for substantial temperature change, implying that the eruption did not significantly impact the climate of East Africa and was not the cause of a human genetic bottleneck at that time.

  9. Lidar observation and model simulation of a volcanic-ash-induced cirrus cloud during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rolf

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous ice formation induced by volcanic ash from the Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption in April 2010 is investigated based on the combination of a cirrus cloud observed with a backscatter lidar over Jülich (western Germany and model simulations along backward trajectories. The microphysical properties of the cirrus cloud could only be represented by the microphysical model under the assumption of an enhanced number of efficient ice nuclei originating from the volcanic eruption. The ice nuclei (IN concentration determined by lidar measurements directly before and after cirrus cloud occurrence implies a value of around 0.1 cm−3 (in comparison normal IN conditions: 0.01 cm−3. This leads to a cirrus cloud with rather small ice crystals having a mean radius of 12 μm and a modification of the ice particle number (0.08 cm−3 instead of 3 × 10−4 cm−3 under normal IN conditions. The effectiveness of ice nuclei was estimated by the use of the microphysical model and the backward trajectories based on ECMWF data, establishing a freezing threshold of around 105% relative humidity with respect to ice in a temperature range from −45 to −55 °C . Only with these highly efficient ice nuclei was it possible for the cirrus cloud to be formed in a slightly supersaturated environment.

  10. Volcanic ash in bare ice south of Sør Rondane Mountains, Antarctica: geochemistry, rock magnetism and nondestructive magnetic detection with SQUID gradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hirokuni; Miyagi, Isoji; Kawai, Jun; Suganuma, Yusuke; Funaki, Minoru; Imae, Naoya; Mikouchi, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Takuya; Yamamoto, Yuhji

    2016-03-01

    Nondestructive magnetic detection of tephra layers in ice cores will be an important method to identify and correlate stratigraphic horizons of ice bearing volcanic ash particles. Volcanic ash particles were extracted from tephra-bearing ice samples collected from Nansen Ice Field south of the Sør Rondane Mountains, Antarctica. Particles are fresh glassy volcanic ash with diameters of ~50 μm, and chemical composition of the matrix glass belongs to a low-K basaltic andesite group, ranging from SiO2 60-62 wt% and K2O 0.40-0.50 wt%. Considering the grain size of ash particles and chemical composition of volcanic glass, the ash in tephra-bearing ice samples might be originated from the South Sandwich Islands located 2800 km northwest of the sampling sites. Correlations on major element concentrations with tephra layers associated with South Sandwich Islands in EPICA-Dome C, Vostok, and Dome Fuji ice cores show high similarity. Rock magnetic experiments show that the magnetic mineral is pseudo-single-domain titanomagnetite with ulvospinel content of 0.2-0.35 mixed with single-domain to superparamagnetic (titano)magnetite. Small blocks of the tephra-bering ice were measured with a SQUID gradiometer at 1-mm intervals with a spatial resolution of ~3 mm. With DC magnetic field of 25 mT, magnetic signal could be enhanced and detected for all the samples including the one with invisible amount of tephra particles. In order to simulate a thin ash layer in ice core, volcanic ash particles extracted from the tephra-bearing ice were used to fabricate a thin ash layer, which were subsequently magnetized, measured with the gradiometer. The noise level for Z axis gradiometer was about 0.6 pT. Detection limit for a half-cylinder with 29 mm radius and a thickness of 1 mm uniformly magnetized in X axis direction is ~9 × 10-5 A/m, which could be improved down to ~2 × 10-6 A/m by reducing the sensor-to-sample distance to 0.5 mm.

  11. Ponderosa pine growth response to soil strength in the volcanic ash soils of central Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.T. Parker; D.A. Maguire; D.D. Marshall; P. Cochran

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical harvesting and associated logging activities have the capacity to compact soil across large portions of harvest units. Two thinning treatments (felled only versus felled and skidded) in 70- to 80-year-old ponderosa pine stands were replicated at three sites with volcanic soils in central Oregon. Growth in diameter, height, and volume of residual trees were...

  12. Multi-level emulation of a volcanic ash transport and dispersion model to quantify sensitivity to uncertain parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Natalie J.; Huntley, Nathan; Dacre, Helen F.; Goldstein, Michael; Thomson, David; Webster, Helen

    2018-01-01

    Following the disruption to European airspace caused by the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 there has been a move towards producing quantitative predictions of volcanic ash concentration using volcanic ash transport and dispersion simulators. However, there is no formal framework for determining the uncertainties of these predictions and performing many simulations using these complex models is computationally expensive. In this paper a Bayesian linear emulation approach is applied to the Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME) to better understand the influence of source and internal model parameters on the simulator output. Emulation is a statistical method for predicting the output of a computer simulator at new parameter choices without actually running the simulator. A multi-level emulation approach is applied using two configurations of NAME with different numbers of model particles. Information from many evaluations of the computationally faster configuration is combined with results from relatively few evaluations of the slower, more accurate, configuration. This approach is effective when it is not possible to run the accurate simulator many times and when there is also little prior knowledge about the influence of parameters. The approach is applied to the mean ash column loading in 75 geographical regions on 14 May 2010. Through this analysis it has been found that the parameters that contribute the most to the output uncertainty are initial plume rise height, mass eruption rate, free tropospheric turbulence levels and precipitation threshold for wet deposition. This information can be used to inform future model development and observational campaigns and routine monitoring. The analysis presented here suggests the need for further observational and theoretical research into parameterisation of atmospheric turbulence. Furthermore it can also be used to inform the most important parameter perturbations for a small operational

  13. A multidisciplinary effort to assign realistic source parameters to models of volcanic ash-cloud transport and dispersion during eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Larry G.; Guffanti, Marianne C.; Servranckx, R.; Webley, P.; Barsotti, S.; Dean, K.; Durant, A.; Ewert, John W.; Neri, A.; Rose, W.I.; Schneider, David J.; Siebert, L.; Stunder, B.; Swanson, G.; Tupper, A.; Volentik, A.; Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2009-01-01

    During volcanic eruptions, volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDs) are used to forecast the location and movement of ash clouds over hours to days in order to define hazards to aircraft and to communities downwind. Those models use input parameters, called “eruption source parameters”, such as plume height H, mass eruption rate Ṁ, duration D, and the mass fraction m63 of erupted debris finer than about 4ϕ or 63 μm, which can remain in the cloud for many hours or days. Observational constraints on the value of such parameters are frequently unavailable in the first minutes or hours after an eruption is detected. Moreover, observed plume height may change during an eruption, requiring rapid assignment of new parameters. This paper reports on a group effort to improve the accuracy of source parameters used by VATDs in the early hours of an eruption. We do so by first compiling a list of eruptions for which these parameters are well constrained, and then using these data to review and update previously studied parameter relationships. We find that the existing scatter in plots of H versus Ṁ yields an uncertainty within the 50% confidence interval of plus or minus a factor of four in eruption rate for a given plume height. This scatter is not clearly attributable to biases in measurement techniques or to well-recognized processes such as elutriation from pyroclastic flows. Sparse data on total grain-size distribution suggest that the mass fraction of fine debris m63 could vary by nearly two orders of magnitude between small basaltic eruptions (∼ 0.01) and large silicic ones (> 0.5). We classify eleven eruption types; four types each for different sizes of silicic and mafic eruptions; submarine eruptions; “brief” or Vulcanian eruptions; and eruptions that generate co-ignimbrite or co-pyroclastic flow plumes. For each eruption type we assign source parameters. We then assign a characteristic eruption type to each of the world's ∼ 1500

  14. Multi-level emulation of a volcanic ash transport and dispersion model to quantify sensitivity to uncertain parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Harvey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the disruption to European airspace caused by the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 there has been a move towards producing quantitative predictions of volcanic ash concentration using volcanic ash transport and dispersion simulators. However, there is no formal framework for determining the uncertainties of these predictions and performing many simulations using these complex models is computationally expensive. In this paper a Bayesian linear emulation approach is applied to the Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME to better understand the influence of source and internal model parameters on the simulator output. Emulation is a statistical method for predicting the output of a computer simulator at new parameter choices without actually running the simulator. A multi-level emulation approach is applied using two configurations of NAME with different numbers of model particles. Information from many evaluations of the computationally faster configuration is combined with results from relatively few evaluations of the slower, more accurate, configuration. This approach is effective when it is not possible to run the accurate simulator many times and when there is also little prior knowledge about the influence of parameters. The approach is applied to the mean ash column loading in 75 geographical regions on 14 May 2010. Through this analysis it has been found that the parameters that contribute the most to the output uncertainty are initial plume rise height, mass eruption rate, free tropospheric turbulence levels and precipitation threshold for wet deposition. This information can be used to inform future model development and observational campaigns and routine monitoring. The analysis presented here suggests the need for further observational and theoretical research into parameterisation of atmospheric turbulence. Furthermore it can also be used to inform the most important parameter perturbations

  15. Extracting the Volcanic Ash Plume Elevation Model (PEM) from Landsat-8. Application to the 2014 Holuhraun (Iceland) Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arason, P.; de Michele, M.; Raucoules, D.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we introduce a method to restitute the volcanic gas/ash Plume Elevation Model (PEM) from optical satellite imagery. As the volcanic plume is moving rapidly, conventional satellite based photogrammetric height restitution methods do not apply as the epipolar offset due to plume motion adds up to the one generated by the stereoscopic view. This is because there are time-lags of tens of seconds between conventional satellite stereoscopic acquisitions, depending on the stereo acquisition mode. Our method is based on a single satellite pass. We exploit the short time lag and resulting baseline that exist between the multispectral (MS) and the panchromatic (PAN) bands to jointly measure the epipolar offsets and the perpendicular to the epipolar (P2E) offsets. The first are proportional to plume height plus the offsets due to plume velocity in the epipolar direction. The second, are proportional to plume velocity in the P2E direction only. The latter is used to compensate the effect of plume velocity in the stereoscopic offsets by projecting it on the epipolar direction assuming a known plume direction, thus improving the height measurement precision. We apply the method to Landsat 8 data taking into account the specificities of the focal plane modules. We focus on the Holuhraun 2014 fissure eruption (Iceland). We validate our measurements against ground based measurements. The method has potential for detailed high resolution routine measurements of volcanic plume height/velocity. The method can be applied both to other multi focal plane modules push broom sensors (such as the ESA Sentinel 2) and potentially to other push-broom systems such as the CNES SPOT family and Pléiades.

  16. Ashes to ashes, charcoal to dust: micromorphological evidence for ash-induced disintegration of charcoal in Early Neolithic (LBK) soil features in Elsloo (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, D.J.; Braadbaart, F.; Wijk, I.M. van; Os, B.J.H. van

    2012-01-01

    Charcoal and other forms of charred organic material e an important part of the archaeological record e consist of benzenoids. Such components are unstable in basic or alkaline conditions. Since ashes are alkaline, this means that archaeological charcoal may have been disintegrated and lost if

  17. Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards: Part II. Validation of satellite-derived Volcanic Sulphur Dioxide Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukouli, MariLiza; Balis, Dimitris; Dimopoulos, Spiros; Clarisse, Lieven; Carboni, Elisa; Hedelt, Pascal; Spinetti, Claudia; Theys, Nicolas; Tampellini, Lucia; Zehner, Claus

    2014-05-01

    The eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in the spring of 2010 turned the attention of both the public and the scientific community to the susceptibility of the European airspace to the outflows of large volcanic eruptions. The ash-rich plume from Eyjafjallajökull drifted towards Europe and caused major disruptions of European air traffic for several weeks affecting the everyday life of millions of people and with a strong economic impact. This unparalleled situation revealed limitations in the decision making process due to the lack of information on the tolerance to ash of commercial aircraft engines as well as limitations in the ash monitoring and prediction capabilities. The European Space Agency project Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards, was introduced to facilitate the development of an optimal End-to-End System for Volcanic Ash Plume Monitoring and Prediction. This system is based on comprehensive satellite-derived ash plume and sulphur dioxide [SO2] level estimates, as well as a widespread validation using supplementary satellite, aircraft and ground-based measurements. The validation of volcanic SO2 levels extracted from the sensors GOME-2/MetopA and IASI/MetopA are shown here with emphasis on the total column observed right before, during and after the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruptions. Co-located ground-based Brewer Spectrophotometer data extracted from the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre, WOUDC, were compared to the different satellite estimates. The findings are presented at length, alongside a comprehensive discussion of future scenarios.

  18. Ash? Particles Found Inside the NASA DC8 which Encountered Hekla's February 2000 Stratospheric Volcanic Cloud--a Needle in a Haystack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, T.; Mills, O. P.; Riley, C. M.; Rose, W. I.

    2001-12-01

    As part of our remote sensing efforts on the Hekla eruption (Rose et al, this session) we have performed an extensive SEM examination of particles provided us by Tom Grindle of NASA Dryden. These particles came from the engines and filters of the NASA DC8 that was damaged by its encounter with the Hekla volcanic cloud at 76N 0W at 0510 UT on 28 February 2000, about 35 hours after the explosive phase of the eruption. Finding definitive evidence of ash in these samples was difficult because other kinds of particles were also present, possibly the result of uncontrolled sampling times. Strong evidence for ash comes from the damage reflected in the aircraft (T. Grindle, 2000, personal communication) and from aerosol number density measurements in the volcanic cloud reported by T M Miller et al (2000, EOS Transactions 81 (48) F1277). The early, most explosive part of the Hekla eruption likely was gas-rich but contained some ash that was andesitic or basaltic andesitic in composition (A. Hoskuldsson, pers comm, 2001). The ash in this early component could not be detected by satellite remote sensing, perhaps because it was masked by the effects of abundant ice. Since ice masses were estimated at engines and a dominance of angular feldspar and other silicates in the other engine and filter samples. We expanded our search of the silicate materials and obtained samples of the early, most silicic ash from Iceland for comparative analytical work. This was still inconclusive prior to abstract submittal.

  19. Application of paste technology to mitigate the dust emissions from handling of fly and bottom ash at coal fired power plant : CGTEE in Candiota, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Marques, M.E. [Golder Associates Peru, Lima (Peru); Lima, H. [Golder Associates Brazil, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mandl, B.; Francoeur, R.; Palkovits, F. [Golder Paste Technology Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada); Blois, R. [Companhia de Geracao Termica de Energia Electrica, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed a method developed to reduce dust emissions generated in a fly ash handling procedure used at a thermal power plant located in the south of Brazil. The fly ash is collected in dry form at several locations in the plant and pneumatically conveyed to storage silos, where it is moistened with water in a mixer, loaded into dump trucks and deposited in a disposal area near a surface coal mine. The new solution created low density fly ash slurry in localized mixing tanks within the power plant. The low density slurry is pumped to an ash conditioning plant where the slurry is then mixed with the bottom ash, dewatered, and densified. The densified slurry is then pumped to an adjacent coal mine disposal site in order to be used as backfill in mined areas. The proposed method will significantly reduce dust emissions both inside and outside the plant, and will substantially reduce truck traffic at the mine. The method will reduce the environmental impacts associated with fly ash dust emissions in the region. 8 figs.

  20. Fractal analysis: A new tool in transient volcanic ash plume characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournigand, Pierre-Yves; Peña Fernandez, Juan Jose; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Perugini, Diego; Sesterhenn, Jörn

    2017-04-01

    Transient volcanic plumes are time-dependent features generated by unstable eruptive sources. They represent a threat to human health and infrastructures, and a challenge to characterize due to their intrinsic instability. Plumes have been investigated through physical (e.g. visible, thermal, UV, radar imagery), experimental and numerical studies in order to provide new insights about their dynamics and better anticipate their behavior. It has been shown experimentally that plume dynamics is strongly dependent to source conditions and that plume shape evolution holds key to retrieve these conditions. In this study, a shape evolution analysis is performed on thermal high-speed videos of volcanic plumes from three different volcanoes Sakurajima (Japan), Stromboli (Italy) and Fuego (Guatemala), recorded with a FLIR SC655 thermal camera during several field campaigns between 2012 and 2016. To complete this dataset, three numerical gas-jet simulations at different Reynolds number (2000, 5000 and 10000) have been used in order to set reference values to the natural cases. Turbulent flow shapes are well known to feature scale-invariant structures and a high degree of complexity. For this reason we characterized the bi-dimensional shape of natural and synthetic plumes by using a fractal descriptor. Such method has been applied in other studies on experimental turbulent jets as well as on atmospheric clouds and have shown promising results. At each time-step plume contour has been manually outlined and measured using the box-counting method. This method consists in covering the image with squares of variable sizes and counting the number of squares containing the plume outline. The negative slope of the number of squares in function of their size in a log-log plot gives the fractal dimension of the plume at a given time. Preliminary results show an increase over time of the fractal dimension for natural volcanic plume as well as for the numerically simulated ones, but at

  1. A great volcanic eruption around AD 1300 recorded in lacustrine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The contents of Ti, Al and Fe₂O₃ in a lacustrine sediment core (DY6) collected from Dongdao Island, South China Sea (SCS), were determined to be much higher than those in the three major sediment endmembers (coral sand, guano and plants), and their likely sources include terrigenous dust and volcanic ash.

  2. Mineralogical analyses and in vitro screening tests for the rapid evaluation of the health hazard of volcanic ash at Rabaul volcano, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Blond, Jennifer S.; Horwell, Claire J.; Baxter, Peter J.; Michnowicz, Sabina A. K.; Tomatis, Maura; Fubini, Bice; Delmelle, Pierre; Dunster, Christina; Patia, Herman

    2010-11-01

    The continuous ash and gas emissions from the Tavurvur cone in Rabaul caldera, Papua New Guinea, during 2007-08, raised concerns regarding how exposure would affect the respiratory health of nearby populations and impact on the environment. As part of a formal evaluation of the effects of volcanic emissions on public health, we investigated the potential health hazard of the ash using a suite of selected mineralogical analyses and in vitro toxicity screening tests. The trachy -andesitic ash comprised 2.1-6.7 vol.% respirable (sub -4 μm diameter) particles. The crystalline silica content was 1.9-5.0 wt.% cristobalite (in the bulk sample) with trace amounts of quartz and/or tridymite. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the ash particles were angular with sparse, fibre -like particles (˜3-60 μm max. diameter) observed in some samples, which we confirmed to be CaSO4 (gypsum, at tested volcanic ash leachates. Ash samples generated potentially -harmful hydroxyl radicals through an iron -mediated catalytic reaction, in the range of 0.15-2.47 μmol m-2 (after 30 min of reaction). However, measurement of particle oxidative capacity (potential oxidative stress reaction using ascorbic acid) and silica -like injury to red blood cells (erythrolysis assay, i.e. measurement of cell death) nevertheless revealed low biological reactivity. The findings suggest that acute exposure to the ash would have a limited potential to exacerbate pre -existing conditions such as asthma or chronic bronchitis, and the potential for chronic exposure leading to silicosis was low.

  3. Moving Toward a Globally Harmonized Volcanic Ash Forecast System: Anchorage and Tokyo VAAC Best Practices on Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiensky, J. M.; Moore, D.; Igarashi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Since the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, there has been an increased awareness on the need for better collaboration between the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs). Work through the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) International Airways Volcano Watch Operations Group (IAVWOPSG) and International Airways Volcano Task Force (IAVTF) brought increased awareness and focus to this challenge. A VAAC Best Practices group was formed out of these larger meetings and focused on VAAC specific issues of importance. Collaboration was one of the topics under consideration. Some ideas and procedures for an effective, yet easy, method for the VAACs to collaborate have been discussed. Implementation has been mainly on a VAAC to VAAC basis, however a more consolidated process needs to be developed and agreed upon between all VAACs in order to successfully move toward harmonization. Collaboration procedures and tools are being considered. The National Weather Service (NWS) Alaska Region has been looking at collaborative software to help the VAACs identify the presence of ash and forecast the plume both in the horizontal and vertical. Having an interactive graphical interface within the forecast operation may help to ensure consistency across VAAC boundaries. Existing chat software within NWS is being investigated to allow Tokyo and Anchorage VAAC to "chat" about forecast issues in real time. This capability is being tested through scenarios. The Anchorage and Tokyo VAACs participated in a series of meetings in Tokyo in March 2014. Collaboration was a major topic of discussion. This paper will outline some of the efforts being undertaken between the Anchorage and Tokyo VAACs as a result of these meetings and subsequent dialogue.

  4. Multitasking in academia: Effective combinations of research, education and public outreach illustrated by a volcanic ash warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, B. L.; Plag, H.

    2011-12-01

    Science permeates our society. Its role and its perceived importance evolves with time. Scientists today are highly specialized, yet society demands they master a variety of skills requiring not only a number of different competencies but also a broad mindset. Scientists are subjected to a meritocracy in terms of having to produce scientific papers. Peer-reviewed scientific publications used to be sufficient to meet the various laws and regulations with respect to dissemination of scientific results. This has dramatically changed; both expressed directly through public voices (such as in the climate change discourses), but also by politicians and policy makers. In some countries research funding now comes with specific requirements concerning public outreach that go way beyond peer-reviewed publications and presentation at scientific conferences. Science policies encourage multidisciplinary cooperation and scientific questions themselves often cannot be answered without knowledge and information from several scientific areas. Scientists increasingly need to communicate knowledge and results in more general terms as well as educating future generations. A huge challenge lies in developing the knowledge, human capacity and mindset that will allow an individual academician to contribute to education, communicate across scientific fields and sectors in multidisciplinary cross sectoral cooperations and also reach out to the general public while succeeding within the scientific meritocracy. We demonstrate how research, education and communication within and outside academia can effectively be combined through a presentation of the International Airways Volcano Watch that encompasses an operational volcanic ash warning system for the aviation industry. This presentation will show the role of science throughout the information flow, from basic science to the pilots' decision-making. Furthermore, it will illustrate how one can connect specific scientific topics to societal

  5. The Campanian Ignimbrite eruption: new data on volcanic ash dispersal and its potential impact on human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Kathryn E; Hambach, Ulrich; Veres, Daniel; Iovita, Radu

    2013-01-01

    The Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) volcanic eruption was the most explosive in Europe in the last 200,000 years. The event coincided with the onset of an extremely cold climatic phase known as Heinrich Event 4 (HE4) approximately 40,000 years ago. Their combined effect may have exacerbated the severity of the climate through positive feedbacks across Europe and possibly globally. The CI event is of particular interest not only to investigate the role of volcanism on climate forcing and palaeoenvironments, but also because its timing coincides with the arrival into Europe of anatomically modern humans, the demise of Neanderthals, and an associated major shift in lithic technology. At this stage, however, the degree of interaction between these factors is poorly known, based on fragmentary and widely dispersed data points. In this study we provide important new data from Eastern Europe which indicate that the magnitude of the CI eruption and impact of associated distal ash (tephra) deposits may have been substantially greater than existing models suggest. The scale of the eruption is modelled by tephra distribution and thickness, supported by local data points. CI ashfall extends as far as the Russian Plain, Eastern Mediterranean and northern Africa. However, modelling input is limited by very few data points in Eastern Europe. Here we investigate an unexpectedly thick CI tephra deposit in the southeast Romanian loess steppe, positively identified using geochemical and geochronological analyses. We establish the tephra as a widespread primary deposit, which blanketed the topography both thickly and rapidly, with potentially catastrophic impacts on local ecosystems. Our discovery not only highlights the need to reassess models for the magnitude of the eruption and its role in climatic transition, but also suggests that it may have substantially influenced hominin population and subsistence dynamics in a region strategic for human migration into Europe.

  6. Organic matter protection as affected by the mineral soil matrix: allophanic vs. non-allophanic volcanic ash soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierop, K. G. J.; Kaal, J.; Jansen, B.; Naafs, D. F. W.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic ash soils (Andosols) contain the largest amounts of organic carbon of all mineral soil types. Chemical (complexes of organic matter with allophane, Al/Fe) and physical (aggregation) mechanisms are protecting the carbon from decomposition. While allophanic Andosols are dominated by short range order minerals such as allophane, imogolite and ferrihydrite, organic matter-Al/Fe complexes dominate non-allophanic Andosols. Consequently, chemical interactions between the mineral soil matrix and organic matter differ between these two soil types. This difference could potentially lead to different organic matter compositions. In this study, the organic matter of Ah horizons of an allophanic Andosol with a non-allophanic Andosol from Madeira Island is compared using analytical pyrolysis. Both volcanic soil types showed a relative decrease of lignin-derived pyrolysis products with depth, but this decrease was more pronounced in the allophanic Andosol. Polysaccharides were more abundant in the allophanic Ah horizon, particularly at lower depth, and this was also the case for the non-plant-derived N-containing polysaccharide chitin. Most likely, these biopolymers are adsorbed onto short range order minerals such as allophane and therefore were better protected in the allophanic Andosol. In addition, the higher chitin contents combined with the more pronounced lignin degradation suggests a higher fungal activity. Aliphatic pyrolysis products (n-alkenes/n-alkanes, fatty acids) were relatively more enriched in the non-allophanic Andosol. Lower microbial activity caused by the more acidic pH and higher levels of (toxic) aluminium are the most plausible reasons for the accumulation of these compounds in the non-allophanic Andosol. Although the allophanic and non-allophanic Andosol resembled each other in containing biopolymer groups of the same orders of magnitudes, in particular the contents of chitin and aliphatic compounds were distinctly affected by the differences in

  7. The Campanian Ignimbrite eruption: new data on volcanic ash dispersal and its potential impact on human evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E Fitzsimmons

    Full Text Available The Campanian Ignimbrite (CI volcanic eruption was the most explosive in Europe in the last 200,000 years. The event coincided with the onset of an extremely cold climatic phase known as Heinrich Event 4 (HE4 approximately 40,000 years ago. Their combined effect may have exacerbated the severity of the climate through positive feedbacks across Europe and possibly globally. The CI event is of particular interest not only to investigate the role of volcanism on climate forcing and palaeoenvironments, but also because its timing coincides with the arrival into Europe of anatomically modern humans, the demise of Neanderthals, and an associated major shift in lithic technology. At this stage, however, the degree of interaction between these factors is poorly known, based on fragmentary and widely dispersed data points. In this study we provide important new data from Eastern Europe which indicate that the magnitude of the CI eruption and impact of associated distal ash (tephra deposits may have been substantially greater than existing models suggest. The scale of the eruption is modelled by tephra distribution and thickness, supported by local data points. CI ashfall extends as far as the Russian Plain, Eastern Mediterranean and northern Africa. However, modelling input is limited by very few data points in Eastern Europe. Here we investigate an unexpectedly thick CI tephra deposit in the southeast Romanian loess steppe, positively identified using geochemical and geochronological analyses. We establish the tephra as a widespread primary deposit, which blanketed the topography both thickly and rapidly, with potentially catastrophic impacts on local ecosystems. Our discovery not only highlights the need to reassess models for the magnitude of the eruption and its role in climatic transition, but also suggests that it may have substantially influenced hominin population and subsistence dynamics in a region strategic for human migration into Europe.

  8. Recent and future advances in remote sensing of volcanic ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, M.; Mackie, S.; Wilkins, K.; Western, L.

    2013-12-01

    The recent eruptions of Icelandic volcanoes have reaffirmed the importance of accurate quantification of a number of key parameters from remotely sensed data. Only through the synoptic perspective afforded satellite sensors can such variables, include cloud mass, concentration, height, and particle size be retrieved on the cloud scale. These parameters are vital to aircraft hazard mitigation as they have a profound impact on the severity of the effects on aircraft, on ash cloud transport and fallout, and can be used to drive dispersion models. This paper will detail recent work on (1) understanding how uncertainty in a priori assumptions impact observations, (2) detection limits for commonly used satellite sensors under a variety of environmental conditions, and (3) present first results from a Bayesian retrieval scheme.

  9. Hazard assessment of far-range volcanic ash dispersal from a violent Strombolian eruption at Somma-Vesuvius volcano, Naples, Italy: implications on civil aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, Roberto; Folch, Arnau; Costa, Antonio; Scaini, Chiara; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2012-11-01

    Long-range dispersal of volcanic ash can disrupt civil aviation over large areas, as occurred during the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland. Here we assess the hazard for civil aviation posed by volcanic ash from a potential violent Strombolian eruption of Somma-Vesuvius, the most likely scenario if eruptive activity resumed at this volcano. A Somma-Vesuvius eruption is of concern for two main reasons: (1) there is a high probability (38 %) that the eruption will be violent Strombolian, as this activity has been common in the most recent period of activity (between AD 1631 and 1944); and (2) violent Strombolian eruptions typically last longer than higher-magnitude events (from 3 to 7 days for the climactic phases) and, consequently, are likely to cause prolonged air traffic disruption (even at large distances if a substantial amount of fine ash is produced such as is typical during Vesuvius eruptions). We compute probabilistic hazard maps for airborne ash concentration at relevant flight levels using the FALL3D ash dispersal model and a statistically representative set of meteorological conditions. Probabilistic hazard maps are computed for two different ash concentration thresholds, 2 and 0.2 mg/m3, which correspond, respectively, to the no-fly and enhanced procedure conditions defined in Europe during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption. The seasonal influence of ash dispersal is also analysed by computing seasonal maps. We define the persistence of ash in the atmosphere as the time that a concentration threshold is exceeded divided by the total duration of the eruption (here the eruption phase producing a sustained eruption column). The maps of averaged persistence give additional information on the expected duration of the conditions leading to flight disruption at a given location. We assess the impact that a violent Strombolian eruption would have on the main airports and aerial corridors of the Central Mediterranean area, and this assessment

  10. Measurement and simulation of the 16/17 April 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash layer dispersion in the northern Alpine region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Emeis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The spatial structure and the progression speed of the first ash layer from the Icelandic Eyjafjallajökull volcano which reached Germany on 16/17 April is investigated from remote sensing data and numerical simulations. The ceilometer network of the German Meteorological Service was able to follow the progression of the ash layer over the whole of Germany. This first ash layer turned out to be a rather shallow layer of only several hundreds of metres thickness which was oriented slantwise in the middle troposphere and which was brought downward by large-scale sinking motion over Southern Germany and the Alps. Special Raman lidar measurements, trajectory analyses and in-situ observations from mountain observatories helped to confirm the volcanic origin of the detected aerosol layer. Ultralight aircraft measurements permitted the detection of the arrival of a second major flush of volcanic material in Southern Germany. Numerical simulations with the Eulerian meso-scale model MCCM were able to reproduce the temporal and spatial structure of the ash layer. Comparisons of the model results with the ceilometer network data on 17 April and with the ultralight aircraft data on 19 April were satisfying. This is the first example of a model validation study from this ceilometer network data.

  11. New Generation Meteorological Satellite Imager Aviation Decision Support Applications for Detection of Convection, Turbulence, and Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltz, Wayne

    2016-04-01

    A suite of aviation related decision support products have been in development to meet GOES-R science requirements since 2008 and are being evaluated to assess meteorological hazards to aircraft in flight derived from the current generation of European Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) imager data. This presentation will focus on GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) measurement requirements relating to satellite-based aviation convective, turbulence, and volcanic ash/SO2 products that can be applied globally on next generation geostationary imagers including the Japanese Himawari, South Korean COMS (AMI), and European Metop-SG imagers. These new methodologies have relevance on current generation GOES and SEVIRI imagers, and overview will include discussion on how product utility has been improved through satellite GOES-R/JPSS Proving Ground NOAA testbed activities. Satellite-based decision support for aviation context toward improvement of future air transportation route planning and warning for the general public with emphasis on successfully bridging research to operations will also be discussed with anticipated October 2016 launch of GOES-R.

  12. A two-way-tracking localized ensemble Kalman filter for assimilating aircraft in situ volcanic ash measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangliang; Lin, Hai Xiang; Heemink, Arnold; Segers, Arjo; Verlaan, Martin; Lu, Tongchao; Lu, Sha

    2017-04-01

    After the eruption of volcano Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, which had a huge impact to aviation and economy, improvements of volcanic ash forecasts have been put onto the research agenda. Data assimilation uses observations to improve the forecast accuracy. Among the data assimilation approaches, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a well-known and popular method. A proper covariance localization strategy in the analysis step of EnKF is essential for reducing spurious covariances caused by the finite ensemble size, as shown for this application for assimilation of aircraft in situ measurements. After analyzing the characteristics of the physical forecast error covariances, we present a two-way tracking approach to define the localization matrix for covariance localization. The result shows that the Two-way-tracking Localized EnKF (TL-EnKF) effectively maintains the correctly specified physical covariances and largely reduces the spurious ones. The computational cost of TL-EnKF is also evaluated and is shown to be advantageous for both serial and parallel implementations. Compared to the commonly used distance-based covariance localization, the two-way tracking approach is shown to be more suitable. In addition, the covariance inflation approach is verified as an additional improvement to TL-EnKF to achieve more accurate results.

  13. Source identification of volcanic ashes by geochemical analysis of well preserved lacustrine tephras in Nahuel Huapi National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Romina; Ribeiro Guevara, Sergio; Sánchez, María Lidia; Arribére, María

    2008-10-01

    Well preserved volcanic ashes produced in recent events, recovered from sedimentary sequences extracted from three lakes belonging to Nahuel Huapi National Park, Northern Patagonia, were geochemically characterized in order to reveal patterns that allow the identification of the source. Two water bodies are situated in the direct impact area of volcanoes Calbuco and Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, while the third, lake Moreno, is situated in-between. The sedimentary sequences were dated by (210)Pb and (137)Cs techniques; the elemental composition was determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. Distinctive patterns were found out when comparing glass shards, and also white pumice but in a lesser degree, of tephra layers extracted from lake Ilón, related mostly to volcano Calbuco events, and lake Nahuel Huapi (Brazo Rincón site), associated to Puyehue-Cordón Caulle eruptions. The geochemical parameters that showed decisive differences were SiO(2) and Na(2)O+K(2)O contents, the Eu anomaly, Rare Earth element ratios; the concentration of incompatible elements Cs, Rb, Th, Hf, Ta and Zr, and the compatible elements Cr and V. The six upper tephra layers extracted from lake Moreno showed geochemical patterns that allowed clear association with Calbuco and Puyehue-Cordón Caulle sources. These results set up the base for tephrochronological applications in historical periods in Nahuel Huapi National Park area.

  14. Source identification of volcanic ashes by geochemical analysis of well preserved lacustrine tephras in Nahuel Huapi National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daga, Romina [Laboratorio de Analisis por Activacion Neutronica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)], E-mail: romina@cab.cnea.gov.ar; Ribeiro Guevara, Sergio [Laboratorio de Analisis por Activacion Neutronica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Sanchez, Maria Lidia [Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, 5800 Rio Cuarto (Argentina); Arribere, Maria [Laboratorio de Analisis por Activacion Neutronica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2008-10-15

    Well preserved volcanic ashes produced in recent events, recovered from sedimentary sequences extracted from three lakes belonging to Nahuel Huapi National Park, Northern Patagonia, were geochemically characterized in order to reveal patterns that allow the identification of the source. Two water bodies are situated in the direct impact area of volcanoes Calbuco and Puyehue-Cordon Caulle, while the third, lake Moreno, is situated in-between. The sedimentary sequences were dated by {sup 210}Pb and {sup 137}Cs techniques; the elemental composition was determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. Distinctive patterns were found out when comparing glass shards, and also white pumice but in a lesser degree, of tephra layers extracted from lake Ilon, related mostly to volcano Calbuco events, and lake Nahuel Huapi (Brazo Rincon site), associated to Puyehue-Cordon Caulle eruptions. The geochemical parameters that showed decisive differences were SiO{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}O+K{sub 2}O contents, the Eu anomaly, Rare Earth element ratios; the concentration of incompatible elements Cs, Rb, Th, Hf, Ta and Zr, and the compatible elements Cr and V. The six upper tephra layers extracted from lake Moreno showed geochemical patterns that allowed clear association with Calbuco and Puyehue-Cordon Caulle sources. These results set up the base for tephrochronological applications in historical periods in Nahuel Huapi National Park area.

  15. Metsulfuron-methyl sorption/desorption behavior on volcanic ash-derived soils. effect of phosphate and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Lizethly; Fuentes, Roxana; Escudey, Mauricio; Fuentes, Edwar; Báez, María E

    2010-06-09

    Metsulfuron-methyl sorption/desorption behavior was studied through batch sorption experiments in three typical volcanic ash-derived soils belonging to Andisol and Ultisol orders. Their distinctive physical and chemical properties are acidic pH and variable surface charge. Organic matter content and mineral composition affected in different ways sorption of metsulfuron-methyl (K(OC) ranging from 113 to 646 mL g(-1)): organic matter and iron and aluminum oxides mainly through hydrophilic rather than hydrophobic interactions in Andisols, and Kaolinite group minerals, as major constituents of Ultisols, and iron and aluminum oxides only through hydrophilic interactions. The Freundlich model described metsulfuron-methyl behavior in all cases (R(2) > 0.992). K(f) values (3.1-14.4 microg(1-1/n) mL(1/n) g(-1)) were higher than those reported for different class of soils including some with variable charge. Hysteresis was more significant in Ultisols. A strong influence of pH and phosphate was established for both kinds of soil, intensive soil fertilization and liming being the most probable scenario for leaching of metsulfuron-methyl, particularly in Ultisols.

  16. Physiological effect of accidental fly ash deposition on plants and chemical study of the dusted plant leaves by XRP and EPMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osan, J.; Torok, S.; Torok, K.; Nemeth, L.; Labar, J.L. [KFTI Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary)

    1996-07-01

    Studies on the influence of fly ash on the photosynthetic activity of Solidago canadensis L. were carried out in order to determine the importance of this material as an environmental impact agent. Leaf samples were dusted with fly ash and sprayed with water of different pH values simulating acid rain. Fly ash was applied in quantities to model an accidental occasion of an extremely high emission level of fly ash as a result of malfunctioning of the electrostatic filters of fossil fuel-burning power plants. Leaf samples were analysed to trace the distribution of fly ash compounds on the leaf epidermis by means of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis and single-particle electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Significant reduction of the photosynthetic activity compared with the control group was observed only when the dusted plants were sprayed with acid rain. The trace element study showed that the uptake of toxic elements by plants was not significant. A quartz microcrystal layer in the case of acid treatment was detected by EPMA, and covered the entire leaf surface. It is considered that this layer, in addition to the fly ash particles themselves, absorbed light significantly, which played an important role in the decrease in photosynthetic activity.

  17. Ash storms: impacts of wind-remobilised volcanic ash on rural communities and agriculture following the 1991 Hudson eruption, southern Patagonia, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. M.; Cole, J. W.; Stewart, C.; Cronin, S. J.; Johnston, D. M.

    2011-04-01

    Tephra fall from the August 1991 eruption of Volcán Hudson affected some 100,000 km2 of Patagonia and was almost immediately reworked by strong winds, creating billowing clouds of remobilised ash, or `ash storms'. The immediate impacts on agriculture and rural communities were severe, but were then greatly exacerbated by continuing ash storms. This paper describes the findings of a 3-week study tour of the diverse environments of southern Patagonia affected by ash storms, with an emphasis on determining the impacts of repeated ash storms on agriculture and local practices that were developed in an attempt to mitigate these impacts. Ash storms produce similar effects to initial tephra eruptions, prolonged for considerable periods. These have included the burial of farmland under dune deposits, abrasion of vegetation and contamination of feed supplies with fine ash. These impacts can then cause problems for grazing animals such as starvation, severe tooth abrasion, gastrointestinal problems, corneal abrasion and blindness, and exhaustion if sheep fleeces become laden with ash. In addition, ash storms have led to exacerbated soil erosion, human health impacts, increased cleanup requirements, sedimentation in irrigation canals, and disruption of aviation and land transport. Ash deposits were naturally stabilised most rapidly in areas with high rainfall (>1,500 mm/year) through compaction and enhanced vegetation growth. Stabilisation was slowest in windy, semi-arid regions. Destruction of vegetation and suppression of regrowth by heavy tephra fall (>100 mm) hindered the stabilisation of deposits for years, and reduced the surface friction which increased wind erosivity. Stabilisation of tephra deposits was improved by intensive tillage, use of windbreaks and where there was dense and taller vegetative cover. Long-term drought and the impracticality of mixing ash deposits with soil by tillage on large farms was a barrier to stabilising deposits and, in turn

  18. Monitoring water infiltration in aggregated volcanic ash soil using multi-offset GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, T.; Saito, H.; Kuroda, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR), one of the electromagnetic (EM) exploration techniques, is regarded as an effective method to monitor soil water infiltration process in rapid and non-destructive fashion. From EM wave velocity data, we can estimate dielectric permittivity of the soil. The dielectric permittivity is then used to calculate volumetric water contents from one of empirically derived equations relating dielectric permittivity and volumetric water content. In many GPR surveys, wide angle reflection and refraction (WARR) or common midpoint (CMP) survey techniques with a pair of GPR antennas are used to obtain EM wave velocities. WARR and CMP, however, are not suitable to monitor dynamic processes, such as soil water infiltration processes, as it takes time to complete each survey. A multi-offset (MO) GPR survey technique allows one to obtain EM wave velocity profiles in short time by scanning soil profiles with multiple GPR antennas. In this study, the MO GPR survey was used to monitor changes in soil water content distribution during infiltration test. A field experiment was conducted at an experimental field at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology where top soils consisted mainly with well aggregated volcanic as soils. The GPR system used in this study was composed of a transmitter and multiple receivers of 250 MHz GPR. Ground truth of soil water content was obtained simultaneously with soil moisture sensors such as Profile Probe.

  19. A new simplified approach for simultaneous retrieval of SO2 and ash content of tropospheric volcanic clouds: an application to the Mt Etna volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pugnaghi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure is presented for simultaneous estimation of SO2 and ash abundance in a volcanic plume, using thermal infrared (TIR MODIS data. Plume altitude and temperature are the only two input parameters required to run the procedure, while surface emissivity, temperature, atmospheric profiles, ash optical properties, and radiative transfer models are not necessary to perform the atmospheric corrections. The procedure gives the most reliable results when the surface under the plume is uniform, for example above the ocean, but still produces fairly good estimates in more challenging and not easily modelled conditions, such as above land or meteorological cloud layers. The developed approach was tested on the Etna volcano. By linearly interpolating the radiances surrounding a detected volcanic plume, the volcanic plume removal (VPR procedure described here computes the radiances that would have been measured by the sensor in the absence of a plume, and reconstructs a new image without plume. The new image and the original data allow computation of plume transmittance in the TIR-MODIS bands 29, 31, and 32 (8.6, 11.0 and 12.0 μm by applying a simplified model consisting of a uniform plume at a fixed altitude and temperature. The transmittances are then refined with a polynomial relationship obtained by means of MODTRAN simulations adapted for the geographical region, ash type, and atmospheric profiles. Bands 31 and 32 are SO2 transparent and, from their transmittances, the effective ash particle radius (Re, and aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550 are computed. A simple relation between the ash transmittances of bands 31 and 29 is demonstrated and used for SO2 columnar content (cs estimation. Comparing the results of the VPR procedure with MODTRAN simulations for more than 200 000 different cases, the frequency distribution of the differences shows the following: the Re error is less than ±0.5 μm in more than 60% of cases; the AOD550 error

  20. A model for the evolution of fluid permeability in welding volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jeremie; Llewellin, Ed; Heap, Michael; Scheu, Bettina; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallee, Yan; Dobson, Katherine; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald

    2017-04-01

    Magmas fragment forming a transiently granular material, which can weld back to a fluid-continuum. This process results in dramatic changes in the porosity of the material, which impacts the fluid permeability. First, we present stochastic simulations of spheres, designed to represent ash particles, in a 3D volume, for which the spheres are permitted to overlap. We use these simulations to show that we can quantitatively predict the surface area and pore-cluster size distribution of these geometrical objects through the full range of inter-sphere gas volume fractions. Second, we perform high temperature sintering experiments using analogue viscous droplets while imaging the internal structure of the sintering packs in situ using synchrotron-source X-rays and volume-reconstruction algorithms. We show that the evolution of structure in these time-resolved 3D datasets are comparable to the sphere-population simulations and to ex-situ tests. We use LBflow, a lattice-Boltzmann fluid flow simulation tool, to quantify the fluid-permeability between the sphere populations (simulation) and the sintering droplets (experimental). We scale the fluid permeability in both systems with the quantitative prediction of internal surface area and find a universal behaviour that additionally agrees well with other published datasets for natural samples. Finally, we use a model for the kinetics of sintering to convert the scaling between the permeability and the internal surface area into a model for the kinetics of the decay of permeability. We propose that this will be a useful tool for predicting the longevity of degassing pathways in granular-filled cracks in conduits and shallow lava domes as well as during the sedimentation of exceptional hot ignimbrites that undergo compaction and welding. Fruitful future research would quantify the effect of pore-cluster anisotropy development in the evolution of fluid permeability.

  1. Risk perceptions and trust following the 2010 and 2011 Icelandic volcanic ash crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiser, J Richard; Donovan, Amy; Sparks, R Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    Eruptions at the Icelandic volcanoes of Eyjafjallajökull (2010) and Grimsvötn (2011) produced plumes of ash posing hazards to air traffic over northern Europe. In imposing restrictions on air traffic, regulators needed to balance the dangers of accidents or aircraft damage against the cost and inconvenience to travelers and industry. Two surveys examined how members of the public viewed the necessity of the imposed restrictions and their trust in different agencies as estimators of the level of risk. Study 1 was conducted with 213 British citizens (112 males, 101 females), who completed questionnaires while waiting for flights at London City Airport during May 2012. Study 2 involved an online survey of 301 Icelandic citizens (172 males, 127 females, 2 undeclared gender) during April 2012. In both samples, there was general support for the air traffic restrictions, especially among those who gave higher estimates of the likelihood of an air accident or mishap having otherwise happened. However, in both countries, the (minority of) respondents who had personally experienced travel disruption were less convinced that these restrictions were all necessary. Scientists, the International Civil Aviation Organization, and (in Iceland) the Icelandic Department of Civil Protection were all highly trusted, and seen as erring on the side of caution in their risk estimates. Airlines were seen as more likely to underestimate any risk. We conclude that perceptions of the balance between risk and caution in judgments under uncertainty are influenced by one's own motives and those attributed to others. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  2. West Coast volcanic ashes provide a new continental-scale Lateglacial isochron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne-O'Donnell, Sean D. F.; Cwynar, Les C.; Jensen, Britta J. L.; Vincent, Jessie H.; Kuehn, Stephen C.; Spear, Ray; Froese, Duane G.

    2016-06-01

    The 'Lateglacial' period (∼14.7-11.7 cal ka BP) eruptions of Mount St Helens and Glacier Peak in the Cascade Range deposited ash layers (tephras) within a short time span across much of western North America where they form event-stratigraphic marker layers or isochrons. They were deposited at a time which has long been of interest because it represents the transition between two fundamental states of the climate system: the late Pleistocene glacial world when ice sheets were widespread, and the modern interglacial Holocene world. This transition was marked by rapid changes in the distribution of plants, animals and humans on the landscape, and is characterised by short, rapid climate reversals in the warming trend. Yet despite the importance of understanding this period for many areas of palaeoclimatology, palaeobotany and archaeology it remains one of the most difficult for which to develop accurate chronologies because of fluctuations in atmospheric radiocarbon concentration. Hence, the occurrences of distinctive tephra isochrons are valuable for chronological control. Here, we report the first detection of the Mount St Helens set J and Glacier Peak tephras as closely-spaced 'cryptotephra' layers (not visible in stratigraphy to the naked eye) in three eastern seaboard lakes and dated to 13.74-13.45 cal ka BP. The presence of these tephras >4000 km from their sources affords an opportunity for continent-wide correlations by providing a high-precision chronological benchmark that is otherwise often lacking in North American studies of palaeoenvironmental change and deglaciation, megafaunal extinction and palaeoindian colonisation.

  3. Long-range hazard assessment of volcanic ash dispersal for a Plinian eruptive scenario at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico): implications for civil aviation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasia, Rosanna; Scaini, Chiara; Capra, Lucia; Nathenson, Manuel; Siebe, Claus; Arana-Salinas, Lilia; Folch, Arnau

    2014-01-01

    Popocatépetl is one of Mexico's most active volcanoes threatening a densely populated area that includes Mexico City with more than 20 million inhabitants. The destructive potential of this volcano is demonstrated by its Late Pleistocene-Holocene eruptive activity, which has been characterized by recurrent Plinian eruptions of large magnitude, the last two of which destroyed human settlements in pre-Hispanic times. Popocatépetl's reawakening in 1994 produced a crisis that culminated with the evacuation of two villages on the northeastern flank of the volcano. Shortly after, a monitoring system and a civil protection contingency plan based on a hazard zone map were implemented. The current volcanic hazards map considers the potential occurrence of different volcanic phenomena, including pyroclastic density currents and lahars. However, no quantitative assessment of the tephra hazard, especially related to atmospheric dispersal, has been performed. The presence of airborne volcanic ash at low and jet-cruise atmospheric levels compromises the safety of aircraft operations and forces re-routing of aircraft to prevent encounters with volcanic ash clouds. Given the high number of important airports in the surroundings of Popocatépetl volcano and considering the potential threat posed to civil aviation in Mexico and adjacent regions in case of a Plinian eruption, a hazard assessment for tephra dispersal is required. In this work, we present the first probabilistic tephra dispersal hazard assessment for Popocatépetl volcano. We compute probabilistic hazard maps for critical thresholds of airborne ash concentrations at different flight levels, corresponding to the situation defined in Europe during 2010, and still under discussion. Tephra dispersal mode is performed using the FALL3D numerical model. Probabilistic hazard maps are built for a Plinian eruptive scenario defined on the basis of geological field data for the "Ochre Pumice" Plinian eruption (4965 14C yr BP

  4. Long-range hazard assessment of volcanic ash dispersal for a Plinian eruptive scenario at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico): implications for civil aviation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasia, Rosanna; Scaini, Chirara; Capra, Lucia; Nathenson, Manuel; Siebe, Claus; Arana-Salinas, Lilia; Folch, Arnau

    2013-01-01

    Popocatépetl is one of Mexico’s most active volcanoes threatening a densely populated area that includes Mexico City with more than 20 million inhabitants. The destructive potential of this volcano is demonstrated by its Late Pleistocene–Holocene eruptive activity, which has been characterized by recurrent Plinian eruptions of large magnitude, the last two of which destroyed human settlements in pre-Hispanic times. Popocatépetl’s reawakening in 1994 produced a crisis that culminated with the evacuation of two villages on the northeastern flank of the volcano. Shortly after, a monitoring system and a civil protection contingency plan based on a hazard zone map were implemented. The current volcanic hazards map considers the potential occurrence of different volcanic phenomena, including pyroclastic density currents and lahars. However, no quantitative assessment of the tephra hazard, especially related to atmospheric dispersal, has been performed. The presence of airborne volcanic ash at low and jet-cruise atmospheric levels compromises the safety of aircraft operations and forces re-routing of aircraft to prevent encounters with volcanic ash clouds. Given the high number of important airports in the surroundings of Popocatépetl volcano and considering the potential threat posed to civil aviation in Mexico and adjacent regions in case of a Plinian eruption, a hazard assessment for tephra dispersal is required. In this work, we present the first probabilistic tephra dispersal hazard assessment for Popocatépetl volcano. We compute probabilistic hazard maps for critical thresholds of airborne ash concentrations at different flight levels, corresponding to the situation defined in Europe during 2010, and still under discussion. Tephra dispersal mode is performed using the FALL3D numerical model. Probabilistic hazard maps are built for a Plinian eruptive scenario defined on the basis of geological field data for the “Ochre Pumice” Plinian eruption (4965 14C

  5. The effect of Sinabung volcanic ash and rock phosphate nanoparticle on CEC (cation exchange capacity) base saturation exchange (K, Na, Ca, Mg) and base saturation at Andisol soils Ciater, West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuniarti, Anni; Arifin, Mahfud; Sofyan, Emma Trinurasi; Natalie, Betty; Sudirja, Rija; Dahliani, Dewi

    2018-02-01

    Andisol, soil orders which covers an upland area dominantly. The aim of this research is to know the effect between the ameliorant of Sinabung volcanic ashes with the ameliorant of rock phosphatenanoparticle towards CEC and base saturation exchange (K, Na, Ca, Mg) and the base saturation on Ciater's Andisols, West Java. A randomized complete block design (RCBD) factorial with two factors was used in this research. The first factor is the volcanic ash and the second factor is rock phosphate which consists of four levels each amount of 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% with three replications. The result showed that there was no interaction between volcanic ash and rock phosphate nanoparticle formed in first month and fourth month towards the improvement of CEC and saturation base exchange rate unless magnesium cation exchange increased in fourth month. There was independent effect of volcanic ash formed nanoparticles towards base saturation exchange increased for 5% dose. There was independent effect of rock phosphate formed nanoparticles towards base saturation exchange and increased for 5% dose. The dose combination of volcanic ashes 7.5% with phosphate rock, 5% increased the base saturation in the first month incubation.

  6. Rare Isotope Insights into Supereruptions: Rare Sulfur and Triple Oxygen Isotope Geochemistry of Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols Absorbed on Volcanic Ash Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, I. N.; Eiler, J.; Wing, B.; Farquhar, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present analyses of stable isotopic ratios of 17O/16O, 18O/16O, 34S/32S, and 33S/32S, 36S/32S of sulfate leached from volcanic ash of a series of well-known volcanic eruptions. This list covers much of the diversity of sizes and the character of volcanic eruptions. Particular emphasis is paid to the Lava Creek Tuff of Yellowstone and we present wide geographic sample coverage for this unit. This global dataset spans a significant range in δ34S, δ18O, and Δ17O of sulfate (29, 30 and 3.3 permil respectively) with oxygen isotopes recording mass-independent fractionation and sulfur isotopes exhibiting mass-dependent behavior. These ranges are defined by the isotopic compositions of products of large caldera forming eruptions. Proximal ignimbrites and coarse ash typically do not contain sulfate. The presence of sulfate with Δ17O > 0.2 permil is characteristic of small distal ash particles, suggesting that sulfate aerosols were scavenged after they underwent atmospheric photochemical reactions. Additionally, sediments that embed ash layers either do not contain sulfate or contain minor sulfate with Δ17O near 0 permil, suggesting that the observed sulfate in ash is of volcanic origin. Mass-dependent sulfur isotopic compositions suggest that sulfate-forming reactions did not involve photolysis of SO2, unlike the situation inferred for some pre-2.3 Ga sulfates or hypothesized to occur during the formation of sulfate associated with plinian eruptions that pierce the ozone layer. However, sulfate in the products of caldera-forming eruptions display a large δ34S range and fractionation relationships that do not follow equilibrium slopes of 0.515 and 1.90 for 33S/32S vs. 34S/32S and 36S/32S vs. 34S/32S, respectively. This implies that the sulfur isotopic characteristics of these sulfates were not set by a single stage, high-temperature equilibrium process in the volcanic plum. The data presented here are consistent with a single stage kinetic fractionation of sulfur

  7. A great volcanic eruption around AD 1300 recorded in lacustrine sediment from Dongdao Island, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongkang; Long, Nanye; Wang, Yuhong; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Yi; Sun, Liguang

    2017-02-01

    The contents of Ti, Al and Fe 2 O 3 in a lacustrine sediment core (DY6) collected from Dongdao Island, South China Sea (SCS), were determined to be much higher than those in the three major sediment end-members (coral sand, guano and plants), and their likely sources include terrigenous dust and volcanic ash. At 61 cm (˜AD 1300), the contents of Ti, Al and Fe 2 O 3 have an abnormally high spike, which cannot be explained by terrigenous dust. The Sr and Nd isotope compositions at 61 cm are in excellent agreement with those in volcanic materials, but they are significantly different from those in terrigenous dust, implying a possible material input from historical volcanic eruptions in the lacustrine sediment DY6. The documented great Samalas volcanic eruption at AD 1257 in Indonesia is likely the candidate for this volcanic eruption.

  8. Toxicity assessment of ash and dust from handmade gold jewelry manufacturing workshops in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Arif M; Hossain, Tanvir; Khan, Manzurul H; Aziz Hasan, M; Fakhruzzaman, M; Turner, Joseph B; Pestov, Dmitry; McCallister, Leigh S; Maudood Elahi, K

    2017-06-01

    Traditionally, handmade gold jewelry played a very important role in the cultural heritage of Bangladesh. Goldsmiths still are partially using ancient manufacturing process with coal fire, candle flame blowing, and nitric and sulfuric acid treatments. Such process leads to the contamination of workplace with the dust of toxic metals, acidic vapors, and particles of different natures. To evaluate contamination by particulate matter (PM), the passive particle collectors were installed in different manufacturing units for a period of 85 days at Tanti Bazar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The laser diffraction analysis of the samples collected at the soldering units showed significant amounts of particulates, both PM10 and PM 2.5, and also nanoparticles in both nucleation and accumulation mode. SEM/EDS analysis revealed partially melted micro blebs that contain a very high concentration of Fe along with Cu. The toxic elements were detected with ICP analysis and include higher concentrations of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), and arsenic (As). It is notable that detection of arsenic contamination was unexpected since raw materials used for jewelry making should not have any arsenic.

  9. The use of fractionated fly ash of thermal power plants as binder for production of briquettes of coke breeze and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temnikova, E. Yu; Bogomolov, A. R.; Lapin, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we propose to use the slag and ash material of thermal power plants (TPP) operating on pulverized coal fuel. The elemental and chemical composition of fly ash of five Kuzbass thermal power plants differs insignificantly from the composition of the mineral part of coking coal because coke production uses a charge, whose composition defines the main task: obtaining coke with the required parameters for production of iron and steel. These indicators are as follows: CRI reactivity and strength of the coke residue after reaction with CO2 – CSR. The chemical composition of fly ash of thermal power plants and microsilica with bulk density of 0.3-0.6 t/m3 generated at production of ferroalloys was compared. Fly ash and microsilica are the valuable raw material for production of mineral binder in manufacturing coke breeze briquettes (fraction of 2-10 mm) and dust (0-200 μm), generated in large quantities during coking (up to 40wt%). It is shown that this binder is necessary for production of smokeless briquettes with low reactivity, high strength and cost, demanded for production of cupola iron and melting the silicate materials, basaltic rocks in low-shaft furnaces. It is determined that microsilica contains up to 90% of silicon oxide, and fly ash contains up to 60% of silicon oxide and aluminum oxide of up to 20%. On average, the rest of fly ash composition consists of basic oxides. According to calculation by the VUKHIN formula, the basicity index of briquette changes significantly, when fly ash is introduced into briquette raw material component as a binder. The technology of coke briquette production on the basis of the non-magnetic fraction of TPP fly ash in the ratio from 3.5:1 to 4.5:1 (coke breeze : coke dust) with the addition of the binder component to 10% is proposed. The produced briquettes meet the requirements by CRI and require further study on CSR requirements.

  10. Rapid release of metal salts and nutrients from the 2011 Grímsvötn, Iceland volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, J.; Stipp, S. L. S.; Dalby, K. N.; Gislason, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    On May 21st, 2011, one of Iceland’s most active volcano, Grímsvötn, started its strongest eruption in a century. Grímsvötn produced hundreds of megatonnes of fine basaltic ash, which spread over Iceland, the North Atlantic and Europe. Such fine grained ash can impact human activity and health both with fertilization and with toxicity potential for aquatic environments. The purpose of this study was: (1) to investigate the basic physical and chemical properties of the ash from the 2011 Grímsvötn eruption, (2) to identify surface salts deposited on the ash during the eruption, (3) to identify which elements are released during ash-water interactions and their release rates, (4) to characterize the secondary phases formed during water exposure, and (5) to assess impact of the ash on humans and the environment. During the eruption, we collected a unique set of pristine ash samples over a range of 50-115 km from the source and examined them with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), surface area analysis (BET), laser absorption, electron microprobe (EMPA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The ash could be classified as glassy tholeiitic basalt with plug, flow through reactor and the effluent was analyzed for 73 elements using inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectroscopy (ICP-SFMS) and ion chromatography (IC). High release rates of mainly S, Na, Ca, Mg, F and Cl were observed during the first 10 min but after 12 h, the most abundant element released was Si. The effluent was alkaline. Secondary phases of mainly Al and Fe precipitated on the ash surfaces and these were suspected of scavenging As, Ba, Cr, Co, Cu, Ga, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Te, V and Zn. The maximum total of surface salts containing F, Cl and S, carried by the erupted ash, was 11, 13 and 117 kilotonne. The flux of nutrient and toxic elements from the Grímsvötn ash was low compared with that from other eruptions and would not

  11. Importance of nanoparticles and colloids from volcanic ash for riverine transport of trace elements to the ocean: evidence from glacial-fed rivers after the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepe, Nathalie; Bau, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Volcanic ashes are often referenced as examples for natural nanoparticles, yet the particle size distribution rarely documented. We here report results of a geochemical study of glacial-fed rivers, glacial surface runoff, glacial base flow, and pure glacial meltwater from southern Iceland, that had been sampled 25 days after the explosive eruptions at Eyjafjallajökull in 2010. In addition to the dissolved concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), Zr, Hf, Nb, and Th in the 450 nm-filtered waters, we also studied the respective filter residues (river particulates >450 nm) and volcanic ash. In spite of the low solubilities and high particle-reactivities of the elements studied, most water samples show high dissolved concentrations, such as up to 971 ng/kg of Ce and 501 ng/kg of Zr. Except for the pure glacial meltwater and glacial base flow, all waters display the same shale-normalized REE patterns with pronounced light and heavy REE depletion and positive Eu anomalies. While such patterns are unusual for river waters, they are similar to those of the respective river particulates and the volcanic ash, though at different concentration levels. The distribution of dissolved Zr, Hf, Nb, and Th in the waters also matches that of filter residues and ash. This strongly suggests that in all 450 nm-filtered river waters, the elements studied are associated with solid ash particles smaller than 450 nm. This reveals that volcanic ash-derived nanoparticles and colloids are present in these glacial-fed rivers and that such ultrafine particles control the trace element distribution in the surface runoff. Subsequent to explosive volcanic eruptions, these waters provide terrigenous input from landmasses to estuaries, that is characterized by a unique trace element signature and that subsequent to modification by estuarine processes delivers a pulse of nutrients to coastal seawater in regions not affected by plume fall-out. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Contribution of volcanic ashes to the regional geochemical balance: the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, F; Fernandez-Turiel, J L; Saavedra, J; Gimeno, D; Polanco, E; Amigo, A; Galindo, G; Caselli, A

    2012-05-15

    The environmental geochemical behaviour of the rhyolitic ashes from the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Southern Chile, has been studied. After the bulk characterisation, the potential contribution to the regional geochemical fluxes was examined using: i) single batch leaching tests to provide a rapid screening of the implied major and trace elements; and ii) column experiments to evaluate the temporal mobility of leached elements. The environmental concerns of these ashes are related to the fine grained component present in each sample (independent of distance from the source), in particular the presence of cristobalite, and the geochemical hazards posed by ash-water interaction. Leaching experiments show the fast dissolution of surface salts and aerosols, which dominate over glass dissolution during the first steps of the ash-water interaction. Chaitén ashes could transfer to the environment more than 1×10(10)g or 10,000 metric tonnes (mt) of Cl, S, Ca, Na, Si, and K; between 1000 and 10,000 mt of F, Mg, and Al; between 100 and 1000 mt of As, Pb, P, Fe, Sr, Zn, Mn, and Br; between 10 and 100 mt of Ba, Li, Ti, Ni, Nb, Cu, Rb, Zr, V, Mo, Co, and Sc; and less than 10 mt of Cr, Sb, Ce, Ga, Cs, and Y. These results show the fertilising potential of the ashes (e.g., providing Ca and Fe) but also the input of potentially toxic trace elements (e.g., F and As) in the regional geochemical mass balance. The Chaitén results evidence lower potentials for poisoning and fertilising than low silica ashes due to the lower contents released of practically all elements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Impairment of soil health due to fly ash-fugitive dust deposition from coal-fired thermal power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, R; Nayak, A K; Shukla, A K; Rao, K S; Gautam, Priyanka; Lal, B; Tripathi, R; Shahid, M; Panda, B B; Kumar, A; Bhattacharyya, P; Bardhan, G; Gupta, S; Patra, D K

    2015-11-01

    Thermal power stations apart from being source of energy supply are causing soil pollution leading to its degradation in fertility and contamination. Fine particle and trace element emissions from energy production in coal-fired thermal power plants are associated with significant adverse effects on human, animal, and soil health. Contamination of soil with cadmium, nickel, copper, lead, arsenic, chromium, and zinc can be a primary route of human exposure to these potentially toxic elements. The environmental evaluation of surrounding soil of thermal power plants in Odisha may serve a model study to get the insight into hazards they are causing. The study investigates the impact of fly ash-fugitive dust (FAFD) deposition from coal-fired thermal power plant emissions on soil properties including trace element concentration, pH, and soil enzymatic activities. Higher FAFD deposition was found in the close proximity of power plants, which led to high pH and greater accumulation of heavy metals. Among the three power plants, in the vicinity of NALCO, higher concentrations of soil organic carbon and nitrogen was observed whereas, higher phosphorus content was recorded in the proximity of NTPC. Multivariate statistical analysis of different variables and their association indicated that FAFD deposition and soil properties were influenced by the source of emissions and distance from source of emission. Pollution in soil profiles and high risk areas were detected and visualized using surface maps based on Kriging interpolation. The concentrations of chromium and arsenic were higher in the soil where FAFD deposition was more. Observance of relatively high concentration of heavy metals like cadmium, lead, nickel, and arsenic and a low concentration of enzymatic activity in proximity to the emission source indicated a possible link with anthropogenic emissions.

  14. Effects of wood saw dust ash admixed with treated sisal fibre on the geotechnical properties of lateritic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Engbonye SANI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The preliminary investigation conducted on the lateritic soil collected at Shika, Zaria shows that it falls under A-7-6 (10 classification for AASHTO (1986 and CL according to unified soil classification system USCS (ASTM 1992. The soil was treated with both wood saw dust ash (WSDA and treated sisal fiber, in stepped concentration of 0,2,4,6, and 8% for WSDA and 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1% treated sisal fibre by dry weight of soil using Standard proctor. The Sisal Fibre was treated with Sodium Borohydride (NaBH4 (1% wt/vol for 60 minutes at room temperature to remove the cellulose content present in the Fibre. Statistical analysis was carried out on the obtained results using XLSTART 2017 software and analysis of variance with the Microsoft Excel Analysis Tool Pak Software Package. The liquid limit (LL of the soil was found to be 48% while the plastic limit(PL is 21.27%. The maximum dry density(MDDhowever, decreases generally from a value of 1.85 Mg/m3 to 1.68Mg/m3 at 0.25% sisal fiber content/0% WSDA. It has its least value of 1.57Mg/m3 at 1% sisal fiber and 8% WSDA. The OMC increased from 18 % of the natural soil to 23.7% at 0.75% sisal fiber / 6% WSDA content. There was a general increase in the value of UCS of the soil-sisal fibre mixture with WSDA content from 100 kN/m2 of the natural soil to 696 kN/m2 at 0.75 % sisal fibre content / 6% WSDA. The UCS value met the standard of 687-1373 kN/m2 requirements of sub base for adequate lime and cement stabilization, respectively (Ingas and Metcalf 1972.

  15. NaOH and Na4P2O7 extractable organic matter in two allophanic volcanic ash soils of the Azores Islands : a pyrolysis GC/MC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierop, K.G.J.; Bergen, van P.F.; Buurman, P.; Lagen, van B.

    2005-01-01

    NaOH and Na4P2O7 extractable organic matter fractions of two volcanic ash profiles (Azores Islands) were studied by pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The soils did not have melanic horizons and were not affected by burning. The pyrolysates of all samples were dominated by

  16. PENENTUAN KOMPOSISI KIMIA ABU VULKANIK DARI ERUPSI GUNUNG MERAPI (Determination of Chemical Composition of Volcanic Ash from Merapi Mt. Eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Tri Wahyuni

    2012-07-01

     In order to identify the utilizing potential and the environmental effect of ash from Merapi Mount eruption in 2010, determination of its chemical composition has been performed, including major, minor and trace elements. In addition,  pH of the ash, and iron concentration in rivers, wells, and  tower for water collection were also determined. The ash samples was taken in December 2010- January 2011, after the eruption stopped, located in Magelang, Sleman, and Klaten regions, in various distances from the summit.The results of the determination show that the Merapi Mt. ash contains major (Al, Si, Ca, and  Fe, minor (K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, S, and Ti, and  trace elements (Au ,As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Sn, Sr, V, Zn, dan Zr.   The elements can be categorized into  widely used elements, i.e.   Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Ti, V, and  Zn, and economic high value element,  i.e.  Au, as well as  the environment and health negative affect elements  such as As, Cr, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and S. It is also found that the  ash taken from different locations with farther distances from the mountain, has similar chemical composition.  Moreover, based on the large content of Al, Ca, and  Si  (around 56%, 4%, and  18 %respectively,  enabling the ash to be used as raw material for  cement or other cement based materials production. In addition, since Ti and Fe is also found in adequate level in the ash, it is also possible to extract the metals to get the pure one having wide and valuable functions. The presence of K and P, as fertilizer components, in the ash with significant amount, it is also interesting to evaluate the effect of the ash covering the soil on its fertile. However, the low pH of the ash is also observed that is due  to the presence of S in considerable amount, leading to the soil becomes unfertile. Although the hazard heavy (Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, and Ni are found in the ash, the contamination of the metals in the rivers and wells are not detected

  17. Long-term variability of dust-storms in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson-Waldhauserová, Pavla; Ólafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Ólafur

    2013-04-01

    Iceland is a volcanic island in the North Atlantic Ocean with maritime climate. In spite of moist climate, large areas are with limited vegetation cover where >40% of Iceland is classified with considerable to very severe erosion and 21% of Iceland are volcanic sandy deserts. Natural emissions from these sources influenced by strong winds affect not only regional air quality in Iceland ("Reykjavik haze") but dust particles are transported over the Atlantic ocean and Arctic Ocean > 1000 km at times. The study places Icelandic dust production area into international perspective, present long term frequency of dust storm events in NE Iceland, and estimate dust aerosol concentrations during reported dust events. Meteorological observations with dust presence codes and related visibility were used to identify the frequency and the long-term changes in dust production in NE Iceland. There were annually 16.4 days on average with reported dust observations on weather stations within the NE erosion area, indicating extreme dust plume activity and erosion within the NE deserts, even though the area is covered with snow during the major part of winter. During the 2000s the highest occurrence of dust events in six decades was reported. We have measured saltation and aeolian transport during dust/volcanic ash storms in Iceland which give some of the most intense wind erosion events ever measured. Icelandic dust affects the ecosystems over much of Iceland and causes regional haze. It is likely to affect the ecosystems of the oceans around Iceland, and it brings dust that lowers the albedo of the Icelandic glaciers, increasing melt-off due to global warming. The study indicates that Icelandic dust is not only a substantial source for regional air pollution, but may be considered to contribute to the Arctic haze phenomena and Arctic air pollution.

  18. Effects of simulated nitrogen deposition on ectomycorrhizae community structure in hybrid larch and its parents grown in volcanic ash soil: The role of phosphorous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaona; Agathokleous, Evgenios; Qu, Laiye; Fujita, Saki; Watanabe, Makoto; Tamai, Yutaka; Mao, Qiaozhi; Koyama, Akihiro; Koike, Takayoshi

    2018-03-15

    With the rapid industrial development and modern agricultural practices, increasing nitrogen (N) deposition can cause nutrient imbalance in immature volcanic ash soil commonly found in Japan. Larch species, widely distributed in northeast Eurasia, are associated with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi which play a critical role in nutrient acquisition for their hosts. In this study, we investigated species richness and diversity of ECM fungi associated with a hybrid larch (F 1 ) and its parents, Dahurian larch (Larix gmelinii var. japonica) and Japanese larch (L. kaempferi), under simulated N deposition (0 and 100kgha -1 yr -1 ) with/without phosphorous (P) (0 and 50kgha -1 yr -1 ). Seedlings planted in immature volcanic ash with low nutrient availability were subjected to the N and P treatments for fifteen months. We found that response of ECM community structure to the increased nutrient availability depended on host genotypes. Nutrient addition significantly affected ECM structure in Japanese larch, but no such significant effect was found for Dahurian larch. Effects of the nutrient addition to ECM fungal community in F 1 were intermediate. F 1 was tolerant to high N loading, which was due to consistent, relatively high association with Suillus sp. and Hebeloma sp. F 1 showed heterosis in relative biomass, which was most apparent under high N treatments. This co-variation of ECM fungal community structure and F 1 biomass in response to N loading suggest that ECM community structure might play an important role in host growth. The present findings indicate effects of N deposition on ECM fungal community structure can depend on larch species, thus it is challenging to predict general trends. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Colloidal stability of nanoparticles derived from simulated cloud-processed mineral dusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, Enikö; Fisher, Andrew; Stolpe, Björn; Calabrese, Sergio; Lead, Jamie; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Shi, Zongbo

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory simulation of cloud processing of three model dust types with distinct Fe-content (Moroccan dust, Libyan dust and Etna ash) and reference goethite and ferrihydrite were conducted in order to gain a better understanding of natural nanomaterial inputs and their environmental fate and bioavailability. The resulting nanoparticles (NPs) were characterised for Fe dissolution kinetics, aggregation/size distribution, micromorphology and colloidal stability of particle suspensions using a multi-method approach. We demonstrated that the: (i) acid-leachable Fe concentration was highest in volcanic ash (1 m Mg(-1) dust) and was followed by Libyan and Moroccan dust with an order of magnitude lower levels; (ii) acid leached Fe concentration in thecolloidal instability; iv) relative Fe percentage in the finer particles derived from cloud processing does not reflect Fe content of unprocessed dusts (e.g. volcanic ash>Libyan dust). The common occurrence of Fe-rich "natural nanoparticles" in atmospheric dust derived materials may indicate their more ubiquitous presence in the marine environment than previously thought. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Refined depositional history and dating of the Tongaporutuan reference section, north Taranaki, New Zealand: new volcanic ash U-Pb zircon ages, biostratigraphy and sedimentation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, K.L.; Crundwell, Martin P.; Coble, Matthew A.; Kingsley-Smith, Peter R.; Graham, Stephan A.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents new radiometric ages from volcanic ash beds within a c. 1900 m thick, progradational, deep-water clastic slope succession of late Miocene age exposed along the north Taranaki coast of the North Island, New Zealand. The ash beds yield U–Pb zircon ages ranging from 10.63 ± 0.65 Ma to 8.97 ± 0.22 Ma. The new ages are compatible with and provide corroboration of New Zealand Tongaporutuan Stage planktic foraminiferal and bolboformid biostratigraphic events identified in the same section. The close accord between these two age datasets provides a stratigraphically consistent and coherent basis for examining margin evolution. The arrival of a prograding clastic wedge and ensuing upward shoaling is recorded by sedimentation rates c. 2000 m/Ma–1 that are an order of magnitude higher than sedimentation rates on the precursor deep basin floor. This outcrop study provides new constraints for interpreting analogous subsurface deposits in Taranaki Basin and complements the regional late Miocene biostratigraphic dating framework.

  1. Spectroscopic and Microscopic Characterization of Volcanic Ash from Puyehue-(Chile Eruption: Preliminary Approach for the Application in the Arsenic Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Lia Botto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash from Puyehue Cordon Caulle Volcanic Complex (Chile, emitted on June 4, 2011, and deposited in Villa La Angostura at ~40 km of the source, was collected and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, surface area (BET, and chemical analysis (ICP-AES-MS technique. The mineralogical and physicochemical study revealed that the pyroclastic mixture contains iron oxides in the form of magnetite and hematite as well as pyroxene and plagioclase mineral species and amorphous pumiceous shards. Carbonaceous material was also identified. Physicochemical techniques allow us to select two representative samples (average composition and Fe-rich materials which were used to analyze their performances in the adsorption process to remove arsenic from water. Additional iron activation by means of ferric salts was performed under original sample. Results showed that the low-cost feedstock exhibited a good adsorption capacity to remove the contaminant, depending on the iron content and the water pH.

  2. Mineralogy and geochemistry of a superhigh-organic-sulfur coal, Yanshan Coalfield, Yunnan, China: Evidence for a volcanic ash component and influence by submarine exhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Ren, D.; Zhou, Y.; Chou, C.-L.; Wang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhu, Xudong

    2008-01-01

    The mineralogy and geochemistry of a superhigh-organic-sulfur (SHOS) coal of Late Permian age from the Yanshan Coalfield, Yunnan Province, southwestern China, have been studied using optical microscope, low-temperature ashing plus X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer, a sequential chemical extraction procedure, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The M9 Coal from the Yanshan Coalfield is a SHOS coal that has a total sulfur content of 10.12%-11.30% and an organic sulfur content of 8.77%-10.30%. The minerals in the coal consist mainly of high-temperature quartz, sanidine, albite, muscovite, illite, pyrite, and trace amounts of kaolinite, plagioclase, akermanite, rutile, and dawsonite. As compared with ordinary worldwide (bituminous coals and anthracite) and Chinese coals, the M9 Coal is remarkably enriched in B (268????g/g), F (841????g/g), V (567????g/g), Cr (329????g/g), Ni (73.9????g/g), Mo (204????g/g), and U (153????g/g). In addition, elements including Se (25.2????g/g), Zr (262????g/g), Nb (20.1????g/g), Cd (2.07????g/g), and Tl (2.03????g/g) are also enriched in the coal. Occurrence of high-temperature quartz, sanidine, muscovite, and illite in the M9 Coal is evidence that there is a volcanic ash component in the coal that was derived from acid volcanic ashes fallen into the swamp during peat accumulation. Occurrence of albite and dawsonite in the coal and strong enrichment of some elements, including F, S, V, Cr, Ni, Mo and U, are attributed to the influence by submarine exhalation which invaded along with seawater into the anoxic peat swamp. Abundances of lithophile elements, including rare earth elements, Nb, Y, Zr, and TiO2, indicate that the silicate minerals in the coal were derived from the northern Vietnam Upland to the south of the basin. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sweet chestnut ( Castanea sativa) leaves as a bio-indicator of volcanic gas, aerosol and ash deposition onto the flanks of Mt Etna in 2005-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R. S.; Mather, T. A.; Pyle, D. M.; Watt, S. F. L.; Day, J. A.; Collins, S. J.; Wright, T. E.; Aiuppa, A.; Calabrese, S.

    2009-01-01

    Sweet chestnut leaves ( Castanea sativa) collected from the flanks of Mt Etna volcano in 2005-2007 were analysed by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of element concentrations. The aim of this work was to determine whether these leaves are a bio-indicator for volcanic gas, aerosol and ash deposition and to gain new insights into the environmental effects of quiescent and eruptive volcanic plumes. Results show a positive correlation between sample variability in the concentration of elements in Castanea sativa and enrichment factors of elements in the plume. The spatial and temporal variability of chalcophilic elements (As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Tl, Zn) is consistent with prevailing winds transporting eruptive plumes to the south-east of the summit, resulting in enhanced plume deposition onto the flanks of the volcano. Similar spatial and temporal variability was found for the halide-forming elements (Cs, K, Rb) and intermediate elements (Al, Co, Mn). The spatial variability of chalcophilic, intermediate and halide-forming elements during quiescent periods was diminished (relative to eruptive periods) and could not be explained by plume deposition. In contrast, the concentrations of lithophilic elements (Ba, Ca, Mg, Sr) did not show any clear spatial variability even during eruptive periods. Comparisons between enrichment factors for elements in Castanea sativa and literature values for enrichment factors of the volcanic plume, groundwater and lichen were made. Whilst Castanea sativa offers insights into the spatial and temporal variability of deposition, the species may not be a bio-indicator for plume composition due to biological fractionation.

  4. Volcanic Ash-cap Forest Soils of the Inland Northwest Properties and Implications for Management and Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven B. Daley-Laursen

    2007-01-01

    Volcanoes have been part of the Earth’s history ever since it has had a solid surface. And, volcanoes have been a part of human culture for thousands of years. In some ways, our reactions to the magnitude of a volcanic explosion haven’t evolved as much as one might think. Ranging from ancient cultures who believed that victims should be sacrificed in response to...

  5. Acute effects of aircraft noise on cardiovascular admissions - an interrupted time-series analysis of a six-day closure of London Heathrow Airport caused by volcanic ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Tim; Campbell, Michael J; Maheswaran, Ravi

    2016-08-01

    Acute noise exposure may acutely increase blood pressure but the hypothesis that acute exposure to aircraft noise may trigger cardiovascular events has not been investigated. This study took advantage of a six-day closure of a major airport in April 2010 caused by volcanic ash to examine if there was a decrease in emergency cardiovascular hospital admissions during or immediately after the closure period, using an interrupted daily time-series study design. The population living within the 55dB(A) noise contour was substantial at 0.7 million. The average daily admission count was 13.9 (SD 4.4). After adjustment for covariates, there was no evidence of a decreased risk of hospital admission from cardiovascular disease during the closure period (relative risk 0.97 (95% CI 0.75-1.26)). Using lags of 1-7 days gave similar results. Further studies are needed to investigate if transient aircraft noise exposure can trigger acute cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Experiments and modeling approaches towards understanding the role of soot and Icelandic volcanic dust in the Arctic cryosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinander, O.; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P.; Virkkula, A.; Dragosics, M.; Peltoniemi, J.; Gritsevich, M.; Svensson, J.; Arnalds, O.; de Leeuw, G.

    2016-12-01

    Light Absorbing Particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, organic carbon, and dust) in snow and ice are considered among the major causes for the amplification of the Arctic climate change. When deposited on land, LAPs can reduce the surface reflectance. This, in turn, can accelerate snow melt, and further reduce snow albedo and increase snowpack melt via the albedo feedback mechanism. However, there are many uncertainties related to these atmosphere-cryosphere interactions. We will present the methods and results of our soot and Icelandic dust in snow and ice experiments, observations and modeling approaches. We also report experimental results on snow BRF due to soot and dust, and measured BC concentrations on natural snow and glacier surface in Iceland. Finally we identify some research needs for understanding the role of Icelandic dust in the cryosphere, in Iceland, Greenland, and elsewhere.

  7. The drag and terminal velocity of volcanic ash and lapilli with 3D shape obtained by X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioguardi, Fabio; Mele, Daniela; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Dürig, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    New experiments of falling volcanic particles were performed in order to define drag and terminal velocity models applicable in a wide range of Reynolds number Re. Experiments were carried out with fluids of various viscosities and with particles that cover a wide range of size, density and shape. Particle shape, which strongly influences fluid drag, was measured in 3D by High-resolution X-ray microtomography, by which sphericity and fractal dimension were obtained, the latter used for quantifying the aerodynamic drag of irregular particles for the first time. With this method, the measure of particle shape descriptors proved to be easier and less operator dependent than previously used 2D image particle analyses. Drag laws that make use of the new 3D parameters were obtained by fitting particle data to the experiments, and single-equation terminal velocity models were derived. They work well both at high and low Re (3x10-2 scientists to model particle transportation of explosive eruptions. Some volcanological application examples are finally presented.

  8. Prevention of Catastrophic Volcanic Eruptions

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Yoshiaki; Kodama, Jun-ichi; Fukuda, Daisuke; Dassanayake, Abn

    2017-01-01

    Giant volcanic eruptions emit sulphate aerosols as well as volcanic ash. Needless to say that volcanic ash causes significant damage to the environment and human at large. However, the aerosols are even worse. They reach the Stratosphere and stay there for months to years reflecting insolation. As a result, air temperature at the Earth's surfaces drops. Even a slight temperature drop may cause severe food shortage. Yellowstone supervolcano, for example, can even make human in the Northern Hem...

  9. The Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM-2) in a terrestrial section of the High Arctic: identification by U-Pb zircon ages of volcanic ashes and carbon isotope records of coal and amber (Stenkul Fiord, Ellesmere Island, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Lutz; von Gosen, Werner; Piepjohn, Karsten; Lückge, Andreas; Schmitz, Mark

    2017-04-01

    The Stenkul Fiord section on southern Ellesmere Island reveals largely fluvial clastic sediments with intercalated coal seams of the Margaret Formation of Late Paleocene/Early Eocene age according to palynology and vertebrate remains. Field studies in recent years and interpretative mapping of a high-resolution satellite image of the area southeast of Stenkul Fiord revealed that the clastic deposits consist of at least four sedimentary units (Units 1 to 4) separated by unconformities. Several centimeter-thin volcanic ash layers, recognized within coal layers and preserved as crandallite group minerals (Ca-bearing goyazite), suggest an intense volcanic ash fall activity. Based on new U-Pb zircon ages (ID-TIMS) of three ash layers, the volcanic ash fall took place at 53.7 Ma in the Early Eocene, i.e. within the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM-2) hyperthermal. The ETM-2 is bracketed further by discrete negative excursions of carbon isotope records of both bulk coal and amber droplets collected from individual coal layers of the section. The identification of the ETM-2 hyperthermal provides a stratigraphic tie-point in the terrestrial Margaret Formation sediments enabling assignment of the lowermost sedimentary Unit 1 to the Late Paleocene-earliest Eocene, Unit 2 to the Early Eocene, whereas Unit 3 and 4 might be Early to Middle Eocene in age. Thus the timing of syn-sedimentary movements of the Eurekan deformation causal for the observed unconformities in the section can be studied and the positions of further hyperthermals like the PETM or the ETM-3 in the section can be identified in the future. The integration of structural studies, new U-Pb zircon ages, and different carbon isotope records provides a new stratigraphic framework for further examination of the unique Early Eocene flora and fauna preserved in this high-latitude outcrop.

  10. Tephrochronology and Stratigraphy of Silicic and Basaltic Volcanic Ash Layers at Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument, Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkup, L. C.; Prassack, K. A.; Hart, W. K.; Wan, E.

    2016-12-01

    Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument (HAFO) is home to a diverse early-middle Pliocene ( 4.2-3.0 Ma) faunal assemblage. The Glenns Ferry Formation, exposed within the Monument and in surrounding areas, preserves lacustrine and fluvial deposits interbedded with tephra and lava flows establishing a broad chronostratigraphic context for the fossils. Despite multiple attempts by previous studies to date several volcanic horizons within the Glenns Ferry Formation, the precise chronostratigraphy of specific key fossil localities within the Monument remains poorly constrained. HAFO contains many type specimens, including that of the newly described river otter Lontra weiri (Prassack, 2016). The chronologies of type specimens are especially important because they establish the first and, in some cases, only known occurrence of a species in the fossil record. Refined chronology also allows for community-level reconstructions of fauna across ancient landscapes. Thus, multiple silicic and basaltic tephra distributions were mapped, sampled, petrographically characterized, analyzed by electron microprobe (EMP), and correlated across the Monument to provide a refined spatial and temporal framework for specific fossil localities. Previous tephrochronologic studies focused on the Fossil Gulch and Peters Gulch areas. This investigation extends the mapped distribution extent of the tephra layers identified by other workers. To further support the updated tephrochronologic framework, several tephra samples from type localities were also analyzed using EMP and correlated with samples collected during this study. We also present a new age of 3.07± 0.23 Ma for an upper tephra horizon, measured via ITPFT and DCFT glass fission track methods. This age is in agreement with a previously suggested age of 3.15 Ma for this horizon based on regional tephra correlation and more precisely constrains the age of an important underlying fossil site.

  11. Municipal solid waste combustor bottom ash stockpile runoff and dust emissions evaluation: Volume I, Part I & Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report describes a phase of the stockpile demonstration program concerned with the storage of ash from municipal waste combustion. To implement this program, bottom ash (BA) collected from the 400 ton per day Warren County Resource Recovery Facility (WCRRF), located in Oxford Township Warren County, New Jersey, was in processed to produce a sand-like aggregate product; stored on a specially constructed pad at the Warren County Landfill site; and monitored for approximately 12 months. During this time, the air, stormwater runoff and soil quality in the vicinity of the stockpile were monitored. An electronic weather station was also installed on site to monitor and record meteorological conditions. The data obtained during the monitoring period were then used to develop a bottom ash stockpile source model to project potential air emissions and runoff loadings from the stockpile. Model generated emissions and loadings figures were used to estimate potential acts on air, groundwater, surface water and soil quality in the vicinity of the stockpile.

  12. The role of airborne mineral dusts in human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) is generally acknowledged to increase risk for human morbidity and mortality. However, particulate matter (PM) research has generally examined anthropogenic (industry and combustion by-products) sources with few studies considering contributions from geogenic PM (produced from the Earth by natural processes, e.g., volcanic ash, windborne ash from wildfires, and mineral dusts) or geoanthropogenic PM (produced from natural sources by processes that are modified or enhanced by human activities, e.g., dusts from lakebeds dried by human removal of water, dusts produced from areas that have undergone desertification as a result of human practices). Globally, public health concerns are mounting, related to potential increases in dust emission from climate related changes such as desertification and the associated long range as well as local health effects. Recent epidemiological studies have identified associations between far-traveled dusts from primary sources and increased morbidity and mortality in Europe and Asia. This paper provides an outline of public health research and history as it relates to naturally occurring inorganic mineral dusts. We summarize results of current public health research and describe some of the many challenges related to understanding health effects from exposures to dust aerosols.

  13. The Earth System Science Pathfinder VOLCAM Volcanic Hazard Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Arlin J.

    1999-01-01

    The VOLCAM mission is planned for research on volcanic eruptions and as a demonstration of a satellite system for measuring the location and density of volcanic eruption clouds for use in mitigating hazards to aircraft by the operational air traffic control systems. A requirement for 15 minute time resolution is met by flight as payloads of opportunity on geostationary satellites. Volcanic sulfur dioxide and ash are detected using techniques that have been developed from polar orbiting TOMS (UV) and AVHRR (IR) data. Seven band UV and three band IR filter wheel cameras are designed for continuous observation of the full disk of the earth with moderate (10 - 20 km) ground resolution. This resolution can be achieved with small, low cost instruments but is adequate for discrimination of ash and sulfur dioxide in the volcanic clouds from meteorological clouds and ozone. The false alarm rate is small through use of sulfur dioxide as a unique tracer of volcanic clouds. The UV band wavelengths are optimized to detect very small sulfur dioxide amounts that are present in pre-eruptive outgassing of volcanoes. The system is also capable of tracking dust and smoke clouds, and will be used to infer winds at tropopause level from the correlation of total ozone with potential vorticity.

  14. The surface of Syrtis Major - Composition of the volcanic substrate and mixing with altered dust and soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F.; Erard, S.; Bibring, J.-P.; Head, J. W.; Hurtrez, S.; Langevin, Y.; Pieters, C. M.; Sotin, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The study characterizes Syrtis Major, an old, low relief volcanic plateau near the equatorial regions of Mars, on the basis of ISM data in order to characterize the spectral properties of the surface, to identify the major mafic mineralogy of the volcanic materials, and to derive estimates of the chemistry of these minerals. The value and spatial distribution of four primary spectral variables (albedo, continuum slope, wavelength of the ferric-ferrous band minimum, and area of the ferric-ferrous absorption) are mapped and coregistered to Viking digital photomosaics. It is shown that although there is a high degree of overall spectral variability on the plateau, the key indicators of mafic mineralogy are relatively homogeneous.

  15. The most unusual dust event cases from Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Olafur; Olafsson, Haraldur; Meinander, Outi; Gritsevich, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Iceland has the largest area of volcaniclastic sandy desert on Earth where dust is originating from volcanic, but also glaciogenic sediments. Total Icelandic desert areas cover over 44,000 km2 suggesting Iceland being the largest Arctic as well as European desert. Satelite MODIS pictures have revealed dust plumes traveling over 1000 km at times. The mean frequency of days with dust suspension was to 135 dust days annually in 1949-2011. The annual dust deposition was calculated as 31 - 40.1 million tons yr-1 affecting the area of > 500,000 km2, which places Iceland among the most active dust sources on Earth. Volcanic dust is distributed over local glaciers (about 4.5 million t annually) and surrounding oceans (6 - 14 million t annually). Mean dust emissions were calculated for minor, medium and major dust events as 0.1, 0.3 and 1 million tons per event, respectively. Three unusual dust events were observed and measured: The first, an extreme wind erosion event of the fresh Eyjafjallajokull 2010 volcanic ash, the second, a Snow-Dust Storm in 2013, and the third, a suspended dust during moist and low wind conditions. Frequent volcanic eruptions in Iceland (new eruption each 3-4 years on average) represent important inputs to dust variability. Freshly deposited ash prolongs impacts of volcanic eruptions as we observed after the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption. In September 2010, an extreme storm was recorded with the maximum wind speed of 38.7 ms-1. The maximum saltation was 6825 pulses per minute while the aeolian transport over one m wide transect and 150 cm height reached 11,800 kg m-1. The largest previously measured amount in Iceland in one storm was about 4,200 kg m-1. This storm is among the most extreme wind erosion events recorded on Earth. Dust events in South Iceland often take place in winter or at sub-zero temperatures. The Snow-Dust Storm occurred in March 6-7th 2013 when snow was nearly black with several mm thick dark layer of dust deposited on snow

  16. The influence of the direct- and semi-direct effect on the weather conditions in Europe caused by the volcanic ash plume of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption during April and May 2010 with WRF-Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirtl, Marcus; Stuefer, Martin; Arias, Delia Arnold; Flandorfer, Claudia; Maurer, Christian; Natali, Stefano; Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions, with gas and/or particle emissions, directly influence our environment, with special significance when they either occur near inhabited regions or are transported towards them. In addition to the well-known impact of air traffic, with large economic costs, the ground touching plumes can directly contaminate soil and water and lead to a decrease of air quality. Aerosols are also known to have an impact on weather and climate via their direct effect on radiation and via their impact on cloud formation. These feedbacks between atmospheric aerosol particles and meteorological processes were known for quite some time and have been implemented into several regional models. This study reveals first results obtained with the on-line coupled meteorological and chemical transport model WRF-Chem which is used to simulate the dispersion of the volcanic ash plume caused by the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in 2010. The main emphasis is to determine the influence of feedback processes caused by aerosol-meteorology interactions which can be simulated with WRF-Chem. The model is used with different set-ups (e.g. direct-effect turned off/on) to quantify the influence of the ash plume on the meteorological conditions during the main episode from April until end of May 2010. This contribution focuses on the investigation/quantification of the direct- and semi-direct effects of the ash plume. The simulated changes caused by the presence of the ash cloud on radiation and other atmospheric parameters such as temperature and wind are presented. A comprehensive observation data set from in-situ and remote sensing instruments is used to evaluate the model simulations.

  17. Effect of curing time on selected properties of soil stabilized with fly ash, marble dust and waste sand for road sub-base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firat, Seyhan; Khatib, Jamal M; Yilmaz, Gulgun; Comert, A T

    2017-07-01

    The properties of sub-base filling materials in highway construction are essential, as they can determine the performance of the road in service. Normally, the existing materials are removed and replaced with new materials that have adequate load-bearing capacity. Rising environmental concern and new environmental legislations have made construction professionals consider other methods. These methods include stabilizing the existing materials with other additives to improve their performance. Additives can be waste materials generated by different industries. In this work, the existing excavated soil is stabilized with waste materials. The wastes consisted of fly ash, marble dust and waste sand. The percentage addition of waste materials was 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% (by mass) of the existing soil. The soil/waste specimens were cured for 1, 7, 28, 56, 90 and 112 days before testing. Testing included the dry unit weight and unconfined compressive strength ( qu) as well as X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy observation. Also, the California Bearing Ratio values were obtained and are reported in this investigation. The results showed that the qu values increased with the increase in waste materials content. Also, there is tendency for the dry unit weight to increase with the increase in waste materials.

  18. Long-term dust aerosol production from natural sources in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Olafur; Olafsson, Haraldur

    2017-02-01

    Iceland is a volcanic island in the North Atlantic Ocean with maritime climate. In spite of moist climate, large areas are with limited vegetation cover where >40% of Iceland is classified with considerable to very severe erosion and 21% of Iceland is volcanic sandy deserts. Not only do natural emissions from these sources influenced by strong winds affect regional air quality in Iceland ("Reykjavik haze"), but dust particles are transported over the Atlantic ocean and Arctic Ocean >1000 km at times. The aim of this paper is to place Icelandic dust production area into international perspective, present long-term frequency of dust storm events in northeast Iceland, and estimate dust aerosol concentrations during reported dust events. Meteorological observations with dust presence codes and related visibility were used to identify the frequency and the long-term changes in dust production in northeast Iceland. There were annually 16.4 days on average with reported dust observations on weather stations within the northeastern erosion area, indicating extreme dust plume activity and erosion within the northeastern deserts, even though the area is covered with snow during the major part of winter. During the 2000s the highest occurrence of dust events in six decades was reported. We have measured saltation and Aeolian transport during dust/volcanic ash storms in Iceland, which give some of the most intense wind erosion events ever measured. Icelandic dust affects the ecosystems over much of Iceland and causes regional haze. It is likely to affect the ecosystems of the oceans around Iceland, and it brings dust that lowers the albedo of the Icelandic glaciers, increasing melt-off due to global warming. The study indicates that Icelandic dust may contribute to the Arctic air pollution. Long-term records of meteorological dust observations from Northeast Iceland indicate the frequency of dust events from Icelandic deserts. The research involves a 60-year period and

  19. 40 CFR 265.314 - Special requirements for bulk and containerized liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (volcanic glass); expanded volcanic rock; volcanic ash; cement kiln dust; fly ash; rice hull ash; activated... density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene, polystyrene, polyurethane, polyacrylate, polynorborene...

  20. Propiedades insecticidas de la ceniza del complejo volcánico Puyehue-Cordón Caulle y su posible impacto ambiental: Insecticidal properties of ashes from the volcanic complex Puyehue-Caulle Range and their possible environmental impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micaela Buteler

    2011-12-01

    insecticidal effect of volcanic ash and its environmental impact, focusing on the ash accumulated as a result of the eruption of the volcanic complex Puyehue- Caulle Range currently affecting an area of over 7.5 million hectares in the Argentine Patagonia. The chemical composition of ashes from the Puyehue-Caulle Range was analyzed by EDS showing that its major components are O, Si, Al, Fe, Na and K. Laboratory bioassays using two species of insects as a biological model, found that the ashes thoroughly adhere to the insect body surface and are toxic to both species tested, when mixed into the substrate at low concentrations. Susceptibility to ashes differs between the two species when tested in a seven day continuous exposure bioassay [CL99(Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. = 10.25 mg.g-1; CL99((Tribolium castaneum (Herbst = 4.96 mg.g-1]. These results agree with those reported in the literature on effects of volcanic eruptions and suggest that the impact of the ashes from the Puyehue-Caulle Range volcanic complex on the insect community may be radical in the acute deposition phase, with substantial qualitative effects in the chronic phase of exposure. Also, the recovery of populations affected by ash in desert areas where dry ash persists will be slower, and this will have tangible and long-term consequences for insect host plants, pollination and on the development of populations of vertebrate insectivores. By contrast, the presence of ash in humid regions will impact the ecosystem by the addition of nutrients, which in combination with water retention by the ash will lead to a qualitative and quantitative recovery of the populations under favorable conditions.

  1. ashing, non-ashing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cistvr

    Three commonly used techniques, namely atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS-Ashing and. AAS-Non Ashing) and titrimetry (potassium permanganate titration) have been evaluated in this study to determine the calcium content in six food samples whose calcium levels ranged from 0 to more than. 250mg/100g ...

  2. Geochemical evidence for African dust inputs to soils of western Atlantic islands: Barbados, the Bahamas, and Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.R.; Prospero, J.M.; Carey, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    We studied soils on high-purity limestones of Quaternary age on the western Atlantic Ocean islands of Barbados, the Florida Keys, and the Bahamas. Potential soil parent materials in this region, external to the carbonate substrate, include volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent (near Barbados), volcanic ash from the islands of Dominica and St. Lucia (somewhat farther from Barbados), the fine-grained component of distal loess from the lower Mississippi River Valley, and wind-transported dust from Africa. These four parent materials can be differentiated using trace elements (Sc, Cr, Th, and Zr) and rare earth elements that have minimal mobility in the soil-forming environment. Barbados soils have compositions that indicate a complex derivation. Volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent appears to have been the most important influence, but African dust is a significant contributor, and even Mississippi River valley loess may be a very minor contributor to Barbados soils. Soils on the Florida Keys and islands in the Bahamas appear to have developed mostly from African dust, but Mississippi River valley loess may be a significant contributor. Our results indicate that inputs of African dust are more important to the genesis of soils on islands in the western Atlantic Ocean than previously supposed. We hypothesize that African dust may also be a major contributor to soils on other islands of the Caribbean and to soils in northern South America, central America, Mexico, and the southeastern United States. Dust inputs to subtropical and tropical soils in this region increase both nutrient-holding capacity and nutrient status and thus may be critical in sustaining vegetation. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Geochemical evidence for African dust inputs to soils of western Atlantic islands: Barbados, the Bahamas, and Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Budahn, James R.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Carey, Steven N.

    2007-06-01

    We studied soils on high-purity limestones of Quaternary age on the western Atlantic Ocean islands of Barbados, the Florida Keys, and the Bahamas. Potential soil parent materials in this region, external to the carbonate substrate, include volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent (near Barbados), volcanic ash from the islands of Dominica and St. Lucia (somewhat farther from Barbados), the fine-grained component of distal loess from the lower Mississippi River Valley, and wind-transported dust from Africa. These four parent materials can be differentiated using trace elements (Sc, Cr, Th, and Zr) and rare earth elements that have minimal mobility in the soil-forming environment. Barbados soils have compositions that indicate a complex derivation. Volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent appears to have been the most important influence, but African dust is a significant contributor, and even Mississippi River valley loess may be a very minor contributor to Barbados soils. Soils on the Florida Keys and islands in the Bahamas appear to have developed mostly from African dust, but Mississippi River valley loess may be a significant contributor. Our results indicate that inputs of African dust are more important to the genesis of soils on islands in the western Atlantic Ocean than previously supposed. We hypothesize that African dust may also be a major contributor to soils on other islands of the Caribbean and to soils in northern South America, central America, Mexico, and the southeastern United States. Dust inputs to subtropical and tropical soils in this region increase both nutrient-holding capacity and nutrient status and thus may be critical in sustaining vegetation.

  4. Dust separation at high temperatures a method for cleaning fly ashes? Final report; Stoftavskiljning vid hoeg temperatur en metod foer rening av flygaska? Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zintl, Frank [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    An experimental study of separation of fly ashes by a filter at high temperatures, 300-650 deg C, with the purpose to study: Capture of heavy metals (Cd, Hg, Pb, Zn) in the fly ash; Relation between heavy metal capture and temperature; Relation between heavy metal capture and the availability of fuel chlorine. Pelletized forestry waste fuel was doped with heavy metals in two different forms. Pelletized Salix was also used, without doping. The study shows that: There is a strong inverse relation between the capture of heavy metals and the filter temperature; There is a strong relation between the availability of chlorine and the capture of heavy metals. Separation at 300-650 deg C gives much less heavy metals in the fly ash, however the ash is not clean enough to allow disposal in ordinary landfills. Thus, high temperature filtering does not seem to be a promising solution for producing 'clean' fly ash.

  5. Triple oxygen and sulfur isotope analyses of sulfate extracted from voluminous volcanic ashes in the Oligocene John Day Formation: insight into dry climate conditions and ozone contribution to supereruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, J.; Bindeman, I. N.; Martin, E.; Retallack, G.; Palandri, J. L.; Weldon, N.

    2014-12-01

    Large volume pyroclastic silicic eruptions emit hundreds of megatons of SO2 into the troposphere and stratosphere that is oxidized into sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by a variety of reactions with mass independent oxygen signatures (MIF), Δ17O>0. Sulfuric acid is then preserved as gypsum in parental volcanic deposits. Diagenic effects are mass dependent and can dilute, but otherwise do not affect MIF ratios. Pleistocene Yellowstone and Bishop tuffs and modern volcanic eruptions preserved under arid climate conditions in North American playa lakes, preserve small amounts of volcanic sulfate as gypsum. This gypsum's Δ17O>0, in combination with isotopic variations of δ18O, δ33S and δ34S is distinct from sedimentary sulfate and reveals its original MIF sulfate isotopic signal and the effect of super eruptions on the atmosphere, and ozone consumption in particular. We use linear algebraic equations to resolve volcanic versus sedimentary (MIF=0) sources. We have found that many large volume ignimbrites have very high initial Δ17O in volcanic sulfate that can only be acquired from reaction with stratospheric ozone. We here investigate nine thick (>2 m) ash beds ranging in age from ~33-23 Ma in the John Day Formation of central Oregon, including massive 28.6 Ma Picture Gorge tuff of newly identified Crooked River supercaldera. The 28.6 Ma Picture Gorge tuff (PGT) has the highest measured Δ17O of 3.5‰, and other tuffs (Tin Roof, Biotite, Deep Creek) have +1.3 to 3.4‰ Δ17O excesses. Sulfate from modern smaller tropospheric eruptions studied for comparison have a resolvable 0.4‰ range consistent with liquid-phase based H2O2 oxidation. The PGT is coeval with the ignimbrite flare-up in western N. America, the 28-29 Ma eruption of the 5000 km3 Fish Canyon tuff and the 28 Ma Never Summer Field eruption in Nebraska-Colorado that have the highest measured Δ17O of 6‰ (Bao et al. 2003). We speculate on the climatic/atmospheric effects of these multiple ~28 Ma supereruptions

  6. Fertilization Potention of Volcanic Dust in the Low-Nutrient Low-Chlorophyll Western North Pacific Subtropical Gyre: Satellite Evidence and Laboratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    bcaring minerals in the May 2003 erupted ash. The formation of sulfate absorbed onto the ash is likely the result of oxidation of magmatic S02 in the...com- positions and fluxes of explosive volcanoes: Budget of S and Cl emitted from Fucgo Volcano, Guatemala, in Andesites: Orogenic Andesites and

  7. Jurassic ash-flow sheets, calderas, and related intrusions of the Cordilleran volcanic arc in southeastern Arizona: implications for regional tectonics and ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P.W.; Hagstrum, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanologic, petrologic, and paleomagnetic studies of widespread Jurassic ash-flow sheets in the Huachuca-southern Dragoon Mountains area have led to identification of four large source calderas and associated comagnetic intracaldera intrusions. Stratigraphic, facies, and contact features of the caldera-related tuffs also provide constraints on the locations, lateral displacements, and very existence for some major northwest-trending faults and inferred regional thrusts in southeastern Arizona. Silicic alkalic compositions of the Jurassic caldera-related, ash-flow tuffs; bimodal associated mafic magmatism; and interstratified coarse sedimentary deposits provide evidence for synvolcanic extension and rifting within the Cordilleran magmatic arc. Gold-copper mineralization is associated with subvolcanic intrusions at several of the Jurassic calderas. -from Authors

  8. Ice nucleation properties of fine ash particles from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Steinke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During the eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in the south of Iceland in April/May 2010, about 40 Tg of ash mass were emitted into the atmosphere. It was unclear whether volcanic ash particles with d < 10 μm facilitate the glaciation of clouds. Thus, ice nucleation properties of volcanic ash particles were investigated in AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere cloud chamber experiments simulating atmospherically relevant conditions. The ash sample that was used for our experiments had been collected at a distance of 58 km from the Eyjafjallajökull during the eruption period in April 2010. The temperature range covered by our ice nucleation experiments extended from 219 to 264 K, and both ice nucleation via immersion freezing and deposition nucleation could be observed. Immersion freezing was first observed at 252 K, whereas the deposition nucleation onset lay at 242 K and RHice =126%. About 0.1% of the volcanic ash particles were active as immersion freezing nuclei at a temperature of 249 K. For deposition nucleation, an ice fraction of 0.1% was observed at around 233 K and RHice =116%. Taking ice-active surface site densities as a measure for the ice nucleation efficiency, volcanic ash particles are similarly efficient ice nuclei in immersion freezing mode (ns,imm ~ 109 m−2 at 247 K compared to certain mineral dusts. For deposition nucleation, the observed ice-active surface site densities ns,dep were found to be 1011 m−2 at 224 K and RHice =116%. Thus, volcanic ash particles initiate deposition nucleation more efficiently than Asian and Saharan dust but appear to be poorer ice nuclei than ATD particles. Based on the experimental data, we have derived ice-active surface site densities as a function of temperature for immersion freezing and of relative humidity over ice and temperature for

  9. DNA damage induced by coal dust, fly and bottom ash from coal combustion evaluated using the micronucleus test and comet assay in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzenbacher, Cristina Araujo; Garcia, Ana Letícia Hilario; Dos Santos, Marcela Silva; Nicolau, Caroline Cardoso; Premoli, Suziane; Corrêa, Dione Silva; de Souza, Claudia Telles; Niekraszewicz, Liana; Dias, Johnny Ferraz; Delgado, Tânia Valéria; Kalkreuth, Wolfgang; Grivicich, Ivana; da Silva, Juliana

    2017-02-15

    Coal mining and combustion generating huge amounts of bottom and fly ash are major causes of environmental pollution and health hazards due to the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and heavy metals. The Candiota coalfield in Rio Grande do Sul, is one of the largest open-cast coal mines in Brazil. The aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxic and mutagenic effects of coal, bottom ash and fly ash samples from Candiota with the comet assay (alkaline and modified version) and micronucleus test using the lung fibroblast cell line (V79). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of PAH and inorganic elements was carried out by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) techniques respectively. The samples demonstrated genotoxic and mutagenic effects. The comet assay modified using DNA-glicosilase formamidopirimidina (FPG) endonuclease showed damage related to oxidative stress mechanisms. The amount of PAHs was higher in fly ash followed by pulverized coal. The amount of inorganic elements was highest in fly ash, followed by bottom ash. It is concluded that the samples induce DNA damage by mechanisms that include oxidative stress, due to their complex composition, and that protective measures have to be taken regarding occupational and environmental hazards. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  11. Combustibility Determination for Cotton Gin Dust and Almond Huller Dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughs, Sidney E; Wakelyn, Phillip J

    2017-04-26

    It has been documented that some dusts generated while processing agricultural products, such as grain and sugar, can constitute combustible dust hazards. After a catastrophic dust explosion in a sugar refinery in 2008, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) initiated action to develop a mandatory standard to comprehensively address the fire and explosion hazards of combustible dusts. Cotton fiber and related materials from cotton ginning, in loose form, can support smoldering combustion if ignited by an outside source. However, dust fires and other more hazardous events, such as dust explosions, are unknown in the cotton ginning industry. Dust material that accumulates inside cotton gins and almond huller plants during normal processing was collected for testing to determine combustibility. Cotton gin dust is composed of greater than 50% inert inorganic mineral dust (ash content), while almond huller dust is composed of at least 7% inert inorganic material. Inorganic mineral dust is not a combustible dust. The collected samples of cotton gin dust and almond huller dust were sieved to a known particle size range for testing to determine combustibility potential. Combustibility testing was conducted on the cotton gin dust and almond huller dust samples using the UN test for combustibility suggested in NFPA 652.. This testing indicated that neither the cotton gin dust nor the almond huller dust should be considered combustible dusts (i.e., not a Division 4.1 flammable hazard per 49 CFR 173.124). Copyright© by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers.

  12. Mazama ash in the northeastern pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, C H; Kulm, L D; Carlson, P R; Duncan, J R

    1968-07-05

    Volcanic glass in marine sediments off Oregon and Washington correlates with continental deposits of Mount Mazama ash by stratigraphic position, refractive index, and radiocarbon dating. Ash deposited in the abyssal regions by turbidity currents is used for tracing of the dispersal routes of postglacial sediments and for evaluation of marine sedimentary processes.

  13. Volcanic hazards and aviation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Thomas J.; Thompson, Theodore B.; Ewert, John W.; ,

    1996-01-01

    An aeronautical chart was developed to determine the relative proximity of volcanoes or ash clouds to the airports and flight corridors that may be affected by volcanic debris. The map aims to inform and increase awareness about the close spatial relationship between volcanoes and aviation operations. It shows the locations of the active volcanoes together with selected aeronautical navigation aids and great-circle routes. The map mitigates the threat that volcanic hazards pose to aircraft and improves aviation safety.

  14. Effect of addition of arc furnace dust in the microstructural properties of fly ash alkali-activated; Estudo do efeito da adicao do po de aciaria nas propriedades microestruturais de matrizes a base de cinzas volantes alcali-ativadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Alexandre Silva de [Centro de Estudos Superiores Feevale, Novo Hamburgo, RS (Brazil); Pavao, Bruno Barreto; Masuero, Angela Boreges; Dal Molin, Denise Carpena Coitinho; Vilela, Antonio Cezar Faria [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), RS (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The search for alternative materials for construction, with less environmental impact, has been the subject of several studies. The alkali-activated cements have shown potential for the reuse of waste, and can be used in the technology of solidification/stabilization. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the main effect of adding arc furnace dust (AFD) in the microstructural properties of matrices based on fly ash alkali-activated. Three levels of AFD were studied: 0, 5, 15 and 25%. The curing was set at 70°C/24 h, and after, kept at room temperature until the age of analysis - 1, 28 and 180 days, with XRD and FTIR analysis. In the XRD spectres it was found that compounds of albite and natron decrease the intensity of their peaks in that there is an increase in the levels of AFD. Concerning to the FTIR, we observed that the band characteristic of the fly ash (FA) 1084 cm{sup -1} was shifted to bands near 1000 cm{sup -1}, which shows that the residue does not interfere in the polymerization and aluminosilicate gel formation. Therefore, under the microstructural aspect, there were no major changes that would impair the use of this residue in alkali-activated matrices. (author)

  15. Concept of a Pitot tube able to detect blockage by ice, volcanic ash, sand and insects, and to clear the tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David A.

    2015-12-01

    A conceptual coaxial Pitot tube (PT) has been developed using fiber optic sensors combined with actuators to monitor and maintain its correct operation under different environmental conditions. Experiments were performed showing that the dynamic and static tubes can be cleared of ice. It was also demonstrated that the dynamic tube could be cleared of dust and sand which was not the case for the static tube in the coaxial configuration. An approach was proposed to overcome this problem involving a conventional configuration where the static tube was operated independently orthogonal to the dynamic tube, and a second set of sensors and actuators was used. Sensors and associated actuators were developed for temperature and intensity for a linear PT. The aim of this work is to propose a solution for a problem that has caused the loss of the lives of many passengers and crew of aircraft. Resources were not available to test a full implementation of a PT incorporating the proposed modifications.

  16. Assessment of organic matter resistance to biodegradation in volcanic ash soils assisted by automated interpretation of infrared spectra from humic acid and whole soil samples by using partial least squares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Zulimar; Pérez Trujillo, Juan Pedro; Hernández-Hernández, Sergio Alexander; Almendros, Gonzalo; Sanz, Jesús

    2014-05-01

    From a practical viewpoint, the most interesting possibilities of applying infrared (IR) spectroscopy to soil studies lie on processing IR spectra of whole soil (WS) samples [1] in order to forecast functional descriptors at high organizational levels of the soil system, such as soil C resilience. Currently, there is a discussion on whether the resistance to biodegradation of soil organic matter (SOM) depends on its molecular composition or on environmental interactions between SOM and mineral components, such could be the case with physical encapsulation of particulate SOM or organo-mineral derivatives, e.g., those formed with amorphous oxides [2]. A set of about 200 dependent variables from WS and isolated, ash free, humic acids (HA) [3] was obtained in 30 volcanic ash soils from Tenerife Island (Spain). Soil biogeochemical properties such as SOM, allophane (Alo + 1 /2 Feo), total mineralization coefficient (TMC) or aggregate stability were determined in WS. In addition, structural information on SOM was obtained from the isolated HA fractions by visible spectroscopy and analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS). Aiming to explore the potential of partial least squares regression (PLS) in forecasting soil dependent variables, exclusively using the information extracted from WS and HA IR spectral profiles, data were processed by using ParLeS [4] and Unscrambler programs. Data pre-treatments should be carefully chosen: the most significant PLS models from IR spectra of HA were obtained after second derivative pre-treatment, which prevented effects of intrinsically broadband spectral profiles typical in macromolecular heterogeneous material such as HA. Conversely, when using IR spectra of WS, the best forecasting models were obtained using linear baseline correction and maximum normalization pre-treatment. With WS spectra, the most successful prediction models were obtained for SOM, magnetite, allophane, aggregate stability, clay and total aromatic compounds, whereas the PLS

  17. Unraveling the complex magma dynamics during the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption by high-resolution geochemistry of volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeger, K.; Petrelli, M.; Andronico, D.; Misiti, V.; Scarlato, P.; Cimarelli, C.; Taddeucci, J.; Perugini, D.

    2016-12-01

    The April-May 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland) volcano was characterized by a change in eruptive style and a large compositional variability of erupted products. Lava deposits of the initial phase consist of evolved Fe-Ti-basalt ( 47 wt% SiO2), whereas fallout deposits of the explosive phases are characterized by a wider compositional spread. We present new EMPA and LA-ICP-MS analyses on groundmass glasses of ash particles erupted between May 18th and 22nd in 2010, i.e. the last days of the eruption. The glasses define two well-separated groups; a basalt composition ranging from 49.98 to 51.76wt% SiO2 and a second group of trachyandesitic and rhyolitic compositions between 57.13 and 70.38 wt% SiO2. Introduction of basalt to a resident silicic melt increased that compositional diversity in the chamber. The ash particles contain plagioclase (An81-10), clinopyroxene (Mg#=0.44-0.71), olivine (Fo83-42) and magnetite. Several plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystals exhibit resorbed cores and rims suggesting disequilibrium caused by recharge of a hotter magma. Additionally, certain clinopyroxene reveals reverse zoning (core: Mg# = 0.53-0.60, rim: Mg# = 0.59-0.71) what can be taken as evidence for mixing between a younger, less evolved magma, and one with a more evolved composition. Here, we unravel the genesis of the compositional variance using petrological, mineralogical and geochemical implications. Magma mixing modeling and element concentration frequency diagrams indicate that incomplete magma mixing between a trachyandesite magma and a trachyte-rhyolite component is the probable main process forming the great compositional variability observed in the erupted products. The rhyolite composition probably represents the residual melt of the AD 1821-23 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull. We suggest that different magmas generated and emplaced separately prior to the eruption have been mobilized by a new intrusion in 2010, and have mingled and mixed with each other

  18. The 17 July 1999 block-and-ash flow (BAF) at Colima Volcano: New insights on volcanic granular flows from textural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarocchi, D.; Sulpizio, R.; Macías, J. L.; Saucedo, R.

    2011-07-01

    On July 17 1999, a strong explosion occurred at Colima Volcano (Mexico) that produced a 10 km high eruptive column. The partial column collapse originated a block-and-ash flow (BAF) that flowed to the south, along the San Antonio and Montegrande ravines, travelling 3.3 km from the volcano summit. The flow filled the ravines with a volume estimated at 7.9 × 10 5 m 3. The erosion of these deposits occurred between 1999 and 2002 (time of sampling), providing excellent longitudinal outcrops that allowed their detailed textural study. The study was carried out by means of quantitative textural analysis: (1) Rosiwal intersections, for carrying out vertical granulometric profiles; (2) total grain-size analysis, from - 11 to + 9 ϕ; and (3) Fourier and fractal analysis of the particle morphology. Grain size and morphometric parameters obtained with these methods were used to identify vertical and longitudinal variation patterns in the BAF deposit. The grain size variations allowed to infer the main particle segregation mechanisms that acted during transport and deposition of the studied BAFs. The two methods used for studying the particle shape morphologies yielded results with different accuracy and reliability. In particular, fractal analyses have been found to be the most effective in describing the particle support mechanisms that acted during transport and deposition of the studied BAFs. The results highlight the importance of the information obtained by means of these techniques, and provide new insights in transportation and deposition mechanisms of BAFs.

  19. Effect of fuel type and deposition surface temperature on the growth and structure of ash deposit collected during co-firing of coal with sewage-sludge, saw-dust and refuse derived fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupka, Tomasz; Zajac, Krzysztof; Weber, Roman [Clausthal Univ. of Technology, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. of Energy Process Engineering and Fuel Technology

    2008-07-01

    Blends of a South African bituminous ''Middleburg'' coal and three alternative fuels (a municipal sewage-sludge, a saw-dust and a refuse derived fuel) have been fired in the slagging reactor to examine the effect of the added fuel on slagging propensity of the mixtures. Two kinds of deposition probes have been used, un-cooled ceramic probes and air-cooled steal probes. Distinct differences in physical and chemical structures of the deposits collected using the un-cooled ceramic probes and air-cooled metal probes have been observed. Glassy, easily molten deposits collected on un-cooled ceramic deposition probes were characteristic for co-firing of municipal sewage-sludge with coal. Porous, sintered (not molten) but easily removable deposits of the same fuel blend have been collected on the air-cooled metal deposition probes. Loose, easy removable deposits have been sampled on air-cooled metal deposition probe during co-firing of coal/saw-dust blends. The mass of the deposit sampled at lower surface temperatures (550-700 C) was always larger than the mass sampled at higher temperatures (1100-1300 C) since the higher temperature ash agglomerated and sintered much faster than the low temperature deposit. (orig.)

  20. Combined exposure of diesel exhaust particles and respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash causes a (pro-)inflammatory response in an in vitro multicellular epithelial tissue barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašek, Ines; Horwell, Claire J; Damby, David E; Barošová, Hana; Geers, Christoph; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J D

    2016-12-12

    There are justifiable health concerns regarding the potential adverse effects associated with human exposure to volcanic ash (VA) particles, especially when considering communities living in urban areas already exposed to heightened air pollution. The aim of this study was, therefore, to gain an imperative, first understanding of the biological impacts of respirable VA when exposed concomitantly with diesel particles. A sophisticated in vitro 3D triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar epithelial tissue barrier was exposed to either a single or repeated dose of dry respirable VA (deposited dose of 0.26 ± 0.09 or 0.89 ± 0.29 μg/cm(2), respectively) from Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat for a period of 24 h at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Subsequently, co-cultures were exposed to co-exposures of single or repeated VA and diesel exhaust particles (DEP; NIST SRM 2975; 0.02 mg/mL), a model urban pollutant, at the pseudo-ALI. The biological impact of each individual particle type was also analysed under these precise scenarios. The cytotoxic (LDH release), oxidative stress (depletion of intracellular GSH) and (pro-)inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-1β) responses were assessed after the particulate exposures. The impact of VA exposure upon cell morphology, as well as its interaction with the multicellular model, was visualised via confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The combination of respirable VA and DEP, in all scenarios, incited an heightened release of TNF-α and IL-8 as well as significant increases in IL-1β, when applied at sub-lethal doses to the co-culture compared to VA exposure alone. Notably, the augmented (pro-)inflammatory responses observed were not mediated by oxidative stress. LSM supported the quantitative assessment of cytotoxicity, with no changes in cell morphology within the barrier model evident. A direct interaction of the VA with all three cell types of

  1. Combined exposure of diesel exhaust particles and respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash causes a (pro-)inflammatory response in an in vitro multicellular epithelial tissue barrier model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašek, Ines; Horwell, Claire J.; Damby, David; Barošová, Hana; Geers, Christoph; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J. D.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundThere are justifiable health concerns regarding the potential adverse effects associated with human exposure to volcanic ash (VA) particles, especially when considering communities living in urban areas already exposed to heightened air pollution. The aim of this study was, therefore, to gain an imperative, first understanding of the biological impacts of respirable VA when exposed concomitantly with diesel particles.MethodsA sophisticated in vitro 3D triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar epithelial tissue barrier was exposed to either a single or repeated dose of dry respirable VA (deposited dose of 0.26 ± 0.09 or 0.89 ± 0.29 μg/cm2, respectively) from Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat for a period of 24 h at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Subsequently, co-cultures were exposed to co-exposures of single or repeated VA and diesel exhaust particles (DEP; NIST SRM 2975; 0.02 mg/mL), a model urban pollutant, at the pseudo-ALI. The biological impact of each individual particle type was also analysed under these precise scenarios. The cytotoxic (LDH release), oxidative stress (depletion of intracellular GSH) and (pro-)inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-1β) responses were assessed after the particulate exposures. The impact of VA exposure upon cell morphology, as well as its interaction with the multicellular model, was visualised via confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively.ResultsThe combination of respirable VA and DEP, in all scenarios, incited an heightened release of TNF-α and IL-8 as well as significant increases in IL-1β, when applied at sub-lethal doses to the co-culture compared to VA exposure alone. Notably, the augmented (pro-)inflammatory responses observed were not mediated by oxidative stress. LSM supported the quantitative assessment of cytotoxicity, with no changes in cell morphology within the barrier model evident. A direct interaction of the VA with all

  2. The structure of volcanic cristobalite in relation to its toxicity; relevance for the variable crystalline silica hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horwell Claire J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respirable crystalline silica (RCS continues to pose a risk to human health worldwide. Its variable toxicity depends on inherent characteristics and external factors which influence surface chemistry. Significant population exposure to RCS occurs during volcanic eruptions, where ashfall may cover hundreds of square km and exposure may last years. Occupational exposure also occurs through mining of volcanic deposits. The primary source of RCS from volcanoes is through collapse and fragmentation of lava domes within which cristobalite is mass produced. After 30 years of research, it is still not clear if volcanic ash is a chronic respiratory health hazard. Toxicological assays have shown that cristobalite-rich ash is less toxic than expected. We investigate the reasons for this by determining the physicochemical/structural characteristics which may modify the pathogenicity of volcanic RCS. Four theories are considered: 1 the reactivity of particle surfaces is reduced due to co-substitutions of Al and Na for Si in the cristobalite structure; 2 particles consist of aggregates of cristobalite and other phases, restricting the surface area of cristobalite available for reactions in the lung; 3 the cristobalite surface is occluded by an annealed rim; 4 dissolution of other volcanic particles affects the surfaces of RCS in the lung. Methods The composition of volcanic cristobalite crystals was quantified by electron microprobe and differences in composition assessed by Welch’s two sample t-test. Sections of dome-rock and ash particles were imaged by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and elemental compositions of rims determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results Volcanic cristobalite contains up to 4 wt. % combined Al2O3 and Na2O. Most cristobalite-bearing ash particles contain adhered materials such as feldspar and glass. No annealed rims were observed. Conclusions The composition of volcanic

  3. The structure of volcanic cristobalite in relation to its toxicity; relevance for the variable crystalline silica hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwell, Claire J; Williamson, Benedict J; Donaldson, Ken; Le Blond, Jennifer S; Damby, David E; Bowen, Leon

    2012-11-19

    Respirable crystalline silica (RCS) continues to pose a risk to human health worldwide. Its variable toxicity depends on inherent characteristics and external factors which influence surface chemistry. Significant population exposure to RCS occurs during volcanic eruptions, where ashfall may cover hundreds of square km and exposure may last years. Occupational exposure also occurs through mining of volcanic deposits. The primary source of RCS from volcanoes is through collapse and fragmentation of lava domes within which cristobalite is mass produced. After 30 years of research, it is still not clear if volcanic ash is a chronic respiratory health hazard. Toxicological assays have shown that cristobalite-rich ash is less toxic than expected. We investigate the reasons for this by determining the physicochemical/structural characteristics which may modify the pathogenicity of volcanic RCS. Four theories are considered: 1) the reactivity of particle surfaces is reduced due to co-substitutions of Al and Na for Si in the cristobalite structure; 2) particles consist of aggregates of cristobalite and other phases, restricting the surface area of cristobalite available for reactions in the lung; 3) the cristobalite surface is occluded by an annealed rim; 4) dissolution of other volcanic particles affects the surfaces of RCS in the lung. The composition of volcanic cristobalite crystals was quantified by electron microprobe and differences in composition assessed by Welch's two sample t-test. Sections of dome-rock and ash particles were imaged by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and elemental compositions of rims determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Volcanic cristobalite contains up to 4 wt. % combined Al(2)O(3) and Na(2)O. Most cristobalite-bearing ash particles contain adhered materials such as feldspar and glass. No annealed rims were observed. The composition of volcanic cristobalite particles gives insight into previously

  4. Swirl chamber for vitrification of fly ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarzycki Robert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the concept of a swirl chamber used for vitrification of fly ashes. It assumes the use of coal dust in the process of fly ash melting. The coal dust supplied to the swirl chamber and gasified in the atmosphere of O2, CO2 and H2O allows for obtaining combustible gases composed of CO and H2, which are burnt with the pneumatically supplied fly ash. The above process allows for obtaining a product in the form of a molten slag which does not contain coal grains. The study presents numerical calculations for the process of combustion and gasification of coal dust and opportunities for ensuring adequate parameters in the fly ash melting zone. The combustible gases obtained during the process of gasification can be supplied to the chamber of a pulverized-bed boiler.

  5. Circle of Ashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Circle of Ashes This plot tells astronomers that a pulsar, the remnant of a stellar explosion, is surrounded by a disk of its own ashes. The disk, revealed by the two data points at the far right from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, is the first ever found around a pulsar. Astronomers believe planets might rise up out of these stellar ashes. The data in this plot, or spectrum, were taken by ground-based telescopes and Spitzer. They show that light from around the pulsar can be divided into two categories: direct light from the pulsar, and light from the dusty disk swirling around the pulsar. This excess light was detected by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Dust gives off more infrared light than the pulsar because it's cooler. The pulsar, called 4U 0142+61, was once a massive star, until about 100,000 years ago, when it blew up in a supernova explosion and scattered dusty debris into space. Some of that debris was captured into what astronomers refer to as a 'fallback disk,' now circling the leftover stellar core, or pulsar. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks around young stars, out of which planets are thought to be born. The data have been corrected to remove the effects of light scattering from dust that lies between Earth and the pulsar. The ground-based data is from the Keck I telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

  6. VOLCANIC EMISSIONS AND DISTAL PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS IN NEW ZEALAND

    OpenAIRE

    GILES, TERESA MARY

    1999-01-01

    This thesis is a palaeoenviromnental investigation into possible non-climatic effects on the environment from volcanic ash fall and toxic emissions outside the blast zone of a volcanic eruption. These effects are determined from palynological and geochemical changes following tephra fall at a range of sites across the North Island of New Zealand which were located at increasing distances from the main volcanic source, the Taupo Volcanic Zone. These sites collectively covered a wid...

  7. The Elusive Evidence of Volcanic Lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genareau, K; Gharghabi, P; Gafford, J; Mazzola, M

    2017-11-14

    Lightning strikes are known to morphologically alter and chemically reduce geologic formations and deposits, forming fulgurites. A similar process occurs as the result of volcanic lightning discharge, when airborne volcanic ash is transformed into lightning-induced volcanic spherules (LIVS). Here, we adapt the calculations used in previous studies of lightning-induced damage to infrastructure materials to determine the effects on pseudo-ash samples of simplified composition. Using laboratory high-current impulse experiments, this research shows that within the lightning discharge channel there is an ideal melting zone that represents roughly 10% or less of the total channel radius at which temperatures are sufficient to melt the ash, regardless of peak current. The melted ash is simultaneously expelled from the channel by the heated, expanding air, permitting particles to cool during atmospheric transport before coming to rest in ash fall deposits. The limited size of this ideal melting zone explains the low number of LIVS typically observed in volcanic ash despite the frequent occurrence of lightning during explosive eruptions.

  8. Distribution of dust during two dust storms in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ösp Magnúsdóttir, Agnes; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Ólafur; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2017-04-01

    Particulate matter mass concentrations and size fractions of PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10, and PM15 measured in transversal horizontal profile of two dust storms in southwestern Iceland are presented. Images from a camera network were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. Numerical simulations were used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources as 180,000 and 280,000 tons for each storm. The mean PM15 concentrations inside of the dust plumes varied from 10 to 1600 ?g?m?3 (PM10 = 7 to 583 ?g?m?3). The mean PM1 concentrations were 97-241 ?g?m?3 with a maximum of 261 ?g?m?3 for the first storm. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios of >0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34-0.63 show that suspension of volcanic materials in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations, similar to polluted urban areas in Europe or Asia. Icelandic volcanic dust consists of a higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. Both dust storms occurred in relatively densely inhabited areas of Iceland. First results on size partitioning of Icelandic dust presented here should challenge health authorities to enhance research in relation to dust and shows the need for public dust warning systems.

  9. Studies on Crop Growth Damage due to Ash Fall form Mt. Minamidake of Sakurajima : (1)Experimental Indications of Crop Damage due to Ash Fall

    OpenAIRE

    角, 明夫; 鈴木, 義則; Akio, SUMI; Yoshinori, SUZUKI; 鹿児島大学農学部生物生産学科; 九州大学農学部農業工学科; Department of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University; Department of Agricultural Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyusyu University

    1998-01-01

    The occurrence mechanisms of crop growth damage due to ash fall were examined experimentally. When volcanic ash was mixed into arable soil, the crop growth was reduced with increasing in its amount because of the deterioration in physical and chemical properties of soil. When the normal soil was arranged concentrically around the main root of a crop, the improvement effect by soil admixing could be found on the smaller replacement. The crop growth was also inhibited when volcanic ash accumula...

  10. Soil genesis on the island of Bermuda in the Quaternary: the importance of African dust transport and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Budahn, James R.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Skipp, Gary; Herwitz, Stanley R.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of terra rossa, red or reddish-brown, clay-rich soils overlying high-purity carbonate substrates, has intrigued geologists and pedologists for decades. Terra rossa soils can form from accumulation of insoluble residues during dissolution of the host limestones, addition of volcanic ash, or addition of externally derived, long-range-transported (LRT) aeolian particles. We studied soils and paleosols on high-purity, carbonate aeolianites of Quaternary age on Bermuda, where terra rossa origins have been debated for more than a century. Potential soil parent materials on this island include sand-sized fragments of local volcanic bedrock, the LRT, fine-grained (N/YbN, GdN/YbN that can be distinguished from African dust and lower Mississippi River valley loess. Bermuda soils have Sc-Th-La, Cr-Ta-Nd, and Eu/Eu*, LaN/YbN, GdN/YbN that indicate derivation from a combination of LRT dust from Africa and local volcanic bedrock. Our results indicate that soils on islands in a very broad latitudinal belt of the western Atlantic margin have been influenced by African LRT dust inputs over much of the past –500 ka.

  11. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for the Katmai volcanic cluster, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierstein, Judy; Hildreth, Wes

    2000-01-01

    The world’s largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century broke out at Novarupta (fig. 1) in June 1912, filling with hot ash what came to be called the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes and spreading downwind more fallout than all other historical Alaskan eruptions combined. Although almost all the magma vented at Novarupta, most of it had been stored beneath Mount Katmai 10 km away, which collapsed during the eruption. Airborne ash from the 3-day event blanketed all of southern Alaska, and its gritty fallout was reported as far away as Dawson, Ketchikan, and Puget Sound (fig. 21). Volcanic dust and sulfurous aerosol were detected within days over Wisconsin and Virginia; within 2 weeks over California, Europe, and North Africa; and in latter-day ice cores recently drilled on the Greenland ice cap. There were no aircraft in Alaska in 1912—fortunately! Corrosive acid aerosols damage aircraft, and ingestion of volcanic ash can cause abrupt jet-engine failure. Today, more than 200 flights a day transport 20,000 people and a fortune in cargo within range of dozens of restless volcanoes in the North Pacific. Air routes from the Far East to Europe and North America pass over and near Alaska, many flights refueling in Anchorage. Had this been so in 1912, every airport from Dillingham to Dawson and from Fairbanks to Seattle would have been enveloped in ash, leaving pilots no safe option but to turn back or find refuge at an Aleutian airstrip west of the ash cloud. Downwind dust and aerosol could have disrupted air traffic anywhere within a broad swath across Canada and the Midwest, perhaps even to the Atlantic coast. The great eruption of 1912 focused scientific attention on Novarupta, and subsequent research there has taught us much about the processes and hazards associated with such large explosive events (Fierstein and Hildreth, 1992). Moreover, work in the last decade has identified no fewer than 20 discrete volcanic vents within 15 km of Novarupta (Hildreth and others

  12. Traumatic Inhalation due to Merapi Volcanic Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Trisnawati

    2016-05-01

    note, diminished vesicular breath sounds in lower right side of the chest. The chest X-ray presence leads to bleb. Based on the clinical and radiological suspicion of pneumoconiosis the patient was submitted to computed tomography of the chest and revealed bilateral multiple bullae mainly at the right lung field. The biopsy specimen verified the diagnosis of anthrocosilicosis. There is no proven specific therapy for any form of silicosis. Symptomatic therapy should include treatment of airflow limitation with bronchodilators, aggressive management of respiratory tract infection with antibiotics, and use of supplemental oxygen (if indicated toprevent complications of chronic hypoxemia. Key words: Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, inorganic particles inhalation, dyspnoea, bullae.

  13. [Effects of volcanic eruptions on human health in Iceland. Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Larsen, Guðrun

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions are common in Iceland and have caused health problems ever since the settlement of Iceland. Here we describe volcanic activity and the effects of volcanic gases and ash on human health in Iceland. Volcanic gases expelled during eruptions can be highly toxic for humans if their concentrations are high, irritating the mucus membranes of the eyes and upper respiratory tract at lower concentrations. They can also be very irritating to the skin. Volcanic ash is also irritating for the mucus membranes of the eyes and upper respiratory tract. The smalles particles of volcanic ash can reach the alveoli of the lungs. Described are four examples of volcanic eruptions that have affected the health of Icelanders. The eruption of Laki volcanic fissure in 1783-1784 is the volcanic eruption that has caused the highest mortality and had the greatest effects on the well-being of Icelanders. Despite multiple volcanic eruptions during the last decades in Iceland mortality has been low and effects on human health have been limited, although studies on longterm effects are lacking. Studies on the effects of the Eyjafjallajökul eruption in 2010 on human health showed increased physical and mental symptoms, especially in those having respiratory disorders. The Directorate of Health in Iceland and other services have responded promptly to recurrent volcanic eruptions over the last few years and given detailed instructions on how to minimize the effects on the public health. Key words: volcanic eruptions, Iceland, volcanic ash, volcanic gases, health effects, mortality. Correspondence: Gunnar Guðmundsson, ggudmund@landspitali.is.

  14. Aluminum is More Cytotoxic than Lunar Dust in Human Skin and Lung Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, D.; Shehata, T.; Hammond, D.; Shehata, T.; Wise, J.P.; Martino, J; Wise, J.P.; Wise, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA plans to build a permanent space station on the moon to explore its surface. The surface of the moon is covered in lunar dust, which consists of fine particles that contain silicon, aluminum and titanium, among others. Because this will be a manned base, the potential toxicity of this dust has to be studied. Also, toxicity standards for potential exposure have to be set. To properly address the potential toxicity of lunar dust we need to understand the toxicity of its individual components, as well as their combined effects. In order to study this we compared NASA simulant JSC-1AVF (volcanic ash particles), that simulates the dust found on the moon, to aluminum, the 3rd most abundant component in lunar dust. We tested the cytotoxicity of both compounds on human lung and skin fibroblasts (WTHBF-6 and BJhTERT cell lines, respectively). Aluminum oxide was more cytotoxic than lunar dust to both cell lines. In human lung fibroblasts 5, 10 and 50 g/sq cm of aluminum oxide induced 85%, 61% and 30% relative survival, respectively. For human skin fibroblasts the same concentrations induced 58%, 41% and 58% relative survival. Lunar dust was also cytotoxic to both cell lines, but its effects were seen at higher concentrations: 50, 100, 200 and 400 g/sq cm of lunar dust induced a 69%, 46%, 35% and 30% relative survival in the skin cells and 53%, 16%, 8% and 2% on the lung cells. Overall, for both compounds, lung cells were more sensitive than skin cells. This work was supported by a NASA EPSCoR grant through the Maine Space Grant Consortium (JPW), the Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health., a Fulbright Grant (JM) and a Delta Kappa Gamma Society International World Fellowship (JM).

  15. Enrichment of Inorganic Martian Dust Simulant with Carbon Component can Provoke Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Pastukhov, Artem; Dudarenko, Marina; Borysov, Arsenii; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasia; Borisova, Tatiana

    2017-02-01

    Carbon is the most abundant dust-forming element in the interstellar medium. Tremendous amount of meteorites containing plentiful carbon and carbon-enriched dust particles have reached the Earth daily. National Institute of Health panel accumulates evidences that nano-sized air pollution components may have a significant impact on the central nervous system (CNS) in health and disease. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the CNS. Based on above facts, here we present the study, the aims of which were: 1) to upgrade inorganic Martian dust simulant derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, nanodiamonds and carbon dots; 2) to analyse acute effects of upgraded simulant on key characteristics of synaptic neurotransmission; and 3) to compare above effects with those of inorganic dust and carbon components per se. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogues resulted in a significant decrease in transporter-mediated uptake of L-[14C]glutamate (the major excitatory neurotransmitter) and [3H]GABA (the main inhibitory neurotransmitter) by isolated rat brain nerve terminals. The extracellular level of both neurotransmitters increased in the presence of carbon-containing Martian dust analogues. These effects were associated with action of carbon components of upgraded Martian dust simulant, but not with its inorganic constituent. This fact indicates that carbon component of native Martian dust can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate and GABA homeostasis in the CNS, and so glutamate- and GABA-ergic neurotransmission disballansing exitation and inhibition.

  16. The climatic impact of supervolcanic ash blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Morgan T.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Valdes, Paul J.

    2007-11-01

    Supervolcanoes are large caldera systems that can expel vast quantities of ash, volcanic gases in a single eruption, far larger than any recorded in recent history. These super-eruptions have been suggested as possible catalysts for long-term climate change and may be responsible for bottlenecks in human and animal populations. Here, we consider the previously neglected climatic effects of a continent-sized ash deposit with a high albedo and show that a decadal climate forcing is expected. We use a coupled atmosphere-ocean General Circulation Model (GCM) to simulate the effect of an ash blanket from Yellowstone volcano, USA, covering much of North America. Reflectivity measurements of dry volcanic ash show albedo values as high as snow, implying that the effects of an ash blanket would be severe. The modeling results indicate major disturbances to the climate, particularly to oscillatory patterns such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Atmospheric disruptions would continue for decades after the eruption due to extended ash blanket longevity. The climatic response to an ash blanket is not significant enough to instigate a change to stadial periods at present day boundary conditions, though this is one of several impacts associated with a super-eruption which may induce long-term climatic change.

  17. The climatic impact of supervolcanic ash blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Morgan T.; Sparks, R.S.J. [University of Bristol, Department of Earth Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom); Valdes, Paul J. [University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Supervolcanoes are large caldera systems that can expel vast quantities of ash, volcanic gases in a single eruption, far larger than any recorded in recent history. These super-eruptions have been suggested as possible catalysts for long-term climate change and may be responsible for bottlenecks in human and animal populations. Here, we consider the previously neglected climatic effects of a continent-sized ash deposit with a high albedo and show that a decadal climate forcing is expected. We use a coupled atmosphere-ocean General Circulation Model (GCM) to simulate the effect of an ash blanket from Yellowstone volcano, USA, covering much of North America. Reflectivity measurements of dry volcanic ash show albedo values as high as snow, implying that the effects of an ash blanket would be severe. The modeling results indicate major disturbances to the climate, particularly to oscillatory patterns such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Atmospheric disruptions would continue for decades after the eruption due to extended ash blanket longevity. The climatic response to an ash blanket is not significant enough to investigate a change to stadial periods at present day boundary conditions, though this is one of several impacts associated with a super-eruption which may induce long-term climatic change. (orig.)

  18. Dust layer profiling using an aerosol dropsonde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Kaye, Paul Henry; Hirst, Edwin; Wieser, Andreas; Stanley, Warren

    2015-04-01

    Routine meteorological data is obtained in the atmosphere using disposable radiosondes, giving temperature, pressure, humidity and wind speed. Additional measurements are obtained from dropsondes, released from research aircraft. However, a crucial property not yet measured is the size and concentration of atmospheric particulates, including dust. Instead, indirect measurements are employed, relying on remote sensing, to meet the demands from areas such as climate research, air quality monitoring, civil emergencies etc. In addition, research aircraft can be used in situ, but airborne measurements are expensive, and aircraft use is restricted to near-horizontal profiling, which can be a limitation, as phenomena such as long-range transport depend on the vertical distribution of aerosol. The Centre for Atmospheric and Instrumentation Research at University of Hertfordshire develops light-scattering instruments for the characterization of aerosols and cloud particles. Recently a range of low-cost, miniature particle counters has been created, intended for use with systems such as disposable balloon-borne radiosondes, dropsondes, or in dense ground-based sensor networks. Versions for different particle size ranges exist. They have been used for vertical profiling of aerosols such as mineral dust or volcanic ash. A disadvantage of optical particle counters that sample through a narrow inlet is that they can become blocked, which can happen in cloud, for example. Hence, a different counter version has been developed, which can have open-path geometry, as the sensing zone is defined optically rather than being delimited by the flow system. This counter has been used for ground based air-quality monitoring around Heathrow airport. The counter has also been adapted for use with radiosondes or dropsondes. The dropsonde version has been successfully tested by launching it from research aircraft together with the so-called KITsonde, developed at the Karlsruhe Institute of

  19. Shape measurements of volcanic particles by CAMSIZER

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Castro, Maria Deborah; Andronico, Daniele; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Spata, Alessandro; Torrisi, Alessio

    2009-01-01

    The shape of volcanic particles is an important parameter holding information related to physical and geochemical processes. The study of particle shape may help improving knowledge on the main eruptive processes (fragmentation, transport and sedimentation) during explosive activity. In general, volcanic ash is formed by different components, namely juvenile, lithic and crystal particles, each one characterized by peculiar morphology. Moreover, quantifying the shape of pyroclasts is needed by...

  20. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  1. Volcanic Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often escape continuously into the atmosphere from the soil, volcanic vents , fumaroles , and hydrothermal systems. By far the ... after falling into a snow depression surrounding a volcanic fumarole and filled ... of CO 2 gas in soils can also damage or destroy vegetation, as is ...

  2. Ash dispersal dynamics: state of the art and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, R.

    2013-05-01

    Volcanic ash, during dispersal and deposition, is among the major hazards from explosive eruptions. Volcanic ash fallout can disrupt communities downwind, interrupt surface transportation networks and lead to closure of airports. Airborne ash seriously threatens modern jet aircraft in flight. In several documented cases, encounters between aircraft and volcanic clouds have resulted in engine flameout and near crashes, so there is a need to accurately predict the trajectory of volcanic ash clouds in order to improve aviation safety and reduce economic losses. The ash clouds affect aviation even in distal regions, as demonstrated by several eruptions with far-range dispersal. Recent examples include Crater Peak 1992, Tungurahua 1999-2001, Mount Cleveland 2001, Chaitén 2008, Eyjafjallajökull 2010, Grimsvötn 2011, and Cordón-Caulle 2011. Amongst these, the April-May 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland provoked the largest civil aviation breakdown. Accumulation of tephra can produce roof collapse, interruption of lifelines (roads, railways, etc.), disruption to airport operations, and damage to communications and electrical power lines. Deposition of ash decreases soil permeability, increases surface runoff, and promotes floods. Ash leaching can result in the pollution of water resources, damage to agriculture, pastures, and livestock, impinge on aquatic ecosystems, and alteration of the geochemical environment on the seafloor. Despite the potential big impact, the dispersal dynamics of volcanic ash is still an unsolved problem for volcanologists, which claims for fiture high level research. Here, a critical overview about models (field, experimental and numerical) for inversion of field data to gain insights on physics of dispersal of volcanic ash is proposed. A special focus is devoted to some physical parameters that are far from a satisfactory inversion (e.g. reconstruction of total grain size distribution), and clues for future research are suggested.

  3. Dust-Firing of Straw and Additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Glarborg, Peter; Frandsen, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, the ash chemistry and deposition behavior during straw dust-firing were studied by performing experiments in an entrained flow reactor. The effect of using spent bleaching earth (SBE) as an additive in straw combustion was also investigated by comparing with kaolinite. During...... dust-firing of straw, the large (>∼2.5 μm) fly ash particles generated were primarily molten or partially molten spherical particles rich in K, Si, and Ca, supplemented by Si-rich flake-shaped particles. The smaller fly ash particles (...

  4. Geology and petrology of the Vulsinian volcanic area (Latium, Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varekamp, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The Vulsinian volcanic area is situated in Latium, west central Italy. This quarternary volcanic complex consists of a series of layered tuffs, lava flows, ignimbrites, and many small cinder and ash cones. A steep central edifice is lacking due to the relatively large amount of pyroclastic deposits.

  5. Geology and petrology of the Vulsinian volcanic area (Latium, Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varekamp, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    The Vulsinian volcanic area is situated in Latium, west central Italy. This quarternary volcanic complex consists of a series of layered tuffs, lava flows, ignimbrites, and many small cinder and ash cones. A steep central edifice is lacking due to the relatively large amount of pyroclastic

  6. Volatile Transport by Volcanic Plumes on Earth, Venus and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Self, Stephen; Baloga, Steve; Stofan, Ellen R.

    2012-01-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can produce sustained, buoyant columns of ash and gas in the atmosphere (Fig. 1). Large flood basalt eruptions may also include significant explosive phases that generate eruption columns. Such eruptions can transport volcanic volatiles to great heights in the atmosphere. Volcanic eruption columns can also redistribute chemical species within the atmosphere by entraining ambient atmosphere at low altitudes and releasing those species at much higher altitudes.

  7. the potential use of fonio husk ash as a pozzolana in concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    2016-01-01

    Jan 1, 2016 ... By-products mineral admixtures such as fly ash, rice husk ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag contribute to improvement of concrete performance ... the presence of RHA and cement kiln dust in cement pastes improved the resistance of the mortar to sulfuric acid attack [11]. Palm Kernel Shell Ash ...

  8. Properties of volcanic soils in cold climate conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Layers of volcanic ash and the Andosol soils derived from them may play an important role in preserving snow and ice as well as developing permafrost conditions in the immediate vicinity of volcanoes of high elevation or those situated at high latitudes, and land areas, often distant from volcanic activity that are either prone to permafrost or covered by snow and ice, but are affected by the deposition of subaerial ash. The special properties of volcanic ash that are responsible are critically reviewed particularly in relation to recent research in Kamchatka in the Far East of Russia. Of particular importance are the thermal properties and the unfrozen water contents of ash layers and the rate at which the weathering of volcanic glass takes place. Volcanic glass is the most easily weathered component of volcanic ejecta (Shoji et al., 1993; Kimble et al., 2000). There are many specific environmental conditions, including paleoclimate and present-day climate, the composition of volcanic tephra and glaciation history, which cause the differences in weathering and development of volcanic ash soils (Zehetner et al., 2003). The preservation of in situ, unweathered, and unaltered surficial ash-fall deposits in the cold regions has important implications for paleoclimate and glacial history. Ash-fall deposits, which trap and preserve the soils, sediments, and landforms on which they fall, can be used to resolve local climate conditions (temperature and moisture) at the ash site during ash-fall deposition. The preservation of detailed sedimentary features (e.g. bedding in the ash, sharpness of stratigraphic contacts) can tell us about their post-depositional history, whether they have been redeposited by wind or water, or overridden by glaciers (Marchant et al., 1996). Weathering of volcanic glass results in the development of amorphous clay minerals (e.g. allophane, opal, palagonite) but this takes place much slower in cold than under warmer climate conditions. Only few

  9. Research paper United theory of biological evolution: Disaster-forced evolution through Supernova, radioactive ash fall-outs, genome instability, and mass extinctions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toshikazu Ebisuzaki Shigenori Maruyama

    2015-01-01

    .... It describes how reproductive isolation of organisms is established through global disasters due to supernova encounters and local disasters due to radioactive volcanic ash fall-outs by continental alkaline volcanism...

  10. Particle size distribution factor as an indicator for the impact of the Eyjafjallajökull ash plume at ground level in Augsburg, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pitz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available During the time period of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption in 2010 increased mass concentration of PM10 (particulate matter, diameter <10 μm were observed at ground level in Augsburg, Germany. In particular on 19 and 20 April 2010 the daily PM10 limit value of 50 μg m−3 was exceeded. Because ambient particles are in general a complex mixture originating from different sources, a source apportionment method (positive matrix factorization (PMF was applied to particle size distribution data in the size range from 3 nm to 10 μm to identify and estimate the volcanic ash contribution to the overall PM10 load in the ambient air in Augsburg. A PMF factor with relevant particle mass concentration in the size range between 1 and 4 μm (maximum at 2 μm was associated with long range transported dust. This factor increased from background concentration to high levels simultaneously with the arrival of the volcanic ash plume in the planetary boundary layer. Hence, we assume that this factor could be used as an indicator for the impact of the Eyjafjallajökull ash plume on ground level in Augsburg. From 17 to 22 April 2010 long range transported dust factor contributed on average 30 % (12 μg m−3 to PM10. On 19 April 2010 at 20:00 UTC+1 the maximum percentage of the long range transported dust factor accounted for around 65 % (35 μg m−3 to PM10 and three hours later the maximum absolute value with around 48 μg m−3 (61 % was observed. Additional PMF analyses for a Saharan dust event occurred in May and June 2008 suggest, that the long range transported dust factor could also be used as an indicator for Saharan dust events.

  11. A new way to detect volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristine M.

    2013-06-01

    of volcanic plumes, especially ash-laden ones, is important both for public health and aircraft safety. A variety of geophysical tools and satellite data are used to monitor volcanic eruptions and to predict the movement of ash. However, satellite-based methods are restricted by time of day and weather, while radars are often unavailable because of cost/portability. Here a method is proposed to detect volcanic plumes using GPS signal strength data. The strengths and limitations of the method are assessed using GPS data collected during the 2008 and 2009 eruptions of the Okmok and Mt. Redoubt volcanoes. Plume detections using this GPS technique are consistent with independently collected seismic and radar data.

  12. Characteristics of Long-Period Events Associated With Volcanic Degassing at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega, A.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.

    2004-05-01

    Emissions of gas and ash dominate volcanic eruptive activity in Popocatepetl volcano since 1994. Volcanic eruptive activity consists of construction and destruction dome phases. Ash emissions ranged from small short-lived plumes rising a few hundred meters above the crater rim, to larger plumes reaching up to 15 km above the crater. Resulting tephra falls dusted the entire summit area. Bursts of volcanic degassing accompanied by long-period (LP) seismic signals observed as isolated events, or as sequences of discrete events with overall durations and amplitudes. Some gas emissions accompanied by persistent or spasmodic tremor. There are four families of LP events identified within the frequency range between 0.5 and 5 Hz. Family-one presents low-frequency emergent onsets with higher amplitudes at higher frequencies. Family-two includes emergent onsets with modulate amplitudes simulating tremor and dominant frequencies in defined picks in the band between 1 and 3 Hz. Family-three presents LP events with impulsive onset and decaying amplitude with time, these events present a wide range of amplitudes and dominant frequencies around 2 Hz. Family-four includes LP events with monochromatic appearance with sharp picks below 3 Hz. From thousands of LP events preliminary locations based on phase picks suggest that LP seismicity occur within uppermost 1000 m below the crater floor, consistently constrain defined clusters in the east-region of the crater and in the area where the domes growth. The network used to located LP events included 15 broadband stations distributed along radial profiles on the upper flanks of Popocatepetl. We report data collected during a broadband seismic experiment carried out at Popocatepetl Volcano as part of an international cooperative program between the GeoForschungsZentr um, Potsdam, Germany, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Institute of Geophysics, UNAM, MEXICO.