WorldWideScience

Sample records for volcanic aerosol layer

  1. Lidar Observations of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer After the Mt. Pinatubo Volcanic Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Tomohiro; Uchino, Osamu; Fujimoto, Toshifumi

    1992-01-01

    The volcano Mt. Pinatubo located on the Luzon Island, Philippines, had explosively erupted on June 15, 1991. The volcanic eruptions such as volcanic ash, SO2 and H2O reached into the stratosphere over 30 km altitude by the NOAA-11 satellite observation and this is considered one of the biggest volcanic eruptions in this century. A grandiose volcanic eruption influences the atmosphere seriously and causes many climatic effects globally. There had been many impacts on radiation, atmospheric temperature and stratospheric ozone after some past volcanic eruptions. The main cause of volcanic influence depends on stratospheric aerosol, that stay long enough to change climate and other meteorological conditions. Therefore it is very important to watch stratospheric aerosol layers carefully and continuously. Standing on this respect, we do not only continue stratospheric aerosol observation at Tsukuba but also have urgently developed another lidar observational point at Naha in Okinawa Island. This observational station could be thought valuable since there is no lidar observational station in this latitudinal zone and it is much nearer to Mt. Pinatubo. Especially, there is advantage to link up these two stations on studying the transportation mechanism in the stratosphere. In this paper, we present the results of lidar observations at Tsukuba and Naha by lidar systems with Nd:YAG laser.

  2. Volcanic aerosols: Chemistry, evolution, and effects

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    Turco, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols have been the subject of scientific speculation since the 1880s, when the powerful eruption of Krakatoa attracted worldwide attention to the upper atmosphere through spectacular optical displays. The presence of a permanent tenuous dust layer in the lower stratosphere was postulated in the 1920s following studies of the twilight glow. Junge collected the first samples of these 'dust' particles and demonstrated that they were actually composed of sulfates, most likely concentrated sulfuric acid (Junge and Manson, 1961; Junge, 1963). Subsequent research has been spurred by the realization that stratospheric particles can influence the surface climate of earth through their effects on atmospheric radiation. Such aerosols can also influence, through chemical and physical effects, the trace composition of the atmosphere, ozone concentrations, and atmospheric electrical properties. The properties of stratospheric aerosols (both the background particles and those enhanced by volcanic eruptions) were measured in situ by balloon ascents and high altitude aircraft sorties. The aerosols were also observed remotely from the ground and from satellites using both active (lidar) and passive (solar occultation) techniques (remote sensing instruments were carried on aircraft and balloon platforms as well). In connection with the experimental work, models were developed to test theories of particle formation and evolution, to guide measurement strategies, to provide a means of connecting laboratory and field data, and to apply the knowledge gained to answer practical questions about global changes in climate, depletion of the ozone layer, and related environmental problems.

  3. The Influence of Volcanic Aerosols on Planetary Habitability

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    Chen, Howard; Horton, Daniel Ethan

    2017-01-01

    On rocky planetary bodies such as Proxima Centuri b, the detection of sulphate aerosols may indicate volcanism and tectonic activity; ingredients hypothesized to be necessary for planetary habitability. However, due to the effect of atmospheric aerosols on a planet’s energy balance, coupled with eruption constituent and frequency uncertainties, the potential impact of volcanic activity on planetary habitability remains unresolved. Here, we employ multi-column climate models in conjunction with a parameter space approach to test the effect of volcanic aerosols on planetary climate with various climate sensitivities. Preliminary results indicate that volcanic activity could provide a means of extending the inner edge of the habitable zone (IHZ), depending on eruption constituents and frequency. Previous work using transit spectra simulations have demonstrated the possibility of detecting transient aerosols of volcanic origin. Our work investigates the range of habitability implications detection of such aerosols would imply.

  4. Global volcanic aerosol properties derived from emissions, 1990-2014, using CESM1(WACCM): VOLCANIC AEROSOLS DERIVED FROM EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Michael J. [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Schmidt, Anja [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds UK; Easter, Richard [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Solomon, Susan [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Massachusetts USA; Kinnison, Douglas E. [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Ghan, Steven J. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Neely, Ryan R. [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds UK; National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Leeds, Leeds UK; Marsh, Daniel R. [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Conley, Andrew [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Bardeen, Charles G. [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Gettelman, Andrew [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA

    2016-03-06

    Accurate representation of global stratospheric aerosol properties from volcanic and non-volcanic sulfur emissions is key to understanding the cooling effects and ozone-loss enhancements of recent volcanic activity. Attribution of climate and ozone variability to volcanic activity is of particular interest in relation to the post-2000 slowing in the apparent rate of global average temperature increases, and variable recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole. We have developed a climatology of global aerosol properties from 1990 to 2014 calculated based on volcanic and non-volcanic emissions of sulfur sources. We have complied a database of volcanic SO2 emissions and plume altitudes for eruptions between 1990 and 2014, and a new prognostic capability for simulating stratospheric sulfate aerosols in version 5 of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, a component of the Community Earth System Model. Our climatology shows remarkable agreement with ground-based lidar observations of stratospheric aerosol optical depth (SAOD), and with in situ measurements of aerosol surface area density (SAD). These properties are key parameters in calculating the radiative and chemical effects of stratospheric aerosols. Our SAOD climatology represents a significant improvement over satellite-based analyses, which ignore aerosol extinction below 15 km, a region that can contain the vast majority of stratospheric aerosol extinction at mid- and high-latitudes. Our SAD climatology significantly improves on that provided for the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative, which misses 60% of the SAD measured in situ. Our climatology of aerosol properties is publicly available on the Earth System Grid.

  5. Volcanic aerosol and ozone depletion within the Antarctic polar vortex during the austral spring of 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshler, T.; Adriani, A.; Gobbi, G.P.; Hofmann, D.J.; Donfrancesco, G. di; Johnson, B.J. (Wyoming Univ., Laramie (United States) CNR, Ist. de Fisica dell' Atmosfera, Frascati (Italy) NOAA, Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Lab., Boulder, CO (United States) ENEA, Centro Ricerche Energia Casaccia, Rome (Italy))

    1992-09-01

    In the spring of 1991 the Antarctic lower stratosphere was characterized by a layer of volcanic aerosol from the Cerro Hudson eruption. This aerosol layer was observed from McMurdo Station, Antarctica, with both lidar and balloonborne particle counters beginning around 10 September. After 20 September the aerosol was observed daily between 9 and 13 km. In this layer homogeneous nucleation of new aerosol was observed with concentrations greater than 6000/cu cm. Comparisons of scattering ratio calculated from measured particle size distributions agree best with the lidar measurements when a real index of refraction near 1.5 is used. In the past 5 years of measurements, ozone below 13 km has been relatively unchanged during the annual Antartic ozone depletion; however, in 1991 ozone below 13 km decreased at a rate of 4 - 8 ppb/day over 30 days. This change began shortly after the appearance of the volcanic aerosol, providing direct measurements correlating volcanic aerosol and ozone depletion. 16 refs.

  6. Small volcanic eruptions and the stratospheric sulfate aerosol burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, David M.

    2012-09-01

    (Rampino and Self 1984, Pyle et al 1996, Self and Rampino 2012). But as yet, there is little evidence for the consequences of this scale of eruption for the climate system (Miles et al 2004), and few data against which to test simulations of stratospheric sulfur-injection 'geoengineering' scenarios of a similar scale and frequency (e.g. English et al 2012). A hint of the new volcano-observing capability came during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland. For a few days in April 2010 meteorological conditions, coupled with a dramatic increase in volcanic ash production, led to the wide dispersal of fine volcanic particles across northern Europe; an event which was widely tracked by ground-based and satellite-borne instruments, augmented by in situ measurements from balloons and aircraft (Bennett et al 2010, Flentje et al 2010, Harrison et al 2010, Stohl et al 2011). Despite the interest in Eyjafjallajökull at the time, this was, geologically, only a very modest eruption with limited sulfur emissions and an impact restricted mainly to the regional troposphere (e.g. Thomas and Prata 2011, Walker et al 2012). Then, in June 2011, a previously dormant volcano in north-east Africa began to erupt violently. Little is known about Nabro, which is a partially collapsed volcano that straddles the Eritrea-Ethiopia border, and has had no known historical activity (Wiart and Oppenheimer 2005). Despite the remote location, and lack of prior warning, the event and its aftermath were remarkably well captured by remote-sensing instruments, as demonstrated in the new letter by Sawamura et al (2012). Using both ground-based and satellite-borne laser-ranging (lidar) data, Sawamura et al (2012) were able to extract detailed information about the nature of the volcanic aerosol layer, and its spread around the globe. The eruption started strongly, with substantial ash plumes for the first 48 h, rising to 9-14 km altitude (Smithsonian Institution 2011, Bourassa et al 2012), that carried at

  7. A Model Simulation of Pinatubo Volcanic Aerosols in the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao , Jing-xia; Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.

    1995-01-01

    A one-dimensional, time-dependent model is used to study the chemical, microphysical, and radiative properties of volcanic aerosols produced by the Mount Pinatubo eruption on June 15, 1991. Our model treats gas-phase sulfur photochemistry, gas-to-particle conversion of sulfur, and the microphysics of sulfate aerosols and ash particles under stratospheric conditions. The dilution and diffusion of the volcanic eruption clouds are also accounted for in these conditions. Heteromolecular homogeneous and heterogeneous binary H2SO4/H2O nucleation, acid and water condensational growth, coagulation, and gravitational sedimentation are treated in detail in the model. Simulations suggested that after several weeks, the volcanic cloud was composed mainly of sulfuric acid/water droplets produced in situ from the SO2 emissions. The large amounts of SO2 (around 20 Mt) injected into the stratosphere by the Pinatubo eruption initiated homogeneous nucleation which generated a high concentration of small H2SO4/H2O droplets. These newly formed particles grew rapidly by condensation and coagulation in the first few months and then reach their stabilized sizes with effective radii in a range between 0.3 and 0.5 micron approximately one-half year after the eruption. The predicted volcanic cloud parameters reasonably agree with measurements in term of the vertical distribution and lifetime of the volcanic aerosols, their basic microphysical structures (e.g., size distribution, concentration, mass ratio, and surface area) and radiative properties. The persistent volcanic aerosols can produce significant anomalies in the radiation field, which have important climatic consequences. The large enhancement in aerosol surface area can result in measurable global stratospheric ozone depletion.

  8. Dust layer profiling using an aerosol dropsonde

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    Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Kaye, Paul Henry; Hirst, Edwin; Wieser, Andreas; Stanley, Warren

    2015-04-01

    Routine meteorological data is obtained in the atmosphere using disposable radiosondes, giving temperature, pressure, humidity and wind speed. Additional measurements are obtained from dropsondes, released from research aircraft. However, a crucial property not yet measured is the size and concentration of atmospheric particulates, including dust. Instead, indirect measurements are employed, relying on remote sensing, to meet the demands from areas such as climate research, air quality monitoring, civil emergencies etc. In addition, research aircraft can be used in situ, but airborne measurements are expensive, and aircraft use is restricted to near-horizontal profiling, which can be a limitation, as phenomena such as long-range transport depend on the vertical distribution of aerosol. The Centre for Atmospheric and Instrumentation Research at University of Hertfordshire develops light-scattering instruments for the characterization of aerosols and cloud particles. Recently a range of low-cost, miniature particle counters has been created, intended for use with systems such as disposable balloon-borne radiosondes, dropsondes, or in dense ground-based sensor networks. Versions for different particle size ranges exist. They have been used for vertical profiling of aerosols such as mineral dust or volcanic ash. A disadvantage of optical particle counters that sample through a narrow inlet is that they can become blocked, which can happen in cloud, for example. Hence, a different counter version has been developed, which can have open-path geometry, as the sensing zone is defined optically rather than being delimited by the flow system. This counter has been used for ground based air-quality monitoring around Heathrow airport. The counter has also been adapted for use with radiosondes or dropsondes. The dropsonde version has been successfully tested by launching it from research aircraft together with the so-called KITsonde, developed at the Karlsruhe Institute of

  9. The effect of volcanic aerosols on the thermal infrared budget of the lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlock, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal IR heating of the stratosphere due to volcanic aerosols such as those released by the eruption of El Chichon is investigated by means of clear-sky model computations using a LOWTRAN5 radiance code (Kneizys et al., 1980) modified by Charlock (1983) to increase its vertical resolution. The results are presented graphically for 4-km-thick aerosol layers at altitudes 18, 22, and 25 km and at latitudes 0 deg and 35 deg N, and the effects of tropospheric cloud height (0-10 km) are taken into account. The aerosol-induced IR divergence is shown to depend on aerosol height and to be highly and nonlinearly sensitive to the location of underlying water clouds.

  10. Variation of the vertical distribution of Nabro volcano aerosol layers in the stratosphere observed by LIDAR

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    Noh, Young Min; Shin, Dong Ho; Müller, Detlef

    2017-04-01

    We present results of the vertical distribution variation of volcanic aerosol layers in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The data were taken with our multiwavelength aerosol Raman lidar at Gwangju (35.10° N, 126.53° E), Korea. The volcanic ash particles and gases were released around 12 June 2011 during the eruption of the Nabro volcano (13.37° N, 41.7° E) in Eritrea, east Africa. Forward trajectory computations show that the volcanic aerosols were advected from North Africa to East Asia. The first measurement of the aerosol layer over Korea was on 19 June 2011. The aerosol layers appeared between 15 km and 17 km height asl (above sea level). The maximum value of the aerosol layer of the particle backscatter coefficient (1.5 ± 0.3 Mm-1 sr-1) and the linear particle depolarization ratio at 532 nm (2.2%) were observed at 16.4 km height asl. We continuously probed the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for this volcanic aerosol layer during the following 6 months, until December 2011. The volcanic aerosol layer showed a single-peak of the particle backscatter coefficient and a comparably narrow vertical thickness at our observation site at the beginning of our observation period (i.e. comparably soon after the initial eruption period). After that initial period the vertical distribution of the plume changed. Multiple peaks and a comparably broad geometrical thickness developed with progressing observation time. The vertical thickness of the volcanic aerosol layer expanded up to 10 km by 3 August 2011. The linear particle depolarization ratios were larger in the lower part of the aerosol layer than the upper part of the aerosol layer. We observed a strong variation of the AOD (aerosol optical depth) in the first two months of our lidar observations. After these two months the AOD gradually decreased with time from September to December 20111 and the maximum particle backscatter coefficients consistently decreased. The corresponding e

  11. Transient Sulfate Aerosols as a Signature of Exoplanet Volcanism

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Amit; Koehler, Matthew C; Sholes, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Geological activity is thought to be important for the origin of life and for maintaining planetary habitability. We show that transient sulfate aerosols could be a signature of exoplanet volcanism, and therefore a geologically active world. A detection of transient aerosols, if linked to volcanism, could thus aid in habitability evaluations of the exoplanet. On Earth, subduction-induced explosive eruptions inject SO2 directly into the stratosphere, leading to the formation of sulfate aerosols with lifetimes of months to years. We demonstrate that the rapid increase and gradual decrease in sulfate aerosol loading associated with these eruptions may be detectable in transit transmission spectra with future large-aperture telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and European Extremely-Large Telescope (E-ELT) for a planetary system at a distance of 10 pc, assuming an Earth-like atmosphere, bulk composition, and size. Specifically, we find that a S/N of 12.1 and 7.1 could be achieved with E-ELT (...

  12. Aerosol in the upper layer of earth's atmosphere

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    Morozhenko, A. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Nevodovskii, P. V.

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol layers exist in the upper atmospheres of Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and the Earth. The reason for their existence may be meteorites, rings, and removal of particles of planetary origin. Observations from 1979 to 1992 showed that the optical thickness of aerosol over the Earth's polar regions changed from tau =0.0002 up to tau =.1 for lambda = 1000 nm. The greatest values of tau were in 1984 and 1992 and they were preceded by a strong volcanic activity of El Chichon (1982) and Pinatubo (1991). We show that the above-mentioned increase in the optical thickness of the stratosphere aerosol can lead to the ozone layer decrease detected in 1970. The stratospheric aerosol nature (real part of refractive index), effective particle size r and changing tau with latitude remain un solved. Among distance methods for the determination of nr and r efficient is the analysis of the phase dependence of the polarization degree. The observational values of the intensity and pol arization degree invisible light are due to optical properties of the surface and optical thickness of the atmosphere, the values of which vary with latitude, longitude and time. Therefore, it is impossible to identify accurately the stratospheric aerosol contribution. When observing in UV at lambda negative factors can take place, namely, the emission of various gases playing depolarizing role, horizontal inhomogeneity of the effective optical thickness of ozone layer, and oriented particles (the polarization plane variation points to their presence).

  13. Distribution of sulfur aerosol precursors in the SPCZ released by continuous volcanic degassing at Ambrym, Vanuatu

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    Lefèvre, Jérôme; Menkes, Christophe; Bani, Philipson; Marchesiello, Patrick; Curci, Gabriele; Grell, Georg A.; Frouin, Robert

    2016-08-01

    volcanic species across the South Pacific atmosphere. For example, in the tropical cloudy air, the sulfate production in the aqueous phase is very efficient, resulting in the formation of a large cloud of highly scattering sulfate aerosols advected horizontally to Eastern Indonesia, in agreement with the AOD feature captured by MODIS/Aqua, but missed in CALIOP/CALIPSO (lidar) products. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that aerosol re-suspension due to evaporating droplets is a significant pathway for the supply of volcanic sulfur species in the remote marine boundary layer. By strongly modulating the irreversible loss due to wet scavenging, this aerosol process has a similar influence on the sulfur burden as natural emission from volcanoes or biogenic sources like dimethyl sulfate (DMS). The results emphasize the importance of MVA passive degassing and SPCZ dynamics on the aerosol background, and raise questions about potential impacts on the local climate and marine ecosystems.

  14. Strong Constraints on Aerosol-Cloud Interactions from Volcanic Eruptions

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    Malavelle, Florent F.; Haywood, Jim M.; Jones, Andy; Gettelman, Andrew; Clarisse, Lieven; Bauduin, Sophie; Allan, Richard P.; Karset, Inger Helene H.; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; hide

    2017-01-01

    Aerosols have a potentially large effect on climate, particularly through their interactions with clouds, but the magnitude of this effect is highly uncertain. Large volcanic eruptions produce sulfur dioxide, which in turn produces aerosols; these eruptions thus represent a natural experiment through which to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions. Here we show that the massive 2014-2015 fissure eruption in Holuhraun, Iceland, reduced the size of liquid cloud droplets - consistent with expectations - but had no discernible effect on other cloud properties. The reduction in droplet size led to cloud brightening and global-mean radiative forcing of around minus 0.2 watts per square metre for September to October 2014. Changes in cloud amount or cloud liquid water path, however, were undetectable, indicating that these indirect effects, and cloud systems in general, are well buffered against aerosol changes. This result will reduce uncertainties in future climate projections, because we are now able to reject results from climate models with an excessive liquid-water-path response.

  15. Aerosol fluxes in the marine boundary layer

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    Petelski, Tomasz; Zieliński, Tymon; Makuch, Przemysław; Kowalczyk, Jakub; Ponczkowska, Agnieszka; Drozdowska, Violetta; Piskozub, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    We present aerosol emission fluxes and concentrations calculated from in-situ measurement in the Nordic Sea from R/V Oceania. We compare vertical fluxes calculated with the eddy correlation and gradient methods. We use the results to test the hypothesis that marine aerosol emitted from the sea surface helps to clear the boundary layer from other aerosol particles. As the emitted droplets do not dry out in the highly humid surface layer air and because of their sizes most of them are deposited quickly at the sea surface. Therefore marine aerosol has many features of rain meaning that the deposition in the marine boundary layer in high wind events is controlled not only by the "dry" processes but also by the "wet" scavenging. We have estimated the effectiveness of the process using our own measurements of vertical aerosol fluxes in the Nordic Seas. This process could explain observed phenomenon of lower Arctic aerosol optical thickness (AOT) when the air masses moved over open sea than over sea-ice. We show a negative correlation between the sea-ice coverage in the seas adjacent to Svalbard and monthly AOT values in Ny Alesund.

  16. Regional radiative impact of volcanic aerosol from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Young

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available High northern latitude eruptions have the potential to release volcanic aerosol into the Arctic environment, perturbing the Arctic's climate system. In this study, we present assessments of shortwave (SW, longwave (LW and net direct aerosol radiative forcings (DARFs and atmospheric heating/cooling rates caused by volcanic aerosol from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano by performing radiative transfer modeling constrained by NASA A-Train satellite data. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, and the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model for volcanic ash were used to characterize aerosol across the region. A representative range of aerosol optical depths (AODs at 550 nm were obtained from MODIS, and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO was used to determine the altitude and thickness of the plumes. The optical properties of volcanic aerosol were calculated using a compositionally resolved microphysical model developed for both ash and sulfates. Two compositions of volcanic aerosol were considered in order to examine a fresh, ash rich plume and an older, ash poor plume. Optical models were incorporated into a modified version of the Santa Barbara Disort Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART model. Radiative transfer calculations were made for a range of surface albedos and solar zenith angles (SZA representative of the region. We find that the total DARF caused by a fresh, thin plume (~2.5–7 km at an AOD (550 nm range of 0.16–0.58 and SZA = 55° is –46 W m−2AOD−1 at the top of the atmosphere (TOA, 110 W m−2AOD−1 in the aerosol layer, and – 150 W m−2AOD−1 at the surface over seawater. However, the total DARF for the same plume over snow and at the same SZA at TOA, in the layer, and at the surface is 170, 170, and −2 W m−2

  17. The impact of stratospheric volcanic aerosol on decadal-scale climate predictions

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    Timmreck, Claudia; Pohlmann, Holger; Illing, Sebastian; Kadow, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of a large future volcanic eruption provides arguably the largest uncertainty concerning the evolution of the climate system on the time scale of a few years; but also the greatest opportunity to learn about the behavior of the climate system, and our models thereof. So the question emerges how large will the uncertainty be for future decadal climate predictions if no volcanic aerosol is taken into account? And how strong has volcanic aerosol affected decadal prediction skill on annual and multi-year seasonal scales over the CMIP5 hindcast period? To understand the impact of volcanic aerosol on multi-year seasonal and decadal climate predictions we performed CMIP5-type hindcasts without volcanic aerosol using the German MiKlip prediction system system baseline 1 from 1961 to 1991 and compared them to the corresponding simulations including aerosols. Our results show that volcanic aerosol significantly affects the prediction skill for global mean surface air temperature in the first five years after strong volcanic eruptions. Also on the regional scale a volcanic imprint on decadal-scale variability is detectable. Neglecting volcanic aerosol leads to a reduced prediction skill over the tropical and subtropical Atlantic, Indic and West Pacific but to an improvement over the tropical East-Pacific, where the model has in general no skill. Multi-seasonal differences in the skill for seasonal-mean temperatures are evident over Continental Europe with significant skill loss due to neglection of volcanic aerosol in boreal winter over central Europe, Scandinavia and over south-eastern Europe and the East-Mediterranean in boreal summer.

  18. Likely seeding of cirrus clouds by stratospheric Kasatochi volcanic aerosol particles near a mid-latitude tropopause fold

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    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Yang, Kai; Stewart, Sebastian A.; Fromm, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Following the explosive 7-8 August 2008 Mt. Kasatochi volcanic eruption in southwestern Alaska, a segment of the dispersing stratospheric aerosol layer was profiled beginning 16 August in continuous ground-based lidar measurements over the Mid-Atlantic coast of the eastern United States. On 17-18 August, the layer was displaced downward into the upper troposphere through turbulent mixing near a tropopause fold. Cirrus clouds and ice crystal fallstreaks were subsequently observed, having formed within the entrained layer. The likely seeding of these clouds by Kasatochi aerosol particles is discussed. Cloud formation is hypothesized as resulting from either preferential homogenous freezing of relatively large sulfate-based solution droplets deliquesced after mixing into the moist upper troposphere or through heterogeneous droplet activation by volcanic ash. Satellite-borne spectrometer measurements illustrate the evolution of elevated Kasatochi SO 2 mass concentrations regionally and the spatial extent of the cirrus cloud band induced by likely particle seeding. Satellite-borne polarization lidar observations confirm ice crystal presence within the clouds. Geostationary satellite-based water vapor channel imagery depicts strong regional subsidence, symptomatic of tropopause folding, along a deepening trough in the sub-tropical westerlies. Regional radiosonde profiling confirms both the position of the fold and depth of upper-tropospheric subsidence. These data represent the first unambiguous observations of likely cloud seeding by stratospheric volcanic aerosol particles after mixing back into the upper troposphere.

  19. Impact of Stratospheric Volcanic Aerosols on Age-of-Air and Transport of Long-Lived Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pitari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The radiative perturbation associated to stratospheric aerosols from major explosive volcanic eruptions may induce significant changes in stratospheric dynamics. The aerosol heating rates warm up the lower stratosphere and cause a westerly wind anomaly, with additional tropical upwelling. Large scale transport of stratospheric trace species may be perturbed as a consequence of this intensified Brewer–Dobson circulation. The radiatively forced changes of the stratospheric circulation during the first two years after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (June 1991 may help explain the observed trend decline of long-lived greenhouse gases at surface stations (approximately −8 and −0.4 ppbv/year for CH4 and N2O, respectively. This decline is partly driven by the increased mid- to high-latitude downward flux at the tropopause and also by an increased isolation of the tropical pipe in the vertical layer near the tropopause, with reduced horizontal eddy mixing. Results from a climate-chemistry coupled model are shown for both long-lived trace species and the stratospheric age-of-air. The latter results to be younger by approximately 0.5 year at 30 hPa for 3–4 years after the June 1991 Pinatubo eruption, as a result of the volcanic aerosols radiative perturbation and is consistent with independent estimates based on long time series of in situ profile measurements of SF6 and CO2. Younger age of air is also calculated after Agung, El Chichón and Ruiz eruptions, as well as negative anomalies of the N2O growth rate at the extratropical tropopause layer. This type of analysis is made comparing the results of two ensembles of model simulations (1960–2005, one including stratospheric volcanic aerosols and their radiative interactions and a reference case where the volcanic aerosols do not interact with solar and planetary radiation.

  20. Phosphorus-bearing Aerosol Particles From Volcanic Plumes

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    Obenholzner, J. H.; Schroettner, H.; Poelt, P.; Delgado, H.; Caltabiano, T.

    2003-12-01

    Particles rich in P or bulk geochemical data of volcanic aerosol particles showing high P contents are known from many volcanic plumes (Stanton, 1994; Obenholzner et al., 2003). FESEM/EDS analysis of individual particles obtained from the passively degassing plume of Popocatepetl volcano, Mx. (1997) and from the plume of Stromboli (May 2003) show P frequently. Even at the high resolution of the FESEM, euhedral apatite crystals could not be observed. At Popocatepetl (1997) spherical Ca-P-O particles are common. Fluffy, fractal or botryoidal particles also can contain EDS-detectable amounts of P. The EDS spectrum of such particles can comprise various elements. However most particles show P, S and Cl. P-S and P-S-metal species are known in chemistry but do they occur in volcanic plumes? Stoichiometric considerations had been made in the past suggesting the existence of P-S species in plumes (Stanton 1994), gas sampling and remote gas monitoring systems have not detected yet such molecules in plumes. The particle spectrum of the reawakened Popocateptel volcano might be related to accumulation of volatiles at the top of a magma chamber during the phase of dormancy. P-Fe rich, Ca-free aggregates are also known from the eruption of El Chichon 1982 (SEM/EDS by M. Sheridan, per. comm. 08-24-2003). Persistently active volcanoes (i.e. Stromboli) represent a different category according to continuous degassing and aerosol particle formation. A particle collector ( ca. 90 ml/min) accompanied a COSPEC helicopter flight at Stromboli (May 15, 2003) after one of the rare types of sub-plinian events on April 5 2003. P-bearing particles are very common. For instance, an Fe oxide grain (diam. = 2 æm) is partially covered by fluffy and euhedral P-bearing matter. The elements detected are P, Cl, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti and (Fe). The fluffy and the euhedral (rhombohedral?) matter show in SE-BSE-mix image almost identical grey colors. At Stromboli and Popocatepetl particles on which

  1. Microphysical, Macrophysical and Radiative Signatures of Volcanic Aerosols in Trade Wind Cumulus Observed by the A-Train

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    Yuan, T.; Remer, L. A.; Yu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Increased aerosol concentrations can raise planetary albedo not only by reflecting sunlight and increasing cloud albedo, but also by changing cloud amount. However, detecting aerosol effect on cloud amount has been elusive to both observations and modeling due to potential buffering mechanisms and convolution of meteorology. Here through a natural experiment provided by long-tem1 degassing of a low-lying volcano and use of A-Train satellite observations, we show modifications of trade cumulus cloud fields including decreased droplet size, decreased precipitation efficiency and increased cloud amount are associated with volcanic aerosols. In addition we find significantly higher cloud tops for polluted clouds. We demonstrate that the observed microphysical and macrophysical changes cannot be explained by synoptic meteorology or the orographic effect of the Hawaiian Islands. The "total shortwave aerosol forcin", resulting from direct and indirect forcings including both cloud albedo and cloud amount. is almost an order of magnitude higher than aerosol direct forcing alone. Furthermore, the precipitation reduction associated with enhanced aerosol leads to large changes in the energetics of air-sea exchange and trade wind boundary layer. Our results represent the first observational evidence of large-scale increase of cloud amount due to aerosols in a trade cumulus regime, which can be used to constrain the representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in climate models. The findings also have implications for volcano-climate interactions and climate mitigation research.

  2. Microphysical, macrophysical and radiative signatures of volcanic aerosols in trade wind cumulus observed by the A-Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yuan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Increased aerosol concentrations can raise planetary albedo not only by reflecting sunlight and increasing cloud albedo, but also by changing cloud amount. However, detecting aerosol effect on cloud amount has been elusive to both observations and modeling due to potential buffering mechanisms and convolution of meteorology. Here through a natural experiment provided by long-term degassing of a low-lying volcano and use of A-Train satellite observations, we show modifications of trade cumulus cloud fields including decreased droplet size, decreased precipitation efficiency and increased cloud amount are associated with volcanic aerosols. In addition we find significantly higher cloud tops for polluted clouds. We demonstrate that the observed microphysical and macrophysical changes cannot be explained by synoptic meteorology or the orographic effect of the Hawaiian Islands. The "total shortwave aerosol forcin", resulting from direct and indirect forcings including both cloud albedo and cloud amount, is almost an order of magnitude higher than aerosol direct forcing alone. Furthermore, the precipitation reduction associated with enhanced aerosol leads to large changes in the energetics of air-sea exchange and trade wind boundary layer. Our results represent the first observational evidence of large-scale increase of cloud amount due to aerosols in a trade cumulus regime, which can be used to constrain the representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in climate models. The findings also have implications for volcano-climate interactions and climate mitigation research.

  3. Glass shards, pumice fragments and volcanic aerosol particles - diagenesis a recorder of volcanic activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenholzner, J. H.; Schroettner, H.; Poelt, P.; Delgado, H.

    2003-04-01

    Detailed SEM/EDS studies of Triassic (Southern Alps, A, I, Sl) and Miocene (Mixteca Alta, Mexico) tuffs revealed that volcanic glass shards can be replaced by zeolites (analcite), chlorites and smectites preserving the shape of primary shards (1). The Triassic pyroclastic deposits have been incorporated in the pre-Alpine burial diagenesis, the Miocene pyroclastic deposits are bentonites. The volcanologist is impressed by the circumstances that million years old pyroclast relict textures can be sized. Shape parameters obtained by image analysis can be compared with much younger pyroclastic deposits (2). Both deposits have not been effected by shearing. The alteration of pumice fragments of Triassic age is not a simple replacement process. Intergrowth of different illites and chlorites and probably vesicle filling by SiO2 and subsequent overgrowth make a reconstruction sometimes difficult. These processes are accompanied by the formation of REE-, Y- and Zr-bearing minerals as well as with the alteration of zircons. Studies of recently erupted ash from Popocatepetl volcano reveal the presence of a variety of µm-sized contact-metamorphosed clasts being a part of the volcanic ash (3). Such clasts should be present in many older pyroclastic deposits, especially where volcanoes had been situated on massive sedimentary units providing contact metamorphism in the realm of a magma chamber or during magma ascent. Volcanic aerosol particles collected in 1997 from the passively degassing plume of Popocatepetl volcano revealed in FESEM/EDS analysis (H. Schroettner and P. Poelt) a wide spectrum of fluffy, spherical and coagulated spherical particles (µm-sized). Under pre-vacuum conditions they remained stable for ca. 3 years (3). In nature the fate of these particles in the atmosphere is unknown. Are there relicts in marine, lacustrine sediments and ice cores, which could be used as proxies of volcanic activity? (1) Obenholzner &Heiken,1999. Ann.Naturhist.Mus.Wien, 100 A, 13

  4. PSC and volcanic aerosol routine observations in Antarctica by UV-visible ground-based spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkissian, A.; Pommereau, J. P.; Goutail, F.

    1994-01-01

    Polar statospheric clouds (PSC) and stratospheric aerosol can be observed by ground-based UV-visible spectrometry by looking at the variation of the color of the sky during twilight. A radiative transfer model shows that reddenings are caused by high altitude (22-28 km) thin layers of scatterers, while low altitude (12-20 km) thick ones result in blueings. The color index method applied on 4 years of observations at Dumont d'Urville (67 deg S), from 1988 to 1991, shows that probably because the station is located at the edge of the vortex, dense PSC are uncommon. More unexpected is the existence of a systematic seasonal variation of the color of the twilight sky - bluer at spring - which reveals the formation of a dense scattering layer at or just above the tropopause at the end of the winter. Large scattering layers are reported above the station in 1991, first in August around 12-14 km, later in September at 22-24 km. They are attributed to volcanic aerosol from Mt Hudson and Mt Pinatubo respectively, which erupted in 1991. Inspection of the data shows that the lowest entered rapidly into the polar vortex but not the highest which remained outside, demonstrating that the vortex was isolated at 22-26 km.

  5. Sulfur mass loading of the atmosphere from volcanic eruptions: Calibration of the ice core record on basis of sulfate aerosol deposition in polar regions from the 1982 El Chichon eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Laj, Paolo

    1990-01-01

    Major volcanic eruptions disperse large quantities of sulfur compound throughout the Earth's atmosphere. The sulfuric acid aerosols resulting from such eruptions are scavenged by snow within the polar regions and appear in polar ice cores as elevated acidity layers. Glacio-chemical studies of ice cores can, thus, provide a record of past volcanism, as well as the means for understanding the fate of volcanic sulfur in the atmosphere. The primary objectives of this project are to study the chemistry and physical properties of volcanic fallout in a Greenland Ice Core in order to evaluate the impact of the volcanic gases on the atmospheric chemistry and the total atmospheric mass of volcanic aerosols emitted by major volcanic eruptions. We propose to compare the ice core record to other atmospheric records performed during the last 10 years to investigate transport and deposition of volcanic materials.

  6. The persistently variable "background" stratospheric aerosol layer and global climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S; Daniel, J S; Neely, R R; Vernier, J-P; Dutton, E G; Thomason, L W

    2011-08-12

    Recent measurements demonstrate that the "background" stratospheric aerosol layer is persistently variable rather than constant, even in the absence of major volcanic eruptions. Several independent data sets show that stratospheric aerosols have increased in abundance since 2000. Near-global satellite aerosol data imply a negative radiative forcing due to stratospheric aerosol changes over this period of about -0.1 watt per square meter, reducing the recent global warming that would otherwise have occurred. Observations from earlier periods are limited but suggest an additional negative radiative forcing of about -0.1 watt per square meter from 1960 to 1990. Climate model projections neglecting these changes would continue to overestimate the radiative forcing and global warming in coming decades if these aerosols remain present at current values or increase.

  7. Effect of volcanic aerosol on stratospheric NO2 and N2O5 from 2002–2014 as measured by Odin-OSIRIS and Envisat-MIPAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Adams

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Following the large volcanic eruptions of Pinatubo in 1991 and El Chichón in 1982, decreases in stratospheric NO2 associated with enhanced aerosol were observed. The Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (OSIRIS measured the widespread enhancements of stratospheric aerosol following seven volcanic eruptions between 2002 and 2014, although the magnitudes of these eruptions were all much smaller than the Pinatubo and El Chichón eruptions. In order to isolate and quantify the relationship between volcanic aerosol and NO2, NO2 anomalies were calculated using measurements from OSIRIS and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS. In the tropics, variability due to the quasi-biennial oscillation was subtracted from the time series. OSIRIS profile measurements indicate that the strongest anticorrelations between NO2 and volcanic aerosol extinction were for the 5 km layer starting  ∼  3 km above the climatological mean tropopause at the given latitude. OSIRIS stratospheric NO2 partial columns in this layer were found to be smaller than background NO2 levels during these aerosol enhancements by up to  ∼  60 % with typical Pearson correlation coefficients of R ∼ −0. 7. MIPAS also observed decreases in NO2 partial columns during periods affected by volcanic aerosol, with percent differences of up to  ∼  25 % relative to background levels. An even stronger anticorrelation was observed between OSIRIS aerosol optical depth and MIPAS N2O5 partial columns, with R ∼ −0. 9, although no link with MIPAS HNO3 was observed. The variation in OSIRIS NO2 with increasing aerosol was found to be consistent with simulations from a photochemical box model within the estimated model uncertainty.

  8. Improved SAGE II cloud/aerosol categorization and observations of the Asian tropopause aerosol layer: 1989–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. W. Thomason

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the challenges associated with the interpretation of extinction coefficient measurements by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II in the presence of clouds. In particular, we have found that tropospheric aerosol analyses are highly dependent on a robust method for identifying when clouds affect the measured extinction coefficient. Herein, we describe an improved cloud identification method that appears to capture cloud/aerosol events more effectively than early methods. In addition, we summarize additional challenges to observing the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL using SAGE II observations. Using this new approach, we perform analyses of the upper troposphere, focusing on periods in which the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere is relatively free of volcanic material (1989–1990 and after 1996. Of particular interest is the Asian monsoon anticyclone where CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Pathfinder Satellite Observations has observed an aerosol enhancement. This enhancement, called the ATAL, has a similar morphology to observed enhancements in long-lived trace gas species like CO. Since the CALIPSO record begins in 2006, the question of how long this aerosol feature has been present requires a new look at the long-lived SAGE II data sets despite significant hurdles to its use in the subtropical upper troposphere. We find that there is no evidence of ATAL in the SAGE II data prior to 1998. After 1998, it is clear that aerosol in the upper troposphere in the ATAL region is substantially enhanced relative to the period before that time. In addition, the data generally supports the presence of the ATAL beginning in 1999 and continuing through the end of the mission, though some years (e.g., 2003 are complicated by the presence of episodic enhancements most likely of volcanic origin.

  9. Total Volcanic Stratospheric Aerosol Optical Depths and Implications for Global Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, D. A.; Solomon, S.; Barnes, J. E.; Burlakov, V. D.; Deshler, T.; Dolgii, S. I.; Herber, A. B.; Nagai, T.; Neely, R. R., III; Nevzorov, A. V.; Ritter, C.; Sakai, T.; Santer, B. D.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, A.; Uchino, O.; Vernier, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cooling effect of recent volcanoes is of particular interest in the context of the post-2000 slowing of the rate of global warming. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth above 15 km have demonstrated that small-magnitude volcanic eruptions substantially perturb incoming solar radiation. Here we use lidar, Aerosol Robotic Network, and balloon-borne observations to provide evidence that currently available satellite databases neglect substantial amounts of volcanic aerosol between the tropopause and 15 km at middle to high latitudes and therefore underestimate total radiative forcing resulting from the recent eruptions. Incorporating these estimates into a simple climate model, we determine the global volcanic aerosol forcing since 2000 to be 0.19 +/- 0.09W/sq m. This translates into an estimated global cooling of 0.05 to 0.12 C. We conclude that recent volcanic events are responsible for more post-2000 cooling than is implied by satellite databases that neglect volcanic aerosol effects below 15 km.

  10. Detection of volcanic sulfate aerosol with Envisat MIPAS shown for the Kasatochi, Sarychev, and Nabro eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griessbach, Sabine; Hoffmann, Lars; Spang, Reinhold; von Hobe, Marc; Müller, Rolf; Riese, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Stratospheric sulfate aerosol is known to have a strong impact on climate. Transport pathways of sulfur dioxide and sulfate aerosol to the stratosphere are still discussed. It is known that volcanic eruptions can inject significant amounts of sulfur directly into the stratosphere. Most sulfur, however, is injected into the troposphere and only a fraction of it can make its way into the stratosphere. Global and altitude resolved time series of observations are a valuable source of information for sulfur dioxide and sulfate aerosol detection. Here we present a new aerosol detection method for the infrared limb sounder Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) and the results for the Kasatochi, Sarychev, and Nabro eruptions. The new detection method utilizes three infrared window regions that are located around 830, 960, and 1224 cm-1. The combination of these three windows allows for a better detection of enhanced aerosol events in the troposphere as well as the discrimination from ice clouds. With this new method the 10 year record of MIPAS measurements was analyzed. The most remarkable sulfate aerosol events follow the Kasatochi, Sarychev, and Nabro eruptions. After these eruptions enhanced aerosol is detected in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region. Within one to two months it spreads over most of the northern hemisphere. In the tropics the aerosol reaches altitudes up to around 20 km and in the Arctic up to 15 km. The enhanced aerosol signal can be observed for about 5, 7, and up to 10 month for the Kasatochi, Sarychev, and Nabro eruptions, respectively. During this period the enhanced aerosol detections decrease in number, strength, and observation altitude. After the Nabro eruption on 13 June 2011 volcanic aerosol is detected in the UTLS region two days after the initial eruption. The following days the aerosol moves around the northern edge of the Asian monsoon region, is then transported southwards and later

  11. Importance of tropospheric volcanic aerosol for indirect radiative forcing of climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmidt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Observations and models have shown that continuously degassing volcanoes have a potentially large effect on the natural background aerosol loading and the radiative state of the atmosphere. Here, we use a global aerosol microphysics model to quantify the impact of these volcanic emissions on the cloud albedo radiative forcing under pre-industrial (PI and present-day (PD conditions. We find that volcanic degassing increases global annual mean cloud droplet number concentrations by 40% under PI conditions, but by only 10% under PD conditions. Consequently, volcanic degassing causes a global annual mean cloud albedo effect of −1.06 W m−2 in the PI era but only −0.56 W m−2 in the PD era. This non-equal effect is explained partly by the lower background aerosol concentrations in the PI era, but also because more aerosol particles are produced per unit of volcanic sulphur emission in the PI atmosphere. The higher sensitivity of the PI atmosphere to volcanic emissions has an important consequence for the anthropogenic cloud radiative forcing because the large uncertainty in volcanic emissions translates into an uncertainty in the PI baseline cloud radiative state. Assuming a −50/+100% uncertainty range in the volcanic sulphur flux, we estimate the annual mean anthropogenic cloud albedo forcing to lie between −1.16 W m−2 and −0.86 W m−2. Therefore, the volcanically induced uncertainty in the PI baseline cloud radiative state substantially adds to the already large uncertainty in the magnitude of the indirect radiative forcing of climate.

  12. Effects of El Chichon volcanic effluents on stratospheric aerosol dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of El Chichon's April 1982 eruption on stratospheric aerosol dynamics are presently discussed in terms of log-normal size distributions over 15-20 km sample altitudes between 30 and 45 deg N over the contiguous U.S. After collection, samples were studied by SEM, and log-normal size distributions were fitted to the data-points obtained. It is found that stratospheric aerosol behavior is explainable by the laws of aerosol mechanics more easily than has been the case for tropospheric aerosol, for which the source-sink relationship is much more complex.

  13. Aerosols upwind of Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign: regional scale biomass burning, dust and volcanic ash from aircraft measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkermann, W.; Steinbrecher, R.

    2009-04-01

    During the MILAGRO Campaign March/April 2006 a series of aircraft flights with the FZK microlight D-MIFU were performed in the area southeast of Mexico City starting from Puebla airport, circling the national park area of Ixtachiuatl and Popocatepetl and scanning the Chalco valley down to Cuautla in the Cuernavaca province. All flights were combined with vertical profiles up to 4500 m a.s.l. in several locations, typically north of volcano Ixtachiuatl on the Puebla side, above Chalco or Tenago del Aire and south of volcano Popocatepetl, either at Cuautla or Atlixco. In Tenango del Aire a ceilometer was additionally operated continuously for characterization of the planetary boundary layer. The aircraft carried a set of aerosol instrumentation, fine and coarse particles and size distributions as well as a 7 wavelength aethalometer. Additionally meteorological parameters, temperature and dewpoint, global radiation and actinic radiation balance, respectively photolysis rates, and ozone concentrations were measured. The instrumentation allowed to characterize the aerosol according to their sources and also their impact on radiation transfer. Biomass burning aerosol, windblown dust and volcanic ash were identified within the upwind area of Mexico City with large differences between the dry season in the first weeks of the campaign and the by far cleaner situation after beginning thunderstorm activity towards the end of the campaign. Also the aerosol characteristics inside and outside the Mexico City basin were often completely different. With wind speeds of ~ 5 m/sec from southerly directions in the Chalco valley the aerosol mixture can reach the City within ~ 2 h. Rural aerosol mixtures from the Cuernavaca plain were mixed during the transport with dust from the MC basin. Very high intensity biomass burning plumes normally reached higher altitudes and produced pyrocumulus clouds. These aerosols were injected mainly into the free troposphere. Within the MC basin a large

  14. Massive Volcanic SO2 Oxidation and Sulphate Aerosol Deposition in Cenozoic North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcanic eruptions release a large amount of sulphur dioxide (SO2) into the atmosphere. SO2 is oxidized to sulphate and can subsequently form sulphate aerosol, which can affect the Earth's radiation balance, biologic productivity and high-altitude ozone co...

  15. 30-year lidar observations of the stratospheric aerosol layer state over Tomsk (Western Siberia, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, Vladimir V.; Burlakov, Vladimir D.; Nevzorov, Aleksei V.; Pravdin, Vladimir L.; Savelieva, Ekaterina S.; Gerasimov, Vladislav V.

    2017-02-01

    There are only four lidar stations in the world which have almost continuously performed observations of the stratospheric aerosol layer (SAL) state over the last 30 years. The longest time series of the SAL lidar measurements have been accumulated at the Mauna Loa Observatory (Hawaii) since 1973, the NASA Langley Research Center (Hampton, Virginia) since 1974, and Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany) since 1976. The fourth lidar station we present started to perform routine observations of the SAL parameters in Tomsk (56.48° N, 85.05° E, Western Siberia, Russia) in 1986. In this paper, we mainly focus on and discuss the stratospheric background period from 2000 to 2005 and the causes of the SAL perturbations over Tomsk in the 2006-2015 period. During the last decade, volcanic aerosol plumes from tropical Mt. Manam, Soufrière Hills, Rabaul, Merapi, Nabro, and Kelut and extratropical (northern) Mt. Okmok, Kasatochi, Redoubt, Sarychev Peak, Eyjafjallajökull, and Grímsvötn were detected in the stratosphere over Tomsk. When it was possible, we used the NOAA HYSPLIT trajectory model to assign aerosol layers observed over Tomsk to the corresponding volcanic eruptions. The trajectory analysis highlighted some surprising results. For example, in the cases of the Okmok, Kasatochi, and Eyjafjallajökull eruptions, the HYSPLIT air mass backward trajectories, started from altitudes of aerosol layers detected over Tomsk with a lidar, passed over these volcanoes on their eruption days at altitudes higher than the maximum plume altitudes given by the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program. An explanation of these facts is suggested. The role of both tropical and northern volcanic eruptions in volcanogenic aerosol loading of the midlatitude stratosphere is also discussed. In addition to volcanoes, we considered other possible causes of the SAL perturbations over Tomsk, i.e., the polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) events and smoke plumes from strong forest fires. At least

  16. Atmospheric aerosol layers over Bangkok Metropolitan Region from CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridhikitti, Arika

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies suggested that aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Earth Observing System satellite retrievals could be used for inference of ground-level air quality in various locations. This application may be appropriate if pollution in elevated atmospheric layers is insignificant. This study investigated the significance of elevated air pollution layers over the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR) from all available aerosol layer scenes taken from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) for years 2007 to 2011. The results show that biomass burning smoke layers alone were the most frequently observed. The smoke layers accounted for high AOD variations and increased AOD levels. In the dry seasons, the smoke layers alone with high AOD levels were likely brought to the BMR via northeasterly to easterly prevailing winds and found at altitudes above the typical BMR mixing heights of approximately 0.7 to 1.5 km. The smoke should be attributed to biomass burning emissions outside the BMR.

  17. Cloud, Aerosol, and Volcanic Ash Retrievals Using ASTR and SLSTR with ORAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarragh, Gregory; Poulsen, Caroline; Povey, Adam; Thomas, Gareth; Christensen, Matt; Sus, Oliver; Schlundt, Cornelia; Stapelberg, Stefan; Stengel, Martin; Grainger, Don

    2015-12-01

    The Optimal Retrieval of Aerosol and Cloud (ORAC) is a generalized optimal estimation system that retrieves cloud, aerosol and volcanic ash parameters using satellite imager measurements in the visible to infrared. Use of the same algorithm for different sensors and parameters leads to consistency that facilitates inter-comparison and interaction studies. ORAC currently supports ATSR, AVHRR, MODIS and SEVIRI. In this proceeding we discuss the ORAC retrieval algorithm applied to ATSR data including the retrieval methodology, the forward model, uncertainty characterization and discrimination/classification techniques. Application of ORAC to SLSTR data is discussed including the additional features that SLSTR provides relative to the ATSR heritage. The ORAC level 2 and level 3 results are discussed and an application of level 3 results to the study of cloud/aerosol interactions is presented.

  18. Variability of Biomass Burning Aerosols Layers and Near Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilescu, Jeni; Belegante, Livio; Marmureanu, Luminita; Toanca, Flori

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize aerosols from both chemical and optical point of view and to explore the conditions to sense the same particles in elevated layers and at the ground. Three days of continuous measurements using a multi-wavelength depolarization lidar(RALI) and a C-ToF-AMS aerosol mass spectrometer are analyzed. The presence of smoke particles was assessed in low level layers from RALI measurements. Chemical composition of submicronic volatile/semi-volatile aerosols at ground level was monitored by the CTOF AMS Several episodes of biomass burning aerosols have been identified by both techniques due to the presence of specific markers (f60, linear particle depolarization ratio, Ängström exponent).

  19. Developments in the Aerosol Layer Height Retrieval Algorithm for the Copernicus Sentinel-4/UVN Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Swadhin; Sanders, Abram; Veefkind, Pepijn

    2016-04-01

    The Sentinel-4 mission is a part of the European Commission's Copernicus programme, the goal of which is to provide geo-information to manage environmental assets, and to observe, understand and mitigate the effects of the changing climate. The Sentinel-4/UVN instrument design is motivated by the need to monitor trace gas concentrations and aerosols in the atmosphere from a geostationary orbit. The on-board instrument is a high resolution UV-VIS-NIR (UVN) spectrometer system that provides hourly radiance measurements over Europe and northern Africa with a spatial sampling of 8 km. The main application area of Sentinel-4/UVN is air quality. One of the data products that is being developed for Sentinel-4/UVN is the Aerosol Layer Height (ALH). The goal is to determine the height of aerosol plumes with a resolution of better than 0.5 - 1 km. The ALH product thus targets aerosol layers in the free troposphere, such as desert dust, volcanic ash and biomass during plumes. KNMI is assigned with the development of the Aerosol Layer Height (ALH) algorithm. Its heritage is the ALH algorithm developed by Sanders and De Haan (ATBD, 2016) for the TROPOMI instrument on board the Sentinel-5 Precursor mission that is to be launched in June or July 2016 (tentative date). The retrieval algorithm designed so far for the aerosol height product is based on the absorption characteristics of the oxygen-A band (759-770 nm). The algorithm has heritage to the ALH algorithm developed for TROPOMI on the Sentinel 5 precursor satellite. New aspects for Sentinel-4/UVN include the higher resolution (0.116 nm compared to 0.4 for TROPOMI) and hourly observation from the geostationary orbit. The algorithm uses optimal estimation to obtain a spectral fit of the reflectance across absorption band, while assuming a single uniform layer with fixed width to represent the aerosol vertical distribution. The state vector includes amongst other elements the height of this layer and its aerosol optical

  20. Observation and Model Comparison on Precipitation response to Volcanic Aerosols in the Asian Monsoon Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Z.; Gao, C.

    2014-12-01

    Disagreement between observation and models were shown on the volcanic sulfate aerosols' effect on precipitation in Asia monsoon region. Here, we investigate it by classifying two groups of historical volcanism between AD 1300 and AD 1850 to 2, 1, and 0.5 times Pinatubo sulfate injection into the northern hemisphere (NH) stratosphere based on IVI2 and Crowley2013 volcanic reconstructions, then comparing precipitation response of BCC-CSM1 and CCSM4 model outputs under past1000 scenario to IVI2 volcanic group, and that of MIROC-ESM and MPI-ESM-P to Crowley2013 group with tree-ring reconstruction data MADA. In both groups, Superposed Epoch Analysis (SEA) of MADA and four model outputs show a drying trend over Asia monsoon regions after the NH injections and drier with larger sulfate magnitude, with a 1 or 2 year time lag in MADA comparing to the model outputs, this may result from the biological response of tree ring data that lag behind the meteorological forcing of model outputs. On the other hand, different responses to Southern Hemisphere (SH) only injections were found between the two groups as well as MADA and model outputs. Most of the results were found significant at 90% or even 95% significance level with a 10,000 Monte Carlo resampling procedure. Spatial variation of MADA show a significant drying effect in central Asia in year 1, and then move westward in year 2 and 3 after 2, 1×Pinatubo eruptions of IVI2, while a significant wetting effect in northwest Asia but drying effect in south Asia were shown in Crowley2013 group. However, model outputs did not show spatial variation, with a pattern drier in northwest than in southeast Asia along the years after the eruptions in both volcanic groups. Thus, observation and model outputs are well consistent on precipitation response to NH aerosol injections, but models may need large improvement on the response to SH aerosol injection as well as the spatial variation. Besides, opposite precipitation response to SH

  1. The Two-Column Aerosol Project: Phase I - Overview and Impact of Elevated Aerosol Layers on Aerosol Optical Depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Burton, Sharon; Cairns, Brian; Chand, Duli; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dunagan, Stephen; Ferrare, Richard A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jefferson, Anne; Johnson, Roy; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Kollias, Pavlos; Lamer, Katia; Lantz, K.; Mei, Fan; Miller, Mark A.; Michalsky, Joseph; Ortega, Ivan; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Rogers, Ray; Russell, P.; Redemann, Jens; Sedlacek, Art; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John E.; Shinozuka, Yohei; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Tyrrell, Megan; Wilson, Jacqueline; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2016-01-08

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), which was conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique field study that was designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including those related to aerosol mixing state and aerosol radiative forcing. The study was designed to sample the atmosphere at a number of altitudes, from near the surface to as high as 8 km, within two atmospheric columns; one located near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. TCAP included the yearlong deployment of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) that was located at the base of the Cape Cod column, as well as summer and winter aircraft intensive observation periods of the ARM Aerial Facility. One important finding from TCAP is the relatively common occurrence (on four of six nearly cloud-free flights) of elevated aerosol layers in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL-2). These layers contributed up to 60% of the total aerosol optical depth (AOD) observed in the column. Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning aerosol and nitrate compared to the aerosol found near the surface.

  2. Imaginary refractive index and other microphysical properties of volcanic ash, Sarahan dust, and other mineral aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Lima, A.; Martins, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Artaxo, P.; Todd, M.; Ben Ami, Y.; Dolgos, G.; Espinosa, R.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol properties are essential to support remote sensing measurements, atmospheric circulation and climate models. This research aims to improve the understanding of the optical and microphysical properties of different types of aerosols particles. Samples of volcanic ash, Saharan dust and other mineral aerosols particles were analyzed by different techniques. Ground samples were sieved down to 45um, de-agglomerated and resuspended in the laboratory using a Fluidized Bed Aerosol Generator (FBAG). Particles were collected on Nuclepore filters into PM10, PM2.5, or PM1.0. and analyzed by different techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for determination of size distribution and shape, spectral reflectance for determination of the optical absorption properties as a function of the wavelength, material density, and X-Ray fluorescence for the elemental composition. The spectral imaginary part of refractive index from the UV to the short wave infrared (SWIR) wavelength was derived empirically from the measurements of the spectral mass absorption coefficient, size distribution and density of the material. Some selected samples were also analyzed with the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph) instrument for the characterization of the aerosol polarized phase function. This work compares results of the spectral refractive index of different materials obtained by our methodology with those available in the literature. In some cases there are significant differences both in magnitude and spectral dependence of the imaginary refractive index. These differences are evaluated and discussed in this work.

  3. The impact of volcanic aerosol on the Northern Hemisphere stratospheric polar vortex: mechanisms and sensitivity to forcing structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toohey

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations and simple theoretical arguments suggest that the Northern Hemisphere (NH stratospheric polar vortex is stronger in winters following major volcanic eruptions. However, recent studies show that climate models forced by prescribed volcanic aerosol fields fail to reproduce this effect. We investigate the impact of volcanic aerosol forcing on stratospheric dynamics, including the strength of the NH polar vortex, in ensemble simulations with the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model. The model is forced by four different prescribed forcing sets representing the radiative properties of stratospheric aerosol following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo: two forcing sets are based on observations, and are commonly used in climate model simulations, and two forcing sets are constructed based on coupled aerosol–climate model simulations. For all forcings, we find that temperature and zonal wind anomalies in the NH high latitudes are not directly impacted by anomalous volcanic aerosol heating. Instead, high latitude effects result from robust enhancements in stratospheric residual circulation, which in turn result, at least in part, from enhanced stratospheric wave activity. High latitude effects are therefore much less robust than would be expected if they were the direct result of aerosol heating. While there is significant ensemble variability in the high latitude response to each aerosol forcing set, the mean response is sensitive to the forcing set used. Significant differences, for example, are found in the NH polar stratosphere temperature and zonal wind response to two different forcing data sets constructed from different versions of SAGE II aerosol observations. Significant strengthening of the polar vortex, in rough agreement with the expected response, is achieved only using aerosol forcing extracted from prior coupled aerosol–climate model simulations. Differences in the dynamical response to the different forcing sets used

  4. Ozone Depletion at Mid-Latitudes: Coupling of Volcanic Aerosols and Temperature Variability to Anthropogenic Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S.; Portmann, R. W.; Garcia, R. R.; Randel, W.; Wu, F.; Nagatani, R.; Gleason, J.; Thomason, L.; Poole, L. R.; McCormick, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    Satellite observations of total ozone at 40-60 deg N are presented from a variety of instruments over the time period 1979-1997. These reveal record low values in 1992-3 (after Pinatubo) followed by partial but incomplete recovery. The largest post-Pinatubo reductions and longer-term trends occur in spring, providing a critical test for chemical theories of ozone depletion. The observations are shown to be consistent with current understanding of the chemistry of ozone depletion when changes in reactive chlorine and stratospheric aerosol abundances are considered along with estimates of wave-driven fluctuations in stratospheric temperatures derived from global temperature analyses. Temperature fluctuations are shown to make significant contributions to model calculated northern mid-latitude ozone depletion due to heterogeneous chlorine activation on liquid sulfate aerosols at temperatures near 200-210 K (depending upon water vapor pressure), particularly after major volcanic eruptions. Future mid-latitude ozone recovery will hence depend not only on chlorine recovery but also on temperature trends and/or variability, volcanic activity, and any trends in stratospheric sulfate aerosol.

  5. Role of volcanic and anthropogenic aerosols in the recent global surface warming slowdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Doug M.; Booth, Ben B. B.; Dunstone, Nick J.; Eade, Rosie; Hermanson, Leon; Jones, Gareth S.; Scaife, Adam A.; Sheen, Katy L.; Thompson, Vikki

    2016-10-01

    The rate of global mean surface temperature (GMST) warming has slowed this century despite the increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. Climate model experiments show that this slowdown was largely driven by a negative phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), with a smaller external contribution from solar variability, and volcanic and anthropogenic aerosols. The prevailing view is that this negative PDO occurred through internal variability. However, here we show that coupled models from the Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project robustly simulate a negative PDO in response to anthropogenic aerosols implying a potentially important role for external human influences. The recovery from the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 also contributed to the slowdown in GMST trends. Our results suggest that a slowdown in GMST trends could have been predicted in advance, and that future reduction of anthropogenic aerosol emissions, particularly from China, would promote a positive PDO and increased GMST trends over the coming years. Furthermore, the overestimation of the magnitude of recent warming by models is substantially reduced by using detection and attribution analysis to rescale their response to external factors, especially cooling following volcanic eruptions. Improved understanding of external influences on climate is therefore crucial to constrain near-term climate predictions.

  6. Climate impact of volcanic aerosol in the stratosphere and upper troposphere - CALIPSO observations from 2006-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Johan; Martinsson, Bengt G.; Andersson, Sandra M.; Sandvik, Oscar S.; Hermann, Markus; van Velthoven, Peter F. J.; Zahn, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We have investigated the climate impact of volcanic eruptions in the period 2006-2015, and found that the volcanic perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol is stronger and lasts longer than previously thought. Recent studies (Ridley et al., 2014, Andersson et al., 2015) show that a large portion of volcanic climate impact stems from aerosol in the LMS (lowermost stratosphere). Although the LMS holds >40% of the stratospheric mass (Appenzeller et al., 1996) it is generally neglected in estimations of the stratospheric AOD (aerosol optical depth). In the past decade the stratospheric aerosol load was perturbed by a number of volcanic eruptions. We cover that period by using the CALIPSO level 1b night-time data to study the volcanic influence on the global and regional climate. CALIPSO data were averaged to a resolution of 180 m vertically and 1×1° horizontally, cleaned from ice clouds by means of the depolarization ratio (Vernier et al., 2009), and a method was developed to remove polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). This approach enables identification of aerosol also at low altitudes (currently using 4 km minimum altitude) and in the Antarctic region (60 to 90°S) where PSCs are frequent during winter. In the current study, we estimate the total stratospheric AOD and radiative forcing and find that significant fractions of volcanic aerosol were located below the static tropopause after volcanic eruptions. Volcanic aerosol was generally observed down to the dynamic tropopause, and detected down to potential vorticities of 1.5-2 PVU (almost 1 km below the static tropopause). Hence, the dynamic tropopause was found to better enclose the volcanic aerosol. Furthermore, large concentrations of aerosol from the Kasatochi eruption (Aug 2008) is found to linger in the extratropical UT (upper troposphere) for several months after the eruption. Sulphate-rich volcanic aerosol transported from the LMS may influence cirrus clouds in the extratropical UT, inducing an indirect

  7. Aerosol properties and meteorological conditions in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina, during the resuspension of volcanic ash from the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciela Ulke, Ana; Torres Brizuela, Marcela M.; Raga, Graciela B.; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2016-09-01

    The eruption in June 2011 of the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex in Chile impacted air traffic around the Southern Hemisphere for several months after the initial ash emissions. The ash deposited in vast areas of the Patagonian Steppe was subjected to the strong wind conditions prevalent during the austral winter and spring experiencing resuspension over various regions of Argentina. In this study we analyze the meteorological conditions that led to the episode of volcanic ash resuspension which impacted the city of Buenos Aires and resulted in the closure of the two main airports in Buenos Aires area (Ezeiza and Aeroparque) on 16 October 2011. A relevant result is that resuspended material (volcanic ash plus dust) imprints a distinguishable feature within the atmospheric thermodynamic vertical profiles. The thermodynamic soundings show the signature of "pulses of drying" in layers associated with the presence of hygroscopic ash in the atmosphere that has already been reported in similar episodes after volcanic eruptions in other parts of the world. This particular footprint can be used to detect the probable existence of volcanic ash layers. This study also illustrates the utility of ceilometers to detect not only cloud base at airports but also volcanic ash plumes at the boundary layer and up to 7 km altitude. Aerosol properties measured in the city during the resuspension episode indicate the presence of enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the boundary layer along with spectral signatures in the measurements at the Buenos Aires AERONET site typical of ash plus dust advected towards the city. The mandatory aviation reports from the National Weather Service about airborne and deposited volcanic ash at the airport near the measurement site (Aeroparque) correlate in time with the enhanced concentrations. The presence of the resuspended material was detected by the CALIOP lidar overpassing the region. Since the dynamics of ash resuspension and

  8. Some remarks about lidar data preprocessing and different implementations of the gradient method for determining the aerosol layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Angelini

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The determination of atmospheric aerosol layers from lidar returns is possible through automated algorithms. This product is useful, for example, in monitoring the Boundary Layer Height (BLH as well as volcanic plumes. Aerosol layers are usually detected using the gradient method, i.e. by finding the inflection points of the range-corrected backscattered signal. These points can be either calculated as the minima of the numerical derivative of the signal, or by zero-order Digital Wavelet Transforms. Since for low signal-to-noise ratios the numerical derivative is very prone to noise-induced fluctuations, a moving average is often performed. We demonstrate why this procedure should be avoided in the gradient calculation. Finally, an alternative approach to the Digital Wavelet Transform is proposed, giving the same results but lowering the computational times by about one order of magnitude.

  9. Volcanic Event Layers-A Marker Bed of Correlation of Coal Measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾炳文; 周安朝; 马美玲; 贾晓云

    2001-01-01

    Upper Carboniferous-Lower Permian volcanic event deposits from two cross sections in Nanpiao, Liaoning Province, and the Daqing Mountains, Inner Mongolia, were examined by systematic rock and mineral identification, differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and trace element and rare earth element quantitative analysis. According to the results, twelve sequences of volcanic event deposits have been distinguished from bottom to top, including 34?9 volcanic event layers. As these layers each have their own distinctive petrological, mineralogical and geochemical characteristics and were derived from the same source, they provide new evidence for further ascertaining the distribution characteristics of volcanic event deposits on the northern margin of the North China plate and carrying out the stratigraphic correlation using volcanic event layers as marker beds.

  10. Lidar observations of high-altitude aerosol layers (cirrus clouds)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleva, Atanaska D.; Grigorov, Ivan V.

    2013-03-01

    Aerosols, clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions are recognized as the key factors influencing the climate. Clouds are the primary modulators of the Earth's radiative budget. This paper focuses on the detection of high-altitude aerosol layers in the troposphere over mid-latitude lidar station in Sofia, Bulgaria. They are situated in the height-region 6 km÷16 km, with thickness in the range 0.2 km÷5 km and have varying optical characteristics. On the basis of the general utilized classification of the Cirrus clouds, high values of the calculated atmospheric backscatter coefficient and Angströmexponent estimation results we conclude that the registered strongly scattered aerosol layers are Cirrus clouds. Lidar measurements are performed with an aerosol lidar, equipped with Nd:YAG laser at wavelengths 532 nm and 1064 nm. Mainly, lidar data are presented in terms of vertical atmospheric backscatter coefficient profiles. We also include 2Dcolormap in height-time coordinates build on the basis of so called range corrected signals. It shows in general changes of the aerosol stratification over the lidar station during the measurement period. We employed HYSPLIT backward trajectories and DREAM forecasts to analyze the lidar profile outlines and characterize the events during which Cirrus cloud samples were observed. So was remarked that most of the results were obtained during Saharan dust long-way transport over the city of Sofia. Reported experimental examples are extracted from regular lidar investigations of the atmosphere within the frame of European project EARLINET.

  11. A model study of Fuego volcanic aerosol dispersion in the lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Turner, R. E.; Butler, C. F.

    1982-01-01

    A zonally averaged time-dependent primitive equation model is used to simulate the dispersion of both a carbon 14 injection and the volcanic aerosol from the 1974 Fuego eruption. It is noted that both injections occurred at low latitudes to midlatitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. The eddy flux terms, which account for the major portion of the transport in the lower stratosphere of this model, are specified in a manner similar to that of Harwood and Pyle (1975). Comparisons with data underline the ability of the model to simulate the vertical character of the tracer while maintaining reasonable meridional transport times. For the aerosol study, the simulated 1/e decay time at 37 deg N and for the 16- to 21-km altitude region is 9 months, whereas lidar measurements at the same latitude give a decay time of 8 months. The simulated vertical width at half-maximum for the aerosol tracer at 37 deg N and 19 deg N and for 6 months after the event possesses values of 5.0 km and 3.6 km, respectively, whereas the observed lidar values are 4.4 km and 3.0 km, respectively. The tracer transport to the Southern Hemisphere also is in qualitative agreement with the limited data that are available.

  12. Stratocumulus cloud thickening beneath layers of absorbing smoke aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, E. M.

    2010-12-01

    Marine stratocumulus cloud properties, and the free-tropospheric environment above them, are examined in NASA A-Train satellite data for cases where smoke from seasonal burning of the West African savannah overlay the persistent southeast Atlantic stratocumulus cloud deck. CALIPSO space-borne lidar observations show that features identified as layers of aerosol occur predominantly between 2 km and 4 km. Layers identified as cloud features occur predominantly below 1.5 km altitude and beneath the layer of elevated smoke aerosol. The diurnal mean shortwave heating rates attributable to the absorption of solar energy in the aerosol layer is nearly 1.5 K d-1 for an aerosol optical thickness value of 1, and increases to 1.8 K d-1 when the smoke resides above clouds owing to the additional component of upward solar radiation reflected by the cloud. As a consequence of this heating, the 700 hPa air temperature above the cloud deck is warmer by approximately 1 K on average for cases where smoke is present above the cloud compared to cases without smoke above cloud. The warmer conditions in the free-troposphere above the cloud during smoke events coincide with cloud liquid water path values that are greater by 20 g m-2 and cloud tops that are lower for overcast conditions compared to periods with low amounts of smoke. The observed thickening and subsidence of the cloud layer are consistent with published results of large-eddy simulations showing that solar absorption by smoke above stratocumulus clouds increases the buoyancy of free-tropospheric air above the temperature inversion capping the boundary layer. Increased buoyancy inhibits the entrainment of dry air through the cloud-top, thereby helping to preserve humidity and cloud cover in the boundary layer. The direct radiative effect of absorbing aerosols residing over a bright cloud deck is a positive radiative forcing (warming) at the top of the atmosphere. However, the greater liquid water path for cases of smoke

  13. Observation of an unusual mid-stratospheric aerosol layer in the Arctic: possible sources and implications for polar vortex dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerding

    Full Text Available By the beginning of winter 2000/2001, a mysterious stratospheric aerosol layer had been detected by four different Arctic lidar stations. The aerosol layer was observed first on 16 November 2000, at an altitude of about 38 km near Søndre Strømfjord, Greenland (67° N, 51° W and on 19 November 2000, near Andenes, Norway (69°  N, 16°  E. Subsequently, in early December 2000, the aerosol layer was observed near Kiruna, Sweden (68°  N, 21°  E and Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen (79°  N, 12°  E. No mid-latitude lidar station observed the presence of aerosols in this altitude region. The layer persisted throughout the winter 2000/2001, at least up to 12 February 2001. In November 2000, the backscatter ratio at a wavelength of 532 nm was up to 1.1, with a FWHM of about 2.5 km. By early February 2001, the layer had sedimented from an altitude of 38 km to about 26 km. Measurements at several wavelengths by the ALOMAR and Koldewey lidars indicate the particle size was between 30 and 50 nm. Depolarisation measurements reveal that the particles in the layer are aspherical, hence solid. In the mid-stratosphere, the ambient atmospheric temperature was too high to support in situ formation or existence of cloud particles consisting of ice or an acid-water solution. Furthermore, in the year 2000 there was no volcanic eruption, which could have injected aerosols into the upper stratosphere. Therefore, other origins of the aerosol, such as meteoroid debris, condensed rocket fuel, or aerosols produced under the influence of charged solar particles, will be discussed in the paper. Trajectory calculations illustrate the path of the aerosol cloud within the polar vortex and are used to link the observations at the different lidar sites. From the descent rate of  the layer and particle sedimentation rates, the mean down-ward motion of air within the polar vortex was estimated to be about 124 m/d between 35 and 30 km, with higher values at the edge of the

  14. Insulation effects of Icelandic dust and volcanic aerosols on snow and ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragosics, Monika; Meinander, Outi; Jónsdóttir, Tinna; Dürig, Tobias; De Leeuw, Gerrit; Pálsson, Finnur; Dagsson-Waldhauserová, Pavla; Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic region, Iceland is an important source of dust due to ash production from volcanic eruptions. In addition dust is resuspended from the surface into the atmosphere as several dust storms occur each year. During volcanic eruptions and dust storms, material is deposited on the glaciers where it influences their energy balance. The effects of deposited volcanic ash on ice and snow melt were examined using laboratory and outdoor experiments. These experiments were made during the snow melt period using two different ash grain sizes (1 ϕ and 3.5 ϕ) from the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption, collected on the glacier. Different amounts of ash were deposited on snow or ice after which the snow properties and melt were measured. The results show that a thin ash layer increases the snow and ice melt but an ash layer exceeding a certain critical thickness caused insulation. Ash with 1 ϕ in grain size insulated the ice below at a thickness of 9-15 mm. For the 3.5 ϕ grain size the insulation thickness is 13 mm. The maximum melt occurred at a thickness of 1 mm for the 1 ϕ and only 1-2 mm for 3.5 ϕ ash. A map of dust concentrations on Vatnajökull that represents the dust deposition during the summer of 2013 is presented with concentrations ranging from 0.2 up to 16.6 g m-2.

  15. Aerosols optical properties in Titan's Detached Haze Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seignovert, Benoit; Rannou, Pascal; Lavvas, Panayotis; West, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Titan's Detached Haze Layer (DHL) was first observed in 1983 by Rages and Pollack during the Voyager 2 is a consistent spherical haze feature surrounding Titan's upper atmosphere and detached from the main haze. Since 2005, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument on board the Cassini mission performs a continuous survey of the Titan's atmosphere and confirmed its persistence at 500 km up to the equinox (2009) before its drop and disappearance in 2012 (West et al. 2011). Previous analyses showed, that this layer corresponds to the transition area between small spherical aerosols and large fractal aggregates and play a key role in the aerosols formation in Titan's atmosphere (Rannou et al. 2000, Lavvas et al. 2009, Cours et al. 2011).In this talk we will present the UV photometric analyses based on radiative transfer inversion to retrieve aerosols particles properties in the DHL (bulk and monomer radius and local density) performed on ISS observations taken from 2005 to 2007.References:- Rages and Pollach, Icarus 55 (1983)- West, et al., Icarus 38 (2011)- Rannou, et al., Icarus 147 (2000)- Lavvas, et al., Icarus 201 (2009)- Cours, et al., ApJ Lett. 741 (2015)

  16. Volcanic ash layers illuminate the resilience of Neanderthals and early modern humans to natural hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John; Barton, Nick; Blockley, Simon; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Cullen, Victoria L; Davies, William; Gamble, Clive; Grant, Katharine; Hardiman, Mark; Housley, Rupert; Lane, Christine S; Lee, Sharen; Lewis, Mark; MacLeod, Alison; Menzies, Martin; Müller, Wolfgang; Pollard, Mark; Price, Catherine; Roberts, Andrew P; Rohling, Eelco J; Satow, Chris; Smith, Victoria C; Stringer, Chris B; Tomlinson, Emma L; White, Dustin; Albert, Paul; Arienzo, Ilenia; Barker, Graeme; Boric, Dusan; Carandente, Antonio; Civetta, Lucia; Ferrier, Catherine; Guadelli, Jean-Luc; Karkanas, Panagiotis; Koumouzelis, Margarita; Müller, Ulrich C; Orsi, Giovanni; Pross, Jörg; Rosi, Mauro; Shalamanov-Korobar, Ljiljiana; Sirakov, Nikolay; Tzedakis, Polychronis C

    2012-08-21

    Marked changes in human dispersal and development during the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition have been attributed to massive volcanic eruption and/or severe climatic deterioration. We test this concept using records of volcanic ash layers of the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption dated to ca. 40,000 y ago (40 ka B.P.). The distribution of the Campanian Ignimbrite has been enhanced by the discovery of cryptotephra deposits (volcanic ash layers that are not visible to the naked eye) in archaeological cave sequences. They enable us to synchronize archaeological and paleoclimatic records through the period of transition from Neanderthal to the earliest anatomically modern human populations in Europe. Our results confirm that the combined effects of a major volcanic eruption and severe climatic cooling failed to have lasting impacts on Neanderthals or early modern humans in Europe. We infer that modern humans proved a greater competitive threat to indigenous populations than natural disasters.

  17. Volcanic ash layers illuminate the resilience of Neanderthals and early modern humans to natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John; Barton, Nick; Blockley, Simon; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Cullen, Victoria L.; Davies, William; Gamble, Clive; Grant, Katharine; Hardiman, Mark; Housley, Rupert; Lane, Christine S.; Lee, Sharen; Lewis, Mark; MacLeod, Alison; Menzies, Martin; Müller, Wolfgang; Pollard, Mark; Price, Catherine; Roberts, Andrew P.; Rohling, Eelco J.; Satow, Chris; Smith, Victoria C.; Stringer, Chris B.; Tomlinson, Emma L.; White, Dustin; Albert, Paul; Arienzo, Ilenia; Barker, Graeme; Borić, Dušan; Carandente, Antonio; Civetta, Lucia; Ferrier, Catherine; Guadelli, Jean-Luc; Karkanas, Panagiotis; Koumouzelis, Margarita; Müller, Ulrich C.; Orsi, Giovanni; Pross, Jörg; Rosi, Mauro; Shalamanov-Korobar, Ljiljiana; Sirakov, Nikolay; Tzedakis, Polychronis C.

    2012-01-01

    Marked changes in human dispersal and development during the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition have been attributed to massive volcanic eruption and/or severe climatic deterioration. We test this concept using records of volcanic ash layers of the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption dated to ca. 40,000 y ago (40 ka B.P.). The distribution of the Campanian Ignimbrite has been enhanced by the discovery of cryptotephra deposits (volcanic ash layers that are not visible to the naked eye) in archaeological cave sequences. They enable us to synchronize archaeological and paleoclimatic records through the period of transition from Neanderthal to the earliest anatomically modern human populations in Europe. Our results confirm that the combined effects of a major volcanic eruption and severe climatic cooling failed to have lasting impacts on Neanderthals or early modern humans in Europe. We infer that modern humans proved a greater competitive threat to indigenous populations than natural disasters. PMID:22826222

  18. Fingerprinting Volcanic and Anthropogenic Sulfur Dioxide in the Air: A 25 Year Record of Sulfate Aerosols from the South Pole Snowpit, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, R.; Abaunza-Quintero, M.; Jackson, T. L.; McCabe, J.; Savarino, J. P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols, unlike greenhouse gases, cause cooling effect (-0.4 ± 0.2 W.m-2) by scattering incoming solar radiation and by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (IPCC 2007). Volcanic eruptions with explosivity Indices >5 inject large amounts of SO2 and particles into the stratosphere causing a significant decrease in temperature. For example a 0.7oC decrease in Earth's temperature was observed following the Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Stratospheric injection of sulfate aerosols has been suggested as a geoengineering effort to mitigate global warming caused by a significant increase in greenhouse gases. To understand the impact of volcanic events on the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer and subsequent changes in the dynamics of the upper atmosphere, a long term and high temporal resolution record of sulfate aerosol is needed. Here we present a 25 year (1978 to 2003) high resolution record of sulfate aerosols which covers largest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century namely, El-Chichón 1982 and Pinatubo 1991. Sulfate aerosol samples were obtained from a 1x1m snowpit at the South Pole, Antarctica with approximately 6 month time steps. Sulfate concentrations vary from 30 to 70 ppb depending on the season with exceptions during volcanic events which contributed a three to four folds increase in sulfate concentration Sulfate concentrations of120 ppb following El Chichón and 190 ppb after Pinatubo eruptions were observed. The oxygen isotopic anomaly varied from 0.7‰ to 3.9‰ with the highest anomaly occurring after the Pinatubo eruption. The positive Δ17O of sulfate derives from aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 and O3 oxidation and involves transfer of the isotopic anomaly from the oxidant to the product sulfate. Coupled with kinetic analysis the relative reaction rates the relative proportions of oxidation can be calculated. All other sulfate sources such as sea salt sulfates, primary sulfates from fossil fuel combustion, metal catalyzed oxidation of S

  19. Determination of cloud and aerosol layers using CALIPSO and image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, A. N.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.; Saleh, N. Mohd.

    2008-10-01

    The height of cloud and aerosol layers in the atmosphere is believed to affect climate change and air pollution because both of them have important direct effects on the radiation balance of the earth. In this paper, we study the ability of Cloud Aerosol LIDAR and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data to detect, locate and distinguish between cloud and aerosol layers in the atmosphere over Peninsula Malaysia. We also used image processing technique to differentiate between cloud and aerosol layers from the CALIPSO images. The cloud and aerosol layers mostly are seen at troposphere (>10 km) and lower stratosphere (>15km). The results shows that CALIPSO can be used to determine cloud and aerosol layers and image processing technique has successfully distinguished them in the atmosphere.

  20. Physical and optical properties of 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption aerosol: ground-based, Lidar and airborne measurements in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hervo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available During the Eyjafjallajökull eruption (14 April to 24 May 2010, the volcanic aerosol cloud was observed across Europe by several airborne in situ and ground-based remote-sensing instruments. On 18 and 19 May, layers of depolarizing particles (i.e. non-spherical particles were detected in the free troposphere above the Puy de Dôme station, (PdD, France with a Rayleigh-Mie LIDAR emitting at a wavelength of 355 nm, with parallel and crossed polarization channels. These layers in the free troposphere (FT were also well captured by simulations with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, which furthermore showed that the ash was eventually entrained into the planetary boundary layer (PBL. Indeed, the ash cloud was then detected and characterized with a comprehensive set of in situ instruments at the Puy de Dôme station (PdD. In agreement with the FLEXPART simulation, up to 65 μg m−3 of particle mass and 2.2 ppb of SO2 were measured at PdD, corresponding to concentrations higher than the 95 percentile of 2 yr of measurements at PdD. Moreover, the number concentration of particles increased to 24 000 cm−3, mainly in the submicronic mode, but a supermicronic mode was also detected with a modal diameter of 2 μm. The resulting optical properties of the ash aerosol were characterized by a low scattering Ångström exponent (0.98, showing the presence of supermicronic particles. For the first time to our knowledge, the combination of in situ optical and physical characterization of the volcanic ash allowed the calculation of the mass-to-extinction ratio (η with no assumptions on the aerosol density. The mass-to-extinction ratio was found to be significantly different from the background boundary layer aerosol (max: 1.57 g m−2 as opposed to 0.33 ± 0.03 g m−2. Using this ratio, ash mass concentration in the volcanic plume derived from LIDAR measurements was found to be 655 ± 23

  1. Physical and optical properties of 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption aerosol: ground-based, Lidar and airborne measurements in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervo, M.; Quennehen, B.; Kristiansen, N. I.; Boulon, J.; Stohl, A.; Fréville, P.; Pichon, J.-M.; Picard, D.; Labazuy, P.; Gouhier, M.; Roger, J.-C.; Colomb, A.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.

    2012-02-01

    During the Eyjafjallajökull eruption (14 April to 24 May 2010), the volcanic aerosol cloud was observed across Europe by several airborne in situ and ground-based remote-sensing instruments. On 18 and 19 May, layers of depolarizing particles (i.e. non-spherical particles) were detected in the free troposphere above the Puy de Dôme station, (PdD, France) with a Rayleigh-Mie LIDAR emitting at a wavelength of 355 nm, with parallel and crossed polarization channels. These layers in the free troposphere (FT) were also well captured by simulations with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, which furthermore showed that the ash was eventually entrained into the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Indeed, the ash cloud was then detected and characterized with a comprehensive set of in situ instruments at the Puy de Dôme station (PdD). In agreement with the FLEXPART simulation, up to 65 μg m-3 of particle mass and 2.2 ppb of SO2 were measured at PdD, corresponding to concentrations higher than the 95 percentile of 2 yr of measurements at PdD. Moreover, the number concentration of particles increased to 24 000 cm-3, mainly in the submicronic mode, but a supermicronic mode was also detected with a modal diameter of 2 μm. The resulting optical properties of the ash aerosol were characterized by a low scattering Ångström exponent (0.98), showing the presence of supermicronic particles. For the first time to our knowledge, the combination of in situ optical and physical characterization of the volcanic ash allowed the calculation of the mass-to-extinction ratio (η) with no assumptions on the aerosol density. The mass-to-extinction ratio was found to be significantly different from the background boundary layer aerosol (max: 1.57 g m-2 as opposed to 0.33 ± 0.03 g m-2). Using this ratio, ash mass concentration in the volcanic plume derived from LIDAR measurements was found to be 655 ± 23 μg m-3 when the plume was located in the FT (3000 m above the sea level

  2. Aerosol Layering Characterization Near the Gobi Desert by a Double Polarization Lidar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y.

    2016-01-01

    Optical properties of aerosol layers developing in the atmosphere have been analyzed and lidar data are discussed in terms of profiles of aerosol backscatter coefficient at 355nm, 532nm, aerosol extinction coefficient at 355nm, aerosol depolarization ratio at 355nm and 532nm and water vapor mixing ratio. Depolarization ratio measured simultaneously at two wavelengths allowed also to study its dependence on the wavelength.

  3. Model representations of aerosol layers transported from North America over the Atlantic Ocean during the Two-Column Aerosol Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, Jerome D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Berg, Larry K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Zhang, Kai [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Easter, Richard C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Ferrare, Richard A. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton Virginia USA; Hair, Johnathan W. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton Virginia USA; Hostetler, Chris A. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton Virginia USA; Liu, Ying [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Ortega, Ivan [Department of Chemistry, Colorado University, Boulder Colorado USA; Sedlacek, Arthur [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Shilling, John E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Shrivastava, Manish [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Springston, Stephen R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Tomlinson, Jason M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Volkamer, Rainer [Department of Chemistry, Colorado University, Boulder Colorado USA; Wilson, Jacqueline [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Zaveri, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Zelenyuk, Alla [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-08-22

    The ability of the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) version 3.7 and the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.3 (CAM5) in simulating profiles of aerosol properties is quantified using extensive in situ and remote sensing measurements from the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) conducted during July of 2012. TCAP was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and was designed to obtain observations within two atmospheric columns; one fixed over Cape Cod, Massachusetts and the other several hundred kilometers over the ocean. The performance is quantified using most of the available aircraft and surface measurements during July, and two days are examined in more detail to identify the processes responsible for the observed aerosol layers. The higher resolution WRF-Chem model produced more aerosol mass in the free troposphere than the coarser resolution CAM5 model so that the fraction of aerosol optical thickness above the residual layer from WRF-Chem was more consistent with lidar measurements. We found that the free troposphere layers are likely due to mean vertical motions associated with synoptic-scale convergence that lifts aerosols from the boundary layer. The vertical displacement and the time period associated with upward transport in the troposphere depend on the strength of the synoptic system and whether relatively high boundary layer aerosol concentrations are present where convergence occurs. While a parameterization of subgrid scale convective clouds applied in WRF-Chem modulated the concentrations of aerosols aloft, it did not significantly change the overall altitude and depth of the layers.

  4. Particle morphologies and formation mechanisms of fine volcanic ash aerosol collected from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkleff, P. G.; Cahill, C. F.

    2010-12-01

    Fine volcanic ash aerosol (35-0.09um) erupted in 2006 by Augustine Volcano, southwest of Anchorage, Alaska was collected by a DRUM cascade impactor and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy for individual particle chemistry and morphology. Results of these analyses show ash particles occur as either individual glass shard and mineral phase (plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite, hornblende, etc.) particles or aggregates thereof. Individual glass shard ash particles are angular, uniformly-sized, consist of calc-alkaline whole-rock elements (Si, Al, Fe, Na, and Ca) and are not collocated on the sample media with non-silicate, Cl and S bearing sea salt particles. Aggregate particles occur as two types: pure ash aggregates and sea salt-cored aggregates. Pure ash aggregates are made up of only ash particles and contain no other constituents. Sea salt-cored aggregates are ash particles commingled with sea salts. Determining the formation processes of the different ash particle types need further investigation but some possibilities are proposed here. Individual ash particles may exist when the ambient air is generally dry, little electrical charge exists on ash particles, the eruptive cloud is generally dry, or the number of individual particles exceeds the scavenging capacity of the water droplets present. Another possibility is that ash aggregates may break apart as relative humidity drops over time and causes ash-laden water droplets to evaporate and subsequently break apart. Pure ash aggregates may form when the ambient air and plume is relatively dry but the ash has a significant charge to cause ash to aggregate. Or they could form during long-range transport when turbulent or Brownian motion can cause ash particles to collide and coagulate. Pure ash aggregates could also form as a result of water droplet scavenging and subsequent evaporation of water droplets, leaving behind only ash. In this case, droplets would not have interacted with a sea salt

  5. A new method for estimating aerosol mass flux in the urban surface layer using LAS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Renmin; Luo, Tao; Sun, Jianning; Liu, Hao; Fu, Yunfei; Wang, Zhien

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol greatly influences human health and the natural environment, as well as the weather and climate system. Therefore, atmospheric aerosol has attracted significant attention from society. Despite consistent research efforts, there are still uncertainties in understanding its effects due to poor knowledge about aerosol vertical transport caused by the limited measurement capabilities of aerosol mass vertical transport flux. In this paper, a new method for measuring atmospheric aerosol vertical transport flux is developed based on the similarity theory of surface layer, the theory of light propagation in a turbulent atmosphere, and the observations and studies of the atmospheric equivalent refractive index (AERI). The results show that aerosol mass flux can be linked to the real and imaginary parts of the atmospheric equivalent refractive index structure parameter (AERISP) and the ratio of aerosol mass concentration to the imaginary part of the AERI. The real and imaginary parts of the AERISP can be measured based on the light-propagation theory. The ratio of the aerosol mass concentration to the imaginary part of the AERI can be measured based on the measurements of aerosol mass concentration and visibility. The observational results show that aerosol vertical transport flux varies diurnally and is related to the aerosol spatial distribution. The maximum aerosol flux during the experimental period in Hefei City was 0.017 mg m-2 s-1, and the mean value was 0.004 mg m-2 s-1. The new method offers an effective way to study aerosol vertical transport in complex environments.

  6. “Lidar Investigations of Aerosol, Cloud, and Boundary Layer Properties Over the ARM ACRF Sites”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrare, Richard [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Turner, David [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Severe Storms Lab., Norman, OK (United States)

    2015-01-13

    Project goals; Characterize the aerosol and ice vertical distributions over the ARM NSA site, and in particular to discriminate between elevated aerosol layers and ice clouds in optically thin scattering layers; Characterize the water vapor and aerosol vertical distributions over the ARM Darwin site, how these distributions vary seasonally, and quantify the amount of water vapor and aerosol that is above the boundary layer; Use the high temporal resolution Raman lidar data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; Use the high temporal resolution Raman lidar and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds; and Use the high temporal Raman lidar data to continue to characterize the turbulence within the convective boundary layer and how the turbulence statistics (e.g., variance, skewness) is correlated with larger scale variables predicted by models.

  7. Lidar Observations of Aerosol Disturbances of the Stratosphere over Tomsk (56.5∘N; 85.0∘E in Volcanic Activity Period 2006–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg E. Bazhenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The lidar measurements (Tomsk: 56.5∘N; 85.0∘E of the optical characteristics of the stratospheric aerosol layer (SAL in the volcanic activity period 2006–2011 are summarized and analyzed. The background SAL state with minimum aerosol content, observed since 1997 under the conditions of long-term volcanically quiet period, was interrupted in October 2006 by series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire: Rabaul (October 2006, New Guinea; Okmok and Kasatochi (July-August 2008, Aleutian Islands; Redoubt (March-April 2009, Alaska; Sarychev Peak (June 2009, Kuril Islands; Grimsvötn (May 2011, Iceland. A short-term and minor disturbance of the lower stratosphere was also observed in April 2010 after eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajokull. The developed regional empirical model of the vertical distribution of background SAL optical characteristics was used to identify the periods of elevated stratospheric aerosol content after each of the volcanic eruptions. Trends of variations in the total ozone content are also considered.

  8. Gas/aerosol-ash interaction in volcanic plumes: New insights from surface analyses of fine ash particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmelle, Pierre; Lambert, Mathieu; Dufrêne, Yves; Gerin, Patrick; Óskarsson, Niels

    2007-07-01

    The reactions occurring between gases/aerosols and silicate ash particles in volcanic eruption plumes remain poorly understood, despite the fact that they are at the origin of a range of volcanic, environmental, atmospheric and health effects. In this study, we apply X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a surface-sensitive technique, to determine the chemical composition of the near-surface region (2-10 nm) of nine ash samples collected from eight volcanoes. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to image the nanometer-scale surface structure of individual ash particles isolated from three samples. We demonstrate that rapid acid dissolution of ash occurs within eruption plumes. This process is favoured by the presence of fluoride and is believed to supply the cations involved in the deposition of sulphate and halide salts onto ash. AFM imaging also has permitted the detection of extremely thin (< 10 nm) coatings on the surface of ash. This material is probably composed of soluble sulphate and halide salts mixed with sparingly soluble fluoride compounds. The surface approach developed here offers promising aspects for better appraising the role of gas/aerosol-ash interaction in dictating the ability of ash to act as sinks for various volcanic and atmospheric chemical species as well as sources for others.

  9. Aerosol optical thickness of Mt. Etna volcanic plume retrieved by means of the Airborne Multispectral Imaging Spectrometer (MIVIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Merucci

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the European MVRRS project (Mitigation of Volcanic Risk by Remote Sensing Techniques, in June 1997 an airborne campaign was organised on Mt. Etna to study different characteristics of the volcanic plume emitted by the summit craters in quiescent conditions. Digital images were collected with the Airborne Multispectral Imaging Spectrometer (MIVIS, together with ground-based measurements. MIVIS images were used to calculate the aerosol optical thickness of the volcanic plume. For this purpose, an inversion algorithm was developed based on radiative transfer equations and applied to the upwelling radiance data measured by the sensor. This article presents the preliminary results from this inversion method. One image was selected following the criteria of concomitant atmospheric ground-based measurements necessary to model the atmosphere, plume centrality in the scene to analyse the largest plume area and cloudless conditions. The selected image was calibrated in radiance and geometrically corrected. The 6S (Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum radiative transfer model was used to invert the radiative transfer equation and derive the aerosol optical thickness. The inversion procedure takes into account both the spectral albedo of the surface under the plume and the topographic effects on the refl ected radiance, due to the surface orientation and elevation. The result of the inversion procedure is the spatial distribution of the plume optical depth. An average value of 0.1 in the wavelength range 454-474 nm was found for the selected measurement day.

  10. Late Cenozoic volcanism in the western Woodlark Basin area, SW Pacific: the sources of marine volcanic ash layers based on their elemental and Sr-Nd isotope compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackschewitz, K. S.; Mertz, D. F.; Devey, C. W.; Garbe-Schönberg, C.-D.

    2002-12-01

    Tephra fallout layers and volcaniclastic deposits, derived from volcanic sources around and on the Papuan Peninsula, form a substantial part of the Woodlark Basin marine sedimentary succession. Sampling by the Ocean Drilling Program Leg 180 in the western Woodlark Basin provides the opportunity to document the distribution of the volcanically-derived components as well as to evaluate their chronology, chemistry, and isotope compositions in order to gain information on the volcanic sources and original magmatic systems. Glass shards selected from 57 volcanogenic layers within the sampled Pliocene-Pleistocene sedimentary sequence show predominantly rhyolitic compositions, with subordinate basaltic andesites, basaltic trachy-andesites, andesites, trachy-andesites, dacites, and phonolites. It was possible to correlate only a few of the volcanogenic layers between sites using geochemical and age information apparently because of the formation of strongly compartmentalised sedimentary realms on this actively rifting margin. In many cases it was possible to correlate Leg 180 volcanic components with their eruption source areas based on chemical and isotope compositions. Likely sources for a considerable number of the volcanogenic deposits are Moresby and Dawson Strait volcanoes (D'Entrecasteaux Islands region) for high-K calc-alkaline glasses. The Dawson Strait volcanoes appear to represent the source for five peralkaline tephra layers. One basaltic andesitic volcaniclastic layer shows affinities to basaltic andesites from the Woodlark spreading tip and Cheshire Seamount. For other layers, a clear identification of the sources proved impossible, although their isotope and chemical signatures suggest similarities to south-west Pacific subduction volcanism, e.g. New Britain and Tonga-Kermadec island arcs. Volcanic islands in the Trobriand Arc (for example, Woodlark Island Amphlett Islands and/or Egum Atoll) are probable sources for several volcaniclastic layers with ages

  11. Volcanic ash layers in blue ice fields (Beardmore Glacier Area, Antarctica): Iridium enrichments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Christian

    1988-01-01

    Dust bands on blue ice fields in Antarctica have been studied and have been identified to originate from two main sources: bedrock debris scraped up from the ground by the glacial movement (these bands are found predominantly at fractures and shear zones in the ice near moraines), and volcanic debris deposited on and incorporated in the ice by large-scale eruptions of Antarctic (or sub-Antractic) volcanoes. Ice core studies have revealed that most of the dust layers in the ice cores are volcanic (tephra) deposits which may be related to some specific volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have to be related to some specific volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have to be relatively recent (a few thousand years old) since ice cores usually incorporate younger ice. In contrast, dust bands on bare blue ice fields are much older, up to a few hundred thousand years, which may be inferred from the rather high terrestrial age of meteorites found on the ice and from dating the ice using the uranium series method. Also for the volcanic ash layers found on blue ice fields correlations between some specific volcanoes (late Cenozoic) and the volcanic debris have been inferred, mainly using chemical arguments. During a recent field expedition samples of several dust bands found on blue ice fields at the Lewis Cliff Ice Tongue were taken. These dust band samples were divided for age determination using the uranium series method, and chemical investigations to determine the source and origin of the dust bands. The investigations have shown that most of the dust bands found at the Ice Tongue are of volcanic origin and, for chemical and petrological reasons, may be correlated with Cenozoic volcanoes in the Melbourne volcanic province, Northern Victoria Land, which is at least 1500 km away. Major and trace element data have been obtained and have been used for identification and correlation purposes. Recently, some additional trace elements were determined in some of the dust band

  12. Optimal estimation retrieval of aerosol microphysical properties from SAGE II satellite observations in the volcanically unperturbed lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Deshler

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric aerosol particles under non-volcanic conditions are typically smaller than 0.1 μm. Due to fundamental limitations of the scattering theory in the Rayleigh limit, these tiny particles are hard to measure by satellite instruments. As a consequence, current estimates of global aerosol properties retrieved from spectral aerosol extinction measurements tend to be strongly biased. Aerosol surface area densities, for instance, are observed to be about 40% smaller than those derived from correlative in situ measurements (Deshler et al., 2003. An accurate knowledge of the global distribution of aerosol properties is, however, essential to better understand and quantify the role they play in atmospheric chemistry, dynamics, radiation and climate. To address this need a new retrieval algorithm was developed, which employs a nonlinear Optimal Estimation (OE method to iteratively solve for the monomodal size distribution parameters which are statistically most consistent with both the satellite-measured multi-wavelength aerosol extinction data and a priori information. By thus combining spectral extinction measurements (at visible to near infrared wavelengths with prior knowledge of aerosol properties at background level, even the smallest particles are taken into account which are practically invisible to optical remote sensing instruments. The performance of the OE retrieval algorithm was assessed based on synthetic spectral extinction data generated from both monomodal and small-mode-dominant bimodal sulphuric acid aerosol size distributions. For monomodal background aerosol, the new algorithm was shown to fairly accurately retrieve the particle sizes and associated integrated properties (surface area and volume densities, even in the presence of large extinction uncertainty. The associated retrieved uncertainties are a good estimate of the true errors. In the case of bimodal background aerosol, where the retrieved (monomodal size

  13. Passive remote sensing of aerosol layer height using near-UV multiangle polarization measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lianghai; Hasekamp, Otto; Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Cairns, Brian; Yorks, John E.; Chowdhary, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that multiangle polarization measurements in the near-UV and blue part of the spectrum are very well suited for passive remote sensing of aerosol layer height. For this purpose we use simulated measurements with different setups (different wavelength ranges, with and without polarization, different polarimetric accuracies) as well as airborne measurements from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) obtained over the continental USA. We find good agreement of the retrieved aerosol layer height from RSP with measurements from the Cloud Physics Lidar showing a mean absolute difference of less than 1 km. Furthermore, we found that the information on aerosol layer height is provided for large part by the multiangle polarization measurements with high accuracy rather than the multiangle intensity measurements. The information on aerosol layer height is significantly decreased when the shortest RSP wavelength (410 nm) is excluded from the retrieval and is virtually absent when 550 nm is used as shortest wavelength.

  14. Compact Layers of Hybrid Halide Perovskites Fabricated via the Aerosol Deposition Process—Uncoupling Material Synthesis and Layer Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Panzer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the successful fabrication of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite layers by the aerosol deposition method (ADM. The layers show high structural purity and compactness, thus making them suitable for application in perovskite-based optoelectronic devices. By using the aerosol deposition method we are able to decouple material synthesis from layer processing. Our results therefore allow for enhanced and easy control over the fabrication of perovskite-based devices, further paving the way for their commercialization.

  15. Understanding volcanism at the PETM: Abundant volcanic ash layers in the Central Tertiary Basin of Spitsbergen, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Morgan; Eliassen, Gauti; Svensen, Henrik; Jochmann, Malte; Friis, Bjarki; Jerram, Dougal; Planke, Sverre

    2014-05-01

    During the early Tertiary, Svalbard developed a fold-thrust belt on its western margin with an associated foreland basin in the central-south of what is now Spitsbergen. This Central Tertiary Basin (CTB) is a syn-orogenic sedimentary basin in a strike-slip regime. The CTB contains the ~1900 m thick Van Mijenfjorden group, a dominantly sandstone-shale succession that was deposited in a North-South extending basin. Sediments in this group display evidence of major transgressive-regressive cycles related to local tectonics and eustatic sea level change. This basin is ideal for study as it has been extensively cored for coal prospecting, allowing a suite of sedimentary logs across the basin to be considered. Prominent marker beds in this sedimentary sequence are 1-30 cm thick bentonites, formed from the chemical weathering of volcanic tuff deposits. In this study, we focus on 8 sedimentary logs across the CTB, spanning the Palaeocene to lower Eocene in age. Bentonites are common in the Palaeocene cores (Basilika and Grumantbyen formations), while rarer but still occasionally present in the Eocene Frysjaodden formation. The cores had between 3-12 observable bentonite layers that showed large variations in preservation and subsequent reworking. Roots and other finer organic material were common, especially when the bentonites were found next to coal seams. Geochemical affinities between ash layers were investigated to identify basin-wide depositional events, with the aim of elucidating the provenance of these ashes. This sedimentary sequence is of broader interest as it covers the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), an extreme global warming event driven by large releases to the atmosphere of CO2 and/or CH4, evidenced by a negative carbon isotope excursion in both the ocean and atmosphere. Potential sources include volcanism and associated gas release from intruded sediments, CH4 hydrate dissociation, and/or the oxidation of organic matter. These formations are

  16. Tropospheric ozone and aerosols measured by airborne lidar during the 1988 Arctic boundary layer experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Ozone (O3) and aerosol distributions were measured from an aircraft using a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system as part of the 1988 NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment - Arctic Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE-3A) to study the sources and sinks of gases and aerosols over the tundra regions of Alaska during the summer. The tropospheric O3 budget over the Arctic was found to be strongly influenced by stratospheric intrusions. Regions of low aerosol scattering and enhanced O3 mixing ratios were usually correlated with descending air from the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere. Several cases of continental polar air masses were examined during the experiment. The aerosol scattering associated with these air masses was very low, and the atmospheric distribution of aerosols was quite homogeneous for those air masses that had been transported over the ice for greater than or = 3 days. The transition in O3 and aerosol distributions from tundra to marine conditions was examined several times. The aerosol data clearly show an abrupt change in aerosol scattering properties within the mixed layer from lower values over the tundra to generally higher values over the water. The distinct differences in the heights of the mixed layers in the two regions was also readily apparent. Several cases of enhanced O3 were observed during ABLE-3 in conjunction with enhanced aerosol scattering in layers in the free atmosphere. Examples are presented of the large scale variations of O3 and aerosols observed with the airborne lidar system from near the surface to above the tropopause over the Arctic during ABLE-3.

  17. SAGE II Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties at Non-Volcanic Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Burton, Sharon P.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Peter, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Since 2000, stratospheric aerosol levels have been relatively stable and at the lowest levels observed in the historical record. Given the challenges of making satellite measurements of aerosol properties at these levels, we have performed a study of the sensitivity of the product to the major components of the processing algorithm used in the production of SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements and the retrieval process that produces the operational surface area density (SAD) product. We find that the aerosol extinction measurements, particularly at 1020 nm, remain robust and reliable at the observed aerosol levels. On the other hand, during background periods, the SAD operational product has an uncertainty of at least a factor of 2 during due to the lack of sensitivity to particles with radii less than 100 nm.

  18. Investigation the optical and radiative properties of aerosol vertical profile of boundary layer by lidar and ground based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Chou, C.; Lin, P.; Wang, S.

    2011-12-01

    The planetary boundary layer is the air layer near the ground directly affected by diurnal heat, moisture, aerosol, and cloud transfer to or from the surface. In the daytime solar radiation heats the surface, initiating thermal instability or convection. Whereas, the scattering and absorption of aerosols or clouds might decrease the surface radiation or heat atmosphere which induce feedbacks such as the enhanced stratification and change in relative humidity in the boundary layer. This study is aimed to understand the possible radiative effect of aerosols basing on ground based aerosol measurements and lidar installed in National Taiwan University in Taipei. The optical and radiative properties of aerosols are dominated by aerosol composition, particle size, hygroscopicity property, and shape. In this study, aerosol instruments including integrating nephelometer, open air nephelometer, aethalometer are applied to investigate the relationship between aerosol hygroscopicity properties and aerosol types. The aerosol hygroscopicity properties are further applied to investigate the effect of relative humidity on aerosol vertical profiles measured by a dual-wavelength and depolarization lidar. The possible radiative effect of aerosols are approached by vertical atmospheric extinction profiles measured by lidar. Calculated atmospheric and aerosol heating effects was compared with vertical meteorological parameters measured by radiosonde. The result shows light-absorbing aerosol has the potential to affect the stability of planetary boundary layer.

  19. The influence of eruption season on the global aerosol evolution and radiative impact of tropical volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toohey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of tropical volcanic eruptions using a general circulation model with coupled aerosol microphysics are used to assess the influence of season of eruption on the aerosol evolution and radiative impacts at the Earth's surface. This analysis is presented for eruptions with SO2 injection magnitudes of 17 and 700 Tg, the former consistent with estimates of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption, the later a near-"super eruption". For each eruption magnitude, simulations are performed with eruptions at 15° N, at four equally spaced times of year, and sensitivity to eruption season is quantified as the difference between the maximum and minimum cumulative anomalies.

    Eruption season has a significant influence on aerosol optical depth (AOD and clear-sky shortwave (SW radiative flux anomalies for both eruption magnitudes. The sensitivity to eruption season for both fields is generally weak in the tropics, but increases in the mid- and high latitudes, reaching maximum values of ~80 %. Global mean AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies show sensitivity to eruption season on the order of 15–20 %, which results from differences in aerosol effective radius for the different eruption seasons. Smallest aerosol size and largest cumulative impact result from a January eruption for the Pinatubo-magnitude, and from a July eruption for the near-super eruption. In contrast to AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies, all-sky SW anomalies are found to be insensitive to season of eruption for the Pinatubo-magnitude eruption experiment, due to the reflection of solar radiation by clouds in the mid- to high latitudes. However, differences in all-sky SW anomalies between eruptions in different seasons are significant for the larger eruption magnitude, and the ~15 % sensitivity to eruption season of the global mean all-sky SW anomalies is comparable to the sensitivity of global mean AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies. Our estimates of sensitivity to eruption season

  20. The influence of eruption season on the global aerosol evolution and radiative impact of tropical volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toohey

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of tropical volcanic eruptions using a general circulation model with coupled aerosol microphysics are used to assess the influence of season of eruption on the aerosol evolution and radiative impacts at the Earth's surface. This analysis is presented for eruptions with SO2 injection magnitudes of 17 and 700 Tg, the former consistent with estimates of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption, the later a near-"super eruption". For each eruption magnitude, simulations are performed with eruptions at 15° N, at four equally spaced times of year. Sensitivity to eruption season of aerosol optical depth (AOD, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave (SW radiative flux is quantified by first integrating each field for four years after the eruption, then calculating for each cumulative field the absolute or percent difference between the maximum and minimum response from the four eruption seasons. Eruption season has a significant influence on AOD and clear-sky SW radiative flux anomalies for both eruption magnitudes. The sensitivity to eruption season for both fields is generally weak in the tropics, but increases in the mid- and high latitudes, reaching maximum values of ~75 %. Global mean AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies show sensitivity to eruption season on the order of 15–20 %, which results from differences in aerosol effective radius for the different eruption seasons. Smallest aerosol size and largest cumulative impact result from a January eruption for Pinatubo-magnitude eruption, and from a July eruption for the near-super eruption. In contrast to AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies, all-sky SW anomalies are found to be insensitive to season of eruption for the Pinatubo-magnitude eruption experiment, due to the reflection of solar radiation by clouds in the mid- to high latitudes. However, differences in all-sky SW anomalies between eruptions in different seasons are significant for the larger eruption magnitude, and the ~15 % sensitivity to

  1. Rare Isotope Insights into Supereruptions: Rare Sulfur and Triple Oxygen Isotope Geochemistry of Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols Absorbed on Volcanic Ash Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, I. N.; Eiler, J.; Wing, B.; Farquhar, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present analyses of stable isotopic ratios of 17O/16O, 18O/16O, 34S/32S, and 33S/32S, 36S/32S of sulfate leached from volcanic ash of a series of well-known volcanic eruptions. This list covers much of the diversity of sizes and the character of volcanic eruptions. Particular emphasis is paid to the Lava Creek Tuff of Yellowstone and we present wide geographic sample coverage for this unit. This global dataset spans a significant range in δ34S, δ18O, and Δ17O of sulfate (29, 30 and 3.3 permil respectively) with oxygen isotopes recording mass-independent fractionation and sulfur isotopes exhibiting mass-dependent behavior. These ranges are defined by the isotopic compositions of products of large caldera forming eruptions. Proximal ignimbrites and coarse ash typically do not contain sulfate. The presence of sulfate with Δ17O > 0.2 permil is characteristic of small distal ash particles, suggesting that sulfate aerosols were scavenged after they underwent atmospheric photochemical reactions. Additionally, sediments that embed ash layers either do not contain sulfate or contain minor sulfate with Δ17O near 0 permil, suggesting that the observed sulfate in ash is of volcanic origin. Mass-dependent sulfur isotopic compositions suggest that sulfate-forming reactions did not involve photolysis of SO2, unlike the situation inferred for some pre-2.3 Ga sulfates or hypothesized to occur during the formation of sulfate associated with plinian eruptions that pierce the ozone layer. However, sulfate in the products of caldera-forming eruptions display a large δ34S range and fractionation relationships that do not follow equilibrium slopes of 0.515 and 1.90 for 33S/32S vs. 34S/32S and 36S/32S vs. 34S/32S, respectively. This implies that the sulfur isotopic characteristics of these sulfates were not set by a single stage, high-temperature equilibrium process in the volcanic plum. The data presented here are consistent with a single stage kinetic fractionation of sulfur

  2. Transformation of aerosol in Planetary Boundary Layer over the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Przemyslaw; Petelski, Tomasz; Piskozub, Jacek; Jankowski, Andrzej; Zieliński, Tymon; Rozwadowska, Anna; Markuszewski, Piotr; Zawadzka, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important components of the atmosphere. The content and composition of aerosols in the atmosphere depends on their origin. In maritime areas transformation of aerosols in the atmosphere may occur. This depends on many factors, such as wind speed and direction, humidity and emission from the sea surface. The transformation of aerosols in the Planetary Boundary Layer over the Baltic Sea is replacing other sources of aerosols to aerosols composed of sea salt. When the air passing over the Baltic aerosol optical thickness (AOT) initially decreases and then increases in strong winds due to increase of the marine aerosol content in the layer. This type of change can be followed with use of many numerical experiments performed on the model of the transformation of aerosols in the Planetary Boundary Layer. This model consists of two parts, dynamic and optical. The dynamic part is based on the repeated numerical solution of the equation of diffusion for different particle size and optical properties. The result of the dynamic part provides vertical profiles of aerosol size distributions. Optical module to calculate the relative cross sections for the weakening used Mie single process. We compare data from numerical experiments with data from in situ experiments and with data from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) on board of Terra and Aqua satellite. From the resulting comparisons received correlations are in order as 0.789 and 0.862. What indicates a good correlation between the data from numerical experiment and in situ data or MODIS data. Acknowledgements: The support for this study was provided by the project Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment - SatBałtyk founded by European Union through European Regional Development Fund contract No. POIG 01.01.02-22-011/09

  3. Influence of micrometeorological features on coastal boundary layer aerosol characteristics at the tropical station, Trivandrum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Parameswaran

    2001-09-01

    Characteristics of aerosols in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) obtained from a bistatic CW lidar at Trivandrum for the last one decade are used to investigate the role of ABL micro- meteorological processes in controlling the altitude distribution and size spectrum. The altitude structure of number density shows three distinct zones depending on the prevailing boundary layer feature; viz, the well-mixed region, entertainment region and upper mixing region. In the lower altitudes vertical mixing is very strong (the well-mixed region) the upper limit of which is defined as aerosol-mixing height, is closely associated with the low level inversion. The aerosol mixing height generally lies in the range 150 to 400 m showing a strong dependence on the vertical eddy mixing processes in ABL. Above this altitude, the number density decreases almost exponentially with increase in altitude with a scale height of 0.5 -1.5 km. The aerosol mixing height is closely associated with the height of the Thermal Internal Boundary Layer (TIBL). Sea-spray aerosols generated as a result of the interaction of surface wind with sea surface forms an important component of mixing region aerosols at this location. This component shows a non-linear dependence on wind speed. On an average, depending on the season, the mixing region contributes about 10-30% of the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 0.5 m wavelength. A long term increasing trend (∼ 2.8% per year) is observed in mixing region AOD from 1989 to 1997. A study on the development of the aerosols in the nocturnal mixing region shows that the convectively driven daytime altitude structure continues to persist for about 4-5 hrs. after the sunset and thereafter the altitude structure is governed by vertical structure of horizontal wind. Stratified aerosol layers associated with stratified turbulence is very common during the late night hours.

  4. Physical and Radiative Properties of Aerosol Particles in the Caribbean: Influence of African Dust and Soufriere Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Birriel, C. M.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Sheridan, P.; Ogren, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric particles such as dust and volcanic ash have the potential of influencing the earth's radiative budget directly by scattering or absorbing solar radiation in the atmosphere and indirectly by affecting cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and, therefore, cloud albedo. The radiatively-important properties of atmospheric particles are determined at the most fundamental level by their chemical composition and size distributions; therefore, the importance of studying the chemical, physical, and optical aerosol properties. Over the summer months, the island of Puerto Rico receives African dust incursions that reduce visibility and have an impact on public health, ecosystem, and climate. Visibility is also negatively affected when the island receives south-east winds and the Soufriere volcano (Montserrat Island) has been active. Here we present preliminary results of measurements performed during 2006 and 2007 at Cape San Juan, a ground-based station located at the northeastern tip of Puerto Rico. The cases investigated showed three possible types of air masses: clean (C), with African Dust (AD), and with volcanic ash (VA) from the Soufriere. We used a condensation particle counter to determine the particle number concentration, a sunphotometer (part of the AERONET) to determine volume size distributions and aerosol optical thickness (AOT), a 3-wavelength nephelometer to determine the scattering coefficients, and a 3-wavelength particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP) for the absorption coefficients. The particle number concentrations were higher for AD and VA periods (up to about 700 cm-3 on average for both cases) in contrast to ~400 cm-3 for the C period. Volume size distributions showed bimodal distributions for the three cases with a greater influence of the coarse fraction for the C and VA periods and an increase in the fine particles for the AD period. The total scattering coefficient showed higher values for the AD (30 Mm-1) and the VA (26

  5. Photo-polarimetric sensitivities to layering and mixing of absorbing aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kalashnikova

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate to what extent multi-angle polarimetric measurements are sensitive to vertical mixing/layering of absorbing aerosols, adopting calibration uncertainty of 1.5% in intensity and 0.5% in the degree of linear polarization of Multiangle Spectro-Polarimetric Imager (MSPI. Employing both deterministic and Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes with polarization, we conduct modeling experiments to determine how the measured Stokes vector elements are affected at UV and short visible wavelengths by the vertical distribution, mixing and layering of smoke and dust aerosols for variety of microphysical parameters. We find that multi-angular polarimetry holds the potential to infer dust-layer heights and thicknesses at blue visible channel due to its lesser sensitivity to changes in dust coarse mode optical properties, but higher sensitivity to the dust vertical profiles. Our studies quantify requirements for obtaining simultaneous information on aerosol layer height and absorption under MSPI measurement uncertainties.

  6. Constraining the long-term climate reponse to stratospheric sulfate aerosols injection by the short-term volcanic climate response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazzotta, M.; Seferian, R.; Douville, H.; Kravitz, B.; Tilmes, S.; Tjiputra, J.

    2016-12-01

    Rising greenhouse gas emissions are leading to global warming and climate change, which will have multiple impacts on human society. Geoengineering methods like solar radiation management by stratospheric sulfate aerosols injection (SSA-SRM) aim at treating the symptoms of climate change by reducing the global temperature. Since a real-world testing cannot be implemented, Earth System Models (ESMs) are useful tools to assess the climate impacts of such geoengineering methods. However, coordinated simulations performed with the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) have shown that climate cooling in response to a continuous injection of 5Tg of SO2 per year under RCP45 future projection (the so-called G4 experiment) differs substantially between ESMs. Here, we employ a volcano analog approach to constrain the climate response in SSA-SRM geoengineering simulations across an ensemble of 10 ESMs. We identify an emergent relationship between the long-term cooling in responses to the mitigation of the clear-sky surface downwelling shortwave radiation (RSDSCS), and the short-term cooling related to the change in RSDSCS during the major tropical volcanic eruptions observed over the historical period (1850-2005). This relationship explains almost 80% of the multi-model spread. Combined with contemporary observations of the latest volcanic eruptions (satellite observations and model reanalyzes), this relationship provides a tight constraint on the climate impacts of SSA-SRM. We estimate that a continuous injection of SO2 aerosols into the stratosphere will reduce the global average temperature of continental land surface by 0.47 K per W m-2, impacting both hydrological and carbon cycles. Compared with the unconstrained ESMs ensemble (range from 0.32 to 0.92 K per W m-2 ), our estimate represents much higher confidence ways to assess the impacts of SSA-SRM on the climate while ruling the most extreme projections of the unconstrained ensemble extremely unlikely.

  7. Amazon boundary layer aerosol concentration sustained by vertical transport during rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Krejci, Radovan; Giangrande, Scott; Kuang, Chongai; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Chi, Xuguang; Comstock, Jennifer; Ditas, Florian; Lavric, Jost; Manninen, Hanna E.; Mei, Fan; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Saturno, Jorge; Schmid, Beat; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Toto, Tami; Walter, David; Wimmer, Daniela; Smith, James N.; Kulmala, Markku; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-11-01

    The nucleation of atmospheric vapours is an important source of new aerosol particles that can subsequently grow to form cloud condensation nuclei in the atmosphere. Most field studies of atmospheric aerosols over continents are influenced by atmospheric vapours of anthropogenic origin (for example, ref. 2) and, in consequence, aerosol processes in pristine, terrestrial environments remain poorly understood. The Amazon rainforest is one of the few continental regions where aerosol particles and their precursors can be studied under near-natural conditions, but the origin of small aerosol particles that grow into cloud condensation nuclei in the Amazon boundary layer remains unclear. Here we present aircraft- and ground-based measurements under clean conditions during the wet season in the central Amazon basin. We find that high concentrations of small aerosol particles (with diameters of less than 50 nanometres) in the lower free troposphere are transported from the free troposphere into the boundary layer during precipitation events by strong convective downdrafts and weaker downward motions in the trailing stratiform region. This rapid vertical transport can help to maintain the population of particles in the pristine Amazon boundary layer, and may therefore influence cloud properties and climate under natural conditions.

  8. Amazon boundary layer aerosol concentration sustained by vertical transport during rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Krejci, Radovan; Giangrande, Scott; Kuang, Chongai; Barbosa, Henrique M J; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Chi, Xuguang; Comstock, Jennifer; Ditas, Florian; Lavric, Jost; Manninen, Hanna E; Mei, Fan; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöhlker, Mira L; Saturno, Jorge; Schmid, Beat; Souza, Rodrigo A F; Springston, Stephen R; Tomlinson, Jason M; Toto, Tami; Walter, David; Wimmer, Daniela; Smith, James N; Kulmala, Markku; Machado, Luiz A T; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O; Petäjä, Tuukka; Martin, Scot T

    2016-11-17

    The nucleation of atmospheric vapours is an important source of new aerosol particles that can subsequently grow to form cloud condensation nuclei in the atmosphere. Most field studies of atmospheric aerosols over continents are influenced by atmospheric vapours of anthropogenic origin (for example, ref. 2) and, in consequence, aerosol processes in pristine, terrestrial environments remain poorly understood. The Amazon rainforest is one of the few continental regions where aerosol particles and their precursors can be studied under near-natural conditions, but the origin of small aerosol particles that grow into cloud condensation nuclei in the Amazon boundary layer remains unclear. Here we present aircraft- and ground-based measurements under clean conditions during the wet season in the central Amazon basin. We find that high concentrations of small aerosol particles (with diameters of less than 50 nanometres) in the lower free troposphere are transported from the free troposphere into the boundary layer during precipitation events by strong convective downdrafts and weaker downward motions in the trailing stratiform region. This rapid vertical transport can help to maintain the population of particles in the pristine Amazon boundary layer, and may therefore influence cloud properties and climate under natural conditions.

  9. Dry Deposition, Surface Production and Dynamics of Aerosols in the Marine Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fairall, C.W.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1984-01-01

    A model of downward aerosol panicle flux characterized by dry deposition velocity, Vd, due to Slinn and Slinn (1980) is generalized to the case of nonzero surface concentration (absorbing surface with a surface source). A more general expression for the flux at some reference height is developed...... which includes Vd and an effective surface source strength, Si, which is a function of the true surface source strength, Si, and the particle transport properties below the reference height. The general expression for the surface flux is incorporated into a dynamic mixed layer model of the type...... developed by Davidson et al. (1983). This three layer model (diffusion sublayer, turbulent surface layer and mixed layer) is applied to an open ocean marine regime where boundary layer advection is ignored. The aerosol concentration in the boundary layer is considered to consist of sea salt particles...

  10. Volcanic-aerosol-induced changes in stratospheric ozone following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, W. B.; Browell, E. V.; Fishman, J.; Brackett, V. G.; Fenn, M. A.; Butler, C. F.; Nganga, D.; Minga, A.; Cros, B.; Mayor, S. D.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of lower stratospheric ozone in the Tropics using electrochemical concentrations cell (ECC) sondes and the airborne UV Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo are compared with the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) and ECC sonde measurements from below the eruption to determine what changes have occurred as a result. Aerosol data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the visible and IR wavelengths of the lidar system are used to examine the relationship between aerosols and ozone changes. Ozone decreases of 30 percent at altitudes between 19 and 26 km, partial column (16-28 km) decreases of about 27 D.U., and slight increases (5.4 D.U.) between 28 and 31 km are found in comparison with SAGE 2 climatological values.

  11. Lidar Observation of the 2014 Kelut Volcanic Stratospheric Aerosols at Kototabang, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, Makoto; Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao

    2016-06-01

    The Kelut (Kelud) volcano (7.9S, 112.3E) in the Java island of Indonesia erupted on 13 February 2014. The CALIOP observed that the eruption cloud reached 26km above sea level. We have observed this stratospheric aerosol from 28 February 2014 at equatorial lidar site located in the Sumatra island of Indonesia (0.2S, 100.3E). We observed the depolarization maximum to be up to 2km below the backscatter maximum in April 2014. We also observed the vertical transportation process of stratospheric aerosol to troposphere by equatorial Kelvin wave.

  12. Water-soluble material on aerosols collected within volcanic eruption clouds ( Fuego, Pacaya, Santiaguito, Guatamala).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.B.; Zielinski, R.A.; Rose, W.I.; Huebert, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    In Feb. and March of 1978, filter samplers mounted on an aircraft were used to collect the aerosol fraction of the eruption clouds from three active Guatemalan volcanoes (Fuego, Pacaya, and Santiaguito). The elements dissolved in the aqueous extracts represent components of water-soluble material either formed directly in the eruption cloud or derived from interaction of ash particles and aerosol components of the plume. Calculations of enrichment factors, based upon concentration ratios, showed the elements most enriched in the extracts relative to bulk ash composition were Cd, Cu, V, F, Cl, Zn, and Pb.-from Authors

  13. Perturbation of the aerosol layer by aviation-produced aerosols: a parametrization of plume processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Meilinger, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut), Mainz (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    The perturbation of the sulfate surface area density (SAD) in the tropopause region and the lower stratosphere by subsonic and supersonic aircraft fleets is examined. The background aerosol surface area, the conversion of fuel sulfur into new sulfate particles in aircraft plumes, and the plume mixing with ambient air control this perturbation. The background aerosol surface area is enhanced by the addition of ultrafine aerosol particles at cruise altitudes. The study includes recent findings concerning the formation and development of these particles in aircraft plumes. Large-scale SAD enhancements become relevant for background SAD levels below about 10 {mu}m{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}, even for moderate sulfate conversion fractions of 5%. Results from an analytic expression for the surface area changes are presented which contains the dependences on these parameters and can be employed in large-scale atmospheric models. (orig.) 11 refs.

  14. Partial Collapse of Plinian Volcanic Jets and the Production of Multiply Layered Ash Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, J. T.; Jellinek, M.

    2014-12-01

    Powerful explosive volcanic eruptions inject ash high into the atmosphere, which spreads as an intrusion to form characteristic umbrella-shaped clouds. An enigmatic feature of a number of recent eruption clouds (e.g. Popocatepetl, 2012; Soufriere Hills, 2010; Mt. St. Helens, 1980 and Puyehue, 2011) is that they are constructed of multiple layers (Figure 1, left). How such layering emerges within an advancing gravity current of initially well-mixed ash is unclear. Potential major controls include the strength and structure of the atmospheric density stratification, the particle size distribution within the ash cloud and the entrainment of ambient atmosphere into the rising plume. Accordingly, we conduct analog experiments in which saltwater jets with mono- and bi-disperse suspensions of fine and coarse silica particles are injected into a saltwater tank with a linear density stratification. Whereas classical umbrella clouds are produced for strong jets (low source Richardson number, -Ri0) under all particle-loading conditions, multiply layered clouds emerge for weak jets (high -Ri0) and relatively concentrated bi-disperse and coarse mono-disperse suspensions. In particular, at high -Ri0 coarse particles inhibit entrainment and enhance the partial collapse of rising jets to form gravity currents that intermittently descend along the jet margin and spread at varying neutral buoyancy heights to form layers. For high concentrations of coarse sand gravity currents can reach the tank floor. Collapse and compaction of this material to form a deposit expels buoyant interstitial fluid that rises to form additional layers below and within the overlying multiply layered cloud. One layer and multiply layered clouds have distinct depositional patterns and present unique risks to air traffic.

  15. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2014-06-25

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  16. Partitioning aerosol optical depth between the boundary layer and the free troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Quentin; Ekman, Annica; Krejci, Radovan; Devasthale, Abhay; Renard, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-04-01

    Aerosols are short-lived (about a week) compounds in the atmosphere due to the efficient removal by dry and wet deposition in the boundary layer (BL) where a majority of the emission sources are located. As a consequence, most of the aerosol mass should be found in the BL and the aerosol optical depth (AOD) integrated over the atmospheric column should be dominated by the BL contribution. As a consequence, BL aerosols would most likely have the largest climate effect. However, aerosols advected to the free troposphere (FT) have a much longer residence time (typically a few weeks) than those in the BL, potentially inducing a more long-term effect on climate. Light-absorbing aerosols may in addition have an enhanced absorption, and thereby climate warming effect, if they are located above low-level reflective clouds. Light-absorbing aerosols above clouds may also modify below cloud formation and transformation. In this study, the global AOD has been retrieved using satellite observations from CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) over a nine-year period (2007-2015) and partitioned between the BL and FT using BL heights obtained from the ERA-Interim re-analysis data. The results show that the vertical distribution of AOD does not follow the diurnal cycle of the BL but remains similar between day and night highlighting the role of a residual layer during night. The BL and FT contribute 71% and 29%, respectively, to the global AOD during daytime. The FT AOD contribution is larger in the tropics than at mid-latitudes which indicates that convective transport largely controls the vertical profile of aerosols, and the FT AOD contribution over oceans is governed by neighboring continents. According to the CALIOP aerosol classification, dust and smoke particles are the main aerosol types transported into the FT. Overall, the study shows that the fraction of AOD in the FT - and thus potentially located above low-level clouds - is substantial and should

  17. Eulerian-Lagranigan simulation of aerosol evolution in turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2016-09-23

    The formation and evolution of aerosol in turbulent flows are ubiquitous in both industrial processes and nature. The intricate interaction of turbulent mixing and aerosol evolution in a canonical turbulent mixing layer was investigated by a direct numerical simulation (DNS) in a recent study (Zhou, K., Attili, A., Alshaarawi, A., and Bisetti, F. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer. Physics of Fluids, 26, 065106 (2014)). In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of aerosol evolution is carried out along Lagrangian trajectories obtained in the previous simulation, in order to quantify the error of the moment method used in the previous simulation. Moreover, the particle size distribution (PSD), not available in the previous works, is also investigated. Along a fluid parcel moving through the turbulent flow, temperature and vapor concentration exhibit complex fluctuations, triggering complicate aerosol processes and rendering complex PSD. However, the mean PSD is found to be bi-modal in most of the mixing layer except that a tri-modal distribution is found in the turbulent transition region. The simulated PSDs agree with the experiment observations available in the literature. A different explanation on the formation of such PSDs is provided.

  18. Coordinated airborne, spaceborne, and ground-based measurements of massive thick aerosol layers during the dry season in southern Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P.B.; Hobbs, P.V.; Hlavka, D.L.; McGill, M.J.; Holben, B.N.; Welton, E.J.; Campbell, J.R.; Torres, O.; Kahn, R.A.; Diner, D.J.; Helmlinger, M.C.; Chu, D.A.; Robles-Gonzalez, C.; Leeuw, G.de

    2003-01-01

    During the dry season airborne campaign of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000), coordinated observations were made of massive thick aerosol layers. These layers were often dominated by aerosols from biomass burning. We report on airborne Sun photometer measurements of aero

  19. Coordinated airborne, spaceborne, and ground-based measurements of massive thick aerosol layers during the dry season in southern Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P.B.; Hobbs, P.V.; Hlavka, D.L.; McGill, M.J.; Holben, B.N.; Welton, E.J.; Campbell, J.R.; Torres, O.; Kahn, R.A.; Diner, D.J.; Helmlinger, M.C.; Chu, D.A.; Robles-Gonzalez, C.; Leeuw, G.de

    2003-01-01

    During the dry season airborne campaign of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000), coordinated observations were made of massive thick aerosol layers. These layers were often dominated by aerosols from biomass burning. We report on airborne Sun photometer measurements of

  20. Catastrophic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  1. Lidar Investigations of Aerosol, Cloud, and Boundary Layer Properties Over the ARM ACRF Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); NOAA National Severe Storms Lab., Norman, OK (United States); Ferrare, Richard [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2015-01-13

    The systematic and routine measurements of aerosol, water vapor, and clouds in the vertical column above the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites from surface-based remote sensing systems provides a unique and comprehensive data source that can be used to characterize the boundary layer (i.e., the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere) and its evolution. New algorithms have been developed to provide critical datasets from ARM instruments, and these datasets have been used in long-term analyses to better understand the climatology of water vapor and aerosol over Darwin, the turbulent structure of the boundary layer and its statistical properties over Oklahoma, and to better determine the distribution of ice and aerosol particles over northern Alaska.

  2. Studies on Aerosols in the Marine Atmospheric Surface Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Leeuw, G. de; Eijk, A.M.J. van; Dekker, H.

    1992-01-01

    The work performed in 1992 in the framework of the EUROTRAC subproject ASE was mainly focused on three topics. The first was the extension of the modified CLUSE numerical model [Rouault et al., 1991; De Leeuw et al., 1992a] to over-ocean conditions. The modifications in the new code (SEACLUSE) include the influence of waves on the air flow and the evaporation of salt-water droplets. The second aim was to finalize the analysis of the TWO-PIE experimental data on tracer aerosol deposition on wa...

  3. Elevated aerosol layers and their radiative impact over Kanpur during monsoon onset period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Chandan; Tripathi, S. N.; Mishra, A. K.; Goel, A.; Welton, E. J.

    2016-07-01

    Accurate information about aerosol vertical distribution is needed to reduce uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcing and its effect on atmospheric dynamics. The present study deals with synergistic analyses of aerosol vertical distribution and aerosol optical depth (AOD) with meteorological variables using multisatellite and ground-based remote sensors over Kanpur in central Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Micro-Pulse Lidar Network-derived aerosol vertical extinction (σ) profiles are analyzed to quantify the interannual and daytime variations during monsoon onset period (May-June) for 2009-2011. The mean aerosol profile is broadly categorized into two layers viz., a surface layer (SL) extending up to 1.5 km (where σ decreased exponentially with height) and an elevated aerosol layer (EAL) extending between 1.5 and 5.5 km. The increase in total columnar aerosol loading is associated with relatively higher increase in contribution from EAL loading than that from SL. The mean contributions of EALs are about 60%, 51%, and 50% to total columnar AOD during 2009, 2010, and 2011, respectively. We observe distinct parabolic EALs during early morning and late evening but uniformly mixed EALs during midday. The interannual and daytime variations of EALs are mainly influenced by long-range transport and convective capacity of the local emissions, respectively. Radiative flux analysis shows that clear-sky incoming solar radiation at surface is reduced with increase in AOD, which indicates significant cooling at surface. Collocated analysis of atmospheric temperature and aerosol loading reveals that increase in AOD not only resulted in surface dimming but also reduced the temperature (˜2-3°C) of lower troposphere (below 3 km altitude). Radiative transfer simulations indicate that the reduction of incoming solar radiation at surface is mainly due to increased absorption by EALs (with increase in total AOD). The observed cooling in lower troposphere in high aerosol loading

  4. Impacts of Aerosol Shortwave Radiation Absorption on the Dynamics of an Idealized Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde Barbaro, E.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Krol, M.C.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the impact of aerosol heat absorption on convective atmospheric boundary-layer (CBL) dynamics. Numerical experiments using a large-eddy simulation model enabled us to study the changes in the structure of a dry and shearless CBL in depthequilibrium for different vertical profiles of

  5. Radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer and its feedback on the haze formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-04-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) plays a key role in air pollution dispersion and influences day-to-day air quality. Some studies suggest that high aerosol loadings during severe haze events may modify PBL dynamics by radiative effects and hence enhance the development of haze. This study mainly investigates the radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer by conducting simulations with Weather Research and Forecasting single-column model (WRF-SCM). We find that high aerosol loading in PBL depressed boundary layer height (PBLH). But the magnitude of the changes of PBLH after adding aerosol loadings in our simulations are small and can't explain extreme high aerosol concentrations observed. We also investigate the impacts of the initial temperature and moisture profiles on the evolution of PBL. Our studies show that the impact of the vertical profile of moisture is comparable with aerosol effects.

  6. Re-evaluating the reactive uptake of HOBr in the troposphere with implications for the marine boundary layer and volcanic plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Roberts

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactive uptake of HOBr onto halogen-rich aerosols promotes conversion of Br−(aq into gaseous reactive bromine (incl. BrO with impacts on tropospheric oxidants and mercury deposition. However, experimental data quantifying HOBr reactive uptake on tropospheric aerosols is limited, and reported values vary in magnitude. This study re-examines the reaction kinetics of HOBr across a range of aerosol acidity conditions, focusing on chemistry within the marine boundary layer and volcanic plumes. We highlight that the termolecular approach to HOBr reaction kinetics, used in numerical model studies to date, is strictly only valid over a specific pH range. Here we re-evaluate the reaction kinetics of HOBr according to the general acid assisted mechanism. The rate of reaction of HOBr with halide ions becomes independent of pH at high acidity yielding an acid-independent second-order rate constant, kII. The limit of acid-saturation is poorly constrained by available experimental data, although a reported estimate for HOBr+ Br−(aq+H+(aq, is kIIsat = 108–109 M−1 s−1, at pH ≲ 1. By consideration of halide nucleophilic strength and re-evaluation of reported uptake coefficient data on H2SO4-acidified sea-salt aerosol, we suggest the reaction of HOBr(aq + Cl−(aq+H+(aq may saturate to become acid-independent at pH ≤ 6, with kIIsat ~104 M−1 s−1. This rate constant is multiple orders of magnitude lower (a factor of 103 at pH = 3 and a factor of 106 at pH = 0 than that currently assumed in numerical models of tropospheric BrO chemistry, which are based on the termolecular approach. Reactive uptake coefficients, γHOBr, were calculated as a function of composition using the revised HOBr kinetics, with kI = kII · [X−(aq], and X = Br or Cl. γHOBr initially increases with acidity but subsequently declines with increasing H2SO4-acidification of sea-salt aerosol. The HOBr+Cl− uptake coefficient declines due to acid-displacement of HCl

  7. Aerosols Monitoring Network to Create a Volcanic ASH Risk Management System in Argentina and Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quel Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two main decisions were made in Argentina to mitigate the impact of the recent volcanic activity in de country basically affected by the presence of volcanic ash in the air and deposited over the Argentinean territory. The first one was to create a risk management commission were this risk between others were studied, and second to develop new ground based remote sensing technologies to be able to identify and inform the risk close to the airports. In addition the Japanese government program for Science and Technology joint Research Partnership between Argentina, Chile and Japan for Sustainable Development (SATREPS accepted to fund this cooperation due to the potential future utilization of the research outcomes to the benefit of the society. This work present the actual achievements and expected advance of these projects that try to joint efforts between national and international agencies as well as countries on behalf of a better understanding of the risks and a joint collaboration on the mitigation of suspended ashes impact over the aerial navigation.

  8. Aerosols Monitoring Network to Create a Volcanic ASH Risk Management System in Argentina and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quel, Eduardo; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Otero, Lidia; Jin, Yoshitaka; Ristori, Pablo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; González, Francisco; Papandrea, Sebastián; Shimizu, Atsushi; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Two main decisions were made in Argentina to mitigate the impact of the recent volcanic activity in de country basically affected by the presence of volcanic ash in the air and deposited over the Argentinean territory. The first one was to create a risk management commission were this risk between others were studied, and second to develop new ground based remote sensing technologies to be able to identify and inform the risk close to the airports. In addition the Japanese government program for Science and Technology joint Research Partnership between Argentina, Chile and Japan for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) accepted to fund this cooperation due to the potential future utilization of the research outcomes to the benefit of the society. This work present the actual achievements and expected advance of these projects that try to joint efforts between national and international agencies as well as countries on behalf of a better understanding of the risks and a joint collaboration on the mitigation of suspended ashes impact over the aerial navigation.

  9. One year of Raman lidar observations of free tropospheric aerosol layers over South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Giannakaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman lidar data obtained over a one year period has been analyzed in relation to aerosol layers in the free troposphere over the Highveld in South Africa. In total, 375 layers were observed above the boundary layer during the period 30 January 2010–31 January 2011. The seasonal behavior of aerosol layer geometrical characteristics, as well as intensive and extensive optical properties were studied. The highest center heights of free tropospheric layers were observed during the South African spring (2520 ± 970 m a.g.l.. The geometrical layer depth was found to be maximum during spring, while it did not show any significant difference for the rest of the seasons. The variability of the analyzed intensive and extensive optical properties was high during all seasons. This was attributed to the mixing state of aerosols and the different transport paths of the aerosol layers. Layers were observed at a mean altitude of 2100 ± 1000 m a.g.l. with an average lidar ratio of 67 ± 25 sr (mean value with one standard deviation at 355 nm and a mean extinction-related Ångström exponent of 1.9 ± 0.8 between 355 and 532 \\unit{nm} during the period under study. During southern hemispheric spring, the biomass burning activity is clearly reflected in the optical properties of the observed free tropospheric layers. Specifically, lidar ratios at 355 nm were 57 ± 20 sr , 65 ± 23 sr, 59 ± 22 sr and 89 ± 21 sr during summer (December–February, winter (June–August, autumn (March–May and spring (September–November, respectively. The extinction-related Ångström exponents between 355 and 532 nm measured during summer, winter, autumn and spring were 2.4 ± 0.9, 1.8 ± 0.6, 1.8 ± 0.9 and 1.8 ± 0.6, respectively. The mean columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD obtained from lidar measurements was found to be 0.46 ± 0.35 at 355 nm and 0.25 ± 0.2 at 532 nm.The contribution of free tropospheric aerosols on the AOD had a wide range of values with a mean

  10. Speciation of organic aerosols in the Saharan Air Layer and in the free troposphere westerlies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. García

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We focused this research on the composition of the organic aerosols transported in the two main airflows of the subtropical North Atlantic free troposphere: (i the Saharan Air Layer – the warm, dry and dusty airstream that expands from North Africa to the Americas at subtropical and tropical latitudes – and (ii the westerlies, which flow from North America over the North Atlantic at mid- and subtropical latitudes. We determined the inorganic compounds (secondary inorganic species and elemental composition, elemental carbon and the organic fraction (bulk organic carbon and organic speciation present in the aerosol collected at Izaña Observatory,  ∼  2400 m a.s.l. on the island of Tenerife. The concentrations of all inorganic and almost all organic compounds were higher in the Saharan Air Layer than in the westerlies, with bulk organic matter concentrations within the range 0.02–4.0 µg m−3. In the Saharan Air Layer, the total aerosol population was by far dominated by dust (93 % of bulk mass, which was mixed with secondary inorganic pollutants ( <  5 % and organic matter ( ∼  1.5 %. The chemical speciation of the organic aerosols (levoglucosan, dicarboxylic acids, saccharides, n-alkanes, hopanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and those formed after oxidation of α-pinene and isoprene, determined by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry accounted for 15 % of the bulk organic matter (determined by the thermo-optical transmission technique; the most abundant organic compounds were saccharides (associated with surface soils, secondary organic aerosols linked to oxidation of biogenic isoprene (SOA ISO and dicarboxylic acids (linked to several primary sources and SOA. When the Saharan Air Layer shifted southward, Izaña was within the westerlies stream and organic matter accounted for  ∼  28 % of the bulk mass of aerosols. In the westerlies, the organic aerosol species determined

  11. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, B.; Gysel, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T. F.; Goger, B.; Poulain, L.; Schlag, P.; Miettinen, P.; Pajunoja, A.; Virtanen, A.; Bialek, J.; Klein Baltink, H.; Henzing, J. S.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; O'Dowd, C.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-03-01

    Airborne measurements of the aerosol hygroscopic and optical properties as well as chemical composition were performed in the Netherlands and northern Italy on board of a Zeppelin NT airship during the PEGASOS field campaigns in 2012. The vertical changes in aerosol properties during the development of the mixing layer were studied. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF) at 95% relative humidity were determined using the white-light humidified optical particles spectrometer (WHOPS) for dry diameters of 300 and 500 nm particles. These measurements were supplemented by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and an aethalometer providing information on the aerosol chemical composition. Several vertical profiles between 100 and 700 m a.g. were flown just after sunrise close to the San Pietro Capofiume ground station in the Po Valley, Italy. During the early morning hours the lowest layer (newly developing mixing layer) contained a high nitrate fraction (20%) which was coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth. In the layer above (residual layer) small nitrate fractions of ~ 2% were measured as well as low GFs. After full mixing of the layers, typically around noon and with increased temperature, the nitrate fraction decreased to 2% at all altitudes and led to similar hygroscopicity values as found in the residual layer. These distinct vertical and temporal changes underline the importance of airborne campaigns to study aerosol properties during the development of the mixed layer. The aerosol was externally mixed with 22 and 67% of the 500 nm particles in the range GF 1.5, respectively. Contributors to the non-hygroscopic mode in the observed size range are most likely mineral dust and biological material. Mean hygroscopicity parameters (κ) were 0.34, 0.19 and 0.18 for particles in the newly forming mixing layer, residual layer and fully mixed layer, respectively. These results agree well with those from chemical analysis which found values of κ = 0.27, 0.21 and 0.19 for the

  12. Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An Arm Mobile Facility Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Rémillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L.; O’Connor, Ewan J.; Hogan, Robin J.; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-03-01

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) 38 deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009-December 2010) 39 comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric 40 Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is 41 to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the 42 marine boundary layer. 43 Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the 44 Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and 45 cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus 46 occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar 47 echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-48 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide 49 range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of 50 sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way 51 interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation 52 and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. 53 The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety 54 of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they 55 reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, 56 but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to 57 be a long-term ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  13. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Browell, Edward V.; Kooi, Susan A.; Dunion, Jason P.; Heymsfield, Gerry; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn F.; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; hide

    2010-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) on-board the NASA DC-8 measured high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern North Atlantic during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment. These measurements were used to study African easterly waves (AEWs), tropical cyclones (TCs), and the Saharan Air Layer(s) (SAL). Interactions between the SAL and tropical air were observed during the early stages of the TC development. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on AEWs and TCs. Examples of profile measurements of aerosol scattering ratios, aerosol extinction coefficients, aerosol optical thickness, water vapor mixing ratios, RH, and temperature are presented to illustrate their characteristics in SAL, convection, and clear air regions. LASE data suggest that the SAL suppresses low-altitude convection at the convection-SAL interface region. Mid-level convection associated with the AEW and transport are likely responsible for high water vapor content observed in the southern regions of the SAL on August 20, 2008. This interaction is responsible for the transfer of about 7 x 10(exp 15) J latent heat energy within a day to the SAL. Measurements of lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratios in the range 36+/-5 to 45+/-5 are within the range of measurements from other lidar measurements of dust. LASE aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles are validated by comparison with onboard in situ aerosol measurements and GPS dropsonde water vapor soundings, respectively.

  14. Mixed-layer ocean responses to anthropogenic aerosol dimming from 1870 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Knutti, Reto; Wild, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It is still debated, to what extent anthropogenic aerosol-induced changes in surface solar radiation (SSR) since industrialization affected surface temperatures (tsurf). We use mixed-layer ocean (MLO) experiments with the general circulation model ECHAM6.1 and explicit aerosols (HAM2.2) to identify regions where this effect is discernible. For each decade from 1870 to 2000 we derive three equilibria: anthropogenic aerosol emissions and greenhouse gas concentrations at the respective decade's levels (ALL), either aerosols or greenhouse gases fixed at year 1850 levels (GHG and AERO). We duplicated parts of the experiments with different prescribed divergence of ocean heat transport (Q_ALL, Q_AERO, Q_GHG). Comparing year 2000 with year 1870 equilibria, we find global average cooling of -1.4K for AERO, and warming of 1.4K for GHG. ALL and Q_ALL warm by 0.6K and 0.4K, respectively. The way divergence of ocean heat transport is prescribed thus matters. Pattern correlations of year 2000 tsurf responses in ALL with the sum of AERO and GHG are higher (0.88) than with Q_ALL (0.71) confirming additivity of global patterns, but not of global means. The imprint of anthropogenic aerosols on tsurf response patterns in ALL is distinct, thus potentially detectable. Over the decades, ocean fractions affected by either changing aerosol optical depth or all-sky SSR vary in concert, supporting linkage between anthropogenic aerosols and all-sky SSR. SSR changes and tsurf responses are marginally collocated. Oceanic regions with strongest tsurf response to aerosol-induced SSR changes are the northern mid-latitudes and North Pacific with tsurf sensitivities up to -0.7K per Wm-2 SSR change. Results presented have been published under the same title in the Journal of Geophysical Research, Volume 121, DOI 10.1002/2015JD024070.

  15. Mixed-layer ocean responses to anthropogenic aerosol dimming from 1870 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallafior, T. N.; Folini, D.; Knutti, R.; Wild, M.

    2016-01-01

    It is debated to what extent surface solar radiation (SSR) changes through varying anthropogenic aerosol emissions since industrialization affected surface temperatures (tsurf). We use mixed-layer ocean experiments with the general circulation model ECHAM6.1 and explicit aerosols (HAM2.2) to identify regions where this effect is discernible. For each decade from 1870 to 2000 we derive three equilibria: anthropogenic aerosol emissions and greenhouse gas concentrations at the respective decade's levels (ALL), either aerosols or greenhouse gases fixed at year 1850 levels (GHG and AERO). We duplicated parts of the experiments with different prescribed divergence of ocean heat transport (Q_ALL, Q_AERO, and Q_GHG). Comparing year 2000 with year 1870 equilibria, we find global average cooling of -1.4 K for AERO and warming of 1.4 K for GHG. ALL and Q_ALL warm by 0.6 K and 0.4 K, respectively. The way divergence of ocean heat transport is prescribed thus matters. Pattern correlations of year 2000 tsurf responses in ALL with the sum of AERO and GHG are higher (0.88) than with Q_ALL (0.71) confirming additivity of global patterns, but not of global means. The imprint of anthropogenic aerosols on tsurf response patterns in ALL is distinct, thus potentially detectable. Over the decades, ocean fractions affected by either changing aerosol optical depth or all-sky SSR vary in concert, supporting linkage between anthropogenic aerosols and all-sky SSR. SSR changes and tsurf responses are marginally collocated. Oceanic regions with strongest tsurf response to aerosol-induced SSR changes are the northern midlatitudes and North Pacific with tsurf sensitivities up to -0.7 K W m-2 SSR change.

  16. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rosati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements of the aerosol hygroscopic and optical properties as well as chemical composition were performed in the Netherlands and northern Italy on board of a Zeppelin NT airship during the PEGASOS field campaigns in 2012. The vertical changes in aerosol properties during the development of the mixing layer were studied. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF at 95% relative humidity were determined using the white-light humidified optical particles spectrometer (WHOPS for dry diameters of 300 and 500 nm particles. These measurements were supplemented by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS and an aethalometer providing information on the aerosol chemical composition. Several vertical profiles between 100 and 700 m a.g. were flown just after sunrise close to the San Pietro Capofiume ground station in the Po Valley, Italy. During the early morning hours the lowest layer (newly developing mixing layer contained a high nitrate fraction (20% which was coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth. In the layer above (residual layer small nitrate fractions of ~ 2% were measured as well as low GFs. After full mixing of the layers, typically around noon and with increased temperature, the nitrate fraction decreased to 2% at all altitudes and led to similar hygroscopicity values as found in the residual layer. These distinct vertical and temporal changes underline the importance of airborne campaigns to study aerosol properties during the development of the mixed layer. The aerosol was externally mixed with 22 and 67% of the 500 nm particles in the range GF 1.5, respectively. Contributors to the non-hygroscopic mode in the observed size range are most likely mineral dust and biological material. Mean hygroscopicity parameters (κ were 0.34, 0.19 and 0.18 for particles in the newly forming mixing layer, residual layer and fully mixed layer, respectively. These results agree well with those from chemical analysis which found values of κ = 0.27, 0.21 and 0

  17. Surface ozone-aerosol behaviour and atmospheric boundary layer structure in Saharan dusty scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, Jose; Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Sorrribas, Mar; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel; Toledo, Daniel; Yela, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    A research campaign was performed for the AMISOC (Atmospheric Minor Species relevant to the Ozone Chemistry) project at El Arenosillo observatory (southwest Spain) in May-June 2012. The campaign focused on the impact of Saharan dust intrusions at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and ozone-aerosol interactions. In-situ and remote-sensing techniques for gases and aerosols were used moreover to modelling analyses. Meteorology features, ABL structures and evolution, aerosol profiling distributions and aerosol-ozone interactions on the surface were analysed. Two four-day periods were selected according to non-dusty (clean conditions) and dusty (Saharan dust) situations. In both scenarios, sea-land breezes developed in the lower atmosphere, but differences were found in the upper levels. Results show that surface temperatures were greater than 3°C and humidity values were lower during dusty conditions than non-dusty conditions. Thermal structures on the surface layer (estimated using an instrument on a 100 m tower) show differences, mainly during nocturnal periods with less intense inversions under dusty conditions. The mixing layer during dusty days was 400-800 m thick, less than observed on non-dusty days. Dust also disturbed the typical daily ABL evolution. Stable conditions were observed during the early evening during intrusions. Aerosol extinction on dusty days was 2-3 times higher, and the dust was confined between 1500 and 5500 m. Back trajectory analyses confirmed that the dust had an African origin. On the surface, the particle concentration was approximately 3.5 times higher during dusty events, but the local ozone did not exhibit any change. The arrival of Saharan dust in the upper levels impacted the meteorological surface, inhibited the daily evolution of the ABL and caused an increase in aerosol loading on the surface and at higher altitudes; however, no dust influence was observed on surface ozone.

  18. A sensitivity study of atmospheric reflectance to aerosol layer height based on multi-angular polarimetric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, Lili; Li, Donghui; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Ying; Hou, Weizhen; Chen, Xingfeng

    2015-10-01

    The reflected Solar radiance at top of atmosphere (TOA) are, to some degree, sensitive to the vertical distribution of absorbing aerosols, especially at short wavelengths (i.e. blue and UV bands). If properly exploited, it may enable the extraction of basic information on aerosol vertical distribution. In recent years, rapid development of the advanced spectral multi-angle polarimetric satellite observation technology and aerosol inversion algorithm makes the extraction of more aerosol information possible. In this study, we perform a sensitivity analysis of the reflection function at TOA to the aerosol layer height, to explore the potential for aerosol height retrievals by using multi-angle total and polarized reflectance passive observations at short wavelength. Employing a vector doubling-adding method radiative transfer code RT3, a series of numerical experiments were conducted considering different aerosol model, optical depth (AOD), single-scattering albedo (SSA), and scale height (H), also the wavelength, solar-viewing geometry, etc. The sensitivity of both intensity and polarization signals to the aerosol layer height as well as the interacted impactions with SSA and AOD are analyzed. It's found that the sensitivity of the atmospheric reflection function to aerosol scale height increase with aerosol loading (i.e. AOD) and aerosol absorption (i.e. SSA), and decrease with wavelength. The scalar reflectance is sensitive to aerosol absorption while the polarized reflectance is more influenced by the altitude. Then the aerosol H and SSA may be derived simultaneously assuming that the total and polarized radiances in UV bands deconvolve the relative influences of height and absorption. Aerosol layer height, Atmospheric reflection function, Sensitivity, Ultraviolet (UV) band.

  19. Radiolarian zonation and volcanic ash layers in two Quaternary sediment cores from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.

    and redistribution of Pliocene taxa by a bottom water current (probably Antarctic Bottom Water Current). Volcanic ash layers of apparently about 20,000; 30,000 - 40,000; 80,000; 340,000 and younger than 4000,000 years are also recognised, which suggest suboceanic...

  20. Dominance of pollutant aerosols over an urban region and its impact on boundary layer temperature profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Shamitaksha; Jana, Soumyajyoti; Maitra, Animesh

    2017-01-01

    Collocated measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and black carbon at different wavelengths over Kolkata, an urban region in eastern India, have been used to calculate aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA). The wavelength dependence of SSA and AOD has been presented to discriminate the aerosol types over this highly populated metropolitan area. The spectral pattern shows that SSA decreases with wavelength for most of the time in a year and corresponding Ångström coefficient is greater than unity. These optical properties indicate the dominance of fine-mode pollutant particles over the city. The temperature lapse rate profile within the surface boundary layer has been found to be significantly influenced by the heating effect of fine-mode pollutants, and consequently, the growth of the convective processes in the lower troposphere is notably affected. In addition, a back trajectory analysis has also been presented to indicate that transported air masses can have significant impact on spectral pattern of SSA.

  1. Evolution of planetary boundary layer under different weather conditions, and its impact on aerosol concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiannong Quan; Yang Gao; Qiang Zhang; Xuexi Tie; Junji Cao; Suqin Han; Junwang Meng

    2013-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted in Tianjin,China from September 9-30,2010,focused on the evolution of Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) and its impact on surface air pollutants.The experiment used three remote sensing instruments,wind profile radar (WPR),microwave radiometer (MWR) and micro-pulse lidar (MPL),to detect the vertical profiles of winds,temperature,and aerosol backscattering coefficient and to measure the vertical profiles of surface pollutants (aerosol,CO,SO2,NOx),and also collected sonic anemometers data from a 255-m meteorological tower.Based on these measurements,the evolution of the PBL was estimated.The averaged PBL height was about 1000-1300 m during noon/afternoon-time,and 200-300 m during night-time.The PBL height and the aerosol concentrations were anti-correlated during clear and haze conditions.The averaged maximum PBL heights were 1.08 and 1.70 km while the averaged aerosol concentrations were 52 and 17 μg/m3 under haze and clear sky conditions,respectively.The influence of aerosols and clouds on solar radiation was observed based on sonic anemometers data collected from the 255-m meteorological tower.The heat flux was found significantly decreased by haze (heavy pollution) or cloud,which tended to depress the development of PBL,while the repressed structure of PBL further weakened the diffusion of pollutants,leading to heavy pollution.This possible positive feedback cycle (more aerosols → lower PBL height → more aerosols) would induce an acceleration process for heavy ground pollution in megacities.

  2. Aerosol size distribution and refractive index from bistatic lidar angular scattering measurements in the surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandithurai, G.; Devara, P.C.S.; Raj, P.E.; Sharma, S. [Indian Inst. of Tropical Meteorology, Pune (India)

    1996-05-01

    The results of an inversion method by iteration for determining the aerosol size distribution and the refractive index of atmospheric aerosols in the surface layer from bistatic lidar angular scattering measurements, followed by a brief description of the experimental and data retrieval techniques are presented. The continuous wave, bistatic Argon ion lidar at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune (18{degree}31{prime}N, 73{degree}51{prime}E, 559 m AMSL), India has been used for the measurements. Results of the analysis of 420 samples collected over a 7 years` period indicate mean value of size and refractive indices of 4.0 and 1.6, respectively, with greater fraction of larger particles during premonsoon while smaller particles during post-monsoon months at the lidar site. The retrieved aerosol parameters are compared with those determined from spectroradiometer observations at the same site. The results are found well in agreement with those obtained previously by the authors using the library search method. The above observations of angular distribution of scattered intensity are used with an aerosol model to infer the dominant type of aerosols present in the environment in and around the experimental station.

  3. Nature, Origin, Potential Composition, and Climate Impact of the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, T. D.; Vernier, J.-P.; Thomason, L. W.; Natarajan, M.; Bedka, K.; Wienhold, F.; Bian J.; Martinsson, B.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite observations from SAGE II and CALIPSO indicate that summertime aerosol extinction has more than doubled in the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL) since the late 1990s. Here we show remote and in-situ observations, together with results from a chemical transport model (CTM), to explore the likely composition, origin, and radiative forcing of the ATAL. We show in-situ balloon measurements of aerosol backscatter, which support the high levels observed by CALIPSO since 2006. We also show in situ measurements from aircraft, which indicate a predominant carbonaceous contribution to the ATAL (Carbon/Sulfur ratios of 2- 10), which is supported by the CTM results. We show that the peak in ATAL aerosol lags by 1 month the peak in CO from MLS, associated with deep convection over Asia during the summer monsoon. This suggests that secondary formation and growth of aerosols in the upper troposphere on monthly timescales make a significant contribution to ATAL. Back trajectory calculations initialized from CALIPSO observations provide evidence that deep convection over India is a significant source for ATAL through the vertical transport of pollution to the upper troposphere.

  4. Radiosonde aerosol counter for vertical profiling of atmospheric dust layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K. A.; Rogers, G.

    2010-05-01

    A low-cost, miniature aerosol particle counter has been developed, intended for use with balloon-borne meteorological radiosondes. It is particularly suitable for airborne mineral dust measurements. Ambient air is drawn into the counter using a diaphragm pump at a rate of 0.5 litre per minute. The counter detects particles in the airstream using a diode laser and a photodiode. Output from the photodiode is digitised into 5 size bins, with minimum particle diameters equivalent to 0.6, 1.4, 2.6, 5.4 and 10.6 micrometers. The counter is interfaced to a Vaisala RS92 radiosonde, which transmits data from the counter together with meteorological parameters and GPS-derived position to a ground based receiver at 1 Hz rate. Statistically significant particle size distributions can be obtained once a second for number concentrations down to about 100,000 particle per litre (within the measured size range), or correspondingly less at lower temporal resolutions. At the same time, the counter is capable of measuring dust number concentrations exceeding a million per litre without incurring significant errors. Soundings during the DREAME campaign in Kuwait (Ulanowski et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7) and on Cape Verde Islands (Nicoll et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7) provided dust concentration profiles with a typical vertical resolution of 4 m. Comparisons with integrated dust column size distribution measurements from AERONET sun photometers showed good agreement in two out of three cases where near-simultaneous retrievals were available. Optical thickness calculations based on the size distributions measured in Kuwait, with the assumption that the dust particles were prolate spheroids, agreed with the AERONET optical thickness at 675 nm to within 15%.

  5. Lidar investigation of tropical nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj, M. G.; Devara, P. C. S.; Taraphdar, S.

    2013-10-01

    Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties over a tropical urban site is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

  6. Modeling the feedback between aerosol and boundary layer processes: a case study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Liu, Shuhua; Zheng, Yijia; Wang, Shu

    2016-02-01

    Rapid development has led to frequent haze in Beijing. With mountains and sea surrounding Beijing, the pollution is found to be influenced by the mountain-plain breeze and sea-land breeze in complex ways. Meanwhile, the presence of aerosols may affect the surface energy balance and impact these boundary layer (BL) processes. The effects of BL processes on aerosol pollution and the feedback between aerosol and BL processes are not yet clearly understood. Thus, the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate the possible effects and feedbacks during a haze episode on 23 September 2011. Influenced by the onshore prevailing wind, sea-breeze, and upslope breeze, about 45% of surface particulate matter (PM)2.5 in Beijing are found to be contributed by its neighbor cities through regional transport. In the afternoon, the development of upslope breeze suppresses the growth of BL in Beijing by imposing a relatively low thermal stable layer above the BL, which exacerbates the pollution. Two kinds of feedback during the daytime are revealed as follows: (1) as the aerosols absorb and scatter the solar radiation, the surface net radiation and sensible heat flux are decreased, while BL temperature is increased, resulting in a more stable and shallower BL, which leads to a higher surface PM2.5 concentration in the morning and (2) in the afternoon, as the presence of aerosols increases the BL temperature over plains, the upslope breeze is weakened, and the boundary layer height (BLH) over Beijing is heightened, resulting in the decrease of the surface PM2.5 concentration there.

  7. Multifunction lidar system and its application for detecting aerosol and wind in boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liquan; Qiu, Jinhuan; Zheng, Siping; Huang, Qirong

    1998-08-01

    A backscatter Nd-YAG lidar system has been constructed in our institute, which was designed to measure and image the four- dimensional structure the aerosol and to detect wind in lower atmosphere. It contains a Nd-YAG laser with maximum repetition rate of 15 pulses per second and a 20-cm telescope with maximum field of view of 3 mrad. A fast computer controlled angular scanning system provides can make the lidar to fire at the set position and time. Data logging system provides a logarithmic amplifier of 80 dB, 8 bit A/D conversion with range resolution of 7.5 m and high pixel resolution lidar images in a graphics computer. The system allows observations of inhomogeneities in natural aerosol in boundary layer showing the spatial distribution of aerosol scattering. A model to use triple angle azimuth scan method for measuring wind velocity is developed, which agrees well with the supposed wind in numerical experiment. The lidar system is been used in observations of aerosol and wind in boundary layer during February to July of 1998 and some results are presented.

  8. Retrievals of Effective Aerosol Layer Height and Single Scattering Albedo for Biomass-Burning Smoke and Mineral Dust Aerosols from A-Train Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, M.; Hsu, C.

    2010-12-01

    Launches of state-of-the-art satellite sensors dedicated to aerosol remote sensing in recent years marked the beginning of a new era in aerosol-related studies by virtue of the well-coordinated observing system consisting of an array of satellites flown in formation, so called A-Train (Afternoon satellites constellation). The capabilities of the individual sensors aboard the A-Train satellites are complementary and overlapping in terms of retrievable aerosol parameters, sensitivity, spatial resolution and coverage. Thus, there is a great potential to gain value-added information about aerosols by merging observations from the A-Train sensors. In this study, we introduce a new algorithm, which can be utilized to derive aerosol layer height (ALH) and single scattering albedo (SSA) for biomass-burning smoke and airborne mineral dust aerosols by synthesizing observations from three A-Train satellite sensors: CALIOP, MODIS, and OMI. By using this algorithm, it is presented that ALH and SSA of biomass-burning smoke aerosols over North America, Southeast Asia, and Europe can be derived successfully. We show the retrieved values of SSA bear reasonable agreements with those from AERONET. The results of this study also reveal that the algorithm has a basic skill to estimate ALH by combining only MODIS and OMI observations, allowing us to separate smoke aerosols residing within the boundary layer from those elevated in the free troposphere. Currently, another version of the algorithm to be applicable for mineral dust aerosols is under development, and earlier results will be presented. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of transport and radiative effects of biomass-burning smoke and mineral dust aerosols.

  9. Marine boundary layer cloud regimes and POC formation in a CRM coupled to a bulk aerosol scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, A. H.; Bretherton, C. S.; Wood, R.; Muhlbauer, A.

    2013-12-01

    A cloud-resolving model (CRM) coupled to a new intermediate-complexity bulk aerosol scheme is used to study aerosol-boundary-layer-cloud-precipitation interactions and the development of pockets of open cells (POCs) in subtropical stratocumulus cloud layers. The aerosol scheme prognoses mass and number concentration of a single lognormal accumulation mode with surface and entrainment sources, evolving subject to processing of activated aerosol and scavenging of dry aerosol by clouds and rain. The CRM with the aerosol scheme is applied to a range of steadily forced cases idealized from a well-observed POC. The long-term system evolution is explored with extended two-dimensional (2-D) simulations of up to 20 days, mostly with diurnally averaged insolation and 24 km wide domains, and one 10 day three-dimensional (3-D) simulation. Both 2-D and 3-D simulations support the Baker-Charlson hypothesis of two distinct aerosol-cloud "regimes" (deep/high-aerosol/non-drizzling and shallow/low-aerosol/drizzling) that persist for days; transitions between these regimes, driven by either precipitation scavenging or aerosol entrainment from the free-troposphere (FT), occur on a timescale of ten hours. The system is analyzed using a two-dimensional phase plane with inversion height and boundary layer average aerosol concentrations as state variables; depending on the specified subsidence rate and availability of FT aerosol, these regimes are either stable equilibria or distinct legs of a slow limit cycle. The same steadily forced modeling framework is applied to the coupled development and evolution of a POC and the surrounding overcast boundary layer in a larger 192 km wide domain. An initial 50% aerosol reduction is applied to half of the model domain. This has little effect until the stratocumulus thickens enough to drizzle, at which time the low-aerosol portion transitions into open-cell convection, forming a POC. Reduced entrainment in the POC induces a negative feedback

  10. Aerosol Distribution in The Planetary Boundary Layer Aloft a Residential Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovorka, Jan; Leoni, Cecilia; Dočekalová, Veronika; Ondráček, Jakub; Zíková, Naděžda

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosol is an omnipresent component of the Earth atmosphere. Aerosol particle of diameters 1 μm defines ultrafine or coarse aerosol particles, respectively. Aerosol particle concentrations within the planetary boundary layer - PBL are measured at the ground level while their vertical profiles in the PBL are usually estimated by modelling. The aim of this study was to construct vertical concentration profiles of ultrafine and coarse aerosol particles from airborne and ground measurements conducted in an urban airshed. Airborne measurements were done by an unmanned airship, remotely controlled with GPS 10 Hz position tracking, and electrically powered with propulsion vectoring, which allows average cruising speed of 6 m.s-1. The airship carried three aerosol monitors and a temperature sensor. The monitors acquired 1 Hz data on mass concentration of coarse and number concentration of ultrafine particles. Four flight sequences were conducted on the 2nd of March 2014 above Plesna village, up-wind suburb of Ostrava in the Moravian-Silesian region of the Czech Republic. The region is a European air pollution hot-spot. Repeated flights were carried out in several height levels up to 570 m above ground level - a.g.l. Early morning flight revealed a temperature inversion in the PBL up to 70 m a.g.l. This lead to coarse particle concentrations of 50 μgm-3 below the inversion layer and 10 μgm-3 above it. Concurrently, air masses at 90-120 m a.g.l. were enriched with ultrafine particles up to 2.5x104 cm-3, which may indicate a fanning plume from a distant emission source with high emission height. During the course of the day, concentrations of ultrafine and coarse particle gradually decreased. Nevertheless, a sudden increase of ultrafine particle concentrations up to 3.7x104 cm-3 was registered at 400 m a.g.l. at noon and also after a lag of 20 min at the ground. This may indicate formation of new aerosol particles at higher altitudes, which are then transported

  11. Study of aerosol penetration into filtering layers; Etude de la penetration des aerosols dans les couches filtrantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parnianpour, H. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-06-15

    In this work a radio-active aerosol is used to study the penetration of particles inside various filtering media by a layer technique. First of all the penetration of the active thoron deposit fixed on the atmospheric dust was examined for a series of filters which were considered to be representative of the various filtering materials used. From this series of tests it appears that the penetration of an ultrafine aerosol in a filter made up of fibrous matter involves two successive, different processes: the first part of the curve characterizes the surface effect, the second part which is practically exponential in form has a slope which depends on the test conditions and on the nature of the filter. The changes in the penetration as a function either of the porosity or of the rate of filtration yield only a qualitative check of the theory; in all cases the penetration is much greater than predicted. The last part of the work is devoted to an examination and a discussion of results obtained, and to various applications of the method, especially concerning the determination of the absorption coefficient for {alpha} particles by the matter. The changes in the absorption factor with filtering speed are particularly studied. (author) [French] On se propose dans ce travail d'etudier, avec un aerosol radioactif, la penetration des particules a l'interieur de differents milieux filtrants en utilisant une methode de feuilletage. On a tout d'abord examine la penetration du depot actif du thoron fixe sur les poussieres atmospheriques pour une serie de filtres que nous avons voulu representative des differents materiaux filtrants utilises. Il ressort de cette serie d'essais que la penetration d'un aerosol ultrafin dans un filtre compose de matiere fibreuse fait intervenir deux processus successifs differents: la premiere partie de courbe caracterise l'effet de surface; la seconde partie pratique- ment exponentielle ou la pente depend des

  12. A Numerical Study of Sea-Spray Aerosol Motion in a Coastal Thermal Internal Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tinghao; Yu, Xiping

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional large-eddy simulation model is applied to the study of sea-spray aerosol transport, dispersion and settling in the coastal thermal internal boundary layer (IBL) formed by cool airflow from the open sea to the warm land. An idealized situation with constant inflow from the ocean and constant heat flux over the coastal land is considered. The numerical results confirm that the thickness of the coastal thermal IBL increases with the distance from the coastline until the outer edge of the IBL penetrates into the capping inversion layer. The thickness increases also with time until a fully-developed thermal boundary layer is formed. In addition, the thickness of the coastal thermal IBL increases more rapidly when the heat flux over the land is greater. Existence of large-scale eddies within the thermal IBL is identified and the turbulence intensity within the thermal IBL is also found to be significantly higher than that above. It is also indicated that the vertical position of the maximum concentration does not occur at the surface but increases as sea-spray aerosols are transported inland. The vertical position of the maximum flux of sea-spray aerosols within the coastal thermal IBL is shown to coincide with that of the maximum vertical velocity fluctuations when the coastal thermal IBL is fully developed with increased distance in the airflow direction.

  13. Multi-layer TiO{sub 2} films prepared by aerosol deposition method for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Yoon, Young Joon, E-mail: yjyoon@kicet.re.kr

    2013-11-29

    The control of microstructure, from a compact to a porous TiO{sub 2}layer, was investigated for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) by employing aerosol deposition. A highly compact TiO{sub 2} layer that suppresses electron recombination was grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide electrode by strong impact and the consolidation of sub-micron-size powders. By spraying a mixture powders with different diameters during the aerosol deposition, it was possible to grow a porous TiO{sub 2} layer on the compact layer without the need for binder components. The performance of DSSCs with as-deposited TiO{sub 2}layers produced by aerosol deposition was compared with corresponding values for an annealed sample. The effect of the compact layer on the conversion efficiency of DSSCs was also investigated. The conversion efficiency of DSSCs with a compact layer was enhanced by 62% compared to those without a compact layer. - Highlights: • A TiO{sub 2} multi-layer for dye-sensitized solar cell was grown by aerosol deposition. • A highly compact TiO{sub 2} layer was used to suppress electron recombination. • A porous TiO{sub 2} layer was grown using a mixture of 700 nm and 25 nm-diameter powders. • The conversion efficiency was enhanced by 62% after adding a compact TiO{sub 2} layer.

  14. Impacts of elevated-aerosol-layer and aerosol type on the correlation of AOD and particulate matter with ground-based and satellite measurements in Nanjing, southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong; Wu, Yonghua; Wang, Tijian; Zhuang, Bingliang; Li, Shu; Zhao, Kun

    2015-11-01

    Assessment of the correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particulate matter (PM) is critical to satellite remote sensing of air quality, e.g. ground PM10 and ground PM2.5. This study evaluates the impacts of aloft-aerosol-plume and aerosol-type on the correlation of AOD-PM by using synergistic measurement of a polarization-sensitive Raman-Mie lidar, CIMEL sunphotometer (SP) and TEOM PM samplers, as well as the satellite MODIS and CALIPSO, during April to July 2011 in Nanjing city (32.05(○)N/118.77(○)E), southeast China. Aloft-aerosol-layer and aerosol types (e.g. dust and non-dust or urban aerosol) are identified with the range-resolved polarization lidar and SP measurements. The results indicate that the correlations for AOD-PM10 and AOD-PM2.5 can be much improved when screening out the aloft-aerosol-layer. The linear regression slopes show significant differences for the dust and non-dust dominant aerosols in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). In addition, we evaluate the recent released MODIS-AOD product (Collection 6) from the "dark-target" (DT) and "deep-blue" (DB) algorithms and their correlation with the PM in Nanjing urban area. The results verify that the MODIS-DT AODs show a good correlation (R = 0.89) with the SP-AOD but with a systematic overestimate. In contrast, the MODIS-DB AOD shows a moderate correlation (R = 0.66) with the SP-AOD but with a smaller regression intercept (0.07). Furthermore, the moderately high correlations between the MODIS-AOD and PM10 (PM2.5) are indicated, which suggests the feasibility of PM estimate using the MODIS-AOD in Nanjing city.

  15. Marine boundary layer sea spray aerosol number concentrations during VOCALS-REx

    Science.gov (United States)

    BLOT, R. P.; Clarke, A. D.; Howell, S. G.; Kapustin, V. N.

    2012-12-01

    Marine boundary layer (MBL) sea spray aerosols include all the inorganic material (sea-salt), organic matter from biogenic activity (plankton, bacteria, microalgae) and other surface active material (exopolymer) found at the surface ocean. SSA are released into the MBL by bursting air bubbles originating from wind-induced breaking waves at the ocean surface. SSA play a major role in the Earth's radiative budget due to their ability to significantly scatter the solar radiation and because of their high hygroscopicity SSA are effective as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing cloud droplet numbers. Early studies generally focused on sizes larger than about 0.2μm due to their influence on atmospheric light propagation and also because of the instrumental difficulty to distinguish SSA from the more numerous natural sulfate and fine anthropogenic aerosol. During the last two decades, evidence from laboratory and field experiments showed the existence of SSA aerosol down to 0.01μm . Even though ultrafine SSA (fraction of the size distribution that dominate CCN at low supersaturations characteristic of stratus clouds near 0.3%. We analyze thermally resolved airborne aerosol measurements made in the MBL during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land-Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) over the the Southeast Pacific. We confirm that open-ocean SSA effective as CCN are produced from bubble bursting processes are present at dry sizes as small as 0.040μm.

  16. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The extensive coverage of low clouds over the subtropical eastern oceans greatly impacts the current climate. In addition, the response of low clouds to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols is a major source of uncertainty, which thwarts accurate prediction of future climate change. Low clouds are poorly simulated in climate models, partly due to inadequate long-term simultaneous observations of their macrophysical and microphysical structure, radiative effects, and associated aerosol distribution in regions where their impact is greatest. The thickness and extent of subtropical low clouds is dependent on tight couplings between surface fluxes of heat and moisture, radiative cooling, boundary layer turbulence, and precipitation (much of which evaporates before reaching the ocean surface and is closely connected to the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei). These couplings have been documented as a result of past field programs and model studies. However, extensive research is still required to achieve a quantitative understanding sufficient for developing parameterizations, which adequately predict aerosol indirect effects and low cloud response to climate perturbations. This is especially true of the interactions between clouds, aerosol, and precipitation. These processes take place in an ever-changing synoptic environment that can confound interpretation of short time period observations.

  17. Chemical composition of aerosol in the atmospheric surface layer of the East Antarctica coastal zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Golobokova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of aerosol in the ground layer of the coastal zone in East Antarctica is analyzed in the article. The aerosol samples were taken in 2006–2015 during seasonal works of the Russian Antarctic Expeditions (RAE, namely, these were 52nd–53rd, 55th, and 58th–60th expeditions. Samples were taken in the 200‑km band of the sea-shore zone along routes of the research vessels (REV «Akademik Fedorov» and «Akademik Treshnikov» as well as on territories of the Russian stations Molodezhnaya and Mirny. Although the results obtained did show the wide range of the aerosol concentrations and a certain variability of their chemical composition, some common features of the variability were revealed. Thus, during the period from 2006 to 2014 a decrease of average values of the sums were noted. Spatially, a tendency of decreasing of the ion concentrations was found in the direction from the station Novolazarevskaya to the Molodezhnaya one, but the concentrations increased from the Molodezhnaya to the station Mirny. The sum of ions of the aerosol in the above mentioned coastal zone was, on the average, equal to 2.44 μg/m3, and it was larger than that on the territory of the Antarctic stations Molodezhnaya (0,29 μg/m3 and Mirny (0,50 ág / m3. The main part to the sum of the aerosol ions on the Antarctic stations was contributed by Na+, Ca2+, Cl−, SO4 2−. The main ions in aerosol composition in the coastal zone are ions Na+ and Cl−. The dominant contribution of the sea salt and SO4 2− can be traced in not only the composition of atmospheric aerosols, but also in the chemical composition of the fresh snow in the coastal areas of East Antarctica: at the Indian station Maitri, on the Larsemann Hills, and in a boring located in 55.3 km from the station Progress (K = 1.4÷6.1. It was noted that values of the coefficient of enrichment K of these ions decreases as someone moves from a shore to inland. Estimation of

  18. Heterogeneous volcanism across the Permian-Triassic Boundary in South China and implications for the Latest Permian Mass Extinction: New evidence from volcanic ash layers in the Lower Yangtze Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhiwei; Hu, Wenxuan; Cao, Jian; Wang, Xiaolin; Yao, Suping; Wu, Haiguang; Wan, Ye

    2016-09-01

    Volcanism has been suggested to have occurred widely in South China across the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB); this has important implications for understanding the cause of the Latest Permian Mass Extinction (LMPE). However, few volcanic deposits have been reported in the Lower Yangtze Region and the extent of volcanism is uncertain. Herein we report new discoveries of intensive volcanism in this region for the first time, as evidenced by multiple (n > 20) and thick (3-5 cm) claystones (volcanic ash layers, K-bentonite) found in three deep-water outcrops in Xuancheng city, southern Anhui Province. Detailed petrographic and geochemical analyses of the ash layers were conducted to understand their origin and implications for the cause of the LPME, including X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and whole-rock geochemistry. The petrological and mineralogical results show that the claystones contain clastic minerals indicative of a volcanic origin, such as zircon, analcites, pentagonal dodecahedral pyrite, and micro-spherules. The whole-rock geochemical data of the claystones suggest that the source rock of the ash layers was intermediate-acidic rhyodacite. The claystones are different from previously known claystones in the Middle-Upper Yangtze regions, indicating the occurrence of chemically heterogeneous volcanism in South China at the PTB.

  19. Measurements and determination of the marine coarse aerosol fluxes in near marine boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markuszewski, Piotr; Petelski, Tomasz; Zielinski, Tymon; Strzalkowska, Agata; Pakszys, Paulina; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    Studies of production and transport of aerosol over the sea are very important for many areas of knowledge. Marine aerosols emitted from the sea surface help to clean the boundary layer from other aerosol particles. The emitted droplets do not dry out in the highly humid surface layer air and because of their sizes most of them are deposited quickly at the sea surface. Therefore, marine aerosols have many features of rain i.e. the deposition in the marine boundary layer in high wind events is controlled not only by the "dry" processes but also by the "wet" scavenging. During a number of cruises conducted on board of r/v Oceania between 2008 and 2012 we collected much data which were further used to calculate sea salt source function over the Baltic Sea. Measurements were carried out using a gradient method. For this method we used a Laser Particle Counter (PMS model CSASP-100_HV) placed on one of the masts of the boat. Measurements were performed at five different levels above the sea level: 8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 meters. The vertical aerosol concentration gradient was obtained from a minimum of 4 measurement series. Thus each result consists of a 1 hour series with the average sampling time at each elevation equaling to 8 minutes. Based on the averaged vertical concentration, and using the Monin Obukhov theory, profiles of vertical sea spray fluxes in the near water layer were calculated. Using the results from those experiments the sea spray emission fluxes have been calculated for all particles of sizes at ranges from 0.5 μm to 8 μm, as well as for particles of sizes from fifteen channels of 0.5 μm width. Using these fluxes we calculated the Sea Salt Generation Function (SSGF) over the Baltic Sea. This function provides information on the emission of particles of different sizes, depending on environmental parameters. The emission of sea spray depends on the magnitude of energy lost by the wind waves in the process of their collapse. The support for this study

  20. Simulated impacts of direct radiative effects of scattering and absorbing aerosols on surface layer aerosol concentrations in China during a heavily polluted event in February 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yulu; Liao, Hong; Zhang, Renjian; Hu, Jianlin

    2017-06-01

    We quantified aerosol direct radiative effects on surface layer concentrations of aerosols during a heavily polluted event in the North China Plain (NCP, 35.4°N-41.2°N, 113.3°E-119.3°E) during 21-27 February 2014, using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) Model. Comparisons of model results with observations showed that the WRF-Chem model reproduced the spatial and temporal variations of meteorological variables reasonably well, but overestimated average PM2.5 concentration by 21.7% over the NCP during 21-27 February. The simulated direct radiative effects of total, absorbing, and scattering aerosols reduced the planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights by 111.4 m, 35.7 m, and 70.7 m, respectively, averaged over NCP and 21-27 February. The direct radiative effects of total aerosols induced increases in aerosol concentrations by 11.5% for SO42-, 29.5% for NO3-, 29.6% for NH4+, 28.7% for organic carbon (OC), 26.7% for black carbon (BC), and 20.4% for PM2.5, respectively, averaged over the NCP during 21-27 February 2014. The increase in PM2.5 concentration averaged over the NCP and the haze event was 29.6 μg m-3 (16.8%) due to radiative effect of scattering aerosols, as a result of the decreases in PBL height and changes in secondary aerosol production rates. The corresponding increase in PM2.5 concentration owing to absorbing aerosols was 2.1 μg m-3 (1.0%), resulting from the offsetting impacts of changes in PBL height, wind near the surface, and chemical processes.

  1. Reactive bromine chemistry in Mt. Etna's volcanic plume: the influence of total Br, high temperature processing, aerosol loading and plume-air mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Roberts

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic emissions present a source of reactive halogens to the troposphere, through rapid plume chemistry that converts the emitted HBr to more reactive forms such as BrO. The nature of this process is poorly quantified, yet is of interest to understand volcanic impacts on the troposphere, and infer volcanic activity from volcanic gas measurements (i.e. BrO / SO2 ratios. Recent observations from Etna report an initial increase and subsequent plateau or decline in BrO / SO2 ratios with distance downwind. We present daytime PlumeChem model simulations that reproduce and explain the reported trend in BrO / SO2 at Etna including the initial rise and subsequent plateau. Through suites of model simulations we also investigate the influences of volcanic aerosol loading, bromine emission, and plume-air mixing rate on the downwind plume chemistry. Emitted volcanic HBr is converted into reactive bromine by autocatalytic bromine chemistry cycles whose onset is accelerated by the model high-temperature initialisation. These rapid chemistry cycles also impact the reactive bromine speciation through inter-conversion of Br, Br2, BrO, BrONO2, BrCl, HOBr. Formation of BrNO2 is also discussed. We predict a new evolution of Br-speciation in the plume, with BrO, Br2, Br and HBr as the main plume species in the near downwind plume whilst BrO, and HOBr are present in significant quantities further downwind (where BrONO2 and BrCl also make up a minor fraction. The initial rise in BrO / SO2 occurs as ozone is entrained into the plume whose reaction with Br promotes net formation of BrO. Aerosol has a modest impact on BrO / SO2 near-downwind (2 occurs as entrainment of oxidants HO2 and NO2 promotes net formation of HOBr and BrONO2, whilst the plume dispersion dilutes volcanic aerosol so slows the heterogeneous loss rates of these species. A higher volcanic aerosol loading enhances BrO / SO2 in the (> 6 km downwind plume. Simulations assuming low/medium and high Etna

  2. Discrimination and Validation of Clouds and Dust Aerosol Layers over the Sahara Desert with Combined CALIOP and IIR Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingjing; CHEN Bin; HUANG Jianping

    2014-01-01

    This study validates a method for discriminating between daytime clouds and dust aerosol layers over the Sahara Desert that uses a combination of active CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polar-ization) and passive IIR (Infrared Imaging Radiometer) measurements; hereafter, the CLIM method. The CLIM method reduces misclassification of dense dust aerosol layers in the Sahara region relative to other techniques. When evaluated against a suite of simultaneous measurements from CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations), CloudSat, and the MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imag-ing Spectroradiometer), the misclassification rate for dust using the CLIM technique is 1.16%during boreal spring 2007. This rate is lower than the misclassification rates for dust using the cloud aerosol discriminations performed for version 2 (V2-CAD;16.39%) or version 3 (V3-CAD;2.01%) of the CALIPSO data processing algorithm. The total identification errors for data from in spring 2007 are 13.46% for V2-CAD, 3.39% for V3-CAD, and 1.99%for CLIM. These results indicate that CLIM and V3-CAD are both significantly better than V2-CAD for discriminating between clouds and dust aerosol layers. Misclassifications by CLIM in this region are mainly limited to mixed cloud-dust aerosol layers. V3-CAD sometimes misidentifies low-level aerosol layers adjacent to the surface as thin clouds, and sometimes fails to detect thin clouds entirely. The CLIM method is both simple and fast, and may be useful as a reference for testing or validating other discrimination techniques and methods.

  3. Discrimination and validation of clouds and dust aerosol layers over the Sahara desert with combined CALIOP and IIR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Chen, Bin; Huang, Jianping

    2014-02-01

    This study validates a method for discriminating between daytime clouds and dust aerosol layers over the Sahara Desert that uses a combination of active CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) and passive IIR (Infrared Imaging Radiometer) measurements; hereafter, the CLIM method. The CLIM method reduces misclassification of dense dust aerosol layers in the Sahara region relative to other techniques. When evaluated against a suite of simultaneous measurements from CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations), CloudSat, and the MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), the misclassification rate for dust using the CLIM technique is 1.16% during boreal spring 2007. This rate is lower than the misclassification rates for dust using the cloud aerosol discriminations performed for version 2 (V2-CAD; 16.39%) or version 3 (V3-CAD; 2.01%) of the CALIPSO data processing algorithm. The total identification errors for data from in spring 2007 are 13.46% for V2-CAD, 3.39% for V3-CAD, and 1.99% for CLIM. These results indicate that CLIM and V3-CAD are both significantly better than V2-CAD for discriminating between clouds and dust aerosol layers. Misclassifications by CLIM in this region are mainly limited to mixed cloud-dust aerosol layers. V3-CAD sometimes misidentifies low-level aerosol layers adjacent to the surface as thin clouds, and sometimes fails to detect thin clouds entirely. The CLIM method is both simple and fast, and may be useful as a reference for testing or validating other discrimination techniques and methods.

  4. Mixing-Height Time Series from Operational Ceilometer Aerosol-Layer Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotteraner, Christoph; Piringer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    A new method is described to derive mixing-height time series directly from aerosol-layer height data available from a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. As complete as possible mixing-height time series are calculated by avoiding outliers, filling data gaps by linear interpolation, and smoothing. In addition, large aerosol-layer heights at night that can be interpreted as residual layers are not assigned as mixing heights. The resulting mixing-height time series, converted to an appropriate data format, can be used as input for dispersion calculations. Two case examples demonstrate in detail how the method works. The mixing heights calculated using ceilometer data are compared with values determined from radiosounding data at Vienna by applying the parcel, Heffter, and Richardson methods. The results of the parcel method, obtained from radiosonde profiles at noon, show the best fit to the ceilometer-derived mixing heights. For midnight radiosoundings, larger deviations between mixing heights from the ceilometer and those deduced from the potential temperature profiles of the soundings are found. We use data from two Vaisala CL51 ceilometers, operating in the Vienna area at an urban and rural site, respectively, during an overlapping period of about 1 year. In addition to the case studies, the calculated mixing-height time series are also statistically evaluated and compared, demonstrating that the ceilometer-based mixing height follows an expected daily and seasonal course.

  5. Mixing-Height Time Series from Operational Ceilometer Aerosol-Layer Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotteraner, Christoph; Piringer, Martin

    2016-11-01

    A new method is described to derive mixing-height time series directly from aerosol-layer height data available from a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. As complete as possible mixing-height time series are calculated by avoiding outliers, filling data gaps by linear interpolation, and smoothing. In addition, large aerosol-layer heights at night that can be interpreted as residual layers are not assigned as mixing heights. The resulting mixing-height time series, converted to an appropriate data format, can be used as input for dispersion calculations. Two case examples demonstrate in detail how the method works. The mixing heights calculated using ceilometer data are compared with values determined from radiosounding data at Vienna by applying the parcel, Heffter, and Richardson methods. The results of the parcel method, obtained from radiosonde profiles at noon, show the best fit to the ceilometer-derived mixing heights. For midnight radiosoundings, larger deviations between mixing heights from the ceilometer and those deduced from the potential temperature profiles of the soundings are found. We use data from two Vaisala CL51 ceilometers, operating in the Vienna area at an urban and rural site, respectively, during an overlapping period of about 1 year. In addition to the case studies, the calculated mixing-height time series are also statistically evaluated and compared, demonstrating that the ceilometer-based mixing height follows an expected daily and seasonal course.

  6. Marine boundary layer cloud regimes and POC formation in an LES coupled to a bulk aerosol scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Berner

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A large-eddy simulation (LES coupled to a new bulk aerosol scheme is used to study long-lived regimes of aerosol-boundary layer cloud-precipitation interaction and the development of pockets of open cells (POCs in subtropical stratocumulus cloud layers. The aerosol scheme prognoses mass and number concentration of a single log-normal accumulation mode with surface and entrainment sources, evolving subject to processing of activated aerosol and scavenging of dry aerosol by cloud and rain. The LES with the aerosol scheme is applied to a range of steadily-forced simulations idealized from a well-observed POC case. The long-term system evolution is explored with extended two-dimensional simulations of up to 20 days, mostly with diurnally-averaged insolation. One three-dimensional two-day simulation confirms the initial development of the corresponding two-dimensional case. With weak mean subsidence, an initially aerosol-rich mixed layer deepens, the capping stratocumulus cloud slowly thickens and increasingly depletes aerosol via precipitation accretion, then the boundary layer transitions within a few hours into an open-cell regime with scattered precipitating cumuli, in which entrainment is much weaker. The inversion slowly collapses for several days until the cumulus clouds are too shallow to efficiently precipitate. Inversion cloud then reforms and radiatively drives renewed entrainment, allowing the boundary layer to deepen and become more aerosol-rich, until the stratocumulus layer thickens enough to undergo another cycle of open-cell formation. If mean subsidence is stronger, the stratocumulus never thickens enough to initiate drizzle and settles into a steady state. With lower initial aerosol concentrations, this system quickly transitions into open cells, collapses, and redevelops into a different steady state with a shallow, optically thin cloud layer. In these steady states, interstitial scavenging by cloud droplets is the main sink of

  7. Microphysical, macrophysical and radiative signatures of volcanic aerosols in trade wind cumulus observed by the A-Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yuan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Increased aerosol concentrations can raise planetary albedo not only by reflecting sunlight and increasing cloud albedo, but also by changing cloud amount. However, detecting aerosol effect on cloud amount has been elusive to both observations and modeling due to potential buffering mechanisms and convolution of meteorology. Here through a natural experiment provided by long-term degassing of a low-lying volcano and use of A-Train satellite observations, we show aerosols are associated strongly with modification of trade cumulus cloud fields including decreased droplet size, decreased precipitation efficiency and increased cloud amount. We also demonstrate that the observed microphysical and macrophysical changes cannot be explained by synoptic meteorology or the orographic effect of the Hawaiian Islands. The "total shortwave aerosol forcing", resulting from direct and indirect forcings including both cloud albedo and cloud amount, is almost an order of magnitude higher than aerosol direct forcing alone. The precipitation reduction associated with enhanced aerosol leads to large changes in the energetics of air-sea exchange. Our results represent the first observational evidence of large-scale increase of cloud amount due to aerosols in a trade cumulus regime, which can be used to constrain the representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in climate models. The findings also have implications for volcano-climate interactions and climate mitigation research.

  8. An aerosol climatology for the Jungfraujoch, Part 1: Criteria for cloud presence and boundary layer influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Erik; Weingartner, Ernest; Gysel, Martin; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Hammer, Emanuel; Collaud Coen, Martine; Conen, Franz; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-05-01

    The high alpine research station at the Jungfraujoch in Switzerland is located at 3580 m asl. Depending on meteorological conditions, the station is in the planetary boundary layer or in the free troposphere; and often it is inside clouds. In one location, it is thus possible to study aerosols under very different conditions. These possibilities have been recognized early on, with aerosol measurements starting in 1995. Over the years, the instrumentation has been extended significantly, today including various measurements of aerosol optical properties (nephelometer, aethalometer, MAAP) as well as aerosol size distribution (SMPS, OPC, APS). Additionally, the station regularly hosts campaigns (e.g. CLACE) with a multitude of additional devices, mostly focusing on new particle formation, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei. However, there are no continuously operated direct measurements to determine whether the station is in the clouds or not, whether it is in the PBL or the free troposphere. As these are essential parameters to describe the aerosol observed at the station, we present approaches to describe them based on the observations available to us. The intuitive choices to look at in terms of clouds are relative humidity and dew point. When comparing dew point and ambient temperature, a clear criterion to identify clouds can be easily deducted. However, the determination of "no clouds" is more ambiguous. Based on longwave radiation measurements performed routinely at the site, it is possible to calculate the sky temperature, i.e. the temperature at the point of origin of the radiation. When within a cloud, the sky temperature should be identical or at least close to ambient temperature. The comparison of sky and ambient temperature shows two clear clusters which can be interpreted as "cloud" and "no cloud". One has to note that in case of inversion or clouds shortly above the research station, this approach will produce false positives. However, combining

  9. Measurement of aerosol sulfuric acid 2. Pronounced layering in the free troposphere during the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtius, J; Sierau, B; Arnold, F; de Reus, M; Strom, J; Scheeren, HA; Lelieveld, J

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of aerosol sulfuric acid in the free troposphere were performed in the vicinity of Tenerife, Canary Islands (28degreesN, 16degreesW), in July 1997. These measurements were carried out on board a Dutch Cessna Citation 11 research aircraft within the framework of the second Aerosol Charac

  10. Amazon boundary layer aerosol concentration sustained by vertical transport during rainfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian; Krejci, Radovan; Giangrande, Scott; Kuang, Chongai; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Chi, Xuguang; Comstock, Jennifer; Ditas, Florian; Lavric, Jost; Manninen, Hanna E.; Mei, Fan; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Saturno, Jorge; Schmid, Beat; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Toto, Tami; Walter, David; Wimmer, Daniela; Smith, James N.; Kulmala, Markku; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-10-24

    A necessary prerequisite of cloud formation, aerosol particles represent one of the largest uncertainties in computer simulations of climate change1,2, in part because of a poor understanding of processes under natural conditions3,4. The Amazon rainforest is one of the few continental regions where aerosol particles and their precursors can be studied under near-natural conditions5-7. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in clean Amazonia are mostly produced by the growth of smaller particles in the boundary layer8-10, whereas these smaller particles themselves 31 appear to be produced elsewhere5,11. Key questions are in what part of the atmosphere they might 32 be produced and what could be the transport processes that deliver them to the boundary layer, where they grow into CCN. Here, using recent aircraft measurements above central Amazonia, we show high concentrations of small particles in the lower free troposphere. The particle size spectrum shifts towards larger sizes with decreasing altitude, implying particle growth as air descends from the free troposphere towards Earth's surface. Complementary measurements at ground sites show that free tropospheric air having high concentrations of small particles (diameters of less than 50 nm) is transported into the boundary layer during precipitation events, both by strong convective downdrafts and by weaker downward motions in the trailing stratiform region. This vertical transport helps maintain the population of small particles and ultimately CCN in the boundary layer, thereby playing an important role in controlling the climate state under natural conditions. In contrast, this mechanism becomes masked under polluted conditions, which sometimes prevail at times in Amazonia as well as over other tropical continental regions5,12.

  11. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähn, Michael; Muñoz-Esparza, Domingo; Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Knoth, Oswald; Haarig, Moritz; Ansmann, Albert; Tegen, Ina

    2016-04-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) with ASAM (All Scale Atmospheric Model) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude potential temperature perturbations. This method is now also validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment) field campaign is used for both model initialization and comparisons. Several sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Additional simulation cases deal with modified surface characteristics and their impacts on the simulation results. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ≈ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength) and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with lidar data show similarities in the downwind vertical wind structure and accurately reproduces the development of the daytime convective boundary layer measured by the Raman lidar.

  12. Airship measurements of aerosol size distributions, cloud droplet spectra, and trace gas concentrations in the marine boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frick, G.M.; Hoppel, W.A. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-11-01

    The use of an airship as a platform to conduct atmospheric chemistry, aerosol, and cloud microphysical research is described, and results from demonstration flights made off the Oregon coast are presented. The slow speed of the airship makes it an ideal platform to do high-spatial resolution profiling both vertically and horizontally, and to measure large aerosol and cloud droplet distributions without the difficulties caused by high-speed aircraft sampling. A unique set of data obtained during the demonstration flights show the effect that processing marine boundary layer aerosol through stratus clouds has on the aerosol size distribution. Evidence of new particle formation (nucleation of particles) was also observed on about half the days on which flights were made. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Elevated aerosol layers modify the O2–O2 absorption measured by ground-based MAX-DOAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Ivan; Berg, Larry K.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The oxygen collisional complex (O2-O2, or O4) is a greenhouse gas, and a calibration trace gas used to infer aerosol and cloud properties by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Recent reports suggest the need for an O4 correction factor (CFO4) when comparing simulated and measured O4 differential slant column densities (dSCD) by passive DOAS. We investigate the sensitivity of O4 dSCD simulations at ultraviolet (360 nm) and visible (477 nm) wavelengths towards separately measured aerosol extinction profiles. Measurements were conducted by the University of Colorado 2D-MAX-DOAS instrument and NASA’s multispectral High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) during the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod, MA in July 2012. During two case study days with (1) high aerosol load (17 July, AOD ~ 0.35 at 477 nm), and (2) near molecular scattering conditions (22 July, AOD < 0.10 at 477 nm) the measured and calculated O4 dSCDs agreed within 6.4±0.4% (360 nm) and 4.7±0.6% (477 nm) if the HSRL-2 profiles were used as input to the calculations. However, if in the calculations the aerosol is confined to the surface layer (while keeping AOD constant) we find 0.53aerosol layers, unless accounted for, can cause negative bias in the simulated O4 dSCDs that can explain CFO4. The air density and aerosol profile aloft needs to be taken into account when interpreting the O4 from ground-based MAX-DOAS. Opportunities to identify and better characterize these layers are also discussed.

  14. Elevated aerosol layers modify the O2–O2 absorption measured by ground-based MAX-DOAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Ivan; Berg, Larry K.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The oxygen collisional complex (O2-O2, or O4) is a greenhouse gas, and a calibration trace gas used to infer aerosol and cloud properties by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Recent reports suggest the need for an O4 correction factor (CFO4) when comparing simulated and measured O4 differential slant column densities (dSCD) by passive DOAS. We investigate the sensitivity of O4 dSCD simulations at ultraviolet (360 nm) and visible (477 nm) wavelengths towards separately measured aerosol extinction profiles. Measurements were conducted by the University of Colorado 2D-MAX-DOAS instrument and NASA’s multispectral High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) during the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod, MA in July 2012. During two case study days with (1) high aerosol load (17 July, AOD ~ 0.35 at 477 nm), and (2) near molecular scattering conditions (22 July, AOD < 0.10 at 477 nm) the measured and calculated O4 dSCDs agreed within 6.4±0.4% (360 nm) and 4.7±0.6% (477 nm) if the HSRL-2 profiles were used as input to the calculations. However, if in the calculations the aerosol is confined to the surface layer (while keeping AOD constant) we find 0.53aerosol layers, unless accounted for, can cause negative bias in the simulated O4 dSCDs that can explain CFO4. The air density and aerosol profile aloft needs to be taken into account when interpreting the O4 from ground-based MAX-DOAS. Opportunities to identify and better characterize these layers are also discussed.

  15. The relationship of boundary layer clouds in the tropical southeast Atlantic to absorbing aerosols, meteorology and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidema, P.; Adebiyi, A. A.; Ramajiguru, L.

    2015-12-01

    Ascension Island, a remote island located in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean within the trade-wind region oat 8S, 14.5W, experiences the outflow of biomass-burning aerosols from continental Africa, over 2000 km away, from July through November, peaking in August and September. The shortwave-absorbing free-tropospheric aerosols, located in a region of high solar irradiance, provide a climate warming that is poorly represented in global aerosol climate models. The low clouds can respond to the smoke layer in myriad possible ways that are not yet well-documented. The shortwave-warming can stabilize the free-troposphere, enhancing the low cloud fraction. The deepening boundary layer and subsiding smoke layer also increase the likelihood of aerosol-cloud microphysical interactions. Interest in this climate regime is supporting an observational strategy of a year-long DOE ARM Mobile Facility deployment to Ascension (Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds, or LASIC), and an NSF aircraft campaign (ObservatioNs of Fire's Impact on the southeast atlantic REgion, or ONFIRE) based on Sao Tome Island. These campaigns will be integrated with NASA, UK and African activities sharing similar goals based further south in Namibia. Initial analysis is distinguishing meteorology from aerosol impacts on the boundary layer cloud fields. The forward trajectories of emissions from over 24,000 fire sources on continental Africa show that a free-tropospheric jet can advect aerosols to above Ascension island in just one-two days. The fast transport time encourages retention of signatures of the fire sources, in particular the radiatively-crucial single-scattering albedo value. Thereafter, a deep land-based anticyclonic high recirculates over one-third of these trajectories back to the African continent, explaining the widespread extent of the aerosol layer. The free-tropospheric jet also reduces the mean atmospheric subsidence independently of shortwave absorption by the aerosols

  16. Aerosol-Jet-Printing silicone layers and electrodes for stacked dielectric elastomer actuators in one processing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitelshöfer, Sebastian; Göttler, Michael; Schmidt, Philip; Treffer, Philipp; Landgraf, Maximilian; Franke, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution we present recent findings of our efforts to qualify the so called Aerosol-Jet-Printing process as an additive manufacturing approach for stacked dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA). With the presented system we are able to print the two essential structural elements dielectric layer and electrode in one machine. The system is capable of generating RTV-2 silicone layers made of Wacker Elastosil P 7670. Therefore, two aerosol streams of both precursor components A and B are generated in parallel and mixed in one printing nozzle that is attached to a 4-axis kinematic. At maximum speed the printing of one circular Elastosil layer with a calculated thickness of 10 μm and a diameter of 1 cm takes 12 seconds while the process keeps stable for 4.5 hours allowing a quite high overall material output and the generation of numerous silicone layers. By adding a second printing nozzle and the infrastructure to generate a third aerosol, the system is also capable of printing inks with conductive particles in parallel to the silicone. We have printed a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) ink prepared in our lab to generate electrodes on VHB 4905, Elastosil foils and finally on Aerosol-Jet-Printed Elastosil layers. With rGO ink printed on Elastosil foil, layers with a 4-point measured sheet resistance as low as 4 kΩ can be realized leaving room for improving the electrode printing time, which at the moment is not as good as the quite good time-frame for printing the silicone layers. Up to now we have used the system to print a fully functional two-layer stacked DEA to demonstrate the principle of continuously 3D printing actuators.

  17. Some aspects of volcanic ash layers in the Central Indian Basin.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sukumaran, N.P.; Banerjee, R.; Borole, D.V.; Gupta, S.M.

    that explosive eruptions in the past have reached the levels required to cause signi cant climatic cooling (Bray 1977; Lamb 1971). Furthermore, Rampino and Self (1993) suggest a possible general feedback coup- ling between explosive eruption and climatic change... the Toba super-eruption. Nature 359 : 50—52 Rampino MR and Self S (1993) Climate-Volcanism feedback and the Toba eruption of &74,000 years ago. Quaternary Research 40 : 269—280 Rampino MR, Self S, and Fairbridge RM (1979) Can rapid climatic change can cause...

  18. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  19. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V3-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  20. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V1-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the...

  1. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V2-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  2. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  3. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V1-20

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  4. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V2-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  5. Utilization of O4 Slant Column Density to Derive Aerosol Layer Height from a Spaceborne UV-Visible Hyperspectral Sensor: Sensitivity and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Torres, Omar; Lee, Kwang-Mog; Lee, Sang Deok

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivities of oxygen-dimer (O4) slant column densities (SCDs) to changes in aerosol layer height are investigated using the simulated radiances by a radiative transfer model, the linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer (VLIDORT), and the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. The sensitivities of the O4 index (O4I), which is defined as dividing O4 SCD by 10(exp 40) sq molecules cm(exp -5), to aerosol types and optical properties are also evaluated and compared. Among the O4 absorption bands at 340, 360, 380, and 477 nm, the O4 absorption band at 477 nm is found to be the most suitable to retrieve the aerosol effective height. However, the O4I at 477 nm is significantly influenced not only by the aerosol layer effective height but also by aerosol vertical profiles, optical properties including single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol optical depth (AOD), particle size, and surface albedo. Overall, the error of the retrieved aerosol effective height is estimated to be 1276, 846, and 739 m for dust, non-absorbing, and absorbing aerosol, respectively, assuming knowledge on the aerosol vertical distribution shape. Using radiance data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a new algorithm is developed to derive the aerosol effective height over East Asia after the determination of the aerosol type and AOD from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). About 80% of retrieved aerosol effective heights are within the error range of 1 km compared to those obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) measurements on thick aerosol layer cases.

  6. Utilization of O4 Slant Column Density to Derive Aerosol Layer Height from a Space-Borne UV-Visible Hyperspectral Sensor: Sensitivity and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Torres, Omar; Lee, Kwang-Mog; Lee, Sang Deok

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivities of oxygen-dimer (O4) slant column densities (SCDs) to changes in aerosol layer height are investigated using the simulated radiances by a radiative transfer model, the linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer (VLIDORT), and the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. The sensitivities of the O4 index (O4I), which is defined as dividing O4 SCD by 10(sup 40) molecules (sup 2) per centimeters(sup -5), to aerosol types and optical properties are also evaluated and compared. Among the O4 absorption bands at 340, 360, 380, and 477 nanometers, the O4 absorption band at 477 nanometers is found to be the most suitable to retrieve the aerosol effective height. However, the O4I at 477 nanometers is significantly influenced not only by the aerosol layer effective height but also by aerosol vertical profiles, optical properties including single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol optical depth (AOD), particle size, and surface albedo. Overall, the error of the retrieved aerosol effective height is estimated to be 1276, 846, and 739 meters for dust, non-absorbing, and absorbing aerosol, respectively, assuming knowledge on the aerosol vertical distribution shape. Using radiance data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a new algorithm is developed to derive the aerosol effective height over East Asia after the determination of the aerosol type and AOD from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). About 80 percent of retrieved aerosol effective heights are within the error range of 1 kilometer compared to those obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) measurements on thick aerosol layer cases.

  7. Utilization of O4 Slant Column Density to Derive Aerosol Layer Height from a Space-Borne UV-Visible Hyperspectral Sensor: Sensitivity and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Torres, Omar; Lee, Kwang-Mog; Lee, Sang Deok

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivities of oxygen-dimer (O4) slant column densities (SCDs) to changes in aerosol layer height are investigated using the simulated radiances by a radiative transfer model, the linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer (VLIDORT), and the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. The sensitivities of the O4 index (O4I), which is defined as dividing O4 SCD by 10(sup 40) molecules (sup 2) per centimeters(sup -5), to aerosol types and optical properties are also evaluated and compared. Among the O4 absorption bands at 340, 360, 380, and 477 nanometers, the O4 absorption band at 477 nanometers is found to be the most suitable to retrieve the aerosol effective height. However, the O4I at 477 nanometers is significantly influenced not only by the aerosol layer effective height but also by aerosol vertical profiles, optical properties including single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol optical depth (AOD), particle size, and surface albedo. Overall, the error of the retrieved aerosol effective height is estimated to be 1276, 846, and 739 meters for dust, non-absorbing, and absorbing aerosol, respectively, assuming knowledge on the aerosol vertical distribution shape. Using radiance data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a new algorithm is developed to derive the aerosol effective height over East Asia after the determination of the aerosol type and AOD from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). About 80 percent of retrieved aerosol effective heights are within the error range of 1 kilometer compared to those obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) measurements on thick aerosol layer cases.

  8. Radiative budget in the presence of multi-layered aerosol structures in the framework of AMMA SOP-0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Raut

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents radiative transfer calculations performed over Niamey in the UV-Visible range over the period 26th January – 1st February during the African Multidisciplinary Monsoon Analysis (AMMA international program. Climatic effects of aerosols along the vertical column have required an accurate determination of their optical properties, which are presented in for a variety of instrumented platforms: Ultralight aircraft, Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM research aircraft, AERONET station. Measurements highlighted the presence of a multi-layered structure of mineral dust located below and biomass-burning particles in the more elevated layers. Radiative forcing was affected by both the scattering and absorption effects governed by the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI. The best agreement between our results and AERONET optical thicknesses, ground-based extinction measurements and NO2 photolysis rate coefficient was found using the synergy between all the instrumented platforms. The corresponding averaged ACRI were 1.53 (±0.04–0.047i (±0.006 and 1.52 (±0.04–0.008i (±0.001 for biomass-burning and mineral dust aerosols, respectively. Biomass-burning aerosols were characterized by single-scattering albedo ranging from 0.78 to 0.82 and asymmetry parameter ranging from 0.71 to 0.73. For dust aerosols, single-scattering albedo (asymmetry parameter ranged from 0.9 to 0.92 (0.73 to 0.75. The solar energy depletion at the surface is shown to be ~ −21.2 (±1.7 W/m2 as a daily average. At the TOA, the radiative forcing appeared slightly negative but very close to zero (~ −1.4 W/m2. The corresponding atmospheric radiative forcing was found to be ~19.8 (±2.3 W/m2. Mineral dust located below a more absorbing layer act as an increase in surface reflectivity of ~3–4%. The radiative forcing is also shown to be highly sensitivity the optical features of the different

  9. Radiative budget in the presence of multi-layered aerosol structures in the framework of AMMA SOP-0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Raut

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents radiative transfer calculations performed over Niamey in the UV-Visible range over the period 26th January–1st February 2006 during the African Multidisciplinary Monsoon Analysis (AMMA international program. Climatic effects of aerosols along the vertical column have required an accurate determination of their optical properties, which are presented here for a variety of instrumented platforms: Ultralight aircraft, Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM research aircraft, AERONET station. Measurements highlighted the presence of a multi-layered structure of mineral dust located below and biomass-burning particles in the more elevated layers. Radiative forcing was affected by both the scattering and absorption effects governed by the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI. The best agreement between our results and AERONET optical thicknesses, ground-based extinction measurements and NO2 photolysis rate coefficient was found using the synergy between all the instrumented platforms. The corresponding averaged ACRI at 355 nm were 1.53 (±0.04 −0.047i (±0.006 and 1.52 (±0.04 −0.008i (±0.001 for biomass-burning and mineral dust aerosols, respectively. Biomass-burning aerosols were characterized by single-scattering albedo ranging from 0.78 to 0.82 and asymmetry parameter ranging from 0.71 to 0.73. For dust aerosols, single-scattering albedo (asymmetry parameter ranged from 0.9 to 0.92 (0.73 to 0.75. The solar energy depletion at the surface is shown to be ~−21.2 (±1.7 W/m2 as a daily average. At the TOA, the radiative forcing appeared slightly negative but very close to zero (~−1.4 W/m2. The corresponding atmospheric radiative forcing was found to be ~19.8 (±2.3 W/m2. Mineral dust located below a more absorbing layer act as an increase in surface reflectivity of ~3–4%. The radiative forcing is also shown to be highly sensitive to the optical features of the

  10. Volcanic hazards: extent and severity of potential tephra hazard interpreted from layer Yn from Mount St. Helens, Washington (Abstract)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullineaux, D.R.

    1977-02-01

    Volcanoes in the conterminous United States erupt infrequently but represent a significant potential hazard. Tephra eruptions can affect broader areas and reach population centers at greater distances from a volcano than any other kind of volcanic event. Lava flows, pyroclastic flows, mudflows, and floods can be more hazardous, but they seldom extend beyond a volcano except along valleys. Severity of risk from tephra depends in part on rate of fall and grain size, but mainly on thickness. Rates of fall from future eruptions in the Cascade Range must be estimated from historic eruptions elsewhere; potential grain sizes and thicknesses can be judged from past tephra eruptions of the Cascade volcanoes themselves. Pumice layer Yn, erupted by Mount St. Helens about BC 2000, exemplifies an extensive and thick tephra resulting from a single eruptive pulse of a Cascade volcano; in thickness and volume it resembles tephra of the type Plinian eruption of Vesuvius in Italy in 79 AD. Layer Yn trends NNE from Mount St. Helens in a long narrow lobe that is much thicker at any given distance than if the layer had formed a wide lobe. On broad ridges where it should be nearly unaffected by thickening or erosion, its present (compacted) thickness is as much as 70 cm at about 50 km from the volcano, 20 cm at 100 km, and 5 cm at about 280 km. Future eruptions like that of layer Yn could produce similar thicknesses in any easterly direction between about NNE and SSE downwind from Mount St. Helens or any other explosive Cascade volcano. Weaker winds toward the west indicate that potential thicknesses are less in westerly directions.

  11. Aerosol and cloud microphysics covariability in the northeast Pacific boundary layer estimated with ship-based and satellite remote sensing observations: NE Pacific Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painemal, David [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton Virginia USA; NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton Virginia USA; Chiu, J. -Y. Christine [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading UK; Minnis, Patrick [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton Virginia USA; Yost, Christopher [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton Virginia USA; Zhou, Xiaoli [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal Quebec Canada; Cadeddu, Maria [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont Illinois USA; Eloranta, Edwin [Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison Wisconsin USA; Lewis, Ernie R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Ferrare, Richard [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton Virginia USA; Kollias, Pavlos [School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA

    2017-02-27

    Ship measurements collected over the northeast Pacific along transects between the port of Los Angeles (33.7°N, 118.2°W) and Honolulu (21.3°N, 157.8°W) during May to August 2013 were utilized to investigate the covariability between marine low cloud microphysical and aerosol properties. Ship-based retrievals of cloud optical depth (τ) from a Sun photometer and liquid water path (LWP) from a microwave radiometer were combined to derive cloud droplet number concentration Nd and compute a cloud-aerosol interaction (ACI) metric defined as ACICCN = ∂ ln(Nd)/∂ ln(CCN), with CCN denoting the cloud condensation nuclei concentration measured at 0.4% (CCN0.4) and 0.3% (CCN0.3) supersaturation. Analysis of CCN0.4, accumulation mode aerosol concentration (Na), and extinction coefficient (σext) indicates that Na and σext can be used as CCN0.4 proxies for estimating ACI. ACICCN derived from 10 min averaged Nd and CCN0.4 and CCN0.3, and CCN0.4 regressions using Na and σext, produce high ACICCN: near 1.0, that is, a fractional change in aerosols is associated with an equivalent fractional change in Nd. ACICCN computed in deep boundary layers was small (ACICCN = 0.60), indicating that surface aerosol measurements inadequately represent the aerosol variability below clouds. Satellite cloud retrievals from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and GOES-15 data were compared against ship-based retrievals and further analyzed to compute a satellite-based ACICCN. Satellite data correlated well with their ship-based counterparts with linear correlation coefficients equal to or greater than 0.78. Combined satellite Nd and ship-based CCN0.4 and Na yielded a maximum ACICCN = 0.88–0.92, a value slightly less than the ship-based ACICCN, but still consistent with aircraft-based studies in the eastern Pacific.

  12. Ozone and aerosol distributions measured by airborne lidar during the 1988 Arctic Boundary Layer Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to O3 and aerosol distributions measured from an aircraft using a DIAL system in order to study the sources and sinks of gases and aerosols over the tundra regions of Alaska during summer 1988. The tropospheric O3 budget over the Arctic was found to be strongly influenced by stratospheric intrusions. Regions of low aerosol scattering and enhanced O3 mixing ratios were usually correlated with descending air from the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere.

  13. Preparation of active layers in polymer solar cells by aerosol jet printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunhe; Zhou, Erjun; Miyanishi, Shoji; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Tajima, Keisuke

    2011-10-01

    Active layers of polymer solar cells were prepared by aerosol jet printing of organic inks. Various solvents and additives with high boiling points were screened for the preparation of high-quality polymer films. The effects on device performance of treating the films by thermal and solvent vapor annealing were also investigated. The components of the solvent were important for controlling the drying rate of the liquid films, reducing the number of particle-like protrusions on the film surface, and realizing high molecular ordering in the polymer phases. The optimized solar cell device with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and a C(60) derivative showed a high fill factor of 67% and power conversion efficiency of 2.53% without thermal annealing. The combination of poly[N-9-heptadecanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-3,6-bis(thiophen-5-yl)-2,5-diethylhexyl-2,5-dihydropyrrolo-[3,4-]pyrrole-1,4-dione] and a C(70) derivative led to power conversion efficiency of 3.92 and 3.14% for device areas of 0.03 and 1 cm(2), respectively.

  14. Long-Term Variation of Stratospheric Aerosols Observed With Lidar from 1982 to 2014 Over Tsukuba, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tetsu; Uchino, Osamu; Nagai, Tomohiro; Fujimoto, Toshifumi; Tabata, Isao

    2016-06-01

    The vertical distribution of stratospheric aerosols has been measured with lidars at the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) over Tsukuba since 1982. After two major volcanic eruptions (Mt. El Chichón in 1982 and Mt. Pinatubo in 1991), stratospheric aerosol loading increased about 50-100 times compared with the background level which was observed for 1997-2000. From 2000 to 2012, a slight increase (5.3% year-1) was observed by some volcanic eruptions. This long-term lidar data have been used for assessing of impact of the stratospheric aerosols on climate and the ozone layer.

  15. Inter-comparison of lidar and ceilometer retrievals for aerosol and Planetary Boundary Layer profiling over Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Tsaknakis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an inter-comparison of two active remote sensors (lidar and ceilometer to determine the mixing layer height and structure of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL and to retrieve tropospheric aerosol vertical profiles over Athens, Greece. This inter-comparison was performed under various strongly different aerosol loads/types (urban air pollution, biomass burning and Saharan dust event, implementing two different lidar systems (one portable Raymetrics S.A. lidar system running at 355 nm and one multi-wavelength Raman lidar system running at 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm and one CL31 Vaisala S.A. ceilometer (running at 910 nm. Spectral conversions of the ceilometer's data were performed using the Ångström exponent estimated by ultraviolet multi-filter radiometer (UV-MFR measurements. The inter-comparison was based on two parameters: the mixing layer height determined by the presence of the suspended aerosols and the attenuated backscatter coefficient. Additionally, radiosonde data were used to derive the PBL height. In general, a good agreement was found between the ceilometer and the lidar techniques in both inter-compared parameters in the height range from 500 m to 5000 m, while the limitations of each instrument are also examined.

  16. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosati, B.; Gysel, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T.F.; Goger, B.; Poulain, L.; Schlag, P.; Miettinen, P.; Pajunoja, A.; Virtanen, A.; Baltink, H.K.; Henzing, J.S.; Größ,, J.; Gobbi, G.P.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M.C.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol particles hygroscopic properties, their mixing state as well as chemical composition were measured above northern Italy and the Netherlands. An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; for chemical composition) and a white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer

  17. The ASTAR 2007 April 14 haze layer: The radiative effect of an aged and internally mixed aerosol in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, A.-C.; Ström, J.; Tunved, P.; Schlager, H.; Minikin, A.

    2009-04-01

    INTRODUCTION The ASTAR project (Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol and Radiation) is aimed at investigating the physico-chemical properties of the Arctic tropospheric aerosol by means of aircraft measurements. The goal of the program is to provide an observational dataset for improving not only the assessment of the direct and indirect effects of aerosols on the Arctic radiative balance, but also the aerosol parameterisation in the regional climate model HIRHAM [Rinke, et al., 1999; Treffeisen, et al., 2005]. The ASTAR 2007 campaign was conducted from March 18 - April 18 in 2007, Svalbard. This timing was chosen to make the measurements span during the Arctic spring due to its frequent Arctic hazes. In the present study we focus on an aerosol layer observed north of Svalbard at an altitude of around 3 km during the campaign. Due to recent discussions about the Arctic temperature amplification and the importance of soot in the atmosphere and its radiative effects, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential magnitude of the radiative effects such a haze layer might have in the Arctic. METHODS In the present study we have analysed in-situ observations of aerosol number densities of particles larger than 10 nm and 260 nm in diameter (henceforth denoted N10 and N260, respectively), aerosol size distributions, aerosol light scattering and absorption, and concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3). The measurements were conducted from the German DLR Falcon 20 research aeroplane. N10 was measured using a condensation particle counter (CPC) model TSI 3010. The aerosol size distribution between 17 and 239 nm was measured with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS) in stepwise mode utilising 13 bins, each of which was measured during 10 s. The aerosol size distribution between 260 and 2200 nm was observed with an optical particle counter (OPC) GRIMM, model 3.709, which sized the particles in 12 bins at 1 Hz. We also used information about

  18. Observations of the aerosol particle number concentration in the marine boundary layer over the south-eastern Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Jasinevičiene

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of the aerosol particle number concentration (PNCin the size range from 4.5 nm to 2 µm were performed at the Preila marine background site during 2008–2009.The concentration maxima in summer was twice the average (2650±50 cm-3. A trajectory-based approach was applied for source identification. Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCFanalysis was performed to estimate the possible contribution of long-range andlocal PNC transport to PNC concentrations recorded at the marine backgroundsite. The PSCF results showed that the marine boundary layer was not seriouslyaffected by long-range transport, but that local transport of air pollutionwas recognized as an important factor. North Atlantic and Sea-Marine typeclusters respectively represented 32.1% and 17.9% of the total PNC spectraand were characterized by the lowest PNCs (1080±1340 and 1210±1040 cm-3 respectively among all clusters.   Wavelet transformation analysis of 1-h aerosol PNC indicated that whilethe 16-h scale was a constant feature of aerosol PNC evolution in spring, the longer (∼60-h scalesappeared mainly over the whole year (except June. Principal componentanalysis (PCA revealed a strong correlation between PNC and NaCl,highlighting the influence of sea-salt aerosols. In addition, PCA also showedthat PNC depended on optical and meteorological parameters such as UVR andtemperature.

  19. Application of a commercial lidar-ceilometer to studies of aerosols in the atmospheric boundary layer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramkilowan, A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available optical sounding principle as more powerful and costly research lidar systems. Ceilometers in persistent and unattended operation have become ubiquitous for aviation safety, particularly in Europe and the USA and their potential for use in aerosol studies...

  20. Biogenic VOC oxidation and organic aerosol formation in an urban nocturnal boundary layer: aircraft vertical profiles in Houston, TX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Brown

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic compounds are a large component of aerosol mass, but organic aerosol (OA sources remain poorly characterized. Recent model studies have suggested nighttime oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons as a potentially large OA source, but analysis of field measurements to test these predictions is sparse. We present nighttime vertical profiles of nitrogen oxides, ozone, VOCs and aerosol composition measured during low approaches of the NOAA P-3 aircraft to airfields in Houston, TX. This region has large emissions of both biogenic hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides. The latter serves as a source of the nitrate radical, NO3, a key nighttime oxidant. Biogenic VOCs (BVOC and urban pollutants were concentrated within the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL, which varied in depth from 100–400 m. Despite concentrated NOx at low altitude, ozone was never titrated to zero, resulting in rapid NO3 radical production rates of 0.2–2.7ppbv h-1 within the NBL. Monoterpenes and isoprene were frequently present within the NBL and underwent rapid oxidation (up to 1ppbv h−1, mainly by NO3 and to a lesser extent O3. Concurrent enhancement in organic and nitrate aerosol on several profiles was consistent with primary emissions and with secondary production from nighttime BVOC oxidation, with the latter equivalent to or slightly larger than the former. Ratios of organic aerosol to CO within the NBL ranged from 14 to 38 μg m−3 OA/ppmv CO. A box model simulation incorporating monoterpene emissions, oxidant formation rates and monoterpene SOA yields suggested overnight OA production of 0.5 to 9 μg m−3.

  1. Certain Results of Measurements of Characteristics of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer and Total Ozone Content at Siberian Lidar Station in Tomsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzorov Aleksey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the results of long-term remote optical monitoring, obtained at the Siberian Lidar Station of Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk (56.5°N, 85.0°E. The scattering characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer, obtained according to data of lidar measurements since 1986, are presented. We analyze the trends of changes in the total ozone (TO content over Tomsk for the period 1996-2013 according to data of spectrophotometric measurements with employment of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS data for the period 1979-1994. We determined the periods of elevated content of stratospheric aerosol over Tomsk aftera series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire and Iceland in 2006-2011. Since the second half of 1990s, we record an increasing TO trend, equaling 0.65 DU/yr for the period 1996-2013.

  2. Certain Results of Measurements of Characteristics of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer and Total Ozone Content at Siberian Lidar Station in Tomsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzorov, Aleksey; Bazhenov, Oleg; Burlakov, Vladimir; Dolgii, Sergey

    2016-06-01

    We consider the results of long-term remote optical monitoring, obtained at the Siberian Lidar Station of Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk (56.5°N, 85.0°E). The scattering characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer, obtained according to data of lidar measurements since 1986, are presented. We analyze the trends of changes in the total ozone (TO) content over Tomsk for the period 1996-2013 according to data of spectrophotometric measurements with employment of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data for the period 1979-1994. We determined the periods of elevated content of stratospheric aerosol over Tomsk aftera series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire and Iceland in 2006-2011. Since the second half of 1990s, we record an increasing TO trend, equaling 0.65 DU/yr for the period 1996-2013.

  3. Continuous measurements of Arctic boundary layer aerosol physical and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmi, E.; Kondratyev, V.; Brus, D.; Lihavainen, H.; Laurila, T. J.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.; Reshetnikov, A.; Ivakhov, V.; Uttal, T.; Makshtas, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic and northern boreal regions of Eurasia are experiencing rapid environmental changes due to pressures by human activities. The largest anthropogenic climate forcings are due to aerosol particles and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The Arctic environment is highly sensitive to changes in aerosol concentrations or composition, largely due to the high surface reflectance for the most part of the year. Concentrations of aerosols in winter and spring Arctic are affected by 'Arctic Haze', a phenomenon suggested to arise from the transport of pollutants from lower latitudes and further strengthened by the strong stratification of the Arctic wintertime atmosphere. Sources and transport patterns of aerosols into the Arctic are, however, not fully understood. In order to monitor the changes within the Arctic region, as well as to understand the sources and feedback mechanisms, direct measurements of aerosols within the Arctic are needed. So far, direct year-round observations have been inadequate especially within the Russian side of the Arctic. This is the reason why a new climate observatory was founded on the shore of the Arctic Ocean, in Tiksi, Russia. Tiksi meteorological observatory in northern Siberia (71_360N; 128_530E) has been operating since 1930s. Recently, it was upgraded and joint in the network of the IASOA, in the framework of the International Polar Year Activity project. The project is run in collaboration between National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) with the support of the National Science Foundation (NSF), Roshydromet (AARI and MGO units), government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The research activities of FMI in Tiksi include e.g. continuous long-term measurements of aerosol particle physical and optical properties. Measurements were initiated in summer 2010 and further extended in summer 2013. Together with the FMI measurements in Pallas GAW station in northern Finland since 1999

  4. Numerical modeling of the three-layered hydrothermal system in the Kuju volcanic region, central Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araragi, K.; Ehara, S.; Fujimitsu, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Numerical modeling of hydrothermal systems beneath active volcanoes has been conducted. Their purposes were, however, confined to interpret individual geothermal systems. We constructed a numerical model of the Kuju volcanic region, central Kyushu, Japan using 3-D finite-difference code HYDROTHERM ver.2.2 (Hayba and Ingebritsen, 1994). The central part of Kuju volcano is categorized as an active magmatic hydrothermal system. Otake-Hatchobaru geothermal area, where two geothermal power plants are in operation, is known as a typical liquid dominated hydrothermal system. These two types of geothermal systems are closely located in the region. Moreover, subsurface horizontal temperature distributions in the Kuju volcanic region consist of a three-layered structure. A horizontal temperature anomaly at a depth of -2000m separates into two anomalies at depths of about 0m. Five anomalies appear in the horizontal temperature distribution of 80m depth. Geothermal systems or such characteristics of the thermal structure should be related to the influence of the magma chamber in the region. Existence of molten magma was suggested from seismic observations (Yoshikawa et al., 2005). Therefore, we presumed that the geothermal systems in Otake- Hatchobaru geothermal area and in the central part of Kuju volcano can be explained by a common magma chamber. We determined the calculation time as 40000 based on the age of the latest large pyroclastic flow deposit (Kamata, 1997). The temperature of the magma chamber in the model was maintained at a constant value during the calculation. Parameter studies of crustal permeabilities were conducted to reproduce temperature profiles obtained by logging at shallow depths (NEDO, 1987). The calculated results show that temperature anomalies in the basement rock seemed to be directly affected by the magma chamber. The results also indicate that molten materials have been continuously supplied from the bottom of the magma chamber of Kuju volcano

  5. Classification of summertime synoptic patterns in Beijing and their associations with boundary layer structure affecting aerosol pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Guo, Jianping; Liu, Shuhua; Liu, Huan; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Wanchun; Zhai, Panmao

    2017-02-01

    Meteorological conditions within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) are closely governed by large-scale synoptic patterns and play important roles in air quality by directly and indirectly affecting the emission, transport, formation, and deposition of air pollutants. Partly due to the lack of long-term fine-resolution observations of the PBL, the relationships between synoptic patterns, PBL structure, and aerosol pollution in Beijing have not been well understood. This study applied the obliquely rotated principal component analysis in T-mode to classify the summertime synoptic conditions over Beijing using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis from 2011 to 2014, and investigated their relationships with PBL structure and aerosol pollution by combining numerical simulations, measurements of surface meteorological variables, fine-resolution soundings, the concentration of particles with diameters less than or equal to 2.5 µm, total cloud cover (CLD), and reanalysis data. Among the seven identified synoptic patterns, three types accounted for 67 % of the total number of cases studied and were associated with heavy aerosol pollution events. These particular synoptic patterns were characterized by high-pressure systems located to the east or southeast of Beijing at the 925 hPa level, which blocked the air flow seaward, and southerly PBL winds that brought in polluted air from the southern industrial zone. The horizontal transport of pollutants induced by the synoptic forcings may be the most important factor affecting the air quality of Beijing in summer. In the vertical dimension, these three synoptic patterns featured a relatively low boundary layer height (BLH) in the afternoon, accompanied by high CLD and southerly cold advection from the seas within the PBL. The high CLD reduced the solar radiation reaching the surface, and suppressed the thermal turbulence, leading to lower BLH. Besides, the numerical sensitive experiments show that cold

  6. The Role of Volcanic Activity in Climate and Global Change

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2015-09-23

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are magnificent events that in many ways affect the Earth\\'s natural processes and climate. They cause sporadic perturbations of the planet\\'s energy balance, activating complex climate feedbacks and providing unique opportunities to better quantify those processes. We know that explosive eruptions cause cooling in the atmosphere for a few years, but we have just recently realized that volcanic signals can be seen in the subsurface ocean for decades. The volcanic forcing of the previous two centuries offsets the ocean heat uptake and diminishes global warming by about 30%. The explosive volcanism of the twenty-first century is unlikely to either cause any significant climate signal or to delay the pace of global warming. The recent interest in dynamic, microphysical, chemical, and climate impacts of volcanic eruptions is also excited by the fact that these impacts provide a natural analogue for climate geoengineering schemes involving deliberate development of an artificial aerosol layer in the lower stratosphere to counteract global warming. In this chapter we aim to discuss these recently discovered volcanic effects and specifically pay attention to how we can learn about the hidden Earth-system mechanisms activated by explosive volcanic eruptions. To demonstrate these effects we use our own model results when possible along with available observations, as well as review closely related recent publications.

  7. On the marine atmospheric boundary layer characteristics over Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Denny P Alappattu; D Bala Subrahamanyam; P K Kunhikrishnan; K M Somayaji; G S Bhat; R Venkatesan; C B S Dutt; A Bagavath Singh; V K Soni; A S Tripathi

    2008-07-01

    Detailed measurements were carried out in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB) which covered both Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal during March to May 2006. In this paper, we present the meteorological observations made during this campaign. The latitudinal variation of the surface layer turbulent fluxes is also described in detail.

  8. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähn, M.; Muñoz-Esparza, D.; Chouza, F.; Reitebuch, O.; Knoth, O.; Haarig, M.; Ansmann, A.

    2016-01-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. Due to the presence of a topographically structured island surface in the domain center, the model setup has to be designed with open lateral boundaries. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude potential temperature perturbations. In this work, this method is for the first time tested and validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE field campaign is used for both model initialization and a comparison with Doppler wind and Raman lidar data. Several numerical sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" when using coarser spatial grid spacings beyond the inertial subrange of three-dimensional turbulence or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Especially cloud properties in the downwind area west of Barbados are markedly affected in these kinds of simulations. Results of an additional simulation with a strong trade-wind inversion reveal its effect on cloud layer depth and location. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ≈ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength) and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with wind lidar data show similarities in the downwind vertical wind structure. Additionally, the model results accurately reproduce the

  9. Case study of a multi-layer aerosol structure in the eastern Mediterranean observed with the airborne polarized lidar ALEX during a STAAARTE campaign (7 June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dulac

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of tropospheric aerosol transport in the eastern Mediterranean, based on airborne measurements obtained south of Greece on 7 June 1997. Airborne observations (backscattering lidar at 0.532 mm with polarization measurements, in situ particle counters/sizers, and standard meteorological measurements are complemented by monitoring with Meteosat visible and infrared images and a ground-based sun-photometer, air-mass back-trajectory computations, and meteorological analyses. The vertical structure of the lower troposphere appears complex with horizontal variability and a superposition of several turbid layers from the surface up to the clean free troposphere which is found above 2 to 4 km in altitude. We identify the presence of depolarising dust from northern Africa in the most elevated turbid layer, which is relatively humid and has clouds embedded. The lowermost troposphere likely contains pollution water-soluble aerosols from eastern continental Greece, and an intermediate layer is found with a probable mixture of the two types of particles. The column optical depth at 0.55 mm estimated from Meteosat is in the range 0.15–0.35. It is used to constrain the aerosol backscattering-to-extinction ratio needed for the backscattering lidar data inversion. The column value of 0.017 sr−1 is found applicable to the various aerosol layers and allows us to derive the aerosol extinction vertical profile. The aerosol extinction coefficient ranges from 0.03 km−1 in the lower clean free troposphere to more than 0.25 km−1 in the marine boundary layer. Values are <0.1 km−1 in the elevated dust layer but its thickness makes it dominate the aerosol optical depth at some places.

  10. Airborne study of a multi-layer aerosol structure in the eastern Mediterranean observed with the airborne polarized lidar ALEX during a STAAARTE campaign (7 June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dulac

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of tropospheric aerosol transport in the eastern Mediterranean, based on airborne measurements obtained south of Greece on 7 June 1997. Airborne observations (backscattering lidar at 0.532 mm with polarization measurements, in situ particle counters/sizers, and standard meteorological measurements are complemented by monitoring with Meteosat visible and infrared images and a ground-based sun-photometer, air-mass back-trajectory computations, and meteorological analyses. As already observed from ground-based lidars in the Mediterranean region, the vertical structure of the lower troposphere appears complex, with a superposition of several turbid layers from the surface up to the clean free troposphere which is found here above 2 to 4 km in altitude. The aircraft observations also reveal an important horizontal variability. We identify the presence of depolarising dust from northern Africa in the most elevated turbid layer, which is relatively humid and has clouds embedded. The lowermost troposphere likely contains pollution water-soluble aerosols from eastern continental Greece, and an intermediate layer is found with a probable mixture of the two types of particles. The column optical depth at 0.55 mm estimated from Meteosat is in the range 0.15-0.35. It is used to constrain the aerosol backscattering-to-extinction ratio needed for the backscattering lidar data inversion. The column value of 0.017 sr -1 is found applicable to the various aerosol layers and allows us to derive the aerosol extinction vertical profile. The aerosol extinction coefficient ranges from 0.03 km-1 in the lower clean free troposphere to more than 0.25 km-1 in the marine boundary layer. Values are -1 in the elevated dust layer but its thickness makes it dominate the aerosol optical depth at some places.

  11. Aircraft measurements of ozone, NOx, CO, and aerosol concentrations in biomass burning smoke over Indonesia and Australia in October 1997: Depleted ozone layer at low altitude over Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Yukitomo; Sawa, Yousuke; Makino, Yukio; Jensen, Jørgen B.; Gras, John L.; Ryan, Brian F.; Diharto, Sri; Harjanto, Hery

    The 1997 El Niño unfolded as one of the most sever El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events in this century and it coincided with massive biomass burning in the equatorial western Pacific region. To assess the influence on the atmosphere, aircraft observations of trace gases and aerosol were conducted over Kalimantan in Indonesia and Australia. Over Kalimantan in Indonesia, high concentrations of O3, NOx, CO, and aerosols were observed during the flight. Although the aerosol and NOx decreased with altitude, the O3 had the maximum concentration (80.5 ppbv) in the middle layer of the smoke haze and recorded very low concentrations (˜20 ppbv) in the lower smoke layer. This feature was not observed in the Australian smoke. We proposed several hypotheses for the low O3 concentration at low levels over Kalimantan. The most likely are lack of solar radiation and losses at the surface of aerosol particles.

  12. Isotopic constraints on the role of hypohalous acids in sulfate aerosol formation in the remote marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianjie; Geng, Lei; Schmidt, Johan A.; Xie, Zhouqing; Kang, Hui; Dachs, Jordi; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Schauer, Andrew J.; Camp, Madeline G.; Alexander, Becky

    2016-09-01

    Sulfate is an important component of global atmospheric aerosol, and has partially compensated for greenhouse gas-induced warming during the industrial period. The magnitude of direct and indirect radiative forcing of aerosols since preindustrial times is a large uncertainty in climate models, which has been attributed largely to uncertainties in the preindustrial environment. Here, we report observations of the oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O) of sulfate aerosol collected in the remote marine boundary layer (MBL) in spring and summer in order to evaluate sulfate production mechanisms in pristine-like environments. Model-aided analysis of the observations suggests that 33-50 % of sulfate in the MBL is formed via oxidation by hypohalous acids (HOX = HOBr + HOCl), a production mechanism typically excluded in large-scale models due to uncertainties in the reaction rates, which are due mainly to uncertainties in reactive halogen concentrations. Based on the estimated fraction of sulfate formed via HOX oxidation, we further estimate that daily-averaged HOX mixing ratios on the order of 0.01-0.1 parts per trillion (ppt = pmol/mol) in the remote MBL during spring and summer are sufficient to explain the observations.

  13. Modifications of the Quasi-biennial Oscillation by a Geoengineering Perturbation of the Stratospheric Aerosol Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, V.; Garfinkel, C. I.; Newman, P. A.; Oman, L. D.; Waugh, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of geoengineering via stratospheric sulfate aerosol on the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Chemistry Climate Model. We performed four 30-year simulations with a continuous injection of sulfur dioxide on the equator at 0 degree longitude. The four simulations differ by the amount of sulfur dioxide injected (5Tg per year and 2.5 Tg per year) and the altitude of the injection (16km-25km and 22km-25km). We find that such an injection dramatically alters the quasi-biennial oscillation, prolonging the phase of easterly shear with respect to the control simulation. In the case of maximum perturbation, i.e. highest stratospheric aerosol burden, the lower tropical stratosphere is locked into a permanent westerly QBO phase. This locked QBO westerly phase is caused by the increased aerosol heating and associated warming in the tropical lower stratosphere.

  14. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jähn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Large eddy simulations (LES are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. Due to the presence of a topographically structured island surface in the domain center, the model setup has to be designed with open lateral boundaries. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude perturbations. In this work, this method is for the first time tested and validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE field campaign is used for both model initialization and a comparison with Doppler wind lidar data. Several numerical sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" when using coarser spatial grid spacings beyond the inertial subrange of three-dimensional turbulence or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Especially cloud properties in the downwind area west of Barbados are markedly affected in these kinds of simulations. Results of an additional simulation with a strong trade-wind inversion reveal its effect on cloud layer depth and location. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ~ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with wind lidar data show similarities in the formation of the daytime convective plume and the mean vertical wind structure.

  15. Characterizing dust aerosols in the atmospheric boundary layer over the deserts in Northwest China: monitoring network and field observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Q.; Matimin, A.; Yang, X.

    2016-12-01

    TheTaklimakan, Gurbantunggut and BadainJaran Deserts with the total area of 43.8×104 km2 in Northwest China are the major dust emission sources in Central Asia. Understanding Central Asian dust emissions and the interaction with the atmospheric boundary layer has an important implication for regional and global climate and environment changes. In order to explore these scientific issues, a monitoring network of 63 sites was established over the vast deserts (Taklimakan Desert, Gurbantunggut Desert and Badain Jaran Desert) in Northwest China for the comprehensive measurements of dust aerosol emission, transport and deposition as well as the atmospheric boundary layer including the meteorological parameters of boundary layer, surface radiation, surface heat fluxes, soil parameters, dust aerosol properties, water vapor profiles, and dust emission. Based on the monitoring network, the field experiments have been conducted to characterize dust aerosols and the atmospheric boundary layer over the deserts. The experiment observation indicated that depth of the convective boundary layer can reach 5000m on summer afternoons. In desert regions, the diurnal mean net radiation was effected significantly by dust weather, and sensible heat was much greater than latent heat accounting about 40-50% in the heat balance of desert. The surface soil and dust size distributions of Northwest China Deserts were obtained through widely collecting samples, results showed that the dominant dust particle size was PM100within 80m height, on average accounting for 60-80% of the samples, with 0.9-2.5% for PM0-2.5, 3.5-7.0% for PM0-10 and 5.0-14.0% for PM0-20. The time dust emission of Taklimakan Desert, Gurbantunggut Desert and Badain Jaran Desert accounted for 0.48%, 7.3%×10-5and 1.9% of the total time within a year, and the threshold friction velocity for dust emission were 0.22-1.06m/s, 0.29-1.5m/s and 0.21-0.59m/s, respectively.

  16. Constraints on 3D fault and fracture distribution in layered volcanic- volcaniclastic sequences from terrestrial LIDAR datasets: Faroe Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithatha, Bansri; McCaffrey, Kenneth; Walker, Richard; Brown, Richard; Pickering, Giles

    2013-04-01

    the upper lava unit and therefore fracture concentration is higher, while in the lower lava unit, the fault zone is narrower and thus fracture concentration is also low. Both field observations and the DFN model indicate that the faults and fractures are steeper in the basalts, and shallower in the volcaniclastic sequences, giving a 'stepped' geometry. To assess the nature of sub-seismic fracturing, fracture attributes (connectivity, spacing, length, and orientation) within the model were analysed quantitatively. Continuing work will integrate the detailed field analysis fully, including 1D and 2D fracture transects, structural logging and mapping as well as microstructural characterisation from collected field samples, to understand the complex nature of fracture networks in inter-layered basalt-volcaniclastic sequences. Fracture attributes, such as the shape, length, aspect ratio, curvature and aperture, will be quantified to provide key parameters for fluid flow simulation. Once these attributes have been assessed, experimental data (porosity and permeability) will be incorporated into the DFN model to constrain the fluid flow potential within these inter-layered volcanic sequences.

  17. Optical and microphysical characterization of aerosol layers over South Africa by means of multi-wavelength depolarization and Raman lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Giannakaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical and microphysical properties of different aerosol types over South Africa measured with a multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar are presented. This study could assist in bridging existing gaps relating to aerosol properties over South Africa, since limited long-term data of this type is available for this region. The observations were performed under the framework of the EUCAARI campaign in Elandsfontein. The multi-wavelength PollyXT Raman lidar system was used to determine vertical profiles of the aerosol optical properties, i.e. extinction and backscatter coefficients, Ångström exponents, lidar ratio and depolarization ratio. The mean microphysical aerosol proper ties, i.e. effective radius and single scattering, albedo were retrieved with an advanced inversion algorithm. Clear differences were observed for the intensive optical properties of atmospheric layers of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosols. Our results reveal a wide range of optical and microphysical parameters for biomass burning aerosols. This indicates probable mixing of biomass burning aerosols with desert dust particles, as well as the possible continuous influence of urban/industrial aerosol load in the region. The lidar ratio at 355 nm, the linear particle depolarization ratio at 355 nm and the extinction-related Ångström exponent from 355 to 532 nm were 52 ± 7 sr; 0.9 ± 0.4 % and 2.3 ± 0.5, respectively for urban/industrial aerosols, while these values were 92 ± 10 sr; 3.2 ± 1.3 %; 2.0 ± 0.4 respectively for biomass burning aerosols layers. Biomass burning particles are larger and slightly less absorbing compared to urban/industrial aerosols. The particle effective radius were found to be 0.10 ± 0.03, 0.17 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03 μm for urban/industrial, biomass burning, and mixed biomass burning and desert dust aerosols, respectively, while the single scattering albedo at 532 nm were 0.87 ± 0.06, 0.90 ± 0.06, and 0.88 ± 0.07 (at 532 nm

  18. Physical and Radiative Properties of Aerosol Particles across the Caribbean Basin: A Comparison between Clean and Perturbed African Dust and Volcanic Ash Air Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, H.; Ogren, J. A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Mayol-Bracero, O.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol’s optical and physical properties were measured during year 2007 at Cape San Juan, a ground-based station located at the northeastern tip of Puerto Rico. The three cases investigated were classified according to the origin of the air masses: clean (C), African dust (AD), and volcanic ash (VA). The instrumentation used included a sunphotometer to determine volume size distributions and aerosol optical thickness (AOT), a 3-wavelength nephelometer to determine the scattering coefficient (σsp), and a 3-wavelength particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP) to measure the absorption coefficient (σap). The average volume size distributions were trimodal for the C (peaks at 0.14, 0.99 and 4.25 µm radius) and AD (peaks at 0.11, 1.30 and 2.00 µm radius) cases and bimodal for the VA (peaks at 0.19 and 2.75 µm radius) case. Fine and coarse modes maxima for AD occurred at radii smaller than for VA, confirming the different origins of those particles. The average values for the total σsp were higher for AD (82.9 Mm-1) and VA (33.7 Mm-1) compared to C (16.6 Mm-1). The same happened for the AOT maximum values at 500 nm with 0.92, 0.30, and 0.06 for AD, VA, and C, respectively. The observed increase in the values of the Angstrom exponent (å) is indicative of a decrease in the size of the particles associated to VA (å= 0.27) and AD (å =0.89) when compared to C (å =0.24). The volume size distributions and thus the mass were dominated by the coarse mode (> 1.0 µm) especially for the AD case. Results have shown that AD as well as VA has a significant impact on the physical and radiative properties across Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. Additional results on the AOT wavelength dependence and on the annual variability of the properties under study will be presented.

  19. Aerosol Characteristics in the Marine Boundary Layer Over the Straits of Gibraltar - June 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    when the marine boundary layer can be decoupled into two layers, a lower well-mixed Eckman layer and an upper cloud layer. From the WMCE optical...depth data, we have found that several estimates of optical depth compared more favorably with the observed values when the well-mixed Eckman layer depth...1000 2 16 40 52 4 24 22 22 32 4 20 6/26 1200 14 18 48 52 0 6 4 18 26 0 20 6/26 1500 0 2 30 46 0 46 8 44 16 2 0 D-5 5 %i DISTRIBUTION PAUL LAVIOLETE

  20. Volcanic signals in oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2009-08-22

    Sulfate aerosols resulting from strong volcanic explosions last for 2–3 years in the lower stratosphere. Therefore it was traditionally believed that volcanic impacts produce mainly short-term, transient climate perturbations. However, the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds over a wide range of time scales. The associated processes, especially ocean heat uptake, play a key role in ongoing climate change. However, they are not well constrained by observations, and attempts to simulate them in current climate models used for climate predictions yield a range of uncertainty. Volcanic impacts on the ocean provide an independent means of assessing these processes. This study focuses on quantification of the seasonal to multidecadal time scale response of the ocean to explosive volcanism. It employs the coupled climate model CM2.1, developed recently at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration\\'s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, to simulate the response to the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1815 Tambora eruptions, which were the largest in the 20th and 19th centuries, respectively. The simulated climate perturbations compare well with available observations for the Pinatubo period. The stronger Tambora forcing produces responses with higher signal-to-noise ratio. Volcanic cooling tends to strengthen the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Sea ice extent appears to be sensitive to volcanic forcing, especially during the warm season. Because of the extremely long relaxation time of ocean subsurface temperature and sea level, the perturbations caused by the Tambora eruption could have lasted well into the 20th century.

  1. Application of the CALIOP Layer Product to Evaluate the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Estimated by Global Models: AeroCom Phase I Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Breon, Francois-Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne; Berntsen, Terje; Chin, Mian; Collins, William D.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) layer product is used for a multimodel evaluation of the vertical distribution of aerosols. Annual and seasonal aerosol extinction profiles are analyzed over 13 sub-continental regions representative of industrial, dust, and biomass burning pollution, from CALIOP 2007-2009 observations and from AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models) 2000 simulations. An extinction mean height diagnostic (Z-alpha) is defined to quantitatively assess the models' performance. It is calculated over the 0-6 km and 0-10 km altitude ranges by weighting the altitude of each 100 m altitude layer by its aerosol extinction coefficient. The mean extinction profiles derived from CALIOP layer products provide consistent regional and seasonal specificities and a low inter-annual variability. While the outputs from most models are significantly correlated with the observed Z-alpha climatologies, some do better than others, and 2 of the 12 models perform particularly well in all seasons. Over industrial and maritime regions, most models show higher Z-alpha than observed by CALIOP, whereas over the African and Chinese dust source regions, Z-alpha is underestimated during Northern Hemisphere Spring and Summer. The positive model bias in Z-alpha is mainly due to an overestimate of the extinction above 6 km. Potential CALIOP and model limitations, and methodological factors that might contribute to the differences are discussed.

  2. Inferring the effects of compositional boundary layers on crystal nucleation, growth textures, and mineral chemistry in natural volcanic tephras through submicron-resolution imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg F. Zellmer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystal nucleation and growth are first order processes captured in volcanic rocks and record important information about the rates of magmatic processes and chemical evolution of magmas during their ascent and eruption. We have studied glass-rich andesitic tephras from the Central Plateau of the Southern Taupo Volcanic Zone by electron- and ion-microbeam imaging techniques to investigate down to sub-micrometre scale the potential effects of compositional boundary layers (CBLs of melt around crystals on the nucleation and growth of mineral phases and the chemistry of crystal growth zones. We find that CBLs may influence the types of mineral phases nucleating and growing, and growth textures such as the development of swallowtails. The chemistry of the CBLs also has the capacity to trigger intermittent overgrowths of nanometre-scale bands of different phases in rapidly growing crystals, resulting in what we refer to as cryptic phase zoning. The existence of cryptic phase zoning has implications for the interpretation of microprobe compositional data, and the resulting inferences made on the conditions of magmatic evolution. Identification of cryptic phase zoning may in future lead to more accurate thermobarometric estimates and thus geospeedometric constraints. In future, a more quantitative characterization of CBL formation and its effects on crystal nucleation and growth may contribute to a better understanding of melt rheology and magma ascent processes at the onset of explosive volcanic eruptions, and will likely be of benefit to hazard mitigation efforts.

  3. Evaluating the Role of Boundary Layer Processes on Diurnal Aerosol Concentrations in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. R.; de Wekker, S.

    2009-12-01

    Forecasting air quality in mountainous terrain is a challenging topic. In this study, we aim to understand the diurnal variability of particulate matter, CO, and CO2 in the Shenandoah National Park (SNP) located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. We focus on the effect of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics on the diurnal aerosol variability using a combination of observations and numerical modeling. Boundary layer dynamics in mountainous terrain is complicated by a variety of factors such as terrain-induced wind flows. These flows can have a significant impact on atmospheric chemistry but are not well resolved in current air quality forecasting models. In this research, we seek to 1) measure and simulate the diurnal evolution of the ABL at a mountaintop site in the Blue Ridge Mountains, 2) investigate the effect of ABL dynamics on aerosol and CO concentrations on clear days, and 3) investigate the transport of aerosols and pollutants by local, regional, and synoptic-scale flows to the mountaintop using the FLEXPART particle dispersion model and WRF-CHEM model. WRF-CHEM will be run with and without chemistry to isolate the effects of boundary layer dynamics and aerosol formation on diurnal aerosol variability. The results of this study will be incorporated into a diagnostic air quality forecast model for SNP. Measurements come from a 17-m walkup tower that was established in May 2008 along a ridgeline at an elevation of 1037m (38.61°N, 78.35°W) at Pinnacles in the north-central section of SNP. The tower is outfitted with a suite of instruments, including temperature/humidity sensors, cup and sonic anemometers, radiation sensors, a closed-path CO/CO2 gas analyzer, and particle counter. Also, a portable eye-safe LIDAR system is located on-site. In addition, ozone data are collected at a site located nearby. Preliminary results from select clear days in fall, 2008 indicate that ABL height is an important factor governing CO and CO2 concentrations at

  4. Scattering and absorption properties of near-surface aerosol over Gangetic–Himalayan region: the role of boundary layer dynamics and long-range transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. C. Dumka

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of light scattering and absorption properties of atmospheric aerosols is of vital importance in evaluating their types, sources and radiative forcing. This is of particular interest over the Gangetic–Himalayan (GH region due to large aerosol loading over the plains and the uplift over the Himalayan range causing serious effects on atmospheric heating, glaciology and monsoon circulation. In this respect, Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX was initiated over the region aiming to examine the aerosol properties, source regions, uplift mechanisms and aerosol-cloud interactions. The present study examines the temporal (monthly, seasonal evolution of scattering (σsp and absorption (σap coefficients, their wavelength dependence, and the role of the Indo-Gangetic plains (IGP, boundary-layer dynamics (BLD and long-range transport (LRT in the aerosol uplift over the Himalayas. The measurements are performed at the elevated site Nainital via the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility including several instruments (Nephelometer, Particle Soot Absorption Photometer, etc. during June 2011 to March 2012. The σsp and σap exhibit a pronounced seasonal variation with monsoon low and post-monsoon (November high, while the scattering wavelength exponent exhibits higher values during monsoon, in contrast to the absorption Ångström exponent which maximizes in December–March. The analysis is performed separately for particles bellow 10 and 1μm in diameter in order to examine the influence of the particle size on optical properties. The elevated-background measuring site provides the advantage of examining the LRT of natural and anthropogenic aerosols from the IGP and southwest Asia and the role of BLD in the aerosol lifting processes, while the aerosols are found to be well-mixed and aged-type dominant.

  5. Altered volcanic ash layers of the Late Cretaceous San Felipe Formation, Sierra Madre Oriental (Northeastern Mexico): Usbnd Pb geochronology, provenance and tectonic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Tapia, Fernando; Martínez-Paco, Margarita; Iriondo, Alexander; Ocampo-Díaz, Yam Zul Ernesto; Cruz-Gámez, Esther María; Ramos-Ledezma, Andrés; Andaverde, Jorge Alberto; Ostrooumov, Mikhail; Masuch, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    A detailed petrographic, geochemical, and Usbnd Pb geochronological study of altered volcanic ash layers, collected in eight outcrops of the Late Cretaceous San Felipe Formation (Sierra Madre Oriental, Northeastern Mexico), has been carried out. The main objectives have been: (1) to establish a deposit period, and (2) to propose a reliable provenance-transport-deposit-diagenetic model. These volcano-sedimentary strata represent the altered remains of vitreous-crystalline ash (main grains: quartz + K-feldspar (sanidine) + Na-plagioclase + zircon + biotite; groundmass: glass + calcite + clinochlore + illite) deposited and preserved in a shallow, relatively large in area, open platform environment. Major and trace element geochemistry indicate that parent volcanism was mainly rhyodacitic to rhyolitic in composition. Discrimination diagrams suggest a link to continental arc transitional to extension tectonic setting. Usbnd Pb geochronology in zircon has revealed that the volcanic ash was released from their sources approximately during the range 84.6 ± 0.8 to 73.7 ± 0.3 Ma, being transported to the depocenters. Burial diagenesis process was marked by: (a) a limited recycling, (b) the partial loss of original components (mainly K-feldspar, plagioclase, biotite and glass), and (c) the addition of quartz, calcite, illite and clinochlore. The location of the source area remains uncertain, although the lack of enrichment in Zr/Sc ratio suggests that ashes were subjected to relatively fast and short-distance transport process. El Peñuelo intrusive complex, at 130-170 km west of the depocenters, is the nearest known zone of active magmatism during the Upper Cretaceous. This intermediate to felsic pluton, characterized by a geochemical affinity to post-orogenic tectonic setting, could be linked to the volcanic sources.

  6. DUAL ORIGIN OF AEROSOLS IN TITAN'S DETACHED HAZE LAYER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cours, T.; Burgalat, J.; Rannou, P. [Groupe de Spectrometrie Moleculaire et Atmospherique (GSMA), CNRS UMR-6089, Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Rodriguez, S.; Brahic, A. [Laboratoire AIM, Universite Paris 7, CNRS UMR-7158, CEA-Saclay/DSM/IRFU/SAp, 91191 Gif/Yvette (France); West, R. A., E-mail: thibaud.cours@univ-reims.fr [Jet Propulsion Laboratory M/S 169-237, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2011-11-10

    We have analyzed scattered light profiles from the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem, taken at the limb and at several large phase angles. We also used results from an occultation observed by Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph in the ultraviolet. We found that particles responsible for the scattering in the detached haze have an effective radius around 0.15 {mu}m and the aerosol size distribution follows a power law (exponent about -4.5). We discuss these results along with microphysical constraints and thermal equilibrium of the detached haze, and we conclude that only a strong interaction with atmospheric dynamics can explain such a structure.

  7. A Simple Apparatus for the Injection of Lithium Aerosol into the Scrape-Off Layer of Fusion Research Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. Mansfield, A.L Roquemore, H. Schneider, J. Timberlake, H. Kugel, M.G. Bell and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-10-11

    A simple device has been developed to deposit elemental lithium onto plasma facing components in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Deposition is accomplished by dropping lithium powder into the plasma column. Once introduced, lithium particles quickly become entrained in scrape-off layer flow as an evaporating aerosol. Particles are delivered through a small central aperture in a computer-controlled resonating piezoelectric disk on which the powder is supported. The device has been used to deposit lithium both during discharges as well as prior to plasma breakdown. Clear improvements to plasma performance have been demonstrated. The use of this apparatus provides flexibility in the amount and timing of lithium deposition and, therefore, may benefit future fusion research devices.

  8. Application of Convolution Perfectly Matched Layer in MRTD scattering model for non-spherical aerosol particles and its performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuai; Gao, Taichang; Li, Hao; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Zidong; Liu, Lei; Chen, Ming

    2017-10-01

    The performance of absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is an important factor influencing the simulation accuracy of MRTD (Multi-Resolution Time-Domain) scattering model for non-spherical aerosol particles. To this end, the Convolution Perfectly Matched Layer (CPML), an excellent ABC in FDTD scheme, is generalized and applied to the MRTD scattering model developed by our team. In this model, the time domain is discretized by exponential differential scheme, and the discretization of space domain is implemented by Galerkin principle. To evaluate the performance of CPML, its simulation results are compared with those of BPML (Berenger's Perfectly Matched Layer) and ADE-PML (Perfectly Matched Layer with Auxiliary Differential Equation) for spherical and non-spherical particles, and their simulation errors are analyzed as well. The simulation results show that, for scattering phase matrices, the performance of CPML is better than that of BPML; the computational accuracy of CPML is comparable to that of ADE-PML on the whole, but at scattering angles where phase matrix elements fluctuate sharply, the performance of CPML is slightly better than that of ADE-PML. After orientation averaging process, the differences among the results of different ABCs are reduced to some extent. It also can be found that ABCs have a much weaker influence on integral scattering parameters (such as extinction and absorption efficiencies) than scattering phase matrices, this phenomenon can be explained by the error averaging process in the numerical volume integration.

  9. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: Analysis of Results from the ARM Mobile Facility Deployment to the Azores (2009/2010)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Robert [University of Washington, Dept of Atmos Sci

    2013-05-31

    The project focuses upon dataset analysis and synthesis of datasets from the AMF deployment entitled “Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL)” at Graciosa Island in the Azores. Wood is serving a PI for this AMF deployment.

  10. The role of cloud contamination, aerosol layer height and aerosol model in the assessment of the OMI near-UV retrievals over the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassó, Santiago; Torres, Omar

    2016-07-01

    Retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 388 nm over the ocean from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) two-channel near-UV algorithm (OMAERUV) have been compared with independent AOD measurements. The analysis was carried out over the open ocean (OMI and MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) AOD comparisons) and over coastal and island sites (OMI and AERONET, the AErosol RObotic NETwork). Additionally, a research version of the retrieval algorithm (using MODIS and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) information as constraints) was utilized to evaluate the sensitivity of the retrieval to different assumed aerosol properties. Overall, the comparison resulted in differences (OMI minus independent measurements) within the expected levels of uncertainty for the OMI AOD retrievals (0.1 for AOD 0.3). Using examples from case studies with outliers, the reasons that led to the observed differences were examined with specific purpose to determine whether they are related to instrument limitations (i.e., pixel size, calibration) or algorithm assumptions (such as aerosol shape, aerosol height). The analysis confirms that OMAERUV does an adequate job at rejecting cloudy scenes within the instrument's capabilities. There is a residual cloud contamination in OMI pixels with quality flag 0 (the best conditions for aerosol retrieval according to the algorithm), resulting in a bias towards high AODs in OMAERUV. This bias is more pronounced at low concentrations of absorbing aerosols (AOD 388 nm ˜ distribution, aerosol height, particle shape). It was found that the spherical shape assumption for dust in the current retrieval is the main cause of the underestimate. In addition, it is demonstrated in an example how an incorrect assumption of the aerosol height can lead to an underestimate. Nevertheless, this is not as significant as the effect of particle shape. These findings will be incorporated in a future version of the retrieval algorithm.

  11. The Model Intercomparison Project on the Climatic Response to Volcanic Forcing (VolMIP): Experimental Design and Forcing Input Data for CMIP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchettin, Davide; Khodri, Myriam; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Schmidt, Anja; Gerber, Edwin P.; Hegerl, Gabriele; Robock, Alan; Pausata, Francesco; Ball, William T.; Bauer, Susanne E.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    The enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer by volcanic eruptions induces a complex set of responses causing global and regional climate effects on a broad range of timescales. Uncertainties exist regarding the climatic response to strong volcanic forcing identified in coupled climate simulations that contributed to the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). In order to better understand the sources of these model diversities, the Model Intercomparison Project on the climatic response to Volcanic forcing (VolMIP) has defined a coordinated set of idealized volcanic perturbation experiments to be carried out in alignment with the CMIP6 protocol. VolMIP provides a common stratospheric aerosol data set for each experiment to minimize differences in the applied volcanic forcing. It defines a set of initial conditions to assess how internal climate variability contributes to determining the response. VolMIP will assess to what extent volcanically forced responses of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system are robustly simulated by state-of-the-art coupled climate models and identify the causes that limit robust simulated behavior, especially differences in the treatment of physical processes. This paper illustrates the design of the idealized volcanic perturbation experiments in the VolMIP protocol and describes the common aerosol forcing input data sets to be used.

  12. The Model Intercomparison Project on the climatic response to Volcanic forcing (VolMIP): experimental design and forcing input data for CMIP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchettin, Davide; Khodri, Myriam; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Schmidt, Anja; Gerber, Edwin P.; Hegerl, Gabriele; Robock, Alan; Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Ball, William T.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bekki, Slimane; Dhomse, Sandip S.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Mann, Graham W.; Marshall, Lauren; Mills, Michael; Marchand, Marion; Niemeier, Ulrike; Poulain, Virginie; Rozanov, Eugene; Rubino, Angelo; Stenke, Andrea; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Tummon, Fiona

    2016-08-01

    The enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer by volcanic eruptions induces a complex set of responses causing global and regional climate effects on a broad range of timescales. Uncertainties exist regarding the climatic response to strong volcanic forcing identified in coupled climate simulations that contributed to the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). In order to better understand the sources of these model diversities, the Model Intercomparison Project on the climatic response to Volcanic forcing (VolMIP) has defined a coordinated set of idealized volcanic perturbation experiments to be carried out in alignment with the CMIP6 protocol. VolMIP provides a common stratospheric aerosol data set for each experiment to minimize differences in the applied volcanic forcing. It defines a set of initial conditions to assess how internal climate variability contributes to determining the response. VolMIP will assess to what extent volcanically forced responses of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system are robustly simulated by state-of-the-art coupled climate models and identify the causes that limit robust simulated behavior, especially differences in the treatment of physical processes. This paper illustrates the design of the idealized volcanic perturbation experiments in the VolMIP protocol and describes the common aerosol forcing input data sets to be used.

  13. Characterization of a volcanic ash episode in southern Finland caused by the Grimsvötn eruption in Iceland in May 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.-M. Kerminen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The volcanic eruption of Grimsvötn in Iceland in May 2011, affected surface-layer air quality at several locations in Northern Europe. In Helsinki, Finland, the main pollution episode lasted for more than 8 h around the noon of 25 May. We characterized this episode by relying on detailed physical, chemical and optical aerosol measurements. The analysis was aided by air mass trajectory calculations, satellite measurements, and dispersion model simulations. During the episode, volcanic ash particles were present at sizes from less than 0.5 μm up to sizes >10 μm. The mass mean diameter of ash particles was a few μm in the Helsinki area, and the ash enhanced PM10 mass concentrations up to several tens of μg m−3. Individual particle analysis showed that some ash particles appeared almost non-reacted during the atmospheric transportation, while most of them were mixed with sea salt or other type of particulate matter. Also sulfate of volcanic origin appeared to have been transported to our measurement site, but its contribution to the aerosol mass was minor due the separation of ash-particle and sulfur dioxide plumes shortly after the eruption. The volcanic material had very little effect on PM1 mass concentrations or sub-micron particle number size distributions in the Helsinki area. The aerosol scattering coefficient was increased and visibility was slightly decreased during the episode, but in general changes in aerosol optical properties due to volcanic aerosols seem to be difficult to be distinguished from those induced by other pollutants present in a continental boundary layer. The case investigated here demonstrates clearly the power of combining surface aerosol measurements, dispersion model simulations and satellite measurements in analyzing surface air pollution episodes caused by volcanic eruptions. None of these three approaches alone would be sufficient to forecast, or even to unambiguously

  14. The global middle-atmosphere aerosol model MAECHAM5-SAM2: comparison with satellite and in-situ observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hommel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate results from a three-dimensional middle-atmosphere aerosol-climate model which has been developed to study the evolution of stratospheric aerosols. Here we focus on the stratospheric background period and evaluate several key quantities of the global distribution of stratospheric aerosols and their precursors with observations and other model studies. It is shown that the model fairly well reproduces in situ observations of the aerosol size and number concentrations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Compared to measurements from the limb-sounding SAGE II satellite instrument, modelled integrated aerosol quantities are more biased the lower the moment of the aerosol population is. Both findings are consistent with earlier work analysing the quality of SAGE II retrieved e.g. aerosol surface area densities in the volcanically unperturbed stratosphere (SPARC/ASAP, 2006; Thomason et al., 2008; Wurl et al., 2010.

    The model suggests that new particles are formed over large areas of the LS, albeit nucleation rates in the upper troposphere are at least one order of magnitude larger than those in the stratosphere. Hence, we suggest that both, tropospheric sulphate aerosols and particles formed in situ in the LS are maintaining the stability of the stratospheric aerosol layer in the absence of direct stratospheric emissions from volcanoes. Particle size distributions are clearly bimodal, except in the upper branches of the stratospheric aerosol layer where aerosols evaporate. Modelled concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN are smaller than measured in regions of the aerosol layer where aerosol mixing ratios are largest. This points to an overestimated particle growth by coagulation.

    Transport regimes of tropical stratospheric aerosol have been identified from modelled aerosol mixing ratios and correspond to those deduced from satellite extinction measurements. We found that convective

  15. On the radiative forcing of volcanic plumes: modelling the impact of Mount Etna in the Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Sellitto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The impact of small to moderate volcanic eruptions on the regional to global radiative forcing and climate is still largely unknown and thought to be presently underestimated. In this work, daily average shortwave radiative forcing efficiencies at the surface (RFEdSurf, at top of the atmosphere (RFEdTOA and their ratio (f, for upper tropospheric volcanic plumes with different optical characterization, are derived using the radiative transfer model UVSPEC and the LibRadtran suite. The optical parameters of the simulated aerosol layer, i.e., the Ångströem coefficient (alpha, the single scattering albedo (SSA and the asymmetry factor (g, have been varied to mimic volcanic ash (bigger and more absorbing particles, sulphate aerosols (smaller and more reflective particles and intermediate/mixed conditions. The characterization of the plume and its vertical distribution have been set-up to simulate Mount Etna, basing on previous studies. The radiative forcing and in particular the f ratio is strongly affected by the SSA and g, and to a smaller extent by alpha, especially for sulphates-dominated plumes. The impact of the altitude and thickness of the plume on the radiative forcing, for a fixed optical characterization of the aerosol layer, has been found negligible (less than 1% for RFEdSurf, RFEdTOA and f. The simultaneous presence of boundary layer/lower tropospheric marine or dust aerosols, like expected in the Mediterranean area, modulates only slightly (up to 12 and 14% for RFEdSurf and RFEdTOA, and 3 to 4% of the f ratio the radiative effects of the upper tropospheric volcanic layer.

  16. Observations of the boundary layer, cloud, and aerosol variability in the southeast Pacific coastal marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zheng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft observations made off the coast of northern Chile in the Southeastern Pacific (20° S, 72° W; named Point Alpha from 16 October to 13 November 2008 during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study-Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx, combined with meteorological reanalysis, satellite measurements, and radiosonde data, are used to investigate the boundary layer (BL and aerosol-cloud-drizzle variations in this region. The BL at Point Alpha was typical of a non-drizzling stratocumulus-topped BL on days without predominately synoptic and meso-scale influences. The BL had a depth of 1140 ± 120 m, was well-mixed and capped by a sharp inversion. The wind direction generally switched from southerly within the BL to northerly above the inversion. The cloud liquid water path (LWP varied between 15 g m−2 and 160 g m−2. From 29 October to 4 November, when a synoptic system affected conditions at Point Alpha, the cloud LWP was higher than on the other days by around 40 g m−2. On 1 and 2 November, a moist layer above the inversion moved over Point Alpha. The total-water specific humidity above the inversion was larger than that within the BL during these days. Entrainment rates (average of 1.5 ± 0.6 mm s−1 calculated from the near cloud-top fluxes and turbulence (vertical velocity variance in the BL at Point Alpha appeared to be weaker than those in the BL over the open ocean west of Point Alpha and the BL near the coast of the northeast Pacific.

    The accumulation mode aerosol varied from 250 to 700 cm−3 within the BL, and CCN at 0.2 % supersaturation within the BL ranged between 150 and 550 cm−3. The main aerosol source at Point Alpha was horizontal advection within the BL from south. The average cloud droplet number concentration ranged between 80 and 400 cm−3, which was consistent with the satellite-derived values. The relationship of cloud droplet

  17. Modified HNO3 seasonality in volcanic layers of a polar ice core - Snow-pack effect or photochemical perturbation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laj, Paolo; Palais, Julie M.; Gardner, James E.; Sigurdsson, Haraldur

    1993-01-01

    Changes in atmospheric HNO3 chemistry following the Laki (1783), Tambora (1815), and Katmai (1912) volcanic eruptions are presently investigated in view of a central Greenland ice core's chemical composition. Attention is given to the concentration of several cations and anions, using ion chromatography. Following the eruptions, the ratio of winter to summer depositions of NO3(-) was significantly higher than during nonvolcanic periods. While this may be due to ice pack effects, it is proposed that large concentrations of the stratospheric H2SO4 particles ejected by the volcanoes favored HNO3 removal during Arctic winter.

  18. Particle size distribution of the stratospheric aerosol from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Malinina, Elizaveta; Rozanov, Vladimir; Hommel, Rene; Burrows, John

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosols are of a great scientific interest because of their crucial role in the Earth's radiative budget as well as their contribution to chemical processes resulting in ozone depletion. While the permanent aerosol background in the stratosphere is determined by the tropical injection of SO2, COS and sulphate particles from the troposphere, major perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol layer result form an uplift of SO2 after strong volcanic eruptions. Satellite measurements in the visible spectral range represent one of the most important sources of information about the vertical distribution of the stratospheric aerosol on the global scale. This study employs measurements of the scattered solar light performed in the limb viewing geometry from the space borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which operated onboard the ENVISAT satellite, from August 2002 to April 2012. A retrieval approach to obtain parameters of the stratospheric aerosol particle size distribution will be reported along with the sensitivity studies and first results.

  19. Four-dimensional distribution of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic cloud over Europe observed by EARLINET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pappalardo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in April/May 2010 represents a "natural experiment" to study the impact of volcanic emissions on a continental scale. For the first time, quantitative data about the presence, altitude, and layering of the volcanic cloud, in conjunction with optical information, are available for most parts of Europe derived from the observations by the European Aerosol Research Lidar NETwork (EARLINET. Based on multi-wavelength Raman lidar systems EARLINET is the only instrument worldwide that is able to provide dense time series of high-quality optical data to be used for aerosol typing and for the retrieval of particle microphysical properties as a function of altitude.

    In this work we show the four-dimensional (4-D distribution of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic cloud over Europe as observed by EARLINET during the entire volcanic event (15 April–26 May 2010. All optical properties directly measured (backscatter, extinction, and particle linear depolarization ratio are stored in the EARLINET database available at http://www.earlinet.org. A specific relational database providing the volcanic mask over Europe, realized ad hoc for this specific event, has been developed and is available on request at http://www.earlinet.org.

    During the first days after the eruption, volcanic particles were detected over Central Europe within a wide range of altitudes, from the lower stratosphere down to the local Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL. After 19 April 2010, volcanic particles were detected over South and South Eastern Europe. During the first half of May (5–15 May, material emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano was detected over Spain and Portugal and then over the Mediterranean and the Balkans. Last observations of the event were recorded until 25 May in Central Europe and in the Eastern

  20. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic

  1. Impact of atmospheric boundary layer depth variability and wind reversal on the diurnal variability of aerosol concentration at a valley site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, S., E-mail: sp5hd@Virginia.EDU; Lee, T.R.; Phelps, S.; De Wekker, S.F.J.

    2014-10-15

    The development of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) plays a key role in affecting the variability of atmospheric constituents such as aerosols, greenhouse gases, water vapor, and ozone. In general, the concentration of any tracers within the ABL varies due to the changes in the mixing volume (i.e. ABL depth). In this study, we investigate the impact on the near-surface aerosol concentration in a valley site of 1) the boundary layer dilution due to vertical mixing and 2) changes in the wind patterns. We use a data set obtained during a 10-day field campaign in which a number of remote sensing and in-situ instruments were deployed, including a ground-based aerosol lidar system for monitoring of the ABL top height (z{sub i}), a particle counter to determine the number concentration of aerosol particles at eight different size ranges, and tower-based standard meteorological instruments. Results show a clearly visible decreasing trend of the mean daytime z{sub i} from 2900 m AGL (above ground level) to 2200 m AGL during a three-day period which resulted in increased near-surface pollutant concentrations. An inverse relationship exists between the z{sub i} and the fine fraction (0.3–0.7 μm) accumulation mode particles (AMP) on some days due to the dilution effect in a well-mixed ABL. These days are characterized by the absence of daytime upvalley winds and the presence of northwesterly synoptic-driven winds. In contrast, on the days with an onset of an upvalley wind circulation after the morning transition, the wind-driven local transport mechanism outweighs the ABL-dilution effect in determining the variability of AMP concentration. The interplay between the ABL depth evolution and the onset of the upvalley wind during the morning transition period significantly governs the air quality in a valley and could be an important component in the studies of mountain meteorology and air quality. - Highlights: • Role of atmospheric boundary layer depth on particle

  2. The ECOMA 2007 campaign: rocket observations and numerical modelling of aerosol particle charging and plasma depletion in a PMSE/NLC layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Brattli

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The ECOMA series of rocket payloads use a set of aerosol particle, plasma, and optical instruments to study the properties of aerosol particles and their interaction with the ambient plasma environment in the polar mesopause region. In August 2007 the ECOMA-3 payload was launched into a region with Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE and noctilucent clouds (NLC. An electron depletion was detected in a broad region between 83 and 88 km, coincident with enhanced density of negatively charged aerosol particles. We also find evidence for positive ion depletion in the same region. Charge neutrality requires that a population of positively charged particles smaller than 2 nm and with a density of at least 2×108 m−3 must also have been present in the layer, undetected by the instruments. A numerical model for the charging of aerosol particles and their interaction with the ambient plasma is used to analyse the results, showing that high aerosol particle densities are required in order to explain the observed ion density depletion. The model also shows that a very high photoionisation rate is required for the particles smaller than 2 nm to become positively charged, indicating that these may have a lower work function than pure water ice.

  3. Enhanced air pollution via aerosol-boundary layer feedback in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petäjä, T; Järvi, L; Kerminen, V-M; Ding, A J; Sun, J N; Nie, W; Kujansuu, J; Virkkula, A; Yang, X-Q; Fu, C B; Zilitinkevich, S; Kulmala, M

    2016-01-12

    Severe air pollution episodes have been frequent in China during the recent years. While high emissions are the primary reason for increasing pollutant concentrations, the ultimate cause for the most severe pollution episodes has remained unclear. Here we show that a high concentration of particulate matter (PM) will enhance the stability of an urban boundary layer, which in turn decreases the boundary layer height and consequently cause further increases in PM concentrations. We estimate the strength of this positive feedback mechanism by combining a new theoretical framework with ambient observations. We show that the feedback remains moderate at fine PM concentrations lower than about 200 μg m(-3), but that it becomes increasingly effective at higher PM loadings resulting from the combined effect of high surface PM emissions and massive secondary PM production within the boundary layer. Our analysis explains why air pollution episodes are particularly serious and severe in megacities and during the days when synoptic weather conditions stay constant.

  4. Verification and application of the extended Spectral Deconvolution Algorithm (SDA+ methodology to estimate aerosol fine and coarse mode extinction coefficients in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Kaku

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Spectral Deconvolution Algorithm (SDA and SDA+ (extended SDA methodologies can be employed to separate the fine and coarse mode extinction coefficients from measured total aerosol extinction coefficients, but their common use is currently limited to AERONET Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD. Here we provide the verification of the SDA+ methodology on a non-AERONET aerosol product, by applying it to fine and coarse mode nephelometer and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP data sets collected in the marine boundary layer. Using datasets collected on research vessels by NOAA PMEL, we demonstrate that with accurate input, SDA+ is able to predict the fine and coarse mode scattering and extinction coefficient partition in global data sets representing a range of aerosol regimes. However, in low-extinction regimes commonly found in the clean marine boundary layer, SDA+ output accuracy is sensitive to instrumental calibration errors. This work was extended to the calculation of coarse and fine mode scattering coefficients with similar success. This effort not only verifies the application of the SDA+ method to in situ data, but by inference verifies the method as a whole for a host of applications, including AERONET. Study results open the door to much more extensive use of nephelometers and PSAPs, with the ability to calculate fine and coarse mode scattering and extinction coefficients in field campaigns that do not have the resources to explicitly measure these values.

  5. Last glacial tephra layers in the Talos Dome ice core (peripheral East Antarctic Plateau), with implications for chronostratigraphic correlations and regional volcanic history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narcisi, Biancamaria; Petit, Jean Robert; Langone, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Tephra isochrons offer considerable potential for correlating diverse palaeoarchives and highlighting regional climatic differences. They are especially useful when applied to polar ice records encompassing the last glacial, as these clearly portray the pronounced millennial-scale climate variability that characterised this period. Here we present the continuous record of primary fallout tephra layers in the East Antarctic Talos Dome ice core (72°49‧S, 159°11‧E), developed upon examination of the core sections spanning the glacial period 16.5 to 71 ka. A total of ca. 45 discrete tephra deposits precisely positioned stratigraphically relative to the temperature record for the core and dated using the AICC2012 timescale, were identified. Quantitative grain size, particle morphology, major and trace element composition using Coulter Counter, SEM, EPMA-WDS, and LA-ICP-MS analytical methods were studied as diagnostic features for tephra characterisation. The tephrostratigraphic framework provides a reference for future precise comparison between ice and sediment sequences across the Antarctic continent. Indeed, several potential markers characterised by distinct volcanic glass geochemistry and/or particular stratigraphic location (e.g., a 17.6-ka ash layer deposited during the well-known major acidity event) are now available for the direct linkage of palaeoclimatic archives. The Talos Dome tephra sequence, dominated by mid-distal pyroclastic products from the nearby Northern Victoria Land volcanoes, also represents the most comprehensive and best time-constrained record of regional Antarctic volcanism yet developed. It documents nearly continuous sustained explosive activity during the considered time interval and, combined with previous ice-core tephra results for the last and the current interglacial periods, suggests progressive compositional shift through time.

  6. The impact of geoengineering aerosols on stratospheric temperature and ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckendorn, P; Luo, B P; Rozanov, E; Schraner, M; Peter, T [Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Weisenstein, D [AER, Lexington, MA (United States); Fueglistaler, S [DAMTP, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Thomason, L W, E-mail: patricia.heckendorn@env.ethz.c [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are warming the global climate at an unprecedented rate. Significant emission reductions will be required soon to avoid a rapid temperature rise. As a potential interim measure to avoid extreme temperature increase, it has been suggested that Earth's albedo be increased by artificially enhancing stratospheric sulfate aerosols. We use a 3D chemistry climate model, fed by aerosol size distributions from a zonal mean aerosol model, to simulate continuous injection of 1-10 Mt/a into the lower tropical stratosphere. In contrast to the case for all previous work, the particles are predicted to grow to larger sizes than are observed after volcanic eruptions. The reason is the continuous supply of sulfuric acid and hence freshly formed small aerosol particles, which enhance the formation of large aerosol particles by coagulation and, to a lesser extent, by condensation. Owing to their large size, these particles have a reduced albedo. Furthermore, their sedimentation results in a non-linear relationship between stratospheric aerosol burden and annual injection, leading to a reduction of the targeted cooling. More importantly, the sedimenting particles heat the tropical cold point tropopause and, hence, the stratospheric entry mixing ratio of H{sub 2}O increases. Therefore, geoengineering by means of sulfate aerosols is predicted to accelerate the hydroxyl catalyzed ozone destruction cycles and cause a significant depletion of the ozone layer even though future halogen concentrations will be significantly reduced.

  7. Merging the SAGE II and OSIRIS Stratospheric Aerosol Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Landon; Bourassa, Adam; Degenstein, Doug

    2016-04-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on the Odin satellite, launched in 2001 and currently operational, measures limb-scattered sunlight from which profiles of stratospheric aerosol extinction at 750nm are retrieved. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas (SAGE) II instrument was operational from 1985 to 2005, and provided aerosol extinction at several visible and near infrared wavelengths. This work compares the SAGE II and OSIRIS aerosol extinction measurements during the four years of instrument overlap by interpolating the SAGE II data to 750nm using the 525 and 1020nm channels. Agreement is generally favourable in the tropics and mid-latitudes with differences less than 10% for the majority of the aerosol layer. However, near the UTLS and outside of the tropics agreement is poorer and reasons for this are investigated. Comparisons between the OSIRIS and SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements at 750nm are used to develop a merged aerosol climatology as a function of time, latitude and altitude at the native SAGE II wavelength of 525nm. Error due to assumptions in the OSIRIS retrieval and wavelength conversion are explored through simulation studies over a range of particle size distributions and is found to be approximately 20% for the majority of low-to-moderate volcanic loading conditions and OSIRIS geometries. Other sources of error such as cloud contamination in the UTLS are also explored.

  8. The Impact of Geoengineering Aerosols on Stratospheric Temperature and Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckendorn, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Fueglistaler, S.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Schraner, M.; Thomason, L. W.; Peter, T.

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are warming the global climate at an unprecedented rate. Significant emission reductions will be required soon to avoid a rapid temperature rise. As a potential interim measure to avoid extreme temperature increase, it has been suggested that Earth's albedo be increased by artificially enhancing stratospheric sulfate aerosols. We use a 3D chemistry climate model, fed by aerosol size distributions from a zonal mean aerosol model. to simulate continuous injection of 1-10 Mt/a into the lower tropical stratosphere. In contrast to the case for all previous work, the particles are predicted to grow to larger sizes than are observed after volcanic eruptions. The reason is the continuous supply of sulfuric acid and hence freshly formed small aerosol particles, which enhance the formation of large aerosol particles by coagulation and, to a lesser extent, by condensation. Owing to their large size, these particles have a reduced albedo. Furthermore, their sedimentation results in a non-linear relationship between stratospheric aerosol burden and annual injection, leading to a reduction of the targeted cooling. More importantly, the sedimenting particles heat the tropical cold point tropopause and, hence, the stratospheric entry mixing ratio of H2O increases. Therefore, geoengineering by means of sulfate aerosols is predicted to accelerate the hydroxyl catalyzed ozone destruction cycles and cause a significant depletion of the ozone layer even though future halogen concentrations will he significantly reduced.

  9. Measurements of Sea Salt Aerosols in the Marine Boundary Layer and Free Troposphere: Vertical Transport and Chemical Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, P. K.; Murphy, D. M.; Cziczo, D. J.; Thomson, D. S.

    2002-12-01

    During the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) mission (Monterey, CA, spring 2002) nearly 400,000 positive and negative mass spectra of single atmospheric aerosols were acquired using the PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry) instrument. The primary focus of the mission was to investigate the composition of air masses along the western coast of the United States. Of particular interest to the mission was to study the influence of anthropogenic emissions from Asia on aerosol composition. To accomplish these goals, the WP-3 aircraft, equipped with a suite of instruments including PALMS, covered a large spatial area flying from 0 - 8000 m altitude covering most of the western coastline from Canada to southern California including flights over the San Francisco and Los Angeles metropolitan areas. The in situ measurements of single particle aerosol mass spectra by PALMS allow for good spatial and vertical resolution of the aerosol composition. By observing the changes in aerosol composition as a function of altitude, the vertical transport of sea salt aerosols over marine and urban environments is examined. Using measurements of other chemical tracers along with the aerosol composition, the chemical processing of these aerosols during transport both vertically and inland can be discerned. These results add insight into the transport and chemical evolution of sea salt aerosol.

  10. Investigations of microphysical and chemical composition of aerosol in near-water layer of the atmosphere over the White Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, Mikhail V.; Kozlov, Valerii S.; Pol'kin, Victor V.; Golobokova, Lyudmila P.; Pogodaeva, Tatyana V.; Khodzher, Tamara V.; Lisitzin, Alexander P.; Shevchenko, Vladimir P.

    2006-11-01

    The peculiarities of spatial-temporal variability of the submicron aerosol number density N Σ (cm -3), particle size distribution in the diameter range 0.4 to 10 μm, mass concentration of submicron aerosol Ma (μg/m 3) and the mass concentration of black carbon (soot, BC) Ms (μg/m 3), as well as chemical composition of particles (ion composition of aerosol soluble fraction) in different regions of White Sea are considered in this paper. The effect of continental and marine sources on formation of the near-water aerosol characteristics is estimated.

  11. Modeling the feedback between aerosol and meteorological variables in the atmospheric boundary layer during a severe fog-haze event over the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen; Liu, Zirui; Wang, Lili; Wang, Pucai; Xia, Xiangao; Tao, Minghui; Zhu, Lingyun

    2016-04-01

    The feedback between aerosol and meteorological variables in the atmospheric boundary layer over the North China Plain (NCP) is analyzed by conducting numerical experiments with and without the aerosol direct and indirect effects via a coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model(WRF-Chem). The numerical experiments are performed for the period of 2-26 January 2013, during which a severe fog-haze event (10-15 January 2013) occurred, with the simulated maximum hourly surface PM2.5 concentration of ~600 μg m-3, minimum atmospheric visibility of ~0.3 km, and 10-100 hours of simulated hourly surface PM2.5 concentration above 300 μg m-3 over NCP. A comparison of model results with aerosol feedback against observations indicates that the model can reproduce the spatial and temporal characteristics of temperature, relative humidity (RH), wind, surface PM2.5 concentration, atmospheric visibility, and aerosol optical depth reasonably well. Analysis of model results with and without aerosol feedback shows that during the fog-haze event aerosols lead to a significant negative radiative forcing of ~20 to ~140 W m-2 at the surface and a large positive radiative forcing of 20-120 W m-2 in the atmosphere and induce significant changes in meteorological variables with maximum changes during 09:00-18:00 local time (LT) over urban Beijing and Tianjin and south Hebei: the temperature decreases by 0.8-2.8 °C at the surface and increases by 0.1-0.5 °C at around 925 hPa, while RH increases by about 4-12% at the surface and decreases by 1-6% at around 925 hPa. As a result, the aerosol-induced equivalent potential temperature profile change shows that the atmosphere is much more stable and thus the surface wind speed decreases by up to 0.3 m s-1 (10 %) and the atmosphere boundary layer height decreases by 40-200 m (5-30 %) during the daytime of this severe fog-haze event. Owing to this more stable atmosphere during 09:00-18:00, 10-15 January, compared to the surface PM2

  12. Optical properties of mixed aerosol layers over Japan derived with multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yukari; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Matsui, Ichiro; Pan, Xiaole; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Osada, Kazuo; Uno, Itsushi

    2017-02-01

    Mixing state of aerosols and optical properties including lidar ratio, particle depolarization ratio, and Ångström exponent were investigated at Fukuoka in western Japan using a multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar (MMRL), various aerosol mass-concentration measurements, and a polarization optical particle counter during Winter-Spring 2015. Aerosol extinction coefficient, backscatter coefficient, and depolarization at 355 and 532 nm and attenuated backscatter coefficient at 1064 nm are obtained from the MMRL measurements. Ten aerosol episodes were classified into three categories (air pollution, mineral dust, and marine aerosol) based on aerosol mass-concentration measurements in the fine-mode (particle diameter Dplidar ratio for air pollution was 57±4 sr at 355 nm and 53±8 sr at 532 nm with Ångström exponent of 1.4±0.5. For mineral dust, a slightly high averaged lidar ratio (50±7 sr at 355 nm and 54±9 sr at 532 nm) was obtained with relatively high Ångström exponent of 0.8±0.3 owing to contributions from fine-mode particles (PMf). The mean particle depolarization ratios of 13±8% at 355 nm and 16±6% at 532 nm also suggest mixing of mineral dust and anthropogenic fine-mode aerosols. The lowest lidar ratio was obtained for marine case. Classification of aerosol types using the lidar ratio and particle depolarization ratio was conducted based on the results obtained in this study. The classified aerosol types almost corresponded to aerosol category obtained by previous studies. We found no remarkable correlation between the fraction of black carbon and the lidar ratio: this might be due to the complexity of the mixing state among various aerosols. The obtained lidar ratio was rather correlated with the ratio of PMf to PM10, representing the mixing state of fine- and coarse-mode particles.

  13. Chemical composition and optical properties of aerosols in the lower mixed layer and the free troposphere. Final report of the AFS project; Chemische Zusammensetzung und optische Eigenschaften des Aerosols in der freien Troposphaere. Abschlussbericht zum AFS-Projekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asseng, H. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Weltraumwissenschaften]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany). Abt. Biogeochemie; Fischer, J. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Weltraumwissenschaften; Helas, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany). Abt. Biogeochemie; Weller, M. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Potsdam (Germany). Meteorologisches Observatorium

    2001-08-02

    Aerosol radiative forcing is the largest unknown in current climate models and, as a result, in predicting future climate. Accurate vertically-resolved measurements of aerosol optical properties are an important element of improved climate prediction (IPCC). The present project has contributed to this objective. Jets of directly and remotely determined radiation data have been provided suitable to cut down the uncertainty of column- or layer related optical aerosol parameters. In the present case mean values and profiles of spectral scattering - and absorption coefficients have been retrieved from ground based and airborne sky-radiance/solar irradiance measurements. Available analyses of size and chemical composition of sampled particles (adjoined projects) have been also taken into consideration. The retrieved parameters have served as an input for modelling the radiative transfer exactly for the real time of measurements. Closure procedures yielded finally realistic spectral scattering - and absorption coefficients typically for the lower troposphere in a mostly rural Central European region. (orig.) [German] Die ungenuegende Kenntnis strahlungswirksamer, optischer Aerosolparameter ist laut IPCC die groesste Unbekannte bei der Modellierung des Klimas und seiner Veraenderung. Wissenschaft und Technik bemuehen sich in sog. Schliessungsexperimenten aus der Ueberbestimmung direkt und indirekt gemessener Aerosolparameter genaue(re) Kenntnis (Mittelwert/Variation) ueber deren Klimawirksamkeit zu erlangen. Im vorliegenden Projekt wurden aus verschiedenen passiven, spektralen Messungen von Streulicht und Transmission der Atmosphaere in verschiedenen Hoehen sowie aus der Beruecksichtigung von Partikelanalysen Dritter, Streu- und Absorptionskoeffizienten des Aerosols der gesamten Luftsaeule und in vertikaler Aufloesung abgeleitet. Strahlungstransportmodellierungen mit den gewonnenen Aerosolparametern als input engten ueber den Vergleich mit den Messungen deren Grad an

  14. Estimating the direct radiative effect of absorbing aerosols overlying marine boundary layer clouds in the southeast Atlantic using MODIS and CALIOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin

    2013-05-01

    aerosols such as smoke strongly absorb solar radiation, particularly at ultraviolet and visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) wavelengths, and their presence above clouds can have considerable implications. It has been previously shown that they have a positive (i.e., warming) direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) when overlying bright clouds. Additionally, they can cause biased passive instrument satellite retrievals in techniques that rely on VIS/NIR wavelengths for inferring the cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective radius (re) of underlying clouds, which can in turn yield biased above-cloud DARE estimates. Here we investigate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical property retrieval biases due to overlying absorbing aerosols observed by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and examine the impact of these biases on above-cloud DARE estimates. The investigation focuses on a region in the southeast Atlantic Ocean during August and September (2006-2011), where smoke from biomass burning in southern Africa overlies persistent marine boundary layer stratocumulus clouds. Adjusting for above-cloud aerosol attenuation yields increases in the regional mean liquid COT (averaged over all ocean-only liquid clouds) by roughly 6%; mean re increases by roughly 2.6%, almost exclusively due to the COT adjustment in the non-orthogonal retrieval space. It is found that these two biases lead to an underestimate of DARE. For liquid cloud Aqua MODIS pixels with CALIOP-observed above-cloud smoke, the regional mean above-cloud radiative forcing efficiency (DARE per unit aerosol optical depth (AOD)) at time of observation (near local noon for Aqua overpass) increases from 50.9Wm-2AOD-1 to 65.1Wm-2AOD-1 when using bias-adjusted instead of nonadjusted MODIS cloud retrievals.

  15. Numerical studies of microphysical modulations of stratospheric aerosol within ROMIC-ROSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, René; von Savigny, Christian; Rozanov, Alexei; Burrows, John; Zalach, Jakob

    2016-04-01

    The stratospheric aerosol layer (so-called Junge layer) is an inherent part of the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC). Stratospheric aerosols play a large role in the Earth's climate system because they interact with catalytic cycles depleting ozone, directly alter the atmosphere's radiative balance and modulate the strength of polar vortices, in particular when this system is perturbed. In terms of mass the layer is predominantly composed of liquid sulphate-water droplets and is fed from the oxidation of gaseous precursors reaching the stratosphere either by direct volcanic injections (mainly supplying SO2) or troposphere-stratosphere exchange processes. In volcanically quiescent periods, latter processes predominantly maintain the so-called background state of aerosol layer through oxidation of OCS above 22 km, and SO2 below. The Junge layer begins to develop 2-3 km above the tropopause and reaches a height of about 35 km, with a largest vertical extent in the tropics and spring-time polar regions. Above the TTL, the layer's vertical extent varies between 2 km and 8 km (about 35% of its mean vertical expansion), depending on the phase of the QBO. The QBO-induced meridional circulation, overlying the BDC, and accompanied signatures in the stratospheric temperature directly affect the life cycle of stratospheric aerosol. Mainly by modulating the equilibrium between microphysical processes which maintain the layer. Effects caused by QBO modulations of the advective transport in the upwelling region of the BDC are smaller and difficult to quantify, because the overlying sedimentation of aerosol is also being modulated and counteract the aerosol lofting. Here we show results from numerical studies performed within the project ROMIC-ROSA (Role of Stratospheric Aerosol in Climate and Atmospheric Science). We further explored relationships between QBO forcing and aerosol processes in the lower stratosphere. We examined whether similar process interferences can be caused by

  16. Black carbon aerosols in a tropical semi-urban coastal environment: Effects of boundary layer dynamics and long range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruna, K.; Kumar, T. V. Lakshmi; Rao, D. Narayana; Murthy, B. V. Krishna; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2013-11-01

    Regular measurements of Black Carbon (BC) aerosol mass concentration have been carried out since March 2011 at a tropical location (12.81°N, 80.03°E) adjoining the mega city, Chennai, on the east coast of India for the first time. As this region is influenced by both the South West and North East monsoons, the BC observations at this site assume importance in understanding the overall BC distribution over India. The data collected until August 2012 has been examined for the general and regionally distinctive features. Spectral absorption characteristics reveal that the BC is mainly from fossil fuel based emissions. The BC concentration shows significant diurnal variation only in the North East monsoon and winter seasons with night time concentration considerably higher than the day time concentration. In the other seasons the day-night contrast in BC is not significant. Seasonal variation is rather subdued with a broad maximum during the Northeast monsoon and winter months and a minimum during the southwest monsoon months. The observed diurnal and seasonal variations are examined in the light of local Atmospheric Boundary Layer dynamics and long range transport. For the first time, an inverse relationship has been established between BC and ABL height on a quantitative basis. A distinctive feature of the region is that in all the seasons transport pathways have long continental overpasses which could lead to the suppressed seasonal variation. It is found that the BC over this region shows distinct diurnal and seasonal features compared to those reported for other coastal and inland regions in India.

  17. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  18. Hail formation triggers rapid ash aggregation in volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eaton, Alexa; Mastin, Larry G.; Herzog, M.; Schwaiger, Hans F.; Schneider, David J.; Wallace, Kristi; Clarke, Amanda B

    2015-01-01

    During explosive eruptions, airborne particles collide and stick together, accelerating the fallout of volcanic ash and climate-forcing aerosols. This aggregation process remains a major source of uncertainty both in ash dispersal forecasting and interpretation of eruptions from the geological record. Here we illuminate the mechanisms and timescales of particle aggregation from a well-characterized ‘wet’ eruption. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska incorporated water from the surface (in this case, a glacier), which is a common occurrence during explosive volcanism worldwide. Observations from C-band weather radar, fall deposits, and numerical modeling demonstrate that volcanic hail formed rapidly in the eruption plume, leading to mixed-phase aggregation of ~95% of the fine ash and stripping much of the cloud out of the atmosphere within 30 minutes. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanism of hail-like aggregation that contributes to the anomalously rapid fallout of fine ash and the occurrence of concentrically-layered aggregates in volcanic deposits.

  19. A new rapid and non-destructive method to detect tephra layers and cryptotephras: applying to the first distal tephrostratigraphic record of the Chaîne des Puys volcanic field (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouannic, Gwénolé; Walter-Simonnet, Anne-Véronique; Bossuet, Gilles; Delabrousse, Eric; Cubizolle, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Tephrostratigraphy has been considerably developed for 30 years, mainly in palaeo-environmental studies. In such studies, distal tephra layers are important chronological markers, but they are also tools to establish or specify record of past eruptions of a volcanic field. Nowadays, development of effective rapid methods to detect tephra layers in sedimentary records of various compositions is a challenge. Many classic methods for detection of tephra layers, like regular sampling or magnetic susceptibility measurements, have shown their limits. Regular sampling takes a long time, and finding tephra layers remains uncertain. Moreover, magnetic susceptibility maesurements, although it is a non-destructive method, is ineffective when tephra layers are made of volcanic glass shards with differentiated magma composition. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is also a non-destructive method but it takes a very long time to analyze a core with sufficient high resolution, and measurements only concern the surface of the sediment. We propose a new method allows detection of tephra layers with, for the first time, a 3D resolution: the Computed Tomography Scan (CT- Scan). This method, regularly used in medicine, allows there to obtain pictures of materials density on 3D with inframillimetric measurement ranges. Then, it is possible to detect tephras, cryptotephras (invisible by naked eye), reworked tephra layers even when tephra layers don't outcrop at the surface of the sediment (and are therefore undetectable by usual methods like XRF and magnetic susceptibility). This method has been tried out on tephras sedimented in different types of sediments (silicated, carbonated and organic matter). Our results show that this method is very efficient for peaty environment. Used on coring carried out in Forez Mountains (French Massif Central), CT-Scan allows to detect more tephra layers than usual methods (XRF and magnetic susceptibility). Results presented here allow to build the first

  20. Tropospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  1. Climatic impact of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have attempted to 'isolate' the volcanic signal in noisy temperature data. This assumes that it is possible to isolate a distinct volcanic signal in a record that may have a combination of forcings (ENSO, solar variability, random fluctuations, volcanism) that all interact. The key to discovering the greatest effects of volcanoes on short-term climate may be to concentrate on temperatures in regions where the effects of aerosol clouds may be amplified by perturbed atmospheric circulation patterns. This is especially true in subpolar and midlatitude areas affected by changes in the position of the polar front. Such climatic perturbation can be detected in proxy evidence such as decrease in tree-ring widths and frost rings, changes in the treeline, weather anomalies, severity of sea-ice in polar and subpolar regions, and poor grain yields and crop failures. In low latitudes, sudden temperature drops were correlated with the passage overhead of the volcanic dust cloud (Stothers, 1984). For some eruptions, such as Tambora, 1815, these kinds of proxy and anectdotal information were summarized in great detail in a number of papers and books (e.g., Post, 1978; Stothers, 1984; Stommel and Stommel, 1986; C. R. Harrington, in press). These studies lead to the general conclusion that regional effects on climate, sometimes quite severe, may be the major impact of large historical volcanic aerosol clouds.

  2. Assessing the Altitude and Dispersion of Volcanic Plumes Using MISR Multi-angle Imaging from Space: Sixteen Years of Volcanic Activity in the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Verity J. B.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    2017-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent a significant source of atmospheric aerosols and can display local, regional and global effects, impacting earth systems and human populations. In order to assess the relative impacts of these events, accurate plume injection altitude measurements are needed. In this work, volcanic plumes generated from seven Kamchatka Peninsula volcanoes (Shiveluch, Kliuchevskoi, Bezymianny, Tolbachik, Kizimen, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky), were identified using over 16 years of Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadimeter (MISR) measurements. Eighty-eight volcanic plumes were observed by MISR, capturing 3-25% of reported events at individual volcanoes. Retrievals were most successful where high intensity events persisted over a period of weeks to months. Compared with existing ground and airborne observations, and alternative satellite-based reports compiled by the Global Volcanism Program (GVP), MISR plume height retrievals showed general consistency; the comparison reports appear to be skewed towards the region of highest concentration observed in MISR-constrained vertical plume extent. The report observations display less discrepancy with MISR toward the end of the analysis period, with improvements in the suborbital data likely the result of the deployment of new instrumentation. Conversely, the general consistency of MISR plume heights with conventionally reported observations supports the use of MISR in the ongoing assessment of volcanic activity globally, especially where other types of volcanic plume observations are unavailable. Differences between the northern (Shiveluch, Kliuchevskoi, Bezymianny and Tolbachik) and southern (Kizimen, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky) volcanoes broadly correspond to the Central Kamchatka Depression (CKD) and Eastern Volcanic Front (EVF), respectively, geological sub-regions of Kamchatka distinguished by varying magma composition. For example, by comparison with reanalysis-model simulations of local meteorological conditions

  3. Efficient transport of tropospheric aerosol into the stratosphere via the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pengfei; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Liu, Shang; Telg, Hagen; Thornberry, Troy D.; Rollins, Andrew W.; Portmann, Robert W.; Bai, Zhixuan; Ray, Eric A.; Duan, Yunjun; Pan, Laura L.; Toon, Owen B.; Bian, Jianchun; Gao, Ru-Shan

    2017-07-01

    An enhanced aerosol layer near the tropopause over Asia during the June-September period of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) was recently identified using satellite observations. Its sources and climate impact are presently not well-characterized. To improve understanding of this phenomenon, we made in situ aerosol measurements during summer 2015 from Kunming, China, then followed with a modeling study to assess the global significance. The in situ measurements revealed a robust enhancement in aerosol concentration that extended up to 2 km above the tropopause. A climate model simulation demonstrates that the abundant anthropogenic aerosol precursor emissions from Asia coupled with rapid vertical transport associated with monsoon convection leads to significant particle formation in the upper troposphere within the ASM anticyclone. These particles subsequently spread throughout the entire Northern Hemispheric (NH) lower stratosphere and contribute significantly (˜15%) to the NH stratospheric column aerosol surface area on an annual basis. This contribution is comparable to that from the sum of small volcanic eruptions in the period between 2000 and 2015. Although the ASM contribution is smaller than that from tropical upwelling (˜35%), we find that this region is about three times as efficient per unit area and time in populating the NH stratosphere with aerosol. With a substantial amount of organic and sulfur emissions in Asia, the ASM anticyclone serves as an efficient smokestack venting aerosols to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. As economic growth continues in Asia, the relative importance of Asian emissions to stratospheric aerosol is likely to increase.

  4. Differentiating the Bishop ash bed and related tephra layers by elemental-based similarity coefficients of volcanic glass shards using solution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (S-ICP-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, J.R.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Montanez, I.P.; Wan, E.

    2007-01-01

    Volcanic glass samples from the same volcanic center (intra-source) often have a similar major-element composition. Thus, it can be difficult to distinguish between individual tephra layers, particularly when using similarity coefficients calculated from electron microprobe major-element measurements. Minor/trace element concentrations in glass can be determined by solution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (S-ICP-MS), but have not been shown as suitable for use in large tephrochronologic databases. Here, we present minor/trace-element concentrations measured by S-ICP-MS and compare these data by similarity coefficients, the method commonly used in large databases. Trial samples from the Bishop Tuff, the upper and lower tuffs of Glass Mountain and the tuffs of Mesquite Spring suites from eastern California, USA, which have an indistinguishable major-element composition, were analyzed using S-ICP-MS. The resulting minor/trace element similarity coefficients clearly separated the suites of tephra layers and, in most cases, individual tephra layers within each suite. Comparisons with previous instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) elemental measurements were marginally successful. This is important step toward quantitative correlation in large tephrochronologic databases to achieve definitive identification of volcanic glass samples and for high-resolution age determinations. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  5. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP: linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiraiwa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007, and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds.

    In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity. Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative aging of organic aerosol particles, we illustrate how the

  6. An analytical solution to calculate bulk mole fractions for any number of components in aerosol droplets after considering partitioning to a surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Topping

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Calculating the equilibrium composition of atmospheric aerosol particles, using all variations of Köhler theory, has largely assumed that the total solute concentrations define both the water activity and surface tension. Recently however, bulk to surface phase partitioning has been postulated as a process which significantly alters the predicted point of activation. In this paper, an analytical solution to calculate the removal of material from a bulk to a surface layer in aerosol particles has been derived using a well established and validated surface tension framework. The applicability to an unlimited number of components is possible via reliance on data from each binary system. Whilst assumptions regarding behaviour at the surface layer have been made to facilitate derivation, it is proposed that the framework presented can capture the overall impact of bulk-surface partitioning. Predictions made by the model across a range of surface active properties should be tested against measurements. The computational efficiency of using the solution presented in this paper is roughly a factor of 20 less than a similar iterative approach, a comparison with highly coupled approaches not available beyond a 3 component system.

  7. Aerosol nucleation over oceans and the role of galactic cosmic rays

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    J. Kazil

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate formation of sulfate aerosol in the marine troposphere from neutral and charged nucleation of H2SO4 and H2O. A box model of neutral and charged aerosol processes is run on a grid covering the oceans. Input data are taken from a model of galactic cosmic rays in the atmosphere, and from global chemistry and transport models. We find a weak aerosol production over the tropical oceans in the lower and middle troposphere, and a stronger production at higher latitudes, most notably downwind of industrial regions. The highest aerosol production, however, occurs in the upper troposphere, in particular in the tropics. This finding supports the proposition by which non-sea salt marine boundary layer aerosol in tropical regions does not form in situ, but nucleates in the upper troposphere from convectively lifted and cloud processed boundary layer air rich in aerosol precursor gases, from where it descends in subsiding air masses compensating convection. Convection of boundary layer air also appears to drive the formation of condensation nuclei in the tropical upper troposphere which maintains the stratospheric aerosol layer in the absence of volcanic activity. Neutral nucleation contributes only marginally to aerosol production in our simulations. This highlights the importance of charged binary and of ternary nucleation involving ammonia for aerosol formation. In clean marine regions however, ammonia concentrations seem too low to support ternary nucleation, making binary nucleation from ions a likely pathway for sulfate aerosol formation. On the other hand, our analysis indicates that the variation of ionization by galactic cosmic rays over the decadal solar cycle does not entail a response in aerosol production and cloud cover via the second indirect aerosol effect that would explain observed variations in global cloud cover. We estimate that the variation in radiative forcing resulting from a response of

  8. Activation of the Solid Silica Layer of Aerosol-Based C/SiO₂ Particles for Preparation of Various Functional Multishelled Hollow Microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangcun; Luo, Fan; He, Gaohong

    2015-05-12

    Double-shelled C/SiO2 hollow microspheres with an outer nanosheet-like silica shell and an inner carbon shell were reported. C/SiO2 aerosol particles were synthesized first by a one-step rapid aerosol process. Then the solid silica layer of the aerosol particles was dissolved and regrown on the carbon surface to obtain novel C/SiO2 double-shelled hollow microspheres. The new microspheres prepared by the facile approach possess high surface area and pore volume (226.3 m(2) g(-1), 0.51 cm(3) g(-1)) compared with the original aerosol particles (64.3 m(2) g(-1), 0.176 cm(3) g(-1)), providing its enhanced enzyme loading capacity. The nanosheet-like silica shell of the hollow microspheres favors the fixation of Au NPs (C/SiO2/Au) and prevents them from growing and migrating at 500 °C. Novel C/C and C/Au/C (C/Pt/C) hollow microspheres were also prepared based on the hollow nanostructure. C/C microspheres (482.0 m(2) g(-1), 0.92 cm(3) g(-1)) were ideal electrode materials. In particular, the Au NPs embedded into the two carbon layers (C/Au/C, 431.2 m(2) g(-1), 0.774 cm(3) g(-1)) show a high catalytic activity and extremely chemical stability even at 850 °C. Moreover, C/SiO2/Au, C/Au/C microspheres can be easily recycled and reused by an external magnetic field because of the presence of Fe3O4 species in the inner carbon shell. The synthetic route reported here is expected to simplify the fabrication process of double-shelled or yolk-shell microspheres, which usually entails multiple steps and a previously synthesized hard template. Such a capability can facilitate the preparation of various functional hollow microspheres by interfacial design.

  9. Observations of the boundary layer, cloud, and aerosol variability in the southeast Pacific near-coastal marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zheng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft observations made off the coast of northern Chile in the Southeastern Pacific (20° S, 72° W; named Point Alpha from 16 October to 13 November 2008 during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud- Atmosphere-Land Study-Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx, combined with meteorological reanalysis, satellite measurements, and radiosonde data, are used to investigate the boundary layer (BL and aerosol-cloud-drizzle variations in this region. On days without predominately synoptic and meso-scale influences, the BL at Point Alpha was typical of a non-drizzling stratocumulus-topped BL. Entrainment rates calculated from the near cloud-top fluxes and turbulence in the BL at Point Alpha appeared to be weaker than those in the BL over the open ocean west of Point Alpha and the BL near the coast of the northeast Pacific. The cloud liquid water path (LWP varied between 15 g m−2 and 160 g m−2. The BL had a depth of 1140 ± 120 m, was generally well-mixed and capped by a sharp inversion without predominately synoptic and meso-scale influences. The wind direction generally switched from southerly within the BL to northerly above the inversion. On days when a synoptic system and related mesoscale costal circulations affected conditions at Point Alpha (29 October–4 November, a moist layer above the inversion moved over Point Alpha, and the total-water mixing ratio above the inversion was larger than that within the BL. The accumulation mode aerosol varied from 250 to 700 cm−3 within the BL, and CCN at 0.2 % supersaturation within the BL ranged between 150 and 550 cm−3. The main aerosol source at Point Alpha was horizontal advection within the BL from south. The average cloud droplet number concentration ranged between 80 and 400 cm−3. While the mean LWP retrieved from GOES was in good agreement with the in situ measurements, the GOES-derived cloud droplet effective radius tended to be larger than that from the

  10. Ice nucleating particles at a coastal marine boundary layer site: correlations with aerosol type and meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Chou, C.; Dickie, R.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Pöhlker, C.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Ladino, L. A.; Jones, K.; Leaitch, W. R.; Schiller, C. L.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Huffman, J. A.; Bertram, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    Information on what aerosol particle types are the major sources of ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the atmosphere is needed for climate predictions. To determine which aerosol particles are the major sources of immersion-mode INPs at a coastal site in Western Canada, we investigated correlations between INP number concentrations and both concentrations of different atmospheric particles and meteorological conditions. We show that INP number concentrations are strongly correlated with the number concentrations of fluorescent bioparticles between -15 and -25 °C, and that the size distribution of INPs is most consistent with the size distribution of fluorescent bioparticles. We conclude that biological particles were likely the major source of ice nuclei at freezing temperatures between -15 and -25 °C at this site for the time period studied. At -30 °C, INP number concentrations are also well correlated with number concentrations of the total aerosol particles ≥ 0.5 μm, suggesting that non-biological particles may have an important contribution to the population of INPs active at this temperature. As we found that black carbon particles were unlikely to be a major source of ice nuclei during this study, these non-biological INPs may include mineral dust. Furthermore, correlations involving chemical tracers of marine aerosols and marine biological activity, sodium and methanesulfonic acid, indicate that the majority of INPs measured at the coastal site likely originated from terrestrial rather than marine sources. Finally, six existing empirical parameterizations of ice nucleation were tested to determine if they accurately predict the measured INP number concentrations. We found that none of the parameterizations selected are capable of predicting INP number concentrations with high accuracy over the entire temperature range investigated. This finding illustrates that additional measurements are needed to improve parameterizations of INPs and their

  11. Balloon-borne observations of stratospheric aerosol in Antarctica from 1972 to 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Stratospheric levels of particles with r or = 0.15 microns were monitored with optical particle counters in approximately monthly balloon soundings at Laramie, Wyoming (41 deg N) since 1971. These measurements were used to characterize the background stratospheric aerosol layer and the disturbed layer following major volcanic eruptions. Levels of particles with r or = 0.01 microns have also been measured with balloon-borne counters since 1973. The latter are collectively called condensation nuclei (CN) as they are characteristic of aerosol in the early stages of growth. While they dominate the size distribution in the tropsophere, they are a trace species in the undisturbed stratosphere. From 1972 until 1980, annual balloon soundings from McMurdo Station (78 deg S) and/or Amundsen-Scott Station (90 deg S), in Antarctica, have also been conducted to crudely monitor Southern Hemisphere aerosol levels. These measurements were continued in 1983 and 1984. Profiles of r 0.15 microns aerosol concentrations as measured during January at the south pole from 1972 to 1975 and in 1980 are given. The former are typical of undisturbed conditions and indicate the small degree of variability under these conditions. The latter indicates the effect of minor volcanic activity, visible in the 10 to 15 km region.

  12. Particle sedimentation and diffusive convection in volcanic ash-clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carazzo, G.; Jellinek, A. M.

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the longevity of volcanic ash-clouds generated by powerful explosive eruptions is a long standing problem for assessing volcanic hazards and the nature and time scale of volcanic forcings on climate change. It is well known that the lateral spreading and longevity of these clouds is influenced by stratospheric winds, particle settling and turbulent diffusion. Observations of the recent 2010 Eyjafjallajökull and 2011 Grimsvötn umbrella clouds, as well as the structure of atmospheric aerosol clouds from the 1991 Mt Pinatubo event, suggest that an additional key process governing the cloud dynamics is the production of internal layering. Here, we use analog experiments on turbulent particle-laden umbrella clouds to show that this layering occurs where natural convection driven by particle sedimentation and the differential diffusion of primarily heat and fine particles give rise to a large scale instability. Where umbrella clouds are particularly enriched in fine ash, this "particle diffusive convection" strongly influences the cloud longevity. More generally, cloud residence time will depend on fluxes due to both individual settling and diffusive convection. We develop a new sedimentation model that includes both sedimentation processes, and which is found to capture real-time measurements of the rate of change of particle concentration in the 1982 El Chichon, 1991 Mt Pinatubo and 1992 Mt Spurr ash-clouds. A key result is that these combined sedimentation processes enhance the fallout of fine particles relative to expectations from individual settling suggesting that particle aggregation is not the only mechanism required to explain volcanic umbrella longevity.

  13. Hail formation triggers rapid ash aggregation in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eaton, Alexa R; Mastin, Larry G; Herzog, Michael; Schwaiger, Hans F; Schneider, David J; Wallace, Kristi L; Clarke, Amanda B

    2015-08-03

    During explosive eruptions, airborne particles collide and stick together, accelerating the fallout of volcanic ash and climate-forcing aerosols. This aggregation process remains a major source of uncertainty both in ash dispersal forecasting and interpretation of eruptions from the geological record. Here we illuminate the mechanisms and timescales of particle aggregation from a well-characterized 'wet' eruption. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, incorporated water from the surface (in this case, a glacier), which is a common occurrence during explosive volcanism worldwide. Observations from C-band weather radar, fall deposits and numerical modelling demonstrate that hail-forming processes in the eruption plume triggered aggregation of ∼95% of the fine ash and stripped much of the erupted mass out of the atmosphere within 30 min. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanism of hail-like ash aggregation that contributes to the anomalously rapid fallout of fine ash and occurrence of concentrically layered aggregates in volcanic deposits.

  14. BrCl production in NaBr/NaCl/HNO3/O3 solutions representative of sea-salt aerosols in the marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disselkamp, R. S.; Chapman, E. G.; Barchet, W. R.; Colson, S. D.; Howd, C. D.

    Atomic bromine and chlorine liberated from sea-salt aerosol is thought to play an important role in chemistry of the marine boundary layer. Despite numerous modeling studies, no prior experimental investigations of the oxidation of halide species contained in simulated, or actual, sea-salt solutions have been performed. We present laboratory data that examines chemistry in NaBr/NaCl/HNO3/O3 solutions at 290 K. Ozonation experiments were performed by flowing ozone in air through a nitric acid/salt solution and monitoring pH with time using an ion-sensitive electrode. The rate of oxidation was observed to be first order in ozone concentration and to have a non-first order bromide concentration dependence. Ion Chromatography was used to measure both bromide disappearance as well as oxidation products formed during the course of the reactions studied. Our measurements of the oxidation rate versus ion concentration indicate that the high ionic strength present in sea-salt aerosol will possess unique kinetics different from dilute solution behavior. In addition, our results are consistent with the reaction sequence O3 + H+ + Br- → O2 + HOBr and HOBr + Cl- + H+ → BrCl + H2O. These observations support the HOBr mediated Cl- oxidation process proposed previously (Vogt et al., 1996).

  15. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  16. Ultrafine sea spray aerosol over the southeastern Pacific: open-ocean contributions to marine boundary layer CCN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Blot

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of natural aerosol emissions over the ocean are needed to estimate the anthropogenic impact on the environment. In this study, we measured sea spray aerosol (SSA concentrations with diameters larger than 0.040 μm produced by open-ocean breaking waves over the SEP (southeastern Pacific. Robust statistics were established through repeated airborne flights over 1000 km along 20° S from the coastline of Chile to 85° W during VOCALS-REx (VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land-Study Regional Experiment. Non-volatile SSA number concentrations were inferred using a thermally resolved technique constrained for clean conditions with an Ångström exponent below 0.5, black carbon mass concentration at values lower than 15 ng m−3 and organic aerosol concentration less than 0.02 μg m−3. We found that number concentrations of SSAs active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN for a supersaturation of 0.25% varied between 17 and 36 cm−3, but these did not increase with the increasing mean wind speed typically observed further offshore along 20° S. Concurrent increases in mean offshore precipitation rate in excess of about 1 mm d−1 indicate that scavenging of SSAs by precipitation exceeds increases in production at wind speeds above about 8 m s−1. This demonstrates the critical role of precipitation as a major sink of SSA over the remote ocean. Finally, we found that under clean conditions and for estimated stratus supersaturations between 0.20 and 0.43%, SSA represented about 20% of the total potential CCN along 20° S.

  17. Ultrafine sea spray aerosol over the south eastern Pacific: open-ocean contributions to marine boundary layer CCN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Blot

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of natural aerosol emissions over the ocean are needed to estimate the anthropogenic impact on the environment. In this study, we measured Sea Spray Aerosol (SSA concentrations with diameters larger than 0.040 μm produced by open-ocean breaking waves over the SEP (South Eastern Pacific. Robust statistics were established through repeated airborne flights over 1000 km along 20° S from the coastline of Chile to 85° W during VOCALS-Rex (VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land-Study Regional Experiment. Non-volatile SSA number concentrations were inferred using a thermally resolved technique constrained for clean conditions with Ångström exponent below 0.5, Black Carbon (BC mass concentration at values lower than 15 ng m−3 and Organic aerosols (Org concentration less than 0.02 μg m−3. We found that number concentrations of SSA active as CCN for a supersaturation of 0.25% varied between 17 cm−3 and 36 cm−3 but these did not increase with the increasing mean wind speed typically observed further offshore along 20° S. Concurrent increases in mean offshore precipitation rate in excess of about 1 mm d−1 indicate scavenging of SSA by precipitation exceeds increases in production at wind speeds above about 8 m s−1. This demonstrates the critical role of precipitation as a major sink of SSA over the remote ocean. Finally, we found that under clean conditions and for estimated stratus supersaturations between 0.20% and 0.43%, SSA represented about 20% of the total ambient CCN along 20° S.

  18. An Empirical Constraint on the Contribution of Sea Spray Aerosol to the Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Condensation Nuclei Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, P.; Bates, T. S.

    2016-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol (SSA) impacts the earth's radiation balance indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and altering cloud microphysical and macrophysical properties. The indirect effects of SSA on MBL cloud properties are controlled by the SSA number concentration, which is comprised of particles less than 200 to 300 nm in diameter. Since aerosol lifetimes and atmospheric transport times often are similar, particles emitted from continental sources can be transported great distances across ocean basins, either in the MBL or in the free troposphere. Hence, the contribution of SSA to the MBL CCN population and associated impacts on MBL cloud properties is expected to vary with the occurrence of transport events. An analysis of number size distributions measured during research cruises in the Pacific Ocean, the Southern Ocean, the Arctic Ocean, and the North Atlantic has been done to constrain and quantify the number fraction of SSA in the MBL. These cruises were chosen for the analysis because they were least impacted by continental emissions due to either their remote marine location or prevailing atmospheric conditions. As a result, this analysis puts an upper bound on the number fraction of SSA in the MBL. After the analysis of Modini et al. (2015), multiple lognormal modes were fit to measured ambient marine size distributions to identify the SSA mode and quantify its contribution to the total number concentration. The SSA mode was fit with the constraint of having a modal diameter of 200 nm +/- 30% (dry) and a geometric standard deviation between 2.5 and 3, which is comparable in shape to SSA generated from wave tanks (Prather et al., 2013) and the canonical distribution defined by Lewis and Schwartz (2004). Measurements of size-segregated aerosol chemical composition were used to verify that the fitted SSA mode was composed of sea salt. The magnitude and variability in the number fraction of SSA in the MBL derived from this analysis will be

  19. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP: linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiraiwa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007, and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system and the computational constraints, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds.

    In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity (Winkler et al., 2006. Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative

  20. The role of boundary layer aerosol particles for the development of deep convective clouds: A high-resolution 3D model with detailed (bin) microphysics applied to CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Delphine; Wobrock, Wolfram; Flossmann, Andrea I.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reproduces aircraft microphysical measurements using a three-dimensional model with bin resolved microphysics and is then used to analyze in particular the role of boundary layer aerosol particles in the anvil and the ice phase. The simulated case is a convective cloud which develops a large anvil of around 10 km height, which was sampled during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers — Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE). The model couples the 3D dynamics of a cloud scale model with a detailed mixed phase microphysical code. The microphysical package considers the evolution of the wet aerosol particles, drop and ice crystal spectra on size grids with 39 bins. With this model hereafter called DESCAM 3D, we are able to simulate the cloud with features close to those observed and to provide explanations of the observed phenomena concerning cloud microphysics as well as cloud dynamics. The same CRYSTAL-FACE cloud has already been simulated by other groups using a similar model. They investigated the role of mid-tropospheric aerosol particles versus boundary layer aerosol on the microphysical properties of the anvil. Similar simulations with our DESCAM 3D lead to quite different results. Reducing the number of mid-tropospheric aerosol particles causes only minor changes in the cloud anvil. However, changing the aerosol particle spectrum in the boundary layer from clean to polluted conditions modifies strongly the dynamical evolution of the convective clouds and thus impacts significantly on the microphysical properties of the anvil. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  1. Water soluble inorganic trace gases and related aerosol compounds in the tropical boundary layer. An analysis based on real time measurements at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trebs, I.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the behavior of water-soluble inorganic trace gases and related aerosol species in the tropical boundary layer. Mixing ratios of ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO;,) and the corresponding water-soluble a

  2. Optical, microphysical, mass and geometrical properties of aged volcanic particles observed over Athens, Greece, during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010 through synergy of Raman lidar and sunphotometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kokkalis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of the optical (extinction and backscatter coefficients, lidar ratio and Ångström exponent, microphysical (mean effective radius, mean refractive index, mean number concentration and geometrical properties, as well as of the mass concentration of volcanic particles from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption were retrieved at selected heights over Athens, Greece using a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system and inversion models, during 21–24 April 2010. Additionally, Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET particulate columnar measurements indicated the presence of volcanic particles over our area. Simulations of the volcanic partilcles dispersion, done by the FLEXPART model, confirmed the presence of these particles over Athens. Our lidar data showed volcanic particles layers, in the form of filaments after 7-day transport from the source (approximately 4000 km away from our site between from ground levels up to nearly 10 km. Over Athens the volcanic particles layers were found to be mixed with locally produced aerosols, inside the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL. Mean hourly-averaged lidar signals indicated that the layer thickness of volcanic particles, ranged between 1.5 and 2.2 km. The corresponding aerosol optical depth (AOD found to vary from 0.014 to 0.184 at 355 nm and from 0.017 up to 0.174 at 532 nm. Furthermore, the corresponding lidar ratios (LR ranged between 59.7–79.6 sr (at 355 nm and 43.9–88.3 sr (at 532 nm. Additionally, we calculated that the mean effective radius of the volcanic particles was 0.13–0.38 μm, while their refractive index ranged from 1.39+0.009i to 1.48+0.006i. Finally, our data also allowed us to quantitatively compare, for the first time, the volcanic ash concentrations simulated by FLEXPART with those calculated by the inversion code LIRIC, using data sets derived from coincident lidar-AERONET measurements. In general, good agreement was found between simulations and observations

  3. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  4. Remote sensing measurements of the volcanic ash plume over Poland in April 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowicz, K. M.; Zielinski, T.; Pietruczuk, A.; Posyniak, M.; Zawadzka, O.; Makuch, P.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Jagodnicka, A. K.; Petelski, T.; Kumala, W.; Sobolewski, P.; Stacewicz, T.

    2012-03-01

    This work provides information on selected optical parameters related to volcanic ash produced during the eruption of the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland in 2010. The observations were made between 16 and 18 April 2010 at four stations representative for northern (Sopot), central (Warsaw, Belsk) and south-eastern (Strzyzow) regions of Poland. The largest ash plume (in terms of aerosol optical thickness) over Poland was observed at night of 16/17 April 2010 in the layer between 4 and 5.5 km a.s.l. The highest values of the aerosol extinction coefficient reached 0.06-0.08 km -1 at 532 nm (based on lidar observations in Warsaw) and 0.02-0.04 km -1 at 1064 nm (based on ceilometer observations in Warsaw). The corresponding optical thickness due to volcanic ash reached values of about 0.05 at 532 nm and about 0.03 at 1064 nm. These values are similar to those reported for the Belsk station based on lidar observations. The ash mass concentration estimated based on the maximum aerosol extinction coefficient reached 0.22 ± 0.11 mg m -3. This value is significantly lower than the limit (2 mg m -3) for the aircraft operation.

  5. Consistent simulation of bromine chemistry from the marine boundary layer to the stratosphere, Part I: model description, sea salt aerosols and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kerkweg

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This is the first article of a series presenting a detailed analysis of bromine chemistry simulated with the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy. Release from sea salt is an important bromine source, hence the model explicitly calculates aerosol chemistry and phase partitioning for coarse mode aerosol particles. Many processes including chemical reaction rates are influenced by the particle size distribution, and aerosol associated water strongly affects the aerosol pH. Knowledge of the aerosol pH is important as it determines the aerosol chemistry, e.g., the efficiency of sulphur oxidation and bromine release. Here, we focus on the simulated sea salt aerosol size distribution and the coarse mode aerosol pH.

    A comparison with available field data shows that the simulated aerosol distributions agree reasonably well within the range of measurements. In spite of the small number of aerosol pH measurements and the uncertainty in its experimental determination, the simulated aerosol pH compares well with the observations. The aerosol pH ranges from alkaline aerosol in areas of strong production down to pH values of 1 over regions of medium sea salt production and high levels of gas phase acids, mostly polluted regions over the oceans in the northern hemisphere.

  6. Consistent simulation of bromine chemistry from the marine boundary layer to the stratosphere – Part 1: Model description, sea salt aerosols and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kerkweg

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This is the first article of a series presenting a detailed analysis of bromine chemistry simulated with the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy. Release from sea salt is an important bromine source, hence the model explicitly calculates aerosol chemistry and phase partitioning for coarse mode aerosol particles. Many processes including chemical reaction rates are influenced by the particle size distribution, and aerosol associated water strongly affects the aerosol pH. Knowledge of the aerosol pH is important as it determines the aerosol chemistry, e.g., the efficiency of sulphur oxidation and bromine release. Here, we focus on the simulated sea salt aerosol size distribution and the coarse mode aerosol pH.

    A comparison with available field data shows that the simulated aerosol distributions agree reasonably well within the range of measurements. In spite of the small number of aerosol pH measurements and the uncertainty in its experimental determination, the simulated aerosol pH compares well with the observations. The aerosol pH ranges from alkaline aerosol in areas of strong production down to pH-values of 1 over regions of medium sea salt production and high levels of gas phase acids, mostly polluted regions over the oceans in the Northern Hemisphere.

  7. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  8. Identifying the AD 1257 Salamas volcanic event from micron-size tephra composition in two East Antarctic ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Jean Robert; Narcisi, Biancamaria; Batanova, Valentina G.; Joël, Savarino; Komorowski, Jean Christophe; Michel, Agnes; Metrich, Nicole; Besson, Pascale; Vidal, Celine; Sobolev, Alexander V.

    2016-04-01

    A wealth of valuable data about the history of explosive volcanic history can be extracted from polar ice successions. Both the volatile by-products and the solid silicate (tephra) components of volcanic plumes can be incorporated into snow layers, providing tools for chronostratigraphic correlations and for interpretation of climate-volcanism interactions. Volcanic events from low-latitude regions are of particular interest as the related sulphate aerosol travelling through the stratosphere can reach the polar sheets forming inter-hemispheric (Greenland and Antarctica) signals preserved in the ice. Within the glaciological record of globally significant volcanic markers, the AD1259 signal represents one of most prominent events over the last thousands years. Its source has been long debated. On the basis of recent field investigations (Lavigne et al., 2013; Vidal et al., 2015), it has been proposed that Mount Samalas on Lombok Island (Indonesia) represents the source responsible for the polar event. With the goal of bringing distal tephrochronological evidence to source identification, we have attempted to identify volcanic ash associated to the AD 1259 sulphate pulse. To this purpose we used firn and ice-core samples from two East Antarctic Plateau sites: Concordia-Dome C (75°06' S, 123°20' E, 3233 m) and Talos Dome (72°49'S, 159°11'E, 2315 m). Our high-resolution studies included sample processing in a Class 100 clean room using established ultra-clean procedures for insoluble microparticle analyses, Coulter counter grain size measurements, scanning electron microscope observations and the geochemical (major elements) composition from the recently set ISTERRE Jeol JXA 8230 Superprobe and calibrated for small particles analysis. Despite the difficulty of studying such minute fragments, within both cores we located and characterised multiple tiny (micron-size) glass shards concomitant with the volcanic peak. We present preliminary results alongside comparison

  9. A Multi-Sensor Approach for Volcanic Ash Cloud Retrieval and Eruption Characterization: The 23 November 2013 Etna Lava Fountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Corradini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic activity is observed worldwide with a variety of ground and space-based remote sensing instruments, each with advantages and drawbacks. No single system can give a comprehensive description of eruptive activity, and so, a multi-sensor approach is required. This work integrates infrared and microwave volcanic ash retrievals obtained from the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG-Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI, the polar-orbiting Aqua-MODIS and ground-based weather radar. The expected outcomes are improvements in satellite volcanic ash cloud retrieval (altitude, mass, aerosol optical depth and effective radius, the generation of new satellite products (ash concentration and particle number density in the thermal infrared and better characterization of volcanic eruptions (plume altitude, total ash mass erupted and particle number density from thermal infrared to microwave. This approach is the core of the multi-platform volcanic ash cloud estimation procedure being developed within the European FP7-APhoRISM project. The Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy volcano lava fountaining event of 23 November 2013 was considered as a test case. The results of the integration show the presence of two volcanic cloud layers at different altitudes. The improvement of the volcanic ash cloud altitude leads to a mean difference between the SEVIRI ash mass estimations, before and after the integration, of about the 30%. Moreover, the percentage of the airborne “fine” ash retrieved from the satellite is estimated to be about 1%–2% of the total ash emitted during the eruption. Finally, all of the estimated parameters (volcanic ash cloud altitude, thickness and total mass were also validated with ground-based visible camera measurements, HYSPLIT forward trajectories, Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI satellite data and tephra deposits.

  10. Temporal variations of flux and altitude of sulfur dioxide emissions during volcanic eruptions: implications for long-range dispersal of volcanic clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boichu

    2015-07-01

    exploiting the high spectral resolution of IASI. The validity of the modelled SO2 altitude is further confirmed by the detection of a layer of particles at the same altitude by the spaceborne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP. Analysis of CALIOP colour and depolarization ratios suggests that these particles consist of sulfate aerosols formed from precursory volcanic SO2. The reconstruction of emission altitude, through inversion procedures which assimilate volcanic SO2 column amounts, requires specific meteorological conditions, especially sufficient wind shear so that gas parcels emitted at different altitudes follow distinct trajectories. We consequently explore the possibility and limits of assimilating in inverse schemes infrared (IR imagery of the volcanic SO2 cloud altitude which will render the inversion procedure independent of the wind shear prerequisite.

  11. Searching for Rich Uranium Layers of Volcanic Rocks by Measuring Potential Difference%测定电位差圈定火山岩富铀层位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁富蕴; 刘峰

    2000-01-01

    (2.岩石的电位差(△Eh)控制着变价元素的地球化学行为,用差减电位法对330铀矿区393个火山岩△Eh值测量结果表明:火山岩的△Eh值可以准确地圈出铀的富集层位,铀矿化只产在△Eh值高的岩石中。%The potential difference(P.D) of rocks controls geochemical behavior of the element whose valence can change.393volcanic rocks are survied in the 330 uranium ore district by the potential difference method. The result shows: volcanic rocks P.D. accuratly the concetration place of uranium accumtly and uranium mineralize only in the rocks where P.D. value is high.

  12. Impact of geoengineered aerosols on the troposphere and stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilmes, S.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Gettelman, A.; Rasch, Philip J.

    2009-06-27

    A coupled chemistry climate model, the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model was used to perform a transient climate simulation to quantify the impact of geoengineered aerosols on atmospheric processes. In contrast to previous model studies, the impact on stratospheric chemistry, including heterogeneous chemistry in the polar regions, is considered in this simulation. In the geoengineering simulation, a constant stratospheric distribution of volcanic-sized, liquid sulfate aerosols is imposed in the period 2020–2050, corresponding to an injection of 2 Tg S/a. The aerosol cools the troposphere compared to a baseline simulation. Assuming an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change A1B emission scenario, global warming is delayed by about 40 years in the troposphere with respect to the baseline scenario. Large local changes of precipitation and temperatures may occur as a result of geoengineering. Comparison with simulations carried out with the Community Atmosphere Model indicates the importance of stratospheric processes for estimating the impact of stratospheric aerosols on the Earth’s climate. Changes in stratospheric dynamics and chemistry, especially faster heterogeneous reactions, reduce the recovery of the ozone layer in middle and high latitudes for the Southern Hemisphere. In the geoengineering case, the recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole is delayed by about 30 years on the basis of this model simulation. For the Northern Hemisphere, a onefold to twofold increase of the chemical ozone depletion occurs owing to a simulated stronger polar vortex and colder temperatures compared to the baseline simulation, in agreement with observational estimates.

  13. Coupling aerosol surface and bulk chemistry with a kinetic double layer model (K2-SUB: oxidation of oleic acid by ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pfrang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a kinetic double layer model coupling aerosol surface and bulk chemistry (K2-SUB based on the PRA framework of gas-particle interactions (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007. K2-SUB is applied to a popular model system of atmospheric heterogeneous chemistry: the interaction of ozone with oleic acid. We show that our modelling approach allows de-convoluting surface and bulk processes, which has been a controversial topic and remains an important challenge for the understanding and description of atmospheric aerosol transformation. In particular, we demonstrate how a detailed treatment of adsorption and reaction at the surface can be coupled to a description of bulk reaction and transport that is consistent with traditional resistor model formulations.

    From literature data we have derived a consistent set of kinetic parameters that characterise mass transport and chemical reaction of ozone at the surface and in the bulk of oleic acid droplets. Due to the wide range of rate coefficients reported from different experimental studies, the exact proportions between surface and bulk reaction rates remain uncertain. Nevertheless, the model results suggest an important role of chemical reaction in the bulk and an approximate upper limit of ~10−11 cm2 s−1 for the surface reaction rate coefficient. Sensitivity studies show that the surface accommodation coefficient of the gas-phase reactant has a strong non-linear influence on both surface and bulk chemical reactions. We suggest that K2-SUB may be used to design, interpret and analyse future experiments for better discrimination between surface and bulk processes in the oleic acid-ozone system as well as in other heterogeneous reaction systems of atmospheric relevance.

  14. Volcanic Catastrophes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The big news from 20th century geophysics may not be plate tectonics but rather the surprise return of catastrophism, following its apparent 19th century defeat to uniformitarianism. Divine miracles and plagues had yielded to the logic of integrating observations of everyday change over time. Yet the brilliant interpretation of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary iridium anomaly introduced an empirically based catastrophism. Undoubtedly, decades of contemplating our own nuclear self-destruction played a role in this. Concepts of nuclear winter, volcanic winter, and meteor impact winter are closely allied. And once the veil of threat of all-out nuclear exchange began to lift, we could begin to imagine slower routes to destruction as "global change". As a way to end our world, fire is a good one. Three-dimensional magma chambers do not have as severe a magnitude limitation as essentially two-dimensional faults. Thus, while we have experienced earthquakes that are as big as they get, we have not experienced volcanic eruptions nearly as great as those preserved in the geologic record. The range extends to events almost three orders of magnitude greater than any eruptions of the 20th century. Such a calamity now would at the very least bring society to a temporary halt globally, and cause death and destruction on a continental scale. At maximum, there is the possibility of hindering photosynthesis and threatening life more generally. It has even been speculated that the relative genetic homogeneity of humankind derives from an evolutionary "bottleneck" from near-extinction in a volcanic cataclysm. This is somewhat more palatable to contemplate than a return to a form of Original Sin, in which we arrived at homogeneity by a sort of "ethnic cleansing". Lacking a written record of truly great eruptions, our sense of human impact must necessarily be aided by archeological and anthropological investigations. For example, there is much to be learned about the influence of

  15. Season - dependent and source-influenced aerosol in Northern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovicheva, Olga; Makshtas, Alexander; Bogorodsky, Peter; Eleftheriadis, Kostantinos; Diapouli, Evangelia; Shonia, Natalia; Uttal, Taneil

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol may serve as a tracer of arctic pollution, allowing a link to climate response if its major characteristics relating to natural and anthropogeneous sources are defined. It has been shown that BC and sulfates are the most important aerosol constituents measured in the Arctic boundary layer; these species demonstrate similar seasonal variations with a peak during winter to early spring and a minimum in summer. Long - time gap in consistent aerosol observations in the Russian Arctic strongly limits the assessment of air pollution and climate impacts. On-line monitoring, sampling, and analyses of atmospheric aerosols were carried out at the Tiksi Hydrometeorological Observatory, Northern Siberia, during one year from September 2014 to 2015. Physico-chemical characterization combining aethalometry, thermo-optical analysis, and analytical chemistry was used in order to identify the seasonal variability of aerosols and to link their composition to possible sources, as well as to characterize the differences in aerosol chemical composition between natural background conditions and BC-pollution episodes. The present study reports the first results from the Tiksi Observatory on season-dependent and source-influenced characteristics of aerosol species, such as carbon fractions (OC, EC), inorganic and organic functionalities of chemical compounds, sulfates, nitrates and other ion components, and elements. In addition, data obtained by individual particles analysis provide insight into micromarkers of combustion sources. Aerosol at the Tiksi Observatory is found to be originated from natural marine, biogenic, and continental sources as well as influenced by local residential activity and regional pollution. Characterization of aerosols during OC and BC-pollution episodes, combined with analysis of the wind direction, atmosphere stability, and air mass trajectories, allows for the identification of the sources which are responsible for the emission of hazardous compounds

  16. What We Can Learn from the Next Large Volcanic Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2015-12-01

    The April 1982 eruption of El Chichón in México stimulated interest in the climate response to volcanic eruptions and produced very useful observations and modeling studies. The last large volcanic eruption, the June 15, 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines, was the best observed eruption ever, and serves as a canonical example for studies of aerosol production and transport, climate response, and deposition on ice sheets. However, many aspects of both eruptions were poorly observed, climate model simulations of the response are imperfect, and new scientific issues, such as stratospheric sulfate geoengineering, raise new scientific questions that could be answered by better observations of the next large volcanic eruption. In this talk I will summarize what we know and do not know about large volcanic eruptions, and discuss new questions that can be addressed by being prepared for the next large eruption. These include: How and how fast will SO2 convert to sulfate aerosols? How will the aerosols grow? What will be the size distribution of the resulting sulfate aerosol particles? How will the aerosols be transported throughout the stratosphere? How much fine ash gets to the stratosphere, how long does it stay there, and what are its radiative and chemical impacts? How will temperatures change in the stratosphere as a result of the aerosol interactions with shortwave (particularly near IR) and longwave radiation? Are there large stratospheric water vapor changes associated with stratospheric aerosols? Is there an initial injection of water from the eruption? Is there ozone depletion from heterogeneous reactions on the stratospheric aerosols? As the aerosols leave the stratosphere, and as the aerosols affect the upper troposphere temperature and circulation, are there interactions with cirrus and other clouds?

  17. Halogen Chemistry in Volcanic Plumes (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tjarda

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes release vast amounts of gases and particles in the atmosphere. Volcanic halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, HI) are co-emitted alongside SO2, and observations show rapid formation of BrO and OClO in the plume as it disperses into the troposphere. The development of 1D and Box models (e.g. PlumeChem) that simulate volcanic plume halogen chemistry aims to characterise how volcanic reactive halogens form and quantify their atmospheric impacts. Following recent advances, these models can broadly reproduce the observed downwind BrO/SO2 ratios using "bromine-explosion" chemistry schemes, provided they use a "high-temperature initialisation" to inject radicals (OH, Cl, Br and possibly NOx) which "kick-start" the low-temperature chemistry cycles that convert HBr into reactive bromine (initially as Br2). The modelled rise in BrO/SO2 and subsequent plateau/decline as the plume disperses downwind reflects cycling between reactive bromine, particularly Br-BrO, and BrO-HOBr-BrONO2. BrCl is produced when aerosol becomes HBr-depleted. Recent model simulations suggest this mechanism for reactive chlorine formation can broadly account for OClO/SO2 reported at Mt Etna. Predicted impacts of volcanic reactive halogen chemistry include the formation of HNO3 from NOx and depletion of ozone. This concurs with HNO3 widely reported in volcanic plumes (although the source of NOx remains under question), as well as observations of ozone depletion reported in plumes from several volcanoes (Mt Redoubt, Mt Etna, Eyjafjallajokull). The plume chemistry can transform mercury into more easily deposited and potentially toxic forms, for which observations are limited. Recent incorporation of volcanic halogen chemistry in a 3D regional model of degassing from Ambrym (Vanuatu) also predicts how halogen chemistry causes depletion of OH to lengthen the SO2 lifetime, and highlights the potential for halogen transport from the troposphere to the stratosphere. However, the model parameter-space is vast and

  18. Climate Throughout Geologic Time Was Cooled by Sequences of Explosive Volcanic Eruptions Forming Aerosols That Reflect and Scatter Ultraviolet Solar Radiation and Warmed by Relatively Continuous Extrusion of Basaltic Lava that Depletes Ozone, Allowing More Solar Ultraviolet Radiation to Reach Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Active volcanoes of all sizes and eruptive styles, emit chlorine and bromine gases observed to deplete ozone. Effusive, basaltic volcanic eruptions, typical in Hawaii and Iceland, extrude large lava flows, depleting ozone and causing global warming. Major explosive volcanoes also deplete ozone with the same emissions, causing winter warming, but in addition eject megatons of water and sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere where they form sulfuric-acid aerosols whose particles grow large enough to reflect and scatter ultraviolet sunlight, causing net global cooling for a few years. The relative amounts of explosive and effusive volcanism are determined by the configuration of tectonic plates moving around Earth's surface. Detailed studies of climate change throughout geologic history, and since 1965, are not well explained by greenhouse-gas theory, but are explained quite clearly at OzoneDepletionTheory.info. Ozone concentrations vary substantially by the minute and show close relationships to weather system highs and lows (as pointed out by Dobson in the 1920s), to the height of the tropopause, and to the strength and location of polar vortices and jet streams. Integrating the effects of volcanism on ozone concentrations and the effects of ozone concentrations on synoptic weather patterns should improve weather forecasting. For example, the volcano Bárðarbunga, in central Iceland, extruded 85 km2 of basaltic lava between August 29, 2014, and February 28, 2015, having a profound effect on weather. Most surprising, more than a week before the March 4 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, substantial amounts of ozone were released in the vicinity of the volcano precisely when surface deformation showed that magma first began moving up from sills below 4 km depth. Ozone similarly appears to have been emitted 3.5 months before the Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Readily available daily maps of ozone concentrations may allow early warning of an imminent volcanic

  19. Inverse transport modeling of volcanic sulfur dioxide emissions using large-scale ensemble simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Y.; Hoffmann, L.; Griessbach, S.; Rößler, T.; Stein, O.

    2015-10-01

    An inverse transport modeling approach based on the concepts of sequential importance resampling and parallel computing is presented to reconstruct altitude-resolved time series of volcanic emissions, which often can not be obtained directly with current measurement techniques. A new inverse modeling and simulation system, which implements the inversion approach with the Lagrangian transport model Massive-Parallel Trajectory Calculations (MPTRAC) is developed to provide reliable transport simulations of volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2). In the inverse modeling system MPTRAC is used to perform two types of simulations, i. e., large-scale ensemble simulations for the reconstruction of volcanic emissions and final transport simulations. The transport simulations are based on wind fields of the ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. The reconstruction of altitude-dependent SO2 emission time series is also based on Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) satellite observations. A case study for the eruption of the Nabro volcano, Eritrea, in June 2011, with complex emission patterns, is considered for method validation. Meteosat Visible and InfraRed Imager (MVIRI) near-real-time imagery data are used to validate the temporal development of the reconstructed emissions. Furthermore, the altitude distributions of the emission time series are compared with top and bottom altitude measurements of aerosol layers obtained by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) satellite instruments. The final transport simulations provide detailed spatial and temporal information on the SO2 distributions of the Nabro eruption. The SO2 column densities from the simulations are in good qualitative agreement with the AIRS observations. Our new inverse modeling and simulation system is expected to become a useful tool to also study other volcanic

  20. Inverse transport modeling of volcanic sulfur dioxide emissions using large-scale ensemble simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Heng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An inverse transport modeling approach based on the concepts of sequential importance resampling and parallel computing is presented to reconstruct altitude-resolved time series of volcanic emissions, which often can not be obtained directly with current measurement techniques. A new inverse modeling and simulation system, which implements the inversion approach with the Lagrangian transport model Massive-Parallel Trajectory Calculations (MPTRAC is developed to provide reliable transport simulations of volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2. In the inverse modeling system MPTRAC is used to perform two types of simulations, i. e., large-scale ensemble simulations for the reconstruction of volcanic emissions and final transport simulations. The transport simulations are based on wind fields of the ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. The reconstruction of altitude-dependent SO2 emission time series is also based on Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS satellite observations. A case study for the eruption of the Nabro volcano, Eritrea, in June 2011, with complex emission patterns, is considered for method validation. Meteosat Visible and InfraRed Imager (MVIRI near-real-time imagery data are used to validate the temporal development of the reconstructed emissions. Furthermore, the altitude distributions of the emission time series are compared with top and bottom altitude measurements of aerosol layers obtained by the Cloud–Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS satellite instruments. The final transport simulations provide detailed spatial and temporal information on the SO2 distributions of the Nabro eruption. The SO2 column densities from the simulations are in good qualitative agreement with the AIRS observations. Our new inverse modeling and simulation system is expected to become a useful tool to also study

  1. Atomic layer epitaxy of Ruddlesden-Popper SrO(SrTiO{sub 3}){sub n} films by means of metalorganic aerosol deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungbauer, M.; Hühn, S.; Moshnyaga, V. [Erstes Physikalisches Institut, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Egoavil, R.; Tan, H.; Verbeeck, J.; Van Tendeloo, G. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2014-12-22

    We report an atomic layer epitaxial growth of Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) thin films of SrO(SrTiO{sub 3}){sub n} (n = ∞, 2, 3, 4) by means of metalorganic aerosol deposition (MAD). The films are grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrates by means of a sequential deposition of Sr-O/Ti-O{sub 2} atomic monolayers, monitored in-situ by optical ellipsometry. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveal the RP structure with n = 2–4 in accordance with the growth recipe. RP defects, observed by TEM in a good correlation with the in-situ ellipsometry, mainly result from the excess of SrO. Being maximal at the film/substrate interface, the SrO excess rapidly decreases and saturates after 5–6 repetitions of the SrO(SrTiO{sub 3}){sub 4} block at the level of 2.4%. This identifies the SrTiO{sub 3} substrate surface as a source of RP defects under oxidizing conditions within MAD. Advantages and limitations of MAD as a solution-based and vacuum-free chemical deposition route were discussed in comparison with molecular beam epitaxy.

  2. The effect of volcanic eruptions on the North Atlantic ocean temperatures over the past millennium (800-2000 AD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrina, M.; Wagner, S.; Zorita, E.

    2014-12-01

    Several studies suggest that the North Atlantic Ocean is of particular importance for the climate variability, especially that of western Europe (Schlesinger M. E. & Ramankutty 1994, Knight J., Folland C. K. & Scaife A. 2006). The changes in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures are related to the thermohaline's circulation strength (Kushnir Y., 1994) and affected by volcanic eruptions (Church J.A, White N.J. & Arblaster J.M. 2005), due to their release of aerosols into the stratosphere. In this study we examine the signal of tropical volcanic eruptions in the temperatures of the North Atlantic Ocean in various depths (6, 100, 560 and 3070 m from the sea surface), for the past millennium. The temperatures are derived from the comprehensive COSMOS Earth System Model (ECHAM5-OM at T30 spatial resolution) and are presented for a control run and for three fully forced ensemble simulations including changes in orbital, solar, volcanic, land use and greenhouse gas changes. The model shows a response in the years following volcanic eruptions, being mostly pronounced after the large eruptions that took place between 1200 and 1300 AD, as well as at the beginning of the 19thcentury. The strongest impact on the ocean temperatures, due to the increased atmospheric optical depth, is evident in the uppermost level, especially for two out of the three ensemble simulations. In these simulations a pronounced decrease in the ocean temperature between 1400 and 1500 AD is observed due to the increase of the aerosol effective radius. In the mixed ocean layers the response to volcanic aerosols is more obvious in the third ensemble simulation, whereas in the deep ocean the temperatures do not seem to be strongly affected by volcanic eruptions. Schlesinger, M. E. & Ramankutty, N. An oscillation in the global climate system of period 65-70 years. Nature 367, 723-726 (1994). Kushnir, Y. Interdecadal variations in North Atlantic sea surface temperature and associated atmospheric conditions

  3. Volcanic ash plume identification using polarization lidar: Augustine eruption, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhu, Jiang; Webley, Peter W.; Dean, K.; Cobb, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    During mid January to early February 2006, a series of explosive eruptions occurred at the Augustine volcanic island off the southern coast of Alaska. By early February a plume of volcanic ash was transported northward into the interior of Alaska. Satellite imagery and Puff volcanic ash transport model predictions confirm that the aerosol plume passed over a polarization lidar (0.694 mm wavelength) site at the Arctic Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. For the first time, lidar linear depolarization ratios of 0.10 – 0.15 were measured in a fresh tropospheric volcanic plume, demonstrating that the nonspherical glass and mineral particles typical of volcanic eruptions generate strong laser depolarization. Thus, polarization lidars can identify the volcanic ash plumes that pose a threat to jet air traffic from the ground, aircraft, or potentially from Earth orbit.

  4. MSA in Beijing aerosol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Hui; WANG Ying; ZHUANG Guoshun

    2004-01-01

    Methane sulphonate (MSA) and sulfate (SO42-), the main oxidation products of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), are the target of atmospheric chemistry study, as sulfate aerosol would have important impact on the global climate change. It is widely believed that DMS is mainly emitted from phytoplankton production in marine boundary layer (MBL), and MSA is usually used as the tracer of non-sea-salt sulfate (nss- SO42-) in marine and coastal areas (MSA/SO42- = 1/18). Many observations of MSA were in marine and coastal aerosols. To our surprise, MSA was frequently (>60%) detected in Beijing TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 aerosols, even in the samples collected during the dust storm period. The concentrations of MSA were higher than those measured in marine aerosols. Factor analysis, correlation analysis and meteorology analysis indicated that there was no obvious marine influence on Beijing aerosols. DMS from terrestrial emissions and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) from industrial wastes could be the two possible precursors of MSA. Warm and low-pressure air masses and long time radiation were beneficial to the formation of MSA. Anthropogenic pollution from regional and local sources might be the dominant contributor to MSA in Beijing aerosol. This was the first report of MSA in aerosols collected in an inland site in China. This new finding would lead to the further study on the balance of sulfur in inland cities and its global biogeochemical cycle.

  5. Influence of the voltage waveform during nanocomposite layer deposition by aerosol-assisted atmospheric pressure Townsend discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profili, J.; Levasseur, O.; Naudé, N.; Chaneac, C.; Stafford, L.; Gherardi, N.

    2016-08-01

    This work examines the growth dynamics of TiO2-SiO2 nanocomposite coatings in plane-to-plane Dielectric Barrier Discharges (DBDs) at atmospheric pressure operated in a Townsend regime using nebulized TiO2 colloidal suspension in hexamethyldisiloxane as the growth precursors. For low-frequency (LF) sinusoidal voltages applied to the DBD cell, with voltage amplitudes lower than the one required for discharge breakdown, Scanning Electron Microscopy of silicon substrates placed on the bottom DBD electrode reveals significant deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) close to the discharge entrance. On the other hand, at higher frequencies (HF), the number of TiO2 NPs deposited strongly decreases due to their "trapping" in the oscillating voltage and their transport along the gas flow lines. Based on these findings, a combined LF-HF voltage waveform is proposed and used to achieve significant and spatially uniform deposition of TiO2 NPs across the whole substrate surface. For higher voltage amplitudes, in the presence of hexamethyldisiloxane and nitrous oxide for plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of inorganic layers, it is found that TiO2 NPs become fully embedded into a silica-like matrix. Similar Raman spectra are obtained for as-prepared TiO2 NPs and for nanocomposite TiO2-SiO2 coating, suggesting that plasma exposure does not significantly alter the crystalline structure of the TiO2 NPs injected into the discharge.

  6. Experimental generation of volcanic lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    Ash-rich volcanic plumes that are responsible for injecting large quantities of aerosols into the atmosphere are often associated with intense electrical activity. Direct measurement of the electric potential at the crater, where the electric activity in the volcanic plume is first observed, is severely impeded, limiting progress in its investigation. We have achieved volcanic lightning in the laboratory during rapid decompression experiments of gas-particle mixtures under controlled conditions. Upon decompression (from ~100 bar argon pressure to atmospheric pressure), loose particles are vertically accelerated and ejected through a nozzle of 2.8 cm diameter into a large tank filled with air at atmospheric conditions. Because of their impulsive character, our experiments most closely represent the conditions encountered in the gas-thrust region of the plume, when ash is first ejected from the crater. We used sieved natural ash with different grain sizes from Popocatépetl (Mexico), Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland), and Soufrière Hills (Montserrat) volcanoes, as well as micrometric glass beads to constrain the influence of material properties on lightning. We monitored the dynamics of the particle-laden jets with a high-speed camera and the pressure and electric potential at the nozzle using a pressure transducer and two copper ring antennas connected to a high-impedance data acquisition system, respectively. We find that lightning is controlled by the dynamics of the particle-laden jet and by the abundance of fine particles. Two main conditions are required to generate lightning: 1) self-electrification of the particles and 2) clustering of the particles driven by the jet fluid dynamics. The relative movement of clusters of charged particles within the plume generates the gradient in electrical potential, which is necessary for lightning. In this manner it is the gas-particle dynamics together with the evolving particle-density distribution within different regions of

  7. Influence of the voltage waveform during nanocomposite layer deposition by aerosol-assisted atmospheric pressure Townsend discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Profili, J. [LAPLACE, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, UPS, Toulouse (France); Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Levasseur, O.; Stafford, L. [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Naudé, N.; Gherardi, N., E-mail: nicolas.gherardi@laplace.univ-tlse.fr [LAPLACE, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, UPS, Toulouse (France); Chaneac, C. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, Collège de France, Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris (CMCP), 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2016-08-07

    This work examines the growth dynamics of TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coatings in plane-to-plane Dielectric Barrier Discharges (DBDs) at atmospheric pressure operated in a Townsend regime using nebulized TiO{sub 2} colloidal suspension in hexamethyldisiloxane as the growth precursors. For low-frequency (LF) sinusoidal voltages applied to the DBD cell, with voltage amplitudes lower than the one required for discharge breakdown, Scanning Electron Microscopy of silicon substrates placed on the bottom DBD electrode reveals significant deposition of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) close to the discharge entrance. On the other hand, at higher frequencies (HF), the number of TiO{sub 2} NPs deposited strongly decreases due to their “trapping” in the oscillating voltage and their transport along the gas flow lines. Based on these findings, a combined LF-HF voltage waveform is proposed and used to achieve significant and spatially uniform deposition of TiO{sub 2} NPs across the whole substrate surface. For higher voltage amplitudes, in the presence of hexamethyldisiloxane and nitrous oxide for plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of inorganic layers, it is found that TiO{sub 2} NPs become fully embedded into a silica-like matrix. Similar Raman spectra are obtained for as-prepared TiO{sub 2} NPs and for nanocomposite TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} coating, suggesting that plasma exposure does not significantly alter the crystalline structure of the TiO{sub 2} NPs injected into the discharge.

  8. Volcanic hazard management in dispersed volcanism areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Traditional volcanic hazard methodologies were developed mainly to deal with the big stratovolcanoes. In such type of volcanoes, the hazard map is an important tool for decision-makers not only during a volcanic crisis but also for territorial planning. According to the past and recent eruptions of a volcano, all possible volcanic hazards are modelled and included in the hazard map. Combining the hazard map with the Event Tree the impact area can be zoned and defining the likely eruptive scenarios that will be used during a real volcanic crisis. But in areas of disperse volcanism is very complex to apply the same volcanic hazard methodologies. The event tree do not take into account unknown vents, because the spatial concepts included in it are only related with the distance reached by volcanic hazards. The volcanic hazard simulation is also difficult because the vent scatter modifies the results. The volcanic susceptibility try to solve this problem, calculating the most likely areas to have an eruption, but the differences between low and large values obtained are often very small. In these conditions the traditional hazard map effectiveness could be questioned, making necessary a change in the concept of hazard map. Instead to delimit the potential impact areas, the hazard map should show the expected behaviour of the volcanic activity and how the differences in the landscape and internal geo-structures could condition such behaviour. This approach has been carried out in La Palma (Canary Islands), combining the concept of long-term hazard map with the short-term volcanic scenario to show the expected volcanic activity behaviour. The objective is the decision-makers understand how a volcanic crisis could be and what kind of mitigation measurement and strategy could be used.

  9. Volcanic loading: The dust veil index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, H.H. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Climatic Research Unit

    1985-09-01

    Dust ejected into the high atmosphere during explosive volcanic eruptions has been considered as a possible cause for climatic change. Dust veils created by volcanic eruptions can reduce the amount of light reaching the Earth`s surface and can cause reductions in surface temperatures. These climatic effects can be seen for several years following some eruptions and the magnitude and duration of the effects depend largely on the density or amount of tephra (i.e. dust) ejected, the latitude of injection, and atmospheric circulation patterns. Lamb (1970) formulated the Dust Veil Index (DVI) in an attempt to quantify the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact of a particular volcanic eruptions release of dust and aerosols over the years following the event. The DVI for any volcanic eruptions are available and have been used in estimating Lamb`s dust veil indices.

  10. Applications of aerosol model in the reactor containment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mossad Slama

    2014-10-01

    For spatially homogeneous aerosol of uniform chemical composition, the aerosol dynamic equation is solved in closed volume to simulate the radionuclide particle transport in the containment. The effects of initial conditions on the aerosol distribution, boundary layer thickness and the aerosol behaviour under source reinforcement (external source are considered.

  11. Atmosphere aerosol satellite project Aerosol-UA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, Gennadi; Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Syniavskyi, Ivan; Bovchaliuk, Andrii; Degtyaryov, Oleksandr; Sosonkin, Mikhail; Mishchenko, Michael; Danylevsky, Vassyl; Ivanov, Yury; Oberemok, Yevgeny; Masley, Volodymyr; Rosenbush, Vera; Moskalev, Sergii

    2017-04-01

    The experiment Aerosol-UA is Ukrainian space mission aimed to the terrestrial atmospheric aerosol spatial distribution and microphysics investigations. The experiment concept is based on idea of Glory/APS mission of precise orbital measurements of polarization and intensity of the sunlight scattered by the atmosphere, aerosol and the surface the multichannel Scanning Polarimeter (ScanPol) with narrow field-of-view. ScanPol measurements will be accompanied by the wide-angle MultiSpectral Imager-Polarimeter (MSIP). The ScanPol is designed to measure Stokes parameters I, Q, U within the spectral range from the UV to the SWIR in a wide range of phase angles along satellite ground path. Expected ScanPol polarimetric accuracy is 0.15%. A high accuracy measurement of the degree of linear polarization is provided by on-board calibration of the ScanPol polarimeter. On-board calibration is performed for each scan of the mirror scanning system. A set of calibrators is viewed during the part of the scan range when the ScanPol polarimeter looks in the direction opposite to the Earth's surface. These reference assemblies provide calibration of the zero of the polarimetric scale (unpolarized reference assembly) and the scale factor for the polarimetric scale (polarized reference assembly). The zero of the radiometric scale is provided by the dark reference assembly.The spectral channels of the ScanPol are used to estimate the tropospheric aerosol absorption, the aerosol over the ocean and the land surface, the signals from cirrus clouds, stratospheric aerosols caused by major volcanic eruptions, and the contribution of the Earth's surface. The imager-polarimeter MSIP will collect 60°x60° field-of-view images on the state of the atmosphere and surface in the area, where the ScanPol polarimeter will measure, to retrieve aerosol optical depth and polarization properties of aerosol by registration of three Stokes parameters simultaneously in three spectral channels. The two more

  12. Aurorae and Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    (mostly greenhouse gases and aerosols) and the appearance of the giant planet is therefore quite different from filter to filter. At the time of these observations, Jupiter was 610 million km from the Earth and 755 million km from the Sun. The angular size of its disk was 48 arcsec, or about 40 times smaller than that of the full moon. The ISAAC instrument The ISAAC multi-mode instrument is capable obtaining images and spectra in the near-to-mid infrared wavelength region from 1 - 5 µm. It is equipped with two state-of-the-art detectors, a Hawaii array (1024 x 1024 pix 2 ; used in the 1.0 - 2.5 µm spectral region) and an Aladdin InSb array also with 1024 x 1024 pix 2 , and sensitive over the entire 1 - 5 µm region, but for the time being only used for the 3-5 µm region. Observations in the thermal-IR wavelength region with the Aladdin array rely on the 'chopping' technique. It consists of tilting the telescope's lightweight 1.1-m secondary mirror back and forth ('tip-tilt') about once per second. This basic technique allows to subtract the strong infrared emission from the sky by also observing an area adjacent to the object area - the difference is then the radiation from the object. Without this method, the strong and rapidly variable sky emission - that originates in all layers of the terrestrial atmosphere - and also the thermal emission from the telescope would render infrared observations of faint celestial objects impossible. 'Chopping' is further combined with 'nodding' , i.e. moving the telescope in the direction opposite to the direction of the 'chop' in order to achieve better cancellation of residual sky emission. Thanks to the very good stability provided by the VLT tip-tilt system and excellent seeing conditions, the image resolution obtained on these images is about 0.39 arcsec in the L-band. The field-of-view is 72 x 72 arcsec 2 (1 pixel = 0.07 arcsec) - this corresponds to 1.5 times the size of Jupiter's disk in November 2000. No other infrared

  13. Global simulations of aerosol processing in clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hoose

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available An explicit and detailed representation of in-droplet and in-crystal aerosol particles in stratiform clouds has been introduced in the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The new scheme allows an evaluation of the cloud cycling of aerosols and an estimation of the relative contributions of nucleation and collision scavenging, as opposed to evaporation of hydrometeors in the global aerosol processing by clouds. On average an aerosol particle is cycled through stratiform clouds 0.5 times. The new scheme leads to important changes in the simulated fraction of aerosol scavenged in clouds, and consequently in the aerosol wet deposition. In general, less aerosol is scavenged into clouds with the new prognostic treatment than what is prescribed in standard ECHAM5-HAM. Aerosol concentrations, size distributions, scavenged fractions and cloud droplet concentrations are evaluated and compared to different observations. While the scavenged fraction and the aerosol number concentrations in the marine boundary layer are well represented in the new model, aerosol optical thickness, cloud droplet number concentrations in the marine boundary layer and the aerosol volume in the accumulation and coarse modes over the oceans are overestimated. Sensitivity studies suggest that a better representation of below-cloud scavenging, higher in-cloud collision coefficients, or a reduced water uptake by seasalt aerosols could reduce these biases.

  14. Global simulations of aerosol processing in clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hoose

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An explicit and detailed representation of in-droplet and in-crystal aerosol particles in stratiform clouds has been introduced in the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The new scheme allows an evaluation of the cloud cycling of aerosols and an estimation of the relative contributions of nucleation and collision scavenging, as opposed to evaporation of hydrometeors in the global aerosol processing by clouds. On average an aerosol particle is cycled through stratiform clouds 0.5 times. The new scheme leads to important changes in the simulated fraction of aerosol scavenged in clouds, and consequently in the aerosol wet deposition. In general, less aerosol is scavenged into clouds with the new prognostic treatment than what is prescribed in standard ECHAM5-HAM. Aerosol concentrations, size distributions, scavenged fractions and cloud droplet concentrations are evaluated and compared to different observations. While the scavenged fraction and the aerosol number concentrations in the marine boundary layer are well represented in the new model, aerosol optical thickness, cloud droplet number concentrations in the marine boundary layer and the aerosol volume in the accumulation and coarse modes over the oceans are overestimated. Sensitivity studies suggest that a better representation of below-cloud scavenging, higher in-cloud collision coefficients, or a reduced water uptake by seasalt aerosols could reduce these biases.

  15. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: Outstanding Research Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of this aerosol cloud produce responses in the climate system. Based on observations after major eruptions of the past and experiments with numerical models of the climate system, we understand much about their climatic impact, but there are also a number of unanswered questions. Volcanic eruptions produce global cooling, and are an important natural cause of interannual, interdecadal, and even centennial-scale climate change. One of the most interesting volcanic effects is the "winter warming" of Northern Hemisphere continents following major tropical eruptions. During the winter in the Northern Hemisphere following every large tropical eruption of the past century, surface air temperatures over North America, Europe, and East Asia were warmer than normal, while they were colder over Greenland and the Middle East. This pattern and the coincident atmospheric circulation correspond to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. While this response is observed after recent major eruptions, most state-of-the-art climate models have trouble simulating winter warming. Why? High latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere, while also producing global cooling, do not have the same impact on atmospheric dynamics. Both tropical and high latitude eruptions can weaken the Indian and African summer monsoon, and the effects can be seen in past records of flow in the Nile and Niger Rivers. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade have had a small effect on global temperature trends. Some important outstanding research questions include: How much seasonal, annual, and decadal predictability is possible following a large volcanic eruption? Do

  16. The ISA-MIP Historical Eruption SO2 Emissions Assessment (HErSEA): an intercomparison for interactive stratospheric aerosol models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Graham; Dhomse, Sandip; Sheng, Jianxiong; Mills, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Major historical volcanic eruptions have injected huge amounts of sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere with observations showing an enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer for several years (ASAP, 2006). Such long-lasting increases in stratospheric aerosol loading cool the Earth's surface by scattering incoming solar radiation and warm the stratosphere via absorption of near infra-red solar and long-wave terrestrial radiation with complex effects on climate (e.g. Robock, 2000). Two recent modelling studies of Mount Pinatubo (Dhomse et al., 2014; Sheng et al. 2015) have highlighted that observations suggest the sulphur loading of the volcanically enhanced stratospheric aerosol may have been considerably lower than suggested by measurements of the injected SO2. This poster describes a new model intercomparison activity "ISA-MIP" for interactive stratospheric aerosol models within the framework of the SPARC initiative on Stratospheric Sulphur and its Role in Climate (SSiRC). The new "Historical Eruption SO2 emissions Assessment" (HErSEA) will intercompare model simulations of the three largest volcanic perturbations to the stratosphere in the last 50 years, 1963 Mt Agung, 1982 El Chichon and 1991 Mt Pinatubo. The aim is to assess how effectively the emitted SO2 translates into perturbations to stratospheric aerosol properties and simulated radiative forcings in different composition-climate models with interactive stratospheric aerosol (ISA). Each modelling group will run a mini-ensemble of transient AMIP-type runs for the 3 eruptions with a control no-eruption run followed by upper and lower bound injection amount estimates and 3 different injection height settings for two shallow (e.g. 19-21km amd 23-25km) and one deep (e.g. 19-25km) injection. First order analysis will intercompare stratospheric aerosol metrics such as 2D-monthly AOD(550nm, 1020nm) and timeseries of tropical and NH/SH mid-visible extinction at three different models levels (15, 20 and 25km

  17. Volcanic hazard assessment in monogenetic volcanic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolini, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    [eng] One of the most important tasks of modern volcanology, which represents a significant socio-economic implication, is to conduct hazard assessment in active volcanic systems. These volcanological studies are aimed at hazard that allows to constructing hazard maps and simulating different eruptive scenarios, and are mainly addressed to contribute to territorial planning, definition of emergency plans or managing volcanic crisis. The impact of a natural event, as a volcanic eruption, can s...

  18. A general circulation model (GCM) parameterization of Pinatubo aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacis, A.A.; Carlson, B.E.; Mishchenko, M.I. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The June 1991 volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo is the largest and best documented global climate forcing experiment in recorded history. The time development and geographical dispersion of the aerosol has been closely monitored and sampled. Based on preliminary estimates of the Pinatubo aerosol loading, general circulation model predictions of the impact on global climate have been made.

  19. COMMENT ON AEROSOL EFFECT ON ANTARCTIC OZONE

    OpenAIRE

    イワサカ, ヤスノブ; Yasunobu, IWASAKA; Guang-Yu, SHI

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the aerosol layer disturbed by a cold air was suggested from the lidar measurements at Syowa Station (69°00′S, 39°35′E). The particle layer containing sublayers of spherical or nonspherical aerosols was frequently observed in Antarctic spring. It is a point one sholud not ignore when he discusses aerosol effects on "Antarctic ozone depletion" through radiative processes and heterogeneous chemical reactions.

  20. Assessing estimates of radiative forcing for solar geoengineering starts with accurate aerosol radiative properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykema, J. A.; Keith, D.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2016-12-01

    The deliberate modification of Earth's albedo as a complement to mitigation in order to slow climate change brings with it a range of risks. A range of different approaches have been studied, including the injection of aerosol particles into the stratosphere to decrease solar energy input into the climate system. Key side effects from this approach include ozone loss and radiative heating. Both of these side effects may produce dynamical changes with further consequences for stratospheric and tropospheric climate. Studies of past volcanic eruptions suggest that sulfate aerosol injection may be capable of achieving a compensating radiative forcing of -1 W m-2 or more. It is also expected that such injection of sulfate aerosols will result in loss of stratospheric ozone and of significant infrared heating. The problems resulting from sulfate aerosols intended have motivated the investigation of alternative materials, including high refractive index solid materials. High refractive index materials have the potential to scatter more efficiently per unit mass, leading to a reduction in surface area for heterogeneous chemistry, and, depending on details of absorption, less radiative heating. Fundamentally, assessing these trade-offs requires accurate knowledge of the complex refractive index of materials being considered over the full range of wavelengths relevant to atmospheric radiative transfer, that is, from ultraviolet to far-infrared. Our survey of the relevant literature finds that such measurements are not available for all materials of interest at all wavelengths. We utilize a method developed in astrophysics to fill in spectral gaps, and find that some materials may heat the stratosphere substantially more than was found in previous work. Stratospheric heating can warm the tropical tropopause layer, increasing the flux of water vapor into the stratosphere, with further consequences for atmospheric composition and radiative forcing. We analyze this consequence

  1. Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham J. Weir

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual model of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ is developed, to a depth of 25 km, formed from three constant density layers. The upper layer is formed from eruption products. A constant rate of eruption is assumed, which eventually implies a constant rate of extension, and a constant rate of volumetric creation in the middle and bottom layers. Tectonic extension creates volume which can accomodate magmatic intrusions. Spreading models assume this volume is distributed throughout the whole region, perhaps in vertical dykes, whereas rifting models assume the upper crust is thinned and the volume created lies under this upper crust. Bounds on the heat flow from such magmatic intrusions are calculated. Heat flow calculations are performed and some examples are provided which match the present total heat output from the TVZ of about 4200 MW, but these either have extension rates greater than the low values of about 8 ± 4 mm/a being reported from GPS measurements, or else consider extension rates in the TVZ to have varied over time.

  2. Gas phase acid, ammonia and aerosol ionic and trace element concentrations at Cape Verde during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe 2007 intensive sampling period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sander

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report mixing ratios of soluble reactive trace gases sampled with mist chambers and the chemical composition of bulk aerosol and volatile inorganic bromine (Brg sampled with filter packs during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe field campaign at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO on São Vicente island in the tropical North Atlantic in May and June 2007. The gas-phase data include HCl, HNO3, HONO, HCOOH, CH3COOH, NH3, and volatile reactive chlorine other than HCl (Cl*. Aerosol samples were analyzed by neutron activation (Na, Al, Cl, V, Mn, and Br and ion chromatography (SO42−, Cl−, Br−, NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+. Content and quality of the data, which are available under doi:10.5281/zenodo.6956, are presented and discussed.

  3. Temporal variations of flux and altitude of sulfur dioxide emissions during volcanic eruptions: implications for long-range dispersal of volcanic clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boichu

    2015-02-01

    of the modeled SO2 altitude is further confirmed by the detection of a layer of particles at the same altitude by the spaceborne CALIOP LiDAR. Analysis of CALIOP color and depolarization ratios suggests that these particles consist of sulfate aerosols formed from precursory volcanic SO2. The reconstruction of emission altitude, through inversion procedures which assimilate volcanic SO2 column amounts, requires specific meteorological conditions, especially sufficient wind shear so that gas parcels emitted at different altitudes follow distinct trajectories. We consequently explore the possibility and limits of assimilating in inverse schemes infrared (IR imagery of the volcanic SO2 cloud altitude which will render the inversion procedure independent of the wind shear prerequisite.

  4. Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Rudolf, F.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols affect the atmospheric energy balance by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation. They also can alter stratospheric chemical cycles by catalyzing heterogeneous reactions which markedly perturb odd nitrogen, chlorine and ozone levels. Aerosol measurements by satellites began in NASA in 1975 with the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) program, to be followed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) starting in 1979. Both programs employ the solar occultation, or Earth limb extinction, techniques. Major results of these activities include the discovery of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in both hemispheres in winter, illustrations of the impacts of major (El Chichon 1982 and Pinatubo 1991) eruptions, and detection of a negative global trend in lower stratospheric/upper tropospheric aerosol extinction. This latter result can be considered a triumph of successful worldwide sulfur emission controls. The SAGE record will be continued and improved by SAGE III, currently scheduled for multiple launches beginning in 2000 as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS). The satellite program has been supplemented by in situ measurements aboard the ER-2 (20 km ceiling) since 1974, and from the DC-8 (13 km ceiling) aircraft beginning in 1989. Collection by wire impactors and subsequent electron microscopic and X-ray energy-dispersive analyses, and optical particle spectrometry have been the principle techniques. Major findings are: (1) The stratospheric background aerosol consists of dilute sulfuric acid droplets of around 0.1 micrometer modal diameter at concentration of tens to hundreds of monograms per cubic meter; (2) Soot from aircraft amounts to a fraction of one percent of the background total aerosol; (3) Volcanic eruptions perturb the sulfuric acid, but not the soot, aerosol abundance by several orders of magnitude; (4) PSCs contain nitric acid at temperatures below 195K, supporting chemical hypotheses

  5. Aviation response to a widely dispersed volcanic ash and gas cloud from the August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi, Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Schneider, David J.; Wallace, Kristi L.; Hall, Tony; Bensimon, Dov R.; Salinas, Leonard J.

    2010-01-01

    The extensive volcanic cloud from Kasatochi's 2008 eruption caused widespread disruptions to aviation operations along Pacific oceanic, Canadian, and U.S. air routes. Based on aviation hazard warnings issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, the Federal Aviation Administration, and Meteorological Service of Canada, air carriers largely avoided the volcanic cloud over a 5 day period by route modifications and flight cancellations. Comparison of time coincident GOES thermal infrared (TIR) data for ash detection with Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) ultraviolet data for SO2 detection shows congruent areas of ash and gas in the volcanic cloud in the 2 days following onset of ash production. After about 2.5 days, the area of SO2 detected by OMI was more extensive than the area of ash indicated by TIR data, indicating significant ash depletion by fall out had occurred. Pilot reports of visible haze at cruise altitudes over Canada and the northern United States suggested that SO2 gas had converted to sulfate aerosols. Uncertain about the hazard potential of the aging cloud, airlines coped by flying over, under, or around the observed haze layer. Samples from a nondamaging aircraft encounter with Kasatochi's nearly 3 day old cloud contained volcanic silicate particles, confirming that some fine ash is present in predominantly gas clouds. The aircraft's exposure to ash was insufficient to cause engine damage; however, slightly damaging encounters with volcanic clouds from eruptions of Reventador in 2002 and Hekla in 2000 indicate the possibility of lingering hazards associated with old and/or diffuse volcanic clouds.

  6. Stratospheric Aerosol--Observations, Processes, and Impact on Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresmer, Stefanie; Thomason, Larry W.; von Hobe, Marc; Hermann, Markus; Deshler, Terry; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Stenke, Andrea; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Weigel, Ralf; Fueglistaler, Stephan; Prata, Fred J.; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Schlager, Hans; Barnes, John E.; Antuna-Marrero, Juan-Carlos; Fairlie, Duncan; Palm, Mathias; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Notholt, Justus; Rex, Markus; Bingen, Christine; Vanhellemont, Filip; Bourassa, Adam; Plane, John M. C.; Klocke, Daniel; Carn, Simon A.; Clarisse, Lieven; Trickl, Thomas; Neeley, Ryan; James, Alexander D.; Rieger, Landon; Wilson, James C.; Meland, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Interest in stratospheric aerosol and its role in climate have increased over the last decade due to the observed increase in stratospheric aerosol since 2000 and the potential for changes in the sulfur cycle induced by climate change. This review provides an overview about the advances in stratospheric aerosol research since the last comprehensive assessment of stratospheric aerosol was published in 2006. A crucial development since 2006 is the substantial improvement in the agreement between in situ and space-based inferences of stratospheric aerosol properties during volcanically quiescent periods. Furthermore, new measurement systems and techniques, both in situ and space based, have been developed for measuring physical aerosol properties with greater accuracy and for characterizing aerosol composition. However, these changes induce challenges to constructing a long-term stratospheric aerosol climatology. Currently, changes in stratospheric aerosol levels less than 20% cannot be confidently quantified. The volcanic signals tend to mask any nonvolcanically driven change, making them difficult to understand. While the role of carbonyl sulfide as a substantial and relatively constant source of stratospheric sulfur has been confirmed by new observations and model simulations, large uncertainties remain with respect to the contribution from anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions. New evidence has been provided that stratospheric aerosol can also contain small amounts of nonsulfatematter such as black carbon and organics. Chemistry-climate models have substantially increased in quantity and sophistication. In many models the implementation of stratospheric aerosol processes is coupled to radiation and/or stratospheric chemistry modules to account for relevant feedback processes.

  7. How Volcanism Controls Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Large explosive volcanoes eject megatons of sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere where it spreads around the world within months and is oxidized slowly to form a sulfuric-acid aerosol with particle sizes that grow large enough to reflect and scatter solar radiation, cooling Earth ~0.5C for up to 3 years. Explosive eruptions also deplete total column ozone ~6% causing up to 3C winter warming at mid-latitudes over continents. Global cooling predominates. Extrusive, basaltic volcanoes deplete ozone ~6% but do not eject much sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere, causing net global warming. Anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) deplete ozone ~3% for up to a century while each volcanic eruption, even small ones, depletes ozone twice as much but for less than a decade through eruption of halogens and ensuing photochemical processes. The 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, the 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn, plus anthropogenic CFCs depleted ozone over Toronto Canada 14% in 2012, causing an unusually warm winter and drought. Total column ozone determines how much solar ultraviolet energy with wavelengths between 290 and 340 nanometers reaches Earth where it is absorbed most efficiently by the ocean. A 25% depletion of ozone increases the amount of this radiation reaching Earth by 1 W m-2 for overhead sun and 0.25 W m-2 for a solar zenith angle of 70 degrees. The tropopause is the boundary between the troposphere heated from below by a sun-warmed Earth and the stratosphere heated from above by the Sun through photodissociation primarily of oxygen and ozone. The mean annual height of the tropopause increased ~160 m between 1980 and 2004 at the same time that northern mid-latitude total column ozone was depleted by ~4%, the lower stratosphere cooled ~2C, the upper troposphere warmed ~0.1C, and mean surface temperatures in the northern hemisphere rose ~0.5C. Regional total ozone columns are observed to increase as rapidly as 20% within 5 hours with an associated 5

  8. Origin Of Aerosols Above Neuchatel, Switzerland, In August 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furger, M.; Mitev, V. [Observatoire de Neuchatel (Switzerland); Matthey, R. [Observatoire de Neuchatel (Switzerland); Collaud-Coen, M. [MeteoSwiss (Switzerland); Weingartner, E.

    2005-03-01

    Aerosols may be transported over continental scale distances. Lidar-detected elevated aerosol layers in the summer of 2003 may have been influenced by Sahara dust rather than forest fire plumes. (author)

  9. Tephra layers from Holocene lake sediments of the Sulmona Basin, central Italy: implications for volcanic activity in Peninsular Italy and tephrostratigraphy in the central Mediterranean area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaccio, B.; Messina, P.; Sposato, A.; Voltaggio, M.; Zanchetta, G.; Galadini, F.; Gori, S.; Santacroce, R.

    2009-12-01

    We present a new tephrostratigraphic record from the Holocene lake sediments of the Sulmona basin, central Italy. The Holocene succession is represented by whitish calcareous mud that is divided into two units, SUL2 (ca 32 m thick) and SUL1 (ca 8 m thick), for a total thickness of ca 40 m. These units correspond to the youngest two out of six sedimentary cycles recognised in the Sulmona basin that are related to the lake sedimentation since the Middle Pleistocene. Height concordant U series age determinations and additional chronological data constrain the whole Holocene succession to between ca 8000 and 1000 yrs BP. This includes a sedimentary hiatus that separates the SUL2 and SUL1 units, which is roughly dated between Ischia Island eruption of the Cannavale tephra (2920 ± 450 cal yrs BP). The 27 ash layers compatible with Mt. Somma-Vesuvius activity are clustered in three different time intervals: from ca 2000 to >1000; from 3600 to 3100; and from 7600 to 4700 yrs BP. The first, youngest cluster, comprises six layers and correlates with the intense explosive activity of Mt. Somma-Vesuvius that occurred after the prominent AD 79 Pompeii eruption, but only the near-Plinian event of AD 472 has been tentatively recognised. The intermediate cluster (3600-3100 yrs BP) starts with tephra that chemically and chronologically matches the products from the "Pomici di Avellino" eruption (ca 3800 ± 200 yrs BP). This is followed by eight further layers, where the glasses exhibit chemical features that are similar in composition to the products from the so-called "Protohistoric" or AP eruptions; however, only the distal equivalents of three AP events (AP3, AP4 and AP6) are tentatively designated. Finally, the early cluster (7600-4700 yrs BP) comprises 12 layers that contain evidence of a surprising, previously unrecognised, activity of the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano during its supposed period of quiescence, between the major Plinian "Pomici di Mercato" (ca 9000 yrs BP) and

  10. Characteristics of absorbing aerosols during winter foggy period over the National Capital Region of Delhi: Impact of planetary boundary layer dynamics and solar radiation flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, S.; Tiwari, S.; Mishra, A.; Singh, S.; Hopke, Philip K.; Singh, Surender; Attri, S. D.

    2017-05-01

    Severe air pollution in the northern India coupled with the formation of secondary pollutants results in severe fog conditions during the winter. Black carbon (BC) and particulate matter (PM2.5) play a vital role within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) to degrade atmospheric visibility. These species were continuously monitored during the winter of 2014 in the National Capital Region (NCR) of Delhi. The average BC concentration was 8.0 ± 3.1 μg/m3 with the January mean (11.1 ± 5.4 μg/m3) approximately two times higher than February (5.9 ± 2.1 μg/m3). The average PM2.5 concentration was 137 ± 67 μg/m3 with monthly area-average maximum and minima in December and February, respectively. Higher concentrations of BC at 10:00 local standard time LST (8.5 μg/m3) and 22:00 LST (9.7 μg/m3) were consistently observed and assigned to morning and evening rush-hour traffic across Delhi. Daily average solar fluxes, varied between 17.9 and 220.7 W/m2 and had a negative correlation (r = - 0.5) with BC during fog episodes. Ventilation coefficient (VC) reduced from 'no fog' to fog phase over Palam Airport (PLM) (0.49) times and Hindon Airport (HND) (0.28) times and from fog to prolonged fog (> 14 h) phase over PLM (0.35) times and HND (0.41) times, respectively, indicating high pollution over the NCR of Delhi. Ground measurements showed that daily mean aerosol optical depth at 500 nm (AOD500) varied between 0.32 and 1.18 with mean AOD500 nm being highest during the prolonged fog (> 14 h) episodes (0.98 ± 0.08) consistent with variations in PM2.5 and BC. Angstrom exponent (α) and Angstrom turbidity coefficient (β) were found to be > 1 and 0.2, respectively, during fog showing the dominance of fine mode particles in the atmosphere.

  11. The impact of high altitude aircraft on the ozone layer in the stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xue XI; Brasseur, Guy; Lin, Xing; Friedlingstein, P.; Granier, Claire; Rasch, Philip

    1994-01-01

    The paper discusses the potential effects on the ozone layer of gases released by the engines of proposed high altitude supersonic aircraft. The major problem arises from the emissions of nitrogen oxides which have the potential to destroy significant quantities of ozone in the stratosphere. The magnitude of the perturbation is highly dependent on the cruise altitude of the aircraft. Furthermore, the depletion of ozone is substantially reduced when heterogeneous conversion of nitrogen oxides into nitric acid on sulfate aerosol particles is taken into account in the calculation. The sensitivity of the aerosol load on stratospheric ozone is investigated. First, the model indicates that the aerosol load induced by the SO2 released by aircraft is increased by about 10-20% above the background aerosols at mid-high latitude of the Northern Hemisphere at 15 km for the NASA emission scenario A (the NASA emission scenarios are explained in Tables I to III). This increase in aerosol has small effects on stratospheric ozone. Second, when the aerosol load is increased following a volcanic eruption similar to the eruption of El Chichon (Mexico, April 1982), the ozone column in spring increases by as much as 9% in response to the injection of NOx from the aircraft with the NASA emission scenario A. Finally, the modeled suggests that significant ozone depletion could result from the formation of additional polar stratospheric clouds produced by the injection of H2O and HNO3 by the aircraft engines.

  12. Whole-atmosphere aerosol microphysics simulations of the Mt Pinatubo eruption: Part 2: Quantifying the direct and indirect (dynamical) radiative forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Graham; Dhomse, Sandip; Carslaw, Ken; Chipperfield, Martyn; Lee, Lindsay; Emmerson, Kathryn; Abraham, Luke; Telford, Paul; Pyle, John; Braesicke, Peter; Bellouin, Nicolas; Dalvi, Mohit; Johnson, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The Mt Pinatubo volcanic eruption in June 1991 injected between 10 and 20 Tg of sulphur dioxide into the tropical lower stratosphere. Following chemical conversion to sulphuric acid, the stratospheric aerosol layer thickened substantially causing a strong radiative, dynamical and chemical perturbation to the Earth's atmosphere with effects lasting several years. In this presentation we show results from model experiments to isolate the different ways the enhanced stratospheric aerosol from Pinatubo influenced the Earth's climate. The simulations are carried out in the UK Chemistry and Aerosol composition-climate model (UKCA) which extends the high-top (to 80km) version of the UK Met Office Unified Model (UM). The UM-UKCA model uses the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics module coupled with a stratosphere-troposphere chemistry scheme including sulphur chemistry. By running no-feedback and standard integrations, we separate the main radiative forcings due to aerosol-radiation interactions (i.e. the direct forcings) from those induced by dynamical changes which alter meridional heat transport and distributions of aerosol, ozone and water vapour.

  13. 卫星遥感技术在火山灰云监测中的应用%APPLICATION OF SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING IN VOLCANIC ASH CLOUD MONITORING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹京苑; 沈迪; 李成范

    2013-01-01

    A large volcanic eruption can produce large amounts of volcanic ash,water vapor and heat,and form the volcanic ash cloud.The volcanic ash cloud is mainly composed of volcanic ash debris in diameter less than 2mm and gases including SO2,H2S,CO2,the mixture of the two can form acidic aerosols which can stay in the atmosphere for a long time.It not only destructs the balance of earth's surface solar radiation and causes the depletion of the ozone layer,the greenhouse effect,air pollution,acid rain,anomalies of air temperature and precipitation,and other major global climate and environmental changes,but also damages and corrodes the structure of an aircraft,reduces the visibility and jams the radio communication system.The most serious problem is that the volcanic ash debris particles are capable of cooling and adhering to the aircraft engine blades after high-temperature melting,resulting in the flameout of aircraft engine.Under the background of globalization and the boom of air-transport industry,the volcanic ash cloud is a serious threat to aviation safety.Remote sensing technology can quickly and accurately obtain the information of the surface's and the atmosphere's changes,therefore it is playing an important role in monitoring volcanic activity.In recent years,with the advancement of sensor technology,the thermal infrared remote sensing technology has become an important means of monitoring the volcanic ash cloud.Currently,there have been a variety of remote sensors for volcanic ash cloud monitoring.Meanwhile,based on that,a series of volcanic ash cloud monitoring algorithms have also been developed for different remote sensors.However,most of the volcanic ash cloud monitoring algorithms have limitations of a low accuracy and a narrow scope.This paper tries to conduct a more comprehensive overview of the different types of remote sensors and the different algorithms for volcanic ash cloud monitoring.First,the damage of volcanic ash cloud to the natural

  14. Experiments on gas-ash separation processes in volcanic umbrella plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holasek, Rick E.; Woods, Andrew W.; Self, Stephen

    1996-03-01

    We present a series of analogue laboratory experiments which simulate the separation of ash and gas and the formation of secondary intrusions from finite volcanic umbrella plumes. We examined the lateral spreading of mixtures of freshwater and particles released into a laboratory tank containing a uniformly stratified aqueous solution. For times smaller than the sedimentation time of particles through the intrusion, the current remains coherent and intrudes laterally. As some of the particles settle into the underlying ambient fluid, a layer of particle-depleted fluid develops below the upper surface of the current and the density of the residual fluid is reduced. Over longer times, the intrusion ceases to be coherent, with small fingers of relatively buoyant, particle-depleted fluid rising from the upper part of the intrusion into the overlying fluid. Meanwhile, the lateral motion of the injected solution induces a return flow in the ambient fluid which sweeps some of the particles sedimenting from the lower surface of the intrusion inwards. As a result, relatively dense particle-laden fluid collects below the intrusion and then sinks into the underlying fluid. Eventually this fluid reaches a new neutral buoyancy height, where it intrudes to form a second laterally spreading current below the original intrusion. The process then repeats to form further weaker intrusions below. These results of the separation of the ash and volcanic gas in an umbrella plume are consistent with field observations at Sakurajima volcano where positively charged plumes, thought to consist of volcanic gas, have been observed above negatively charged plumes of ash. This work also suggests that volcanic aerosols may form up to a kilometer above the original injection height of the ash. In a strong wind shear, this could result in very different trajectories of the ash and gas and so be important for evaluating the impact of ash plumes on both aviation safety and volcanic aerosol formation

  15. Geology and petrology of the Vulsinian volcanic area (Latium, Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varekamp, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The Vulsinian volcanic area is situated in Latium, west central Italy. This quarternary volcanic complex consists of a series of layered tuffs, lava flows, ignimbrites, and many small cinder and ash cones. A steep central edifice is lacking due to the relatively large amount of pyroclastic deposits.

  16. Investigation of the seasonal variations of aerosol physicochemical properties and their impact on cloud condensation nuclei number concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Timothy S.

    strongly absorbing carbonaceous particles generated from the flaming combustion mode. The cases represented complex mixtures of the flaming and smoldering combustion phases. Lastly, SQ3 is addressed by using a multi-platform dataset from the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa, Azores, 2009-2010 field campaign. The seasonal aerosol particle volume and number size distributions, AOD, and AEAOD during the CAP-MBL campaign have shown that a low overall mean AOD440 of 0.12 denoted a clean environment over this region that typically contains MBL sea salt. In terms of aerosol volume, a bimodal signal was prominent where the coarse mode influence (r ≥ 1 μm) dominated that of the fine mode (r < 1 μm) throughout the year. However, there are considerable continental fine mode aerosols advected to the Azores region during summer months, including Saharan mineral dust, volcanic ash, biomass smoke, and pollution from North American as identified by HYSPLIT backward trajectories. These aerosol types have been shown to have impacts on MBL cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that are likely different from coarse mode marine aerosols (e.g., sea salt) (Remillard et al. 2014; Wood et al. 2014). The alternating presence of dominant clean air masses with periodic episodes of polluted air masses will provide a substantial variety in aerosol properties during the summer. This will provide a great opportunity to investigate the interactions between aerosol and cloud properties in terms of the aerosol indirect effect (AIE).

  17. 35 yr of stratospheric aerosol measurements at Garmisch-Partenkirchen: from Fuego to Eyjafjallajökull, and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickl, T.; Giehl, H.; Jäger, H.; Vogelmann, H.

    2013-05-01

    Lidar measurements at Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany) have almost continually delivered backscatter coefficients of stratospheric aerosol since 1976. The time series is dominated by signals from the particles injected into or formed in the stratosphere due to major volcanic eruptions, in particular those of El Chichon (Mexico, 1982) and Mt Pinatubo (Philippines, 1991). Here, we focus more on the long-lasting background period since the late 1990s and 2006, in view of processes maintaining a residual lower-stratospheric aerosol layer in absence of major eruptions, as well as the period of moderate volcanic impact afterwards. During the long background period the stratospheric backscatter coefficients reached a level even below that observed in the late 1970s. This suggests that the predicted potential influence of the strongly growing air traffic on the stratospheric aerosol loading is very low. Some correlation may be found with single strong forest-fire events, but the average influence of biomass burning seems to be quite limited. No positive trend in background aerosol can be resolved over a period as long as that observed by lidar at Mauna Loa. We conclude that the increase of our integrated backscatter coefficients starting in 2008 is mostly due to volcanic eruptions with explosivity index 4, penetrating strongly into the stratosphere. Most of them occurred in the mid-latitudes. A key observation for judging the role of eruptions just reaching the tropopause region was that of the plume from the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull above Garmisch-Partenkirchen (April 2010) due to the proximity of that source. The top altitude of the ash above the volcano was reported just as 9.3 km, but the lidar measurements revealed enhanced stratospheric aerosol up to 14.3 km. Our analysis suggests for two or three of the four measurement days the presence of a stratospheric contribution from Iceland related to quasi-horizontal transport, differing from the strong descent

  18. Volcanic rock properties control sector collapse events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amy; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Hornby, Adrian; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes constructed by superimposed layers of varying volcanic materials are inherently unstable structures. The heterogeneity of weak and strong layers consisting of ash, tephra and lavas, each with varying coherencies, porosities, crystallinities, glass content and ultimately, strength, can promote volcanic flank and sector collapses. These volcanoes often exist in areas with complex regional tectonics adding to instability caused by heterogeneity, flank overburden, magma movement and emplacement in addition to hydrothermal alteration and anomalous geothermal gradients. Recent studies conducted on the faulting properties of volcanic rocks at variable slip rates show the rate-weakening dependence of the friction coefficients (up to 90% reduction)[1], caused by a wide range of factors such as the generation of gouge and frictional melt lubrication [2]. Experimental data from experiments conducted on volcanic products suggests that frictional melt occurs at slip rates similar to those of plug flow in volcanic conduits [1] and the bases of mass material movements such as debris avalanches from volcanic flanks [3]. In volcanic rock, the generation of frictional heat may prompt the remobilisation of interstitial glass below melting temperatures due to passing of the glass transition temperature at ˜650-750 ˚C [4]. In addition, the crushing of pores in high porosity samples can lead to increased comminution and strain localisation along slip surfaces. Here we present the results of friction tests on both high density, glass rich samples from Santaguito (Guatemala) and synthetic glass samples with varying porosities (0-25%) to better understand frictional properties underlying volcanic collapse events. 1. Kendrick, J.E., et al., Extreme frictional processes in the volcanic conduit of Mount St. Helens (USA) during the 2004-2008 eruption. J. Structural Geology, 2012. 2. Di Toro, G., et al., Fault lubrication during earthquakes. Nature, 2011. 471(7339): p. 494-498. 3

  19. Fractionation of sulfur isotopes during heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 on sea salt aerosol: a new tool to investigate non-sea salt sulfate production in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Borrmann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of SO2 to sulfate on sea salt aerosols in the marine environment is highly important because of its effect on the size distribution of sulfate and the potential for new particle nucleation from H2SO4 (g. However, models of the sulfur cycle are not currently able to account for the complex relationship between particle size, alkalinity, oxidation pathway and rate – which is critical as SO2 oxidation by O3 and Cl catalysis are limited by aerosol alkalinity, whereas oxidation by hypohalous acids and transition metal ions can continue at low pH once alkalinity is titrated. We have measured 34S/32S fractionation factors for SO2 oxidation in sea salt, pure water and NaOCl aerosol, as well as the pH dependency of fractionation. Oxidation of SO2 by NaOCl aerosol was extremely efficient, with a reactive uptake coefficient of ≈0.5, and produced sulfate that was enriched in 32S with αOCl = 0.9882±0.0036 at 19 °C. Oxidation on sea salt aerosol was much less efficient than on NaOCl aerosol, suggesting alkalinity was already exhausted on the short timescale of the experiments. Measurements at pH = 2.1 and 7.2 were used to calculate fractionation factors for each step from SO2(g → multiple steps → SOOCl2−. Oxidation on sea salt aerosol resulted in a lower fractionation factor than expected for oxidation of SO32− by O3 (αseasalt = 1.0124±0.0017 at 19 °C. Comparison of the lower fractionation during oxidation on sea salt aerosol to the fractionation factor for high pH oxidation shows HOCl contributed 29% of S(IV oxidation on sea salt in the short experimental timescale, highlighting the potential importance of hypohalous acids in the marine environment. The sulfur isotope fractionation factors measured in this study allow differentiation between the alkalinity-limited pathways – oxidation by O3 and by Cl catalysis (α34 = 1.0163±0.0018 at 19 °C in pure water or 1.0199±0.0024 at pH = 7.2 – which favour the heavy isotope, and

  20. Elevated aerosols and role of circulation parameters in aerosol vertical distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prijith, S. S.; Aloysius, Marina; Mohan, Mannil; Rao, P. V. N.

    2016-01-01

    The study examines aerosol loading in different vertical layers of the atmosphere and explores the role of atmospheric circulation parameters in vertical distribution of aerosols and in its seasonal variability. Aerosol vertical distribution over the globe is examined, using long term satellite observations, by considering aerosol loading in different layers of atmosphere upto ∼6 km altitudes from surface and fractional contribution of each of these layers to total columnar aerosol loading. Aerosols are observed residing close to the surface in most of the oceanic environments, except over certain regions which are in the close proximity of continents where upper level winds are conducive for long range aerosol transport. In contrast, considerable vertical spread in aerosol distribution with strong seasonal variability, minimum occurring in winter months and maximum in summer, is observed over the continental regions. Vertical spread in aerosol distribution is observed highest over north eastern and north western parts of Africa during northern hemispheric summer, when the convection activity peaks over these regions due to large solar insolation and associated surface heating. Seasonal variation of aerosol vertical spread over both of these regions is observed in phase with variation in atmospheric convergence and vorticity. During summer months, when the aerosol vertical spread is highest, strong surface level convergence and associated cyclonic vorticity is observed along with an upper level (700-600 hPa) divergence. The surface level convergence and upper level divergence together induce an upward flow of air which carries aerosols from ground to higher altitudes. This mechanism of aerosol vertical transport is further corroborated through the correlation and regression relations of surface convergence/vorticity with aerosol loading above different elevations and hence the study reveals role of circulation parameters in aerosol vertical distribution.

  1. Nanoscale surface modification of Mt. Etna volcanic ashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, G.; Mazzoleni, P.; Corsaro, R. A.; Costagliola, P.; Di Benedetto, F.; Ciliberto, E.; Gimeno, D.; Bongiorno, C.; Spinella, C.

    2016-02-01

    Ashes emitted during volcanic explosive activity present peculiar surface chemical and mineralogical features related in literature to the interaction in the plume of solid particles with gases and aerosols. The compositional differences of magmas and gases, the magnitude, intensity and duration of the emission and the physical condition during the eruption, strongly influence the results of the modification processes. Here we report the characterization of the products emitted during the 2013 paroxysmal activity of Mt. Etna. The surface features of the ash particles were investigated through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) allowing the analysis at nanometer scale. TEM images showed on the surface the presence of composite structures formed by Ca, Mg and Na sulphates and halides and of droplets and crystals of chlorides; nanometric magnesioferrite and metallic iron dendrites are observable directly below the surface. From the chemical point of view, the most external layer of the volcanic glassy particles (XPS, presents depletion in Si, Mg, Ca, Na and K and strong enrichment in volatile elements especially F and S, with respect to the inner zone, which represents the unaltered counterpart. Below this external layer, a transition glassy shell (thick 50-100 nm) is characterized by Fe, Mg and Ca enrichments with respect to the inner zone. We propose that the ash particle surface composition is the result of a sequence of events which start at shallow depth, above the exsolution surface, where gas bubbles nucleate and the interfaces between bubbles and melt represent proto-surfaces of future ash particles. Enrichment of Ca, Mg and Fe and halides may be due to the early partition of F and Cl in the gas phase and their interaction with the melt layer located close to the bubbles. Furthermore the formation of volatile SiF4 and KF explain the observed depletion of Si and K. The F enrichment in the external ∼50 nm thick

  2. Layer Formation in Sedimentary Fingering Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Reali, J F; Alsinan, A; Meiburg, E

    2016-01-01

    When particles settle through a stable temperature or salinity gradient they can drive an instability known as sedimentary fingering convection. This phenomenon is thought to occur beneath sediment-rich river plumes in lakes and oceans, in the context of marine snow where decaying organic materials serve as the suspended particles, or in the atmosphere in the presence of aerosols or volcanic ash. Laboratory experiments of Houk and Green (1973) and Green (1987) have shown sedimentary fingering convection to be similar to the more commonly known thermohaline fingering convection in many ways. Here, we study the phenomenon using 3D direct numerical simulations. We find evidence for layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection in regions of parameter space where it does not occur for non-sedimentary systems. This is due to two complementary effects. Sedimentation affects the turbulent fluxes and broadens the region of parameter space unstable to the $\\gamma$-instability (Radko 2003) to include systems at l...

  3. Volcanic monitoring from space using neural networks approach. Simultaneous ash and sulfur dioxide retrievals using multispectral measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscini, A.; Corradini, S.; Chini, M.; Merucci, L.; Stramondo, S.; Picchiani, M.; Del Frate, F.

    2012-04-01

    In this work a Multi Layer Perceptron Neural Networks (MLPNN) approach has been used for a simultaneous volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide retrievals considering the MODIS measurements. As test case the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption have been considered. A network was built for each parameter to be retrieved. Additionally, for volcanic ash, a network for the classification of "ash image pixels" was implemented, which was then used to mask the estimates. Several network topologies were compared in terms of their performance. Concerning the training phase and networks testing, a set of MODIS images was selected covering the Eyjafjallajokull May events. The classification NNs were trained with the volcanic ash classification map obtained with the Brightness Temperature Difference algorithm, assumed as benchmark. The neural networks for the quantitative estimation of the parameters associated with volcanic ash, mass, effective radius, aerosol optical depth and SO2, were instead trained with maps obtained using consolidated estimation algorithms based on simulated radiances at the top of the atmosphere, generated in turn applying a radiative transfer model to remote sensing data. The networks proved to be very effective in solving the inversion problem related to the estimation of the parameters of the volcanic cloud, settling the crucial issue related to false alarms in the detection of volcanic ash. Furthermore, once the training phase is complete, NNs provide a faster inversion technique, useful for the applications. From this point of view the technique satisfies the need to respond quickly as a result of disastrous natural hazards, such as volcanic eruptions. Future activities include testing the effectiveness of the technique under different lighting conditions (night images) and on other types of multispectral data, such as that provided by high temporal resolution sensors like SEVIRI-MSG, on board the METEOSAT second Generation satellites. The latter would be

  4. Molecular distributions of dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls in biomass burning aerosols: implications for photochemical production and degradation in smoke layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hoffer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols in the size class <2.5 μm (6 daytime and 9 nighttime samples were collected at a pasture site in Rondônia, Brazil, during the intensive biomass burning period of 16–26 September 2002 as part of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia – Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate (LBA-SMOCC. Homologous series of dicarboxylic acids (C2–C11 and related compounds (ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls were identified using gas chromatography (GC and GC/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Among the species detected, oxalic acid was found to be the most abundant, followed by succinic, malonic and glyoxylic acids. Average concentrations of total dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls in the aerosol samples were 2180, 167 and 56 ng m−3, respectively. These are 2–8, 3–11 and 2–16 times higher, respectively, than those reported in urban aerosols, such as in 14 Chinese megacities. Higher ratios of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds to biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan and K+ were found in the daytime than in the nighttime, suggesting the importance of photochemical production. On the other hand, higher ratios of oxalic acid to other dicarboxylic acids and related compounds normalized to biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan and K+ in the daytime provide evidence for the possible degradation of dicarboxylic acids (≥C3 in this smoke-polluted environment. Assuming that these and related compounds are photo-chemically oxidized to oxalic acid in the daytime, and given their linear relationship, they could account for, on average, 77% of the formation of oxalic acid. The remaining portion of oxalic acid may have been directly emitted from biomass burning as suggested by a good correlation with the biomass burning tracers (K+, CO and ECa and organic carbon (OC. However, photochemical production from other precursors could not be excluded.

  5. eVolv2k: A new ice core-based volcanic forcing reconstruction for the past 2000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Matthew; Sigl, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Radiative forcing resulting from stratospheric aerosols produced by major volcanic eruptions is a dominant driver of climate variability in the Earth's past. The ability of climate model simulations to accurately recreate past climate is tied directly to the accuracy of the volcanic forcing timeseries used in the simulations. We present here a new volcanic forcing reconstruction, based on newly updated ice core composites from Antarctica and Greenland. Ice core records are translated into stratospheric aerosol properties for use in climate models through the Easy Volcanic Aerosol (EVA) module, which provides an analytic representation of volcanic stratospheric aerosol forcing based on available observations and aerosol model results, prescribing the aerosol's radiative properties and primary modes of spatial and temporal variability. The evolv2k volcanic forcing dataset covers the past 2000 years, and has been provided for use in the Paleo-Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP), and VolMIP experiments within CMIP6. Here, we describe the construction of the eVolv2k data set, compare with prior forcing sets, and show initial simulation results.

  6. Was Global Warming at the Paleocene-Eocene Boundary Terminated by Flood Volcanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegner, C.; Larsen, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) has recently been attributed to greenhouse gases released from sedimentary basins in the Northeast Atlantic due to interaction with continental flood basalt magmatism. In the marine section in Denmark the alkaline Ash-17 has been dated at 55.1 plus minus 0.1 Ma and the PETM at 55.6-55.4 Ma. A similar alkaline tephra deposit in the uppermost part of the East Greenland flood basalt succession has also been dated at 55.1 plus minus 0.1 Ma and provides a linkage to Ash-17. Our recent results on the pressure of the coeval Skaergaard intrusion indicate that the majority of flood basalts erupted in less than 300,000 years. It is therefore possible to correlate the main flood basalt event with the interval immediately postdating PETM (55.4-55.1 Ma). This is consistent with a report of a small dinoflagellate cyst assemblage with a high proportion of Apectodinium homomorphum in one productive sample from sediments within the lower volcanics underlying the main flood basalt succession. The Apectodinium genus is usually abundant in the PETM interval. A scarcity of ash layers within the PETM interval also supports a correlation of the main flood basalt event with the overlying marine section including more abundant ash layers. The high eruption rate of the main flood basalts is likely to have resulted in atmospheric cooling caused by sulfuric acid aerosols produced from volcanic sulfur dioxide. Available estimates for volume and composition of the Northeast Atlantic flood basalts indicate that at least 36 teratonnes of sulfur dioxide was pumped into the atmosphere. This average 120 megatonnes per year over 300,000 years. For comparison, the historic Laki eruption in Iceland is estimated to have released 120 megatonnes sulfur dioxide over 5 months. We suggest that flood volcanism of the Northeast Atlantic terminated the global warming event at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary.

  7. Supervolcanoes within an ancient volcanic province in Arabia Terra, Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Joseph R; Bleacher, Jacob E

    2013-10-03

    Several irregularly shaped craters located within Arabia Terra, Mars, represent a new type of highland volcanic construct and together constitute a previously unrecognized Martian igneous province. Similar to terrestrial supervolcanoes, these low-relief paterae possess a range of geomorphic features related to structural collapse, effusive volcanism and explosive eruptions. Extruded lavas contributed to the formation of enigmatic highland ridged plains in Arabia Terra. Outgassed sulphur and erupted fine-grained pyroclastics from these calderas probably fed the formation of altered, layered sedimentary rocks and fretted terrain found throughout the equatorial region. The discovery of a new type of volcanic construct in the Arabia volcanic province fundamentally changes the picture of ancient volcanism and climate evolution on Mars. Other eroded topographic basins in the ancient Martian highlands that have been dismissed as degraded impact craters should be reconsidered as possible volcanic constructs formed in an early phase of widespread, disseminated magmatism on Mars.

  8. Tropical tropopause layer cirrus and its relation to tropopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, H.-H.; Fu, Q.

    2017-02-01

    This study examines the spatial and temporal patterns of tropical tropopause layer (TTL) cirrus clouds (i.e., clouds with bases higher than 14.5 km) and their relationship to tropical tropopause including both cold point tropopause (CPT) and lapse rate tropopause (LRT). We use eight years (2006-2014) data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) and Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) measurements. In addition to the CALIPSO cloud layer product, the clouds included in the current CALIPSO dataset as stratospheric features have been considered by separating clouds from aerosols, which are important in the TTL cloud analysis. It is also shown that the temporal variation of the stratospheric aerosols matches well with the volcanic eruption events. The TTL cloud fraction and the tropical tropopause temperature both have pronounced annual cycles and are strongly negatively correlated both temporally and spatially. The examination of the TTL cloud height relative to tropopause from collocated CALIPSO and COSMIC observations indicates that the tropopause plays a critical role in constraining the TTL cloud top height. We show that the probability density function of TTL cloud top height peaks just below the CPT while the occurrence of TTL clouds with cloud tops above the CPT could be largely explained by observed tropopause height uncertainty associated with the COSMIC vertical resolution.

  9. Vertical profile and aerosol size distribution measurements in Iceland (LOAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Olafur; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Vignelles, Damien; Verdier, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Cold climate and high latitudes regions contain important dust sources where dust is frequently emitted, foremost from glacially-derived sediments of riverbeds or ice-proximal areas (Arnalds, 2010; Bullard, 2013). Iceland is probably the most active dust source in the arctic/sub-arctic region (Dagsson-Waldhauserova, 2013). The frequency of days with suspended dust exceeds 34 dust days annually. Icelandic dust is of volcanic origin; it is very dark in colour and contains sharp-tipped shards with bubbles. Such properties allow even large particles to be easily transported long distances. Thus, there is a need to better understand the spatial and temporal variability of these dusts. Two launch campaigns of the Light Optical Aerosols Counter (LOAC) were conducted in Iceland with meteorological balloons. LOAC use a new optical design that allows to retrieve the size concentrations in 19 size classes between 0.2 and 100 microm, and to provide an estimate of the main nature of aerosols. Vertical stratification and aerosol composition of the subarctic atmosphere was studied in detail. The July 2011 launch represented clean non-dusty season with low winds while the November 2013 launch was conducted during the high winds after dusty period. For the winter flight (performed from Reykjavik), the nature of aerosols strongly changed with altitude. In particular, a thin layer of volcanic dust was observed at an altitude of 1 km. Further LOAC measurements are needed to understand the implication of Icelandic dust to the Arctic warming and climate change. A new campaign of LAOC launches is planned for May 2014. Reference: Arnalds, O., 2010. Dust sources and deposition of aeolian materials in Iceland. Icelandic Agricultural Sciences 23, 3-21. Bullard, J.E., 2013. Contemporary glacigenic inputs to the dust cycle. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 38, 71-89. Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P., Arnalds O., Olafsson H. 2013. Long-term frequency and characteristics of dust storm events in

  10. Aerosolized Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Marcos I; Keyt, Holly; Reyes, Luis F

    2015-06-01

    Administration of medications via aerosolization is potentially an ideal strategy to treat airway diseases. This delivery method ensures high concentrations of the medication in the targeted tissues, the airways, with generally lower systemic absorption and systemic adverse effects. Aerosolized antibiotics have been tested as treatment for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The most successful application of this to date is treatment of infections in patients with CF. It has been hypothesized that similar success would be seen in NCFB and in difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections such as VAP. This review summarizes the available evidence supporting the use of aerosolized antibiotics and addresses the specific considerations that clinicians should recognize when prescribing an aerosolized antibiotic for patients with CF, NCFB, and VAP.

  11. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): A New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Mathew J.; Yorks. John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064,532,355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time (NRT) data capability ofthe ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as aerosol and air quality forecasting and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a

  12. Kinetic multi-layer model of aerosol surface and bulk chemistry (KM-SUB): the influence of interfacial transport and bulk diffusion on the oxidation of oleic acid by ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Pfrang, Christian; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and have strong effects on climate and public health. Gas-particle interactions can significantly change the physical and chemical properties of aerosols such as toxicity, reactivity, hygroscopicity and radiative properties. Chemical reactions and mass transport lead to continuous transformation and changes in the composition of atmospheric aerosols ("chemical aging"). Resistor model formulations are widely used to describe and investigate heterogeneous reactions and multiphase processes in laboratory, field and model studies of atmospheric chemistry. The traditional resistor models, however, are usually based on simplifying assumptions such as steady state conditions, homogeneous mixing, and limited numbers of non-interacting species and processes. In order to overcome these limitations, Pöschl, Rudich and Ammann have developed a kinetic model framework (PRA framework) with a double-layer surface concept and universally applicable rate equations and parameters for mass transport and chemical reactions at the gas-particle interface of aerosols and clouds [1]. Based on the PRA framework, we present a novel kinetic multi-layer model that explicitly resolves mass transport and chemical reaction at the surface and in the bulk of aerosol particles (KM-SUB) [2]. The model includes reversible adsorption, surface reactions and surface-bulk exchange as well as bulk diffusion and reaction. Unlike earlier models, KM-SUB does not require simplifying assumptions about steady-state conditions and radial mixing. The temporal evolution and concentration profiles of volatile and non-volatile species at the gas-particle interface and in the particle bulk can be modeled along with surface concentrations and gas uptake coefficients. In this study we explore and exemplify the effects of bulk diffusion on the rate of reactive gas uptake for a simple reference system, the ozonolysis of oleic acid particles, in comparison to experimental data and

  13. Mechanical properties of biocompatible titania layers produced in an aerosol-gel reactor; Propiedades mecanicas de recubrimientos biocompatibles de oxido de titanio producidos en un reactor aerosol-gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manso, M.; Langlet, M.; Martinez-Duart, J.

    2001-07-01

    The present work deals with the formation of titania coatings depending on the parameters of an aerosol-gel reactor. It has been found that the mechanical properties of the films can be tailored selecting the degree of drying and condensation of the precursor solution. To show it, the plastic deformation energy has been calculated from dynamic uniaxial tests over coatings formed at different temperatures. Furthermore, the values of hardness and elastic modules of the coatings have been obtained from loading-unloading indentation cycles. Clearly different values were obtained for each coating and an increase of the above mentioned magnitudes was observed for the coatings prepared at higher sintering temperatures. (Author) 7 refs.

  14. Real Time Volcanic Cloud Products and Predictions for Aviation Alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Habib, Shahid; da Silva, Arlindo; Hughes, Eric; Yang, Kai; Brentzel, Kelvin; Seftor, Colin; Li, Jason Y.; Schneider, David; Guffanti, Marianne; Hoffman, Robert L.; Myers, Tim; Tamminen, Johanna; Hassinen, Seppo

    2014-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can inject significant amounts of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and volcanic ash into the atmosphere, posing a substantial risk to aviation safety. Ingesting near-real time and Direct Readout satellite volcanic cloud data is vital for improving reliability of volcanic ash forecasts and mitigating the effects of volcanic eruptions on aviation and the economy. NASA volcanic products from the Ozone Monitoring Insrument (OMI) aboard the Aura satellite have been incorporated into Decision Support Systems of many operational agencies. With the Aura mission approaching its 10th anniversary, there is an urgent need to replace OMI data with those from the next generation operational NASA/NOAA Suomi National Polar Partnership (SNPP) satellite. The data provided from these instruments are being incorporated into forecasting models to provide quantitative ash forecasts for air traffic management. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the volcanic near-real time and Direct Readout data products from the new Ozone Monitoring and Profiling Suite (OMPS) ultraviolet sensor onboard SNPP for monitoring and forecasting volcanic clouds. The transition of NASA data production to our operational partners is outlined. Satellite observations are used to constrain volcanic cloud simulations and improve estimates of eruption parameters, resulting in more accurate forecasts. This is demonstrated for the 2012 eruption of Copahue. Volcanic eruptions are modeled using the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) and the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol and Radiation Transport (GOCART) model. A hindcast of the disruptive eruption from Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull is used to estimate aviation re-routing costs using Metron Aviation's ATM Tools.

  15. Reconstructing Volcanic Forcing of Climate: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, M.; Timmreck, C.; Sigl, M.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative forcing resulting from major volcanic eruptions has been a dominant driver of climate variability during Earth's history. Including volcanic forcing in climate model simulations is therefore essential to recreate past climate variability, and provides the opportunity to test the ability of models to respond accurately to external forcing. Ice cores provide estimates of the volcanic sulfate loadings from past eruptions, from which radiative forcing can be reconstructed, with associated uncertainties. Using prior reconstructions, climate models have reproduced the gross features of global mean temperature variability reconstructed from climate proxies, although some significant differences between model results and reconstructions remain. There is much less confidence in the accuracy of the dynamical responses to volcanic forcing produced by climate models, and thus the regional aspects of post-volcanic climate anomalies are much more uncertain—a result which mirrors uncertainties in the dynamical responses to future climate change. Improvements in model's response to volcanic forcing may be possible through improving the accuracy of the forcing data. Recent advances on multiple fronts have motivated the development of a next-generation volcanic forcing timeseries for use in climate models, based on (1) improved dating and precision of ice core records, (2) better understanding of the atmospheric transport and microphysical evolution of volcanic aerosol, including its size distribution, and (3) improved representations of the spatiotemporal structure of volcanic radiative forcing. A new volcanic forcing data set, covering the past 2500 years, will be introduced and compared with prior reconstructions. Preliminary results of climate model simulations using the new forcing will also be shown, and current and future applications of the forcing set discussed.

  16. Characterization of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic plume over the Iberian Peninsula by lidar remote sensing and ground-level data collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revuelta, M. A.; Sastre, M.; Fernández, A. J.; Martín, L.; García, R.; Gómez-Moreno, F. J.; Artíñano, B.; Pujadas, M.; Molero, F.

    2012-03-01

    In April and May 2010 the eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano disrupted air traffic across Europe. The vast economic impact of this event has stirred interest on accurate plume dispersion estimation and detailed ash characterization, in order to establish a more precise threshold for safe aircraft operation. In this work we study the physical and chemical properties of volcanogenic aerosol detected at ground level at several locations over the Iberian Peninsula, nearly 3000 km away from the Icelandic volcano. Between 4 and 14 May, the volcanogenic plume was detected at ground level, identified by an increase in sulfur dioxide, particle mass concentrations, and particulate sulfate concentration, at most EMEP stations as well as at the CIEMAT site (for the sulfate concentration in PM). At the CIEMAT site, the synergic use of Raman lidar and on-site instruments provided relevant information on the evolution and properties of the plume over the central part of the Iberian Peninsula. Aerosol extinction coefficient profiles provided by the lidar station show the presence of remarkable aerosol layers between 6 May and 15 May. Provenance studies using FLEXTRA backtrajectories confirmed that most of the aerosol layers originated in the Eyjafjallajökull eruption. The large suite of semi-continuous instruments present in the latter site allowed a better characterization of the aerosol properties. Size distribution and chemical composition were continuously monitored during the event, revealing a large increase in the aerosol fine mode, in coincidence with increases in ambient sulfate concentration, while the coarse mode remained almost unaltered. These results show that the plume carried mainly fine particles, with sizes between 0.1 and 0.7 μm in diameter, in contrast with studies of the plume that affected Central Europe in April, where particles with diameters larger than 20 μm were present in the ash layers. A possible explanation for this can be related to the

  17. Impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Michael; Brinkop, Sabine; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have a significant impact on the Earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes, the stratosphere is also influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Hamburg - Modular Earth Submodel System (ECHAM/MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the long-wave volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour induced by the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on tropospheric water vapour and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are evident, if the long-wave forcing is strong enough. Our results are corroborated by additional sensitivity simulations of the Mount Pinatubo period with reduced nudging and reduced volcanic aerosol extinction.

  18. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  19. Quantitative estimation of inter layers heterogeneity characteristics of volcanic reservoir: taking one member of Yingcheng formation in Xudong area for an example%火山岩储层层内非均质性定量评价——以松辽盆地徐东地区营城组一段为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈欢庆

    2012-01-01

    Due to few researches on volcanic reservoir heterogeneity, and in order to deeply un- derstand the structural characteristics of reservoir in micro-scale and provide reference to the effective exploitation of volcanic reservoir, the characteristics of inter layer heterogeneity of volcanic reservoir were quantitatively studied. one member of Yingcheng cretaceous formation In this research, the volcanic gas reservoir of in Xudong area, Xushen gas field was taken as an example. At the same time, the genesis and impact factor of inter layer heterogeneity of vol- canic reservoir and its influence to the reservoir development are also discussed. In this process, 56 core analysis data and 275 statistics of samples of reservoir properties were ana- lyzed, and 32 well log interpretation data were used. Methods of geological statistics and arith- metical operation means were used. The methods of core analyses combined with methods of well logging results statistics used to study the characteristics of inter layers heterogeneity of volcanic reservoir are presented. The results show that the inter layer heterogeneity of studied horizon volcanic reservoir in the aimed area was the strongest in terms of mass, whereas the in- ter layer heterogeneity of the YCII1 single layer, which was the leading layer, was the weakest among the four layers with a vertical permeability of more than half the cross range permeabili- ty. As a whole, variations of reservoir permeability in cross range were far bigger than those in vertical direction. The impact factors of inter layer heterogeneity of volcanic reservoir include the structural functioning, volcanic eruption characteristics, volcanic lithology, volcanic litho- facies and diagenesis, where the structural functioning and diagenesis took the dominant roles. Taking the variation coefficient of permeability as an index, the reservoir development condi- tions were researched. The results show that the reservoir development often occurred in

  20. Aerosol observation in Fengtai area, Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengdong Liu; Jianguo Liu; Bei Wang; Fan Lu; Shuhua Huang; Dexia Wu; Daowen Han

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of aerosol number concentration and particulate matter with diameter less than 10μm (PM10) mass concentrations of urban background aerosols were performed in Fengtai area, Beijing in 2006. Black carbon (BC) was collected simultaneously from the ground and analyzed to determine the particulate matter components. To satisfy the interest in continuous monitoring of temporal and spatial distribution of aerosols, the relationship between extinction coefficient (visibility) measured by lidar remote sensing and the aerosol number concentration measured from the ground was derived by using statistical method. Vertical particle number concentration profile within the planetary boundary layer could be inversed through the lidar data as well as the statistical relation.

  1. Inverse transport modeling of volcanic sulfur dioxide emissions using large-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Yi; Hoffmann, Lars; Griessbach, Sabine; Rößler, Thomas; Stein, Olaf

    2016-05-01

    An inverse transport modeling approach based on the concepts of sequential importance resampling and parallel computing is presented to reconstruct altitude-resolved time series of volcanic emissions, which often cannot be obtained directly with current measurement techniques. A new inverse modeling and simulation system, which implements the inversion approach with the Lagrangian transport model Massive-Parallel Trajectory Calculations (MPTRAC) is developed to provide reliable transport simulations of volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2). In the inverse modeling system MPTRAC is used to perform two types of simulations, i.e., unit simulations for the reconstruction of volcanic emissions and final forward simulations. Both types of transport simulations are based on wind fields of the ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. The reconstruction of altitude-dependent SO2 emission time series is also based on Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) satellite observations. A case study for the eruption of the Nabro volcano, Eritrea, in June 2011, with complex emission patterns, is considered for method validation. Meteosat Visible and InfraRed Imager (MVIRI) near-real-time imagery data are used to validate the temporal development of the reconstructed emissions. Furthermore, the altitude distributions of the emission time series are compared with top and bottom altitude measurements of aerosol layers obtained by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) satellite instruments. The final forward simulations provide detailed spatial and temporal information on the SO2 distributions of the Nabro eruption. By using the critical success index (CSI), the simulation results are evaluated with the AIRS observations. Compared to the results with an assumption of a constant flux of SO2 emissions, our inversion approach leads to an improvement

  2. Molecular distributions of dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls in biomass burning aerosols: implications for photochemical production and degradation in smoke layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kundu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols in the size class <2.5 μm (6 daytime and 9 nighttime samples were collected at a pasture site in Rondônia, Brazil, during the intensive biomass burning period of 16–26 September 2002 as part of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia – Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate (LBA-SMOCC. Homologous series of dicarboxylic acids (C2–C11 and related compounds (ketocarboxylic acids and dicarbonyls were identified using gas chromatography and GC/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Among the species detected, oxalic acid was found to be the most abundant, followed by succinic, malonic and glyoxylic acids. Average concentrations of total dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls in the aerosol samples were 2180, 167 and 56 ng m−3, respectively. These are 2–8, 3–11 and 2–16 times higher, respectively, than those reported in urban aerosols, such as in 14 Chinese megacities. Higher ratios of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds to biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan and K+ were found in the daytime than in the nighttime, suggesting an importance of photochemical production. On the other hand, higher ratios of oxalic acid to other dicarboxylic acids and related compounds normalized to biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan and K+ in the daytime provide evidence for the possible degradation of dicarboxylic acids (≥C3 in this smoke-polluted environment. Assuming that these and related compounds are photochemically oxidized to oxalic acid in the daytime and given their linear relationship, they could account for, on average, 77% of the formation of oxalic acid. The remaining portion of oxalic acid may have been directly emitted from biomass burning as suggested by a good correlation with the biomass burning tracers (K+, CO and ECa and organic carbon (OC. However, photochemical production from other precursors

  3. What do we need to know to model the microphysical evolution of volcanic clouds and how can we make these measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, J. M.; Toon, O. B.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions can inject millions of tons of ash, sulfate and gaseous precursors into the stratosphere. The magnitude and duration of the volcanic cloud on Earth's temperatures, circulation, clouds, and stratospheric ozone is strongly affected by the microphysical properties of the aerosol size distribution, which can evolve in complex ways. This presentation will cover the impacts and uncertainties associated with microphysical aerosol measurements and modeling of the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption, and valuable future measurements after the next large volcanic eruption. These additional measurements can help improve our understanding of stratospheric processes as well as possible consequences of large volcanic eruptions and hypothetical geoengineering scenarios on radiative forcing and chemistry.

  4. The ice-core record of volcanism: Status and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigl, Michael; McConnell, Joseph R.; Chellman, Nathan; Ludlow, Francis; Curran, Mark; Plunkett, Gill; Büntgen, Ulf; Toohey, Matthew; Burke, Andrea; Grieman, Mackenzie

    2016-04-01

    Radiative forcing resulting from stratospheric aerosols produced by major volcanic eruptions is a dominant driver of climate variability in the Earth's past. Accurate knowledge of the climate anomalies resulting from volcanic eruptions provides important information for understanding the global and regional responses of the Earth system to external forcing agents. Based on a unique compilation of newly obtained, high-resolution, ice-core measurements, as well as palaeo-climatic evidence inferred from existing tree-ring records and historical documentary sources, we revised the dating of ice-core based reconstructions of past volcanic eruptions and confirmed the dominant role of explosive volcanism on short-term summer temperature variability throughout the past 2,500 years. Continuous weekly surface snow measurements obtained from Summit, Greenland (2005-2014) further allow placing volcanic sulphate emissions arising from a series of moderate volcanic eruptions during the last decade into a multi-millennial context. While these updated ice core records provide a more accurate constraint on the timing and magnitude of volcanic eruptions, there is also new data emerging on the geographic locations of past eruptions, atmospheric transport of volcanic fallout and climatic consequences (e.g. sea-ice; hydro-climate) from studying volcanic deposits (e.g. extent of volcanic ash deposition), proxy data and historical records. On the basis of selected case studies we will discuss the role volcanic eruptions have played in the Earth's climate system during the past and identify potential additional constraints provided by ice cores.

  5. Optical Properties of Aged Free Tropospheric Aerosol Over the Northern Atlantic: Analysis of 2012-2014 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K.; Mazzoleni, L. R.; Fialho, P. J.; Dzepina, K.; Helmig, D.; Jacques, H.; Dziobak, M.; Kumar, S.; China, S.; Sharma, N.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Azores are a volcanic archipelago located 1500km west of Lisbon, Portugal in the North Atlantic Ocean. A 2351 meter dormant volcano lies on the 447 km2island of Pico with a population of around 15,000. Its location and orography are such that the summit typically lies above the well mixed marine boundary layer. A station was established in the caldera of the volcano at 2225 m by the late Dr. Richard Honrath in collaboration with the University of the Azores and began collecting data in 2001. A seven-wavelength aethalometer was employed to measure the black carbon equivalent mass concentration in the free troposphere since then. In 2012 a three wavelength nephelometer was added to measure total light scattering and back scattering due to aerosol. In 2013 an optical particle counter was added. Aerosol, including black carbon, play an important role in atmospheric processes for a number of reasons including different radiative forcing effects, acting as a cloud condensation and ice nuclei and changing surface albedo of snow. We present the wavelength-dependent aerosol optical properties measured during the 2012, 2013 and 2014 sampling seasons along with particle count data when available. Several events with high aerosol concentrations are investigated in detail.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide in the marine atmospheric boundary layer during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment/Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange experiment in the eastern subtropical North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniel; Tsivou, Maria; Bonsang, Bernard; Abonnel, Christian; Carsey, Thomas; Springer-Young, Margie; Pszenny, Alex; Suhre, Karsten

    1997-03-01

    Gas phase H2O2 was measured in surface air on the NOAA ship Malcolm Baldrige from June 8 to 27, 1992 (Julian days 160-179), during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment/Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange experiment in the eastern subtropical North Atlantic region. Average H2O2 mixing ratios observed were 0.63±0.28 ppbv, ranging between detection limit and 1.5 ppbv. For the entire experiment, only weak or no correlation was found between H2O2 mixing ratio and meteorological parameters (pressure, temperature, humidity, or UV radiation flux) as well as with tracers of continental air masses (CO, black carbon, radon). The average daily H2O2 cycle for the entire period exhibits a maximum of 0.8±0.3 ppbv near sunset and a minimum of 0.4±0.2 ppbv 4-5 hours after sunrise. Several clear H2O2 diurnal variations have been observed, from which a first-order removal rate of about 1×10-5 s-1 for H2O2 can be inferred from nighttime measurements. This rate compares well with those deduced from measurements taken at Cape Grim (Tasmania, 41°S) and during the Soviet-American Gas and Aerosol III experiment (equatorial Pacific Ocean).

  7. Improving Aerosol and Visibility Forecasting Capabilities Using Current and Future Generations of Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    retrievals . 15. SUBJECT TERMS ’ Aerosol, data assimilation, satellite remote sensing, visibility forecast, electro-optical propagation 16. SECURITY...innovative methods for retrieving aerosol optical depth at nighttime using Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data (Johnson et al...Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol and cloud layer products, as well as collocated Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Aerosol Index (Al) data and

  8. Highly Resolved Paleoclimatic Aerosol Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Ernesto

    In ice cores a plethora of proxies for paleoclimatic conditions is archived. Air trapped in the ice during firnification allows for direct measurements of the concentrations and isotope ratios of paleoatmospheric gases while, the isotopic composition of the ice matrix itself is related...... to paleotemperatures. Impurities in the matrix are comprised of particulate and soluble aerosols, each carrying information on its source’s activitiy and|or proximity. Opposed to gases and water isotopes, the seasonality of many aerosols is not smoothed out in the firn column so that large concentration gradients...... with frequently changing signs are preserved. Therefore, these aerosol records can be used for dating by annual layer counting. However, with increasing depth the annual layer thicknesses decreases due to pressure and ice flow and accurate dating is possible only as long as the rapid variations can be resolved...

  9. Global two-channel AVHRR aerosol climatology: effects of stratospheric aerosols and preliminary comparisons with MODIS and MISR retrievals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geogdzhayev, Igor V. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Mishchenko, Michael I. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States)]. E-mail: crmim@giss.nasa.gov; Liu Li [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Remer, Lorraine [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 913, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2004-10-15

    We present an update on the status of the global climatology of the aerosol column optical thickness and Angstrom exponent derived from channel-1 and -2 radiances of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) in the framework of the Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP). The latest version of the climatology covers the period from July 1983 to September 2001 and is based on an adjusted value of the diffuse component of the ocean reflectance as derived from extensive comparisons with ship sun-photometer data. We use the updated GACP climatology and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) data to analyze how stratospheric aerosols from major volcanic eruptions can affect the GACP aerosol product. One possible retrieval strategy based on the AVHRR channel-1 and -2 data alone is to infer both the stratospheric and the tropospheric aerosol optical thickness while assuming fixed microphysical models for both aerosol components. The second approach is to use the SAGE stratospheric aerosol data in order to constrain the AVHRR retrieval algorithm. We demonstrate that the second approach yields a consistent long-term record of the tropospheric aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent. Preliminary comparisons of the GACP aerosol product with MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer aerosol retrievals show reasonable agreement, the GACP global monthly optical thickness being lower than the MODIS one by approximately 0.03. Larger differences are observed on a regional scale. Comparisons of the GACP and MODIS Angstrom exponent records are less conclusive and require further analysis.

  10. Atmospheric responses to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Angus; Highwood, Eleanor; Charlton-Perez, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, also called solar radiation management (SRM), involves the injection of aerosol into the stratosphere to increase the planetary albedo. It has been conceieved as a policy option in response to human-induced global warming. It is well-established from modelling studies and observations following volcanic eruptions that stratospheric sulphate aerosols cause global cooling. Some aspects of the climate response, especially those involving large-scale dynamical changes, are more uncertain. This work attempts to identify the physical mechanisms operating in the climate response to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering using idealised model experiments. The radiative forcing produced by the aerosol depends on its type (species) and size. Aerosols absorb terrestrial and solar radiation, which drives stratospheric temperature change. The stratospheric temperature change also depends on aerosol type and size. We calculate the stratospheric temperature change due to geoengineering with sulphate, titania, limestone and soot in a fixed-dynamical-heating radiative model. Sulphate produces tropical heating of up to ~6 K. Titania produces much less heating, whereas soot produces much more. Most aerosols increase the meridional temperature gradient in the lower stratosphere which, by thermal wind balance, would be expected to intensify the zonal winds in the polar vortex. An intermediate-complexity general circulation model is used to investigate the dynamical response to geoengineering aerosols. Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The carbon dioxide forcing is then balanced using stratospheric sulphate aerosol. We assess dynamical changes in the stratosphere, for example, the frequency of stratospheric sudden warmings and the strength of the Brewer-Dobson overturning circulation. We also assess changes in the strength and position of the tropospheric jets. We compare results for sulphate with those for titania.

  11. Pathways, Impacts, and Policies on Severe Aerosol Injections into the Atmosphere: 2011 Severe Atmospheric Aerosols Events Conference

    KAUST Repository

    Weil, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The 2011 severe atmospheric events conference, held on August 11-12, 2011, Hamburg, Germany, discussed climatic and environmental changes as a result of various kinds of huge injections of aerosols into the atmosphere and the possible consequences for the world population. Various sessions of the conference dealt with different aspects of large aerosol injections and severe atmospheric aerosol events along the geologic time scale. A presentation about radiative heating of aerosols as a self-lifting mechanism in the Australian forest fires discussed the question of how the impact of tropical volcanic eruptions depends on the eruption season. H.-F. Graf showed that cloud-resolving plume models are more suitable to predict the volcanic plume height and dispersion than one-dimensional models. G. Stenchikov pointed out that the absorbing smoke plumes in the upper troposphere can be partially mixed into the lower stratosphere because of the solar heating and lofting effect.

  12. Evolution of Small Scale Density Perturbations of Plasma and Charged Aerosol Particles in Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) Layers%Evolution of Small Scale Density Perturbations of Plasma and Charged Aerosol Particles in Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡祖权; 陈银华; 郑聚高; 刘昊; 郁明阳; 吴剑

    2011-01-01

    Time evolution of ionospheric D-region plasmas including the perturbations of electrons and charged aerosol particles is investigated under the conditions of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). It is shown that the time scale of decay of the electron density is in the order of an hour under typical PMSE conditions, in the majority of cases, the electron density is anticorrelated to the ion density, except that the radius of aerosol particles is greater than 50 nm. Also, the evolutions under varied parameters, such as the amplitude and width of perturbation, the aerosol particle radius, and the altitude of the PMSE occurrence are investigated. The obtained results are useful for interpreting the experimental observations.

  13. Discrimination of water, ice and aerosols by light polarisation in the CLOUD experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Nichman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather and General Circulation Models (GCMs. The simultaneous detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud-particle size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable ice-water phase environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarisation (CASPOL is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure their effects on the backscatter polarisation state. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics-Leaving-OUtdoor-Droplets (CLOUD chamber facility at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed phase clouds and viscous Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA are presented. We report observations of significant liquid – viscous SOA particle polarisation transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarisation ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid, crystalline substances such as ammonium sulphate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentration and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8–9 campaigns and its potential contribution to Tropical Troposphere Layer (TTL analysis.

  14. NUMBER CONCENTRATION, SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND FINE PARTICLE FRACTION OF TROPOSPHERIC AND STRATOSPHERIC AEROSOLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xu; Guangyu Shi; Li Zhang; Jun Zhou; Yasunobu Iwasaka

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol observations were carried out at Xianghe Scientific Balloon Base (39.45°N, 117°E) using a stratospheric balloon. The particle number concentrations of the tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols were directly explored.The vertical distributions of the number concentration, number-size (that is, particle number versus particle size)distribution, and the fraction of fine particles (0.5 μm>r>0.15 μm/r>0.15 μm) are reported in this paper. The profiles of particle concentration present multi-peak phenomenon. The pattern of size distribution for atmospheric aerosol indicates a tri-modal (r=~0.2 μm, ~0.88 μm and ~7.0 μm) and a bi-modal (r=~0.13 μm and 2.0 μm). The number-size distribution almost fits the Junge distribution for particles with r<0.5 μm in the stratosphere of 1993 and the troposphere of 1994. But the distributions of coarse particles (r>0.5 μm) are not uniform. The number-size distribution exhibits also a wide size range in the troposphere of 1993. The results demonstrate that fine particles represent the major portion in the troposphere during the measurement period, reaching as high as 95% in 1994. Certain coarse particle peaks in the troposphere were attributed to clouds and other causes, and in the stratosphere to volcanic eruption. The stratospheric aerosol layer consists of unique fractions of fine or coarse particles depending on their sources. In summary, the process of gas-to-particles conversion was active and the coarse particles were rich over the Xianghe area. The measurements also demonstrate that the spatial and temporal atmospheric aerosol distributions are nonuniform and changeful.

  15. Ozone depletion following future volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Klobas, J.; Wilmouth, David M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Anderson, James G.; Salawitch, Ross J.

    2017-07-01

    While explosive volcanic eruptions cause ozone loss in the current atmosphere due to an enhancement in the availability of reactive chlorine following the stratospheric injection of sulfur, future eruptions are expected to increase total column ozone as halogen loading approaches preindustrial levels. The timing of this shift in the impact of major volcanic eruptions on the thickness of the ozone layer is poorly known. Modeling four possible climate futures, we show that scenarios with the smallest increase in greenhouse gas concentrations lead to the greatest risk to ozone from heterogeneous chemical processing following future eruptions. We also show that the presence in the stratosphere of bromine from natural, very short-lived biogenic compounds is critically important for determining whether future eruptions will lead to ozone depletion. If volcanic eruptions inject hydrogen halides into the stratosphere, an effect not considered in current ozone assessments, potentially profound reductions in column ozone would result.

  16. Volcanic ash and its enigma: A case study from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.

    -1 JOURNAL GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF INDIA Vol 60, August 2002, pp.127-130 Volcanic Ash and its Enigma: A Case Study from the Central Indian Ocean Basin J. N. PATTAN National Institute of Oceanography. Dona Paula. 403 004. Goa, India. Email: pattan... is reported. Keywords: Ash layer. Glass shards, Youngest Toba Tuff, Terrigenous influx, Indian Ocean. INTRODUCTION Marine ash layers provide information about cyclicity of volcanism. volcanic production rate and volume, eruption duration, geochemical...

  17. Volcanic Supersites as cross-disciplinary laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzale, Antonello; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Giamberini, Mariasilvia; Pennisi, Maddalena; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic Supersites, defined in the frame of the GEO-GSNL Initiative, are usually considered mainly for their geohazard and geological characteristics. However, volcanoes are extremely challenging areas from many other points of view, including environmental and climatic properties, ecosystems, hydrology, soil properties and biogeochemical cycling. Possibly, volcanoes are closer to early Earth conditions than most other types of environment. During FP7, EC effectively fostered the implementation of the European volcano Supersites (Mt. Etna, Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius and Iceland) through the MED-SUV and FUTUREVOLC projects. Currently, the large H2020 project ECOPOTENTIAL (2015-2019, 47 partners, http://www.ecopotential-project.eu/) contributes to GEO/GEOSS and to the GEO ECO Initiative, and it is devoted to making best use of remote sensing and in situ data to improve future ecosystem benefits, focusing on a network of Protected Areas of international relevance. In ECOPOTENTIAL, remote sensing and in situ data are collected, processed and used for a better understanding of the ecosystem dynamics, analysing and modelling the effects of global changes on ecosystem functions and services, over an array of different ecosystem types, including mountain, marine, coastal, arid and semi-arid ecosystems, and also areas of volcanic origin such as the Canary and La Reunion Islands. Here, we propose to extend the network of the ECOPOTENTIAL project to include active Volcanic Supersites, such as Mount Etna and other volcanic Protected Areas, and we discuss how they can be included in the framework of the ECOPOTENTIAL workflow. A coordinated and cross-disciplinary set of studies at these sites should include geological, biological, ecological, biogeochemical, climatic and biogeographical aspects, as well as their relationship with the antropogenic impact on the environment, and aim at the global analysis of the volcanic Earth Critical Zone - namely, the upper layer of the Earth

  18. A Centrifugal Volcanism Mechanism for the AMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, V. R.

    2016-12-01

    The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation has proved hard to isolate from both (i) global warming and (ii) faster oscillations. For (i), we showed [1] that by filtering all harmonics of a 63-year period, what remained could be explained remarkably accurately by the expected contribution of greenhouse warming along with the interesting increase in TSI during 1900-1950, leading to considerable confidence that global surface temperature averaged over 2069-2131 will be very close to 3 C above preindustrial. For (ii), principal component analysis of HadCRUT4 since 1850, Central England Temperature since 1659, and various other land and sea time series all show a distinct 21-year oscillation the start of whose downward swing is well synchronized with the maximum solar activity of the odd-numbered solar cycles, persisting even through the Maunder Minimum. After these are removed there remains a well-defined signal that has been associated with the so-called Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. There are two schools of thought, the AMO is of either radiative (RAD) or internal (INT) origin. RAD is explained in terms of aerosol fluctuations of volcanic origin. In [2] we gave what we felt was a knockdown argument against RAD. INT so far has been explained mainly in terms of instabilities in ocean currents such as the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Current. An interesting correlation between the AMO and Earth's Length of Day (LOD) has been noted by several authors. Missing is a plausible mechanism explaining this correlation. The mechanism we propose here is that magma welling up through ocean ridges is in a quasi-equilibrium that even small fluctuations in LOD can disturb significantly. Heat from emerging magma is carried up to the oceanic mixed layer in very large thermals. A simple model of this process leads to a correlation that is excellent except for the period 1940-1950. We propose to explain this difference in terms of a lifting of the crust by the excess magma developed

  19. Particle analysis of volcanic ash with Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieke, K. I.; Kristensen, T. B.; Koch, C. B.; Korsholm, U. S.; Sørensen, J. H.; Bilde, M.

    2012-04-01

    Since the airspace closure over Europe due to the Eyjafjalla eruption in 2010, volcanic ash has come more in the focus of atmospheric science. The airspace closure accompanying the Grímsvötn eruption in 2011 clearly indicates that there is still a great need to increase the scientific understanding of the properties and impacts of volcanic ash particles. Determination of particle characteristics, preferably in near real time, serves as an important input to transport models in operational use for decision support and guidance of authorities. We collected particles before and after the Grímsvötn volcanic ash arrived at Copenhagen, Denmark, between 23 May and 31 May 2011, as well as at a number of other locations. The analysis of meteorological conditions shows that the particle collection performed before arrival of the volcanic ash may serve as a good reference sample. We have thus been able to identify significant differences in aerosol chemical composition during a volcanic ash event over Copenhagen. These results are compared to volcanic ash particles collected on Iceland. We provide unique data about single-particle structure, chemical composition, size and morphology of volcanic ash particles. Single-particle analysis by SEM, and mineralogical studies by XRD and TEM prove that the particles are composed of glass of a characteristic composition and small, nm sized minerals attached to the large (up to tens of µm) glass fragments. The derived information about volcanic ash particles can be used by transport models, resulting in improved information to the authorities in case of new volcanic ash events over Scandinavia or Europe.

  20. Volcanic Rocks and Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. The...

  1. Kinetic double-layer model of aerosol surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions (K2-SURF): Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposed to O3, NO2, H2O, OH and NO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Garland, Rebecca M.; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    We present a kinetic double-layer surface model (K2-SURF) that describes the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on aerosol particles exposed to ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor, hydroxyl and nitrate radicals [1]. The model is based on multiple experimental studies of PAH degradation and on the Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann (PRA) framework [2] for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions. For a wide range of substrates, including solid and liquid organic and inorganic substances (soot, silica, sodium chloride, octanol/decanol, organic acids, etc.), the concentration- and time-dependence of the heterogeneous reaction between PAHs and O3 can be efficiently described with a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type mechanism. Depending on the substrate material, the Langmuir adsorption constants for O3 vary over three orders of magnitude, and the second-order rate coefficients for the surface layer reaction of O3 with different PAH vary over two orders of magnitude. The available data indicate that the Langmuir adsorption constants for NO2 are similar to those of O3, while those of H2O are several orders of magnitude smaller. The desorption lifetimes and adsorption enthalpies suggest chemisorption of NO2 and O3 and physisorption of H2O. Note, however, that the exact reaction mechanisms, rate limiting steps and possible intermediates still remain to be resolved (e.g., surface diffusion and formation of O atoms or O3- ions at the surface). The K2-SURF model enables the calculation of ozone uptake coefficients, γO3, and of PAH concentrations in the quasi-static particle surface layer. Competitive adsorption and chemical transformation of the surface (aging) lead to a strong non-linear dependence of γO3 on time and gas phase composition, with different characteristics under dilute atmospheric and concentrated laboratory conditions. Under typical ambient conditions, γO3 of PAH-coated aerosol particles are expected to be in the range of 10-6 - 10

  2. Self-limiting physical and chemical effects in volcanic eruption clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Joseph P.; Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    One-dimensional aerosol microphysical and photochemical models are used to study the chemistry of stratospheric volcanic clouds. The results indicate that the aerosol microphysical processes of condensation and coagulation produce larger particles as the SO2 injection rate is increased. Larger particles have a smaller optical depth per unit mass and settle out of the stratosphere at a faster rate than smaller ones, restricting the total number of particles in the stratosphere. The microphysical processes moderate the impact of volcanic clouds on the earth's radiation budget and climate, suggesting that volcanic effects may be self limiting. It is noted that the injection of HCl into the stratosphere, which could lead to large ozone changes, is limited by a cold trap effect in which HCl and water vapor condense on ash particles in the rising volcanic plume and fall out as ice.

  3. Coarse mode aerosols in the High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baibakov, K.; O'Neill, N. T.; Chaubey, J. P.; Saha, A.; Duck, T. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2014-12-01

    Fine mode (submicron) aerosols in the Arctic have received a fair amount of scientific attention in terms of smoke intrusions during the polar summer and Arctic haze pollution during the polar winter. Relatively little is known about coarse mode (supermicron) aerosols, notably dust, volcanic ash and sea salt. Asian dust is a regular springtime event whose optical and radiative forcing effects have been fairly well documented at the lower latitudes over North America but rarely reported for the Arctic. Volcanic ash, whose socio-economic importance has grown dramatically since the fear of its effects on aircraft engines resulted in the virtual shutdown of European civil aviation in the spring of 2010 has rarely been reported in the Arctic in spite of the likely probability that ash from Iceland and the Aleutian Islands makes its way into the Arctic and possibly the high Arctic. Little is known about Arctic sea salt aerosols and we are not aware of any literature on the optical measurement of these aerosols. In this work we present preliminary results of the combined sunphotometry-lidar analysis at two High Arctic stations in North America: PEARL (80°N, 86°W) for 2007-2011 and Barrow (71°N,156°W) for 2011-2014. The multi-years datasets were analyzed to single out potential coarse mode incursions and study their optical characteristics. In particular, CIMEL sunphotometers provided coarse mode optical depths as well as information on particle size and refractive index. Lidar measurements from High Spectral Resolution lidars (AHSRL at PEARL and NSHSRL at Barrow) yielded vertically resolved aerosol profiles and gave an indication of particle shape and size from the depolarization ratio and color ratio profiles. Additionally, we employed supplementary analyses of HYSPLIT backtrajectories, OMI aerosol index, and NAAPS (Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System) outputs to study the spatial context of given events.

  4. The Many Problems with Geoengineering Using Stratospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan

    2009-05-01

    In response to the global warming problem, there has been a recent renewed call for geoengineering ``solutions'' involving injecting particles into the stratosphere or blocking sunlight with satellites between the Sun and Earth. While volcanic eruptions have been suggested as innocuous examples of stratospheric aerosols cooling the planet, the volcano analog actually argues against geoengineering because of ozone depletion and regional hydrologic and temperature responses. In this talk, I consider the suggestion to create an artificial stratospheric aerosol layer. No systems to conduct geoengineering now exist, but a comparison of different proposed stratospheric injection schemes, airplanes, balloons, artillery, and a space elevator, shows that using airplanes would not be that expensive. We simulated the climate response to both tropical and Arctic stratospheric injection of sulfate aerosol precursors using a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean general circulation model, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE. We simulated the injection of SO2 and the model converts it to sulfate aerosols, transports them and removes them through dry and wet deposition, and calculates the climate response to the radiative forcing from the aerosols. We conducted simulations of future climate with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change A1B business-as-usual scenario both with and without geoengineering, and compare the results. We found that if there were a way to continuously inject SO2 into the lower stratosphere, it would produce global cooling. Acid deposition from the sulfate would not be enough to disturb most ecosystems. Tropical SO2 injection would produce sustained cooling over most of the world, with more cooling over continents. Arctic SO2 injection would not just cool the Arctic. But both tropical and Arctic SO2 injection would disrupt the Asian and African summer monsoons, reducing precipitation to the food supply

  5. Characteristics of trace gases and aerosols at top of urban canopy layer in Nanjing of China from one year observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tijian

    2013-04-01

    To understand the physical and chemical processes of air pollution formation in urban and their linkage with climate change in Yangtze River Delta(YRD), the fast developing area in China, a monitoring site was built on the top of a high building in the center of Nanjing. The site was set up to investigate the long term variations of trace gases and aerosols, which may play important roles in air pollution and climate change in regional scale. From one year measurement records, the annual average concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, total reactive nitrogen, water vapor are reported as 161.9±19.4 ppb, 93.8±8.9 ppb, 3856.7±412.1 ppb, 565.1±20.0 ppm, 173.6±15.6 ppb, 230.8±24.9 ppb, 34.76±7.2x10-3, respectively. PM10, PM2.5, visibility, black carbon, back scattering of particles(BSP), single scattering albedo(SSA), aerosol optical depth(AOD) and Angstrom wavelength exponent (AWE) are 115±113.1 μg/m3, 54±46.1 μg/m3, 9780±5594 m, 3055.9±2102.3 ng/m3, 66.3±97.5 Mm-1, 0.5±2.4, 0.7±0.38 and 1.22±0.28, respectively. Measurement show that the levels of air pollutants in YRD in East China are high compared to Pearl River Delta(PRD) in South China and Jing-Jin-Ji (JJJ) in North China, suggesting a possible stronger effect on atmospheric environment, climate change and human health in this region, which should be further addressed in the future study.

  6. Ice nucleating properties of volcanic ash particles from the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, G.; Zelenyuk, A.; Beranek, J.

    2011-12-01

    The volcanic ash from the volcanic emissions can significantly contribute to the natural source of aerosols in the atmosphere. In the vicinity and downwind of eruption site, the transported ash might have a stronger impact on the aviation industry, regional air quality, and climate. Despite the environmental significance of ash, our understanding of ash particles reacting with other volcanic plume constituents is rudimentary. In particular, the complex interactions between the water vapor and ash particles under different meteorological conditions that lead to cloud hydrometeors are poorly understood. To improve our understanding, we focus on investigating the ice formation properties of ash particles collected from the recent volcanic eruption. It was observed that the ash particles are less efficient ice nuclei compared to the natural dust particles in the deposition nucleation regime, but have similar efficiencies in the condensation freezing mode. The ice nucleated ash particles are separated from the interstitial particles, and further evaporated to understand the elemental composition, size, shape and morphology of the ice residue using the single particle mass spectrometer. The elemental composition reveals that majority of the elements are also present in the natural dust particles, but subtle differences are observed. This suggests that particle properties play an important role in the ice nucleation process.

  7. Volcanic forcing for climate modeling: a new microphysics-based dataset covering years 1600–present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Peter

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available As the understanding and representation of the impacts of volcanic eruptions on climate have improved in the last decades, uncertainties in the stratospheric aerosol forcing from large eruptions are now not only linked to visible optical depth estimates on a global scale but also to details on the size, latitude and altitude distributions of the stratospheric aerosols. Based on our understanding of these uncertainties, we propose a new model-based approach to generating a volcanic forcing for General-Circulation-Model (GCM and Chemistry-Climate-Model (CCM simulations. This new volcanic forcing, covering the 1600–present period, uses an aerosol microphysical model to provide a realistic, physically consistent treatment of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols. Twenty-six eruptions were modeled individually using the latest available ice cores aerosol mass estimates and historical data on the latitude and date of eruptions. The evolution of aerosol spatial and size distribution after the sulfur dioxide discharge are hence characterized for each volcanic eruption. Large variations are seen in hemispheric partitioning and size distributions in relation to location/date of eruptions and injected SO2 masses. Results for recent eruptions are in good agreement with observations. By providing accurate amplitude and spatial distributions of shortwave and longwave radiative perturbations by volcanic sulfate aerosols, we argue that this volcanic forcing may help refine the climate model responses to the large volcanic eruptions since 1600. The final dataset consists of 3-D values (with constant longitude of spectrally resolved extinction coefficients, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors calculated for different wavelength bands upon request. Surface area densities for heterogeneous chemistry are also provided.

  8. Aerosol measurements over South Africa using LIDAR, Satellite and Sun Photometer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available of South Africa. 1. Introduction Aerosols (solid particles suspended in the air) play an important role in the global climate, the radiative forcing of the climate, and the Earth?s radiative balance. The interaction between atmospheric aerosol... pollution as well as from natural processes, such as wind generated dust and sea spray, volcanic eruptions and smoke from natural forest fires, etc. The knowledge of aerosol characteristics at a local and global scale, their temporal change interrelations...

  9. Volcanic ash: What it is and how it forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.

    1991-09-13

    There are four basic eruption processes that produce volcanic ash: (1) decompression of rising magma, gas bubble growth, and fragmentation of the foamy magma in the volcanic vent (magmatic), (2) explosive mixing of magma with ground or surface water (hydrovolcanic), (3) fragmentation of country rock during rapid expansion of steam and/or hot water (phreatic), and (4) breakup of lava fragments during rapid transport from the vent. Variations in eruption style and the characteristics of volcanic ashes produced during explosive eruptions depend on many factors, including magmatic temperature, gas content, viscosity and crystal content of the magma before eruption, the ratio of magma to ground or surface water, and physical properties of the rock enclosing the vent. Volcanic ash is composed of rock and mineral fragments, and glass shards, which is less than 2 mm in diameter. Glass shard shapes and sizes depend upon size and shape of gas bubbles present within the magma immediately before eruption and the processes responsible for fragmentation of the magma. Shards range from slightly curved, thin glass plates, which were broken from large, thin-walled spherical bubble walls, to hollow needles broken from pumiceous melts containing gas bubbles stretched by magma flow within the volcanic vent. Pumice fragments make up the coarser-grained portions of the glass fraction. Particle sizes range from meters for large blocks expelled near the volcanic vent to nanometers for fine ash and aerosol droplets within well-dispersed eruption plumes. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Simultaneous aerosol measurements of unusual aerosol enhancement in troposphere over Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hara

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Unusual aerosol enhancement is often observed at Syowa Station, Antarctica during winter through spring. Simultaneous aerosol measurements near the surface and in the upper atmosphere were conducted twice using a ground-based optical particle counter, a balloon-borne optical particle counter, and micro-pulse LIDAR (MPL in August and September 2012. During 13–15 August, aerosol enhancement occurred immediately after a storm condition. A high backscatter ratio and aerosol concentrations were observed from the surface to ca. 2.5 km over Syowa Station. Clouds appeared occasionally at the top of aerosol-enhanced layer during the episode. Aerosol enhancement was terminated on 15 August by strong winds caused by a cyclone's approach. In the second case on 5–7 September, aerosol number concentrations in Dp > 0.3 μm near the surface reached > 104 L−1 at about 15:00 UT on 5 September in spite of calm wind conditions, whereas MPL measurement exhibited aerosols were enhanced at about 04:00 UT at 1000–1500 m above Syowa Station. The aerosol enhancement occurred near the surface–ca. 4 km. In both cases, air masses with high aerosol enhancement below 2.5–3 km were transported mostly from the boundary layer over the sea-ice area. In addition, air masses at 3–4 km in the second case came from the boundary layer over the open-sea area. This air mass history strongly suggests that dispersion of sea-salt particles from the sea-ice surface contributes considerably to the aerosol enhancement in the lower free troposphere (about 3 km and that the release of sea-salt particles from the ocean surface engenders high aerosol concentrations in the free troposphere (3–4 km.

  11. Holocene explosive volcanism of the Jan Mayen (island) volcanic province, North-Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerløw, Eirik; Haflidason, H.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2016-07-01

    The volcanic island Jan Mayen, located in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, hosts the active stratovolcano of Beerenberg, the northernmost active subaerial volcano in the world. At least five eruptions are known from the island following its discovery in the 17th century, but its eruptive history prior to this is basically unknown. In this paper two sediment cores retrieved close to Jan Mayen have been studied in detail to shed light on the Holocene history of explosive volcanism from the Jan Mayen volcanic province. Horizons with elevated tephra concentrations were identified and tephra from these was analysed to determine major element chemistry of the tephra. The tephra chemistry was used to provide a link between the two cores and the land based tephra records from Jan Mayen Island. We managed to link two well-developed tephra peaks in the cores by their geochemical composition and age to Jan Mayen. One of these peaks represents the 1732 AD eruption of Eggøya while the other peak represents a previously undescribed eruption dated to around 10.3 ka BP. Two less prominent tephra peaks, one in each core, dated to approximately 2.3 and 3.0 ka BP, also have a distinct geochemical character linking them to Jan Mayen volcanism. However, the most prominent tephra layer in the cores located close to Jan Mayen and numerous other cores along the Jan Mayen ridge is the 12.1 ka BP Vedde Ash originating from the Iceland volcanic province. We find that the Holocene volcanism on Jan Mayen is much less explosive than volcanism in Iceland, and propose that either low amounts of explosive volcanic activity from the summit region of Beerenberg or small to absent glacier cover on Beerenberg is responsible for this.

  12. Dispersion of the Nabro volcanic plume and its relation to the Asian summer monsoon

    OpenAIRE

    Fairlie, T. D.; Vernier, J.-P.; M. Natarajan; Bedka, K M

    2014-01-01

    We use nighttime measurements from the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, together with a Lagrangian trajectory model, to study the initial dispersion of volcanic aerosol from the eruption of Mt. Nabro (Ethiopia/Eritrea) in June 2011. The Nabro eruption reached the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) directly, and the plume was initially entrained by the flow surrounding the Asian anticyclone, which prevails in ...

  13. Atmospheric and environmental impacts of volcanic ash particle emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Adam

    2010-05-01

    Globally, at any one time, there may be 20 volcanoes erupting that collectively emit a constant flux of gases and aerosol, including silicate particles (tephra), to the atmosphere which influences processes including cloud microphysics, heterogeneous chemistry and radiative balance. The nature and impact of atmospheric volcanic particle fluxes depend on total mass erupted, emission rate, emission source location, physical and chemical properties of the particles, and the location and residence time of the particles in the atmosphere. Removal of ash particles from the atmosphere through sedimentation is strongly influenced by particle aggregation through hydrometeor formation, and convective instabilities such as mammatus. I will address the following questions: What are the atmospheric impacts of volcanic ash emissions? What controls the residence time of volcanic particles in the atmosphere? What affects particle accumulation at the surface? And what are the human and environmental impacts of ash fallout?

  14. Volcanism and global change conference set for 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papers are solicited for the AGU Chapman Conference on Climate, Volcanism, and Global Change, to be held March 23-27, 1992, in Hilo, Hawaii. Conference conveners are Stephen Self, University of Hawaii at Manoa, and Richard P. Turco, University of California, Los Angeles. Papers should focus on areas related to volcanic eruption dynamics and geochemistry, dispersion and removal of volcanogenic aerosols, effects on the atmosphere and climate, and signatures in sediments, ice cores, and tree rings. The conference will bring together a broad range of geophysicists whose research or interests involve volcanic eruptions and their impact. Results obtained from investigations of the El Chichón 1982 event and its aftermath are of particular interest for sessions dedicated to this specific, well-documented atmospheric perturbation.

  15. Satellite Observations of Atmospheric SO2 from Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, M. F.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    Volcanoes are an important source of various atmospheric trace gases. Volcanic eruptions and their emissions are sporadic and intermittent and often occur in uninhabited regions. Therefore assessing the amount and size of the gaseous and particulate emission from volcanoes is difficult. Satellite remote sensing measurements provide one well suited opportunity to overcome this difficulty. Onboard ERS-2, GOME's moderate spectral resolution enables us to apply the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm to retrieve SO2 column densities from radiance/irradiance measurements in UV spectral region. Volcanic emissions can cause significant variations of climate on a variety of time scales; just one very large eruption can cause a measurable change in the Earth's climate with a time scale of a few years. Stratospheric aerosols produced by volcanic eruptions can influence stratospheric chemistry both through chemical reactions that take place on the surface of the aerosols and through temperature changes induced by their presence in the stratosphere. In this work we give a comprehensive overview on several volcanoes and the retrieval of SO2 column densities from GOME data for the years 1996 - 2002. The focus is on both eruption and out gassing scenarios from different volcanic eruptions in Italy, Iceland, Congo/ Zaire, Ecuador and Mexico.

  16. VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL CONCENTRATION AT XIANGHE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xu; Guangyu Shi; Jun Zhou; Yasunobu Iwasaka

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes atmospheric aerosol concentrations of 5 stratospheric balloon soundings during the period from 1984 to 1994. Aerosol-rich layers in the troposphere were detected and the causes were analyzed. The main results are as follows: (1) the vertical distribution of the atmospheric aerosol is affected by atmospheric dynamic processes, humidity, etc.; (2) the tropospheric column concentrations of aerosol were 72.2×105, 20.2×105, 20.7×105 and 34.4×105 cm-2 and occupying 81%, 61% and 60% of the 0-to-30 km aerosol column, on Aug. 23, 1984, Aug. 22, 1993,Sept. 12, 1993 and Sept. 15, 1994, respectively; (3) the effect of volcano eruption was still evident in the aerosol profiles,28 and 27 months after the El Chichon and Pinatubo eruption; (4) the aerosol concentration in the troposphere did not decrease at all heights as atmospheric aerosol model.

  17. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  18. Using the OMI aerosol index and absorption aerosol optical depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2015-05-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV aerosol index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model-produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the southern African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons

  19. Mantle updrafts and mechanisms of oceanic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Don L.; Natland, James H.

    2014-10-01

    Convection in an isolated planet is characterized by narrow downwellings and broad updrafts-consequences of Archimedes' principle, the cooling required by the second law of thermodynamics, and the effect of compression on material properties. A mature cooling planet with a conductive low-viscosity core develops a thick insulating surface boundary layer with a thermal maximum, a subadiabatic interior, and a cooling highly conductive but thin boundary layer above the core. Parts of the surface layer sink into the interior, displacing older, colder material, which is entrained by spreading ridges. Magma characteristics of intraplate volcanoes are derived from within the upper boundary layer. Upper mantle features revealed by seismic tomography and that are apparently related to surface volcanoes are intrinsically broad and are not due to unresolved narrow jets. Their morphology, aspect ratio, inferred ascent rate, and temperature show that they are passively responding to downward fluxes, as appropriate for a cooling planet that is losing more heat through its surface than is being provided from its core or from radioactive heating. Response to doward flux is the inverse of the heat-pipe/mantle-plume mode of planetary cooling. Shear-driven melt extraction from the surface boundary layer explains volcanic provinces such as Yellowstone, Hawaii, and Samoa. Passive upwellings from deeper in the upper mantle feed ridges and near-ridge hotspots, and others interact with the sheared and metasomatized surface layer. Normal plate tectonic processes are responsible both for plate boundary and intraplate swells and volcanism.

  20. A characterization of Arctic aerosols on the basis of aerosol optical depth and black carbon measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Stone

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aerosols, transported from distant source regions, influence the Arctic surface radiation budget. When deposited on snow and ice, carbonaceous particles can reduce the surface albedo, which accelerates melting, leading to a temperature-albedo feedback that amplifies Arctic warming. Black carbon (BC, in particular, has been implicated as a major warming agent at high latitudes. BC and co-emitted aerosols in the atmosphere, however, attenuate sunlight and radiatively cool the surface. Warming by soot deposition and cooling by atmospheric aerosols are referred to as “darkening” and “dimming” effects, respectively. In this study, climatologies of spectral aerosol optical depth AOD (2001–2011 and Equivalent BC (EBC (1989–2011 from three Arctic observatories and from a number of aircraft campaigns are used to characterize Arctic aerosols. Since the 1980s, concentrations of BC in the Arctic have decreased by more than 50% at ground stations where in situ observations are made. AOD has increased slightly during the past decade, with variations attributed to changing emission inventories and source strengths of natural aerosols, including biomass smoke and volcanic aerosol, further influenced by deposition rates and airflow patterns.

  1. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  2. Marine mesocosm bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Verena; Cimarelli, Corrado; Ayris, Paul; Kueppers, Ulrich; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald; Woerheide, Gert

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, wind-delivered volcanic ash may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation remain unknown. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. The effect of substrate properties on bacterial colonisation was tested by exposing five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash (Sakurajima, Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size, in controlled marine coral reef aquaria under low light conditions for six months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis of Similarity supported significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community with the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community composition during colonisation of volcanic ash in a coral reef-like environment is controlled by the

  3. TOMS Absorbing Aerosol Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — TOMS_AI_G is an aerosol related dataset derived from the Total Ozone Monitoring Satellite (TOMS) Sensor. The TOMS aerosol index arises from absorbing aerosols such...

  4. Precambrian Lunar Volcanic Protolife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Green

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Five representative terrestrial analogs of lunar craters are detailed relevant to Precambrian fumarolic activity. Fumarolic fluids contain the ingredients for protolife. Energy sources to derive formaldehyde, amino acids and related compounds could be by flow charging, charge separation and volcanic shock. With no photodecomposition in shadow, most fumarolic fluids at 40 K would persist over geologically long time periods. Relatively abundant tungsten would permit creation of critical enzymes, Fischer-Tropsch reactions could form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble volcanic polyphosphates would enable assembly of nucleic acids. Fumarolic stimuli factors are described. Orbital and lander sensors specific to protolife exploration including combined Raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrocsopy are evaluated.

  5. Atmospheric ice nuclei in the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bingemer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have sampled atmospheric ice nuclei (IN and aerosol in Germany and in Israel during spring 2010. IN were analyzed by the static vapor diffusion chamber FRIDGE, as well as by electron microscopy. During the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption of April 2010 we have measured the highest ice nucleus number concentrations (>600 l−1 in our record of 2 yr of daily IN measurements in central Germany. Even in Israel, located about 5000 km away from Iceland, IN were as high as otherwise only during desert dust storms. The fraction of aerosol activated as ice nuclei at −18 °C and 119% rhice and the corresponding area density of ice-active sites per aerosol surface were considerably higher than what we observed during an intense outbreak of Saharan dust over Europe in May 2008.

    Pure volcanic ash accounts for at least 53–68% of the 239 individual ice nucleating particles that we collected in aerosol samples from the event and analyzed by electron microscopy. Volcanic ash samples that had been collected close to the eruption site were aerosolized in the laboratory and measured by FRIDGE. Our analysis confirms the relatively poor ice nucleating efficiency (at −18 °C and 119% ice-saturation of such "fresh" volcanic ash, as it had recently been found by other workers. We find that both the fraction of the aerosol that is active as ice nuclei as well as the density of ice-active sites on the aerosol surface are three orders of magnitude larger in the samples collected from ambient air during the volcanic peaks than in the aerosolized samples from the ash collected close to the eruption site. From this we conclude that the ice-nucleating properties of volcanic ash may be altered substantially by aging and processing during long-range transport in the atmosphere, and that global volcanism deserves further attention as a potential source of atmospheric ice nuclei.

  6. Aerosol Lidar observations and model calculations of the Planetary Boundary Layer evolution over Greece, during the March 2006 Total Solar Eclipse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Amiridis

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL height evolution over Greece, during the solar eclipse of 29 March 2006, is presented. Ground based observations were carried out using lidar detection and ranging devices and ground meteorological instruments, to estimate the height of the mixing layer (ML before, during and after the solar eclipse in northern and southern parts of Greece exhibiting different sun obscuration. Data demonstrate that the solar eclipse has induced a decrease of the PBL height, indicating a suppression of turbulence activity similar to that during the sunset hours. The changes in PBL height were associated with a very shallow entrainment zone, indicating a significant weakening of the penetrative convection. Heat transfer was confined to a thinner layer above the ground. The thickness of the entrainment zone exhibited its minimum during the maximum of the eclipse, demonstrative of turbulence mechanisms suppression at that time. Model estimations of the PBL evolution were additionally conducted using the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF. Model-diagnosed PBL height decrease during the solar eclipse due to vertical transport decay, in agreement with the experimental findings; vertical profiles of atmospheric particles and gaseous species showed an important vertical mixing attenuation.

  7. Aerosol lidar observations and model calculations of the planetary boundary layer evolution over Greece, during the March 2006 total solar eclipse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Amiridis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL height evolution over Greece, during the solar eclipse of 29 March 2006, is presented. Ground based observations were carried out using lidar detection and ranging devices (Lidars and ground meteorological instruments, to estimate the height of the Mixing Layer (ML before, during and after the solar eclipse in Northern and Southern parts of Greece exhibiting different sun obscuration. Data demonstrate that the solar eclipse has induced a decrease of the PBL height, indicating a suppression of turbulence activity similar to that during the sunset hours. The changes in PBL height were associated with a very shallow entrainment zone, indicating a significant weakening of the penetrative convection. Heat transfer was confined to a thinner layer above ground. The thickness of the entrainment zone exhibited its minimum during the maximum of the eclipse, demonstrative of turbulence mechanisms suppression at that time. Model estimations of the PBL evolution were additionally conducted using the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF. Model diagnosed PBL height decrease during the solar eclipse due to vertical transport decay, in agreement with the experimental findings; vertical profiles of atmospheric particles and gaseous species showed an important vertical mixing attenuation.

  8. Free Tropospheric Aerosols Over South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elina, Giannakaki; Pfüller, Anne; Korhonen, Kimmo; Mielonen, Tero; Laakso, Lauri; Vakkari, Ville; Baars, Holger; Engelmann, Ronny; Beukes, Johan P.; Van Zyl, Pieter G.; Josipovic, Miroslav; Tiitta, Petri; Chiloane, Kgaugelo; Piketh, Stuart; Lihavainen, Heikki; Lehtinen, Kari

    2016-06-01

    Raman lidar data of one year was been analyzed to obtain information relating aerosol layers in the free troposphere over South Africa, Elandsfontein. In total, 375 layers were observed above the boundary layer during the period 30th January 2010 - 31st January 2011. The seasonal behavior of aerosol layer geometrical characteristics as well as intensive and extensive optical properties were studied. In general, layers were observed at higher altitudes during spring (2520 ± 970 m) while the geometrical layer depth did not show any significant seasonal dependence. The variations of most of the intensive and extensive optical properties analyzed were high during all seasons. Layers were observed at mean altitude of 2100 m ± 1000 m with lidar ratio at 355 nm of 67 ± 25 and extinction-related Ångström exponent between 355 and 532 nm of 1.9 ± 0.8.

  9. Free Tropospheric Aerosols Over South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Giannakaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman lidar data of one year was been analyzed to obtain information relating aerosol layers in the free troposphere over South Africa, Elandsfontein. In total, 375 layers were observed above the boundary layer during the period 30th January 2010 – 31st January 2011. The seasonal behavior of aerosol layer geometrical characteristics as well as intensive and extensive optical properties were studied. In general, layers were observed at higher altitudes during spring (2520 ± 970 m while the geometrical layer depth did not show any significant seasonal dependence. The variations of most of the intensive and extensive optical properties analyzed were high during all seasons. Layers were observed at mean altitude of 2100 m ± 1000 m with lidar ratio at 355 nm of 67 ± 25 and extinction-related Ångström exponent between 355 and 532 nm of 1.9 ± 0.8.

  10. Laser radar monitoring of tropospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devara, P. C. S.; Raj, P. Ernest; Londhe, A. L.

    1989-04-01

    A bistatic laser radar (using a continuous wave argon ion laser) installed at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, for remote sounding of atmospheric aerosol characteristics has been briefly described. The day-to-day and height-time variations in the vertical distribution of aerosol number density (up to 3680 m AGL) have been studied by operating the radar on 6 clear days during nighttime in the month of April 1987. The results of the study indicated the formation and redistribution of aerosol layer structure in the lower altitudes (up to 1800 m). Also, conspicuous differences in the height distribution of aerosol number density were noticed between the post-sunset and pre-sunrise periods. The observed features have been explained on the basis of aerosol transport and diffusion processes occurring in the nocturnal urban atmosphere.

  11. Aerosol Observation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The aerosol observation system (AOS) is the primary Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) platform for in situ aerosol measurements at the surface. The principal...

  12. Lung problems and volcanic smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... releases gases into the atmosphere. Volcanic smog can irritate the lungs and make existing lung problems worse. ... deep into the lungs. Breathing in volcanic smog irritates the lungs and mucus membranes. It can affect ...

  13. Two-Phase Coupled Flow and Aerosols Dynamical Characteristics in the Fog Layer%雾层两相耦合流场及气溶胶颗粒物的动力学性质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家骅; 丁珏; 翁培奋

    2013-01-01

    雾层气溶胶系统涉及复杂的动力学演变过程:碰撞、凝并、破碎、冷凝/蒸发、成核、沉积、表面化学反应等.因此,发展雾层与气相流场耦合的Eulerian-Lagrangian两相流模型、颗粒动力学及随机轨道模型,考虑重力、曳力、布朗力、Basset力等对颗粒相的作用.基于SIMPLE和多重Monte Carlo算法求解颗粒群平衡方程,自行开发了FAD程序首先对室内燃烧源细微颗粒物的扩散实验展开数值模拟,计算结果与实验数据吻合较好.将建立的模型和方法数值研究气溶胶污染物在雾环境中的输运过程,分析雾消散阶段颗粒相浓度、平均尺度的时空分布.结果显示:当时间演化至60 min,雾滴的平均尺度减小到初始的65.67%,而气溶胶颗粒最大数目对应的尺度为0.006 μm.%The complex dynamic evolution processes exist in the fog layer, which involve collision,coag-ualtion,breakage, condensation / evaporation, nucleation, deposition and surface chemical reaction. So, with considering effects of gravity, drag force, brownian force, basset forces on the particles, the Euleri-an-Lagrangian two-phase coupled flow model, particle dynamics models and stochastic trajectory model were developed. The SIMPLE scheme was used for the fluid phase, while Particle Balance Equation (PBE) of aerosols was solved by Multi-Monte Carlo method. Firstly, the FAD (Fog-Aerosol-Dynamics) program was developed for simulating the experiment research on fine particles diffusion from indoor combustion sources, and the computed results were accordance with experimental data. Then, the transport process of aerosol particles in fog environment was studied numerically. Moreover, particle concentration, temporal and spatial distributions for particle average scale were analyzed during fog dissipation stage. The study results show for the time evolution to 60 min, average scale of fog droplet is reduced to 65.67% of the initial scale, and the scale of

  14. Natural and anthropogenic perturbations of the stratospheric ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, Guy P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reviews potential causes for reduction in the ozone abundance. The response of stratospheric ozone to solar activity is discussed. Ozone changes are simulated in relation with the potential development of a fleet of high-speed stratospheric aircraft and the release in the atmosphere of chlorofluorocarbons. The calculations are performed by a two-dimensional chemical-radiative-dynamical model. The importance of heterogeneous chemistry in polar stratospheric clouds and in the Junge layer (sulfate aerosol) is emphasized. The recently reported ozone trend over the last decade is shown to have been largely caused by the simultaneous effects of increasing concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons and heterogeneous chemistry. The possibility for a reduction in stratospheric ozone following a large volcanic eruption such as that of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 is discussed.

  15. Volcanism and Oil & Gas In Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Xuanlong

    2000-01-01

    Based on study on the relation with volcanic rock and oil & gas in Songliao Basin and Liaohe Basin in northeast China, author proposes that material from deep by volcanism enrichs the resources in basins, that heat by volcanism promotes organic matter transforming to oil and gas, that volcanic reservoir is fracture, vesicular, solution pore, intercrystal pore.Lava facies and pyroclastic facies are favourable reservoir. Mesozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of intermediate, acid rock,but Cenozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of basalt. Types of oil and gas pool relating to volcanic rock include volcanic fracture pool, volcanic unconformity pool, volcanic rock - screened pool, volcanic darpe structural pool.

  16. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard...

  17. Infrared limb emission measurements of aerosol in the troposphere and stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Griessbach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Altitude resolved aerosol detection in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS is a challenging task for remote sensing instruments. Here, we introduce a new method for detecting aerosol in the UTLS based on infrared limb emission measurements. The method applies an improved aerosol-cloud-index that indicates infrared limb spectra affected by aerosol and ice clouds. For the discrimination between aerosol and ice clouds we developed a new method based on brightness temperature difference correlations. The discrimination thresholds for the new method were derived from radiative transfer simulations (including scattering and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS/Envisat measurements obtained in 2011. The method not only reliably separates aerosol from ice clouds, but also provides characteristic yet overlapping correlation patterns for volcanic ash and sulfate aerosol. We demonstrate the value of the new approach for volcanic ash and sulfate aerosol originating from the Grímsvötn (Iceland, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (Chile and Nabro (Eritrea eruptions by comparing with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS volcanic ash and SO2 measurements.

  18. Monitoring the Eyjafjöll volcanic plume using OPGC platforms : remote sensing and in-situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labazuy, Philippe; Gouhier, Mathieu; Hervo, Maxime; Freville, Patrick; Quehennen, Boris; Donnadieu, Frank; Guehenneux, Yannick; Cacault, Philippe; Colomb, Aurélie; Gayet, Jean-François; Pichon, Jean-Marc; Rivet, Sandrine; Schwarzenböck, Alfons; Sellegri, Karine

    2010-05-01

    OPGC (Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand) presents a unique combination of knowledge in volcanology and atmosphere physics, for the tracking and the monitoring of volcanic plumes. These competences interact through the combination of the mastering of Lidar and radar techniques; gas and aerosol measurement (in-situ and airborne) by the Laboratoire de Météorologie Physique (LaMP,OPGC) and the expertise of the Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans (LMV,OPGC) in eruption dynamics and spatial remote sensing. Platforms for observations benefit from the technical support and expertise of the OPGC staff. HOTVOLC group is dedicated to the near-real-time monitoring of thermal anomalies related to the eruptive activity of volcanoes. The main goal of HOTVOLC deals with estimation of quantitative parameters that give stringent constraints on ash plumes dynamics, from the vent to the atmosphere. Datas from HOTVOLC give near -real time monitoring of ash plume, and its height, crucial parameter for predictive models and risk assessment. The height of the plume of Eyjafjöll on April 15 2010 at 12:00 UTC was estimated at 5000-6500 m, in accordance with ground observations and Lidar data. TERRA MODIS and AURA OMI sensors were used for the daily quantitative estimation of ash and SO2 burden , respectively. Two peaks of ash and SO2 emissions occurring on April 15 (100 kt and 8 kt) and 19 (170 kt and 12 kt) were determined. HOTVOLC is involved in the monitoring of the eruption at Eyjafjöll(Iceland) and belongs to a volcano alert group, at the request of the MEEDDM (French Ministry for ecology, energy, sustainable development and sea). LIDAR at the OPGC, is a Rayleigh-Mie LIDAR emitting at 355nm, with parallel and crossed polarization channels. On April 19, a layer of depolarizing particles i.e.non-spherical particles was observed at 3000 m a.s.l, with maximum thickness of 500m. The instrumented station at the top of the Puy de Dôme allows measurements of gas-phase and of

  19. Global monsoon precipitation responses to large volcanic eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Chai, Jing; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-11

    Climate variation of global monsoon (GM) precipitation involves both internal feedback and external forcing. Here, we focus on strong volcanic forcing since large eruptions are known to be a dominant mechanism in natural climate change. It is not known whether large volcanoes erupted at different latitudes have distinctive effects on the monsoon in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and the Southern Hemisphere (SH). We address this issue using a 1500-year volcanic sensitivity simulation by the Community Earth System Model version 1.0 (CESM1). Volcanoes are classified into three types based on their meridional aerosol distributions: NH volcanoes, SH volcanoes and equatorial volcanoes. Using the model simulation, we discover that the GM precipitation in one hemisphere is enhanced significantly by the remote volcanic forcing occurring in the other hemisphere. This remote volcanic forcing-induced intensification is mainly through circulation change rather than moisture content change. In addition, the NH volcanic eruptions are more efficient in reducing the NH monsoon precipitation than the equatorial ones, and so do the SH eruptions in weakening the SH monsoon, because the equatorial eruptions, despite reducing moisture content, have weaker effects in weakening the off-equatorial monsoon circulation than the subtropical-extratropical volcanoes do.

  20. Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2014-10-21

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

  1. Global Aerosol Effect Retrieval From Passive Hyperspectral Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, M.; Tilstra, L. G.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    Absorbing aerosols can have a significant local direct radiative effect (DRE), while the global average aerosol DRE remains highly uncertain. Modelling studies have shown that the magnitude and sign of the aerosol DRE at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) depend on the scene, especially on the albedo of the scene under the aerosol layer. It changes with cloud fraction, from large positive for overcast conditions when aerosols are present above the cloud, to large negative for clear sky ocean scenes. Observational studies, which are necessary to constrain the model studies, have been scarce. The results of modelling studies depend strongly on the assumed aerosol properties. Observational studies also need to assume aerosol type and geophysical properties to derive aerosol optical properties from radiation measurements. This introduces large uncertainties in the retrieved aerosol DRE. Furthermore, the retrieval of aerosols over clouds from passive instruments is difficult, due to the large optical thickness of clouds. Therefore, observational studies of aerosol direct and indirect effects from passive satellite instruments are invariably restricted to aerosol studies close to the cloud edges. We have developed a method to derive the aerosol DRE for smoke over clouds directly from passive satellite hyperspectral reflectance measurements, independent of aerosol micro- physical property assumptions. This allows us to assess the local aerosol DRE from passive imagery directly on a pixel to pixel basis, even over clouds. The solar radiative absorption by smoke layers is quantified using the TOA reflectance spectrum from the ultraviolet (UV) to the shortwave infrared (SWIR). UV- absorbing aerosols have a strong signature that can be detected using UV reflectance measurements. Since the aerosol extinction optical thickness decreases rapidly with increasing wavelength for smoke, the properties of the scene below the aerosol layer can be retrieved in the SWIR, where aerosol

  2. Highly Resolved Paleoclimatic Aerosol Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Ernesto

    experimentally. Over the last decades Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) has become a well-established technique for aerosol quantification. In CFA, a piece of core is melted continuously and the melt water is analysed for an array of chemical impurities. When designing a CFA system, a trilemma between high sample...... with frequently changing signs are preserved. Therefore, these aerosol records can be used for dating by annual layer counting. However, with increasing depth the annual layer thicknesses decreases due to pressure and ice flow and accurate dating is possible only as long as the rapid variations can be resolved...... impossible to circumvent by employing a third detection technique - laser scattering. Reliable information on size changes, even relative ones, cannot be obtained using optical methods. It is therefore proposed to focus further efforts on electrical measurements, making use of the advancements made over...

  3. In situ measurements constraining the role of sulphate aerosols in mid-latitude ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Tin, P.; Wilson, J. C.; Jonsson, H. H.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Borrmann, S.; Toohey, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    In situ measurements of stratospheric sulphate aerosol, reactive nitrogen and chlorine concentrations at middle latitudes confirm the importance of aerosol surface reactions that convert active nitrogen to a less active, reservoir form. This makes mid-latitude stratospheric ozone less vulnerable to active nitrogen and more vulnerable to chlorine species. The effect of aerosol reactions on active nitrogen depends on gas phase reaction rates, so that increases in aerosol concentration following volcanic eruptions will have only a limited effect on ozone depletion at these latitudes.

  4. Determination of the atmospheric optical depth due to the El Chichon stratospheric aerosol cloud in the polluted atmosphere of Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, Ignacio [Centro Universitario de Investigaciones en Ciencia del Ambiente, Universidad de Colima, Colima, Colima, (Mexico); Kondratyev, Kirill Ya. [Academician, Counsellor Center for Ecological Safety, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zenteno, Gerardo [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1996-01-01

    Direct solar radiation measurements were used to determine the aerosol optical depth (AOD) increase associated with the presence of aerosol and large particles (ash) originating from the 28 March to 4 April 1982 El Chichon eruptions (17.5 degrees N, 93.3 degrees W; Mexico) on Mexico City's polluted atmospheric aerosol layer. The results are compared with those obtained at Vancouver, British Columbia, revealing that a first AOD increase occurred in both locations during May, June, and July 1982, the Mexico City AOD decay is more extended, not reaching normal climatological values until February 1983. Meanwhile, Vancouver's AOD reached minimum values in September 1982, which subsequently increased over a period from October 1982 to September 1983. This secondary maximum was recorded in Mexico City from March to August 1983. Results suggest that the first AOD increases in May, June and July 1982, both at Vancouver and Mexico City, are due chiefly to short life-time volcanic ash particles being located near the surface. However, the second AOD increases, associated with anomalously colored twilights, corresponds to stratospheric volcanic aerosols. [Spanish] Se utilizaron mediciones de radiacion solar directa para determinar el incremento de la profundidad optica del aerosol (AOD) asociada a la presencia de aerosoles y particulas grandes (cenizas) organizadas por las erupciones de El Chichon (17.5 grados N, 93.3 grados W; Mexico) del 28 de marzo al 4 de abril de 1982 sobre la capa atmosferica contaminada de la Ciudad de Mexico. Los resultados se comparan con los obtenidos en Vancouver, Colombia Britanica, relevando que un primer aumento de AOD ocurrio en ambos lugares durante mayo, junio y julio de 1982. Sin embargo, la AOD decayo en Ciudad de Mexico mas lentamente, alcanzando los valores climatologicos normales hasta febrero de 1983. Mientras tanto la AOD para Vancouver alcanzo valores minimos en septiembre de 1982; estos subsecuentemente se incrementaron en

  5. Retrieving the Height of Smoke and Dust Aerosols by Synergistic Use of Multiple Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, N. Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew M.; Seftor, Colin J.; Jeong, Myeong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    The Aerosol Single scattering albedo and Height Estimation (ASHE) algorithm was first introduced in Jeong and Hsu (2008) to provide aerosol layer height and single scattering albedo (SSA) for biomass burning smoke aerosols. By using multiple satellite sensors synergistically, ASHE can provide the height information over much broader areas than lidar observations alone. The complete ASHE algorithm uses aerosol data from MODIS or VIIRS, OMI or OMPS, and CALIOP. A simplified algorithm also exists that does not require CALIOP data as long as the SSA of the aerosol layer is provided by another source. Several updates have recently been made: inclusion of dust layers in the retrieval process, better determination of the input aerosol layer height from CALIOP, improvement in aerosol optical depth (AOD) for nonspherical dust, development of quality assurance (QA) procedure, etc.

  6. Infrared remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols; Apports du sondage infrarouge a l'etude des aerosols atmospheriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierangelo, C.

    2005-09-15

    The 2001 report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emphasized the very low level of understanding of atmospheric aerosol effects on climate. These particles originate either from natural sources (dust, volcanic aerosols...) or from anthropogenic sources (sulfates, soot...). They are one of the main sources of uncertainty on climate change, partly because they show a very high spatio-temporal variability. Observation from space, being global and quasi-continuous, is therefore a first importance tool for aerosol studies. Remote sensing in the visible domain has been widely used to obtain a better characterization of these particles and their effect on solar radiation. On the opposite, remote sensing of aerosols in the infrared domain still remains marginal. Yet, not only the knowledge of the effect of aerosols on terrestrial radiation is needed for the evaluation of their total radiative forcing, but also infrared remote sensing provides a way to retrieve other aerosol characteristics (observations are possible at night and day, over land and sea). In this PhD dissertation, we show that aerosol optical depth, altitude and size can be retrieved from infrared sounder observations. We first study the sensitivity of aerosol optical properties to their micro-physical properties, we then develop a radiative transfer code for scattering medium adapted to the very high spectral resolution of the new generation sounder NASA-Aqua/AIRS, and we finally focus on the inverse problem. The applications shown here deal with Pinatubo stratospheric volcanic aerosol, observed with NOAA/HIRS, and with the building of an 8 year climatology of dust over sea and land from this sounder. Finally, from AIRS observations, we retrieve the optical depth at 10 {mu}m, the average altitude and the coarse mode effective radius of mineral dust over sea. (author)

  7. Exploring Hawaiian Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-02-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai`i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO's founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists' understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  8. Exploring Hawaiian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai‘i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO’s founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists’ understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  9. In situ and space-based observations of the Kelud volcanic plume: The persistence of ash in the lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernier, Jean-Paul; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Deshler, Terry; Natarajan, Murali; Knepp, Travis; Foster, Katie; Wienhold, Frank G.; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Thomason, Larry; Trepte, Charles

    2016-09-01

    Volcanic eruptions are important causes of natural variability in the climate system at all time scales. Assessments of the climate impact of volcanic eruptions by climate models almost universally assume that sulfate aerosol is the only radiatively active volcanic material. We report satellite observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite after the eruption of Mount Kelud (Indonesia) on 13 February 2014 of volcanic materials in the lower stratosphere. Using these observations along with in situ measurements with the Compact Optical Backscatter AerosoL Detector (COBALD) backscatter sondes and optical particle counters (OPCs) made during a balloon field campaign in northern Australia, we find that fine ash particles with a radius below 0.3 µm likely represented between 20 and 28% of the total volcanic cloud aerosol optical depth 3 months after the eruption. A separation of 1.5-2 km between the ash and sulfate plumes is observed in the CALIOP extinction profiles as well as in the aerosol number concentration measurements of the OPC after 3 months. The settling velocity of fine ash with a radius of 0.3 µm in the tropical lower stratosphere is reduced by 50% due to the upward motion of the Brewer-Dobson circulation resulting a doubling of its lifetime. Three months after the eruption, we find a mean tropical clear-sky radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere from the Kelud plume near -0.08 W/m2 after including the presence of ash; a value 20% higher than if sulfate alone is considered. Thus, surface cooling following volcanic eruptions could be affected by the persistence of ash and should be considered in climate simulations.

  10. Subdiffusion of volcanic earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study is performed on volcanic seismicities at Mt.Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland and Mt. Etna in Sicily, Italy, from the viewpoint of science of complex systems, and the discovery of remarkable similarities between them regarding their exotic spatio-temporal properties is reported. In both of the volcanic seismicities as point processes, the jump probability distributions of earthquakes are found to obey the exponential law, whereas the waiting-time distributions follow the power law. In particular, a careful analysis is made about the finite size effects on the waiting-time distributions, and accordingly, the previously reported results for Mt. Etna [S. Abe and N. Suzuki, EPL 110, 59001 (2015)] are reinterpreted. It is shown that spreads of the volcanic earthquakes are subdiffusive at both of the volcanoes. The aging phenomenon is observed in the "event-time-averaged" mean-squared displacements of the hypocenters. A comment is also made on presence/absence of long term memories in the context of t...

  11. Indoor aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morawska, L.; Afshari, Alireza; N. Bae, G.

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by growing considerations of the scale, severity, and risks associated with human exposure to indoor particulate matter, this work reviewed existing literature to: (i) identify state-of-the-art experimental techniques used for personal exposure assessment; (ii) compare exposure levels...... reported for domestic/school settings in different countries (excluding exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and particulate matter from biomass cooking in developing countries); (iii) assess the contribution of outdoor background vs indoor sources to personal exposure; and (iv) examine scientific...... understanding of the risks posed by personal exposure to indoor aerosols. Limited studies assessing integrated daily residential exposure to just one particle size fraction, ultrafine particles, show that the contribution of indoor sources ranged from 19% to 76%. This indicates a strong dependence on resident...

  12. Climatic Impacts of a Volcanic Double Event: 536/540 CE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, M.; Krüger, K.; Sigl, M.; Stordal, F.; Svensen, H.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic activity in and around the year 536 CE led to the coldest decade of the Common Era, and has been speculatively linked to large-scale societal crises around the world. Using a coupled aerosol-climate model, with eruption parameters constrained by recently re-dated ice core records and historical observations of the aerosol cloud, we reconstruct the radiative forcing resulting from a sequence of two major volcanic eruptions in 536 and 540 CE. Comparing with a reconstruction of volcanic forcing over the past 1200 years, we estimate that the decadal-scale Northern Hemisphere (NH) extra-tropical radiative forcing from this volcanic "double event" was larger than that of any known period. Earth system model simulations including the volcanic forcing are used to explore the temperature and precipitation anomalies associated with the eruptions, and compared to available proxy records, including maximum latewood density (MXD) temperature reconstructions. Special attention is placed on the decadal persistence of the cooling signal in tree rings, and whether the climate model simulations reproduce such long-term climate anomalies. Finally, the climate model results will be used to explore the probability of socioeconomic crisis resulting directly from the volcanic radiative forcing in different regions of the world.

  13. The Properties and Distribution of Eyjafjallajökull Volcanic Ash, as Observed with MISR Space-based Multi-angle Imaging, April-May 2010 (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, R. A.; Gaitley, B. J.; Nelson, D. L.; Garay, M. J.; Misr Team

    2010-12-01

    Although volcanic eruptions occur about once per week globally, on average, relatively few of them affect the daily lives of millions of people. Significant exceptions were two eruptions of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in southern Iceland, which produced ash clouds lasting several weeks during each of April and May 2010. During the first eruption, air traffic over most of Europe was halted, severely affecting international transportation, trade, and economics. For the second ash cloud, space-based and suborbital observations, together with aerosol transport modeling, were used to predict ash plume distribution, making it possible to selectively close only the limited airspace in which there was actual risk of significant ash exposure. These events highlight the immense value of aerosol measurement and modeling capabilities when integrated and applied in emergency response situations. Geosynchronous satellite and continuous, ground-based observations played the most immediate roles in constraining model ash-cloud-extent predictions. However, the rich information content of large-scale though less frequent observations from instruments such as the NASA Earth Observing System’s Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) are key to improving the underlying representations of processes upon which the plume transport models rely. MISR contributes to this pool of information by providing maps of plume height derived from stereo imaging that are independent of knowledge of the temperature structure of the atmosphere or assumptions that the ash cloud is in thermal equilibrium with the environment. Such maps are obtained primarily near-source, where features of the ash cloud can be observed and co-registered in the multi-angle views. A distribution of heights is produced, making it possible to report all-important layer extent rather than just a characteristic plume elevation. Results are derived at 1.1 km horizontal and about 0.5 km vertical resolution. In addition

  14. Instantaneous aerosol dynamics in a turbulent flow

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2012-01-01

    Dibutyl phthalate aerosol particles evolution dynamics in a turbulent mixing layer is simulated by means of direct numerical simulation for the flow field and the direct quadrature method of moments for the aerosol evolution. Most par-ticles are nucleated in a thin layer region corresponding to a specific narrow temperature range near the cool stream side. However, particles undergo high growth rate on the hot stream side due to condensation. Coagulation decreases the total particle number density at a rate which is highly correlated to the in-stantaneous number density.

  15. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  16. Theoretical description of functionality, applications, and limitations of SO2 cameras for the remote sensing of volcanic plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Platt

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The SO2 camera is a novel technique for the remote sensing of volcanic emissions using solar radiation scattered in the atmosphere as a light source for the measurements. The method is based on measuring the ultra-violet absorption of SO2 in a narrow wavelength window around 310 nm by employing a band-pass interference filter and a 2-D UV-sensitive CCD detector. The effect of aerosol scattering can be eliminated by additionally measuring the incident radiation around 325 nm where the absorption of SO2 is no longer significant, thus rendering the method applicable to optically opaque plumes. The ability to deliver spatially resolved images of volcanic SO2 distributions at a frame rate on the order of 1 Hz makes the SO2 camera a very promising technique for volcanic monitoring and for studying the dynamics of volcanic plumes in the atmosphere. This study gives a theoretical basis for the pertinent aspects of working with SO2 camera systems, including the measurement principle, instrument design, data evaluation and technical applicability. Several issues are identified that influence camera calibration and performance. For one, changes in the solar zenith angle lead to a variable light path length in the stratospheric ozone layer and therefore change the spectral distribution of scattered solar radiation incident at the Earth's surface. The thus varying spectral illumination causes a shift in the calibration of the SO2 camera's results. Secondly, the lack of spectral resolution inherent in the measurement technique leads to a non-linear relationship between measured weighted average optical density and the SO2 column density. In addition, as is the case with all remote sensing techniques that use scattered solar radiation as a light source, the radiative transfer between the sun and the instrument is variable, with both radiative dilution as well as multiple scattering occurring. These effects can lead to both, over or underestimation of the SO2

  17. NOVAM evaluation from aerosol and lidar measurements in a tropical marine environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Kunz, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    NOVAM, the Naval Oceanic Vertical Aerosol Model, has been developed to predict the nonuniform and nonlogarithmic extinction profiles that are often observed in the marine atmospheric boundary layer. The kernel of NOVAM is the Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) that calculates the aerosol size distribution at

  18. Airborne Atmospheric Aerosol Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, K.; Park, Y.; Eun, H.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    It is important to understand the atmospheric aerosols compositions and size distributions since they greatly affect the environment and human health. Particles in the convection layer have been a great concern in global climate changes. To understand these characteristics satellite, aircraft, and radio sonde measurement methods have usually been used. An aircraft aerosol sampling using a filter and/or impactor was the method commonly used (Jay, 2003). However, the flight speed particle sampling had some technical limitations (Hermann, 2001). Moreover, the flight legal limit, altitude, prohibited airspace, flight time, and cost was another demerit. To overcome some of these restrictions, Tethered Balloon Package System (T.B.P.S.) and Recoverable Sonde System(R.S.S.) were developed with a very light optical particle counter (OPC), impactor, and condensation particle counter (CPC). Not only does it collect and measure atmospheric aerosols depending on altitudes, but it also monitors the atmospheric conditions, temperature, humidity, wind velocity, pressure, GPS data, during the measurement (Eun, 2013). In this research, atmospheric aerosol measurement using T.B.P.S. in Ansan area is performed and the measurement results will be presented. The system can also be mounted to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and create an aerial particle concentration map. Finally, we will present measurement data using Tethered Balloon Package System (T.B.P.S.) and R.S.S (Recoverable Sonde System).

  19. Climatic impacts of anthropogenic aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iversen, T. [Oslo Univ. (Norway)

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. Anthropogenic production of aerosols is mainly connected with combustion of fossil fuel. Measured by particulate mass, the anthropogenic sulphate production is the dominating source of aerosols in the Northern Hemisphere. Particles emitted in mechanical processes, fly ash etc. are less important because of their shorter atmospheric residence time. Possible climatological effects of anthropogenic aerosols are usually classified in two groups: direct and indirect. Direct effects are alterations of the radiative heating budget due to the aerosol particles in clear air. Indirect effects involve the interaction between particles and cloud processes. A simplified one-layer radiation model gave cooling in the most polluted mid-latitude areas and heating due to soot absorption in the Arctic. This differential trend in heating rates may have significant effects on atmospheric meridional circulations, which is important for the atmosphere as a thermodynamic system. Recently the description of sulphur chemistry in the hemispheric scale dispersion model has been improved and will be used in a model for Mie scattering and absorption

  20. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  1. Records of volcanic events since AD 1800 in the East Rongbuk ice core from Mt. Qomolangma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU JianZhong; KASPARI S.; HOU ShuGui; KANG ShiChang; QIN DaHe; REN JiaWen; MAYEWSKI p

    2009-01-01

    Continuous