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Sample records for volatiles moisture sulfur

  1. Volatile earliest Triassic sulfur cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schobben, Martin; Stebbins, Alan; Algeo, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Marine biodiversity decreases and ecosystem destruction during the end-Permian mass extinction (EPME) have been linked to widespread marine euxinic conditions. Changes in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), and marine dissolved sulfate concentrations during the Per...... of widespread euxinic conditions, posing a sustained threat to marine life during the Early Triassic....

  2. Volatile Sulfur Compounds from Livestock Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds, i.e. hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide have been identified as key odorants in livestock production due to their high concentration levels and low odor threshold values. At the same time their removal with abatement technologies based on mass transfer...... and, thus, odor removal in these systems. In this context, two processes based on the absorptive oxidation of sulfur compounds in trickling filters containing metal catalysts were examined. One process with iron chelated by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was shown to remove hydrogen sulfide...... that the original sample composition was significantly impaired due to adsorption and diffusion at the walls of the measuring equipment. Generally, sulfur compounds were best preserved in both olfactometers and sample bags, while carboxylic acids, 4-methylphenol and trimethylamine were found to undergo substantial...

  3. Sulfur and Moisture Effects on Alumina Scale and TBC Spallation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialek, James L.

    2007-01-01

    It has been well established that a few ppmw sulfur impurity may segregate to the interface of thermally grown alumina scales and the underlying substrate, resulting in bond degradation and premature spallation. This has been shown for NiAl and NiCrAl-based alloys, bare single crystal superalloys, or coated superalloys. The role of reactive elements (especially Y) has been to getter the sulfur in the bulk and preclude interfacial segregation. Pt additions are also very beneficial, however a similar thermodynamic explanation does not apply. The purpose of the present discussion is to highlight some observations of these effects on Rene'142, Rene'N5, PWA1480, and PWA1484. For PWA1480, we have mapped cyclic oxidation and spallation in terms of potential sulfur interfacial layers and found that a cumulative amount of about one monolayer is sufficient to degrade long term adhesion. Depending on substrate thickness, optimum performance occurs if sulfur is reduced below about 0.2-0.5 ppmw. This is accomplished in the laboratory by hydrogen annealing or commercially by melt-fluxing. Excellent 1150 C cyclic oxidation is thus demonstrated for desulfurized Rene'142, Rene'N5, and PWA1484. Alternatively, a series of N5 alloys provided by GE-AE have shown that as little as 15 ppmw of Y dopant was effective in providing remarkable scale adhesion. In support of a Y-S gettering mechanism, hydrogen annealing was unable to desulfurize these alloys from their initial level of 5 ppmw S. This impurity and critical doping level corresponds closely to YS or Y2S3 stoichiometry. In many cases, Y-doped alloys or alloys with marginal sulfur levels exhibit an oxidative sensitivity to the ambient humidity called Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation (MIDS). After substantial scale growth, coupled with damage from repeated cycling, cold samples may spall after a period of time, breathing on them, or immersing them in water. While stress corrosion arguments may apply, we propose that the underlying

  4. [Emission of volatile sulfur gases from Chinese paddy soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, W; Yang, Z; Cao, J; Li, Z

    2001-09-01

    In the paper, emission of volatile sulfur gases from paddy soil was discussed in a growth period of paddy rice by constructing a field sampling system. The result showed that COS, CS2, DMS and DMDS were mainly emitted from paddy soil. The order of emission fluxes was 81.11, 6.33 and 10.71 mg.(m2.a)-1. Sulphur emission fluxes of Chinese paddy soil was 0.013662 Tg/a, and those of world paddy soil was 0.07992 Tg/a.

  5. Pengaruh Ritma Circadian Terhadap Produksi Volatile Sulfur Compounds (VSC Oral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriatno Supriatno

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs oral dihasilkan dari produk putrifikasi mikroba gas hidrogen sulfida (H2S, metil merkaptan (CH3SH dan dimetil sulfida [(CH32S] yang merupakan gas utama penyebab halitosis. Ritma circadian mempunyai pengaruh terhadap fungsi beberapa organ tubuh termasuk sekresi saliva, produksi hormon, fungsi sistem tubuh, dan aktivitas mikroorganisma. Penelitian bertujuan menguji pengaruh ritma circadian terhadap produksi VSC oral yang diukur menggunakan OralChroma portable. Penelitian dilakukan dengan mengukur gas VSC individu yang sama pada pagi, siang dan malam hari di laboratorium riset terpadu FKG UGM. Hasil pengukuran H2S, CH3SH dan (CH32S diuji menggunakan analisis statistik Anava dua jalur dilanjutkan uji LSD dan uji korelasi Pearson dengan derajat kemaknaan 95%. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan terdapat perbedaan yang sangat bermakna antara produksi gas H2S, CH3SH dan (CH32S dengan waktu pengukuran (efek circadian (p=0,000. Perbedaan sangat bermakna diketahui pula pada pengukuran gas H2S dan (CH32S antara pagi, siang dan malam (p=0,01 dan p= 0,00, serta pengukuran gas CH3SH siang dan malam (p=0,006, tetapi tidak pada CH3SH pagi hari (p=0,061. Produksi gas H2S tertinggi diketahui pada pagi hari (mean 1,198 ng/10 ml, CH3SH pada malam hari (mean 0,099 ng/10 ml, dan (CH32S pada siang hari (mean 1,216 ng/10 ml. Kekuatan hubungan pengukuran antara ke tiga gas dengan efek circadian diketahui sebesar r=0,738. Disimpulkan bahwa ritma circadian berpengaruh terhadap produksi VSCs oral. Produksi gas H2S dan (CH32S berbeda antara pagi, siang dan malam hari, sedangkan produksi gas CH3SH berbeda hanya pengukuran siang dan malam hari. Produksi gas H2S tertinggi diketahui pada pagi hari, gas CH3SH pada malam hari, dan gas (CH32S pada siang hari. Maj Ked Gi. Juni 2013; 20(1: 14 - 20. The Effect Of Circadian Rhythm To Oral Volatile Sulfur Compounds Production. Oral volatile sulfur compound (VSC is produced from microbial purification

  6. [Influence of exogenous sulfur-containing compounds on the exchange fluxes of volatile organic sulfur compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Xin-Ming

    2011-08-01

    The influences of cysteine, sodium sulfide (Na2S) and sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) on the soil-air exchange fluxes of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs), including carbonyl sulfide (COS), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon disulfide (CS2) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), were studied employing static chamber enclosure followed by laboratory determination using an Entech 7100 preconcentrator coupled with an Agilent 5973 GC-MSD. The results showed that after the addition of cysteine, the soil for the exchange fluxes of COS and CS2 shifted to be the source from sink and the emissions of DMS and DMDS increased significant. The emission amount of DMS and CS2 accounted for 89.2% to the total VOSCs after the addition of cysteine, implying that cysteine is an important precursor for DMS and CS2 in the soil. The amount of DMDS accounted for 93.2% to the total sulfur from the soil after addition of Na2S, indicating that Na2S is a key precursor for DMDS. No significant difference of VOSCs fluxes was found between the controlled soil and the soil with addition of Na2SO4, suggesting Na2SO4 was not the direct precursor for VOSCs in soil. VOSCs exchange rates reached the maximum at 6 to 8 days after addition of cysteine. As for addition of Na2S, the maximal emission rates of different VOSCs appeared at different dates, and the dates differed significantly from those after addition of cysteine, implying that the formation process of VOSCs from the soil with addition of Na2S was more complex and different from the soil with addition of cysteine.

  7. Removal of H2S and volatile organic sulfur compounds by silicone membrane extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manconi, I.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study explores an alternative process for the abatement and/or desulfurization of H2S and volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) containing waste streams, which employs a silicone-based membrane to simultaneously remove H2S and VOSC. An extractive membrane reactor allows the selec

  8. Gas chromatographic determination of volatile sulfur fluorides in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezkin, V.G.; Drugov, Yu.S.

    1984-07-01

    An analytical method was developed for the determination of toxic products from thermooxidative destruction of sulfur hexafluoride (650-850/sup 0/C) found in the surrounding air of the work zone in production of high quality magnesium alloys. Sulfur hexafluoride (0.6-1.2%) and carbon dioxide (3-6%) are used as the protective atmosphere. The method involved preliminary concentration of lower sulfur fluorides in a cold trap filled with porapak Q followed with thermodesorption of concentrated impurities and their determination using a flame-photometric detector. The sensitivity of this method was 0.01 mg/m/sup 3/ and relative standard deviation 0.22-0.26. It was shown that when the temperature of the alloy increased from 720 to 800/sup 0/C, the content of HF over it increased from 6.7 to 15.5 mg/m/sup 3/. When zirconium alloy was introduced into this product, the concentration of HF above it reached the level of 52 mg/m/sup 3/, showing that it catalyzed the CF/sub 6/ thermodestruction process. 15 references, 2 figures.

  9. Catabolism of L-methionine in the formation of sulfur and other volatiles in melon (Cucumis melo L.) fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Itay; Lev, Shery; Bar, Einat; Sikron, Noga; Portnoy, Vitaly; Davidovich-Rikanati, Rachel; Burger, Joseph; Schaffer, Arthur A; Tadmor, Ya'akov; Giovannonni, James J; Huang, Mingyun; Fei, Zhangjun; Katzir, Nurit; Fait, Aaron; Lewinsohn, Efraim

    2013-05-01

    Sulfur-containing aroma volatiles are important contributors to the distinctive aroma of melon and other fruits. Melon cultivars and accessions differ in the content of sulfur-containing and other volatiles. L-methionine has been postulated to serve as a precursor of these volatiles. Incubation of melon fruit cubes with ¹³C- and ²H-labeled L-methionine revealed two distinct catabolic routes into volatiles. One route apparently involves the action of an L-methionine aminotransferase and preserves the main carbon skeleton of L-methionine. The second route apparently involves the action of an L-methionine-γ-lyase activity, releasing methanethiol, a backbone for formation of thiol-derived aroma volatiles. Exogenous L-methionine also generated non-sulfur volatiles by further metabolism of α-ketobutyrate, a product of L-methionine-γ-lyase activity. α-Ketobutyrate was further metabolized into L-isoleucine and other important melon volatiles, including non-sulfur branched and straight-chain esters. Cell-free extracts derived from ripe melon fruit exhibited L-methionine-γ-lyase enzymatic activity. A melon gene (CmMGL) ectopically expressed in Escherichia coli, was shown to encode a protein possessing L-methionine-γ-lyase enzymatic activity. Expression of CmMGL was relatively low in early stages of melon fruit development, but increased in the flesh of ripe fruits, depending on the cultivar tested. Moreover, the levels of expression of CmMGL in recombinant inbred lines co-segregated with the levels of sulfur-containing aroma volatiles enriched with +1 m/z unit and postulated to be produced via this route. Our results indicate that L-methionine is a precursor of both sulfur and non-sulfur aroma volatiles in melon fruit.

  10. Investigating sulfur partitioning between nominally volatile-free minerals and silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzoli, A.; Callegaro, S.; Baker, D. R.; Geraki, K.; Maneta, V.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the key role played by volatile species in magmatic systems, it is still challenging to quantify their concentrations in ancient melts. We suggested a quantitative approach for estimating S contents in basaltic melts (Callegaro et al., 2014), based on direct measurement of S on clinopyroxene and calculation of its concentration in the melt through an experimentally determined partition coefficient (KD). We further investigated the partitioning of sulfur between silicate melts and nominally volatile-free minerals (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and plagioclase), as well as between melt and amphibole. Partitioning experiments were performed with basaltic, andesitic and dacitic bulk compositions, at hydrous and anhydrous conditions, and at high and low oxygen fugacities (fO2), where sulfur in the melt is dominantly present as an S6+ or S2- species, respectively (Wilke et al., 2011). Sulfur concentrations in melts were measured by electron microprobe and in crystals by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence. At low fO2 the average crystal/liquid KDs for sulfur vary from 0.0004 (at a maximum) for olivine, to 0.003 (another maximum) for orthopyroxene, to 0.03 for clinopyroxene, and to 0.07 for plagioclase. The KDs correlate positively with the cation-oxygen bond lengths in the crystals. At high fO2 the KDs drop to approximately one-third of those observed at low fO2. These observations suggest that S2- replaces oxygen in the crystal structure. Water has no measureable influence on the crystal/melt partitioning of sulfur. Clinopyroxene/melt KDs are correlated with the Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio of the crystal, but appear insensitive to the IVAl in the structure. Plagioclase/melt S partitioning appears unaffected by anorthite content and iron concentration in the crystal. These new KDs allow the determination of sulfur concentration in the igneous melts co-existing with these crystals and provide insights into the volatile concentrations of ancient magmas and their possible

  11. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions along a high arctic soil moisture gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Sarah Hagel; Lindwall, Frida; Michelsen, Anders; Rinnan, Riikka

    2016-12-15

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from terrestrial ecosystems are important for the atmospheric chemistry and the formation of secondary organic aerosols, and may therefore influence the climate. Global warming is predicted to change patterns in precipitation and plant species compositions, especially in arctic regions where the temperature increase will be most pronounced. These changes are potentially highly important for the BVOC emissions but studies investigating the effects are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the quality and quantity of BVOC emissions from a high arctic soil moisture gradient extending from dry tundra to a wet fen. Ecosystem BVOC emissions were sampled five times in the July-August period using a push-pull enclosure technique, and BVOCs trapped in absorbent cartridges were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Plant species compositions were estimated using the point intercept method. In order to take into account important underlying ecosystem processes, gross ecosystem production, ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem production were measured in connection with chamber-based BVOC measurements. Highest emissions of BVOCs were found from vegetation communities dominated by Salix arctica and Cassiope tetragona, which had emission profiles dominated by isoprene and monoterpenes, respectively. These results show that emissions of BVOCs are highly dependent on the plant cover supported by the varying soil moisture, suggesting that high arctic BVOC emissions may affect the climate differently if soil water content and plant cover change.

  12. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from feedlot pen surface materials as affected by within pen location, moisture, and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of pen location, moisture, and temperature on emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from surface materials obtained from feedlot pens where beef cattle were fed a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain plus solubles. Surface material...

  13. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol (-SH

  14. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, Albert

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile Sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol (-SH

  15. Characterization of carbon, sulfur and volatile compounds in nuclear fuel U{sub 3}SI{sub 2}-AL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Sergio C.; Coelho, Felipe P.; Bustillos, Jose O.V., E-mail: ovega@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CNEN/IPEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The scope of this work is to describe the characterization of Carbon, Sulfur and Volatile Compounds in nuclear fuel U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al used in a research pool type reactor with 5 KW power capacities, located in Sao Paulo, Brazil. This reactor produces a large range of radioisotopes for radiopharmaceutical needed in Brazil nuclear medicine. The fabrication of the fuel U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al plate is the key of the whole assembly production and its quality directly affects the safety and reliability of the fuel assembly performance. For this reason, it is very necessary to analyze the Carbon, Sulfur and Volatile Compounds to avoid damage in the fuel plate. The Carbon and Sulfur are characterized by the method of radio frequency furnace gas extraction system coupled with infrared cell detector. The Volatile Compounds are characterized by the method of heat gas extraction coupled with gravimetric technique. These methods are recommended by American Society for Testing Materials ASTM for nuclear materials. The average carbon and sulfur analyzed are 30 μg/g and 3 μg/g, respectively. The average for Volatile Compounds is 40 μg/g. These results represent satisfactory performance of the fuel inside the nuclear reactor. A statistical laboratory program has been set to validate the data generated in the nuclear fuel material to specify any agreement with the recommended ASTM methods. (author)

  16. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, Albert

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile Sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol

  17. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol

  18. Pengaruh Cara Aplikasi Pasta Gigi Herbal terhadap Produksi Volatile Sulfur Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryono Suryono

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatile Sulfur Compound (VSC merupakan komponen gas yang dihasilkan oleh bakteri dalam rongga mulut, terdiri dari Hidrogen sulfide, Methyl Mercaptan dan Dimethyl Sulfide. Ketiga komponen gas tersebut sering digunakan sebagai indikator untuk menilai status bau mulut seseorang. Pasta gigi berbasis herbal telah dilaporkan pada penelitian sebelumnya mampu menghambat pertumbuhan kuman penyebab penyakit periodontal. Bakteri plak dalam rongga mulut dapat dikurangi melalui cara gosok gigi dan/atau penggunaan material antiseptik. Dua kelompok subjek terpilih diberikan perlakuan dengan menggunakan pasta gigi herbal dengan cara yang berbeda, kelompok pertama dengan cara menggosok gigi dengan pasta gigi herbal sesuai dengan cara yang sudah biasa mereka lakukan dan kelompok ke-2 diberikan perlakuan dengan cara mengoleskan pasta herbal di daerah molar kiri dan kanan rahang atas. Pengambilan sampel nafas dilakukan sebelum perlakuan, 5 menit dan 2 jam paska menggosok gigi atau mengoles pasta herbal. Hasil pengamatan menunjukkan bahwa penggunaan pasta gigi herbal dengan cara sikat gigi maupun pengolesan memiliki pola yang sama pada masing-masing komponen gas sulfur yaitu peningkatan pada lima menit paska aplikasi kemudian menurun pada 2 jam paska aplikasi. Pasta gigi herbal yang diaplikasikan dengan cara gosok gigi maupun dengan cara pengolesan mempengaruhi kadar VSC yaitu yaitu menurunkan kadar Hydrogen sulfide, relatif stabil kadar methyl mercaptan dan terjadi peningkatan kadar dimethyl sulfide. Pasta gigi berbasis herbal dapat digunakan dengan cara sikat gigi maupun pengolesan untuk menurunkan kadar gas VSC, khususnya Hydrogen sulfide pada subjek normal. Effect of Herbal Toothpaste Application Method on Production of Volatile Sulfur Compound. Volatile sulfur compound (VSC is a component of the gas produced by bacteria in the oral cavity, consisting of hydrogen sulfide,methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide. This gas is often used as an indicator to assess the

  19. Chlorine and Sulfur Volatiles from in Situ Measurements of Martian Surface Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    A sentinel discovery by the first in situ measurements on Mars was the high sulfur and chlorine content of global-wide soils. A variety of circumstantial evidence led to the conclusion that soil S is in the form of sulfate, and the Cl is probably chloride. An early hypothesis states that these volatiles are emitted as gases from magmas, and quickly react with dust, soil, and exposed rocks. Subsequent determination that SNC meteorites are also samples of the martian crust revealed a significantly higher S content, as sulfide, than terrestrial igneous rocks but substantially less than in soils. The ensuing wet chemical analyses by the high-latitude Phoenix mission discovered not only chloride but also perchlorate and possibly chlorate. MSL data now also implicate perchlorate at low latitudes. Gaseous interactions may have produced amorphous material on grain surfaces without forming stoichiometric salts. Yet, when exposed to liquid water, Phoenix samples released electrolytes, indicating that the soils have not been leached by rain or fresh groundwater. Sulfate occurrences at many locations on Mars, as well as some chloride enrichments, have now been discovered by remote sensing, Landed missions have discovered Cl-enrichments and ferric, Mg, Ca and more complex sulfates as duricrust, subsurface soil horizons, sandstone evaporites, and rock coatings - most of which cannot be detected from orbit. Salt-forming volatiles affect habitability wherever they are in physical contact: physicochemical parameters (ionic strength, freezing point, water activity); S is an essential element for terrestrial organisms; perchlorate is an oxidant which can degrade some organics but also can be utilized as an energy source; the entire valence range of S-compounds has been exploited by diverse microbiota on Earth. Whether such salt-induced conditions are "extremes" of habitability depends on the relative abundance of liquid H2O.

  20. Direct effect of chlorine dioxide, zinc chloride and chlorhexidine solution on the gaseous volatile sulfur compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Sik; Park, Ji-Woon; Kim, Dae-Jung; Kim, Young-Ku; Lee, Jeong-Yun

    2014-11-01

    This study focused on the ability of aqueous anti-volatile-sulfur-compound (VSC) solutions to eliminate gaseous VSCs by direct contact in a sealed space to describe possible mode of action of anti-VSC agents. Twenty milliliters of each experimental solution, 0.16% sodium chlorite, 0.25% zinc chloride, 0.1% chlorhexidine and distilled water, was injected into a Teflon bag containing mixed VSCs, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide and mixed vigorously for 30 s. The VSC concentration was measured by gas chromatography before, immediately after, 30 min and 60 min after mixing. The sodium chlorite solution reduced the VSC concentration remarkably. After mixing, nearly all VSCs were eliminated immediately and no VSCs were detected at 30 and 60 min post-mixing. However, in the other solutions, the VSC concentration decreased by ∼30% immediately after mixing and there was no further decrease. The results suggest that sodium chlorite solution has the effect of eliminating gaseous VSCs directly. This must be because it can release chlorine dioxide gas which can react directly with gaseous VSCs. In the case of other solutions that have been proved to be effective to reduce halitosis clinically, it can be proposed that their anti-VSC effect is less likely due to the direct chemical elimination of gaseous VSCs in the mouth.

  1. Malodorous volatile organic sulfur compounds: Sources, sinks and significance in inland waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Susan B; Jüttner, Friedrich

    2017-03-01

    Volatile Organic Sulfur Compounds (VOSCs) are instrumental in global S-cycling and greenhouse gas production. VOSCs occur across a diversity of inland waters, and with widespread eutrophication and climate change, are increasingly linked with malodours in organic-rich waterbodies and drinking-water supplies. Compared with marine systems, the role of VOSCs in biogeochemical processes is far less well characterized for inland waters, and often involves different physicochemical and biological processes. This review provides an updated synthesis of VOSCs in inland waters, focusing on compounds known to cause malodours. We examine the major limnological and biochemical processes involved in the formation and degradation of alkylthiols, dialkylsulfides, dialkylpolysulfides, and other organosulfur compounds under different oxygen, salinity and mixing regimes, and key phototropic and heterotrophic microbial producers and degraders (bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae) in these environs. The data show VOSC levels which vary significantly, sometimes far exceeding human odor thresholds, generated by a diversity of biota, biochemical pathways, enzymes and precursors. We also draw attention to major issues in sampling and analytical artifacts which bias and preclude comparisons among studies, and highlight significant knowledge gaps that need addressing with careful, appropriate methods to provide a more robust understanding of the potential effects of continued global development.

  2. Biodrying of sewage sludge: kinetics of volatile solids degradation under different initial moisture contents and air-flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Manuel; Huiliñir, Cesar

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on the kinetics of the biodegradation of volatile solids (VS) of sewage sludge for biodrying under different initial moisture contents (Mc) and air-flow rates (AFR). For the study, a 3(2) factorial design, whose factors were AFR (1, 2 or 3L/minkgTS) and initial Mc (59%, 68% and 78% w.b.), was used. Using seven kinetic models and a nonlinear regression method, kinetic parameters were estimated and the models were analyzed with two statistical indicators. Initial Mc of around 68% increases the temperature matrix and VS consumption, with higher moisture removal at lower initial Mc values. Lower AFRs gave higher matrix temperatures and VS consumption, while higher AFRs increased water removal. The kinetic models proposed successfully simulate VS biodegradation, with root mean square error (RMSE) between 0.007929 and 0.02744, and they can be used as a tool for satisfactory prediction of VS in biodrying.

  3. The partitioning of sulfur and chlorine between andesite melts and magmatic volatiles and the exchange coefficients of major cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajacz, Zoltán; Candela, Philip A.; Piccoli, Philip M.; Sanchez-Valle, Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Andesite melts were equilibrated with an H-O-S-bearing volatile phase to determine the partition coefficients for S and Cl as a function of melt composition and oxygen fugacity. The experiments were conducted in rapid-quench MHC vessel assemblies at 200 MPa and 1000 °C, and over a range of imposed fO2 between NNO-1.2 and NNO+1.8. High fluid/melt mass ratios (∼15) were employed, allowing precise and accurate partition coefficients to be obtained by mass balance calculations. Chlorine exhibits Henrian behavior at ClO-0.5 activities typical for arc magmas, with D Cl volatile/melt = 1.36 ± 0.06 (1σ) below 0.2 wt.% Cl in the melt; at higher ClO-0.5 activities, D Cl volatile/melt increases linearly to 2.11 ± 0.02 at 1 wt.% Cl in the melt. In the volatile phase: FeCl2 ∼ NaCl > KCl ∼ HCl. The determination of cation exchange coefficients for major cations yielded: K K,Na volatile/melt = 1.23 ± 0.10 (1σ) and ∗K Fe,Na volatile/melt = D Fe volatile/melt / D Na volatile/melt = 1.08 ± 0.16 (1σ). Under these conditions, the concentration of HCl in the vapor is negatively correlated with the (Na + K)/(Al + Fe3+) ratio in the melt. Reduced sulfur (S2-) appears to obey Henry's law in andesite melt-volatile system at fH2S below pyrrhotite saturation. The partition coefficient for S at fO2 = NNO-0.5 correlates negatively with the FeO concentration in the melt, changing from 254 ± 25 at 4.0 wt.% FeO to 88 ± 6 at 7.5 wt.% FeO. Pyrrhotite saturation is reached when approximately 3.2 mol% S is present in the volatile phase at fO2 = NNO-0.5. At the sulfide/sulfate transition, the partition coefficient of S drops from 171 ± 23 to 21 ± 1 at a constant FeO content of ∼6 wt.% in the melt. At fO2 = NNO+1.8, anhydrite saturation is reached at ∼3.3 mol% S present in the volatile phase. Aqueous volatiles exsolving from intermediate to mafic magmas can efficiently extract S, and effect its transfer to sites of magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposit formation.

  4. Assessment of halitosis using the organoleptic method and volatile sulfur compounds monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alasqah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Halitosis can be tested using two main methods, organoleptic and assessment of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs, using an electronic meter like Halimeter. Therefore, the present study was conducted to measure the oral malodor of volunteers by means of the organoleptic method and VSCs monitoring and to evaluate the diagnostic value of the Halimeter in the diagnosis of halitosis. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was conducted to compare the two diagnostic aids for halitosis. The study population included 110 volunteers, all males, between the ages of 18 and 45 years selected from academic staff, students, and patients of college. Evaluation and comparison of two main methods for halitosis were done, namely, organoleptic and Halimeter. Specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV, and disease prevalence were calculated for the sulfide monitor test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to determine the diagnostic values of Halimeter to differentiate individuals with and without halitosis. Results: The correlation coefficient between VSC grading and organoleptic score (Kendall′s tau-b was −0.1090, which was not significant (P = 0.2170. Sensitivity and specificity of sulfide monitor grades for detecting individuals with and without halitosis were 20.75% and 66.67%, respectively. The PPV for the Halimeter was 36.67%, and the NPV was 47.50%. A total of 48.18% of all subjects were accurately identified and differentiated. The area under the ROC curve was 0.5790 (95% confidence interval: 0.4600-0.6980. Conclusion: In the present study, the Halimeter was not found to have a good correlation with the organoleptic method. However, due to the diverse influencing factors, proof of halitosis should always be obtained with two different methods.

  5. Emission of volatile organic compounds as affected by feedlot location, moisture, and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the effects within pen location, moisture, and temperature on odor emission from manure resulting from a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain with solubles. Pen surface material was collected from three locations. Material from each pen was consolidated for each specific...

  6. Augmenting Sulfur Metabolism and Herbivore Defense in Arabidopsis by Bacterial Volatile Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina eAziz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur is an element necessary for the life cycle of higher plants. Its assimilation and reduction into essential biomolecules are pivotal factors determining a plant’s growth and vigor as well as resistance to environmental stress. While certain soil microbes can enhance ion solubility via chelating agents or oxidation, microbial regulation of plant-sulfur assimilation has not been reported. With an increasing understanding that soil microbes can activate growth and stress tolerance in plants via chemical signaling, the question arises as to whether such beneficial bacteria also regulate sulfur assimilation. Here we report a previously unidentified mechanism by which the growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (GB03 transcriptionally activates genes responsible for sulfur assimilation, increasing sulfur uptake and accumulation in Arabidopsis. Transcripts encoding for sulfur-rich aliphatic and indolic glucosinolates are also GB03 induced. As a result, GB03-exposed plants with elevated glucosinolates exhibit greater protection against the generalist herbivore, Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm. In contrast, a previously-characterized glucosinolate mutant compromised in the production of both aliphatic and indolic glucosinolates is also compromised in terms of GB03-induced protection against insect herbivory. As with in vitro studies, soil-grown plants show enhanced glucosinolate accumulation and protection against beet armyworm feeding with GB03 exposure. These results demonstrate the potential of microbes to enhance plant sulfur assimilation and emphasize the sophisticated integration of microbial signaling in plant defense.

  7. Volatile Evolution and Anhydrite-Bearing Dacite, Yanacocha Gold Deposit, Cajamarca, Peru: Relevance for the Sulfur Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambefort, I. S.; Dilles, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    Magmatic water, sulfur and chlorine evolved during volcanic eruptions have important climactic effects, but during passive degassing these volatiles may transport metals and produce hydrothermal ore deposits. At the Yanacocha Mine, we are examining the volatile evolution of the Miocene andesitic to dacitic volcanic rocks (ca 20 to 8 Ma). High sulfidation epithermal deposits contain >50 Moz of gold in oxides with additional deeper sulfide resources containing >5 Mt of copper. Large volumes (>10 km3) of rock are hydrothermally altered by sulfate-rich and low pH fluid to quartz, quartz-alunite, quartz-pyrophyllite, illite. Pyrite (1-5 vol.%), native sulfur, covellite, enargite and chalcopyrite constitute reduced S-species. In total, at least 500 M tonnes of sulfur were added during alteration. The San Jose ignimbrite (SJI) erupted 30 km3 magma in two cooling units at 11.50 and 11.28 Ma, and immediately predates the bulk of gold mineralization at about 10.80 Ma (Longo, 2005). This hornblende- plagioclase dacitic magma is highly oxidized with fO2 ≍ 2 NNO. Low-Al2O3 (~7 wt.%), and high- Al2O3 (~12 wt.%) amphiboles coexist in most of the samples. Plag-hbl thermobarometry on low-Al content amphibole yields ca. 1.5-2 kb and 800°C. High-Al pargasitic hornblende forms sparse crystals up to 1 cm long that often show resorption or oxide rims associated with oxyhornblende breakdown. Apatite is an inclusion but generally not plagioclase or oxide. These petrographic relations suggest that the high-Al hornblende is the liquidus phase (at 950 to 1000°C, PH2O > 3 kb) in an andesitic or basaltic magma. The high-Al amphibole in two samples contains anhydrite inclusions, one with >5 vol.% anhydrite associated with apatite having up to 1.2 wt.% SO3. Comparison of these data with experimental sulfate solubilities at NNO+2 suggests the andesitic or basaltic melt dissolved at least 1000 ppm S. One low-Al amphibole contains anhydrite, demonstrating that the cooler dacite magma was also

  8. Sulfur isotope effects associated with protonation of HS- and volatilization of H2S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The isotope effects associated with: (1) formation of H2S from HS- by protonation in aqueous solution; and (2) volatilization of H2S have been experimentally determined. Both isotopic distributions in closed systems at equilibrium and differential rates of volatilization of isotopic species in open systems were measured at 22 +/- 1 degrees C. It was found that, at equilibrium aqueous H2S is enriched in 34S by 2.0 - 2.7% relative to HS- and that H2S volatilized from solution is depleted in 34S by 0.5% relative to dissolved H2S. A small kinetic isotope effect accompanying volatilization of H2S was observed in the open-system experiments.

  9. Ammonia Volatilization in Cocoa Farm as Affected by Sugarcane Filter Cake Supply at Different Urea and Soil Moisture Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Prastowo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia  (NH3  volatilization  is  a  crucial  mechanism  in  soil  nitrogen  (N cycle. It accounts for main loss  of N in cocoa  farms  when  environment is  suitable to  promote  the  emission.  A  research  to  locate  a  link  of  several  factors,  namely, sugarcane filter cake  (SFC, urea  and soil moisture content  to NH 3 volatilization,  and  to reveal  cocoa  N  uptake  and  urea  fertilizer  efficiency  was  taken  place  both  in  a laboratory  with  the  incubation  technique,  and  in  a  greenhouse  as  a  pot  trial. The design was completely randomized design in factorial. The soil was Inceptisol from Kaliwining Experimental Station, Jember, East Java, collected from top soil of  a  productive  cocoa  farm.  A  closed  trap  system  was  designed  to  measurevolatilized  NH 3 from  soil  and  SFC  mixture  incubated  for  14  days.  For  the  pot experiment,  cocoa  clone  of  Scavina  6  seedlings  were  grown  for  six  months  withtreatments  involving  series  level  of  SFC  and  series  level  of  urea.  Soil  moisture content influenced volatilized NH3 by reducing 50% emission in where it was more obvious in higher level of urea applied. It was more than 90% in average for the increase in volatilized NH 3roduced by increasing in level of urea from 0 to 0.4 g kg -1 in  overall  level  of  combinations. An increase in urea  level  had  resulted in increase in  soil  pH, and  Parson correlation suggested a direct  link  with  volatilized  NH 3  We found  a  relationship  between  SFC  and volatilized  NH 3 and  their combinations  with soil  moisture  and  urea  content  were  able  to  inhibit  the  emission.  Emission decrease  up  to  28%  was  observed  from  0  to  100  g  SFC  kg-1.  This  inhibition may  have contributed to  the increase in  N cocoa  plant uptake

  10. Combinatorial synthesis by nature: volatile organic sulfur-containing constituents of Ruta chalepensis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Sina; Niclass, Yvan; van de Waal, Matthijs; Starkenmann, Christian

    2006-09-01

    Ongoing interest in discovering new natural fragrance and flavor ingredients prompted us to examine a solvent extract of sulfurous-sweaty smelling Ruta chalepensis L. (Rutaceae) plant material more closely. Twenty-one sulfur-containing constituents of similar structures were identified by GC/MS techniques. Amongst them, 14 have never been described to occur in nature. The compounds 1-18 belong to a family of natural flavor and fragrance molecules having a 1,3-positioned O,S moiety in common. The identities of the natural constituents were confirmed by comparison with synthetic reference samples, and the organoleptic properties of the latter were studied. The relative and absolute configurations of the four stereoisomers of 4-methyl-3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (5) were established by stereoselective synthesis. The natural isomers consisted of a 65 : 35 mixture of (3R,4S)-5 and (3S,4S)-5.

  11. Production of volatile and sulfur compounds by ten Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains inoculated in Trebbiano must

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca ePatrignani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In wines, the presence of sulphur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained throughout the fermentation of 10 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, the production of sulphur compounds was further evaluated by using a gas-chromatograph coupled with a Flame Photometric Detector. Specifically, the ten strains were inoculated in Trebbiano musts and the fermentations were monitored for 19 days. In the produced wines, volatile and sulphur compounds as well as amino acid concentrations were investigated. Also the physico-chemical characteristics of the wines and their electronic nose profiles were evaluated.

  12. A purge and trap technique to capture volatile compounds combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry to investigate the effect of sulfur-fumigation on Radix Angelicae Dahuricae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Li, Qinglin; Zhang, Jida; Cai, Hao; Cai, Baochang

    2014-09-01

    Sulfur-fumigation is known to reduce volatile compounds that are the main active components in herbs used in herbal medicine. We investigated changes in chemical composition between sun-dried and sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Dahuricae using a purge and trap technique to capture volatile compounds, and two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry for identification. Using sun-dried Radix Angelicae Dahuricae samples as a reference, the results showed that 73 volatile compounds, including 12 sulfide compounds, were found to be present only in sulfur-fumigated samples. Furthermore, 32 volatile compounds that were found in sun-dried Radix Angelicae Dahuricae samples disappeared after sulfur-fumigation. The proposed method can be applied to accurately discriminate sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Dahuricae from different commercial sources.

  13. Sulfur, halogens and helium in vesicles and glass of MORB; global fluxes of volatiles from ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagoshima, T.; Sano, Y.; Takahata, N.; Hattori, K. H.; Marty, B.

    2013-12-01

    We determined the compositions of vesicles and glasses of MORB to estimate fluxes of S and halogens from ridges to the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Samples were collected at 3 sites of the East Pacific Rise, 3 sites between 15-40 N of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and 2 sites near 25 S on the Central Indian Ridge. Volatiles were extracted from vesicles by crushing samples in dilute NaOH solution at liq. nitrogen temp. Helium isotope compositions were measured with a VG-5400 MS; S, F and Cl contents with ICS-2100 ion chromatography; and the contents of Br, I and metals with Agilent 7700x ICP-MS. For glass, the concentrations of S, F, Cl and Br were determined with a NanoSIMS. Vesicles contain similar concentrations of 3He (6.3E-16-5.1E-15 mol/g of sample) and F/Cl molar ratios (0.03-0.15) at all sites. Cl/S ratios are higher at shallower sites, suggesting the start of S degassing at deep levels, > 3000 m. Averages of vesicle data are (4.4×1.3)E7 for S/3He, (1.4×0.7)E6 for F/3He, (2.8×1.3)E7 for Cl/3He, and Earth's age are explained by recycling of volatiles through subduction process.

  14. Catabolism of volatile sulfur compounds precursors by Brevibacterium linens and Geotrichum candidum, two microorganisms of the cheese ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfi, Kenza; Amárita, Felix; Spinnler, Henry-Eric; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2003-11-01

    Two Brevibacterium linens strains and the cheese-ripening yeast Geotrichum candidum were compared with regard to their ability to produce volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) from three different precursors namely L-methionine, 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid (KMBA) and 4-methylthio-2-hydroxybutyric acid (HMBA). All microorganisms were able to convert these precursors to VSCs. However, although all were able to produce VSCs from L-methionine, only G. candidum accumulated KMBA when cultivated on this amino acid, contrary to B. linens suggesting that the transamination pathway is not active in this microorganism. Conversely, a L-methionine gamma-lyase activity--which catalyses the one step L-methionine to methanethiol (MTL) degradation route--was only found in B. linens strains. Several other enzymatic activities involved in the catabolism of the precursors tested were investigated. KMBA transiently accumulated in G. candidum cultures, and was then reduced to HMBA by a KMBA dehydrogenase (KDH) activity. This activity was not detected in B. linens. Despite no HMBA dehydrogenase (HDH) was found in G. candidum, a strong HMBA oxidase (HOX) activity was measured in this microorganism. This latter activity was weakly active in B. linens. KMBA and HMBA demethiolating activities were found in all the microorganisms. Our results illustrate the metabolic diversity between cheese-ripening microorganisms of the cheese ecosystem.

  15. Influence of aeration on volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) and NH3 emissions during aerobic composting of kitchen waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Li, Guoxue; Gu, Jun; Wang, Guiqin; Li, Yangyang; Zhang, Difang

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the influence of aeration on volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) and ammonia (NH3) emissions during kitchen waste composting. Aerobic composting of kitchen waste and cornstalks was conducted at a ratio of 85:15 (wet weight basis) in 60L reactors for 30days. The gas emissions were analyzed with force aeration at rates of 0.1 (A1), 0.2 (A2) and 0.3 (A3) L (kgDMmin)(-1), respectively. Results showed that VSCs emission at the low aeration rate (A1) was more significant than that at other two rates (i.e., A2 and A3 treatment), where no considerable emission difference was observed. On the other hand, NH3 emission reduced as the aeration rate decreased. It is noteworthy that the aeration rate did not significantly affect the compost quality. These results suggest that the aeration rate of 0.2L (kgDMmin)(-1) may be applied to control VSCs and NH3 emissions during kitchen waste composting.

  16. First determination of dissolved volatiles in magmas of Mt Garet (Vanuatu arc). Origin of sulfur emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floury, P.; Metrich, N.; Bertagnini, A.; Garaebiti, E.; Hidalgo, S.; Beaumais, A.; Neuville, D.

    2012-12-01

    Mt Garet, on Gaua island, is one of the active volcanoes of the Vanuatu arc in the Southwest Pacific. This 360 m high cone emerges from the lake Letas in the summit caldera of a composite volcano. Since 1962, Mt Garet produced ash and gas plumes recurrently, the last explosive events being documented in 2009 - 2010. Airborne measurements of SO2 emission rates, the only data set presently available for this volcano, were realized in 2009 and revealed a high SO2 flux of, on average, 2955 tons per day [1]. We report here the very first data on the geochemistry of the scoriae emitted in January 2010, together with analyses of major elements and volatiles (H2O, Cl, S) in crystal-hosted melt inclusions and a detailed mineralogy of the samples. The 2010 scoriae are basaltic-andesites and are more evolved that the pre-1962 basaltic lava flows of Mt Garet. Their major and trace element evolution cannot be reconciled with a single process of fractional crystallization, but suggest mixing between a pre-1962 like basalt and an evolved trachydacitic end-member. This observation strongly suggests the recent development of a small reservoir beneath Mt Garet. The plagioclases (An89-73) and clinopyroxenes (Fs5-16) display a significant chemical range but do not clearly evidence reverse zoning. The paragenesis is complemented by Fe-Ti oxides (USP39-40) and scarce olivines (Fo72.7). Some crystals are obviously inherited (e.g., An-poor plagioclase). The melt inclusions are ubiquitous but of small size in each mineral phase. Their H2O content was specifically determined using micro-Raman spectroscopy (IPGP), with a series of basaltic glass standards previously developed for Raman calibration [2]. Data and spectrum are treated following [3]. As a whole melt inclusion compositions cover the whole chemical spectrum from basalt to trachydacite. Their contents in H2O (2.7-0.8 wt%), S (1570 - Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 211-212, 36-46 [2] Mercier et al., (2009) and (2010

  17. Effect of Green Tea-Added Tablets on Volatile Sulfur-Containing Compounds in the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porciani, Pier Francesco; Grandini, Simone

    2016-12-01

    A controlled, clinical, double-blind, cross-over study was conducted to assess the efficacy of sugar-free tablets containing green tea extract on oral volatile sulfur-containing compounds (VSC) versus placebo tablets for 30 minutes. To join the study, subjects had to have at least 24 teeth, no report of oral and systemic diseases, and no removable dentures. All eligible participants had to avoid professional oral hygiene and drugs for two weeks, to not be menstruating, to avoid brushing their teeth and tongue, to not smoke, to not consume alcohol, coffee or tea, nor onion, garlic, or licorice for six hours before the test. Moreover, they had to score a level of VSC ≥ 75 ppb at the basal measurement. Subjects were entered into their respective groups after a minimum 48-hour wash-out period. The test tablet (0.7 g) contained 0.05% green tea extract (equivalent of 1 mg polyphenols for three tablets); the control tablet was identical but without the active agent. The OralChroma2™ device was utilized to evaluate VSC in the oral air. The levels were recorded at baseline, after sucking three tablets in succession, and after 30 minutes. Data were analyzed with SPSS software and significance was set at α = 0.05. 54 subjects completed the trial (23 men, 31 women). None reported problems linked to green tea. The mean reductions in VSC level from baseline at the end of tablet sucking were 34% (p green tea extract can statistically significantly reduce the oral VSC levels immediately, and after 30 minutes. Moreover, the test tablets reduced oral VSC significantly more than the control tablets.

  18. Identification, synthesis, and characterization of novel sulfur-containing volatile compounds from the in-depth analysis of Lisbon lemon peels (Citrus limon L. Burm. f. cv. Lisbon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Robert J; Kazimierski, Arkadiusz; Curto, Nicole L; Li, Jing; Trinnaman, Laurence; Jańczuk, Adam J; Agyemang, David; Da Costa, Neil C; Chen, Michael Z

    2015-02-25

    Lemons (Citrus limon) are a desirable citrus fruit grown and used globally in a wide range of applications. The main constituents of this sour-tasting fruit have been well quantitated and characterized. However, additional research is still necessary to better understand the trace volatile compounds that may contribute to the overall aroma of the fruit. In this study, Lisbon lemons (C. limon L. Burm. f. cv. Lisbon) were purchased from a grove in California, USA, and extracted by liquid-liquid extraction. Fractionation and multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were utilized to separate, focus, and enhance unidentified compounds. In addition, these methods were employed to more accurately assign flavor dilution factors by aroma extract dilution analysis. Numerous compounds were identified for the first time in lemons, including a series of branched aliphatic aldehydes and several novel sulfur-containing structures. Rarely reported in citrus peels, sulfur compounds are known to contribute significantly to the aroma profile of the fruit and were found to be aroma-active in this particular study on lemons. This paper discusses the identification, synthesis, and organoleptic properties of these novel volatile sulfur compounds.

  19. Volatile Solubilities in Mt. Somma-Vesuvius Phonolite Melt and New Insights on Degassing of Sulfur, Chlorine, and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, J. D.; Sintoni, M. F.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.

    2007-05-01

    To better understand volatile exsolution, degassing, and eruptive processes in subduction-related magmas, we have conducted thirty H2O plus S plus Cl solubility experiments with phonolite melt at 905 to 1000 deg. C, 200 MPa, and relatively oxidizing conditions. The experiments include an 8000-year old Mt. Somma-Vesuvius phonolite, distilled H2O, NaCl, KCl, and CaSO4, and they involve a new method of constraining the concentration of S in the run-product fluids. Unlike prior S-solubility experiments, the S concentration in fluid is determined as proportional to the mass loss of the anhydrite crystals in the starting charges of the experiments. This method provides accurate S contents of fluids. The H2O, Cl, and S concentrations of the phonolitic glasses of our experiments range from 4 to 8, 0.38 to 0.84, and 0.01 to 0.19 wt.%, respectively. Sulfur solubility increases with increasing CaO and FeO (total iron) in melt, decreasing Cl and K2O in melt, decreasing Cl in fluid(s), and with increasing oxygen fugacity values greater than NNO. Chlorine solubility in melt increases with decreasing S content of melt and decreasing S and H2O in the coexisting fluid(s). Water solubility in melt shows no systematic variation with melt composition, but varies strongly with the composition of fluids. The partition coefficients (wt.% of X in fluid[s]/wt.% of X in phonolitic melt) range from 40 to > 200 for S and from 12 to 87 for Cl. At pressure-temperature-oxygen fugacity conditions similar to those of this study, these partition coefficients are equivalent to those determined previously for natural equilibria involving andesite melt plus Cl-free, S-bearing aqueous fluid (Scaillet and Pichavant, 2003) and experimental equilibria with andesite melt plus S-free, Cl-bearing aqueous fluid (Webster et al., 1999), respectively. Our research also shows that these partition coefficients for S and Cl are inversely proportional to one another. Silicate melt inclusions in pyroxene phenocrysts

  20. In-situ studies on volatile jet exhaust particle emissions - impacts of fuel sulfur content and environmental conditions on nuclei-mode aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F.; Baumann, R.; Petzold, A.; Busen, R.; Schulte, P.; Fiebig, M. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Brock, C.A. [Denver Univ., CO (United States). Dept. of Engineering

    2000-02-01

    In-situ measurements of ultrafine aerosol particle emissions were performed at cruise altitudes behind the DLR ATTAS research jet (RR M45H M501 engines) and a B737-300 aircraft (CFM56-3B1 engines). Measurements were made 0.15-20 seconds after emission as the source aircraft burned fuel with sulfur contents (FSC) of 2.6, 56 or 118 mg kg{sup -1}. Particle size distributions of from 3 to 60 nm diameter were determined using CN-counters with varying lower size detection limits. Volatile particle concentrations in the aircraft plumes strongly increased as diameter decreased toward the sizes of large molecular clusters, illustrating that apparent particle emissions are extremely sensitive to the smallest particle size detectable by the instrument used. Environmental conditions and plume age alone could influence the number of detected ultrafine (volatile) aerosols within an order of magnitude, as well. The observed volatile particle emissions decreased nonlinearly as FSC decreased to 60 mg kg{sup -1}, reaching minimum values of about 2 x 10{sup 17} kg{sup -1} and 2 x 10{sup 16} kg{sup -1} for particles >3 nm and >5 nm, respectively. Volatile particle emissions did not change significantly as FSCs were further reduced below 60 mg kg{sup -1}. Volatile particle emissions did not differ significantly between the two studied engine types. In contrast, soot particle emissions from the modern CFM56-3B1 engines were 4-5 times less (4 x 10{sup 14} kg{sup -1}) than from the older RR M45H M501 engines (1.8 x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1}). Contrail processing has been identified as an efficient sink/quenching parameter for ultrafine particles and reduces the remaining interstitial aerosol by factors 2-10 depending on particle size.

  1. Volatile Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl D. Rowan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (volatiles comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites.

  2. Characterizing reduced sulfur compounds and non-methane volatile organic compounds emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Ian Cooper

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have become a potential environmental and human health concern. Both RSCs and NMVOCs contribute to odor. In addition, RSCs also have the potential to form fine particulate matter (PMfine) and NMVOCs the potential to form ozone. Measurements of RSCs and NMVOCs emissions were made from both an anaerobic lagoon and barn at a swine CAFO in North Carolina. Emission measurements were made over all four seasonal periods. In each seasonal period, measurements were made from both the anaerobic lagoon and barn for ˜1 week. RSC and NMVOCs samples were collected using passivated canisters. Nine to eleven canister samples were taken from both the lagoon and barn over each sampling period. The canisters were analyzed ex-situ using gas chromatography flame ionization detection (GC-FID). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) measurements were made in-situ using a pulsed fluorescence H2S/SO2 analyzer. During sampling, measurements of meteorological and physiochemical parameters were made. H2S had the largest RSC flux, with an overall average lagoon flux of 1.33 mug m-2 min-1. The two main RSCs identified by the GC-FID, dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), had overall average lagoon fluxes an order of magnitude lower, 0.12 and 0.09 mug m-2 min-1, respectively. Twelve significant NMVOCs were identified in lagoon samples (ethanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, methanol, acetaldehyde, decanal, heptanal, hexanal, nonanal, octanal, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, and 4-methylphenol). The overall average fluxes for these NMVOCs, ranged from 0.08 mug m-2 min-1 (4-methylphenol) to 2.11 mug m-2 min-1 (acetone). Seasonal H2S barn concentrations ranged from 72-631 ppb. DMS and DMDS seasonal concentrations were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower. There were six significant NMVOCs identified in barn samples (methanol, ethanol, acetone 2-3 butanedione, acetaldehyde

  3. Fully automatic apparatus for proximate analysis and total sulfur analysis of coal and coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, Y.; Fukumoto, K.; Maeda, K.; Ogawa, A.; Goto, K.; Ishii, T.

    1987-02-01

    For the purpose of saving labor and improving working conditions, the full automatic apparatus for the proximate analysis and total sulfur analysis of coal and coke was developed. Objects of this automation were to quantify inherent moisture, ash, volatile matter and total sulfur. Quantitative determination of inherent moisture, ash and volatile matter was made gravimetrically. Total sulfur was measured by combustion and acid and base titration, using a conductivity glass electrode sensor. The robot was set to the center of the automatic apparatus and relevant apparatuses were arranged in concentric circular locations. The computer carried out condition control of each apparatus, sequence control by operating demand and operation completing signal, and progress control of analysis. Very high correlation between the conventional method and this automatic method was confirmed. 4 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the concentration of volatile sulfur compound in mouth air of a group of nigerian young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehizele, Ao; Akhionbare, O

    2013-07-01

    The major goal of non-surgical periodontal therapy is to reduce or eliminate the subgingival pathogenic microbial flora that is known to be associated with volatile sulfur compounds (VSC). The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the concentration of VSC in mouth air of young adults. Four hundred subjects, grouped into two based on the absence or presence of periodontal diseases, were involved in this study. Basic periodontal examination was used for the grouping. The measurement of the concentration of the VSC in the mouth air of the subjects was done objectively, using the Halimeter, before and after the therapy, and at recall visits 2 weeks and 6 weeks after therapy. Chi-square and Paired t-test were used to find statistical significance. The results revealed that at baseline, 78.7% (48/61) of the subjects who had VSC concentration more than 250 parts per billion (ppb) were from the group with periodontal disease. Immediately after non-surgical periodontal therapy, only 8.5% (17/200) of the subjects with periodontal disease had VSC concentration of more than 250 ppb while all the subjects with no periodontal disease had VSC concentration less than 181 ppb. The same pattern of reduction in the concentration of the VSC and improvement in oral hygiene was also obtained 2 weeks and 6 weeks after therapy. It can be concluded that non-surgical periodontal therapy brought about reduction in the concentration of volatile sulfur compounds in mouth air of young adults.

  5. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  6. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  7. Lunar sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuck, David L.

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  8. Volatile organic sulfur compounds as biomarkers complementary to methane: Infrared absorption spectroscopy of CH 3SH enables insitu measurements on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Steve; Christensen, Lance E.; Webster, Christopher R.; Sung, Keeyoon

    2011-02-01

    As universal products of biological processes, volatile organic sulfur compounds such as methyl mercaptan (CH 3SH) may be essential in the search for signs of life on Mars and in exoplanet atmospheres. Methyl mercaptan is implicated in the origin of life at sites of low-temperature hydrothermal activity driven by serpentinization. Serpentinization may occur on Mars, in icy satellite oceans, and in other small wet bodies to a greater extent than on Earth, with important implications for life. We characterized absorption features in pure laboratory sample spectra of CH 3SH using the Carbon Isotope Laser Spectrometer (CILS), an infrared (3.27μm) tunable diode laser spectrometer with capabilities nearly identical to those of the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory. The molecular species proves detectable by CILS and TLS at the sensitivities approaching the level of parts per trillion with pre-concentration. These measurements demonstrate the possibility for detection of methyl mercaptan, with implications for its possible use as an in situ biosignature for Earth-based and extraterrestrial exploration.

  9. 挥发性硫化物口臭模型的建立%Establishment of Experimental Halitosis Model by Volatile Sulfur Compounds Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐平平; 杨梅; 黄苑玲

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨采用挥发性硫化物(volatile sulfur compounds,VSCs)建立试验性口臭模型的可行性.方法 36名健康自愿者含漱自制的"口臭造模液"(主要成分为VSCs)前后进行口腔VSCs检测,之后每隔1周重复测试1次,共测试4次.对每次造模前后口腔VSCs体积分数差异进行两样本配对的Wilcoxon秩和检验;对4次测试的基线值差异、4次测试的造模后口腔VSCs体积分数的差异分别进行Friedman秩和检验;对每次测试的基线和造模后口腔VSCs体积分数分别进行Spearman相关性检验.结果 4次测试的基线和造模后口腔VSCs体积分数(×10-9)分别为90±61、688±340;100±69、662±303;94±52、684±290和82±54、602±293.每次造模后口腔VSCs体积分数均较基线值升高,差异有统计学意义(P0.05).每次测试获得的基线和造模后口腔VSCs体积分数存在正相关关系(P<0.05).结论 采用自制"口臭造模液"建立的试验性口臭模型稳定性好,可资后续的口臭防治相关产品开发时应用.

  10. Quantitative determination of wine highly volatile sulfur compounds by using automated headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-pulsed flame photometric detection. Critical study and optimization of a new procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Ricardo; Lapeña, Ana Cristina; Cacho, Juan; Ferreira, Vicente

    2007-03-02

    The quantitative determination of wine volatile sulfur compounds by automated headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with a carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR-PDMS) fiber and subsequent gas chromatography-pulsed flame photometric detection (GC-PFPD) has been evaluated. The direct extraction of the sulfur compounds in 5 ml of wine has been found to suffer from matrix effects and short linear ranges, problems which could not be solved by the use of different internal standards or by multiple headspace SPME. These problems were attributed to saturation of the fiber and to competitive effects between analytes, internal standards and other wine volatiles. Another problem was the oxidation of analytes during the procedure. The reduction in sample volume by a factor 50 (0.1 ml diluted with water or brine) brought about a reduction in the amount of sulfur compounds taken in the fiber by a factor just 3.3. Consequently, a new procedure has been proposed. In a sealed vial containing 4.9 ml of saturated NaCl brine, the air is thoroughly displaced with nitrogen, and the wine (0.1 ml) and the internal standards (0.02 ml) are further introduced with a syringe through the vial septum. This sample is extracted at 35 degrees C for 20 min. This procedure makes a satisfactory determination possible of hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, ethanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, diethyl sulfide and dimethyl disulfide. The linear dynamic ranges cover the normal ranges of occurrence of these analytes in wine with typical r2 between 0.9823 and 0.9980. Reproducibility in real samples ranges from 10 to 20% and repeatability is better than 10% in most cases. The method accuracy is satisfactory, with errors below 20% for hydrogen sulfide and mostly below 10% for the other compounds. The proposed method has been applied to the analysis of 34 Spanish wines.

  11. Hygroscopicity and ammonia volatilization losses from nitrogen sources in coated urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia de Abreu Faria

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hygroscopic fertilizers tend to absorb moisture from the air and may have undesirable characteristics such as moistness, clumping and lower fluidity, hampering the application. The increasing use of urea is due to its numerous advantages, although this nitrogen (N source is highly susceptible to volatilization losses, particularly when applied to the soil surface of management systems with conservation of crop residues. The volatilization losses can be minimized by slow or controlled-release fertilizers, with controlled water solubility of the urea-coating materials; and by stabilized fertilizers, which prolong the period during which N remains in the amide or ammonia forms by urease inhibitors. This study evaluated the hygroscopicity of and ammonia volatilization from urea coated with boric acid and copper sulfate or with sulfur. The hygroscopicity of the sources was evaluated over time after exposure to five levels of relative humidity (RH and volatilization evaluated after application to the soil surface covered with sugarcane trash. Ammonium nitrate has a low potential for volatilization losses, but is highly hygroscopic. Although coating with boric acid and copper sulfate or elemental sulfur reduced the critical humidity level of urea, the delay in the volatilization process is a potential positive factor.

  12. Modeling total reduced sulfur and sulfur dioxide emissions from a kraft recovery boiler using an artificial neural network, and, Investigating volatile organic compounds in an urban intermountain valley using a TD/GC/MS methodology and intrinsic tracer molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Christopher Louis

    2000-11-01

    Back-propagation neural networks were trained to predict total reduced sulfur (TRS) and SO2 emissions from kraft recovery boiler operational data. A 0.721 coefficient of correlation was achieved between actual and predicted sulfur emissions on test data withheld from network training. The artificial neural network (ANN) models found an inverse, linear relationship between TRS/SO2 emissions and percent opacity. A number of relationships among operating parameters and sulfur emissions were identified by the ANN models. These relationships were used to formulate strategies for reducing sulfur emissions. Disagreement between ANN model predictions on a subsequent data set revealed an additional scenario for sulfur release not present in the training data. ANN modeling was demonstrated to be an effective tool for analyzing process variables when balancing productivity and environmental concerns. Five receptor sites distributed in the Missoula Valley, Montana, were employed to investigate possible VOC (benzene, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-/p-xylene, o-xylene, naphthalene, acetone, chloroform, α-pinene, β-pinene, p-cymene and limonene) sources. The most dominant source of VOCs was found to be vehicle emissions. Furthermore, anthropogenic sources of terpenoids overwhelmed biogenic emissions, on a local scale. Difficulties correlating wind direction and pollutant levels could be explained by wind direction variability, low wind speed and seasonally dependent meteorological factors. Significant evidence was compiled to support the use of p-cymene as a tracer molecule for pulp mill VOC emissions. Apportionment techniques using o-xylene and p-cymene as tracers for automobile and pulp mill emissions, respectively, were employed to estimate each source's VOC contribution. Motor vehicles were estimated to contribute between 56 and 100 percent of the aromatic pollutants in the Missoula Valley airshed, depending upon the sampling location. Pulp mill emissions

  13. Analysis of Volatile Sulfur Compounds in Waste Gases by Gas Chromatography with a Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detector%硫化学发光检测器-气相色谱法测定废气中挥发性硫化物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩丛碧; 李凌波

    2012-01-01

    采用硫化学发光检测-宽口径石英毛细管柱气相色谱法,建立了废气中羰基硫、硫化氢、二硫化碳、甲硫醇、乙硫醇、甲硫醚、乙硫醚、丙硫醇、异丙硫醇、噻吩及二甲二硫等11种挥发性硫化物的分析方法.硫化学发光检测器的灵敏度、选择性及线性范围均优于传统的火焰光度检测器.进样体积为0.2 ml时,硫化物的检出限为0.03~0.1 mg/m3.实际样品5次测定的相对标准偏差小于5.1%,加标回收率为83.7%~108.8%.测定了某炼油厂酸性水罐尾气、污油罐尾气及瓦斯气中挥发性硫化物,为其恶臭控制与治理提供检测手段和基础数据.%Sulfur chemiluminescence detector-vast capillary gas chromatography has been conducted on the analysis of volatile sulfur compounds in waste gases. The recoveries of hydrogen sulfide, carbon disulfide, methyl mercaptan, ethyl mercaptan, carbon disulfide,dimethyl sulphide,diethyl sulphide, n-propyl merrcaptan, i-propyl merrcaptan, thiophene and dimethyl disulfide were from 83. 7% to 108. 8% , the relative standard deviations were less than 5. 1% . When inject volumn was 0. 2 ml, the minimum detection levels of the above-mentioned volatile sulfur compounds varied between 0.03 mg/m3and 0. 1 mg/m3 Volatile sulfur compounds in waste gases from sour water tanks and oil tanks in an refinery and Gas were analyzed.

  14. 46 CFR 154.1715 - Moisture control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Moisture control. 154.1715 Section 154.1715 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... § 154.1715 Moisture control. When a vessel is carrying sulfur dioxide, the master shall ensure that:...

  15. Effectiveness of porous covers for control of ammonia, reduced sulfur compounds, total hydrocarbons, selected volatile organic compounds, and odor from hog manure storage lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Shekhar; Ongwandee, Maneerat; Morrison, Glenn; Fitch, Mark; Surampalli, Rao

    2007-06-01

    Anaerobic lagoons are a major source of odor at concentrated animal feeding operations. Seven different kinds of artificial (geotextile and polyethylene foam) and natural (straw and redwood) permeable lagoon covers were evaluated for their potential to reduce odorous emissions generated by anaerobic waste lagoons. A novel floating sampling raft was constructed and used to simultaneously evaluate the effectiveness of lagoon covers on an operating swine waste lagoon. The air collected from the raft was evaluated for odor, total reduced sulfur (TRS) compounds, ammonia, total hydrocarbons, dimethyldisulfide, and trimethylamine. The emission rates from the lagoon were highly variable both temporally and spatially. All of the lagoon covers substantially reduced TRS emissions and odor. Geotextile fabric and a recycled foam cover exhibited the greatest reduction in total hydrocarbon emissions; natural covers were less effective. Because of consistently low emission rates of ammonia, no statistically significant reduction of ammonia emissions were observed from any of the lagoon covers.

  16. Volatile compounds of sulfur in the Fe-C-S system at 5.3 GPa and 1300°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhimulev, E. I.; Sonin, V. M.; Bul'bak, T. A.; Chepurov, A. I.; Tomilenko, A. A.; Pokhilenko, N. P.

    2015-05-01

    This report presents the results of experimental studies of the fluid phase in the Fe-C-S system at high P and T values (5.3 GPa and 1300°C) conforming to diamond synthesis. The samples for experiments were mounted on air; therefore, the volatile compounds detected after the experiments are characterized by a wide variety and complicated composition involving both inorganic and organic components. Among the inorganic compounds, CO2, H2O, N2, SO2, CS2, and COS were detected. The GC/MS analysis revealed hydrocarbons (paraffins, olefins, and arenes), including high-molecular compounds. The formation of heavy hydrocarbons confirms their thermodynamic stability under high pressure. Oxygenated hydrocarbons (alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and ethers) were also detected.

  17. moisture transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Kulasiri

    2005-01-01

    model drying porous materials. Coupled partial differential equations governing the moisture and heat transfer can be solved using numerical techniques, and in this paper we solve them analytically in a setting suitable for industrial drying situations. We discuss the nature of the solutions using the physical properties of Pinus radiata. It is shown that the temperature gradients play a significant role in deciding the moisture profiles within the material when thickness is large and that models based only on moisture potential gradients may not be sufficient to explain the drying phenomena in moist porous materials.

  18. A Response Surface Methodology Approach to Investigate the Effect of Sulfur Dioxide, pH, and Ethanol on DbCD and DbVPR Gene Expression and on the Volatile Phenol Production in Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis CBS2499.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdetara, Federica; Fracassetti, Daniela; Campanello, Alessia; Costa, Carlo; Foschino, Roberto; Compagno, Concetta; Vigentini, Ileana

    2017-01-01

    Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis, the main spoilage yeast in barrel-aged wine, metabolize hydroxycinnamic acids into off-flavors, namely ethylphenols. Recently, both the enzymes involved in this transformation, the cinnamate decarboxylase (DbCD) and the vinylphenol reductase (DbVPR), have been identified. To counteract microbial proliferation in wine, sulfur dioxide (SO2) is used commonly to stabilize the final product, but limiting its use is advised to preserve human health and boost sustainability in winemaking. In the present study, the influence of SO2 was investigated in relation with pH and ethanol factors on the expression of DbCD and DbVPR genes and volatile phenol production in D. bruxellensis CBS2499 strain under different model wines throughout a response surface methodology (RSM). In order to ensure an exact quantification of DbCD and DbVPR expression, an appropriate housekeeping gene was sought among DbPDC, DbALD, DbEF, DbACT, and DbTUB genes by GeNorm and Normfinder algorithms. The latter gene showed the highest expression stability and it was chosen as the reference housekeeping gene in qPCR assays. Even though SO2 could not be commented as main factor because of its statistical irrelevance on the response of DbCD gene, linear interactions with pH and ethanol concurred to define a significant effect (p bruxellensis spoilage.

  19. Sulfur Release during Alternative fuels Combustion in Cement Rotary Kilns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortada Mut, Maria del Mar

    Cement production is an energy-intensive process, whic h has traditionally been dependent on fossil fuels. However, the usage of selected waste, biomass, and by-products with recoverable calorific value, defined as alternative fuels, is increasing and their combustion is mo re challenging compared...... to fossil fuels, due to the lack of experience in handling the different and va rying combustion characteristics caused by different chemical and physical properties, e.g. higher moisture content and larger particle sizes. When full combustion of alternative fuels in the calcin er and/or main burner...... of minor elements into the kiln system. The minor elements of concern are sulfur, chlorine, so dium, and potassium, which are known to be circulating or volatile elements in the kiln system. Compounds containing these elements evaporate, when exposed to high temperatures, and may subsequently condense in c...

  20. Effective and Selective Trapping of Volatile Organic Sulfur Derivatives by Montmorillonite Intercalated with a μ-oxo Fe(III)-Phenanthroline Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, Fabrizio; Castellini, Elena; Malferrari, Daniele; Castro, German Rafael; Sainz Díaz, Claro Ignacio; Brigatti, Maria Franca; Borsari, Marco

    2017-01-11

    The μ-oxo Fe(III)-phenanthroline complex [(OH2)3(Phen)FeOFe(Phen) (OH2)3](+4) intercalated in montmorillonite provides a stable hybrid material. In this study, the ability and efficiency of this material to immobilize thiols in gas phase, acting as a trap at the solid-gas interface, were investigated. Aliphatic thiols containing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic end groups were chosen to test the selectivity of this gas trap. DR-UV-vis, IR, elemental analysis, thermal analysis and evolved gas mass spectrometry, X-ray powder diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques were employed to characterize the hybrid material before and after thiol exposure and to provide information on the entrapping process. Thiol immobilization is very large, up to 21% w/w for heptanethiol. In addition, evidence was obtained that immobilization occurs through the formation of a covalent bond between the iron of the complex and the sulfur of the thiol. This provides an immobilization process characterized by a higher stability with respect to the methods based on physi-adsorption. Thiol immobilization resulted thermally reversible at least for 20 adsorption/desorption cycles. Unlike standard desulfurization processes like hydrotreating and catalytic oxidation which work at high temperatures and pressures, the present system is able to efficiently trap thiols at room temperature and pressure, thus saving energy. Furthermore, we found that the selectivity of thiol immobilization can be tuned acting on the amount of complex intercalated in montmorillonite. In particular, montmorillonite semisaturated with the complex captures both hydrophobic and hydrophilic thiols, while the saturated montmorillonite shows a strong selectivity toward the hydrophobic molecules.

  1. 呼气中挥发性硫化物的质子转移反应质谱在线检测%On-line Detection of Volatile Sulfur Compounds in Breath Gas by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈成银; 王鸿梅; 黄超群; 陆燕; 夏磊; 陈小景; 王宏志; 储焰南

    2015-01-01

    利用自主研制的高灵敏呼气检测质子转移反应质谱( PTR-MS),对一名口臭受试者的口腔吹出气体、鼻子呼出气体和口腔内气体分别进行多组分实时监测,发现了该受试者呼气中3种引起口臭的挥发性硫化物( VSCs)的来源并不相同,其中甲硫醇主要来源于口腔,硫化氢和二甲基硫则主要来源于肺或呼吸道。本研究不仅发现了口腔内气体在PTR-MS呼气监测过程中的特征变化趋势,还分析了呼出气体中3种VSCs的来源,对于呼气的正确采样和检测具有重要的指导意义。%To develop a kind of noninvasive method of breath diagnosis in diseases, much attention has been paid to the study of the relation between diseases and volatile organic compounds in human breath gas. However, the gas in oral cavity was usually ignored in many studies of breath gas. The bad breath odor of a participant was studied by a home-made proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer( PTR-MS) . The breath via the mouth, breath via the nose and the air in the mouth cavity were monitored with the mode of multiple ion detect scans. The results show that three different volatile sulfur compounds that cause bad breath odor should be attributed to different sources. The source of methyl mercaptan in breath is oral cavity, and the source of hydrogen sulphide and dimethylsulfide in breath is lung or respiratory tract. The related result is very important to sampling and detection of breath gas.

  2. Sulfur: its clinical and toxicologic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarnisky, Lioudmila A; Christopherson, Robert J; Basu, Tapan K

    2003-01-01

    Although there is no known dietary requirement for inorganic sulfur, it is an essential element for all animal species in as much as they all require the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine. There are three predominate forms of organic sulfur in animals and humans: 1). the thiomethyl of methionine residues in protein; 2). the sulfhydryl disulfides of protein; and 3). the compounds containing ester or amide bound sulfates of glycosaminoglycans, steroids, and many xenobiotic metabolites. Thus, sulfur becomes an important constituent of amino acids, proteins, enzymes, vitamins and other biomolecules. Unlike mammalian species, plants can use inorganic sulfur and synthesize methionine from which are synthesized all the other important sulfur compounds. Hence, sulfur deficiency occurs mainly when plants are grown in sulfur-depleted soils and when humans and animals consume low-protein diets. In recent times, however, the increasing prevalence of refining petroleum and smelting sulfur compounds of metallic minerals into free metals are having a large impact on the balance of sulfur in the environment. Sulfur toxicity is associated mainly with high levels of the element and its toxic volatile substances in the environment. Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), a major air pollutant, may adversely affect animal and human health by causing bronchitis, bronchoconstriction, and increased pulmonary resistance.

  3. Volatility Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Gustavo Fruet; Scherrer, Cristina; Papailias, Fotis

    The price discovery literature investigates how homogenous securities traded on different markets incorporate information into prices. We take this literature one step further and investigate how these markets contribute to stochastic volatility (volatility discovery). We formally show...... that the realized measures from homogenous securities share a fractional stochastic trend, which is a combination of the price and volatility discovery measures. Furthermore, we show that volatility discovery is associated with the way that market participants process information arrival (market sensitivity...

  4. A Response Surface Methodology Approach to Investigate the Effect of Sulfur Dioxide, pH, and Ethanol on DbCD and DbVPR Gene Expression and on the Volatile Phenol Production in Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis CBS2499

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Valdetara

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis, the main spoilage yeast in barrel-aged wine, metabolize hydroxycinnamic acids into off-flavors, namely ethylphenols. Recently, both the enzymes involved in this transformation, the cinnamate decarboxylase (DbCD and the vinylphenol reductase (DbVPR, have been identified. To counteract microbial proliferation in wine, sulfur dioxide (SO2 is used commonly to stabilize the final product, but limiting its use is advised to preserve human health and boost sustainability in winemaking. In the present study, the influence of SO2 was investigated in relation with pH and ethanol factors on the expression of DbCD and DbVPR genes and volatile phenol production in D. bruxellensis CBS2499 strain under different model wines throughout a response surface methodology (RSM. In order to ensure an exact quantification of DbCD and DbVPR expression, an appropriate housekeeping gene was sought among DbPDC, DbALD, DbEF, DbACT, and DbTUB genes by GeNorm and Normfinder algorithms. The latter gene showed the highest expression stability and it was chosen as the reference housekeeping gene in qPCR assays. Even though SO2 could not be commented as main factor because of its statistical irrelevance on the response of DbCD gene, linear interactions with pH and ethanol concurred to define a significant effect (p < 0.05 on its expression. The DbCD gene was generally downregulated respect to a permissive growth condition (0 mg/L mol. SO2, pH 4.5 and 5% v/v ethanol; the combination of the factor levels that maximizes its expression (0.83-fold change was calculated at 0.25 mg/L mol. SO2, pH 4.5 and 12.5% (v/v ethanol. On the contrary, DbVPR expression was not influenced by main factors or by their interactions; however, its expression is maximized (1.80-fold change at the same conditions calculated for DbCD gene. While no linear interaction between factors influenced the off-flavor synthesis, ethanol and pH produced a significant effect as

  5. Volatiles in Inter-Specific Bacterial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well-described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium, and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal, and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide) were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here, we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities.

  6. Volatiles in inter-specific bacterial interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf eTyc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities.

  7. Virtual volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A. Christian; Prange, Richard E.

    2007-03-01

    We introduce the concept of virtual volatility. This simple but new measure shows how to quantify the uncertainty in the forecast of the drift component of a random walk. The virtual volatility also is a useful tool in understanding the stochastic process for a given portfolio. In particular, and as an example, we were able to identify mean reversion effect in our portfolio. Finally, we briefly discuss the potential practical effect of the virtual volatility on an investor asset allocation strategy.

  8. Virtual volatility

    OpenAIRE

    A. Christian Silva; Prange, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    We introduce the concept of virtual volatility. This simple but new measure shows how to quantify the uncertainty in the forecast of the drift component of a random walk. The virtual volatility also is a useful tool in understanding the stochastic process for a given portfolio. In particular, and as an example, we were able to identify mean reversion effect in our portfolio. Finally, we briefly discuss the potential practical effect of the virtual volatility on an investor asset allocation st...

  9. Plant volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ian T

    2010-05-11

    Plant volatiles are the metabolites that plants release into the air. The quantities released are not trivial. Almost one-fifth of the atmospheric CO2 fixed by land plants is released back into the air each day as volatiles. Plants are champion synthetic chemists; they take advantage of their anabolic prowess to produce volatiles, which they use to protect themselves against biotic and abiotic stresses and to provide information - and potentially disinformation - to mutualists and competitors alike. As transferors of information, volatiles have provided plants with solutions to the challenges associated with being rooted in the ground and immobile.

  10. Thermochromatography study of volatile polonium species in various gas atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Eichler, Robert; Piguet,David; Mendonça, Tania Melo; Stora, Thierry; Schumann, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Phenomena related to the volatilization of polonium and its compounds are critical issues for the safety assessment of the innovative lead–bismuth cooled type of nuclear reactor or accelerator driven systems. The formation and volatilization of different species of polonium and their interaction with fused silica was studied by thermochromatography using carrier gases with varied redox potential. The obtained results show that under inert and reducing conditions in the absence of moisture, elemental polonium is formed. Polonium compounds more volatile than elemental polonium can be formed if traces of moisture are present in both inert and reducing carrier gas. The use of dried oxygen as carrier gas leads to the formation of polonium oxides, which are less volatile than elemental polonium. It was also found that the volatility of polonium oxides increases with increasing oxidation state. In the presence of moisture in an oxidizing carrier gas, species are formed that are more volatile than the oxides and le...

  11. Influence of Exogenous Sulfur-containing Compounds on the Exchange Fluxes of Volatile Organic Sulfur Compounds%外源含硫化合物对土壤挥发性有机硫化合物交换通量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易志刚; 王新明

    2011-01-01

    通过静态箱采样和Entech7100预浓缩仪-GC-MS分析了半胱氨酸、硫化钠和硫酸钠对土壤吸收或释放羰基硫(COS)、二甲基硫醚(DMS)、二硫化碳(CS2)和二甲二硫醚(DMDS)等4种挥发性有机硫化合物(VOSCs)的影响.结果表明,添加半胱氨酸后,土壤由COS和CS2汇转变为源,DMS和DMDS通量显著增加,且DMS和CS2释放量占总量的89.2%,说明半胱氨酸主要是DMS和CS2的前体物.添加Na2S后土壤DMDS释放量占总量的93.2%,说明Na2S是DMDS的重要前体物.添加Na2SO4后,%The influences of cysteine,sodium sulfide(Na2S) and sodium sulfate(Na2SO4) on the soil-air exchange fluxes of volatile organic sulfur compounds(VOSCs),including carbonyl sulfide(COS),dimethyl sulfide(DMS),carbon disulfide(CS2) and dimethyl disulfide(DMDS),were studied employing static chamber enclosure followed by laboratory determination using an Entech 7100 preconcentrator coupled with an Agilent 5973 GC-MSD.The results showed that after the addition of cysteine,the soil for the exchange fluxes of COS and CS2 shifted to be the source from sink and the emissions of DMS and DMDS increased significant.The emission amount of DMS and CS2 accounted for 89.2% to the total VOSCs after the addition of cysteine,implying that cysteine is an important precursor for DMS and CS2 in the soil.The amount of DMDS accounted for 93.2% to the total sulfur from the soil after addition of Na2S,indicating that Na2S is a key precursor for DMDS.No significant difference of VOSCs fluxes was found between the controlled soil and the soil with addition of Na2SO4,suggesting Na2SO4 was not the direct precursor for VOSCs in soil.VOSCs exchange rates reached the maximum at 6 to 8 days after addition of cysteine.As for addition of Na2S,the maximal emission rates of different VOSCs appeared at different dates,and the dates differed significantly from those after addition of cysteine,implying that the formation process

  12. Unstable volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casas, Isabel; Gijbels, Irène

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce the break-preserving local linear (BPLL) estimator for the estimation of unstable volatility functions for independent and asymptotically independent processes. Breaks in the structure of the conditional mean and/or the volatility functions are common i...

  13. Unstable volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casas, Isabel; Gijbels, Irène

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce the break-preserving local linear (BPLL) estimator for the estimation of unstable volatility functions for independent and asymptotically independent processes. Breaks in the structure of the conditional mean and/or the volatility functions are common i...

  14. Sulfur Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  15. Moisture conditions in buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Growth of mould requires the presence of moisture at a certain high level. In a heated indoor environment such moisture levels occur only if there is a reason for the moisture supply. Such moisture can come from the use of the building, because of malfunctioning constructions, or it can be the re......Growth of mould requires the presence of moisture at a certain high level. In a heated indoor environment such moisture levels occur only if there is a reason for the moisture supply. Such moisture can come from the use of the building, because of malfunctioning constructions, or it can...

  16. Chasing volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Rossi, Eduardo; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    The realized volatility of financial returns is characterized by persistence and occurrence of unpreditable large increments. To capture those features, we introduce the Multiplicative Error Model with jumps (MEM-J). When a jump component is included in the multiplicative specification, the condi...... models, the introduction of the jump component provides a sensible improvement in the fit, as well as for in-sample and out-of-sample volatility tail forecasts....

  17. Volatility Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiguang Wang

    2009-01-01

    Classical capital asset pricing theory tells us that riskaverse investors would require higher returns to compensate for higher risk on an investment. One type of risk is price (return) risk, which reflects uncertainty in the price level and is measured by the volatility (standard deviation) of asset returns. Volatility itself is also known to be random and hence is perceived as another type of risk. Investors can bear price risk in exchange for a higher return. But are investors willing to p...

  18. Acid volatile sulfide (AVS)- a comment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meysman, F.J.R.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The review by Rickard and Morse (this volume) adequately summarizes our current understanding with respect to acid-volatile sulfides (AVS). At the same time, this review addresses some of the misunderstandings with regard to measurements and dynamics of this important sedimentary sulfur pool. In

  19. Biologically produced sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, W.E.; Keizer, de A.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfur compound oxidizing bacteria produce sulfur as an intermediate in the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate. Sulfur produced by these microorganisms can be stored in sulfur globules, located either inside or outside the cell. Excreted sulfur globules are colloidal particles which are stabil

  20. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB......). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms...... in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative...

  1. Effect of Moisture on Partitioning of Heavy Metals in Incineration of Municipal Solid Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒙爱红; 李清海; 贾金岩; 张衍国

    2012-01-01

    The effect of moisture in municipal solid waste (MSW) on partitioning of lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd) was studied in a laboratory tubular furnace by using simulated MSW. The moisture in MSW influences heavy metals in following ways, to increase the moisture in flue gas and decrease the combustion temperature, to prolong the combustion time, and to prolong the releasing time of volatiles with the furnace temperature decreased by increasing the moisture. The volatilization of Pb, Zn and Cd was enhanced by increasing the moisture in MSW because of the prolonged combustion time. For Pb and Zn, the combustion time was important at higher temperature, while for Cd, it was important at low temperature. The moisture content showed slight effect on Cu partitioning. When extra chlorine was added to MSW, such as 1%PVC + 0.5%NaCl, the volatilization of Pb, Zn and Cu was enhanced by increasing the moisture because water evaporation reduced the temperature and increased devolatilization time. At higher temperature, NaCl tends to decompose and generates more free chlorine, producing more metal chlorides. Since Cd is a strong volatile heavy metal in MSW, the effect of moisture content on its volatilization is less than that of Pb, Zn or Cu during the MSW incineration.

  2. The fate of sulfur during rapid pyrolysis of scrap tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongyun; Fang, Yuan; Liu, Huan; Yu, Ren; Luo, Guangqian; Liu, Wenqiang; Li, Aijun; Yao, Hong

    2014-02-01

    The fate of sulfur during rapid pyrolysis of scrap tires at temperatures from 673 to 1073K was investigated. Sulfur was predominant in the forms of thiophenic and inorganic sulfides in raw scrap tires. In the pyrolysis process, sulfur in organic forms was unstable and decomposed, leading to the sulfur release into tar and gases. At 673 and 773K, a considerable amount of sulfur was distributed in tar. Temperature increasing from 773 to 973K promoted tar decomposition and facilitated sulfur release into gases. At 1073K, the interactions between volatiles and char stimulated the formation of high-molecular-weight sulfur-containing compounds. After pyrolysis, almost half of the total content of sulfur in raw scrap tires still remained in the char and was mostly in the form of sulfides. Moreover, at temperatures higher than 873K, part of sulfur in the char was immobilized in the sulfates. In the pyrolysis gases, H2S was the main sulfur-containing gas. Increasing temperature stimulated the decomposition of organic polymers in scrap tires and more H2S was formed. Besides H2S, other sulfur-containing gases such as CH3SH, COS and SO2 were produced during the rapid pyrolysis of scrap tires.

  3. Microbiology, biochemistry, and volatile composition of Tulum cheese ripened in goat's skin or plastic bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayaloglu, A A; Cakmakci, S; Brechany, E Y; Deegan, K C; McSweeney, P L H

    2007-03-01

    Tulum cheeses were manufactured from raw ewe's milk and ripened in goat's skin bags (tulums) or plastic containers to understand the effect of ripening container on the chemical composition, biochemistry, microbiology, and volatile composition of Tulum cheeses during 150 d of ripening. Chemical compositions of the cheeses ripened in tulums were significantly different and the moisture contents decreased rapidly in those cheeses because of the porous structure of the tulum. Higher microbial counts were detected in the cheeses ripened in plastic than in cheeses ripened in tulums. Differences in nitrogenous compounds and total free AA of the cheeses were not significant. Total concentrations of free AA in cheeses increased with age and Glu, Ala, Val, Leu, and Phe were the most abundant AA in the cheeses. Urea-PAGE of pH 4.6-insoluble fractions of the cheeses during ripening showed similar degradation patterns in all cheeses. Peptide profiles by reversed-phase HPLC of pH 4.6- and ethanol-soluble or ethanol-insoluble fractions of the cheeses revealed only minor differences in the concentrations of some peptides among the cheeses; however, age-related changes in peptide concentrations were significantly different among the cheeses. Cheeses were analyzed at 90 d of ripening for volatile compounds by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. One hundred volatile components were identified, including 11 acids, 16 esters, 12 methyl ketones, 7 aldehydes, 22 alcohols, 7 sulfur compounds, 6 terpenes, and 19 miscellaneous compounds. The main components were short-chain fatty acids, 2-butanone, diacetyl, and primary alcohols. Quantitative differences in several volatile compounds were evident among the cheeses. Cheeses ripened in tulums or plastic had similar aroma patterns, but the concentrations of some components were different.

  4. 两种漱口液对口腔挥发性硫化物及舌背细菌的影响%The effect of two kinds of mouthwash on the volatile sulfur compounds and the anaerobic bacteria of tongue dorsum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金华; 蒋琳; 胡赟

    2011-01-01

    目的 评价常见的两种市售漱口液对口腔挥发性硫化物水平及舌背菌群的影响.方法 采用为期1月的单中心、随机、对照、双盲的临床研究方法.研究对象共60人.分为李斯德林漱口液组(A组),高露洁贝齿漱口液组(B组),阴性对照组(C组).分别在基线、半个月、1个月时检测各组研究对象的口腔挥发性硫化物水平及舌背厌氧菌的数量变化,并进行统计学分析处理.结果 对于口腔挥发性硫化物水平,在半个月及1个月时,A组、B组均有明显的下降,均优于C组,差异具有统计学意义(P0.05).结论 李斯德林漱口液及高露洁贝齿漱口液均能有效降低口腔挥发性硫化物水平及舌背厌氧菌的数量,且李斯德林漱口液降低硫化物的效果更优.%Objective To evaluate the effect of two kinds of mouthwash on the levels of the volatile sulfur compounds and the anaerobic bacteria of tongue dorsum. Method The trial adopted a dual-center, randomized, double-blind,controlled clinical methods, which lasted for one month. A total of 60 subjects were selected and randomly allocated in three groups, Listerine group, Colgate group and placebo group. Recordings were assessed statistically at the baseline, half a month and one month, which included the level of the volatile sulfur compounds and quantitity changes of bacteria of the tongue dorsum. Result At half a month and one month, the Listerine group and Colgate group had a significant reduction in the VSCs scores, which got a better effect in comparison to the placebo group with a significant statistically difference (P < 0.05), and there was a significant statistically difference between Listerine group and Colgate group. At the same time, the Listerine group and Colgate group resulted in a significant reduction in the total anaerobic bacteria of tongue dorsum,which got a better effect in comparison to the placebo group with a significant statistically difference (P < 0

  5. Ammonia volatilization from coated urea forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Costa do Nascimento

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen fertilization is a major component of the cost of agricultural production, due to the high cost and low efficiency of fertilizers. In the case of urea, the low efficiency is mainly due to losses by volatilization, which are more pronounced in cultivation systems in which plant residues are left on the soil. The objective of this work was to compare the influence of urea coated with sulfur or boric acid and copper sulfate with conventional N fertilizers on N volatilization losses in sugar cane harvested after stubble burning. The sources urea, sulfur-coated urea, urea coated with boric acid and copper sulfate, as well as nitrate and ammonium sulfate, were tested at amounts containing N rates of 120 kg ha-1 N. The integration of new technologies in urea fertilization can reduce N losses by volatilization. These losses were most reduced when using nitrate and ammonium sulfate. The application of a readily acidified substance (boric acid to urea was more efficient in reducing volatilization losses and nutrient removal by sugar cane than that of a substance with gradual acidification (elemental sulfur.

  6. Rhenium volatilization in waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kai; Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hrma, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.hrma@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Kruger, Albert A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Re did not volatilize from a HLW feed until 1000 °C. • Re began to volatilize from LAW feeds at ∼600 °C. • The vigorous foaming and generation of gases from salts enhanced Re evaporation in LAW feeds. • The HLW glass with less foaming and salts is a promising medium for Tc immobilization. - Abstract: We investigated volatilization of rhenium (Re), sulfur, cesium, and iodine during the course of conversion of high-level waste melter feed to glass and compared the results for Re volatilization with those in low-activity waste borosilicate glasses. Whereas Re did not volatilize from high-level waste feed heated at 5 K min{sup −1} until 1000 °C, it began to volatilize from low-activity waste borosilicate glass feeds at ∼600 °C, a temperature ∼200 °C below the onset temperature of evaporation from pure KReO{sub 4}. Below 800 °C, perrhenate evaporation in low-activity waste melter feeds was enhanced by vigorous foaming and generation of gases from molten salts as they reacted with the glass-forming constituents. At high temperatures, when the glass-forming phase was consolidated, perrhenates were transported to the top surface of glass melt in bubbles, typically together with sulfates and halides. Based on the results of this study (to be considered preliminary at this stage), the high-level waste glass with less foaming and salts appears a promising medium for technetium immobilization.

  7. Identification and origin of odorous sulfur compounds in cooked ham

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Caroline; Mercier, Frederic; Tournayre, Pascal; Martin, Jean-Luc; Berdagué, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to identify and gain further knowledge on the origin of sulfur compounds present in the volatile fraction of cooked ham, and on their role in the aroma of this product. To this end, we performed analyses by one- and two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, and olfactometry. Among the odorant sulfur compounds identified, three furans present in trace amounts proved to have very intense odours responsible for the "meaty, cooked ham" notes of th...

  8. Sulfur turnover and emissions during storage of cattle slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Andersen, Astrid J; Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard

    2012-01-01

    with acidification, on sulfur transformations in slurry and emissions of volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) during storage of fresh and aged cattle slurry. When pH was lowered to 5.5 it resulted in an almost complete inhibition of sulfate reduction. There was a huge emission of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with addition...... of sulfate and methionine (P production in the sulfate-amended slurries resulted in little accumulation of MT and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) under neutral...

  9. Oxidation of Elemental Sulfur in Selected Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An incubation experiment was carried out in laboratory to study the effect of temperature, moisture,phosphorus, organic matter, cropping and previous elemental sulfur application on elemental sulfur oxidation in four selected soils, fluvo-aquic soil, black soil, yellow-brown soil and red soil. In all the soils tested, sulfur oxidation rate was influenced by temperature and the temperature coefficient (Q10) values at the range from 10to 30 ℃ were 4.41, 4.05, 6.19 and 3.71 for the four soils, respectively. The rate of sulfur oxidation was parabolically related to soil water content. The optimum moisture content for the maximum oxidation rate was different among soils. Phosphorus increased the oxidation rate of elemental sulfur by 57.7%, 33.1%, 21.7% and 26.4% for the above four soils, respectively, compared with the control (no phosphorus applied). Organic material of corn straw which was ground and passed through a 0.5-mm sieve also increased the oxidation rate of elemental sulfur in the four soils by 59.8%, 7.8%, 39.2% and 540.4%, respectively. Elemental sulfur which was applied previously to soils significantly enhanced the oxidation of elemental sulfur subsequently added and increased sulfur-oxidizing populations such as autotrophic elemental sulfur oxidizers with pH optimum 6.8, autotrophic thiosulfate oxidizers with pH optimum 6.8, heterotrophic thiosulfate oxidizers and heterotrophic sulfate producers. Cropping had little effect on lemental sulfur-oxidizing potentiality of soils.

  10. Understanding chemistry behind secondary aerosol production from nitrogen and sulfur compounds from agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural emissions impact particulate mass concentrations through both primary and secondary processes. Evidence from laboratory and field work suggest that not only does ammonia produce secondary particulate matter, but nitrogen and sulfur containing volatile organic compounds also contribute. ...

  11. Moisture Transport in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, T.; Hansen, K. K.; Hoffmeyer, P.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of moisture transport in wood is of great importance as most mechanical and physical properties of wood depend on moisture content. Moisture transport in porous materials is often described by Ficks second law, but several observations indicate that this does not apply very well to wood....... Recently at the Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering, a new model for moisture transport in wood has been developed. The model divides the transport into two phases, namely water vapour in the cell lumens and bound water in the cell walls....

  12. Moisture Transport in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, T.; Hansen, K. K.; Hoffmeyer, P.;

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of moisture transport in wood is of great importance as most mechanical and physical properties of wood depend on moisture content. Moisture transport in porous materials is often described by Ficks second law, but several observations indicate that this does not apply very well to wood....... Recently at the Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering, a new model for moisture transport in wood has been developed. The model divides the transport into two phases, namely water vapour in the cell lumens and bound water in the cell walls....

  13. Pricing Volatility Referenced Assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan De Genaro Dario

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatility swaps are contingent claims on future realized volatility. Variance swaps are similar instruments on future realized variance, the square of future realized volatility. Unlike a plain vanilla option, whose volatility exposure is contaminated by its asset price dependence, volatility and variance swaps provide a pure exposure to volatility alone. This article discusses the risk-neutral valuation of volatility and variance swaps based on the framework outlined in the Heston (1993 stochastic volatility model. Additionally, the Heston (1993 model is calibrated for foreign currency options traded at BMF and its parameters are used to price swaps on volatility and variance of the BRL / USD exchange rate.

  14. Sulfur turnover and emissions during storage of cattle slurry: effects of acidification and sulfur addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Andersen, Astrid J; Poulsen, Henrik V; Adamsen, Anders Peter S; Petersen, Søren O

    2012-01-01

    Slurry acidification using sulfuric acid reduces ammonia emissions but also affects sulfur (S) cycling. Emission of sulfur is a source of malodor and reduces the sulfur fertilizer value of the slurry. We investigated the effect of sulfate and methionine amendments, alone or in combination with acidification, on sulfur transformations in slurry and emissions of volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) during storage of fresh and aged cattle slurry. When pH was lowered to 5.5 it resulted in an almost complete inhibition of sulfate reduction. There was a huge emission of hydrogen sulfide (HS) with addition of sulfate and methionine ( slurries resulted in little accumulation of MT and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) under neutral conditions, in contrast to acidic conditions where the degradation was inhibited and both MT and DMS accumulated. Based on odor activity values, untreated slurry had little odor development from S compounds, especially the aged slurry. Acidification did not significantly increase odor contribution from any of the compounds in fresh or aged slurry. Generally, addition of a sulfate increased the contribution from HS dramatically, whereas acidification lowered the HS contribution but increased that of MT. Thus, acidification of slurry with sulfuric acid may potentially produce more odor from S compounds than untreated slurry. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  15. Solubility of Sulfur Dioxide in Sulfuric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K. K.; Compton, L. E.; Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid was evaluated by regular solution theory, and the results verified by experimental measurements in the temperature range of 25 C to 70 C at pressures of 60 to 200 PSIA. The percent (wt./wt.) of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid is given by the equation %SO2 = 2.2350 + 0.0903P - 0.00026P 10 to the 2nd power with P in PSIA.

  16. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrah, L.A.; Mead, K.E.; Smith, H.M.

    1983-09-20

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (1) a solid acetylenic compound and (2) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  17. Carbon and sulfur budget of the silicate Earth explained by accretion of differentiated planetary embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Tsuno, Kyusei; Monteleone, Brian; Shimizu, Nobumichi

    2016-10-01

    The abundances of volatile elements in the Earth's mantle have been attributed to the delivery of volatile-rich material after the main phase of accretion. However, no known meteorites could deliver the volatile elements, such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and sulfur, at the relative abundances observed for the silicate Earth. Alternatively, Earth could have acquired its volatile inventory during accretion and differentiation, but the fate of volatile elements during core formation is known only for a limited set of conditions. Here we present constraints from laboratory experiments on the partitioning of carbon and sulfur between metallic cores and silicate mantles under conditions relevant for rocky planetary bodies. We find that carbon remains more siderophile than sulfur over a range of oxygen fugacities; however, our experiments suggest that in reduced or sulfur-rich bodies, carbon is expelled from the segregating core. Combined with previous constraints, we propose that the ratio of carbon to sulfur in the silicate Earth could have been established by differentiation of a planetary embryo that was then accreted to the proto-Earth. We suggest that the accretion of a Mercury-like (reduced) or a sulfur-rich (oxidized) differentiated body--in which carbon has been preferentially partitioned into the mantle--may explain the Earth's carbon and sulfur budgets.

  18. Increased accumulation of sulfur in lake sediments of the high Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drevnick, Paul E.; Muir, Derek C.G.; Lamborg, Carl H.;

    2010-01-01

    stimulates dissimilatory sulfate reduction. The sulfide produced is stored in sediment (as acid volatile sulfide), converted to other forms of sulfur, or reoxidized to sulfate and lost to the water column. An acceleration of the sulfur cycle in Arctic lakes could have profound effects on important...

  19. 环境条件对木家具底漆的水分挥发及封闭效果的影响%Sealed state and moisture volatilization of water-based sealers for wood furniture tested in five environmental conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路则光; 贾万达; 王萌

    2012-01-01

    The sealed state and moisture volatilization of a water-borne sealer for wood furniture using maple-veneered panels were determined for five different natural environments. Drying ability in different conditions was analyzed and the sealed state was studied with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The dried-water weight for moisture and the drying rate were measured using a water weight-loss method. Results showed that the drying condition greatly influenced the sealed state and drying speed. After drying for 30 min with drying conditions of temperatures of 11.2-13.2 ℃, relative humidity of 21.1%-23.4%, and air velocity of 0.04-0.05 m·s-1; the moisture evaporation rate of the sealer was 16.48%. However, with temperatures of 18.9-19.1 ℃, relative humidity of 54.1%-55.6% , and air velocity of 0.03-0.15 m·s-1, the evaporation rate was 2.23%. Thus, the sealed state with 11.2-13.2 ℃ was better than with 18.9-19.1 ℃.%为了探讨环境条件对木家具底漆的水分挥发及封闭效果的影响,在5种自然干燥条件下,以枫木薄木贴面家具板材为基材,以水性封闭底漆为涂料,在分析干燥环境干燥能力基础上,用扫描电镜观察了徐层在基材上的封闭状态,用称量法研究了涂层水分挥发率和挥发速度.结果表明:水性封闭底漆封闭效果及干燥速度受干燥条件的影响明显.干燥30 min时,在温度11.2~13.2℃,湿度21.1%~23.4%,风速0.04~0.05 m·s-1的干燥条件环境中,水分挥发率为16.48%;在温度18.9~19.1℃,湿度54.1%~55.6%,风速0.03~0.15 m·s-1的干燥条件环境中,水分挥发率为2.23%;前者的封闭效果好.

  20. Determination of sulfur compounds in fermented raspberry beverages by GC-PFPD

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Whasley F.; Dragone, Giuliano; Dias, D. R.; Teixeira, J. A.; Schawn, R. F.; Oliveira, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds are known to have very powerful and characteristic odours, and can contribute to pleasant or unpleasant aromas of a wine, according to their nature and concentration. Their concentration has a great influence on sensory properties, often being strongly dependent on threshold values, normally low. The determination of sulfur compounds, eluted in a chromatographic column, has been performed using mainly flame photometric detection (FPD), sulfur chemiluminescence detect...

  1. Approaching Moisture Recycling Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Patrick; Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Gordon, Line; Galaz, Victor; Ebbesson, Jonas

    2017-04-01

    The spatial and temporal dynamics of water resources are a continuous challenge for effective and sustainable national and international governance. Despite the surface watershed being the typical unit of water management, recent advances in hydrology have revealed 'atmospheric watersheds' - otherwise known as precipitationsheds. Also, recent research has demonstrated that water flowing within a precipitationshed may be modified by land-use change in one location, while the effect of this modification could be felt in a different province, nation, or continent. Notwithstanding these insights, the major legal and institutional implications of modifying moisture recycling have remained unexplored. In this presentation, we examine potential approaches to moisture recycling governance. We first identify a set of international study regions, and then develop a typology of moisture recycling relationships within these regions ranging from bilateral moisture exchange to more complex networks. This enables us to classify different types of legal and institutional governance principles. Likewise, we relate the moisture recycling types to existing land and water governance frameworks and management practices. The complexity of moisture recycling means institutional fit will be difficult to generalize for all moisture recycling relationships, but our typology allows the identification of characteristics that make effective governance of these normally ignored water flows more tenable.

  2. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  3. Geochemistry of sulfur in the Florida Everglades; 1994 through 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Anne L.; Orem, W.H.; Harvey, J.W.; Spiker, E. C.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we present data on the geochemistry of sulfur in sediments and in surface water, groundwater, and rainwater in the Everglades region in south Florida. The results presented here are part of a larger study intended to determine the roles played by the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in the ecology of the south Florida wetlands. The geochemistry of sulfur in the region is particularly important because of its link to the production of toxic methylmercury through processes mediated by sulfate reducing bacteria. Sediment cores were collected from the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA), Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) 1A and 2A, from Lake Okeechobee, and from Taylor Slough in the southern Everglades. Water collection was more widespread and includes surface water from WCAs 1A, 2A, 3A, 2B, the EAA, Taylor Slough, Lake Okeechobee, and the Kissimmee River. Groundwater was collected from The Everglades Nutrient Removal Area (ENR) and from WCA 2A. Rainwater was collected at two month intervals over a period of one year from the ENR and from WCA 2A. Water was analyzed for sulfate concentration and sulfate sulfur stable isotopic ratio (34S/32S). Sediment cores were analyzed for total sulfur concentration and/or for concentrations of sulfur species (sulfate, organic sulfur, disulfides, and acid volatile sulfides (AVS)) and for their stable sulfur isotopic ratio. Results show a decrease in total sulfur content (1.57 to 0.61 percent dry weight) with depth in two sediment cores collected in WCA 2A, indicating that there has been an increase in total sulfur content in recent times. A sediment core from the center of Lake Okeechobee shows a decrease in total sulfur content with depth (0.28 to 0.08 percent dry weight). A core from the periphery of the lake (South Bay) likewise shows a decrease in total sulfur content with depth (1.00 to 0.69 percent dry weight), however, the overall sulfur content is greater than that near the center at all depths

  4. Sodium and sulfur release and recapture during black liquor burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, W.J.; Iisa, K.; Wag, K.; Reis, V.V.; Boonsongsup, L.; Forssen, M.; Hupa, M.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this study was to provide data on sulfur and sodium volatilization during black liquor burning, and on SO2 capture by solid sodium carbonate and sodium chloride. This data was interpreted and modeled into rate equations suitable for use in computational models for recovery boilers.

  5. Volatile flavor compounds in yogurt: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hefa

    2010-11-01

    Considerable knowledge has been accumulated on the volatile compounds contributing to the aroma and flavor of yogurt. This review outlines the production of the major flavor compounds in yogurt fermentation and the analysis techniques, both instrumental and sensory, for quantifying the volatile compounds in yogurt. The volatile compounds that have been identified in plain yogurt are summarized, with the few key aroma compounds described in detail. Most flavor compounds in yogurt are produced from lipolysis of milkfat and microbiological transformations of lactose and citrate. More than 100 volatiles, including carbonyl compounds, alcohols, acids, esters, hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, sulfur-containing compounds, and heterocyclic compounds, are found in yogurt at low to trace concentrations. Besides lactic acid, acetaldehyde, diacetyl, acetoin, acetone, and 2-butanone contribute most to the typical aroma and flavor of yogurt. Extended storage of yogurt causes off-flavor development, which is mainly attributed to the production of undesired aldehydes and fatty acids during lipid oxidation. Further work on studying the volatile flavor compounds-matrix interactions, flavor release mechanisms, and the synergistic effect of flavor compounds, and on correlating the sensory properties of yogurt with the compositions of volatile flavor compounds are needed to fully elucidate yogurt aroma and flavor.

  6. CPC Soil Moisture

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The monthly data set consists of a file containing 1/2 degree monthly averaged soil moisture water height equivalents for the globe from 1948 onwards. Values are...

  7. Removal Of Volatile Impurities From Copper Concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkel, L.; Schuler, A.; Frei, A.; Sturzenegger, M.

    2005-03-01

    To study the removal of volatile impurities from two different copper concentrates they have been heated on a thermo balance to temperatures between 900 and 1500 C. This sample treatment revealed that both concentrates undergo strong weight losses at 500 and 700 C. They were attributed to the removal of sulfur. Elemental analyses of the residues by ICP spectrometry have shown that the thermal treatment efficiently removes the volatile impurities. Already below 900 C most of the arsenic is removed by evaporation, the largest fraction of lead and zinc is removed in the temperature interval of 1300-1500 C. It was observed that quartz in the concentrate leads to the formation of a silicon-enriched phase besides a metal rich sulfide phase. The former is interpreted as an early stage of a silicate slag. Elemental analysis showed that the formation of this distinct slag phase does not hinder the efficient removal of volatile impurities. (author)

  8. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide

  9. Buffer moisture protection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritola, J.; Peura, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-11-15

    With the present knowledge, bentonite blocks have to be protected from the air relative humidity and from any moisture leakages in the environment that might cause swelling of the bentonite blocks during the 'open' installation phase before backfilling. The purpose of this work was to design the structural reference solution both for the bottom of the deposition hole and for the buffer moisture protection and dewatering system with their integrated equipment needed in the deposition hole. This report describes the Posiva's reference solution for the buffer moisture protection system and the bottom plate on basis of the demands and functional requirements set by long-term safety. The reference solution with structural details has been developed in research work made 2010-2011. The structural solution of the moisture protection system has not yet been tested in practice. On the bottom of the deposition hole a copper plate which protects the lowest bentonite block from the gathered water is installed straight to machined and even rock surface. The moisture protection sheet made of EPDM rubber is attached to the copper plate with an inflatable seal. The upper part of the moisture protection sheet is fixed to the collar structures of the lid which protects the deposition hole in the disposal tunnel. The main function of the moisture protection sheet is to protect bentonite blocks from the leaking water and from the influence of the air humidity at their installation stage. The leaking water is controlled by the dewatering and alarm system which has been integrated into the moisture protection liner. (orig.)

  10. Moisture transport in coated wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meel, P.A. van; Erich, S.J.F.; Huinink, H.P.; Kopinga, K.; Jong, J. DE; Adan, O.C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Moisture accumulation inside wood causes favorable conditions for decay. Application of a coating alters the moisture sorption of wood and prevents accumulation of moisture. This paper presents the results of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study on the influence of a coating on the moisture abso

  11. Mantle Volatiles - Distribution and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luth, R. W.

    2003-12-01

    O and 10-44% of the CO2 that is subducted is returned to the surface in arc magmatism. He emphasized that the "missing" volatiles may have multiple fates, including incorporation into the mantle wedge, large-scale fluid flow up along the interface between the subducting slab and overlying mantle, and transport into the deeper mantle.Because of the hydrous nature of arc magmatism, a common hypothesis is that there is a hydrous phase that breaks down at subarc conditions to trigger melting in the overlying mantle wedge to produce arc magmas. A key research goal has been to identify this phase, or phases. For example, serpentine in peridotite will break down during subduction to produce olivine+orthopyroxene+fluid or, in cooler slabs, a progression of DHMSs, the last of which may survive into the transition zone.At some point, however, because of the limited thermal or pressure stability of the hydrous phases, water will be liberated from the slab into the surrounding mantle. At this point, the water will either exist as a fluid, a melt - or something intermediate if we are above the second critical end point in the relevant system (Wyllie and Ryabchikov, 2000) - or it may dissolve into nominally anhydrous phases.The understanding of the relevant phase relations for the other volatiles is not as advanced. For carbon, we have a reasonable understanding of its phase stability in the mantle, but there is still no good understanding of the relative importance of carbonates, elemental carbon, and other forms as hosts for carbon in the mantle. In the upper mantle, sulfur resides primarily in sulfides; their behavior during partial melting will play a major role in the geochemical cycling of sulfur as well as of chalcophile elements. The halogens are rare (and rarely studied) in mantle-derived samples; more insight into their behavior is currently coming from the study of mantle-derived magmas.This review will first consider the evidence from mantle-derived magmas pertaining

  12. Hygroscopic behavior of partially volatilized coastal marine aerosols using the volatilization and humidification tandem differential mobility analyzer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G. R.; Ristovski, Z. D.; D'Anna, B.; Morawska, L.

    2005-10-01

    Coastal marine nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation mode aerosol particles with back trajectories indicative of marine origin were examined using a volatilization and humidification tandem differential mobility analyzer (VHTDMA) to reveal the volatilization temperatures of the various component species. The diameter hygroscopic growth factors of the residue particles were continually examined throughout the volatilization process. In each of the three modes the dominant particle type appeared to be composed of the same four physicochemically distinct species though in different ratios. These species exhibited volatility and hygroscopic behavior consistent with combinations of a volatile organic species, sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate or bisulfate, iodine oxide, and an insoluble nonvolatile residue. The Aitken and accumulation mode aerosols contain large fractions of the insoluble, volatile, organic-like material, and the volatilization of this species results in a distinct increase in the water volume uptake of the particles. Of the four distinct species, only the sulfuric acid-like species constituted an increasing volume fraction with decreasing particle size. This finding indicates that nucleation mode particles constitute an acidic seed and as such would undergo acid-catalyzed secondary organic aerosol growth at a faster rate. The lack of a nonvolatile hygroscopic residue consistent with sea salt in these particles implies that the aerosolization of seawater is not the dominant production mechanism for these submicrometer coastal marine aerosols.

  13. Effect of aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions on near field plume aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

    1997-12-31

    Based on estimated exit plane sulfur speciation, a two dimensional, axisymmetric flow field model with coupled gas phase oxidation kinetics and aerosol nucleation and growth dynamics is used to evaluate the effect of fuel sulfur oxidation in the engine on the formation and growth of volatile H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O aerosols in the near field plume. The conversion of fuel sulfur to sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid in the engine is predicted to significantly increase the number density and surface area density of volatile H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O aerosols and the chemical activation of exhaust soot particulates. This analysis indicates the need for experimental measurements of exhaust SO{sub x} emissions to fully assess the atmospheric impact of aircraft emissions. (author) 18 refs.; Submitted to Geophysical Research Letters

  14. Measurement of biogenic sulfur gases emission from some Chinese and Japanese soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Kanda, K.; Tsuruta, H.; Minami, K.

    Emission of volatile sulfur gases from waterlogged paddy soils and upland soils of China and Japan was studied in the laboratory. Emission of hydrogen sulfide (H 2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), methyl mercaptan (CH 3SH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon disulfide (CS 2) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) were detected. Emission of sulfur gases from paddy soil was more than that from upland, and emission from the Chinese paddy soils was more than that from Japanese. At the same soil, emission of sulfur gases, when both organic manure and chemical fertilizer were applied was higher than when only organic manure or only chemical fertilizer was applied. Under anaerobic conditions, detected biogenic sulfur gases were far more than that under aerobic conditions, H 2S was the most obvious. The results have also shown that, at higher temperature, emission and expiration rate of volatile sulfur gases were higher than that at lower temperature.

  15. Lactose and galactose content in cheese results in overestimation of moisture by vacuum oven and microwave methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H; Rankin, S A; Fonseca, L M; Milani, F X

    2014-05-01

    Moisture determination in cheese is a critical test for regulatory compliance, functionality, and economic reasons. Common methods for moisture determination in cheese rely upon the thermal volatilization of water from cheese and calculation of moisture content based on the resulting loss of mass. Residual sugars, such as lactose and galactose, are commonly present in cheeses at levels ranging from trace amounts to 5%. These sugars are capable of reacting with other compounds in cheese, especially under the thermal conditions required for moisture determination, to yield volatile reaction products. The hypothesis of this work is that residual sugars in cheese will be converted into volatile compounds over the course of moisture determination at a level sufficient to result in overestimated cheese moisture. A full-factorial statistical design was used to evaluate the effects of cheese type, sugar type, sugar level, method type, and all interactions. Cheddar and low-moisture, part-skim (LMPS) Mozzarella cheeses were prepared with 1, 3, and 5% added lactose or galactose, and subjected to either vacuum oven or microwave-based moisture determination methods. Browning index and colorimetry were measured to characterize the color and extent of browning. Volatile analyses were performed to provide chemical evidence of the reactions proposed. The presence of residual sugars altered moisture calculations as a function of cheese type, sugar type, sugar level, method type, and numerous interactions. At higher concentrations of residual sugar, the percentage moisture determinations were increased by values of up to 1.8. Measures of browning reactions, including browning index, colorimetry, and volatile profiles demonstrate that the proposed browning reactions played a causative role. This work establishes the need to consider cheese type, sugar type, sugar levels, and method type as a means of more accurately determining moisture levels.

  16. Moisturizers: The Slippery Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Anisha; Kaur, Tejinder; Malhotra, SK; Gambhir, ML

    2016-01-01

    Moisturizers are an important part of a dermatologist's armamentarium although little is written and well, a less is truly known about them. There is a cornucopia of projected skin products in the market whose real scientific role is not proven. These products although at times are regarded as mere cosmetics but have a well-known role in many skin disorders. Adequate knowledge about their mechanism of action, dosage, usage, and adverse effects is must for a dermatologist in this era. This article aims to bring forth the ever hidden facts of the much-hyped moisturizers. It is probably the first of its kind covering all aspects of moisturizers ranging from basic science to clinical usage, a subject that receives a short shrift in the current dermatological text. PMID:27293248

  17. Moisturizers: The slippery road

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha Sethi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Moisturizers are an important part of a dermatologist's armamentarium although little is written and well, a less is truly known about them. There is a cornucopia of projected skin products in the market whose real scientific role is not proven. These products although at times are regarded as mere cosmetics but have a well-known role in many skin disorders. Adequate knowledge about their mechanism of action, dosage, usage, and adverse effects is must for a dermatologist in this era. This article aims to bring forth the ever hidden facts of the much-hyped moisturizers. It is probably the first of its kind covering all aspects of moisturizers ranging from basic science to clinical usage, a subject that receives a short shrift in the current dermatological text.

  18. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  19. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Share Volatile Organic Compounds' Impact on Indoor Air Quality On this page: Introduction Sources Health Effects Levels in Homes Steps to Reduce Exposure Standards or Guidelines Additional Resources Introduction Volatile organic compounds ( ...

  20. Sulfur recovery further improved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsboom, J.; Grinsven, M. van; Warners, A. van [Jacobs Nederland B.V., (Netherlands); Nisselrooy, P. van [Gastec N.V., (Netherlands)

    2002-04-01

    The original 100-year-old Claus process for producing sulfur from hydrogen sulfide in acid gas is described together with improvements which have been made over the years. The most recent modification, EUROCLAUS, achieves sulfur recoveries of 99-99.9 per cent. Five commercial units are being designed.

  1. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Qualitative analysis of a sulfur-fumigated Chinese herbal medicine by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and high-resolution time of flight mass spectrometry using colorized fuzzy difference data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hao; Cao, Gang; Zhang, Hong-Yan

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the chemical transformation of volatile compounds in sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Sinensis. A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-TOF/MS) with colorized fuzzy difference (CFD) method was used to investigate the effect of sulfur-fumigation on the volatile components from Radix Angelicae Sinensis. Twenty-five compounds that were found in sun-dried samples disappeared in sulfur-fumigated samples. Seventeen volatile components including two sulfur-containing compounds were newly generated for the first time in volatile oils of sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Sinensis. The strategy can be successfully applied to rapidly and holistically discriminate sun-dried and sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Sinensis. GC×GC-HR-TOF/MS based CFD is a powerful and feasible approach for the global quality evaluation of Radix Angelicae Sinensis as well as other herbal medicines.

  3. Workshop on moisture buffer capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Summary report of a Nordtest workshop on moisture buffer capacity held at Copenhagen August 21-22 2003......Summary report of a Nordtest workshop on moisture buffer capacity held at Copenhagen August 21-22 2003...

  4. Relación entre los niveles de compuestos volátiles sulfurados con los niveles de RANKL y OPG en pacientes con periodontitis crónica moderada o severa: Estudio transversal Relationship between the levels of volatile sulfur compounds with the levels of RANKL and OPG in patients with moderate or severe periodontitis: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Prieto Damm

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes: El efecto de los Compuestos Volátiles Sulfurados (CVS sobre los tejidos periodontales, específicamente a nivel del eje RANKL/OPG, no ha sido dilucidado y en la actualidad existe escasa literatura al respecto publicada. Objetivo: Evaluar si los CVS medidos en la cavidad oral de pacientes con periodontitis crónica moderada a severa se relacionan con la expresión de RANKL y OPG a nivel de fluido gingival crevicular (FGC. Método: Se realizó un estudio transversal con 71 pacientes derivados de la Unidad de Diagnóstico de la Clínica Odontológica Docente Asistencial de la Universidad de los Andes. Posterior a la realización de un examen periodontal completo se tomaron muestra de los niveles de CVS de la boca de los pacientes mediante un monitor de sulfuros y muestras de FGC para evaluar los niveles de RANKL y OPG mediante test de ELISA. Los datos obtenidos fueron analizados mediante test de correlación de Spearman. Resultados: Al evaluar la correlación de los niveles de CVS con los niveles de RANKL, OPG y la razón RANKL/OPG, se observó un R de 0.098 con un p value = 0.41; -0.084 con un p value= 0.48 y 0.067 con un p value = 0.57 respectivamente. Conclusiones: El presente estudio no pudo demostrar si existe una relación entre los niveles de CVS con la expresión de RANKL y OPG en el FGC de pacientes con periodontitis crónica.Background: The effect of the Volatile Sulfur Compounds (VSC on the periodontal tissues, specifically at the RANKL/OPG level has not been elucidate and there is little literature published on this subject. Aim: To explore if the VSC levels measured in the oral cavity of patients with moderate or severe chronic periodontitis are correlated with the expression of RANKL and OPG at the gingival fluid level (GF. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 71 patients referred by the Universidad de los Andes’s dentistry diagnosis department. After undergoing full-mouth periodontal exam, levels of CVS

  5. Influência do dióxido de enxofre e cultivares de videira na formação de alguns compostos voláteis e na qualidade sensorial do destilado de vinho Influence of sulfur dioxide and grape varieties at the formation of some volatile compounds and at the sensory quality of the wine distillate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio SALTON

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de estudar o efeito do SO2 e das cultivares de videira - Herbemont, Couderc 13, Trebbiano e Isabel - na composição química e na qualidade sensorial do destilado de vinho, efetuaram-se microvinificações e posterior destilação dos vinhos na safra de 1996. As análises dos compostos voláteis foram feitas através de cromatografia gasosa e a avaliação sensorial dos destilados foi efetuada pelo grupo de degustação da Embrapa Uva e Vinho. Os resultados mostraram que o SO2 favoreceu a formação de etanal nas cultivares estudadas. Observou-se também um aumento na soma dos álcoois superiores em função do SO2, exceto para o destilado da cv. Isabel. Constatou-se que o destilado de Isabel se caracterizou por apresentar teor mais elevado de metanol e mais baixo de 1-propanol, possivelmente devido ao sistema de vinificação. O destilado de Isabel, juntamente com o de Couderc 13, apresentou teores mais baixos de 2-metil-1-propanol, 3-metil-1-butanol e da soma dos álcoois superiores. O destilado de Trebbiano apresentou teor mais elevado de 2-metil-1-propanol e juntamente com o de Herbemont teores mais elevados de 1-propanol, 2-metil-1-butanol, 3-metil-1-butanol e na soma dos álcoois superiores. A avaliação sensorial evidenciou que o SO2 influenciou na qualidade de aroma, no gosto agradável e na qualidade geral dos destilados das cultivares Herbemont e Trebbiano. O de Herbemont se caracterizou por apresentar menor qualidade de aroma, gosto agradável, tipicidade e qualidade geral. Apresentou, ainda, nota mais elevada para aroma e gosto indesejáveis.With the aim of studying the influence of SO2 and grape varieties - Herbemont, Couderc 13, Trebbiano and Isabella, on the chemical composition and sensory quality of wine distillates, some microvinification and posterior distillation of wines were made, at the harvest of 1996. The analyses of volatile components were made through gas chromatography and the sensory evaluation of

  6. Evaluating Soil Moisture Status Using an e-Nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Bieganowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of distinguishing different soil moisture levels by electronic nose (e-nose was studied. Ten arable soils of various types were investigated. The measurements were performed for air-dry (AD soils stored for one year, then moistened to field water capacity and finally dried within a period of 180 days. The volatile fingerprints changed during the course of drying. At the end of the drying cycle, the fingerprints were similar to those of the initial AD soils. Principal component analysis (PCA and artificial neural network (ANN analysis showed that e-nose results can be used to distinguish soil moisture. It was also shown that different soils can give different e-nose signals at the same moistures.

  7. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain. This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks. Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  8. The role of crystallization-driven exsolution on the sulfur mass balance in volcanic arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y.; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Zajacz, Zoltán.; Wright, Heather; Vazquez, Jorge

    2016-08-01

    The release of large amounts of sulfur to the stratosphere during explosive eruptions affects the radiative balance in the atmosphere and consequentially impacts climate for up to several years after the event. Quantitative estimations of the processes that control the mass balance of sulfur between melt, crystals, and vapor bubbles is needed to better understand the potential sulfur yield of individual eruption events and the conditions that favor large sulfur outputs to the atmosphere. The processes that control sulfur partitioning in magmas are (1) exsolution of volatiles (dominantly H2O) during decompression (first boiling) and during isobaric crystallization (second boiling), (2) the crystallization and breakdown of sulfide or sulfate phases in the magma, and (3) the transport of sulfur-rich vapor (gas influx) from deeper unerupted regions of the magma reservoir. Vapor exsolution and the formation/breakdown of sulfur-rich phases can all be considered as closed-system processes where mass balance arguments are generally easier to constrain, whereas the contribution of sulfur by vapor transport (open system process) is more difficult to quantify. The ubiquitous "excess sulfur" problem, which refers to the much higher sulfur mass released during eruptions than what can be accounted for by amount of sulfur originally dissolved in erupted melt, as estimated from melt inclusion sulfur concentrations (the "petrologic estimate"), reflects the challenges in closing the sulfur mass balance between crystals, melt, and vapor before and during a volcanic eruption. In this work, we try to quantify the relative importance of closed- and open-system processes for silicic arc volcanoes using kinetic models of sulfur partitioning during exsolution. Our calculations show that crystallization-induced exsolution (second boiling) can generate a significant fraction of the excess sulfur observed in crystal-rich arc magmas. This result does not negate the important role of vapor

  9. Cytoplasmic sulfur trafficking in sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Persulfide groups are chemically versatile and participate in a wide array of biochemical pathways. Although it is well documented that persulfurated proteins supply a number of important and elaborate biosynthetic pathways with sulfane sulfur, it is far less acknowledged that the enzymatic generation of persulfidic sulfur, the successive transfer of sulfur as a persulfide between multiple proteins, and the oxidation of sulfane sulfur in protein-bound form are also essential steps during dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in bacteria and archaea. Here, the currently available information on sulfur trafficking in sulfur oxidizing prokaryotes is reviewed, and the idea is discussed that sulfur is always presented to cytoplasmic oxidizing enzymes in a protein-bound form, thus preventing the occurrence of free sulfide inside of the prokaryotic cell. Thus, sulfur trafficking emerges as a central element in sulfur-oxidizing pathways, and TusA homologous proteins appear to be central and common elements in these processes.

  10. Water on The Moon, III. Volatiles & Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Crotts, Arlin

    2012-01-01

    For centuries some scientists have argued that there is activity on the Moon (or water, as recounted in Parts I & II), while others have thought the Moon is simply a dead, inactive world. The question comes in several forms: is there a detectable atmosphere? Does the surface of the Moon change? What causes interior seismic activity? From a more modern viewpoint, we now know that as much carbon monoxide as water was excavated during the LCROSS impact, as detailed in Part I, and a comparable amount of other volatiles were found. At one time the Moon outgassed prodigious amounts of water and hydrogen in volcanic fire fountains, but released similar amounts of volatile sulfur (or SO2), and presumably large amounts of carbon dioxide or monoxide, if theory is to be believed. So water on the Moon is associated with other gases. We review what is known (and touch on what is unknown) about outgassing of various gases from the Moon.

  11. EDITORIAL: Microwave Moisture Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, Udo; Kupfer, Klaus; Hübner, Christof

    2007-04-01

    Microwave moisture measurements refer to a methodology by which the water content of materials is non-invasively determined using electromagnetic fields of radio and microwave frequencies. Being the omnipresent liquid on our planet, water occurs as a component in most materials and often exercises a significant influence on their properties. Precise measurements of the water content are thus extremely useful in pure sciences, particularly in biochemistry and biophysics. They are likewise important in many agricultural, technical and industrial fields. Applications are broad and diverse, and include the quality assessment of foodstuffs, the determination of water content in paper, cardboard and textile production, the monitoring of moisture in sands, gravels, soils and constructions, as well as the measurement of water admixtures to coal and crude oil in reservoirs and in pipelines. Microwave moisture measurements and evaluations require insights in various disciplines, such as materials science, dielectrics, the physical chemistry of water, electrodynamics and microwave techniques. The cooperation of experts from the different fields of science is thus necessary for the efficient development of this complex discipline. In order to advance cooperation the Workshop on Electromagnetic Wave Interaction with Water and Moist Substances was held in 1993 in Atlanta. It initiated a series of international conferences, of which the last one was held in 2005 in Weimar. The meeting brought together 130 scientists and engineers from all over the world. This special issue presents a collection of some selected papers that were given at the event. The papers cover most topics of the conference, featuring dielectric properties of aqueous materials, electromagnetic wave interactions, measurement methods and sensors, and various applications. The special issue is dedicated to Dr Andrzej W Kraszewski, who died in July 2006 after a distinguished career of 48 years in the research of

  12. On-line moisture analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cutmore, N G

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of the moisture content of iron ore has become a key issue for controlling moisture additions for dust suppression. In most cases moisture content is still determined by manual or automatic sampling of the ore stream, followed by conventional laboratory analysis by oven drying. Although this procedure enables the moisture content to be routinely monitored, it is too slow for control purposes. This has generated renewed interest in on-line techniques for the accurate and rapid measurement of moisture in iron ore on conveyors. Microwave transmission techniques have emerged over the past 40 years as the dominant technology for on-line measurement of moisture in bulk materials, including iron ores. Alternative technologies have their limitations. Infra-red analysers are used in a variety of process industries, but rely on the measurement of absorption by moisture in a very thin surface layer. Consequently such probes may be compromised by particle size effects and biased presentation of the bulk mater...

  13. Precision moisture generation and measurement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Irwin, Adriane Nadine

    2010-03-01

    In many industrial processes, gaseous moisture is undesirable as it can lead to metal corrosion, polymer degradation, and other materials aging processes. However, generating and measuring precise moisture concentrations is challenging due to the need to cover a broad concentration range (parts-per-billion to percent) and the affinity of moisture to a wide range surfaces and materials. This document will discuss the techniques employed by the Mass Spectrometry Laboratory of the Materials Reliability Department at Sandia National Laboratories to generate and measure known gaseous moisture concentrations. This document highlights the use of a chilled mirror and primary standard humidity generator for the characterization of aluminum oxide moisture sensors. The data presented shows an excellent correlation in frost point measured between the two instruments, and thus provides an accurate and reliable platform for characterizing moisture sensors and performing other moisture related experiments.

  14. PERUBAHAN KOMPONEN VOLATIL SELAMA FERMENTASI KECAP [Change Volatile Components During Soy Sauce Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Apriyantono1

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A study has been conducted to investigate changes of volatile components during soy sauce fermentation. During the fermentation, many volatile components produced may contribute to soy sauce flavor. THe volatile identified by GC-MS werw classified into hydrocarbon (15, alcohol (15, aldehyde (14, ester (14, ketone (9, benzene derivative (11, fatty acid (9, furan (5, terpenoid (18, pyrazine (3, thiazole (1, pyridine (1 and sulfur containing compound (2.Concentration of compounds found in almost all fermentation steps, such as hexanal and benzaldehyde did. These compounds may be derived from raw soybean, since they were all present in raw soybean and their concentration did not change during fermentation. Concentration of palmitic acid and benzeneacetaldehyde, in general, increased during all fermentation steps. They are probably derived from lipid degradation or microorganism activities. Concentrations of some fatty acids, esters and hydrocarbons, such as linoleic acid, methyl palmitate and heptadecane increased during salt fermentation only. Concentration of some other compounds, such as 2,4 decadienal decreased or undetected during fermentation.The absence of some volatile compounds, e.g. (E-nerolidol and (E,E-famesol in boiled soybean which were previously present in raw soybean may be due to evaporation of these compounds during boiling. Some volatile compounds such as, methyl heptadecanoate and few aromatic alcohols are likely derived from Aspergillus sojae, since these compounds were identified only in 0 day koji

  15. The role of crystallization-driven exsolution on the sulfur mass balance in volcanic arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanqing; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Zajacz, Zoltán; Wright, Heather M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    The release of large amounts of sulfur to the stratosphere during explosive eruptions affects the radiative balance in the atmosphere and consequentially impacts climate for up to several years after the event. Quantitative estimations of the processes that control the mass balance of sulfur between melt, crystals, and vapor bubbles is needed to better understand the potential sulfur yield of individual eruption events and the conditions that favor large sulfur outputs to the atmosphere. The processes that control sulfur partitioning in magmas are (1) exsolution of volatiles (dominantly H2O) during decompression (first boiling) and during isobaric crystallization (second boiling), (2) the crystallization and breakdown of sulfide or sulfate phases in the magma, and (3) the transport of sulfur-rich vapor (gas influx) from deeper unerupted regions of the magma reservoir. Vapor exsolution and the formation/breakdown of sulfur-rich phases can all be considered as closed-system processes where mass balance arguments are generally easier to constrain, whereas the contribution of sulfur by vapor transport (open system process) is more difficult to quantify. The ubiquitous “excess sulfur” problem, which refers to the much higher sulfur mass released during eruptions than what can be accounted for by amount of sulfur originally dissolved in erupted melt, as estimated from melt inclusion sulfur concentrations (the “petrologic estimate”), reflects the challenges in closing the sulfur mass balance between crystals, melt, and vapor before and during a volcanic eruption. In this work, we try to quantify the relative importance of closed- and open-system processes for silicic arc volcanoes using kinetic models of sulfur partitioning during exsolution. Our calculations show that crystallization-induced exsolution (second boiling) can generate a significant fraction of the excess sulfur observed in crystal-rich arc magmas. This result does not negate the important role of

  16. Emerging Equity Market Volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Geert Bekaert; Harvey, Campbell R.

    1995-01-01

    Returns in emerging capital markets are very different from returns in developed markets. While most previous research has focused on average returns, we analyze the volatility of the returns in emerging equity markets. We characterize the time-series of volatility in emerging markets and explore the distributional foundations of the variance process. Of particular interest is evidence of asymmetries in volatility and the evolution of the variance process after periods of capital market refor...

  17. Volatility in Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Sizova, Natalia; Tauchen, George

    Stock market volatility clusters in time, carries a risk premium, is fractionally inte- grated, and exhibits asymmetric leverage effects relative to returns. This paper develops a first internally consistent equilibrium based explanation for these longstanding empirical facts. The model is cast......, and the dynamic cross-correlations of the volatility measures with the returns calculated from actual high-frequency intra-day data on the S&P 500 aggregate market and VIX volatility indexes....

  18. Effect of Flotation Reagents on the Cake Moisture of Copper Concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effect of reagents used in separating chalcopyrite from pyrite on the cake moisture of the copper concentrate at Daye Iron Mine Mineral Processing Plant was investigated. The results showed that the dosage of lime used for depressing pyrite was the main factor that increased the filter cake moisture of copper concentrate. With increasing the dosage of lime, the cake moisture of copper concentrate increased sharply. The cause was concluded to be the addition of lime to the pulp, which resulted in the formation of floc and a high pH value. The collector Z-200#, used for collecting chalcopyrite, had, as well, an adverse effect on the cake moisture of copper concentrate, but its effect was inferior in respect to that of lime. The cake moisture of copper concentrate can be decreased by changing the method with which lime is added and the pH value of pulp is regulated. The experiment results showed that the sulfuric acid was the best regulator. When the clarified liquor of lime was used as a depressant and the pH value of the pulp was regulated to 6.5€?7.0 by adding sulfuric acid, the cake moisture of copper concentrate was reduced from 15.49% to 13.13%. The examination of chalcopyrite surface by using ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) showed that calcium sulfate and iron hydroxide had formed on the surface of chalcopyrite when lime was added to the pulp. The formation of calcium sulfate and iron hydroxide on its surface increased the hydrophilicity of chalcopyrite so that its cake moisture increased. The addition of sulfuric acid to the pulp not only removed the calcium sulfate, but also reduced the concentration of iron hydroxide on the surface of chalcopyrite so that the cake moisture of copper concentrate was decreased.

  19. Large sulfur isotope fractionations in Martian sediments at Gale crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, H. B.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Freissinet, C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Eldridge, D. L.; Fischer, W. W.; Grotzinger, J. P.; House, C. H.; Hurowitz, J. A.; McLennan, S. M.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Vaniman, D. T.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Dottin, J. W., III; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Farley, K. A.; Glavin, D. P.; Johnson, S. S.; Knudson, C. A.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-González, R.; Pavlov, A. A.; Plummer, R.; Rampe, E. B.; Stern, J. C.; Steele, A.; Summons, R. E.; Sutter, B.

    2017-09-01

    Variability in the sulfur isotopic composition in sediments can reflect atmospheric, geologic and biological processes. Evidence for ancient fluvio-lacustrine environments at Gale crater on Mars and a lack of efficient crustal recycling mechanisms on the planet suggests a surface environment that was once warm enough to allow the presence of liquid water, at least for discrete periods of time, and implies a greenhouse effect that may have been influenced by sulfur-bearing volcanic gases. Here we report in situ analyses of the sulfur isotopic compositions of SO2 volatilized from ten sediment samples acquired by NASA’s Curiosity rover along a 13 km traverse of Gale crater. We find large variations in sulfur isotopic composition that exceed those measured for Martian meteorites and show both depletion and enrichment in 34S. Measured values of δ34S range from -47 +/- 14‰ to 28 +/- 7‰, similar to the range typical of terrestrial environments. Although limited geochronological constraints on the stratigraphy traversed by Curiosity are available, we propose that the observed sulfur isotopic signatures at Gale crater can be explained by equilibrium fractionation between sulfate and sulfide in an impact-driven hydrothermal system and atmospheric processing of sulfur-bearing gases during transient warm periods.

  20. SOIL moisture data intercomparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Yann; Rodriguez-Frenandez, Nemesio; Al-Yaari, Amen; Parens, Marie; Molero, Beatriz; Mahmoodi, Ali; Mialon, Arnaud; Richaume, Philippe; Bindlish, Rajat; Mecklenburg, Susanne; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity satellite (SMOS) was launched in November 2009 and started delivering data in January 2010. Subsequently, the satellite has been in operation for over 6 years while the retrieval algorithms from Level 1 to Level 2 underwent significant evolutions as knowledge improved. Other approaches for retrieval at Level 2 over land were also investigated while Level 3 and 4 were initiated. In this présentation these improvements are assessed by inter-comparisons of the current Level 2 (V620) against the previous version (V551) and new products either using neural networks or Level 3. In addition a global evaluation of different SMOS soil moisture (SM) products is performed comparing products with those of model simulations and other satellites (AMSR E/ AMSR2 and ASCAT). Finally, all products were evaluated against in situ measurements of soil moisture (SM). The study demonstrated that the V620 shows a significant improvement (including those at level1 improving level2)) with respect to the earlier version V551. Results also show that neural network based approaches can yield excellent results over areas where other products are poor. Finally, global comparison indicates that SMOS behaves very well when compared to other sensors/approaches and gives consistent results over all surfaces from very dry (African Sahel, Arizona), to wet (tropical rain forests). RFI (Radio Frequency Interference) is still an issue even though detection has been greatly improved while RFI sources in several areas of the world are significantly reduced. When compared to other satellite products, the analysis shows that SMOS achieves its expected goals and is globally consistent over different eco climate regions from low to high latitudes and throughout the seasons.

  1. Enigmatic Moisture Effects on Al2O3 Scale and TBC Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialek, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Alumina scale adhesion to high temperature alloys is known to be affected primarily by sulfur segregation and reactive element additions. However, adherent scales can become partially compromised by excessive strain energy and cyclic cracking. With time, exposure of such scales to moisture can lead to spontaneous interfacial decohesion, occurring while the samples are maintained at ambient conditions. Examples of this Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation (MIDS) are presented for NiCrAl and single crystal superalloys, becoming more severe with sulfur level and cyclic exposure conditions. Similarly, delayed failure or Desk Top Spallation (DTS) results are reviewed for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), culminating in the water drop failure test. Both phenomena are discussed in terms of moisture effects on bulk alumina and bulk aluminides. A mechanism is proposed based on hydrogen embrittlement and is supported by a cathodic hydrogen charging experiment. Hydroxylation of aluminum from the alloy interface appears to be the relevant basic reaction.

  2. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics; Sorokin, A.A.; Buriko, Y.I. [Scientific Research Center `Ecolen`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The extent to which fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 3} during combustion and the subsequent turbine flow in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. The analysis is based on: a flamelet model with non-equilibrium sulfur chemistry for the combustor, and a one-dimensional, two-stream model with finite rate chemical kinetics for the turbine. The results indicate that between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. It is also shown that, for a high fuel sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is limited by the level of atomic oxygen at the combustor exit, leading to higher SO{sub 2} oxidation efficiency at lower fuel sulfur loadings. While SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are the primary oxidation products, the model results further indicate H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} levels on the order of 0.1 ppm for supersonic expansions through a divergent nozzle. This source of fully oxidized S(6) (SO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) exceeds previously calculated S(6) levels due to oxidation of SO{sub 2} by OH in the exhaust plume outside the engine nozzle. (author) 26 refs.

  3. Understanding Financial Market Volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Opschoor (Anne)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Volatility has been one of the most active and successful areas of research in time series econometrics and economic forecasting in recent decades. Loosely speaking, volatility is defined as the average magnitude of fluctuations observed in some phenomenon over time. Wi

  4. Improving Garch Volatility Forecasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, F.J.G.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many researchers use GARCH models to generate volatility forecasts. We show, however, that such forecasts are too variable. To correct for this, we extend the GARCH model by distinguishing two regimes with different volatility levels. GARCH effects are allowed within each regime, so that our model

  5. Understanding Financial Market Volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Opschoor (Anne)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Volatility has been one of the most active and successful areas of research in time series econometrics and economic forecasting in recent decades. Loosely speaking, volatility is defined as the average magnitude of fluctuations observed in some phenomenon over

  6. Volatile metabolites from actinomycetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholler, C.E.G.; Gurtler, H.; Pedersen, R.

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-six Streptomyces spp. were screened for their volatile production capacity on yeast starch agar. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were concentrated on a porous polymer throughout an 8-day growth period. VOCs were analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and ident...

  7. Moisture dynamics in building envelopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peuhkuri, R.

    2003-07-01

    The overall scope of this Thesis 'Moisture dynamics in building envelopes' has been to characterise how the various porous insulation materials investigated performed hygro thermally under conditions similar to those in a typical building envelope. As a result of the changing temperature and moisture conditions in the exterior weather and indoor climate the materials dynamically absorb and release moisture. The complexity of the impact of these conditions on the resulting moisture transport and content of the materials has been studied in this Thesis with controlled laboratory tests. (au)

  8. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  9. A sulfur-poor terrestrial core inferred from metal-silicate partitioning experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suer, Terry-Ann; Siebert, Julien; Remusat, Laurent; Menguy, Nicolas; Fiquet, Guillaume

    2017-07-01

    As a siderophile and a volatile element, sulfur's partitioning behavior allows constraints to be placed on processes in the primitive Earth. Sulfur's core-mantle distribution during Earth's accretion has consequences for core content and implications for volatile accretion. In this study, metal-silicate partitioning experiments of sulfur were conducted in a diamond anvil cell at pressures from 46 to 91 GPa and temperatures between 3100 and 4100 K, conditions that are directly relevant to core segregation in a deep magma ocean. The sulfur partition coefficients measured from these experiments are an order of magnitude less than those obtained from extrapolation of previous results to core formation conditions (e.g., Rose-Weston et al., 2009; Boujibar et al., 2014). These measurements challenge the idea that sulfur becomes a highly siderophile element at high pressures and temperatures. A relationship was derived that describes sulfur's partitioning behavior at the pressure-temperature range of core formation. This relationship combined with an accretion model was used to explore the effects of varying impactor sizes and volatile compositions on the sulfur contents of the Earth's core and mantle. The results show that homogeneous delivery of sulfur throughout accretion would overenrich the mantle in sulfur relative to the present day observations of 200 ± 80 ppm (Lorand et al., 2013) unless the bulk Earth sulfur content is lower than its cosmochemical estimate of ∼6400 ppm (e.g., McDonough, 2003). On the other hand, the mantle's sulfur content is matched if sulfur is delivered with large bodies (3 to 10% Earth mass) during the last 20% of Earth's accretion, combined with a chondritic late veneer of 0.5% Earth mass. These results are conditional on the lowered equilibration efficiency of large impactor cores in a terrestrial magma ocean. In each accretion scenario, the core sulfur content remains below ∼2 wt.% in close agreement with cosmochemical estimates and

  10. 学龄前儿童口腔中挥发性硫化物的检出情况及其相关因素%Analysis of volatile sulfur compounds production of oral cavity in preschool children and influencing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张群; 刘雪楠; 常青; 敖霜; 郑树国; 徐韬

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the prevalence of volatile sulfur compounds ( VSC ) in oral cavity of preschool children, and to analyze related factors, thus to provide scientific basis for the prediction and treatment of halitosis. Methods:The VSC content ( hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, dimethyl sul-fide) of 170 preschool children (4 to 6 years old) was detected by a portable gas chromatograph Oral-ChromaTM . The status of the oral health was evaluated. The living habits and other aspects were obtained through questionnaires from the children' s parents. A soft package for social statistics version 13. 0 ( SPSS 13 . 0 ) was used in which univariate analysis and multivariate analysis were utilized to analyze the related factors of halitosis in children. Results:In the study, 34. 4% of the total subjects had excessive VSC. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) [(1. 59 ± 2. 41) ng/10 mL] and total VSC concentration [(2. 14 ± 4. 42) ng/10 mL] in the girls were significantly higher (P<0. 05) than those in the boys. The tongue coating score had a significant positive correlation with H2S [tongue coating area (1. 68 ± 2. 48) ng/10 mL,tongue coating thickness (2. 18 ± 2. 69) ng/10 mL] and total VSC concentration [ tongue coating area, (2. 26 ± 4. 31) ng/10 mL,tongue coating thickness (2. 41 ± 3. 02) ng/10 mL , P<0. 01]. The site number of DI-S≥2 had a significant positive correlation with methyl mercaptan ( CH3 SH) and dime-thyl sulfide [(CH3)2S] concentration (P<0. 01). The concentration of H2S [(1. 19 ± 1. 62) ng/10 mL] in children, whose mother had a higher degree of education, was statistically lower (P<0. 01).The children who took dessert or sweat drinks more frequently had lower H2S [(1. 04 ± 1. 55) ng/10 mL, P<0. 05] concentration, while CH3SH and (CH3)2S concentration [(0. 29 ± 1. 92) ng/10 mL, (0. 37 ± 2. 06) ng/10 mL, P<0. 05) were higher in the children with mouth -breath habit. Conclu-sion:A high prevalence of halitosis was noted in preschool children. Gender

  11. Effect of Drying Moisture Exposed Almonds on the Development of the Quality Defect Concealed Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogel-Castillo, Cristian; Luo, Kathleen; Huang, Guangwei; Mitchell, Alyson E

    2017-10-02

    Concealed damage (CD), is a term used by the nut industry to describe a brown discoloration of kernel nutmeat that becomes visible after moderate heat treatments (e.g., roasting). CD can result in consumer rejection and product loss. Postharvest exposure of almonds to moisture (e.g., rain) is a key factor in the development of CD as it promotes hydrolysis of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. The effect of drying moisture-exposed almonds between 45 to 95 °C, prior to roasting was evaluated as a method for controlling CD in roasted almonds. Additionally, moisture-exposed almonds dried at 55 and 75 °C were stored under accelerated shelf life conditions (45 °C/80% RH) and evaluated for headspace volatiles. Results indicate that drying temperatures below 65 °C decreases brown discoloration of nutmeat up to 40% while drying temperatures above 75 °C produce significant increases in brown discoloration and volatiles related to lipid oxidation, and nonsignificant increases in Amadori compounds. Results also demonstrate that raw almonds exposed to moisture and dried at 55 °C prior to roasting, reduce the visual sign of CD and maintain headspace volatiles profiles similar to almonds without moisture damage during accelerated storage.

  12. Mass-dependent sulfur isotope fractionation during reoxidative sulfur cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellerin, André; Bui, Thi Hao; Rough, Mikaella

    2015-01-01

    of Mangrove Lake appears to include sulfide oxidation to elemental sulfur followed by the disproportionation of the elemental sulfur to sulfate and sulfide. This model also indicates that the reoxidative sulfur cycle of Mangrove Lake turns over from 50 to 80% of the sulfide produced by microbial sulfate...... that the two processes cannot be discriminated from each other....

  13. Lunar Sulfur Capture System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) is an innovative method to recover sulfur compounds from lunar soil using sorbents derived primarily from in-situ resources....

  14. Lunar Sulfur Capture System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) is an innovative method to capture greater than 90 percent of sulfur gases evolved during thermal treatment of lunar soils....

  15. Nonisothermal moisture movement in wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xianjun; ZHANG Biguang; LI Wenjun; LI Yanjun

    2006-01-01

    In order to analyze the effect of temperature gradient on moisture movement during highly intensive drying,such as microwave-vacuum drying,the profile of the temperature and moisture content in sealed wood whose opposite faces were subjected to temperature gradient for a short time was measured.The ratio of the moisture content (MC) gradient to the temperature gradient (dM/dT) was calculated and the factors influencing moisture movement under nonisothermal conditions were discussed.The results indicate that moisture moved in wood from the warm surface to the cold one even if opposite faces of the sealed wood assembly were exposed continuously to different but constant temperatures for a short period.The moisture content on the cold surface was higher than that on the warm surface.The moisture content gradient opposite to the temperature gradient was established,and the dM/dT was below 0.9%/℃.The temperature in the sample and the distance from the hot surface of the sample was strongly linearly correlated.With an increase in temperature,initial moisture content and experimental time,the dM/dT was significantly increased.

  16. Moisture Dynamics in Building Envelopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2003-01-01

    The overall scope of this Thesis "Moisture dynamics in building envelopes" has been to characterise how the various porous insulation materials investigated performed hygrothermally under conditions similar to those in a typical building envelope. As a result of the changing temperature and moist......The overall scope of this Thesis "Moisture dynamics in building envelopes" has been to characterise how the various porous insulation materials investigated performed hygrothermally under conditions similar to those in a typical building envelope. As a result of the changing temperature...... and moisture conditions in the exterior weather and indoor climate the materials dynamically absorb and release moisture. The complexity of the impact of these conditions on the resulting moisture transport and content of the materials has been studied in this Thesis with controlled laboratory tests. The first...... part of the Thesis consists of a theory and literature review on the moisture storage and transport processes (Chapter 2), on the non-Fickian moisture transport (Chapter 3)and on the methods for determining the moisture properties (Chapter 4). In the second part, the conducted experimental work...

  17. Moisture relationships in composting processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, T.L.; Veeken, A.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    Moisture is a key environmental factor that affects many aspects of the composting process. Biodegradation kinetics are affected by moisture through changes in oxygen diffusion, water potential and water activity, and microbial growth rates. These relationships are made more complex by the dynamic

  18. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  19. Impacts and implementation of fuel moisture release and radiation properties in modelling of pulverized fuel combustion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2015-01-01

    Pulverized fuels (PF) prepared and fired in utility boilers usually contain a certain amount of moisture, either free moisture or chemically bound moisture. In PF furnaces, radiation which is the principal mode of heat transfer consists of contribution from both gas and particle phase. This paper...... presents different methods for fuel moisture release and new models for gas and particle radiative properties, and demonstrates their implementation, importance and impacts in PF combustion modelling via a comprehensive CFD study of a pulverized coal-fired utility boiler. To conclude, it is recommended...... to add the free moisture into the primary air stream while lump the moisture retained in the feed after the mills with volatiles in PF combustion modelling. For gas and particle radiation in PF boilers, it is found that particle radiation largely overwhelms gas radiation due to high particle loading...

  20. Idiosyncratic Volatility Puzzle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslanidis, Nektarios; Christiansen, Charlotte; Lambertides, Neophytos;

    from a large pool of macroeconomic and Önancial variables. Cleaning for macro-Önance e§ects reverses the puzzling negative relation between returns and idiosyncratic volatility documented previously. Portfolio analysis shows that the e§ects from macro-Önance factors are economically strong......In this paper, we scrutinize the cross-sectional relation between idiosyncratic volatility and stock returns. As a novelty, the idiosyncratic volatility is obtained by conditioning upon macro-Önance factors as well as upon traditional asset pricing factors. The macro-Önance factors are constructed...

  1. Structure of amorphous sulfur

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Eichinger, BE

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The lambda-transition of elemental sulfur occurring at about 159°C has long been associated with the conversion of cyclic S8 rings (c-S8) to amorphous polymer (a-S) via a ring opening polymerization. It is demonstrated, with the use of both density...

  2. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  3. Volatile displacement of Meghalaya coals – A pointer to explore low sulphur coals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Behera

    2007-04-01

    Volatile displacement, which measures the difference between calculated and experimental volatile matter, is indicative of abnormality in coals which may be related to petrological or chemical parameters. The volatile displacement () values of Meghalaya coals were calculated from their chemical analyses. Correlations of volatile displacement () with parameters such as carbon, hydrogen, moisture, oxygen, oxygen plus sulphate sulphur, oxygen plus pyritic sulphur, oxygen plus organic sulphur and total sulphur were studied. An approximately linear relationship exists only between and moisture, and and total sulphur, and not between other parameters. Plots on Seyler’s chart indicate the coals as perhydrous to orthohydrous. The linear relationship with total sulphur indicates that the coals may have become abnormal mainly due to the marine environment of deposition and weathering.

  4. On guidance and volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Billings, M.B.; Jennings, R.; Lev, B.

    2013-01-01

    Survey evidence suggests that managers voluntarily disclose information, particularly earnings guidance, with an aim toward dampening share price volatility. Yet, consultants and influential institutions advise against providing guidance — citing fears of litigation and market penalties associated w

  5. Dynamic Volatility Arbitrage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorn, Jochen

    profit on well-developed markets. Dynamic participation features on cross asset portfolios are at rst sight a remedy to that dilemma. Based on volatility thresholds and portfolio re-balancing, the fund engineers try to create a "volatility guaranteed" investment opportunity by surfing on the unusual high...... concepts, next to nothing is known about position reverting strategies and how, and -even more important- in which context they are applied in practice. In the recent market downturn only one sector generated signicant profits for the leading investment banks: Volatility trading activities, namely on Forex......, interest rates and commodities. If an investor positions himself on the (volatility) market within a long/short trading framework, he typically bets on a traditional mispricing arbitrage. However as this corresponds to a call spread with equal exercise prices, this strategy alone would not generate enough...

  6. It’s all about volatility of volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grassi, Stefano; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    for the realized volatility series. It emerges that during the recent financial crisis the relative weight of the daily component dominates over the monthly term. The estimates of the two factor stochastic volatility model suggest that the change in the dynamic structure of the realized volatility during...... the financial crisis is due to the increase in the volatility of the persistent volatility term. A set of Monte Carlo simulations highlights the robustness of the methodology adopted in tracking the dynamics of the parameters....

  7. Non-volatile memories

    CERN Document Server

    Lacaze, Pierre-Camille

    2014-01-01

    Written for scientists, researchers, and engineers, Non-volatile Memories describes the recent research and implementations in relation to the design of a new generation of non-volatile electronic memories. The objective is to replace existing memories (DRAM, SRAM, EEPROM, Flash, etc.) with a universal memory model likely to reach better performances than the current types of memory: extremely high commutation speeds, high implantation densities and retention time of information of about ten years.

  8. Resistance to injury by sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiya, J.; Wilson, L.G.; Filner, P.

    1982-08-01

    In Cucurbitaceae young leaves are resistant to injury from acute exposure to SO/sub 2/, whereas mature leaves are sensitive. After exposure of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants to SO/sub 2/ at injurious concentrations, illuminated leaves emit volatile sulfur, which is solely H/sub 2/S. Young leaves emit H/sub 2/S many times more rapidly than do mature leaves. Young leaves convert approximately 10% of absorbed (/sup 35/S)SO/sub 2/ to emitted (/sup 35/S)H/sub 2/S, but mature leaves convert less than 2%. These results suggest that a high capability for the reduction of SO/sub 2/ to H/sub 2/S and emission of the H/sub 2/S is a part of the biochemical basis of the resistance of young leaves to SO/sub 2/.

  9. Early Soil Moisture Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, T.

    2008-12-01

    Before the large scale field experiments described in the call for papers, there were a number of experiments devoted to a single parameter, e.g. soil moisture. In the early 1970's, before the launch of the first microwave radiometer by NASA, there were a number of aircraft experiments to determine utility of these sensors for land observations. For soil moisture, these experiments were conducted in southwestern United States over irrigated agricultural areas which could provide a wide range of moisture conditions on a given day. The radiometers covered the wavelength range from 0.8 to 21 cm. These experiments demonstrated that it is possible to observe soil moisture variations remotely using a microwave radiometer with a sensitivity of about 3 K / unit of soil moisture. The results also showed that the longer wavelengths were better, with a radiometer at the 21 cm wavelength giving the best results. These positive results led to the development of Push Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) and the Electrically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instruments at the 21-cm wavelength. They have been used extensively in the large-scale experiments such as HAPEX-MOBILHY, FIFE, Monsoon90, SMEX, etc. The multi-beam nature of these instruments makes it possible to obtain more extensive coverage and thus to map spatial variations of surface soil moisture. Examples of the early results along with the more recent soil moisture maps will be presented.

  10. Sulfur and iron speciation in surface sediments along the northwestern margin of the Black Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, J.W.M.; Middelburg, J.J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Bottcher, M.E.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2001-01-01

    The speciation of sedimentary sulfur (pyrite, acid volatile sulfides (AVS), S-0 H2S, and sulfate) was analyzed in surface sediments recovered at different water depths from the northwestern margin of the Black Sea. Additionally, dissolved and dithionite-extractable iron were quantified, and the sulf

  11. Understanding natural moisturizing mechanisms: implications for moisturizer technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandar, Prem; Nole, Greg; Johnson, Anthony W

    2009-07-01

    Dry skin and moisturization are important topics because they impact the lives of many individuals. For most individuals, dry skin is not a notable concern and can be adequately managed with current moisturizing products. However, dry skin can affect the quality of life of some individuals because of the challenges of either harsh environmental conditions or impaired stratum corneum (SC) dry skin protection processes resulting from various common skin diseases. Dry skin protection processes of the SC, such as the development of natural moisturizing factor (NMF), are complex, carefully balanced, and easily perturbed. We discuss the importance of the filaggrin-NMF system and the composition of NMF in both healthy and dry skin, and also reveal new insights that suggest the properties required for a new generation of moisturizing technologies.

  12. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, T.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    During the four years of the AgRISTARS Program, significant progress was made in quantifying the capabilities of microwave sensors for the remote sensing of soil moisture. In this paper, a discussion is provided of the results of numerous field and aircraft experiments, analysis of spacecraft data, and modeling activities which examined the various noise factors such as roughness and vegetation that affect the interpretability of microwave emission measurements. While determining that a 21-cm wavelength radiometer was the best single sensor for soil moisture research, these studies demonstrated that a multisensor approach will provide more accurate soil moisture information for a wider range of naturally occurring conditions.

  13. A adição de diferentes produtos químicos e o efeito da umidade na volatilização de amônia em cama de frango Addition of chemical additives and the effect of moisture in the volatilization of ammonia in poultry litter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangel Medeiros

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliada a redução da volatilização de amônia em cama de frangos por meio da adição de aditivos químicos em três experimentos. No primeiro experimento foram estudadas diferentes doses de fosfato: testemunha; 5, 10, 15, 20 e 25%, adicionado à cama No segundo, foi estudado o efeito da umidade, para os mesmos tratamentos realizados no primeiro experimento. No terceiro experimento, foram testados diferentes aditivos na cama de frango (testemunha, Sal de Glauber, Enxofre, Sulfato de cobre, Fosfato, Sulfato de alumínio e Carbonato de sódio, nos níveis de concentração de: 1,2,3,4 e 5%. Como resultado, obteve-se que a dose de 15% de superfosfatosimples foi a mais eficiente (PThe effect of additives to reduce volatilization of ammonia in poultry litter was evaluated in three experiments. In experiment one, different doses of phosphate, in the form of simple superphosphate, were studied by means of six treatments: 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25% added to the poultry litter. In the second experiment, the effect of humidity was verified by using the same treatments carried out in the previous experiment. In experiment three, different additives were tested in the poultry litter, following seven treatments: Glauber’s salt; sulphur; copper sulphate, phosphate, aluminium sulphate; and sodium carbonate. In treatment one, the dose of 15% of simple superphosphate added to the poultry litter showed to be more effective than the other additives, for it has inhibited 95% of the volatilization. As to experiment two, a strong inhibiting influence of water in the volatilization of ammonia could be detected. As to experiment three, the copper sulphate was the best additive (P>0.05 to inhibit the poultry litter’s volatilization of ammonia (62%, followed by both the aluminium sulphate (53% and the simple superphosphate (43%. The use of carbonate has promoted an increase of 41% in the levels of ammonia volatilization.

  14. Effects of sulfur on lead partitioning during sludge incineration based on experiments and thermodynamic calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing-yong, E-mail: www053991@126.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Huang, Shu-jie; Sun, Shui-yu; Ning, Xun-an; He, Rui-zhe [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Li, Xiao-ming [Guangdong Testing Institute of Product Quality Supervision, Guangzhou 510330 (China); Chen, Tao [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Luo, Guang-qian [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xie, Wu-ming; Wang, Yu-jie; Zhuo, Zhong-xu; Fu, Jie-wen [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • A thermodynamic equilibrium calculation was carried out. • Effects of three types of sulfurs on Pb distribution were investigated. • The mechanism for three types of sulfurs acting on Pb partitioning were proposed. • Lead partitioning and species in bottom ash and fly ash were identified. - Abstract: Experiments in a tubular furnace reactor and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were conducted to investigate the impact of sulfur compounds on the migration of lead (Pb) during sludge incineration. Representative samples of typical sludge with and without the addition of sulfur compounds were combusted at 850 °C, and the partitioning of Pb in the solid phase (bottom ash) and gas phase (fly ash and flue gas) was quantified. The results indicate that three types of sulfur compounds (S, Na{sub 2}S and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) added to the sludge could facilitate the volatilization of Pb in the gas phase (fly ash and flue gas) into metal sulfates displacing its sulfides and some of its oxides. The effect of promoting Pb volatilization by adding Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S was superior to that of the addition of S. In bottom ash, different metallic sulfides were found in the forms of lead sulfide, aluminosilicate minerals, and polymetallic-sulfides, which were minimally volatilized. The chemical equilibrium calculations indicated that sulfur stabilizes Pb in the form of PbSO{sub 4}(s) at low temperatures (<1000 K). The equilibrium calculation prediction also suggested that SiO{sub 2}, CaO, TiO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} containing materials function as condensed phase solids in the temperature range of 800–1100 K as sorbents to stabilize Pb. However, in the presence of sulfur or chlorine or the co-existence of sulfur and chlorine, these sorbents were inactive. The effect of sulfur on Pb partitioning in the sludge incineration process mainly depended on the gas phase reaction, the surface reaction, the volatilization of products, and the

  15. Oil and stock market volatility: A multivariate stochastic volatility perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vo, Minh, E-mail: minh.vo@metrostate.edu

    2011-09-15

    This paper models the volatility of stock and oil futures markets using the multivariate stochastic volatility structure in an attempt to extract information intertwined in both markets for risk prediction. It offers four major findings. First, the stock and oil futures prices are inter-related. Their correlation follows a time-varying dynamic process and tends to increase when the markets are more volatile. Second, conditioned on the past information, the volatility in each market is very persistent, i.e., it varies in a predictable manner. Third, there is inter-market dependence in volatility. Innovations that hit either market can affect the volatility in the other market. In other words, conditioned on the persistence and the past volatility in their respective markets, the past volatility of the stock (oil futures) market also has predictive power over the future volatility of the oil futures (stock) market. Finally, the model produces more accurate Value-at-Risk estimates than other benchmarks commonly used in the financial industry. - Research Highlights: > This paper models the volatility of stock and oil futures markets using the multivariate stochastic volatility model. > The correlation between the two markets follows a time-varying dynamic process which tends to increase when the markets are more volatile. > The volatility in each market is very persistent. > Innovations that hit either market can affect the volatility in the other market. > The model produces more accurate Value-at-Risk estimates than other benchmarks commonly used in the financial industry.

  16. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eigh...

  17. Moisture Dynamics in Building Envelopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2003-01-01

    The overall scope of this Thesis "Moisture dynamics in building envelopes" has been to characterise how the various porous insulation materials investigated performed hygrothermally under conditions similar to those in a typical building envelope. As a result of the changing temperature...... and moisture conditions in the exterior weather and indoor climate the materials dynamically absorb and release moisture. The complexity of the impact of these conditions on the resulting moisture transport and content of the materials has been studied in this Thesis with controlled laboratory tests. The first......, results, and analysis are presented (Chapters 5-7). The major findings are discussed (Chapter 8), before the final conclusion (Chapter 9). The Appendices include the material parameters used, some additional results and the description of the simulation models....

  18. Compact RFID Enabled Moisture Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. H. Khan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research proposes a novel, low-cost RFID tag sensor antenna implemented using commercially available Kodak photo-paper. The aim of this paper is to investigate the possibility of stable, RFID centric communication under varying moisture levels. Variation in the frequency response of the RFID tag in presence of moisture is used to detect different moisture levels. Combination of unique jaw shaped contours and T-matching network is used for impedance matching which results in compact size and minimal ink consumption. Proposed tag is 1.4 × 9.4 cm2 in size and shows optimum results for various moisture levels upto 45% in FCC band with a bore sight read range of 12.1 m.

  19. Moisturizers: Options for Softer Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... producing glands become less active. To keep your skin soft and well-hydrated, choose an oil-based moisturizer that contains petrolatum as the base, along with antioxidants or alpha hydroxy acids to combat wrinkles. These ...

  20. Pesticide volatilization from soil: lysimeter measurements versus predictions of European registration models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, André; Linnemann, Volker; Herbst, Michael; Klein, Michael; Schäffer, Andreas; Vereecken, Harry

    2003-01-01

    A comparison was drawn between model predictions and experimentally determined volatilization rates to evaluate the volatilization approaches of European registration models. Volatilization rates of pesticides (14C-labeled parathion-methyl, fenpropimorph, and terbuthylazine and nonlabeled chlorpyrifos) were determined in a wind-tunnel experiment after simultaneous soil surface application on Gleyic Cambisol. Both continuous air sampling, which quantifies volatile losses of 14C-organic compounds and 14CO2 separately, and the detection of soil residues allow for a mass balance of radioactivity of the 14C-labeled pesticides. Recoveries were found to be > 94% of the applied radioactivity. The following descending order of cumulative volatilization was observed: chlorpyrifos > parathion-methyl > terbuthylazine > fenpropimorph. Due to its high air-water partitioning coefficient, nonlabeled chlorpyrifos was found to have the highest cumulative volatilization (44.4%) over the course of the experiment. Volatilization flux rates were measured up to 993 microg m(-2) h(-1) during the first hours after application. Parameterization of the Pesticide Emission Assessment at Regional and Local Scales (PEARL) model and the Pesticide Leaching Model (PELMO) was performed to mirror the experimental boundary conditions. In general, model predictions deviated markedly from measured volatilization rates and showed limitations of current volatilization models, such as the uppermost compartment thickness, making an enormous influence on predicted volatilization losses. Experimental findings revealed soil moisture to be an important factor influencing volatilization from soil, yet its influence was not reflected by the model calculations. Future versions of PEARL and PELMO ought to include improved descriptions of aerodynamic resistances and soil moisture dependent soil-air partitioning coefficients.

  1. Effect of sequential fermentations and grape cultivars on volatile compounds and sensory profiles of Danish wines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jing; Arneborg, Nils; Toldam-Andersen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    : The different non-Saccharomyces strains and cool-climate grape cultivars produced wines with a distinctive aromatic profile. A total of 67 volatile compounds were identified, including 43 esters, 14 alcohols, five acids, two ketones, a C13-norisoprenoid, a lactone and a sulfur compound. The use of M. viticola...

  2. 甲硫氨酸和水分对土壤挥发性有机硫化物通量的影响%INFLUENCE OF METHIONINE AND SOIL MOISTURE ON SOIL-ATMOSPHERE EXCHANGE FLUXES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC SULFUR COMPOUNDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易志刚; 王新明; 盛国英; 傅家谟

    2009-01-01

    通过静态箱采样和Entech7100预浓缩仪-GC-MS分析了甲硫氨酸和土壤水分对羰基硫(COS)、二甲基硫醚(DMS)、二硫化碳(CS2)和二甲二硫醚(DMDS)等4种挥发性有机硫化合物(VOSCs)吸收或释放的影响.结果表明,土壤水分主要影响土壤COS和DMS通量,含水量低时,土壤吸收COS,释放DMS;接近或超过最大持水量时,土壤释放COS和DMS,且DMS释放速率显著增加,这可能主要受土壤Eh值的影响.添加甲硫氨酸后,土壤DMDS和DMS释放量显著增加,两者释放量接近所观测四种VOSCs总释放量的100%,说明甲硫氨酸是DMDS和的DMS重要前体物,DMDS与DMS释放速率峰值出现时间相同,而COS与CS2释放速率峰值出现时间基本一致,可能是不同VOSCs受不同土壤微生物和酶的影响所致.

  3. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.; Chang, S.G.

    1996-02-27

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h{sup {minus}1}. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications. 21 figs.

  4. Experimental and thermodynamic investigation on transfer of cadmium influenced by sulfur and chlorine during municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanguo; Chen, Yong; Meng, Aihong; Li, Qinghai; Cheng, Hefa

    2008-05-01

    We used two approaches to investigate the impact of sulfur and chlorine compounds on transfer of a semivolatile heavy metal, cadmium, during municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration: experiments using a tubular furnace reactor and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Artificial wastes representative of typical MSW in China with and without the presence of sulfur and chlorine compounds were combusted at 850 degrees C, and the partitioning of Cd among bottom ash, fly ash and flue gas was quantified. The results indicate that sulfur compounds in the elemental form and reduced state could stabilize Cd in the form of CdS due to local reducing environment, while sulfur in the oxidized forms slightly increased Cd volatilization during incineration. In contrast, the presence of chlorine compounds significantly increased the partitioning of Cd on fly ash. Chemical equilibrium calculations show that sulfur binds with Cd and alters Cd speciation at low temperatures (<700 degrees C), while chlorine significantly increases the volatilization of Cd through formation of volatile CdCl(2) and thus its partitioning on the fly ash between 400 and 1000 degrees C. The equilibrium calculation results also suggest that SiO(2)- and Al(2)O(3)-containing minerals could function as sorbents stabilizing Cd as condensed phase solids (CdSiO(3) and CdAl(2)O(4)). These findings provide useful information on understanding the partitioning behavior of Cd and can help development of strategies to control volatilization of Cd during MSW incineration.

  5. Understanding Interest Rate Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volker, Desi

    This thesis is the result of my Ph.D. studies at the Department of Finance of the Copenhagen Business School. It consists of three essays covering topics related to the term structure of interest rates, monetary policy and interest rate volatility. The rst essay, \\Monetary Policy Uncertainty...... and Interest Rates", examines the role of monetary policy uncertainty on the term structure of interest rates. The second essay, \\A Regime-Switching A ne Term Structure Model with Stochastic Volatility" (co-authored with Sebastian Fux), investigates the ability of the class of regime switching models...... with and without stochastic volatility to capture the main stylized features of U.S. interest rates. The third essay, \\Variance Risk Premia in the Interest Rate Swap Market", investigates the time-series and cross-sectional properties of the compensation demanded for holding interest rate variance risk. The essays...

  6. Volatiles in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Bergin, Edwin A; Brittain, Sean; Marty, Bernard; Mousis, Olvier; Oberg, Karin L

    2014-01-01

    Volatiles are compounds with low sublimation temperatures, and they make up most of the condensible mass in typical planet-forming environments. They consist of relatively small, often hydrogenated, molecules based on the abundant elements carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Volatiles are central to the process of planet formation, forming the backbone of a rich chemistry that sets the initial conditions for the formation of planetary atmospheres, and act as a solid mass reservoir catalyzing the formation of planets and planetesimals. This growth has been driven by rapid advances in observations and models of protoplanetary disks, and by a deepening understanding of the cosmochemistry of the solar system. Indeed, it is only in the past few years that representative samples of molecules have been discovered in great abundance throughout protoplanetary disks - enough to begin building a complete budget for the most abundant elements after hydrogen and helium. The spatial distributions of key volatiles are being mapped...

  7. Stochastic volatility selected readings

    CERN Document Server

    Shephard, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Neil Shephard has brought together a set of classic and central papers that have contributed to our understanding of financial volatility. They cover stocks, bonds and currencies and range from 1973 up to 2001. Shephard, a leading researcher in the field, provides a substantial introduction in which he discusses all major issues involved. General Introduction N. Shephard. Part I: Model Building. 1. A Subordinated Stochastic Process Model with Finite Variance for Speculative Prices, (P. K. Clark). 2. Financial Returns Modelled by the Product of Two Stochastic Processes: A Study of Daily Sugar Prices, 1961-7, S. J. Taylor. 3. The Behavior of Random Variables with Nonstationary Variance and the Distribution of Security Prices, B. Rosenberg. 4. The Pricing of Options on Assets with Stochastic Volatilities, J. Hull and A. White. 5. The Dynamics of Exchange Rate Volatility: A Multivariate Latent Factor ARCH Model, F. X. Diebold and M. Nerlove. 6. Multivariate Stochastic Variance Models. 7. Stochastic Autoregressive...

  8. 7 CFR 52.3185 - Moisture limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Moisture limits. 52.3185 Section 52.3185 Agriculture... Moisture limits. Dried prunes shall not exceed the moisture limits for the applicable grades and kind and size of packaging as designated in Table IV of this subpart except there is no moisture limit when...

  9. The Influence of Spices on the Volatile Compounds of Cooked Beef Patty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Samooel; Jo, Cheorun; Kim, Il Suk; Nam, Ki Chang; Ahn, Dong Uk; Lee, Kyung Heang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the influences of spices on the amounts and compositions of volatile compounds released from cooked beef patty. Beef patty with 0.5% of spice (nutmeg, onion, garlic, or ginger powder, w/w) was cooked by electronic pan until they reached an internal temperature of 75℃. A total of 46 volatile compounds (6 alcohols, 6 aldehydes, 5 hydrocarbons, 6 ketones, 9 sulfur compounds, and 14 terpenes) from cooked beef patties were detected by using purgeand- trap GC/MS. The addition of nutmeg, onion, or ginger powder significantly reduced the production of the volatile compounds via lipid oxidation in cooked beef patty when compared to those from the control. Also, the addition of nutmeg and garlic powder to beef patty generated a lot of trepans or sulfur volatile compounds, respectively. From these results, the major proportion by chemical classes such as alcohols, aldehydes, hydrocarbons, ketones, sulfur compounds, and terpenes was different depending on the spice variations. The results indicate that addition of spices to the beef patty meaningfully changes the volatile compounds released from within. Therefore, it can be concluded that spices can interact with meat aroma significantly, and thus, the character of each spice should be considered before adding to the beef patty.

  10. Pricing Volatility of Stock Returns with Volatile and Persistent Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jie

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a two-component volatility model based on first moments of both components to describe the dynamics of speculative return volatility. The two components capture the volatile and the persistent part of volatility, respectively. The model is applied to 10 Asia-Pacific stock...... markets. Their in-mean effects on returns are tested. The empirical results show that the persistent component is much more important for the volatility dynamic process than is the volatile component. However, the volatile component is found to be a significant pricing factor of asset returns for most...... markets. A positive or risk-premium effect exists between the return and the volatile component, yet the persistent component is not significantly priced for the return dynamic process....

  11. Effects of soil moisture on the diurnal pattern of pesticide emission: Comparison of simulations with field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Rivka; Yates, Scott R.; Skaggs, Todd H.; Rolston, Dennis E.

    2013-02-01

    Pesticide volatilization from agricultural soils is one of the main pathways in which pesticides are dispersed in the environment and affects ecosystems including human welfare. Thus, it is necessary to have accurate knowledge of the various physical and chemical mechanisms that affect volatilization rates from field soils. A verification of the influence of soil moisture modeling on the simulated volatilization rate, soil temperature and soil-water content is presented. Model simulations are compared with data collected in a field study that measured the effect of soil moisture on diazinon volatilization. These data included diurnal changes in volatilization rate, soil-water content, and soil temperature measured at two depths. The simulations were performed using a comprehensive non-isothermal model, two water retention functions, and two soil surface resistance functions, resulting in four tested models. Results show that the degree of similarity between volatilization curves simulated using the four models depended on the initial water content. Under fairly wet conditions, the simulated curves mainly differ in the magnitude of their deviation from the measured values. However, under intermediate and low moisture conditions, the simulated curves also differed in their pattern (shape). The model prediction accuracy depended on soil moisture. Under normal practices, where initial soil moisture is about field capacity or higher, a combination of Brooks and Corey water retention and the van de Grind and Owe soil surface resistance functions led to the most accurate predictions. However, under extremely dry conditions, when soil-water content in the top 1 cm is below the volumetric threshold value, the use of a full-range water retention function increased prediction accuracy. The different models did not affect the soil temperature predictions, and had a minor effect on the predicted soil-water content of Yolo silty clay soil.

  12. Pricing Volatility of Stock Returns with Volatile and Persistent Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jie

    In this paper a two-component volatility model based on the component's first moment is introduced to describe the dynamic of speculative return volatility. The two components capture the volatile and persistent part of volatility respectively. Then the model is applied to 10 Asia-Pacific stock m......, a positive or risk-premium effect exists between return and the volatile component, yet the persistent component is not significantly priced for return dynamic process.......In this paper a two-component volatility model based on the component's first moment is introduced to describe the dynamic of speculative return volatility. The two components capture the volatile and persistent part of volatility respectively. Then the model is applied to 10 Asia-Pacific stock...... markets. Their in-mean effects on return are also tested. The empirical results show that the persistent component accounts much more for volatility dynamic process than the volatile component. However the volatile component is found to be a significant pricing factor of asset returns for most markets...

  13. Skin moisturization mechanisms: new data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonté, F

    2011-05-01

    The main function of the skin is to protect the body against exogenous substances and excessive water loss. The skin barrier is located in the outermost layer of the skin, called the stratum corneum, which is composed of corneocytes, originating from the keratinocytes differentiation process, embedded in organized complex lipid domains. Moisturizing of the skin is recognized as the first anti-aging skin care. Skin moisturization is essential for its appearance, protection, complexion, softness and the reinforcement of its barrier properties against deleterious and exogenous environmental factors. The intrinsic water binding capacity of skin is not only due to the complex natural moisturizing factor present in corneocytes, but also to hyaluronic acid and a regulated water transport within the skin. Recent data shows that the water movements between the cells at the different levels of the epidermis are due to dedicated water and glycerol transport proteins named aquaporins. Their role in the skin moisturization is completed by corneodesmosomes and tight junctions. Water and pH are now shown to be of prime importance in the regulation of the epidermal enzymes linked to corneocytes desquamation and lipid synthesis. Furthermore, the level of moisturization of the skin is important in its protection against repeated exposure to various irritant agents or phenomena such as very frequent washing with strong tensioactive materials.

  14. Sulfur cycling of intertidal Wadden Sea sediments (Konigshafen, Island of Sylt, Germany): sulfate reduction and sulfur gas emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, E.; Bodenbender, J.; Jensen, M. H.; Rennenberg, H.; Jensen, K. M.

    2000-05-01

    Sulfate reduction rates (SRR t) and reduced inorganic sulfur pools (RIS) in Wadden Sea sediment as well as sulfur gas emissions directly to the atmosphere were measured at intervals of 2 to 12 months from 1991 to 1994. Three stations were chosen in the intertidal embayment, Königshafen, representing the range of sediments found in the Wadden Sea: Organic-poor coarse sand, organic-poor and Arenicola marina inhabited medium sand, and organic-rich muddy sand. Maximum SRR t were 2 to 5 times higher in muddy sand than in the sandy sediments. The depth-integrated SRR t varied 12 to 13-fold on a seasonal basis at the three stations. Although temperature controls biochemical processes, the overall control is more complex due to the simultaneous influence of other seasonal factors such as availability of organic matter and oxidation level of surface sediment. The sedimentary RIS pools were low due to iron limitation and contained only 30% acid volatile sulfur (AVS). Muddy sand had up to an order of magnitude more RIS than the two sandy sediments. The turnover of RIS was rapid (turnover time from ˜1 to 32 h), fastest during summer and at the sandy stations. The emission of S-gases was dominated by H 2S during summer (45-67% of the total), and was highest in muddy and lowest in coarse sand. H 2S was less important in early spring (3-49% of the total). Other sulfur gases, such as COS, DMS and CS 2, each accounted for less than 20% of the total sulfur emissions with no specific temporal and spatial pattern. Due to the low content of metals in the sediment, the reduced sulfur pools are cycled rapidly with chemical and biological reoxidation at oxic-anoxic boundaries as a major sink. Thus, the emissions of H 2S account for less than 1‰ of the sulfide produced.

  15. Dynamic Volatility Arbitrage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorn, Jochen

    concepts, next to nothing is known about position reverting strategies and how, and -even more important- in which context they are applied in practice. In the recent market downturn only one sector generated signicant profits for the leading investment banks: Volatility trading activities, namely on Forex...

  16. Lithium sulfur batteries and electrolytes and sulfur cathodes thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Steven J.; Goncharenko, Nikolay; Nimon, Vitaliy; Petrov, Alexei; Nimon, Yevgeniy S.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Katz, Bruce D.; Loginova, Valentina

    2017-05-23

    Lithium sulfur battery cells that use water as an electrolyte solvent provide significant cost reductions. Electrolytes for the battery cells may include water solvent for maintaining electroactive sulfur species in solution during cell discharge and a sufficient amount of a cycle life-enhancing compound that facilitates charging at the cathode. The combination of these two components enhances one or more of the following cell attributes: energy density, power density and cycle life. For instance, in applications where cost per Watt-Hour (Wh) is paramount, such as grid storage and traction applications, the use of an aqueous electrolyte in combination with inexpensive sulfur as the cathode active material can be a key enabler for the utility and automotive industries, for example, providing a cost effective and compact solution for load leveling, electric vehicles and renewable energy storage. Sulfur cathodes, and methods of fabricating lithium sulfur cells, in particular for loading lithium sulfide into the cathode structures, provide further advantages.

  17. Stock markets liberalization affects volatility?

    OpenAIRE

    Ioan Alin NISTOR; Maria-Lenuţa CIUPAC-ULICI; GHERMAN Mircea-Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Regarding the impact of liberalization, the results show that, in general, market opening is accompanied by a significant increase in market volatility. In particular, volatility tends to decrease due to large capital inflows and domestic growth.The study analyzes the impact of stock market liberalization on volatility in six emerging stock markets by using GARCH methodology. Theory on the effects of financial liberalization on volatility has been ambiguous, and empirical work has yielded con...

  18. Sulfur in Cometary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.

    1997-01-01

    The computer-intensive project consisted of the analysis and synthesis of existing data on composition of comet Halley dust particles. The main objective was to obtain a complete inventory of sulfur containing compounds in the comet Halley dust by building upon the existing classification of organic and inorganic compounds and applying a variety of statistical techniques for cluster and cross-correlational analyses. A student hired for this project wrote and tested the software to perform cluster analysis. The following tasks were carried out: (1) selecting the data from existing database for the proposed project; (2) finding access to a standard library of statistical routines for cluster analysis; (3) reformatting the data as necessary for input into the library routines; (4) performing cluster analysis and constructing hierarchical cluster trees using three methods to define the proximity of clusters; (5) presenting the output results in different formats to facilitate the interpretation of the obtained cluster trees; (6) selecting groups of data points common for all three trees as stable clusters. We have also considered the chemistry of sulfur in inorganic compounds.

  19. The exploitation of volatile oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Teng; ZHANG Da; TENG Xiangjin; LINing; HAO Zaibin

    2007-01-01

    Rose is a kind of favorite ornamental plant. This article briefly introduced the cultivation and the use of rose around the world both in ancient time and nowadays. Today, volatile oil becomes the mainstream of the rose industry. People pay attention to the effect of volatile oil; meanwhile, they speed up their research on extracting volatile oil and the ingredients.

  20. Plant volatiles and the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loreto, F.; Dicke, M.; Schnitzler, J.P.; Turlings, T.C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds emitted by plants represent the largest part of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) released into our atmosphere. Plant volatiles are formed through many biochemical pathways, constitutively and after stress induction. In recent years, our understanding of the func

  1. Sulfur plant start-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, Hank; Grigson, Susan [Ortloff Engineers Ltd. (United States)

    2002-02-01

    The authors discuss an Ortloff sulfur plant design concept using the Claus reaction that differs from accepted 'industry practice': cold reactor bed start-up. The process is designed to eliminate catalyst sulfation, heat damage and furnace overheating in sulfur recovery units. (UK)

  2. Latent Integrated Stochastic Volatility, Realized Volatility, and Implied Volatility: A State Space Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Christian; Christensen, Bent Jesper

    We include simultaneously both realized volatility measures based on high-frequency asset returns and implied volatilities backed out of individual traded at the money option prices in a state space approach to the analysis of true underlying volatility. We model integrated volatility as a latent...... fi…rst order Markov process and show that our model is closely related to the CEV and Barndorff-Nielsen & Shephard (2001) models for local volatility. We show that if measurement noise in the observable volatility proxies is not accounted for, then the estimated autoregressive parameter in the latent...... process is downward biased. Implied volatility performs better than any of the alternative realized measures when forecasting future integrated volatility. The results are largely similar across the stock market (S&P 500), bond market (30-year U.S. T-bond), and foreign currency exchange market ($/£ )....

  3. Measurement of moisture in mill feed ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timm, A.R.; Moench, P.; Moisel, E. (Council for Mineral Technology, Randburg (South Africa))

    1985-04-01

    The control of the moisture in the feed to a mill is very important for efficient mill operation. Water is added continuously to the ore fed to a mill to maintain a suitable mix of ore and moisture in the mill. However, problems arise because of the large variation in the moisture content of the ore, which affects the efficiency of the grind. If too little moisture is present, the mill is unable to grind the ore finely enough, creating instead a thick 'porridge' that causes the mill to choke up. On the other hand, too much moisture results in inefficient grinding because the ore is flushed through the mill too quickly. Several techniques are available for measuring moisture and Mintek undertook an investigation in an attempt to develop a reliable robust moisture meter suitable for monitoring the moisture content of ore, which include the following: neutron backscattering, infrared absorption, microwaves, capacitance and moisture as a function of conductivity.

  4. Opto-thermal Moisture Content and Moisture Depth Profile Measurements in Organic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Peng; GUO Xin-xin; CUI Ying-xin; Robert E. Imhof; Dane Bicanic

    2004-01-01

    Opto-thermal transient emission radiometry(OTTER) is a infrared remote sensing technique, which has been successfully used in in vivo skin moisture content and skin moisture depth profiling measurements. In present paper, we extend this moisture content measurement capability to analyze the moisture content of fruit (tomato, grape, etc. ) skins, and to study the relationship between fruits ripening process and their surface moisture and moisture depth profiles.

  5. Assessing sulfur redox state and distribution in abyssal serpentinites using XANES spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debret, Baptiste; Andreani, Muriel; Delacour, Adélie; Rouméjon, Stéphane; Trcera, Nicolas; Williams, Helen

    2017-05-01

    Sulfur is one of the main redox sensitive and volatile elements involved in chemical transfers between earth surface and the deep mantle. At mid-oceanic ridges, sulfur cycle is highly influenced by serpentinite formation which acts as a sink of sulfur under various oxidation states (S2-, S-, S0 and S6+). Sulfur sequestration in serpentinites is usually attributed to the crystallization of secondary minerals, such as sulfides (e.g. pyrite, pyrrhotite) or sulfates (e.g. anhydrite). However, the role of serpentine minerals as potential sulfur carriers is not constrained. We investigate the distribution and redox state of sulfur at micro-scale combining in situ spectroscopic (X-ray absorption near-edge structure: XANES) and geochemical (SIMS) measurements in abyssal serpentinites from the SWIR (South West Indian Ridge), the Rainbow and the MARK (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Kane Fracture Zone) areas. These serpentinites are formed in different tectono-metamorphic settings and provide a meaningful database to understand the fate of sulfur during seafloor serpentinization. XANES spectra of serpentinite powders show that the sulfur budget of the studied samples is dominated by oxidized sulfur (S6+ / ∑ S = 0.6- 1) although sulfate micro-phases, such as barite and anhydrite, are absent. Indeed, μ-XANES analyses of mesh, bastite and antigorite veins in thin sections and of serpentine grains rather suggest the presence of S6+ ions incorporated into serpentine minerals. The structural incorporation of S in serpentine minerals is also supported by X-ray fluorescence mapping revealing large areas (1600 μm2) of serpentinite where S is homogeneously distributed. Our observations show that serpentine minerals can incorporate high S concentrations, from 140 to 1350 ppm, and that this can account for 60 to 100% of the sulfur budget of abyssal serpentinites. Serpentine minerals thus play an important role in S exchanges between the hydrosphere and the mantle at mid-oceanic ridges and may

  6. Measurement of soil moisture using gypsum blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Dela, B.

    the building. Consequently, measuring the moisture of the surrounding soil is of great importance for detecting the source of moisture in a building. Up till now, information has been needed to carry out individual calibrations for the different types of gypsum blocks available on the market and to account......For the past 50 years, gypsum blocks have been used to determine soil moisture content. This report describes a method for calibrating gypsum blocks for soil moisture measurements. Moisture conditions inside a building are strongly influenced by the moisture conditions in the soil surrounding...

  7. Measurement of soil moisture using gypsum blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Dela, B.

    For the past 50 years, gypsum blocks have been used to determine soil moisture content. This report describes a method for calibrating gypsum blocks for soil moisture measurements. Moisture conditions inside a building are strongly influenced by the moisture conditions in the soil surrounding...... the building. Consequently, measuring the moisture of the surrounding soil is of great importance for detecting the source of moisture in a building. Up till now, information has been needed to carry out individual calibrations for the different types of gypsum blocks available on the market and to account...

  8. Isotopically labeled sulfur compounds and synthetic selenium and tellurium analogues to study sulfur metabolism in marine bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson L. Brock

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Members of the marine Roseobacter clade can degrade dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP via competing pathways releasing either methanethiol (MeSH or dimethyl sulfide (DMS. Deuterium-labeled [2H6]DMSP and the synthetic DMSP analogue dimethyltelluriopropionate (DMTeP were used in feeding experiments with the Roseobacter clade members Phaeobacter gallaeciensis DSM 17395 and Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, and their volatile metabolites were analyzed by closed-loop stripping and solid-phase microextraction coupled to GC–MS. Feeding experiments with [2H6]DMSP resulted in the incorporation of a deuterium label into MeSH and DMS. Knockout of relevant genes from the known DMSP demethylation pathway to MeSH showed in both species a residual production of [2H3]MeSH, suggesting that a second demethylation pathway is active. The role of DMSP degradation pathways for MeSH and DMS formation was further investigated by using the synthetic analogue DMTeP as a probe in feeding experiments with the wild-type strain and knockout mutants. Feeding of DMTeP to the R. pomeroyi knockout mutant resulted in a diminished, but not abolished production of demethylation pathway products. These results further corroborated the proposed second demethylation activity in R. pomeroyi. Isotopically labeled [2H3]methionine and 34SO42−, synthesized from elemental 34S8, were tested to identify alternative sulfur sources besides DMSP for the MeSH production in P. gallaeciensis. Methionine proved to be a viable sulfur source for the MeSH volatiles, whereas incorporation of labeling from sulfate was not observed. Moreover, the utilization of selenite and selenate salts by marine alphaproteobacteria for the production of methylated selenium volatiles was explored and resulted in the production of numerous methaneselenol-derived volatiles via reduction and methylation. The pathway of selenate/selenite reduction, however, proved to be strictly separated from sulfate reduction.

  9. Moisture transport in coated plaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, E.L.J.; Van der Spoel, W.H.; Bancken, E.L.J.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the research project: 'Water balance of water-borne paint systems on plaster substrates in relation to fungal growth', a study is carried out to moisture transport mechanisms in coated gypsum plaster. In this contribution, the set-up of the study is described. Besides a descripti

  10. Moisture Sorption in Porous Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Information on pore geometry is very important in any study of the mechanical and physical behavior of porous materials. Unfortunately pores are not very accessible for direct measurements. Indirect methods have to be used which involve impregnation (sorption) experiments from which...... in the subject considered this software is available on request to the author. Keywords: Porous materials, moisture, adsorption, desorption, BET-parameters....

  11. Moisture transport in coated plaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, E.L.J.; Van der Spoel, W.H.; Bancken, E.L.J.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the research project: 'Water balance of water-borne paint systems on plaster substrates in relation to fungal growth', a study is carried out to moisture transport mechanisms in coated gypsum plaster. In this contribution, the set-up of the study is described. Besides a descripti

  12. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  13. Scaling Foreign Exchange Volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Batten; Craig Ellis

    2001-01-01

    When asset returns are normally distributed the risk of an asset over a long return interval may be estimated by scaling the risk from shorter return intervals. While it is well known that asset returns are not normally distributed a key empirical question concerns the effect that scaling the volatility of dependent processes will have on the pricing of related financial assets. This study provides an insight into this issue by investigating the return properties of the most important currenc...

  14. Fossilization of melanosomes via sulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Maria E; van Dongen, Bart E; Lockyer, Nick P; Bull, Ian D; Orr, Patrick J

    2016-05-01

    Fossil melanin granules (melanosomes) are an important resource for inferring the evolutionary history of colour and its functions in animals. The taphonomy of melanin and melanosomes, however, is incompletely understood. In particular, the chemical processes responsible for melanosome preservation have not been investigated. As a result, the origins of sulfur-bearing compounds in fossil melanosomes are difficult to resolve. This has implications for interpretations of original colour in fossils based on potential sulfur-rich phaeomelanosomes. Here we use pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GCMS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to assess the mode of preservation of fossil microstructures, confirmed as melanosomes based on the presence of melanin, preserved in frogs from the Late Miocene Libros biota (NE Spain). Our results reveal a high abundance of organosulfur compounds and non-sulfurized fatty acid methyl esters in both the fossil tissues and host sediment; chemical signatures in the fossil tissues are inconsistent with preservation of phaeomelanin. Our results reflect preservation via the diagenetic incorporation of sulfur, i.e. sulfurization (natural vulcanization), and other polymerization processes. Organosulfur compounds and/or elevated concentrations of sulfur have been reported from melanosomes preserved in various invertebrate and vertebrate fossils and depositional settings, suggesting that preservation through sulfurization is likely to be widespread. Future studies of sulfur-rich fossil melanosomes require that the geochemistry of the host sediment is tested for evidence of sulfurization in order to constrain interpretations of potential phaeomelanosomes and thus of original integumentary colour in fossils.

  15. Development of a novel Process for the Biological conversion of H2S and Methanethiol to Elemental Sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipma, J.; Janssen, A.J.H.; Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing methanethiol (MT), an extremely volatile and malodorous sulfur compound, was investigated in lab-scale bioreactors. Inoculum biomass originating from full-scale anaerobic wastewater treatment facilities was used. Several sludges were te

  16. Sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototrophic and filamentous sulfur bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, R.; Brune, D.; Poplawski, R.; Schmidt, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria taken from different habitate (Alum Rock State Park, Palo Alto salt marsh, and Big Soda Lake) were grown on selective media, characterized by morphological and pigment analysis, and compared with bacteria maintained in pure culture. A study was made of the anaerobic reduction of intracellular sulfur globules by a phototrophic sulfur bacterium (Chromatium vinosum) and a filamentous aerobic sulfur bacterium (Beggiatoa alba). Buoyant densities of different bacteria were measured in Percoll gradients. This method was also used to separate different chlorobia in mixed cultures and to assess the relative homogeneity of cultures taken directly or enriched from natural samples (including the purple bacterial layer found at a depth of 20 meters at Big Soda Lake.) Interactions between sulfide oxidizing bacteria were studied.

  17. [Ammonia volatilization of slow release compound fertilizer in different soils water conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-feng; Wang, Zheng-yin; You, Yuan; Li, Jing-chao

    2010-08-01

    By using venting method incubation experiment, we studied the ammonia volatilization and kinetics characteristics of uncoated slowed release compound fertilizer (SRF) under different soil water conditions and the growth and nitrogen utilization efficiency of rice in pot experiment. Results indicated that the ammonia volatilization of SRF under waterflooding reached the peak ahead of 3-4 days compared to the moist treatment. The peak and accumulation of ammonia volatilization in the waterflooding treatments were higher than those under the moist condition. SRF could significantly reduce total ammonia volatilization compared to the common compound fertilizer (CCF), reduced by 50.6% and 22.8% in the moist treatment and reduced by 24.2% and 10.4% in the waterflooding treatment,but the loss of ammonia volatilization of SRF was higher significantly than that of the coated fertilizer (CRF). Ammonia volatilization increased with the increasing of fertilizer application. The dynamics of ammonia volatilization of SRF could be quantitatively described with three equations: the first order kinetics equation, Elovich equation and parabola equation. Compared to moist condition, the biomass of rice plant in SRF, CCF and SRF treatments increased by 67.86%, 78.25% and 48.75%, and nitrogen utilization efficiency increased by 57.73%, 80.70% and 12.06% under waterflooding condition, respectively. Comparing with CCF, nitrogen utilization efficiency in SRF treatment improved by 59.10% and 10.40% under two soil moisture conditions. SRF could reduce ammonia volatilization and improve biomass and nitrogen utilization efficiency.

  18. Volatile S-nitrosothiols and the typical smell of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Wolfgang

    2015-03-09

    An unconventional approach to investigations into the identification of typical volatile emissions during illnesses gives rise to the proposal of a new class of cancer markers. Until now, cancer markers seem not to have been conclusively identified, though the obvious behavior of dogs points to their existence. The focus has been directed towards molecules containing sulfurous functionalities. Among such compounds, S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are known to be involved in important physiological processes in living organisms and they are described as being typically elevated in cancer. Volatile SNOs (vSNOs) are proposed to be the source of the significant smell of cancer. Synthetic vSNOs are known to have lifetimes of between some minutes and several hours, which may be the main reason as to why they have been ignored until now, and also for the inability of analytics to detect them in vivo. Based on typical structures occurring in the volatile sulfur organics being emitted from human breath, four vSNOs have been synthesized and characterized by tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Simulating the relatively fatty consistency of cancer tissue by diluting the samples in n-decane, surprisingly reduces their tendency to decompose to lifetimes of weeks even at room temperature. A sniffer dog was trained with the synthetic vSNOs, and the results of the tests indicate that synthetic and cancer smells are very similar or even the same. The findings can be a clue for further target-oriented systematic optimization of existing sensitive measurement methods to prove vSNOs as cancer emissions and finally establish future methods for cancer diagnosis based on screening for this new class of volatile illness markers.

  19. Nematode survival in relation to soil moisture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, W.R.

    1973-01-01

    Established nematode populations are very persistent in the soil. It is known that they need sufficient soil moisture for movement, feeding and reproduction (fig. 5), and that there are adverse soil moisture conditions which they cannot survive. The influence of soil moisture on survival of nematode

  20. Nematode survival in relation to soil moisture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, W.R.

    1973-01-01

    Established nematode populations are very persistent in the soil. It is known that they need sufficient soil moisture for movement, feeding and reproduction (fig. 5), and that there are adverse soil moisture conditions which they cannot survive. The influence of soil moisture on survival

  1. Method of preparing graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2015-04-07

    A method of preparing a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite for a cathode in a rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery comprising thermally expanding graphite oxide to yield graphene layers, mixing the graphene layers with a first solution comprising sulfur and carbon disulfide, evaporating the carbon disulfide to yield a solid nanocomposite, and grinding the solid nanocomposite to yield the graphene-sulfur nanocomposite. Rechargeable-lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter of less than 50 nm.

  2. Graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuiliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2014-06-17

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter less than 50 nm..

  3. Effects of simulated rain acidified with sulfuric acid on host-parasite interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. S. Shriner

    1976-01-01

    Wind-blown rain, rain splash, and films of free moisture play important roles in the epidemiology of many plant diseases. The effects of simulated rain acidified with sulfuric acid were studied on several host-parasite systems. Plants were exposed, in greenhouse or field, to simulated rain of pH 3.2 ? 0.1 or pH 6.0 ? 0.2. Simulated "rain" of pH 3.2 resulted...

  4. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  5. Satellite observed preferential states in soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilasa, Luis U.; De Jeu, Richard A. M.; Dolman, Han A. J.; Wang, Guojie

    2013-04-01

    This study presents observational evidence for the existence of preferential states in soil moisture content. Recently there has been much debate about the existence, location and explanations for preferential states in soil moisture. A number of studies have provided evidence either in support or against the hypothesis of a positive feedback mechanism between soil moisture and subsequent precipitation in certain regions. Researchers who support the hypothesis that preferential states in soil moisture holds information about land atmosphere feedback base their theory on the impact of soil moisture on the evaporation process. Evaporation recycles moisture to the atmosphere and soil moisture has a direct impact on the supply part of this process but also on the partitioning of the available energy for evaporation. According to this theory, the existence of soil moisture bimodality can be used as an indication of possible land-atmosphere feedbacks, to be compared with model simulations of soil moisture feedbacks. On the other hand, other researchers argue that seasonality in the meteorological conditions in combination with the non-linearity of soil moisture response alone can induce bimodality. In this study we estimate the soil moisture bimodality at a global scale as derived from the recently available 30+ year ESA Climate Change Initative satellite soil moisture dataset. An Expectation-Maximization iterative algorithm is used to find the best Gaussian Mixture Model, pursuing the highest likelihood for soil moisture bimodality. With this approach we mapped the regions where bi-modal probability distribution of soil moisture appears for each month for the period between 1979-2010. These bimodality areas are analyzed and compared to maps of model simulations of soil moisture feedbacks. The areas where more than one preferential state exists compare surprisingly well with the map of land-atmosphere coupling strength from model simulations. This approach might

  6. Dazhou Becomes China's Sulfur Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang He

    2008-01-01

    @@ Located at the juncture of Sichuan, Hubei, Shaanxi provinces and Chongqing municipality, Dazhou,which is a city in the eastem part of Southwest China's Sichuan Province and has convenient transport facilities, boasts natural gas reserves of 3.8 trillion cubic meters, of which 660 billion cubic meters have been found. It will make full use of its natural gas reserves to build Asia's largest sulfur producing base by 2010 when its annual sulfur output is expected to surpass 4 million tons.

  7. Option Pricing using Realized Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentoft, Lars Peter

    In the present paper we suggest to model Realized Volatility, an estimate of daily volatility based on high frequency data, as an Inverse Gaussian distributed variable with time varying mean, and we examine the joint properties of Realized Volatility and asset returns. We derive the appropriate...... benchmark model estimated on return data alone. Hence the paper provides evidence on the value of using high frequency data for option pricing purposes....

  8. Option Pricing using Realized Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentoft, Lars Peter

    In the present paper we suggest to model Realized Volatility, an estimate of daily volatility based on high frequency data, as an Inverse Gaussian distributed variable with time varying mean, and we examine the joint properties of Realized Volatility and asset returns. We derive the appropriate d...... benchmark model estimated on return data alone. Hence the paper provides evidence on the value of using high frequency data for option pricing purposes....

  9. Detecting Moisture In Buildings Using Infrared Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Stephen J.

    1981-01-01

    Visual examination is a reliable means of moisture detection in building walls after serious damaR'e has been done. Traditional spot measurement instruments are inexpedient devices for elusive moisture detection in heterogeneous materials. The infrared thermal imaging system was found t be a more versatile tool for in-situ moisture detection because of its unique characteristics. Several thermographic examples of moisture detection in. building walls are presented, which will aid the reader in the qualitative interpretation o1 therm.ograms 1or moisture problem.s.

  10. Use of Edible Laminate Layers in Intermediate Moisture Food Rations to Inhibit Moisture Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-29

    LAYERS IN INTERMEDIATE MOISTURE FOOD RATIONS TO INHIBIT MOISTURE MIGRATION by Lauren J. Pecukonis Ann H. Barrett and Nicole Farhadi...December 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE USE OF EDIBLE LAMINATE LAYERS IN INTERMEDIATE MOISTURE FOOD RATIONS TO INHIBIT MOISTURE MIGRATION 5a. CONTRACT...ABSTRACT This report documents a storage study of a novel technology to inhibit moisture migration in multi-component foods, specifically shelf-stable

  11. Equation of State of Fe3S and Limits on the Sulfur Content of Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A.; Mattillion, A.; Bausch, H.; Tecklenburg, S.; Fischer, R. A.; Chidester, B.; Prakapenka, V.

    2016-12-01

    Sulfur is a common component of protoplanetary cores, as represented by iron meteorites, and it is likely to be a significant alloying component with iron in Earth's core as well, along with silicon, oxygen, and perhaps other light elements. Cosmochemical limits on the sulfur content of Earth's core, based on the relative volatilities of sulfur and other elements, are weakened by the observation that this approach fails to accurately predict the sulfur content in iron meteorite parent bodies. To better understand the geophysical consequences of sulfur addition to Earth's core, we report equation of state measurements of Fe3S to pressures and temperatures exceeding 140 GPa and 2000 K, using synchrotron X-ray diffraction in a laser heated diamond anvil cell. New room temperature measurements are also reported, improved by the use of a neon pressure medium. With this P-V-T equation of state for Fe3S, along with an assumed 2% density change upon melting and a 4000 K core-mantle boundary temperature, the PREM density in the outer core can be matched with 14 wt% sulfur, which should be considered an upper bound because of the likely additional presence of other light elements.

  12. Nucleation modeling of the Antarctic stratospheric CN layer and derivation of sulfuric acid profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Steffen; Curtius, Joachim

    2017-06-01

    Recent analysis of long-term balloon-borne measurements of Antarctic stratospheric condensation nuclei (CN) between July and October showed the formation of a volatile CN layer at 21-27 km altitude in a background of existing particles. We use the nucleation model SAWNUC to simulate these CN in subsiding air parcels and study their nucleation and coagulation characteristics. Our simulations confirm recent analysis that the development of the CN layer can be explained with neutral sulfuric acid-water nucleation and we show that outside the CN layer the measured CN concentrations are well reproduced just considering coagulation and the subsidence of the air parcels. While ion-induced nucleation is expected as the dominating formation process at higher temperatures, it does not play a significant role during the CN layer formation as the charged clusters recombine too fast. Further, we derive sulfuric acid concentrations for the CN layer formation. Our concentrations are about 1 order of magnitude higher than previously presented concentrations as our simulations consider that nucleated clusters have to grow to CN size and can coagulate with preexisting particles. Finally, we calculate threshold sulfuric acid profiles that show which concentration of sulfuric acid is necessary for nucleation and growth to observable size. These threshold profiles should represent upper limits of the actual sulfuric acid outside the CN layer. According to our profiles, sulfuric acid concentrations seem to be below midlatitude average during Antarctic winter but above midlatitude average for the CN layer formation.

  13. Volatile signals during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaglio, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Scents play a key role in mediating reproductive interactions in many vertebrates including mammals. Nowadays, several studies indicate that humans seem to use remarkably olfactory communication and are even able to produce and perceive pheromones. Furthermore, over the past several years, it became increasingly clear that pheromone-like chemical signals probably play a role in offspring identification and mother recognition. Recently developed technical procedures (solid-phase microextraction and dynamic headspace extraction) now allow investigators to characterize volatile compounds with high reliability. We analyzed the volatile compounds in sweat patch samples collected from the para-axillary and nipple-areola regions of women during pregnancy and after childbirth. We hypothesized that, at the time of birth and during the first weeks of life, the distinctive olfactory pattern of the para-axillary area is probably useful to newborn babies for recognizing and distinguishing their own mother, whereas the characteristic pattern of the nipple-areola region is probably useful as a guide to nourishment.

  14. Molecular plant volatile communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Jarmo K; Blande, James D

    2012-01-01

    Plants produce a wide array of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which have multiple functions as internal plant hormones (e.g., ethylene, methyl jasmonate and methyl salicylate), in communication with conspecific and heterospecific plants and in communication with organisms of second (herbivores and pollinators) and third (enemies of herbivores) trophic levels. Species specific VOCs normally repel polyphagous herbivores and those specialised on other plant species, but may attract specialist herbivores and their natural enemies, which use VOCs as host location cues. Attraction of predators and parasitoids by VOCs is considered an evolved indirect defence, whereby plants are able to indirectly reduce biotic stress caused by damaging herbivores. In this chapter we review these interactions where VOCs are known to play a crucial role. We then discuss the importance of volatile communication in self and nonself detection. VOCs are suggested to appear in soil ecosystems where distinction of own roots from neighbours roots is essential to optimise root growth, but limited evidence of above-ground plant self-recognition is available.

  15. The Influence of Spices on the Volatile Compounds of Cooked Beef Patty

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Samooel; Jo, Cheorun; Kim, Il Suk; Nam, Ki Chang; Ahn, Dong Uk; Lee, Kyung Heang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the influences of spices on the amounts and compositions of volatile compounds released from cooked beef patty. Beef patty with 0.5% of spice (nutmeg, onion, garlic, or ginger powder, w/w) was cooked by electronic pan until they reached an internal temperature of 75℃. A total of 46 volatile compounds (6 alcohols, 6 aldehydes, 5 hydrocarbons, 6 ketones, 9 sulfur compounds, and 14 terpenes) from cooked beef patties were detected by using purgeand- trap GC/MS....

  16. Optimizing stratospheric sulfur geoengineering by seasonally changing sulfur injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Anton; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Kokkola, Harri; Lehtinen, Kari; Korhonen, Hannele

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) by stratospheric sulfur injection has been shown to have potential in counteracting global warming if reducing of greenhouse gases has not been achieved fast enough and if climate warming will continue. Injecting large amounts of sulfate particles to the stratosphere would increase the reflectivity of the atmosphere and less sunlight would reach the surface. However, the effectivity (per injected sulphur mass unit) of this kind of geoengineering would decrease when amount of injected sulfur is increased. When sulfur concentration increases, stratospheric particles would grow to larger sizes which have larger gravitational settling velocity and which do not reflect radiation as efficiently as smaller particles. In many previous studies, sulfur has been assumed to be injected along the equator where yearly mean solar intensity is the highest and from where sulfur is spread equally to both hemispheres. However, the solar intensity will change locally during the year and sulfate has been assumed to be injected and spread to the hemisphere also during winter time, when the solar intensity is low. Thus sulfate injection could be expected to be more effective, if sulfur injection area is changed seasonally. Here we study effects of the different SRM injection scenarios by using two versions of the MPI climate models. First, aerosol spatial and temporal distributions as well as the resulting radiative properties from the SRM are defined by using the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.2-SALSA. After that, the global and regional climate effects from different injection scenarios are predicted by using the Max Planck Institute's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). We carried out simulations, where 8 Tg of sulfur is injected as SO2 to the stratosphere at height of 20-22 km in an area ranging over a 20 degree wide latitude band. Results show that changing the sulfur injection area seasonally would lead to similar global mean shortwave

  17. Sulfur-impregnated disordered carbon nanotubes cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juchen; Xu, Yunhua; Wang, Chunsheng

    2011-10-12

    The commercialization of lithium-sulfur batteries is hindered by low cycle stability and low efficiency, which are induced by sulfur active material loss and polysulfide shuttle reaction through dissolution into electrolyte. In this study, sulfur-impregnated disordered carbon nanotubes are synthesized as cathode material for the lithium-sulfur battery. The obtained sulfur-carbon tube cathodes demonstrate superior cyclability and Coulombic efficiency. More importantly, the electrochemical characterization indicates a new stabilization mechanism of sulfur in carbon induced by heat treatment.

  18. Automated dynamic headspace/GC-MS analyses affect the repeatability of volatiles in irradiated Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki-Chang; Cordray, Joseph; Ahn, Dong U

    2004-03-24

    Although a dynamic headspace/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DH/GC-MS) method is an effective tool for determining volatiles of irradiated turkey meat, the profile of volatiles may be changeable depending upon the availability of oxygen in the sample vial and sample holding time before purge. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of helium flushing and sample holding time before purge on the volatiles profiles of irradiated raw and cooked turkey breast meat. Vacuum-packaged turkey breasts were irradiated at 2.5 kGy, and the volatiles of irradiated raw and cooked samples were analyzed using a DH/GC-MS with different holding times up to 280 min. The amounts of dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide decreased as sample holding time in an autosampler (4 degrees C) before purge increased, whereas those of aldehdyes increased as holding time increased due to lipid oxidation. Helium flush of sample vials before sample loading on an autosampler retarded lipid oxidation and minimized the changes of sulfur volatiles in raw meat but was not enough to prevent oxidative changes in cooked meat. Although DH/GC-MS is a convenient method for automatic analysis of volatiles in meat samples, the number of samples that can be loaded in an autosampler at a time should be limited within the range that can permit reasonable repeatabilities for target volatile compounds.

  19. In situ extraction and analysis of volatiles and simple molecules in interplanetary dust particles, contaminants, and silica aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Blanford, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented for the analyses of eight interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) for the volatile elements H, C, N, O, and S and their molecular species, as well as of the volatiles associated with contaminants (i.e., the compounds used during the collection and curation of IDPs), which were carried out using a laser microprobe interfaced with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It was found that the volatile species from contaminants were always present in the spectra of IDPs. Despite the contamination problems, several indigenous molecular species could be identified, including OH, CO2 or C2H4, C and CS2, CO2 along with CO (possibly indicating the presence of carbonate), H2S, SO, COS, SO2, and CS2. In some cases, the sulfur components can be attributed to aerosols; however, in one of the IDPs, the presence of H2S, SO, COS, and SO2 indicates the possible presence of elemental sulfur.

  20. Consistent ranking of volatility models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    2006-01-01

    We show that the empirical ranking of volatility models can be inconsistent for the true ranking if the evaluation is based on a proxy for the population measure of volatility. For example, the substitution of a squared return for the conditional variance in the evaluation of ARCH-type models can...

  1. Political institutions and economic volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, Jeroen; de Haan, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We examine the effect of political 'institutions' on economic growth volatility, using data from more than 100 countries over the period 1960 to 2005, taking into account various control variables as suggested in previous studies. Our indicator of volatility is the relative standard deviation of the

  2. Emerging non-volatile memories

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Seungbum; Wouters, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the fundamentals of emerging non-volatile memories and provides an overview of future trends in the field. Readers will find coverage of seven important memory technologies, including Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM), Ferromagnetic RAM (FMRAM), Multiferroic RAM (MFRAM), Phase-Change Memories (PCM), Oxide-based Resistive RAM (RRAM), Probe Storage, and Polymer Memories. Chapters are structured to reflect diffusions and clashes between different topics. Emerging Non-Volatile Memories is an ideal book for graduate students, faculty, and professionals working in the area of non-volatile memory. This book also: Covers key memory technologies, including Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM), Ferromagnetic RAM (FMRAM), and Multiferroic RAM (MFRAM), among others. Provides an overview of non-volatile memory fundamentals. Broadens readers' understanding of future trends in non-volatile memories.

  3. Moisture map by IR thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinzato, E.; Cadelano, G.; Bison, P.

    2010-10-01

    A new approach to moisture detection in buildings by an optical method is presented. Limits of classical and new methods are discussed. The state of the art about the use of IR thermography is illustrated as well. The new technique exploits characteristics of the materials and takes into account explicitly the heat and mass exchange between surface and environment. A set of experiments in controlled laboratory conditions on different materials is used to better understand the physical problem. The testing procedure and the data reduction are illustrated. A case study on a heritage building points up the features of this technique.

  4. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  5. Governmentally amplified output volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funashima, Yoshito

    2016-11-01

    Predominant government behavior is decomposed by frequency into several periodic components: updating cycles of infrastructure, Kuznets cycles, fiscal policy over business cycles, and election cycles. Little is known, however, about the theoretical impact of such cyclical behavior in public finance on output fluctuations. Based on a standard neoclassical growth model, this study intends to examine the frequency at which public investment cycles are relevant to output fluctuations. We find an inverted U-shaped relationship between output volatility and length of cycle in public investment. This implies that periodic behavior in public investment at a certain frequency range can cause aggravated output resonance. Moreover, we present an empirical analysis to test the theoretical implication, using the U.S. data in the period from 1968 to 2015. The empirical results suggest that such resonance phenomena change from low to high frequency.

  6. Volatility Exposure for Strategic Asset Allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Briere, Marie; Burgues, Alexandre; Signori, Ombretta

    2010-01-01

    The authors examine the advantages of incorporating strategic exposure to equity volatility into the investment opportunity set of a long-term equity investor. They consider two standard volatility investments: implied volatility and volatility risk premium strategies. An analytical framework, which offers pragmatic solutions for long-term investors who seek exposure to volatility, is used to calibrate and assess the risk-return profiles of portfolios. The benefit of volatility exposure for a...

  7. Analysis of volatile compounds from Iberian hams: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narváez-Rivas, M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides information on the study of the volatile compounds in raw and dry-cured Iberian hams. Different volatile compounds are identified and studies carried out by different authors are presented. This article reviews the analytical methods that have been used to determine the different volatiles of these samples. Furthermore, all volatile compounds identified (a total of 411 volatiles have been collected in several tables according to different series of compounds: hydrocarbons, aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, esters and ethers, lactones, terpenes and chloride compounds, nitrogenous compounds, sulfur compounds and carboxylic acids. This review can be useful in subsequent research due to the complexity of the study.

    En este artículo se proporciona información sobre el estudio de los compuestos volátiles del jamón ibérico tanto fresco como curado. Se presentan los diferentes compuestos volátiles identificados por distintos autores. Además, se evalúan los métodos analíticos que han sido utilizados para determinar dichos compuestos volátiles en este tipo de muestras. Todos los compuestos identificados y descritos en esta revisión (un total de 411 compuestos volátiles han sido agrupados en diversas tablas de acuerdo a las diferentes familias a que pertenecen: hidrocarburos, aldehídos, cetonas, alcoholes, ésteres y éteres, lactonas, terpenos, compuestos halogenados, compuestos nitrogenados, compuestos de azufre y ácidos carboxílicos. Debido a la complejidad de este estudio, la presente revisión puede ser muy útil en investigaciones posteriores.

  8. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. Kwon

    2003-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term DOE efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 60-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a PFA differential fixed-bed micro reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.01-0.047 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, moisture concentrations, reaction pressures on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 61-89 v% hydrogen, 2,300-9,200-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-4,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 2.6-13.7 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 100-110 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 28-127 psia. The following results were obtained based on experimental data generated from the differential reactor system, and their interpretations, (1) Concentration of moisture and concentrations of both H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} appear to affect slightly reaction

  9. Reduced Heart Rate Volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Eric L.; Morris, John A.; Norris, Patrick R.; France, Daniel J.; Ozdas, Asli; Stiles, Renée A.; Harris, Paul A.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Speroff, Theodore

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine if using dense data capture to measure heart rate volatility (standard deviation) measured in 5-minute intervals predicts death. Background: Fundamental approaches to assessing vital signs in the critically ill have changed little since the early 1900s. Our prior work in this area has demonstrated the utility of densely sampled data and, in particular, heart rate volatility over the entire patient stay, for predicting death and prolonged ventilation. Methods: Approximately 120 million heart rate data points were prospectively collected and archived from 1316 trauma ICU patients over 30 months. Data were sampled every 1 to 4 seconds, stored in a relational database, linked to outcome data, and de-identified. HR standard deviation was continuously computed over 5-minute intervals (CVRD, cardiac volatility–related dysfunction). Logistic regression models incorporating age and injury severity score were developed on a test set of patients (N = 923), and prospectively analyzed in a distinct validation set (N = 393) for the first 24 hours of ICU data. Results: Distribution of CVRD varied by survival in the test set. Prospective evaluation of the model in the validation set gave an area in the receiver operating curve of 0.81 with a sensitivity and specificity of 70.1 and 80.0, respectively. CVRD predict death as early as 24 hours in the validation set. Conclusions: CVRD identifies a subgroup of patients with a high probability of dying. Death is predicted within first 24 hours of stay. We hypothesize CVRD is a surrogate for autonomic nervous system dysfunction. PMID:15319726

  10. Modification of lipid fraction in ensiled high moisture corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Bochicchio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the changes of the lipidic fraction of ensiled high moisture corn (HMC. 11 maize hybrids were used, ensiled each in 3 mini experimental silos of 100 litres. For each hybrid 1 sample of fresh high moisture corn was obtained immediately after milling and 3 samples of ensiling HMC were kept after 2, 7 and 12 months. All samples were analysed for pH, dry matter, lactic acid, ammonia-N, ether extract, fatty acid composition and volatile fatty acids (VFAs. Ether extract of fresh high moisture corn was 35.7 g/kg dry matter (DM and increased after 2 and 7 months of storage up to 39.4 g/Kg DM (P≤0.01; after 12 months it decreased to 38.1 g/kg DM (P≤0.01. Both saturated fatty acids (SFA and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA percentages decreased from 18.23% to 15.47% and from 24.84% to 23.57% respectively (before ensiling vs 12 months P≤0.01. Linoleic acid percentage increased from 55.34% to 59.44% (before ensiling vs 12 months P≤0.01. The linoleic acid content (g/kg of DM increased on average from 19,1 before ensiling to 22.5 after 12 months of ensiling. These differences may affect the linoleic acid content of heavy pig diets when maize is used as HMC instead of corn meal.

  11. Biochemistry of Dissimilatory Sulfur Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake II, R.

    2003-05-30

    The long term goals of this research were to define the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during the dissimilatory oxidation of sulfur practiced by various species of the thiobacilli. Specific adhesion of the thiobacilli to elemental sulfur was studied by electrical impedance, dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry, and optical trapping methods. The conclusion is that the thiobacilli appear to express specific receptors that enable the bacteria to recognize and adhere to insoluble sulfur. The enzyme tetrathionate oxidase was purified from two species of the thiobacilli. Extensive structural and functional studies were conducted on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase purified from cell-free extracts of Thiobacillus denitrificans. The kinetic mechanism of rhodanese was studied.

  12. Effect of Environmental Factors on Sulfur Gas Emissions from Drywall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, Randy

    2011-08-20

    Problem drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) investigation of problem drywall incorporates three parallel tracks: (1) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and reported health symptoms; (2) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and electrical and fire safety issues in affected homes; and (3) tracing the origin and the distribution of the drywall. To assess the potential impact on human health and to support testing for electrical and fire safety, the CPSC has initiated a series of laboratory tests that provide elemental characterization of drywall, characterization of chemical emissions, and in-home air sampling. The chemical emission testing was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The LBNL study consisted of two phases. In Phase 1 of this study, LBNL tested thirty drywall samples provided by CPSC and reported standard emission factors for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aldehydes, reactive sulfur gases (RSGs) and volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). The standard emission factors were determined using small (10.75 liter) dynamic test chambers housed in a constant temperature environmental chamber. The tests were all run at 25 C, 50% relative humidity (RH) and with an area-specific ventilation rate of {approx}1.5 cubic meters per square meter of emitting surface per hour [m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}/h]. The thirty samples that were tested in Phase 1 included seventeen that were manufactured in China in 2005, 2006 and 2009, and thirteen that were manufactured in North America in 2009. The measured emission factors for VOCs and aldehydes were generally low and did not differ significantly between the Chinese and North American drywall. Eight of the samples tested had elevated emissions of volatile sulfur-containing compounds with total RSG emission factors between 32 and 258 micrograms per square

  13. Modeling soil moisture memory in savanna ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, S.; Miller, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    Antecedent soil conditions create an ecosystem's "memory" of past rainfall events. Such soil moisture memory effects may be observed over a range of timescales, from daily to yearly, and lead to feedbacks between hydrological and ecosystem processes. In this study, we modeled the soil moisture memory effect on savanna ecosystems in California, Arizona, and Africa, using a system dynamics model created to simulate the ecohydrological processes at the plot-scale. The model was carefully calibrated using soil moisture and evapotranspiration data collected at three study sites. The model was then used to simulate scenarios with various initial soil moisture conditions and antecedent precipitation regimes, in order to study the soil moisture memory effects on the evapotranspiration of understory and overstory species. Based on the model results, soil texture and antecedent precipitation regime impact the redistribution of water within soil layers, potentially causing deeper soil layers to influence the ecosystem for a longer time. Of all the study areas modeled, soil moisture memory of California savanna ecosystem site is replenished and dries out most rapidly. Thus soil moisture memory could not maintain the high rate evapotranspiration for more than a few days without incoming rainfall event. On the contrary, soil moisture memory of Arizona savanna ecosystem site lasts the longest time. The plants with different root depths respond to different memory effects; shallow-rooted species mainly respond to the soil moisture memory in the shallow soil. The growing season of grass is largely depended on the soil moisture memory of the top 25cm soil layer. Grass transpiration is sensitive to the antecedent precipitation events within daily to weekly timescale. Deep-rooted plants have different responses since these species can access to the deeper soil moisture memory with longer time duration Soil moisture memory does not have obvious impacts on the phenology of woody plants

  14. Moisture related test protocols for HVS testing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Denneman, E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available is to determine the effect of changes in moisture condition on the performance of the pavement structure, and specific layers in the structure. The development of Moisture Accelerated Distress (MAD) was defined by De Beer and Horak (1987) as a specific failure... mode where the addition of moisture to the pavement structure causes severe and relatively rapid structural damage to the pavement. The response indicated in Figure 1 indicates schematically the development of MAD for a granular pavement structure...

  15. Moisture Conditions in Passive House Wall Constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Gullbrekken, Lars; Geving, Stig; Time, Berit; ANDRESEN, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Buildings for the future, i.e zero emission buildings and passive houses, will need well insulated building envelopes, which includes increased insulation thicknesses for roof, wall and floor constructions. Increased insulation thicknesses may cause an increase in moisture levels and thereby increased risk of mold growth. There is need for increased knowledge about moisture levels in wood constructions of well insulated houses, to ensure robust and moisture safe solutions. Monitoring of w...

  16. Moisture damage of aggregate-bitumen bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2016-01-01

    Moisture damage of the asphalt mixture is defined as the loss of strength, stiffness and durability due to the presence of moisture (in a liquid or vapour state) leading to adhesive failure at the aggregate-bitumen interface and/or the cohesive failure within the bitumen or bitumen-filler mastic. The presence of moisture can accelerate the distress of asphalt pavement in several different modes, such as rutting, fatigue cracking, thermal cracking and the formation of potholes. In the field, t...

  17. An integrated method incorporating sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and electrokinetics to enhance removal of copper from contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maini, G.; Sharman, A.K.; Sunderland, G.; Knowles, C.J.; Jackman, S.A.

    2000-03-15

    The combination of bioleaching and electrokinetics for the remediation of metal contaminated land has been investigated. In bioleaching, bacteria convert reduced sulfur compounds to sulfuric acid, acidifying soil and mobilizing metal ions. In electrokinetics, DC current acidifies soil, and mobilized metals are transported to the cathode by electromigration. When bioleaching was applied to silt soil artificially contaminated with seven metals and amended with sulfur, bacterial activity was partially inhibited and limited acidification occurred. Electrokinetic treatment of silt soil contaminated solely with 1000 mg/kg copper nitrate showed 89% removal of copper from the soil within 15 days. To combine bioleaching and electrokinetics sequentially, preliminary partial acidification was performed by amending copper-contaminated soil with sulfur (to 5% w/w) and incubating at constant moisture (30% w/w) and temperature (20 C) for 90 days. Indigenous sulfur oxidizing bacteria partially acidified the soil from pH 8.1 to 5.4. This soil was then treated by electrokinetics yielding 86% copper removal in 16 days. In the combined process, electrokinetics stimulated sulfur oxidation, by removing inhibitory factors, yielding a 5.1-fold increase in soil sulfate concentration. Preacidification by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria increased the cost-effectiveness of the electrokinetic treatment by reducing the power requirement by 66%.

  18. The analysis of forms of sulfur in ancient sediments and sedimentary rocks: comments and cautions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, C.A.; Tuttle, M.L.; Reynolds, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Assumptions commonly made during analysis of the amount of monosulfides [acid-volatile sulfides (AVS)] and disulfides in modern sediments, may not be valid for ancient sedimentary rocks. It is known that ferric iron can oxidize H2S during AVS analysis unless a reducing agent such as stannous chloride is added to the treatment. In addition, some monosulfides such as greigite and pyrrhotite require heat during the AVS analysis in order to dissolve completely. However, the use of heat and/or stannous chloride in the AVS treatment may partially dissolve disulfides and it is generally recommended that stannous chloride not be used in the AVS treatment for modern sediments. Most of the monosulfides are assumed to be recovered as AVS without the addition of stannous chloride. This study investigates the recovery of monosulfides during sulfur speciation analysis with application to ancient sedimentary rocks. Sulfur in samples containing naturally occurring greigite and mackinawite or pyrite was measured using variations of a common sulfur-speciation scheme. The sulfur-speciation scheme analyzes for monosulfide sulfur, disulfide sulfur, elemental sulfur, inorganic sulfate and organically bound sulfur. The effects of heat, stannous chloride and ferric iron on the amounts of acid-volatile sulfide and disulfide recovered during treatment for AVS were investigated. Isotopic compositions of the recovered sulfur species along with yields from an extended sulfur-speciation scheme were used to quantify the effects. Hot 6 N HCl AVS treatment recovers > 60% of the monosulfides as AVS in samples containing pure greigite and mackinawite. The remaining monosulfide sulfur is recovered in a subsequent elemental sulfur extraction. Hot 6 N HCl plus stannous chloride recovers 100% of the monosulfides as AVS. The addition of ferric iron to pure greigite and mackinawite samples during AVS treatment without stannous chloride decreased the amount of monosulfides recovered as AVS and, if present

  19. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. Kwon

    2004-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 1-6 milliseconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, moisture concentration, reaction pressure on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 70 v% hydrogen, 2,500-7,500-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,250-3,750 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 0-15 vol% moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 100 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The

  20. Sulfuric acid speleogenesis (SAS) close to the water table: Examples from southern France, Austria, and Sicily

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jo; Audra, Philippe; Madonia, Giuliana; Vattano, Marco; Plan, Lukas; D'Angeli, Ilenia M.; Bigot, Jean-Yves; Anoux, Catherine; Nobécourt, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Caves formed by rising sulfuric waters have been described from all over the world in a wide variety of climate settings, from arid regions to mid-latitude and alpine areas. H2S is generally formed at depth by reduction of sulfates in the presence of hydrocarbons and is transported in solution through the deep aquifers. In tectonically disturbed areas major fractures eventually allow these H2S-bearing fluids to rise to the surface where oxidation processes can become active producing sulfuric acid. This extremely strong acid reacts with the carbonate bedrock creating caves, some of which are among the largest and most spectacular in the world. Production of sulfuric acid mostly occurs at or close to the water table but also in subaerial conditions in moisture films and droplets in the cave environment. These caves are generated at or immediately above the water table, where condensation-corrosion processes are dominant, creating a set of characteristic meso- and micromorphologies. Due to their close connection to the base level, these caves can also precisely record past hydrological and geomorphological settings. Certain authigenic cave minerals, produced during the sulfuric acid speleogenesis (SAS) phase, allow determination of the exact timing of speleogenesis. This paper deals with the morphological, geochemical and mineralogical description of four very typical sulfuric acid water table caves in Europe: the Grotte du Chat in the southern French Alps, the Acqua Fitusa Cave in Sicily (Italy), and the Bad Deutsch Altenburg and Kraushöhle caves in Austria.

  1. Volatile Release From The Siberian Traps Inferred From Melt Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Benjamin A.; Elkins-Tanton, Linda T.; Rowe, Michael C.; Ukstins Peate, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    The Siberian Traps Large Igneous Province is one of the largest known continental flood volcanic provinces in the Phanerozoic. The quantification of volatile degassing is particularly important because the Siberian Traps have often been invoked as a possible trigger for the end-Permian mass extinction (e.g. Campbell et al., 1992; Wignall, 2001). Volatile degassing provides a crucial mechanism to link mafic volcanic eruption with global environmental change. Mafic flood basalt magmas are expected to have low volatile contents (similar to mid-ocean ridge basalts). However, Siberian Traps magmas were chambered in and erupted through a thick sedimentary basin and may have interacted with, and obtained volatiles from, sedimentary lithologies such as limestone, coal, and evaporite. Melt inclusions from the Siberian Traps provide insight into the potential total volatile budget throughout the evolution of the large igneous province. These droplets of trapped melt may preserve volatile species that would otherwise have degassed at the time of eruption. We present data from the analysis of more than 100 melt inclusions, including both homogenized inclusions and rare glassy inclusions with low crystallinity. Many melt inclusions from tuffs and flows near the base of the Siberian Traps sequence are substantially enriched in chlorine and fluorine compared to Deccan Traps and Laki melt inclusions (Self et al., 2008; Thordarson et al., 1996). These inclusions record chlorine concentrations up to ~1400 ppm, and fluorine concentrations up to ~5000 ppm. Olivines from the Maymechinsky suite, recognized as the last extrusive products of Siberian Traps volcanism, contain melt inclusions with maximum sulfur concentrations in the range of ~5000 ppm and substantial concentrations of chlorine. Intrusive igneous rocks from the province also display significant volatile contents. A sill from the Ust-Ilimsk region yielded plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions which contain chlorine and fluorine

  2. The international soil moisture network: A data hosting facility for global in situ soil moisture measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    In situ measurements of soil moisture are invaluable for calibrating and validating land surface models and satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. In addition, long-term time series of in situ soil moisture measurements themselves can reveal trends in the water cycle related to climate or land co...

  3. Physiology of Haloalkaliphilic Sulfur-oxidizing Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banciu, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    The inorganic sulfur oxidation by obligate haloalkaliphilic chemolithoautotrophs was only recently discovered and investigated. These autotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB), capable of oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds at moderate to high salt concentration and at high pH, can be divided

  4. Genetic engineering of sulfur-degrading Sulfolobus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, N.W.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research is to first establish a plasmid-mediated genetic transformation system for the sulfur degrading Sulfolobus, and then to clone and overexpress the genes encoding the organic-sulfur-degrading enzymes from Sulfolobus- as well as from other microorganisms, to develop a Sulfolobus-based microbial process for the removal of both organic and inorganic sulfur from coal.

  5. Physiology of Haloalkaliphilic Sulfur-oxidizing Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banciu, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    The inorganic sulfur oxidation by obligate haloalkaliphilic chemolithoautotrophs was only recently discovered and investigated. These autotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB), capable of oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds at moderate to high salt concentration and at high pH, can be divided

  6. Detection of sulfur dioxide using a piezoelectric quartz crystal microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, O.M. [Instituto de Quimica de Sao Carlos (Brazil)

    1997-09-01

    Sulfur dioxide was detected and determined in air by a piezoelectric quartz crystal sensor coated with 4-aminoantipyrine/1-hydroxyetil-2-heptadecenyl imidazol (amine 220) solution (1:1 v/v in chloroform). The analytical response curve is linear over the concentration range from 0.70 to 5.0 ppm of SO{sub 2}. Good linearities (r = 0.9990, 0.9995 and 0.9968) and sensitivities (18.0, 33.4 and 50.7 Hz/ppm) were found, respectively for exposure times of 30, 60 and 90 seconds. The sensor can be used for more than six months without loss in sensitivity and presented good reversibility and reproducibility. Among some possible interferents tested, only nitrogen dioxide and moisture caused major frequency changes.

  7. Stochastic volatility and stochastic leverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veraart, Almut; Veraart, Luitgard A. M.

    This paper proposes the new concept of stochastic leverage in stochastic volatility models. Stochastic leverage refers to a stochastic process which replaces the classical constant correlation parameter between the asset return and the stochastic volatility process. We provide a systematic...... treatment of stochastic leverage and propose to model the stochastic leverage effect explicitly, e.g. by means of a linear transformation of a Jacobi process. Such models are both analytically tractable and allow for a direct economic interpretation. In particular, we propose two new stochastic volatility...... models which allow for a stochastic leverage effect: the generalised Heston model and the generalised Barndorff-Nielsen & Shephard model. We investigate the impact of a stochastic leverage effect in the risk neutral world by focusing on implied volatilities generated by option prices derived from our new...

  8. Ammonia volatilization from surface application of organic residues and urea on Marandu palisadegrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álisson Vanin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to measure ammonia volatilization from surface application of pig slurry, poultry litter, urea and no fertilization. An experiment was conducted in a randomized block design, in plots repeated over time, with four treatments and four replications. The fertilizers tested were: mineral fertilizer (70 kg ha-1 N, 100 kg ha-1 P2O5 and 30 kg ha-1 of K2O, as urea, triple superphosphate and potassium chloride, respectively, pig slurry (200 m³ ha-1 applied in November 2008 and 200 m³ ha-1 applied in April 2009 and poultry litter (10 t ha-1 applied in November 2008 and 10 t ha-1 applied in April 2009. Five evaluations were performed with 24-hour intervals. Foams were used with glycerin and sulfuric acid, internally fixed in PET bottles for collecting ammonia. After collected, the samples were sent to the laboratory to determine volatilized ammonia levels by the semi-micro Kjedahl distillation method. Fertilization with chicken litter had lower ammonia volatilization in relation to urea and pig slurry. Most of the ammonia volatilization from pig slurry occurred within 48 hours after application, totaling losses of 630 g kg-1 of a total of 8.25 kg ha-1 of volatilized ammonia. The biggest loss by ammonia volatilization was from fertilization with urea, totaling approximately 80 g kg-1 of N applied.

  9. Chemical characteristics and volatile profile of genetically modified peanut cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ee Chin; Dunford, Nurhan T; Chenault, Kelly

    2008-10-01

    Genetic engineering has been used to modify peanut cultivars for improving agronomic performance and pest resistance. Food products developed through genetic engineering have to be assessed for their safety before approval for human consumption. Preservation of desirable chemical, flavor and aroma attributes of the peanut cultivars during the genetic modifications is critical for acceptance of genetically modified peanuts (GMP) by the food industry. Hence, the main objective of this study is to examine chemical characteristics and volatile profile of GMP. The genetically modified peanut cultivars, 188, 540 and 654 were obtained from the USDA-ARS in Stillwater, Oklahoma. The peanut variety Okrun was examined as a control. The volatile analysis was performed using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) equipped with an olfactory detector. The peanut samples were also analyzed for their moisture, ash, protein, sugar and oil compositions. Experimental results showed that the variations in nutritional composition of peanut lines examined in this study were within the values reported for existing cultivars. There were minor differences in volatile profile among the samples. The implication of this study is significant, since it shows that peanut cultivars with greater pest and fungal resistance were successfully developed without major changes in their chemical characteristics.

  10. New insights into sulfur metabolism in yeasts as revealed by studies of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Agnès; Forquin-Gomez, Marie-Pierre; Roux, Aurélie; Aubert, Julie; Junot, Christophe; Heilier, Jean-François; Landaud, Sophie; Bonnarme, Pascal; Beckerich, Jean-Marie

    2013-02-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica, located at the frontier of hemiascomycetous yeasts and fungi, is an excellent candidate for studies of metabolism evolution. This yeast, widely recognized for its technological applications, in particular produces volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) that fully contribute to the flavor of smear cheese. We report here a relevant global vision of sulfur metabolism in Y. lipolytica based on a comparison between high- and low-sulfur source supplies (sulfate, methionine, or cystine) by combined approaches (transcriptomics, metabolite profiling, and VSC analysis). The strongest repression of the sulfate assimilation pathway was observed in the case of high methionine supply, together with a large accumulation of sulfur intermediates. A high sulfate supply seems to provoke considerable cellular stress via sulfite production, resulting in a decrease of the availability of the glutathione pathway's sulfur intermediates. The most limited effect was observed for the cystine supply, suggesting that the intracellular cysteine level is more controlled than that of methionine and sulfate. Using a combination of metabolomic profiling and genetic experiments, we revealed taurine and hypotaurine metabolism in yeast for the first time. On the basis of a phylogenetic study, we then demonstrated that this pathway was lost by some of the hemiascomycetous yeasts during evolution.

  11. Wet Chemistry Synthesis of Multidimensional Nanocarbon-Sulfur Hybrid Materials with Ultrahigh Sulfur Loading for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen-Cheng; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zeng, Xian-Xiang; Shi, Ji-Lei; Zhang, Shuai-Feng; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-02-17

    An optimized nanocarbon-sulfur cathode material with ultrahigh sulfur loading of up to 90 wt % is realized in the form of sulfur nanolayer-coated three-dimensional (3D) conducting network. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network combines three different nanocarbons, as follows: zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticle, one-dimensional carbon nanotube, and two-dimensional graphene. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network is synthesized by using a method based on soluble chemistry of elemental sulfur and three types of nanocarbons in well-chosen solvents. The resultant sulfur-carbon material shows a high specific capacity of 1115 mA h g(-1) at 0.02C and good rate performance of 551 mA h g(-1) at 1C based on the mass of sulfur-carbon composite. Good battery performance can be attributed to the homogeneous compositing of sulfur with the 3D hierarchical hybrid nanocarbon networks at nanometer scale, which provides efficient multidimensional transport pathways for electrons and ions. Wet chemical method developed here provides an easy and cost-effective way to prepare sulfur-carbon cathode materials with high sulfur loading for application in high-energy Li-S batteries.

  12. On forecasting Exchange Rate Volatility.

    OpenAIRE

    Hafner, Christian

    2003-01-01

    In an efficient market, foreign exchange rates have to guarantee absence of triangular arbitrage. This note shows that the no-arbitrage condition can be exploited for forecasting the volatility of a single rate by using the information contained in the other rates. Linearly transforming the volatility forecasts of a bivariate model is shown to be more efficient than using a univariate model for the cross-rate.

  13. Uneven moisture patterns in water repellent soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    In the Netherlands, water-repellent soils are widespread and they often show irregular moisture patterns, which cause accelerated transport of water and solutes to the groundwater and surface water. Under grass cover, spatial variability in soil moisture content is high owing to fingered flow; in ar

  14. Modern moisturizer myths, misconceptions, and truths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2013-06-01

    Xerosis is a highly prevalent condition that can be caused by environmental factors, age, or various diseases. Although the causes, symptoms, and severity of dry skin vary widely, moisturizers form the mainstay of treatment in simple cases and can be used as adjunctive therapy in more serious clinical cases. The market now contains a plethora of moisturizing formulations from which consumers can choose, but dermatologists need to distinguish among marketing claims, anecdotal evidence, and proven clinical effects when recommending moisturizers to their patients. Many lesser-quality moisturizers were never designed to mitigate dry skin or more serious skin conditions in a therapeutically relevant manner and are unlikely to provide clinically adequate moisturizing therapy. This article aims to clarify some common prevailing myths and misconceptions about moisturizers in the dermatology community. Recent advances in research have revealed that natural moisturizing factor (NMF), ceramides, and aquaporins (AQPs) are key factors in skin hydration. The impact of these advances on the ingredients that are being used in moisturizers is discussed, along with the importance of dermatologists choosing clinically proven products released by laboratories with demonstrated track records in research.

  15. Embedded solution for a microwave moisture meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper, the conversion of a PC or laptop-controlled microwave moisture meter to a stand-alone meter hosting its own embedded system is discussed. The moisture meter is based on the free-space transmission measurement technique and uses low-intensity microwaves to measure the attenuation and p...

  16. Rhodanese functions as sulfur supplier for key enzymes in sulfur energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussignargues, Clément; Giuliani, Marie-Cécile; Infossi, Pascale; Lojou, Elisabeth; Guiral, Marianne; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ilbert, Marianne

    2012-06-08

    How microorganisms obtain energy is a challenging topic, and there have been numerous studies on the mechanisms involved. Here, we focus on the energy substrate traffic in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This bacterium can use insoluble sulfur as an energy substrate and has an intricate sulfur energy metabolism involving several sulfur-reducing and -oxidizing supercomplexes and enzymes. We demonstrate that the cytoplasmic rhodanese SbdP participates in this sulfur energy metabolism. Rhodaneses are a widespread family of proteins known to transfer sulfur atoms. We show that SbdP has also some unusual characteristics compared with other rhodaneses; it can load a long sulfur chain, and it can interact with more than one partner. Its partners (sulfur reductase and sulfur oxygenase reductase) are key enzymes of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus and share the capacity to use long sulfur chains as substrate. We demonstrate a positive effect of SbdP, once loaded with sulfur chains, on sulfur reductase activity, most likely by optimizing substrate uptake. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a physiological role for SbdP as a carrier and sulfur chain donor to these key enzymes, therefore enabling channeling of sulfur substrate in the cell as well as greater efficiency of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus.

  17. On-irrigator pasture soil moisture sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng-Choon Tan, Adrian; Richards, Sean; Platt, Ian; Woodhead, Ian

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we presented the development of a proximal soil moisture sensor that measured the soil moisture content of dairy pasture directly from the boom of an irrigator. The proposed sensor was capable of soil moisture measurements at an accuracy of  ±5% volumetric moisture content, and at meter scale ground area resolutions. The sensor adopted techniques from the ultra-wideband radar to enable measurements of ground reflection at resolutions that are smaller than the antenna beamwidth of the sensor. An experimental prototype was developed for field measurements. Extensive field measurements using the developed prototype were conducted on grass pasture at different ground conditions to validate the accuracy of the sensor in performing soil moisture measurements.

  18. MOISTURE-BUFFERING CHARACTERISTICS OF BUILDING MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Cheol Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The humidity level of indoor air is an important factor influencing the air quality and energy consumption of buildings, as well as the durability of building components. Indoor humidity levels depend on several factors, such as moisture sources, air flow, and the adsorption/desorption properties of materials. The moisture-buffering characteristics of building materials that are in contact with indoor air may help moderate the variations of indoor humidity, especially in the summer and winter. In this study, the moisture adsorption/desorption properties of building materials were investigated experimentally and numerically. These properties can be used to characterize the ability of building materials to exchange moisture with the indoor environment. This study indicates that a building material surface resistivity was the main factor creating variations of moisture buffering.

  19. Soil Moisture Monitorization Using GNSS Reflected Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Egido, Alejandro; Caparrini, Marco; Martin, Cristina; Farres, Esteve; Banque, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    The use of GNSS signals as a source of opportunity for remote sensing applications, GNSS-R, has been a research area of interest for more than a decade. One of the possible applications of this technique is soil moisture monitoring. The retrieval of soil moisture with GNSS-R systems is based on the variability of the ground dielectric properties associated to soil moisture. Higher concentrations of water in the soil yield a higher dielectric constant and reflectivity, which incurs in signals that reflect from the Earth surface with higher peak power. Previous investigations have demonstrated the capability of GPS bistatic scatterometers to obtain high enough signal to noise ratios in order to sense small changes in surface reflectivity. Furthermore, these systems present some advantages with respect to others currently used to retrieve soil moisture. Upcoming satellite navigation systems, such as the European Galileo, will represent an excellent source of opportunity for soil moisture remote sensing for vario...

  20. Calibration of Soil Moisture Measurement Using Pr2 Moisture Meter and Gravimetric-Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olotu Yahaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The research study strongly focused on creating strong mechanism for measuring and evaluating soil moisture content comparing PR2 capacitance moisture meter and gravimetric approach. PR2 moisture meter shows a better performance accuracy of ± 6%; 0.06 m 3 /m 3 and intercept a0 =1.8; indicating the field is heavy clay. It measures to 1000 mm depth with high precision; while realistic result could not be obtained from gravimetric method at this measuring depth. Therefore, effective soil moisture measuring, monitoring and evaluation can be achieved with PR2 moisture meter.

  1. Sulfur and metal fertilization of the lower continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locmelis, Marek; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Rushmer, Tracy; Arevalo, Ricardo; Adam, John; Denyszyn, Steven W.

    2016-02-01

    Mantle-derived melts and metasomatic fluids are considered to be important in the transport and distribution of trace elements in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. However, the mechanisms that facilitate sulfur and metal transfer from the upper mantle into the lower continental crust are poorly constrained. This study addresses this knowledge gap by examining a series of sulfide- and hydrous mineral-rich alkaline mafic-ultramafic pipes that intruded the lower continental crust of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone in the Italian Western Alps. The pipes are relatively small (tectonic architecture of any given terrain, metals and volatiles stored in the lower continental crust may become available as sources for subsequent ore-forming processes, thus enhancing the prospectivity of continental block margins for a wide range of mineral systems.

  2. A soil moisture climatology of Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollinger, S.E.; Isard, S.A. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States) Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Ten years of soil moisture measurements (biweekly from March through September and monthly during winter) within the top 1 m of soil at 17 grass-covered sites across Illinois are analyzed to provide a climatology of soil moisture for this important Midwest agricultural region. Soil moisture measurements were obtained with neutron probes that were calibrated for each site. Measurement errors are dependent upon the volumetric water content with errors less than 20 percent when soil moisture is above 0 percent of soil volume. Single point errors in moisture measurements from the top 1 m of soil range from 6 percent to 13 percent when volumetric soil moisture is 30 percent of soil volume. The average depletion in moisture between winter and summer over the 10-year period for the top 2 m of soil in Illinois was 72.3 mm. Three-quarters of this decrease occurred above 0.5 m and only 5 percent occurred between the 1.0-m and 2.0-m depths. The average moisture decrease between winter and summer during a wet year (1985) and a drought year (1988) in the top 2 m of soil was 64 percent and 204 percent of the average for the 10-year period, respectively. Seasonal means in soil moisture averaged for the state show the effects of different seasons and soil types on soil moisture. In the winter and spring a latitudinal gradient exists with the wetter soils in the southern part of the state. During summer and autumn there is a longitudinal gradient with the wetter soils in the eastern half of the state. The longitudinal gradient is closely associated with the depth of loess deposits.

  3. Ammonia Volatilization from Winter Wheat Field Top—Dressed with Urea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIANGUANGMING; CAOJINLIU; 等

    1998-01-01

    Ammonia volatilization was measured with a continuous air flow enclosure method from a winter wheat field in the Experimental Farm of Jurong Agricultural School to investigate its main influencing factors.The experiment with five treatments in triplicate,no N( control),100,200 and 300kg N ha-1 with rice straw cover at a rate of 1500 kg ha-1 and 200 kg N ha-1 without rice straw,started when the winter wheat was sown in 1994,Sixty percent of the total amount of N applice was basal and 40% was top-dressd,The measurement of ammonia volatilization was immediately conducted after urea was top-dressed on soil surface at wheat elongation stage in spring of 1996 and 1997.The results showed that there was a diurnal variation of ammonia volatilization rate from the winter wheat field,which synchronized with air temperature.N losses through ammonia volatilzation increased with increasing N application rate,but the ratio of N lost through ammonia volatilization to applied N was not significantly affected by N application rate The coverage of rice straw had no significant effect on ammonia volatilization ,Soil moisture and rain events after urea was top-dressed affected ammonia volatilization significantly.

  4. Recent Advances in Volatiles of Teas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Qiang Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Volatile compounds are important components of tea aroma, a key attribute of sensory quality. The present review examines the formation of aromatic volatiles of various kinds of teas and factors influencing the formation of tea volatiles, including tea cultivar, growing environment and agronomic practices, processing method and storage of tea. The determination of tea volatiles and the relationship of active-aroma volatiles with the sensory qualities of tea are also discussed in the present paper.

  5. Volatile profile, lipid oxidation and protein oxidation of irradiated ready-to-eat cured turkey meat products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation had little effects on the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values in ready-to-eat (RTE) turkey meat products, while it increased protein oxidation at 4.5 kGy. The volatile profile analyses indicated that the amount of sulfur compounds increased linearly as doses increased in RTE turkey meat products. By correlation analysis, a positive correlation was found between benzene/ benzene derivatives and alcohols with lipid oxidation, while aldehydes, ketones and alkane, alkenes and alkynes were positively correlated with protein oxidation. Principle component analysis showed that irradiated meat samples can be discriminated by two categories of volatile compounds: Strecker degradation products and radiolytic degradation products. The cluster analysis of volatile data demonstrated that low-dose irradiation had minor effects on the volatile profile of turkey sausages (<1.5 kGy). However, as the doses increased, the differences between the irradiated and non-irradiated cured turkey products became significant.

  6. The effect of moisture on the release and enrichment of heavy metals during pyrolysis of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raclavská, Helena; Corsaro, Agnieszka; Hlavsová, Adéla; Juchelková, Dagmar; Zajonc, Ondřej

    2015-03-01

    The investigation of the effect of moisture on the release and enrichment of heavy metals during pyrolysis of municipal solid waste is essential. This is important owing to: (i) the increasing amount of metals in the solid product of pyrolysis beyond the normalised level; (ii) the effect of moisture on the overall cost of pyrolysis process; and (iii) the utilisation of pyrolysis products. Seven metals were selected for evaluation: arsenic, cadmium, chromium, mercury, nickel, lead, and vanadium. Pyrolysis experiments were conducted in a steel retort at 650 °C. The municipal solid waste samples with moisture contents of 0, 30, and 65 wt% were investigated. The relative enrichment index and release of heavy metals were evaluated individually for liquid and solid fractions. A consistent trend was observed for the majority of metals investigated. Reductions of relative enrichment index and release, i.e. an increase of volatility, were observed for arsenic, chromium, cadmium, nickel, and vanadium, with an increase of municipal solid waste moisture. Whereas divergent results were obtained for lead and mercury. The effect of moisture on the relative enrichment index and release was greater at 65 wt% moisture than at 30 wt% for lead, and more remarkable at 30 wt% than at 65 wt% for mercury.

  7. The effects of sulfur amendments on the geochemistry of sulfur, phosphorus and iron in the mangrove plant (Kandelia obovata (S. L.)) rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Li; Junyi, Yu; Jingchun, Liu; Chongling, Yan; Haoliang, Lu; Spencer, Kate L

    2017-01-30

    P (phosphorus) and Fe (iron) are limiting elements and S (sulfur) is an important element of the biogeochemical cycle in the mangrove environment. To assess the effects of sulfur on the geochemical cycling of Fe and P at the sediment-plant interface, the speciation distributions of Fe, P and S in sediments were examined. The data showed that higher proportions of amorphous Fe, Fe-bound phosphate, chromium reducible sulfur and elemental sulfur were found in the rhizosphere, while more crystalline Fe, exchangeable phosphate and acid-volatile sulfide were determined in the non-rhizosphere. Sulfate application induced an increase in the Ex-P concentration, high P accumulation and high iron plaque deposition in the roots. In conclusion, sulfate applications had a significant influence on the geochemical cycling of Fe and P in the sediments. It significantly curtailed the Fe and P limit to plant growth and enhanced plant resistance to the rugged surroundings in mangrove. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Surface moisture estimation in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yitong

    Surface moisture is an important parameter because it modifies urban microclimate and surface layer meteorology. The primary objectives of this paper are: 1) to analyze the impact of surface roughness from buildings on surface moisture in urban areas; and 2) to quantify the impact of surface roughness resulting from urban trees on surface moisture. To achieve the objectives, two hypotheses were tested: 1) the distribution of surface moisture is associated with the structural complexity of buildings in urban areas; and 2) The distribution and change of surface moisture is associated with the distribution and vigor of urban trees. The study area is Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. In the part of the morphology of urban trees, Warren Township was selected due to the limitation of tree inventory data. To test the hypotheses, the research design was made to extract the aerodynamic parameters, such as frontal areas, roughness length and displacement height of buildings and trees from Terrestrial and Airborne LiDAR data, then to input the aerodynamic parameters into the urban surface energy balance model. The methodology was developed for comparing the impact of aerodynamic parameters from LiDAR data with the parameters that were derived empirically from land use and land cover data. The analytical procedures are discussed below: 1) to capture the spatial and temporal variation of surface moisture, daily and hourly Land Surface Temperature (LST) were downscaled from 4 km to 1 km, and 960 m to 30 m, respectively, by regression between LST and various components that impact LST; 2) to estimate surface moisture, namely soil moisture and evapotranspiration (ET), land surfaces were classified into soil, vegetation, and impervious surfaces, using Linear Spectral Mixture Analysis (LSMA); 3) aerodynamic parameters of buildings and trees were extracted from Airborne and Terrestrial LiDAR data; 4) the Temperature-Vegetation-Index (TVX) method, and the Two-Source-Energy-Balance (TSEB

  9. Transporters in plant sulfur metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara eGigolashvili

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur is an essential nutrient, necessary for synthesis of many metabolites. The uptake of sulfate, primary and secondary assimilation, the biosynthesis, storage and final utilisation of sulfur (S containing compounds requires a lot of movement between organs, cells, and organelles. Efficient transport systems of S-containing compounds across the internal barriers or the plasma membrane and organellar membranes are therefore required. Here, we review a current state of knowledge of the transport of a range of S-containing metabolites within and between the cells as well as of their long distance transport. An improved understanding of mechanisms and regulation of transport will facilitate successful engineering of the respective pathways, to improve the plant yield, biotic interaction and nutritional properties of crops.

  10. Identification and origin of odorous sulfur compounds in cooked ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Caroline; Mercier, Frédéric; Tournayre, Pascal; Martin, Jean-Luc; Berdagué, Jean-Louis

    2014-07-15

    The aim of this work was to identify and gain further knowledge on the origin of sulfur compounds present in the volatile fraction of cooked ham, and on their role in the aroma of this product. To this end, we performed analyses by one- and two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, and olfactometry. Among the odorant sulfur compounds identified, three furans present in trace amounts proved to have very intense odours responsible for the "meaty, cooked ham" notes of this pork product. They were 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, 2-methyl-3-(methyldithio)furan and bis(2-methyl-3-furyl) disulphide. Addition of thiamine or cysteine also enabled us to study the effect of these odour precursors on the formation of odorant furans during the cooking of ham. The results revealed a direct link between the thermal degradation of thiamine and the formation of these compounds. By contrast, addition of cysteine in the presence of fructose or xylose did not appreciably increase their production.

  11. Moisture in multilayer ceramic capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoe, Daniel Noel

    When both precious metal electrode and base metal electrode (BME) capacitors were subjected to autoclave (120°C/100% RH) testing, it was found that the precious metal capacitors aged according to a well known aging mechanism (less than 3% from their starting values), but the BME capacitors degraded to below the -30% criterion at 500 hours of exposure. The reasons for this new failure mechanism are complex, and there were two theories that were hypothesized. The first was that there could be oxidation or corrosion of the nickel plates. The other hypothesis was that the loss of capacitance was due to molecular changes in the barium titanate. This thesis presents the evaluation of these hypotheses and the physics of the degradation mechanism. It is concluded by proof by elimination that there are molecular changes in the barium titanate. Furthermore, the continuous reduction in capacitor size makes the newer base metal electrode capacitors more vulnerable to moisture degradation than the older generation precious metal capacitors. In addition, standard humidity life testing, such as JESD-22 THB and HAST, will likely not uncover this problem. Therefore, poor reliability due to degradation of base metal electrode multilayer ceramic capacitors may catch manufacturers and consumers by surprise.

  12. Isotopic insights into microbial sulfur cycling in oil reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Hubbard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs (biosouring is often associated with secondary oil production where seawater containing high sulfate concentrations (~28 mM is injected into a reservoir to maintain pressure and displace oil. The sulfide generated from biosouring can cause corrosion of infrastructure, health exposure risks, and higher production costs. Isotope monitoring is a promising approach for understanding microbial sulfur cycling in reservoirs, enabling early detection of biosouring, and understanding the impact of souring. Microbial sulfate reduction is known to result in large shifts in the sulfur and oxygen isotope compositions of the residual sulfate, which can be distinguished from other processes that may be occurring in oil reservoirs, such as precipitation of sulfate and sulfide minerals. Key to the success of this method is using the appropriate isotopic fractionation factors for the conditions and processes being monitored. For a set of batch incubation experiments using a mixed microbial culture with crude oil as the electron donor, we measured a sulfur fractionation factor for sulfate reduction of -30‰. We have incorporated this result into a simplified 1D reservoir reactive transport model to highlight how isotopes can help discriminate between biotic and abiotic processes affecting sulfate and sulfide concentrations. Modeling results suggest that monitoring sulfate isotopes can provide an early indication of souring for reservoirs with reactive iron minerals that can remove the produced sulfide, especially when sulfate reduction occurs in the mixing zone between formation waters containing elevated concentrations of volatile fatty acids and injection water containing elevated sulfate. In addition, we examine the role of reservoir thermal, geochemical, hydrological, operational and microbiological conditions in determining microbial souring dynamics and hence the anticipated isotopic signatures.

  13. Spiral mining for lunar volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, H. H.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Sviatoslavsky, I. N.; Carrier, W. D., III

    Lunar spiral mining, extending outward from a periodically mobile central power and processing station represents an alternative for comparison with more traditional mining schemes. In this concept, a mining machine would separate regolith fines and extract the contained volatiles. Volatiles then would be pumped along the miner's support arm to the central station for refining and for export or storage. The basic architecture of the central processing station would be cylindrical. A central core area could house the power subsystem of hydrogen-oxygen engines or fuel cells. Habitat sections and other crew occupied areas could be arranged around the power generation core. The outer cylinder could include all volatile refining subsystems. Solar thermal power collectors and reflectors would be positioned on top of the central station. Long term exploitation of a volatile resource region would begin with establishment of a support base at the center of a long boundary of the region. The mining tract for each spiral mining system would extend orthogonal to this boundary. New spiral mining systems would be activated along parallel tracts as demand for lunar He-3 and other solar wind volatiles increased.

  14. Origin of moisture at Arctic sites

    OpenAIRE

    Jonassen, Trine

    2016-01-01

    The hydrological cycle is an important component in the understanding of the climate system, and a good understanding of the moisture transport in the atmosphere is important in a changing climate. The climate change may have large impact on the Arctic sites. In this thesis we look at the moisture source for NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Drilling Project) in Greenland (77.45°N, 51.05°W, 2484m a.s.l.) and Tustervatn in Norway (65.83°N, 13.92°E, 439m a.s.l.), by diagnosing the origin of moisture...

  15. Coal Moisture Estimation in Power Plant Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Palle; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Pedersen, Tom S.;

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of moisture content in raw coal feed to a power plant coal mill is of importance for efficient operation of the mill. The moisture is commonly measured approximately once a day using offline chemical analysis methods; however, it would be advantageous for the dynamic operation...... of the plant if an on-line estimate were available. In this paper we such propose an on-line estimator (an extended Kalman filter) that uses only existing measurements. The scheme is tested on actual coal mill data collected during a one-month operating period, and it is found that the daily measured moisture...

  16. Incorporating Sulfur Inside the Pores of Carbons for Advanced Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: An Electrolysis Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Li, Wen-Cui; Yang, Chao; Wang, Si-Qiong; Lu, An-Hui

    2016-01-26

    We have developed an electrolysis approach that allows effective and uniform incorporation of sulfur inside the micropores of carbon nanosheets for advanced lithium-sulfur batteries. The sulfur-carbon hybrid can be prepared with a 70 wt % sulfur loading, in which no nonconductive sulfur agglomerations are formed. Because the incorporated sulfur is electrically connected to the carbon matrix in nature, the hybrid cathode shows excellent electrochemical performance, including a high reversible capacity, good rate capability, and good cycling stability, as compared to one prepared using the popular melt-diffusion method.

  17. Sulfur globule oxidation in green sulfur bacteria is dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holkenbrink, Carina; Ocón Barbas, Santiago; Mellerup, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with extracellular globules of elemental sulfur as intermediate. Here we investigated which genes are involved in the formation and consumption of these sulfur globules in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. We show...... that sulfur globule oxidation is strictly dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) system. Deletion of dsrM/CT2244 or dsrT/CT2245 or the two dsrCABL clusters (CT0851-CT0854, CT2247-2250) abolished sulfur globule oxidation and prevented formation of sulfate from sulfide, whereas deletion of dsr...

  18. RICE PRICE VOLATILITY IN EAST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wati R.Y.E.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is analyzing the volatility and volatility spillover of monthly price of paddy at the level of farmers and consumers in 2010-2016. ARCH/GARCH used to analyze volatility and GARCH BEKK-model is used to analyze the volatility spillover. The results of the analysis show that price volatility at the farmer level is very high (extremely high volatility, price volatility at the consumer level is low (low volatility, and volatility spillover does not occur between the farmers and the consumers market. The need to guarantee an effective floor price as well as information disclosure related to the market commodity prices so that the pattern of prices transmission among interrelated markets can be symmetrical.

  19. The price of fixed income market volatility

    CERN Document Server

    Mele, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Fixed income volatility and equity volatility evolve heterogeneously over time, co-moving disproportionately during periods of global imbalances and each reacting to events of different nature. While the methodology for options-based "model-free" pricing of equity volatility has been known for some time, little is known about analogous methodologies for pricing various fixed income volatilities. This book fills this gap and provides a unified evaluation framework of fixed income volatility while dealing with disparate markets such as interest-rate swaps, government bonds, time-deposits and credit. It develops model-free, forward looking indexes of fixed-income volatility that match different quoting conventions across various markets, and uncovers subtle yet important pitfalls arising from naïve superimpositions of the standard equity volatility methodology when pricing various fixed income volatilities. The ultimate goal of the authors´ efforts is to make interest rate volatility standardization a valuable...

  20. Bacterial Disproportionation of Elemental Sulfur Inferred from a Field Study of Stable-Isotope Fractionations between Elemental Sulfur and Pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardisty, D.; Pratt, L. M.; Olyphant, G. A.; Bell, J.; Johnson, A.

    2011-12-01

    Elemental sulfur (ES) is a common product of pyrite oxidation during acid mine drainage (AMD), but bacterial disproportionation of ES has not previously been inferred in acidic environments. Pore water profiles were collected seasonally within a coal-mine waste deposit, Minnehaha, in Southwest Indiana that has been abandoned for over 30 years. Geochemical characterization and modeling were used to assess how the interactions between the sulfur and iron cycle are affected by seasonally dynamic hydrologic conditions. Pore waters were collected seasonally and concentrations of Fe-species and sulfur isotopic compositions of sulfate were determined. Additionally, a sediment core was collected and used for sequential extraction and isotopic characterization of solid-phase sulfur species including elemental sulfur (δ34Ses), pyrite (δ34Spy), acid-volatile sulfides, water-soluble sulfates, and acid-soluble sulfates. The dominant disulfide phase was found to be pyrite through x-ray diffraction of an additional sediment core. Sulfur isotope fractionations between δ34Spy and δ34Ses (Δ34Ses-py) of up to -33% are inferred to indicate bacterial disproportionation of ES in the presence of a non-limiting sulfide 'scrub' Fe(III). The initial isotopic composition, following formation from pyrite oxidation, is inferred from δ34Spy, found to be ≈ 8.75% at the study site. Although ES has previously been found to accumulate in acidic Fe(III)-rich pore waters, ES is typically assumed to account for less than 1% of the oxidized sulfur pool and measurements of the ES isotopic composition are often neglected during field studies of acid AMD. The pore waters at Minnehaha were seasonally suboxic with sharp transitions from Fe(III)- to Fe(II)- dominated conditions near the phreatic surface. It is hypothesized that the sulfide product of ES disproportionation, fractionated by up to -8.6%, is immediately re-oxidized to ES near the redox gradient via reaction with Fe(III). Sulfide re

  1. Observability of market daily volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroni, Filippo; Serva, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    We study the price dynamics of 65 stocks from the Dow Jones Composite Average from 1973 to 2014. We show that it is possible to define a Daily Market Volatility σ(t) which is directly observable from data. This quantity is usually indirectly defined by r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) where the r(t) are the daily returns of the market index and the ω(t) are i.i.d. random variables with vanishing average and unitary variance. The relation r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) alone is unable to give an operative definition of the index volatility, which remains unobservable. On the contrary, we show that using the whole information available in the market, the index volatility can be operatively defined and detected.

  2. Consistent ranking of volatility models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    2006-01-01

    result in an inferior model being chosen as "best" with a probability that converges to one as the sample size increases. We document the practical relevance of this problem in an empirical application and by simulation experiments. Our results provide an additional argument for using the realized...... variance in out-of-sample evaluations rather than the squared return. We derive the theoretical results in a general framework that is not specific to the comparison of volatility models. Similar problems can arise in comparisons of forecasting models whenever the predicted variable is a latent variable.......We show that the empirical ranking of volatility models can be inconsistent for the true ranking if the evaluation is based on a proxy for the population measure of volatility. For example, the substitution of a squared return for the conditional variance in the evaluation of ARCH-type models can...

  3. Oil Volatility Risk and Expected Stock Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Pan, Xuhui (Nick)

    After the financialization of commodity futures markets in 2004-05 oil volatility has become a strong predictor of returns and volatility of the overall stock market. Furthermore, stocks' exposure to oil volatility risk now drives the cross-section of expected returns. The difference in average...... return between the quintile of stocks with low exposure and high exposure to oil volatility is significant at 0.66% per month, and oil volatility risk carries a significant risk premium of -0.60% per month. In the post-financialization period, oil volatility risk is strongly related with various measures...

  4. Radiolysis of Sulfuric Acid, Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate, and Sulfuric Acid Tetrahydrate and Its Relevance to Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report laboratory studies on the 0.8 MeV proton irradiation of ices composed of sulfuric acid (H2SO4), sulfuric acid monohydrate (H2SO4 H2O), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (H2SO4 4H2O) between 10 and 180 K. Using infrared spectroscopy, we identify the main radiation products as H2O, SO2, (S2O3)x, H3O+, HSO4(exp -), and SO4(exp 2-). At high radiation doses, we find that H2SO4 molecules are destroyed completely and that H2SO4 H2O is formed on subsequent warming. This hydrate is significantly more stable to radiolytic destruction than pure H2SO4, falling to an equilibrium relative abundance of 50% of its original value on prolonged irradiation. Unlike either pure H2SO4 or H2SO4 H2O, the loss of H2SO4 4H2O exhibits a strong temperature dependence, as the tetrahydrate is essentially unchanged at the highest irradiation temperatures and completely destroyed at the lowest ones, which we speculate is due to a combination of radiolytic destruction and amorphization. Furthermore, at the lower temperatures it is clear that irradiation causes the tetrahydrate spectrum to transition to one that closely resembles the monohydrate spectrum. Extrapolating our results to Europa s surface, we speculate that the variations in SO2 concentrations observed in the chaotic terrains are a result of radiation processing of lower hydration states of sulfuric acid and that the monohydrate will remain stable on the surface over geological times, while the tetrahydrate will remain stable in the warmer regions but be destroyed in the colder regions, unless it can be reformed by other processes, such as thermal reactions induced by diurnal cycling.

  5. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.059-0.87 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, H{sub 2}S concentration, reaction pressure, and catalyst loading on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 62-78 v% hydrogen, 3,000-7,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,500-3,500 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 50 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an

  6. Moisture-induced stresses in glulam frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormarsson, Sigurdur; Gislason, Oskar V

    2016-01-01

    Wood is a hygroscopic and moisture-sensitive material that seeks to achieve equilibrium moisture content (EMC) with its surrounding environment. For softwood timber structures exposed to variations in climate throughout their service life, this behaviour results in variable moisture...... by hand. Accordingly, there is a need for advanced computer tools to study how the long-term stress behaviour of timber structures is affected by creep and cyclic variations in climate. A beam model to simulate the overall hygro-mechanical and visco-elastic behaviour of (inhomogeneous) glulam structures...... is presented. A two-dimensional transient, non-linear moisture transport model for wood is also developed and linked with this beam model. The combined models are used to study the long-term deformations and stresses in a curved frame structure exposed to both mechanical loading and cyclic climate conditions...

  7. MOISTURE MOVEMENT (WICKING) WITHIN GYPSUM WALLBOARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gypsum wallboard with repeated or prolonged exposure to water or excess moisture can lose its structural integrity and provide a growth medium for biological contaminants. Poorly sealed buildings, leaking or failed plumbing systems, or improperly constructed HVAC systems can all ...

  8. Moisture Transfer in Ventilated Facade Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olshevskyi Vyacheslav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the phenomenon of moisture transfer in the designs of ventilated facades (VF. The main ways of moisture transfer are defined. The negative factors connected with moisture accumulation and excessive moistening of insulation are given. The physical processes occurring in the gap of the building envelope due to saturation of air with water vapor are described. The dependence of the intensity of the mass transfer on the air velocity in the layer is considered. Much attention is paid to the selection of the optimum design of the facade, namely a system with or without grooved lines. The dependence of velocity and temperature on the width of the ventilated gap is established empirically for the constructions with open and closed grooves. Expediency of a design without grooves to effectively remove moisture is determined.

  9. Moisture-driven fracture in solid wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur; Olesen, John Forbes

    2011-01-01

    Moisture-induced fractures in solid timber create considerable problems for both building industries and sawmills. Cracks caused by kiln-drying of solid timber are extremely difficult to predict. This paper reports on experiments concerned with methods of reducing cracks in wood and with the crac......Moisture-induced fractures in solid timber create considerable problems for both building industries and sawmills. Cracks caused by kiln-drying of solid timber are extremely difficult to predict. This paper reports on experiments concerned with methods of reducing cracks in wood...... process, suggesting that sealing the ends of timber logs while in the green moisture state could considerably reduce the development of end-cracks. The initial moisture content and the shrinkage properties of the wood varied markedly from pith to bark. The importance of taking material inhomogeneities...

  10. Moisture Buffer Value of Building Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut; Time, Berit

    2007-01-01

    When building materials are in contact with indoor air they have some effect to moderate the variations of indoor humidity in occupied buildings. But so far there has been a lack of a standardized quantity to characterize the moisture buffering capability of materials. It has been the objective...... of a recent Nordic project to define such a quantity, and to declare it in the form of a NORDTEST method. The Moisture Buffer Value is the figure that has been developed in the project as a way to appraise the moisture buffer effect of materials, and the value is described in the paper. Also explained...... is a test protocol which expresses how materials should be tested for determination of their Moisture Buffer Value. Finally, the paper presents some of the results of a Round Robin Test on various typical building materials that has been carried out in the project....

  11. Biochemical and secondary metabolites changes under moisture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology ... In our study, the effects of low soil moisture and increased temperature on cassava physiology were investigated. ... Hydrothermal stress was described as a period of no rainfall for a period of eight weeks ...

  12. Characteristics of volatile compounds removal in biogas slurry of pig manure by ozone oxidation and organic solvents extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujun Wang; Lianshuang Feng; Xiaosong Zhao; Xiulan Ma; Jingmin Yang; Huiqing Liu; Sen Dou

    2013-01-01

    Biogas slurry is not suitable for liquid fertilizer due to its high amounts of volatile materials being of complicated composition and peculiar smell.In order to remove volatiles from biogas slurry efficiently,the dynamic headspace and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to clear the composition of volatiles.Nitrogen stripping and superfluous ozone were also used to remove volatiles from biogas slurry.The results showed that there were 21 kinds of volatile compounds in the biogas slurry,including sulfur compounds,organic amines,benzene,halogen generation of hydrocarbons and alkanes,some of which had strong peculiar smell.The volatile compounds in biogas slurry can be removed with the rate of 53.0% by nitrogen stripping and with rate of 81.7% by the oxidization and stripping of the superfluous ozone.On this basis,the removal rate of the volatile compounds reached 99.2%by chloroform and n-hexane extraction,and almost all of odor was eliminated.The contents of some dissolved organic compounds decreased obviously and however main plant nutrients had no significant change in the biogas slurry after being treated.

  13. Radar for Measuring Soil Moisture Under Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Mahta; Moller, Delwyn; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    2004-01-01

    A two-frequency, polarimetric, spaceborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system has been proposed for measuring the moisture content of soil as a function of depth, even in the presence of overlying vegetation. These measurements are needed because data on soil moisture under vegetation canopies are not available now and are necessary for completing mathematical models of global energy and water balance with major implications for global variations in weather and climate.

  14. Stability parameters of high moisture pet foods

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Salguero Carretero, J.; Gómez Díaz, R.; Sánchez Sánchez, E.; Vioque Amor, M.

    1996-01-01

    In the present work were analyzed the stability conditions of a group of high moisture petfoods. The samples considered complete preserves forming part of a widest study which are included lowmoisture animal feed. It was confirmed that in base to the individual water activity values (aw), pH and moisture contents of 20 analyzed samples, is not assured its stability in relation to microorganism spoilage, only exclusively with a sterilization process. It is discussed the utilization of Hurdle ...

  15. DOES ENERGY CONSUMPTION VOLATILITY AFFECT REAL GDP VOLATILITY? AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS FOR THE UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rashid

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper empirically examines the relation between energy consumption volatility and unpredictable variations in real gross domestic product (GDP in the UK. Estimating the Markov switching ARCH model we find a significant regime switching in the behavior of both energy consumption and GDP volatility. The results from the Markov regime-switching model show that the variability of energy consumption has a significant role to play in determining the behavior of GDP volatilities. Moreover, the results suggest that the impacts of unpredictable variations in energy consumption on GDP volatility are asymmetric, depending on the intensity of volatility. In particular, we find that while there is no significant contemporaneous relationship between energy consumption volatility and GDP volatility in the first (low-volatility regime, GDP volatility is significantly positively related to the volatility of energy utilization in the second (high-volatility regime.

  16. Analysis of seven salad rocket (Eruca sativa) accessions: The relationships between sensory attributes and volatile and non-volatile compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Luke; Methven, Lisa; Signore, Angelo; Oruna-Concha, Maria Jose; Wagstaff, Carol

    2017-03-01

    Sensory and chemical analyses were performed on accessions of rocket (Eruca sativa) to determine phytochemical influences on sensory attributes. A trained panel was used to evaluate leaves, and chemical data were obtained for polyatomic ions, amino acids, sugars and organic acids. These chemical data (and data of glucosinolates, flavonols and headspace volatiles previously reported) were used in Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to determine variables statistically important to sensory traits. Significant differences were observed between samples for polyatomic ion and amino acid concentrations. PCA revealed strong, positive correlations between glucosinolates, isothiocyanates and sulfur compounds with bitterness, mustard, peppery, warming and initial heat mouthfeel traits. The ratio between glucosinolates and sugars inferred reduced perception of bitter aftereffects. We highlight the diversity of E. sativa accessions from a sensory and phytochemical standpoint, and the potential for breeders to create varieties that are nutritionally and sensorially superior to existing ones.

  17. Cytochromes and iron sulfur proteins in sulfur metabolism of phototrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, U.

    1985-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria provides the bacteria with electrons for photosynthetic electron transport chain and, with energy. Assimilatory sulfate reduction is necessary for the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing cell components. Sulfide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur are the sulfur compounds most commonly used by phototrophic bacteria as electron donors for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Cytochromes or other electron transfer proteins, like high-potential-iron-sulfur protein (HIPIP) function as electron acceptors or donors for most enzymatic steps during the oxidation pathways of sulfide or thiosulfate. Yet, heme- or siroheme-containing proteins themselves undergo enzymatic activities in sulfur metabolism. Sirohemes comprise a porphyrin-like prosthetic group of sulfate reductase. eenzymatic reactions involve electron transfer. Electron donors or acceptors are necessary for each reaction. Cytochromes and iron sulfur problems, are able to transfer electrons.

  18. Measurement of heat and moisture exchanger efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, M

    2013-09-01

    Deciding between a passive heat and moisture exchanger or active humidification depends upon the level of humidification that either will deliver. Published international standards dictate that active humidifiers should deliver a minimum humidity of 33 mg.l(-1); however, no such requirement exists, for heat and moisture exchangers. Anaesthetists instead have to rely on information provided by manufacturers, which may not allow comparison of different devices and their clinical effectiveness. I suggest that measurement of humidification efficiency, being the percentage moisture returned and determined by measuring the temperature of the respired gases, should be mandated, and report a modification of the standard method that will allow this to be easily measured. In this study, different types of heat and moisture exchangers for adults, children and patients with a tracheostomy were tested. Adult and paediatric models lost between 6.5 mg.l(-1) and 8.5 mg.l(-1) moisture (corresponding to an efficiency of around 80%); however, the models designed for patients with a tracheostomy lost between 16 mg.l(-1) and 18 mg.l(-1) (60% efficiency). I propose that all heat and moisture exchangers should be tested in this manner and percentage efficiency reported to allow an informed choice between different types and models.

  19. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  20. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  1. Physiology of Haloalkaliphilic Sulfur-oxidizing Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Banciu, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    The inorganic sulfur oxidation by obligate haloalkaliphilic chemolithoautotrophs was only recently discovered and investigated. These autotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB), capable of oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds at moderate to high salt concentration and at high pH, can be divided into three genera belonging to the γ subdivision of the Proteobacteria: Thioalkalimicrobium, Thioalkalivibrio and Thioalkalispira. Their taxonomy, metabolic diversity and the potential application...

  2. Factors affecting the volatilization of volatile organic compounds from wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junya Intamanee

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the influence of the wind speed (U10cm, water depth (h and suspended solids (SS on mass transfer coefficient (KOLa of volatile organic compounds (VOCs volatilized from wastewater. The novelty of this work is not the method used to determine KOLa but rather the use of actual wastewater instead of pure water as previously reported. The influence of U10cm, h, and SS on KOLa was performed using a volatilization tank with the volume of 100-350 L. Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK was selected as a representative of VOCs investigated here in. The results revealed that the relationship between KOLa and the wind speeds falls into two regimes with a break at the wind speed of 2.4 m/s. At U10cm 2.4 m/s, KOLa increased more rapidly. The relationship between KOLa and U10cm was also linear but has a distinctly higher slope. For the KOLa dependency on water depth, the KOLa decreased significantly with increasing water depth up to a certain water depth after that the increase in water depth had small effect on KOLa. The suspended solids in wastewater also played an important role on KOLa. Increased SS resulted in a significant reduction of KOLa over the investigated range of SS. Finally, the comparison between KOLa obtained from wastewater and that of pure water revealed that KOLa from wastewater were much lower than that of pure water which was pronounced at high wind speed and at small water depth. This was due the presence of organic mass in wastewater which provided a barrier to mass transfer and reduced the degree of turbulence in the water body resulting in low volatilization rate and thus KOLa. From these results, the mass transfer model for predicting VOCs emission from wastewater should be developed based on the volatilization of VOCs from wastewater rather than that from pure water.

  3. Sulfonation of polyester fabrics by gaseous sulfur oxide activated by UV irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordoghli, Bessem; Khiari, Ramzi; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk; Sakli, Faouzi; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes an original technique aiming to improve the hydrophilic properties of polyester fibres. In this method, the sulfonation of the aromatic rings is carried out using gaseous sulfur trioxide activated by UV irradiations. Thus, exposing the polyester textile fabric to the UVC light (wavelength around 254 nm) under a stream of sulfur trioxide leads to the fixation of sbnd SO3H groups. The amounts of the fixed sulfonate groups depended on the reaction conditions. Evidence of grafting deduced from the measurements of hygroscopic properties was carried out by contact angle measurement, moisture regain as well as by measuring the rate of retention. SEM and FT-IR analysis, DSC and DTA/TGA thermograms showed that no significant modifications have occurred in the bulk of the treated PET fabrics.

  4. Changes of Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Fermented Sausage from Sulfur-fed Pork

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the quality of fermented sausages manufactured with processed sulfur-fed pigs. The fermented sausages were divided into two groups; one was manufactured with non sulfur-fed pigs (NP), the other one was made with processed sulfur-fed pigs (SP). No differences were found in moisture and fat contents (p>0.05) between NP and SP, but the protein and ash contents of SP were significantly higher than those of NP (p<0.05). The pH of SP was significantly lower than that of NP, and the water activity (aw) of SP was significantly higher than that of NP after 14 and 21 d (p<0.05). The TBA (Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance) value of SP was significantly lower than that of NP (p<0.05). The lightness and yellowness of NP were significantly higher than those of SP, whereas the redness of NP was lower than SP (p<0.05). The total plate count of SP was lower than that of NP (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in TPA (Texture profile analysis) between the two samples. SP showed significantly increased monounsaturated fatty acid (p<0.05) and decreased saturated fatty acid. Umami taste and richness in SP were significantly higher than in NP (p<0.05). Therefore, it is suggested that processed sulfur fed pigs may play a key role in enhancing the quality of meat products. PMID:28115883

  5. Characterization of sulfur oxidizing bacteria related to biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion in sludge digesters

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Bettina;Herzog, Bastian;Drewes, Jörg E.;Koch, Konrad;Müller, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Biogenic sulfuric acid (BSA) corrosion damages sewerage and wastewater treatment facilities but is not well investigated in sludge digesters. Sulfur/sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB) oxidize sulfur compounds to sulfuric acid, inducing BSA corrosion. To obtain more information on BSA corrosion in sludge digesters, microbial communities from six different, BSA-damaged, digesters were analyzed using culture dependent methods and subsequent polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient ...

  6. Active microbial sulfur disproportionation in the Mesoproterozoic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, David T; Wing, Boswell A; Farquhar, James; Kaufman, Alan J; Strauss, Harald; Lyons, Timothy W; Kah, Linda C; Canfield, Donald E

    2005-12-02

    The environmental expression of sulfur compound disproportionation has been placed between 640 and 1050 million years ago (Ma) and linked to increases in atmospheric oxygen. These arguments have their basis in temporal changes in the magnitude of 34S/32S fractionations between sulfate and sulfide. Here, we present a Proterozoic seawater sulfate isotope record that includes the less abundant sulfur isotope 33S. These measurements imply that sulfur compound disproportionation was an active part of the sulfur cycle by 1300 Ma and that progressive Earth surface oxygenation may have characterized the Mesoproterozoic.

  7. Modeling the Volatility in Global Fertilizer Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P-Y. Chen (Ping-Yu); C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); C-C. Chen (Chi-Chung); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe main purpose of this paper is to estimate the volatility in global fertilizer prices. The endogenous structural breakpoint unit root test and alternative volatility models, including the generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) model, Exponential GARCH (EGARC

  8. Fluctuation behaviors of financial return volatility duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hongli; Wang, Jun; Lu, Yunfan

    2016-04-01

    It is of significantly crucial to understand the return volatility of financial markets because it helps to quantify the investment risk, optimize the portfolio, and provide a key input of option pricing models. The characteristics of isolated high volatility events above certain threshold in price fluctuations and the distributions of return intervals between these events arouse great interest in financial research. In the present work, we introduce a new concept of daily return volatility duration, which is defined as the shortest passage time when the future volatility intensity is above or below the current volatility intensity (without predefining a threshold). The statistical properties of the daily return volatility durations for seven representative stock indices from the world financial markets are investigated. Some useful and interesting empirical results of these volatility duration series about the probability distributions, memory effects and multifractal properties are obtained. These results also show that the proposed stock volatility series analysis is a meaningful and beneficial trial.

  9. A Fractionally Integrated Wishart Stochastic Volatility Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Asai (Manabu); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThere has recently been growing interest in modeling and estimating alternative continuous time multivariate stochastic volatility models. We propose a continuous time fractionally integrated Wishart stochastic volatility (FIWSV) process. We derive the conditional Laplace transform of

  10. Stochastic Volatility and DSGE Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller

    This paper argues that a specification of stochastic volatility commonly used to analyze the Great Moderation in DSGE models may not be appropriate, because the level of a process with this specification does not have conditional or unconditional moments. This is unfortunate because agents may...

  11. Moisture and shelf life in sugar confections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, R; Lietha, R; Hartel, R W

    2010-02-01

    From hardening of marshmallow to graining of hard candies, moisture plays a critical role in determining the quality and shelf life of sugar-based confections. Water is important during the manufacturing of confections, is an important factor in governing texture, and is often the limiting parameter during storage that controls shelf life. Thus, an understanding of water relations in confections is critical to controlling quality. Water content, which is controlled during candy manufacturing through an understanding of boiling point elevation, is one of the most important parameters that governs the texture of candies. For example, the texture of caramel progresses from soft and runny to hard and brittle as the moisture content decreases. However, knowledge of water content by itself is insufficient to controlling stability and shelf life. Understanding water activity, or the ratio of vapor pressures, is necessary to control shelf life. A difference in water activity, either between candy and air or between two domains within the candy, is the driving force for moisture migration in confections. When the difference in water activity is large, moisture migration is rapid, although the rate of moisture migration depends on the nature of resistances to water diffusion. Barrier packaging films protect the candy from air whereas edible films inhibit moisture migration between different moisture domains within a confection. More recently, the concept of glass transition, or the polymer science approach, has supplemented water activity as a critical parameter related to candy stability. Confections with low moisture content, such as hard candy, cotton candy, and some caramels and toffees, may contain sugars in the amorphous or glassy state. As long as these products remain below their glass transition temperature, they remain stable for very long times. However, certain glassy sugars tend to be hygroscopic, rapidly picking up moisture from the air, which causes

  12. Business Cycles, Financial Crises, and Stock Volatility

    OpenAIRE

    G. William Schwert

    1989-01-01

    This paper shows that stock volatility increases during recessions and financial crises from 1834-1987. The evidence reinforces the notion that stock prices are an important business cycle indicator. Using two different statistical models for stock volatility, I show that volatility increases after major financial crises. Moreover. stock volatility decreases and stock prices rise before the Fed increases margin requirements. Thus, there is little reason to believe that public policies can con...

  13. Decomposing European bond and equity volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    The paper investigates volatility spillover from US and aggregate European asset markets into European national asset markets. A main contribution is that bond and equity volatilities are analyzed simultaneously. A new model belonging to the "volatilityspillover" family is suggested: The conditio...... (stock) volatilities are mainly influenced by bond (stock) effects. Global, regional, and local volatility effects are all important. The introduction of the euro is associated with a structural break....

  14. The january effect across volatility regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Agnani, Betty; Aray, Henry

    2007-01-01

    Using a Markov regime switching model, this article presents evidence on the well-known January effect on stock returns. The specification allows a distinction to be drawn between two regimes, one with high volatility and other with low volatility. We obtain a time-varying January effect that is, in general, positive and significant in both volatility regimes. However, this effect is larger in the high volatility regime. In sharp contrast with most previous literature we find two major result...

  15. Exponential Smoothing, Long Memory and Volatility Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proietti, Tommaso

    Extracting and forecasting the volatility of financial markets is an important empirical problem. The paper provides a time series characterization of the volatility components arising when the volatility process is fractionally integrated, and proposes a new predictor that can be seen as extensi...... methods for forecasting realized volatility, and that the estimated model confidence sets include the newly proposed fractional lag predictor in all occurrences....

  16. Possible Sources of Polar Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, P. H.

    2011-12-01

    Extensive analyses of returned Apollo samples demonstrated that the Moon is extremely volatile poor. While this conclusion remains true, various measurements since the late 90's implicated the presence of water: e.g., enhanced reflection of circularly polarized radar signals and suppression of epithermal neutrons near the poles. More recently, traces of H2O have been discovered inside volcanic glass, along with more significant amounts residing in hydrous minerals (apatite) returned from both highland and mare landing sites. Three recent lunar missions (DIXI, M3, Cassini) identified hydrous phases on/near the lunar surface, whereas the LCROSS probe detected significant quantities of volatiles (OH, H2O and other volatiles) excavated by the Centaur impact. These new mission results and sample studies, however, now allow testing different hypotheses for the generation, trapping, and replenishment of these volatiles. Solar-proton implantation must contribute to the hydrous phases in the lunar regolith in order to account for the observed time-varying abundances and occurrence near the lunar equator. This also cannot be the entire story. The relatively low speed LCROSS-Centaur impact (2.5km/s) could not vaporize such hydrous minerals, yet emissions lines of OH (from the thermal disassociation of H2O), along with other compounds (CO2, NH2) were detected within the first second, before ejecta could reach sunlight. Telescopic observations by Potter and Morgan (1985) discovered a tenuous lunar atmosphere of Na, but the LCROSS UV/Vis spectrometer did not detect the Na-D line until after the ejecta reached sunlight (along with a line pair attributed to Ag). With time, other volatile species emerged (OH, CO). The LAMP instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter had a different viewpoint from the side (rather than from above) and detected many other atomic species release by the LCROSS-Centaur impact. Consequently, it appears that there is a stratigraphy for trapped species

  17. Geochemistry of iron,sulfur and related heavy metals in metal-polluted Taihu Lake sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hong-Bin; FAN Cheng-Xin; DING Shi-Ming; ZHANG Lu; ZHONG Ji-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    To understand the geochemical characteristics of iron and sulfur and the extent of iron-sulfide minerals influencing heavy metal behaviour in metal-polluted sediments of Talhu Lake,two sites,in Meiliang Bay (ML) and Wuli Lake (WL),were selected to study the fractionation of iron,sulfur and related heavy metals.There were relatively high concentrations of Fe2+ and low concentrations of total S2- in porewaters,indicating that conditions in these sediments favored iron reduction.The concentrations of acid volatile sulfides in sediments were 1.9-9.6μmol g-1 at ML and 1.0-11.7 μmol g-1 at WL,both in the range of values detected in unpolluted lakes.Pyrite-S was 10.2-49.4 μmol g-1 at ML and 10.333.0 μmol g-1 at WL,accounting for more than 69% of the reduced inorganic sulfur at both sites.The low degree of sulphidization (<14%) and pyritization (<10%) indicate that sulfate may be the limiting factor for pyrite formation.The extractability of Mn,Cu,Pb,Zn,Ni,and Cr in sediments all suggest that sulfides are not the major binding phase for these metals during early diagenesis.Sulfur may play a modest role in the geochemistry of iron and traced metals in the sediments.

  18. Effect of hydroxytyrosol on quality of sulfur dioxide-free red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, R; Ruiz-Moreno, M J; Garde-Cerdán, T; Puertas, B; Moreno-Rojas, J M; Gonzalo-Diago, A; Guerrero, R F; Ortiz, V; Cantos-Villar, E

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the feasibility of two commercial products enriched in hydroxytyrosol (HT) as alternative to sulfur dioxide in Syrah red wines was evaluated. The HT enriched products came from synthesis and from olive waste. Wines treated with HT were compared with wines treated with sulfur dioxide at two winemaking stages: bottling and after 6 months of storage in bottle. Minor differences were found in enological parameters and volatile composition (esters, alcohols and acids). Significant differences were observed in color related parameters and sensory analysis. HT wines improved color parameters as well as scents and tasting at bottling. However, after 6 months of storage in bottle HT wines were more oxidized than SO2 wines. The olfactometry profile of HT wines supported sensory analysis. HT wines showed new odorant zones from both the added product and oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Soil moisture variability across different scales in an Indian watershed for satellite soil moisture product validation

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Gurjeet

    2016-05-05

    Strategic ground-based sampling of soil moisture across multiple scales is necessary to validate remotely sensed quantities such as NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) product. In the present study, in-situ soil moisture data were collected at two nested scale extents (0.5 km and 3 km) to understand the trend of soil moisture variability across these scales. This ground-based soil moisture sampling was conducted in the 500 km2 Rana watershed situated in eastern India. The study area is characterized as sub-humid, sub-tropical climate with average annual rainfall of about 1456 mm. Three 3x3 km square grids were sampled intensively once a day at 49 locations each, at a spacing of 0.5 km. These intensive sampling locations were selected on the basis of different topography, soil properties and vegetation characteristics. In addition, measurements were also made at 9 locations around each intensive sampling grid at 3 km spacing to cover a 9x9 km square grid. Intensive fine scale soil moisture sampling as well as coarser scale samplings were made using both impedance probes and gravimetric analyses in the study watershed. The ground-based soil moisture samplings were conducted during the day, concurrent with the SMAP descending overpass. Analysis of soil moisture spatial variability in terms of areal mean soil moisture and the statistics of higher-order moments, i.e., the standard deviation, and the coefficient of variation are presented. Results showed that the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of measured soil moisture decreased with extent scale by increasing mean soil moisture. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  20. Involvement of a broccoli COQ5 methyltransferase in the production of volatile selenium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Yuan, Youxi; Yang, Yong; Rutzke, Michael; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Kochian, Leon V; Li, Li

    2009-10-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for animals and humans but becomes toxic at high dosage. Biologically based Se volatilization, which converts Se into volatile compounds, provides an important means for cleanup of Se-polluted environments. To identify novel genes whose products are involved in Se volatilization from plants, a broccoli (Brassica oleracea var italica) cDNA encoding COQ5 methyltransferase (BoCOQ5-2) in the ubiquinone biosynthetic pathway was isolated. Its function was authenticated by complementing a yeast coq5 mutant and by detecting increased cellular ubiquinone levels in the BoCOQ5-2-transformed bacteria. BoCOQ5-2 was found to promote Se volatilization in both bacteria and transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. Bacteria expressing BoCOQ5-2 produced an over 160-fold increase in volatile Se compounds when they were exposed to selenate. Consequently, the BoCOQ5-2-transformed bacteria had dramatically enhanced tolerance to selenate and a reduced level of Se accumulation. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing BoCOQ5-2 volatilized three times more Se than the vector-only control plants when treated with selenite and exhibited an increased tolerance to Se. In addition, the BoCOQ5-2 transgenic plants suppressed the generation of reactive oxygen species induced by selenite. BoCOQ5-2 represents, to our knowledge, the first plant enzyme that is not known to be directly involved in sulfur/Se metabolism yet was found to mediate Se volatilization. This discovery opens up new prospects regarding our understanding of the complete metabolism of Se and may lead to ways to modify Se-accumulator plants with increased efficiency for phytoremediation of Se-contaminated environments.

  1. Graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres with ultra-high sulfur loading for high energy density lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Guo, Jinxin; Zhang, Jun; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery with high theoretical energy density is one of the most promising energy storage systems for electric vehicles and intermittent renewable energy. However, due to the poor conductivity of the active material, considerable weight of the electrode is occupied by the conductive additives. Here we report a graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite (S-nanosphere@G) with sulfur content up to 91 wt% as the high energy density cathode material for Li-S battery. The sulfur nanospheres with diameter of 400-500 nm are synthesized through a solution-based approach with the existence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Then the sulfur nanospheres are uniformly wrapped by conductive graphene sheets through the electrostatic interaction between graphene oxide and PVP, followed by reducing of graphene oxide with hydrazine. The design of graphene wrapped sulfur nanoarchitecture provides flexible conductive graphene coating with void space to accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur and to minimize polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the S-nanosphere@G nanocomposite with 91 wt% sulfur shows a reversible initial capacity of 970 mA h g-1 and an average columbic efficiency > 96% over 100 cycles at a rate of 0.2 C. Taking the total mass of electrode into account, the S-nanosphere@G composite is a promising cathode material for high energy density Li-S batteries.

  2. Volatile Compounds Produced by Lactobacillus paracasei During Oat Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Mi; Oh, Jieun; Hurh, Byung-Serk; Jeong, Gwi-Hwa; Shin, Young-Keum; Kim, Young-Suk

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the profiles of volatile compounds produced by Lactobacillus paracasei during oat fermentation using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with headspace solid-phase microextraction method. A total of 60 compounds, including acids, alcohols, aldehydes, esters, furan derivatives, hydrocarbons, ketones, sulfur-containing compounds, terpenes, and other compounds, were identified in fermented oat. Lipid oxidation products such as 2-pentylfuran, 1-octen-3-ol, hexanal, and nonanal were found to be the main contributors to oat samples fermented by L. paracasei with the level of 2-pentylfuran being the highest. In addition, the contents of ketones, alcohols, acids, and furan derivatives in the oat samples consistently increased with the fermentation time. On the other hand, the contents of degradation products of amino acids, such as 3-methylbutanal, benzaldehyde, acetophenone, dimethyl sulfide, and dimethyl disulfide, decreased in oat samples during fermentation. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to discriminate the fermented oat samples according to different fermentation times. The fermented oats were clearly differentiated on PCA plots. The initial fermentation stage was mainly affected by aldehydes, whereas the later samples of fermented oats were strongly associated with acids, alcohols, furan derivatives, and ketones. The application of PCA to data of the volatile profiles revealed that the oat samples fermented by L. paracasei could be distinguished according to fermentation time. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  3. Oil Volatility Risk and Expected Stock Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Pan, Xuhui (Nick)

    After the financialization of commodity futures markets in 2004-05 oil volatility has become a strong predictor of returns and volatility of the overall stock market. Furthermore, stocks' exposure to oil volatility risk now drives the cross-section of expected returns. The difference in average r...

  4. Volatiles in inter-specific bacterial interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyc, O.; Zweers, H.; De Boer, W.; Garbeva, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures o

  5. Volatiles in inter-specific bacterial interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyc, O.; Zweers, H.; De Boer, W.; Garbeva, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures

  6. Ammonia volatilization from intensively managed dairy pastures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussink, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis are (i) to quantify NH 3 volatilization from grassland, (ii) to gain understanding of the NH3 volatilization processes on grassland and (iii) to study measures how to reduce NH 3 volatilization from gra

  7. Oil Volatility Risk and Expected Stock Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Pan, Xuhui (Nick)

    After the financialization of commodity futures markets in 2004-05 oil volatility has become a strong predictor of returns and volatility of the overall stock market. Furthermore, stocks' exposure to oil volatility risk now drives the cross-section of expected returns. The difference in average r...

  8. Cost Linkages Transmit Volatility Across Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Daniel Xuyen; Schaur, Georg

    to link the domestic and export supply costs. This theoretical contribution has two new implications for the exporting firm. First, the demand volatility in the foreign market now directly affects the firm's domestic sales volatility. Second, firms hedge domestic demand volatility with exports. The model...

  9. Moisture monitoring in waste disposal surface barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandelik, Alex; Huebner, Christof

    2003-05-01

    Surface barriers for waste disposal sites should prevent waste water and gas emission into the environment. It is necessary to assess their proper operation by monitoring the water regime of the containment. A set of three new water content measuring devices has been developed that provide an economical solution for monitoring the moisture distribution and water dynamic. They will give an early warning service if the barrier system is at risk of being damaged. The cryo soil moisture sensor 'LUMBRICUS' is an in situ self-calibrating absolute water content measuring device. It measures moisture profiles at spot locations down to 2.5 m depth with an accuracy of better than 1.5% and a depth resolution of 0.03 m. The sensor inherently measures density changes and initial cracks of shrinking materials like clay minerals. The large area soil moisture sensor 'TAUPE' is a moisture sensitive electric cable network to be buried in the mineral barrier material of the cover. A report will be given with results and experiences on an exemplary installation at the Waste Disposal Facility Karlsruhe-West. 800 m2 of the barrier construction have been continuously monitored since December 1997. Volumetric water content differences of 1.5% have been detected and localised within 4 m. This device is already installed in two other waste disposal sites. A modified 'TAUPE' was constructed for the control of tunnels and river dams as well. Thin sheet moisture sensor 'FORMI' is specifically designed for moisture measurements in liners like bentonite, textile and plastic. Due to its flexibility it follows the curvature of the liner. The sensor measures independently from neighbouring materials and can be matched to a wide range of different thickness of the material. The sensors are patented in several countries.

  10. Contribution of the novel sulfur-producing adjunct Lactobacillus nodensis to flavor development in Gouda cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Elaine; Mills, Susan; Dobson, Alleson; Serrano, L Mariela; Hannon, John; Ryan, Siobhan P; Kilcawley, Kieran N; Brandsma, Johannes B; Meijer, Wilco C; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2017-06-01

    We assessed the efficacy of Lactobacillus nodensis CSK964 as an adjunct culture in Gouda cheese under various industrial conditions. We set up 4 different systems: a direct vat inoculum with and without adjunct using the calf rennet Kalase, and an undefined bulk starter culture with and without adjunct using the microbial rennet Milase (both rennets from CSK Food Enrichment, Ede, the Netherlands). During ripening, we subjected the cheeses to the following analyses: viability of starter and adjunct cells, composition, proteolysis, and flavor development by detection of sulfur compounds and descriptive sensory analysis. In general, the presence of Lb. nodensis increased secondary proteolysis and influenced cheese flavor, particularly in relation to volatile sulfur compounds; hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol were present in higher abundances in cheeses containing Lb. nodensis. The primary starter also influenced the range of volatile sulfur compounds produced. Methanethiol and dimethyl disulfide were more abundant in the nisin-producing direct vat inoculum cheese with adjunct; hydrogen sulfide was more prevalent when bulk starter culture was used with Lb. nodensis. Sensory analysis revealed that the direct vat inoculum cheese with adjunct scored significantly better in terms of smell and taste than the direct vat inoculum cheese without adjunct and lacked the dominant sulfur flavors of the bulk starter cheese with adjunct. Subsequent analysis using lead acetate paper and modified motility broth as indicators of hydrogen sulfide production confirmed that Lb. nodensis produced hydrogen sulfide in broth and in the cheese matrix. This study suggests that the inclusion of Lb. nodensis as an adjunct culture can significantly alter the flavor profile of the final cheese. However, the selection of a suitable primary starter is imperative to ensure a desirable product. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springston, Stephen R [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures sulfur dioxide based on absorbance of UV light at one wavelength by SO2 molecules which then decay to a lower energy state by emitting UV light at a longer wavelength. Specifically, SO2 + hυ1 →SO2 *→SO2 + hυ2 The emitted light is proportional to the concentration of SO2 in the optical cell. External communication with the analyzer is available through an Ethernet port configured through the instrument network of the AOS systems. The Model 43i-TLE is part of the i-series of Thermo Scientific instruments. The i-series instruments are designed to interface with external computers through the proprietary Thermo Scientific iPort Software. However, this software is somewhat cumbersome and inflexible. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has written an interface program in National Instruments LabView that both controls the Model 43i-TLE Analyzer AND queries the unit for all measurement and housekeeping data. The LabView vi (the software program written by BNL) ingests all raw data from the instrument and outputs raw data files in a uniform data format similar to other instruments in the AOS and described more fully in Section 6.0 below.

  12. Should we use a simple or complex model for moisture recycling and atmospheric moisture tracking?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ent, van der R.J.; Tuinenburg, O.A.; Knoche, H.R.; Kunstmann, H.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares state-of-the-art atmospheric moisture tracking models. Such models are typically used to study the water component of coupled land and atmosphere models, in particular quantifying moisture recycling and the source-sink relations between evaporation and precipitation. There are se

  13. Should we use a simple or complex model for moisture recycling and atmospheric moisture tracking?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Ent, R.J.; Tuinenburg, O.A.; Knoche, H.R.; Kunstmann, H.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares three state-of-the-art atmospheric moisture tracking models. Such models are typically used to study the water component of coupled land and atmosphere models, in particular quantifying moisture recycling and the source-sink relations between evaporation and precipitation. Howeve

  14. Should we use a simple or complex model for moisture recycling and atmospherix moisture tracking?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Ent, R.J.; Tuinenburg, O.A.; Knoche, H.R.; Kunstmann, H.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares state-of-the-art atmospheric moisture tracking models. Such models are typically used to study the water component of coupled land and atmosphere models, in particular quantifying moisture recycling and the source-sink relations between evaporation and precipitation. There are se

  15. Graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres with ultra-high sulfur loading for high energy density lithium–sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ya; Guo, Jinxin; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: zhangjun@zjnu.cn; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui, E-mail: gaohuidu@zjnu.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite with 91 wt% S is prepared. • It shows highly improved electrochemical performance as cathode for Li–S cell. • The PVP coating and conductive graphene minimize polysulfides dissolution. • The flexible coatings with void space accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur. - Abstract: Lithium–sulfur (Li–S) battery with high theoretical energy density is one of the most promising energy storage systems for electric vehicles and intermittent renewable energy. However, due to the poor conductivity of the active material, considerable weight of the electrode is occupied by the conductive additives. Here we report a graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite (S-nanosphere@G) with sulfur content up to 91 wt% as the high energy density cathode material for Li–S battery. The sulfur nanospheres with diameter of 400–500 nm are synthesized through a solution-based approach with the existence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Then the sulfur nanospheres are uniformly wrapped by conductive graphene sheets through the electrostatic interaction between graphene oxide and PVP, followed by reducing of graphene oxide with hydrazine. The design of graphene wrapped sulfur nanoarchitecture provides flexible conductive graphene coating with void space to accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur and to minimize polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the S-nanosphere@G nanocomposite with 91 wt% sulfur shows a reversible initial capacity of 970 mA h g{sup −1} and an average columbic efficiency > 96% over 100 cycles at a rate of 0.2 C. Taking the total mass of electrode into account, the S-nanosphere@G composite is a promising cathode material for high energy density Li–S batteries.

  16. Emissions of sulfur-containing odorants, ammonia, and methane from pig slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Adamsen, Anders Peter S.; Nørgaard, Jan Værum

    2010-01-01

    Supplementation of benzoic acid to pig diets reduces the pH of urine and may thereby affect emissions of ammonia and other gases from slurry, including sulfur-containing compounds that are expected to play a role in odor emission. Over a period of 112 d, we investigated hydrogen sulfide (H2S...... from the slurry of the control treatment, which came from pigs fed according to Danish recommendations for amino acids and minerals. The emission patterns of volatile S compounds suggested an intense cycling between pools of organic S in the slurries, with urinary sulfate as the main source. Diet...... and benzoic acid treatments, which caused a significant increase in emissions of especially MT, but also of DMDS. In conclusion, addition of 2% benzoic acid to pig diets effectively reduced ammonia volatilization, but interactions with dietary S may increase odor problems....

  17. Sulfur-carbon nanocomposites and their application as cathode materials in lithium-sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Chengdu; Dudney, Nancy J.; Howe, Jane Y.

    2017-08-01

    The invention is directed in a first aspect to a sulfur-carbon composite material comprising: (i) a bimodal porous carbon component containing therein a first mode of pores which are mesopores, and a second mode of pores which are micropores; and (ii) elemental sulfur contained in at least a portion of said micropores. The invention is also directed to the aforesaid sulfur-carbon composite as a layer on a current collector material; a lithium ion battery containing the sulfur-carbon composite in a cathode therein; as well as a method for preparing the sulfur-composite material.

  18. Snow cover and soil moisture in mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, N.; Lehning, M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil moisture is an important parameter of the climate system. It constrains evapotranspiration of plants and it functions as a storage of water, giving it an economic value, e.g. for agriculture. Furthermore, soil moisture is an important factor for predicting flood risk. In mountainous areas with a seasonal snow cover, the spatial distribution of snow depth is strongly influencing the spatial variation of soil moisture. To assess potential flooding situations during snow melt and rain on snow events in particular but for any heavy precipitation event in the mountains, it is important to understand the influence of the snow cover on soil status with respect to liquid and solid water. Only if this is known, the reaction of the soil i.e. amount of runoff, storage or melt, on additional water input can be assessed. For an operational assessment of the soil moisture state in the Swiss Alps at 140 measurement sites for snow and avalanche forecasting (IMIS network), the SNOWPACK model has been extended with a soil module, solving the Richards equation for the matrix flow. The modelling is validated with vertical profile measurements of soil moisture at meteorological stations in an Alpine catchment near Davos, Switzerland. It was found that the combination of a physical based snowpack model with a Richards equation solver seems to provide an adequate description of soil moisture fluctuations, especially in near surface layers. Soil moisture fluctuations, both measured and modelled, are strongly reduced when a snow cover is present. The measurements also revealed a strong increase in soil moisture, accompanied by a daily cycle in soil moisture during snow melt, extending down to 120cm depth. When soil properties from literature were assumed for the soil type in the vertical profile, the daily cycle in the model during snow melt was restricted mainly to the top layers, while observations show also a reaction in deeper layers. These observations are consistent with the

  19. Level Shifts in Volatility and the Implied-Realized Volatility Relation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; de Magistris, Paolo Santucci

    to the multivariate case of the univariate level shift technique by Lu and Perron (2008). An application to the S&P500 index and a simulation experiment show that the recently documented empirical properties of strong persistence in volatility and forecastability of future realized volatility from current implied...... volatility, which have been interpreted as long memory (or fractional integration) in volatility and fractional cointegration between implied and realized volatility, are accounted for by occasional common level shifts....

  20. Sulfur Reduction in Acid Rock Drainage Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentino, A.P.; Weijma, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Sanchez Andrea, I.

    2015-01-01

    Microbiological suitability of acidophilic sulfur reduction for metal recovery was explored by enriching sulfur reducers from acidic sediments at low pH (from 2 to 5) with hydrogen, glycerol, methanol and acetate as electron donors at 30°C. The highest levels of sulfide in the enrichments were detec

  1. Ambient Air Monitoring for Sulfur Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Joseph; Newman, Leonard

    1973-01-01

    A literature review of analytical techniques available for the study of compounds at low concentrations points up some of the areas where further research is needed. Compounds reviewed are sulfur dioxide, sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate and bisulfate, metal sulfates, hydrogen sulfide, and organic sulfides. (BL)

  2. Comparative Genomics of Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Davenport, C; Tümmler, B

    2010-01-01

    Eleven completely sequenced Chlorobi genomes were compared in oligonucleotide usage, gene contents, and synteny. The green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are equipped with a core genome that sustains their anoxygenic phototrophic lifestyle by photosynthesis, sulfur oxidation, and CO(2) fixation. Whole...... weight of 10(6), and are probably instrumental for the bacteria to generate their own intimate (micro)environment....

  3. Heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions of sulfur aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, Alexander

    2011-11-18

    Sulfur aromatic compounds, such as mono-, di-, tri-, and tetraalkyl-substituted thiophene, benzothiophenes, dibenzothiophenes, are the molecular components of many fossils (petroleum, oil shale, tar sands, bitumen). Structural units of natural, cross-linked heteroaromatic polymers present in brown coals, turf, and soil are similar to those of sulfur aromatic compounds. Many sulfur aromatic compounds are found in the streams of petroleum refining and upgrading (naphthas, gas oils) and in the consumer products (gasoline, diesel, jet fuels, heating fuels). Besides fossils, the structural fragments of sulfur aromatic compounds are present in molecules of certain organic semiconductors, pesticides, small molecule drugs, and in certain biomolecules present in human body (pheomelanin pigments). Photocatalysis is the frontier area of physical chemistry that studies chemical reactions initiated by absorption of photons by photocatalysts, that is, upon electronic rather than thermal activation, under "green" ambient conditions. This review provides systematization and critical review of the fundamental chemical and physicochemical information on heterogeneous photocatalysis of sulfur aromatic compounds accumulated in the last 20-30 years. Specifically, the following topics are covered: physicochemical properties of sulfur aromatic compounds, major classes of heterogeneous photocatalysts, mechanisms and reactive intermediates of photocatalytic reactions of sulfur aromatic compounds, and the selectivity of these reactions. Quantum chemical calculations of properties and structures of sulfur aromatic compounds, their reactive intermediates, and the structure of adsorption complexes formed on the surface of the photocatalysts are also discussed.

  4. Sulfur Reduction in Acid Rock Drainage Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentino, A.P.; Weijma, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Sanchez Andrea, I.

    2015-01-01

    Microbiological suitability of acidophilic sulfur reduction for metal recovery was explored by enriching sulfur reducers from acidic sediments at low pH (from 2 to 5) with hydrogen, glycerol, methanol and acetate as electron donors at 30°C. The highest levels of sulfide in the enrichments were detec

  5. Halophilic and haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Banciu, H.; Robertson, L.A.; Kuenen, J.G.; Muntyan, M.S.; Muyzer, G.; Rosenberg, E.; DeLong, F.; Delong, E.; Lory, S.; Stackebrandt, E.; Thompson, F.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) represent an important functional group of microorganisms responsible for the dark oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds generated by sulfidogens. Until recently, only a single genus of halophilic SOB (Halothiobacillus) has been described, and nothing was

  6. Halophilic and haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Banciu, H.; Robertson, L.A.; Kuenen, J.G.; Muntyan, M.S.; Muyzer, G.; Rosenberg, E.; DeLong, F.; Delong, E.; Lory, S.; Stackebrandt, E.; Thompson, F.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) represent an important functional group of microorganisms responsible for the dark oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds generated by sulfidogens. Until recently, only a single genus of halophilic SOB (Halothiobacillus) has been described, and nothing was

  7. The adsorption of sulfur by microporous materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The sorption of sulfur by the zeolites NaX (= 13X) and CaA (= 5A) and an activated charcoal prepared from sugar was investigated at temperatures between 150 and 350°C and relative sulfur pressures between 10−4 and 10−1. The adsorbate-adsorbate interaction indicated by the S-shaped isotherm for the z

  8. Economic comparison of hydrogen production using sulfuric acid electrolysis and sulfur cycle water decomposition. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farbman, G.H.; Krasicki, B.R.; Hardman, C.C.; Lin, S.S.; Parker, G.H.

    1978-06-01

    An evaluation of the relative economics of hydrogen production using two advanced techniques was performed. The hydrogen production systems considered were the Westinghouse Sulfur Cycle Water Decomposition System and a water electrolysis system employing a sulfuric acid electrolyte. The former is a hybrid system in which hydrogen is produced in an electrolyzer which uses sulfur dioxide to depolarize the anode. The electrolyte is sulfuric acid. Development and demonstration efforts have shown that extremely low cell voltages can be achieved. The second system uses a similar sulfuric acid electrolyte technology in water electrolysis cells. The comparative technoeconomics of hydrogen produced by the hybrid Sulfur Cycle and by water electrolysis using a sulfuric acid electrolyte were determined by assessing the performance and economics of 380 million SCFD plants, each energized by a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). The evaluation concluded that the overall efficiencies of hydrogen production, for operating parameters that appear reasonable for both systems, are approximately 41% for the sulfuric acid electrolysis and 47% for the hybrid Sulfur Cycle. The economic evaluation of hydrogen production, based on a 1976 cost basis and assuming a developed technology for both hydrogen production systems and the VHTRs, indicated that the hybrid Sulfur Cycle could generate hydrogen for a total cost approximately 6 to 7% less than the cost from the sulfuric acid electrolysis plant.

  9. The economic value of realized volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Feunou, Bruno; Jacobs, Kris

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have documented that daily realized volatility estimates based on intraday returns provide volatility forecasts that are superior to forecasts constructed from daily returns only. We investigate whether these forecasting improvements translate into economic value added. To do so, we...... develop a new class of affine discrete-time option valuation models that use daily returns as well as realized volatility. We derive convenient closed-form option valuation formulas, and we assess the option valuation properties using Standard & Poor’s (S&P) 500 return and option data. We find...... that realized volatility reduces the pricing errors of the benchmark model significantly across moneyness, maturity, and volatility levels....

  10. Effect of Additive on Sulfur-fixation Process of Sulfur-fixation Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Jun-lin; QIU Jian-rong; ZHAO Gai-ju; LOU Jin-ping; HAN Chun-hua

    2003-01-01

    The crystallization behavior of desulfurization product is directly related to its high-temperatureresistant ability. Effects of the additive on the sulfur-fixation efficiency of the Ba-sulfur-fixation agent and also on the crystallization behavior of the sulfur-fixation product were studied when CaCO3 and BaCO3 were used as the desulfurization agent and MgO and SrCO3 used as the assistant sulfur-fixation agent. The result shows that increase of sulfur-fixation capability for the additive is not owe to their directly react to form sulfate or interact with CaCO3 and BaCO3 to form composite mineral heat-resistant in high temperature, but owe to their activation to sulfur-fixation reaction of the sulfur-fixation agent.

  11. Arbitrage and Volatility in Chinese Stock's Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shu Quan; Ito, Takao; Zhang, Jianbo

    From the point of view of no-arbitrage pricing, what matters is how much volatility the stock has, for volatility measures the amount of profit that can be made from shorting stocks and purchasing options. With the short-sales constraints or in the absence of options, however, high volatility is likely to mean arbitrage from stock market. As emerging stock markets for China, investors are increasingly concerned about volatilities of Chinese two stock markets. We estimate volatility's models for Chinese stock markets' indexes using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method and GARCH. We find that estimated values of volatility parameters are very high for all data frequencies. It suggests that stock returns are extremely volatile even at long term intervals in Chinese markets. Furthermore, this result could be considered that there seems to be arbitrage opportunities in Chinese stock markets.

  12. Forecasting volatility of crude oil markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sang Hoon [Department of Business Administration, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, 660-701 (Korea); Kang, Sang-Mok; Yoon, Seong-Min [Department of Economics, Pusan National University, Busan, 609-735 (Korea)

    2009-01-15

    This article investigates the efficacy of a volatility model for three crude oil markets - Brent, Dubai, and West Texas Intermediate (WTI) - with regard to its ability to forecast and identify volatility stylized facts, in particular volatility persistence or long memory. In this context, we assess persistence in the volatility of the three crude oil prices using conditional volatility models. The CGARCH and FIGARCH models are better equipped to capture persistence than are the GARCH and IGARCH models. The CGARCH and FIGARCH models also provide superior performance in out-of-sample volatility forecasts. We conclude that the CGARCH and FIGARCH models are useful for modeling and forecasting persistence in the volatility of crude oil prices. (author)

  13. Emollients, moisturizers, and keratolytic agents in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluhr, Joachim W; Cavallotti, Claudia; Berardesca, Enzo

    2008-01-01

    Emollients, moisturizers, and keratolytic agents are essential in the topical treatment of psoriasis. They are adjuvants for classic treatments and help to reduce the scale load of individual patients. The major role for emollients and moisturizers is the supportive role in normalizing hyperproliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis; furthermore, they exert anti-inflammatory effects, for example, through physiologic lipids. Subsequently, an improved barrier function and stratum corneum hydration makes the epidermis more resistant to external stressors and reduces the induction of Koebner phenomena. Most of the emollients are lipid-rich (sometimes oily). The keratolytic agents, especially salicylic acid, and higher concentration of urea should be used in the initial keratolytic phase, whereas moisturizing products and emollients are especially suitable in the intermediate phase and the chronic/remission phase of psoriasis. They should be combined with bath oils.

  14. Soil moisture needs in earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engman, Edwin T.

    1992-01-01

    The author reviews the development of passive and active microwave techniques for measuring soil moisture with respect to how the data may be used. New science programs such as the EOS, the GEWEX Continental-Scale International Project (GCIP) and STORM, a mesoscale meteorology and hydrology project, will have to account for soil moisture either as a storage in water balance computations or as a state variable in-process modeling. The author discusses future soil moisture needs such as frequency of measurement, accuracy, depth, and spatial resolution, as well as the concomitant model development that must proceed concurrently if the development in microwave technology is to have a major impact in these areas.

  15. Chirospecific analysis of plant volatiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkachev, A V [N.N. Vorozhtsov Novosibirsk Institute of Organic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-31

    Characteristic features of the analysis of plant volatiles by enantioselective gas (gas-liquid) chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry are discussed. The most recent advances in the design of enantioselective stationary phases are surveyed. Examples of the preparation of the most efficient phases based on modified cyclodextrins are given. Current knowledge on the successful analytical resolution of different types of plant volatiles (aliphatic and aromatic compounds and mono-, sesqui- and diterpene derivatives) into optical antipodes is systematically described. Chiral stationary phases used for these purposes, temperature conditions and enantiomer separation factors are summarised. Examples of the enantiomeric resolution of fragrance compounds and components of plant extracts, wines and essential oils are given.

  16. Chirospecific analysis of plant volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachev, A. V.

    2007-10-01

    Characteristic features of the analysis of plant volatiles by enantioselective gas (gas-liquid) chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry are discussed. The most recent advances in the design of enantioselective stationary phases are surveyed. Examples of the preparation of the most efficient phases based on modified cyclodextrins are given. Current knowledge on the successful analytical resolution of different types of plant volatiles (aliphatic and aromatic compounds and mono-, sesqui- and diterpene derivatives) into optical antipodes is systematically described. Chiral stationary phases used for these purposes, temperature conditions and enantiomer separation factors are summarised. Examples of the enantiomeric resolution of fragrance compounds and components of plant extracts, wines and essential oils are given.

  17. Money, banks and endogenous volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Pere Gomis-Porqueras

    2000-01-01

    In this paper I consider a monetary growth model in which banks provide liquidity, and the government fixes a constant rate of money creation. There are two underlying assets in the economy, money and capital. Money is dominated in rate of return. In contrast to other papers with a larger set of government liabilities, I find a unique equilibrium when agents' risk aversion is moderate. However, indeterminacies and endogenous volatility can be observed when agents are relatively risk averse.

  18. Volatility at Karachi Stock Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Aslam Farid; Javed Ashraf

    1995-01-01

    Frequent “crashes” of the stock market reported during the year 1994 suggest that the Karachi bourse is rapidly converting into a volatile market. This cannot be viewed as a positive sign for this developing market of South Asia. Though heavy fluctuations in stock prices are not an unusual phenomena and it has been observed at almost all big and small exchanges of the world. Focusing on the reasons for such fluctuations is instructive and likely to have important policy implications. Proponen...

  19. Effects of soy sauce and packaging method on volatile compounds and lipid oxidation of cooked irradiated beef patties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Soo-Yeon; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Kim, Yong-Jae; Ham, Yun-Kyung; Lee, Choong-Hee; Choi, Yun-Sang; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effect of soy sauce on volatile compounds and lipid oxidation of cooked irradiated beef patties. Sulfur-containing volatile components, which are produced by irradiation, were not found in all treatments. Volatile components derived from soy sauce, such as 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, acetic acid, 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-methyl-1-butanol, were detected in beef patties containing soy sauce regardless of irradiation and packaging method. Volatile aldehydes, including hexanal, significantly decreased the irradiated beef patty prepared with soy sauce compared to those of irradiated beef patty made with NaCl at 1 day and 5 days after irradiation. In addition, combined use of vacuum packaging and soy sauce treatments could inhibit the formation of volatile compounds and 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances during chilled storage. Therefore, the use of soy sauce in cooked and irradiated beef could reduce the production of volatile components associated with the irradiation-induced off-flavor and lipid oxidation.

  20. DETERMINATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF VOLATILE COMPOUNDS OF PASTIRMA USING SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION/GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Demirok

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pastırma, a traditional dry cured Turkish meat product, has a great number of specific aroma compounds, which occur as a result of lipid oxidation, protein degradation and formulation of çemen paste. These compounds give characteristic flavor to pastırma and the main objective of this study was to determine the nature of these compounds. Fifty-eight volatile compounds, grouped into nine chemical classes were identified using solid phase microextraction technique (SPME coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Aldehydes, mostly lipid oxidation products, were determined as the major chemical group, representing 17.54-78.02% of total volatile compounds. The major volatile aldehyde was hexanal (2.36-55.41%, followed by 2-methyl-2-butenal (0.97-14.69% and then heptanal (0.29-4.77%. Sulfur compounds possibly derived from spices or formed by proteolysis of sulfur-containing amino acids, were the second most abundant group, with concentrations ranging between 6.04 and 50.60%. Other important volatile compounds of pastırma were aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic ketones, hydrocarbons, esters, alcohols, acids, terpenes, and furans.

  1. Human skin volatiles: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormont, Laurent; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Cohuet, Anna

    2013-05-01

    Odors emitted by human skin are of great interest to biologists in many fields; applications range from forensic studies to diagnostic tools, the design of perfumes and deodorants, and the ecology of blood-sucking insect vectors of human disease. Numerous studies have investigated the chemical composition of skin odors, and various sampling methods have been used for this purpose. The literature shows that the chemical profile of skin volatiles varies greatly among studies, and the use of different sampling procedures is probably responsible for some of these variations. To our knowledge, this is the first review focused on human skin volatile compounds. We detail the different sampling techniques, each with its own set of advantages and disadvantages, which have been used for the collection of skin odors from different parts of the human body. We present the main skin volatile compounds found in these studies, with particular emphasis on the most frequently studied body regions, axillae, hands, and feet. We propose future directions for promising experimental studies on odors from human skin, particularly in relation to the chemical ecology of blood-sucking insects.

  2. Kinetics of aerobic oxidation of volatile sulfur compounds in wastewater and biofilm from sewers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudelle, Elise Alice; Vollertsen, Jes; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2013-01-01

    -spot downstream of a force main and the other was a gravity sewer transporting young aerobic wastewater. The kinetics of VSC oxidation for both wastewater and suspended biofilm samples followed a first-order rate equation. The average values of the reaction rate constants demonstrated the following order......) and total inorganic sulfide, which have all been reported as the main constituents of foul sewer gas. Samples of wastewater and biofilm for the experiments were obtained from two locations that differed significantly with respect to the occurrence of VSCs. One location represented an odor hot...

  3. Kinetics of aerobic oxidation of volatile sulfur compounds in wastewater and biofilm from sewers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudelle, Elise Alice; Vollertsen, Jes; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild;

    2013-01-01

    ) and total inorganic sulfide, which have all been reported as main constituents of foul sewer gas. Samples of wastewater and biofilm for the experiments were obtained from two locations that differed significantly with respect to occurrence of VSCs. One location represented an odor hot-spot downstream......: total inorganic sulfide > EtSH > MeSH >> DMS. Except for total inorganic sulfide oxidation in wastewater, kinetic parameters for each VSC were of similar magnitude for the two locations. In the wastewater from the odor hot-spot, sulfide oxidation rates were approximately 12 times faster than...

  4. Volatile Sulfur Compounds as The Cause of Bad Breath : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, Albert; Winkel, Edwin G.

    2013-01-01

    Bad breath or halitosis is a concern for millions of people. Halitosis is subdivided into intraoral and extraoral halitosis, depending on the place where it originates. About 90% of halitosis originates within the oral cavity and includes bacterial reservoirs such as the dorsum of the tongue, where

  5. Volatile organic sulfur compounds in anaerobic sludge and sediments: biodegradation and toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leerdam, van R.C.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Lomans, B.P.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of environmental samples was screened for anaerobic degradation of methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, dimethylsulfide, and dimethyldisulfide. All sludge and sediment samples degraded methanethiol, dimethylsulfide, and dimethyldisulfide anaerobically. In contrast, ethanethiol and prop

  6. Volatile and non-volatile/semi-volatile compounds and in vitro bioactive properties of Chilean Ulmo (Eucryphia cordifolia Cav.) honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Francisca; Torres, Paulina; Oomah, B Dave; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Massarioli, Adna Prado; Martín-Venegas, Raquel; Albarral-Ávila, Vicenta; Burgos-Díaz, César; Ferrer, Ruth; Rubilar, Mónica

    2017-04-01

    Ulmo honey originating from Eucryphia cordifolia tree, known locally in the Araucania region as the Ulmo tree is a natural product with valuable nutritional and medicinal qualities. It has been used in the Mapuche culture to treat infections. This study aimed to identify the volatile and non-volatile/semi-volatile compounds of Ulmo honey and elucidate its in vitro biological properties by evaluating its antioxidant, antibacterial, antiproliferative and hemolytic properties and cytotoxicity in Caco-2 cells. Headspace volatiles of Ulmo honey were isolated by solid-phase microextraction (SPME); non-volatiles/semi-volatiles were obtained by removing all saccharides with acidified water and the compounds were identified by GC/MS analysis. Ulmo honey volatiles consisted of 50 compounds predominated by 20 flavor components. Two of the volatile compounds, lyrame and anethol have never been reported before as honey compounds. The non-volatile/semi-volatile components of Ulmo honey comprised 27 compounds including 13 benzene derivatives accounting 75% of the total peak area. Ulmo honey exhibited weak antioxidant activity but strong antibacterial activity particularly against gram-negative bacteria and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the main strain involved in wounds and skin infections. At concentrations >0.5%, Ulmo honey reduced Caco-2 cell viability, released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in a dose dependent manner in the presence of foetal bovine serum (FBS). The wide array of volatile and non-volatile/semi-volatile constituents of Ulmo honey rich in benzene derivatives may partly account for its strong antibacterial and antiproliferative properties important for its therapeutic use. Our results indicate that Ulmo honey can potentially inhibit cancer growth at least partly by modulating oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of volatile components in a Chinese fish sauce,Fuzhou Yulu, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-fan YANG; Shen-ru CHEN; Hui NI; Xing-qian YE

    2008-01-01

    Volatile components of Fuzhou Yulu, a Chinese fish sauce, were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and two pretreatment methods, i.e., purge and trap (P&T) GC-MS and ethyl acetate extraction followed by GC-MS, were compared. P&T-GC-MS method determined 12 components, including sulfur-containing constituents (such as dimethyl disulfide), nitrogen-containing constituents (such as pyrazine derivatives), aldehydes and ketones. Ethyl ace tate extraction fol-lowed by GC-MS method detected 10 components, which were mainly volatile organic acids (such as benzenepropanoic acid) and esters. Neither of the two methods detected alcohols or trimethylamine. This study offers an important reference to determine volatile flavor components of traditional fish sauce through modem analysis methods.

  8. Comparison of the moisturization efficacy of two vaginal moisturizers: Pectin versus polycarbophil technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Michael; Kane, Michael

    2002-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the vaginal deposition and moisturization of two vaginal moisturizers, Summer's Eve (SE), based on pectin, and Replens (Rp), based on polycarbophil, in a double-blind crossover study design. Fifty-one female patients were each randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups. After a one-week washout period, the products were used for two weeks. After another one-week washout period, product assignments were switched. Colposcopy examinations were performed at the beginning and at the end of each product use. Of the forty-seven patients completing the study, 41 (87%) were found to have no vaginal residue after SE vaginal moisturizer, while only 25 (53%) were found to have no vaginal residue after using Rp vaginal moisturizer. No difference in relief of vaginal dryness or in product acceptance was found between the two products. This study shows that the use of SE vaginal moisturizer, based on pectin, resulted in significantly less vaginal residue compared to Rp vaginal moisturizer, based on polycarbophil, and in comparable relief of vaginal dryness. These results strongly suggest that bioadhesion is not important in vaginal moisturizers.

  9. The effects of bacterial volatile emissions on plant abiotic stress tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Min eLiu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are beneficial plant symbionts that have been successfully used in agriculture to increase seedling emergence, plant weight, crop yield, and disease resistance. Some PGPR strains release volatile organic compounds (VOCs that can directly and/or indirectly mediate increases in plant biomass, disease resistance, and abiotic stress tolerance. This mini-review focuses on the enhancement of plant abiotic stress tolerance by bacterial VOCs. The review considers how PGPR VOCs induce tolerance to salinity and drought stress and also how they improve sulfur and iron nutrition in plants. The potential complexities in evaluating the effects of PGPR VOCs are also discussed.

  10. Chemical Composition of the Volatile Components of Tropaeolum majus L. (Garden Nasturtium from North Western Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. BENYELLES

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil from Tropaeolum majus L. aerial parts, a plant native to North Western Algeria, was obtained by hydrodistillation. The oil volatile components were identified by a combination of gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID, GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS techniques, and NMR spectroscopy. Nine components representing 92.0 % of the essential oil total (GC/FID chromatogram were identified. The most abundant compounds were benzyl isothiocyanate (82.5 %, benzene acetonitrile (3.9 % and 2-phenylethyl isovalerate (2.9 %. Higher content in nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds accounting to 86.4 % of the volatile fraction composition of T. majus were quantified.

  11. Fundamental mechanisms for conversion of volatiles in biomass and waste combustion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glarborg, P.; Hindiyarti, L.; Marshall, P.; Livbjerg, H.; Dagaut, P.; Jensen, Anker; Frandsen, Flemming

    2007-03-15

    This project deals with the volatile oxidation chemistry in biomass and waste fired systems, emphasizing reactions important for pollutants emissions (NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, HCl, aerosols). The project aims to extend existing models and databases with a number of chemical subsystems that are presently not well understood, but are particularly important in connection with combustion of biomass and waste. The project is divided into 3 tasks. Task 1: Conversion of chlorine, sulfur and alkali gas phase components in combustion of biomass. Task 2: Formation mechanisms for NO{sub x} in the freeboard of grate combustion of biomass. Task 3: Oxidation mechanisms for oxygenated hydrocarbons in the volatiles from pyrolysis of biomass. (au)

  12. Sulfur nanocrystals anchored graphene composite with highly improved electrochemical performance for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Dong, Zimin; Wang, Xiuli; Zhao, Xuyang; Tu, Jiangping; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2014-12-01

    Two kinds of graphene-sulfur composites with 50 wt% of sulfur are prepared using hydrothermal method and thermal mixing, respectively. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectra mapping show that sulfur nanocrystals with size of ∼5 nm dispersed on graphene sheets homogeneously for the sample prepared by hydrothermal method (NanoS@G). While for the thermal mixed graphene-sulfur composite (S-G mixture), sulfur shows larger and uneven size (50-200 nm). X-ray Photoelectron Spectra (XPS) reveals the strong chemical bonding between the sulfur nanocrystals and graphene. Comparing with the S-G mixture, the NanoS@G composite shows highly improved electrochemical performance as cathode for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The NanoS@G composite delivers an initial capacity of 1400 mAh g-1 with the sulfur utilization of 83.7% at a current density of 335 mA g-1. The capacity keeps above 720 mAh g-1 over 100 cycles. The strong adherence of the sulfur nanocrystals on graphene immobilizes sulfur and polysulfides species and suppressed the "shuttle effect", resulting higher coulombic efficiency and better capacity retention. Electrochemical impedance also suggests that the strong bonding enabled rapid electronic/ionic transport and improved electrochemical kinetics, therefore good rate capability is obtained. These results demonstrate that the NanoS@G composite is a very promising candidate for high-performance Li-S batteries.

  13. Modelling heat and moisture transfer in buildings. Applications to indoor thermal and moisture control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Xiaoshu

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this thesis is to firstly develop a mathematical model for predicting heat and moisture transfer in buildings exposed to outdoor climatic conditions presented as temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation and wind velocity. Secondly, the heat and moisture transfer model is used to theoretically study the possibilities of controlling indoor thermal and moisture levels into an allowable range by means of heating indoor air and ventilating outdoor air. Starting from an extensive literature, it is indicated that less attention has been devoted to the topic that is similar to this thesis work. The reviewed literature has been classified into different categories in a consistent and systematic way. In modelling heat and moisture transfer in a building, the building structure is split into two components: building indoor air and building envelopes, most of which are porous media. The heat and moisture transfer equations are based on the fundamental thermodynamic relations. Darcy's law, Fick's law and Fourier's law are used in describing the transfer equations. The resultant nonlinear system of partial differential equations is discretised by using the finite element method or the finite difference method. The time marching scheme, Crank-Nicolson scheme, is adopted to advance the solution in time. The final solution provides transient distributions of thermal, moisture content and gaseous pressure for the envelopes as well as the transient thermal and moisture content for indoor air. The model program, named as HMTB, is validated with the real test houses. HMTB has a highly flexibility: It has been used to simulate the multiphase drying process of a porous medium. It has been adopted to predict transient thermal and moisture contents for buildings, transient indoor moisture generation rates and condensation potential on the wall surfaces. In studying the applications of indoor thermal and moisture control, HMTB has been applied to

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a novel carboxyl group containing (copolyimide with sulfur in the polymer backbone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Mrsevic

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Soluble functional (copolyimides are of great interest in the area of separation processes or optical applications, due to their excellent mechanical-, thermal- and optical properties, their superior processability and the ability to adapt their properties to a wide range of special applications. Therefore, two series of novel (copolyimides containing fluorinated sulfur- and carboxylic acid groups consisting of 4,4′-(hexafluoroisopropylidenedi(phthalic anhydride (6FDA, 3,5-diaminobenzoic acid (DABA, 4,4′-diaminodiphenylsulfide (4,4′-SDA and 3,3′-diaminodiphenylsulfone (3,3′-DDS were synthesized in a two-step polycondensation reaction. The synthesized copolymers were characterized by using NMR, FTIR, GPC, and DSC. Furthermore, with regard to processing and potential applications, the thermal stability, solubility in common organic solvents, moisture uptake, and transparency were investigated. Compared to commercially available transparent polymers, i.e., polymethylmethacrylate and cycloolefin polymers, the sulfur (copolyimides containing carboxyl groups showed much higher glass-transition temperatures, comparably low moisture uptake and high transmission at the sodium D-line. Furthermore, good solubility in commonly used organic solvents makes them very attractive as high-performance coating materials.

  15. Kinetics of the degradation of sulfur mustard on ambient and moist concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevett, Carol A.S. [SAIC, Gunpowder Branch, P.O. Box 68, APG, MD 21010-0068 (United States)], E-mail: carol.brevett@us.army.mil; Sumpter, Kenneth B. [U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, 5183 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5424 (United States); Nickol, Robert G. [SAIC, Gunpowder Branch, P.O. Box 68, APG, MD 21010-0068 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    The rate of degradation of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, was measured on ambient and moist concrete using {sup 13}C Solid State Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SSMAS NMR). Three samples of concrete made by the same formulation, but differing in age and alkalinity were used. The sulfur mustard eventually degraded to thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane via the intermediate sulfonium ions CH-TG, H-TG, H-2TG and O(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}S{sup +}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH on all of the concrete samples, and in addition formed 8-31% vinyl moieties on the newer, more alkaline concrete samples. This is the first observation of the formation of O(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}S{sup +}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH on a solid substrate. The addition of 2-chloroethanol to concrete on which mustard had fully degraded to thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane resulted in the formation of O(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}S{sup +}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH, thus demonstrating the reversibility of sulfur mustard degradation pathways. The sulfur mustard degradation half-lives on ambient concrete at 22 deg. C ranged from 3.5 to 54 weeks. When the substrates were moistened, the degradation half-lives at 22 deg. C ranged from 75 to 350 h. The degradation of sulfur mustard occurred more quickly at elevated temperatures and with added water. The non-volatile toxic sulfonium ions persisted for months to years on concrete at 22 deg. C and weeks to months on concrete at 35 deg. C, before decomposing to the relatively non-toxic compounds thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane.

  16. Kinetics of the degradation of sulfur mustard on ambient and moist concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevett, Carol A S; Sumpter, Kenneth B; Nickol, Robert G

    2009-02-15

    The rate of degradation of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, was measured on ambient and moist concrete using (13)C Solid State Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SSMAS NMR). Three samples of concrete made by the same formulation, but differing in age and alkalinity were used. The sulfur mustard eventually degraded to thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane via the intermediate sulfonium ions CH-TG, H-TG, H-2TG and O(CH(2)CH(2))(2)S(+)CH(2)CH(2)OH on all of the concrete samples, and in addition formed 8-31% vinyl moieties on the newer, more alkaline concrete samples. This is the first observation of the formation of O(CH(2)CH(2))(2)S(+)CH(2)CH(2)OH on a solid substrate. The addition of 2-chloroethanol to concrete on which mustard had fully degraded to thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane resulted in the formation of O(CH(2)CH(2))(2)S(+)CH(2)CH(2)OH, thus demonstrating the reversibility of sulfur mustard degradation pathways. The sulfur mustard degradation half-lives on ambient concrete at 22 degrees C ranged from 3.5 to 54 weeks. When the substrates were moistened, the degradation half-lives at 22 degrees C ranged from 75 to 350h. The degradation of sulfur mustard occurred more quickly at elevated temperatures and with added water. The non-volatile toxic sulfonium ions persisted for months to years on concrete at 22 degrees C and weeks to months on concrete at 35 degrees C, before decomposing to the relatively non-toxic compounds thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane.

  17. Comparison of original and adulterated Oscypek cheese based on volatile and sensory profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Majcher

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. This paper describes a preliminary studies aiming to compare volatile fractions of Oscypek and oscypek-like cheeses with SPME-GC/TOFMS to determine the possibility of applying for future routine investigation of adulteration of Polish PDO cheeses. Material and methods. For sensory and volatiles analysis four different cheeses were compared: Oscypek cheese prepared according to PDO regulations and three oscypek-like cheeses: type “CM industry” – produced from pasteurised cow milk in dairy plant, type “EM-industry” – produced from pasteurised ewe milk in dairy plant and type “CM-shep­herds” – produced from unpasteurised cow milk in shepherds huts. Isolation of volatiles was performed with PDMS/CAR/DVB fiber. Compounds identification was performed using gas chromatography coupled to time of flight mass spectrometry. Results. Headspace SPME-GC/TOFMS method revealed a total of 51 compounds in Oscypek and oscypek-like cheeses representing nine chemical groups such as: free fatty acids, esters, ketones, alcohols, aldehydes, furans and furanones, phenols, sulfur compounds and terpenes. Results showed that original Oscypek, PDO labeled was represented by the largest number of volatiles identified compared to oscypek-like cheeses, which also showed a relationship with sensory analysis where Oscypek has been described as a cheese with mostly developed flavour bouquet. Additionally it could be observed that cheeses made from unpasteurised milk using traditional method of preparation in shepherds huts (Oscypek and CM-shepherds had superior volatile profiles and enhanced aroma compared to cheeses made industrially. Conclusions. The differences showed in volatile fraction of original Oscypek cheese and adulterated ones provide possibility of employing SPME-GC/TOFMS technique to find adulteration in PDO labelled Oscypek.

  18. New methods to quantify NH3 volatilization from fertilized surface soil with urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Alves

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous N losses from soil are considerable, resulting mostly from ammonia volatilization linked to agricultural activities such as pasture fertilization. The use of simple and accessible measurement methods of such losses is fundamental in the evaluation of the N cycle in agricultural systems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantification methods of NH3 volatilization from fertilized surface soil with urea, with minimal influence on the volatilization processes. The greenhouse experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with 13 treatments and five replications, with the following treatments: (1 Polyurethane foam (density 20 kg m-3 with phosphoric acid solution absorber (foam absorber, installed 1, 5, 10 and 20 cm above the soil surface; (2 Paper filter with sulfuric acid solution absorber (paper absorber, 1, 5, 10 and 20 cm above the soil surface; (3 Sulfuric acid solution absorber (1, 5 and 10 cm above the soil surface; (4 Semi-open static collector; (5 15N balance (control. The foam absorber placed 1 cm above the soil surface estimated the real daily rate of loss and accumulated loss of NH3N and proved efficient in capturing NH3 volatized from urea-treated soil. The estimates based on acid absorbers 1, 5 and 10 cm above the soil surface and paper absorbers 1 and 5 cm above the soil surface were only realistic for accumulated N-NH3 losses. Foam absorbers can be indicated to quantify accumulated and daily rates of NH3 volatilization losses similarly to an open static chamber, making calibration equations or correction factors unnecessary.

  19. Relationships between Microbial Activities and Subduction-related Outgassing and Volatile Flux at Aleutian Arc Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.; Lopez, T. M.; Fischer, T. P.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2016-12-01

    Subduction-related processes, including the movement and alteration of carbon compounds, are an important component of global geochemical cycles. Actively degassing volcanoes of the Aleutian Island arc offer interesting opportunities to not only characterize the composition and abundance of volatiles, but also to identify the origin of the discharging gases (e.g. mantle, organic matter, or carbonates). Taking this approach a step further, microbial activities in and around volcanic fumarole areas may impact the composition and flux of reduced volcanic gases, either through their modification or their assimilation into fixed biomass. Microbiological studies of these systems can be used to develop predictive models to complement those based upon geochemical data while providing greater understanding of the causal relationships between microbial populations and their environment, and ultimately refine estimates of volcanic outgassing. Coupled fumarole soil and gas samples were collected from several Aleutian Island volcanoes in 2015 (Gareloi, Kanaga, Kiska, Little Sitkin) and 2016 (Okmok, Resheschnoi). DNA was extracted from the soil and used to describe microbial community composition, while gas samples were analyzed through chromatography and mass spectrometry. Preliminary data suggests a relationship between the abundance of specific groups of prokaryotes known to metabolize reduced gases, such as sulfur-oxidizers and methanotrophs, and the abundances of the degassing volatiles, including sulfur dioxide and methane. Ongoing studies aimed at investigating the relationship between the genomic composition of the fumarolic microbial community and the physical and chemical properties of the soil (i.e. mineralogy, bulk geochemistry, nutrient concentration, gas flux, and environmental measurements) are underway. These data will be used to evaluate the potential for microbial communities to remove volcanic carbon and store it as biomass, or to modify the volatile carbon

  20. Microwave moisture measurements of flowing biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production of pelleted biomass is a significant emerging industry in the United States. A primary quality attribute of pelleted biomass is moisture content. This parameter is critical in pricing, binding, combustion, and storage of pelleted biomass. In order to produce pellets of a high quality mois...

  1. Moisture buffer capacity of different insulation materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2004-01-01

    lead to more durable constructions. In this paper, a large range of very different thermal insulation materials have been tested in specially constructed laboratory facilities to determine their moisture buffer capacity. Both isothermal and nonisothermal experimental set-ups have been used...

  2. Assessment of NGNP Moisture Ingress Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Landman

    2011-04-01

    An assessment of modular HTGR moisture ingress events, making use of a phenomena identification and ranking process, was conducted by a panel of experts in the related areas for the U.S. next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) design. Consideration was given mainly to the prismatic core gas-cooled reactor configurations incorporating a steam generator within the primary circuit.

  3. Moisture in organic coatings - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, G.K. van der; Adan, O.C.G.

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on transport and equilibrium sorption of moisture in polymer films and organic coatings. Polymeric material forms the continuous phase of a coating and is therefore important for transport properties. Besides polymer, coatings consist of pigments and fillers and various additives,

  4. Analysis of Joint Masonry Moisture Content Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Kohta [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Adding insulation to the interior side of walls of masonry buildings in cold (and wet) climates may cause performance and durability problems. Some concerns, such as condensation and freeze-thaw, have known solutions, but wood members embedded in the masonry structure will be colder (and potentially wetter) after an interior insulation retrofit. Moisture content & relative humidity were monitored at joist ends in historic mass brick masonry walls retrofitted with interior insulation in a cold climate (Zone 5A); data were collected from 2012-2015. Eleven joist ends were monitored in all four orientations. One limitation of these results is that the renovation is still ongoing, with limited wintertime construction heating and no permanent occupancy to date. Measurements show that many joists ends remain at high moisture contents, especially at north- and east-facing orientations, with constant 100% RH conditions at the worst cases. These high moisture levels are not conducive for wood durability, but no evidence for actual structural damage has been observed. Insulated versus non-insulated joist pockets do not show large differences. South facing joists have safe (10-15%) moisture contents. Given the uncertainty pointed out by research, definitive guidance on the vulnerability of embedded wood members is difficult to formulate. In high-risk situations, or when a very conservative approach is warranted, the embedded wood member condition can be eliminated entirely, supporting the joist ends outside of the masonry pocket.

  5. Moisture in organic coatings - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, G.K. van der; Adan, O.C.G.

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on transport and equilibrium sorption of moisture in polymer films and organic coatings. Polymeric material forms the continuous phase of a coating and is therefore important for transport properties. Besides polymer, coatings consist of pigments and fillers and various additives,

  6. Soil moisture and temperature algorithms and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture has matured over the past decade as a result of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) program of JAXA. This program has resulted in improved algorithms that have been supported by rigorous validation. Access to the products and the valida...

  7. Estimating Subcanopy Soil Moisture with RADAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, M.; Saatchi, S.; Cuenca, R. H.

    1998-01-01

    The subcanopy soil moisture of a boreal old jack pine forest is estimated using polarimetric L- and P-band AIRSAR data. Model simulations have shown that for this stand, the principal scattering mechanism responsible for radar backscatter is the double-bounce mechanism between the tree trunks and the ground.

  8. Effect of moisture on tuff stone degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.; Nijland, T.G.

    2016-01-01

    Tuff stone elements with a large length/width ratio often suffer damage in the form of cracks parallel to the surface and spalling of the outer layer. The response of tuff to moisture might be a reason for this behaviour. This research aimed at verifying if differential dilation between parts with d

  9. Effect of soil moisture on chlorine deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, John; Eichler, Jeffery; Hare, Christopher; Henley, Michael

    2014-02-28

    The effect of soil moisture on chlorine (Cl(2)) deposition was examined in laboratory chamber experiments at high Cl(2) exposures by measuring the concentration of chloride (Cl(-)) in soil columns. Soil mixtures with varying amounts of clay, sand, and organic matter and with moisture contents up to 20% (w/w) were exposed to ≈3×10(4)ppm Cl(2) vapor. For low water content soils, additional water increased the reaction rate as evidenced by higher Cl(-) concentration at higher soil moisture content. Results also showed that the presence of water restricted transport of Cl(2) into the soil columns and caused lower overall deposition of Cl(2) in the top 0.48-cm layer of soil when water filled ≈60% or more of the void space in the column. Numerical solutions to partial differential equations of Fick's law of diffusion and a simple rate law for Cl(2) reaction corroborated conclusions derived from the data. For the soil mixtures and conditions of these experiments, moisture content that filled 30-50% of the available void space yielded the maximum amount of Cl(2) deposition in the top 0.48cm of soil. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Moisture Buffer Value of Building Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut; Time, Berit

    2007-01-01

    When building materials are in contact with indoor air they have some effect to moderate the variations of indoor humidity in occupied buildings. But so far there has been a lack of a standardized quantity to characterize the moisture buffering capability of materials. It has been the objective o...

  11. Origin of Volatiles in Earth: Indigenous Versus Exogenous Sources Based on Highly Siderophile, Volatile Siderophile, and Light Volatile Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K. M.; Marin, N.; Nickodem, K.

    2015-01-01

    Origin of Earth's volatiles has traditionally been ascribed to late accretion of material after major differentiation events - chondrites, comets, ice or other exogenous sources. A competing theory is that the Earth accreted its volatiles as it was built, thus water and other building blocks were present early and during differentiation and core formation (indigenous). Here we discuss geochemical evidence from three groups of elements that suggests Earth's volatiles were acquired during accretion and did not require additional sources after differentiation.

  12. Nitrogen loss by volatilization of nitrogen fertilizers applied to coffee orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson William Dominghetti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ammonia volatilization (N-NH3 is one of the main pathways of Nitrogen loss reducing nitrogen use efficiency in coffee orchard. This work aimed at quantifying ammonia volatilization (N-NH3 losses from N-sources to be used in coffee plantations fertilization in Brazil. The experiment was conducted in the field on a dystrophic red latosol (Ferralsol in FAO's classification at the Coffee Research Sector, University of Lavras, MG, Brazil. The experimental design was of complete randomized blocks with three repetitions of the following treatments: conventional urea, ammonium nitrate and urea + 0.15% Cu and 0.4% B, urea + anionic polymers, urea + elementary sulfur (S0 + polymers, and urea + plastic resin. These N sources were split into three doses of 150 kg ha-1 and band applied. The N-NH3 losses by volatilization and variations of pH (H2O were measured, before and after N application. The N-sources contributed to reduce the soil pH, measured after the third nitrogen fertilization. The N-NH3 losses by volatilization (average from three applications was as follows: urea + anionic polymers (35.8% > conventional urea (31.2% = urea + S0 + polymers (31.0% > urea + 0.15% Cu + 0.4 % B (25.6% > urea + plastic resin (8.6% = ammonium nitrate (1.0%.

  13. Determination of volatile components in fresh, frozen, and freeze-dried Padrón-type peppers by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using dynamic headspace sampling and microwave desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruña-Concha, M J; López-Hernández, J; Simal-Lozano, J A; Simal-Gándara, J; González-Castro, M J; de la Cruz García, C

    1998-12-01

    "Padrón-type" peppers are a small variety of Capsicum annuum cultivated mainly in Galicia, Spain. To compare the effects of freezing and freeze-drying on the volatile components of Padrón-type peppers, preserved samples are analyzed by means of dynamic headspace sampling on an adsorbent followed by microwave desorption into a gas chromatograph equipped with a mass spectrometric detector. Sixty-five compounds are identified, including hydrocarbons, terpenes, alcohols, phenols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, esters, pyrroles, pyrazines, and sulfurous compounds. Fresh whole, homogenized, and freeze-dried peppers have characteristic volatile-component profiles, whereas frozen peppers have a highly variable volatile-component profile.

  14. Impact of the 0.1% fuel sulfur content limit in SECA on particle and gaseous emissions from marine vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterdahl, Maria; Moldanová, Jana; Pei, Xiangyu; Pathak, Ravi Kant; Demirdjian, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    Emissions were measured on-board a ship in the Baltic Sea, which is a sulfur emission control area (SECA), before and after the implementation of the strict fuel sulfur content (FSC) limit of 0.1 m/m% S on the 1st of January 2015. Prior to January 2015, the ship used a heavy fuel oil (HFO) but switched to a low-sulfur residual marine fuel oil (RMB30) after the implementation of the new FSC limit. The emitted particulate matter (PM) was measured in terms of mass, number, size distribution, volatility, elemental composition, content of organics, black and elemental carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), microstructure and micro-composition, along with the gaseous emissions at different operating conditions. The fuel change reduced emissions of PM mass up to 67%. The number of particles emitted remained unchanged and were dominated by nanoparticles. Furthermore, the fuel change resulted in an 80% reduction of SO2 emissions and decreased emissions of total volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The emissions of both monoaromatic and lighter polyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds increased with RMB30, while the heavy, PM-bound PAH species that belong to the carcinogenic PAH family were reduced. Emissions of BC remained similar between the two fuels. This study indicates that the use of low-sulfur residual marine fuel oil is a way to comply with the new FSC regulation and will reduce the anthropogenic load of SO2 emissions and secondary PM formed from SO2. Emissions of primary particles, however, remain unchanged and do not decrease as much as would be expected if distilled fuel was used. This applies both to the number of particles emitted and some toxic components, such as heavy metals, PAHs or elemental carbon (EC). The micro-composition analyses showed that the soot particles emitted from RMB30 combustion often do not have any trace of sulfur compared with particles from HFO combustion, which always have a sulfur content over 1%m/m. The soot sulfur content can

  15. Recycling of water, carbon, and sulfur during subduction of serpentinites: A stable isotope study of Cerro del Almirez, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Jeffrey C.; Garrido, Carlos J.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Turchyn, Alexandra; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Gómez Pugnaire, María Teresa; Marchesi, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    We use the concentrations and isotope compositions of water, carbon, and sulfur in serpentinites and their dehydration products to trace the cycling of volatiles during subduction. Antigorite serpentinites from the Cerro del Almirez complex, Spain, contain 9–12 wt.% H2O and 910 ± 730 ppm sulfur, and have bulk δ18O values of 8.6 ± 0.4‰, δD = − 54 ± 5‰, and δ34S = 5.0‰, consistent with serpentinization at temperatures of ~ 200 °C by seawater hydrothermal fluids in a seafloor setting. The serpentinites were dehydrated to chlorite–harzburgite (olivine + orthopyroxene + chlorite) at 700 °C and 1.6–1.9 GPa during subduction metamorphism, resulting in loss of water, and sulfur. The chlorite–harzburgites contain 5.7 ± 1.9 wt.% H2O, and have bulk δ18O = 8.0 ± 0.9‰, and δD = − 77 ± 11‰. The rocks contain 650 ± 620 ppm sulfur having δ34S = 1.2‰. Dehydration of serpentinite resulted in loss of 5 wt.% H2O having δ18O = 8–10‰ and δD = − 27 to − 65‰, and loss of 260 ppm sulfur as sulfate, having δ34S = 14.5‰. The contents and δ13C of total carbon in the two rock types overlap, with a broad trend of decreasing carbon contents and δ13C from ~ 1300 to 200 ppm and − 9.6 to − 20.2‰. This reflects mixing between reduced carbon in the rocks (210 ppm, δ13C ≈ − 26‰) and seawater-derived carbonate (δ13C ≈ − 1‰). Our results indicate: 1) Serpentinized oceanic peridotites carry significant amounts of isotopically fractionated water, carbon and sulfur into subduction zones; 2) Subduction of serpentinites to high P and T results in loss of water, and sulfur, which can induce melting and contribute to 18O, D, and 34S enrichments and oxidation of the sub-arc mantle wedge; and 3) Isotopically fractionated water, carbon, and sulfur in serpentinite dehydration products are recycled deeper into the mantle where they can contribute to isotope heterogeneities and may be significant for volatile budgets of the deep Earth.

  16. A Carbon-Sulfur Hybrid with Pomegranate-like Structure for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanting; Lv, Wei; Niu, Shuzhang; He, Yanbing; Zhou, Guangmin; Chen, Guohua; Li, Baohua; Yang, Quan-Hong; Kang, Feiyu

    2016-05-01

    A carbon-sulfur hybrid with pomegranate-like core-shell structure, which demonstrates a high rate performance and relatively high cyclic stability, is obtained through carbonization of a carbon precursor in the presence of a sulfur precursor (FeS2 ) and a following oxidation of FeS2 to sulfur by HNO3 . Such a structure effectively protects the sulfur and leaves enough buffer space after Fe(3+) removal and, at the same time, has an interconnected conductive network. The capacity of the obtained hybrid is 450 mA h g(-1) under the current density of 5 C. This work provides a simple strategy to design and prepare various high-performance carbon-sulfur hybrids for lithium-sulfur batteries.

  17. Amylopectin wrapped graphene oxide/sulfur for improved cyclability of lithium-sulfur battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weidong; Chen, Hao; Yu, Yingchao; Wang, Deli; Cui, Zhiming; Disalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2013-10-22

    An amylopectin wrapped graphene oxide-sulfur composite was prepared to construct a 3-dimensionally cross-linked structure through the interaction between amylopectin and graphene oxide, for stabilizing lithium sulfur batteries. With the help of this cross-linked structure, the sulfur particles could be confined much better among the layers of graphene oxide and exhibited significantly improved cyclability, compared with the unwrapped graphene oxide-sulfur composite. The effect of the electrode mass loading on electrochemical performance was investigated as well. In the lower sulfur mass loading cells, such as 2 mg cm(-2), both the capacity and the efficiency were obviously better than those of the higher sulfur mass loading cells, such as 6 mg cm(-2).

  18. Graphene oxide as a sulfur immobilizer in high performance lithium/sulfur cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuegang; Cairns, Elton J.; Ji, Liwen; Rao, Mumin

    2017-06-06

    The loss of sulfur cathode material as a result of polysulfide dissolution causes significant capacity fading in rechargeable lithium/sulfur cells. Embodiments of the invention use a chemical approach to immobilize sulfur and lithium polysulfides via the reactive functional groups on graphene oxide. This approach obtains a uniform and thin (.about.tens of nanometers) sulfur coating on graphene oxide sheets by a chemical reaction-deposition strategy and a subsequent low temperature thermal treatment process. Strong interaction between graphene oxide and sulfur or polysulfides demonstrate lithium/sulfur cells with a high reversible capacity of 950-1400 mAh g.sup.-1, and stable cycling for more than 50 deep cycles at 0.1 C.

  19. Sulfur Isotopic Characteristics of Coal in China and Sulfur Isotopic Fractionation during Coal—burning Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪业汤; 张鸿斌; 等

    1993-01-01

    The determined results of the sulfur contents and isotopic composition of coal samples from major coal mines in 15 provinces and regions of China show that the coal mined in the north of China is characterized by higher 34S and lower sulfur content, but that in the south of China has lower 34S and higher sulfur content.During the coal-burning process in both indrstrial and daily use of coal as fuel the released sulfur dioxide is always enriched in lighter sulfur isotope relative to the corresponding coal;the particles are always enriched in heavier sulfur isotope.The discussion on the environmental geochemical significance of the above-mentioned results also has been made.

  20. Behavior of sulfur and chlorine in coal during combustion and boiler corrosion. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, C.L.; Hackley, K.C.; Cao, J.; Donnals, G.L.; Ruch, R.R. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Pan, W.P.; Shao, D. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Using the pyrolysis-QGA system, samples of coal were heated from ambient temperature to 800{degrees}C at a rate of 20{degrees}C/min in the pyrolysis chamber under a nitrogen atmosphere. The volatile products were carried with the nitrogen flow to the combustion chamber which was maintained at 850{degrees}C under a constant flow of oxygen. For Illinois coals (IBC-101, 103, and -109), HCl was the only chlorine species identified by the QGA. The HCl release profiles for the coals showed a broad peak between 250{degrees}C and 600{degrees}C with a maximum at 445{degrees}C. Neutron activation analysis of pyrolysis residues showed that 98 percent of the chlorine in raw coal was volatilized. Thus, it may be inferred that the chlorine in Illinois coals is released rapidly as HCl, not as sodium chloride (NaCl), during combustion in a utility/industrial boiler. In contrast to chlorine, the sulfur release profile for IBC-109 showed three peaks: the first sulfur peak at about 350{degrees}C was probably derived from elemental sulfur, the main peak at 475{degrees}C corresponded to the release of organic sulfur, and the third peak at 600{degrees}C resulted from the decomposition of pyrite. The low-temperature peak was absent for fresh samples. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) was the major sulfur species in combustion gases under an oxidizing condition; additional gaseous sulfur species (COS and H{sub 2}S) were observed when the atmosphere was changed to a reducing condition.

  1. Improvements in the manufacture of sulfur from hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoulay, A.

    1968-12-23

    In this process for the manufacture of sulfur from hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide, the sulfur is separated from the gas after reaction by direct contact by cooling with a cooling liquid. The sulfur is carried away by the cooling liquid.

  2. Volatile accretion history of the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, B J; Halliday, A N; Rehkämper, M

    2010-10-28

    It has long been thought that the Earth had a protracted and complex history of volatile accretion and loss. Albarède paints a different picture, proposing that the Earth first formed as a dry planet which, like the Moon, was devoid of volatile constituents. He suggests that the Earth's complement of volatile elements was only established later, by the addition of a small veneer of volatile-rich material at ∼100 Myr (here and elsewhere, ages are relative to the origin of the Solar System). Here we argue that the Earth's mass balance of moderately volatile elements is inconsistent with Albarède's hypothesis but is well explained by the standard model of accretion from partially volatile-depleted material, accompanied by core formation.

  3. Volatile communication in plant-aphid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Martin; Jander, Georg

    2010-08-01

    Volatile communication plays an important role in mediating the interactions between plants, aphids, and other organisms in the environment. In response to aphid infestation, many plants initiate indirect defenses through the release of volatiles that attract ladybugs, parasitoid wasps, and other aphid-consuming predators. Aphid-induced volatile release in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana requires the jasmonate signaling pathway. Volatile release is also induced by infection with aphid-transmitted viruses. Consistent with mathematical models of optimal transmission, viruses that are acquired rapidly by aphids induce volatile release to attract migratory aphids, but discourage long-term aphid feeding. Although the ecology of these interactions is well-studied, further research is needed to identify the molecular basis of aphid-induced and virus-induced changes in plant volatile release.

  4. Mass-independent sulfur of inclusions in diamond and sulfur recycling on early Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, J; Wing, B A; McKeegan, K D; Harris, J W; Cartigny, P; Thiemens, M H

    2002-12-20

    Populations of sulfide inclusions in diamonds from the Orapa kimberlite pipe in the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton, Botswana, preserve mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations. The data indicate that material was transferred from the atmosphere to the mantle in the Archean. The data also imply that sulfur is not well mixed in the diamond source regions, allowing for reconstruction of the Archean sulfur cycle and possibly offering insight into the nature of mantle convection through time.

  5. Constraining the Volatility Distributions and Possible Diffusion Limitations of Secondary Organic Aerosols Using Laboratory Dilution Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Q.; Robinson, E. S.; Mahfouz, N.; Sullivan, R. C.; Donahue, N. M.

    2016-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) dominate the mass of fine particles in the atmosphere. Their formation involves both oxidation of volatile organics from various sources that produce products with uncertain volatilities, and diffusion of these products into the condensed phase. Therefore, constraining volatility distribution and diffusion timescales of the constituents in SOA are important in predicting size, concentration and composition of SOA, as well as how these properties of SOA evolve in the atmosphere. In this work, we demonstrate how carefully designed laboratory isothermal dilution experiments in smog chambers can shed light into the volatility distribution and any diffusion barriers of common types of SOA over time scales relevant to atmospheric transport and diurnal cycling. We choose SOA made from mono-terpenes (alpha-pinene and limonene) and toluene to represent biogenic and anthropogenic SOA. We look into how moisture content can alter any evaporation behaviors of SOA by varying relative humidity during SOA generation and during dilution process. This provides insight into whether diffusion in the condensed phase is rate limiting in reaching gas/particle equilibrium of semi-volatile organic compounds. Our preliminary results show that SOA from alpha-pinene evaporates continuously over several hours of experiments, and there is no substantial discernible differences over wide ranges of the chamber humidity. SOA from toluene oxidation shows slower evaporation. We fit these experimental data using absorptive partitioning theory and a particle dynamic model to obtain volatility distributions and to predict particle size evolution. This in the end will help us to improve representation of SOA in large scale chemical transport models.

  6. Milk Price Volatility and its Determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Fengxia; Du, Xiaodong; Gould, Brian W.

    2011-01-01

    The classified pricing of fluid milk under the Federal Milk Marketing Orders (FMMO) system combined with the cash settlement feature of Class IIII milk futures contracts generate a unique volatility pattern of these futures markets in the sense that the volatility gradually decreases as the USDA price announcement dates approaching in the month. Focusing on the evolution of volatility in Class III milk futures market, this study quantifies the relative importance of a set of factors driving m...

  7. DOES VOLATILITY RESPOND ASYMMETRIC TO PAST SHOCKS?

    OpenAIRE

    Claudiu Botoc

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the paper is to examine if the stock market volatility exhibits asymmetric or an asymmetric response to past shocks, for certain CEE countries (Romania,Hungary, Bulgaria, Poland) over the period May 2004 - September 2014. For the stock marketsfrom East Europe the results are in line with the symmetric volatility, i.e. volatility is similaraffected by both positive and negative returns with the same magnitude. For the stock marketsfrom Central Europe the results are consistent ...

  8. The Determinants of Public Deficit Volatility

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper empirically analyzes the political, institutional and economic sources of public deficit volatility. Using the system-GMM estimator for linear dynamic panel data models and a sample of 125 countries analyzed from 1980 to 2006, we show that higher public deficit volatility is typically associated with higher levels of political instability and less democracy. In addition, public deficit volatility tends to be magnified for small countries, in the outcome of hyper-inflation episodes ...

  9. Exchange Rate Volatility in BRICS Countries

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper measures the impact of bilateral exchange rates, the world agricultural GDP and third-country exchange rate volatilities (Yen/USD and Euro/USD) on the BRICS agricultural exports using a vector autoregressive (VAR) model. Two measures of volatility are used: the standard deviation and the coefficient of variation of the rates of change of the real exchange rates. We found that most variables are integrated of order two except the third-country exchange rate volatilities which are st...

  10. Grains colonised by moulds: fungal identification and headspace analysis of produced volatile metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paola Tampieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to verify if the headspace analysis of fungal volatile compounds produced by some species of Fusarium can be used as a marker of mould presence on maize. Eight samples of maize (four yellow maize from North Italy and four white maize from Hungary, naturally contaminated by Fusarium and positive for the presence of fumonisins, were analyzed to detect moisture content, Aw, volatile metabolites and an enumeration of viable moulds was performed by means of a colony count technique. Headspace samples were analysed using a gas-chromatograph equipped with a capillary column TR-WAX to detect volatile metabolites of moulds. Furthermore macro and microscopic examination of the colonies was performed in order to distinguish, according to their morphology, the genera of the prevalent present moulds. Prevalent mould of eight samples was Fusarium, but other fungi, like Aspergillus, Penicillum and Mucoraceae, were observed. The metabolites produced by F.graminearum and F. moniliforme were Isobutyl-acetate, 3-Methyl-1-butanol and, only at 8 days, 3-Octanone. The incubation time can affect off flavour production in consequence of the presence of other moulds. Further studies on maize samples under different conditions are needed in order to establish the presence of moulds using the count technique and through the identification of volatile compounds.

  11. Terrestrial Ecosystems - Topographic Moisture Potential of the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has generated topographic moisture potential classes for the contiguous United States. These topographic moisture potential classes...

  12. Soil and Moisture Plan : 1971 - 1980 : Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Soil and Moisture Plan for Agassiz NWR provides an overview of the Refuge, a description of soil and moisture problems, and proposed solutions to these...

  13. development and testing of a capacitive digital soil moisture metre

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    moisture affects crop growth, seed development, root development and agricultural ... benefits, capacitive sensor techniques are applied in precision agriculture [3]. ..... lentil moisture content using dielectric properties. Journal of Agricultural ...

  14. Determination of Optimum Moisture Content of Palm Nut Cracking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    optimum moisture content of nuts for high yield of whole kernels during cracking. Thirteen .... moisture were determined from the weight lost (ASAE, 1983;. Ajibola et al. .... measurement-Grains and Seeds, American Society of. Agricultural ...

  15. Volatiles Which Increase Magma Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S.

    2015-12-01

    The standard model of an erupting volcano is one in which the viscosity of a decompressing magma increases as the volatiles leave the melt structure to form bubbles. It has now been observed that the addition of the "volatiles" P, Cl and F result in an increase in silicate melt viscosity. This observation would mean that the viscosity of selected degassing magmas would decrease rather than increase. Here we look at P, Cl and F as three volatiles which increase viscosity through different structural mechanisms. In all three cases the volatiles increase the viscosity of peralkaline composition melts, but appear to always decrease the viscosity of peraluminous melts. Phosphorus causes the melt to unmix into a Na-P rich phase and a Na-poor silicate phase. Thus as the network modifying Na (or Ca) are removed to the phosphorus-rich melt, the matrix melt viscosity increases. With increasing amounts of added phosphorus (at network modifying Na ~ P) the addition of further phosphorus causes a decrease in viscosity. The addition of chlorine to Fe-free aluminosilicate melts results in an increase in viscosity. NMR data on these glass indicates that the chlorine sits in salt-like structures surrounded by Na and/or Ca. Such structures would remove network-modifying atoms from the melt structure and thus result in an increase in viscosity. The NMR spectra of fluorine-bearing glasses shows that F takes up at least 5 different structural positions in peralkaline composition melts. Three of these positions should result in a decrease in viscosity due to the removal of bridging oxygens. Two of the structural positons of F, however, should result in an increase in viscosity as they require the removal of network-modifying atoms from the melt structure (with one of the structures being that observed for Cl). This would imply that increasing amounts of F might result in an increase in viscosity. This proposed increase in viscosity with increasing F has now been experimentally confirmed.

  16. Volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Makoto; Toyoda, Masatake; Saito, Yukio [National Institute of Health Services, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1995-02-01

    Volatile halogenated organic compounds were determined in foods. Statistical treatment of the data for 13 sampled from 20 families living in suburban Tokyo (Saitama prefecture) indicated that the foods were contaminated by water pollution and/or substances introduced by the process of food production. Butter and margarine were contaminated by chlorinated ethylene, ethane, and related compounds released by dry cleaning and other operations. Soybean sprouts and tofu (soybean curd) contained chloroform and related trihalomethanes absorbed during the production process. 27 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Volatile Constituents of Zhumaria Majdae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazdanparst

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available Capillary gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC- MS analyses of a sample of essential oil of zhumaria Linalool ned by simple water distillation of the pulverized air - dired leaves and flowers of the plant indicated that Linalool and comphor are the two major constituents of the volatile oil. Sylvestrene , y -terpinene, a- Pinene, b - carene, camphene, and Epiborneol constitute the other main components of the essential oil. The GC - MS chromatogram indicated the presence of more than fifty - components in the oil, most of them were present in trace amounts. In this study, the chemical structures of twenty of these consti tuents were elucidated using GC - MS analysis.

  18. Analysis of sulfur in deposited aerosols by thermal decomposition and sulfur dioxide analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masatoshi

    2005-07-15

    A thermal decomposition method that measures aerosol sulfur at the nanogram level directly from the collection substrate is described. A thermal decomposition apparatus was designed. A stainless steel strip was used as the aerosol collection substrate. A 0.1 mol/L MnCl2 solution was added as the thermal decomposition catalyst. Currents were passed through the strip where aerosol particles had been deposited. In this way, the strip was heated at 780 +/- 10 degrees C, and particulate sulfur was evaporated. A sulfur dioxide analyzer (SDA) with flame photometric detector (FPD) was used to detect gaseous sulfur. High sulfur recoveries from (NH4)2SO4 and other inorganic sulfates, such as NH4HSO4, K2SO4, MgSO4, and CaSO4, were obtained. From the sulfur blank and the calibration, a lower limited detection of 0.2 ng of sulfur and the determination range of 3.3-167 ng of sulfur were estimated. The method is effective for measuring the sulfate size distributions of urban aerosols in a small sample air volume of 50-60 L. The method is applicable to measuring the sulfur in aqueous extracts of size-segregated urban aerosols collected by impactor and comparing the results with the sulfate data measured by ion chromatography.

  19. Mechanisms and evolution of oxidative sulfur metabolism in green sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea Haarup; Bryant, Donald A.; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) constitute a closely related group of photoautotrophic and thiotrophic bacteria with limited phenotypic variation. They typically oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with sulfur globules as an intermediate. Based on genome sequence information from 15 strains......, the distribution and phylogeny of enzymes involved in their oxidative sulfur metabolism was investigated. At least one homolog of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is present in all strains. In all sulfur-oxidizing GSB strains except the earliest diverging Chloroherpeton thalassium, the sulfide oxidation...... and SOX systems. Finally, based upon structural, biochemical, and phylogenetic analyses, a uniform nomenclature is suggested for sqr genes in prokaryotes....

  20. Sulfur-centered reactive intermediates derived from the oxidation of sulfur compounds of biological interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedinzadeh, Z. [Lab. de Chimie Physique, UMR, Univ. Rene Descartes, Paris (France)

    2001-02-01

    Sulphur compounds play a central role in the structure and activity of many vital systems. In the living cell, sulfur constitutes an essential part of the defense against oxidative damage and is transformed into a variety of sulfur free radical species. Many studies of the chemistry of sulfur-centered radicals using pulse radiolysis and photolysis techniques to detect and measure the kinetics of these radicals have been published and reviewed. This paper discusses the present state of research on the formation and reactivity of certain sulfur-centered radicals [RS{sup .}, RSS{sup .}, RS{sup .+}, (RSSR){sup .+}] and their implications for biological systems. (author)

  1. Linking neutral and charged sulfuric acid-ammonia and sulfuric acid-dimethylamine clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ismael K.; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-05-01

    We have used a quantum chemical method to calculate the formation free energies of negatively charged sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters. Using the calculated formation free energies we have estimated the evaporation rates of the clusters. We have compared the evaporation rate of the charged clusters with the corresponding neutral clusters. We found that, although small clusters of sulfuric acid with ammonia and dimethylamine are stable and should be present in the atmosphere, they can not be detected using mass spectroscopy techniques. Charging the cluster will result in the fast evaporation of the base molecules, and they will be detected as pure sulfuric acid cluster.

  2. Dual protection of sulfur by carbon nanospheres and graphene sheets for lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Wen, Yanfen; Ye, Delai; Yu, Hua; Sun, Bing; Wang, Guoxiu; Hulicova-Jurcakova, Denisa; Wang, Lianzhou

    2014-04-25

    Well-confined elemental sulfur was implanted into a stacked block of carbon nanospheres and graphene sheets through a simple solution process to create a new type of composite cathode material for lithium-sulfur batteries. Transmission electron microscopy and elemental mapping analysis confirm that the as-prepared composite material consists of graphene-wrapped carbon nanospheres with sulfur uniformly distributed in between, where the carbon nanospheres act as the sulfur carriers. With this structural design, the graphene contributes to direct coverage of sulfur to inhibit the mobility of polysulfides, whereas the carbon nanospheres undertake the role of carrying the sulfur into the carbon network. This composite achieves a high loading of sulfur (64.2 wt %) and gives a stable electrochemical performance with a maximum discharge capacity of 1394 mAh g(-1) at a current rate of 0.1 C as well as excellent rate capability at 1 C and 2 C. The improved electrochemical properties of this composite material are attributed to the dual functions of the carbon components, which effectively restrain the sulfur inside the carbon nano-network for use in lithium-sulfur rechargeable batteries.

  3. Corrosion pathways in liquid sulfur run-down pits and other liquid sulfur handling facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P.D.; Dowling, N.I.; Huang, M.

    2010-01-15

    This poster presentation explained why sulfur pits deteriorate over time and provided the detailed chemistry of the mechanisms for the deterioration of concrete in sulfur pits. Liquid and solid sulfur may build up in the pore structure of the concrete, which is followed by chemical reactions. The sulfur formation inside the concrete pore structure is catalyzed by concrete constituents. The sulfate formation in sulfur pit concrete was described. The chemical process that produces the corrosion of re-enforcing steel rods used in the construction of sulfur pits was also described. The consequence of such corrosion is the loss of structural integrity. The secondary corrosion processes at concrete pit reinforcing steel were also presented. To limit the deterioration of sulfur pit concrete, high-density silica facing should be used on the concrete to prevent the ingress of gases into the concrete. Silica does not catalyze the conversion of hydrogen disulfide and sulfur dioxide to sulfur, so there is no formation of stable sulfates and acidic intermediates. 8 figs.

  4. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-10-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  5. Mesoporous hollow carbon spheres for lithium–sulfur batteries: distribution of sulfur and electrochemical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika C. Juhl

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hollow carbon spheres (HCS with a nanoporous shell are promising for the use in lithium–sulfur batteries because of the large internal void offering space for sulfur and polysulfide storage and confinement. However, there is an ongoing discussion whether the cavity is accessible for sulfur. Yet no valid proof of cavity filling has been presented, mostly due to application of unsuitable high-vacuum methods for the analysis of sulfur distribution. Here we describe the distribution of sulfur in hollow carbon spheres by powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy along with results from scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen physisorption. The results of these methods lead to the conclusion that the cavity is not accessible for sulfur infiltration. Nevertheless, HCS/sulfur composite cathodes with areal sulfur loadings of 2.0 mg·cm−2 were investigated electrochemically, showing stable cycling performance with specific capacities of about 500 mAh·g−1 based on the mass of sulfur over 500 cycles.

  6. ROE Total Sulfur Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of sulfur in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991 at a set of point locations across the...

  7. ROE Total Sulfur Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of sulfur in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013 at a set of point locations across the...

  8. Environmental behavior and analysis of agricultural sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Corey M; Woodrow, James E; Seiber, James N

    2015-11-01

    Sulfur has been widely used for centuries as a staple for pest and disease management in agriculture. Presently, it is the largest-volume pesticide in use worldwide. This review describes the sources and recovery methods for sulfur, its allotropic forms and properties and its agricultural uses, including development and potential advantages of nanosulfur as a fungicide. Chemical and microbial reactivity, interactions in soil and water and analytical methods for determination in environmental samples and foodstuffs, including inexpensive analytical methods for sulfur residues in wine, beer and other food/beverage substrates, will be reviewed. The toxicology of sulfur towards humans and agriculturally important fungi is included, with some restrictions on use to promote safety. The review concludes with areas for which more research is warranted.

  9. Atmospheric influence of Earth's earliest sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar; Bao; Thiemens

    2000-08-01

    Mass-independent isotopic signatures for delta(33)S, delta(34)S, and delta(36)S from sulfide and sulfate in Precambrian rocks indicate that a change occurred in the sulfur cycle between 2090 and 2450 million years ago (Ma). Before 2450 Ma, the cycle was influenced by gas-phase atmospheric reactions. These atmospheric reactions also played a role in determining the oxidation state of sulfur, implying that atmospheric oxygen partial pressures were low and that the roles of oxidative weathering and of microbial oxidation and reduction of sulfur were minimal. Atmospheric fractionation processes should be considered in the use of sulfur isotopes to study the onset and consequences of microbial fractionation processes in Earth's early history.

  10. Efficient Electrolytes for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan eAngulakshmi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This review article mainly encompasses on the state-of-the-art electrolytes for lithium–sulfur batteries. Different strategies have been employed to address the issues of lithium-sulfur batteries across the world. One among them is identification of electrolytes and optimization of their properties for the applications in lithium-sulfur batteries. The electrolytes for lithium-sulfur batteries are broadly classified as (i non-aqueous liquid electrolytes, (ii ionic liquids, (iii solid polymer and (iv glass-ceramic electrolytes. This article presents the properties, advantages and limitations of each type of electrolytes. Also the importance of electrolyte additives on the electrochemical performance of Li-S cells is discussed.

  11. Influence of Initial Moisture Content on Heat and Moisture Transfer in Firefighters’ Protective Clothing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model for heat and moisture transfer through firefighters’ protective clothing (FPC during radiation exposure. The model, which accounts for air gaps in the FPC as well as heat transfer through human skin, investigates the effect of different initial moisture contents on the thermal insulation performance of FPC. Temperature, water vapor density, and the volume fraction of liquid water profiles were monitored during the simulation, and the heat quantity absorbed by water evaporation was calculated. Then the maximum durations of heat before the wearer acquires first- and second-degree burns were calculated based on the bioheat transfer equation and the Henriques equation. The results show that both the moisture weight in each layer and the total moisture weight increase linearly within a given environmental humidity level. The initial moisture content in FPC samples significantly influenced the maximum water vapor density. The first- and second-degree burn injury time increase 16 sec and 18 sec when the RH increases from 0% to 90%. The total quantity of heat accounted for by water evaporation was about 10% when the relative humidity (RH is 80%. Finally, a linear relationship was identified between initial moisture content and the human skin burn injury time before suffering first- and second-degree burn injuries.

  12. Mars Accreted a Volatile Element-Depleted Late Veneer Indicating Early Delivery of Martian Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, H.; Wang, Z.

    2016-08-01

    Chalcophile elements in SNC meteorites are used to constrain abundances in the Martian mantle. Strong depletion of Te relative to highly siderophile elements suggests a volatile element-depleted late veneer, requiring that volatiles arrived earlier.

  13. [Solidification of volatile oil with graphene oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Mei; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Sun, E; Xu, Yi-Hao

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the properties of solidifying volatile oil with graphene oxide, clove oil and zedoary turmeric oil were solidified by graphene oxide. The amount of graphene oxide was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria. Curing powder was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of graphene oxide on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. The optimum solidification ratio of graphene oxide to volatile oil was 1:1. Dissolution rate of active components had rare influence while their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was solidified. Solidifying herbal volatile oil with graphene oxide deserves further study.

  14. CAM Stochastic Volatility Model for Option Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanwan Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The coupled additive and multiplicative (CAM noises model is a stochastic volatility model for derivative pricing. Unlike the other stochastic volatility models in the literature, the CAM model uses two Brownian motions, one multiplicative and one additive, to model the volatility process. We provide empirical evidence that suggests a nontrivial relationship between the kurtosis and skewness of asset prices and that the CAM model is able to capture this relationship, whereas the traditional stochastic volatility models cannot. We introduce a control variate method and Monte Carlo estimators for some of the sensitivities (Greeks of the model. We also derive an approximation for the characteristic function of the model.

  15. Assessing Relative Volatility/Intermittency/Energy Dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Pakkanen, Mikko; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    We introduce the notion of relative volatility/intermittency and demonstrate how relative volatility statistics can be used to estimate consistently the temporal variation of volatility/intermittency even when the data of interest are generated by a non-semimartingale, or a Brownian semistationary...... process in particular. While this estimation method is motivated by the assessment of relative energy dissipation in empirical data of turbulence, we apply it also to energy price data. Moreover, we develop a probabilistic asymptotic theory for relative power variations of Brownian semistationary...... processes and Ito semimartingales and discuss how it can be used for inference on relative volatility/intermittency....

  16. Amine reactivity with charged sulfuric acid clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Bzdek, B. R.; D. P. Ridge; Johnston, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of ionic species produced by electrospray of an ammonium sulfate solution in both positive and negative polarities is examined using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Positively-charged ammonium bisulfate cluster composition differs significantly from negatively-charged cluster composition. For positively-charged clusters all sulfuric acid is neutralized to bisulfate, whereas for negatively-charged clusters the degree of sulfuric acid neu...

  17. Amine reactivity with charged sulfuric acid clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Bzdek, B. R.; D. P. Ridge; Johnston, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of charged species produced by electrospray of an ammonium sulfate solution in both positive and negative polarities is examined using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Positively-charged ammonium bisulfate cluster composition differs significantly from negatively-charged cluster composition. For positively-charged clusters all sulfuric acid is neutralized to bisulfate, whereas for negatively-charged clusters the degree of sulfuric acid n...

  18. A Cable-Shaped Lithium Sulfur Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin; Weng, Wei; Ren, Jing; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-01-20

    A carbon nanostructured hybrid fiber is developed by integrating mesoporous carbon and graphene oxide into aligned carbon nanotubes. This hybrid fiber is used as a 1D cathode to fabricate a new cable-shaped lithium-sulfur battery. The fiber cathode exhibits a decent specific capacity and lifespan, which makes the cable-shaped lithium-sulfur battery rank far ahead of other fiber-shaped batteries.

  19. Biologically produced sulfur particles and polysulfide ions

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinjan, W. E.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis deals with the effects of particles of biologically produced sulfur (or 'biosulfur') on a biotechnological process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams. Particular emphasis is given to the role of polysulfide ions in such a process. These polysulfide ions are formed from reaction of sulfide with biologically produced sulfur. The basic concepts of this H 2 S removal process were developed at the department of Environmental Technology of Wageningen University and the...

  20. Attachment of Thiobacillus thiooxidans to sulfur crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHAEFFER, W I; HOLBERT, P E; UMBREIT, W W

    1963-01-01

    Schaeffer, W. I. (Rutgers, The State University, New Brunswick, N.J.), P. E. Holbert, and W. W. Umbreit. Attachment of Thiobacillus thiooxidans to sulfur crystals. J. Bacteriol. 85:137-140. 1963.-Electron micrographs of replicas of sulfur crystals before and after attack by Thiobacillus thiooxidans show that the microorganisms erode the crystal in the area immediately adjacent to the cell. When there are many cells, the entire crystal surface appears eroded.

  1. Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium/Sulfur Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Nam Long Doan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This review evaluates the characteristics and advantages of employing polymer electrolytes in lithium/sulfur (Li/S batteries. The main highlights of this study constitute detailed information on the advanced developments for solid polymer electrolytes and gel polymer electrolytes, used in the lithium/sulfur battery. This includes an in-depth analysis conducted on the preparation and electrochemical characteristics of the Li/S batteries based on these polymer electrolytes.

  2. Mixed Population Screening for Sulfur Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Bin; ZHAO Lei; ZHAN Zhaoyang; HE Zhijun

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative research of the origin of sulfur isotopes is a difficult problem that has puzzled geochemists all along. In the study of the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River and the Dongpo orefield in Hunan Province,the authors successfully applied the mathematical model of mixed population screening to quantitatively resolving the problem on the origin of sulfur isotopes, which is significant in finding out the source of mineralizing matter and metallogenic mechanisms.

  3. Moisture properties of self-levelling flooring compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Anderberg, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Self-levelling flooring compounds (SLC) are used to level substrates (mainly concrete slabs) before applying final floor coverings. Although it is an extensively used product, only limited research has so far been published concerning their moisture properties. This report focuses on moisture properties of SLC and describes methods for determining them. Moisture properties of materials are important for the calculation of drying times and moisture loads and for prediction of ion transport and...

  4. Moisture conditions in buildings:how to avoid mould problems

    OpenAIRE

    Rode, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Growth of mould requires the presence of moisture at a certain high level. In a heated indoor environment such moisture levels occur only if there is a reason for the moisture supply. Such moisture can come from the use of the building, because of malfunctioning constructions, or it can be the result of insufficient ventilation. The article will give an overview of these reasons, and thereby also give hints to how problems can be avoided.

  5. Sulfonation of polyester fabrics by gaseous sulfur oxide activated by UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordoghli, Bessem [Laboratory of Applied Chemical and Environment (UR-CAE) - University of Monastir (Tunisia); Textile Research Laboratory (LRT) - ISET Kasr Hellal, University of Monastir (Tunisia); Khiari, Ramzi, E-mail: khiari_ramzi2000@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Applied Chemical and Environment (UR-CAE) - University of Monastir (Tunisia); LGP2 - Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science, 461, Rue de la Papeterie - BP 65, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk [Laboratory of Applied Chemical and Environment (UR-CAE) - University of Monastir (Tunisia); Sakli, Faouzi [Textile Research Laboratory (LRT) - ISET Kasr Hellal, University of Monastir (Tunisia); Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur [LGP2 - Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science, 461, Rue de la Papeterie - BP 65, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France)

    2012-10-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this paper, an original technique was present to improve the hydrophilic properties of polyester fibres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The modification of PET fabric was carried out using gaseous sulfur trioxide activated by UV irradiations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We fully characterized the modified and untreated fabrics. - Abstract: This paper describes an original technique aiming to improve the hydrophilic properties of polyester fibres. In this method, the sulfonation of the aromatic rings is carried out using gaseous sulfur trioxide activated by UV irradiations. Thus, exposing the polyester textile fabric to the UVC light (wavelength around 254 nm) under a stream of sulfur trioxide leads to the fixation of -SO{sub 3}H groups. The amounts of the fixed sulfonate groups depended on the reaction conditions. Evidence of grafting deduced from the measurements of hygroscopic properties was carried out by contact angle measurement, moisture regain as well as by measuring the rate of retention. SEM and FT-IR analysis, DSC and DTA/TGA thermograms showed that no significant modifications have occurred in the bulk of the treated PET fabrics.

  6. Ocular Effects of Sulfur Mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunes Panahi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To review current knowledge about ocular effects of sulfur mustard (SM and the associated histopathologic findings and clinical manifestationsMethods: Literature review of medical articles (human and animal studies was accomplished using PubMed, Scopus and ISI databases. A total of 274 relevant articles in English were retrieved and reviewed thoroughly.Results: Eyes are the most sensitive organs to local toxic effects of mustard gas. Ocular injuries are mediated through different toxic mechanisms including: biochemical damages, biomolecular and gene expression modification, induction of immunologic and inflammatory reactions, disturbing ultrastructural architecture of the cornea, and long-lasting corneal denervation. The resulting ocular injuries can roughly be categorized into acute or chronic complications. Most of the patients recover from acute injuries, but a minority of victims will suffer from chronic ocular complications. Mustard gas keratopathy (MGK is a devastating late complication of SM intoxication that proceeds from limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD.Conclusion: SM induces several different damaging changes in case of ocular exposure; hence leading to a broad spectrum of ocular manifestations in terms of severity, timing and form. Unfortunately, no effective strategy has been introduced yet to inhibit or restore these damaging changes.

  7. Sulfur nutrition of deciduous trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschbach, Cornelia; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Sulfur in its reduced form (-II) is an essential nutrient for growth and development, but is mainly available to plants in its oxidised form as sulfate. Deciduous trees take up sulfate by the roots from the soil solution and reduce sulfate to sulfide via assimilatory sulfate reduction in both roots and leaves. For reduction in the leaves, sulfate is loaded into the xylem and transported to the shoot. The surplus of sulfate not reduced in the chloroplast or stored in the vacuole and the surplus of reduced S not used for protein synthesis in the leaves is loaded into the phloem and transported back to the roots. Along the transport path, sulfate and glutathione (GSH) is unloaded from the phloem for storage in xylem and phloem parenchyma as well as in pit and ray cells. Re-mobilised S from storage tissues is loaded into the xylem during spring, but a phloem to xylem exchange does not appear to exist later in the season. As a consequence, a cycling pool of S was only found during the change of the seasons. The sulfate:glutathione ratio in the phloem seems to be involved in the regulation of S nutrition. This picture of S nutrition is discussed in relation to the different growth patterns of deciduous trees from the temperate climate zone, i.e. (1) terminated, (2) periodic and (3) indeterminate growth patterns, and in relation to environmental changes.

  8. Microwave Soil Moisture Retrieval Under Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, P.; Lang, R.; Kurum, M.; Joseph, A.; Jackson, T.; Cosh, M.

    2008-01-01

    Soil moisture is recognized as an important component of the water, energy, and carbon cycles at the interface between the Earth's surface and atmosphere. Current baseline soil moisture retrieval algorithms for microwave space missions have been developed and validated only over grasslands, agricultural crops, and generally light to moderate vegetation. Tree areas have commonly been excluded from operational soil moisture retrieval plans due to the large expected impact of trees on masking the microwave response to the underlying soil moisture. Our understanding of the microwave properties of trees of various sizes and their effect on soil moisture retrieval algorithms at L band is presently limited, although research efforts are ongoing in Europe, the United States, and elsewhere to remedy this situation. As part of this research, a coordinated sequence of field measurements involving the ComRAD (for Combined Radar/Radiometer) active/passive microwave truck instrument system has been undertaken. Jointly developed and operated by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and George Washington University, ComRAD consists of dual-polarized 1.4 GHz total-power radiometers (LH, LV) and a quad-polarized 1.25 GHz L band radar sharing a single parabolic dish antenna with a novel broadband stacked patch dual-polarized feed, a quad-polarized 4.75 GHz C band radar, and a single channel 10 GHz XHH radar. The instruments are deployed on a mobile truck with an 19-m hydraulic boom and share common control software; real-time calibrated signals, and the capability for automated data collection for unattended operation. Most microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms developed for use at L band frequencies are based on the tau-omega model, a simplified zero-order radiative transfer approach where scattering is largely ignored and vegetation canopies are generally treated as a bulk attenuating layer. In this approach, vegetation effects are parameterized by tau and omega, the microwave

  9. Complex land surface phenologies of moisture status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henebry, G. M.; Doubkova, M.

    2006-12-01

    Making cross-scale linkages from experimental plots or flux tower footprints to regional and continental extents is made difficult by disparate spatial and temporal scales between process and observation. While exchanges between the vegetated land surface and the atmospheric boundary layer are continual, sampling and observations are typically intermittent in time and limited across space. Remote sensing of reflected sunlight has proven useful to track ecological dynamics. These observations are, however, restricted to daytime and often obscured by cloud cover, necessitating production of multi-date composites. The current generation of passive microwave radiometers can observe the land surface both day and night regardless of cloudiness, albeit at a spatial resolution coarser than typically used in ecological remote sensing. Datastreams from the AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS) onboard NASA's Aqua platform are processed daily at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) into various products, including global retrievals of surficial soil moisture and vegetation water content based on microwave brightness temperatures observed at multiple frequencies. Due to sensor orbit and swath width, gaps occur at the lower latitudes in daily products. We have further processed the product-streams from the descending (01:30) and ascending (13:30) orbits into separate smoothed daily composites using an 8-day retrospective moving average. Of particular interest for synoptic ecology is the diel difference in vegetation water content. When the difference between the pre-dawn and the early afternoon values is positive, it suggests that the supply of moisture from the root zone is not able to keep pace with evapotranspiration during the day, but the soil and canopy moisture equalize overnight. Time series of the diel difference show rapid changes in moisture status in response to precipitation events and dry spells. What constitutes the appropriate baseline

  10. Estimating Soil Moisture from Satellite Microwave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, M.; VandeGriend, A. A.; deJeu, R.; deVries, J.; Seyhan, E.

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative research in microwave remote sensing between the Hydrological Sciences Branch of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Earth Sciences Faculty of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam began with the Botswana Water and Energy Balance Experiment and has continued through a series of highly successful International Research Programs. The collaboration between these two research institutions has resulted in significant scientific achievements, most notably in the area of satellite-based microwave remote sensing of soil moisture. The Botswana Program was the first joint research initiative between these two institutions, and provided a unique data base which included historical data sets of Scanning Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (SN4NM) data, climate information, and extensive soil moisture measurements over several large experimental sites in southeast Botswana. These data were the basis for the development of new approaches in physically-based inverse modelling of soil moisture from satellite microwave observations. Among the results from this study were quantitative estimates of vegetation transmission properties at microwave frequencies. A single polarization modelling approach which used horizontally polarized microwave observations combined with monthly composites of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index was developed, and yielded good results. After more precise field experimentation with a ground-based radiometer system, a dual-polarization approach was subsequently developed. This new approach realized significant improvements in soil moisture estimation by satellite. Results from the Botswana study were subsequently applied to a desertification monitoring study for the country of Spain within the framework of the European Community science research programs EFEDA and RESMEDES. A dual frequency approach with only microwave data was used for this application. The Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) was calculated from 37 GHz data

  11. Genetic engineering of sulfur-degrading Sulfolobus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, N.W.Y. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA). Lab. of Renewable Resources Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that some microorganisms can play a significant role in removing the sulfur compounds from coal. Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is one such microorganism. Some microorganisms can remove only organic sulfur from coal, other can remove only inorganic sulfur from coal, but S. acidocaldarius seems to be able to remove both the organic and the inorganic sulfur from coal. Furthermore, S. acidocaldarius has been shown to be able to use the sulfur and carbon derived from coal as its sole carbon and energy source for growth. These properties make this microorganism unique for coal desulfurization. This project is aimed at applying recombinant DNA techniques to improve the capability of S. acidocaldarius for coal desulfurization, which includes making it the host for housing foreign genes that encode the most effective enzymes for coal desulfurization. Since there is no established vectors and procedures for introducing vectors into S. acidocaldarius and related microorganisms, the immediate goal is to establish a gene cloning system for this species. During the present quarter, the authors have studied a few systems which can be used as the potential selection mechanism for the selection of the desired transformants. In addition, they also analyzed the extracellular proteins from S. acidocaldarius as well as other potential organic sulfur removing species and also managed to obtain most strains and plasmids that are needed for this work. Results to date are given. 1 tab.

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Sulfur Compounds Contents and Antiobesity Properties of Allium hookeri Prepared by Different Drying Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min Hye; Kim, Na-Hyun; Heo, Jeong-Doo; Rho, Jung-Rae; Ock, Kwang Ju

    2017-01-01

    Despite the nutritional and medicinal values of Allium hookeri, its unique flavor (onion or garlic taste and smell) coming from sulfur containing compounds limits its usage as functional food. For comparative study, A. hookeri roots were prepared under two different drying conditions, namely, low-temperature drying that minimizes the volatilization of sulfur components and hot-air drying that minimizes the garlic odor and spicy taste of A. hookeri. In GC/MS olfactory system, the odorous chemicals and organosulfur compounds such as diallyl trisulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, and dipropyl trisulfide were significantly decreased in hot-air drying compared to low-temperature drying. The spiciness and saltiness taste were noticeably reduced, while sourness, sweetness, and umami taste were significantly increased in hot-air dried A. hookeri according to electronic tongue. Although the content of volatile sulfur components was present at lower level, the administration of hot-air dried A. hookeri extract (100 mg/kg p.o.) apparently prevented the body weight gain and improved insulin resistance in C57BL/6J obese mice receiving high fat diet. Results suggested that the hot-air dried A. hookeri possessing better taste and odor might be available as functional crop and bioactive diet supplement for the prevention and/or treatment of obesity.

  13. Comparative Evaluation of Sulfur Compounds Contents and Antiobesity Properties of Allium hookeri Prepared by Different Drying Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hye Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the nutritional and medicinal values of Allium hookeri, its unique flavor (onion or garlic taste and smell coming from sulfur containing compounds limits its usage as functional food. For comparative study, A. hookeri roots were prepared under two different drying conditions, namely, low-temperature drying that minimizes the volatilization of sulfur components and hot-air drying that minimizes the garlic odor and spicy taste of A. hookeri. In GC/MS olfactory system, the odorous chemicals and organosulfur compounds such as diallyl trisulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, and dipropyl trisulfide were significantly decreased in hot-air drying compared to low-temperature drying. The spiciness and saltiness taste were noticeably reduced, while sourness, sweetness, and umami taste were significantly increased in hot-air dried A. hookeri according to electronic tongue. Although the content of volatile sulfur components was present at lower level, the administration of hot-air dried A. hookeri extract (100 mg/kg p.o. apparently prevented the body weight gain and improved insulin resistance in C57BL/6J obese mice receiving high fat diet. Results suggested that the hot-air dried A. hookeri possessing better taste and odor might be available as functional crop and bioactive diet supplement for the prevention and/or treatment of obesity.

  14. CFD modelling of moisture interactions between air and constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Woloszyn, Monika; Hohota, Raluca;

    2005-01-01

    There is a strong demand for accurate moisture modelling since moisture poses a risk for both the constructions and the indoor climate. Thus, in this investigation there is special focus on moisture modelling. The paper describes a new model based on a CFD tool that is enhanced to include both de...

  15. First soil moisture values from SMOS over a Sahelian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhier, Claire; Kerr, Yann; de Rosnay, Patricia; Pellarin, Thierry; Grippa, Manuela

    2010-05-01

    Soil moisture is a crucial variable which influences the land surface processes. Numerous studies shown microwaves at low frequency are particularly performed to access to soil moisture values. SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity), launched the November 2th 2009, is the first space mission dedicated to soil moisture observations. Before SMOS, several soil moisture products were provided, based on active or passive microwaves measurements. Gruhier et al. (2010) analyse five of them over a Sahelian area. The results show that the range of volumetric soil moisture values obtained over Sahel is drastically different depending on the remote sensing approach used to produce soil moisture estimates. Although microwave bands currently available are not optimal, some products are in very good agreement with ground data. The main goal of this study is to introduce the first soil moisture maps from SMOS over West Africa. A first analyse of values over a Sahelian region is investigated. The study area is located in Gourma region in Mali. This site has been instrumented in the context of the AMMA project (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) and was specifically designed to address the validation of remotely sensed soil moisture. SMOS soil moisture values was analysed with ground knowledge and placed in the context of previous soil moisture products. The high sensitivity of the L-band used by SMOS should provide very accurate soil moisture values.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Moisture Effect on Black Soil Reflectance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Huan-Jun; ZHANG Yuan-Zhi; ZHANG Xin-Le; ZHANG Bai; SONG Kai-Shan; WANG Zong-Ming; TANG Na

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that soil reflectance decreases with increasing soil moisture content,or increases when the soil moisture reaches a certain content;however,there are few analyses on the quantitative relationship between soil reflectance and its moisture,especially in the case of black soils in northeast China.A new moisture adjusting method was developed to obtain soil reflectance with a smaller moisture interval to describe the quantitative relationship between soil reflectance and moisture.For the soil samples with moisture contents ranging from air-dry to saturated,the changes in soil reflectance with soil moisture can be depicted using a cubic equation.Both moisture threshold (MT) and moisture inflexion (MI) of soil reflectance can also be determined by the equation.When the moisture range was smaller than MT,soil reflectance can be simulated with a linear model.However,for samples with different soil organic matter (OM),the parameters of the linear model varied regularly with the OM content.Based on their relationship,the soil moisture can be estimated from soil reflectance in the black soil region.

  17. Soil moisture patterns in a northern coniferous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas F. McLintock

    1959-01-01

    The trend of soil moisture during the growing season, the alternate wetting from rainfall and drying during clear weather, determines the amount of moisture available for tree growth and also fixes, in part, the environment for root growth. In much of the northern coniferous region both moisture content and root environment are in turn affected by the hummock-and-...

  18. 7 CFR 51.2561 - Average moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Average moisture content. 51.2561 Section 51.2561... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pistachio Nuts § 51.2561 Average moisture content. (a) Determining average moisture content of the lot is not a requirement of the grades, except...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2548 - Average moisture content determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Average moisture content determination. 51.2548..., AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Pistachio Nuts in the Shell § 51.2548 Average moisture content determination. (a) Determining average moisture content of the lot is not a requirement...

  20. Guidelines on the prevention of built-in moisture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Møller, Eva B.

    2014-01-01

    the execution phase and the building’s capacity to withstand moisture. It also specifies how moisture should be dealt with in the general quality assurance system of the building industry. The Danish guideline is compared with similar guidelines and tools in other Nordic countries. The education of moisture...

  1. Estimation of Moisture Content in Coal in Coal Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Mataji, Babak

    2006-01-01

    the moisture content of the coal is proposed based on a simple dynamic energy model of a coal mill, which pulverizes and dries the coal before it is burned in the boiler. An optimal unknown input observer is designed to estimate the moisture content based on an energy balance model. The designed moisture...

  2. Estimation of Moisture Content in Coal in Coal Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Mataji, B.

    the moisture content of the coal is proposed based on a simple dynamic energy model of a coal mill, which pulverizes and dries the coal before it is burned in the boiler. An optimal unknown input observer is designed to estimate the moisture content based on an energy balance model. The designed moisture...

  3. Microphysical simulations of sulfur burdens from stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. English

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent microphysical studies suggest that geoengineering by continuous stratospheric injection of SO2 gas may be limited by the growth of the aerosols. We study the efficacy of SO2, H2SO4 and aerosol injections on aerosol mass and optical depth using a three-dimensional general circulation model with sulfur chemistry and sectional aerosol microphysics (WACCM/CARMA. We find increasing injection rates of SO2 in a narrow band around the equator to have limited efficacy while broadening the injecting zone as well as injecting particles instead of SO2 gas increases the sulfate burden for a given injection rate, in agreement with previous work. We find that injecting H2SO4 gas instead of SO2 does not discernibly alter sulfate size or mass, in contrast with a previous study using a plume model with a microphysical model. However, the physics and chemistry in aircraft plumes, which are smaller than climate model grid cells, need to be more carefully considered. We find equatorial injections increase aerosol optical depth in the Northern Hemisphere more than the Southern Hemisphere, potentially inducing regional climate changes. We also find significant perturbations to tropospheric aerosol for all injections studied, particularly in the upper troposphere and near the poles, where sulfate burden increases by up to 100 times. This enhanced burden could have implications for tropospheric radiative forcing and chemistry. These results highlight the need to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions through means other than geoengineering, and to further study geoengineering before it can be seriously considered as a climate intervention option.

  4. Microphysical simulations of sulfur burdens from stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. English

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent microphysical studies suggest that geoengineering by continuous stratospheric injection of SO2 gas may be limited by the growth of the aerosols. We study the efficacy of SO2, H2SO4 and aerosol injections on aerosol mass and optical depth using a three-dimensional general circulation model with sulfur chemistry and sectional aerosol microphysics (WACCM/CARMA. We find increasing injection rates of SO2 in a narrow band around the equator to have limited efficacy while broadening the injecting zone as well as injecting particles instead of SO2 gas increases the sulfate burden for a given injection rate, in agreement with previous work. We find that injecting H2SO4 gas instead of SO2 does not discernibly alter sulfate size or mass, in contrast with a previous study using a plume model with a microphysical model. However, the physics and chemistry in aircraft plumes, which are smaller than climate model grid cells, need to be more carefully considered. We also find significant perturbations to tropospheric aerosol for all injections studied, particularly in the upper troposphere and near the poles, where sulfate burden increases by up to 100 times. This enhanced burden could have implications for tropospheric radiative forcing and chemistry. These results highlight the need to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions rather than attempt to cool the planet through geoengineering, and to further study geoengineering before it can be seriously considered as a climate intervention option.

  5. [Prediction of litter moisture content in Tahe Forestry Bureau of Northeast China based on FWI moisture codes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Jin, Sen; Di, Xue-Ying

    2014-07-01

    Canadian fire weather index system (FWI) is the most widely used fire weather index system in the world. Its fuel moisture prediction is also a very important research method. In this paper, litter moisture contents of typical forest types in Tahe Forestry Bureau of Northeast China were successively observed and the relationships between FWI codes (fine fuel moisture code FFMC, duff moisture code DMC and drought code DC) and fuel moisture were analyzed. Results showed that the mean absolute error and the mean relative error of models.established using FWI moisture code FFMC was 14.9% and 70.7%, respectively, being lower than those of meteorological elements regression model, which indicated that FWI codes had some advantage in predicting litter moisture contents and could be used to predict fuel moisture contents. But the advantage was limited, and further calibration was still needed, especially in modification of FWI codes after rainfall.

  6. Variability of Moisture Sources and Moisture Transport in the East Asian Monsoon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremme, Astrid; Sodemann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The rainfall of the East Asian Monsoon is of key importance for livelihoods in the densely populated area of China, Japan and Korea. The interplay of many factors, including land surface processes, makes monsoon precipitation difficult to predict. To contribute to improved precipitation prediction we investigate the atmospheric mechanisms importing moisture to the region. In previous studies moisture transport has mainly been analysed by examining a combination of temperature, pressure, winds and water vapour content. However this has been done without linking precipitation to its moisture sources directly. In this project we use the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART and the diagnostic tool WaterSip to analyse ERA Interim reanalysis data to obtain a link between precipitation and its moisture sources. The total atmospheric mass is subdivided into millions air parcels, which are traced backwards for 20 days for each rainfall event in the 34 year ERA-Interim period. Specific humidity changes are interpreted as evaporation and precipitation in the area beneath the parcel with the help of a sophisticated accounting method related to target precipitation. Results on the relationship between source and sink areas reflect changes in the conditions of the source regions and in moisture transport. We investigate the moisture transport mechanisms for both seasonal and inter-annual variations during the study period 1979-2013. Preliminary results show that the sources for precipitation in the Yangtze River Valley (YRV) in China have a clear seasonal cycle in terms of location and evaporation conditions. Land areas outside the YRV Region contribute most of the moisture. The second largest source is inside the YRV region itself. For monthly means the sum of all direct oceanic sources rarely exceeds 20%. Recycling of moisture from land surfaces outside the target regions therefore seems to play a pivotal role in the East Asian Monsoon's moisture budget. Contrasting

  7. Surface defect passivation of MoS2 by sulfur, selenium, and tellurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Qi, Long; Shen, Lei; Wu, Yihong

    2016-04-01

    Few-layer MoS2 field-effect transistors often show an n-type conduction behavior due to the presence of high-density sulfur vacancies. Here, we investigated the possibility of surface defect passivation of MoS2 by sulfur treatment in (NH4)2S solution or coating with an ultrathin layer of selenium or tellurium. It was found that all three elements investigated are able to induce a p-doping effect through suppressing the residual electron concentration by an amount exceeding 0.5 × 1012 cm-2 in few-layer MoS2. Among them, the sulfur-treatment exhibits the most superior thermal stability that survives thermal annealing at temperatures ≥120 °C for at least 10 h. Tellurium exhibits the strongest p-doping effect due to electron trapping by physisorption-induced gap states near the valence band edge. On the other hand, selenium is highly volatile on MoS2; it evaporates and desorbs easily due to Joule heating during electrical measurements in vacuum. The results of first-principles calculations support the experimental observations.

  8. Moisture damage evaluation of aggregate–bitumen bonds with the respect of moisture absorption, tensile strength and failure surface

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jizhe; AIREY, Gordon D; Grenfell, James; Apeagyei, Alex K.

    2017-01-01

    The moisture-induced deterioration of asphalt mixture is because of the loss of adhesion at the aggregate–bitumen interface and/or the loss of cohesion within the bitumen film. An experimental study was undertaken in this paper to characterise the effects of moisture on the direct tensile strength of aggregate–bitumen bonds. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the moisture sensitivity of aggregate–bitumen bonds in several different aspects, which included moisture absorption, tensile streng...

  9. Sulfur and zinc abundances of red giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Takeda, Yoichi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Sato, Bun'ei

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur and zinc are chemically volatile elements, which play significant roles as depletion-free tracers in studying galactic chemical evolution. However, regarding red giants having evolved off the main sequence, reliable abundance determinations of S and Zn seem to be difficult despite that a few studies have been reported so far. Given this situation, we tried to establish the abundances of these elements for an extensive sample of 239 field GK giants (-0.8 < [Fe/H] < +0.2), by applying the spectrum-fitting technique to S I 8694-5, S I 6757, and Zn I 6362 lines and by taking into account the non-LTE effect. Besides, similar abundance analysis was done for 160 FGK dwarfs to be used for comparison. The non-LTE corrections for the S and Zn abundances derived from these lines turned out < 0.1(-0.2) dex for most cases and not very significant. It revealed that the S I 6757 feature is more reliable as an abundance indicator than S I 8694-5 for the case of red giants, because the latter suffers blending ...

  10. Moisture buffer capacity of different insulation materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing focus on the possibilities of utilizing the absorptive ability of porous materials to create passive control of humidity variations in the indoor air. These variations result in peaks in the indoor air humidity due to moisture production, or in the exterior building envelope...... due to the diurnal variations of outdoor air temperature and humidity. A passive control of the humidity of the indoor air - particularly together with passive thermal control - may lead to smaller energy use for climatization of buildings. For exterior envelopes, the choice of right materials can...... lead to more durable constructions. In this paper, a large range of very different thermal insulation materials have been tested in specially constructed laboratory facilities to determine their moisture buffer capacity. Both isothermal and nonisothermal experimental set-ups have been used...

  11. Moisture properties of the lightweight brick body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čáchová, Monika; Koňáková, Dana; Vejmelková, Eva; Keppert, Martin; Černý, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Brick have been used for thousands years and during that time they went throw the long development. One of the possibilities how to changed properties of ceramic products is to change material compositions. This article is focused on utilization of lightening additives. Commonly used sawdust is compared with straw. The matter of measurement was to determine its influence on moisture properties. Basic physical properties were measured as well, since mainly open porosity has influence on water transport. Achieved results proved that utilization of straw leads to open porosity decrease. Particularly the amount of small pores (diameter under 1µm) went down. Regarding the moisture properties water vapor transport ability was decreased by adding straw in to the ceramic, while ability of water liquid transport remained unaffected.

  12. Active thermal testing of moisture in bricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bison, Paolo G.; Bressan, Chiara; Grinzato, Ermanno G.; Marinetti, Sergio; Vavilov, Vladimir P.

    1993-04-01

    Measurement by active thermal testing of effusivity on porous moistened material is analyzed. Moistened bricks show that thermal properties of this porous solid depend on water content. Various solutions of the heat transfer problem are taken into account and approximations introduced to simplify the data reduction are discussed. Error analysis is also considered to justify the adoption of relative technique. Errors analysis speaks strongly in favor of reference method which allows to avoid the measurement of incident energy and optical properties of a specimen. This procedure allows to introduce a rather simple expression to extract moisture values from one-side thermal test. Diffusivity measurement trough flash method is proposed to determine the influence of moisture on the variation of thermal conductivity.

  13. A traditional intermediate moisture meat: Beef cecina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Cano, R; Dorantes-Alvarez, L; Hernandez-Sanchez, H; Gutierrez-Lopez, G F

    1994-01-01

    Cecina is an intermediate moisture meat produced and consumed to a large extent in Mexico. Four samples of cecina coming from different States of this country, were tested for water activity, colour, texture, fat, protein, moisture and chloride content. Sensory and microbiological analyses were also performed. Different fabrication methods for producing cecina were identified, involving large variations in the formulation of the product. There was a significant difference (P < 0·05) among samples regarding fat and chloride content, colour and texture. Differences in colour and saltiness were recorded through sensory analysis. Microbiological analysis showed higher counts than those recommended in the Mexican Official Standard for chopped and raw meat, due to poor sanitary conditions during production and marketing.

  14. Moisture redistribution in screeded concrete slabs

    OpenAIRE

    Åhs, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    The principal objective for this licentiate thesis is to develop a methodology and evaluation model in order to make the future relative humidity in a screeded concrete slab predictable. Residual moisture in screeded concrete slabs may redistribute to the top screed surface under semi-permeable flooring, thus elevating the relative humidity, RH, and possibly exceed the critical humidity level. Passing the critical humidity level may result in material damages on the flooring and adhesive. ...

  15. Process for treating moisture laden coal fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Burl E.; Henry, Raymond M.; Trivett, Gordon S.; Albaugh, Edgar W.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for making a free flowing granular product from moisture laden caked coal fines, such as wet cake, by mixing a water immiscible substance, such as oil, with the caked coal, preferably under low shear forces for a period of time sufficient to produce a plurality of free flowing granules. Each granule is preferably comprised of a dry appearing admixture of one or more coal particle, 2-50% by weight water and the water immiscible substance.

  16. Measured moisture properties for alternative insulation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Padfield, Tim

    1999-01-01

    During the past few years there has been a growing interest in using alternative insulation products in buildings. Among these products are the organic materials cellulose fibre, flax and sheep's wool as well as the inorganic perlite. The organic materials are regarded with some suspicion, because...... of their hygroscopicity. This paper describes two of the moisture-related properties of these materials: the water sorption and the water vapour transmission. For reference, some mineral fibre products are studied as well....

  17. Measured moisture properties for alternative insulation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Padfield, Tim

    1999-01-01

    During the past few years there has been a growing interest in using alternative insulation products in buildings. Among these products are the organic materials cellulose fibre, flax and sheep's wool as well as the inorganic perlite. The organic materials are regarded with some suspicion, because...... of their hygroscopicity. This paper describes two of the moisture-related properties of these materials: the water sorption and the water vapour transmission. For reference, some mineral fibre products are studied as well....

  18. Does Saffron Have Antisolar and Moisturizing Effects?

    OpenAIRE

    GOLMOHAMMADZADEH, SHIVA; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of saffron as a natural sunscreen and moisturizer. The pollens of the saffron were dried and powdered in a grinder. The experimental formulations included a homosalate (8%) lotion reference, lotions with 2, 4 and 8% of grinded saffron, and the control lotion base without saffron. The lotions containing saffron were prepared like homosalate lotion reference according to FDA. The sun protection factors (SPFs) of the formulations were de...

  19. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Barron; Moran, M. Susan; Escobar, Vanessa; Brown, Molly E.

    2014-05-01

    The launch of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission in 2014 will provide global soil moisture and freeze-thaw measurements at moderate resolution (9 km) with latency as short as 24 hours. The resolution, latency and global coverage of SMAP products will enable new applications in the fields of weather, climate, drought, flood, agricultural production, human health and national security. To prepare for launch, the SMAP mission has engaged more than 25 Early Adopters. Early Adopters are users who have a need for SMAP-like soil moisture or freeze-thaw data, and who agreed to apply their own resources to demonstrate the utility of SMAP data for their particular system or model. In turn, the SMAP mission agreed to provide Early Adopters with simulated SMAP data products and pre-launch calibration and validation data from SMAP field campaigns, modeling, and synergistic studies. The applied research underway by Early Adopters has provided fundamental knowledge of how SMAP data products can be scaled and integrated into users' policy, business and management activities to improve decision-making efforts. This presentation will cover SMAP applications including weather and climate forecasting, vehicle mobility estimation, quantification of greenhouse gas emissions, management of urban potable water supply, and prediction of crop yield. The presentation will end with a discussion of potential international applications with focus on the ESA/CEOS TIGER Initiative entitled "looking for water in Africa", the United Nations (UN) Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) which carries a specific mandate focused on Africa, the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) which lists soil moisture as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV), and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which reported a food and nutrition crisis in the Sahel.

  20. Soil moisture sensors based on metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Kitić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper novel miniature metamaterial-based soil moisture sensors are presented. The sensors are based on resonant-type metamaterials and employ split-ring resonators (SRR, spiral resonators and fractal SRRs to achieve small dimensions, high sensitivity, and compatibility with standard planar fabrication technologies. All these features make the proposedsensors suitable for deployment in agriculture for precise mapping of soil humidity.