WorldWideScience

Sample records for volatile reaction products

  1. Duff reaction on phenols: Characterization of non steam volatile products

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.; DeSouza, L.; Bhattacharya, J.

    New products having structures 1 and 2 have been characterized in the Duff reaction thymol arid carvacrol. These products have been identified as 2.6'-dithymylmethane 1 and 5.5' -dicarvacryl methane 2 respectively on the basis of spectral data...

  2. Productions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Surface Waters from Reactions with Atmospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Frances; Bell, Thomas; Yang, Mingxi

    2017-04-01

    Ozone (O3) is a key atmospheric oxidant, greenhouse gas and air pollutant. In marine environments, some atmospheric ozone is lost by reactions with aqueous compounds (e.g. dissolved organic material, DOM, dimethyl sulfide, DMS, and iodide) near the sea surface. These reactions also lead to formations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Removal of O3 by the ocean remains a large uncertainty in global and regional chemical transport models, hampering coastal air quality forecasts. To better understand the role of the ocean in controlling O3 concentrations in the coastal marine atmosphere, we designed and implemented a series of laboratory experiments whereby ambient surface seawater was bubbled with O3-enriched, VOC-free air in a custom-made glass bubble equilibration system. Gas phase concentrations of a range of VOCs were monitored continuously over the mass range m/z 33 - 137 at the outflow of the bubble equilibrator by a proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Gas phase O3 was also measured at the input and output of the equilibrator to monitor the uptake due to reactions with dissolved compounds in seawater. We observed consistent productions of a variety of VOCs upon reaction with O3, notably isoprene, aldehydes, and ketones. Aqueous DMS is rapidly removed from the reactions with O3. To test the importance of dissolved organic matter precursors, we added increasing (milliliter) volumes of Emiliania huxleyi culture to the equilibrator filled with aged seawater, and observed significant linear increases in gas phase concentrations of a number of VOCs. Reactions between DOM and O3 at the sea-air interface represent a potentially significant source of VOCs in marine air and a sink of atmospheric O3.

  3. IVO, a device for In situ Volatilization and On-line detection of products from heavy ion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Duellmann, C E; Eichler, R; Gäggeler, H W; Jost, D T; Piguet, D; Türler, A

    2002-01-01

    A new gaschromatographic separation system to rapidly isolate heavy ion reaction products in the form of highly volatile species is described. Reaction products recoiling from the target are stopped in a gas volume and converted in situ to volatile species, which are swept by the carrier gas to a chromatography column. Species that are volatile under the given conditions pass through the column. In a cluster chamber, which is directly attached to the exit of the column, the isolated volatile species are chemically adsorbed to the surface of aerosol particles and transported to an on-line detection system. The whole set-up was tested using short-lived osmium (Os) and mercury (Hg) nuclides produced in heavy ion reactions to model future chemical studies with hassium (Hs, Z=108) and element 112. By varying the temperature of the isothermal section of the chromatography column between room temperature and -80 deg. C, yield measurements of given species can be conducted, yielding information about the volatility o...

  4. Volatile Reaction Products From Silicon-Based Ceramics in Combustion Environments Identified

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1997-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics and composites are prime candidates for use as components in the hot sections of advanced aircraft engines. These materials must have long-term durability in the combustion environment. Because water vapor is always present as a major product of combustion in the engine environment, its effect on the durability of silicon-based ceramics must be understood. In combustion environments, silicon-based ceramics react with water vapor to form a surface silica (SiO2) scale. This SiO2 scale, in turn, has been found to react with water vapor to form volatile hydroxides. Studies to date have focused on how water vapor reacts with high-purity silicon carbide (SiC) and SiO2 in model combustion environments. Because the combustion environment in advanced aircraft engines is expected to contain about 10-percent water vapor at 10-atm total pressure, the durability of SiC and SiO2 in gas mixtures containing 0.1- to 1-atm water vapor is of interest. The reactions of SiC and SiO2 with water vapor were monitored by measuring weight changes of sample coupons in a 0.5-atm water vapor/0.5-atm oxygen gas mixture with thermogravimetric analysis.

  5. Studies of the Atmospheric Chemsitry of Energy-Related Volatile Organic Compounds and of their Atmospheric Reaction Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger Atkinson; Janet Arey

    2007-04-14

    The focus of this contract was to investigate selected aspects of the atmospheric chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted into the atmosphere from energy-related sources as well as from biogenic sources. The classes of VOCs studied were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-PAHs, the biogenic VOCs isoprene, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol and cis-3-hexen-1-ol, alkenes (including alkenes emitted from vegetation) and their oxygenated atmospheric reaction products, and a series of oxygenated carbonyl and hydroxycarbonyl compounds formed as atmospheric reaction products of aromatic hydrocarbons and other VOCs. Large volume reaction chambers were used to investigate the kinetics and/or products of photolysis and of the gas-phase reactions of these organic compounds with hydroxyl (OH) radicals, nitrate (NO3) radicals, and ozone (O3), using an array of analytical instrumentation to analyze the reactants and products (including gas chromatography, in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and direct air sampling atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry). The following studies were carried out. The photolysis rates of 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene and of eleven isomeric methylnitronaphthalenes were measured indoors using blacklamp irradiation and outdoors using natural sunlight. Rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals, Cl atoms and NO3 radicals with naphthalene, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, 1- and 2-ethylnaphthalene and the ten dimethylnaphthalene isomers. Rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with four unsaturated carbonyls and with a series of hydroxyaldehydes formed as atmospheric reaction products of other VOCs, and for the gas-phase reactions of O3 with a series of cycloalkenes. Products of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and O3 with a series of biogenically emitted VOCs were identified and quantified. Ambient atmospheric measurements of the concentrations of a

  6. Volatile compounds in meat and meat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika KOSOWSKA

    Full Text Available Abstract Meaty flavor is composed of a few hundreds of volatile compounds, only minor part of which are responsible for the characteristic odor. It is developed as a result of multi-directional reactions proceeding between non-volatile precursors contained in raw meat under the influence of temperature. The volatile compounds are generated upon: Maillard reactions, lipid oxidation, interactions between Maillard reaction products and lipid oxidation products as well as upon thiamine degradation. The developed flavor is determined by many factors associated with: raw material (breed, sex, diet and age of animal, conditions and process of slaughter, duration and conditions of meat storage, type of muscle, additives applied and the course of the technological process. The objective of this review article is to draw attention to the issue of volatile compounds characteristic for meat products and factors that affect their synthesis.

  7. Volatility Measurements Of Reaction Chamber-Generated Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, D. [PSI and ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Duplissy, J.; Weingartner, E.; Alfarra, R. [University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Baltensperger, U.

    2005-03-01

    A volatility-tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) was designed to monitor the non-volatile fraction of reaction chamber-generated organic particles. Using a coiled-tube heater for particle volatilization, particle volume fraction remaining measurements were made for wall temperatures of 100, 150, and 200 C. Oligomerization of organic particles generated from irradiations of {alpha}-pinene/NO{sub x} in the reaction chamber shows a strong linear relationship with time. (author)

  8. Analyzing volatile compounds in dairy products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile compounds give the first indication of the flavor in a dairy product. Volatiles are isolated from the sample matrix and then analyzed by chromatography, sensory methods, or an electronic nose. Isolation may be performed by solvent extraction or headspace analysis, and gas chromatography i...

  9. Biomass torrefaction: modeling of volatile and solid product evolution kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Richard B; Ghoniem, Ahmed F

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this work is the development of a kinetics model for the evolution of the volatile and solid product composition during torrefaction conditions between 200 and 300°C. Coupled to an existing two step solid mass loss kinetics mechanism, this model describes the volatile release kinetics in terms of a set of identifiable chemical components, permitting the solid product composition to be estimated by mass conservation. Results show that most of the volatiles released during the first stage include highly oxygenated species such as water, acetic acid, and carbon dioxide, while volatiles released during the second step are composed primarily of lactic acid, methanol, and acetic acid. This kinetics model will be used in the development of a model to describe reaction energy balance and heat release dynamics.

  10. Volatile products controlling Titan's tholins production

    KAUST Repository

    Carrasco, Nathalie

    2012-05-01

    A quantitative agreement between nitrile relative abundances and Titan\\'s atmospheric composition was recently shown with a reactor simulating the global chemistry occurring in Titan\\'s atmosphere (Gautier et al. [2011]. Icarus, 213, 625-635). Here we present a complementary study on the same reactor using an in situ diagnostic of the gas phase composition. Various initial N 2/CH 4 gas mixtures (methane varying from 1% to 10%) are studied, with a monitoring of the methane consumption and of the stable gas neutrals by in situ mass spectrometry. Atomic hydrogen is also measured by optical emission spectroscopy. A positive correlation is found between atomic hydrogen abundance and the inhibition function for aerosol production. This confirms the suspected role of hydrogen as an inhibitor of heterogeneous organic growth processes, as found in Sciamma-O\\'Brien et al. (Sciamma-O\\'Brien et al. [2010]. Icarus, 209, 704-714). The study of the gas phase organic products is focussed on its evolution with the initial methane amount [CH 4] 0 and its comparison with the aerosol production efficiency. We identify a change in the stationary gas phase composition for intermediate methane amounts: below [CH 4] 0=5%, the gas phase composition is mainly dominated by nitrogen-containing species, whereas hydrocarbons are massively produced for [CH 4] 0>5%. This predominance of N-containing species at lower initial methane amount, compared with the maximum gas-to solid conversion observed in Sciamma-O\\'Brien et al. (2010) for identical methane amounts confirms the central role played by N-containing gas-phase compounds to produce tholins. Moreover, two protonated imines (methanimine CH 2NH and ethanamine CH 3CHNH) are detected in the ion composition in agreement with Titan\\'s INMS measurements, and reinforcing the suspected role of these chemical species on aerosol production. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  11. Measurements of gas and volatile element production rates from an irradiated molten lead and lead-bismuth spallation target with proton beams of 1 and 1.4 GeV; Mesures de taux de production d'elements gazeux et volatiles lors de reactions induites par des protons de 1 et 1,4 GeV sur des cibles epaisses de plomb et plomb-bismuth liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tall, Y

    2008-03-15

    The integrated project EUROTRANS (European Research Programme for the Transmutation of High Level Nuclear Waste in an Accelerator Driven System) of the 6. EURATOM Framework Programme aims to demonstrate the transmutation of radioactive waste in ADS (Accelerator Driven Sub-critical system). It will carry out a first advanced design of an experimental facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of transmutation, and will produce a conceptual design of an industrial facility dedicated to transmutation. An ADS consists of three fundamental elements: the accelerator of protons, the sub-critical core and the spallation target. SUBATECH (physique Sub-Atomique et des Technologies associees) laboratory is involved to the study of the chosen liquid lead-bismuth as a spallation ADS target. The irradiation of liquid lead-bismuth target with energetic proton beam generates in addition to neutrons, volatile and radioactive residues. In order to determine experimentally the production rates of gas and volatile elements following a spallation reaction in a lead-bismuth target, the experiment IS419 was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN (Centre Europeen de la Recherche Nucleaire). This experiment constitutes the frame of the thesis whose main objective is to assess and study the production and release rates of many gas and volatile element from the irradiated lead-bismuth target with an energetic proton beam. The obtained data are compared to Monte Carlo simulation code (MCNPX) results in order to test the intranuclear cascade model of Bertini and of Cugnon, and the evaporation options of Dresner and Schmidt. (author)

  12. Volatile Sulfur Compounds from Livestock Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds, i.e. hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide have been identified as key odorants in livestock production due to their high concentration levels and low odor threshold values. At the same time their removal with abatement technologies based on mass transfer...... and, thus, odor removal in these systems. In this context, two processes based on the absorptive oxidation of sulfur compounds in trickling filters containing metal catalysts were examined. One process with iron chelated by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was shown to remove hydrogen sulfide...... that the original sample composition was significantly impaired due to adsorption and diffusion at the walls of the measuring equipment. Generally, sulfur compounds were best preserved in both olfactometers and sample bags, while carboxylic acids, 4-methylphenol and trimethylamine were found to undergo substantial...

  13. Double Pion Production Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Oset, E; Cano, F; Hernández, E; Kamalov, S S; Nacher, J C; Tejedor, J A G

    1999-01-01

    We report on reactions producing two pions induced by real and virtual photons or nucleons. The role of different resonances in these reactions is emphasized. Novel results on coherent two pion photoproduction in nuclei are also reported.

  14. Meson production in + reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Machner; M Betigeri; J Bojowald; A Budzanowski; A Chatterjee; J Ernst; L Freindl; D Frekers; W Garske; K Grewer; A Hamacher; J Ilieva; L Jarczyk; K Kilian; S Kliczewski; W Klimala; D Kolev; T Kutsarova; J Lieb; H Machner; A Magiera; H Nann; L Pentchev; H S Plendl; D Protić; B Razen; P Von Rossen; B J Roy; R Siudak; J Smyrski; R V Srikantiah; A Strzałkowski; R Tsenov; K Zwoll

    2001-08-01

    Total and differential cross sections for the reactions $p+d → 3He + 0 with = ; and + → 3H + + were measured with the GEM detector at COSY for beam momenta between threshold and the maximum of the corresponding baryon resonance. For both reactions a strong forward–backward asymmetry was found. The data were compared with model calculations. The aspect of isospin symmetry breaking is studied.

  15. Proteomic and metabolomic analyses provide insight into production of volatile and non-volatile flavor components in mandarin hybrid fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although many of the volatile constituents of flavor and aroma in citrus have been identified, the molecular mechanism and regulation of volatile production is not well understood. Our aim was to understand mechanisms of flavor volatile production and regulation in mandarin fruit. To this end fruits...

  16. Reaction of ozone with c5 and c6 biogenic volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    O Connor, M.; O Dwyer, M.; Wenger, J.

    2003-04-01

    REACTION OF OZONE WITH C5 AND C6 BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS M. O'Connor, M. O'Dwyer, J. Wenger CRAC-Centre for Research into Atmospheric Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University College Cork, Ireland. jwenger@chemistry.ucc.ie Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) account for around 90% of hydrocarbon emissionsinto the Earth's atmosphere. During the last ten years an increasing number of oxygenated BVOCs have also been detected in field measurement campaigns and plant emission studies. In particular a range of C5 and C6 oxygenates have been identifiedincluding compounds such as 1-penten-3-ol, E-2-hexenal and E-2-hexenyl acetate. The atmospheric impact of many of these compounds is largely unknown. The major atmospheric degradation processes for biogenic VOCs are gas-phase reaction with hydroxyl (OH) radicals, nitrate (NO3) radicals and ozone (O3). These reactions produce oxidized hydrocarbons, ozone and secondary organic aerosol and, as a result, exert a strong influence on the chemical compositionof the atmosphere. Although a number of studies have been made on the kinetics of the degradation of BVOCs, very few details are available concerning the reaction products and chemical mechanisms. In this work we have studied the reaction of O3 with a series of C5 unsaturated alcohols and C6 unsaturated aldehydes. Rate coefficients for these reactions have been studied using the relative rate method and gas-phase oxidation products have been identified using FTIR spectroscopy and PFBHA derivatisation coupled with GC-MS analysis. In addition secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has been studied as a function of humidity. The data obtained in this work will be used to further our knowledge of the atmospheric degradation of these naturally occurring compounds.

  17. Reaction product imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, D.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  18. Volatile fingerprints of seeds of four species indicate the involvement of alcoholic fermentation, lipid peroxidation, and Maillard reactions in seed deterioration during ageing and desiccation stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colville, Louise; Bradley, Emma L; Lloyd, Antony S; Pritchard, Hugh W; Castle, Laurence; Kranner, Ilse

    2012-11-01

    The volatile compounds released by orthodox (desiccation-tolerant) seeds during ageing can be analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Comparison of three legume species (Pisum sativum, Lathyrus pratensis, and Cytisus scoparius) during artificial ageing at 60% relative humidity and 50 °C revealed variation in the seed volatile fingerprint between species, although in all species the overall volatile concentration increased with storage period, and changes could be detected prior to the onset of viability loss. The volatile compounds are proposed to derive from three main sources: alcoholic fermentation, lipid peroxidation, and Maillard reactions. Lipid peroxidation was confirmed in P. sativum seeds through analysis of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal. Volatile production by ageing orthodox seeds was compared with that of recalcitrant (desiccation-sensitive) seeds of Quercus robur during desiccation. Many of the volatiles were common to both ageing orthodox seeds and desiccating recalcitrant seeds, with alcoholic fermentation forming the major source of volatiles. Finally, comparison was made between two methods of analysis; the first used a Tenax adsorbent to trap volatiles, whilst the second used solid phase microextraction to extract volatiles from the headspace of vials containing powdered seeds. Solid phase microextraction was found to be more sensitive, detecting a far greater number of compounds. Seed volatile analysis provides a non-invasive means of characterizing the processes involved in seed deterioration, and potentially identifying volatile marker compounds for the diagnosis of seed viability loss.

  19. Ozone consumption and volatile byproduct formation from surface reactions with aircraft cabin materials and clothing fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Beverly K.; Destaillats, Hugo; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Nazaroff, William W.

    We measured ozone consumption and byproduct formation on materials commonly found in aircraft cabins at flight-relevant conditions. Two series of small-chamber experiments were conducted, with most runs at low relative humidity (10%) and high air-exchange rate (˜20 h -1). New and used cabin materials (seat fabric, carpet, and plastic) and laundered and worn clothing fabrics (cotton, polyester, and wool) were studied. We measured ozone deposition to many material samples, and we measured ozone uptake and primary and secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a subset of samples. Deposition velocities ranged from 0.06 to 0.54 cm s -1. Emissions of VOCs were higher with ozone than without ozone in every case. The most commonly detected secondary emissions were C 1 through C 10 saturated aldehydes and the squalene oxidation products 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one and acetone. For the compounds measured, summed VOC emission rates in the presence of 55-128 ppb (residual level) ozone ranged from 1.0 to 8.9 μmol h -1 m -2. Total byproduct yield ranged from 0.07 to 0.24 moles of product volatilized per mole of ozone consumed. Results were used to estimate the relative contribution of different materials to ozone deposition and byproduct emissions in a typical aircraft cabin. The dominant contributor to both was clothing fabrics, followed by seat fabric. Results indicate that ozone reactions with surfaces substantially reduce the ozone concentration in the cabin but also generate volatile byproducts of potential concern for the health and comfort of passengers and crew.

  20. Solvent desorption dynamic headspace sampling of fermented dairy product volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, S A

    2001-01-01

    A method was developed based on solvent desorption dynamic headspace analysis for the identification and relative quantification of volatiles significant to the study of fermented dairy product aroma. Descriptions of applications of this method are presented including the measurement of diacetyl and acetoin in fermented milk, the evaluation of volatile-hydrocolloid interactions in dairy-based matrices, and the identification of volatiles in cheeses for canonical discriminative analysis. Advantages of this method include rapid analysis, minimal equipment investment, and the ability to analyze samples with traditional GC split/splitless inlet systems. Limitations of this method are that the sample must be in the liquid state and the inherent analytical limitation to those compounds that do not coelute with the solvent or solvent impurity peaks.

  1. Liquid biofuel production from volatile fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinbusch, K.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The production of renewable fuels and chemicals reduces the dependency on fossil fuels and limits the increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere only if a sustainable feedstock and an energy efficient process are used. The thesis assesses the possibility to use municipal and industrial waste as

  2. Volatile emission in dry seeds as a way to probe chemical reactions during initial asymptomatic deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Sara; Hill, Lisa M; González-Benito, M Elena; Ibáñez, Miguel Angel; Walters, Christina

    2016-03-01

    The nature and kinetics of reactions in dry seeds determines how long the seeds survive. We used gas chromatography to assay volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from seeds of three unrelated species as a means to non-invasively probe chemical changes during very dry, dry, and humid storage (seeds were dried to 5.5, 33, and 75% relative humidity at room temperature). VOCs emitted from seeds stored in humid conditions reflected fermentation-type reactions, with methanol and ethanol being predominant in Lactuca sativa and Carum carvi, and acetaldehyde and acetone being predominant in Eruca vesicaria. Dried C. carvi seeds continued to emit fermentation-type products, although at slower rates than the seeds stored in humid conditions. In contrast, drying caused a switch in VOC emission in L. sativa and E. vesicaria seeds towards higher emission of pentane and hexanal, molecules considered to be byproducts from the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Longevity correlated best with the rate of fermentation-type reactions and appeared unrelated to the rate of lipid peroxidation. Emission of VOCs decreased when seed species were mixed together, indicating that seeds adsorbed VOCs. Adsorption of VOCs did not appear to damage seeds, as longevity was not affected in seed mixtures. Collectively, the study shows similarity among species in the types of reactions that occur in dry seeds, but high diversity in the substrates, and hence the byproducts, of the reactions. Moreover, the study suggests that the most abundant VOCs arise from degradation of storage reserves within seed cells, and that these reactions and their byproducts are not, in themselves, damaging.

  3. The physiological and ecological roles of volatile halogen production by marine diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Claire; Sun, Shuo

    2015-04-01

    Sea-to-air halogen flux is known to have a major impact on catalytic ozone cycling and aerosol formation in the troposphere. The biological production of volatile organic (e.g. bromoform, diiodomethane) and reactive inorganic halogens (e.g. molecular iodine) is believed to play an important role in mediating halogen emissions from the marine environment. Marine diatoms in particular are known to produce the organic and inorganic volatile halogens at high rates in pelagic waters and sea-ice systems. The climate-induced changes in diatom communities that have already been observed and are expected to occur throughout the world's oceans as warming progresses are likely to alter sea-to-air halogen flux. However, we currently have insufficient understanding of the physiological and ecological functions of volatile halogen production to develop modelling tools that can predict the nature and magnitude of the impact. The results of a series of laboratory studies aimed at establishing the physiological and ecological role of volatile halogen production in two marine polar diatoms (Thalassiosira antarctica and Porosira glacialis) will be described in this presentation. We will focus on our work investigating how the activity of the haloperoxidases, a group of enzymes known to be involved in halogenation reactions in marine organisms, is altered by environmental conditions. This will involve exploring the antioxidative defence role proposed for marine haloperoxidases by showing specifically how halogenating activity varies with photosynthetic rate and changes in the ambient light conditions in the two model marine diatoms. We will also present results from our experiments designed to investigate how volatile halogen production is impacted by and influences diatom-bacterial interactions. We will discuss how improved mechanistic understanding like this could pave the way for future volatile halogen-ecosystem model development.

  4. Lipid oxidation in baked products: impact of formula and process on the generation of volatile compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maire, Murielle; Rega, Barbara; Cuvelier, Marie-Elisabeth; Soto, Paola; Giampaoli, Pierre

    2013-12-15

    This paper investigates the effect of ingredients on the reactions occurring during the making of sponge cake and leading to the generation of volatile compounds related to flavour quality. To obtain systems sensitive to lipid oxidation (LO), a formulation design was applied varying the composition of fatty matter and eggs. Oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and formation of related volatile compounds were followed at the different steps of cake-making. Optimised dynamic Solid Phase Micro Extraction was applied to selectively extract either volatile or semi-volatile compounds directly from the baking vapours. We show for the first time that in the case of alveolar baked products, lipid oxidation occurs very early during the step of dough preparation and to a minor extent during the baking process. The generation of lipid oxidation compounds depends on PUFA content and on the presence of endogenous antioxidants in the raw matter. Egg yolk seemed to play a double role on reactivity: protecting unsaturated lipids from oxidation and being necessary to generate a broad class of compounds of the Maillard reaction during baking and linked to the typical flavour of sponge cake.

  5. Reactions of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere: Ozone-alkene reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Jill Denise

    2000-08-01

    Photochemical smog cannot form without sunlight, nitrogen oxides, and volatile organic compounds (VOC). This dissertation addresses several different aspects of VOC chemistry in the atmosphere. Aside from ambient levels of VOC outdoors, VOC are also present at moderate concentrations indoors. Many studies have measured indoor air concentrations of VOC, but only one considered the effects of human breath. The major VOC in the breath of healthy individuals are isoprene (12-580 ppb), acetone (1.2-1800 ppb), ethanol (13-1000 ppb), methanol (160-2000 ppb), and other alcohols. Human emissions of VOC are negligible on a regional (less than 4%) and global scale (less than 0.3%). However, in indoor air, under fairly crowded situations, human emissions of VOC may dominate other sources of VOC. An important class of VOC in the atmosphere is alkenes, due to their high reactivity. The ozone reaction with alkenes forms OH radicals, a powerful oxidizing agent in the troposphere. OH radical formation yields from the ozonolysis of several cycloalkenes were measured using small amounts of fast-reacting aromatics and aliphatic ethers to trace OH formation. The values are 0.62 +/- 0.15, 0.54 +/- 0.13, 0.36 +/- 0.08, and 0.91 +/- 0.20 for cyclopentene, cyclohexene, cycloheptene and 1-methylcyclohexene, respectively. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-31 G(d,p) level are presented to aid in understanding the trends observed. The pressure dependence of OH radical yields may lend insight into the formation mechanism. We have made the first study of the pressure dependence of the OH radical yield for ethene, propene, 1-butene, trans-2-butene, and 2,3-dimethyl-2- butene over the range 20-760 Torr, and trans -3-hexene, and cyclopentene over the range 200-760 Torr. The OH yields from ozonolysis of ethene and propene were pressure dependent, while the other compounds had OH yields that were independent of pressure. Ozone-alkene reactions form vibrationally excited carbonyl

  6. Volatile emission in dry seeds as a way to probe chemical reactions during initial asymptomatic deterioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nature and kinetics of reactions in dry seeds determines how long they survive. We used gas chromatography to assay volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted from seeds of three unrelated species as a means to non-invasively probe chemical changes during very dry, dry and humid (15, 33 and 75% RH...

  7. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxide treatment of organic materials are oxidized species, some of which also contain chlorine. The relative amounts of species types may depend on the amount of chlorine dioxide residual maintained and the concentration and nature of the organic material present in the source water. The trend toward lower concentrations of chlorinated by-products with increasing ClO2 concentration, which was observed with phenols, has not been observed with natural humic materials as measured by the organic halogen parameter. Organic halogen concentrations have been shown to increase with increasing chlorine dioxide dose, but are much lower than those observed when chlorine is applied. Aldehydes have been detected as apparent by-products of chlorine dioxide oxidation reactions in a surface water that is a drinking water source. Some other nonchlorinated products of chlorine dioxide treatment may be quinones and epoxides. The extent of formation of these moieties within the macromolecular humic structure is also still unknown. PMID:7151750

  8. Volatile compounds present in traditional meat products (charqui and longaniza sausage in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Pía Gianelli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to identify and quantify the volatile compounds in five different commercial brands of charqui and longaniza sausages. Volatile compounds were extracted from some samples headspace using solid phase microextraction (SPME. The identification and quantification were made through the gas chromatography with a mass-selective detector (GS-MS. Fifty-four volatile compounds were identified in charqui samples and thirty-two volatile compounds in longaniza sausages. The chemical groups of the volatile compounds found in both the products were: aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, organic acids, furans, aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Significant differences were found (p<0.05 in the volatile compounds among the brands of longaniza and charqui. A characteristic volatile compounds profile was not found in the analyzed products. However, an important percentage of the volatile compounds in charqui came from the lipid oxidation. In the case of longanizas sausages, volatile compounds come mainly from the carbohydrates fermentation and spices.

  9. Radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbon production in platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, E.; Vaishnav, Y.N.; Kumar, K.S.; Weiss, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Generation of volatile hydrocarbons (ethane, pentane) as a measure of lipid peroxidation was followed in preparations from platelet-rich plasma irradiated in vitro. The hydrocarbons in the headspace of sealed vials containing irradiated and nonirradiated washed platelets, platelet-rich plasma, or platelet-poor plasma increased with time. The major hydrocarbon, pentane, increased linearly and significantly with increasing log radiation dose, suggesting that reactive oxygen species induced by ionizing radiation result in lipid peroxidation. Measurements of lipid peroxidation products may give an indication of suboptimal quality of stored and/or irradiated platelets.

  10. Volatiles production from the coking of coal; Sekitan no netsubunkai ni okeru kihatsubun seisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Y.; Saito, H.; Inaba, A. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    In order to simplify the coke manufacturing process, a coke production mechanism in coal pyrolysis was discussed. Australian bituminous coal which can produce good coke was used for the discussion. At a temperature raising rate of 50{degree}C per minute, coal weight loss increases monotonously. However, in the case of 3{degree}C, the weight loss reaches a peak at a maximum ultimate temperature of about 550{degree}C. The reaction mechanism varies with the temperature raising rates, and in the case of 50{degree}C per minute, volatiles other than CO2 and propane increased. Weight loss of coal at 3{degree}C per minute was caused mainly by methane production at 550{degree}C or lower. When the temperature is raised to 600{degree}C, tar and CO2 increased, and so did the weight loss. Anisotropy was discerned in almost of all coke particles at 450{degree}C, and the anisotropy became remarkable with increase in the maximum ultimate temperature. Coke and volatiles were produced continuously at a temperature raising rate of 50{degree}C per minute, and at 3{degree}C per minute, the production of the coke and volatiles progressed stepwise as the temperature has risen. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Relationship between the catalytic properties of the products of the oxidative thermolysis of certain complexes and the porous structures of samples in the oxidation reactions of volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semushina, Yu. P.; Pechenyuk, S. I.; Kuzmich, L. F.; Knyazeva, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    The rate of the gas-phase oxidation of ethanol, 2-propanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, dioxane, and benzene with atmospheric oxygen is studied on surfaces of bimetallic oxide catalysts Co-Fe, Cu-Fe, Cr-Co, and Ni-Fe, prepared via thermal decomposition of double complex compounds in air. It is found that the rate of oxidation of volatile compounds depends on the volume of the transient pores in the catalyst sample. The rate of oxidation on the same catalyst at 350°C depends on the nature of the substance in the order: acetone > ethyl acetate > ethanol > propanol > dioxane, benzene.

  12. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from α-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. D. Lopez-Hilfiker

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We measured a large suite of gas and particle phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer, but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gas and particle phases, the latter being detected upon temperature programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50% of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS. Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from large molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e. multi-phase accretion reaction products. Approximately 50% of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption temperature based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas–particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing

  13. Occurence and dietary exposure of volatile and non-volatile N-Nitrosamines in processed meat products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Susan Strange; Duedahl-Olesen, Lene; Granby, Kit

    a high level of consumer protection Denmark obtains National low limits of the nitrite use in meat products. An estimation of the dietary exposure to volatile NAs (VNA) and non-volatile NAs (NVNA) is necessary when performing a risk assessment of the use of nitrite and nitrate for meat preservation.......Nitrite and nitrate have for many decades been used for preservation of meat. However, nitrite can react with secondary amines in meat to form N-Nitrosamines (NAs), many of which have been shown to be genotoxic1 . The use of nitrite therefore ought to be limited as much as possible. To maintain...

  14. The lipoxygenase metabolic pathway in plants: potential for industrial production of natural green leaf volatiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigot, C.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoxygenase enzymatic pathway is a widely studied mechanism in the plant kingdom. Combined actions of three enzymes: lipase, lipoxygenase (LOX and hydroperoxide lyase (HPL convert lipidic substrates such as C18:2 and C18:3 fatty acids into short chain volatiles. These reactions, triggered by cell membrane disruptions, produce compounds known as Green Leaf Volatiles (GLVs which are C6 or C9-aldehydes and alcohols. These GLVs are commonly used as flavors to confer a fresh green odor of vegetable to food products. Therefore, competitive biocatalytic productions have been developed to meet the high demand in these natural flavors. Vegetable oils, chosen for their lipidic acid profile, are converted by soybean LOX and plant HPL into natural GLVs. However this second step of the bioconversion presents low yield due to the HPL instability and the inhibition by its substrate. This paper will shortly describe the different enzymes involved in this bioconversion with regards to their chemical and enzymatic properties. Biotechnological techniques to enhance their production potentialities will be discussed along with their implication in a complete bioprocess, from the lipid substrate to the corresponding aldehydic or alcoholic flavors.

  15. Rapid tomato volatile profiling by using proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farneti, Brian; Cristescu, Simona M; Costa, Guglielmo; Harren, Frans J M; Woltering, Ernst J

    2012-05-01

    The availability of rapid and accurate methods to assess fruit flavor is of utmost importance to support quality control especially in the breeding phase. Breeders need more information and analytical tools to facilitate selection for complex multigenic traits such as flavor quality. In this study, it is shown that proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a suitable method to monitor at high sensitivity the emission of volatiles determining the tomato aromatic profile such as hexanal, hexenals, methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde. The volatiles emitted by 14 tomato varieties (at red stage) were analyzed by 2 solvent-free headspace methods: solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography MS and PTR-MS. Multivariate statistics (principal component analysis and cluster analysis) of the PTR-MS results allow an unambiguous separation between varieties, especially with a clear fingerprinting separation between the different tomato types: round truss, cocktail, and cherry tomatoes. PTR-MS was also successfully used to monitor the changes in volatile profiles during postharvest ripening and storage.

  16. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxi...

  17. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxi...

  18. Radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbon production in platelets. Scientific report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, E.; Vaishnav, Y.N.; Kumar, K.S.; Weiss, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia plays an important role in the development of the post-irradiation hemorrhagic syndrome. Although destruction of platelet precursors in bone marrow is a major effect of high-dose radiation exposure, the effects of radiation on preformed platelets are unclear. The latter is also of concern with respect to blood-banking practices since platelets are often irradiated at doses in the range of 20-50 Gy before transfusions to prevent graft-versus-host disease. With increasing emphasis on allogenic and autologous bone-marrow transplantation, transfusions of irradiated platelets are likely to rise. Generation of volatile hydrocarbons (ethane, pentane) as a measure of lipid peroxidation was followed in preparations from platelet-rich plasma irradiated in vitro. The hydrocarbons in the headspace of sealed vials containing irradiated and nonirradiated washed platelets, platelet-rich plasma, or platelet-poor plasma increased with time. The major hydrocarbon, pentane, increased linearly and significantly with increasing log radiation dose, suggesting that reactive oxygen species induced by ionizing radiation result in lipid peroxidation. Measurements of lipid peroxidation products may give an indication of suboptimal quality of stored and/or irradiated platelets.

  19. A combination of quantitative marinating and Maillard reaction to enhance volatile flavor in Chinese marinated chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiuli; Wang, Chunqing; Zhang, Chunhui; Li, Xia; Wang, Jinzhi; Li, Hai; Tang, Chunhong

    2017-02-01

    A combination of quantitative marinating and Maillard reaction was investigated by adding d-xylose, l-cysteine and thiamine to the marinated brine of quantitative marinating, which was expected to enhance the volatile flavor of Chinese marinated chicken. Response surface methodology was used to optimize parameters, in which response was sensory evaluation scores of marinated chicken. A Box-Behnken center design was applied to the optimized added contents. The optimized contents were d-xylose (1-5‰), l-cysteine (1-5‰) and thiamine (1-3‰). Analysis of variance indicated that a second-order polynomial equation could predict the experimental data well (R(2)  = 0.94), and sensory evaluation scores were significantly affected by the added amount of d-xylose, l-cysteine and thiamine. The optimal conditions that maximized the sensory evaluation score of Chinese marinated chicken were found to be 4.96‰ d-xylose, 2.28‰ l-cysteine and 2.66‰ thiamine (w/w). Given these optimal conditions, a number of meat-like flavor compounds such as 2-pentyl-furan, benzothiazole and 4-methyl-5-thiazoleethanol were identified by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis. Our results suggested that a combination of quantitative marinating and Maillard reaction might be a promising method to enhance the volatile flavor, especially meat-like flavor, of Chinese marinated chicken. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Snake antivenoms: adverse reactions and production technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VM Morais

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Antivenoms have been widely used for more than a century for treating snakebites and other accidents with poisonous animals. Despite their efficacy, the use of heterologous antivenoms involves the possibility of adverse reactions due to activation of the immune system. In this paper, alternatives for antivenom production already in use were evaluated in light of their ability to minimize the occurrence of adverse reactions. These effects were classified according to their molecular mechanism as: anaphylactic reactions mediated by IgE, anaphylactoid reactions caused by complement system activation, and pyrogenic reactions produced mainly by the presence of endotoxins in the final product. In the future, antivenoms may be replaced by humanized antibodies, specific neutralizing compounds or vaccination. Meanwhile, improvements in antivenom quality will be focused on the obtainment of a more purified and specific product in compliance with good manufacturing practices and at an affordable cost.

  1. Potential atmospheric production of small volatile organic compounds from soot oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, A.; Carpenter, L.; Daly, H.; Jones, C.

    2003-04-01

    In the polluted troposphere, VOCs are involved in a range of interlinked chemical and photochemical cycles with a direct bearing on the production of ozone. The rates of emission, production and reaction of VOC are therefore an important component of atmospheric models. Recent urban measurements using 2D-GC methods show that there are a large number of unidentified and unattributed VOC components. Any new sources of such material with high photochemical ozone creation potentials may therefore be significant. Hydrocarbon, fossil fuel and biomass burning produces particulate carbonaceous aerosols (soot) in addition to gas phase products. Soot in the atmosphere is known to undergo oxidation becoming hydrophilic in aged urban plumes and the process is also known to produce water soluble organic compounds. In our experiments, soot samples are prepared by combustion of appropriate liquid hydrocarbons and reacted with ozone in a glass reaction vessel. Analysis of the surface and gas-phase during the course of this reaction confirms kinetic measurements showing irreversible uptake of O_3 on soot and further identify that the reaction has oxidised the surface. Transmission electron micrographs of the fresh and ozonised soot reveal small, coagulated particles: fresh soot particle size ranges from 50--90 nm which reduces to 40--50 nm after ozonolysis. Separation of the soluble components of fresh and ozonised soot samples analysed by GC/MS reveal the presence of polyaromatic and unsaturated components in unreacted soot and partially oxidised components post-ozonolysis. ATR-IR spectra of soot extracts and ozonised soot confirm that surface features due to the creation of oxidised surface products grow in with exposure time. These include carbonyl, ester and alcohol functional groups. Direct sampling of the gas-phase during the ozone reaction allows some gaseous products to be identified as small organic acids, ketones and alcohols. Overall, the reaction of ozone with soot

  2. Volatile compound profiling of Turkish Divle Cave cheese during production and ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozturkoglu-Budak, S; Gursoy, A; Aykas, D P; Koçak, C; Dönmez, S; de Vries, R P; Bron, P A

    2016-01-01

    The formation of volatile compounds in Turkish Divle Cave cheese produced in 3 different dairy farms was determined during production and ripening, revealing 110 compounds including acids, alcohols, ketones, esters, and terpenes. The presence and concentration of these volatile compounds varied betw

  3. Dynamical Model of Weak Pion Production Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, T; Lee, T S H

    2003-01-01

    The dynamical model of pion electroproduction has been extended to investigate the weak pion production reactions. The predicted cross sections of neutrino-induced pion production reactions are in good agreement with the existing data. We show that the renormalized(dressed) axial N-$\\Delta$ form factor contains large dynamical pion cloud effects and this renormalization effects are crucial in getting agreement with the data. We conclude that the N-$\\Delta$ transitions predicted by the constituent quark model are consistent with the existing neutrino induced pion production data in the $\\Delta$ region.

  4. Influence of volatile organic compounds on Fusarium graminearum mycotoxin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are involved in a diverse range of ecological interactions. Due to their low molecular weight, lipophilic nature, and high vapor pressure at ambient temperatures, they can serve as airborne signaling molecules that are capable of mediating inter and intraspecies com...

  5. Volatile fatty acids production in ruminants and the role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    organic volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and microbial protein then become available to the ... short-chain fatty acids and lactate (Ritzhaupt et al.,. 1998a,b; Muller et al., 2002; .... staining for MCT4 was visualized in strata spinosum and basale. In the ...

  6. Intranidal worker reactions to volatile compounds identified from cephalic secretions in the stingless bee,Scaptotrigona postica (Hymenoptera, Meliponinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, E; Engels, W; Schröder, W; Francke, W

    1987-02-01

    From pentane extracts of worker heads of the stingless bee (Scaptotrigona postica), 70 volatile compounds were identified by combined gas chromatographic-mass spectroscopic analyses. A bioassay was developed to evaluate intranidal reactions of workers to synthetic volatiles. Thirty-six of the cephalic volatiles were tested. Thirteen types of behavioral reactions were recorded in a semiquantitative manner. The test was run in the brood nest where mainly young nurse bees are present and also in the storage area of the nest with old foragers traffic. The results obtained were compared and discussed in order to understand the chemical communication system of this species. Especially in the dark interior of the nest, which in nature is found in hollow tree cavities, chemical messages obviously play a particularly important role in the communication systems of the bees.

  7. Light Quality Dependent Changes in Morphology, Antioxidant Capacity, and Volatile Production in Sweet Basil (Ocimum basilicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Carvalho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Narrow-bandwidth light treatments may be used to manipulate plant growth, development and metabolism. In this report LED-based light treatments were used to affect yield and metabolic content of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L. cv ‘Ceasar’ grown in controlled environments. This culinary herb produces an aroma highly appreciated by consumers, primarily composed of terpenes/terpenoids, phenylpropanoids, and fatty-acid- derived volatile molecules. Basil plants were grown under narrow-bandwidth light conditions, and leaf area, height, mass, antioxidant capacity and volatile emissions were measured at various time points. The results indicate reproducible significant differences in specific volatiles, and in biochemical classes of volatiles, compared to greenhouse grown plants. For example, basil plants grown under blue/red/yellow or blue/red/green wavelengths emit higher levels of a subset of monoterpenoid volatiles, while a blue/red/far-red treatment leads to higher levels of most sesquiterpenoid volatile molecules. Specific light treatments increase volatile content, mass, and antioxidant capacity. The results show that narrow-bandwidth illumination can induce discrete suites of volatile classes that affect sensory quality in commercial herbs, and may be useful tools in improving commercial production.

  8. Light Quality Dependent Changes in Morphology, Antioxidant Capacity, and Volatile Production in Sweet Basil (Ocimum basilicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sofia D; Schwieterman, Michael L; Abrahan, Carolina E; Colquhoun, Thomas A; Folta, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Narrow-bandwidth light treatments may be used to manipulate plant growth, development and metabolism. In this report LED-based light treatments were used to affect yield and metabolic content of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L. cv "Ceasar") grown in controlled environments. This culinary herb produces an aroma highly appreciated by consumers, primarily composed of terpenes/terpenoids, phenylpropanoids, and fatty-acid- derived volatile molecules. Basil plants were grown under narrow-bandwidth light conditions, and leaf area, height, mass, antioxidant capacity and volatile emissions were measured at various time points. The results indicate reproducible significant differences in specific volatiles, and in biochemical classes of volatiles, compared to greenhouse grown plants. For example, basil plants grown under blue/red/yellow or blue/red/green wavelengths emit higher levels of a subset of monoterpenoid volatiles, while a blue/red/far-red treatment leads to higher levels of most sesquiterpenoid volatile molecules. Specific light treatments increase volatile content, mass, and antioxidant capacity. The results show that narrow-bandwidth illumination can induce discrete suites of volatile classes that affect sensory quality in commercial herbs, and may be a useful tool in improving commercial production.

  9. Light Quality Dependent Changes in Morphology, Antioxidant Capacity, and Volatile Production in Sweet Basil (Ocimum basilicum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sofia D.; Schwieterman, Michael L.; Abrahan, Carolina E.; Colquhoun, Thomas A.; Folta, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Narrow-bandwidth light treatments may be used to manipulate plant growth, development and metabolism. In this report LED-based light treatments were used to affect yield and metabolic content of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L. cv “Ceasar”) grown in controlled environments. This culinary herb produces an aroma highly appreciated by consumers, primarily composed of terpenes/terpenoids, phenylpropanoids, and fatty-acid- derived volatile molecules. Basil plants were grown under narrow-bandwidth light conditions, and leaf area, height, mass, antioxidant capacity and volatile emissions were measured at various time points. The results indicate reproducible significant differences in specific volatiles, and in biochemical classes of volatiles, compared to greenhouse grown plants. For example, basil plants grown under blue/red/yellow or blue/red/green wavelengths emit higher levels of a subset of monoterpenoid volatiles, while a blue/red/far-red treatment leads to higher levels of most sesquiterpenoid volatile molecules. Specific light treatments increase volatile content, mass, and antioxidant capacity. The results show that narrow-bandwidth illumination can induce discrete suites of volatile classes that affect sensory quality in commercial herbs, and may be a useful tool in improving commercial production. PMID:27635127

  10. Occurrence of volatile and non-volatile N-nitrosamines in processed meat products and the role of heat treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Susan Strange; Duedahl-Olesen, Lene; Granby, Kit

    2015-01-01

    Most of the available data on the occurrence of N-nitrosamines (NA) in processed meat products have been generated in the 1980s and 1990s and especially data on the occurrence of non-volatile NA (NVNA) are scarce. Therefore we have studied the levels of volatile nitrosamines (VNA) and NVNA...... in processed meat products on the Danish market (N = 70) and for comparison also products on the Belgian market (N = 20). The effect of heat treatment on the NA levels, in selected samples, was also studied, in order to enable an evaluation of how preparation before consumption affects the levels of NA...... μg kg−1 for one Danish sample and two Belgian samples. Levels of up to 2000 and 4000 μg kg−1 of N-nitroso-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NTCA) an NVNA occurred in the Danish and the Belgian samples, respectively. The majority of the Danish processed meat products contain NVNA but also VNA occur...

  11. Simultaneous determination of volatile and non-volatile nitrosamines in processed meat products by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation and electrospray ionisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Susan Strange; Duedahl-Olesen, Lene; Granby, Kit

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive, selective and generic method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the contents (μgkg−1 range) of both volatile nitrosamines (VNA) and non-volatile nitrosamines (NVNA) in processed meat products. The extraction procedure only requires basic laboratory equipment and...

  12. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry volatile organic compound fingerprinting for monovarietal extra virgin olive oil identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Samblas, C.; Tres, A.; Koot, A.H.; Ruth, van S.M.; Gonzalez-Casado, A.; Cuadros-Rodriguez, L.

    2012-01-01

    Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new technique that allows the fast and accurate qualification of the volatile organic compound (VOC) fingerprint. This paper describes the analysis of thirty samples of extra virgin olive oil, of five different varieties of olive

  13. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry volatile organic compound fingerprinting for monovarietal extra virgin olive oil identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Samblas, C.; Tres, A.; Koot, A.H.; Ruth, van S.M.; Gonzalez-Casado, A.; Cuadros-Rodriguez, L.

    2012-01-01

    Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new technique that allows the fast and accurate qualification of the volatile organic compound (VOC) fingerprint. This paper describes the analysis of thirty samples of extra virgin olive oil, of five different varieties of olive fr

  14. Non-random species loss in bacterial communities reduces antifungal volatile production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, W H Gera; Garbeva, Paolina; Hordijk, Cornelis; Hundscheid, P J; Gunnewiek, Paulien J A Klein; Van Agtmaal, Maaike; Kuramae, Eiko E; De Boer, Wietse

    2015-08-01

    The contribution of low-abundance microbial species to soil ecosystems is easily overlooked because there is considerable overlap between metabolic abilities (functional redundancy) of dominant and subordinate microbial species. Here we studied how loss of less abundant soil bacteria affected the production of antifungal volatiles, an important factor in the natural control of soil-borne pathogenic fungi. We provide novel empirical evidence that the loss of soil bacterial species leads to a decline in the production of volatiles that suppress root pathogens. By using dilution-to-extinction for seven different soils we created bacterial communities with a decreasing number of species and grew them under carbon-limited conditions. Communities with high bacterial species richness produced volatiles that strongly reduced the hyphal growth of the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. For most soil origins loss of bacterial species resulted in loss of antifungal volatile production. Analysis of the volatiles revealed that several known antifungal compounds were only produced in the more diverse bacterial communities. Our results suggest that less abundant bacterial species play an important role in antifungal volatile production by soil bacterial communities and, consequently, in the natural suppression of soil-borne pathogens.

  15. Particle production in antiproton induced nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The quantum molecular dynamics model has been improved to investigate the reaction dynamics induced by antiprotons. The reaction channels of elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic collisions have been included in the model. Dynamics on particle production, in particular pions, kaons, antikaons and hyperons, is investigated in collisions of $\\overline{p}$ on $^{12}$C, $^{20}$Ne, $^{40}$Ca, $^{112}$Sn, $^{181}$Ta, $^{197}$Au and $^{238}$U from a low to high incident momentum. The rapidity and momentum distributions of $\\pi^{+}$ and protons from the LEAR measurements can be well reproduced. The impacts of system size and incident momentum on particle emissions are investigated from the inclusive spectra, transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. It is found that the annihilations of $\\overline{p}$ on nucleons are of importance on the particle production. Hyperons are mainly produced via meson induced reactions on nucleons and strangeness exchange collisions when the incident moment...

  16. Production of volatile fatty acids from sewage organic matter by combined bioflocculation and alkaline fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khiewwijit, R.; Temmink, B.G.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.; Keesman, K.J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the potential of volatile fatty acids (VFA) production from sewage by a combined high-loaded membrane bioreactor and sequencing batch fermenter. VFA production was optimized with respect to SRT and alkaline pH (pH 8–10). Application of pH shock to a value of 9 at the start of a s

  17. Dietary exposure to volatile and non-volatile N-nitrosamines from processed meat products in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, S S; Duedahl-Olesen, L; Christensen, T; Olesen, P T; Granby, K

    2015-06-01

    Recent epidemiological studies show a positive association between cancer incidence and high intake of processed meat. N-nitrosamines (NAs) in these products have been suggested as one potential causative factor. Most volatile NAs (VNAs) are classified as probable human carcinogens, whereas the carcinogenicity for the majority of the non-volatile NA (NVNA) remains to be elucidated. Danish adults (15-75 years) and children (4-6 years) consume 20 g and 16 g of processed meat per day (95th percentile), respectively. The consumption is primarily accounted for by sausages, salami, pork flank (spiced and boiled) and ham. This consumption results in an exposure to NVNA of 33 and 90 ng kg bw(-1) day(-1) for adults and children, respectively. The exposure to VNA is significantly lower amounting to 0.34 and 1.1 ng kg bw(-1) day(-1) for adults and children, respectively. Based on a BMDL10 of 29 µg kg bw(-1) day(-1) a MOE value ≥17,000 was derived for the exposure to NA known to be carcinogenic (VNA including NSAR), indicating an exposure of low concern. The exposure to the NVNA is substantially higher and if found to be of toxicological significance the exposure may be of concern.

  18. Rapid Detection of Meat Spoilage by Measuring Volatile Organic Compounds by Using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Mayr, D; Margesin, R.; Klingsbichel, E.; E. Hartungen; Jenewein, D.; Schinner, F.; Märk, T.D.

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of the microbial spoilage population for air- and vacuum-packaged meat (beef and pork) stored at 4°C was investigated over 11 days. We monitored the viable counts (mesophilic total aerobic bacteria, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, lactic acid bacteria, and Enterococcus spp.) by the microbiological standard technique and by measuring the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with the recently developed proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry system. Storage time,...

  19. Methods to assess secondary volatile lipid oxidation products in complex food matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Yesiltas, Betül

    A range of different methods are available to determine secondary volatile lipid oxidation products. These methods include e.g. spectrophotometric determination of anisidine values and TBARS as well as GC based methods for determination of specific volatile oxidation products such as pentanal...... and hexanal. Different extraction methods for extracting volatiles before GC analysis can be used, e.g static headspace, dynamic headspace and solid phase microextraction. Traditionally, dynamic headspace extraction has been performed manually. However, recently automated dynamic headspace methods have become...... available. This presentation will briefly discuss advantages and disadvantages of spectrophotometric methods versus GC- based methods. Moreover, the different extraction methods used for GC-based analysis will be discussed and examples on results obtained with SPME, the traditional and the automated dynamic...

  20. Volatility and lifetime against OH heterogeneous reaction of ambient isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Weiwei; Palm, Brett B.; Day, Douglas A.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Krechmer, Jordan E.; Peng, Zhe; de Sá, Suzane S.; Martin, Scot T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Baumann, Karsten; Hacker, Lina; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Koss, Abigail R.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Seco, Roger; Sjostedt, Steven J.; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Guenther, Alex B.; Kim, Saewung; Canonaco, Francesco; Prévôt, André S. H.; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    Isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) can contribute substantially to organic aerosol (OA) concentrations in forested areas under low NO conditions, hence significantly influencing the regional and global OA budgets, accounting, for example, for 16–36 % of the submicron OA in the southeastern United States (SE US) summer. Particle evaporation measurements from a thermodenuder show that the volatility of ambient IEPOX-SOA is lower than that of bulk OA and also much lower than that of known monomer IEPOX-SOA tracer species, indicating that IEPOX-SOA likely exists mostly as oligomers in the aerosol phase. The OH aging process of ambient IEPOX-SOA was investigated with an oxidation flow reactor (OFR). New IEPOX-SOA formation in the reactor was negligible, as the OFR does not accelerate processes such as aerosol uptake and reactions that do not scale with OH. Simulation results indicate that adding ~100 µg m-3 of pure H2SO4 to the ambient air allows IEPOX-SOA to be efficiently formed in the reactor. The heterogeneous reaction rate coefficient of ambient IEPOX-SOA with OH radical (kOH) was estimated as 4.0 ± 2.0 ×10-13 cm3 molec-1 s-1, which is equivalent to more than a 2-week lifetime. A similar kOH was found for measurements of OH oxidation of ambient Amazon forest air in an OFR. At higher OH exposures in the reactor (> 1 × 1012 molec cm-3 s), the mass loss of IEPOX-SOA due to heterogeneous reaction was mainly due to revolatilization of fragmented reaction products. We report, for the first time, OH reactive uptake coefficients (γOH = 0.59±0.33 in SE US and γOH = 0.68±0.38 in Amazon) for SOA under ambient conditions. A relative humidity dependence of kOH and γOH was observed, consistent with surface-area-limited OH uptake

  1. Optimization of volatile fatty acids and hydrogen production from Saccharina japonica: acidogenesis and molecular analysis of the resulting microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwonsu; Kim, Woong; Park, Gwon Woo; Seo, Charles; Chang, Ho Nam; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and hydrogen from mixed anaerobic cultures of Saccharina japonica with respect to two independent variables: methanogenic inhibitor concentration and temperature. The effects of four methanogenic inhibitors on acidogenic processes were tested, and qualitative microbial analyses were carried out. Escherichia, Acinetobacter, and Clostridium were the most predominant genera in samples treated with chloroform (CHCl3), iodoform (CHI3), 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES), or β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), respectively. RSM showed that the production of VFAs reached a peak of 12.5 g/L at 38.6 °C in the presence of 7.4 g/L β-CD; these were the conditions under which hydrogen production was also nearly maximal. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) showed that shifts in the bacterial community population correlated with the concentrations of β-CD indicating that this compound effectively inhibited methanogens.

  2. Microbial production of volatile sulphur compounds in the large intestine of pigs fed two different diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Jensen, Bent Borg; Finster, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the production of volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) in segments of the large intestine of pigs and to assess the impact of diet on this production. Methods and Results: Pigs were fed two diets based on either wheat and barley (STD) or wheat and dried distillers grains with sol......Aims: To investigate the production of volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) in segments of the large intestine of pigs and to assess the impact of diet on this production. Methods and Results: Pigs were fed two diets based on either wheat and barley (STD) or wheat and dried distillers grains...... significantly higher in the STD group. Conversely, the net methanethiol production rate was significantly higher in the DDGS-group, while no difference was observed for dimethyl sulphide. The number of sulphate reducing bacteria and total bacteria were determined by quantitative PCR and showed a significant...

  3. Solid state fermentation of food waste mixtures for single cell protein, aroma volatiles and fat production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggelopoulos, Theodoros; Katsieris, Konstantinos; Bekatorou, Argyro; Pandey, Ashok; Banat, Ibrahim M; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2014-02-15

    Growth of selected microorganisms of industrial interest (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus and kefir) by solid state fermentation (SSF) of various food industry waste mixtures was studied. The fermented products were analysed for protein, and nutrient minerals content, as well as for aroma volatile compounds by GC/MS. The substrate fermented by K. marxianus contained the highest sum of fat and protein concentration (59.2% w/w dm) and therefore it could be considered for utilisation of its fat content and for livestock feed enrichment. Regarding volatiles, the formation of high amounts of ε-pinene was observed only in the SSF product of kefir at a yield estimated to be 4 kg/tn of SSF product. A preliminary design of a biorefinery-type process flow sheet and its economic analysis, indicated potential production of products (enriched livestock feed, fat and ε-pinene) of significant added value.

  4. Characterization of volatile production during storage of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    The duration that seeds stay vigorous during storage is difficult to predict but critical to seed industry and conservation communities. Production of volatile compounds from lettuce seeds during storage was investigated as a non-invasive and early detection method of seed aging rates. Over thirty...

  5. Volatile fatty acids production in ruminants and the role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Essential to these roles is their rapid transport across the plasma membrane, ... The aim of this review is to critically discuss short-chain fatty acids production and the ... Two major functions of monocarboxylate transporter proteins, namely the ...

  6. Involvement of a broccoli COQ5 methyltransferase in the production of volatile selenium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Yuan, Youxi; Yang, Yong; Rutzke, Michael; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Kochian, Leon V; Li, Li

    2009-10-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for animals and humans but becomes toxic at high dosage. Biologically based Se volatilization, which converts Se into volatile compounds, provides an important means for cleanup of Se-polluted environments. To identify novel genes whose products are involved in Se volatilization from plants, a broccoli (Brassica oleracea var italica) cDNA encoding COQ5 methyltransferase (BoCOQ5-2) in the ubiquinone biosynthetic pathway was isolated. Its function was authenticated by complementing a yeast coq5 mutant and by detecting increased cellular ubiquinone levels in the BoCOQ5-2-transformed bacteria. BoCOQ5-2 was found to promote Se volatilization in both bacteria and transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. Bacteria expressing BoCOQ5-2 produced an over 160-fold increase in volatile Se compounds when they were exposed to selenate. Consequently, the BoCOQ5-2-transformed bacteria had dramatically enhanced tolerance to selenate and a reduced level of Se accumulation. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing BoCOQ5-2 volatilized three times more Se than the vector-only control plants when treated with selenite and exhibited an increased tolerance to Se. In addition, the BoCOQ5-2 transgenic plants suppressed the generation of reactive oxygen species induced by selenite. BoCOQ5-2 represents, to our knowledge, the first plant enzyme that is not known to be directly involved in sulfur/Se metabolism yet was found to mediate Se volatilization. This discovery opens up new prospects regarding our understanding of the complete metabolism of Se and may lead to ways to modify Se-accumulator plants with increased efficiency for phytoremediation of Se-contaminated environments.

  7. Effect of Boric Acid on Volatile Products of Thermooxidative Degradation of Epoxy Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, O. B.; Bukhareva, P. B.; Melnikova, T. V.; Visakh, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The polymeric materials are characterized by high flammability. The use of flame retardants in order to reduce the flammability of polymers can lead to the formation of toxic gaseous products under fire conditions. In this work we studied the effect of boric acid on the volatile products of thermooxidative degradation of epoxy polymers. The comparative investigations were carried out on the samples of the unfilled epoxy resin and epoxy resin filled with a boric acid at percentage 10 wt. %. The analysis of the volatile decomposition products and thermal stability of the samples under heating in an oxidizing medium was performed using a thermal mass-spectrometric analysis. It is found that the incorporation of boric acid into the polymer matrix increases the thermal stability of epoxy composites and leads to a reduction in the 2-2.7 times of toxic gaseous products

  8. Reactive oxidation products promote secondary organic aerosol formation from green leaf volatiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Hamilton

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Green leaf volatiles (GLVs are an important group of chemicals released by vegetation which have emission fluxes that can be significantly increased when plants are damaged or stressed. A series of simulation chamber experiments has been conducted at the European Photoreactor in Valencia, Spain, to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from the atmospheric oxidation of the major GLVs cis-3-hexenylacetate and cis-3-hexen-1-ol. Liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry was used to identify chemical species present in the SOA. Cis-3-hexen-1-ol proved to be a more efficient SOA precursor due to the high reactivity of its first generation oxidation product, 3-hydroxypropanal, which can hydrate and undergo further reactions with other aldehydes resulting in SOA dominated by higher molecular weight oligomers. The lower SOA yields produced from cis-3-hexenylacetate are attributed to the acetate functionality, which inhibits oligomer formation in the particle phase. Based on observed SOA yields and best estimates of global emissions, these compounds may be calculated to be a substantial unidentified global source of SOA, contributing 1–5 TgC yr−1, equivalent to around a third of that predicted from isoprene. Molecular characterization of the SOA, combined with organic mechanistic information, has provided evidence that the formation of organic aerosols from GLVs is closely related to the reactivity of their first generation atmospheric oxidation products, and indicates that this may be a simple parameter that could be used in assessing the aerosol formation potential for other unstudied organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  9. Selective Trapping of Volatile Fission Products with an Off-Gas Treatment System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.R. Westphal; J.J. Park; J.M. Shin; G.I. Park; K.J. Bateman; D.L. Wahlquist

    2008-07-01

    A head-end processing step, termed DEOX for its emphasis on decladding via oxidation, is being developed for the treatment of spent oxide fuel by pyroprocessing techniques. The head-end step employs high temperatures to oxidize UO2 to U3O8 resulting in the separation of fuel from cladding and the removal of volatile fission products. Development of the head-end step is being performed in collaboration with the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) through an International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Following the initial experimentation for the removal of volatile fission products, an off-gas treatment system was designed in conjunction with KAERI to collect specific fission gases. The primary volatile species targeted for trapping were iodine, technetium, and cesium. Each species is intended to be collected in distinct zones of the off-gas system and within those zones, on individual filters. Separation of the volatile off-gases is achieved thermally as well as chemically given the composition of the filter media. A description of the filter media and a basis for its selection will be given along with the collection mechanisms and design considerations. In addition, results from testing with the off-gas treatment system will be presented.

  10. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry: online and rapid determination of volatile organic compounds of microbial origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Andrea; Capozzi, Vittorio; Spano, Giuseppe; Biasioli, Franco

    2015-05-01

    Analytical tools for the identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by microbial cultures have countless applications in an industrial and research context which are still not fully exploited. The various techniques for VOC analysis generally arise from the application of different scientific and technological philosophies, favoring either sample throughput or chemical information. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) represents a valid compromise between the two aforementioned approaches, providing rapid and direct measurements along with highly informative analytical output. The present paper reviews the main applications of PTR-MS in the microbiological field, comprising food, environmental, and medical applications.

  11. A theoretical study of volatile fission products release from oxide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paraschiv, M.C.; Paraschiv, A. [Inst. for Nucl. Res., Pitesti (Romania); Grecu, V.V. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, P.O. Box MG-11, Bucharest (Romania)

    1999-11-01

    Treating the average volume grains as thermodynamically closed subsystems, a method to evaluate the volatile fission products migration at the grain boundary and their release in the void volume of the fuel elements is proposed. The method considers the phenomena of the intergranular bubble growth and interlinkage, grain growth and grain boundary resolution. Analytical solutions of the diffusion problem associated with the volatile fission products behaviour taking into account their direct yield from fission and from precursors simultaneously with the diffusion and decay, irradiation induced resolution and fuel grain growth, during a time-step varying irradiation history have also been derived. The results are very accurate and point out the strong effect of the boundary condition changes on the volatile fission products behaviour when the simultaneous effects of the intergranular bubble coalescence, the precursors, the irradiation induced resolution and grain growth are considered. Comparative analyses versus other similar models of the diffusion of only stable gas species of fission products are also presented. (orig.)

  12. Molecular identification of Brettanomyces bruxellensis strains isolated from red wines and volatile phenol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelofse, A; Lonvaud-Funel, A; du Toit, M

    2009-06-01

    The spoilage yeast Brettanomyces/Dekkera can persist throughout the winemaking process and has the potential to produce off-flavours that affect the sensory quality of wine. The main objective of this study was to select different strains of Brettanomyces bruxellensis isolated from red wines and to compare their volatile phenol production. From a collection of 63 strains, eight strains of B. bruxellensis were selected for volatile phenol production after the application of molecular techniques such as ISS-PCR, PCR-DGGE and REA-PFGE. All strains showed three large chromosomes of similar size with PFGE. However, unique restriction profiles of the chromosomes were visible after NotI digestion that clearly distinguished the strains. All strains were capable of producing large quantities of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol from p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid, respectively in synthetic media. However, the diversity among strains for volatile phenol production differed between synthetic media and wine with regard to the maximum production levels of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol. This study illustrated the diversity of B. bruxellensis strains that occur during winemaking.

  13. Chilling and heating may regulate C6 volatile aroma production by different mechanisms in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexanal, Z-3-hexenal, E-2-hexenal, hexanol, and Z-3-hexenol are major tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) volatile aromas derived from oxygenation of unsaturated fatty acids. Chilling and heating may suppress production of these C6 volatiles. The objective of this research was to determine the response...

  14. Lipid and cholesterol oxidation, color changes, and volatile compounds production in irradiated raw pork batters with different fat content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Cheo Run; Byun, Myung Woo [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    An emulsion-type product was prepared to determine the effect of irradiation on lipid and cholesterol oxidation, color change, and volatile production in raw pork with different fat content. Lipid oxidation increased with an increase in fat content or irradiation dose. Irradiated batters had higher cholesterol oxides than did non-irradiated batters, and the major cholesterol oxides formed in irradiated pork batters were 7{alpha}- and 7{beta}- hydroxycholesterol. Hunter color a- and b-values of raw pork batters were decreased by irradiation regardless of fat content. Irradiation significantly increased the amount of volatile compounds. Although lipid oxidation of high fat products (10 and 15% fat) was higher than that of low fat products (4%), high fat products did not always produce greater amount of volatile compounds in raw pork batters. In summary, irradiation increased lipid and cholesterol oxidation, and volatile compounds production, and had detrimental effects on the color of raw pork batter under aerobic conditions.

  15. Volatile components and sensory characteristics of Thai traditional fermented shrimp pastes during fermentation periods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kleekayai, Thanyaporn; Pinitklang, Surapong; Laohakunjit, Natta; Suntornsuk, Worapot

    2016-01-01

    Headspace-volatile components and sensory characteristics, including color, Maillard reaction products and free amino acid profiles, of two types of Thai traditional fermented shrimp paste, Kapi Ta...

  16. Biotic and abiotic factors affect green ash volatile production and emerald ash borer adult feeding preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigen; Poland, Therese M

    2009-12-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an exotic woodborer first detected in 2002 in Michigan and Ontario and is threatening the ash resource in North America. We examined the effects of light exposure and girdling on green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) volatile production, and effects of light exposure, girdling, and leaf age on emerald ash borer adult feeding preferences and phototaxis. Green ash seedlings grown under higher light exposure had lower amounts of three individual volatile compounds, (Z)-3-hexenol, (E)-beta-ocimene, and (Z,E)-alpha-farnesene, as well as the total amount of six detected volatile compounds. Girdling did not affect the levels of these volatiles. Emerald ash borer females preferred mature leaves, leaves from girdled trees, and leaves grown in the sun over young leaves, leaves from nongirdled trees, and leaves grown in the shade, respectively. These emerald ash borer preferences were most likely because of physical, nutritional, or biochemical changes in leaves in response to the different treatments. Emerald ash borer females and males showed positive phototaxis in laboratory arenas, a response consistent with emerald ash borer preference for host trees growing in sunlight.

  17. Revisiting The Financial Volatility – Derivative Products Relationship On Euronext. Liffe Using A Frequency Domain Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Albulescu, Claudiu Tiberiu; Daniel GOYEAU; Tiwari, Aviral Kumar

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The present paper analyse the relationship between the volume of transactions with futures equity index products and the return volatility of their underlying assets. The study addresses the case of five stock markets, members of the Euronext.liffe: London, Paris, Amsterdam, Brussels and Lisbon. We employ a frequency domain analysis, using monthly data for the period 2001.09 – 2010.06, which allows us to identify the direction of the causality between the derivatives v...

  18. A Reduced Reaction Scheme for Volatile Nitrogen Conversion in Coal Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Saaby; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    In pulverised coal flames, the most important volatile nitrogen component forming NOx is HCN. To be able to model the nitrogen chemistry in coal flames it is necessary to have an adequate model for HCN oxidation. The present work was concerned with developing a model for HCN/NH3/NO conversion based...... that the CO/H-2 chemistry was described adequately, the reduced HCN/NH3/NO model compared very well with the detailed model over a wide range of stoichiometries. Decoupling of the HCN chemistry from the CO/H-2 chemistry resulted in over-prediction of the HCN oxidation rate under fuel rich conditions, but had...... negligible effect on the CO/H-2 chemistry. Comparison with simplified HCN models from the literature revealed significant differences, indicating that these models should be used cautiously in modelling volatile nitrogen conversion....

  19. Headspace Gas Chromatography Method for Studies of Reaction and Permeation of Volatile Agents with Solid Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    oxidation using potassium iodide solution. 13.2.1. Repeated sampling of the same sample vial: Each vial was remeasured in this experiment. Results for...criteria. 9.1 Routine stability testing The QC sensitivity measurement can be done by preparing a vial with a standard quantity of a reagent... stability checks has been a problem for this method. The problem is illustrated in Figure 1. Volatile compounds like triethylphosphate or

  20. Growth and volatile compound production by Brettanomyces/Dekkera bruxellensis in red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, A; Perello, M C; de Revel, G; Lonvaud-Funel, A

    2008-06-01

    Brettanomyces/Dekkera bruxellensis is a particularly troublesome wine spoilage yeast. This work was aimed at characterizing its behaviour in terms of growth and volatile compound production in red wine. Sterile red wines were inoculated with 5 x 10(3) viable cells ml(-1) of three B. bruxellensis strains and growth and volatile phenol production were followed for 1 month by means of plate counts and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) respectively. Maximum population levels generally attained 10(6)-10(7) colony forming units (CFU) ml(-1) and volatile phenol concentrations ranged from 500 to 4000 microg l(-1). Brettanomyces bruxellensis multiplication was also accompanied by the production of organic acids (from C(2) to C(10)), short chain acid ethyl-esters and the 'mousy off-flavour' component 2-acetyl-tetrahydropyridine. Different kinds of 'Brett character' characterized by distinct metabolic and sensory profiles can arise in wine depending on the contaminating strain, wine pH and sugar content and the winemaking stage at which contamination occurs. We identified new chemical markers that indicate wine defects caused by B. bruxellensis. Further insight was provided into the role of some environmental conditions in promoting wine spoilage.

  1. Volatile profile, lipid oxidation and protein oxidation of irradiated ready-to-eat cured turkey meat products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation had little effects on the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values in ready-to-eat (RTE) turkey meat products, while it increased protein oxidation at 4.5 kGy. The volatile profile analyses indicated that the amount of sulfur compounds increased linearly as doses increased in RTE turkey meat products. By correlation analysis, a positive correlation was found between benzene/ benzene derivatives and alcohols with lipid oxidation, while aldehydes, ketones and alkane, alkenes and alkynes were positively correlated with protein oxidation. Principle component analysis showed that irradiated meat samples can be discriminated by two categories of volatile compounds: Strecker degradation products and radiolytic degradation products. The cluster analysis of volatile data demonstrated that low-dose irradiation had minor effects on the volatile profile of turkey sausages (<1.5 kGy). However, as the doses increased, the differences between the irradiated and non-irradiated cured turkey products became significant.

  2. Hydroperoxide-lyase activity in mint leaves. Volatile C6-aldehyde production from hydroperoxy-fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargouri, Mohamed; Drouet, Philippe; Legoy, Marie-Dominique

    2004-07-01

    The extraction of 13-hydroperoxide-lyase activity from mint leaves as well as its use for C6-aldehyde production was studied in this work. The enzyme cleaves 13(S)-hydroperoxy-C18 fatty acids into C6-aldehyde and C12-oxo-acid. Two mint species were tested: Mentha veridis and Mentha pulegium. The headspace injection method coupled to gas chromatography was used for volatile compound analysis. The optimal conditions for temperature and pH were, respectively, 15 and 7 degrees C. We also studied the specific synthesis of hexanal and hexenals respectively from 13(S)-hydroperoxy-linoleic acid and 13(S)-hydroperoxy-linolenic acid. Considerable quantities of aldehyde (up to 2.58 micromol) were produced after 15 min of cleavage reaction in 2 ml stirred at 100 rpm, especially in presence of extract of M. veridis. The conversion yields decreased from 52.5% as maximum to 3.3% when using initial hydroperoxide concentrations between 0.2 and 15 mM. An unsaturated aldehyde, the 3(Z)-hexenal was produced from 13(S)-hydroperoxy-linolenic acid. The 3(Z)-isomer was unstable and isomerized in part to 2(E)-hexenal. In this work, we observed a very limited isomerization of 3(Z)-hexenal to 2(E)-hexenal, since the reaction and the volatile purge were carried out successively in the same flask without delay or any contact with the atmosphere. These aldehydes contribute to the fresh green odor in plants and are widely used in perfumes and in food technology. Their importance increases especially when the starting materials are of natural biological origin as used in this work. GC-MS analysis allowed the identification of the products.

  3. Effect of Pozzolanic Reaction Products on Alkali-silica Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Fengyan; LAN Xianghui; LV Yinong; XU Zhongzi

    2006-01-01

    The effect of fly ash on controlling alkali-silica reaction (ASR) in simulated alkali solution was studied. The expansion of mortar bars and the content of Ca(OH)2 in cement paste cured at 80 ℃ for 91 d were measured. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were employed to study the microstructure of C-S-H. TEM/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was then used to determine the composition of C-S-H. The pore structure of the paste was analyzed by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). The results show that the contents of fly ash of 30% and 45% can well inhibit ASR. And the content of Ca(OH)2 decreases with the increase of fly ash. That fly ash reacted with Ca(OH)2 to produce C-S-H with a low Ca/Si molar ratio could bind more Na+ and K+ ions, and produce a reduction in the amount of soluble alkali available for ASR. At the same time, the C-S-H produced by pozzolanic reaction converted large pores to smaller ones (gel pores smaller than 10 nm) to densify the pore structure. Perhaps that could inhibit alkali transport to aggregate for ASR.

  4. Investigation the Impact of Exchange Rate Volatility on the Export of Agricultural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamalipour

    2016-10-01

    coefficients. Results and Discussion: Main results showed that real exchange rate volatility and export value of selected commodities are Co-integrated. The coefficient estimation of FMOLS and DOLS methods are equal and statically significant; so, these methods aren’t statically different and they showed that real exchange rate volatility has a negative impact on exported value for whole panel. However, the specific coefficient for each commodity showed contradictory behavior in short run and long run; for example real exchange rate fluctuation has a negative and significant impact on all the commodities; but, in short run this variable has a positive and significant impact on exported value. Moreover, based on estimated results it seems that fluctuation in exchange market has a greater impact on more valuable commodities like date. Conclusion: Considering the importance of agricultural product trade and in order to overcome mono-product economy, this study investigated long term and short term relation between export of grape, orange, date and exchange rate volatilities. To this aim, first the index of exchange volatility using generated autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (GARCH was calculated. In order to investigate the relation between exchange rate volatilities and export value of agricultural product, unit root test and cointegration test related to panel data were used during years 1971-2013. The results of model estimation showed that exchange rate volatilities in short term and long term have respectively positive and negative effects on the export value of orange, grape and date. In long term, the negative effects of Exchange rate volatilities on high-export-value products are more than its effects on low-export-value products. Based on the estimation results we can conclude that, in short run, exporters are willing to increase their interchange and gain profits of the volatility in exchange market; however, in long run exchange rate fluctuation has

  5. Optimization of process parameters for production of volatile fatty acid, biohydrogen and methane from anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M A; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Liu, Y; Nghiem, L D; Hai, F I; Deng, L J; Wang, J; Wu, Y

    2016-11-01

    The anaerobic digestion process has been primarily utilized for methane containing biogas production over the past few years. However, the digestion process could also be optimized for producing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and biohydrogen. This is the first review article that combines the optimization approaches for all three possible products from the anaerobic digestion. In this review study, the types and configurations of the bioreactor are discussed for each type of product. This is followed by a review on optimization of common process parameters (e.g. temperature, pH, retention time and organic loading rate) separately for the production of VFA, biohydrogen and methane. This review also includes additional parameters, treatment methods or special additives that wield a significant and positive effect on production rate and these products' yield.

  6. Verification of“Trend-Volatility Model”in Short-Term Forecast of Grain Production Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI Chang-hong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The "trend-volatility model" in short-term forecasting of grain production potential was verified and discussed systematically by using the grain production data from 1949 to 2014, in 16 typical counties and 6 typical districts, and 31 provinces, of China. The results showed as follows:(1 Size of forecast error reflected the precision of short-term production potential, the main reason of large prediction error was a great amount of high yield farmlands were occupied in developed areas and a great increase of vegetable and fruit planted that made grain yield decreased in a short time;(2 The micro-trend amendment method was a necessary part of "trend-volatility model", which could involve the short-term factors such as meteorological factors, science and technology input, social factors and other effects, while macro-trend prediction could not. Therefore, The micro-trend amendment method could improve the forecast precision.(3 In terms of actual situation in recent years in China, the more developed the areas was, the bigger the volatility of short-term production potential was; For the short-term production potential, the stage of increasing-decreasing-recovering also existed in developed areas;(4 In the terms of forecast precision of short-terms production potential, the scale of national was higher than the scale of province, the scale of province was higher than the scale of district, the scale of district was higher than the scale of county. And it was large differences in precision between different provinces, different districts and different counties respectively, which was concerned to the complementarity of domestic climate and the ability of the farmland resistance to natural disasters.

  7. Comprehensive verification of new method "Ethanol as Internal Standard" for determination of volatile compounds in alcohol products by gas chromatography

    CERN Document Server

    Charapitsa, Siarhei V; Markovsky, Mikhail G; Yakuba, Yurii F; Kotov, Yurii N

    2014-01-01

    Recently proposed new method "Ethanol as Internal Standard" for determination of volatile compounds in alcohol products by gas chromatography is investigated from different sides. Results of experimental study from three different laboratories from Belarus and Russian Federation are presented.

  8. Production of volatile and sulfur compounds by ten Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains inoculated in Trebbiano must

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca ePatrignani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In wines, the presence of sulphur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained throughout the fermentation of 10 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, the production of sulphur compounds was further evaluated by using a gas-chromatograph coupled with a Flame Photometric Detector. Specifically, the ten strains were inoculated in Trebbiano musts and the fermentations were monitored for 19 days. In the produced wines, volatile and sulphur compounds as well as amino acid concentrations were investigated. Also the physico-chemical characteristics of the wines and their electronic nose profiles were evaluated.

  9. Detection of some volatile degradation products released during photoexposition of ranitidine in a solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamrógiewicz, Marzena; Wielgomas, Bartosz

    2013-03-25

    Ranitidine (RAN) is on top of the list of prescribed drugs, due to its popularity as a selective H2-receptor antagonist, which efficiently decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach. RAN is not stable both in a solid state and in a solution, which creates manufacturing problems, requires appropriate storage conditions, and results in a short drug shelf-life. The aim of this work was to study the emission of volatile degradation products generated during photoexposition of ranitidine hydrochloride in a solid state. Significant changes in volatile profile of irradiated RAN were detected using HS-SPME-GC-MS. Sixteen major peaks were noticed on the chromatograms of irradiated ranitidine and the structures of some compounds were elucidated, while the presence of acetaldoxime, thiazole, dimethylformamide, dimethylacetamide and 5-methylfurfural was confirmed by means of the analysis of the authentic standards.

  10. Reactions of lactones with tropospheric oxidants: A kinetics and products study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walavalkar, M. P.; Sharma, A.; Dhanya, S.; Naik, P. D.

    2017-07-01

    Tropospheric lifetimes of two lactones, gamma-valerolactone (GVL) and alpha-methyl gamma-butyrolactone (AMGBL) in terms of their reactions with two important tropospheric oxidants- OH and Cl - are estimated, after determining the respective rate coefficients of their reactions in the gas phase using relative rate method. Values of the rate coefficients of the reactions of GVL (kOH = (1.95 ± 0.58) x 10-12; kCl = 2.26 ± 0.53 × 10-11 cm3molecule-1s-1) and AMGBL (kOH = 1.81 ± 0.43 × 10-12; kCl = 3.42 ± 0.63 × 10-11 cm3molecule-1s-1) at 298 K imply that reaction with OH is the dominant reaction in the ambient conditions, and that reaction with Cl atom becomes relevant under marine boundary layer (MBL) conditions, reducing the tropospheric lifetimes to almost half. The tropospheric life times of GVL and AMGBL based on their reaction with OH under ambient conditions are comparable, 71.2 and 76.7 h respectively. However, the products of the reactions are found to be different. In GVL, a promising second generation biofuel component, only ring opening reactions are important, acetic acid and CO2 being the only observed volatile products. In AMGBL, additional ring oxidized products are also formed, of which 3,4-dihydro-3-methyl-2,5-furandione is the most dominant one. The absence of such ring oxidized products in GVL is assigned to the difference in the preferred position of H atom abstraction, based on the computed rate coefficients of individual channels reported in the literature. This suggests that the impact in terms of aerosol generation in the troposphere may also be different for GVL and AMGBL, which differ only in the position of methyl substitution.

  11. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas‐Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second‐order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140‐mL gas‐phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10−12 (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7–2.2) × 10−12) and 2.6 × 10−12 (CI: (2.3–2.9) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1, respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10−12 (CI: (2.5–3.2) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1 and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30–37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5–10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol. PMID:27708500

  12. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas-Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Macleod, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second-order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140-mL gas-phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10(-12) (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7-2.2) × 10(-12)) and 2.6 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.3-2.9) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.5-3.2) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30-37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5-10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol.

  13. Maillard reaction products in pet foods

    OpenAIRE

    Rooijen, van, J.

    2015-01-01

    Pet dogs and cats around the world are commonly fed processed commercial foods throughout their lives. Often heat treatments are used during the processing of these foods to improve nutrient digestibility, shelf life, and food safety. Processing is known to induce the Maillard reaction, in which a reducing sugar binds to a free reactive amino group of an amino acid. In intact proteins, the ε-amino group of lysine is the most abundant free amino group. The reaction reduces the bioavail...

  14. Heavy quark production in neutrino-nucleon reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, C.E.M. de; Simoes, J.A.M. (Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica); Garcia Canal, C.A. (La Plata Univ. Nacional (Argentina))

    1982-05-01

    The heavy quark production (charm and bottom) in neutrino-nucleon reactions is discussed. The greater interest is in the leptonic channels, in particular in the production of two charged leptons in the final state.

  15. Research on Nuclear Reaction Network Equation for Fission Product Nuclides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Reaction Network Equation calculation system for fission product nuclides was developed. With the system, the number of the fission product nuclides at different time can be calculated in the different neutron field intensity and neutron energy spectra

  16. Formation of highly oxygenated low-volatility products from cresol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwantes, Rebecca H.; Schilling, Katherine A.; McVay, Renee C.; Lignell, Hanna; Coggon, Matthew M.; Zhang, Xuan; Wennberg, Paul O.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) oxidation of toluene produces ring-retaining products: cresol and benzaldehyde, and ring-opening products: bicyclic intermediate compounds and epoxides. Here, first- and later-generation OH oxidation products from cresol and benzaldehyde are identified in laboratory chamber experiments. For benzaldehyde, first-generation ring-retaining products are identified, but later-generation products are not detected. For cresol, low-volatility (saturation mass concentration, C* ˜ 3.5 × 104 - 7.7 × 10-3 µg m-3), first- and later-generation ring-retaining products are identified. Subsequent OH addition to the aromatic ring of o-cresol leads to compounds such as hydroxy, dihydroxy, and trihydroxy methyl benzoquinones and dihydroxy, trihydroxy, tetrahydroxy, and pentahydroxy toluenes. These products are detected in the gas phase by chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and in the particle phase using offline direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART-MS). Our data suggest that the yield of trihydroxy toluene from dihydroxy toluene is substantial. While an exact yield cannot be reported as authentic standards are unavailable, we find that a yield for trihydroxy toluene from dihydroxy toluene of ˜ 0.7 (equal to the reported yield of dihydroxy toluene from o-cresol; Olariu et al., 2002) is consistent with experimental results for o-cresol oxidation under low-NO conditions. These results suggest that even though the cresol pathway accounts for only ˜ 20 % of the oxidation products of toluene, it is the source of a significant fraction (˜ 20-40 %) of toluene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) due to the formation of low-volatility products.

  17. Volatile fatty acids production from anaerobic treatment of cassava waste water: effect of temperature and alkalinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Salah Din Mahmud; Giongo, Citieli; Fiorese, Mônica Lady; Gomes, Simone Damasceno; Ferrari, Tatiane Caroline; Savoldi, Tarcio Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs), intermediates in the anaerobic degradation process of organic matter from waste water, was evaluated in this work. A batch reactor was used to investigate the effect of temperature, and alkalinity in the production of VFAs, from the fermentation of industrial cassava waste water. Peak production of total volatile fatty acids (TVFAs) was observed in the first two days of acidogenesis. A central composite design was performed, and the highest yield (3400 mg L(-1) of TVFA) was obtained with 30°C and 3 g L(-1) of sodium bicarbonate. The peak of VFA was in 45 h (pH 5.9) with a predominance of acetic (63%) and butyric acid (22%), followed by propionic acid (12%). Decreases in amounts of cyanide (12.9%) and chemical oxygen demand (21.6%) were observed, in addition to the production of biogas (0.53 cm(3) h(-1)). The process was validated experimentally and 3400 g L(-1) of TVFA were obtained with a low relative standard deviation.

  18. α-Terpineol reactions with the nitrate radical: Rate constant and gas-phase products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian T.; Ham, Jason E.

    The bimolecular rate constant of k rad +α-terpineol (16 ± 4) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 was measured using the relative rate technique for the reaction of the nitrate radical (NO 3rad ) with α-terpineol (2-(4-methyl-1-cyclohex-3-enyl)propan-2-ol) at 297 ± 3 K and 1 atmosphere total pressure. To more clearly define part of α-terpineol's indoor environment degradation mechanism, the products of α-terpineol + NO 3rad reaction were investigated. The identified reaction products were: acetone, glyoxal (HC( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H), and methylglyoxal (CH 3C( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H). The use of derivatizing agents O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) and N, O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) were used to propose the other major reaction products: 6-hydroxyhept-5-en-2-one, 4-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-1-methyl-2-oxocyclohexyl nitrate, 5-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-2-oxocyclohexyl nitrate, 1-formyl-5-hydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl)-1,5-dimethylhexyl nitrate, and 1,4-diformyl-5-hydroxy-1,5-dimethylhexyl nitrate. The elucidation of these products was facilitated by mass spectrometry of the derivatized reaction products coupled with plausible α-terpineol + NO 3rad reaction mechanisms based on previously published volatile organic compound + NO 3rad gas-phase mechanisms. The additional gas-phase products (2,6,6-trimethyltetrahydro-2 H-pyran-2,5-dicarbaldehyde and 2,2-dimethylcyclohexane-1,4-dicarbaldehyde) are proposed to be the result of cyclization through a reaction intermediate.

  19. Emission of volatile organic compounds and production of secondary organic aerosol from stir-frying spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tengyu; Liu, Qianyun; Li, Zijun; Huo, Lei; Chan, ManNin; Li, Xue; Zhou, Zhen; Chan, Chak K

    2017-12-01

    Cooking is an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and a potential source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) both indoors and outdoors. In this study, VOC emissions from heating corn oil and stir-frying spices (i.e. garlic, ginger, myrcia and zanthoxylum piperitum (Sichuan pepper)) were characterized using an on-line membrane inlet vacuum ultraviolet single-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-SPI-TOFMS). VOC emissions from heating corn oil were dominated by aldehydes, which were enhanced by factors of one order of magnitude when stir-frying spices. Stir-frying any of the spices studied generated large amounts of methylpyrrole (m/z 81). In addition, stir-frying garlic produced abundant dihydrohydroxymaltol (m/z 144) and diallyldisulfide (DADS) (m/z 146), while stir-frying ginger, myrcia and zanthoxylum piperitum produced abundant monoterpenes (m/z 136) and terpenoids (m/z 152, 154). SOA formed from emissions of stir-frying spices through reactions with excess ozone in a flow reactor as well as primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions were characterized using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS). Stir-frying garlic and ginger generated similar POA concentrations to those from heating corn oil while stir-frying myrcia and zanthoxylum piperitum generated double the amount of emissions. No SOA was observed from stir-frying garlic and ginger. The rates of SOA production from stir-frying myrcia and zanthoxylum piperitum were 1.8μgmin(-1)gspice(-1) and 8.7μgmin(-1)gspice(-1), equivalent to 13.4% and 53.1% of their own POA emission rates, respectively. Therefore, the contribution of stir-frying spices to ambient organic aerosol levels is likely dominated by POA. The rates of total terpene emission from stir-frying myrcia and zanthoxylum piperitum were estimated to be 5.1μgmin(-1)gspice(-1) and 24.9μgmin(-1)gspice(-1), respectively. Our results suggest

  20. Microorganisms Associated with Volatile Organic Compound Production in Spoilt Mango Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyu D. Ibrahim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms associated with the production of volatile compound in spoilt mango fruits sold in Sokoto town were isolated and identified. The organisms include seven species of bacteria and a species of yeast. These include Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus firmus, Brevibacillus laterosporus, Morganella morganii, Paenibacillus alvei, Staphylococcus saccharolyticus, Listeria monocytogenes and Candida krusei respectively. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of eleven and sixteen volatile organic compound in the healthy and spoilt ripe mango fruits. Octadecanoic acid, oleic acid, 1 – Butanol, 3 – methyl-, carbonate (2:1 and 3,7 – Dimethyl nonane were common to both healthy and spoilt fruits with the first three having higher concentration in healthy fruits than spoilt while the later had higher concentration in the spoilt. One methyl group of 3,3- Dimethyl hexane in healthy fruit was shifted to position two to yield 2,3-Dimethyl hexane in the spoilt fruits. 2,2-Dimethylbutane, Methyl(methyl-4-deoxy-2,3-di-O-methyl.beta.1-threo-hex-4-enopyranosid urinate, 3-(4-amino-phenyl-2-(toluene-4-sulfonylamino-propionic acid, 2-Methyl-3-heptanone, 3,5-Nonadien-7-yn-2-ol, (E,E, Butanoic acid, 1,1-dimethylethyl ester, 1-methyl-3-beta.phenylethyl-2,4,5-trioxoimidazolidine, Pentanoic acid, 2,2-dimethyl, ethyl ester (Vinyl 2,2-dimethylpentanoate, 4-Methyurazole, 1-Tridecyn- 4 – 9 – ol, 1-Hexyl-1-nitrocyclohexane were unique to spoilt fruits. This study suggests that these unique volatile metabolites could be exploited as biomarkers to discriminate pathogens even when more than one disease is present thereby curbing post harvest loss during storage after further validation and the volatile organic compound could form the basis for constructing a metabolomics database for Nigeria.

  1. The Heck reaction in the production of fine chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, Johannes G. de

    2001-01-01

    An overview is given of the use of the Heck reaction for the production of fine chemicals. Five commercial products have been identified that are produced on a scale in excess of 1 ton/year. The herbicide Prosulfuron™ is produced via a Matsuda reaction of 2-sulfonatobenzenediazonium on 3,3,3-trifluo

  2. Stream of Reaction Products behind the Detonation Wave Front

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Embedded copper foils in a high explosive charge allow to see the stream of the reaction products behind the detonation front. With three individual firings in front of FXR it can be shown that the reaction products behind the detonation front are immediately going in the direction of the detonation front. But then the rarefaction fans are influencing strongly the further displacements.

  3. Rapid detection of meat spoilage by measuring volatile organic compounds by using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, D; Margesin, R; Klingsbichel, E; Hartungen, E; Jenewein, D; Schinner, F; Märk, T D

    2003-08-01

    The evolution of the microbial spoilage population for air- and vacuum-packaged meat (beef and pork) stored at 4 degrees C was investigated over 11 days. We monitored the viable counts (mesophilic total aerobic bacteria, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, lactic acid bacteria, and Enterococcus spp.) by the microbiological standard technique and by measuring the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with the recently developed proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry system. Storage time, packaging type, and meat type had statistically significant (P meat. We found statistically significant strong correlations (up to 99%) between some of the VOCs and the bacterial contamination. The concentrations of these VOCs increased linearly with the bacterial numbers. This study is a first step toward replacing the time-consuming plate counting by fast headspace air measurements, where the bacterial spoilage can be determined within minutes instead of days.

  4. Volatilization of low vapor pressure--volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) during three cleaning products-associated activities: Potential contributions to ozone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E; Bennett, Deborah H

    2016-06-01

    There have been many studies to reduce ozone formation mostly from volatile organic compound (VOC) sources. However, the role of low vapor pressure (LVP)-VOCs from consumer products remains mostly unexplored and unaddressed. This study explores the impact of high production volume LVP-VOCs on ozone formation from three cleaning products-associated activities (dishwashing, clothes washing, and surface cleaning). We develop a model framework to account for the portion available for ozone formation during the use phase and from the down-the-drain disposal. We apply experimental studies that measured emission rates or models that were developed for estimating emission rates of organic compounds during the use phase. Then, the fraction volatilized (fvolatilized) and the fraction disposed down the drain (fdown-the-drain) are multiplied by the portion available for ozone formation for releases to the outdoor air (fO3|volatilized) and down-the-drain (fO3|down-the-drain), respectively. Overall, for chemicals used in three specific cleaning-product uses, fvolatilized is less than 0.6% for all studied LVP-VOCs. Because greater than 99.4% of compounds are disposed of down the drain during the use phase, when combined with fO3|volatilized and fO3|down-the-drain, the portion available for ozone formation from the direct releases to outdoor air and the down-the-drain disposal is less than 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. The results from this study indicate that the impact of the studied LVP-VOCs on ozone formation is very sensitive to what occurs during the use phase and suggest the need for future research on experimental work at the point of use.

  5. Estimation of the Accuracy of Method for Quantitative Determination of Volatile Compounds in Alcohol Products

    CERN Document Server

    Charepitsa, S V; Zadreyko, Y V; Sytova, S N

    2016-01-01

    Results of the estimation of the precision for determination volatile compounds in alcohol-containing products by gas chromatography: acetaldehyde, methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, propyl alcohol, isobutyl alcohol, butyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol are presented. To determine the accuracy, measurements were planned in accordance with ISO 5725 and held at the gas chromatograph Crystal-5000. Standard deviation of repeatability, intermediate precision and their limits are derived from obtained experimental data. The uncertainty of the measurements was calculated on the base of an "empirical" method. The obtained values of accuracy indicate that the developed method allows measurement uncertainty extended from 2 to 20% depending on the analyzed compound and measured concentration.

  6. Deposition of volatile fission products during commercial high-level waste vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, M.S.; Carter, J.G.

    1982-09-01

    High-level waste from spent commercial PWR fuel was vitrified during the Nuclear Waste Vitrification Project (NWVP), conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in 1978 and 1979. The solidification equipment employed sintered metal filters and a conventional wet off-gas cleanup system to decontaminate the gases generated during waste processing. This report is a summary of a study completed under contract with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the fate of volatile fission products in the filters and off-gas system. The study objectives were to determine (1) the extent of volatile fission product deposition within the sintered metal filters, (2) the distribution of fission products in the off-gas system, and (3) the factors that control the distribution. Such information is needed for the design and operation of future waste immobilization systems. The scope of the study included identification, preparation, and microprobe analyses of suitable filter samples and radiochemical analyses of off-gas system samples. The report describes the methods of sample selection and gathering, the analytical methods and results, and the interpretations of the results. Relationships to vitrification system operations are defined and operating conditions to minimize problems recommended. 37 figures, 14 tables.

  7. Maillard reaction products in pet foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van C.

    2015-01-01

    Pet dogs and cats around the world are commonly fed processed commercial foods throughout their lives. Often heat treatments are used during the processing of these foods to improve nutrient digestibility, shelf life, and food safety. Processing is known to induce the Maillard reaction, in which a

  8. Maillard reaction products in pet foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van C.

    2015-01-01

    Pet dogs and cats around the world are commonly fed processed commercial foods throughout their lives. Often heat treatments are used during the processing of these foods to improve nutrient digestibility, shelf life, and food safety. Processing is known to induce the Maillard reaction, in which a r

  9. Process engineering versus product engineering - A case study on volatile organic compounds removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, João A.P.; Vilela, T.; Pereira, P.

    2005-01-01

    to the problem-need specified in the beginning of the project, but producing a novel formulation (chemical product design) represents a method that results to a completely xylene-free process which is environmentally and economically more interesting than those generated via the more traditional process......Three solutions for removing the dangerous volatile organic compound (VOC) xylene from an industrial coating process are presented and compared. Two of them are based on classical process engineering principles, i.e., development of separation-cleaning methods such as incineration and adsorption....... The last approach is somewhat different and is based on the so-called product engineering concept, i.e., in this case, a change of the formulation so that xylene is entirely eliminated from the process. It is shown that both the process and the product engineering approaches yield viable solutions...

  10. Chemical diversity of microbial volatiles and their potential for plant growth and productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHIDANANDA NAGAMANGALA KANCHISWAMY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs are produced by a wide array of microorganisms ranging from bacteria to fungi. A growing body of evidence indicates that MVOCs are ecofriendly and can be exploited as a cost-effective sustainable strategy for use in agricultural practice as agents that enhance plant growth, productivity and disease resistance. As naturally occurring chemicals, MVOCs have potential as possible alternatives to harmful pesticides, fungicides and bactericides as well as genetic modification. Recent studies performed under open field conditions demonstrate that efficiently adopting MVOCs may contribute to sustainable crop protection and production. We review here the chemical diversity of MVOCs and their potential physiological effects on crops and analyze potential and actual limitations for MVOC use as a sustainable strategy for improving productivity and reducing pesticide use.

  11. Correct quantitative determination of ethanol and volatile compounds in alcohol products

    CERN Document Server

    Charapitsa, Siarhei; Sytova, Svetlana; Yakuba, Yurii

    2014-01-01

    Determination of the volume content of ethanol in the alcohol products in practice is usually determined by pycnometry, electronic densimetry, or densimetry using a hydrostatic balance in accordance with Commission Regulation No 2870/2000. However, these methods determine directly only density of the tested liquid sample and does not take into account the effects of other volatile components such as aldehydes, esters and higher alcohols. So they are appropriate only for binary water-ethanol solutions in accordance with international table adopted by the International Legal Metrology Organization in its Recommendation No 22. Availability notable concentrations of the higher alcohols and ethers in different alcohol-based products, e. g. in whisky, cognac, brandy, wine as well as in waste alcohol and alcohol beverage production, leads to the significant contribution of these compounds in the value of the density of tested alcohol-containing sample. As a result, determination of the volume of ethanol content for ...

  12. Production of Radioactive Nuclides in Inverse Reaction Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Traykov, E; Dendooven, P; Dermois, O C; Jungmann, K; Onderwater, G; Rogachevskiy, A; Sohani, M; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W; Young, A R

    2006-01-01

    Efficient production of short-lived radioactive isotopes in inverse reaction kinematics is an important technique for various applications. It is particularly interesting when the isotope of interest is only a few nucleons away from a stable isotope. In this article production via charge exchange and stripping reactions in combination with a magnetic separator is explored. The relation between the separator transmission efficiency, the production yield, and the choice of beam energy is discussed. The results of some exploratory experiments will be presented.

  13. Massive production of nanoparticles via mist reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Liu, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2009-06-01

    A novel conceptual nanoparticle fabrication method is proposed in this paper. It can be easily implemented for the preparation of micro or nanoparticles through a reaction between mists with different specific chemical compounds produced by ultrasonic atomization technology. Ultrasonic atomization is an established technology that easily atomizes liquid to produce very small droplets-in the orders of tens to hundreds of micrometers. The results reveal that metal oxide nanoparticles, such as iron oxide can be massively produced via reactions between metal chlorides and sodium carbonate in an experimental set-up based on physical and chemical principles. The density of the nanoparticle distribution is also investigated and determined to be dependent on the amount of mist reacted and the collection time. Moreover, since the vibrational frequency of ultrasound can be adjusted, we can control the size of micro-droplets of reactants, hence producing particles of different dimensions. Given that the double mist reaction method is easily controllable, environmentally friendly and extremely low in cost, it can potentially become a significant method for making micro/nano particles in the newly emerging field of nanofabrication and integration.

  14. An investigation of oxidation products and SOA yields from OH + pesticide reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murschell, T.; Friedman, B.; Link, M.; Farmer, D.

    2016-12-01

    Pesticides are used globally in agricultural and residential areas. After application and/or volatilization from a surface, these compounds can be transported over long distances in the atmosphere. However, their chemical fate, including oxidation and gas-particle partitioning in the atmosphere, is not well understood. We present gas and particle measurements of oxidation products from pesticide + OH reactions using a dynamic solution injection system coupled to an Oxidative Flow Reactor. Products were detected with a High Resolution Time of Flight Iodide Chemical Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) and a Size Mobility Particle Scanner (SMPS). The OFR allows pesticides to react with variable OH radical exposures, ranging from the equivalent of one day to a full week of atmospheric oxidative aging. In this work, we explore pesticide oxidation products from reaction with OH and ozone, and compare those products to photolysis reactions. Pesticides of similar chemical structures were explored, including acetochlor / metolachlor and permethrin / cypermethrin, to explore mechanistic differences. We present chemical parameters including average product oxidation state, average oxygen to carbon ratio, and potential secondary organic aerosol formation for each of these compounds.

  15. Characterisation of the volatile profiles of infant formulas by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruth, van S.M.; Floris, V.; Fayoux, S.

    2006-01-01

    The volatile profiles of 13 infant formulas were evaluated by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and gas chromatography¿mass spectrometry (GC¿MS). The infant formulas varied in brand (Aptamil, Cow & Gate, SMA), type (for different infant target groups) and physical form (powder/

  16. Production of extremely low volatile organic compounds from biogenic emissions: Measured yields and atmospheric implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokinen, Tuija; Berndt, Torsten; Makkonen, Risto; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Junninen, Heikki; Paasonen, Pauli; Stratmann, Frank; Herrmann, Hartmut; Guenther, Alex B.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, M.; Ehn, Mikael K.; Sipila, Mikko

    2015-06-09

    Extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOC) are suggested to promote aerosol particle formation and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) production in the atmosphere. We show that the capability of biogenic VOC (BVOC) to produce ELVOC depends strongly on their chemical structure and relative oxidant levels. BVOC with an endocyclic double bond, representative emissions from, e.g., boreal forests, efficiently produce ELVOC from ozonolysis. Compounds with exocyclic double bonds or acyclic compounds including isoprene, emission representative of the tropics, produce minor quantities of ELVOC, and the role of OH radical oxidation is relatively larger. Implementing these findings into a global modeling framework shows that detailed assessment of ELVOC production pathways is crucial for understanding biogenic secondary organic aerosol and atmospheric CCN formation.

  17. Volatile fatty acids productions by mesophilic and thermophilic sludge fermentation: Biological responses to fermentation temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiuxiao; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The volatile fatty acids (VFAs) productions, as well as hydrolases activities, microbial communities, and homoacetogens, of mesophilic and thermophilic sludge anaerobic fermentation were investigated to reveal the microbial responses to different fermentation temperatures. Thermophilic fermentation led to 10-fold more accumulation of VFAs compared to mesophilic fermentation. α-glucosidase and protease had much higher activities in thermophilic reactor, especially protease. Illumina sequencing manifested that raising fermentation temperature increased the abundances of Clostridiaceae, Microthrixaceae and Thermotogaceae, which could facilitate either hydrolysis or acidification. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that under thermophilic condition the relative abundance of homoacetogens increased in batch tests and reached higher level at stable fermentation, whereas under mesophilic condition it only increased slightly in batch tests. Therefore, higher fermentation temperature increased the activities of key hydrolases, raised the proportions of bacteria involved in hydrolysis and acidification, and promoted the relative abundance of homoacetogens, which all resulted in higher VFAs production.

  18. Fungal volatile compounds induce production of the secondary metabolite Sodorifen in Serratia plymuthica PRI-2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ruth; Jager, Victor de; Zühlke, Daniela; Wolff, Christian; Bernhardt, Jörg; Cankar, Katarina; Beekwilder, Jules; Ijcken, Wilfred van; Sleutels, Frank; Boer, Wietse de; Riedel, Katharina; Garbeva, Paolina

    2017-04-13

    The ability of bacteria and fungi to communicate with each other is a remarkable aspect of the microbial world. It is recognized that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) act as communication signals, however the molecular responses by bacteria to fungal VOCs remain unknown. Here we perform transcriptomics and proteomics analyses of Serratia plymuthica PRI-2C exposed to VOCs emitted by the fungal pathogen Fusarium culmorum. We find that the bacterium responds to fungal VOCs with changes in gene and protein expression related to motility, signal transduction, energy metabolism, cell envelope biogenesis, and secondary metabolite production. Metabolomic analysis of the bacterium exposed to the fungal VOCs, gene cluster comparison, and heterologous co-expression of a terpene synthase and a methyltransferase revealed the production of the unusual terpene sodorifen in response to fungal VOCs. These results strongly suggest that VOCs are not only a metabolic waste but important compounds in the long-distance communication between fungi and bacteria.

  19. Simulation Analysis of Sludge Disposal and Volatile Fatty Acids Production from Gravity Pressure Reactor via Wet Air Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gwon Woo [Biomass and Waste Energy Laboratory, KIER, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Tae Wan; Lee, Hong-Cheol; Hwang, In-Ju [Environmental and Plant Engineering Research Institute, KICT, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Efficacious wastewater treatment is essential for increasing sewage sludge volume and implementing strict environmental regulations. The operation cost of sludge treatment amounts up to 50% of the total costs for wastewater treatment plants, therefore, an economical sludge destruction method is crucially needed. Amid several destruction methods, wet air oxidation (WAO) can efficiently treat wastewater containing organic pollutants. It can be used not only for sludge destruction but also for useful by-product production. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs), one of many byproducts, is considered to be an important precursor of biofuel and chemical materials. Its high reaction condition has instituted the study of gravity pressure reactor (GPR) for an economical process of WAO to reduce operation cost. Simulation of subcritical condition was conducted using Aspen Plus with predictive Soave-Redlich-Kwong (PSRK) equation of state. Conjointly, simulation analysis for GPR depth, oxidizer type, sludge flow rate and oxidizer injection position was carried out. At GPR depth of 1000m and flow rate of 2 ton/h, the conversion and yield of VFAs were 92.02% and 0.17g/g, respectively.

  20. Comparison of two headspace sampling techniques for the analysis of off-flavour volatiles from oat based products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognat, Claudine; Shepherd, Tom; Verrall, Susan R; Stewart, Derek

    2012-10-01

    Two different headspace sampling techniques were compared for analysis of aroma volatiles from freshly produced and aged plain oatcakes. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) using a Carboxen-Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fibre and entrainment on Tenax TA within an adsorbent tube were used for collection of volatiles. The effects of variation in the sampling method were also considered using SPME. The data obtained using both techniques were processed by multivariate statistical analysis (PCA). Both techniques showed similar capacities to discriminate between the samples at different ages. Discrimination between fresh and rancid samples could be made on the basis of changes in the relative abundances of 14-15 of the constituents in the volatile profiles. A significant effect on the detection level of volatile compounds was observed when samples were crushed and analysed by SPME-GC-MS, in comparison to undisturbed product. The applicability and cost effectiveness of both methods were considered. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of ethylene signaling in the production of rice volatiles induced by the rice brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yujie; WANG Xia; LOU Yonggen; CHENG Jiaan

    2006-01-01

    Ethylene signaling pathway plays an important role in induced plant direct defense against herbivores and pathogens; however, up to now, only few researches have focused on its role in induced plant indirect defense, i.e. the release of herbivore-induced volatiles, and the results are variable.Using a model system consisting of rice plants, the rice brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens and its egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae, we examined the role of ethylene signaling in the production of rice volatiles induced by N. lugens by measuring both the timing of herbivore-induced ethylene levels and the relationships between ethylene, rice volatiles and attraction of the parasitoid. N. lugens infestation significantly enhanced the release of ethylene during 2-24 h after infestation. Plants treated with ethephon, a compound that breaks down to release ethylene at cytoplasmic pH, released volatiles profiles similar to those released by N.lugens-infested plants,and both of them showed an equal attraction of the parasitoid. Moreover, pretreatment with 1-MCP, an inhibitor of ethylene perception, reduced the release of most of rice volatiles whose amount was enhanced by N.lugens infestation and decreased the attractiveness to the parasitoid. These results demonstrate that ethylene signaling is required for the production of rice volatiles induced by N.lugens.

  2. Comparison of the constituents of two jet engine lubricating oils and their volatile pyrolytic degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, C; Leung, V

    2000-03-01

    Leaking oil seals in jet engines, at locations prior to the compressor stage, can be a cause of smoke in the cabins of BAe-146 aircraft. Compressed combustion air is bled off to pressurize the cabin and to provide a source of fresh air. Bleed air is diverted from a location just prior to the combustion chamber at a temperature around 500 degrees C. To prevent oil breakdown products from entering the cabin air, catalytic converters have been used to clean the air. During an oil seal failure this device becomes overloaded and smoke is observed in the cabin. Some aircraft companies have removed the catalytic converters and claim an improvement in air quality. During an oil seal failure, however, the flight crew is potentially exposed to the thermal breakdown products of the engine oils. Because very little is known regarding the thermal breakdown products of jet engine lubrication oils, two commercially available oils were investigated under laboratory conditions at 525 degrees C to measure the release of CO, CO2,NO2, and HCN as well as volatiles which were analyzed using GC-Mass spectrometry in an attempt to see if the neurotoxic agents tricresyl phosphates (TCPs) and trimethyl propane phosphate (TMPP) would be present or formed. TMPP was not found in these experiments. Some CO2 was generated along with CO which reached levels in excess of 100 ppm. HCN and NO2 were not detected. GC compositions of the two bulk oils and their breakdown products were almost identical. The presence of TCPs was confirmed in the bulk oils and in the volatiles. Localized condensation in the ventilation ducts and filters in the air conditioning packs are likely the reason why the presence of TCPs has not been demonstrated in cabin air. It was recommended that this needed to be verified in aircraft.

  3. [Volatile organic compounds in ready-to-eat fruits and vegetable products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzetta, S; Capobianco, E; Sansebastiano, E

    2008-01-01

    An increased consumer demand for bagged prepared fruits and vegetables has recently occurred, these being ready-to-eat products. The different phases in the preparation of these products include cleaning, peeling, cutting, washing, drying and packaging. The quality, safety and shelf-life of ready-to-eat products is highly influenced by the washing process which is generally performed by soaking the vegetables in cold water containing disinfectants (usually sodium hypochlorite). We therefore evaluated the presence of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOC) in 70 samples of ready-to-eat products produced by 15 different establishments. Results showed that 54% of the products were contaminated by at least one halogenated VOC. Trialomethane was the most frequently detected contaminant and 50% of samples were found to contain chloroform. Contamination by other halogenated VOCs was less frequent. Also, there was variation in concentration values of contaminants between different establishments and different packages. No halogenated VOCs were found in products from only three of the 15 establishments included in the study.

  4. Products of the Benzene + O(3P) Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Meloni, Giovanni; Trevitt, Adam J.; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I.; Sirjean, Baptiste; Dames, Enoch; Wang, Hai

    2009-12-21

    The gas-phase reaction of benzene with O(3P) is of considerable interest for modeling of aromatic oxidation, and also because there exist fundamental questions concerning the prominence of intersystem crossing in the reaction. While its overall rate constant has been studied extensively, there are still significant uncertainties in the product distribution. The reaction proceeds mainly through the addition of the O atom to benzene, forming an initial triplet diradical adduct, which can either dissociate to form the phenoxy radical and H atom, or undergo intersystem crossing onto a singlet surface, followed by a multiplicity of internal isomerizations, leading to several possible reaction products. In this work, we examined the product branching ratios of the reaction between benzene and O(3P) over the temperature range of 300 to 1000 K and pressure range of 1 to 10 Torr. The reactions were initiated by pulsed-laser photolysis of NO2 in the presence of benzene and helium buffer in a slow-flow reactor, and reaction products were identified by using the multiplexed chemical kinetics photoionization mass spectrometer operating at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Phenol and phenoxy radical were detected and quantified. Cyclopentadiene and cyclopentadienyl radical were directly identified for the first time. Finally, ab initio calculations and master equation/RRKM modeling were used to reproduce the experimental branching ratios, yielding pressure-dependent rate expressions for the reaction channels, including phenoxy + H, phenol, cyclopentadiene + CO, which are proposed for kinetic modeling of benzene oxidation.

  5. Quantitation of Maillard reaction products in commercially available pet foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van C.; Bosch, G.; Poel, van der A.F.B.; Wierenga, P.A.; Alexander, L.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    During processing of pet food, the Maillard reaction occurs, which reduces the bioavailability of essential amino acids such as lysine and results in the formation of advanced Maillard reaction products (MRPs). The aim of this study was to quantitate MRPs (fructoselysine (FL), carboxymethyllysine

  6. Dietary exposure to volatile and non-volatile N-nitrosamines from processed meat products in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Susan Strange; Duedahl-Olesen, Lene; Christensen, Tue

    2015-01-01

    the carcinogenicity for the majority of the non-volatile NA (NVNA) remains to be elucidated. Danish adults (15–75 years) and children (4–6 years) consume 20 g and 16 g of processed meat per day (95th percentile), respectively. The consumption is primarily accounted for by sausages, salami, pork flank (spiced...... and boiled) and ham. This consumption results in an exposure to NVNA of 33 and 90 ng kg bw−1 day−1 for adults and children, respectively. The exposure to VNA is significantly lower amounting to 0.34 and 1.1 ng kg bw−1 day−1 for adults and children, respectively. Based on a BMDL10 of 29 µg kg bw−1 day−1 a MOE...

  7. Studies on Absorption and Elimination of Dietary Maillard Reaction Products

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    FÖRSTER, ANKE; KÜHNE, YVONNE; HENLE, T.OMAS

    2005-01-01

    A bstract : A nine‐day dietary study involving 18 healthy volunteers was performed in order to investigate the influence of nutrition on the urinary excretion of the Maillard reaction products (MRPs...

  8. Cyclometalation reactions five-membered ring products as universal reagents

    CERN Document Server

    Omae, Iwao

    2014-01-01

    Offering unrivalled breadth of coverage on the topic, this review of cyclometalation reactions and organometallic intramolecular-coordination five-membered ring products includes discussion of vital commercial aspects such as synthetic applications.

  9. Charmonium production in p̄-induced reactions on nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larionov Alexei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of charmonia in the antiproton-nucleus reactions at plab = 3 − 10 GeV/c is studied within the Glauber model and the generalized eikonal approximation. The main reaction channel is charmonium formation in an antiproton-proton collision. The target mass dependence of the charmonium transparency ratio allows to determine the charmonium-nucleon cross section. The polarization effects in the production of χc2 states are evaluated.

  10. Charmonium production in $\\bar p$-induced reactions on nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Larionov, Alexei; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Strikman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The production of charmonia in the antiproton-nucleus reactions at $p_{\\rm lab}=3-10$ GeV/c is studied within the Glauber model and the generalized eikonal approximation. The main reaction channel is charmonium formation in an antiproton-proton collision. The target mass dependence of the charmonium transparency ratio allows to determine the charmonium-nucleon cross section. The polarization effects in the production of $\\chi_{c2}$ states are evaluated.

  11. Determination of volatile glucosinolate degradation products in seed coat, stem and in vitro cultures of Moringa peregrina (Forssk.) Fiori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehshahri, S; Afsharypuor, S; Asghari, G; Mohagheghzadeh, A

    2012-01-01

    Moringaceae, a monogeneric family in Capparales (glucosinolate-containing species), includes 14 species. One of them is Moringa peregrina (Forssk.) Fiori., a small tree, which grows in south east of Iran. Volatile constituents of seed coat and stem of M. peregrina were determined by GC and GC/MS. Moreover, extracts of seed and different cultured cells were analyzed by TLC and GC. Three volatile isothiocyanates including isopropyl isothiocyanate (4.2%), sec-butyl isothiocyanate (< 0.1%) and isobutyl isothiocyanate (92.9%) were found in the volatile oil of the stem , while only two volatile isothiocyanates namely isopropyl isothiocyanate (7.0%) and isobutyl isothiocyanate (51.5%) were determined in the seed coat of the tree. For the first time, the callus and suspension cultures of M. peregrina were initiated and established successfully on Murashige and Skoog medium, containing plant growth hormones. Different precursors and elicitors were fed to the cultures to induce glucosinolates production. This is the first report of in vitro culture production of M. peregrina. There was no production of volatile isothiocyanates in M. peregrina callus and suspension cultures with different treatments.

  12. Reactant-Product Quantum Coherence in Electron Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kominis, I K

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the physical meaning of quantum superposition states between reactants and products in electron transfer reactions. We show that such superpositions are strongly suppressed and to leading orders of perturbation theory do not pertain in electron transfer reactions. This is because of the intermediate manifold of states separating the reactants from the products. We provide an intuitive description of these considerations with Feynman diagrams. We also discuss the relation of such quantum coherences to understanding the fundamental quantum dynamics of spin-selective radical-ion-pair reactions.

  13. Contribution of low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) from consumer products to ozone formation in urban atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E.; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2015-05-01

    Because recent laboratory testing indicates that some low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOC) solvents readily evaporate at ambient conditions, LVP-VOCs used in some consumer product formulations may contribute to ozone formation. The goal of this study is to determine the fraction of LVP-VOCs available for ozone formation from the use of consumer products for two hypothetical emissions. This study calculates and compares the fraction of consumed product available for ozone formation as a result of (a) volatilization to air during use and (b) down-the-drain disposal. The study also investigates the impact of different modes of releases on the overall fraction available in ambient air for ozone formation. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs volatilized to air during use, we applied a multi-compartment mass-balance model to track the fate of emitted LVP-VOCs in a multimedia urban environment. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain, we used a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) fate model to predict the emission rates of LVP-VOCs to ambient air at WWTPs or at the discharge zone of the facilities and then used these results as emissions in the multimedia urban environment model. In a WWTP, the LVP-VOCs selected in this study are primarily either biodegraded or removed via sorption to sludge depending on the magnitude of the biodegradation half-life and the octanol-water partition coefficient. Less than 0.2% of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain are available for ozone formation. In contrast, when the LVP-VOC in a consumer product is volatilized from the surface to which it has been applied, greater than 90% is available for photochemical reactions either at the source location or in the downwind areas. Comparing results from these two modes of releases allows us to understand the importance of determining the fraction of LVP-VOCs volatilized versus disposed down the drain when the product is used by consumers. The results from this study

  14. Communication between oocytes and somatic cells regulates volatile pheromone production in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Daniel H W; Choe, Andrea; Wu, Shannon Y; Sternberg, Paul W

    2014-12-16

    Males of the androdioecious species Caenorhabditis elegans are more likely to attempt to mate with and successfully inseminate C. elegans hermaphrodites that do not concurrently harbor sperm. Although a small number of genes have been implicated in this effect, the mechanism by which it arises remains unknown. In the context of the battle of the sexes, it is also unknown whether this effect is to the benefit of the male, the hermaphrodite, or both. We report that successful contact between mature sperm and oocyte in the C. elegans gonad at the start of fertilization causes the oocyte to release a signal that is transmitted to somatic cells in its mother, with the ultimate effect of reducing her attractiveness to males. Changes in hermaphrodite attractiveness are tied to the production of a volatile pheromone, the first such pheromone described in C. elegans.

  15. Effects of different drying methods on the product quality and volatile compounds of whole shiitake mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuting; Zhao, Yingting; Huang, Jijun; Zeng, Hongliang; Zheng, Baodong

    2016-04-15

    Various drying methods play important roles in the preservation of foods. However, how the different drying methods affect the quality of some foods is not clear. This paper evaluates the effects of hot air, vacuum, microwave, and microwave vacuum drying techniques on important qualities and volatile compounds of whole shiitake (Lentinus edodes) mushrooms. These four drying methods resulted in a significantly (pdried products. Microwave vacuum drying helped to maintain larger amounts of taste-active amino acids, and improved nutrient retention and color attributes. Furthermore, the uniform honeycomb network created by microwave vacuum drying along with a less collapsed structure of dried samples can be used to explain the observed high rehydration ratio. Therefore, microwave vacuum drying should be a potential method for obtaining high-quality dried mushrooms.

  16. Aqueous-phase oxidation of green leaf volatiles by hydroxyl radical as a source of SOA: Product identification from methyl jasmonate and methyl salicylate oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Amie K.; Ehrenhauser, Franz S.; Richards-Henderson, Nicole K.; Anastasio, Cort; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.

    2015-02-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a group of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) released into the atmosphere by vegetation. BVOCs produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via gas-phase reactions, but little is known of their aqueous-phase oxidation as a source of SOA. GLVs can partition into atmospheric water phases, e.g., fog, mist, dew or rain, and be oxidized by hydroxyl radicals (˙OH). These reactions in the liquid phase also lead to products that have higher molecular weights, increased polarity, and lower vapor pressures, ultimately forming SOA after evaporation of the droplet. To examine this process, we investigated the aqueous, ˙OH-mediated oxidation of methyl jasmonate (MeJa) and methyl salicylate (MeSa), two GLVs that produce aqueous-phase SOA. High performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) was used to monitor product formation. The oxidation products identified exhibit higher molecular mass than their parent GLV due to either dimerization or the addition of oxygen and hydroxyl functional groups. The proposed structures of potential products are based on mechanistic considerations combined with the HPLC/ESI-MS data. Based on the structures, the vapor pressure and the Henry's law constant were estimated with multiple methods (SPARC, SIMPOL, MPBPVP, Bond and Group Estimations). The estimated vapor pressures of the products identified are significantly (up to 7 orders of magnitude) lower than those of the associated parent compounds, and therefore, the GLV oxidation products may remain as SOA after evaporation of the water droplet. The contribution of the identified oxidation products to SOA formation is estimated based on measured HPLC-ESI/MS responses relative to previous aqueous SOA mass yield measurements.

  17. Bioelectrochemical recovery of waste-derived volatile fatty acids and production of hydrogen and alkali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-09-15

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA) are organic compounds of great importance for various industries and environmental processes. Fermentation and anaerobic digestion of organic wastes are promising alternative technologies for VFA production. However, one of the major challenges is development of sustainable downstream technologies for VFA recovery. In this study, an innovative microbial bipolar electrodialysis cell (MBEDC) was developed to meet the challenge of waste-derived VFA recovery, produce hydrogen and alkali, and potentially treat wastewater. The MBEDC was operated in fed-batch mode. At an applied voltage of 1.2 V, a VFA recovery efficiency of 98.3%, H2 of 18.4 mL and alkali production presented as pH of 12.64 were obtained using synthetic fermentation broth. The applied voltage, initial VFA concentrations and composition were affecting the VFA recovery. The energy balance revealed that net energy (5.20-6.86 kWh/kg-VFA recovered) was produced at all the applied voltages (0.8-1.4 V). The coexistence of other anionic species had no negative effect on VFA transportation. The VFA concentration was increased 2.96 times after three consecutive batches. Furthermore, the applicability of MBEDC was successfully verified with digestate. These results demonstrate for the first time the possibility of a new method for waste-derived VFA recovery and valuable products production that uses wastewater as fuel and bacteria as catalyst. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Acidogenic fermentation of food waste for volatile fatty acid production with co-generation of biohydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Shikha; Sarkar, Omprakash; Swamy, Y V; Mohan, S Venkata

    2015-04-01

    Fermentation experiments were designed to elucidate the functional role of the redox microenvironment on volatile fatty acid (VFA, short chain carboxylic acid) production and co-generation of biohydrogen (H2). Higher VFA productivity was observed at pH 10 operation (6.3g/l) followed by pH 9, pH 6, pH 5, pH 7, pH 8 and pH 11 (3.5 g/l). High degree of acidification, good system buffering capacity along with co-generation of higher H2 production from food waste was also noticed at alkaline condition. Experiments illustrated the role of initial pH on carboxylic acids synthesis. Alkaline redox conditions assist solubilization of carbohydrates, protein and fats and also suppress the growth of methanogens. Among the carboxylic acids, acetate fraction was higher at alkaline condition than corresponding neutral or acidic operations. Integrated process of VFA production from waste with co-generation of H2 can be considered as a green and sustainable platform for value-addition.

  19. Volatile elements production rates in a 1.4 Gev proton-irradiated molten lead-bismuth target

    CERN Document Server

    Zanini, L; Everaerts, P; Fallot, M; Franberg, H; Gröschel, F; Jost, C; Kirchner, T; Kojima, Y; Köster, U; Lebenhaft, J; Manfrina, E; Pitcher, E J; Ravn, H L; Tall, Y; Wagner, W; Wohlmuther, M

    2005-01-01

    Production rates of volatile elements following spallation reaction of 1.4 GeV protons on a liquid Pb/Bi target have been measured. The experiment was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. These data are of interest for the developments of targets for accelerator driven systems such as MEGAPIE. Additional data have been taken on a liquid Pb target. Calculations were performed using the FLUKA and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes coupled with the evolution codes ORIHET3 and FISPACT using different options for the intra-nuclear cascades and evaporation models. Preliminary results from the data analysis show good comparison with calculations for Hg and for noble gases. For other elements such as I it is apparent that only a fraction of the produced isotopes is released. The agreement with the experimental data varies depending on the model combination used. The best results are obtained using MCNPX with the INCL4/ABLA models and with FLUKA. Discrepancies are found for some isotopes produced by fission using the MCNPX ...

  20. Toxicity of aerosols of sodium reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, G M; Allen, M D; Stevens, D L

    1979-01-01

    Sodium is used as the heat transfer medium in several new energy technologies such as liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors and solar-thermal collection systems. Because sodium burns in air and reacts violently with water, the potential exists for an airborne release of sodium combustion products and subsequent human exposure. To help evaluate the potential short-term hazard from an accidental sodium fire, male juvenile or adult Wistar rats were exposed to sodium aerosols for 2 hours to determine the dose at which 50 percent of the animals were affected (ED50) for each age group. The estimated ED50 of 510 microgram/l for adults was not significantly different from the estimated ED50 of 489 microgram/l for juveniles. The incidence of acute laryngitis, attributed to exposure, was three times higher for juvenile rats than for adults, and the degree of severity of this lesion was significantly (P less than 0.05) higher for juveniles.

  1. Simultaneous determination of volatile and non-volatile nitrosamines in processed meat products by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation and electrospray ionisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, S S; Duedahl-Olesen, L; Granby, K

    2014-02-21

    A sensitive, selective and generic method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the contents (μgkg(-1) range) of both volatile nitrosamines (VNA) and non-volatile nitrosamines (NVNA) in processed meat products. The extraction procedure only requires basic laboratory equipment and a small volume of organic solvent. Separation and quantification were performed by the developed LC-(APCI/ESI)MS/MS method. The method was validated using spiked samples of three different processed meat products. Satisfactory recoveries (50-130%) and precisions (2-23%) were obtained for eight VNA and six NVNAs with LODs generally between 0.2 and 1μgkg(-1), though for a few analyte/matrix combinations higher LODs were obtained (3 to 18μgkg(-1)). The validation results show that results obtained for one meat product is not always valid for other meat products. We were not able to obtain satisfactory results for N-nitrosohydroxyproline (NHPRO), N-nitrosodibenzylamine (NDBzA) and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA). Application of the APCI interface improved the sensitivity of the method, because of less matrix interference, and gave the method a wider scope, as some NAs were ionisable only by APCI. However, it was only possible to ionize N-nitroso-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NTCA) and N-nitroso-2-methyl-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NMTCA) by ESI. The validated method was applied for the analysis of processed meat products and contents of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), N-nitrosomethylaniline (NMA), N-nitrosoproline (NPRO), NTCA, and NMTCA were found in one or several nitrite cured meat products, whereas none were detected in non-nitrite cured bacon.

  2. How is entropy production rate related to chemical reaction rate?

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Kinshuk

    2013-01-01

    The entropy production rate is a key quantity in irreversible thermodynamics. In this work, we concentrate on the realization of entropy production rate in chemical reaction systems in terms of the experimentally measurable reaction rate. Both triangular and linear networks have been studied. They attain either thermodynamic equilibrium or a non-equilibrium steady state, under suitable external constraints. We have shown that the entropy production rate is proportional to the square of the reaction velocity only around equilibrium and not any arbitrary non-equilibrium steady state. This feature can act as a guide in revealing the nature of a steady state, very much like the minimum entropy production principle. A discussion on this point has also been presented.

  3. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Dennis D.; Dee, Louis A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), the product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants prepared under laboratory conditions and from firings of Shuttle Reaction Control System thrusters, has been characterized by chemical and thermal analysis. The composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depend on three factors: the fuel-oxidizer ratio at the time of formation; whether the composition of the post-formation atmosphere is reducing or oxidizing; and the reaction or post-reaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, methylammonium nitrate, and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. Thermal decomposition reactions of the FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable. Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid monomethylhydrazine and liquid nitrogen tetroxide in a confined space. These tests demonstrated that monomethylhydrazine, methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide to produce component-damaging energies. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

  4. Efficacy of essence oil supplementation to feeds on volatile fatty acid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tekeli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Determine the effect of some plant extract supplementation to Total Mixed Ration (TMR, concentrate and hay on volatile fatty acid (VFA production at 8 and 24 hours (h using in vitro gas production technique in cattle. Material and methods. Three fistulated Holstein dairy cows were used for rumen fluid collection for application of in vitro gas production technique. Four essence oils (T. vulgaris, O. vulgare, S. aromaticum, Z. officinale were used as plant extracts. Results. Essence oil supplementations to the examined feed groups had significant effect only on C2/C3 VFA level at 8 h in all feed groups (p<0.05. C2/C3 VFA level at 8 h significantly increased in the groups with Oregano 25 ppm supplementation for TMR and concentrate and in the groups with Thymol 25 ppm supplementation for hay. C3 VFA level at 8 h significantly increased in the group that received Syzygium 200 ppm supplementation for hay. Different plant extracts supplemented to TMR, concentrate and hay significantly affected C2, C3, IC4, IC5, C5 and C2/C3 VFA levels at 24 h (p<0.05. Conclusions. The findings of the study indicate that moderate doses of plant extracts result in increased VFA levels in ruminants while higher doses demonstrate the opposite effect.

  5. Effects of Ultrasonic and Acid Pretreatment on Food Waste Disintegration and Volatile Fatty Acid Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinglian Wu; Wanqian Guo∗; Shanshan Yang; Haichao Luo; Simai Peng; Nanqi Ren

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the effects of ultrasonic and acid pretreatment on food waste ( FW) disintegration and volatile fatty acid ( VFA ) production. Single⁃factor experiments are carried out to obtain optimal conditions of individual ultrasonic and acid pretreatment, and response surface method ( RSM ) is applied to optimize the conditions of the combination of ultrasonic and acid ( UA) pretreatment. Results show that the optimal acid, ultrasonic and UA pretreatments conditions are individual pH 2, individual ultrasonic energy density of 1�0 W/mL and the combination of ultrasonic energy density1�11 W/mL and pH 1�43, respectively. Correspondingly, the maximum disintegration degrees ( DD) of 46�90%, 57�38% and68�83%are obtained by acid, ultrasonic and UA pretreatments, respectively. After optimizing pretreatment conditions, batch experiments are operated to produce VFA from raw and pretreated FW under anaerobic fermentation process. Both the maximum VFA production ( 976�17 mg COD/gVS) and VFA/SCOD ( 72�89%) are obtained with ultrasonic pretreatment, followed by UA pretreatment, non⁃pretreatment and acid pretreatment, respectively. This observation demonstrates that a higher acidity on acid and UA pretreatments inhibits the generation of VFA. Results suggest that ultrasonic pretreatment is preferable to promote the disintegration degree of FW and VFA production.

  6. Effect of volatile fatty acids mixtures on the simultaneous photofermentative production of hydrogen and polyhydroxybutyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardeña, René; Valdez-Vazquez, Idania; Buitrón, Germán

    2017-02-01

    Purple non-sulfur bacteria generate hydrogen and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) as a mechanism for disposing of reducing equivalents generated during substrate consumption. However, both pathways compete for the reducing equivalents released from bacteria growing under certain substrates, thus the formation of hydrogen or PHB is detrimental to the formation of each other. The effect of mixtures of acetic, propionic and butyric acids on the formation of H2 and PHB was evaluated using Box-Behnken design. A bacterial community mainly constituted by Rhodopseudomonas palustris was used as inoculum. It was observed that the three volatile fatty acids had a significant effect on the specific PHB production. However, only the propionic acid had a significant effect on the specific H2 production activity and the highest value was observed when acetate was the main component in the mixture. The maximum values for the specific PHB and hydrogen production rates were 16.4 mg-PHB/g-TSS/day and 391 mL-H2/g-TSS/day, respectively.

  7. Energy, volatile production, and climatic effects of the Chicxulub Cretaceous/Tertiary impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, K. O.; Baines, K. H.; Ocampo, A. C.; Ivanov, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of volatiles in the Chicxulub impact strongly supports the hypothesis that impact-generated sulfate aerosols caused over a decade of global cooling, acid rain, and disruption of ocean circulation, which contributed to the mass extinction at the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary. The crater size, meteoritic content of the K/T boundary clay, and impact models indicate that the Chicxulub crater was formed by a short period comet or an asteroid impact that released 0.7-3.4 x 10(31) ergs of energy. Impact models and experiments combined with estimates of volatiles in the projectile and target rocks predict that over 200 gigatons (Gt) each of SO2 and water vapor, and over 500 Gt of CO2, were globally distributed in the stratosphere by the impact. Additional volatiles may have been produced on a global or regional scale that formed sulfate aerosols rapidly in cooler parts of the vapor plume, causing an early, intense pulse of sulfuric acid rain. Estimates of the conversion rate of stratospheric SO2 and water vapor to sulfate aerosol, based on volcanic production of sulfate aerosols, coupled with calculations of diffusion, coagulation, and sedimentation, demonstrate that the 200 Gt stratospheric SO2 and water vapor reservoir would produce sulfate aerosols for 12 years. These sulfate aerosols caused a second pulse of acid rain that was global. Radiative transfer modeling of the aerosol clouds demonstrates (1) that if the initial rapid pulse of sulfate aerosols was global, photosynthesis may have been shut down for 6 months and (2) that for the second prolonged aerosol cloud, solar transmission dropped 80% by the end of first year and remained 50% below normal for 9 years. As a result, global average surface temperatures probably dropped between 5 degrees and 31 degrees K, suggesting that global near-freezing conditions may have been reached. Impact-generated CO2 caused less than 1 degree K greenhouse warming and therefore was insignificant compare

  8. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) for extraction of volatile oxidation products from complex food systems – Pros and cons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Lu, Henna Fung Sieng

    Volatile secondary lipid oxidation products can be identified and quantified by GC-FID or GC-MS. An extraction step is, however, needed before GC analysis. A range of different extraction methods are available such as static headspace, dynamic headspace and SPME. Each of these methods has its adv...

  9. Is Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) an appropriate method for extraction of volatile oxidation products from complex food systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Lu, Henna Fung Sieng

    Volatile secondary lipid oxidation products can be identified and quantified by GC-FID or GC-MS. An extraction step is, however, needed before GC analysis. A range of different extraction methods are available such as static headspace, dynamic headspace and SPME. Each of these methods has its adv...

  10. Volatile organic compounds at oil and natural gas production well pads in Colorado and Texas using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot study was conducted in application of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Methods 325A/B variant for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near two oil and natural gas (ONG) production well pads in the Texas Barnett Shale formation and Colorado Denver&nd...

  11. Involvement of a Broccoli COQ5 Methyltransferase in the Production of Volatile Selenium Compounds[C][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Yuan, Youxi; Yang, Yong; Rutzke, Michael; Thannhauser, Theodore W.; Kochian, Leon V.; Li, Li

    2009-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for animals and humans but becomes toxic at high dosage. Biologically based Se volatilization, which converts Se into volatile compounds, provides an important means for cleanup of Se-polluted environments. To identify novel genes whose products are involved in Se volatilization from plants, a broccoli (Brassica oleracea var italica) cDNA encoding COQ5 methyltransferase (BoCOQ5-2) in the ubiquinone biosynthetic pathway was isolated. Its function was authenticated by complementing a yeast coq5 mutant and by detecting increased cellular ubiquinone levels in the BoCOQ5-2-transformed bacteria. BoCOQ5-2 was found to promote Se volatilization in both bacteria and transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. Bacteria expressing BoCOQ5-2 produced an over 160-fold increase in volatile Se compounds when they were exposed to selenate. Consequently, the BoCOQ5-2-transformed bacteria had dramatically enhanced tolerance to selenate and a reduced level of Se accumulation. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing BoCOQ5-2 volatilized three times more Se than the vector-only control plants when treated with selenite and exhibited an increased tolerance to Se. In addition, the BoCOQ5-2 transgenic plants suppressed the generation of reactive oxygen species induced by selenite. BoCOQ5-2 represents, to our knowledge, the first plant enzyme that is not known to be directly involved in sulfur/Se metabolism yet was found to mediate Se volatilization. This discovery opens up new prospects regarding our understanding of the complete metabolism of Se and may lead to ways to modify Se-accumulator plants with increased efficiency for phytoremediation of Se-contaminated environments. PMID:19656903

  12. Efficient combinatorial filtering for desired molecular properties of reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, S; Peng, Z; Kostrowicki, J; Paderes, G; Kuki, A

    2000-01-01

    Two combinatorial filtering methods for efficiently selecting reaction products with desired properties are presented. The first, "direct reactants" method is applicable only to those molecular properties that are strictly additive or approximately additive, with relatively small interference between neighboring fragments. This method uses only the molecular properties of reactants. The second, "basis products" method can be used to filter not only the strictly additive properties but also the approximately additive molecular properties where a certain degree of mutual influence occurs between neighboring fragments. This method requires the molecular properties of the "basis products," which are the products formed by combining all the reactants for a given reaction component with the simplest set of complementary reactant partners. There is a one-to-one correspondence between the reactants and the "basis products." The latter is a product representation of the former. High efficiency of both methods is enhanced further by a tree-sorting and hierarchical selection algorithm, which is performed on the reaction components in a limited space determined systematically from the filtering criteria. The methods are illustrated with product logPs, van der Waals volumes, solvent accessible surface areas, and other product properties. Good results are obtained when filtering for a number of important molecular properties in a virtual library of 1.5 billion.

  13. Comparison of Three Methods for Extraction of Volatile Lipid Oxidation Products from Food Matrices for GC-MS Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Yesiltas, B.; Berner, Lis

    GC based methods are often used for determination of volatile oxidation products such as pentanal and hexanal. Different extraction methods for extracting volatiles before GC analysis can be used, e.g static headspace, dynamic headspace and solid phase microextraction (SPME). Traditionally, dynamic...... headspace extraction has been performed manually. Recently, automated dynamic headspace methods have become available. This presentation will summarize the principles of the different extraction methods. Moreover, results from fish oil, oil-in-water emulsion and milk obtained with SPME, manual dynamic...... headspace or automated dynamic headspace (TDU/DHS) extraction followed by GC-MS analysis will be compared. In all cases, concentrations of volatiles were quantified by calibration curves by addition of selected standards to oil, emulsion or milk. The results show that the linearity of calibration curves...

  14. Investigation of the formation of benzoyl peroxide, benzoic anhydride, and other potential aerosol products from gas-phase reactions of benzoylperoxy radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strollo, Christen M.; Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-04-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products of the reaction of benzaldehyde with Cl atoms and with OH radicals in air in the absence of NOx were investigated in an environmental chamber in order to better understand the possible role of organic peroxy radical self-reactions in SOA formation. SOA products and authentic standards were analyzed using mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography, and results show that the yields of benzoyl peroxide (C6H5C(O)OO(O)CC6H5) and benzoic anhydride (C6H5C(O)O(O)CC6H5), two potential products from the gas-phase self-reaction of benzoylperoxy radicals (C6H5C(O)OO·), were less than 0.1%. This is in contrast to results of recent studies that have shown that the gas-phase self-reactions of β-nitrooxyperoxy radicals formed from reactions of isoprene with NO3 radicals form dialkyl peroxides that contribute significantly to gas-phase and SOA products. Such reactions have also been proposed to explain the gas-phase formation of extremely low volatility dimers from autooxidation of terpenes. The results obtained here indicate that, at least for benzoylperoxy radicals, the self-reactions form only benzoyloxy radicals. Analyses of SOA composition and volatility were inconclusive, but it appears that the SOA may consist primarily of oligomers formed through heterogeneous/multiphase reactions possibly involving some combination of phenol, benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, and peroxybenzoic acid.

  15. Improving production of volatile fatty acids from food waste fermentation by hydrothermal pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Wang, Kun; Yang, Yuqiang; Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Meizhen; Mo, Han

    2014-11-01

    Food waste (FW) was pretreated by a hydrothermal method and then fermented for volatile fatty acid (VFAs) production. The soluble substance in FW increased after hydrothermal pretreatment (⩽200 °C). Higher hydrothermal temperature would lead to mineralization of the organic compounds. The optimal temperature for organic dissolution was 180 °C, at which FW dissolved 42.5% more soluble chemical oxygen demand than the control. VFA production from pretreated FW fermentation was significantly enhanced compared with the control. The optimal hydrothermal temperature was 160 °C with a VFA yield of 0.908 g/g VSremoval. Butyrate and acetate were the prevalent VFAs followed by propionate and valerate. FW fermentation was inhibited after 200 °C pretreatment. The VFAs were extracted from the fermentation broth by liquid-liquid extraction. The VFA recovery was 50-70%. Thus, 0.294-0.411 g VFAs could be obtained per gram of hydrothermally pretreated FW (in dry weight) by this method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Herbivory by a Phloem-feeding insect inhibits floral volatile production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Pareja

    Full Text Available There is extensive knowledge on the effects of insect herbivory on volatile emission from vegetative tissue, but little is known about its impact on floral volatiles. We show that herbivory by phloem-feeding aphids inhibits floral volatile emission in white mustard Sinapis alba measured by gas chromatographic analysis of headspace volatiles. The effect of the Brassica specialist aphid Lipaphis erysimi was stronger than the generalist aphid Myzus persicae and feeding by chewing larvae of the moth Plutella xylostella caused no reduction in floral volatile emission. Field observations showed no effect of L. erysimi-mediated floral volatile emission on the total number of flower visits by pollinators. Olfactory bioassays suggested that although two aphid natural enemies could detect aphid inhibition of floral volatiles, their olfactory orientation to infested plants was not disrupted. This is the first demonstration that phloem-feeding herbivory can affect floral volatile emission, and that the outcome of interaction between herbivory and floral chemistry may differ depending on the herbivore's feeding mode and degree of specialisation. The findings provide new insights into interactions between insect herbivores and plant chemistry.

  17. Herbivory by a Phloem-feeding insect inhibits floral volatile production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Martin; Qvarfordt, Erika; Webster, Ben; Mayon, Patrick; Pickett, John; Birkett, Michael; Glinwood, Robert

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive knowledge on the effects of insect herbivory on volatile emission from vegetative tissue, but little is known about its impact on floral volatiles. We show that herbivory by phloem-feeding aphids inhibits floral volatile emission in white mustard Sinapis alba measured by gas chromatographic analysis of headspace volatiles. The effect of the Brassica specialist aphid Lipaphis erysimi was stronger than the generalist aphid Myzus persicae and feeding by chewing larvae of the moth Plutella xylostella caused no reduction in floral volatile emission. Field observations showed no effect of L. erysimi-mediated floral volatile emission on the total number of flower visits by pollinators. Olfactory bioassays suggested that although two aphid natural enemies could detect aphid inhibition of floral volatiles, their olfactory orientation to infested plants was not disrupted. This is the first demonstration that phloem-feeding herbivory can affect floral volatile emission, and that the outcome of interaction between herbivory and floral chemistry may differ depending on the herbivore's feeding mode and degree of specialisation. The findings provide new insights into interactions between insect herbivores and plant chemistry.

  18. Determination of volatile and non-volatile products of milk fermentation processes using capillary zone electrophoresis and solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligor, Magdalena; Jarmalaviciene, Reda; Szumski, Michal; Maruska, Audrius; Buszewski, Boguslaw

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the investigations was to develop analytical methods for the determination of selected volatile and non-volatile organic compounds numbering among the final products of milk fermentation. The analyzed compounds were as follows: biacetyl and carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, citric, and lactic). The model yogurt was prepared under controlled conditions in our laboratory by addition of the selected bacteria (Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) to the milk sample. The temperature, time, and stirring were controlled during the fermentation process. Factors considered in SPMPE-GC-FID method development included fiber exposure time, salt addition, temperature of extraction, and temperature of desorption. Various SPME fibers, for example with PDMS, CAR/PDMS, PA, and PDMS/DVB coatings, were tested to obtain the highest recovery of the investigated compounds extracted from yogurt samples. Based on these preliminary experiments, qualitative and quantitative analyses for the determination of biacetyl were performed by SPME-GC-FID. Moreover, a capillary zone electrophoresis method was developed for the determination of carboxylic acids in the yogurt samples. The buffer composition as well as deproteinization by acetonitrile were found to have a crucial effect on the analysis.

  19. Product branching ratio of the HCCO + NO reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, K.T.; Hershberger, J.F.

    2000-01-20

    The reaction of HCCO radicals with NO was studied at room temperature by excimer laser photolysis of ketene precursor molecules followed by infrared absorption spectroscopic detection of CO and CO{sub 2} product molecules. After quantification of product yields and consideration of secondary chemistry, the authors obtain the following product branching ratios (1{sigma} error bars) at 296 K: 0.12 {+-} 0.04 for CO{sub 2} + (HCN) and 0.88 {+-} 0.04 for CO + (HCNO). In addition, they estimate a relative quantum yield for HCCO production in the 193 nm photolysis of CH{sub 2}CO to be 0.17 {+-} 0.02.

  20. Influence of carbon and nitrogen source on production of volatile fragrance and flavour metabolites by the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gethins, Loughlin; Guneser, Onur; Demirkol, Aslı; Rea, Mary C; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Yuceer, Yonca; Morrissey, John P

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus produces a range of volatile molecules with applications as fragrances or flavours. The purpose of this study was to establish how nutritional conditions influence the production of these metabolites. Four strains were grown on synthetic media, using a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources and volatile metabolites analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The nitrogen source had pronounced effects on metabolite production: levels of the fusel alcohols 2-phenylethanol and isoamyl alcohol were highest when yeast extract was the nitrogen source, and ammonium had a strong repressing effect on production of 2-phenylethyl acetate. In contrast, the nitrogen source did not affect production of isoamyl acetate or ethyl acetate, indicating that more than one alcohol acetyl transferase activity is present in K. marxianus. Production of all acetate esters was low when cells were growing on lactose (as opposed to glucose or fructose), with a lower intracellular pool of acetyl CoA being one explanation for this observation. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis of the known yeast alcohol acetyl transferases ATF1 and ATF2 suggests that the ancestral protein Atf2p may not be involved in synthesis of volatile acetate esters in K. marxianus, and raises interesting questions as to what other genes encode this activity in non-Saccharomyces yeasts. Identification of all the genes involved in ester synthesis will be important for development of the K. marxianus platform for flavour and fragrance production.

  1. High-intensity ultrasound production of Maillard reaction flavor compounds in a cysteine-xylose model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Olivia X H; Seow, Yi-Xin; Ong, Peter K C; Zhou, Weibiao

    2015-09-01

    Application of high intensity ultrasound has shown potential in the production of Maillard reaction odor-active flavor compounds in model systems. The impact of initial pH, sonication duration, and ultrasound intensity on the production of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) by ultrasound processing in a cysteine-xylose model system were evaluated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) with a modified mathematical model. Generation of selected MRPs, 2-methylthiophene and tetramethyl pyrazine, was optimal at an initial pH of 6.00, accompanied with 78.1 min of processing at an ultrasound intensity of 19.8 W cm(-2). However, identification of volatiles using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) revealed that ultrasound-assisted Maillard reactions generated fewer sulfur-containing volatile flavor compounds as compared to conventional heat treatment of the model system. Likely reasons for this difference in flavor profile include the expulsion of H2S due to ultrasonic degassing and inefficient transmission of ultrasonic energy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Strangeness production and hypernucleus formation in antiproton induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Formation mechanism of fragments with strangeness in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport approach combined with a statistical model (GEMINI) for describing the decays of excited fragments. Production of strange particles in the antiproton induced nuclear reactions is modeled within the LQMD model, in which all possible reaction channels such as elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic scattering in antibaryon-baryon, baryon-baryon and meson-baryon collisions have been included. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing hyperfragments in phase space after de-excitation of nucleonic fragments. The combined approach could describe the production of fragments in low-energy antiproton induced reactions. Hyperfragments are formed within the narrower rapidities and lower kinetic energies. It has advantage to produce heavier hyperfragments and hypernuclides with strangeness s=-2 (double-$\\Lambda$ fra...

  3. Influence of growth regulators in biomass production and volatile profile of in vitro plantlets of Thymus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affonso, Vanessa Ribeiro; Bizzo, Humberto Ribeiro; Lage, Celso Luiz Salgueiro; Sato, Alice

    2009-07-22

    In vitro shoots of thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) were established, and the effects of the auxin indole-3-acetic (IAA) acid and the cytokinins benzyladenine (BA), zeatin (ZEA), and kinetin (KIN) at 1.0, 5.0, and 10.0 microM on rooting, biomass production, and volatile compounds production by these plants were investigated. The volatiles were extracted by solid phase microextraction (SPME) and analyzed by gas chromatography. The highest biomass shoot growth was obtained with BA at 5.0 microM, while IAA at all concentrations tested achieved 100% rooting frequency. The three major compounds were gamma-terpinene (22.8-38.8%), p-cymene (13.8-27.9%), and thymol (6.5-29.0%). Quantitative changes of these compounds were observed in response to the effect of varying growth regulators concentrations in the culture medium. Growing Thymus vulgaris L. plants in media supplemented with IAA at 1.0 microM increased volatile compounds such as thymol by 315%. Nevertheless, the same major compounds were produced in all treatments and no qualitative changes were observed in the volatile profile of thyme plants.

  4. Nitric Oxide and Brassinosteroids Mediated Fungal Endophyte-Induced Volatile Oil Production Through Protein Phosphorylation Pathways in Atractylodes lancea Plantlets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Gang Ren; Chuan-Chao Dai

    2013-01-01

    Fungal endophytes have been isolated from almost every plant, infecting their hosts without causing visible disease symptoms, and yet have still proved to be involved in plant secondary metabolites accumulation. To decipher the possible physiological mechanisms of the endophytic fungus-host interaction, the role of protein phosphorylation and the relationship between endophytic fungus-induced kinase activity and nitric oxide (NO) and brassinolide (BL) in endophyte-enhanced volatile oil accumulation in Atractylodes lancea plantlets were investigated using pharmacological and biochemical approaches. Inoculation with the endophytic fungus Gilmaniella sp. AL12 enhanced the activities of total protein phosphorylation, Ca2þ-dependent protein kinase, and volatile oil accumulation in A. lancea plantlets. The upregulation of protein kinase activity could be blocked by the BL inhibitor brassinazole. Furthermore, pretreatments with the NO-specific scavenger cPTIO significantly reduced the increased activities of protein kinases in A. lancea plantlets inoculated with endophytic fungus. Pretreatments with different protein kinase inhibitors also reduced fungus-induced NO production and volatile oil accumulation, but had barely no effect on the BL level. These data suggest that protein phosphorylation is required for endophyte-induced volatile oil production in A. lancea plantlets, and that crosstalk between protein phosphorylation and the NO pathway may occur and act as a downstream signaling event of the BL pathway.

  5. Fission-product SiC reaction in HTGR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, F.

    1981-07-13

    The primary barrier to release of fission product from any of the fuel types into the primary circuit of the HTGR are the coatings on the fuel particles. Both pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings are very effective in retaining fission gases under normal operating conditions. One of the possible performance limitations which has been observed in irradiation tests of TRISO fuel is chemical interaction of the SiC layer with fission products. This reaction reduces the thickness of the SiC layer in TRISO particles and can lead to release of fission products from the particles if the SiC layer is completely penetrated. The experimental section of this report describes the results of work at General Atomic concerning the reaction of fission products with silicon carbide. The discussion section describes data obtained by various laboratories and includes (1) a description of the fission products which have been found to react with SiC; (2) a description of the kinetics of silicon carbide thinning caused by fission product reaction during out-of-pile thermal gradient heating and the application of these kinetics to in-pile irradiation; and (3) a comparison of silicon carbide thinning in LEU and HEU fuels.

  6. Measurement of Gas and Volatile Elements Production Cross Section in a Molten Lead-Bismuth Target

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    MEGAPIE is a project for a 1 MW liquid PbBi spallation source, to be built at the SINQ facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut, which will be an important step in the roadmap towards the demonstration of the ADS concept and high power molten metal targets in general. In the design and construction of such a challenging project it is extremely important to evaluate the amount and type of gas and volatile elements which will be produced, for a reliable and safe operation of the experiment. Both stable (H, $^{4}$He and other noble gases) and radioactive isotopes are of interest. Currently, different design options are under consideration to deal with the gas produced during operation. \\\\ For a correct estimation of the production cross sections, a measurement with a liquid PbBi target and a proton beam of energy close to the one of MEGAPIE (575 MeV) is necessary. We would like to use the ISOLDE facility, which offers the unique opportunity via its mass spectrometric analysis of the elements present in the gas pha...

  7. Screening of representative cider yeasts and bacteria for volatile phenol-production ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buron, Nicolas; Coton, Monika; Desmarais, Cécile; Ledauphin, Jérôme; Guichard, Hugues; Barillier, Daniel; Coton, Emmanuel

    2011-10-01

    Representative cider microorganisms (47 yeast strains and 16 bacterial strains) were studied for their ability to produce volatile phenols in a synthetic medium simulating cider conditions and supplemented with the necessary precursors. The various strains were tested for cinnamoyl esterase activity and only Lactobacillus collinoides were able to hydrolyse chlorogenic acid. Phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) activities were observed for 6 yeasts and 4 bacterial species allowing them to produce vinylphenols from hydroxycinnamic acids. On the other hand, 4 bacterial species exhibited phenolic acid reductase (PAR) activities leading to the formation of hydroxyphenylpropionic acids. Brettanomyces/Dekkera anomala and L. collinoides were able to produce 4-ethylcatechol (4-EC) and 4-ethylphenol (4-EP) from caffeic and p-coumaric acid, respectively, indicating that both species exhibit PAD and vinylphenol reductase (VPR) activities. In the experimental conditions used, the production of ethylphenols by L. collinoides was faster than the one observed for D. anomala. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaporation release behavior of volatile fission products from liquid sodium pool to the inert cover gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagiri, T.; Miyahara, S. [Oarai Engineering Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oaraimachi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    In fuel failure of sodium cooled fast breeder reactors, released volatile fission products (VFPs) such as iodine and cesium from the fuel will be dissolved into the liquid sodium coolant and transferred to the cover vaporization. In the cover gas system of the reactor, natural convection occurs due to temperature differences between the sodium pool and the gas phase. The release rates of VFPs together with sodium vaporization are considered to be controlled by the convection. In this study, three analytical models are developed and examined to calculate the transient release rates using the equilibrium partition coefficients of VFPs. The calculated release rates are compared with experimental results for sodium and sodium iodide. The release rate of sodium is closest to the calculation by the heterogeneous nucleation theory. The release rate of sodium iodide obtained from the experiment is between the release rates calculated by the model based on heat-and-mass transfer analogy and the Hill`s theory. From this study, it is confirmed that the realistic release rate of sodium is able to be calculated by the model based on the heterogeneous nucleation theory. The conservative release rate of sodium iodide is able to be calculated by the model based on the Hill`s theory using the equilibrium partition coefficient of sodium iodide. (author) 7 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs.

  9. Phenolic carbonyls undergo rapid aqueous photodegradation to form low-volatility, light-absorbing products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremy D.; Kinney, Haley; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the aqueous photochemistry of six phenolic carbonyls - vanillin, acetovanillone, guaiacyl acetone, syringaldehyde, acetosyringone, and coniferyl aldehyde - that are emitted from wood combustion. The phenolic carbonyls absorb significant amounts of solar radiation and decay rapidly via direct photodegradation, with lifetimes (τ) of 13-140 min under Davis, CA winter solstice sunlight at midday (solar zenith angle = 62°). The one exception is guaiacyl acetone, where the carbonyl group is not directly connected to the aromatic ring: This species absorbs very little sunlight and undergoes direct photodegradation very slowly (τ > 103 min). We also found that the triplet excited states (3C*) of the phenolic carbonyls rapidly oxidize syringol (a methoxyphenol without a carbonyl group), on timescales of 1-5 h for solutions containing 5 μM phenolic carbonyl. The direct photodegradation of the phenolic carbonyls, and the oxidation of syringol by 3C*, both efficiently produce low volatility products, with SOA mass yields ranging from 80 to 140%. Contrary to most aliphatic carbonyls, under typical fog conditions we find that the primary sink for the aromatic phenolic carbonyls is direct photodegradation in the aqueous phase. In areas of significant wood combustion, phenolic carbonyls appear to be small but significant sources of aqueous SOA: over the course of a few hours, nearly all of the phenolic carbonyls will be converted to SOA via direct photodegradation, enhancing the POA mass from wood combustion by approximately 3-5%.

  10. Open charm and beauty production in hadron reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lykasov, G.I.; Lyubushkin, V.V.; Bednyakov, V.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980, Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-15

    The production of charmed and beauty hadrons in proton-proton and proton-antiproton collisions at high energies is analyzed within the modified quark-gluon string model (QGSM) including the internal motion of quarks in colliding hadrons. It is shown that using both the QGSM and NLO QCD one can describe these experimental data rather successfully in a wide region of transverse momenta. We also present some predictions for the future experiments on the beauty baryon production in pp collisions at LHC energies and on the charmed meson production in p-bar p reactions at GSI energies.

  11. Production of radioactive nuclides in inverse reaction kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traykov, E.; Rogachevskiy, A.; Dammalapati, U.; Dendooven, P.; Dermois, O.C.; Jungmann, K.; Onderwater, C.J.G.; Sohani, M.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W. [KVI, Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands); Young, A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Beams of radioactive nuclides can be produced in a variety of ways. Effcient production of short-lived radioactive isotopes in inverse reaction kinematics is an important technique for a number of applications. It is particularly interesting when the isotope is only a few nucleons away from stable isotopes. The production via charge exchange and stripping reactions has been explored at the TRI{mu}P magnetic double separator at the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut in Groningen. The balance between separator transmission efficiency and production yield and the corresponding choice for the beam energy has been investigated. The results of some exploratory experiments at the new TRI{mu}P facility will be presented. (orig.)

  12. Hydrogen production from methane through catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, S.; Calogero, G.; Cavallaro, S.

    This paper reviews recent developments in syn-gas production processes used for partial methane oxidation with and/or without steam. In particular, we examined different process charts (fixed bed, fluidised bed, membrane, etc.), kinds of catalysts (powders, foams, monoliths, etc.) and catalytically active phases (Ni, Pt, Rh, etc.). The explanation of the various suggested technical solutions accounted for the reaction mechanism that may selectively lead to calibrated mixtures of CO and H 2 or to the unwanted formation of products of total oxidation (CO 2 and H 2O) and pyrolysis (coke). Moreover, the new classes of catalysts allow the use of small reactors to treat large amounts of methane (monoliths) or separate hydrogen in situ from the other reaction products (membrane). This leads to higher conversions and selectivity than could have been expected thermodynamically. Although catalysts based on Rh are extremely expensive, they can be used to minimise H 2O formation by maximising H 2 yield.

  13. Production of volatile organic compounds in the culture of marine α-proteobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, M.; Abe, M.; Hashimoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) release halogens in the troposphere and in the stratosphere by photolysis and released halogens catalyze ozone depletion . In the ocean, macroalgae, phytoplankton, and bacteria are considered to be the main producers of VOCs. Recent investigations have shown that marine bacteria produce halomethanes such as chloromethane, bromomethane, and iodomethane. However, knowledge of aquatic VOC production, particularly through bacteria, is lacking. We studied the production of VOCs, including halomethanes, through the bacterium HKF-1. HKF-1 was isolated from brackish water in Sanaru Lake, Shizuoka prefecture, Japan. The bacterium belongs to the α-proteobacteria. Bacteria were incubated in marine broth 2216 (Difco) added with KI and KIO3 (each at 0.02 μmol/L) at 25°C. VOCs in the gas phase above the cultured samples was determined using a dynamic headspace (GESTEL DHS)—gas chromatograph (Agilent 6890N)—mass spectrometer (Agilent 5975C) at 0, 4, 7, 10 and 12 incubation days. In addition, the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was measured during the culture period. Measurement of VOCs showed that chloromethane, bromomethane, iodomethane, isoprene, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, and dimethyl disulfide were produced in the culture of HKF-1. Dihalomethanes and trihalomethanes, such as dibromomethane, chloroiodomethane, bromoiodomethane, and tribromomethane, were not detected. Given that monohalomethanes and sulfur-containing VOCs were abundant in the culture, HKF-1 is one of the possible candidates as a producer of monohalomethane and sulfur-containing VOCs in marine environment, but not of di- or trihalomethanes.

  14. Factors Affecting Volatile Phenol Production During Fermentations with Pure and Mixed Cultures of Dekkera bruxellensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Kosel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the impact of ethanol, and hidroxycinnamic and vinylphenol precursors on the production of volatile phenols in fermentations of mixed and pure cultures of yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Dekkera bruxellensis. Three different D. bruxellensis strains were examined and they all showed a unique volatile phenol production pattern in the fermentations of pure and mixed cultures. Generally, the results showed that in mixed culture fermentations less vinylphenols and more ethylphenols were produced in comparison with D. bruxellensis pure culture fermentations. Vinylphenol precursors significantly inhibited the growth of S. cerevisiae and the production of ethylphenols. Nevertheless, it was found that D. bruxellensis genes encoding for enzymes coumaric acid decarboxylase (CAD and vinylphenol reductase (VPR are more responsive to vinylphenol precursors in comparison with hidroxycinnamic acids. Consequently, higher concentrations of vinylphenols in the cell were found to be more cytotoxic than hidroxycinnamic acids. In general, low ethanol concentrations induced higher production of volatile phenols by S. cerevisiae and D. bruxellensis. This was confirmed with the expression pattern of gene encoding for CAD of D. bruxellensis.

  15. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, S.; Anand, M.; Carvill, B. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process, the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The consequences of SER are: (1) reformation reaction at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than conventional SMR (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (2) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 99+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (3) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The early focus of the program will be on the identification of an adsorbent/chemisorbent for CO{sub 2} and on the demonstration of the SER concept for SMR in our state-of-the-art bench scale process. In the latter stages, a pilot plant will be built to scale-up the technology and to develop engineering data. The program has just been initiated and no significant results for SMR will be reported. However, results demonstrating the basic principles and process schemes of SER technology will be presented for reverse water gas shift reaction as the model reaction. If successful, this technology will be commercialized by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) and used in its existing hydrogen business. APCI is the world leader in merchant hydrogen production for a wide range of industrial applications.

  16. Volatile organic compound emissions from unconventional natural gas production: Source signatures and air quality impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarthout, Robert F.

    Advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing over the past two decades have allowed access to previously unrecoverable reservoirs of natural gas and led to an increase in natural gas production. Intensive unconventional natural gas extraction has led to concerns about impacts on air quality. Unconventional natural gas production has the potential to emit vast quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. Many VOCs can be toxic, can produce ground-level ozone or secondary organic aerosols, and can impact climate. This dissertation presents the results of experiments designed to validate VOC measurement techniques, to quantify VOC emission rates from natural gas sources, to identify source signatures specific to natural gas emissions, and to quantify the impacts of these emissions on potential ozone formation and human health. Measurement campaigns were conducted in two natural gas production regions: the Denver-Julesburg Basin in northeast Colorado and the Marcellus Shale region surrounding Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. An informal measurement intercomparison validated the canister sampling methodology used throughout this dissertation for the measurement of oxygenated VOCs. Mixing ratios of many VOCs measured during both campaigns were similar to or higher than those observed in polluted cities. Fluxes of natural gas-associated VOCs in Colorado ranged from 1.5-3 times industry estimates. Similar emission ratios relative to propane were observed for C2-C6 alkanes in both regions, and an isopentane:n-pentane ratio ≈1 was identified as a unique tracer for natural gas emissions. Source apportionment estimates indicated that natural gas emissions were responsible for the majority of C2-C8 alkanes observed in each region, but accounted for a small proportion of alkenes and aromatic compounds. Natural gas emissions in both regions accounted for approximately 20% of hydroxyl radical reactivity, which could hinder federal ozone standard

  17. Tropical Greenhouse Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Switchable Reagent Ion Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectromety (PTR-TOF-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, P.; Auld, J.; Williams, J.

    2012-04-01

    In this presentation, we will summarize the results of measurements made in an approximately 1300 m3 tropical greenhouse at the Johannes Gutenberg University botanical garden in Mainz Germany conducted over a one month period. The greenhouse is home to a large variety of plant species from hot and humid regions of the world. The greenhouse is also host to several crops such as Cocoa and Cola Nut as well as ornamental plants. A particular focus of the species maintained are those which are considered ant plants, or plants which have an intimate relationship with ants in tropical habitats. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using a Switchable Reagent Ion Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) using H3O+, NO+, and O2+ ion chemistry. Measurements will be presented both for primary emissions observed in the closed greenhouse atmosphere as well as the oxidation products observed after the introduction of ambient ozone. The high resolving power (5000 m/Δm) of the time-of-flight instrument allows for the separation of isobaric species. In particular, both isoprene (68.1170 amu) and furan (68.0740 amu) were observed and separated as primary emissions during this study. The significance of this will be discussed in terms of both atmospheric implications as well as with respect to previous measurements of isoprene obtained using quadrupole PTR-MS where isobaric separation of these compounds is not possible. Additionally observed species (e.g. Methanol, Acetaldehyde, MVK and MEK) will be discussed in detail with respect to their behavior as a function of light, temperature and relative humidity. The overall instrument performance of the PTR-TOF-MS technique using the H3O+, NO+, and O2+ primary ions for the measurement of VOCs will be evaluated.

  18. The asymmetric reactions of mean and volatility of stock returns to domestic and international information based on a four-regime double-threshold GARCH model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cathy W. S.; Yang, Ming Jing; Gerlach, Richard; Jim Lo, H.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the asymmetric reactions of mean and volatility of stock returns in five major markets to their own local news and the US information via linear and nonlinear models. We introduce a four-regime Double-Threshold GARCH (DTGARCH) model, which allows asymmetry in both the conditional mean and variance equations simultaneously by employing two threshold variables, to analyze the stock markets’ reactions to different types of information (good/bad news) generated from the domestic markets and the US stock market. By applying the four-regime DTGARCH model, this study finds that the interaction between the information of domestic and US stock markets leads to the asymmetric reactions of stock returns and their variability. In addition, this research also finds that the positive autocorrelation reported in the previous studies of financial markets may in fact be mis-specified, and actually due to the local market's positive response to the US stock market.

  19. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from building materials and consumer products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Lance A.; Pellizzari, Edo; Leaderer, Brian; Zelon, Harvey; Sheldon, Linda

    EPA's TEAM Study of personal exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOC) in air and drinking water of 650 residents of seven U.S. cities resulted in the identification of a number of possible sources encountered in peoples' normal daily activities and in their homes. A follow-up EPA study of publicaccess buildings implicated other potential sources of exposure. To learn more about these potential sources, 15 building materials and common consumer products were analyzed using a headspace technique to detect organic emissions and to compare relative amounts. About 10-100 organic compounds were detected offgassing from each material. Four mixtures of materials were then chosen for detailed study: paint on sheetrock; carpet and carpet glue; wallpaper and adhesives; cleansers and a spray pesticide. The materials were applied as normally used, allowed to age 1 week (except for the cleansers and pesticides, which were used normally during the monitoring period), and placed in an environmentally controlled chamber. Organic vapors were collected on Tenax-GC over a 4-h period and analyzed by GC-MS techniques. Emission rates and chamber concentrations were calculated for 17 target chemicals chosen for their toxic, carcinogenic or mutagenic properties. Thirteen of the 17 chemicals were emitted by one or more of the materials. Elevated concentrations of chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, n-decane, n-undecane, p-dichlorobenzene, 1,2-dichloroethane and styrene were produced by the four mixtures of materials tested. For some chemicals, these amounts were sufficient to account for a significant fraction of the elevated concentrations observed in previous indoor air studies. We conclude that common materials found in nearly every home and place of business may cause elevated exposures to toxic chemicals.

  20. Production of hydrogen and volatile fatty acid by Enterobacter sp. T4384 using organic waste materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Chun; Deshpande, Tushar R; Chun, Jongsik; Yi, Sung Chul; Kim, Hyunook; Um, Youngsoon; Sang, Byoung-In

    2013-02-01

    In a study of hydrogen-producing bacteria, strain T4384 was isolated from rice field samples in the Republic of Korea. The isolate was identified as Enterobacter sp. T4384 by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences. Enterobacter sp. T4384 grew at a temperature range of 10-45 degrees C and at an initial pH range of 4.5-9.5. Strain T4384 produced hydrogen at 0-6% NaCl by using glucose, fructose, and mannose. In serum bottle cultures using a complete medium, Enterobacter sp. T4384 produced 1,098 ml/l H2, 4.0 g/l ethanol, and 1.0 g/l acetic acid. In a pH-regulated jar fermenter culture with the biogas removed, 2,202 ml/l H2, 6.2 g/l ethanol, and 1.0 g/l acetic acid were produced, and the lag-phase time was 4.8 h. Strain T4384 metabolized the hydrolysate of organic waste for the production of hydrogen and volatile fatty acid. The strain T4384 produced 947 ml/l H2, 3.2 g/l ethanol, and 0.2 g/l acetic acid from 6% (w/v) food waste hydrolysate; 738 ml/l H2, 4.2 g/l ethanol, and 0.8 g/l acetic acid from Miscanthus sinensis hydrolysate; and 805 ml/l H2, 5.0 g/l ethanol, and 0.7 g/l acetic acid from Sorghum bicolor hydrolysate.

  1. Dual Position Sensitive MWPC for tracking reaction products at VAMOS++

    CERN Document Server

    Vandebrouck, Marine; Rejmund, Maurycy; Fremont, Georges; Pancin, Julien; Navin, Alahari; Michelagnoli, Caterina; Goupil, Johan; Spitaels, Charles; Jacquot, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics and performance of a Dual Position Sensitive Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (DPS-MWPC) used to measure the scattering angle, interaction position on the target and the velocity of reaction products, detected in the VAMOS++ magnetic spectrometer, are reported. The detector consists of a pair of position sensitive low pressure MWPCs and provides both fast timing signals, along with the two-dimensional position coordinates required to define the trajectory of the reaction products. A time-of-flight resolution of 305(11) ps (FWHM) was measured. The measured resolutions (FWHM) were 2.5(3) mrad and 560(70) {\\mu}m for the scattering angle and the interaction point at the target respectively. The subsequent improvement of the Doppler correction of the energy of the gamma-rays, detected in the gamma-ray tracking array AGATA in coincidence with isotopically identified ions in VAMOS++, is also discussed.

  2. Product detection of the CH radical reaction with acetaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulay, Fabien; Trevitt, Adam J; Savee, John D; Bouwman, Jordy; Osborn, David L; Taatjes, Craig A; Wilson, Kevin R; Leone, Stephen R

    2012-06-21

    The reaction of the methylidyne radical (CH) with acetaldehyde (CH(3)CHO) is studied at room temperature and at a pressure of 4 Torr (533.3 Pa) using a multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometer coupled to the tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The CH radicals are generated by 248 nm multiphoton photolysis of CHBr(3) and react with acetaldehyde in an excess of helium and nitrogen gas flow. Five reaction exit channels are observed corresponding to elimination of methylene (CH(2)), elimination of a formyl radical (HCO), elimination of carbon monoxide (CO), elimination of a methyl radical (CH(3)), and elimination of a hydrogen atom. Analysis of the photoionization yields versus photon energy for the reaction of CH and CD radicals with acetaldehyde and CH radical with partially deuterated acetaldehyde (CD(3)CHO) provides fine details about the reaction mechanism. The CH(2) elimination channel is found to preferentially form the acetyl radical by removal of the aldehydic hydrogen. The insertion of the CH radical into a C-H bond of the methyl group of acetaldehyde is likely to lead to a C(3)H(5)O reaction intermediate that can isomerize by β-hydrogen transfer of the aldehydic hydrogen atom and dissociate to form acrolein + H or ketene + CH(3), which are observed directly. Cycloaddition of the radical onto the carbonyl group is likely to lead to the formation of the observed products, methylketene, methyleneoxirane, and acrolein.

  3. Exposure to Volatile Organic Compounds and Possibility of Exposure to By-product Volatile Organic Compounds in Photolithography Processes in Semiconductor Manufacturing Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung-Hyun; Shin, Jung-Ah; Park, Hyun-Hee; Yi, Gwang Yong; Chung, Kwang-Jae; Park, Hae-Dong; Kim, Kab-Bae; Lee, In-Seop

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the concentration of volatile organic compound (VOC)s originated from the chemicals used and/or derived from the original parental chemicals in the photolithography processes of semiconductor manufacturing factories. A total of four photolithography processes in 4 Fabs at three different semiconductor manufacturing factories in Korea were selected for this study. This study investigated the types of chemicals used and generated during the photolithography process of each Fab, and the concentration levels of VOCs for each Fab. A variety of organic compounds such as ketone, alcohol, and acetate compounds as well as aromatic compounds were used as solvents and developing agents in the processes. Also, the generation of by-products, such as toluene and phenol, was identified through a thermal decomposition experiment performed on a photoresist. The VOC concentration levels in the processes were lower than 5% of the threshold limit value (TLV)s. However, the air contaminated with chemical substances generated during the processes was re-circulated through the ventilation system, thereby affecting the airborne VOC concentrations in the photolithography processes. Tens of organic compounds were being used in the photolithography processes, though the types of chemical used varied with the factory. Also, by-products, such as aromatic compounds, could be generated during photoresist patterning by exposure to light. Although the airborne VOC concentrations resulting from the processes were lower than 5% of the TLVs, employees still could be exposed directly or indirectly to various types of VOCs.

  4. Measurement of Volatile Radionuclides Production and Release Yields followed by a Post-Irradiation Analysis of a Pb/Bi Filled Ta Target at ISOLDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, L.; Köster, U.; David, J. C.; Tall, Y.; Andersson, M.; Berg, K.; Cormon, S.; Fallot, M.; Foucher, Y.; Frånberg, H.; Gröschel, F.; Guertin, A.; Kirchner, T.; Leray, S.; Manfrin, E.; Noah, E.; Ravn, H.; Stora, T.; Thiollière, N.; Wohlmuther, M.

    2014-05-01

    A crucial requirement in the development of liquid-metal spallation neutron target is knowledge of the composition and amount of volatile radionuclides that are released from the target during operation. It is also important to know the total amount produced, which could be released if there was an accident. One type is the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) target where different radionuclides can be produced following interaction with a high-energy proton beam, notably noble gases (Ar, Kr, Xe isotopes) and other relative volatile isotopes such as Hg and At. The results of an irradiation experiment performed at ISOLDE on a LBE target are compared with predictions from the MCNPX code using the latest developments on the Liège Intranuclear Cascade model (INCL4.6) and the CEM03 model. The calculations are able to reproduce the mass distribution of the radioisotopes produced, including the At production, where there is a significant contribution from secondary reactions. Subsequently, a post-irradiation examination of the irradiated target was performed. Investigations of both the tantalum target structure, in particular the beam window, and the lead-bismuth eutectic were performed using several experimental techniques. No sign of severe irradiation damage, previously observed in other ISOLDE targets, was found.

  5. Effects of temperature on the production of hydrogen peroxide and volatile halocarbons by brackish-water algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Katarina; Choo, Kyung Sil; Pedersén, Marianne; Johansson, Gustav; Snoeijs, Pauli

    2003-10-01

    Marine algae produce volatile halocarbons, which have an ozone-depleting potential. The formation of these compounds is thought to be related to oxidative stress, involving H2O2 and algal peroxidases. In our study we found strong correlations between the releases of H2O2 and brominated and some iodinated compounds to the seawater medium, but no such correlation was found for CHCl3, suggesting the involvement of other formation mechanisms as well. Little is known about the effects of environmental factors on the production of volatile halocarbons by algae and in the present study we focused on the influence of temperature. Algae were sampled in an area of the brackish Baltic Sea that receives thermal discharge, allowing us to collect specimens of the same species that were adapted to different field temperature regimes. We exposed six algal species (the diatom Pleurosira laevis, the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus and four filamentous green algae, Cladophora glomerata, Enteromorpha ahlneriana, E. flexuosa and E. intestinalis) to temperature changes of 0-11 degrees C under high irradiation to invoke oxidative stress. The production rates, as well as the quantitative composition of 16 volatile halocarbons, were strongly species-dependent and different types of responses to temperature were recorded. However, no response patterns to temperature change were found that were consistent for all species or for all halocarbons. We conclude that the production of certain halocarbons may increase with temperature in certain algal species, but that the amount and composition of the volatile halocarbons released by algal communities are probably more affected by temperature-associated species shifts. These results may have implications for climatic change scenarios.

  6. Headspace-free setup of in vitro bioassays for the evaluation of volatile disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalter, Daniel; Dutt, Mriga; Escher, Beate I

    2013-11-18

    The conventional setup of in vitro bioassays in microplates does not prevent the loss of volatile compounds, which hampers the toxicological characterization of waterborne volatile disinfection by-products (DBPs). To minimize the loss of volatile test chemicals, we adapted four in vitro bioassays to a headspace-free setup using eight volatile organic compounds (four trihalomethanes, 1,1-dichloroethene, bromoethane, and two haloacetonitriles) that cover a wide range of air-water partition coefficients. The nominal effect concentrations of the test chemicals decreased by up to three orders of magnitude when the conventional setup was changed to a headspace-free setup for the bacterial cytotoxicity assay using bioluminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri. The increase of apparent sensitivity correlated significantly with the air-water partition coefficient. Purge and trap GC/MS analysis revealed a reduced loss of dosed volatile compounds in the headspace free setup (78-130% of nominal concentration) compared to a substantial loss in the conventional set up (2-13% of the nominal concentration). The experimental effect concentrations converged with the headspace-free setup to the effect concentrations predicted by a QSAR model, confirming the suitability of the headspace-free approach to minimize the loss of volatile test chemicals. The analogue headspace-free design of the bacterial bioassays for genotoxicity (umuC assay) and mutagenicity (Ames fluctuation assay) increased the number of compounds detected as genotoxic or mutagenic from one to four and zero to two, respectively. In a bioassay with a mammalian cell line applied for detecting the induction of the Nrf-2-mediated oxidative stress response (AREc32 assay), the headspace-free setup improved the apparent sensitivity by less than one order of magnitude, presumably due to the retaining effect of the serum components in the medium, which is also reflected in the reduced aqueous concentrations of compounds. This

  7. Influence of transesterification reaction temperature on biodiesel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pighinelli, Anna Leticia Montenegro Turtelli; Zorzeto, Thais Queiroz; Park, Kil Jin [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola], E-mail: annalets@agr.unicamp.br; Bevilaqua, Gabriela [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    Brazilian government policy has authorized the introduction of biodiesel into the national energy matrix, law no.11.097 of January 13th, 2005. It is necessary, like any new product, to invest in research which is able to cover its entire production chain (planting of oilseeds, vegetable oils extraction and chemical reactions), providing data and relevant information in order to optimize the process and solve critical issues. The objective of this work was to study the effects of temperature on crude sunflower transesterification reaction with ethanol. A central composite experimental design with five variation levels (25 deg, 32 deg, 47.5 deg, 64 deg and 70 deg C) was used and response surface methodology applied for the data analysis. The statistical analysis of the results showed that the production suffered the influence of temperature (linear and quadratic effects) and reaction time (linear and quadratic). The generated models did not show significant regression. The model generated was not well suited to the experimental data and the value of the coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}=0.52) was low. Consequently it was not possible to build the response surface. (author)

  8. Multi-Strangeness Production in Hadron Induced Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Gaitanos, T; Lalazissis, G A; Lenske, H

    2016-01-01

    We discuss in detail the formation and propagation of multi-strangeness particles in reactions induced by hadron beams relevant for the forthcoming experiments at FAIR. We focus the discussion on the production of the decuplett-particle $\\Omega$ and study for the first time the production and propagation mechanism of this heavy hyperon inside hadronic environments. The transport calculations show the possibility of $\\Omega$-production in the forthcoming \\panda-experiment, which can be achieved with measurable probabilities using high-energy secondary $\\Xi$-beams. We predict cross sections for $\\Omega$-production. The theoretical results are important in understanding the hyperon-nucleon and, in particular, the hyperon-hyperon interactions also in the high-strangeness sector. We emphasize the importance of our studies for the research plans at FAIR.

  9. Multi-strangeness production in hadron induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitanos, T.; Moustakidis, Ch.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Lenske, H.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss in detail the formation and propagation of multi-strangeness particles in reactions induced by hadron beams relevant for the forthcoming experiments at FAIR. We focus the discussion on the production of the decuplet-particle Ω and study for the first time the production and propagation mechanism of this heavy hyperon inside hadronic environments. The transport calculations show the possibility of Ω-production in the forthcoming P ‾ANDA-experiment, which can be achieved with measurable probabilities using high-energy secondary Ξ-beams. We predict cross sections for Ω-production. The theoretical results are important in understanding the hyperon-nucleon and, in particular, the hyperon-hyperon interactions also in the high-strangeness sector. We emphasize the importance of our studies for the research plans at FAIR.

  10. Volatile production during preignition heating. Final technical report, 15 September 1980-30 September 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballantyne, A.; Chou, H.; Flusberg, A.; Neoh, K.; Orozco, N.; Stickler, D.

    1983-10-01

    Pulverized coal particles, in a flowing inert nitrogen stream, have been heated by high power Carbon Dioxide Laser. The consequence of such an irradiation have proved to be both novel and surprising as a result of the rapid quenching of primary coal products. It ahs been found that the gas phase yield from such heating (typically, temperatures in excess of 1400 K at rates approx. 2 x 10/sup 5/ K/s) is very small (< 0.2 percent of coal carbon and hydrogen). Analysis of the solid residue has shown the presence of fine lacy particulate chains of material of 0.1 ..mu..m diameter, which appears to be soluble in tetrahydrofuran. The yields of solute were significantly much higher than for raw coals. Molecular weight of the solute material was high, being in the range of 600 to 3000. The above and substantiating evidence point to a new mechanism of high heating rate pyrolysis in which only tar-like materials are produced as primary products from the coal. It is hypothesized that gas phase products are primarily the result of secondary reactions of these primary products in the hot gas environments usually employed by other heating techniques.

  11. Method "Ethanol as Internal Standard" for determination of volatile compounds in alcohol products by gas chromatography in daily practice

    CERN Document Server

    Charapitsa, Siarhei V; Makhomet, Andrey A; Guguchkina, Tatiana I; Markovsky, Mikhail G; Yakuba, Yurii F; Kotov, Yurii N

    2016-01-01

    Recently proposed new method "Ethanol as Internal Standard" for determination of volatile compounds in alcohol products by gas chromatography (GC) is investigated from different sides including method testing on prepared standard solutions like cognac and brandy, different ethanol-water solutions and certified reference material CRM LGC5100 Whisky-Congeners. Analysis of obtained results of experimental study from four different laboratories shows that relative bias between the experimentally measured concentrations calculated in accordance with proposed method and the values of concentrations assigned during the preparation by gravimetric method for all analyzed compounds does not exceed 10 %. It is shown that relative response factors (RRF) between analyzed volatile compounds and ethanol do not depend on time of analysis and are constant for every model of GC. It is shown the possibility to use predetermined RRF in daily practice of testing laboratories and to implement this new method in the international s...

  12. TEACHING NOTE FOR CASE STUDY: “STRATEGIC DECISION-MAKING UNDER UNCERTAINTY: INNOVATION AND NEW PRODUCT INTRODUCTION DURING VOLATILE TIMES”

    OpenAIRE

    Maud Roucan-Kane; Michael Boehlje

    2009-01-01

    This teaching note accompanies the case study titled “Strategic Decision Making under Uncertainty: Innovation and New Product Introduction during Volatile Times” published under the reference: Boehlje, M. And M. Roucan-Kane, ”Strategic Decision Making under Uncertainty: Innovation and New Product Introduction during Volatile Times”, International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, 12 (4), 2009. This case study outlines the strategic, marketing, and organizational issues facing the farm ...

  13. Growth and production of volatiles by Staphylococcus carnosus in dry sausages:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjener, Karsten; Stahnke, Louise Heller; Andersen, L.

    2004-01-01

    Three sausage batches inoculated with normal inoculation level of Pediococcus pentosaceus (5 x 10(6) CFU/g) and with low, intermediate, and high inoculation levels of Staphylococcus carnosus (10(5), 5 x 10(6), 5 x 10(7) CFU/g, respectively) were produced. Cell counts and formation of volatiles were...

  14. Production of volatile aroma compounds by bacterial strains isolated from different surface-ripened French cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deetae, Pawinee; Bonnarme, Pascal; Spinnler, Henry E; Helinck, Sandra

    2007-10-01

    Twelve bacterial strains belonging to eight taxonomic groups: Brevibacterium linens, Microbacterium foliorum, Arthrobacter arilaitensis, Staphylococcus cohnii, Staphylococcus equorum, Brachybacterium sp., Proteus vulgaris and Psychrobacter sp., isolated from different surface-ripened French cheeses, were investigated for their abilities to generate volatile aroma compounds. Out of 104 volatile compounds, 54 volatile compounds (identified using dynamic headspace technique coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry [GC-MS]) appeared to be produced by the different bacteria on a casamino acid medium. Four out of eight species used in this study: B. linens, M. foliorum, P. vulgaris and Psychrobacter sp. showed a high flavouring potential. Among these four bacterial species, P. vulgaris had the greatest capacity to produce not only the widest varieties but also the highest quantities of volatile compounds having low olfactive thresholds such as sulphur compounds. Branched aldehydes, alcohols and esters were produced in large amounts by P. vulgaris and Psychrobacter sp. showing their capacity to breakdown the branched amino acids. This investigation shows that some common but rarely mentioned bacteria present on the surface of ripened cheeses could play a major role in cheese flavour formation and could be used to produce cheese flavours.

  15. Alcohol production through volatile fatty acids reduction with hydrogen as electron donor by mixed cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2008-01-01

    In this research we demonstrated a new method to produce alcohols. It was experimentally feasible to produce ethanol, propanol and butanol from solely volatile fatty acids (VFAs) with hydrogen as electron donor. In batch tests, VFAs such as acetic, propionic and butyric acids were reduced by mixed m

  16. COMPARING GIBBS ENERGY RELATIONSHIPS FOR AMMONIA VOLATILIZATIONS FROM AGRICULTURAL SOILS FOR POTATO PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil drought, that can be enhanced by global warming increases ammonia (NH3 volatilization. This laboratory study was conducted with two soils: Krome Gravelly Loam (KGL from Florida and Warden Silt Loam (WSL from Washington State and two fertilizers: Ammonium sulfate [(NH42SO4] or ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3. Two water regimes including 20 and 80% Field Capacity (FC were used at 20°C which is the average temperature in the potato growing season in Washington State. The data demonstrated that variation in NH3 volatilization subject to different soil water regimes can be explained by changes in Gibbs free energy of Nitrogen (N fertilization in soils with varying water contents. The absolute values of Gibbs free energy of (NH42SO4 or NH4NO3 applied to soil at 20% FC soil water regime were 5-fold greater than at 80% FC. Accordingly, the equilibrium constant (K of deprotonation of ammonium ions in soil solutions at 20% FC was 3,000- or 50-fold greater than that at 80% FC for (NH42SO4 or NH4NO3, respectively. Nitrogen loss via NH3 volatilization was 4-to 7-fold greater at 20% FC than that at 80% FC. This study suggests potential acceleration of NH3 volatilization from soils under drought. Therefore, optimal water management is critical to mitigate NH3 volatilization from agricultural soils.

  17. Manifestation of macroscopic correlations in elementary reaction kinetics. I. Irreversible reaction A +A→product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorov, Alexander B.; Kipriyanov, Alexander A.; Kipriyanov, Alexey A.

    2010-05-01

    Using an modern many-particle method for the derivation of non-Markovian binary kinetic equations, we have treated theoretically the applicability of the encounter theory (ET) (the prototype of the collision theory) concepts to the widely known diffusion assisted irreversible bulk reaction A +A→product (for example, radical reaction) in dilute solutions. The method shows that the agreement with the ET is observed when the familiar integral ET is employed which in this method is just a step in the derivation of kinetic equations. It allows for two-particle correlations only, but fails to take account of correlation of reactant simultaneously with the partner of the encounter and the reactant in the bulk. However, the next step leading to the modified ET under transformation of equations to the regular form both extends the time range of the applicability of ET rate equation (as it was for reactions proceeding with one of the reactants in excess), and gives the equation of the generalized ET. In full agreement with physical considerations, this theory reveals macroscopic correlations induced by the encounters in the reservoir of free walks. This means that the encounters of reactants in solution are correlated on a rather large time interval of the reaction. Though any nonstationary (non-Markovian) effects manifest themselves rather weakly in the kinetics of the bimolecular reaction in question, just the existence of the revealed macroscopic correlations in the binary theory is of primary importance. In particular, it means that the well-known phenomena which are generally considered to be associated solely with correlation of particles on the encounter (for example, chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization) may be induced by correlation in the reservoir of free random walks of radicals in solution.

  18. Manifestation of macroscopic correlations in elementary reaction kinetics. I. Irreversible reaction A+A-->product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorov, Alexander B; Kipriyanov, Alexander A; Kipriyanov, Alexey A

    2010-05-28

    Using an modern many-particle method for the derivation of non-Markovian binary kinetic equations, we have treated theoretically the applicability of the encounter theory (ET) (the prototype of the collision theory) concepts to the widely known diffusion assisted irreversible bulk reaction A+A-->product (for example, radical reaction) in dilute solutions. The method shows that the agreement with the ET is observed when the familiar integral ET is employed which in this method is just a step in the derivation of kinetic equations. It allows for two-particle correlations only, but fails to take account of correlation of reactant simultaneously with the partner of the encounter and the reactant in the bulk. However, the next step leading to the modified ET under transformation of equations to the regular form both extends the time range of the applicability of ET rate equation (as it was for reactions proceeding with one of the reactants in excess), and gives the equation of the generalized ET. In full agreement with physical considerations, this theory reveals macroscopic correlations induced by the encounters in the reservoir of free walks. This means that the encounters of reactants in solution are correlated on a rather large time interval of the reaction. Though any nonstationary (non-Markovian) effects manifest themselves rather weakly in the kinetics of the bimolecular reaction in question, just the existence of the revealed macroscopic correlations in the binary theory is of primary importance. In particular, it means that the well-known phenomena which are generally considered to be associated solely with correlation of particles on the encounter (for example, chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization) may be induced by correlation in the reservoir of free random walks of radicals in solution.

  19. Two-pion production in photon-induced reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Schadmand

    2006-05-01

    Differences in the photoproduction of mesons on the free proton and on nuclei are expected to reveal changes in the properties of hadrons. Inclusive studies of nuclear photoabsorption have provided evidence of medium modifications. However, the results have not been explained in a model independent way. A deeper understanding of the situation is anticipated from a detailed experimental study of meson photoproduction from nuclei in exclusive reactions. In the energy regime above the (1232) resonance, the dominant double pion production channels are of particular interest. Double pion photoproduction from nuclei is also used to investigate the in-medium modification of meson–meson interactions.

  20. Temperature and solids retention time control microbial population dynamics and volatile fatty acid production in replicated anaerobic digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwonterghem, Inka; Jensen, Paul D.; Rabaey, Korneel; Tyson, Gene W.

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a widely used technology for waste stabilization and generation of biogas, and has recently emerged as a potentially important process for the production of high value volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and alcohols. Here, three reactors were seeded with inoculum from a stably performing methanogenic digester, and selective operating conditions (37°C and 55°C 12 day and 4 day solids retention time) were applied to restrict methanogenesis while maintaining hydrolysis and fermentation. Replicated experiments performed at each set of operating conditions led to reproducible VFA production profiles which could be correlated with specific changes in microbial community composition. The mesophilic reactor at short solids retention time showed accumulation of propionate and acetate (42 +/- 2% and 15 +/- 6% of CODhydrolyzed, respectively), and dominance of Fibrobacter and Bacteroidales. Acetate accumulation (>50% of CODhydrolyzed) was also observed in the thermophilic reactors, which were dominated by Clostridium. Under all tested conditions, there was a shift from acetoclastic to hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, and a reduction in methane production by >50% of CODhydrolyzed. Our results demonstrate that shortening the SRT and increasing the temperature are effective strategies for driving microbial communities towards controlled production of high levels of specific volatile fatty acids.

  1. Effects of minerals in ferric bauxite on sodium carbonate decomposition and volatilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡文韬; 王化军; 刘欣伟; 孙传尧

    2015-01-01

    Direct reduction is an emerging technology for ferric bauxite utilization. However, because of sodium volatilization, its sodium carbonate consumption is considerably higher than that in ordinary bauxite processing technology. TG-DSC and XRD were applied to detecting phase transformation and mass loss in direct reduction to reveal the mechanism on sodium volatilization. The results show that the most significant influence factor of ferric bauxite on sodium volatilization in direct reduction system is its iron content. Sodium volatilization is probably ascribed to the instability of amorphous substances structure. Amorphous substances are the intermediate-products of the reaction, and the volatilization rate of sodium increases with its generating rate. These amorphous substances are volatile, thus, more sodium is volatilized with its generation. A small amount of amorphous substances are generated in the reaction between Na2CO3and Al2O3; thus, only 3.15% of sodium is volatilized. Similarly, the volatilization rate is 1.87% in the reaction between Na2CO3and SiO2. However, the volatilization rate reaches 7.64% in the reaction between Na2CO3 and Fe2O3 because of the generation of a large amount of amorphous substances.

  2. Production of Energetic Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashnik Stepan G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Different reaction mechanisms contribute to the production of light fragments (LF from nuclear reactions. Available models cannot accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the emission of LF is important formany applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets, radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The cascade-exciton model (CEM and the Los Alamos version of the quark-gluon string model (LAQGSM, as implemented in the CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators used in the Los Alamos Monte Carlo transport code MCNP6, describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to 4He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies. However, they do not predict high-energy tails for LF heavier than 4He. The standard versions of CEM and LAQGSM do not account for preequilibrium emission of LF larger than 4He. The aim of our work is to extend the preequilibrium model to include such processes. We do this by including the emission of fragments heavier than 4He at the preequilibrium stage, and using an improved version of the Fermi Break-up model, providing improved agreement with various experimental data.

  3. Multistage Extractive Reaction for Hydrogen Peroxide Production by Anthraquinone Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; L(U) Shuxiang; WANG Yaquan; MI Zhentao

    2005-01-01

    The extractive reaction process of oxygen-working solution-water three-phase system for the production of hydrogen peroxide by the anthraquinone method was investigated in a sieve plate column of 50 mm in internal diameter. The oxidation reaction of anthrahydroquinone in the working solution with oxygen and the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from the working solution into aqueous phase occurred simultaneously in the countercurrent mode. The agitating effect caused by gaseous phase made the droplets of the dispersed phase become smaller, thus, increasing the liquid-liquid interfacial contact areas and resulting in the improvement of the mass transfer velocity. Results showed that the gas-agitation had a beneficial effect on the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from the working solution into the aqueous phase; the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the raffinate decreased with the increase of the gaseous superficial velocities; and the concentration of H2O2 in the raffinate increased with the increase of the dispersed phase superficial velocity at the same superficial velocity of the gaseous phase. In the G-L-L extractive reaction process, with the increase of the gaseous superficial velocities, both the conversion of the anthrahydroquinone oxidation and the extraction efficiency of hydrogen peroxide first increased significantly, then increased gradually.

  4. Production of Energetic Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Mashnik, Stepan G; Gudima, Konstantin K; Sierk, Arnold J

    2013-01-01

    Different reaction mechanisms contribute to the production of light fragments (LF) from nuclear reactions. Available models cannot accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the emission of LF is important for many applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets, radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The cascade-exciton model (CEM) and the Los Alamos version of the quark-gluon string model (LAQGSM), as implemented in the CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators used in the Los Alamos transport code MCNP6, describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to 4He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies. However, they do not predict high-energy tails for LF heavier than 4He. The standard versions of CEM and LAQGSM do not account for preequilibrium emission of LF larger than 4He. The aim of our work is to extend the preequilibrium model to include such processes. We do this by including the...

  5. Occupational exposure to coal tar pitch volatiles, benzo/a/pyrene and dust in tyre production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogaczewska, T; Ligocka, D

    1994-01-01

    Occupational exposure to coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPVs), benzo/a/pyrene (BaP) and dust was evaluated by means of individual measurements carried out in 80 workers and by stationary measurements on 16 work-posts in two divisions of the tyre producing plant. Dust and coal tar pitch volatiles concentrations in the air were determinated by the gravimetric method, measured, in the case of CPTVs, benzene-soluble fraction (BSF) with ultrasonic extraction. Benzo/a/pyrene analysis was performed using high performance liquid chromato-graphy (HPLC) with a spectrofluorimetric detector. It was found that nearly all personal sampling results for BaP were within the range 90%) which exceeded the admissible value (4 mg/m3) was found mainly only in the workers of the Semiproducts Division at some work-posts.

  6. Growth and production of volatiles by Staphylococcus carnosus in dry sausages:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjener, Karsten; Stahnke, Louise Heller; Andersen, L.

    2004-01-01

    Three sausage batches inoculated with normal inoculation level of Pediococcus pentosaceus (5 x 10(6) CFU/g) and with low, intermediate, and high inoculation levels of Staphylococcus carnosus (10(5), 5 x 10(6), 5 x 10(7) CFU/g, respectively) were produced. Cell counts and formation of volatiles were...... followed throughout a ripening period of three weeks. The staphylococci exhibited the fastest growth in sausages with a low inoculation level, whereas growth was only moderate in sausages with a high initial level. Analysis of volatiles showed that methyl-branched aldehydes and acids, phenylacetaldehyde, 2......-methyl-l-butanol, dimethyldisulphide and dimethyltrisulphide were produced in higher amounts in sausages with a high inoculation level of S. carnosus, whercas a low inoculation level correlated with high amounts of diacetyl, ethanol and ethyl esters. The levels of most compounds increased over time...

  7. Effects of volatiles on melt production and reactive flow in the mantle

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Magmatism in the Earth interior has a significant impact on its dynamic, thermal and compositional evolution. Experimental studies of petrology of mantle melting find that small concentrations of water and carbon dioxide have a significant effect on the solidus temperature and distribution of melting in the upper mantle. However, it has remained unclear what effect small fractions of deep, volatile-rich melts have on melting and melt transport in the shallow asthenosphere. We present a method to simulate the thermochemical evolution of the upper mantle in the presence of volatiles. The method is based on a novel, thermodynamically consistent framework for reactive, disequilibrium, multi-component melting/crystallisation. This is coupled with a system of equations representing conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for a partially molten grain aggregate. Application of this method to upwelling-column models demonstrates that it captures leading-order features of hydrated and carbonated peridotite melting. ...

  8. Enzymatic production and emission of floral scent volatiles in Jasminum sambac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Paramita; Mukherjee, Chiranjit; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2017-03-01

    Floral scent composed of low molecular weight volatile organic compounds. The sweet fragrance of any evening blooming flower is dominated by benzenoid and terpenoid volatile compounds. Floral scent of Jasminum sambac (Oleaceae) includes three major benzenoid esters - benzylacetate, methylbenzoate, and methylsalicylate and three major terpene compounds viz. (E)-β-ocimene, linalool and α-farnesene. We analyzed concentrations and emission rates of benzenoids and terpenoids during the developmental stages of J. sambac flower. In addition to spatial emission from different floral parts, we studied the time-course mRNA accumulations of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and the two representative genes of terpenoid pathway, namely 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) and terpene synthase (TPS). Further, in vitro activities of several enzymes of phenylpropanoid/benzenoid pathway viz., PAL and acetyl-coenzyme A: benzylalcohol acetyltransferase (BEAT), S-adenosyl-l-methionine: benzoic acid carboxyl methyl transferase (BAMT) and S-adenosyl-l-methionine: salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (SAMT) were studied. All the above enzyme activities along with the in vitro activities of DXR and TPS were found to follow a certain rhythm as observed in the emission of different benzenoid and terpenoid compounds. Linalool emission peaked after petal opening and coincided with maximal expression of JsTPS gene as evidenced from RT-PCR analyses (semi-quantitative). The maximum transcript accumulation of this gene was observed in flower petals, indicating that the petals of J. sambac flower play an important role as a major contributor of volatile precursors. The transcripts accumulation of JsDXR and JsTPS in different developmental stages and in different floral part showed that emissions of terpenoid volatiles in J. sambac flower are partially regulated at transcription levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of yeast starter formulations on the production of volatile compounds during wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Patrizia; Pietrafesa, Rocchina; Romaniello, Rossana; Zambuto, Marianna; Calabretti, Antonella; Capece, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The most diffused starter formulation in winemaking is actually represented by active dry yeast (ADY). Spray-drying has been reported as an appropriate preservation method for yeast and other micro-organisms. Despite the numerous advantages of this method, the high air temperatures used can negatively affect cell viability and the fermentative performance of dried cells. In the present study, 11 wine S. cerevisiae strains (both indigenous and commercial) were submitted to spray-drying; different process conditions were tested in order to select the conditions allowing the highest strain survival. The strains exhibited high variability for tolerance to spray-drying treatment. Selected strains were tested in fermentation at laboratory scale in different formulations (free fresh cells, free dried cells, immobilized fresh cells and immobilized dried cells), in order to assess the influence of starter formulation on fermentative fitness of strains and aromatic quality of wine. The analysis of volatile fraction in the experimental wines produced by selected strains in different formulations allowed identification of > 50 aromatic compounds (alcohols, esters, ketones, aldehydes and terpenes). The results obtained showed that the starter formulation significantly influenced the content of volatile compounds. In particular, the wines obtained by strains in dried forms (as both free and immobilized cells) contained higher numbers of volatile compounds than wines obtained from fresh cells.

  10. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao; Zhang, Ya; Ji, Yuefei; Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-06-05

    This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H2O2 concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H2O2 concentration, while the optimal pH and H2O2 concentration were 7.0 and 8μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1UmL(-1) SBP in 30min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3UmL(-1) was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (KCAT) and catalytic efficiency (KCAT/KM) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via CC and CO coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water/wastewater treatment.

  11. NUCLEOTIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS, TOTAL VOLATILE BASIC NITROGEN, SENSORY AND MICROBIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF NILE PERCH (LATES NILOTICUS FILLETS UNDER CHILLED STORAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Kiri Amegovu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Degradation products of adenosine nucleotide and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN concentration provide means of ascertaining freshness of commercial fish products. A complementary sensory analysis has also been adopted by export markets for assessing the quality of fresh fish. Nucleotide breakdown products and TVBN was determined in fresh fillets from beach seined and gill netted Nile perch, a highly commercialized freshwater fish from Lake Victoria (Uganda, under chilled storage. Microbiological and sensory qualities were also evaluated. Total plate and Pseudomonas spp. counts positively correlated with TVBN. Basing on sensory, microbiological and biochemical attributes of the fillets, shelf-life of gill netted Nile perch was lower (13 days than that of the beach seined (17 days. Fillets of beach seined Nile perch have a better keeping quality than that of the gill netted.

  12. Development of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor for concurrent extraction of volatile fatty acids and biohydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trad, Zaineb; Akimbomi, Julius; Vial, Christophe; Larroche, Christian; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J; Fontaine, Jean-Pierre

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study an externally-submerged membrane bioreactor for the cyclic extraction of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) during anaerobic fermentation, combining the advantages of submerged and external technologies for enhancing biohydrogen (BioH2) production from agrowaste. Mixing and transmembrane pressure (TMP) across a hollow fiber membrane placed in a recirculation loop coupled to a stirred tank were investigated, so that the loop did not significantly modify the hydrodynamic properties in the tank. The fouling mechanism, due to cake layer formation, was reversible. A cleaning procedure based on gas scouring and backwashing with the substrate was defined. Low TMP, 10(4)Pa, was required to achieve a 3Lh(-1)m(-2) critical flux. During fermentation, BioH2 production was shown to restart after removing VFAs with the permeate, so as to enhance simultaneously BioH2 production and the recovery of VFAs as platform molecules.

  13. In vitro effects of Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil on growth and production of volatile sulphur compounds by oral bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    GRAZIANO, Talita Signoreti; CALIL, Caroline Morini; SARTORATTO, Adilson; FRANCO, Gilson César Nobre; GROPPO, Francisco Carlos; COGO-MÜLLER, Karina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Halitosis can be caused by microorganisms that produce volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs), which colonize the surface of the tongue and subgingival sites. Studies have reported that the use of natural products can reduce the bacterial load and, consequently, the development of halitosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia on the growth and volatile sulphur compound (VSC) production of oral bacteria compared with chlorhexidine. Material and Methods The effects of these substances were evaluated by the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) in planktonic cultures of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Porphyromonas endodontalis. In addition, gas chromatography analyses were performed to measure the concentration of VSCs from bacterial cultures and to characterize M. alternifolia oil components. Results The MIC and MBC values were as follows: M. alternifolia - P. gingivalis (MIC and MBC=0.007%), P. endodontalis (MIC and MBC=0.007%=0.5%); chlorhexidine - P. gingivalis and P. endodontalis (MIC and MBC=1.5 mg/mL). M. alternifolia significantly reduced the growth and production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by P. gingivalis (p<0.05, ANOVA-Dunnet) and the H2S and methyl mercaptan (CH3SH) levels of P. endodontalis (p<0.05, ANOVA-Dunnet). Chlorhexidine reduced the growth of both microorganisms without altering the production of VSC in P. endodontalis. For P. gingivalis, the production of H2S and CH3SH decreased (p<0.05, ANOVA-Dunnet). Conclusion M. alternifolia can reduce bacterial growth and VSCs production and could be used as an alternative to chlorhexidine. PMID:28076463

  14. In vitro effects of Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil on growth and production of volatile sulphur compounds by oral bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Signoreti GRAZIANO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Halitosis can be caused by microorganisms that produce volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs, which colonize the surface of the tongue and subgingival sites. Studies have reported that the use of natural products can reduce the bacterial load and, consequently, the development of halitosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia on the growth and volatile sulphur compound (VSC production of oral bacteria compared with chlorhexidine. Material and Methods The effects of these substances were evaluated by the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC in planktonic cultures of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Porphyromonas endodontalis. In addition, gas chromatography analyses were performed to measure the concentration of VSCs from bacterial cultures and to characterize M. alternifolia oil components. Results The MIC and MBC values were as follows: M. alternifolia - P. gingivalis (MIC and MBC=0.007%, P. endodontalis (MIC and MBC=0.007%=0.5%; chlorhexidine - P. gingivalis and P. endodontalis (MIC and MBC=1.5 mg/mL. M. alternifolia significantly reduced the growth and production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S by P. gingivalis (p<0.05, ANOVA-Dunnet and the H2S and methyl mercaptan (CH3SH levels of P. endodontalis (p<0.05, ANOVA-Dunnet. Chlorhexidine reduced the growth of both microorganisms without altering the production of VSC in P. endodontalis. For P. gingivalis, the production of H2S and CH3SH decreased (p<0.05, ANOVA-Dunnet. Conclusion M. alternifolia can reduce bacterial growth and VSCs production and could be used as an alternative to chlorhexidine.

  15. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... identified generically as a hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (PMN P-99-0052) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane (PMN P-98-1036; CAS No. 207409-71-0) is subject to...

  17. Volatile fatty acids derived from waste organics provide an economical carbon source for microbial lipids/biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwon Woo; Fei, Qiang; Jung, Kwonsu; Chang, Ho Nam; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Kim, Nag-jong; Choi, Jin-dal-rae; Kim, Sangyong; Cho, Jaehoon

    2014-12-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) derived from organic waste, were used as a low cost carbon source for high bioreactor productivity and titer. A multi-stage continuous high cell density culture (MSC-HCDC) process was employed for economic assessment of microbial lipids for biodiesel production. In a simulation study we used a lipid yield of 0.3 g/g-VFAs, cell mass yield of 0.5 g/g-glucose or wood hydrolyzates, and employed process variables including lipid contents from 10-90% of cell mass, bioreactor productivity of 0.5-48 g/L/h, and plant capacity of 20000-1000000 metric ton (MT)/year. A production cost of USD 1.048/kg-lipid was predicted with raw material costs of USD 0.2/kg for wood hydrolyzates and USD 0.15/kg for VFAs; 9 g/L/h bioreactor productivity; 100, 000 MT/year production capacity; and 75% lipids content. The variables having the highest impact on microbial lipid production costs were the cost of VFAs and lipid yield, followed by lipid content, fermenter cost, and lipid productivity. The cost of raw materials accounted for 66.25% of total operating costs. This study shows that biodiesel from microbial lipids has the potential to become competitive with diesels from other sources.

  18. Evaluation of Neutron Induced Reactions for 32 Fission Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeong Il

    2007-02-15

    Neutron cross sections for 32 fission products were evaluated in the neutron-incident energy range from 10{sup -5} eV to 20 MeV. The list of fission products consists of the priority materials for several applications, extended to cover complete isotopic chains for three elements. The full list includes 8 individual isotopes, {sup 95}Mo, {sup 101}Ru, {sup 103}Rh, {sup 105}Pd, {sup 109}Ag, {sup 131}Xe, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 141}Pr, and 24 isotopes in complete isotopic chains for Nd (8), Sm (9) and Dy (7). Our evaluation methodology covers both the low energy region and the fast neutron region.In the low energy region, our evaluations are based on the latest data published in the Atlas of Neutron Resonances. This resource was used to infer both the thermal values and the resolved resonance parameters that were validated against the capture resonance integrals. In the unresolved resonance region we performed the additional evaluation by using the averages of the resolved resonances and adjusting them to the experimental data.In the fast neutron region our evaluations are based on the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE-2.19 validated against the experimental data. EMPIRE is the modular system of codes consisting of many nuclear reaction models, including the spherical and deformed Optical Model, Hauser-Feshbach theory with the width fluctuation correction and complete gamma-ray emission cascade, DWBA, Multi-step Direct and Multi-step Compound models, and several versions of the phenomenological preequilibrium models. The code is equipped with a power full GUI, allowing an easy access to support libraries such as RIPL and CSISRS, the graphical package, as well the utility codes for formatting and checking. In general, in our calculations we used the Reference Input Parameter Library, RIPL, for the initial set model parameters. These parameters were properly adjusted to reproduce the available experimental data taken from the CSISRS library. Our evaluations cover cross

  19. INFLUENCE OF REACTION TEMPERATURE AND REACTION TIME ON PRODUCT FROM HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT OF BIOMASS RESIDUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakaphong Kongpanya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thailand is facing with problems associated with biomass residue such as palm oil residues (oil palm trunks, oil palm fronds, empty fruit bunches, shells and fibers. Biomass is promising source for the production of an array of energy-related produts including, liquid, solid and gaseous fuels, heat, chemicals electricity and other materials. Therefore, the use of biomass for energy is not still fully utilization due to the high moisture content, lower heating value of the energy unit or low bulk density and the problems withtar. While Thailand has high potential because the reisa lot of biomass that has not been utilizedfor example biomass residues from palm oil industry. About 2 million tons of empty fruit bunches in Thailand have great potential. This amount will continue increase with the rapid growth in the Thailand, the largest crude palm oil producer in the world. This amount will continue increase with the rapid growth in the Thailand palm oil industry. Therefore, a better method to manage such biomass residues is highly desired. One of the potential ways for alternative utilization of biomass is thermo-chemical process. Hydrothermal treatment is a process for making a homogenizinged, carbon rich and energy-dense solid fuel, called hydrochar. The objective of the study was to identify the effect of reaction temperature and reaction time for hydrothermal treatment of Empty Fruit Bunches (EFB. Influence of temperature 100°C, 150°C and 200°C for 30 to 90 min and active biogas process on 1.00-15.538 bars, within 1,000 mL stainless steel 316 batch-type reactor with a stirrer and there is an automatic temperature controller. Results showed that the highest chemical and physical properties of hydrochar product was achieved when operated on 200°C for 90 min. Maximum heating value was found that 5678 cal/g for EFB9. The result showed that the chemical and physical properties increased progressively with higher temperature. The results was

  20. Optimizing headspace sampling temperature and time for analysis of volatile oxidation products in fish oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbæk, Karen; Jensen, Benny

    1997-01-01

    Headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC), based on adsorption to Tenax GR(R), thermal desorption and GC, has been used for analysis of volatiles in fish oil. To optimize sam sampling conditions, the effect of heating the fish oil at various temperatures and times was evaluated from anisidine values (......) and HS-CC. AV indicated sample degradations at 90 degrees C but only small alterations between 60 and 75 degrees C. HS-GC showed increasing response with temperature and rime. Purging at 75 degrees C for 45 min was selected as the preferred sampling condition for oxidized fish oil....

  1. Detection of plant volatiles after leaf wounding and darkening by proton transfer reaction "time-of-flight" mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Brilli

    Full Text Available Proton transfer reaction-time of flight (PTR-TOF mass spectrometry was used to improve detection of biogenic volatiles organic compounds (BVOCs induced by leaf wounding and darkening. PTR-TOF measurements unambiguously captured the kinetic of the large emissions of green leaf volatiles (GLVs and acetaldehyde after wounding and darkening. GLVs emission correlated with the extent of wounding, thus confirming to be an excellent indicator of mechanical damage. Transient emissions of methanol, C5 compounds and isoprene from plant species that do not emit isoprene constitutively were also detected after wounding. In the strong isoprene-emitter Populus alba, light-dependent isoprene emission was sustained and even enhanced for hours after photosynthesis inhibition due to leaf cutting. Thus isoprene emission can uncouple from photosynthesis and may occur even after cutting leaves or branches, e.g., by agricultural practices or because of abiotic and biotic stresses. This observation may have important implications for assessments of isoprene sources and budget in the atmosphere, and consequences for tropospheric chemistry.

  2. Influence of environmental conditions on production of volatiles by Trichoderma atroviride in relation with the sick building syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polizzi, Viviana [Ghent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Coupure links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Laboratory of Food Analysis, Harelbekestraat 72, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Adams, An; De Kimpe, Norbert [Ghent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Coupure links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Picco, Anna Maria [Pavia University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Territorial Ecology and Environment, via S. Epifanio 14, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Adriaens, Els; Lenoir, Joke [Ghent University, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Harelbekestraat 72, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Peteghem, Carlos; De Saeger, Sarah [Ghent University, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Laboratory of Food Analysis, Harelbekestraat 72, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-04-15

    A Trichoderma atroviride strain was isolated from a water-damaged office and the production of microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) was investigated by means of headspace solid phase microextraction GC-MS. Different growth conditions (substrate, temperature, relative humidity) were selected, resembling indoor parameters, to elucidate a possible relationship between MVOCs, produced by Trichoderma atroviride, and the Sick Building Syndrome. In general, the range of MVOCs and the emitted quantities were larger on malt extract agar (MEA) than on wallpaper and plasterboard. Particular attention was dedicated to the volatile marker 6-pentyl-2-pyrone, a compound produced in high quantities on MEA, and its mucosal irritation potency was shown in a slug mucosal irritation assay. Some compounds characteristic for growth on specific building materials were detected, e.g. 2-ethylcyclopentanone, menthone, iso-menthone and trans-p-menth-2-en-7-ol on plasterboard and 4-heptanone and 1-octen-3-ol on wallpaper. Relative humidity and substrate had a more important effect on MVOC production than temperature. (author)

  3. Chlorination of parabens: reaction kinetics and transformation product identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qianhui; Ji, Feng; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qiquan; Hu, Zhenhu; Yuan, Shoujun

    2016-11-01

    The reactivity and fate of parabens during chlorination were investigated in this work. Chlorination kinetics of methylparaben (MeP), ethylparaben (EtP), propylparaben (PrP), and butylparaben (BuP) were studied in the pH range of 4.0 to 11.0 at 25 ± 1 °C. Apparent rate constants (k app) of 9.65 × 10(-3) M(-0.614)·s(-1), 1.77 × 10(-2) M(-1.019)·s(-1), 2.98 × 10(-2) M(-0.851)·s(-1), and 1.76 × 10(-2) M(-0.860)·s(-1) for MeP, EtP, PrP, and BuP, respectively, were obtained at pH 7.0. The rate constants depended on the solution pH, temperature, and NH4(+) concentration. The maximum k app was obtained at pH 8.0, and the minimum value was obtained at pH 11.0. The reaction rate constants increased with increasing temperature. When NH4(+) was added to the solution, the reaction of parabens was inhibited due to the rapid formation of chloramines. Two main transformation products, 3-chloro-parabens and 3,5-dichloro-parabens, were identified by GC-MS and LCMS-IT-TOF, and a reaction pathway was proposed. Dichlorinated parabens accumulated in solution, which is a threat to human health and the aqueous environment.

  4. Maillard reaction products as antimicrobial components for packaging films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Carolin; Müller, Ulla; Sauer, Tanja; Augner, Kerstin; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2014-02-15

    Active packaging foils with incorporated antimicrobial agents release the active ingredient during food storage. Maillard reaction products (MRPs) show antimicrobial activity that is at least partially mediated by H2O2. De novo generation of H2O2 by an MRP fraction, extracted from a ribose/lysine Maillard reaction mixture by 85% ethanol, was monitored at three concentrations (1.6, 16.1, and 32.3g/L) and three temperatures (4, 25, and 37 °C) between 0 and 96 h, reaching a maximum of 335 μM H2O2 (32.3g/L, 37 °C, 96 h). The active MRP fraction (16.1g/L) completely inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli for 24h and was therefore incorporated in a polyvinyl acetate-based lacquer and dispersed onto a low-density polyethylene film. The coated film generated about 100 μM H2O2 and resulted in a log-reduction of >5 log-cycles against E. coli. Thus, MRPs can be considered as active ingredients for antimicrobial packaging materials.

  5. Rapid electrochemiluminescence assays of polymerase chain reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenten, J H; Casadei, J; Link, J; Lupold, S; Willey, J; Powell, M; Rees, A; Massey, R

    1991-09-01

    We demonstrate the first use of an electrochemiluminescent (ECL) label, [4-(N-succimidyloxycarbonylpropyl)-4'-methyl-2,2'- bipyridine]ruthenium(II) dihexafluorophosphate (Origen label; IGEN Inc.), in DNA probe assays. This label allows rapid (less than 25 min) quantification and detection of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified products from oncogenes, viruses, and cloned genes. For the PCR, we used labeled oligonucleotide primers complementary to human papiloma virus and the Ha-ras oncogene. These samples were followed by ECL analysis or hybridization with specific, Origen-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These studies demonstrate the speed, specificity, and effectiveness of the new ECL labels, compared with 32P, for nucleic acid probe applications. We describe formats involving conventional methodologies and a new format that requires no wash step, allowing simple and rapid sample analysis. These rapid assays also reduce PCR contamination, by requiring less sample handling. Improvements in ECL detectability are currently under investigation for use in DNA probe assays without amplification.

  6. Volatile metabolites from actinomycetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholler, C.E.G.; Gurtler, H.; Pedersen, R.

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-six Streptomyces spp. were screened for their volatile production capacity on yeast starch agar. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were concentrated on a porous polymer throughout an 8-day growth period. VOCs were analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and ident...

  7. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for the production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.; Gaffney, T.; Nataraj, S.; Rao, M.; Sircar, S. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The novel Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process has the potential to decrease the cost of hydrogen production by steam methane reforming. Current effort for development of this technology has focused on adsorbent development, experimental process concept testing, and process development and design. A preferred CO{sub 2} adsorbent, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted hydrotalcite, satisfies all of the performance targets and it has been scaled up for process testing. A separate class of adsorbents has been identified which could potentially improve the performance of the H{sub 2}-SER process. Although this material exhibits improved CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the HTC adsorbent, its hydrothermal stability must be improved. Single-step process experiments (not cyclic) indicate that the H{sub 2}-SER reactor performance during the reaction step improves with decreasing pressure and increasing temperature and steam to methane ratio in the feed. Methane conversion in the H{sub 2}-SER reactor is higher than for a conventional catalyst-only reactor operated at similar temperature and pressure. The reactor effluent gas consists of 90+% H{sub 2}, balance CH{sub 4}, with only trace levels (< 50 ppm) of carbon oxides. A best-case process design (2.5 MMSCFD of 99.9+% H{sub 2}) based on the HTC adsorbent properties and a revised SER process cycle has been generated. Economic analysis of this design indicates the process has the potential to reduce the H{sub 2} product cost by 25--31% compared to conventional steam methane reforming.

  8. The cumulative methane production from dairy cattle slurry can be explained by its volatile solid, temperature and length of storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamoto, Takuji; Nakamura, Megumi; Nekomoto, Kenji; Hoshiba, Shinji; Minato, Keiko; Nakayama, Motoo; Osada, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    In order to refine the national estimate of methane emission from stored cattle slurry, it is important to comprehend the basic characteristics of methane production. Two dairy cattle slurries were obtained from livestock farms located in Hokkaido (a northern island) and Kyushu (a southern island). The slurries were diluted with water into three levels: undiluted, three times diluted, and 10 times diluted. Three hundred mL of the slurries were put into a bottle with a headspace volume of 2.0 L, which was filled with nitrogen gas and then sealed by butyl rubber. Four levels of temperature were used for incubation: 35, 25, 15 and 5 °C. The time course of the cumulative methane production per volatile solid (VS) was satisfactorily expressed by an asymptotic regression model. The effect of dilution on the methane production per VS was not distinctive, but that of temperature was of primary importance. In particular, higher temperature yields a higher potential production and a shorter time when the cumulative production reaches half of the potential production. The inclusive and simple models obtained in this study indicate that the cumulative methane production from stored cattle slurry can be explained by VS, temperature and length of storage.

  9. The effect of sugar concentration and temperature on growth and volatile phenol production by Dekkera bruxellensis in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, André; Pagliara, Daniela; Piccininno, Tiziana; Tarantino, Francesco; Ciardulli, Wilma; Malfeito-Ferreira, Manuel; Loureiro, Virgílio

    2008-11-01

    The wine spoilage yeast Dekkera bruxellensis was evaluated for the production of 4-ethylphenol under low concentrations (0.02-20 g L(-1)) of glucose and fructose in synthetic media. Measurable amounts of 4-ethylphenol were produced over 0.2 g L(-1) of each sugar. The yeast growth rate and amount of biomass formed increased from 0.2 to 20 g L(-1) of glucose or fructose, being accompanied by increasing production of 4-ethylphenol. In red wines, the production of 4-ethylphenol was only observed in the presence of growing populations of indigenous or inoculated strains of D. bruxellensis. The production rate of 4-ethylphenol varied between 22 and 93 mug day(-1) either with inoculated strains or wild populations in bottled wines. The production rate of 4-ethylphenol as a function of the increase in the number of cells varied from 349 to 1882 mug L(-1) per one log CFU mL(-1). The effect of temperature on cellular viability and 4-ethylphenol production was tested in red wines with indigenous or inoculated strains of D. bruxellensis. Incubation temperatures of 15, 20 and 25 degrees C allowed cellular growth and volatile phenol production. Increasing incubation temperatures to 36 degrees C induced full viability loss of 10 strains of D. bruxellensis within <12 h.

  10. Experimental determination of the partitioning coefficient and volatility of important BVOC oxidation products using the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) coupled to a PTR-ToF-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkatzelis, G.; Hohaus, T.; Tillmann, R.; Schmitt, S. H.; Yu, Z.; Schlag, P.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol can alter the Earth's radiative budget and global climate but can also affect human health. A dominant contributor to the submicrometer particulate matter (PM) is organic aerosol (OA). OA can be either directly emitted through e.g. combustion processes (primary OA) or formed through the oxidation of organic gases (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). A detailed understanding of SOA formation is of importance as it constitutes a major contribution to the total OA. The partitioning between the gas and particle phase as well as the volatility of individual components of SOA is yet poorly understood adding uncertainties and thus complicating climate modelling. In this work, a new experimental methodology was used for compound-specific analysis of organic aerosol. The Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) is a newly developed instrument that deploys an aerodynamic lens to separate the gas and particle phase of an aerosol. The particle phase is directed to a cooled sampling surface. After collection particles are thermally desorbed and transferred to a detector for further analysis. In the present work, the ACM was coupled to a Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) to detect and quantify organic compounds partitioning between the gas and particle phase. This experimental approach was used in a set of experiments at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR to investigate SOA formation. Ozone oxidation with subsequent photochemical aging of β-pinene, limonene and real plant emissions from Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) were studied. Simultaneous measurement of the gas and particle phase using the ACM-PTR-ToF-MS allows to report partitioning coefficients of important BVOC oxidation products. Additionally, volatility trends and changes of the SOA with photochemical aging are investigated and compared for all systems studied.

  11. Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, M.; Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The key consequences of SERP are: (i) reformation reaction is carried out at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than that in a conventional SMR reactor (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (ii) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 98+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (iii) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The first phase of the program has focused on the development of a sorbent for CO{sub 2} which has (a) reversible CO{sub 2} capacity >0.3 mmol/g at low partial pressures of CO{sub 2} (0.1 - 1.0 atm) in the presence of excess steam (pH{sub 2}O/pCO{sub 2}>20) at 400-500{degrees}C and (b) fast sorption-desorption kinetics for CO{sub 2}, at 400-500{degrees}C. Several families of supported sorbents have been identified that meet the target CO{sub 2} capacity. A few of these sorbents have been tested under repeated sorption/desorption cycles and extended exposure to high pressure steam at 400-500{degrees}C. One sorbent has been scaled up to larger quantities (2-3 kg) and tested in the laboratory process equipment for sorption and desorption kinetics of CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2}, sorption and desorption kinetics are desirably fast. This was a critical path item for the first phase of the program and now has been successfully demonstrated. A reactor has been designed that will allow nearly isothermal operation for SERP-SMR. This reactor was integrated into an overall process flow diagram for the SERP-SMR process.

  12. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhang, Ya [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People’s Republic of China, Nanjing 210042 (China); Ji, Yuefei [College of Resources and Environmental Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Gao, Shixiang, E-mail: ecsxg@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-06-05

    Highlights: • Enzymatic treatment of triclosan in water by soybean and horseradish peroxidases. • pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage affected the removal efficiency of TCS. • The removal of TCS by SBP was more efficient than that of HRP. • K{sub CAT} and K{sub CAT}/K{sub M} values for SBP toward TCS were much higher than those for HRP. • Polymers formed via radical coupling mechanism were nontoxic to the growth of alga. - Abstract: This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, while the optimal pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration were 7.0 and 8 μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1 U mL{sup −1} SBP in 30 min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3 U mL{sup −1} was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (K{sub CAT}) and catalytic efficiency (K{sub CAT}/K{sub M}) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via C−C and C−O coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water

  13. Fast analysis of volatile organic compounds and disinfection by-products in drinking water using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niri, Vadoud H; Bragg, Leslie; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2008-08-08

    A fast method was developed for the extraction and analysis of volatile organic compounds, including disinfection by-products (DBPs), with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) techniques. A GC/time-of-flight (TOF)-MS instrument, which had fast acquisition rates and powerful deconvolution software, was used. Under optimum conditions total runtime was 45s. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including purgeable A and B compounds (listed in US Environmental Protection Agency method 624), were identified in standard water samples. Extraction times were 1min for more volatile compounds and 2min for less volatile compounds. The method was applied to the analysis of water samples treated under different disinfection processes and the results were compared with those from a liquid-liquid extraction method.

  14. A COMBINED REACTION/PRODUCT RECOVERY PROCESS FOR THE CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdwell, J.F., Jr.; McFarlane, J.; Schuh, D.L.; Tsouris, C; Day, J.N. (Nu-Energie, LLC); Hullette, J.N. (Nu-Energie, LLC)

    2009-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nu-Energie, LLC entered into a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) for the purpose of demonstrating and deploying a novel technology for the continuous synthesis and recovery of biodiesel from the transesterification of triglycerides. The focus of the work was the demonstration of a combination Couette reactor and centrifugal separator - an invention of ORNL researchers - that facilitates both product synthesis and recovery from reaction byproducts in the same apparatus. At present, transesterification of triglycerides to produce biodiesel is performed in batch-type reactors with an excess of a chemical catalyst, which is required to achieve high reactant conversions in reasonable reaction times (e.g., 1 hour). The need for long reactor residence times requires use of large reactors and ancillary equipment (e.g., feed and product tankage), and correspondingly large facilities, in order to obtain the economy of scale required to make the process economically viable. Hence, the goal of this CRADA was to demonstrate successful, extended operation of a laboratory-scale reactor/separator prototype to process typical industrial reactant materials, and to design, fabricate, and test a production-scale unit for deployment at the biodiesel production site. Because of its ease of operation, rapid attainment of steady state, high mass transfer and phase separation efficiencies, and compact size, a centrifugal contactor was chosen for intensification of the biodiesel production process. The unit was modified to increase the residence time from a few seconds to minutes*. For this application, liquid phases were introduced into the reactor as separate streams. One was composed of the methanol and base catalyst and the other was the soy oil used in the experiments. Following reaction in the mixing zone, the immiscible glycerine and methyl ester products were separated in the high speed rotor and collected from separate

  15. ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF VOLATILE COMPONENTS GENERATED BY ESSENTIAL OILS AGAINST THE GENUS PENICILLIUM ISOLATED FROM BAKERY PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Císarová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluation of the antifungal activity of 5 essential oils (EOs. We concretely used thyme, clove, basil, jasmine and rosemary EOs by vapor contact against the fungal species, namely Penicillium citrinum, P. chrysogenum, P. hordei, P. citreonigrum, and P. viridicatum and their ability to affect production of mycotoxins. Each fungus was inoculated in the centre on Czapek Yeast Autolysate Agar (CYA dishes. Dishes were tightly sealed with parafilm and incubated for fourteen days at 25 ± 1 °C (three replicates were used for each treatment. Volatile phase effect of 50 μl of the essential oils was found to inhibit on growth of Penicillium spp.. Complete growth inhibition of the isolates by EOs of thyme and clove was observed. The EO of basil had antifungal effect on growth of P. citreonigrum only after 3rd and 7th day of the incubation at concentration 100 % of EO, like a P. viridicatum, which was inhibited by basil EO (100 % in comparison with control sets. Data was evaluated statistically by 95.0 % Tukey HSD test. In this study we also tested potentional effect of EOs to affect production of mycotoxins of tested Penicillium isolates which are potential toxigenic fungi. After 14 days of incubation with EOs (100 % with control sets, they were screened for a production of mycotoxins by TLC chromatography. Results showed non affecting production of mycotoxins by tested EOs. Conclusions indicate that volatile phase of combinations of thyme oil and clove oil showed good potential in the inhibition of growth of Penicillium spp. EOs should find a practical application in the inhibition of the fungal mycelial growth in some kind of the food.

  16. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production via Terbium Oxide Based Redox Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhosale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The computational thermodynamic modeling of the terbium oxide based two-step solar thermochemical water splitting (Tb-WS cycle is reported. The 1st step of the Tb-WS cycle involves thermal reduction of TbO2 into Tb and O2, whereas the 2nd step corresponds to the production of H2 through Tb oxidation by water splitting reaction. Equilibrium compositions associated with the thermal reduction and water splitting steps were determined via HSC simulations. Influence of oxygen partial pressure in the inert gas on thermal reduction of TbO2 and effect of water splitting temperature (TL on Gibbs free energy related to the H2 production step were examined in detail. The cycle (ηcycle and solar-to-fuel energy conversion (ηsolar-to-fuel efficiency of the Tb-WS cycle were determined by performing the second-law thermodynamic analysis. Results obtained indicate that ηcycle and ηsolar-to-fuel increase with the decrease in oxygen partial pressure in the inert flushing gas and thermal reduction temperature (TH. It was also realized that the recuperation of the heat released by the water splitting reactor and quench unit further enhances the solar reactor efficiency. At TH=2280 K, by applying 60% heat recuperation, maximum ηcycle of 39.0% and ηsolar-to-fuel of 47.1% for the Tb-WS cycle can be attained.

  17. Measurement of charmed particle production in hadronic reactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to measure the production cross-section for charmed particles in hadronic reactions, study their production mechanism, and search for excited charmed hadrons.\\\\ \\\\ Charmed Mesons and Baryons will be measured in $\\pi$ and $p$ interactions on Beryllium between 100 and 200 GeV/c. The trigger will be on an electron from the leptonic decay of one charmed particle by signals from the Cerenkov counter (Ce), the electron trigger calorimeter (eCal), scintillation counters, and proportional wire chambers. The accompanying charmed particle will be measured via its hadronic decay in a two-stage magnetic spectrometer with drift chambers (arms 2, 3a, 3b, 3c), two large-area multicell Cerenkov counters (C2, C3) and a large-area shower counter ($\\gamma$-CAL). The particles which can be measured and identified include $\\gamma, e, \\pi^{\\pm}, \\pi^{0}, K^{\\pm}, p, \\bar{p}$ so that a large number of hadronic decay modes of charmed particles can be studied. \\\\ \\\\ A silicon counter telescope with 5 $\\m...

  18. A Review of Microwave-Assisted Reactions for Biodiesel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomanbhay, Saifuddin; Ong, Mei Yin

    2017-01-01

    The conversion of biomass into chemicals and biofuels is an active research area as trends move to replace fossil fuels with renewable resources due to society’s increased concern towards sustainability. In this context, microwave processing has emerged as a tool in organic synthesis and plays an important role in developing a more sustainable world. Integration of processing methods with microwave irradiation has resulted in a great reduction in the time required for many processes, while the reaction efficiencies have been increased markedly. Microwave processing produces a higher yield with a cleaner profile in comparison to other methods. The microwave processing is reported to be a better heating method than the conventional methods due to its unique thermal and non-thermal effects. This paper provides an insight into the theoretical aspects of microwave irradiation practices and highlights the importance of microwave processing. The potential of the microwave technology to accomplish superior outcomes over the conventional methods in biodiesel production is presented. A green process for biodiesel production using a non-catalytic method is still new and very costly because of the supercritical condition requirement. Hence, non-catalytic biodiesel conversion under ambient pressure using microwave technology must be developed, as the energy utilization for microwave-based biodiesel synthesis is reported to be lower and cost-effective. PMID:28952536

  19. GALS - setup for production and study of multinucleon transfer reaction products: present status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlyanoy, S.; Zagrebaev, V.; Kozulin, E.; Kudryavtsev, Yu; Fedosseev, V.; Bark, R.; Janas, Z.

    2016-06-01

    This is a brief report on the current status of the new GAs cell based Laser ionization Setup (GALS) at Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) - JINR, Dubna. GALS is planned to exploit available beams from the U-400M cyclotron in low energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions to study exotic neutron-rich nuclei located in the "north-east" region of nuclear map. Products from 4.5 to 9 MeV/nucleon heavy-ion collisions, such as 136Xe on 208Pb, are to be captured in a gas cell and selectively laser-ionized in a sextupole (quadrupole) ion guide extraction system.

  20. Direct vacuum inlet system enabling highly sensitive in-situ analysis of chemical reaction products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trimarco, Daniel Bøndergaard; Scott, Søren Bertelsen; Pedersen, Thomas

    , a capillary maintaining a controlled flow over a pressure drop to ultra-high vacuum, and inlet and outlet channels for an inert make up gas. The use of a direct inlet enables orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than differentially pumped systems without a loss in time response for volatile products, while...

  1. Chemical Reaction and Flow Modeling in Fullerene and Nanotube Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Farhat, Samir; Greendyke, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    The development of processes to produce fullerenes and carbon nanotubes has largely been empirical. Fullerenes were first discovered in the soot produced by laser ablation of graphite [1]and then in the soot of electric arc evaporated carbon. Techniques and conditions for producing larger and larger quantities of fullerenes depended mainly on trial and error empirical variations of these processes, with attempts to scale them up by using larger electrodes and targets and higher power. Various concepts of how fullerenes and carbon nanotubes were formed were put forth, but very little was done based on chemical kinetics of the reactions. This was mainly due to the complex mixture of species and complex nature of conditions in the reactors. Temperatures in the reactors varied from several thousand degrees Kelvin down to near room temperature. There are hundreds of species possible, ranging from atomic carbon to large clusters of carbonaceous soot, and metallic catalyst atoms to metal clusters, to complexes of metals and carbon. Most of the chemical kinetics of the reactions and the thermodynamic properties of clusters and complexes have only been approximated. In addition, flow conditions in the reactors are transient or unsteady, and three dimensional, with steep spatial gradients of temperature and species concentrations. All these factors make computational simulations of reactors very complex and challenging. This article addresses the development of the chemical reaction involved in fullerene production and extends this to production of carbon nanotubes by the laser ablation/oven process and by the electric arc evaporation process. In addition, the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process is discussed. The article is in several parts. The first one addresses the thermochemical aspects of modeling; and considers the development of chemical rate equations, estimates of reaction rates, and thermodynamic properties where they are available. The second part

  2. In vivo analysis of palm wine (Elaeis guineensis) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasekan, Ola; Otto, Sabine

    2009-04-01

    The in vivo volatile organic compounds (VOCs) release patterns in palm wine was carried out using the PTR-MS. In order to analyze the complex mixtures of VOCs in palm wine, the fragmentation patterns of 14 known aroma compounds of palm wine were also investigated. Results revealed masses m/z (43, 47, 61, 65, 75, 89 and 93) as the predominant ones measured in-breathe exhaled from the nose, during consumption of palm wine. Further studies of aroma's fragmentation patterns, showed that the m/z 43 is characteristic of fragment of various compounds, while m/z 47 is ethanol, m/z 61(acetic acid), m/z 65 (protonated ethanol cluster ions), m/z 75 (methyl acetate), m/z 89 (acetoin) and m/z 93 (2-phenylethanol) respectively. The dynamic release parameters (Imax and tmax) of the 7 masses revealed significant (P = 0.05) differences, between maximum intensity (Imax) and no significant (P = 0.05) differences between tmax among VOCs respectively.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) mitigation in the pyrolysis process of waste tires using CO₂ as a reaction medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Our work reported the CO2-assisted mitigation of PAHs and VOCs in the thermo-chemical process (i.e., pyrolysis). To investigate the pyrolysis of used tires to recover energy and chemical products, the experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale batch-type reactor. In particular, to examine the influence of the CO2 in pyrolysis of a tire, the pyrolytic products including C1-5-hydrocarbons (HCs), volatile organic carbons (VOCs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were evaluated qualitatively by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectroscopy (MS) as well as with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). The mass balance of the pyrolytic products under various pyrolytic conditions was established on the basis of their weight fractions of the pyrolytic products. Our experimental work experimentally validated that the amount of gaseous pyrolytic products increased when using CO2 as a pyrolysis medium, while substantially altering the production of pyrolytic oil in absolute content (7.3-17.2%) and in relative composition (including PAHs and VOCs). Thus, the co-feeding of CO2 in the pyrolysis process can be considered an environmentally benign and energy efficient process.

  4. Investigation of Volatiles Emitted from Freshly Cut Onions (Allium cepa L. by Real Time Proton-Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Marie Løkke

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs in cut onions (Allium cepa L. were continuously measured by PTR-MS during the first 120 min after cutting. The headspace composition changed rapidly due to the very reactive volatile sulfurous compounds emitted from onion tissue after cell disruption. Mass spectral signals corresponding to propanethial S-oxide (the lachrymatory factor and breakdown products of this compound dominated 0–10 min after cutting. Subsequently, propanethiol and dipropyl disulfide predominantly appeared, together with traces of thiosulfinates. The concentrations of these compounds reached a maximum at 60 min after cutting. Propanethiol was present in highest concentrations and had an odor activity value 20 times higher than dipropyl disulfide. Thus, propanethiol is suggested to be the main source of the characteristic onion odor. Monitoring the rapid changes of VOCs in the headspace of cut onion necessitates a high time resolution, and PTR-MS is demonstrated to be a very suitable method for monitoring the headspace of freshly cut onions directly after cutting without extraction or pre-concentration.

  5. Volatility Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Gustavo Fruet; Scherrer, Cristina; Papailias, Fotis

    The price discovery literature investigates how homogenous securities traded on different markets incorporate information into prices. We take this literature one step further and investigate how these markets contribute to stochastic volatility (volatility discovery). We formally show...... that the realized measures from homogenous securities share a fractional stochastic trend, which is a combination of the price and volatility discovery measures. Furthermore, we show that volatility discovery is associated with the way that market participants process information arrival (market sensitivity...

  6. Volatile Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl D. Rowan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (volatiles comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites.

  7. Volatile organic compounds and metal leaching from composite products made from fiberglass-resin portion of printed circuit board waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jie; Jiang, Ying; Hu, Xiaofang; Xu, Zhenming

    2012-01-17

    This study focused on the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metal leaching from three kinds of composite products made from fiberglass-resin portion (FRP) of crushed printed circuit board (PCB) waste, including phenolic molding compound (PMC), wood plastic composite (WPC), and nonmetallic plate (NMP). Released VOCs from the composite products were quantified by air sampling on adsorbent followed by thermal desorption and GC-MS analysis. The results showed that VOCs emitted from composite products originated from the added organic components during manufacturing process. Phenol in PMC panels came primarily from phenolic resin, and the airborne concentration of phenol emitted from PMC product was 59.4 ± 6.1 μg/m(3), which was lower than odor threshold of 100% response for phenol (180 μg/m(3)). VOCs from WPC product mainly originated from wood flour, e.g., benzaldehyde, octanal, and d-limonene were emitted in relatively low concentrations. For VOCs emitted from NMP product, the airborne concentration of styrene was the highest (633 ± 67 μg/m(3)). Leaching characteristics of metal ions from composite products were tested using acetic acid buffer solution and sulphuric acid and nitric acid solution. Then the metal concentrations in the leachates were tested by ICP-AES. The results showed that only the concentration of Cu (average = 893 mg/L; limit = 100 mg/L) in the leachate solution of the FRP using acetic acid buffer solution exceeded the standard limit. However, concentrations of other metal ions (Pb, Cd, Cr, Ba, and Ni) were within the standard limit. All the results indicated that the FRP in composite products was not a major concern in terms of environmental assessment based upon VOCs tests and leaching characteristics.

  8. Comparison of Three Methods for Extraction of Volatile Lipid Oxidation Products from Food Matrices for GC–MS Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Birgitte Raagaard; Yesiltas, Betül; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three different collection methods; purge and trap, solid phase micro extraction and automated dynamic headspace/thermal desorption, all followed by GC–MS analysis used for the measurements of concentrations of volatile oxidation products in three different food...... matrices, namely oil, emulsion and milk. The linearity ranges of calibration curves obtained by the three different methods were compared for oil samples. Overall, the results showed that the three collection methods were comparable, although there were large differences in the linearity range...... of the calibration curves depending on the collection method. However, some challenges were observed for solid phase micro extraction and automated dynamic headspace/thermal desorption, namely, competition problems and overestimation of concentration by calibration curves, respectively. Based on the results, we...

  9. Plant Glutathione Biosynthesis: Diversity in Biochemical Regulation and Reaction Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley eGalant

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In plants, exposure to temperature extremes, heavy metal-contaminated soils, drought, air pollutants, and pathogens results in the generation of reactive oxygen species that alter the intracellular redox environment, which in turn influences signaling pathways and cell fate. As part of their response to these stresses, plants produce glutathione. Glutathione acts as an antioxidant by quenching reactive oxygen species, and is involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle that eliminates damaging peroxides. Plants also use glutathione for the detoxification of xenobiotics, herbicides, air pollutants (sulfur dioxide and ozone, and toxic heavy metals. Two enzymes catalyze glutathione synthesis: glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL, and glutathione synthetase (GS. Glutathione is a ubiquitous protective compound in plants, but the structural and functional details of the proteins that synthesize it, as well as the potential biochemical mechanisms of their regulation, have only begun to be explored. As discussed here, the core reactions of glutathione synthesis are conserved across various organisms, but plants have diversified both the regulatory mechanisms that control its synthesis and the range of products derived from this pathway. Understanding the molecular basis of glutathione biosynthesis and its regulation will expand our knowledge of this component in the plant stress response network.

  10. Plant glutathione biosynthesis: diversity in biochemical regulation and reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galant, Ashley; Preuss, Mary L; Cameron, Jeffrey C; Jez, Joseph M

    2011-01-01

    In plants, exposure to temperature extremes, heavy metal-contaminated soils, drought, air pollutants, and pathogens results in the generation of reactive oxygen species that alter the intracellular redox environment, which in turn influences signaling pathways and cell fate. As part of their response to these stresses, plants produce glutathione. Glutathione acts as an anti-oxidant by quenching reactive oxygen species, and is involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle that eliminates damaging peroxides. Plants also use glutathione for the detoxification of xenobiotics, herbicides, air pollutants (sulfur dioxide and ozone), and toxic heavy metals. Two enzymes catalyze glutathione synthesis: glutamate-cysteine ligase, and glutathione synthetase. Glutathione is a ubiquitous protective compound in plants, but the structural and functional details of the proteins that synthesize it, as well as the potential biochemical mechanisms of their regulation, have only begun to be explored. As discussed here, the core reactions of glutathione synthesis are conserved across various organisms, but plants have diversified both the regulatory mechanisms that control its synthesis and the range of products derived from this pathway. Understanding the molecular basis of glutathione biosynthesis and its regulation will expand our knowledge of this component in the plant stress response network.

  11. Electrochemical device for converting carbon dioxide to a reaction product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Chen, Qingmei; Liu, Zengcai; Kutz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    An electrochemical device converts carbon dioxide to a reaction product. The device includes an anode and a cathode, each comprising a quantity of catalyst. The anode and cathode each has reactant introduced thereto. A polymer electrolyte membrane is interposed between the anode and the cathode. At least a portion of the cathode catalyst is directly exposed to gaseous carbon dioxide during electrolysis. The average current density at the membrane is at least 20 mA/cm.sup.2, measured as the area of the cathode gas diffusion layer that is covered by catalyst, and CO selectivity is at least 50% at a cell potential of 3.0 V. In some embodiments, the polymer electrolyte membrane comprises a polymer in which a constituent monomer is (p-vinylbenzyl)-R, where R is selected from the group consisting of imidazoliums, pyridiniums and phosphoniums. In some embodiments, the polymer electrolyte membrane is a Helper Membrane comprising a polymer containing an imidazolium ligand, a pyridinium ligand, or a phosphonium ligand.

  12. KRATTA, a versatile triple telescope array for charged reaction products

    CERN Document Server

    Łukasik, J; Budzanowski, A; Czech, B; Skwirczyńska, I; Brzychczyk, J; Adamczyk, M; Kupny, S; Lasko, P; Sosin, Z; Wieloch, A; Kiš, M; Leifels, Y; Trautmann, W

    2013-01-01

    A new detection system KRATTA, Krak\\'ow Triple Telescope Array, is presented. This versatile, low threshold, broad energy range system has been built to measure the energy, emission angle, and isotopic composition of light charged reaction products. It consists of 38 independent modules which can be arranged in an arbitrary configuration. A single module, covering actively about 4.5 msr of the solid angle at the optimal distance of 40 cm from the target, consists of three identical, 0.500 mm thick, large area photodiodes, used also for direct detection, and of two CsI(1500 ppm Tl) crystals of 2.5 and 12.5 cm length, respectively. All the signals are digitally processed. The lower identification threshold, due to the thickness of the first photodiode, has been reduced to about 2.5 MeV for protons (~0.065 mm of Si equivalent) by applying a pulse shape analysis. The pulse shape analysis allowed also to decompose the complex signals from the middle photodiode into their ionization and scintillation components and...

  13. Volatile Fatty Acids Production from Codigestion of Food Waste and Sewage Sludge Based on β-Cyclodextrins and Alkaline Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile fatty acids (VFAs are preferred valuable resources, which can be produced from anaerobic digestion process. This study presents a novel technology using β-cyclodextrins (β-CD pretreatment integrated alkaline method to enhance VFAs production from codigestion of food waste and sewage sludge. Experiment results showed that optimized ratio of food waste to sewage sludge was 3 : 2 because it provided adequate organic substance and seed microorganisms. Based on this optimized ratio, the integrated treatment of alkaline pH 10 and β-CD addition (0.2 g/g TS performed the best enhancement on VFAs production, and the maximum VFAs production was 8631.7 mg/L which was 6.13, 1.38, and 1.57 times higher than that of control, initial pH 10, and 0.2 g β-CD/g TS treatment, respectively. Furthermore, the hydrolysis rate of protein and polysaccharides was greatly improved in integration treatment, which was 1.18–3.45 times higher than that of other tests. Though the VFAs production and hydrolysis of polymeric organics were highly enhanced, the primary bacterial communities with different treatments did not show substantial differences.

  14. Medical costs and lost productivity from health conditions at volatile organic compound-contaminated Superfund sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lybarger, J.A.; Spengler, R.F.; Brown, D.R. [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (United States). Div. of Health Studies; Lee, R.; Vogt, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perhac, R.M. Jr. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-10-01

    This paper estimates the health costs at Superfund sites for conditions associated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water. Health conditions were identified from published literature and registry information as occurring at excess rates in VOC-exposed populations. These health conditions were: (1) some categories of birth defects, (2) urinary tract disorders, (3) diabetes, (4) eczema and skin conditions, (5) anemia, (6) speech and hearing impairments in children under 10 years of age, and (7) stroke. Excess rates were used to estimate the excess number of cases occurring among the total population living within one-half mile of 258 Superfund sites. These sites had evidence of completed human exposure pathways for VOCs in drinking water. For each type of medical condition, an individual`s expected medical costs, long-term care costs, and lost work time due to illness or premature mortality were estimated. Costs were calculated to be approximately $330 million per year, in the absence of any remediation or public health intervention programs. The results indicate the general magnitude of the economic burden associated with a limited number of contaminants at a portion of all Superfund sites, thus suggesting that the burden would be greater than that estimated in this study if all contaminants at all Superfund sites could be taken into account.

  15. Development of volatile compounds during storage at various conditions of different lipid containing lip balm products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Birgitte Raagaard; Horn, A. F.; Hyldig, Grethe

    Many lip balms contain various lipids to care and soften the lips. However, the content of these lipids even in small amounts increases the risk of oxidation when exposed to heat, light or other conditions with a pro-oxidative effect. The progress of oxidation can be affected by several factors...... volatile compounds with off-odours. This presentation will include results from a storage experiment on four lip balms stored between 14 and 84 days, under different conditions. The samples were exposed to heat (20°C, 40°C and 50°C), light (samples at 20°C) and iron (samples at 40°C). Samples were analysed......; the degree of unsaturation, the content of antioxidants and the quality of the raw materials. When stored in the homes of consumers the lip balms may be exposed to relatively high temperatures and light. Hence, especially lip balms sold in countries with a warm climate can undergo lipid oxidation and develop...

  16. Product inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose: are we running the reactions all wrong?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    include high substrate conversion (maximal yields), maximal enzyme efficiency, maximal volumetric reactor productivity, minimal equipment investment, minimal size, and short reaction time. The classic batch type STR reactions used for enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis prevent these goals to be fulfilled...... of minimum ∼5–6% v/v, the glucose product concentrations exceed the critical limit for product inhibition. Hence, regardless of the recent progress in enzyme development for cellulose hydrolysis, the glucose product inhibition remains an issue, which is exacerbated as the reaction progresses, especially...... at high substrate loadings in batch reactions. Hence in addition to understanding product inhibition and develop new cellulolytic enzymes that are more resistant to product inhibition, much can be gained from proper reaction design and continuous removal of the product(s) in enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis...

  17. Significance of melatonin in antioxidative defense system: reactions and products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, D X; Manchester, L C; Reiter, R J; Qi, W B; Karbownik, M; Calvo, J R

    2000-01-01

    Melatonin is a potent endogenous free radical scavenger, actions that are independent of its many receptor-mediated effects. In the last several years, hundreds of publications have confirmed that melatonin is a broad-spectrum antioxidant. Melatonin has been reported to scavenge hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hydroxyl radical (HO(.)), nitric oxide (NO(.)), peroxynitrite anion (ONOO(-)), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)), superoxide anion (O(2)(-).) and peroxyl radical (LOO(.)), although the validity of its ability to scavenge O(2)(-). and LOO(.) is debatable. Regardless of the radicals scavenged, melatonin prevents oxidative damage at the level of cells, tissues, organs and organisms. The antioxidative mechanisms of melatonin seem different from classical antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E and glutathione. As electron donors, classical antioxidants undergo redox cycling; thus, they have the potential to promote oxidation as well as prevent it. Melatonin, as an electron-rich molecule, may interact with free radicals via an additive reaction to form several stable end-products which are excreted in the urine. Melatonin does not undergo redox cycling and, thus, does not promote oxidation as shown under a variety of experimental conditions. From this point of view, melatonin can be considered a suicidal or terminal antioxidant which distinguishes it from the opportunistic antioxidants. Interestingly, the ability of melatonin to scavenge free radicals is not in a ratio of mole to mole. Indeed, one melatonin molecule scavenges two HO. Also, its secondary and tertiary metabolites, for example, N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine, N-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine and 6-hydroxymelatonin, which are believed to be generated when melatonin interacts with free radicals, are also regarded as effective free radical scavengers. The continuous free radical scavenging potential of the original molecule (melatonin) and its metabolites may be defined as a

  18. A COMBINED REACTION/PRODUCT RECOVERY PROCESS FOR THE CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdwell, J.F., Jr.; McFarlane, J.; Schuh, D.L.; Tsouris, C; Day, J.N. (Nu-Energie, LLC); Hullette, J.N. (Nu-Energie, LLC)

    2009-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nu-Energie, LLC entered into a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) for the purpose of demonstrating and deploying a novel technology for the continuous synthesis and recovery of biodiesel from the transesterification of triglycerides. The focus of the work was the demonstration of a combination Couette reactor and centrifugal separator - an invention of ORNL researchers - that facilitates both product synthesis and recovery from reaction byproducts in the same apparatus. At present, transesterification of triglycerides to produce biodiesel is performed in batch-type reactors with an excess of a chemical catalyst, which is required to achieve high reactant conversions in reasonable reaction times (e.g., 1 hour). The need for long reactor residence times requires use of large reactors and ancillary equipment (e.g., feed and product tankage), and correspondingly large facilities, in order to obtain the economy of scale required to make the process economically viable. Hence, the goal of this CRADA was to demonstrate successful, extended operation of a laboratory-scale reactor/separator prototype to process typical industrial reactant materials, and to design, fabricate, and test a production-scale unit for deployment at the biodiesel production site. Because of its ease of operation, rapid attainment of steady state, high mass transfer and phase separation efficiencies, and compact size, a centrifugal contactor was chosen for intensification of the biodiesel production process. The unit was modified to increase the residence time from a few seconds to minutes*. For this application, liquid phases were introduced into the reactor as separate streams. One was composed of the methanol and base catalyst and the other was the soy oil used in the experiments. Following reaction in the mixing zone, the immiscible glycerine and methyl ester products were separated in the high speed rotor and collected from separate

  19. Productivity and quality of volatile oil extracted from Mentha spicata and M. arvensis var. piperascens grown by a hydroponic system using the deep flow technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Sitthithaworn, Worapan; Vannavanich, Danai; Keattikunpairoj, Sunisa; Chittasupho, Chuda

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) and Japanese mint (M. arvensis L. var. piperascens Malinv.) cultivated in either soil or nutrient solution using the deep flow technique (DFT). The differences were measured in terms of harvest period (full bloom period) and quantity and chemical components of volatile oils. The spearmint and Japanese mint were cultivated in four different nutrient formulas: plant standard nutrient, plant standard nutrient with an amino acid mixture, plant standard nutrient with a sulphur compound, and a combination of plant standard nutrient with an amino acid mixture and a sulphur compound. We observed that cultivation of spearmint and Japanese mint in nutrient solution using DFT is an effective method to provide high production of volatile oil, since it results in an earlier harvest period and higher quantity of volatile oil. We determined that for spearmint an amino acid mixture is an appropriate nutrient supplement to enhance production of volatile oil with optimum carvone content. Finally, we observed high menthol content in Japanese mint grown in all four nutrient formulas; however, supplementation with a combination of sulphur fertilisation and amino acid mixture yields the highest quantity of volatile oil.

  20. Catalytic degradation of high-density polyethylene on an ultrastable-Y zeolite. Nature of initial polymer reactions, pattern of formation of gas and liquid products, and temperature effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos, G.; Garforth, A.; Dwyer, J.

    2000-05-01

    The catalytic degradation of high-density polyethylene (hdPE) over ultrastable Y zeolite in a semibatch reactor was studied at different heating rates and reaction temperatures. Catalytic degradation of the polymer occurred at much lower temperatures than pure thermal degradation. When gel permeation chromatography was used to determine the molar mass distribution, it was found that solid state reactions occur only in the presence of a catalyst. These reactions change the polymer structure well before the formation of significant amounts of volatile products. The pattern of formation of gaseous and liquid products was studied and found to follow the temperature increase. After the system reached its final temperature, the reaction rate of formation of volatile products decreased rapidly. The product range was typically between C{sub 3} and C{sub 15}. Isobutane and isopentane were the main gaseous products. The liquid product fraction was alkane-rich, as alkenes rapidly undergo bimolecular hydrogen transfer reactions to give alkanes as secondary products.

  1. Concentrations of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes in European cosmetics and personal care products: prerequisite for human and environmental exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzina, Tatsiana; von Goetz, Natalie; Bogdal, Christian; Biesterbos, Jacqueline W H; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Low molecular weight cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMSs) are widely employed as emollients and carrier solvents in personal care formulations in order to acquire desired performance benefits owing to their distinctive physicochemical properties. Under current European legislation cosmetic ingredients such as cVMSs are required to be labeled on the product package only qualitatively, while for the assessment of environmental and consumer exposure quantitative information is needed. The aim of this study was therefore to measure concentrations of three cVMSs, namely octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) in 51 cosmetics and personal care products (C&PCPs) that are currently available on the European market. The list of selected articles comprised a variety of hair and sun care products, skin creams and lotions, deodorants including antiperspirants, liquid foundations and a toothpaste. The target compounds were extracted from the products with different organic solvents dependent on the product matrix, followed by gas chromatography analysis with flame ionization detection (GC-FID). D5 was the predominant cVMS with the highest mean and median concentrations in all the C&PCP categories. The median concentrations of D5, D6 and D4 were 142, 2.3 and 0.053 mg/g in deodorants/antiperspirants (n = 11); 44.6, 30.0mg/g and below the limit of quantification (cosmetics (n = 5); 8.4, 0.32 mg/g and products, respectively. The calculated median aggregate daily dermal exposure to D4 and D5 from multiple C&PCPs was approximately 100 times lower than the current NOAEL derived from chronic inhalation rat studies. © 2013.

  2. Feed-derived volatile basic nitrogen increases reactive oxygen species production of blood leukocytes in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Ei; Gross, Josef J; Kawashima, Chiho; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Kida, Katsuya; Miyamoto, Akio

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated over 9 months the changes of fermentative quality of total mixed rations (TMR) containing grass silage (GS) as a major component, associated with changes in the volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) levels in an experimental dairy farm. Effects of VBN levels in TMR on metabolic parameters, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and conception rates for dairy cows were analyzed. According to VBN levels in TMR during survey periods, three distinct phases were identified; phase A with low VBN; phase B with high VBN; and phase C with mid-VBN. Metabolic parameters in blood were all within normal range. However, during phases B and C, nitrogen metabolic indices such as blood urea nitrogen and milk urea nitrogen showed higher levels compared to those in phase A, and a simultaneous increase in ROS production by blood PMNs and the load on hepatic function in metabolic parameters was observed in the cows with a lower conception rate. This suggests that feeding TMR with elevated VBN levels due to poor fermented GS results in stimulation of ROS production by PMNs by ammonia, and negatively affects metabolism and reproductive performance in lactating dairy cow.

  3. Wounding tomato fruit elicits ripening-stage specific changes in gene expression and production of volatile compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, Valentina; Cabassi, Giovanni; Spadafora, Natasha D; Aprile, Alessio; Müller, Carsten T; Rogers, Hilary J; Ferrante, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Fleshy fruits develop from an unripe organ that needs to be protected from damage to a ripe organ that attracts frugivores for seed dispersal through production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Thus, different responses to wounding damage are predicted. The aim of this study was to discover whether wound-induced changes in the transcriptome and VOC production alter as tomato transitions from unripe to ripe. Transcript changes were analysed 3h post-wounding using microarray analysis in two commercial salad-tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) cultivars: Luna Rossa and AVG, chosen for their high aroma production. This was followed by quantitative PCR on Luna Rossa genes involved in VOC biosynthesis and defence responses. VOCs elicited by wounding at different ripening stages were analysed by solid phase micro extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Approximately 4000 differentially expressed genes were identified in the cultivar AVG and 2500 in Luna Rossa. In both cultivars the majority of genes were up-regulated and the most affected pathways were metabolism of terpenes, carotenoids, and lipids. Defence-related genes were mostly up-regulated in immature stages of development, whereas expression of genes related to VOCs changed at riper stages. More than 40 VOCs were detected and profiles changed with ripening stage. Thus, both transcriptome and VOC profiles elicited by wounding depend on stage of ripening, indicating a shift from defence to attraction.

  4. Identification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in plastic products using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerlis Pajaro-Castro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Plastic materials are widely used in daily life. They contain a wide range of compounds with low molecular mass, including monomeric and oligomeric residues of polymerization, solvent-related chemicals residues, and various additives. Plastic products made of expanded polystyrene (EPS are currently employed as food containers. This study therefore sought to identify volatile organic compounds released by EPS from food packages and utensils used in Cartagena, Colombia. EPS-based plates, food and soup containers were subjected to various temperatures and released chemicals captured by solid phase microextraction, followed by on-column thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. The results revealed the presence of at least 30 different compounds in the EPS-based products examined; the most frequently found were benzaldehyde, styrene, ethylbenzene and tetradecane. The release of these molecules was temperature-dependent. It is therefore advisable to regulate the use of EPS products which may be subjected to heating in order to protect human health by decreasing the exposure to these chemicals.

  5. Optimization of hydrolysis and volatile fatty acids production from sugarcane filter cake: Effects of urea supplementation and sodium hydroxide pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Leandro; Leite, Athaydes; Batista, Karla; Weinrich, Sören; Sträuber, Heike; Nikolausz, Marcell; Nelles, Michael; Stinner, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Different methods for optimization the anaerobic digestion (AD) of sugarcane filter cake (FC) with a special focus on volatile fatty acids (VFA) production were studied. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) pretreatment at different concentrations was investigated in batch experiments and the cumulative methane yields fitted to a dual-pool two-step model to provide an initial assessment on AD. The effects of nitrogen supplementation in form of urea and NaOH pretreatment for improved VFA production were evaluated in a semi-continuously operated reactor as well. The results indicated that higher NaOH concentrations during pretreatment accelerated the AD process and increased methane production in batch experiments. Nitrogen supplementation resulted in a VFA loss due to methane formation by buffering the pH value at nearly neutral conditions (∼ 6.7). However, the alkaline pretreatment with 6g NaOH/100g FCFM improved both the COD solubilization and the VFA yield by 37%, mainly consisted by n-butyric and acetic acids.

  6. The Biological Diversity and Production of Volatile Organic Compounds by Stem-Inhabiting Endophytic Fungi of Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Rundell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal endophytes colonize every major lineage of land plants without causing apparent harm to their hosts. Despite their production of interesting and potentially novel compounds, endophytes—particularly those inhabiting stem tissues—are still a vastly underexplored component of microbial diversity. In this study, we explored the diversity of over 1500 fungal endophyte isolates collected from three Ecuadorian ecosystems: lowland tropical forest, cloud forest, and coastal dry forest. We sought to determine whether Ecuador’s fungal endophytes are hyperdiverse, and whether that biological diversity is reflected in the endophytes’ chemical diversity. To assess this chemical diversity, we analyzed a subset of isolates for their production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, a representative class of natural products. This study yielded a total of 1526 fungal ITS sequences comprising some 315 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, resulting in a non-asymptotic OTU accumulation curve and characterized by a Fisher’s α of 120 and a Shannon Diversity score of 7.56. These figures suggest that the Ecuadorian endophytes are hyperdiverse. Furthermore, the 113 isolates screened for VOCs produced more than 140 unique compounds. These results present a mere snapshot of the remarkable biological and chemical diversity of stem-inhabiting endophytic fungi from a single neotropical country.

  7. Production of medium-chain volatile fatty acids by mixed ruminal microorganisms is enhanced by ethanol in co-culture with Clostridium kluyveri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermentative production of medium-chain (C5-C8) volatile fatty acids by the carboxylate platform has several potential advantages as a route to biofuel precursors. However, its practicality is limited by the relatively slow synthesis of these acids from shorter precursors (C2-C4) that accumulate dur...

  8. Accessing reaction rate constants in on-column reaction chromatography: an extended unified equation for reaction educts and products with different response factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Oliver; Bremer, Sabrina; Weber, Sven K

    2009-11-01

    An extension of the unified equation of chromatography to directly access reaction rate constants k(1) of first-order reaction in on-column chromatography is presented. This extended equation reflects different response factors in the detection of the reaction educt and product which arise from structural changes by elimination or addition, e.g., under pseudo-first-order reaction conditions. The reaction rate constants k(1) and Gibbs activation energies DeltaG(double dagger) of first-order reactions taking place in a chromatographic system can be directly calculated from the chromatographic parameters, i.e., retention times of the educt E and product P (t(R)(A) and t(R)(B)), peak widths at half height (w(A) and w(B)), the relative plateau height (h(p)) of the conversion profile, and the individual response factors f(A) and f(B). The evaluation of on-column reaction gas chromatographic experiments is exemplified by the evaluation of elution profiles obtained by ring-closing metathesis reaction of N,N-diallytrifluoroacetamide in presence of Grubbs second-generation catalyst, dissolved in polydimethylsiloxane (GE SE 30).

  9. Kinetic modeling of Secondary Organic Aerosol formation: effects of particle- and gas-phase reactions of semivolatile products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. H. Chan

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The distinguishing mechanism of formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA is the partitioning of semivolatile hydrocarbon oxidation products between the gas and aerosol phases. While SOA formation is typically described in terms of partitioning only, the rate of formation and ultimate yield of SOA can also depend on the kinetics of both gas- and aerosol-phase processes. We present a general equilibrium/kinetic model of SOA formation that provides a framework for evaluating the extent to which the controlling mechanisms of SOA formation can be inferred from laboratory chamber data. With this model we examine the effect on SOA formation of gas-phase oxidation of first-generation products to either more or less volatile species, of particle-phase reaction (both first- and second-order kinetics, of the rate of parent hydrocarbon oxidation, and of the extent of reaction of the parent hydrocarbon. The effect of pre-existing organic aerosol mass on SOA yield, an issue of direct relevance to the translation of laboratory data to atmospheric applications, is examined. The importance of direct chemical measurements of gas- and particle-phase species is underscored in identifying SOA formation mechanisms.

  10. Kinetic modeling of secondary organic aerosol formation: effects of particle- and gas-phase reactions of semivolatile products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. H. Chan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The distinguishing mechanism of formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA is the partitioning of semivolatile hydrocarbon oxidation products between the gas and aerosol phases. While SOA formation is typically described in terms of partitioning only, the rate of formation and ultimate yield of SOA can also depend on the kinetics of both gas- and aerosol-phase processes. We present a general equilibrium/kinetic model of SOA formation that provides a framework for evaluating the extent to which the controlling mechanisms of SOA formation can be inferred from laboratory chamber data. With this model we examine the effect on SOA formation of gas-phase oxidation of first-generation products to either more or less volatile species, of particle-phase reaction (both first- and second-order kinetics, of the rate of parent hydrocarbon oxidation, and of the extent of reaction of the parent hydrocarbon. The effect of pre-existing organic aerosol mass on SOA yield, an issue of direct relevance to the translation of laboratory data to atmospheric applications, is examined. The importance of direct chemical measurements of gas- and particle-phase species is underscored in identifying SOA formation mechanisms.

  11. Products and Mechanisms of Aerosol Formation from Reactions of OH Radicals with Linear and Branched Alkenes in the Presence of NOx (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemann, P. J.; Matsunaga, A.

    2009-12-01

    The chemical and physical processes involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are complex and can include reactions of volatile organic compounds with a number of atmospheric oxidants (the major ones are O3, and OH and NO3 radicals), as well as surface and condensed-phase reactions, homogeneous nucleation, and gas-particle partitioning. It should come as no surprise that understanding and accurately modeling these processes is a major challenge that has not yet been fully addressed. Alkenes emitted from vegetation are the largest source of non-methane hydrocarbons to the global atmosphere and consist mostly of isoprene (C5H8), monoterpenes (C10H16), and sesquiterpenes (C15H24), compounds with a large range of sizes and molecular structures. Their atmospheric oxidation is initiated primarily by reactions with hydroxyl radicals and can lead to a variety of products, some of which can form SOA. Because of the complexity of terpene reactions and the large numbers of products that are formed, there are advantages to studying the chemistry of simpler alkenes in order to gain insights that can be applied to more complex reaction systems. This is the approach we have taken, and in this talk I will report results of studies of the products, SOA yields, and mechanisms of SOA formation from reactions of a variety of linear and branched alkenes with hydroxyl radicals in the presence of nitrogen oxides. Products consist of a large array of multifunctional compounds, including oligomers, containing carbonyl, hydroxy, carboxyl, and nitrate groups. I will demonstrate some of the ways in which changes in molecular structure can alter both gas and SOA products, including those formed through condensed-phase reactions, and also SOA yields, and suggest explanations for these effects based on current understanding of chemical reaction mechanisms.

  12. The evolution of volatile production in C/2009 P1 (Garradd) during its 2011-2012 apparition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquel, A.; Milam, S.; Cordiner, M.; Villanueva, G.; Charnley, S.; Coulson, I.; Remijan, A.; DiSanti, M.; Mumma, M.; Szutowicz, S.

    2014-07-01

    Comets are likely to be the most pristine objects in our Solar System. They provide a record of the physical and chemical conditions in the protosolar nebula between about 5 and 40 au during the epoch when the distinct cometary populations were being assembled (Festou et al. 2004; Jewitt 2004; Mumma & Charnley 2011). Cometary nuclei today reside in (at least) two distinct reservoirs, the Oort Cloud (OC) and the Kuiper Belt (KB). Past observations have shown that comets appear to contain a mixture of products from both interstellar and nebular chemistries and could also have been important for initiating prebiotic chemistry on the early Earth (Ehrenfreund & Charnley 2000). Although there are some differences, the volatile composition of cometary ices is generally similar to the inventory of molecules detected in the ices and gas of dense molecular clouds. Given the gradient in physical conditions expected across the proto-Solar nebula, chemical diversity in the comet population is to be expected. Here we report an analysis of long-term ground-based radio observations towards comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd). Comet C/2009 P1 Garradd is an OC comet that reached perihelion (at heliocentric distance R_h = 1.55 au) in late December 2011 and had its closest approach to the Earth on 5 March 2012. Like C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) at 7.2 au, Garradd exhibited unusual activity at large R_h (8.68 au), displaying a 15'' diameter circular coma (IAUC 9062). It is well known that some comets exhibit volatile activity at large heliocentric distances, where water ice cannot sublime efficiently. Infrared (IRTF/CSHELL, Keck 2/NIRSPEC, and VLT/CRIRES) spectroscopy of Garradd showed clear CO (R1 & R2) emission near λ = 4.7 μ m (2150 cm^{-1}), as well as a suite of molecules (e.g., C_2H_6, CH_4, CH_3OH, H_2CO, HCN, C_2H_2, NH_3) that were also detected near or beyond R_h = 2 au (Villanueva et al. 2012; Paganini et al. 2012; DiSanti et al. 2014). We monitored the abundance of parent volatiles in

  13. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  14. Real-time monitoring of respiratory absorption factors of volatile organic compounds in ambient air by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhonghui [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Yanli [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Center for Excellence in Urban Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Yan, Qiong [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Guangzhou No. 12 People' s Hospital, Guangzhou 510620 (China); Zhang, Zhou [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Xinming, E-mail: wangxm@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Center for Excellence in Urban Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Respiratory absorption factors (AFs) are essential parameters in the evaluation of human health risks from toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air. A method for the real time monitoring of VOCs in inhaled and exhaled air by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) has been developed to permit the calculation of respiratory AFs of VOCs. Isoprene was found to be a better breath tracer than O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, humidity, or acetone for distinguishing between the expiratory and inspiratory phases, and a homemade online breath sampling device with a buffer tube was used to optimize signal peak shapes. Preliminary tests with seven subjects exposed to aromatic hydrocarbons in an indoor environment revealed mean respiratory AFs of 55.0%, 55.9%, and 66.9% for benzene, toluene, and C8-aromatics (ethylbenzene and xylenes), respectively. These AFs were lower than the values of 90% or 100% used in previous studies when assessing the health risks of inhalation exposure to hazardous VOCs. The mean respiratory AFs of benzene, toluene and C8-aromatics were 66.5%, 70.2% and 82.3% for the three female subjects; they were noticeably much higher than that of 46.4%, 45.2% and 55.3%, respectively, for the four male subjects.

  15. Studies concerning the production of volatile oil, rhizomes and roots, to different genotypes of Valeriana officinalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Radu POP

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Valeriana officinalis L. is considered to pertain to European species, with great ecologic plasticity, which allows its adaptation to climate conditions characteristics to plain areas and also to mountain areas up to an altitude of 2400 meters. The species is a well-known curative plant, with a long history and multiple uses. Essential oils deriving from this species revealed the interest of researchers in food industry, cosmetics and officinal industry, furthermore being used as additives too.The raw material from which essential oils are being extracted is represented mainly by rhizomes and roots. This study has the purpose to emphasize the differences of essential oils production registered based upon the genotypes diversity. Thus, 11 experimental variants have been used, with biologic material of different origin, from Romania, Poland, Germany and Russia; they have been measured in relation to their production of rhizomes, roots and volatile oil, in the ecological conditions of Brasov, Romania.The results proved the superiority of the variants was used Romanian variety M-100, but have also revealed a negative correlation between capacity and essential oil biosynthesis.

  16. Significance of the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products on the properties of activated carbons from phosphoric acid activation of lignocellulosic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Songlin; Yang, Jianxiao; Cai, Xuan [Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037 (China); Liu, Junli [Institute of Chemical Industry of Forest Products, CAF, Nanjing 210042 (China)

    2009-07-15

    Two series of activated carbons derived from China fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) wood impregnated with phosphoric acid were prepared in a cylindrical container that was kept in a closed state covered with a lid (the covered case) or in an open state. The effects of the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products of starting materials on the properties of activated carbon were investigated in the process of phosphoric acid activation. Elemental analysis and SEM observation showed that both activating in the covered case and increasing the mass of starting material used favored the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products. An investigation of N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms revealed that the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products significantly enhanced mesopore development in the final carbons, especially pores with a size range from 2.5 to 30 nm, with little influence on micropores, and therefore produced a large increase in the adsorption capacity to Vitamin B12 (with a molecular size of 2.09 nm). Activated carbons with highly developed mesopores could be obtained in the covered case. The carbonization mechanism of volatiles was discussed and two different carbonization pathways (in solid and gas phases) were proposed during phosphoric acid activation. (author)

  17. Laser ion source for multi-nucleon transfer reaction products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Y.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Imai, N.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Miyatake, H.; Oyaizu, M.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Sonoda, T.; Wada, M.; Huyse, M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Van Duppen, P.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a laser ion source for the target-like fragments (TLFs) produced in multi-nucleon transfer (MNT) reactions. The operation principle of the source is based on the in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) approach. In the source TLFs are thermalized and neutralized in high pressure and high purity argon gas, and are extracted after being selectively re-ionized in a multi-step laser resonance ionization process. The laser ion source has been implemented at the KEK Isotope Separation System (KISS) for β-decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich isotopes with N = 126 of nuclear astrophysical interest. The simulations of gas flow and ion-beam optics have been performed to optimize the gas cell for efficient thermalization and fast transporting the TLFs, and the mass-separator for efficient transport with high mass-resolving power, respectively. To confirm the performances expected at the design stage, off-line experiments have been performed by using 56Fe atoms evaporated from a filament in the gas cell. The gas-transport time of 230 ms in the argon cell and the measured KISS mass-resolving power of 900 are consistent with the designed values. The high purity of the gas-cell system, which is extremely important for efficient and highly-selective production of laser ions, was achieved and confirmed from the mass distribution of the extracted ions. After the off-line tests, on-line experiments were conducted by directly injecting energetic 56Fe beam into the gas cell. After thermalization of the injected 56Fe beam, laser-produced singly-charged 56Fe+ ions were extracted. The extraction efficiency and selectivity of the gas cell in the presence of plasma induced by 56Fe beam injection as well as the time profile of the extracted ions were investigated; extraction efficiency of 0.25%, a beam purity of >99% and an extraction time of 270 ms. It has been confirmed that the performance of the KISS laser ion source is satisfactory to start the measurements of

  18. Technical Note: Performance of Chemical Ionization Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (CIR-TOF-MS for the measurement of atmospherically significant oxygenated volatile organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Wyche

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a new chemical ionization reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CIR-TOF-MS utilising the environment chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric Photochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber- Forschungzentrum Jülich, Germany is described. The work took place as part of the ACCENT (Atmospheric Composition and Change the European NeTwork for excellence supported oxygenated volatile organic compound (OVOC measurement intercomparison during January 2005. The experiment entailed the measurement of 14 different atmospherically significant OVOCs at various mixing ratios in the approximate range 10.0–0.6 ppbV. The CIR-TOF-MS operated throughout the exercise with the hydronium ion (H3O+ as the primary chemical ionization (CI reagent in order to facilitate proton transfer to the analyte OVOCs. The results presented show that the CIR time-of-flight mass spectrometer is capable of detecting a wide range of atmospheric OVOCs at mixing ratios of around 10 ppbV in "real-time" (i.e. detection on the one-minute time scale, with sub-ppbV measurement also achieved following an increase in averaging time to tens of minutes. It is shown that in general OVOC measurement is made with high accuracy and precision, with integration time, mixing ratio and compound dependent values as good as 4–13% and 3–15% respectively. It is demonstrated that CIR-TOF-MS has rapid multi-channel response at the required sensitivity, accuracy and precision for atmospheric OVOC measurement.

  19. Virtual volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A. Christian; Prange, Richard E.

    2007-03-01

    We introduce the concept of virtual volatility. This simple but new measure shows how to quantify the uncertainty in the forecast of the drift component of a random walk. The virtual volatility also is a useful tool in understanding the stochastic process for a given portfolio. In particular, and as an example, we were able to identify mean reversion effect in our portfolio. Finally, we briefly discuss the potential practical effect of the virtual volatility on an investor asset allocation strategy.

  20. Virtual volatility

    OpenAIRE

    A. Christian Silva; Prange, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    We introduce the concept of virtual volatility. This simple but new measure shows how to quantify the uncertainty in the forecast of the drift component of a random walk. The virtual volatility also is a useful tool in understanding the stochastic process for a given portfolio. In particular, and as an example, we were able to identify mean reversion effect in our portfolio. Finally, we briefly discuss the potential practical effect of the virtual volatility on an investor asset allocation st...

  1. Degradation products of citrus volatile organic compounds (VOCs) acting as phagostimulants that increase probing behavior of Asian citrus psyllid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile phytochemicals play a role in orientation by phytophagous insects. We studied antennal and behavioral responses of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, vector of the citrus greening disease pathogen. Little or no response to citrus leaf volatiles was detected by electroanten...

  2. ‘Fuji’ apple (Malus domestica Borkh) volatile production during high pCO2 controlled atmosphere storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Fuji’apple [Malus sylvestris var. domestica (Borkh.) Mansf.] volatile compound dynamics were characterized during cold storage in air or at low pO2 controlled atmosphere (CA) with up to 5 kPa CO2. Volatile compounds in storage chambers were adsorbed onto solid sorbent traps and analyzed by GC-MS....

  3. Concentrations of volatile 4-alkyl-branched fatty acids in sheep and goat milk and dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaffarnik, Stefanie; Kayademir, Yasemin; Heid, Carolina; Vetter, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Goat and sheep milk and dairy products thereof are characterized by a strong and unique flavor. In this context, the volatile minor fatty acid 4-ethyloctanoic acid plays a prominent role along with 4-methyloctanoic acid when both are present in free form. Using a novel GC/MS method in the selected ion-monitoring mode, previously developed for sheep subcutaneous adipose tissue, we were able to analyze the total concentrations of these flavor-relevant minor fatty acids as methyl esters in goat and sheep milk as well as in their products. Differences between the concentrations and ratios of 4-methyloctanoic acid and 4-ethyloctanoic acid in goat milk (n = 4), goat cheese (n = 4), sheep milk (n = 2), and sheep cheese (n = 4) were observed. Goat milk and cheese resulted in higher concentrations for both fatty acids (190 to 480 μg/g milk fat) and smaller 4-Me-8:0 to 4-Et-8:0 ratios (1.4 to 2.7) compared to sheep milk and cheese (78 to 220 μg/g milk fat; 4-Me-8:0 to 4-Et-8:0 ratio: 15 to 42). In all samples, the concentration of 4-Me-8:0 exceeded the one of 4-Et-8:0. However, due to its lower flavor threshold value the contribution of 4-Et-8:0 to the flavor was generally >76%. The calculated flavor values were >1400 for goat milk and cheeses and >200 for sheep milk and cheeses. In goat milk and its products, only a proportion of milk and sheep samples would be sufficient to generate the characteristic goaty flavor. Parameters that promote or prevent the release of 4-Me-8:0, and especially 4-Et-8:0, will be decisive for the flavor in the resulting dairy product.

  4. Bioelectrochemical reduction of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion effluent for the production of biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondaveeti, Sanath; Min, Booki

    2015-12-15

    This study proves for the first time the feasibility of biofuel production from anaerobic digestion effluent via bioelectrochemical cell operation at various applied cell voltages (1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 V). An increase in cell voltage from 1 to 2 V resulted in more reduction current generation (-0.48 to -0.78 mA) at a lowered cathode potential (-0.45 to -0.84 mV vs Ag/AgCl). Various alcohols were produced depending on applied cell voltages, and the main products were butanol, ethanol, and propanol. Hydrogen and methane production were also observed in the headspace of the cell. A large amount of lactic acid was unexpectedly formed at all conditions, which might be the primary cause of the limited biofuel production. The addition of neutral red (NR) to the system could increase the cathodic reduction current, and thus more biofuels were produced with an enhanced alcohol formation compared to without a mediator.

  5. Plant volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ian T

    2010-05-11

    Plant volatiles are the metabolites that plants release into the air. The quantities released are not trivial. Almost one-fifth of the atmospheric CO2 fixed by land plants is released back into the air each day as volatiles. Plants are champion synthetic chemists; they take advantage of their anabolic prowess to produce volatiles, which they use to protect themselves against biotic and abiotic stresses and to provide information - and potentially disinformation - to mutualists and competitors alike. As transferors of information, volatiles have provided plants with solutions to the challenges associated with being rooted in the ground and immobile.

  6. Entropy production and efficiency analysis of the Bunsen reaction in the General Atomic sulfur-iodine thermochemical hydrogen production cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.E.; Conger, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    An entropy production and efficiency analysis of the first reaction in the General Atomic sulfur-iodine thermochemical hydrogen production cycle has been carried out by simulating the reaction including the mixing of reactants and separation of the resulting phases. The reaction: 2H/sub 2/O(L) + SO/sub 2/(g) + (excess) I/sub 2/(g) = H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (sol)(Phase I) + 2 HI core (Phase II) was simulated at 388 K, which is slightly above the melting point of I/sup 2/. Analysis of only this reaction shows that the reaction should be run at 15 to 25% I/sub 2/ reacted and the greatest excess of H/sub 2/O which will produce two product phases. Actual operating conditions are however dependent on the total processing scheme. An entropy production and efficiency analysis along with economic factors for the entire process is necessary to obtain these conditions.

  7. Singlet oxygen production in the reaction of superoxide with organic peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacManus-Spencer, Laura A; Edhlund, Betsy L; McNeill, Kristopher

    2006-01-20

    [reaction: see text] A selective chemiluminescent probe for singlet oxygen has been employed to detect and quantify singlet oxygen in the reactions of superoxide with organic peroxides. The production of singlet oxygen has been quantified in the reaction of superoxide with benzoyl peroxide (BP). No singlet oxygen was detected in the reactions of superoxide with cumyl peroxide, tert-butyl peroxide, or tert-butyl hydroperoxide. On the basis of these results and on the temperature dependence of the reaction, we proposed a mechanism for singlet oxygen formation in the reaction of superoxide with BP.

  8. 78 FR 78748 - 2,5-Furandione, polymer With ethenylbenzene, Reaction Products With polyethylene-polypropylene...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 2,5-Furandione, polymer With ethenylbenzene, Reaction Products With polyethylene... for residues of 2,5-furandione, polymer with ethenylbenzene, reaction products with polyethylene... polyethylene-polypropylene glycol 2-aminopropyl Me ether on food or feed commodities. DATES: This regulation is...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... Substances § 721.10125 Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. 721.2625 Section 721.2625 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a)...

  11. Bioelectrochemical recovery of waste-derived volatile fatty acids and production of hydrogen and alkali

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    was successfully verified with digestate. These results demonstrate for the first time the possibility of a new method for waste-derived VFA recovery and valuable products production that uses wastewater as fuel and bacteria as catalyst. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....... of sustainable downstream technologies for VFA recovery. In this study, an innovative microbial bipolar electrodialysis cell (MBEDC) was developed to meet the challenge of waste-derived VFA recovery, produce hydrogen and alkali, and potentially treat wastewater. The MBEDC was operated in fed-batch mode...... energy (5.20 e6.86 kWh/kg-VFA recovered) was produced at all the applied voltages (0.8e1.4 V). The coexistence of other anionic species had no negative effect on VFA transportation. The VFA concentration was increased 2.96 times after three consecutive batches. Furthermore, the applicability of MBEDC...

  12. Functional genomics reveals that a compact terpene synthase gene family can account for terpene volatile production in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J; Green, Sol A; Chen, Xiuyin; Bailleul, Estelle J D; Matich, Adam J; Wang, Mindy Y; Atkinson, Ross G

    2013-02-01

    Terpenes are specialized plant metabolites that act as attractants to pollinators and as defensive compounds against pathogens and herbivores, but they also play an important role in determining the quality of horticultural food products. We show that the genome of cultivated apple (Malus domestica) contains 55 putative terpene synthase (TPS) genes, of which only 10 are predicted to be functional. This low number of predicted functional TPS genes compared with other plant species was supported by the identification of only eight potentially functional TPS enzymes in apple 'Royal Gala' expressed sequence tag databases, including the previously characterized apple (E,E)-α-farnesene synthase. In planta functional characterization of these TPS enzymes showed that they could account for the majority of terpene volatiles produced in cv Royal Gala, including the sesquiterpenes germacrene-D and (E)-β-caryophyllene, the monoterpenes linalool and α-pinene, and the homoterpene (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene. Relative expression analysis of the TPS genes indicated that floral and vegetative tissues were the primary sites of terpene production in cv Royal Gala. However, production of cv Royal Gala floral-specific terpenes and TPS genes was observed in the fruit of some heritage apple cultivars. Our results suggest that the apple TPS gene family has been shaped by a combination of ancestral and more recent genome-wide duplication events. The relatively small number of functional enzymes suggests that the remaining terpenes produced in floral and vegetative and fruit tissues are maintained under a positive selective pressure, while the small number of terpenes found in the fruit of modern cultivars may be related to commercial breeding strategies.

  13. Functional Genomics Reveals That a Compact Terpene Synthase Gene Family Can Account for Terpene Volatile Production in Apple1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J.; Green, Sol A.; Chen, Xiuyin; Bailleul, Estelle J.D.; Matich, Adam J.; Wang, Mindy Y.; Atkinson, Ross G.

    2013-01-01

    Terpenes are specialized plant metabolites that act as attractants to pollinators and as defensive compounds against pathogens and herbivores, but they also play an important role in determining the quality of horticultural food products. We show that the genome of cultivated apple (Malus domestica) contains 55 putative terpene synthase (TPS) genes, of which only 10 are predicted to be functional. This low number of predicted functional TPS genes compared with other plant species was supported by the identification of only eight potentially functional TPS enzymes in apple ‘Royal Gala’ expressed sequence tag databases, including the previously characterized apple (E,E)-α-farnesene synthase. In planta functional characterization of these TPS enzymes showed that they could account for the majority of terpene volatiles produced in cv Royal Gala, including the sesquiterpenes germacrene-D and (E)-β-caryophyllene, the monoterpenes linalool and α-pinene, and the homoterpene (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene. Relative expression analysis of the TPS genes indicated that floral and vegetative tissues were the primary sites of terpene production in cv Royal Gala. However, production of cv Royal Gala floral-specific terpenes and TPS genes was observed in the fruit of some heritage apple cultivars. Our results suggest that the apple TPS gene family has been shaped by a combination of ancestral and more recent genome-wide duplication events. The relatively small number of functional enzymes suggests that the remaining terpenes produced in floral and vegetative and fruit tissues are maintained under a positive selective pressure, while the small number of terpenes found in the fruit of modern cultivars may be related to commercial breeding strategies. PMID:23256150

  14. Volatile organic compounds at two oil and natural gas production well pads in Colorado and Texas using passive samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisele, Adam P; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Smith, Luther A; Thoma, Eben D; Whitaker, Donald A; Oliver, Karen D; Wu, Tai; Colon, Maribel; Alston, Lillian; Cousett, Tamira A; Miller, Michael C; Smith, Donald M; Stallings, Casson

    2016-04-01

    A pilot study was conducted in application of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Methods 325A/B variant for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near two oil and natural gas (ONG) production well pads in the Texas Barnett Shale formation and Colorado Denver-Julesburg Basin (DJB), along with a traffic-dominated site in downtown Denver, CO. As indicated in the EPA method, VOC concentrations were measured for 14-day sampling periods using passive-diffusive tube samplers with Carbopack X sorbent at fenceline perimeter and other locations. VOCs were significantly higher at the DJB well pad versus the Barnett well pad and were likely due to higher production levels at the DJB well pad during the study. Benzene and toluene were significantly higher at the DJB well pad versus downtown Denver. Except for perchloroethylene, VOCs measured at passive sampler locations (PSs) along the perimeter of the Barnett well pad were significantly higher than PSs farther away. At the DJB well pad, most VOC concentrations, except perchloroethylene, were significantly higher prior to operational changes than after these changes were made. Though limited, the results suggest passive samplers are precise (duplicate precision usually ≤10%) and that they can be useful to assess spatial gradients and operational conditions at well pad locations over time-integrated periods. Recently enacted EPA Methods 325A/B use passive-diffusive tube samplers to measure benzene at multiple fenceline locations at petrochemical refineries. This pilot study presents initial data demonstrating the utility of Methods 325A/B for monitoring at ONG facilities. Measurements revealed elevated concentrations reflective of production levels and spatial gradients of VOCs relative to source proximity at the Barnett well pad, as well as operational changes at the DJB well pad. Though limited, these findings indicate that Methods 325A/B can be useful in application to characterize VOCs at well pad

  15. Development of volatile compounds during storage of different skin care products at various conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, A. F.; Thomsen, Birgitte Raagaard; Hyldig, Grethe

    Many skin care products contain various lipids to care and soften the skin. These lipids are either saturated or unsaturated. In the case of even small amounts of unsaturated lipids, these are at risk of oxidizing when exposed to heat, light or other conditions with a pro-oxidative effect. When s...... chromatography-mass spectrometry and peroxide value, and compared to samples stored at 2°C in the dark. In addition, sensory analyses were carried out to assess the off-odours developed in the samples....

  16. Health evaluation of volatile organic compound (VOC) emission from exotic wood products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeskov, L; Witterseh, T; Funch, L W

    2009-01-01

    analyses by climate chamber measurement (iroko, ramin, sheesham, merbau, and rubber tree). Samples of exotic wood (rubber tree and belalu) were further analyzed for emission of chemical compounds by migration into artificial saliva and for content of pesticides and allergenic natural rubber latex (NR latex......) (rubber tree). The toxicological effects of all substances identified were evaluated and the lowest concentrations of interest (LCI) assessed. An R-value was calculated for each wood product (R-value below 1 is considered to be unproblematic as regards health). Emission from the evaluated exotic wood only...

  17. Protonation Reaction of Benzonitrile Radical Anion and Absorption of Product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holcman, Jerzy; Sehested, Knud

    1975-01-01

    The rate constant for the protonation of benzonitrile radical anions formed in pulse radiolysis of aqueous benzonitrile solutions is (3.5 ± 0.5)× 1010 dm3 mol–1 s–1. A new 270 nm absorption band is attributed to the protonated benzonitrile anion. The pK of the protonation reaction is determined...

  18. Unstable volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casas, Isabel; Gijbels, Irène

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce the break-preserving local linear (BPLL) estimator for the estimation of unstable volatility functions for independent and asymptotically independent processes. Breaks in the structure of the conditional mean and/or the volatility functions are common i...

  19. Unstable volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casas, Isabel; Gijbels, Irène

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce the break-preserving local linear (BPLL) estimator for the estimation of unstable volatility functions for independent and asymptotically independent processes. Breaks in the structure of the conditional mean and/or the volatility functions are common i...

  20. Volatile Organic Compound Emission from Quercus suber, Quercus canariensis, and its hybridisation product Quercus afares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, S.; Bracho Nuñez, A.; Staudt, M.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2009-04-01

    Oaks represent one of the most important plant genera in the Northern hemisphere and include many intensively VOC emitting species. The major group constitutes the isoprene emitters, but also monoterpene emitters and non-emitters can be found. These variations in the oak species might partly be due to their propensity for inter- and intraspecific hybridisation. This study addresses the foliar VOC production of the former hybridisation product the deciduous Quercus afares and its parents, two very distant species: the evergreen monoterpene emitter Quercus suber and the deciduous isoprene emitter Quercus canariensis. The measurements were performed in Southern France, applying two different methods. Plants were investigated in situ in the field with a portable gas exchange measuring system as well as in the laboratory on cut branches with an adapted enclosure system. Quercus afares was found to be a monoterpene emitting species. However, the monoterpene emission was lower and the composition different to that of Quercus suber. Whereas Quercus suber trees belonged to the pinene type most individuals of Quercus afares were identified to represent a limonene type. Quercus canariensis emitted besides high amounts of isoprene also linalool and (Z)-3-hexenylacetate. Emissions from Quercus suber and Quercus afares were higher in the field measurements than in the laboratory on cut branches whereas Quercus canariensis exhibited lower isoprene emissions from cut branches. The results demonstrate the need of further emission studies on a plant species level.

  1. Production of hydrogen, ethanol and volatile fatty acids through co-fermentation of macro- and micro-algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ao; Jacob, Amita; Tabassum, Muhammad Rizwan; Herrmann, Christiane; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-04-01

    Algae may be fermented to produce hydrogen. However micro-algae (such as Arthrospira platensis) are rich in proteins and have a low carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio, which is not ideal for hydrogen fermentation. Co-fermentation with macro-algae (such as Laminaria digitata), which are rich in carbohydrates with a high (C/N) ratio, improves the performance of hydrogen production. Algal biomass, pre-treated with 2.5% dilute H2SO4 at 135°C for 15min, effected a total yield of carbohydrate monomers (CMs) of 0.268g/g volatile solids (VS). The CMs were dominating by glucose and mannitol and most (ca. 95%) were consumed by anaerobic fermentative micro-organisms during subsequent fermentation. An optimal specific hydrogen yield (SHY) of 85.0mL/g VS was obtained at an algal C/N ratio of 26.2 and an algal concentration of 20g VS/L. The overall energy conversion efficiency increased from 31.3% to 54.5% with decreasing algal concentration from 40 to 5 VS g/L.

  2. From the shop to the drain - Volatile methylsiloxanes in cosmetics and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capela, Daniela; Alves, Arminda; Homem, Vera; Santos, Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Organosiloxanes are widely used in the formulation of a broad range of cosmetic and personal care products (PCPs), including creams and lotions, bath soaps, shampoo and hair care products to soften, smooth, and moisten. In fact, the intensive and widespread use of organosiloxanes combined with their lipophilic nature, makes them interesting targets for future research, particularly in the toxicology area. This study focused on determining the concentration levels of these compounds in the bestselling brands of PCPs in the Oporto region (Portugal), allowing the estimation of dermal and inhalation exposure to siloxanes and the evaluation of the quantities released to the environment "down-the-drain" and to air. To accomplish this task, a QuEChERS technique ("Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe") was employed to extract the siloxanes from the target PCPs, which has never been tested before. The resulting extract was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The limits of detection varied between 0.17 (L2) and 3.75ngg(-1) (L5), being much lower than any values reported in the literature for this kind of products. In general, satisfactory precision (Shampoo exhibited the highest concentration for cyclic and aftershaves for linear siloxanes. Combining these results with the daily usage amounts, an average daily dermal exposure of 25.04μgkgbw(-1)day(-1) for adults and 0.35μgkgbw(-1)day(-1) for baby/children was estimated. The main contributors for adult dermal exposure were body moisturizers, followed by facial creams and aftershaves, while for babies/children were body moisturizers, followed by shower gel and shampoo. Similarly, the average daily inhalation exposure was also estimated. Values of 1.56μgkgbw(-1)day(-1) for adults and 0.03μgkgbw(-1)day(-1) for babies/children were calculated. An estimate of the siloxanes amount released "down-the-drain" into the sewage systems through the use of toiletries was also performed. An emission per

  3. The oleic acid-ozone heterogeneous reaction system: products, kinetics, secondary chemistry, and atmospheric implications of a model system – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zahardis

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous processing of organic aerosols by trace oxidants has many implications to atmospheric chemistry and climate regulation. This review covers a model heterogeneous reaction system (HRS: the oleic acid-ozone HRS and other reaction systems featuring fatty acids, and their derivatives. The analysis of the primary products of ozonolysis (azelaic acid, nonanoic acid, 9-oxononanoic acid, nonanal is described. Anomalies in the relative product yields are noted and explained by the observation of secondary chemical reactions. The secondary reaction products arising from reactive Criegee intermediates are mainly peroxidic, notably secondary ozonides and α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxide polymers. These highly oxygenated products are of low volatility and hydrophilic which may enhance the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei. The kinetic description of this HRS is critically reviewed. Most kinetic studies suggest this oxidative processing is either a near surface reaction that is limited by the diffusion of ozone or a surface based reaction. Internally mixed particles and coatings represent the next stage in the progression towards more realistic proxies of tropospheric organic aerosols and a description of the products and the kinetics resulting from the ozonolysis of these proxies, which are based on fatty acids or their derivatives, is presented. Finally, a series of atmospheric implications of oxidative processing of particulate containing fatty acids is presented. These implications include the extended lifetime of unsaturated species in the troposphere facilitated by the presence of solids, semisolids or viscous phases, and an enhanced rate of ozone uptake by particulate unsaturates compared to corresponding gas phase organics. Ozonolysis of oleic acid enhances its CCN activity, which implies that oxidatively processed particulate may contribute to indirect forcing of radiation. Other effects, including the potential

  4. Prevention of volatile fatty acids production and limitation of odours from winery wastewaters by denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bories, André; Guillot, Jean-Michel; Sire, Yannick; Couderc, Marie; Lemaire, Sophie-Andréa; Kreim, Virginie; Roux, Jean-Claude

    2007-07-01

    The effect of the addition of nitrate to winery wastewaters to control the formation of VFA in order to prevent odours during storage and treatment was studied in batch bioreactors at different NO(3)/chemical oxygen demand (COD) ratios and at full scale in natural evaporation ponds (2 x 7000 m(2)) by measuring olfactory intensity. In the absence of nitrate, butyric acid (2304 mgL(-1)), acetic acid (1633 mgL(-1)), propionic acid (1558 mgL(-1)), caproic acid (499 mgL(-1)) and valeric acid (298 mgL(-1)) were produced from reconstituted winery wastewater. For a ratio of NO(3)/COD=0.4 gg(-1), caproic and valeric acids were not formed. The production of butyric and propionic acids was reduced by 93.3% and 72.5%, respectively, at a ratio of NO(3)/COD=0.8, and by 97.4% and 100% at a ratio of NO(3)/COD=1.2 gg(-1). Nitrate delayed and decreased butyric acid formation in relation to the oxidoreduction potential. Studies in ponds showed that the addition of concentrated calcium nitrate (NITCAL) to winery wastewaters (3526 m(3)) in a ratio of NO(3)/COD=0.8 inhibited VFA production, with COD elimination (94%) and total nitrate degradation, and no final nitrite accumulation. On the contrary, in ponds not treated with nitrate, malodorous VFA (from propionic to heptanoïc acids) represented up to 60% of the COD. Olfactory intensity measurements in relation to the butanol scale of VFA solutions and the ponds revealed the pervasive role of VFA in the odour of the untreated pond as well as the clear decrease in the intensity and not unpleasant odour of the winery wastewater pond enriched in nitrates. The results obtained at full scale underscored the feasibility and safety of the calcium nitrate treatment as opposed to concentrated nitric acid.

  5. The Phase Behavior Effect on the Reaction Engineering of Transesterification Reactions and Reactor Design for Continuous Biodiesel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernica, Stephen N.

    transitions from two phases to a single phase, or pseudo-single phase. The transition to a single phase or pseudo-single phase is a function of the methanol content. Regardless, the maximum observed reaction rate occurs at the point of the phase transition, when the concentration of triglycerides in the methanol phase is largest. The phase transition occurs due to the accumulation of the primary product, biodiesel methyl esters. Through various experiments, it was determined that the rate of the triglyceride mass transfer into the methanol phase, as well as the solubility of triglycerides in methanol, increases with increasing methyl ester concentration. Thus, there exists some critical methyl ester concentration which favors the formation of a single or pseudo-single phase system. The effect of the by-product glycerol on the reaction kinetics was also investigated. It was determined that at low methanol to triglyceride molar ratios, glycerol acts to inhibit the reaction rate and limit the overall triglyceride conversion. This occurs because glycerol accumulates in the methanol phase, i.e. the primary reaction volume. When glycerol is at relatively high concentrations within the methanol phase, triglycerides become excluded from the reaction volume. This greatly reduces the reaction rate and limits the overall conversion. As the concentration of methanol is increased, glycerol becomes diluted and the inhibitory effects become dampened. Assuming pseudo-homogeneous phase behavior, a simple kinetic model incorporating the inhibitory effects of glycerol was proposed based on batch reactor data. The kinetic model was primarily used to theoretically compare the performance of different types of continuous flow reactors for continuous biodiesel production. It was determined that the inhibitory effects of glycerol result in the requirement of very large reactor volumes when using continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR). The reactor volume can be greatly reduced using tubular style

  6. Evolution of Volatile Compounds during the Distillation of Cognac Spirit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Pierre; Athès, Violaine; Decloux, Martine Esteban; Ferrari, Gérald; Snakkers, Guillaume; Raguenaud, Patrick; Giampaoli, Pierre

    2017-09-06

    Cognac wine spirit has a complex composition in volatile compounds which contributes to its organoleptic profile. This work focused on the batch distillation process and, in particular, on volatile compounds specifically produced by chemical reactions during the distillation of Cognac wine spirit, traditionally conducted in two steps with charentais pot stills. The aim of this study was to characterize these volatile compounds formed during distillation. Sampling has been performed on the distillates and inside the boiler during a typical Cognac distillation. The analysis of these samples allowed us to perform a mass balance and to point out several types of volatile compounds whose quantities strongly increased during the distillation process. These compounds were distinguished by their chemical family. It has been found that the first distillation step was decisive for the formation of volatile compounds. Moreover, 2 esters, 3 aldehydes, 12 norisoprenoids, and 3 terpenes were shown to be generated during the process. These results suggest that some volatile compounds found in Cognac spirit are formed during distillation due to chemical reactions induced by high temperature. These findings give important indications to professional distillers in order to enhance the product's quality.

  7. Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0124 Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product...Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0486 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Grant #FA9550-12-1-0486 2013 Basic Research Initiative (BRI

  8. Complex signal amplitude analysis for complete fusion nuclear reaction products

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, Yu S

    2015-01-01

    A complex analysis has been performed on the energy amplitude signals corresponding to events of Z=117 element measured in the 249Bk+48Ca complete fusion nuclear reaction. These signals were detected with PIPS position sensitive detector. The significant values of pulse height defect both for recoils (ER) and fission fragments (FF) were measured. Comparison with the computer simulations and empirical formulae has been performed both for ER and FF signals.

  9. Hydrogen production via thermochemical water-splitting by lithium redox reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Naoya [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Miyaoka, Hiroki, E-mail: miyaoka@h2.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Institute for Sustainable Sciences and Development, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •Hydrogen production via water-splitting by lithium redox reactions possibly proceeds below 800 °C. •Entropy control by using nonequilibrium technique successfully reduces the reaction temperature. •The operating temperature should be further reduced by optimizing the nonequilibrium condition to control the cycle. -- Abstracts: Hydrogen production via thermochemical water-splitting by lithium redox reactions was investigated as energy conversion technique. The reaction system consists of three reactions, which are hydrogen generation by the reaction of lithium and lithium hydroxide, metal separation by thermolysis of lithium oxide, and oxygen generation by hydrolysis of lithium peroxide. The hydrogen generation reaction completed at 500 °C. The metal separation reaction is thermodynamically difficult because it requires about 3400 °C in equilibrium condition. However, it was indicated from experimental results that the reaction temperature was drastically reduced to 800 °C by using nonequilibrium technique. The hydrolysis reaction was exothermic reaction, and completed by heating up to 300 °C. Therefore, it was expected that the water-splitting by lithium redox reactions was possibly operated below 800 °C under nonequilibrium condition.

  10. Volatile organic compound flux from manure of cattle fed diets differing in grain processing method and co-product inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Kristin; Parker, David B.; Cole, N. Andy

    2015-01-01

    Odor emissions from livestock production have become increasingly important in the past decade. Odors derived from animal feeding operations are caused by odorous VOC emitted from the mixture of feces and urine, as well as feed and silage which may be experiencing microbial fermentation. Distillers grains are a by-product of corn grain fermentation used to produce fuel ethanol, and this industry has grown rapidly throughout the U.S. in past years. Therefore, the use of wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) in feedlot cattle diets has also increased. The objective of this research was to determine specific VOC emissions from feces and urine or a mixture of both, from cattle fed steam flaked or dry-rolled corn (DRC)-based diets containing either 0% or 30% WDGS. Flux of dimethyl trisulfide was greater from feces of cattle fed DRC than steam-flaked corn (SFC) diets. No other differences in flux from feces were detected across dietary treatments for phenol, 4-methylphenol, indole, skatole, dimethyl disulfide, and flux of volatile fatty acids (VFA) such as acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, and valeric acids (P > 0.15). Flux of skatole, acetic acid, and valeric acid from urine was greater for cattle fed SFC than DRC diets (P acetic acid and heptanoic acid from urine was greater when cattle were fed diets containing 0% WDGS than 30% WDGS (P < 0.05). When combining urine and feces in the ratio in which they were excreted from the animal, flux of propionic acid was greater when cattle were fed DRC vs. SFC diets (P = 0.05). Based on these results, the majority of the VOC, VFA, and odor flux from cattle feeding operations is from the urine. Therefore, dietary strategies to reduce odor from cattle feeding facilities should primarily focus on reducing excretion of odorous compounds in the urine.

  11. Effect of an allophanic soil on humification reactions between catechol and glycine: Spectroscopic investigations of reaction products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Masami; Miura, Akitaka; Sasaki, Masahide; Izumo, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Adduction of amino acids to phenols is a possible humification reaction pathway [F.J. Stevenson, Humus Chemistry: Genesis, Composition, Reaction, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1994, pp. 188-211; M.C. Wang, P.M. Huang, Sci. Total Environ. 62 (1987) 435; M.C. Wang, P.M. Huang, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 55 (1991) 1156; M.C. Wang, P.M. Huang, Geoderma 112 (2003) 31; M.C. Wang, P.M. Huang, Geoderma 124 (2005) 415]. To elucidate the reaction kinetics and products of abiotic humification, the effects of an allophanic soil on the adduction of amino acids to phenols were investigated using catechol (CT) and glycine (Gly) as a model phenol and amino acid, respectively. An aqueous solution containing CT and Gly (pH 7.0) in the presence of allophanic soil was incubated for 2 weeks, and the kinetics of the humification reactions were monitored by analysis of absorptivity at 600 nm ( E600). A mixture of CT and Gly in the absence of allophanic soil was used as a control. The E600 value increased markedly in the presence of allophanic soil. In addition, unreacted CT was detected in the control reaction mixture, but not in the allophane-containing reaction mixture. Under the sterilized conditions, absorbance at 600 nm for the control reaction mixture was significantly smaller than that for the allophanic soil-containing reaction mixture, which indicates there was no microbial participation during incubation. These results indicate that the allophanic soil effectively facilitated humification reactions between CT and Gly. The reaction mixtures were acidified and humic-like acid (HLA) was isolated as a precipitate. The elemental composition, acidic functional group contents, molecular weight, FT-IR, solid-state CP-MAS 13C NMR, and 1H NMR spectra of the purified HLAs were analyzed. The results of these analyses indicate that the nitrogen atom of Gly binds to the aromatic carbon of CT in the HLA products.

  12. Concentrations of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes in European cosmetics and personal care products: Prerequisite for human and environmental exposure assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dudzina, T.; Goetz, N. von; Bogdal, C.; Biesterbos, J.W.H.; Hungerbuhler, K.

    2014-01-01

    Low molecular weight cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMSs) are widely employed as emollients and carrier solvents in personal care formulations in order to acquire desired performance benefits owing to their distinctive physicochemical properties. Under current European legislation cosmetic ingred

  13. Modeling the sensory impact of defined combinations of volatile lipid oxidation products on fishy and metallic off-flavors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkateshwarlu Venkat, Guidipati; Bruni Let, Mette; Meyer, Anne S.;

    2004-01-01

    and highlighted the importance of two-factor interactions for contribution toward off-flavors. The results suggest that (EZ)-2,6-nonadienal and 1-penten-3-one could be useful markers for fishy and metallic off-flavors in fish oil and fish oil enriched foods. Within the addition levels of the volatiles......The volatiles (EZ)-2,6-nonadienal, 1-penten-3-one, (Z)-4-heptenal, and (EE)-2,4-heptadienal were added to milk containing 1.5% fat according to a central composite design, to evaluate the individual and combinatory effects of these volatiles on sensory properties. The milk samples with added...... volatiles were subjected to sensory descriptive analysis for fishy and metallic off-flavors. The data were analyzed using partial least-squares regression and multiple linear regression to develop mathematical models. The models revealed significant main effects of (EZ)-2,6-nonadienal and 1-penten-3-one...

  14. Concentrations of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes in European cosmetics and personal care products: Prerequisite for human and environmental exposure assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dudzina, T.; Goetz, N. von; Bogdal, C.; Biesterbos, J.W.H.; Hungerbuhler, K.

    2014-01-01

    Low molecular weight cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMSs) are widely employed as emollients and carrier solvents in personal care formulations in order to acquire desired performance benefits owing to their distinctive physicochemical properties. Under current European legislation cosmetic

  15. Origin of Nanobubbles Electrochemically Formed in a Magnetic Field: Ionic Vacancy Production in Electrode Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aogaki, Ryoichi; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Miura, Makoto; Oshikiri, Yoshinobu; Miura, Miki; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Takagi, Satoshi; Mogi, Iwao; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-07-01

    As a process complementing conventional electrode reactions, ionic vacancy production in electrode reaction was theoretically examined; whether reaction is anodic or cathodic, based on the momentum conservation by Newton’s second law of motion, electron transfer necessarily leads to the emission of original embryo vacancies, and dielectric polarization endows to them the same electric charge as trans- ferred in the reaction. Then, the emitted embryo vacancies immediately receive the thermal relaxation of solution particles to develop steady-state vacancies. After the vacancy production, nanobubbles are created by the collision of the vacancies in a vertical magnetic field.

  16. In cleanroom, sub-ppb real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using proton-transfer reaction/time of flight/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayeck, Nathalie; Maillot, Philippe; Vitrani, Thomas; Pic, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri; Gligorovski, Sasho; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Mizzi, Aurélie; Poulet, Irène

    2014-04-01

    Refractory compounds such as Trimethylsilanol (TMS) and other organic compounds such as propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (PGMEA) used in the photolithography area of microelectronic cleanrooms have irreversible dramatic impact on optical lenses used on photolithography tools. There is a need for real-time, continuous measurements of organic contaminants in representative cleanroom environment especially in lithography zone. Such information is essential to properly evaluate the impact of organic contamination on optical lenses. In this study, a Proton-Transfer Reaction-Time-of-Flight Mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) was applied for real-time and continuous monitoring of fugitive organic contamination induced by the fabrication process. Three types of measurements were carried out using the PTR-TOF-MS in order to detect the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) next to the tools in the photolithography area and at the upstream and downstream of chemical filters used to purge the air in the cleanroom environment. A validation and verification of the results obtained with PTR-TOF-MS was performed by comparing these results with those obtained with an off-line technique that is Automated Thermal Desorber - Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (ATD-GC-MS) used as a reference analytical method. The emerged results from the PTR-TOF-MS analysis exhibited the temporal variation of the VOCs levels in the cleanroom environment during the fabrication process. While comparing the results emerging from the two techniques, a good agreement was found between the results obtained with PTR-TOF-MS and those obtained with ATD-GC-MS for the PGMEA, toluene and xylene. Regarding TMS, a significant difference was observed ascribed to the technical performance of both instruments.

  17. Separation and analysis of trace volatile formaldehyde in aquatic products by a MoO₃/polypyrrole intercalative sampling adsorbent with thermal desorption gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunjian; Zhao, Cheng; Zhan, Yisen; Li, Jianbin; Zhang, Zhuomin; Li, Gongke

    2015-05-01

    An in situ embedded synthesis strategy was developed for the preparation of a MoO3 /polypyrrole intercalative sampling adsorbent for the separation and analysis of trace volatile formaldehyde in aquatic products. Structural and morphological characteristics of the MoO3 /polypyrrole intercalative adsorbent were investigated by a series of characterization methods. The MoO3 /polypyrrole sampling adsorbent possessed a higher sampling capacity and selectivity for polar formaldehyde than commonly used commercial adsorbent Tenax TA. Finally, the MoO3 /polypyrrole adsorbent was packed in the thermal desorption tube that was directly coupled to gas chromatography with mass spectrometry for the analysis of trace volatile formaldehyde in aquatic products. Trace volatile formaldehyde from real aquatic products could be selectively sampled and quantified to be 0.43-6.6 mg/kg. The detection limit was achieved as 0.004 μg/L by this method. Good recoveries for spiked aquatic products were achieved in range of 75.0-108% with relative standard deviations of 1.2-9.0%. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur: reaction between barium sulfide and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653 to 866/sup 0/C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. The rate of formation of hydrogen can be expressed as: RH2 = 1.07 x 10/sup -2/ exp (-3180/RT) (mol H/sub 2//mol BaS s). Hydrogen sulfide was produced during the initial period of reaction and the quantity of hydrogen sulfide formed during this period decreased as the temperature of reaction was increased.

  19. Continuous thermochromatographic separation of carrier-free radioisotopes of platinum elements in air flow from products of nuclear reactions in beam of heavy-ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domanov, V.P.; Zvara, I.

    1984-01-01

    The thermochromatographic behaviour of volatile oxygen-containing compounds of platinum group metals in on-line regime in an accelerator beam has been studied to evaluate possibilities of chemical separation of the Z=108-110 elements. Volatile compounds of radioplatinoids were prepared while decelerating the recoil atoms - nuclear reaction products - in a flow of dry (partial water vapour pressure below 10/sup -4/ Pa) or humid air (saturated with H/sub 2/O vapours at 0 deg C) and they were extracted on the walls of a quartz thermochromatographic column. Under certain experimental conditions the maximum of /sup 173/OsO/sub 4/ precipitation zone is located at -88 +- 10 deg C, and that for sup(183, 184)IrO/sub 3/ - at 80 +- 10 deg C. It is shown that the fast response of the method for Os is not worse than 1 s. A high volatility of sup(99, 100)Rh has been observed for the first time, being evidently related to the RhO/sub 3/ formation. Ir and /sup 187/Pt in the humid air flow were precipitated at 20-10 deg C. Possible composition of compounds formed is being discussed. Possibility of using, in principle, oxygen-containing compounds for chemical identification of Z=108-110 elements is pointed out.

  20. The oleic acid-ozone heterogeneous reaction system: products, kinetics, secondary chemistry, and atmospheric implications of a model system – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zahardis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous processing of organic aerosols by trace oxidants has many implications to atmospheric chemistry and climate regulation. This review covers a model heterogeneous reaction system (HRS: the oleic acid-ozone HRS and other reaction systems featuring fatty acids, and their derivatives. The analysis of the commonly observed aldehyde and organic acid products of ozonolysis (azelaic acid, nonanoic acid, 9-oxononanoic acid, nonanal is described. The relative product yields are noted and explained by the observation of secondary chemical reactions. The secondary reaction products arising from reactive Criegee intermediates are mainly peroxidic, notably secondary ozonides and α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxide oligomers and polymers, and their formation is in accord with solution and liquid-phase ozonolysis. These highly oxygenated products are of low volatility and hydrophilic which may enhance the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The kinetic description of this HRS is critically reviewed. Most kinetic studies suggest this oxidative processing is either a near surface reaction that is limited by the diffusion of ozone or a surface based reaction. Internally mixed particles and coatings represent the next stage in the progression towards more realistic proxies of tropospheric organic aerosols and a description of the products and the kinetics resulting from the ozonolysis of these proxies, which are based on fatty acids or their derivatives, is presented. Finally, the main atmospheric implications of oxidative processing of particulate containing fatty acids are presented. These implications include the extended lifetime of unsaturated species in the troposphere facilitated by the presence of solids, semi-solids or viscous phases, and an enhanced rate of ozone uptake by particulate unsaturates compared to corresponding gas-phase organics. Ozonolysis of oleic acid enhances its CCN activity, which implies that

  1. Production of heavy actinides in incomplete fusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, N. V.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Iljinov, A. S.; Mebel, M. V.

    1994-10-01

    We present preliminary results of calculations by the phenomenological model of the estimated yield of some heavy actinide isotopes. It is assumed that these isotopes are produced as a result of multinucleon transfers followed by neutrons and charged particle emission A.S. Iljinov and E.A. Cherepanov (1980). The yield P(sub Z, N)(E*) of primary excited actinides is found using the model of N.V. Antonenko and R.V. Jolos (1991). Absolute cross-sections for different binary reaction channels are obtained by summing the cross-sections for all subchannels with an appreciable yield according to J. Wilczynski et al. (1980).

  2. Production of metallic copper powder by autocatalytic reaction in suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Guilherme Rocha Poço

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The production of metallic powder by precipitation from solution was studied in laboratory scale as an alternative to the conventionally adopted processes, based on the atomization of molten material, for producing metal powders with small particle size. The process is based on the precipitation of metals from aqueous solutions by reduction under controlled conditions. Results of laboratory scale experiments are presented for the production of copper particles from aqueous solutions of copper sulfate, using formaldehyde as reducing reactant, and EDTA as complexing agent. The effect of the presence of nuclei was studied. Metallic particles with average sizes in the range from about 0.3 µm to about 15 µm were obtained. In the process, large particles are formed mainly by aggregation of submicrometric particles, indicating that the particle size distribution of the product depends on the control of particle agglomeration rate.

  3. Reactions of 3-Formylchromone with Active Methylene and Methyl Compounds and Some Subsequent Reactions of the Resulting Condensation Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lácova

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a survey of the condensations of 3-formylchromone with various active methylene and methyl compounds, e.g. malonic or barbituric acid derivatives, five-membered heterocycles, etc. The utilisation of the condensation products for the synthesis of different heterocyclic systems, which is based on the ability of the γ-pyrone ring to be opened by the nucleophilic attack is also reviewed. Finally, the applications of microwave irradiation as an unconventional method of reaction activation in the synthesis of condensation products is described and the biological activity of some chromone derivatives is noted.

  4. A short review of headspace extraction and ultrasonic solvent extraction for honey volatiles fingerprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Jerković, I.; Marijanović, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Honey volatiles exhibit a potential role in distinguishing honeys as a function of botanical origin, but heating of honey generates artefacts such as compounds of Strecker degradation and Maillard reaction products. This short review is focused on the most recently applied methods for honey volatiles fingerprinting (without generation of thermal artefacts): headspace extraction (dynamic headspace extraction (DHE), headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME)) and ultrasonic solvent extract...

  5. Chasing volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Rossi, Eduardo; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    The realized volatility of financial returns is characterized by persistence and occurrence of unpreditable large increments. To capture those features, we introduce the Multiplicative Error Model with jumps (MEM-J). When a jump component is included in the multiplicative specification, the condi...... models, the introduction of the jump component provides a sensible improvement in the fit, as well as for in-sample and out-of-sample volatility tail forecasts....

  6. Volatility Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiguang Wang

    2009-01-01

    Classical capital asset pricing theory tells us that riskaverse investors would require higher returns to compensate for higher risk on an investment. One type of risk is price (return) risk, which reflects uncertainty in the price level and is measured by the volatility (standard deviation) of asset returns. Volatility itself is also known to be random and hence is perceived as another type of risk. Investors can bear price risk in exchange for a higher return. But are investors willing to p...

  7. Quasielastic production of polarized hyperons in antineutrino--nucleon reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Akbar, F; Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the longitudinal and perpendicular polarizations of final hyperon($\\Lambda$,$\\Sigma$) produced in the antineutrino induced quasielastic charged current reactions on nucleon targets. The nucleon-hyperon transition form factors are determined from the experimental data on quasielastic $(\\Delta S =0)$ charged current (anti)neutrino--nucleon scattering and the semileptonic decay of neutron and hyperons assuming G--invariance, T--invariance and SU(3) symmetry. The vector transition form factors are obtained in terms of nucleon electromagnetic form factors for which various parameterizations available in literature have been used. A dipole parameterization for the axial vector form factor and the pseudoscalar transition form factor derived in terms of axial vector form factor assuming PCAC and GT relation extended to strangeness sector have been used in numerical evaluations. The flux averaged cross section and polarization observables corresponding to CERN Gargamelle experiment have been calculated...

  8. Formic acid production from carbohydrates biomass by hydrothermal reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, J; Kishita, A; Tohji, K; Enomoto, H [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Jin, F, E-mail: yun@bucky1.kankyo.tohoku.ac.j [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200091 (China)

    2010-03-01

    The formation of formic acid or formate salts by hydrothermal oxidation of model biomass materials (glucose, starch and cellulose) was investigated. All experiments were conducted in a batch reactor, made of SUS 316 tubing, providing an internal volume of 5.7 cm{sup 3}. A 30 wt% hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution was used as an oxidant. The experiments were carried out with temperature of 250{sup 0}C, reaction time varying from 0.5 min to 5 min, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} supply of 240%, and alkaline concentration varying from 0 to 1.25 M. Similar to glucose, in the cases of the oxidation of hydrothermal starch and cellulose, the addition of alkaline can also improve the yield of formic acid. And the yield were glucose>starch> cellulose in cases of with or without of alkaline addition.

  9. The effect of nuclear structure in the emission of reaction products in heavy-ion reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samir Kundu

    2014-04-01

    Study of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) and light charged particles (LCPs) emission has been carried out for a few reactions involving -cluster and non--cluster systems to see how the emission processes are affected by nuclear clustering. Li, Be, B and -particles have been studied from α-clustered system 16O + 12C for 117, 125, 145 and 160 MeV bombarding energies respectively. The enhanced yields of near-entrance channel fragment B and large quadrupole deformation of the produced composite 28Si* extracted from LCP spectra indicate the survival of orbiting-like process in 16O + 12C system at these energies. The same IMFs emitted from the -cluster system 12C (77 MeV) + 28Si and nearby non- cluster 11B (64 MeV) + 28Si and 12C (73 MeV) + 27Al (all having the same excitation energy of ∼67 MeV) have also been studied. The fully energy damped (fusion–fission) and the partially energy damped (deep inelastic) components of the fragment energy spectra have been extracted. It has been found that the yields of the fully energy damped fragments for all the above reactions are in conformity with the respective statistical model predictions. The time-scales of various deep inelastic fragment emissions have been extracted from the angular distribution data. The angular momentum dissipation in deep inelastic collisions has been estimated from the data and it has been found to be close to the corresponding sticking limit value.

  10. Advances of zeolite based membrane for hydrogen production via water gas shift reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen is considered as a promising energy vector which can be obtained from various renewable sources. However, an efficient hydrogen production technology is still challenging. One technology to produce hydrogen with very high capacity with low cost is through water gas shift (WGS) reaction. Water gas shift reaction is an equilibrium reaction that produces hydrogen from syngas mixture by the introduction of steam. Conventional WGS reaction employs two or more reactors in series with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given volume of catalyst. Membrane reactor as new technology can cope several drawbacks of conventional reactor by removing reaction product and the reaction will favour towards product formation. Zeolite has properties namely high temperature, chemical resistant, and low price makes it suitable for membrane reactor applications. Moreover, it has been employed for years as hydrogen selective layer. This review paper is focusing on the development of membrane reactor for efficient water gas shift reaction to produce high purity hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Development of membrane reactor is discussed further related to its modification towards efficient reaction and separation from WGS reaction mixture. Moreover, zeolite framework suitable for WGS membrane reactor will be discussed more deeply.

  11. DOES ENERGY CONSUMPTION VOLATILITY AFFECT REAL GDP VOLATILITY? AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS FOR THE UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rashid

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper empirically examines the relation between energy consumption volatility and unpredictable variations in real gross domestic product (GDP in the UK. Estimating the Markov switching ARCH model we find a significant regime switching in the behavior of both energy consumption and GDP volatility. The results from the Markov regime-switching model show that the variability of energy consumption has a significant role to play in determining the behavior of GDP volatilities. Moreover, the results suggest that the impacts of unpredictable variations in energy consumption on GDP volatility are asymmetric, depending on the intensity of volatility. In particular, we find that while there is no significant contemporaneous relationship between energy consumption volatility and GDP volatility in the first (low-volatility regime, GDP volatility is significantly positively related to the volatility of energy utilization in the second (high-volatility regime.

  12. Direct photon production in heavy-ion reactions at SPS and RHIC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Peitzmann

    2003-04-01

    A review on experimental results for direct photon production in heavy ion reactions is given. A brief survey of early direct photon limits from SPS experiments is presented. The first measurement of direct photons in heavy ion reactions from the WA98 collaboration is discussed and compared to theoretical calculations. An outlook on the perspective of photon measurements at RHIC is given.

  13. 21 CFR 73.3127 - Vinyl alcohol/methyl methacrylate-dye reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3127 Vinyl alcohol/methyl methacrylate-dye reaction products. (a) Identity. The color additives are formed by... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vinyl alcohol/methyl methacrylate-dye reaction...

  14. Use of Moessbauer spectroscopy to study reaction products of polyphenols and iron compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, J. (Building Research Inst., Warsaw (Poland)); Suwalski, J. (Atomic Energy Inst., Otwock-Swierk (Poland))

    1994-05-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study parameters of the reaction products of iron compounds (Fe[sup III]) and polyphenols with hydroxyl (OH) groups in ortho positions. Polyphenols used in the reaction were catechol, pyrogallol, gallic acid, and oak tannin. The Fe-containing compounds were hydrated ferric sulfate (Fe[sub 2][SO[sub 4

  15. Mapping Students' Conceptual Modes When Thinking about Chemical Reactions Used to Make a Desired Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, M. L.; Talanquer, V.

    2015-01-01

    The central goal of this qualitative research study was to uncover major implicit assumptions that students with different levels of training in the discipline apply when thinking and making decisions about chemical reactions used to make a desired product. In particular, we elicited different ways of conceptualizing why chemical reactions happen…

  16. Recent applications of intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions to natural product synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, M.; Tanner, David Ackland

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review presents some recent examples of intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) reactions as key complexity-generating steps in the total synthesis of structurally intricate natural products. The opportunities afforded by transannular (TADA) versions of the IMDA reaction in complex molecu...

  17. Dynamical coupled-channels study of meson production reactions from EBAC@Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroyuki Kamano

    2011-10-01

    We present the current status of a combined and simultaneous analysis of meson production reactions based on a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model, which is conducted at Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of Jefferson Lab.

  18. Extraction of Nucleon Resonances From Global Analysis of Meson Production Reactions at EBAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroyuki Kamano

    2011-10-01

    We report the current status of exploring the dynamical aspect of the excited nucleon states through the comprehensive coupled-channels analysis of meson production reactions at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center of Jefferson Lab.

  19. Dynamical Coupled-Channel Model of Meson Production Reactions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.-S. H. Lee; A. Matsuyama; T. Sato

    2006-11-15

    A dynamical coupled-channel model is presented for investigating the nucleon resonances (N*) in the meson production reactions induced by pions and photons. Our objective is to extract the N* parameters and to investigate the meson production reaction mechanisms for mapping out the quark-gluon substructure of N* from the data. The model is based on an energy-independent Hamiltonian which is derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method.

  20. The influence of reactive side products in electrocatalytic reactions: methanol oxidation as case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Robert; Schnaidt, Johannes; Jusys, Zenonas; Behm, R Jürgen

    2013-11-11

    The role and impact of follow-up processes involving reactive side products in an electrocatalytic reaction is demonstrated for the electrooxidation of methanol at a Pt electrode. By using combined in situ infrared spectroscopy and online mass spectrometry and employing isotope-labeling techniques, it is shown that even small amounts of the incomplete oxidation products formaldehyde and formic acid have pronounced effects on the reaction. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. 40 CFR 721.10145 - Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino compound (generic). 721.10145 Section 721... Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino compound... identified generically as modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane,...

  2. Influence of rhizobacterial volatiles on the root system architecture and the production and allocation of biomass in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon (L.) P. Beauv.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaplace, Pierre; Delory, Benjamin M; Baudson, Caroline; Mendaluk-Saunier de Cazenave, Magdalena; Spaepen, Stijn; Varin, Sébastien; Brostaux, Yves; du Jardin, Patrick

    2015-08-12

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria are increasingly being seen as a way of complementing conventional inputs in agricultural systems. The effects on their host plants are diverse and include volatile-mediated growth enhancement. This study sought to assess the effects of bacterial volatiles on the biomass production and root system architecture of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. An in vitro experiment allowing plant-bacteria interaction throughout the gaseous phase without any physical contact was used to screen 19 bacterial strains for their growth-promotion ability over a 10-day co-cultivation period. Five groups of bacteria were defined and characterised based on their combined influence on biomass production and root system architecture. The observed effects ranged from unchanged to greatly increased biomass production coupled with increased root length and branching. Primary root length was increased only by the volatile compounds emitted by Enterobacter cloacae JM22 and Bacillus pumilus T4. Overall, the most significant results were obtained with Bacillus subtilis GB03, which induced an 81 % increase in total biomass, as well as enhancing total root length, total secondary root length and total adventitious root length by 88.5, 201.5 and 474.5 %, respectively. This study is the first report on bacterial volatile-mediated growth promotion of a grass plant. Contrasting modulations of biomass production coupled with changes in root system architecture were observed. Most of the strains that increased total plant biomass also modulated adventitious root growth. Under our screening conditions, total biomass production was strongly correlated with the length and branching of the root system components, except for primary root length. An analysis of the emission kinetics of the bacterial volatile compounds is being undertaken and should lead to the identification of the compounds responsible for the observed growth-promotion effects. Within the

  3. Species-specific production of microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOC) by airborne fungi from a compost facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G; Schwalbe, R; Möller, M; Ostrowski, R; Dott, W

    1999-08-01

    Thirteen airborne fungal species frequently isolated in composting plants were screened for microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOC), i.e., Aspergillus candidus, A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, Emericella nidulans, Paecilomyces variotii, Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium clavigerum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium cyclopium, Penicillium expansum, Penicillium glabrum, Penicillium verruculosum, and Tritirachium oryzae. Air samples from pure cultures were sorbed on Tenax GR and analyzed by thermal desorption in combination with GC/MS. Various hydrocarbons of different chemical groups and a large number of terpenes were identified. Some compounds such as 3-methyl-1-butanol and 1-octen-3-ol were produced by a number of species, whereas some volatiles were specific for single species. An inventory of microbial metabolites will allow identification of potential health hazards due to an exposure to fungal propagules and metabolites in the workplace. Moreover, species-specific volatiles may serve as marker compounds for the selective detection of fungal species in indoor domestic and working environments.

  4. $X(3872)$ production from reactions involving $D$ and $D^*$ mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, A Martinez; Navarra, F S; Nielsen, M; Abreu, Luciano M

    2014-01-01

    In this proceeding we show the results found for the cross sections of the processes $\\bar D D\\to\\pi X(3872)$, $\\bar D^* D\\to \\pi X(3872)$ and $\\bar D^* D^*\\to\\pi X(3872)$, information needed for calculations of the $X(3872)$ abundance in heavy ion collisions. Our formalism is based on the generation of $X(3872)$ from the interaction of the hadrons $\\bar D^0 D^{*0} - \\textrm{c.c}$, $D^- D^{*+} - \\textrm{c.c}$ and $D^-_s D^{*+}_s - \\textrm{c.c}$. The evaluation of the cross section associated with processes having $D^*$ meson(s) involves an anomalous vertex, $X\\bar D^* D^*$, which we have determined by considering triangular loops motivated by the molecular nature of $X(3872)$. We find that the contribution of this vertex is important. Encouraged by this finding we estimate the $X\\bar D^* D^*$ coupling, which turns out to be $1.95\\pm 0.22$. We then use it to obtain the cross section for the reaction $\\bar D^* D^*\\to\\pi X$ and find that the $X\\bar D^* D^*$ vertex is also relevant in this case. We also discuss t...

  5. Production of medium-chain volatile flavour esters in Pichia pastoris whole-cell biocatalysts with extracellular expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl-CoA: ethanol O-acyltransferase Eht1 or Eeb1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Shiwen; Fu, Junshu; Powell, Chris;

    2015-01-01

    Medium-chain volatile flavour esters are important molecules since they have extensive applications in food, fragrance, cosmetic, paint and coating industries, which determine different characteristics of aroma or taste in commercial products. Biosynthesis of these compounds by alcoholysis...

  6. Characterization of ionic liquid‐based biocatalytic two‐phase reaction system for production of biodiesel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhavathi Devi, Bethala Lakshmi Anu; Guo, Zheng; Xu, Xuebing

    2011-01-01

    /IL biphasic reaction system by mixing with substrates, which is highly effective for the production of biodiesel with more than 98% biodiesel yield and nearly 100% conversion of oil. Conductor‐like screening model for real solvent (COSMO‐RS) in silico prediction of substrate solubility and simulation...... a large chemical potential to move reaction equilibrium for maximum oil conversion and yield of target biodiesel. The reaction behavior and specificity of oil/IL biphasic system for enzymatic production of biodiesel were theoretically delineated through COSMO‐RS computation with experimental validation...

  7. 动物生产中挥发性脂肪酸的研究进展%Review of Volatile Fatty Acid in Animal Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗佳捷; 张彬; 兰欣怡; 王洁

    2012-01-01

    Volatile fatty acid is a short chain fatty acid,can regulate metabolism and preserve animal health.The article summarized the biological functions,measuring methods and research situations in animal production of volatile fatty acid.%挥发性脂肪酸是一种短链脂肪酸,在调节新陈代谢及维护动物机体健康等方面发挥着重要的作用。文章从生物学功能、测定方法及其在动物生产中的研究情况等方面对挥发性脂肪酸进行了综述。

  8. Contact allergy to a reaction product in Hirudoid cream: an example of compound allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenk, G; Kerckhoffs, H P; Schreurs, P H

    1987-02-01

    We have investigated patients with a contact allergy to Hirudoid cream. The hypersensitivity reactions appeared to be due to an allergy to the cream base, but the separate ingredients did not give rise to positive patch test reactions. The hypersensitivity proved to be due to an allergy to a reaction product, and the simultaneous presence of the preservatives 1,3,5-trihydroxyethylhexahydrotriazine and thymol was found to be necessary for the occurrence of a positive patch test reaction. A new allergen was found to be formed by the reaction between thymol and the degradation products of the triazine derivative. This allergen was identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy as 3-(hydroxyethyl)-5-methyl-8-(2-methylethyl)-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,3-benzoxazi ne.

  9. 40 CFR 721.5560 - Formaldehyde, polymer with (chloromethyl) oxirane and phenol, reaction products with 6H-dibenz[c...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (chloromethyl) oxirane and phenol, reaction products with 6H-dibenz oxaphosphorin-6-oxide. 721.5560 Section 721... Formaldehyde, polymer with (chloromethyl) oxirane and phenol, reaction products with 6H-dibenz oxaphosphorin-6... identified as formaldehyde, polymer with (chloromethyl) oxirane and phenol, reaction products with...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10190 - Formaldehyde, polymer with aliphatic diamine and phenol, reaction products with 4-methyl-2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... diamine and phenol, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone (generic). 721.10190 Section 721.10190... Formaldehyde, polymer with aliphatic diamine and phenol, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone (generic... identified generically as formaldehyde, polymer with aliphatic diamine and phenol, reaction products with...

  11. Ethanol yield and volatile compound content in fermentation of agave must by Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 comparing with Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alvarez, Arnoldo; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Sosa-Aguirre, Carlos; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Campos-García, Jesús

    2012-05-01

    In tequila production, fermentation is an important step. Fermentation determines the ethanol productivity and organoleptic properties of the beverage. In this study, a yeast isolated from native residual agave must was identified as Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 by 26S rRNA sequencing. This yeast was compared with the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pan1. Our findings demonstrate that the UMPe-1 yeast was able to support the sugar content of agave must and glucose up to 22% (w/v) and tolerated 10% (v/v) ethanol concentration in the medium with 50% cells survival. Pilot and industrial fermentation of agave must tests showed that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 yeast produced ethanol with yields of 94% and 96% with respect to fermentable sugar content (glucose and fructose, constituting 98%). The S. cerevisiae Pan1 baker's yeast, however, which is commonly used in some tequila factories, showed 76% and 70% yield. At the industrial level, UMPe-1 yeast shows a maximum velocity of fermentable sugar consumption of 2.27g·L(-1)·h(-1) and ethanol production of 1.38g·L(-1)·h(-1), providing 58.78g ethanol·L(-1) at 72h fermentation, which corresponds to 96% yield. In addition, the major and minor volatile compounds in the tequila beverage obtained from UMPe-1 yeast were increased. Importantly, 29 volatile compounds were identified, while the beverage obtained from Pan1-yeast contained fewer compounds and in lower concentrations. The results suggest that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 is a suitable yeast for agave must fermentation, showing high ethanol productivity and increased volatile compound content comparing with a S. cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

  12. Volatile compounds of commercial Milano salami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynier, A; Novelli, E; Chizzolini, R; Zanardi, E; Gandemer, G

    1999-02-01

    The relationship between extracted volatiles of Milano salami, one of the main dry-cured sausages produced in Italy, and their olfactory properties was studied. Volatile compounds were extracted by a purge-and-trap method, quantified using a flame ionisation detector and identified by mass spectrometry. Olfactory analysis was performed by sniffing the gas chromatographic effluent. Nearly 80 compounds were identified and quantified: most came from spices (60.5%), 18.9% from lipid oxidation, 11.8% from amino acid catabolism and 4.9% from fermentation processes. Panellists detected 19 odours by sniffing. These odours were associated with spices, lipid oxidation or fermentation and were in agreement with the contributions of each reaction to the overall aroma of the product.

  13. Effect of ozonation of swimming pool water on formation of volatile disinfection by-products - A laboratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram

    2016-01-01

    Ozonation experiments were performed using unchlorinated tap water used for filling municipal swimming pools, actual pool water and pool water polluted by addition of fresh tap water and artificial body fluid to evaluate ozone kinetics and water quality effects on formation of volatile disinfection...

  14. A plan to reduce volatile organic compound emissions from consumer products in Canada (excluding windshield washer fluid and surface coatings) : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    This report highlights the recommendations made by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment for the development of a guideline to provide a means by which to reduce (VOC) emissions from consumer products (excluding windshield washer fluid and surface coatings) in Canada. VOCs and nitrogen oxides react photochemically in the presence of sunlight to create ground-level ozone, a primary component of urban smog which has a detrimental effect on human health, agricultural crops and building materials. In recent years, most urban areas of Canada have shown an annual increase in the maximum acceptable air quality levels for ground level ozone. Reducing emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from consumer products was first suggested in 1990 by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment in phase one of their program entitled the 'Management plan for nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds'. Phase 2 of the program was implemented in 1997 to harmonize the emissions reduction program with the United States Environmental Protection Agency regulations. The Canadian Environmental Protection Agency (CEPA) recommended the following control options: (1) a CEPA guideline should be developed which states the maximum VOC and high-volatility organic compound (HVOC) content in Canadian consumer products including hair care products, herbicides, insecticides, air fresheners, deodorants, fungicides, surface cleaners, fragrance products, anti-microbial agents, laundry products and automotive detailing products. These limits should be identical to those found in the 1998 U.S. Final Rule for Consumer Products, (2) the CEPA guideline should require that records specifying VOC content in weight-per cent be maintained for a period of three years, (3) the CEPA guideline should include a declaration procedure for Canadian importers and manufacturers of consumer products to report to Environment Canada regarding the VOC content of their products, and

  15. Model studies on the pattern of volatiles generated in mixtures of amino acids, lipid oxidation-derived aldehydes, and glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, An; Kitrytė, Vaida; Venskutonis, Rimantas; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    The development of flavor and browning in thermally treated foods results mainly from the Maillard reaction and lipid degradation but also from the interactions between both reaction pathways. To study these interactions, we analyzed the volatile compounds resulting from model reactions of lysine or glycine with aldehydes originating from lipid oxidation [hexanal, (E)-2-hexenal, or (2E,4E)-decadienal] in the presence and absence of glucose. The main reaction products identified in these model...

  16. Reaction Product Identification in Extreme Chemical Environments by Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Brooks

    Molecular rotational spectroscopy has several advantages for detection of reaction intermediates and products under extreme laboratory conditions. Rotational spectroscopy has high sensitivity to the molecular structure and provides high spectral resolution in low pressure environments. Furthermore, quantum chemistry provides accurate estimates of the spectroscopic parameters. As a result, rotational spectroscopy can identify molecular species in complex reaction mixtures without the need for chromatographic separation and without the need for a previously recorded ``library spectrum'' of the molecule. The application of chirped pulse Fourier transform rotational spectroscopy methods for the identification of molecules of astrochemical interest formed in pulsed discharge sources will be described including recent advances for high-throughput mm-wave spectroscopy. The set of reaction products created in the experiment can provide insight into the reaction mechanism. Reactions involving the CN radical will be discussed. These reactions can be barrierless making them candidates for interstellar gas reactions. The possibility that interstellar cyanomethanimine is produced by gas phase radical-neutral reactions instead of surface chemistry on grain-supported ices will be discussed using recent spatially resolved chemical images in Sagittarius B2 observed with the Jansky Very Large Array. This work supported by NSF CHE 1213200.

  17. Biodiesel production from integration between reaction and separation system: reactive distillation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Nívea de Lima; Santander, Carlos Mario Garcia; Batistella, César Benedito; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf

    2010-05-01

    Biodiesel is a clean burning fuel derived from a renewable feedstock such as vegetable oil or animal fat. It is biodegradable, non-inflammable, non-toxic, and produces lesser carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons than petroleum-based fuel. The purpose of the present work is to present an efficient process using reactive distillation columns applied to biodiesel production. Reactive distillation is the simultaneous implementation of reaction and separation within a single unit of column. Nowadays, it is appropriately called "Intensified Process". This combined operation is especially suited for the chemical reaction limited by equilibrium constraints, since one or more of the products of the reaction are continuously separated from the reactants. This work presents the biodiesel production from soybean oil and bioethanol by reactive distillation. Different variables affect the conventional biodiesel production process such as: catalyst concentration, reaction temperature, level of agitation, ethanol/soybean oil molar ratio, reaction time, and raw material type. In this study, the experimental design was used to optimize the following process variables: the catalyst concentration (from 0.5 wt.% to 1.5 wt.%), the ethanol/soybean oil molar ratio (from 3:1 to 9:1). The reactive column reflux rate was 83 ml/min, and the reaction time was 6 min.

  18. Drought-tolerance of wheat improved by rhizosphere bacteria from harsh environments: enhanced biomass production and reduced emissions of stress volatiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salme Timmusk

    Full Text Available Water is the key resource limiting world agricultural production. Although an impressive number of research reports have been published on plant drought tolerance enhancement via genetic modifications during the last few years, progress has been slower than expected. We suggest a feasible alternative strategy by application of rhizospheric bacteria coevolved with plant roots in harsh environments over millions of years, and harboring adaptive traits improving plant fitness under biotic and abiotic stresses. We show the effect of bacterial priming on wheat drought stress tolerance enhancement, resulting in up to 78% greater plant biomass and five-fold higher survivorship under severe drought. We monitored emissions of seven stress-related volatiles from bacterially-primed drought-stressed wheat seedlings, and demonstrated that three of these volatiles are likely promising candidates for a rapid non-invasive technique to assess crop drought stress and its mitigation in early phases of stress development. We conclude that gauging stress by elicited volatiles provides an effectual platform for rapid screening of potent bacterial strains and that priming with isolates of rhizospheric bacteria from harsh environments is a promising, novel way to improve plant water use efficiency. These new advancements importantly contribute towards solving food security issues in changing climates.

  19. Volatility and entrainment of feed components and product glass characteristics during pilot-scale vitrification of simulated Hanford site low-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shade, J.W.

    1996-05-03

    Commercially available melter technologies were tested for application to vitrification of Hanford site low-level waste (LLW). Testing was conducted at vendor facilities using a non-radioactive LLW simulant. Technologies tested included four Joule-heated melter types, a carbon electrode melter, a cyclone combustion melter, and a plasma torch-fired melter. A variety of samples were collected during the vendor tests and analyzed to provide data to support evaluation of the technologies. This paper describes the evaluation of melter feed component volatility and entrainment losses and product glass samples produced during the vendor tests. All vendors produced glasses that met minimum leach criteria established for the test glass formulations, although in many cases the waste oxide loading was less than intended. Entrainment was much lower in Joule-heated systems than in the combustion or plasma torch-fired systems. Volatility of alkali metals, halogens, B, Mo, and P were severe for non-Joule-heated systems. While losses of sulfur were significant for all systems, the volatility of other components was greatly reduced for some configurations of Joule-heated melters. Data on approaches to reduce NO{sub x} generation, resulting from high nitrate and nitrite content in the double-shell slurry feed, are also presented.

  20. Effects of reduced levels of sulfite in wine production using mixtures with lysozyme and dimethyl dicarbonate on levels of volatile and biogenic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancín-Azpilicueta, Carmen; Jiménez-Moreno, Nerea; Moler, José Antonio; Nieto-Rojo, Rodrigo; Urmeneta, Henar

    2016-10-01

    Sulphur dioxide (SO2) is an important preservative for wine, but its presence in foods can cause allergies and this has given impetus to the research for alternatives. The aim of this study was to reduce levels of sulfite in wine production using mixtures with lysozyme and dimethyl dicarbonate and examine the influence on levels of volatile and biogenic amines. To do so, vinifications were carried out using lysozyme, dimethyl dicarbonate (DMDC) and mixtures of these with SO2 in different concentrations (25 and 50 mg l(-1)). Results were compared with a control vinification with only SO2 (50 mg l(-1)). Mixing low concentrations of SO2 with lysozyme and DMDC reduced the concentration of biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, phenylethylamine + spermidine and spermine). In general, the total concentration of volatile amines (dimethylamine, isopropylamine, isobutylamine, pyrrolidine, ethylamine, diethylamine, amylamine and hexylamine) was higher in the sample fermented only with SO2. The concentrations of amines with secondary amino groups (dimethylamine, diethylamine, pyrrolidine) were higher in the sample only fermented with SO2 than those fermented with DMDC and lysozyme or with a mixture of preservatives. When SO2 was the only preservative in wine, total amine concentration (biogenic and volatile amines) was higher than for the rest of the treatments. Lysozyme by itself, and lysozyme mixed with SO2, both reduced the formation of biogenic amines but given the antioxidant activity of SO2 the use of the preservative mixture seems more advisable.

  1. Volatiles in inter-specific bacterial interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyc, O.; Zweers, H.; De Boer, W.; Garbeva, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures o

  2. Volatiles in inter-specific bacterial interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyc, O.; Zweers, H.; De Boer, W.; Garbeva, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures

  3. Stochastic volatility selected readings

    CERN Document Server

    Shephard, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Neil Shephard has brought together a set of classic and central papers that have contributed to our understanding of financial volatility. They cover stocks, bonds and currencies and range from 1973 up to 2001. Shephard, a leading researcher in the field, provides a substantial introduction in which he discusses all major issues involved. General Introduction N. Shephard. Part I: Model Building. 1. A Subordinated Stochastic Process Model with Finite Variance for Speculative Prices, (P. K. Clark). 2. Financial Returns Modelled by the Product of Two Stochastic Processes: A Study of Daily Sugar Prices, 1961-7, S. J. Taylor. 3. The Behavior of Random Variables with Nonstationary Variance and the Distribution of Security Prices, B. Rosenberg. 4. The Pricing of Options on Assets with Stochastic Volatilities, J. Hull and A. White. 5. The Dynamics of Exchange Rate Volatility: A Multivariate Latent Factor ARCH Model, F. X. Diebold and M. Nerlove. 6. Multivariate Stochastic Variance Models. 7. Stochastic Autoregressive...

  4. High temperature corrosion studies. A. Iron: based superalloy in SO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ atmospheres. B. Gas: solid reaction with formation of volatile species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T.K.

    1980-03-01

    The thermogravimetric method was used to study high temperature corrosion under SO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ atmosphere applied to Armco 18SR alloys with different heat treatment histories, Armco T310 and pure chromium between 750 and 1100/sup 0/C. The weight gain follows the parabolic rate law. The volatilization of the protective Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ layer via formation of CrO/sub 3/ was taken into account above 900/sup 0/C for long time runs. The parabolic rate and the volatilization rate, derived from fitting the experimental data to the modified Tedmon's non-linear model, were correlated using the Arrhenius equation. Armco 18SR-C has the best corrosion resistance of the Armco 18SR alloys. Armco T310 is not protective at high temperatures. The available rate data on the oxidation of chromium oxide, chlorination of chromium, oxidation-chlorination of chromium oxide, chlorination of nickel and chlorination of iron were found to be predictable. The calculation of high temperature volatilization rate was performed using the available fluid correlation equations and the Lennard-Jones parameters derived from the molecule with similar structure and from the low temperature viscosity measurement. The lower predicted volatilization rate is due to the use of the Chapman-Enskog equation with the Lennard-Jones parameters mostly derived from the low temperature viscosity measurement. This was substantiated by comparing the reliable high temperature diffusion rate in the literature with the above mentioned calculational method. The experimental volatilization rates of this study are compared with the other related studies and the mass transfer predictions.

  5. Cutin-derived CuO reaction products from purified cuticles and tree leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi, Miguel A.; Hedges, John I.

    1990-11-01

    Long chain (C 16-C 18) hydroxy fatty acids are obtained among the nonlignin-derived reaction products from the CuO oxidation of a variety of geochemical samples. In order to investigate the origin of these acids, the CuO reaction products of isolated cuticles and whole leaves were investigated. The reaction products from the CuO oxidation of purified apple ( Malus pumila) cuticle include 16-hydroxy-hexadecanoic acid, 10,16-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid, 9,10,18-trihydroxyoctadec-12-enoic acid, and 9,10,18-trihydroxyoctadecanoic acid as major components. The distribution of these cutin-derived CuO reaction products is similar to the monomer compositions deduced from traditional methods of cutin analysis. Oxidation of whole English Holly ( Ilex aquifolium) leaves yields cutin-derived acidic reaction products (in addition to lignin-derived phenols) similar to those obtained from oxidation of the corresponding isolated cuticles, indicating that CuO oxidation of bulk plant tissue is a viable procedure of cutin analysis in geochemical applications.

  6. Reactions between ozone and building products: Impact on primary and secondary emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Mélanie; Ramalho, Olivier; Maupetit, François

    Reactions of ozone on common building products were studied in a dedicated emission test chamber system. Fourteen new and unused products were exposed to 100-160 ppb of ozone at 23 °C and 50% RH during 48 h experiments. Ozone deposition velocities calculated at steady state were between 0.003 cm s -1 (alkyd paint on polyester film) and 0.108 cm s -1 (pine wood board). All tested product showed modified emissions when exposed to ozone and secondary emissions of several aldehydes were identified. Carpets and wall coverings emitted mainly C 5-C 10n-aldehydes, typical by-products of surface reactions. Linoleum, polystyrene tiles and pine wood boards also showed increased emissions of formaldehyde, benzaldehyde and hexanal associated with reduced emissions of unsaturated compounds suggesting the occurrence of gas-phase reactions. The ozone removal on the different tested products was primarily associated with surface reactions. The relative contribution of gas-phase reactions to the total ozone removal was estimated to be between 5% and 30% for pine wood boards depending on relative humidity (RH) and on the incoming ozone concentration and 2% for polystyrene tiles. On pine wood board, decreasing ozone deposition velocities were measured with increasing ozone concentrations and with RH increasing in the range 30-50%.

  7. Reaction of zearalenone and α-zearalenol with allyl isothiocyanate, characterization of reaction products, their bioaccessibility and bioavailability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, K; Saladino, F; Fernández-Blanco, C; Ruiz, M J; Mañes, J; Fernández-Franzón, M; Meca, G; Luciano, F B

    2017-02-15

    This study investigates the reduction of zearalenone (ZEA) and α-zearalenol (α-ZOL) on a solution model using allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and also determines the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of the reaction products isolated and identified by MS-LIT. Mycotoxin reductions were dose-dependent, and ZEA levels decreased more than α-ZOL, ranging from 0.2 to 96.9% and 0 to 89.5% respectively, with no difference (p⩽0.05) between pH 4 and 7. Overall, simulated gastric bioaccessibility was higher than duodenal bioaccessibility for both mycotoxins and mycotoxin-AITC conjugates, with duodenal fractions representing ⩾63.5% of the original concentration. Simulated bioavailability of reaction products (α-ZOL/ZEA-AITC) were lower than 42.13%, but significantly higher than the original mycotoxins. The cytotoxicity of α-ZOL and ZEA in Caco-2/TC7 cells was also evaluated, with toxic effects observed at higher levels than 75μM. Further studies should be performed to evaluate the toxicity and estrogenic effect of α-ZOL/ZEA-AITC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Surveillance of suspected adverse reactions to natural health products: the case of propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Mazzanti, Gabriela; Vitalone, Annabella; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Santuccio, Carmela

    2008-01-01

    Natural health products are promoted to the public as equally or more effective and less toxic than conventional drugs. However, some 'natural' medicines are known to have adverse effects. From April 2002 to August 2007, 18 suspected adverse reactions associated with propolis-containing products were reported to the national surveillance system of natural health products, coordinated by the Italian National Health Institute. Sixteen reports concerned allergic reactions (with dermatological or respiratory symptoms), while two concerned the digestive tract. Some of the reactions were serious: six patients were admitted to hospital or visited an emergency department and in two of these a life-threatening event was reported. In seven patients (four of whom were children), an allergic predisposition was indicated. Propolis, a resinous substance collected by honeybees from the buds of living plants, has been used for several purposes (dermatitis, laryngitis, oral ulcers) because of its wide range of suggested activities (antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and chemopreventive actions). However, propolis is also a potent sensitizer and should not be used in patients with an allergic predisposition, in particular an allergy to pollen. In Italy, products containing bee derivatives (bee pollen, royal jelly or propolis) are available to the public as food supplements. No label warning of possible adverse reactions is found on the packaging, although it is well known that atopic and asthmatic individuals may be at an increased risk of allergic reactions after using these products. The public and healthcare practitioners should be aware of the risk of allergic reactions to products derived from bees and a warning should be added to the packaging of these products.

  9. Fast online emission monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in wastewater and product streams (using stripping with direct steam injection).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schocker, Alexander; Lissner, Bert

    2012-03-01

    Open-loop stripping analysis (also referred to as dynamic headspace) is a very flexible and robust technology for online monitoring of volatile organic compounds in wastewater or coolant. However, the quality and reliability of the analytical results depend strongly on the temperature during the stripping process. Hence, the careful and constant heating of the liquid phase inside the stripping column is a critical parameter. In addition, this stripping at high temperatures extends the spectrum of traceable organics to less volatile and more polar compounds with detection limits down to the ppm-level. This paper presents a novel and promising approach for fast, efficient, and constant heating by the direct injection of process steam into the strip medium. The performance of the system is demonstrated for temperatures up to 75 °C and traces of various hydrocarbons in water (e.g., tetrahydrofuran, methanol, 1-propanol, n-butanol, ethylbenzene).

  10. Key volatile compounds in red koji-shochu, a Monascus-fermented product, and their formation steps during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu, Yen Yen Sally; Yoshizaki, Yumiko; Yamaguchi, Keiko; Okutsu, Kayu; Futagami, Taiki; Tamaki, Hisanori; Sameshima, Yoshihiro; Takamine, Kazunori

    2017-06-01

    Red koji, which refers the solid culture grown koji mold on the steamed rice, is one of the ingredients of Asian fermented foods including the Japanese spirit shochu. This study was aimed at elucidating the characteristic flavor and key volatile compounds of red koji-shochu as well as the mechanism of their formation. Sensory evaluation showed that red koji-shochu has the distinctive flavors cheese, sour, milky, and oily. Fifteen key volatile compounds of red koji-shochu were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography, and by comparison between red koji-shochu and white koji-shochu, as another typical shochu. The mash analysis revealed that ketone compounds and short-chain acids derive from red koji. Furthermore, although other key compounds were produced by yeast, it is highly likely that their concentrations were affected directly or indirectly by the high activities of protease and lipase in red koji.

  11. O/S-1/ interactions - The product channels. [collisional electron quenching and chemical reaction pathway frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanger, T. G.; Black, G.

    1978-01-01

    The first measurements are reported of the reaction pathways for the interaction between oxygen atoms in the 4.19 eV S-1 state, and four molecules, N2O, CO2, H2O, and NO. Distinction is made between three possible paths - quenching to O(D-1), quenching to O(P-3), and chemical reaction. With N2O, the most reasonable interpretation of the data indicates that there no reaction, in sharp contrast with the interaction between O(D-1) and N2O, which proceeds entirely by reaction. Similarly, there is no reaction with CO2. With H2O, the reactive pathway is the dominant one, although electronic quenching is not negligible. With NO, O(D-1) is the preferred product.

  12. Reactions of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Product Detection and Low-Temperature Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevitt, Adam J.; Goulay, Fabien; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-12-23

    Low temperature rate coefficients are measured for the CN + benzene and CN + toluene reactions using the pulsed Laval nozzle expansion technique coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The CN + benzene reaction rate coefficient at 105, 165 and 295 K is found to be relatively constant over this temperature range, 3.9 - 4.9 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. These rapid kinetics, along with the observed negligible temperature dependence, are consistent with a barrierless reaction entrance channel and reaction efficiencies approaching unity. The CN + toluene reaction is measured to have a slower rate coefficient of 1.3 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 105 K. At room temperature, non-exponential decay profiles are observed for this reaction that may suggest significant back-dissociation of intermediate complexes. In separate experiments, the products of these reactions are probed at room temperature using synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry. For CN + benzene, cyanobenzene (C6H5CN) is the only product recorded with no detectable evidence for a C6H5 + HCN product channel. In the case of CN + toluene, cyanotoluene (NCC6H4CH3) constitutes the only detected product. It is not possible to differentiate among the ortho, meta and para isomers of cyanotoluene because of their similar ionization energies and the ~;; 40 meV photon energy resolution of the experiment. There is no significant detection of benzyl radicals (C6H5CH2) that would suggest a H-abstraction or a HCN elimination channel is prominent at these conditions. As both reactions are measured to be rapid at 105 K, appearing to have barrierless entrance channels, it follows that they will proceed efficiently at the temperatures of Saturn?s moon Titan (~;;100 K) and are also likely to proceed at the temperature of interstellar clouds (10-20 K).

  13. Effect of different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on production of volatiles in Napa Gamay wine and Petite Sirah wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sangeeta; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2002-09-25

    Napa Gamay grapes were fermented with four different strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (VL1, MI16, Fermirouge, and RA17). Petite Sirah grapes were fermented with seven different strains of the same yeast (BM45, Fermirouge, RA17, NI, CX3079, A350, and A796). Volatile compounds formed in the wines were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Volatile compounds found in both wines were alcohols, esters, and acids, as well as some miscellaneous compounds. Isoamyl alcohol was the compound found in the highest relative amount with all four yeast strains in the Napa Gamay wines, followed by 2-phenyl ethanol, monoethyl succinate, and hexanoic acid. The relative amounts of isoamyl alcohol ranged from 30.84% (VL1) to 43.28% (RA17). Major volatile compounds found in Petite Sirah wines were isoamyl alcohol, 2-phenyl ethanol, 2-hydroxy ethyl propanoate, monoethyl succinate, and octanoic acid. The several esters, including 2-hydroxyethyl propanoate, may contribute to the fruity flavor of Petite Sirah wines. Overall, the S. cerevisiae yeast strains used to ferment Napa Gamay grapes and Petite Sirah grapes produced the same major components, with certain variations in formation levels.

  14. Pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr.) wine production in Angola: Characterisation of volatile aroma compounds and yeast native flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacassa, Eduardo; Trenchs, Oriol; Fariña, Laura; Debernardis, Florencia; Perez, Gabriel; Boido, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2017-01-16

    A pineapple vinification process was conducted through inoculated and spontaneous fermentation to develop a process suitable for a quality beverage during two successive vintages in Huambo, Angola. Wines obtained with the conventional Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, were analysed by gas chromatography, and a total of 61 volatile constituents were detected in the volatile fraction and 18 as glycosidically bound aroma compounds. Concentration levels of carbonyl and sulphur compounds were in agreement with the limited information reported about pineapple fruits of other regions. We report, for the first time in pineapple wines, the presence of significant concentrations of lactones, ketones, terpenes, norisoprenoids and a variety of volatile phenols. Eight native yeast strains were isolated from spontaneous batches. Further single-strain fermentations allowed us to characterise their suitability for commercial fermentation. Three native strains (Hanseniaspora opuntiae, H. uvarum and Meyerozyma guilliermondii) were selected with sensory potential to ferment pineapple fruits with increased flavour diversity. Results obtained here contribute to a better understanding of quality fermentation alternatives of this tropical fruit in subtropical regions.

  15. Effect of organic loading rate on methane and volatile fatty acids productions from anaerobic treatment of palm oil mill effluent in UASB and UFAF reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumate Chaiprapat

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME with the separation of the acidogenic and methanogenic phase was studied in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor and an up-flowanaerobic filter (UFAF reactor. Furthermore, the effect of OLR on methane and volatile fatty acid productions in UASB and UFAF reactors was investigated. In this research, UASB as acidogenic reactor wasused for volatile fatty acid production and UFAF as methanogenic reactor was used for methane production. Therefore, POME without pH adjustment was used as influent for the UASB reactor. Moreover, the syntheticwastewater with pH adjustment to 6.00 was fed into the UFAF reactor. The inoculum source for both reactors was the combination of POME sludge collected from the CSTR of a POME treatment plant and granulesludge collected from the UASB reactor of a frozen sea food industry treatment plant. During experimental operation, the organic loading rate (OLR was gradually increased from 2.50 to 17.5 g COD/l/day in theUASB reactor and 1.10 to 10.0 g COD/l/day in the UFAF reactor. Consequently, hydraulic retention time (HRT ranged from 20.0 to 2.90 days in the UASB reactor and from 13.5 to 1.50 days in the UFAF reactor.The result showed that the COD removal efficiency from both reactors was greater than 60.0%. In addition, the total volatile fatty acids increased with the increasing OLR. The total volatile fatty acids and acetic acidproduction in the UASB reactor reached 5.50 g/l and 4.90 g/l, respectively at OLR of 17.5 g COD/l/day and HRT of 2.90 days before washout was observed. In the UFAF reactor, the methane and biogas productionincreased with increasing OLR until an OLR of 7.50 g COD/l/day. However, the methane and biogas production significantly decreased when OLR increased up to 10.0 g COD/l/day. Therefore, the optimum OLR inthe laboratory-scale UASB and UFAF reactors were concluded to be 15.5 and 7.50 g COD/l/day, respectively.

  16. Reaction of cyclodextrins with propylene oxide or with glycidol: analysis of product distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitha, J; Szabo, L; Fales, H M

    1987-11-01

    Reaction of cyclomalto-hexaose, -heptaose, or -octaose with propylene oxide in strong aqueous alkali gave products in which distribution of the degrees of substitution was relatively narrow and nearly symmetrical, and increased with the average degree of substitution. When an equimolar mixture of cyclomalto-hexaose, heptaose, or -octaose was used, the average degrees of substitution of all three carbohydrates were close to each other. These findings indicate that the reactivities of the hydroxyl groups of cyclomalto-hexaose, -heptaose, or -octaose, and of all their (2-hydroxypropyl) ethers formed in the reactions, are quite similar. Reaction of cyclomaltoheptaose with glycidol also yielded a product having a narrow distribution of degree of substitution, but which was slightly skewed towards the higher degrees. Thus, as it proceeds, this etherification leads to products having higher reactivity towards the epoxide.

  17. Mode specificity and product energy disposal in unimolecular reactions: insights from the sudden vector projection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Guo, Hua

    2014-04-03

    A simple model is proposed to predict mode specificity and product energy disposal in unimolecular dissociation reactions. This so-called Sudden Vector Projection (SVP) model quantifies the coupling of a reactant or product mode with the reaction coordinate at the transition state by projecting the corresponding normal mode vector onto the imaginary frequency mode at the saddle point. Due to the sudden assumption, SVP predictions for mode specificity are expected to be valid only when the reactant molecule has weak intermodal coupling. On the other hand, the sudden limit is generally satisfied for its predictions of product energy disposal in unimolecular reactions with a tight barrier. The SVP model is applied to several prototypical systems and the agreement with available experimental and theoretical results is satisfactory.

  18. Understanding evolution of product composition and volatility distribution through in-situ GC × GC analysis: a case study of longifolene ozonolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Donahue

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A method for predicting volatility and polarity based on chromatographic information was developed and applied to the smog chamber ozonolysis of the sesquiterpene longifolene. The products were collected and analyzed using a GC × GC Thermal Desorption Aerosol Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (2D-TAG and a quadrupole Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS. All the secondary organic aerosol (SOA was produced within the first half hour of the experiment. However, the oxidation level of the organic aerosol, as inferred from the fraction of ion m/z 44, suggested continued evolution of the SOA over the subsequent hours. Measurements of speciated organic compounds using 2D-TAG confirm that the composition of the particles changed over the course of the experiment. Nearly 200 oxidation products (thought to be mostly ketones and acids were observed with 2D-TAG, but most could not be identified definitively due to a lack of standards and the absence of likely sesquiterpene oxidation products in available mass spectral databases. To categorize the observed products, the vapor pressure and oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O/C of observed compounds were estimated based on their two-dimensional chromatographic retention times relative to those of known standards, establishing a retention time correlation (RTC method for using 2D-TAG to better constrain important modelling parameters. The product distribution continuously evolved in volatility and oxygenation during 5 h of oxidation. Using peak area as the best available proxy for mass, we conclude that the product mixture includes many non-negligible products; the most abundant 3 compounds accounted for only half of the total observed peak area and 80 % of peak area was spread across 15 compounds. The data provide evidence for three conclusions: (1 2D-TAG provides valuable volatility and oxygenation information even in the absence of definitive species identification, (2 complex particle-phase chemistry causes

  19. Understanding evolution of product composition and volatility distribution through in situ GC × GC analysis: a case study of longifolene ozonolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Donahue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for predicting volatility and polarity based on chromatographic information was developed and applied to the smog chamber ozonolysis of the sesquiterpene longifolene. The products were collected and analyzed using a GC × GC Thermal Desorption Aerosol Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (2D-TAG and a quadrupole Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS. All the secondary organic aerosol (SOA was produced within the first half hour of the experiment. However, the oxidation level of the organic aerosol, as inferred from the fraction of ion m/z 44, suggested continued evolution of the SOA over the subsequent hours. Measurements of speciated organic compounds using 2D-TAG confirm that the composition of the particles changed over the course of the experiment. Nearly 200 oxidation products (thought to be mostly ketones and acids were observed with 2D-TAG, but most could not be identified definitively due to a lack of standards and the absence of likely sesquiterpene oxidation products in available mass spectral databases. To categorize the observed products, the vapor pressure and oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O/C of observed compounds were estimated based on their multi-dimensional chromatographic retention times relative to those of known standards, establishing a retention time correlation (RTC method for using 2D-TAG to better constrain important modelling parameters. The product distribution continuously evolved in volatility and oxygenation during 5 h of oxidation. Using peak area as the best available proxy for mass, we conclude that the product mixture includes many non-negligible products; the most abundant 3 compounds accounted for only half of the total observed peak area and 80% of peak area was spread across 15 compounds. The data provide evidence for three conclusions: (1 2D-TAG can provide valuable volatility and oxygenation information even in the absence of definitive species identification, (2 complex particle-phase chemistry

  20. Mesures de taux de production d'éléments gazeux et volatiles lors de réactions induites par des protons de 1 et 1,4 GeV sur des cibles épaisses de plomb-bismuth liquides

    CERN Document Server

    Tall, Yoro

    2008-01-01

    The integrated project EUROTRANS (European Research Programme for the Transmutation of High Level Nuclear Waste in an Accelerator Driven System) of the 6th Euratom Framework Programme aims to demonstrate the transmutation of radioactive waste in ADS (Accelerator Driven Sub-critical system). It will carry out a first advanced design of an experimental facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of transmutation, and will produce a conceptual design of an industrial facility dedicated to transmutation. An ADS consists of three fundamental elements: the accelerator of protons, the sub-critical core and the spallation target which one molten lead-bismuth concept is studied by the SUBATECH (physique SUBAtomique et des TECHnologies associées) laboratory in Nantes. The irradiation of molten lead-bismuth target with energetic proton beam generates volatile and radioactive residues. In order to determine experimentally the production rates of gas and volatile elements following a spallation reaction in a lead-b...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  2. Gaseous hydrocarbon production by the reaction of coal char with hydrogen plasma at relatively lower microwave power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, S.; Nishikubo, K.; Imamura, T. [Kyushu National Industrial Research Institute, Tosu (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Experimental conditions such as reaction temperature, microwave power and reaction pressure were changed in the reaction of carbon with hydrogen plasma. Methane was major product and other hydrocarbons such as acetylene and C2-C4 hydrocarbons were also produced. Methane production shows its maximum at 700-900 K and at 30W of microwave power. 2 figs.

  3. Occurrence of the Bunsen side reaction in the sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao-qiao ZHU; Yan-wei ZHANG; Zhi YING; Jun-hu ZHOU; Zhi-hua WANG; Ke-fa CEN

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to establish a closed-cycle operation technology with high thermal efficiency in the thermochemical sulfur-iodine cycle for large-scale hydrogen production.A series of experimental studies were performed to investigate the occurrence of side reactions in both the H2SO4 and HIx phases from the H2SO4/HI/I2/H2O quaternary system within a constant temperature range of 323-363 K.The effects of iodine content,water content and reaction temperature on the side reactions were evaluated.The results showed that an increase in the reaction temperature promoted the side reactions.However,they were prevented as the iodine or water content increased.The occurrence of side reactions was faster in kinetics and more intense in the H2SO4 phase than in the HIx phase.The sulfur or hydrogen sulfide formation reaction or the reverse Bunsen reaction was validated under certain conditions.

  4. Process intensification of esterification reaction for the production of propyl butyrate by pervaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakant R. Khudsange

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pervaporation is a membrane separation process vastly used for purification in chemical and allied industries. Esterification reaction can be intensified and enhanced by coupling with pervaporation reactor (PVR. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/polyethersulfone (PES composite membrane was used for the pervaporation coupled esterification reaction study. Esterification of butyric acid with n-propanol was taken as a model reaction for the study and to test the performance of pervaporation reactor. Catalyst p-toluenesulfonic acid was used for the esterification reaction. The effects of various reaction parameters on conversion of butyric acid such as reaction temperature, initial molar ratio of n-propanol to butyric acid, catalyst loading and reaction time were studied. Experimental results show that the increase of temperature, initial molar ratio, and catalyst concentration enhance the conversion of butyric acid considerably. The highest conversion of 96.41% was obtained at temperature 353 K, molar ratio of 2 and catalyst loading of 2.5%w/w at reaction time of 420 minutes. PVA/PES membrane used in the experiments shows the good activity and hydrophilicity and plays a vital role for enhancing the conversion by selectively removing water. Pervaporation coupled esterification shows the better choice over the conventional route for the production of esters. This technique is environment friendly and energy intensified approach as it reduces pollution and energy requirement.

  5. Deep subthreshold Xi;{-} production in Ar + KCl reactions at 1.76A GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agakishiev, G; Balanda, A; Bassini, R; Belver, D; Belyaev, A V; Blanco, A; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Braun-Munzinger, P; Cabanelas, P; Castro, E; Chernenko, S; Christ, T; Destefanis, M; Díaz, J; Dohrmann, F; Dybczak, A; Eberl, T; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O V; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzón, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Gil, A; Gilardi, C; Golubeva, M; González-Díaz, D; Guber, F; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Kanaki, K; Karavicheva, T; Kirschner, D; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kotte, R; Krizek, F; Krücken, R; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Lang, S; Lange, J S; Lapidus, K; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Mishra, D; Morinière, E; Mousa, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, L; Otwinowski, J; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Roy-Stephan, M; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Sailer, B; Salabura, P; Schmah, A; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Sudol, M; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wisniowski, M; Wojcik, T; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y V; Zhou, P; Zumbruch, P

    2009-09-25

    We report first results on a deep subthreshold production of the doubly strange hyperon Xi;{-} in a heavy-ion reaction. At a beam energy of 1.76A GeV the reaction Ar + KCl was studied with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer at SIS18/GSI. A high-statistics and high-purity Lambda sample was collected, allowing for the investigation of the decay channel Xi;{-} --> Lambdapi;{-}. The deduced Xi;{-}/(Lambda + Sigma;{0}) production ratio of (5.6 +/- 1.2_{-1.7};{+1.8}) x 10;{-3} is significantly larger than available model predictions.

  6. Reaction product analysis of aconitine in dilute ethanol using ESI-Q-ToF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Peng; Liu, Yong-Gang; Li, Fei; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2012-04-01

    The study was done to identify the reaction products of aconitine in dilute ethanol using electrospray ionization-triple quad time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF-MS). Five hydrolysates were detected, their pseudo-molecules are 632, 604, 586, 570, 500, they are 8-ethyoxyl-14-benzoylaconitine, benzoylaconine, pyraconitine, 8-acetyl-14-ethyoxylaconitine, aconine, respectively. Among them, 8-ethyoxyl-14-benzoylaconitine and 8-acetyl-14-ethyoxylaconitine were identified firstly as reaction products of aconitine in dilute ethanol, and can thus be used as indicators in quality control of medicinal Aconitum preparations used in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

  7. Influence of operating conditions for volatile fatty acids enrichment as a first step for polyhydroxyalkanoate production on a municipal waste water treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittmann, Timo; Steinmetz, Heidrun

    2013-11-01

    This work describes the generation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) as the first step of the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production cycle. Therefore four different substrates from a municipal waste water treatment plant (WWTP) were investigated regarding high VFA production and stable VFA composition. Due to its highest VFA yield primary sludge was used as substrate to test a series of operating conditions (temperature, pH, retention time (RT) and withdrawal (WD)) in order to find suitable conditions for a stable VFA production. The results demonstrated that although the substrate primary sludge differs in its consistence a stable composition of VFA could be achieved. Experiments with a semi-continuous reactor operation showed that a short RT of 4d and a small WD of 25% at pH=6 and around 30°C is preferable for high VFA mass flow (MF=1913 mg VFA/(Ld)) and a stable VFA composition.

  8. Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2011-01-01

      My concern is to understand augmentation as an emergent modality - among many others in ‘the expanding digital field' (Søndergaard M. , Transformative Creativity in the Expanded Digital Field, 2009)' - attributed to the production of contemporary art and the ‘archive of knowledge' in the (art......) museum. Augmentation, in this expanding digital field, is part of a production of new public spaces, as well as a new reality that affects and traverses art and institutions immanently and througout. The expanding digital field is transforming art and the art museum in a number of fundamental ways, a few...... that ties together ... (Robert J.K. Jacob, 2008) I suggest that a negotiation between reality-based interaction and a digital dialectic (Lunenfeld, 1999)(Søndergaard M. o., 2008) is becoming still more evident, on two levels: 1) As an investigation into (the visuality of) a digital reality under...

  9. Computational Raman spectroscopy of organometallic reaction products in lithium and sodium-based battery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Carrera, Roel S; Kozinsky, Boris

    2014-11-28

    A common approach to understanding surface reaction mechanisms in rechargeable lithium-based battery systems involves spectroscopic characterization of the product mixtures and matching of spectroscopic features to spectra of pure candidate reference compounds. This strategy, however, requires separate chemical synthesis and accurate characterization of potential reference compounds. It also assumes that atomic structures are the same in the actual product mixture as in the reference samples. We propose an alternative approach that uses first-principles computations of spectra of the possible reaction products and by-products present in advanced battery systems. We construct a library of computed Raman spectra for possible products, achieving excellent agreement with reference experimental data, targeting solid-electrolyte interphase in Li-ion cells and discharge products of Li-air cells. However, the solid-state crystalline structure of Li(Na) metal-organic compounds is often not known, making the spectra computations difficult. We develop and apply a novel technique of simplifying spectra calculations by using dimer-like representations of the solid state structures. On the basis of a systematic investigation, we demonstrate that molecular dimers of Li(Na)-based organometallic material provide relevant information about the vibrational properties of many possible solid reaction products. Such an approach should serve as a basis to extend existing spectral libraries of molecular structures relevant for understanding the link between atomic structures and measured spectroscopic data of materials in novel battery systems.

  10. Role of ( n,2 n) reactions in transmutation of long-lived fission products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apse, V. A.; Kulikov, G. G.; Kulikov, E. G.

    2016-12-01

    The conditions under which ( n,γ) and ( n,2 n) reactions can help or hinder each other in neutron transmutation of long-lived fission products (LLFPs) are considered. Isotopic and elemental transmutation for the main long-lived fission products, 79Se, 93Zr, 99Tc, 107Pd, 126Sn, 129I, and 135Cs, are considered. The effect of ( n,2 n) reactions on the equilibrium amount of nuclei of the transmuted isotope and the neutron consumption required for the isotope processing is estimated. The aim of the study is to estimate the influence of ( n,2 n) reactions on efficiency of neutron LLFP transmutation. The code TIME26 and the libraries of evaluated nuclear data ABBN-93, JEF-PC, and JANIS system are applied. The following results are obtained: (1) The effect of ( n,2 n) reactions on the minimum number of neutrons required for transmutation and the equilibrium amount of LLFP nuclei is estimated. (2) It is demonstrated that, for three LLFP isotopes (126Sn, 129I, and 135Cs), ( n,γ) and ( n,2 n) reactions are partners facilitating neutron transmutation. The strongest effect of ( n,2 n) reaction is found for 126Sn transmutation (reduction of the neutron consumption by 49% and the equilibrium amount of nuclei by 19%).

  11. Production of Zinc Borate for Pilot-Scale Equipment and Effects of Reaction Conditions on Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek BARDAKCI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, zinc borate (ZB was synthesized by reacting zinc oxide and boric acid in the presence of standard ZB (w/w, in terms of boric acid in order to promote crystallization. The effects of seed, H3BO3/ZnO (boric acid/zinc oxide ratio, reaction time, water volume, reaction temperature and cooling temperature on yield were investigated for pilot-scale equipment. The results indicated that the addition of seed (w/w to a saturated solution of reactants increased the yield of the reaction. The results of reaction yields obtained from either magnetically or mechanically stirred systems were compared. At various reaction times, the optimal yield was 86.78 % in a saturated aqueous solution. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and Thermogravimetric / Differential Thermal Analysis (TG/DTA. The results displayed that ZB was successfully produced under the optimized reaction conditions and the product synthesized had high thermal stability.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.2.4432

  12. Role of (n,2n) reactions in transmutation of long-lived fission products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apse, V. A.; Kulikov, G. G., E-mail: ggkulikov@mephi.ru; Kulikov, E. G. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The conditions under which (n,γ) and (n,2n) reactions can help or hinder each other in neutron transmutation of long-lived fission products (LLFPs) are considered. Isotopic and elemental transmutation for the main long-lived fission products, {sup 79}Se, {sup 93}Zr, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 107}Pd, {sup 126}Sn, {sup 129}I, and {sup 135}Cs, are considered. The effect of (n,2n) reactions on the equilibrium amount of nuclei of the transmuted isotope and the neutron consumption required for the isotope processing is estimated. The aim of the study is to estimate the influence of (n,2n) reactions on efficiency of neutron LLFP transmutation. The code TIME26 and the libraries of evaluated nuclear data ABBN-93, JEF-PC, and JANIS system are applied. The following results are obtained: (1) The effect of (n,2n) reactions on the minimum number of neutrons required for transmutation and the equilibrium amount of LLFP nuclei is estimated. (2) It is demonstrated that, for three LLFP isotopes ({sup 126}Sn, {sup 129}I, and {sup 135}Cs), (n,γ) and (n,2n) reactions are partners facilitating neutron transmutation. The strongest effect of (n,2n) reaction is found for {sup 126}Sn transmutation (reduction of the neutron consumption by 49% and the equilibrium amount of nuclei by 19%).

  13. Production of Zinc Borate for Pilot-Scale Equipment and Effects of Reaction Conditions on Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek BARDAKCI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, zinc borate (ZB was synthesized by reacting zinc oxide and boric acid in the presence of standard ZB (w/w, in terms of boric acid in order to promote crystallization. The effects of seed, H3BO3/ZnO (boric acid/zinc oxide ratio, reaction time, water volume, reaction temperature and cooling temperature on yield were investigated for pilot-scale equipment. The results indicated that the addition of seed (w/w to a saturated solution of reactants increased the yield of the reaction. The results of reaction yields obtained from either magnetically or mechanically stirred systems were compared. At various reaction times, the optimal yield was 86.78 % in a saturated aqueous solution. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and Thermogravimetric / Differential Thermal Analysis (TG/DTA. The results displayed that ZB was successfully produced under the optimized reaction conditions and the product synthesized had high thermal stability.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.2.4432

  14. $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi '$ production in p, O and S induced reactions at SPS energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, M C; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, Marc; Bordalo, P; Bohrani, A; Bussière, A; Busson, P; Castor, J I; Chambon, T; Charlot, C; Chaurand, B; Chevrot, I; Contardo, D; Descroix, E; Devaux, A; Drapier, O; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Ferreira, R; Fleuret, F; Force, P; Fredj, L; Gago, J M; Gerschel, C; Gorodetzky, P; Grossiord, J Y; Guichard, A; Guillaud, J P; Haroutunian, R; Jouan, D; Kluberg, L; Kossakowski, R; Landaud, G; Lourenço, C; Luquin, Lionel; Mandry, R; Mourgues, S; Ohlsson-Malek, F; Papillon, S; Pizzi, J R; Racca, C; Ramos, S; Romana, A; Ronceux, B; Saturnini, P; Silva, S; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Varela, J; Vazeille, F

    1999-01-01

    The production of the \\jpsi\\ and \\psip\\ charmonia states has been studied, through their dimuon decay, in proton, Oxygen and Sulphur induced reactions, by the NA38 experiment at the CERN SPS. The proton data was collected with beams of 200 and 450~GeV, while the ion beams had an energy of 200~GeV per incident nucleon. The \\jpsi\\ production cross-section per nucleon-nucleon collision exhibits a remarkably continuous pattern, as a function of the product of the mass numbers of the interacting nuclei, from pp up to S-U reactions. The same pattern is observed within S-U collisions, as a function of the collision centrality. While in p-A interactions both charmonia states exhibit the same A-dependence, in \\mbox{S-U} collisions the \\psip\\ production is very strongly suppressed.

  15. $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi'$ production in p, O and S induced reactions at SPS energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, M C; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, Marc; Bordalo, P; Bohrani, A; Bussière, A; Busson, P; Castor, J I; Chambon, T; Charlot, C; Chaurand, B; Chevrot, I; Contardo, D; Descroix, E; Devaux, A; Drapier, O; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Ferreira, R; Fleuret, F; Force, P; Fredj, L; Gago, J M; Gerschel, C; Gorodetzky, P; Grossiord, J Y; Guichard, A; Guillaud, J P; Haroutunian, R; Jouan, D; Kluberg, L; Kossakowski, R; Landaud, G; Lourenço, C; Luquin, Lionel; Mandry, R; Mourgues, S; Ohlsson-Malek, F; Papillon, S; Pizzi, J R; Racca, C; Ramos, S; Romana, A; Ronceux, B; Saturnini, P; Silva, S; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Varela, J; Vazeille, F

    1999-01-01

    The production of the J/ psi and psi ' charmonia states has been studied, through their dimuon decay, in proton, oxygen and sulphur induced reactions, by the NA38 experiment at the CERN SPS. The proton data was collected with beams of 200 and 450 GeV, while the ion beams had an energy of 200 GeV per incident nucleon. The J/ psi production cross-section per nucleon-nucleon collision exhibits a remarkably continuous pattern, as a function of the product of the mass numbers of the interacting nuclei, from pp up to S-U reactions. The same pattern is observed within S-U collisions, as a function of the collision centrality. While in p-A interactions both charmonia states exhibit the same A-dependence, in S-U collisions the psi ' production is very strongly suppressed. (15 refs).

  16. Production of Solar-Grade Silicon by the SiF4 and Mg Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaobing; Bao, Jianer; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2016-12-01

    Over 90 pct of the solar cells currently produced and installed are Si based, and this industrial dominance is expected to persist for the foreseeable future. The crystalline Si substrate accounts for a significant portion of the total cost of solar cells. In order to further reduce the cost of solar panels, there has been significant effort in producing inexpensive solar-grade Si, mainly through three paths: (1) modification of the Siemens process to lower production costs, (2) upgrading metallurgical-grade Si to reach solar-grade purity, and (3) by means of new metallurgical processes such as the reduction of a silicon halide, e.g., SiF4 or SiCl4, by a reactive metal such as Na or Zn. In this paper, we describe an alternative path that uses Mg to react with SiF4 to produce low-cost solar grade Si. Experimental conditions for complete reaction and separation of the products, Si and MgF2, as well as aspects of the reaction mechanism are described. The reaction involves both a heterogeneous liquid-gas phase reaction and a homogeneous gas-gas phase reaction. When pure Mg was used, the Si product obtained had sub-ppm levels of B and P impurities and is expected to be suitable for solar cell applications.

  17. Production of Solar-Grade Silicon by the SiF4 and Mg Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaobing; Bao, Jianer; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2016-08-01

    Over 90 pct of the solar cells currently produced and installed are Si based, and this industrial dominance is expected to persist for the foreseeable future. The crystalline Si substrate accounts for a significant portion of the total cost of solar cells. In order to further reduce the cost of solar panels, there has been significant effort in producing inexpensive solar-grade Si, mainly through three paths: (1) modification of the Siemens process to lower production costs, (2) upgrading metallurgical-grade Si to reach solar-grade purity, and (3) by means of new metallurgical processes such as the reduction of a silicon halide, e.g., SiF4 or SiCl4, by a reactive metal such as Na or Zn. In this paper, we describe an alternative path that uses Mg to react with SiF4 to produce low-cost solar grade Si. Experimental conditions for complete reaction and separation of the products, Si and MgF2, as well as aspects of the reaction mechanism are described. The reaction involves both a heterogeneous liquid-gas phase reaction and a homogeneous gas-gas phase reaction. When pure Mg was used, the Si product obtained had sub-ppm levels of B and P impurities and is expected to be suitable for solar cell applications.

  18. Chemoselective reaction of cyanoacetic acid with benzal-4-acetylanilines and fungitoxicity of products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anjali Sidhu; J R Sharma; Mangat Rai

    2009-07-01

    Cyanoacetic acid reacted chemoselectively with carbon-nitrogen double bond of benzal-4-acetylaniliines, leaving the carbon-oxygen double bond, considered to be more reactive, intact, leading to the formation of mono addition-elimination products rather than bis attack at both the reactive centres, even when the reaction was carried out with two moles of cyanoacetic acid. The product viz. benzalcyanoacetic acid and its derivatives were screened for their fungitoxicity against five pathogenic fungi.

  19. Prediction of insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis strains by polymerase chain reaction product profiles.

    OpenAIRE

    Carozzi, N B; Kramer, V C; Warren, G W; Evola, S; Koziel, M G

    1991-01-01

    A rapid analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis strains predictive of insecticidal activity was established by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology. Primers specific to regions of high homology within genes encoding three major classes of B. thuringiensis crystal proteins were used to generate a PCR product profile characteristic of each insecticidal class. Predictions of insecticidal activity were made on the basis of the electrophoretic patterns of the PCR products. Included in the s...

  20. Determination of 68Ga production parameters by different reactions using ALICE and TALYS codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahdi Sadeghi; Tayeb Kakavand; Leila Mokhtari; Zohreh Gholamzadeh

    2009-02-01

    Gallium-68 (1/2 = 68 min, + = 89%) is an important positron-emitting radionuclide for positron emission tomography and used in nuclear medicine for diagnosing tumours. This study gives a suitable reaction to produce 68Ga. Gallium-68 excitation function via 68Zn(, ) 68Ga, 68Zn(, 2) 68Ga, 70Zn(, 3) 68Ga and 65Cu(, ) 68Ga reactions were calculated by ALICE-91 and TALYS-1.0 codes. The calculated excitation function of 68Zn(, ) 68Ga reaction was compared with the reported measurement and evaluations. Requisite thickness of the targets was obtained by SRIM code for each reaction. The 68Ga production yield was evaluated using excitation function and stopping power.

  1. Characterization of the products formed by the reaction of trichlorocyanuric acid with 2-propanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandercock, P Mark L; Barnett, Julie S

    2009-11-01

    We report a recent investigation into the death of a cat that was initially thought to involve intentionally burning the animal via the use of an ignitable liquid. The exposure of the animal to flame was ruled out. Instead, forensic investigation revealed the intentional mixing together of a common outdoor swimming pool chlorinator, trichlorocyanuric acid (TCCA), and 2-propanol (aka, isopropyl alcohol or rubbing alcohol). The reaction of these two chemicals resulted in the formation of cyanuric acid residue, hydrochloric acid, and the evolution of a significant volume of chlorine gas. Further alpha-chlorination side reactions also occurred between 2-propanol and TCCA to produce a variety of chlorinated 2-propanone species that were detected on the submitted evidence. The identification of the products of both the main reaction and the side reactions allowed the authors to determine what chemicals were originally mixed together by the culprit.

  2. Food Processing and Maillard Reaction Products: Effect on Human Health and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanna, Nahid; Mahmood, Niaz

    2015-01-01

    Maillard reaction produces flavour and aroma during cooking process; and it is used almost everywhere from the baking industry to our day to day life to make food tasty. It is often called nonenzymatic browning reaction since it takes place in the absence of enzyme. When foods are being processed or cooked at high temperature, chemical reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars leads to the formation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs). Depending on the way the food is being processed, both beneficial and toxic MRPs can be produced. Therefore, there is a need to understand the different types of MRPs and their positive or negative health effects. In this review we have summarized how food processing effects MRP formation in some of the very common foods.

  3. Food Processing and Maillard Reaction Products: Effect on Human Health and Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Tamanna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction produces flavour and aroma during cooking process; and it is used almost everywhere from the baking industry to our day to day life to make food tasty. It is often called nonenzymatic browning reaction since it takes place in the absence of enzyme. When foods are being processed or cooked at high temperature, chemical reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars leads to the formation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs. Depending on the way the food is being processed, both beneficial and toxic MRPs can be produced. Therefore, there is a need to understand the different types of MRPs and their positive or negative health effects. In this review we have summarized how food processing effects MRP formation in some of the very common foods.

  4. Fuel Oxidizer Reaction Products (FORP) Contamination of Service Module (SM) and Release of N-nitrosodimethylamine(NDMA)in a Humid Environment from Crew EVA Suits Contaminated with FORP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidl, William; Mikatarian, Ron; Lam, Chiu-Wing; West, Bil; Buchanan, Vanessa; Dee, Louis; Baker, David; Koontz, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The Service Module (SM) is an element of the Russian Segment of the International Space Station (ISS). One of the functions of the SM is to provide attitude control for the ISS using thrusters when the U.S. Control Moment Gyros (CMG's) must be desaturated. Prior to an Extravehicular Activity (EVA) on the Russian Segment, the Docking Compartment (DC1) is depressurized, as it is used as an airlock. When the DC1 is depressurized, the CMG's margin of momentum is insufficient and the SM attitude control thrusters need to fire to desaturate the CMG's. SM roll thruster firings induce contamination onto adjacent surfaces with Fuel Oxidizer Reaction Products (FORP). FORP is composed of both volatile and non-volatile components. One of the components of FORP is the potent carcinogen N-nitrosdimethylamine (NDMA). Since the EVA crewmembers often enter the area surrounding the thrusters for tasks on the aft end of the SM and when translating to other areas of the Russian Segment, the presence of FORP is a concern. This paper will discuss FORP contamination of the SM surfaces, the release of NDMA in a humid environment from crew EVA suits, if they happen to be contaminated with FORP, and the toxicological risk associated with the NDMA release.

  5. Acid-Catalyzed Transesterification Reaction of Beef Tallow For Biodiesel Production By Factor Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Ehiri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a diesel grade fuel made by transesterification reaction of vegetable oils and animal fats with alcohol. Three variable factors that affect the yield of biodiesel namely, reaction time, reaction temperature and catalyst concentration were studied in this work. The biodiesel was produced via a batchprocess acid-catalyzed transesterification reaction of beef tallow with methanol. Optimal conditions for the reaction were established in a three factor two-level (23 central composite design with the biodiesel pretreatment yield as the response surface. The results show that the mean yield of biodiesel was 92.04% with a standard deviation of 5.16. An optimal biodiesel yield of 96.30% occurred at 0.5% HCl catalyst concentration and at constant conditions of 1.5h reaction time, 60oC reaction temperature and 6:1 methanol: tallow volume ratio. Gas chromatographic analysis of the beef tallow identified palmitic, stearic and oleic acids in it while the fatty acid methyl esters in the biodiesel product were oleate and linoleate. Catalysis was the most significant factor in the transesterification process.

  6. Concurrent extraction and reaction for the production of biodiesel from wet microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hanjin; Lee, HanSol; Park, Min S; Yang, Ji-Won; Lee, Jae W

    2014-01-01

    This work addresses a reliable in situ transesterification process which integrates lipid extraction from wet microalgae, and its conversion to biodiesel, with a yield higher than 90 wt.%. This process enables single-step production of biodiesel from microalgae by mixing wet microalgal cells with solvent, methanol, and acid catalyst; and then heating them in one pot. The effects of reaction parameters such as reaction temperature, wet cell weight, reaction time, and catalyst volume on the conversion yield are investigated. This simultaneous extraction and transesterification of wet microalgae may enable a significant reduction in energy consumption by eliminating the drying process of algal cells and realize the economic production of biodiesel using wet microalgae.

  7. Rapid and sensitive detection of Campylobacter spp. in chicken products by using the polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesendorf, B A; Quint, W G; Henkens, M H; Stegeman, H; Huf, F A; Niesters, H G

    1992-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) after a short enrichment culture was used to detect Campylobacter spp. in chicken products. After the 16S rRNA gene sequence of Campylobacter jejuni was determined and compared with known sequences from other enterobacteria, a primer and probe combination was sele

  8. Hyperon production in photonuclear reactions on protons and deuterons : The Kappa(0)Sigma(+) channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohner, H; Bacelar, J; Castelijns, R; Messchendorp, J; Shende, S; Maeda, K; Tamura, H; Nakamura, SN; Hashimoto, O

    2004-01-01

    With the combined setup of the Crystal Barrel and TAPS photonspectrometers at ELSA in Bonn we have studied photonuclear reactions on protons and deuterons. From the series of experiments on single and multiple neutral meson emission we concentrate here on the hyperon production off protons and deute

  9. A new branch of advertising: reviewing factors that influence reactions to product placement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reijmersdal, E.; Neijens, P.; Smit, E.G.

    2009-01-01

    This iiterature review presents a quantitative synthesis of 57 studies on product placement and shows which factors are most effective, it shows that placement characteristics, such as placement commerciality, modality, and prominence, have a strong impact on audience reactions. Audience characteris

  10. Characterization of cement minerals, cements and their reaction products at the atomic and nano scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen; Hall, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances and highlights in characterization methods are reviewed for cement minerals, cements and their reaction products. The emphasis is on X-ray and neutron diffraction, and on nuclear magnetic resonance methods, although X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopies are discussed briefly...

  11. Age-related accumulation of Maillard reaction products in human articular cartilage collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, N.; Groot, J. de; Oldehinkel, E.; Bank, R.A.; Thorpe, S.R.; Baynes, J.W.; Bayliss, M.T.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Non-enzymic modification of tissue proteins by reducing sugars, the so-called Maillard reaction, is a prominent feature of aging. In articular cartilage, relatively high levels of the advanced glycation end product (AGE) pentosidine accumulate with age. Higher pentosidine levels have been associated

  12. Rapid and sensitive detection of Campylobacter spp. in chicken products by using the polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesendorf, B A; Quint, W G; Henkens, M H; Stegeman, H; Huf, F A; Niesters, H G

    1992-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) after a short enrichment culture was used to detect Campylobacter spp. in chicken products. After the 16S rRNA gene sequence of Campylobacter jejuni was determined and compared with known sequences from other enterobacteria, a primer and probe combination was

  13. 40 CFR 721.10154 - Quaternary ammonium compounds, dicoco alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium compounds, dicoco alkyldimethyl, chlorides, reaction products with silica. 721.10154 Section 721.10154 Protection of Environment... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10154 Quaternary ammonium...

  14. Detection and analysis of polymerase chain reaction products by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, G.B., Doktycz, M.J., Britt, P.F., Vass, A.A., Buchanan, M.V.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes recent and ongoing efforts to overcome some of the obstacles to more routine and robust application of MALDI-TOF to analysis of polymerase chain reaction products and other information- bearing nucleic acid molecules. Methods for purifying nucleic acid samples are described, as is the application of delayed extraction TOF mass spectrometry to analysis of short oligonucleotides.

  15. Kinetics and corrosion products of aqueous nitrate reduction by iron powder without reaction conditions control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiaomeng; GUAN Xiaohong; MA Jun; AI Hengyu

    2009-01-01

    Although considerable research has been conducted on nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron powder (Fe0), these studies were mostly operated under anaerobic and invariable pH conditions that was unsuitable for practical application.Without reaction conditions (dissolved oxygen or reaction pH) control, this study aimed at subjecting the kinetics of denitrification by microscale Fe0 (160-200 mesh) to analysis the factors affecting the denitrification of nitrate and the composition of iron reductive products coating upon the iron surface.Results of the kinetics study have indicated that a higher initial concentration of nitrate would yield a greater reaction rate constant.Additional test results showed that the reduction rate of nitrate increased with increasing Fe0 dosage.The reaction can be described as a pseudo-first order reaction with respect to nitrate concentration or Fe0 dosage.Experimental results also suggested that nitrate reduction by microscale Fe0 without reaction condition control primarily was an acid-driven surface-mediated process, and the reaction order was 0.65 with respect to hydrogen ion concentration.X-ray diffractometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that a black coating, consisted of Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and FeO(OH), was formed on the surface of iron grains as an iron corrosion product when the system initial pH was lower than 5.The proportion of FeO(OH) increased as reaction time went on, whereas the proportion of Fe3O4 decreased.

  16. Effects of organic loading rate on hydrogen and volatile fatty acid production and microbial community during acidogenic hydrogenesis in a continuous stirred tank reactor using molasses wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, J; Cho, K-S

    2016-12-01

    Microbial community associated with hydrogen production and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) accumulation was characterized in acidogenic hydrogenesis using molasses wastewater as a feedstock. Hydrogen and VFAs production were measured under an organic loading rate (OLR) from 19 to 35 g-COD l(-1)  day(-1) . The active microbial community was analysed using RNA-based massively parallel sequencing technique, and their correlation patterns were analysed using networking analysis. The continuous stirred tank reactor achieved stable hydrogen production at different OLR conditions, and the maximum hydrogen production rate (HPR) was 1·02 L-H2  l(-1)  day(-1) at 31·0 g-COD l(-1)  day(-1) . Butyrate (50%) and acetate (38%) positively increased with increase in OLR. Total VFA production stayed around 7135 mg l(-1) during the operation period. Although Clostridiales and Lactobacillales were relatively abundant, the HPR was positively associated with Pseudomonadaceae and Micrococcineae. Total VFA and acetate, butyrate and propionate concentrations were positively correlated with lactic acid bacteria (LAB) such as Bacillales, Sporolactobacillus and Lactobacillus. The close relationship between Pseudomonadaceae and Micrococcineae, and LAB play important roles for stable hydrogen and VFA production from molasses wastewater. Microbial information on hydrogen and VFA production can be useful to design and operate for acidogenic hydrogenesis using high strength molasses wastewater. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Volatile fatty acids production from food waste: effects of pH, temperature, and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianguo; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Kaimin; Wang, Quan; Gong, Changxiu; Li, Menglu

    2013-09-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, and organic loading rate (OLR) on the acidogenesis of food waste have been determined. The present study investigated their effects on soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), volatile solids (VS), and ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N). Both the concentration and yield of VFAs were highest at pH 6.0, acetate and butyrate accounted for 77% of total VFAs. VFAs concentration and the VFA/SCOD ratio were highest, and VS levels were lowest, at 45 °C, but the differences compared to the values at 35 °C were slight. The concentrations of VFAs, SCOD, and NH4(+)-N increased as OLR increased, whereas the yield of VFAs decreased from 0.504 at 5 g/Ld to 0.306 at 16 g/Ld. Acetate and butyrate accounted for 60% of total VFAs. The percentage of acetate and valerate increased as OLR increased, whereas a high OLR produced a lower percentage of propionate and butyrate.

  18. Evolution of Volatile Flavour Compounds during Fermentation of African Oil Bean (Pentaclethra macrophylla Benth) Seeds for "Ugba" Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwokeleme, C O; Ugwuanyi, J Obeta

    2015-01-01

    Fermented African oil bean (Pentaclethra macrophylla Benth) seed is a successful and well studied seasoning and snack in parts of Western Africa. GC-MS analysis of fermenting seeds revealed a mixture of several volatile aroma compounds which changed with time and starter organism. During natural mixed culture process 36 volatile compounds including 12 hydrocarbons, 10 esters, 5 alcohols, 2 phenols, 2 ketones, and one each of furan, amine, acid, thiophene, and lactone were identified. When Bacillus subtilis was used in pure culture, 30 compounds comprising 10 hydrocarbons, 8 esters, 3 alcohols, 2 amines, 2 sulfur compounds, and one of each of acid, aldehyde, phenol, ketone, and furan were identified. Sample fermented with B. megaterium produced 29 aroma compounds comprising 9 hydrocarbons, 10 esters, 2 nitrogenous compounds, 2 ketones, 3 alcohols, and one of each of lactone, aldehyde, furan, and amine. Methyl esters of various long chain fatty acids may be key aroma compounds, based on consistency and persistence. Qualitative or quantitative contribution of individual compounds may only be determined following flavour threshold analysis.

  19. Volatile Organic Compound emissions from soil: using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) for the real time observation of microbial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, P. R.; Behrendt, T.; Klapthor, A.; Meixner, F. X.; Williams, J.

    2014-08-01

    In this study we report on the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitric oxide (NO) from two contrasting soils (equatorial rainforest and arid cotton field) analyzed in a laboratory based dynamic chamber system. The effect of soil moisture and soil temperature on VOC and NO emission was examined in laboratory incubation experiments by measuring as a pre-saturated soil dried out. Our results suggest that real time monitoring of VOC emissions from soil using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) instrument can be used to improve our understanding of the release mechanisms of trace gases (e.g. NO, N2O) that are involved in the nitrogen cycle. Moreover, we report on the release rate of various VOC species, many of which exhibit a temperature dependent response indicative of biological production, namely a temperature amplification factor (Q10) ∼ 2-3. Contrary to the conventional modeling of NO emissions from soils, that the release of NO from the overall community across the range of soil water content can be modeled as an optimum function, we suggest that VOC measurements indicate there exist multiple distinct contributing microbial guilds releasing NO. These microbial guilds could likely be individually identified with the observed VOC profiles. Using a cotton field soil sample from a Sache oasis (Taklimakan desert, Xinijang, P. R. China), we identify five VOC emission groups with varying degrees of NO co-emission. An equatorial rainforest soil (Suriname) was shown to emit a variety of VOC including acetaldehyde, acetone, DMS, formaldehyde, and isoprene that vary strongly and individually as a function of temperature and soil moisture content. PTR-TOF-MS with high time resolution, sensitivity, and molecular specificity is an ideal tool for the real time analysis of VOC and NO emitting processes in soil systems. These experiments can be used as a template for future experiments to more completely and specifically

  20. Production of biodegradable plastics from volatile fatty acids using activated sludge; Kassei odei wo mochiiru kihatsuei teikyu shibosan kara no seibunkaisei plastic no seisan to hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Y.; Soejima, T.; Tomozawa, T. [Taisei Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Doi, Y. [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Tokyo (Japan); Kiya, F. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-08-21

    The production of biodegradable plastics, polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) from volatile fatty acids (VFA) by aerobic or anaerobic/aerobic activated sludge was investigated. The anaerobic/aerobic activated sludge produced co-polyesters composed of 2-4 monomer units from VFA(C 2-C 5), and that the contents in dried sludge were as high as 7.8. -18.2wt%. The anaerobic/aerobic activated sludge produced co-polyester composed of [R]-hydroxybuyrate (3HB), [R]-3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV), [R]-3-hydroxynonanoate(3HN), and [R]-3-hydroxydecanoate (3HD) with high yield of 40 wt% from acetic acid as the sole carbon source in nitrogen-free wastewater for 6-12 h. It was suggested that PHA production from wastewater treatment was possible by using the anaerobic/aerobic activated sludge. 9 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Competition between functionalization and fragmentation pathways in the OH-initiated oxidation of aqueous tartaric acid droplets: Reaction products and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C. T.; Chow, C. Y.; Chan, M. N.; Zuend, A.; Berkemeier, T.; Shiraiwa, M.

    2015-12-01

    To gain better insights into the competition between functionalization and fragmentation pathways for oxygenated organic compounds, we investigate the OH-radical initiated oxidation of aqueous tartaric acid (C4H6O6) droplets using an aerosol flow tube reactor. The molecular composition of reaction products is characterized by an atmospheric pressure ionization source (Direct Analysis in Real Time, DART) coupled with a high resolution mass spectrometer. The reaction produces four major products: a functionalization product (C4H4O6) and three fragmentation products (C3H4O4, C3H2O4 and C3H2O5), with a predominance of the functionalization product which supports the literature result that only less than 10% of carbon loss was observed for the OH oxidation of tartaric acid. The formation of the functionalization product (2-hydroxy-3-oxosuccinic acid, C4H4O6) can be attributed to that the tertiary alkyl radical, formed after hydrogen abstraction, reacts with an O2 molecule to form a hydroxyperoxyl radical which tends to quickly undergo intramolecular HO2 elimination without fragmentation. The molecular transformation of aqueous tartaric acid droplets is stimulated using the kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP) and the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model in order to take into account the change in particle-phase water and activities of reaction products during the oxidation. Results suggest that aqueous tartaric acid droplets become slightly less hygroscopic after oxidation due to the formation of less polar products. The formation of products with different hygroscopicities and volatilities largely determine the amount of particle-phase water, which in turn governs the size of the aqueous droplets and the concentration of the reactants. Consideration of the variation in water content in response to the chemical evolution in the aerosol is needed to better understand

  2. Measurement of Secondary Products During Oxidation Reactions of Terpenes and Ozone Based on the PTR-MS Analysis: Effects of Coexistent Carbonyl Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Yusuke; Tokumura, Masahiro; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Noguchi, Miyuki; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    Continuous measurements using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) can be used to describe the production processes of secondary products during ozone induced oxidation of terpenes. Terpenes are emitted from woody building materials, and ozone is generated from ozone air purifiers and copy machines in indoor environments. Carbonyl compounds (CCs) are emitted by human activities such as smoking and drinking alcohol. Moreover, CCs are generated during ozone oxidation of terpenes. Therefore, coexistent CCs should affect the ozone oxidation. This study has focused on the measurement of secondary products during the ozone oxidation of terpenes based on the use of PTR-MS analysis and effects of coexistent CCs on oxidized products. Experiments were performed in a fluoroplastic bag containing α-pinene or limonene as terpenes, ozone and acetaldehyde or formaldehyde as coexistent CCs adjusted to predetermined concentrations. Continuous measurements by PTR-MS were conducted after mixing of terpenes, ozone and CCs, and time changes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) concentrations were monitored. Results showed that, high-molecular weight intermediates disappeared gradually with elapsed time, though the production of high-molecular weight intermediates was observed at the beginning. This phenomenon suggested that the ozone oxidation of terpenes generated ultrafine particles. Coexistent CCs affected the ozone oxidation of α-pinene more than limonene. PMID:21139865

  3. Measurement of secondary products during oxidation reactions of terpenes and ozone based on the PTR-MS analysis: effects of coexistent carbonyl compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Yusuke; Tokumura, Masahiro; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Noguchi, Miyuki; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2010-11-01

    Continuous measurements using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) can be used to describe the production processes of secondary products during ozone induced oxidation of terpenes. Terpenes are emitted from woody building materials, and ozone is generated from ozone air purifiers and copy machines in indoor environments. Carbonyl compounds (CCs) are emitted by human activities such as smoking and drinking alcohol. Moreover, CCs are generated during ozone oxidation of terpenes. Therefore, coexistent CCs should affect the ozone oxidation. This study has focused on the measurement of secondary products during the ozone oxidation of terpenes based on the use of PTR-MS analysis and effects of coexistent CCs on oxidized products. Experiments were performed in a fluoroplastic bag containing α-pinene or limonene as terpenes, ozone and acetaldehyde or formaldehyde as coexistent CCs adjusted to predetermined concentrations. Continuous measurements by PTR-MS were conducted after mixing of terpenes, ozone and CCs, and time changes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) concentrations were monitored. Results showed that, high-molecular weight intermediates disappeared gradually with elapsed time, though the production of high-molecular weight intermediates was observed at the beginning. This phenomenon suggested that the ozone oxidation of terpenes generated ultrafine particles. Coexistent CCs affected the ozone oxidation of α-pinene more than limonene.

  4. Volatiles in Inter-Specific Bacterial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well-described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium, and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal, and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide) were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here, we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities.

  5. Volatiles in inter-specific bacterial interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf eTyc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities.

  6. Li production in alpha-alpha reactions. [relation to gamma ray observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovsky, B.; Ramaty, R.

    1974-01-01

    The cross section for Li-7 production in alpha-alpha reactions is shown to be increased by about a factor of 2 due to the excitation levels of Li-7 and Be-7 at 478 keV and 431 keV, respectively. The cross section for Li-6 production, however, remains the same as calculated on the basis of the detailed balance principle. The lines at 478 keV and 431 keV may link Li-7 production to feasible gamma-ray observations.

  7. Thermonuclear breakup reactions of light nuclei. II - Gamma-ray line production and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guessoum, Nidhal

    1989-01-01

    The main consequence of nuclear breakup reactions in high-temperature plasmas is shown to be to reduce the production of the gamma-ray lines, due to the breakup of these species at high temperature. Results of the emissivities of all the relevant gamma-ray lines are discussed. It is shown that the magnitude of the breakup effect on the line emissivities depends strongly on temperature, but more importantly on the plasma density and on the available time for the ion processes. Other effects considered include the production of neutrons (from the breakup of helium) and its consequences (such as the production of gamma rays from n-capture reactions and dynamical effects in accretion disk plasmas).

  8. The Reaction between CH3O2 and OH Radicals: Product Yields and Atmospheric Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Emmanuel; Sheps, Leonid; Whalley, Lisa; Heard, Dwayne; Tomas, Alexandre; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2017-02-21

    The reaction between CH3O2 and OH radicals has been shown to be fast and to play an appreciable role for the removal of CH3O2 radials in remote environments such as the marine boundary layer. Two different experimental techniques have been used here to determine the products of this reaction. The HO2 yield has been obtained from simultaneous time-resolved measurements of the absolute concentration of CH3O2, OH, and HO2 radicals by cw-CRDS. The possible formation of a Criegee intermediate has been measured by broadband cavity enhanced UV absorption. A yield of ϕHO2 = (0.8 ± 0.2) and an upper limit for ϕCriegee = 0.05 has been determined for this reaction, suggesting a minor yield of methanol or stabilized trioxide as a product. The impact of this reaction on the composition of the remote marine boundary layer has been determined by implementing these findings into a box model utilizing the Master Chemical Mechanism v3.2, and constraining the model for conditions found at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory in the remote tropical Atlantic Ocean. Inclusion of the CH3O2+OH reaction into the model results in up to 30% decrease in the CH3O2 radical concentration while the HO2 concentration increased by up to 20%. Production and destruction of O3 are also influenced by these changes, and the model indicates that taking into account the reaction between CH3O2 and OH leads to a 6% decrease of O3.

  9. Pressure Dependent Product Formation in the Photochemically Initiated Allyl + Allyl Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Zeuch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Photochemically driven reactions involving unsaturated radicals produce a thick global layer of organic haze on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. The allyl radical self-reaction is an example for this type of chemistry and was examined at room temperature from an experimental and kinetic modelling perspective. The experiments were performed in a static reactor with a volume of 5 L under wall free conditions. The allyl radicals were produced from laser flash photolysis of three different precursors allyl bromide (C3H5Br, allyl chloride (C3H5Cl, and 1,5-hexadiene (CH2CH(CH22CHCH2 at 193 nm. Stable products were identified by their characteristic vibrational modes and quantified using FTIR spectroscopy. In addition to the (re- combination pathway C3H5+C3H5 → C6H10 we found at low pressures around 1 mbar the highest final product yields for allene and propene for the precursor C3H5Br. A kinetic analysis indicates that the end product formation is influenced by specific reaction kinetics of photochemically activated allyl radicals. Above 10 mbar the (re- combination pathway becomes dominant. These findings exemplify the specificities of reaction kinetics involving chemically activated species, which for certain conditions cannot be simply deduced from combustion kinetics or atmospheric chemistry on Earth.

  10. Ozone deposition velocities, reaction probabilities and product yields for green building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamble, S. P.; Corsi, R. L.; Morrison, G. C.

    2011-12-01

    Indoor surfaces can passively remove ozone that enters buildings, reducing occupant exposure without an energy penalty. However, reactions between ozone and building surfaces can generate and release aerosols and irritating and carcinogenic gases. To identify desirable indoor surfaces the deposition velocity, reaction probability and carbonyl product yields of building materials considered green (listed, recycled, sustainable, etc.) were quantified. Nineteen separate floor, wall or ceiling materials were tested in a 10 L, flow-through laboratory reaction chamber. Inlet ozone concentrations were maintained between 150 and 200 ppb (generally much lower in chamber air), relative humidity at 50%, temperature at 25 °C and exposure occurred over 24 h. Deposition velocities ranged from 0.25 m h -1 for a linoleum style flooring up to 8.2 m h -1 for a clay based paint; reaction probabilities ranged from 8.8 × 10 -7 to 6.9 × 10 -5 respectively. For all materials, product yields of C 1 thru C 12 saturated n-aldehydes, plus acetone ranged from undetectable to greater than 0.70 The most promising material was a clay wall plaster which exhibited a high deposition velocity (5.0 m h -1) and a low product yield (

  11. Iron-catalyzed photochemical transformation of benzoic acid in atmospheric liquids: Product identification and reaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yiwei; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Hao; Wu, Taixing; Krzyaniak, Metthew; Wellons, Amina; Bolla, Dawn; Douglas, Kenneth; Zuo, Yuegang

    This study investigated iron-catalyzed photochemical oxidation of benzoic acid (BA), one of the major photodegradation products of petroleum hydrocarbons, under sunlight or monochromatic light irradiation in a wavelength range of 254-419 nm. The photochemical degradation of BA in the absence of iron (III) occurred at irradiation wavelengths below 300 nm. The photochemical transformation of BA in the presence Fe(III) was observed at both 254, 350, 419 nm and under solar irradiation. The half-life for the photodegradation of BA (100 μM) was 160±20 min in the presence of 20 μM Fe(III) at pH 3.20 on sunny August days at noon time. The degradation rate increased with increasing concentration of Fe(III). The reaction products were separated and identified using capillary electrophoresis (CE), gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and UV-Visible spectrophotometry. The major reaction products were 2-hydroxybenzoic, 3-hydroxybenzoic and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids. Hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and Fe(II) species were also formed during the photochemical reactions. The proposed reaction mechanisms include the photoexcitation of Fe(III) hydroxide complexes to form Fe(II) ions and hydroxyl radicals (OH rad ) that attack ortho, meta and para positions of BA to form corresponding monohydroxybenzoic acids and H 2O 2. The monohydroxybenzoic acids formed further react with hydroxyl and surperoxide radicals (HO 2- rad /O 2- rad ) to yield dihydroxybenzoic acids in atmospheric water droplets.

  12. [Vigilance for veterinary medicinal products: declarations of adverse reactions in the year 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müntener, C R; Bruckner, L; Stürer, A; Althaus, F R; Caduff-Janosa, P

    2012-02-01

    In 2010, we observed again an increase in the number of declarations reported to the vigilance system for veterinary medicinal products up to a total of 160. The species and drug classes reported remained the same as in previous years: the majority of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) concerned either dogs or cats and the most frequently involved drugs were either antiparasitic products or antiinfectives. Adverse reactions following reconversions and 8 cases of suspected allergic reactions following the use of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combinations in dogs were reported. Additional enquiries were processed by the Swiss Toxicological Information Centre and transmitted to Swiss medic. 11 of these reported accidental ingestions of flavoured tablets in overdose by dogs and some cats. The vaccino vigilance program received 179 declarations following immunization against blue tongue disease as well as 82 declarations following the application of other vaccines. The vigilance system increases the chance to identify rare reactions or interactions and thereby contributes to the security of veterinary medicinal products.

  13. The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of an α-pinene-derived organic nitrate: kinetics, products, reaction mechanisms, and atmospheric impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindelaub, Joel D.; Borca, Carlos H.; Hostetler, Matthew A.; Slade, Jonathan H.; Lipton, Mark A.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.; Shepson, Paul B.

    2016-12-01

    The production of atmospheric organic nitrates (RONO2) has a large impact on air quality and climate due to their contribution to secondary organic aerosol and influence on tropospheric ozone concentrations. Since organic nitrates control the fate of gas phase NOx (NO + NO2), a byproduct of anthropogenic combustion processes, their atmospheric production and reactivity is of great interest. While the atmospheric reactivity of many relevant organic nitrates is still uncertain, one significant reactive pathway, condensed phase hydrolysis, has recently been identified as a potential sink for organic nitrate species. The partitioning of gas phase organic nitrates to aerosol particles and subsequent hydrolysis likely removes the oxidized nitrogen from further atmospheric processing, due to large organic nitrate uptake to aerosols and proposed hydrolysis lifetimes, which may impact long-range transport of NOx, a tropospheric ozone precursor. Despite the atmospheric importance, the hydrolysis rates and reaction mechanisms for atmospherically derived organic nitrates are almost completely unknown, including those derived from α-pinene, a biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) that is one of the most significant precursors to biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA). To better understand the chemistry that governs the fate of particle phase organic nitrates, the hydrolysis mechanism and rate constants were elucidated for several organic nitrates, including an α-pinene-derived organic nitrate (APN). A positive trend in hydrolysis rate constants was observed with increasing solution acidity for all organic nitrates studied, with the tertiary APN lifetime ranging from 8.3 min at acidic pH (0.25) to 8.8 h at neutral pH (6.9). Since ambient fine aerosol pH values are observed to be acidic, the reported lifetimes, which are much shorter than that of atmospheric fine aerosol, provide important insight into the fate of particle phase organic nitrates. Along with rate constant

  14. TiCl4-promoted Baylis-Hillman reaction: mechanistic rationale toward product distribution and stereoselectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chandan; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2010-01-15

    The mechanism of TiCl(4)-promoted Baylis-Hillman reaction between methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and acetaldehyde, in the absence of any base, is studied using the mPW1K density functional theory. The study focuses on several mechanistic intricacies as well as selectivity issues at each step of the reaction. The minimum energy pathway for this reaction involves three major steps such as a chloride transfer resulting in a chloro-enolate, titanium-mediated aldol reaction, and elimination of HCl or HOTiCl(3). Both s-cis and s-trans conformers of MVK are considered along with various modes of chloride transfer involving different complexes between TiCl(4), aldehyde, and MVK. Chloride transfer is found to be kinetically more favored for s-cis-MVK than for s-trans-MVK. The diastereoselectivity in the next step, i.e., Ti-mediated aldol reaction between the enolate and aldehyde, is found to be dependent on the geometry of the enolate, wherein anti and syn BH products are predicted for Z and E enolates, respectively. An interesting secondary orbital interaction between the oxygen atoms of the enolate and aldehyde moieties in the transition states for the C-C bond formation is identified as one of the contributing factors toward the predicted diastereoselectivity in the formation of the alpha-chloromethyl aldol product (P2). It has earlier been reported that under different experimental conditions, any of the three products such as (i) a normal BH product (P1), (ii) 2-(chloromethyl)vinyl ketones (P3), and (iii) alpha-chloro methyl aldol could be generated (Scheme 1 ). The present study offers valuable insights toward rationalizing the observed product distribution as well as diastereoselectivity in TiCl(4)-promoted BH reaction under base-free conditions. The computed energetics indicate that when MVK is employed as the Michael acceptor, the formation of 2-(choromethyl)vinyl ketone is the preferred product rather than the corresponding normal BH product, consistent with the known

  15. Pricing Volatility Referenced Assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan De Genaro Dario

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatility swaps are contingent claims on future realized volatility. Variance swaps are similar instruments on future realized variance, the square of future realized volatility. Unlike a plain vanilla option, whose volatility exposure is contaminated by its asset price dependence, volatility and variance swaps provide a pure exposure to volatility alone. This article discusses the risk-neutral valuation of volatility and variance swaps based on the framework outlined in the Heston (1993 stochastic volatility model. Additionally, the Heston (1993 model is calibrated for foreign currency options traded at BMF and its parameters are used to price swaps on volatility and variance of the BRL / USD exchange rate.

  16. Heat of Combustion of the Product Formed by the Reaction of Acetylene, Ethylene, and Diborane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Stanley

    1957-01-01

    The net heat of combustion of the product formed by the reaction of diborane with a mixture of acetylene and ethylene was found to be 20,440 +/- 150 Btu per pound for the reaction of liquid fuel to gaseous carbon dioxide, gaseous water, and solid boric oxide. The measurements were made in a Parr oxygen-bomb calorimeter, and the combustion was believed to be 98 percent complete. The estimated net-heat of combustion for complete combustion would therefore be 20,850 +/- 150 Btu per pound.

  17. Measurements of photo-oxidation products from the reaction of a series of alkyl-benzenes with hydroxyl radicals during EXACT using comprehensive gas chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Hamilton

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Photo-oxidation products from the reaction of a series of alkyl-benzenes, (benzene, toluene, p-xylene and 1,3,5-trimethyl-benzene with hydroxyl radicals in the presence of NOx have been investigated using comprehensive gas chromatography (GCxGC. A GCxGC system has been developed which utilises valve modulation and independent separations as a function of both volatility and polarity. A number of carbonyl-type compounds were identified during a series of reactions carried out at the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE, a large volume outdoor reaction chamber in Valencia, Spain. Experiments were carried as part of the EXACT project (Effects of the oXidation of Aromatic Compounds in the Troposphere. Two litre chamber air samples were cryo-focused, with a sampling frequency of 30 minutes, allowing the evolution of species to be followed over oxidation periods of 3-6 hours. To facilitate product identification, several carbonyl compounds, which were possible products of the photo-oxidation, were synthesised and used as reference standards. For toluene reactions, observed oxygenated intermediates found included the co-eluting pair a-angelicalactone/4-oxo-2-pentenal, maleic anhydride, citraconic anhydride, benzaldehyde and p-methyl benzoquinone. In the p-xylene experiment, the products identified were E/Z-hex-3-en-2,5-dione and citraconic anhydride. For 1,3,5-TMB reactions, the products identified were 3,5-dimethylbenzaldehyde, 3,5-dimethyl-3H-furan-2-one and 3-methyl-5-methylene-5H-furan-2-one. Preliminary quantification was carried out on identified compounds using liquid standards. Comparison of FTIR and GCxGC for the measurement of the parent aromatics generally showed good agreement. Comparison of the concentrations observed by GCxGC to concentration-time profiles simulated using the Master Chemical Mechanism, MCMv3, demonstrates that this mechanism significantly over-predicts the concentrations of many product compounds and highlights the

  18. Where do herbivore-induced plant volatiles go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmo K. Holopainen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Herbivore induced plant volatiles (HIPV are specific volatile organic compounds (VOC that a plant produces in response to herbivory. Some HIPVs are only produced after damage, while others are also produced by intact plants, but in lower quantities. Among the known functions of HIPVs are within plant volatile signalling to activate systemic plant defences, the priming and activation of defences in neighbouring plants and the attraction of natural enemies of herbivores. When released into the atmosphere a plant’s control over the produced compounds ends. However, many of the HIPVs are highly reactive with atmospheric oxidants and their atmospheric life times could be relatively short, often only a few minutes. We summarise the potential ecological and atmospheric processes that involve the reaction products of HIPVs in their gaseous, liquid and solid secondary organic aerosol (SOA forms, both in the atmosphere and after deposition on plant surfaces. A potential negative feedback loop, based on the reactions forming SOA from HIPV and the associated stimulation of sun screening cloud formation is presented. This hypothesis is based on recent field surveys in the geographical areas facing greatest degree of global warming and insect outbreaks. Furthermore, we discuss how these processes could benefit the individual plant or conspecifics that originally released the HIPVs into the atmosphere. Further ecological studies should aim to elucidate the possible reasons for biosynthesis of short-lived volatile compounds to have evolved as a response to external biotic damage to plants.

  19. Heterogeneous and Photochemical Reactions Involving Surface Adsorbed Organics: Common Lignin Pyrolysis Products With Nitrogen Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.; Nichols, B. R.; Rapa, C.; Costa, V.

    2009-05-01

    Solid-air interfaces, such as airborne particulate matter and ground level surfaces, provide unique supports for tropospheric heterogeneous chemistry. These interfaces commonly contain surface adsorbed organics, such as lignin pyrolysis products, that can significantly alter their physical and chemical properties. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) provides an ideal tool for monitoring chemical changes in thin organic films during heterogeneous and photochemical reactions. Phenolic compounds, with and without co- adsorbed photosensitizers, were exposed to NO2 concentrations in the parts-per-billion range at 300 K and 20% relative humidity. Catechol, when mixed with benzophenone or dicyclohexylketone, formed 4- nitrocatechol as the dominant product under dark conditions. Deuterating the catechol alcohol groups caused the initial rate of reaction to decrease by a factor of 3.3±0.5, consistent with formation of the ortho- semiquinone radical as the rate determining step. The rate of 4-nitrocatechol formation did not increase under illuminated conditions, even with the presence of benzophenone a well known photosensitizer. UV-A/visible radiation did, however, initiate a photochemical reaction between benzophenone and 4-nitrocatechol, likely forming high molecular weight polymerization products. In contrast, 2-ethoxyphenol displayed no reactivity with NO2, even under illuminated conditions with a photosensitizer. Implications for the fate of lignin pyrolysis products, which are prevalent in biomass combustion smoke, will be discussed.

  20. Behaviour and hormonal status in healthy rats on a diet rich in Maillard reaction products with or without solvent extractable aroma compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebeková, Katarína; Klenovics, Kristína Simon; Boor, Peter; Celec, Peter; Behuliak, Michal; Schieberle, Peter; Heidland, August; Palkovits, Miklós; Somoza, Veronika

    2012-02-01

    Maillard reaction products (MRPs) are generated upon thermal processing of foods, modifying their colour and flavour. We asked whether aroma compounds generated via Maillard-type reactions modulate the in vivo effects of MRP-rich diets (MRPD). Male Wistar rats were fed for 3weeks either with a standard rat chow, an aroma compounds containing MRPD comprising 25% bread crust, or an aroma-extracted MRPD. In contrast to standard rat chow, consumption of MRPDs affected glucose control, induced hyper-leptinemia and hyper-adiponectinemia. Plasma adipokines were significantly higher in rats on aroma containing MRPD in comparison with those consuming aroma-extracted MRPD. Consumption of both MRPDs significantly increased the expression of the insulin receptor in the olfactory bulb, and mildly in the hypothalamus. Administration of the aroma containing MRPD significantly increased the leptin receptor expression in the olfactory bulb, and in the hypothalamus. Under both MRPDs, strong expression of c-fos indicated an increased neuronal activity in the olfactory bulb. Neuronal activity in brain areas involved in the central regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis was more pronounced in rats fed by the aroma containing MRPD. In conclusion, short-term consumption of a MRPD fortified with bread crust, particularly if containing solvent extractable volatile aroma compounds, affected the leptin-induced central signalling of anorexigenic/orexigenic hormones, and the neuronal activity in the central nervous system. Behavioural changes and altered glucose control were more evident in rats on the aroma containing MRPD. Our data suggest that volatile aroma compounds in foods might affect endocrine signalling and neuronal regulation of metabolism.

  1. Product lambda-doublet ratios for the O(3P) + D2 reaction: A mechanistic imprint

    CERN Document Server

    Jambrina, P G; Aldegunde, J; Brouard, M; Aoiz, F J

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, the development of theoretical methods have allowed chemists to reproduce and explain almost all of the experimental data associated with elementary atom plus diatom collisions. However, there are still a few examples where theory cannot account yet for experimental results. This is the case for the preferential population of one of the $\\Lambda$-doublet states produced by chemical reactions. In particular, recent measurements of the OD($^2\\Pi$) product of the O($^3$P) + D$_2$ reaction have shown a clear preference for the $\\Pi(A')$ $\\Lambda$-doublet states, in apparent contradiction with {\\em ab initio} calculations, which predict a larger reactivity on the $A"$ potential energy surface. Here we present a method to calculate the $\\Lambda$-doublet ratio when concurrent potential energy surfaces participate in the reaction. It accounts for the experimental $\\Lambda$-doublet populations via explicit consideration of the stereodynamics of the process. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that...

  2. Strangeness Production in Au+Au Reactions at √ {SNN} = 62.4\\ GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsene, Ionut-Cristian

    The measurement of strangeness is a valuable tool for understanding the reaction mechanism of nuclear collisions since all the strange particles need to be created during the reaction. Also, strangeness enhancement is one of the predicted signals of the QGP. In the present work we will discuss the behaviour of the strangeness production (i.e. K/π ratio) with rapidity and baryo-chemical potential in Au+Au collisions at 62.4 A GeV. In this particular reaction, BRAHMS is able to identify particles over 3.5 rapidity units and thereby cover a wide range of bar {p}/p ratios, including the fragmentation region. We will show spectra and ratios of identified particles as a function of pT and rapidity.

  3. Mn(II) Oxidation in Fenton and Fenton Type Systems: Identification of Reaction Efficiency and Reaction Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genuchten, Case M; Peña, Jasquelin

    2017-03-07

    Efficient and low-cost methods of removing aqueous Mn(II) are required to improve the quality of impacted groundwater supplies. In this work, we show that Fe(0) electrocoagulation (EC) permits the oxidative removal of Mn(II) from solution by reaction with the reactive oxidant species produced through Fe(II) oxidation. Manganese(II) removal was enhanced when the accumulation of aqueous Fe(II) was minimized, which was achieved at low Fe(II) production rates, high pH, the presence of H2O2 instead of O2 as the initial Fe(II) oxidant, or a combination of all three. In addition, in the EC-H2O2 system, Mn(II) removal efficiency increased as pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.5 and as pH increased from 6.5 to 8.5, which implicates different reactive oxidants in acidic and alkaline solutions. Chemical analyses and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that Mn(II) removal during Fe(0) EC leads to the formation of Mn(III) (0.02 to >0.26 Mn·Fe(-1) molar ratios) and its incorporation into the resulting Fe(III) coprecipitates (lepidocrocite and hydrous ferric oxide for EC-O2 and EC-H2O2, respectively), regardless of pH and Fe(II) production rate. The Mn(II) oxidation pathways elucidated in this study set the framework to develop kinetic models on the impact of Mn(II) during EC treatment and in other Fenton type systems.

  4. Novel consortium of Klebsiella variicola and Lactobacillus species enhances the functional potential of fermented dairy products by increasing the availability of branched-chain amino acids and the amount of distinctive volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Bravo, H; Morales-Torres, H C; Vázquez-Martínez, J; Molina-Torres, J; Olalde-Portugal, V; Partida-Martínez, L P

    2017-08-17

    Identify novel bacterial taxa that could increase the availability of branched-chain amino acids and the amount of distinctive volatiles during skim milk fermentation. We recovered 344 bacterial isolates from stool samples of healthy and breastfed infants. Five were selected based on their ability to produce branched-chain amino acids. Three strains were identified as Escherichia coli, one as Klebsiella pneumoniae and other as Klebsiella variicola by molecular and biochemical methods. HPLC and solid-phase microextraction with GC-MS were used for the determination of free amino acids and volatile compounds respectively. The consortium formed by K. variicola and four Lactobacillus species showed the highest production of Leu and Ile in skim milk fermentation. In addition, the production of volatile compounds, such as acetoin, ethanol, 2-nonanone, and acetic, hexanoic and octanoic acids, increased in comparison to commercial yogurt, Emmental and Gouda cheese. Also, distinctive volatiles, such as 2,3-butanediol, 4-methyl-2- hexanone and octanol, were identified. The use of K. variicola in combination with probiotic Lactobacillus species enhances the availability of Leu and Ile and the amount of distinctive volatiles during skim milk fermentation. The identified consortium increases the functional potential of fermented dairy products. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Hydroxyl radical reactions with adenine: reactant complexes, transition states, and product complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qianyi; Gu, Jiande; Compaan, Katherine R; Schaefer, Henry F

    2010-10-18

    In order to address problems such as aging, cell death, and cancer, it is important to understand the mechanisms behind reactions causing DNA damage. One specific reaction implicated in DNA oxidative damage is hydroxyl free-radical attack on adenine (A) and other nucleic acid bases. The adenine reaction has been studied experimentally, but there are few theoretical results. In the present study, adenine dehydrogenation at various sites, and the potential-energy surfaces for these reactions, are investigated theoretically. Four reactant complexes [A···OH]* have been found, with binding energies relative to A+OH* of 32.8, 11.4, 10.7, and 10.1 kcal mol(-1). These four reactant complexes lead to six transition states, which in turn lie +4.3, -5.4, (-3.7 and +0.8), and (-2.3 and +0.8) kcal mol(-1) below A+OH*, respectively. Thus the lowest lying [A···OH]* complex faces the highest local barrier to formation of the product (A-H)*+H(2)O. Between the transition states and the products lie six product complexes. Adopting the same order as the reactant complexes, the product complexes [(A-H)···H(2)O]* lie at -10.9, -22.4, (-24.2 and -18.7), and (-20.5 and -17.5) kcal mol(-1), respectively, again relative to separated A+OH*. All six A+OH* → (A-H)*+H(2)O pathways are exothermic, by -0.3, -14.7, (-17.4 and -7.8), and (-13.7 and -7.8) kcal mol(-1), respectively. The transition state for dehydrogenation at N(6) lies at the lowest energy (-5.4 kcal mol(-1) relative to A+OH*), and thus reaction is likely to occur at this site. This theoretical prediction dovetails with the observed high reactivity of OH radicals with the NH(2) group of aromatic amines. However, the high barrier (37.1 kcal mol(-1)) for reaction at the C(8) site makes C(8) dehydrogenation unlikely. This last result is consistent with experimental observation of the imidazole ring opening upon OH radical addition to C(8). In addition, TD-DFT computed electronic transitions of the N(6) product around 420 nm

  6. Uses of alpha particles, especially in nuclear reaction studies and medical radionuclide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qaim, Syed M.; Spahn, Ingo; Scholten, Bernhard; Neumaier, Bernd [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin (INM), Nuklearchemie (INM-5)

    2016-11-01

    Alpha particles exhibit three important characteristics: scattering, ionisation and activation. This article briefly discusses those properties and outlines their major applications. Among others, α-particles are used in elemental analysis, investigation and improvement of materials properties, nuclear reaction studies and medical radionuclide production. The latter two topics, dealing with activation of target materials, are treated in some detail in this paper. Measurements of excitation functions of α-particle induced reactions shed some light on their reaction mechanisms, and studies of isomeric cross sections reveal the probability of population of high-spin nuclear levels. Regarding medical radionuclides, an overview is presented of the isotopes commonly produced using α-particle beams. Consideration is also given to some routes which could be potentially useful for production of a few other radionuclides. The significance of α-particle induced reactions to produce a few high-spin isomeric states, decaying by emission of low-energy conversion or Auger electrons, which are of interest in localized internal radiotherapy, is outlined. The α-particle beam, thus broadens the scope of nuclear chemistry research related to development of non-standard positron emitters and therapeutic radionuclides.

  7. State-to-state mode selectivity in the HD + OH reaction: Perspectives from two product channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua

    2016-06-01

    The state-to-state quantum dynamics (Jtot = 0) of the HD + OH(υ2 = 0, 1) reaction is studied using a reactant coordinate based method, which allows the analysis of both the H + DOH and D + HOH channels with a single propagation. The stretching vibration of the newly formed bond, namely, the OD bond in DOH and one OH bond in HOH, is excited, thanks to its strong coupling with the reaction coordinate at the transition state. On the other hand, the vibrational energy deposited into the OH reactant (υ2 = 1) is sequestered during the reaction in the spectator OH mode. The combined effect leads to the excitation of both the OD and OH stretching modes in the DOH product, and the dominance of the (002) normal-mode state population in the HOH product, which in the local-mode picture corresponds to the excitation of both OH bonds with one quantum each. The energy flow in this prototypical tetratomic reaction can be understood in terms of the sudden vector projection model.

  8. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jerry Y.S. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  9. Multi-reaction-channel fitting calculations in a coupled-channel model: Photoinduced strangeness production

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O Scholten; A Usov

    2010-08-01

    To describe photo- and meson-induced reactions on the nucleon, one is faced with a rather extensive coupled-channel problem. Ignoring the effects of channel coupling, as one would do in describing a certain reaction at the tree level, invariably creates a large inconsistency between the different reactions that are described. In addition, the imaginary parts of the amplitude, which are related through the optical theorem, to total cross-sections, are directly reflected in certain polarization observables. Performing a full coupled-channel calculation thus offers the possibility to implement the maximum number of constraints. The drawback one is faced with is to arrive at a simultaneous fit of a large number of reaction channels. While some of the parameters are common to many reactions, one is still faced with the challenge to optimize a large number of parameters in a highly non-linear calculation. Here we show that such an approach is possible and present some results for photoinduced strangeness production.

  10. Hypernuclear production cross section in the reaction of Li-6+C-12 at 2 A GeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rappold, C.; Saito, T. R.; Bertini, O.; Bianchin, S.; Bozkurt, V.; Kim, E.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.; Minami, S.; Nakajima, D.; Ozel-Tashenov, B.; Yoshida, K.; Achenbach, P.; Ajimura, S.; Aumann, T.; Gayoso, C. Ayerbe; Bhang, H. C.; Caesar, C.; Erturk, S.; Fukuda, T.; Goekuezuem, B.; Guliev, E.; Hoffmann, J.; Ickert, G.; Ketenci, Z. S.; Khaneft, D.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Koch, K.; Kurz, N.; Le Fevre, A.; Mizoi, Y.; Nungesser, L.; Ott, W.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sakaguchi, A.; Schmidt, C. J.; Sekimoto, M.; Simon, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tambave, G. J.; Tamura, H.; Trautmann, W.; Voltz, S.; Yoon, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypernuclear production cross sections have been deduced for the first time with induced reaction of heavy ion beam on fixed target and by means of the invariant mass method by the HypHI Collaboration exploiting the reaction of Li-6 C-12 at 2 A GeV or root S-NN = 2.70 GeV. A production cross section

  11. Measurement of reaction cross sections of fission products induced by DT neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Daisuke; Murata, Isao; Takahashi, Akito [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    With the view of future application of fusion reactor to incineration of fission products, we have measured the {sup 129}I(n,2n){sup 128}I reaction cross section by DT neutrons with the activation method. The measured cross section was compared with the evaluated nuclear data of JENDL-3.2. From the result, it was confirmed that the evaluation overestimated the cross section by about 20-40%. (author)

  12. Production of neutron-rich isotopes in {sup 82}Se+{sup 238}U grazing reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marginean, N.; Corradi, L. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro Padova (Italy); Berghini, S. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    The reactions at the grazing angle between heavy ions at energies close to the Coulomb barrier are presently considered as a valuable tool for the production of nuclei far from stability, particularly in the neutron-rich area. Recent high mass-resolution experiments demonstrated that one could observe the transfer of up to six proton stripping (-6p) and six neutron pick-up (+6n) channels with cross sections down to {approx}50-100 {mu}b.

  13. Composite Si/C/N powder production by laser induced gas phase reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsella, E.; Botti, S.; Fantoni, R.; Alexandrescu, R.; Morjan, I.; Popescu, C.; Dikonimos-Makris, T.; Giorgi, R.; Enzo, S.

    1991-08-01

    Ultrafine amorphous Si/C/N ternary powders were prepared in a CO/sub 2/ laser assisted process. This paper demonstrates the possibility of driving the C/N ratio the powder by properly choosing the experimental conditions and the gaseous reactant ratio in the initial mixture containing silane, dimethylamine and ammonia. A kinetic model which accounts for reaching the equilibrium between the gaseous reaction intermediates and the solid products is proposed.

  14. Urinary excretion of dietary maillard reaction products in healthy adult female cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van C.; Bosch, G.; Butre, C.I.; Poel, van der A.F.B.; Wierenga, P.A.; Alexander, L.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2016-01-01

    Download »Citation Alerts »Sign up for TOC email alerts Share »Email this content »Recommend to librarian Facebook Twitter doi:10.2527/jas.2015-9550 Urinary excretion of dietary Maillard reaction products in healthy adult female cats12 C. van Rooijen*, G. Bosch 3*, C. I. Butré†, A. F. B. van der Poe

  15. Detection of specific polymerase chain reaction product by utilizing the 5'----3' exonuclease activity of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The 5'----3' exonuclease activity of the thermostable enzyme Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase may be employed in a polymerase chain reaction product detection system to generate a specific detectable signal concomitantly with amplification. An oligonucleotide probe, nonextendable at the 3' end, labeled at the 5' end, and designed to hybridize within the target sequence, is introduced into the polymerase chain reaction assay. Annealing of probe to one of the polymerase chain reaction product s...

  16. Biodiesel Fuel Production by the Transesterification Reaction of Soybean Oil Using Immobilized Lipase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Otávio L.; Bevilaqua, Juliana V.; Leal, Márcia C. M. R.; Freire, Denise M. G.; Langone, Marta A. P.

    The enzymatic alcoholysis of soybean oil with methanol and ethanol was investigated using a commercial, immobilized lipase (Lipozyme RM IM). The effect of alcohol (methanol or ethanol), enzyme concentration, molar ratio of alcohol to soybean oil, solvent, and temperature on biodiesel production was determined. The best conditions were obtained in a solvent-free system with ethanol/oil molar ratio of 3.0, temperature of 50°C, and enzyme concentration of 7.0% (w/w). Three-step batch ethanolysis was most effective for the production of biodiesel. Ethyl esters yield was about 60% after 4 h of reaction.

  17. The direct oxidative diene cyclization and related reactions in natural product synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The direct oxidative cyclization of 1,5-dienes is a valuable synthetic method for the (diastereoselective preparation of substituted tetrahydrofurans. Closely related reactions start from 5,6-dihydroxy or 5-hydroxyalkenes to generate similar products in a mechanistically analogous manner. After a brief overview on the history of this group of transformations and a survey on mechanistic and stereochemical aspects, this review article provides a summary on applications in natural product synthesis. Moreover, current limitations and future directions in this area of chemistry are discussed.

  18. Superoxide anion production by human spermatozoa as a part of the ionophore-induced acrosome reaction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griveau, J F; Renard, P; Le Lannou, D

    1995-04-01

    The involvement of superoxide anion (O2o-) in human sperm capacitation and/or acrosome reaction was investigated. Addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) to the medium at the beginning of the capacitation process or 15 min before induction of the acrosome reaction, decreased the level of ionophore-induced acrosome reaction. Hyperactivation was unaffected by the presence of SOD during the capacitation process. Addition of calcium ionophore to the sperm suspension increased production of O2o- by the spermatozoa by four to five-fold and induced the acrosome reaction. In the presence of SOD, superoxide anion could not be detected in the medium and the rate of induced-acrosome reaction was decreased greatly. The presence of an inhibitor of protein kinase C inhibited the production of O2o- in the medium and reduced the induced-acrosome reaction. The production of O2o- and the acrosome reaction were also increased by exposure of spermatozoa to 12-myristate 13-acetate phorbol ester, a specific activator of protein kinase C. While the level of spontaneous acrosome reaction was not increased by the direct addition of O2o- to the medium, its presence induced the release of unesterified fatty acids from membrane phospholipids. These findings suggest that the production of O2o- by spermatozoa could be involved in the ionophore-induced acrosome reaction, possibly through the de-esterification of membrane phospholipids. However, this production of superoxide anion is not sufficient on its own to induce the acrosome reaction.

  19. Polymerase-Endonuclease Amplification Reaction (PEAR) for Large-Scale Enzymatic Production of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Gou, Deming; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2010-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR), for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI) cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs. PMID:20062528

  20. Analysis of ligase chain reaction products amplified in a silicon-glass chip using capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J; Shoffner, M A; Mitchelson, K R; Kricka, L J; Wilding, P

    1996-04-26

    Ligase chain reaction (LCR) is a useful molecular technique for detecting known point mutations. We report the first example of the use of a disposable silicon-glass micro-chip for LCR and the first application of capillary electrophoresis (CE) to analyze samples amplified by LCR in a chip. Silicon-glass chips were manufactured using conventional photolithography and anodic bonding. The chips provide three distinct advantages for LCR: excellent thermal conductivity, a micro reaction volume ( < 10 microliters), and reproducible, low-cost manufacturing. Investigation and quantitation of amplification efficiency of LCR in a chip or in a tube requires an analytical technique that is faster and more convenient than the conventional slab gel methods. Slab gel electrophoresis uses relatively large amounts of sample and is labor-intensive and time-consuming, and thus is unsuitable for the separation and detection of LCR products. In contrast CE requires sample volume (original LCR products) of less than 1 microliter and is therefore well-suited to analysis of the micro-volume reaction mixture from chips. We combined CE with a sensitive laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system for the rapid separation and quantitative detection of LCR products amplified from the lacI gene in a silicon-glass chip. Comparative studies were made with LCR between tubes and silicon-glass chips. CE-LIF analysis is ideally suited to examination of micro-LCR amplification with high throughput. The technologies may find medical uses in disease diagnosis and research.

  1. Crystal structure of an EAL domain in complex with reaction product 5'-pGpG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Robert-Paganin

    Full Text Available FimX is a large multidomain protein containing an EAL domain and involved in twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present here two crystallographic structures of the EAL domain of FimX (residues 438-686: one of the apo form and the other of a complex with 5'-pGpG, the reaction product of the hydrolysis of c-di-GMP. In both crystal forms, the EAL domains form a dimer delimiting a large cavity encompassing the catalytic pockets. The ligand is trapped in this cavity by its sugar phosphate moiety. We confirmed by NMR that the guanine bases are not involved in the interaction in solution. We solved here the first structure of an EAL domain bound to the reaction product 5'-pGpG. Though isolated FimX EAL domain has a very low catalytic activity, which would not be significant compared to other catalytic EAL domains, the structure with the product of the reaction can provides some hints in the mechanism of hydrolysis of the c-di-GMP by EAL domains.

  2. Polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR for large-scale enzymatic production of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Wang

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR, for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs.

  3. Solvent-resistant nanofiltration for product purification and catalyst recovery in click chemistry reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Odena, Angels; Vandezande, Pieter; Fournier, David; Van Camp, Wim; Du Prez, Filip E; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2010-01-18

    The quickly developing field of "click" chemistry would undoubtedly benefit from the availability of an easy and efficient technology for product purification to reduce the potential health risks associated with the presence of copper in the final product. Therefore, solvent-resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) membranes have been developed to selectively separate "clicked" polymers from the copper catalyst and solvent. By using these solvent-stable cross-linked polyimide membranes in diafiltration, up to 98 % of the initially present copper could be removed through the membrane together with the DMF solvent, the polymer product being almost completely retained. This paper also presents the first SRNF application in which the catalyst permeates through the membrane and the reaction product is retained.

  4. Product rotational polarization. The stereodynamics of the F + H 2 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoiz, F. J.; Brouard, M.; Herrero, V. J.; Sáez Rábanos, V.; Stark, K.

    1997-01-01

    The angular momentum polarization of the products of the reaction F + H 2 ( ν = 0, j = 0) → HF( ν') + H is calculated via the QCT methodology at a collision energy of 0.119 eV. The HF rotational angular momentum distribution is found to display both alignment and orientation, the latter along the y-axis, perpendicular to the k-k' scattering plane, which depend sensitively on the product vibrational level. The origin of polarization behaviour is traced back to different dynamical mechanisms leading to production of HF(ν' = 0), and to a lesser extent HF (ν' = 1), compared with higher product vibrational states, with the former originating primarily from repulsive insertion type trajectories, and the latter primarily from repulsive abstraction type trajectories.

  5. Hypernucleus Production by $A(p,pK^+)_{\\Lambda}B$ Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, Hantao; Chiang, Huanching

    2008-01-01

    The $\\Lambda$-hypernucleus production by $A(p, pK^+)_{\\Lambda}B$ reactions is investigated within the framework of the distorted wave impulse approximation(DWIA). The amplitude for the elementary process is evaluated in a fully covariant two-nucleon model based on the effective Lagrangian. The reaction cross sections for $\\Lambda$-hypernucleus productions on $^6Li$, $^{12}C$ and $^{16}O$ targets are calculated. It is found that the distortion effects tend to reduce the cross sections by a factor of 3$\\sim$10. Various differential cross sections (DCS) and double differential cross sections (DDCS) are presented. It is shown that for the $s_{\\Lambda}-$wave hypernucleus production, the DCS is decreased with increasing nuclear mass, and the DCS for the $p_{\\Lambda}-$wave hypernucleus production is normally higher than that for the $s_{\\Lambda}-$wave hypernucleus production. As a reference, the DDCS with respect to the momenta of the outgoing proton and kaon is also demonstrated. Finally, the missing mass spectra o...

  6. Product polarization distribution: Stereodynamics of the reaction of atom H and radical NH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The product angular momentum polarization of the reaction of H+NH is calculated via the quasiclassical trajectory method(QCT)based on the extended London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato(LEPS)potential energy surface(PES)at a collision energy of 5.1 kcal/mol.The calculated results of the vector correlations are denoted by using the angular distribution functions.The polarization-dependent differential cross sections(PDDCSs)demonstrate that the rotational angular momentum of the product H2 is aligned and oriented along the direction perpendicular to the scattering plane.Vector correlation shows that the angular momentum of the product H2 is aligned in the plane perpendicular to the velocity vector.It suggests that the reaction proceeds preferentially when the reactant velocity vector lies in a plane containing all three atoms.The orientation and alignment of the product angular momentum affects the scattering direction of the product molecules.The polarization-dependent differential cross sections(PDDCSs)reveal that scattering is predominantly in the backward hemisphere.

  7. Effect of Solvents on the Product Distribution and Reaction Rate of a Buchwald-Hartwig Amination Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    2006-01-01

    The Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction between p-bromotoluene and piperazine in the presence of the homogeneous catalytic system Pd(dba)(2)/(+/-)-BINAP and the base NaO-t-Bu was investigated in two different classes of solvents: aprotic, nonpolar and aprotic, polar. The reaction was carried out...... solvent for the Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction under the conditions applied was m-xylene....

  8. Plant essential oils and allied volatile fractions as multifunctional additives in meat and fish-based food products: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Essential oils are concentrated aromatic volatile compounds derived from botanicals by distillation or mechanical pressing. They play multiple, crucial roles as antioxidants, food pathogen inhibitors, shelf-life enhancers, texture promoters, organoleptic agents and toxicity-reducing agents. For their versatility, they appear promising as food preservatives. Several research findings in recent times have validated their potential as functional ingredients in meat and fish processing. Among the assortment of bioactive compounds in the essential oils, p-cymene, thymol, eugenol, carvacrol, isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde, cuminaldehyde, linalool, 1,8-cineol, α-pinene, α-terpineol, γ-terpinene, citral and methyl chavicol are most familiar. These terpenes (monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes) and phenolics (alcohols, esters, aldehydes and ketones) have been extracted from culinary herbs such as oregano, rosemary, basil, coriander, cumin, cinnamon, mint, sage and lavender as well as from trees such as myrtle, fir and eucalyptus. This review presents essential oils as alternatives to conventional chemical additives. Their synergistic actions with modified air packaging, irradiation, edible films, bacteriocins and plant byproducts are discussed. The decisive roles of metabolic engineering, microwave technology and metabolomics in quality and quantity augmentation of essential oil are briefly mooted. The limitations encountered and strategies to overcome them have been illuminated to pave way for their enhanced popularisation. The literature has been mined from scientific databases such as Pubmed, Pubchem, Scopus and SciFinder.

  9. Improving volatile fatty acids production by exploiting the residual substrates in post-fermented sludge: Protease catalysis of refractory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bo; Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Yuanyuan; Bai, Jie; Liu, He; Fu, Bo

    2016-03-01

    The real cause to the low yield of volatile fatty acids (VFAs), from inhibition or low biodegradation, is uncertain in sludge anaerobic fermentation. In this study, poor biodegradability of proteins and fast decrease of the indigenous hydrolase activity in the residual post-fermented sludge were found to be the major reasons. With the addition of trypsin or alkaline protease in residual post-fermented sludge after primary alkaline fermentation, degradation efficiency of refractory protein increased by 33.6% and 34.8%, respectively. Accordingly, the VFAs yields were improved by 69.7% and 106.1%, respectively. Furthermore, the activities of added trypsin and alkaline protease could maintain at 13.52 U/mL and 19.11 U/mL in the alkaline fermentation process. This study demonstrated that exploiting the refractory proteins in residual post-fermented sludge by protease addition seems to be a very promising way for improving VFAs yield of conventional alkaline fermentations with waste activated sludge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of ozonation of swimming pool water on formation of volatile disinfection by-products - A laboratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram;

    2016-01-01

    byproducts during subsequent chlorination. The ozone reaction was observed to behave according to first order kinetics. For tap water half-life was 4 min whilst polluted and unpolluted pool water exhibited half-life of 8 and 11 min, respectively. When ozonation dosage was repeated half-life of ozone...

  11. Gas-Solid Reaction Route toward the Production of Intermetallics from Their Corresponding Oxide Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Near-net shape forming of metallic components from metallic powders produced in situ from reduction of corresponding pure metal oxides has not been explored to a large extent. Such a process can be probably termed in short as the “Reduction-Sintering” process. This methodology can be especially effective in producing components containing refractory metals. Additionally, in situ production of metallic powder from complex oxides containing more than one metallic element may result in in situ alloying during reduction, possibly at lower temperatures. With this motivation, in situ reduction of complex oxides mixtures containing more than one metallic element has been investigated intensively over a period of years in the department of materials science, KTH, Sweden. This review highlights the most important features of that investigation. The investigation includes not only synthesis of intermetallics and refractory metals using the gas solid reaction route but also study the reaction kinetics and mechanism. Environmentally friendly gases like H2, CH4 and N2 were used for simultaneous reduction, carburization and nitridation, respectively. Different techniques have been utilized. A thermogravimetric analyzer was used to accurately control the process conditions and obtain reaction kinetics. The fluidized bed technique has been utilized to study the possibility of bulk production of intermetallics compared to milligrams in TGA. Carburization and nitridation of nascent formed intermetallics were successfully carried out. A novel method based on material thermal property was explored to track the reaction progress and estimate the reaction kinetics. This method implies the dynamic measure of thermal diffusivity using laser flash method. These efforts end up with a successful preparation of nanograined intermetallics like Fe-Mo and Ni-W. In addition, it ends up with simultaneous reduction and synthesis of Ni-WN and Ni-WC from their oxide mixtures

  12. Volatile and non-volatile/semi-volatile compounds and in vitro bioactive properties of Chilean Ulmo (Eucryphia cordifolia Cav.) honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Francisca; Torres, Paulina; Oomah, B Dave; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Massarioli, Adna Prado; Martín-Venegas, Raquel; Albarral-Ávila, Vicenta; Burgos-Díaz, César; Ferrer, Ruth; Rubilar, Mónica

    2017-04-01

    Ulmo honey originating from Eucryphia cordifolia tree, known locally in the Araucania region as the Ulmo tree is a natural product with valuable nutritional and medicinal qualities. It has been used in the Mapuche culture to treat infections. This study aimed to identify the volatile and non-volatile/semi-volatile compounds of Ulmo honey and elucidate its in vitro biological properties by evaluating its antioxidant, antibacterial, antiproliferative and hemolytic properties and cytotoxicity in Caco-2 cells. Headspace volatiles of Ulmo honey were isolated by solid-phase microextraction (SPME); non-volatiles/semi-volatiles were obtained by removing all saccharides with acidified water and the compounds were identified by GC/MS analysis. Ulmo honey volatiles consisted of 50 compounds predominated by 20 flavor components. Two of the volatile compounds, lyrame and anethol have never been reported before as honey compounds. The non-volatile/semi-volatile components of Ulmo honey comprised 27 compounds including 13 benzene derivatives accounting 75% of the total peak area. Ulmo honey exhibited weak antioxidant activity but strong antibacterial activity particularly against gram-negative bacteria and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the main strain involved in wounds and skin infections. At concentrations >0.5%, Ulmo honey reduced Caco-2 cell viability, released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in a dose dependent manner in the presence of foetal bovine serum (FBS). The wide array of volatile and non-volatile/semi-volatile constituents of Ulmo honey rich in benzene derivatives may partly account for its strong antibacterial and antiproliferative properties important for its therapeutic use. Our results indicate that Ulmo honey can potentially inhibit cancer growth at least partly by modulating oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry detects rapid changes in volatile metabolite emission by Mycobacterium smegmatis after the addition of specific antimicrobial agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crespo, E.; Cristescu, S. M.; de Ronde, H.; Kuijper, S.; Kolk, A.H.J.; Anthony, R.M.; Harren, F. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic activity of plants, animals or microbes can be monitored by gas headspace analysis. This can be achieved using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS), a highly sensitive detection method for trace gas analysis. PTR-MS is rapid and can detect metabolic responses on-line as

  14. Impact of antioxidants on the formation of volatile secondary lipid oxidation products in oil-in-water emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food emulsions are particularly susceptible to lipid oxidation, which leads to the formation of off-flavors and odors, and ultimately, shorter product shelf lives. Here we examine antioxidants for use in emulsions from a variety of different sources, including natural product extracts as well as rat...

  15. ASR prevention — Effect of aluminum and lithium ions on the reaction products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemann, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.ch [Laboratory for Concrete/Construction Chemistry, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Bernard, Laetitia [Laboratory for Nanoscale Materials Science, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Alahrache, Salaheddine; Winnefeld, Frank [Laboratory for Concrete/Construction Chemistry, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of the recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms enabling aluminum-containing SCM like metakaolin and added LiNO{sub 3} to limit the extent of ASR in mortar and concrete, some gaps still remain. They concern mainly the effect of aluminum-containing SCM on the formed ASR products and the influence of aggregate characteristics on the effectiveness of LiNO{sub 3}. In this study, a model system, concrete and mortar were investigated by pore solution analysis, TGA, XRD, NMR, SEM combined with EDX and ToF-SIMS to address these questions. The amount of aluminum present in the pore solution of concrete and mortar is only able to slow down SiO{sub 2} dissolution but not to alter morphology, structure and composition of the reaction products. LiNO{sub 3} can suppress ASR by forming dense products protecting reactive minerals from further reaction. But its effectiveness is decreasing with increasing specific surface area of the reactive minerals in aggregates. - Highlights: • Aluminum of SCM slows down SiO{sub 2} dissolution. • Aluminum of SCM does not alter morphology and structure of ASR product. • ASR suppressing effect of LiNO{sub 3} depends on specific surface area of the aggregates.

  16. Effect of organic fertilizers prepared from organic waste materials on the production of antibacterial volatile organic compounds by two biocontrol Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Waseem; Wei, Zhong; Ling, Ning; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-06-10

    Three organic fertilizers made of different animal and plant waste materials (BOFs) were evaluated for their effects on the production of antibacterial volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by two Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strains SQR-9 and T-5 against the tomato wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum (RS). Both strains could produce VOCs that inhibited the growth and virulence traits of RS; however, in the presence of BOFs, the production of antibacterial VOCs was significantly increased. The maximum inhibition of growth and virulence traits of RS by VOCs of T-5 and SQR-9 was determined at 1.5% BOF2 and 2% BOF3, respectively. In case of strain T-5, 2-nonanone, nonanal, xylene, benzothiazole, and butylated hydroxy toluene and in case of strain SQR-9, 2-nonanone, nonanal, xylene and 2-undecanone were the main antibacterial VOCs whose production was increased in the presence of BOFs. The results of this study reveal another significance of using organic fertilizers to improve the antagonistic activity of biocontrol agents against phytopathogens.

  17. Influence of gas-phase reactions on the product yields obtained in the pyrolysis of polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzani, V.; Tognotti, L. [Univ. degli Studi di Pisa (Italy); Nicolella, C.; Rovatti, M. [Univ. degli Studi di Genova (Italy). Ist. di Ingegneria Chimica e di Processo G.B. Bonino

    1997-02-01

    The amount of plastic wastes is growing year after year, and the fraction of plastics in municipal solid wastes (MSW) and in refuse-derived fuels (RDF) is progressively increasing. Pyrolysis and gasification processes appear to be promising routes for the upgrading of solid wastes to more usable and energy dense materials such as gas fuel and/or fuel oil or to high-value feedstocks for the chemical industry. The characterization of the product fractions obtained from the pyrolysis of polyethylene (PE) in a laboratory-scale fixed bed reactor was performed. The experimental system allowed quantitative information to be obtained on the global tar, char, and gas yields. Pyrolysis runs were performed using reactor temperatures ranging between 500 and 800 C. The influence of the residence times in the reactor of the primary volatiles generated by the pyrolysis process was also discussed. The secondary reactivity of the tar originated from PE pyrolysis was examined. A lumped-parameters approach was used in order to evaluate the global kinetic parameters for the gas-phase tar-cracking process. PE tars resulted to be more refractory to thermal decomposition than those obtained in the pyrolysis of biomass and lignocellulosic materials, but more reactive than tars obtained in the pyrolysis of coal.

  18. Product lambda-doublet ratios as an imprint of chemical reaction mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, P. G.; Zanchet, A.; Aldegunde, J.; Brouard, M.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2016-11-01

    In the last decade, the development of theoretical methods has allowed chemists to reproduce and explain almost all of the experimental data associated with elementary atom plus diatom collisions. However, there are still a few examples where theory cannot account yet for experimental results. This is the case for the preferential population of one of the Λ-doublet states produced by chemical reactions. In particular, recent measurements of the OD(2Π) product of the O(3P)+D2 reaction have shown a clear preference for the Π(A') Λ-doublet states, in apparent contradiction with ab initio calculations, which predict a larger reactivity on the A'' potential energy surface. Here we present a method to calculate the Λ-doublet ratio when concurrent potential energy surfaces participate in the reaction. It accounts for the experimental Λ-doublet populations via explicit consideration of the stereodynamics of the process. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the propensity of the Π(A') state is a consequence of the different mechanisms of the reaction on the two concurrent potential energy surfaces

  19. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Tyler C; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L

    2015-06-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO₂ from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin.

  20. Influence of temperature inhomogeneity on product profile of reactions occurring within zeolites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A V Anil Kumar; S Yashonath; G Ananthakrishna

    2003-10-01

    In zeolites, diffusion is often accompanied by a reaction or sorption which in turn can induce temperature inhomogeneities. Monte Carlo simulations of Lennard-Jones atoms in zeolite NaCaA are reported for the presence of a hot zone presumed to be created by a reaction or chemi- or physi-sorption site. These simulations show that the presence of localized hot regions can alter both kinetic and transport properties such as diffusion. Further, we show that enhancement of diffusion constant is greater for systems with larger barrier height, a surprising result that may be of considerable significance in many chemical and biological processes. We find an unanticipated coupling between reaction and diffusion due to the presence of a hot zone in addition to that which normally exists via concentration. Implications of this coupling for the product profile of a reaction are discussed. We also propose a mechanism by which mobility of ions or diffusion of molecular species within biomembranes may take place.

  1. Coupled Pervaporation-Reaction Distillation Process for the Production of n-Bromopropane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛澄宇; 余立新; 郭庆丰; 席春光

    2002-01-01

    The reaction of n-C3H7OH+HBr=n-C3H7Br+H2O was used to experimentally study a coupled pervaporation (PV)-reaction distillation (RD) process. The results show that polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a suitable membrane material for water removal. The typical separation properties of PVA polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite membranes are a highest flux of 780 g/(m2*h) and a separation factor of 840 for the C3H7OH concentration in the original feed of 95% at 90℃ and below 3300 Pa(abs). Reaction distillation produced the n-bromopropane from the distillation column as a ternary azeotropic liquid mixture of C3H7OH, H2O and C3H7Br, with a product concentration of about 92%. The coupled PV-RD membrane reactor experiment shows that the BrPr yield can reach 92%, much higher than that for reaction-distillation without pervaporation.

  2. Deuteron-induced reactions generated by intense lasers for PET isotope production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Sachie; Bonasera, Aldo

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using laser accelerated protons/deuterons for positron emission tomography (PET) isotope production by means of the nuclear reactions 11B(p, n) 11C and 10B(d, n) 11C. The second reaction has a positive Q-value and no energy threshold. One can, therefore, make use of the lower energy part of the laser-generated deuterons, which includes the majority of the accelerated deuterons. By assuming that the deuteron spectra are similar to the proton spectra, the 11C produced from the reaction 10B(d, n) 11C is estimated to be 7.4×10 9 per laser-shot at the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Meanwhile a high-repetition table-top laser irradiation is estimated to generate 3.5×10 711C per shot from the same reaction. In terms of the 11C activity, it is about 2×10 4 Bq per shot. If this laser delivers kHz, the activity is integrated to 1 GBq after 3 min. The number is sufficient for the practical application in medical imaging for PET.

  3. Deuteron-induced reactions generated by intense Lasers for PET isotope production

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Sachie

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using laser accelerated protons/deuterons for positron emission tomography (PET) isotope production by means of the nuclear reactions $^{11}$B($p,n$)$^{11}$C and $^{10}$B($d,n$)$^{11}$C. The second reaction has a positive Q-value and no energy threshold. One can, therefore, make use of the lower energy part of the laser-generated deuterons, which includes the majority of the accelerated deuterons. The $^{11}$C produced from the reaction $^{10}$B($d,n$)$^{11}$C is estimated to be 7.4 $\\times$ 10$^{9}$ per laser-shot at the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Meanwhile a high-repetition table top laser irradiation is estimated to generate 3.5 $\\times$ 10$^7$ $^{11}$C per shot from the same reaction. In terms of the $^{11}$C activity, it is about 2 $\\times$ 10$^4$ Bq per shot. If this laser delivers kHz, the activity is integrated to 1 GBq after 3 minutes. The number is sufficient for the practical application in medical imaging for PET.

  4. Pyranone natural products as inspirations for catalytic reaction discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Benjamin R; Scheidt, Karl A

    2015-04-21

    Natural products continue to provide a wealth of opportunities in the areas of chemical and therapeutic development. These structures are effective measuring sticks for the current state of chemical synthesis as a field and constantly inspire new approaches and strategies. Tetrahydropryans and tetrahydropyran-4-ones are found in numerous bioactive marine natural products and medicinal compounds. Our interest in exploring the therapeutic potential of natural products containing these motifs provided the impetus to explore new methods to access highly functionalized, chiral pyran molecules in the most direct and rapid fashion possible. This goal led to exploration and development of a Lewis acid-mediated Prins reaction between a chiral β-hydroxy-dioxinone and aldehyde to produce a pyran-dioxinone fused product that can be processed in a single pot operation to the desired tetrahydropyran-4-ones in excellent yield and stereoselectivity. Although the Prins reaction is a commonly employed approach toward pyrans, this method uniquely provides a 3-carboxy-trisubstituted pyran and utilizes dioxinones in a manner that was underexplored at the time. The 3-carboxy substituent served as a key synthetic handhold when this method was applied to the synthesis of highly functionalized pyrans within the macrocyclic natural products neopeltolide, okilactiomycin, and exiguolide. When employed in challenging macrocyclizations, this tetrahydropyranone forming reaction proved highly stereoselective and robust. Another major thrust in our lab has been the synthesis of benzopyranone natural products, specifically flavonoids, because this broad and diverse family of compounds possesses an equally broad range of biological and medicinal applications. With the goal of developing a broad platform toward the synthesis of enantioenriched flavonoid analogs and natural products, a biomimetic, asymmetric catalytic approach toward the synthesis of 2-aryl benzopyranones was developed. A

  5. Reactions of hexadehydro-Diels-Alder benzynes with structurally complex multifunctional natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sean P.; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2017-06-01

    An important question in organic chemistry concerns the extent to which benzynes—one of the classical reactive intermediates in organic chemistry—can react in discriminating fashion with trapping reagents. In particular, whether these species can react selectively with substrates containing multiple functional groups and possible sites of reactivity has remained unanswered. Natural products comprise a palette of multifunctional compounds with which to address this question. Here, we show that benzynes produced by the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reaction react with many secondary metabolites with a preference for one among several pathways. Examples demonstrating such selectivity include reactions with: phenolics, through dearomatizing ortho-substitution; alkaloids, through Hofmann-type elimination; tropolone and furan, through cycloaddition; and alkaloids, through three-component fragmentation-coupling reactions. We also demonstrate that the cinchona alkaloids quinidine and quinine give rise to products (some in as few as three steps) that enable subsequent and rapid access to structurally diverse polyheterocyclic compounds. The results show that benzynes are quite discriminating in their reactivity—a trait perhaps not broadly enough appreciated.

  6. Raman Spectroscopy of Serpentine and Reaction Products at High Pressure Using a Diamond Anvil Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, K.; Zinin, P.; Odake, S.; Fryer, P.; Hellebrand, E.

    2012-12-01

    Serpentine is one of the most abundant hydrous phases in the altered subducting plate, and contributes a large portion of the water flux in subduction zones. Measuring and understanding the structural changes in serpentine with pressure aids our understanding of the processes ongoing in oceanic crust and subduction zones. We have conducted high-pressure/high-temperature experiments on serpentine and its dehydration reaction products using a diamond anvil cell. We used the multifunctional in-situ measurement system equipped with a Raman device and laser heating system at the University of Hawaii. Well-characterized natural serpentinite was used in the study. Pressure was determined using the shift of the fluorescence line of a ruby placed next to the sample. Raman spectra of serpentine were obtained at higher pressures than previously published, up to 15 GPa; the peak shift with pressure fits the model determined by Auzende et al. [2004] at lower pressures. Heating was done at several different pressures up to 20 GPa, and reaction products were identified using Raman. Micro-Raman techniques allow us to determine reaction progress and heterogeneity within natural samples containing olivine and serpentine. Auzende, A-L., I. Daniel, B. Reynard, C. Lemaire, F. Guyot (2004). High-pressure behavior of serpentine minerals: a Raman spectroscopic study. Phys. Chem. Minerals 31 269-277.

  7. Multiphasic Reaction Modeling for Polypropylene Production in a Pilot-Scale Catalytic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jakir Hossain Khan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel multiphasic model for the calculation of the polypropylene production in a complicated hydrodynamic and the physiochemical environments has been formulated, confirmed and validated. This is a first research attempt that describes the development of the dual-phasic phenomena, the impact of the optimal process conditions on the production rate of polypropylene and the fluidized bed dynamic details which could be concurrently obtained after solving the model coupled with the CFD (computational fluid dynamics model, the basic mathematical model and the moment equations. Furthermore, we have established the quantitative relationship between the operational condition and the dynamic gas–solid behavior in actual reaction environments. Our results state that the proposed model could be applied for generalizing the production rate of the polymer from a chemical procedure to pilot-scale chemical reaction engineering. However, it was assumed that the solids present in the bubble phase and the reactant gas present in the emulsion phase improved the multiphasic model, thus taking into account that the polymerization took place mutually in the emulsion besides the bubble phase. It was observed that with respect to the experimental extent of the superficial gas velocity and the Ziegler-Natta feed rate, the ratio of the polymer produced as compared to the overall rate of production was approximately in the range of 9%–11%. This is a significant amount and it should not be ignored. We also carried out the simulation studies for comparing the data of the CFD-dependent dual-phasic model, the emulsion phase model, the dynamic bubble model and the experimental results. It was noted that the improved dual-phasic model and the CFD model were able to predict more constricted and safer windows at similar conditions as compared to the experimental results. Our work is unique, as the integrated developed model is able to offer clearer ideas

  8. Hexagonal boron nitride thin film thermal neutron detectors with high energy resolution of the reaction products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doan, T.C.; Majety, S.; Grenadier, S.; Li, J.; Lin, J.Y.; Jiang, H.X., E-mail: hx.jiang@ttu.edu

    2015-05-21

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is highly promising for solid-state thermal neutron detector applications due to its many outstanding physical properties, especially its very large thermal neutron capture cross-section (~3840 barns for {sup 10}B), which is several orders of magnitude larger than those of most other isotopes. The focus of the present work is to carry out studies on h-BN thin film and detector properties to lay the foundation for the development of a direct-conversion solid-state thermal neutron detector with high sensitivity. The measured carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) product of h-BN thin films grown on sapphire substrates is 2.83×10{sup −7} cm{sup 2}/V for electrons and holes, which is comparable to the value of about 10{sup −7} cm{sup 2}/V for GaN thin films grown on sapphire. Detectors based on h-BN thin films were fabricated and the nuclear reaction product pulse height spectra were measured. Under a bias of 20 V, very narrow individual peaks corresponding to the reaction product energies of α and Li particles as well as the sum peaks have been clearly resolved in the pulse height spectrum for the first time by a B-based direct-conversion semiconductor neutron detector. Our results indicate that h-BN thin film detectors possess unique advantages including small size, low weight, portability, low voltage operation and high energy resolution of specific reaction products.

  9. Lipoxidation products as biomarkers of oxidative damage to proteins during lipid peroxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, J R; Fu, M X; Ahmed, M U; Jenkins, A J; Lyons, T J; Thorpe, S R

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous disease processes including diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, ischaemia reperfusion injury and rheumatoid arthritis. Chemical modification of amino acids in protein during lipid peroxidation results in the formation of lipoxidation products which may serve as indicators of oxidative stress in vivo. The focus of the studies described here was initially to identify chemical modifications of protein derived exclusively from lipids in order to assess the role of lipid peroxidative damage in the pathogenesis of disease. Malondialdehye (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) are well characterized oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and adducts of these compounds have been detected by immunological means in atherosclerotic plaque. Thus, we first developed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assays for the Schiff base adduct of MDA to lysine, the lysine-MDA-lysine diimine cross-link and the Michael addition product of HNE to lysine. Using these assays, we showed that the concentrations of all three compounds increased significantly in LDL during metal-catalysed oxidation in vitro. The concentration of the advanced glycation end-product N epsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) also increased during LDL oxidation, while that of its putative carbohydrate precursor the Amadori compound N epsilon-(1-deoxyfructose-1-yl)lysine did not change, demonstrating that CML is a marker of both glycoxidation and lipoxidation reactions. These results suggest that MDA and HNE adducts to lysine residues should serve as biomarkers of lipid modification resulting from lipid peroxidation reactions, while CML may serve as a biomarker of general oxidative stress resulting from both carbohydrate and lipid oxidation reactions.

  10. Linking gene regulation and the exo-metabolome: A comparative transcriptomics approach to identify genes that impact on the production of volatile aroma compounds in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer Florian F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 'Omics' tools provide novel opportunities for system-wide analysis of complex cellular functions. Secondary metabolism is an example of a complex network of biochemical pathways, which, although well mapped from a biochemical point of view, is not well understood with regards to its physiological roles and genetic and biochemical regulation. Many of the metabolites produced by this network such as higher alcohols and esters are significant aroma impact compounds in fermentation products, and different yeast strains are known to produce highly divergent aroma profiles. Here, we investigated whether we can predict the impact of specific genes of known or unknown function on this metabolic network by combining whole transcriptome and partial exo-metabolome analysis. Results For this purpose, the gene expression levels of five different industrial wine yeast strains that produce divergent aroma profiles were established at three different time points of alcoholic fermentation in synthetic wine must. A matrix of gene expression data was generated and integrated with the concentrations of volatile aroma compounds measured at the same time points. This relatively unbiased approach to the study of volatile aroma compounds enabled us to identify candidate genes for aroma profile modification. Five of these genes, namely YMR210W, BAT1, AAD10, AAD14 and ACS1 were selected for overexpression in commercial wine yeast, VIN13. Analysis of the data show a statistically significant correlation between the changes in the exo-metabome of the overexpressing strains and the changes that were predicted based on the unbiased alignment of transcriptomic and exo-metabolomic data. Conclusion The data suggest that a comparative transcriptomics and metabolomics approach can be used to identify the metabolic impacts of the expression of individual genes in complex systems, and the amenability of transcriptomic data to direct applications of

  11. The Effect of CmLOXs on the Production of Volatile Organic Compounds in Four Aroma Types of Melon (Cucumis melo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yufan; Zhang, Chong; Cao, Songxiao; Wang, Xiao; Qi, Hongyan

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) play important role in the synthesis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which influence the aroma of fruit. In this study, we elucidate that there is a positive relationship between LOXs activity and VOC production in melon (Cucumis melo), and CmLOX genes are involved in fruit aroma generation in melon. To this end, we tested four aroma types of melon that feature a thin pericarp: two aromatic cultivars of the oriental melons (C. melo var. makuwa Makino), 'Yu Meiren' (YMR) and 'Cui Bao' (CB); a non-aromatic oriental pickling melon (C. melo var. conomon), 'Shao Gua' (SHAO); and a non-aromatic snake melon (C. melo L. var. flexuosus Naud), 'Cai Gua' (CAI). A principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that the aromas of SHAO and CAI are similar in nature because their ester contents are lower than those of YMR and CB. Ethyl acetate, benzyl acetate, (E, Z)-2, 6-nonadienal and menthol are four principal volatile compounds that affect the aromatic characteristics of these four types of melons. The LOX activity and total ester content in YMR were the highest among the examined melon varieties. The expression patterns of 18 CmLOX genes were found to vary based on the aromatic nature of the melon. Four of them were highly expressed in YMR. Moreover, we treated the fruit disks of YMR with LOX substrates (linoleic acid and linolenic acid) and LOX inhibitors (n-propyl gallate and nordihydroguariaretic acid). Substrate application promoted LOX activity and induced accumulation of hexanal, (2E)-nonenal and straight-chain esters, such as ethyl acetate. In contrast, LOX inhibitors decreased the levels of these compounds. The effect of CmLOXs in the biosynthesis of esters in melons are discussed.

  12. The Effect of CmLOXs on the Production of Volatile Organic Compounds in Four Aroma Types of Melon (Cucumis melo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufan Tang

    Full Text Available Lipoxygenases (LOXs play important role in the synthesis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, which influence the aroma of fruit. In this study, we elucidate that there is a positive relationship between LOXs activity and VOC production in melon (Cucumis melo, and CmLOX genes are involved in fruit aroma generation in melon. To this end, we tested four aroma types of melon that feature a thin pericarp: two aromatic cultivars of the oriental melons (C. melo var. makuwa Makino, 'Yu Meiren' (YMR and 'Cui Bao' (CB; a non-aromatic oriental pickling melon (C. melo var. conomon, 'Shao Gua' (SHAO; and a non-aromatic snake melon (C. melo L. var. flexuosus Naud, 'Cai Gua' (CAI. A principal component analysis (PCA revealed that the aromas of SHAO and CAI are similar in nature because their ester contents are lower than those of YMR and CB. Ethyl acetate, benzyl acetate, (E, Z-2, 6-nonadienal and menthol are four principal volatile compounds that affect the aromatic characteristics of these four types of melons. The LOX activity and total ester content in YMR were the highest among the examined melon varieties. The expression patterns of 18 CmLOX genes were found to vary based on the aromatic nature of the melon. Four of them were highly expressed in YMR. Moreover, we treated the fruit disks of YMR with LOX substrates (linoleic acid and linolenic acid and LOX inhibitors (n-propyl gallate and nordihydroguariaretic acid. Substrate application promoted LOX activity and induced accumulation of hexanal, (2E-nonenal and straight-chain esters, such as ethyl acetate. In contrast, LOX inhibitors decreased the levels of these compounds. The effect of CmLOXs in the biosynthesis of esters in melons are discussed.

  13. Engineering of carboligase activity reaction in Candida glabrata for acetoin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shubo; Xu, Nan; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2014-03-01

    Utilization of Candida glabrata overproducing pyruvate is a promising strategy for high-level acetoin production. Based on the known regulatory and metabolic information, acetaldehyde and thiamine were fed to identify the key nodes of carboligase activity reaction (CAR) pathway and provide a direction for engineering C. glabrata. Accordingly, alcohol dehydrogenase, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, and butanediol dehydrogenase were selected to be manipulated for strengthening the CAR pathway. Following the rational metabolic engineering, the engineered strain exhibited increased acetoin biosynthesis (2.24 g/L). In addition, through in silico simulation and redox balance analysis, NADH was identified as the key factor restricting higher acetoin production. Correspondingly, after introduction of NADH oxidase, the final acetoin production was further increased to 7.33 g/L. By combining the rational metabolic engineering and cofactor engineering, the acetoin-producing C. glabrata was improved stepwise, opening a novel pathway for rational development of microorganisms for bioproduction.

  14. Production of A-hypernuclei in A(p,K+)ΛB reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The production of A-hypernuclei in the A(p,K+)ΛB reaction is investigated in the framework of the distorted wave impulse approximation(DWIA).The total cross sections and differential cross sections for various nuclear targets are calculated with an elementary process pN→+NKA where the additional contributions from the N*(1535)resonance and the final state interaction between p and A are included.The dependence of the production cross sections of Λ-hypernuclei on the phenomenological nuclear density and the nucleon number in the target,as well as the distortion effect of the incident proton and outgoing kaon,are also explored.It is shown that the distortion effect tends to decrease the cross sections by a factor of about 3-10.The production cross sections are sensitive to the adopted nuclear density.

  15. Kinetics and product studies of the reaction ClO + BrO using discharge-flow mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Randall R.; Sander, Stanley P.

    1989-01-01

    The kinetics and product branching ratios of the reaction between ClO and BrO were studied at 1 torr pressure over the temperature range 220-400 K, using the method of discharge-flow mass spectrometry. Three product channels were identified and quantified: Br + ClOO, Br + OClO, and BrCl + O2, indicating that the reaction mechanism of ClO + BrO involves metastable intermediates. The overall reaction rate coefficient and the rate coefficients for the three channel reactions are given.

  16. Immunoassay utilizing biochemistry reaction product via surface-enhanced Raman scattering in near field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Haiying; NI; Yi; JIANG; Wei; LUO; Peiqing; HUANG; Mei

    2005-01-01

    We propose here a kind of applications of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to immunology. It is a new enzyme immunoassay based on SERS. In the proposed system, antibody immobilized on a solid substrate reacts with antigen, which binds with another antibody labeled with peroxidase. If this immunocomplex is subjected to reaction with o-phenylenediamine and hydrogenperoxide, azoaniline is generated. This azo compound is adsorbed on a silver colloid and only the azo compound gives a strong surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) spectrum. A linear relationship was observed between the peak intensity of the N=N stretching band and the concentration of antigen, revealing that one can determine the concentration of antigen by the SERRS measurement of the reaction product. The detection limit of this SERS enzyme immunoassay method was found to be about 10-15 mol/L.

  17. Production of Camphene by Isomerization Reaction on Sulfated ZrO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NoraAlejandraComelli; OmarMasini; AlfredoL~zaroCarrascull; EstherNataliaPonzi; MartaIsabelPonzi

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of camphene production in liquid phase from α-pinene was experimentally determined in an isothermal batch reactor. To this end, a sulfated ZrO2 catalyst was used and the reaction studied in the temperature range of 370-403 K. By analyzing the experimental data, second reaction order for α-pinene was found. A kinetic model is presented which includes term for the catalyst load used. The specific rate constant at 393K was 2.19×10-3 mol·L-1·min-1, the activation energy being 93kJ·mo1·-1. Both values are within the range of literature results.

  18. Triosidines: novel Maillard reaction products and cross-links from the reaction of triose sugars with lysine and arginine residues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tessier, Frederic J; Monnier, Vincent M; Sayre, Lawrence M; Kornfield, Julia A

    2003-01-01

    The role of the highly reactive triose sugars glyceraldehyde and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate in protein cross-linking and other amino acid modifications during the Maillard reaction was investigated...

  19. Metrological effectiveness of an analytical method for volatile organic compounds standard materials using post-column reaction GC/FID system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takuro; Kato, Kenji; Tsunoda, Kin-ichi; Maeda, Tsuneaki

    2008-06-30

    The metrological effectiveness of an analytical method using the post-column reaction GC/FID system was evaluated. The SI-traceable certified reference material (CRM), the eight ester phthalates mixture standard solution, was used as a sample. We assigned specific value to n-eicosane and it was used as an internal standard. A known quantity of n-eicosane was added to the CRM, and the mixture was measured with the post-column reaction GC/FID system. Six phthalate esters were chromatographically separated and determined. The assigned values by our system are in good agreement with the certified values of the CRM, and the combined uncertainties of the measurements by the present system were better than those of the CRM. Our method is classified as a primary ratio method and the specific values of many organic compounds can be assigned very precisely by using a small number of reference materials. Also, the method can make it possible to avoid the purity determination of raw materials and directly to assign their specific values after the preparation of the standard mixture. Conclusively, this post-column reaction GC/FID system is very effective for the chemical metrology.

  20. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity Testing of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product (Test Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, or fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), has been hypothesized as a contributory cause of an anomaly which occurred in the chamber pressure (PC) transducer tube on the Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) aft thruster 467 on flight STS-51. A small hole was found in the titanium-alloy PC tube at the first bend below the pressure transducer. It was surmised that the hole may have been caused by heat and pressure resulting from ignition of FORP. The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to define the chemical characteristics of FORP, characterize its reactivity, and simulate the events in a controlled environment which may have lead to the Pc-tube failure. Samples of FORP were obtained from the gas-phase reaction of MMH with NTO under laboratory conditions, the pulsed firings of RCS thrusters with modified PC tubes using varied oxidizer or fuel lead times, and the nominal RCS thruster firings at WSTF and Kaiser-Marquardt. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), ion chromatography (IC), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to FTIR (TGA/FTIR), and mechanical impact testing were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the chemical, thermal, and ignition properties of FORP. These studies showed that the composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depends on the fuel loxidizer ratio at the time of formation, composition of the post-formation atmosphere (reducing or oxidizing), and reaction or postreaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate (MMHN), ammonium nitrate (AN), methylammonium nitrate (MAN), and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. The thermal decomposition