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Sample records for volatile anesthetic isoflurane

  1. From the Cover: Prolonged Exposure to Volatile Anesthetic Isoflurane Worsens the Outcome of Polymicrobial Abdominal Sepsis.

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    Koutsogiannaki, Sophia; Schaefers, Matthew M; Okuno, Toshiaki; Ohba, Mai; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Priebe, Gregory P; DiNardo, James A; Sulpicio, Soriano G; Yuki, Koichi

    2017-04-01

    Sepsis continues to result in high morbidity and mortality. General anesthesia is often administered to septic patients, but the impacts of general anesthesia on host defense are not well understood. General anesthesia can be given by volatile and intravenous anesthetics. Our previous in vitro study showed that volatile anesthetic isoflurane directly inhibits leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1), critical adhesion molecules on leukocytes. Thus, the role of isoflurane exposure on in vivo LFA-1 and Mac-1 function was examined using polymicrobial abdominal sepsis model in mice. As a comparison, intravenous anesthetic propofol was given to a group of mice. Wild type, LFA-1, Mac-1, and adhesion molecule-1 knockout mice were used. Following the induction of polymicrobial abdominal sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture, groups of mice were exposed to isoflurane for either 2 or 6 h, or to propofol for 6 h, and their outcomes were examined. Bacterial loads in tissues and blood, neutrophil recruitment to the peritoneal cavity and phagocytosis were studied. Six hours of isoflurane exposure worsened the outcome of abdominal sepsis (P sepsis and was associated with impaired neutrophil recruitment and bacterial phagocytosis via reduced LFA-1 and Mac-1 function. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Volatile anesthetic isoflurane inhibits LTP induction of hippocampal CA1 neurons through α4β2 nAChR subtype-mediated mechanisms.

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    Piao, M-H; Liu, Y; Wang, Y-S; Qiu, J-P; Feng, C-S

    2013-10-01

    Volatile anesthetic isoflurane contributes to postoperative cognitive dysfunction and inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP), a synaptic model of learning and memory, but the mechanisms are uncertain. Central neuronal α4β2 subtype nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are involved in the induction of LTP in the hippocampus. Isoflurane inhibits α4β2 nAChRs at concentrations lower than those used for anesthesia. Therefore, we hypothesized that isoflurane-inhibited LTP induction of hippocampal CA1 neurons via α4β2 nAChRs subtype inhibition. Transverse hippocampal slices (400μm thick) were obtained from male rats (6-8 weeks old). Population spikes were evoked using extracellular electrodes by electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway of rat hippocampal slices. LTP was induced using high frequency stimulation (HFS; 100Hz, 1s). Clinically relevant concentrations (0.125-0.5mM) of isoflurane with or without nicotine (nAChRs agonist), mecamylamine (nAChRs antagonist), 3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy] pyridine (A85380) and epibatidine (α4β2 nAChRs agonist), dihydro β erythroidine (DHβE) (α4β2 nAChRs antagonist) were added to the perfusion solution 20min before HFS to test their effects on LTP by HFS respectively. A brief HFS induced stable LTP in rat hippocampal slices, but LTP was significantly inhibited in the presence of isoflurane at concentrations of 0.125-0.5mM. The inhibitive effect of isoflurane on LTP was not only reversible and could be prevented by nAChRs agonist nicotine and α4β2 nAChRs agonist A85380 and epibatidine, but also mimicked and potentiated by nAChRs antagonist mecamylamine and α4β2 nAChRs antagonist DHβE. Inhibition of α4β2 nAChRs subtype of hippocampus participates in isoflurane-mediated LTP inhibition. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The volatile anesthetic isoflurane differentially suppresses the induction of erythropoietin synthesis elicited by acute anemia and systemic hypoxemia in mice in an hypoxia-inducible factor-2-dependent manner.

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    Kai, Shinichi; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Matsuyama, Tomonori; Suzuki, Kengo; Hirota, Kiichi

    2014-06-05

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a glycoprotein hormone essential for the regulation of erythroid homeostasis. Although EPO production is prominent in the kidney and liver, its production in the central nervous system has also been detected. Tissue hypoxia due to systemic or local hypoxemia and acute anemia due to blood loss occurs frequently during various clinical settings, leading to a high possibility of elevated plasma EPO levels. However, it is largely unknown whether volatile anesthetic agents affect EPO production elicited by acute hypoxia in vivo. Male C57BL/6N CrSlc mice were exposed to a hypoxic insult as a result of bleeding-related anemia or hypoxemia while they were under anesthetized using various concentrations of isoflurane. EPO protein concentrations were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and mRNA levels were measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Plasma EPO concentration was induced as early as 3h following acute anemic and hypoxemic hypoxia and suppressed by clinically relevant doses of isoflurane in a dose-dependent manner. Anemic hypoxia induced EPO mRNA and protein synthesis in the kidney. In the kidney, isoflurane inhibited EPO induction caused by anemia but not that caused by hypoxemia. On the other hand, in the brain hypoxemia-induced EPO production was suppressed by isoflurane. Finally, qRT-PCR studies demonstrate that isoflurane differentially inhibit HIF-1α and HIF-2α mRNA expression in brain and kidney, indicating the involvement of HIF-2 in the hypoxia-induced EPO expression and inhibition of the induction by isoflurane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial effects of liquid anesthetic isoflurane on Candida albicans

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    Armstead Valerie

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that can grow in yeast morphology or hyphal form depending on the surrounding environment. This ubiquitous fungus is present in skin and mucus membranes as a potential pathogen that under opportunistic conditions causes a series of systemic and superficial infections known as candidiasis, moniliasis or simply candidiasis. There has been a steady increase in the prevalence of candidiasis that is expressed in more virulent forms of infection. Although candidiasis is commonly manifested as mucocutaneous disease, life-threatening systemic invasion by this fungus can occur in every part of the body. The severity of candidal infections is associated with its morphological shift such that the hyphal morphology of the fungus is most invasive. Of importance, aberrant multiplication of Candida yeast is also associated with the pathogenesis of certain mucosal diseases. In this study, we assessed the anti-candidal activity of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in liquid form in comparison with the anti-fungal agent amphotericin B in an in vitro culture system. Exposure of C. albicans to isoflurane (0.3% volume/volume and above inhibited multiplication of yeast as well as formation of hyphae. These data suggest development of potential topical application of isoflurane for controlling a series of cutaneous and genital infections associated with this fungus. Elucidiation of the mechanism by which isoflurane effects fungal growth could offer therapeutic potential for certain systemic fungal infections.

  5. Hiccup-Like Response in a Dog Anesthetized with Isoflurane

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    Enzo Vettorato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An eight-year-old, female intact Golden Retriever underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for investigation of urinary and faecal incontinence. Soon after induction of general anesthesia, tracheal intubation, and isoflurane administration, hiccup-like movements were evident. These hiccup-like movements did not respond to hyperventilation and increase of anesthetic. After having ruled out pulmonary disease, the animal was reanesthetized with a similar technique; hiccup-like movements reoccurred and did not stop after discontinuation of isoflurane and commencement of a propofol infusion. Eventually, a nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent was administered to stop the hiccup-like response and allow MRI to be performed. This case report describes the pathophysiology of hiccup-like response and its management in a dog.

  6. Paired assessment of volatile anesthetic concentrations with synaptic actions recorded in vitro.

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    Stuart J McDougall

    Full Text Available The volatile anesthetic isoflurane poses a number of experimental challenges in the laboratory. Due to its rapid evaporation, the open conditions of most in vitro electrophysiological recording systems make the determination of actual isoflurane concentrations a challenge. Since the absolute anesthetic concentration in solution is directly related to efficacy, concentration measurements are important to allow comparisons between laboratory and clinical studies. In this study we quantify the sources of isoflurane loss during experimentation and describe a method for the measurement of isoflurane concentrations using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry simultaneous to in vitro electrophysiological measurements. Serial samples of perfused bath solution allowed correlation of isoflurane concentrations with ongoing biological effects. Saturated physiological solutions contained 13.4 +/- 0.2 mM isoflurane and were diluted to desired "nominal" concentrations for experiments. The perfusion system established stable isoflurane concentrations within the bath by 2 minutes. However, bath isoflurane concentrations varied substantially and unpredictably between experiments. The magnitudes of such discrepancies in isoflurane concentrations spanned clinically important levels. Our studies suggest that, despite countermeasures, solution handling significantly impacted the isoflurane content in the tissue bath. The magnitude of these discrepancies appears to necessitate systematic direct measurement of bath isoflurane concentrations during most in vitro conditions.

  7. Pattern recognition analysis of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of brain tissue extracts from rats anesthetized with propofol or isoflurane.

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    Hiroshi Kawaguchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: General anesthesia is routinely used as a surgical procedure and its safety has been endorsed by clinical outcomes; however, its effects at the molecular level have not been elucidated. General anesthetics influence glucose metabolism in the brain. However, the effects of anesthetics on brain metabolites other than those related to glucose have not been well characterized. We used a pattern recognition analysis of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra to visualize the changes in holistic brain metabolic phenotypes in response to the widely used intravenous anesthetic propofol and the volatile anesthetic isoflurane. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Rats were randomized into five groups (n = 7 each group. Propofol and isoflurane were administered to two groups each, for 2 or 6 h. The control group received no anesthesia. Brains were removed directly after anesthesia. Hydrophilic compounds were extracted from excised whole brains and measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All spectral data were processed and analyzed by principal component analysis for comparison of the metabolite profiles. Data were visualized by plotting principal component (PC scores. In the plots, each point represents an individual sample. The propofol and isoflurane groups were clustered separately on the plots, and this separation was especially pronounced when comparing the 6-h groups. The PC scores of the propofol group were clearly distinct from those of the control group, particularly in the 6-h group, whereas the difference in PC scores was more subtle in the isoflurane group and control groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the present study showed that propofol and isoflurane exerted differential effects on holistic brain metabolism under anesthesia.

  8. Minimum anesthetic concentration of isoflurane in captive thick-billed parrots (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha).

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    Mercado, Julio A; Larsen, R Scott; Wack, Raymund F; Pypendop, Bruno H

    2008-02-01

    To determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in thick-billed parrots (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha). 15 healthy thick-billed parrots. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. In the first bird that was anesthetized, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.0% for 15 minutes. After this period of anesthetic equilibration, an end-tidal gas sample was obtained for verification of isoflurane concentration. A toe was pinched to determine the bird's response to pain, and the bird was then allowed to recover from aesthesia. To determine MAC, a so-called up-and-down approach was subsequently used in all 15 birds. Compared with the isoflurane concentration used for MAC determination in the first bird, maintenance isoflurane concentration for the second bird was increased by approximately 10% if the first bird reacted and decreased by approximately 10% if the first bird did not react to a toe pinch. These steps were then followed until all 15 birds had been anesthetized. Crossover events occurred when birds in sequence had discordant results (ie, 1 reactor and 1 nonreactor). The MAC was defined as the mean of the isoflurane concentrations measured during these crossover events. Mean MAC of isoflurane in thick-billed parrots was estimated to be 1.07% (95% confidence interval, 0.97% to 1.16%). Isoflurane MAC appears to be lower in thick-billed parrots than the MAC determined for other bird species. Determination of the species-specific requirements of thick-billed parrots should allow isoflurane anesthesia to be performed more safely in this endangered species.

  9. Sevoflurane Induces DNA Damage Whereas Isoflurane Leads to Higher Antioxidative Status in Anesthetized Rats

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    Thalita L. A. Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account that there are controversial antioxidative effects of inhalational anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane and absence of comparison of genotoxicity of both anesthetics in animal model, the aim of this study was to compare DNA damage and antioxidant status in Wistar rats exposed to a single time to isoflurane or sevoflurane. The alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay was performed in order to evaluate DNA damage in whole blood cells of control animals (unexposed; n = 6 and those exposed to 2% isoflurane (n = 6 or 4% sevoflurane (n = 6 for 120 min. Plasma antioxidant status was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. There was no statistically significant difference between isoflurane and sevoflurane groups regarding hemodynamic and temperature variables (P > 0.05. Sevoflurane significantly increased DNA damage compared to unexposed animals (P = 0.02. In addition, Wistar rats anesthetized with isoflurane showed higher antioxidative status (MTT than control group (P = 0.019. There were no significant differences in DNA damage or antioxidant status between isoflurane and sevoflurane groups (P > 0.05. In conclusion, our findings suggest that, in contrast to sevoflurane exposure, isoflurane increases systemic antioxidative status, protecting cells from DNA damage in rats.

  10. Anesthetic propofol attenuates the isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and Aβ oligomerization.

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    Yiying Zhang

    Full Text Available Accumulation and deposition of β-amyloid protein (Aβ are the hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease. The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce caspase activation and increase Aβ accumulation. In addition, recent studies suggest that isoflurane may directly promote the formation of cytotoxic soluble Aβ oligomers, which are thought to be the key pathological species in AD. In contrast, propofol, the most commonly used intravenous anesthetic, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to compare the effects of isoflurane and propofol alone and in combination on caspase-3 activation and Aβ oligomerization in vitro and in vivo. Naïve and stably-transfected H4 human neuroglioma cells that express human amyloid precursor protein, the precursor for Aβ; neonatal mice; and conditioned cell culture media containing secreted human Aβ40 or Aβ42 were treated with isoflurane and/or propofol. Here we show for the first time that propofol can attenuate isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in cultured cells and in the brain tissues of neonatal mice. Furthermore, propofol-mediated caspase inhibition occurred when there were elevated levels of Aβ. Finally, isoflurane alone induces Aβ42, but not Aβ40, oligomerization, and propofol can inhibit the isoflurane-mediated oligomerization of Aβ42. These data suggest that propofol may mitigate the caspase-3 activation by attenuating the isoflurane-induced Aβ42 oligomerization. Our findings provide novel insights into the possible mechanisms of isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity that may aid in the development of strategies to minimize potential adverse effects associated with the administration of anesthetics to patients.

  11. Anesthetics isoflurane and desflurane differently affect mitochondrial function, learning, and memory.

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    Zhang, Yiying; Xu, Zhipeng; Wang, Hui; Dong, Yuanlin; Shi, Hai Ning; Culley, Deborah J; Crosby, Gregory; Marcantonio, Edward R; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Xie, Zhongcong

    2012-05-01

    There are approximately 8.5 million Alzheimer disease (AD) patients who need anesthesia and surgery care every year. The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane, but not desflurane, has been shown to induce caspase activation and apoptosis, which are part of AD neuropathogenesis, through the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. However, the in vivo relevance, underlying mechanisms, and functional consequences of these findings remain largely to be determined. We therefore set out to assess the effects of isoflurane and desflurane on mitochondrial function, cytotoxicity, learning, and memory using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, and the fear conditioning test. Here we show that isoflurane, but not desflurane, induces opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), increase in levels of reactive oxygen species, reduction in levels of mitochondrial membrane potential and adenosine-5'-triphosphate, activation of caspase 3, and impairment of learning and memory in cultured cells, mouse hippocampus neurons, mouse hippocampus, and mice. Moreover, cyclosporine A, a blocker of mPTP opening, attenuates isoflurane-induced mPTP opening, caspase 3 activation, and impairment of learning and memory. Finally, isoflurane may induce the opening of mPTP via increasing levels of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that desflurane could be a safer anesthetic for AD patients as compared to isoflurane, and elucidate the potential mitochondria-associated underlying mechanisms, and therefore have implications for use of anesthetics in AD patients, pending human study confirmation. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  12. Sodium channels as targets for volatile anesthetics

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    Karl F. Herold

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms of modern inhaled anesthetics although widely used in clinical settings are still poorly understood. Considerable evidence supports effects on membrane proteins such as ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels of excitable cells. Na+ channels are crucial to action potential initiation and propagation, and represent potential targets for volatile anesthetics. Inhibition of presynaptic Na+ channels leads to reduced neurotransmitter release at the synapse and could therefore contribute to the mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics produce their characteristic effects: amnesia, unconsciousness, and immobility. Early studies on crayfish and squid giant axon showed inhibition of Na+ currents by volatile anesthetics. Subsequent studies using native neuronal preparations and heterologous expression systems with various mammalian Na+ channel isoforms implicated inhibition of presynaptic Na+ channels in anesthetic actions. Volatile anesthetics reduce peak Na+ current and shift the voltage of half-maximal steady-state inactivation towards more negative potentials, thus stabilizing the fast-inactivated state. Furthermore recovery from fast-inactivation is slowed together with an enhanced use-dependent block during pulse train protocols. These effects can reduce neurotransmitter release by depressing presynaptic excitability, depolarization and Ca entry, and ultimately transmitter release. This reduction in transmitter release is more portent for glutamatergic vs. GABAergic terminals. Involvement of Na+ channel inhibition in mediating the immobility caused by volatile anesthetics has been demonstrated in animal studies, in which intrathecal infusion of the Na+ channel blocker tetrodotoxin increases volatile anesthetic potency, whereas infusion of the Na+ channels agonist veratridine reduces anesthetic potency. These studies indicate that inhibition of presynaptic Na+ channels by volatile anesthetics is involved in mediating some of

  13. Inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels by emulsified isoflurane may contribute to its subarachnoid anesthetic effect in beagle dogs.

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    Zhou, Cheng; Wu, Wei; Liu, Jin; Liao, Da-qing; Kang, Yi; Chen, Xiang-dong

    2011-01-01

    Volatile anesthetics, in addition to their general anesthesia action, have been proven to produce regional anesthetic effect in various animal models. The major aim of this study was to examine whether emulsified isoflurane (EI) could also produce subarachnoid anesthesia and to investigate its possible mechanism. Beagle dogs were randomly assigned into 5 groups (n = 6/group): intrathecally receiving 1% lidocaine 0.1 mL/kg, 30% intralipid 0.1 mL/kg (control), or 8% EI at doses of 0.05, 0.075, or 0.1 mL/kg, respectively. Consciousness state, motor function of limbs, and response to nociceptive stimulus were observed after drug administration. The effect of EI on voltage-gated Na channel was recorded from isolated spinal neurons of rats, using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Inhibition of peak sodium currents and effect of EI on Na channel gating were analyzed. Emulsified isoflurane produced subarachnoid anesthesia in a dose-dependent manner, and at the dose of 0.1 mL/kg, the effect of 8% EI was similar to 1% lidocaine. Sodium channel currents were inhibited by EI at clinically relevant concentrations, with the IC50 (median inhibitory concentration) at 0.69 ± 0.08 mM. Voltage activation of Na channels was positive, shifted by isoflurane at the concentration of 0.77 mM, and V½ of activation (voltage for half-maximal activation) shifted from -12.4 ± 2.7 mV to -7.3 ± 2.3 mV (P channels in the spinal cord.

  14. Isoflurane anesthetic hypersensitivity and progressive respiratory depression in a mouse model with isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency

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    Roelofs, S.; Manjeri, G.R.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Smeitink, J.; Driessen, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with mitochondrial disorders are frequently anesthetized for a wide range of operations. These disorders may interfere with the response to surgery and anesthesia. We examined anesthetic sensitivity to and respiratory effects of isoflurane in the Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mouse

  15. Effects of inhaled anesthetic isoflurane on long-term potentiation of CA3 pyramidal cell afferents in vivo

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    Ballesteros KA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kristen A Ballesteros,1 Angela Sikorski,2 James E Orfila,3 Joe L Martinez Jr41Department of Biology, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; 2Texas A&M University Texarkana, Texarkana, TX, USA; 3University of Colorado in Denver, Denver, CO, USA; 4University of Illinois in Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Isoflurane is a preferred anesthetic, due to its properties that allow a precise concentration to be delivered continually during in vivo experimentation. The major mechanism of action of isoflurane is modulation of the γ-amino butyric acid (GABAA receptor-chloride channel, mediating inhibitory synaptic transmission. Animal studies have shown that isoflurane does not cause cell death, but it does inhibit cell growth and causes long-term hippocampal learning deficits. As there are no studies characterizing the effects of isoflurane on electrophysiological aspects of long-term potentiation (LTP in the hippocampus, it is important to determine whether isoflurane alters the characteristic responses of hippocampal afferents to cornu ammonis region 3 (CA3. We investigated the effects of isoflurane on adult male rats during in vivo induction of LTP, using the mossy fiber pathway, the lateral perforant pathway, the medial perforant pathway, and the commissural CA3 (cCA3 to CA3, with intracranial administration of Ringer’s solution, naloxone, RS-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA, or 3-[(R-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl]-propo-2-enyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP. Then, we compared these responses to published electrophysiological data, using sodium pentobarbital as an anesthetic, under similar experimental conditions. Our results showed that LTP was exhibited in animals anesthetized with isoflurane under vehicle conditions. With the exception of AIDA in the lateral perforant pathway, the defining characteristics of the four pathways appeared to remain intact, except for the observation that LTP was markedly reduced in animals

  16. Does chronic occupational exposure to volatile anesthetic agents influence the rate of neutrophil apoptosis?

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    Goto, Y

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to determine whether the rate of neutrophil apoptosis in health care workers is influenced by exposure to volatile anesthetic agents. METHODS: Percentage neutrophil apoptosis (Annexin-V FITC assay) was measured in health care workers (n = 20) and unexposed volunteers (n = 10). For the health care workers, time weighted personal exposure monitoring to N2O, sevoflurane and isoflurane was carried out. RESULTS: The sevoflurane and isoflurane concentrations to which health care workers were exposed were less than recommended levels in all 20 cases. Percent apoptosis was less at 24 (but not at one and 12) hr culture in health care workers [50.5 (9.7)%; P = 0.008] than in unexposed volunteers [57.3 (5.1)%]. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis at 24 hr culture was demonstrated in health care workers chronically exposed to volatile anesthetic agents. Exposure was well below recommended levels in the both scavenged and unscavenged work areas in which the study was carried out. Further study is required to assess the effect of greater degrees of chronic exposure to volatile anesthetic agents on neutrophil apoptosis.

  17. Dose-dependent effects of the clinical anesthetic isoflurane on Octopus vulgaris: a contribution to cephalopod welfare.

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    Polese, Gianluca; Winlow, William; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in animal welfare legislation relating to invertebrates has provoked interest in methods for the anesthesia of cephalopods, for which different approaches to anesthesia have been tried but in most cases without truly anesthetizing the animals. For example, several workers have used muscle relaxants or hypothermia as forms of "anesthesia." Several inhalational anesthetics are known to act in a dose-dependent manner on the great pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis, a pulmonate mollusk. Here we report, for the first time, on the effects of clinical doses of the well-known inhalational clinical anesthetic isoflurane on the behavioral responses of the common octopus Octopus vulgaris. In each experiment, isoflurane was equilibrated into a well-aerated seawater bath containing a single adult O. vulgaris. Using a web camera, we recorded each animal's response to touch stimuli eliciting withdrawal of the arms and siphon and observed changes in the respiratory rate and the chromatophore pattern over time (before, during, and after application of the anesthetic). We found that different animals of the same size responded with similar behavioral changes as the isoflurane concentration was gradually increased. After gradual application of 2% isoflurane for a maximum of 5 min (at which time all the responses indicated deep anesthesia), the animals recovered within 45-60 min in fresh aerated seawater. Based on previous findings in gastropods, we believe that the process of anesthesia induced by isoflurane is similar to that previously observed in Lymnaea. In this study we showed that isoflurane is a good, reversible anesthetic for O. vulgaris, and we developed a method for its use.

  18. Comparison of the effects of xylazine bolus versus medetomidine constant rate infusion on the stress response, urine production, and anesthetic recovery characteristics in horses anesthetized with isoflurane.

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    Creighton, Catherine M; Lemke, Kip A; Lamont, Leigh A; Horney, Barbara S; Doyle, Aimie J

    2012-04-15

    To compare the effect of xylazine bolus versus medetomidine constant rate infusion (MCRI) on serum cortisol and glucose concentrations, urine production, and anesthetic recovery characteristics in dorsally recumbent, spontaneously breathing, isoflurane-anesthetized horses. Prospective, randomized crossover study. 10 healthy Standardbreds. Horses were premedicated with xylazine or medetomidine IV. Anesthesia was induced with diazepam and ketamine and maintained with isoflurane for 150 minutes. For the xylazine treatment, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.7% and xylazine (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb]), IV) was administered as a bolus at the end of anesthesia. For the MCRI treatment, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.4% and medetomidine (0.005 mg/kg/h [0.0023 mg/lb/h], IV) was infused throughout anesthesia. Serum cortisol and glucose concentrations were measured before, during, and after anesthesia. Urine specific gravity and volume were measured during anesthesia. Unassisted anesthetic recoveries were recorded by a digital video camera for later evaluation by 2 observers who were blinded to treatment. Serum cortisol concentration was lower and serum glucose concentration was higher with MCRI treatment, compared with xylazine treatment. Time to sternal recumbency was longer with MCRI treatment, but no difference was seen between treatments for times to extubation, first movement, or standing. Objective (mean attempt interval) and subjective (visual analog score) recovery scores were significantly better with MCRI treatment, compared with xylazine treatment. In isoflurane-anesthetized horses, premedication and administration of medetomidine as a constant rate infusion resulted in decreased serum cortisol concentration, increased serum glucose concentration, and superior anesthetic recovery characteristics, compared with conventional treatment with xylazine.

  19. Development of three Drosophila melanogaster strains with different sensitivity to volatile anesthetics.

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    Liu, Jin; Hu, Zhao-yang; Ye, Qi-quan; Dai, Shuo-hua

    2009-03-05

    The mechanisms of action for volatile anesthetics remain unknown for centuries partly owing to the insufficient or ineffective research models. We designed this study to develop three strains derived from a wild-type Drosophila melanogaster with different sensitivities to volatile anesthetics, which may ultimately facilitate molecular and genetic studies of the mechanism involved. Median effective doses (ED(50)) of sevoflurane in seven-day-old virgin female and male wild-type Drosophila melanogaster were determined. The sensitive males and females of percentile 6 - 10 were cultured for breeding sensitive offspring (S(1)). So did median ones of percentile 48 - 52 for breeding median offspring (M(1)), resistant ones of percentile 91 - 95 for breeding resistant offspring (R(1)). Process was repeated through 31 generations, in the 37th generation, S(37), M(37) and R(37) were used to determine ED(50) for enflurane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, halothane, methoxyflurane, chloroform and trichloroethylene, then ED(50) values were correlated with minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) values in human. From a wild-type Drosophila melanogaster we were able to breed three strains with high, median and low sevoflurane requirements. The ratio of sevoflurane requirements of three strains were 1.20:1.00:0.53 for females and 1.22:1.00:0.72 for males. Strains sensitive, median and resistant to sevoflurane were also sensitive, median and resistant to other volatile anesthetics. For eight anesthetics, ED(50) values in three strains correlated directly with MAC values in human. Three Drosophila melanogaster strains with high, median and low sensitivity to volatile anesthetics, but with same hereditary background were developed. The ED(50) are directly correlated with MAC in human for eight volatile anesthetics.

  20. Comparison of three different inhalant anesthetic agents (isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane) in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

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    Granone, Tiffany D; de Francisco, Olga N; Killos, Maria B; Quandt, Jane E; Mandsager, Ron E; Graham, Lynelle F

    2012-01-01

    To compare isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane for inhalant anesthesia in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) in terms of the speed and characteristics of induction; cardiovascular and respiratory parameters while anesthetized; and speed and quality of recovery. Prospective, cross over, randomized experimental study. 12 healthy adult red-tailed hawks. Anesthesia was induced with isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane in oxygen via face mask in a crossover, randomized design with a 1 week washout period between each treatment. Hawks were tracheally intubated, allowed to breathe spontaneously, and instrumented for cardiopulmonary monitoring. Data collected included heart rate, respiratory rate, end-tidal CO(2) , inspired and expired agent, SpO(2,) temperature, systolic blood pressure, time to intubation and time to recovery (tracking). Recovery was subjectively scored on a 4 point scale as well as a summary evaluation, by a single blinded observer. No significant difference in time to induction and time to extubation was noted with the administration of isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane. Time to the ability of the bird to follow a moving object with its eyes (tracking) was significantly faster with the administration of sevoflurane and desflurane. All recoveries were scored 1 or 2 and were assessed as good to excellent. No significant difference was noted in heart rate, blood pressure and temperature among the three inhalants. Administration of isoflurane resulted in lower respiratory rates. Overall, although isoflurane remains the most common inhaled anesthetic in avian practice, sevoflurane and desflurane both offer faster time to tracking, while similar changes in cardiopulmonary function were observed with each agent during anesthesia of healthy red-tailed hawks. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2011 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  1. Effect of 50% and maximal inspired oxygen concentrations on respiratory variables in isoflurane-anesthetized horses

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    Lerche Phillip

    2011-06-01

    dorsally recumbent isoflurane anesthetized horses does not improve oxygenation or oxygen delivery.

  2. Response surface model predictions of emergence and response to pain in the recovery room: an evaluation of patients emerging from an isoflurane and fentanyl anesthetic

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    Syroid, Noah D.; Johnson, Ken B.; Pace, Nathan L.; Westenskow, Dwayne R.; Tyler, Diane; Brühschwein, Frederike; Albert, Robert W.; Roalstad, Shelly; Costy-Bennett, Samuel; Egan, Talmage D.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Sevoflurane - remifentanil interaction models that predict responsiveness and response to painful stimuli have been evaluated in patients undergoing elective surgery. Preliminary evaluations of model predictions were found to be consistent with observations in patients anesthetized with sevoflurane, remifentanil and fentanyl. The present study explored the feasibility of adapting the predictions of sevoflurane-remifentanil interaction models to an isoflurane-fentanyl anesthetic. We hypothesized that model predictions adapted for isoflurane and fentanyl are consistent with observed patient responses and are similar to the predictions observed in our prior work with sevoflurane-remifentanil/fentanyl anesthetics. Methods Twenty-five patients scheduled for elective surgery received a fentanyl-isoflurane anesthetic. Model predictions of unresponsiveness were recorded at emergence and predictions of a response to noxious stimulus were recorded when patients first required analgesics in the recovery room. Model predictions were compared to observations with graphical and temporal analyses. Results were also compared to our prior predictions following a sevoflurane-remifentanil/fentanyl anesthetic. Results While patients were anesthetized, model predictions indicated a high likelihood that patients would be unresponsive (≥ 99%). Following termination of the anesthetic, model predictions of responsiveness well described the actual fraction of patients observed to be responsive during emergence. Half of the patients awoke within 2 minutes of the 50% model predicted probability of unresponsiveness; 70% awoke within 4 minutes. Similarly, predictions of a response to a noxious stimulus were consistent with the number of patients who required fentanyl in the recovery room. Model predictions following an isoflurane-fentanyl anesthetic were similar to model predictions following a sevoflurane-remifentanil/fentanyl anesthetic. Discussion Results confirmed our study

  3. The scavenging of volatile anesthetic agents in the cardiovascular intensive care unit environment: a technical report.

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    Pickworth, Thomas; Jerath, Angela; DeVine, Rita; Kherani, Nazmin; Wąsowicz, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    The use of volatile-based sedation within critical care environments has been limited by difficulties of drug administration and safety concerns over environment pollution and staff exposure in an intensive care unit (ICU) with no scavenging. The aim of this study was to develop a simple scavenging system to be used with the Anesthesia Conserving Device (AnaConDa(®)) and to determine whether or not ambient concentrations of residual anesthetic are within current acceptable limits. The scavenging system consists of two Deltasorb(®) canisters attached to the ICU ventilator in series. AnaConDa is a miniature vaporizer designed to provide volatile-based sedation within an ICU. The first ten patients recruited into a larger randomized trial assessing outcomes after elective coronary graft bypass surgery were sedated within the cardiac ICU using either isoflurane or sevoflurane. Sedation was guided by the Sedation Agitation Scale, resulting in an end-tidal minimum anesthetic concentration of volatile agent ranging from 0.1-0.3. At one hour post ICU admission, infrared photometric analysis was used to assess environmental contamination at four points along the ventilator circuit and scavenging system and around the patient's head. All measurements taken within the patient's room were below 1 part per million, which satisfies criteria for occupational exposure. This study shows that volatile agents can be administered safely within critical care settings using a simple scavenging system. Our scavenging system used in conjunction with the AnaConDa device reduced the concentration of environmental contamination to a level that is acceptable to Canadian standards and standards in most Western countries and thus conforms to international safety standards. The related clinical trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01151254).

  4. Comparison of the effects of xylazine bolus versus medetomidine constant rate infusion on cardiopulmonary function and depth of anesthesia in horses anesthetized with isoflurane.

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    Creighton, Catherine M; Lemke, Kip A; Lamont, Leigh A; Horney, Barbara S; Riley, Christopher B

    2012-04-15

    To compare the effects of xylazine bolus versus medetomidine constant rate infusion (MCRI) on cardiopulmonary function and depth of anesthesia in dorsally recumbent, spontaneously breathing, isoflurane-anesthetized horses. Prospective, randomized crossover study. 10 healthy adult Standardbreds. Horses were premedicated with xylazine or medetomidine IV. Anesthesia was induced with diazepam and ketamine and maintained with isoflurane for 150 minutes. For the xylazine treatment, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.7%, and xylazine (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb], IV) was administered as a bolus at the end of anesthesia. For the MCRI treatment, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.4%, and medetomidine (0.005 mg/kg/h [0.0023 mg/lb/h], IV) was infused throughout anesthesia. Physiologic data (ie, heart rate, respiratory rate, rectal temperature, bispectral index, and electromyographic values) were compared between treatments with xylazine bolus versus MCRI. Heart rate was lower, but mean arterial blood pressure was higher from 20 to 40 minutes with MCRI treatment, compared with conventional treatment with xylazine. Respiratory rate and rectal temperature were greater with MCRI treatment. Bispectral index was lower with MCRI treatment from 80 to 150 minutes, and electromyographic values were lower with MCRI treatment from 30 to 150 minutes. In isoflurane-anesthetized horses, premedication with medetomidine followed by administration of medetomidine as a constant rate infusion resulted in decreased heart rate, higher arterial blood pressure from 20 through 40 minutes after induction of anesthesia, and better preserved body temperature, compared with conventional treatment with xylazine. Greater depth of anesthesia and muscle relaxation were seen with MCRI treatment, despite the lower isoflurane concentration.

  5. Isoflurane preconditioning confers cardioprotection by activation of ALDH2.

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    Xiao-E Lang

    Full Text Available The volatile anesthetic, isoflurane, protects the heart from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 is thought to be an endogenous mechanism against ischemia-reperfusion injury possibly through detoxification of toxic aldehydes. We investigated whether cardioprotection by isoflurane depends on activation of ALDH2.Anesthetized rats underwent 40 min of coronary artery occlusion followed by 120 min of reperfusion and were randomly assigned to the following groups: untreated controls, isoflurane preconditioning with and without an ALDH2 inhibitor, the direct activator of ALDH2 or a protein kinase C (PKCε inhibitor. Pretreatment with isoflurane prior to ischemia reduced LDH and CK-MB levels and infarct size, while it increased phosphorylation of ALDH2, which could be blocked by the ALDH2 inhibitor, cyanamide. Isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes were treated with hypoxia followed by reoxygenation. Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and injury which were attenuated by isoflurane and forced the activation of ALDH2. In contrast, the effect of isoflurane-induced protection was almost abolished by knockdown of ALDH2. Activation of ALDH2 and cardioprotection by isoflurane were substantially blocked by the PKCε inhibitor. Activation of ALDH2 by mitochondrial PKCε plays an important role in the cardioprotection of isoflurane in myocardium I/R injury.

  6. Early exposure to volatile anesthetics impairs long-term associative learning and recognition memory.

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    Bradley H Lee

    Full Text Available Anesthetic exposure early in life affects neural development and long-term cognitive function, but our understanding of the types of memory that are altered is incomplete. Specific cognitive tests in rodents that isolate different memory processes provide a useful approach for gaining insight into this issue.Postnatal day 7 (P7 rats were exposed to either desflurane or isoflurane at 1 Minimum Alveolar Concentration for 4 h. Acute neuronal death was assessed 12 h later in the thalamus, CA1-3 regions of hippocampus, and dentate gyrus. In separate behavioral experiments, beginning at P48, subjects were evaluated in a series of object recognition tests relying on associative learning, as well as social recognition.Exposure to either anesthetic led to a significant increase in neuroapoptosis in each brain region. The extent of neuronal death did not differ between groups. Subjects were unaffected in simple tasks of novel object and object-location recognition. However, anesthetized animals from both groups were impaired in allocentric object-location memory and a more complex task requiring subjects to associate an object with its location and contextual setting. Isoflurane exposure led to additional impairment in object-context association and social memory.Isoflurane and desflurane exposure during development result in deficits in tasks relying on associative learning and recognition memory. Isoflurane may potentially cause worse impairment than desflurane.

  7. Isoflurane reversibly destabilizes hippocampal dendritic spines by an actin-dependent mechanism.

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    Jimcy Platholi

    Full Text Available General anesthetics produce a reversible coma-like state through modulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. Recent evidence suggests that anesthetic exposure can also lead to sustained cognitive dysfunction. However, the subcellular effects of anesthetics on the structure of established synapses are not known. We investigated effects of the widely used volatile anesthetic isoflurane on the structural stability of hippocampal dendritic spines, a postsynaptic structure critical to excitatory synaptic transmission in learning and memory. Exposure to clinical concentrations of isoflurane induced rapid and non-uniform shrinkage and loss of dendritic spines in mature cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Spine shrinkage was associated with a reduction in spine F-actin concentration. Spine loss was prevented by either jasplakinolide or cytochalasin D, drugs that prevent F-actin disassembly. Isoflurane-induced spine shrinkage and loss were reversible upon isoflurane elimination. Thus, isoflurane destabilizes spine F-actin, resulting in changes to dendritic spine morphology and number. These findings support an actin-based mechanism for isoflurane-induced alterations of synaptic structure in the hippocampus. These reversible alterations in dendritic spine structure have important implications for acute anesthetic effects on excitatory synaptic transmission and synaptic stability in the hippocampus, a locus for anesthetic-induced amnesia, and have important implications for anesthetic effects on synaptic plasticity.

  8. Isoflurane induces learning impairment that is mediated by interleukin 1β in rodents.

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    Lin Cao

    Full Text Available Postoperative cognitive decline is a clinical syndrome. Volatile anesthetics are commonly used during surgery. It is conceivable that volatile anesthetics may contribute to postoperative cognitive decline. Isoflurane can impair cognitive functions of animals under certain conditions. However, the mechanisms for this impairment are not clear. Here, male 18-month old Fisher 344 rats or 10-week old mice were exposed to 1.2 or 1.4% isoflurane for 2 h. Our studies showed that isoflurane impaired the cognitive functions of the rats in Barnes maze. Isoflurane-exposed rats had reduced freezing behavior during the training sessions in the fear conditioning test. This isoflurane effect was attenuated by lidocaine, a local anesthetic with anti-inflammatory property. Rats that had training sessions and were exposed to isoflurane 30 min later had freezing behavior similar to that of control animals. Isoflurane increased the expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β, interleukin-6 and activated caspase 3 in the hippocampus of the 18-month old rats. IL-1β positive staining was co-localized with that of NeuN, a neuronal marker. The increase of IL-1β and activated caspase 3 but not interleukin-6 was attenuated by lidocaine. Isoflurane also impaired the cognitive functions of 10-week old C57BL/6J mice and increased IL-1β in their hippocampi. However, isoflurane did not affect the cognitive functions of IL-1β deficient mice. Our results suggest that isoflurane impairs the learning but may not affect the recall of the aged rats. IL-1β may play an important role in this isoflurane effect.

  9. Comparison of Doppler, oscillometric, auricular and carotid arterial blood pressure measurements in isoflurane anesthetized New Zealand white rabbits.

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    Barter, Linda S; Epstein, Steven E

    2014-07-01

    To assess agreement between carotid arterial pressure and auricular arterial, thoracic limb Doppler or thoracic limb oscillometric blood pressure measurements. Prospective experimental study. Six adult New Zealand white rabbits. Rabbits were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen at 1, 1.5 and 2 MAC on two separate occasions. Catheters in the auricular and the contralateral external carotid artery were connected to calibrated pressure transducers via non-compliant tubing. Inflatable cuffs of width equal to approximately 40% of the limb circumference were placed above the carpus on both thoracic limbs with a Doppler transducer placed distal to the cuff on one. Systolic (SAP) and mean (MAP) arterial blood pressure measurements were obtained at each dose, on each occasion. Agreement between measurement techniques was evaluated by repeated measures Bland Altman analysis with carotid pressure as the reference. Variation in bias over the measurement range was evaluated by regression analysis. Carotid MAP and SAP ranged from 20 to 65 mmHg and 37 to 103 mmHg respectively. Bias and 95% limits of agreement for auricular and oscillometric MAP were 7 (0-14) and -5 (-21-11) mmHg, respectively, and for auricular, oscillometric and Doppler SAP were 23 (8-37), -2 (-24-20) and 13 (-14-39) mmHg, respectively. Bias varied significantly over the measurement range (p < 0.001) for all three SAP techniques but not for MAP measurements. Limits of agreement for all measurements were large but less so for MAP than SAP. Variation in bias with SAP should be considered when using these measurements clinically. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  10. Increasing Cumulative Exposure to Volatile Anesthetic Agents Is Associated with Poorer Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

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    Diaz, Laura K.; Gaynor, J. William; Koh, Shannon J.; Ittenbach, Richard F.; Gerdes, Marsha; Bernbaum, Judy C.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Clancy, Robert R.; Rehman, Mohamed A.; Pennington, Jeffrey W.; Burnham, Nancy; Spray, Thomas L.; Nicolson, Susan C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Despite improved survival in children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), significant concern persists regarding their neurodevelopmental (ND) outcomes. Previous studies have identified patient factors, such as prematurity and genetic syndromes, to be associated with worse ND outcomes. However, no consistent relationships have been identified among modifiable management factors, including cardiopulmonary bypass strategies, and ND outcomes after cardiac surgery in infancy. Studies in immature animals, including primates, have demonstrated neurodegeneration and apoptosis in the brain after certain levels and extended durations of anesthetic exposure. Retrospective human studies have also suggested relationships between adverse ND effects and anesthetic exposure. Methods Cumulative minimum alveolar concentration hours (MAC-hrs) of exposure to volatile anesthetic agents (VAA) (desflurane, halothane, isoflurane and sevoflurane) were collected from an anesthetic database and medical record review for 96 patients with HLHS or variants. ND testing was performed between ages 4 and 5 years including full-scale IQ, verbal IQ, performance IQ and processing speed. Four generalized linear modes were hypothesized a priori and tested using a Gaussian (normal) distribution with an identity link. Results Cumulative VAA exposure ranged from 0 to 35.3 MAC-hrs (median 7.5 hrs). Using specified covariates identified previously as significant predictors of ND outcomes, statistically significant relationships were identified between total MAC-hrs exposure and worse full-scale IQ and verbal IQ scores (p’s < 0.05) alone and after adjusting for relevant covariates. Conclusion Increased cumulative MAC-hrs exposure to VAA is associated with worse ND outcomes in certain domains in children with HLHS and variants. PMID:27183886

  11. Anesthesia with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane in the Crested Serpent Eagle (Spilornis cheela hoya): Minimum Anesthetic Concentration, Physiological Effects, Hematocrit, Plasma Chemistry and Behavioral Effects

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    CHAN, Fang-Tse; CHANG, Geng-Ruei; WANG, Hsien-Chi; HSU, Tien-Huan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The initial goal of this study was to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) for isoflurane (ISO) and sevoflurane (SEVO) for the crested serpent eagle. Next, we compared the anesthetic effects of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values and behavior in spontaneously breathing captive adult crested serpent eagles. Sixteen eagles were randomly allocated to two groups for anesthesia with ISO (n=8) or SEVO (n=8). First, we measured the MAC values of ISO and SEVO, and four weeks later, we investigated the effect of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit (HCT) and plasma chemistry values. The MAC values of ISO and SEVO for crested serpent eagles were 1.46 ± 0.30 and 2.03 ± 0.32%, respectively. The results revealed no significant differences between the two anesthetics in induction time, while time of extubation to recovery was significantly shorter with SEVO. A time-related increase in end-tidal CO2 and decreases in body temperature and respiratory rates were observed during anesthesia with each anesthetic. There were no significant differences between the effect of the two anesthetics on heart rate, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values or respiration, although each caused minor respiration depression. We concluded that SEVO is a more effective inhalant agent than ISO for use in eagles, showing the most rapidest induction and recovery from anesthesia. PMID:23955396

  12. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary parameters and recovery from anesthesia in cougars (Puma concolor anesthetized with detomidine/ketamine and isoflurane or sevoflurane

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    Verônica B. Albuquerque

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of this study was to assess the cardiopulmonary effects, the onset time after the administration of a detomidine/ketamine combination, and the recovery from anesthesia of cougars (Puma concolor anesthetized with detomidine/ketamine and isoflurane or sevoflurane for abdominal ultrasound imaging. Fourteen animals were randomly allocated into two experimental groups: GISO (n=7 and GSEVO (n=7. Chemical restraint was performed using 0.15mg/kg detomidine combined with 5mg/kg ketamine intramuscularly; anesthesia induction was achieved using 2mg/kg propofol intravenously and maintenance with isoflurane (GISO or sevoflurane (GSEVO. The following parameters were assessed: heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, oxyhemoglobin saturation, rectal temperature, central venous pressure, and end-tidal carbon dioxide. The time to sternal recumbency (TSR and time to standing position (TSP were also determined. There was not statistically significant difference for the cardiopulmonary variables or TSP whereas TSR was significantly shorter in GSEVO. The time to onset of anesthesia was 11.1±1.2 minutes and 11.3±1.8 minutes for GISO and GSEVO, respectively. The anesthesia of cougars with detomidine/ketamine and isoflurane or sevoflurane was conducted with safety, cardiopulmonary stability, and increased time to sternal recumbency in the GISO group.

  13. Shaker-related potassium channels in the central medial nucleus of the thalamus are important molecular targets for arousal suppression by volatile general anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioudyno, Maria I; Birch, Alexandra M; Tanaka, Brian S; Sokolov, Yuri; Goldin, Alan L; Chandy, K George; Hall, James E; Alkire, Michael T

    2013-10-09

    The molecular targets and neural circuits that underlie general anesthesia are not fully elucidated. Here, we directly demonstrate that Kv1-family (Shaker-related) delayed rectifier K(+) channels in the central medial thalamic nucleus (CMT) are important targets for volatile anesthetics. The modulation of Kv1 channels by volatiles is network specific as microinfusion of ShK, a potent inhibitor of Kv1.1, Kv1.3, and Kv1.6 channels, into the CMT awakened sevoflurane-anesthetized rodents. In heterologous expression systems, sevoflurane, isoflurane, and desflurane at subsurgical concentrations potentiated delayed rectifier Kv1 channels at low depolarizing potentials. In mouse thalamic brain slices, sevoflurane inhibited firing frequency and delayed the onset of action potentials in CMT neurons, and ShK-186, a Kv1.3-selective inhibitor, prevented these effects. Our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of delayed rectifier Kv1 channels to modulation by volatile anesthetics and highlight an arousal suppressing role of Kv1 channels in CMT neurons during the process of anesthesia.

  14. Effect of a heat and moisture exchanger on heat loss in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs undergoing single-limb orthopedic procedures.

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    Hofmeister, Erik H; Brainard, Benjamin M; Braun, Christina; Figueiredo, Juliana P

    2011-12-15

    To determine whether a heat and moisture exchange device (HME) prevents a decrease in body temperature in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs undergoing orthopedic procedures. Blinded randomized controlled clinical trial. 60 privately owned dogs weighing at least 15 kg (33 lb). Dogs were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups (n = 20/group): HME placed immediately after anesthetic induction with isoflurane, after transfer to the operating room, or not at all. The device consisted of a hygroscopic filter placed between the endotracheal tube and the Y piece of the anesthesia circuit. Each dog was positioned on a circulating warm water blanket and had a forced-air warming blanket placed over its body. Body temperature was monitored after transfer to the operating room with a probe placed in the thoracic aspect of the esophagus. Study groups did not differ significantly with respect to body weight, body condition score, reproductive status, breed, surgical procedure, preoperative sedative and opioid administration, anesthetic induction drug, local nerve block technique, or operating room assignment. There were no significant differences among groups in esophageal temperature variables, interval between anesthetic induction and surgery, surgery duration, anesthesia duration, or oxygen flow rate. However, the relationship between temperature delta and body weight was significant and relevant (R(2) = 0.23), as was the association between temperature nadir and body weight (R(2)= 0.10). As body weight increased, the temperature delta decreased and temperature nadir increased. No other significant relationships were identified. Inclusion of an HME in healthy dogs undergoing anesthesia for an elective orthopedic surgery did not facilitate maintenance of body temperature throughout the procedure.

  15. Role of nitric oxide-containing factors in the ventilatory and cardiovascular responses elicited by hypoxic challenge in isoflurane-anesthetized rats.

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    Mendoza, James P; Passafaro, Rachael J; Baby, Santhosh M; Young, Alex P; Bates, James N; Gaston, Benjamin; Lewis, Stephen J

    2014-06-01

    Exposure to hypoxia elicits changes in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate, and frequency of breathing (fR). The objective of this study was to determine the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the cardiovascular and ventilatory responses elicited by brief exposures to hypoxia in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. The rats were instrumented to record MAP, heart rate, and fR and then exposed to 90 s episodes of hypoxia (10% O2, 90% N2) before and after injection of vehicle, the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), or the inactive enantiomer D-NAME (both at 50 μmol/kg iv). Each episode of hypoxia elicited a decrease in MAP, bidirectional changes in heart rate (initial increase and then a decrease), and an increase in fR. These responses were similar before and after injection of vehicle or D-NAME. In contrast, the hypoxia-induced decreases in MAP were attenuated after administration of L-NAME. The initial increases in heart rate during hypoxia were amplified whereas the subsequent decreases in heart rate were attenuated in L-NAME-treated rats. Finally, the hypoxia-induced increases in fR were virtually identical before and after administration of L-NAME. These findings suggest that NO factors play a vital role in the expression of the cardiovascular but not the ventilatory responses elicited by brief episodes of hypoxia in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Based on existing evidence that NO factors play a vital role in carotid body and central responses to hypoxia in conscious rats, our findings raise the novel possibility that isoflurane blunts this NO-dependent signaling. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Carbon monoxide production from five volatile anesthetics in dry sodalime in a patient model: halothane and sevoflurane do produce carbon monoxide; temperature is a poor predictor of carbon monoxide production

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    Perez Roberto SGM

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desflurane and enflurane have been reported to produce substantial amounts of carbon monoxide (CO in desiccated sodalime. Isoflurane is said to produce less CO and sevoflurane and halothane should produce no CO at all. The purpose of this study is to measure the maximum amounts of CO production for all modern volatile anesthetics, with completely dry sodalime. We also tried to establish a relationship between CO production and temperature increase inside the sodalime. Methods A patient model was simulated using a circle anesthesia system connected to an artificial lung. Completely desiccated sodalime (950 grams was used in this system. A low flow anesthesia (500 ml/min was maintained using nitrous oxide with desflurane, enflurane, isoflurane, halothane or sevoflurane. For immediate quantification of CO production a portable gas chromatograph was used. Temperature was measured within the sodalime container. Results Peak concentrations of CO were very high with desflurane and enflurane (14262 and 10654 ppm respectively. It was lower with isoflurane (2512 ppm. We also measured small concentrations of CO for sevoflurane and halothane. No significant temperature increases were detected with high CO productions. Conclusion All modern volatile anesthetics produce CO in desiccated sodalime. Sodalime temperature increase is a poor predictor of CO production.

  17. Effects of intravenous administration of lactated Ringer's solution on hematologic, serum biochemical, rheological, hemodynamic, and renal measurements in healthy isoflurane-anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, William W; Kijtawornrat, Anusak; Ueyama, Yukie; Radecki, Steven V; Hamlin, Robert L

    2011-09-01

    To determine the hematologic, serum biochemical, rheological, hemodynamic, and renal effects of IV administration of lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) to healthy anesthetized dogs. 4-period, 4-treatment cross-over study. 8 healthy mixed-breed dogs. Each dog was anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, instrumented, and randomly assigned to receive LRS (0, 10, 20, or 30 mL/kg/h [0, 4.5, 9.1, or 13.6 mL/lb/h]), IV, on 4 occasions separated by at least 7 days. Blood hemoglobin concentration and serum total protein, albumin, lactate, and electrolyte concentrations; PCV; colloid osmotic pressure; arterial and venous pH and blood gases (Po2; Pco2); whole blood and plasma viscosity; arterial and venous blood pressures; cardiac output; results of urinalysis; urine production; glomerular filtration rate; and anesthetic recovery times were monitored. Oxygen delivery, vascular resistance, stroke volume, pulse pressure, and blood and plasma volume were calculated. Increasing rates of LRS administration resulted in dose-dependent decreases in PCV; blood hemoglobin concentration and serum total protein and albumin concentrations; colloid osmotic pressure; and whole blood viscosity. Plasma viscosity; serum electrolyte concentrations; data from arterial and venous blood gas analysis; glomerular filtration rate; urine production; heart rate; pulse, central venous, and arterial blood pressures; pulmonary vascular resistance; and oxygen delivery did not change. Pulmonary artery pressure, stroke volume, and cardiac output increased, and systemic vascular resistance decreased. Conventional IV infusion rates of LRS to isoflurane-anesthetized dogs decreased colligative blood components; increased plasma volume, pulmonary artery pressure, and cardiac output; and did not change urine production or oxygen delivery to tissues.

  18. Gas Sensor for Volatile Anesthetic Agents Based on Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Sebastian; Popovska-Leipertz, Nadejda; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    Continuous monitoring of respiratory and anesthetic gases during a surgery is of vital importance for the patient safety. Commonly the gas composition is determined by gas chromatography or a combination of IR-spectroscopy and electrochemical sensors. This study presents a concept for an optical sensor based on spontaneous Raman scattering which offers several advantages compared to established systems. All essential components can be detected simultaneously, no sample preparation is necessary and it provides fast response times. To reach the performance of a commonly used gas monitor signal gain has to be increased e.g. by using a multi pass setup.

  19. An innovative technique to improve safety of volatile anesthetics suction from the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit

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    Francesco De Simone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Myocardial injury during cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB is a major determinant of morbidity and mortality. Preclinical and clinical evidence of dose- and time-related cardioprotective effects of volatile anesthetic drugs exist and their use during the whole surgery duration could improve perioperative cardiac protection. Even if administering volatile agents during CPB are relatively easy, technical problems, such as waste gas scavenging, may prevent safe and manageable administration of halogenated vapors during CPB. Aims: The aim of this study is to improve the safe administration of volatile anesthesia during CPB. Settings and Design: Tertiary teaching hospital. Subjects and Methods: We describe an original device that collects and disposes of any volatile anesthetic vapors present in the exit stream of the oxygenator, hence preventing its dispersal into the operating theatre environment and adaptively regulates pressure of oxygenator chamber in the CPB circuit. Results: We have so far applied a prototype of this device in more than 1300 adult cardiac surgery patients who received volatile anesthetics during the CPB phase. Conclusions: Widespread implementation of scavenging system like the one we designed may facilitate the perfusionist and the anesthesiologist in delivering these cardioprotective drugs with beneficial impact on patients' outcome without compromising on safety.

  20. TREK-1 pathway mediates isoflurane-induced memory impairment in middle-aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yanhui; Peng, Zhengwu; Guo, Haiyun; Wang, Feng; Zeng, Yi

    2017-11-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) has been widely reported, especially in elderly patients. An association between POCD and inhalational anesthetics, such as isoflurane, has been suggested. The TWIK-related K+ channel-1 (TREK-1) controls several major cellular responses involved in memory formation and is believed to participate in the development of depression, cerebral ischemia and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. However, the specific role of TREK-1 in mediating anesthesia-induced POCD remains unknown. In the current study, we determined that exposure to isoflurane affected memory in middle-aged mice and altered TREK-1 expression. In addition, TREK-1 over-expression exacerbated isoflurane-induced memory impairment, while TREK-1 silence attenuated the impairment. Taken together, our data demonstrate that inhibition of TREK-1 protects mice from cognitive impairment induced by anesthesia and TREK-1 is a potential therapeutic target against memory impairment induced by volatile anesthetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Isoflurane Protects Against Human Endothelial Cell Apoptosis by Inducing Sphingosine Kinase-1 via ERK MAPK

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    H. Thomas Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction is a major clinical problem affecting virtually every patient requiring critical care. Volatile anesthetics are frequently used during the perioperative period and protect the heart and kidney against ischemia and reperfusion injury. We aimed to determine whether isoflurane, the most commonly used volatile anesthetic in the USA, protects against endothelial apoptosis and necrosis and the mechanisms involved in this protection. Human endothelial EA.hy926 cells were pretreated with isoflurane or carrier gas (95% room air + 5% CO2 then subjected to apoptosis with tumor necrosis factor-α or to necrosis with hydrogen peroxide. DNA laddering and in situ Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL staining determined EA.hy926 cell apoptosis and percent LDH released determined necrosis. We also determined whether isoflurane modulates the expression and activity of sphingosine kinase-1 (SK1 and induces the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK MAPK as both enzymes are known to protect against cell death. Isoflurane pretreatment significantly decreased apoptosis in EA.hy926 cells as evidenced by reduced TUNEL staining and DNA laddering without affecting necrosis. Mechanistically, isoflurane induces the phosphorylation of ERK MAPK and increased SK1 expression and activity in EA.hy926 cells. Finally, selective blockade of SK1 (with SKI-II or S1P1 receptor (with W146 abolished the anti-apoptotic effects of isoflurane. Taken together, we demonstrate that isoflurane, in addition to its potent analgesic and anesthetic properties, protects against endothelial apoptosis most likely via SK1 and ERK MAPK activation. Our findings have significant clinical implication for protection of endothelial cells during the perioperative period and patients requiring critical care.

  2. Isoflurane anesthesia exacerbates learning and memory impairment in zinc-deficient APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunsheng; Liu, Ya; Yuan, Ye; Cui, Weiwei; Zheng, Feng; Ma, Yuan; Piao, Meihua

    2016-12-01

    Zinc (Zn) is known to play crucial roles in numerous brain functions including learning and memory. Zn deficiency is believed to be widespread throughout the world, particularly in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). A number of studies have shown that volatile anesthetics, such as isoflurane, might be potential risk factors for the development of AD. However, whether isoflurane exposure accelerates the process of AD and cognitive impairment in AD patients with Zn deficiency is yet to be documented. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of 1.4% isoflurane exposure for 2 h on learning and memory function, and neuropathogenesis in 10-month-old Zn-adequate, Zn-deficient, and Zn-treated APP/PS1 mice with the following parameters: behavioral tests, neuronal apoptosis, Aβ, and tau pathology. The results demonstrated that isoflurane exposure showed no impact on learning and memory function, but induced transient elevation of neuroapoptosis in Zn-adequate APP/PS1 mice. Exposure of isoflurane exhibited significant neuroapoptosis, Aβ generation, tau phosphorylation, and learning and memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice in the presence of Zn deficiency. Appropriate Zn treatment improved learning and memory function, and prevented isoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis in APP/PS1 mice. Isoflurane exposure may cause potential neurotoxicity, which is tolerated to some extent in Zn-adequate APP/PS1 mice. When this tolerance is limited, like in AD with Zn deficiency, isoflurane exposure markedly exacerbated learning and memory impairment, and neuropathology, indicating that AD patients with certain conditions such as Zn deficiency may be vulnerable to volatile anesthetic isoflurane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Isoflurane-induced spatial memory impairment in mice is prevented by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil.

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    Diansan Su

    Full Text Available Although many studies have shown that isoflurane exposure impairs spatial memory in aged animals, there are no clinical treatments available to prevent this memory deficit. The anticholinergic properties of volatile anesthetics are a biologically plausible cause of cognitive dysfunction in elderly subjects. We hypothesized that pretreatment with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil, which has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, prevents isoflurane-induced spatial memory impairment in aged mice. In present study, eighteen-month-old mice were administered donepezil (5 mg/kg or an equal volume of saline by oral gavage with a feeding needle for four weeks. Then the mice were exposed to isoflurane (1.2% for six hours. Two weeks later, mice were subjected to the Morris water maze to examine the impairment of spatial memory after exposure to isoflurane. After the behavioral test, the mice were sacrificed, and the protein expression level of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, choline acetylase (ChAT and α7 nicotinic receptor (α7-nAChR were measured in the brain. Each group consisted of 12 mice. We found that isoflurane exposure for six hours impaired the spatial memory of the mice. Compared with the control group, isoflurane exposure dramatically decreased the protein level of ChAT, but not AChE or α7-nAChR. Donepezil prevented isoflurane-induced spatial memory impairments and increased ChAT levels, which were downregulated by isoflurane. In conclusions, pretreatment with the AChE inhibitor donepezil prevented isoflurane-induced spatial memory impairment in aged mice. The mechanism was associated with the upregulation of ChAT, which was decreased by isoflurane.

  4. Isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis through reduced Ca2+ influx, not Ca2+-exocytosis coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Joel P; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hara, Masato; Cook, Daniel C; Hoppa, Michael B; Ryan, Timothy A; Hemmings, Hugh C

    2015-09-22

    Identifying presynaptic mechanisms of general anesthetics is critical to understanding their effects on synaptic transmission. We show that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis at nerve terminals in dissociated rat hippocampal neurons through inhibition of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx without significantly altering the Ca(2+) sensitivity of SV exocytosis. A clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane (0.7 mM) inhibited changes in [Ca(2+)]i driven by single action potentials (APs) by 25 ± 3%, which in turn led to 62 ± 3% inhibition of single AP-triggered exocytosis at 4 mM extracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]e). Lowering external Ca(2+) to match the isoflurane-induced reduction in Ca(2+) entry led to an equivalent reduction in exocytosis. These data thus indicate that anesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release from small SVs occurs primarily through reduced axon terminal Ca(2+) entry without significant direct effects on Ca(2+)-exocytosis coupling or on the SV fusion machinery. Isoflurane inhibition of exocytosis and Ca(2+) influx was greater in glutamatergic compared with GABAergic nerve terminals, consistent with selective inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission. Such alteration in the balance of excitatory to inhibitory transmission could mediate reduced neuronal interactions and network-selective effects observed in the anesthetized central nervous system.

  5. Anesthetics Impact the Resolution of Inflammation

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    Fredman, Gabrielle; Kasuga, Kie; Gelman, Simon; Serhan, Charles N.

    2008-01-01

    Background Local and volatile anesthetics are widely used for surgery. It is not known whether anesthetics impinge on the orchestrated events in spontaneous resolution of acute inflammation. Here we investigated whether a commonly used local anesthetic (lidocaine) and a widely used inhaled anesthetic (isoflurane) impact the active process of resolution of inflammation. Methods and Findings Using murine peritonitis induced by zymosan and a systems approach, we report that lidocaine delayed and blocked key events in resolution of inflammation. Lidocaine inhibited both PMN apoptosis and macrophage uptake of apoptotic PMN, events that contributed to impaired PMN removal from exudates and thereby delayed the onset of resolution of acute inflammation and return to homeostasis. Lidocaine did not alter the levels of specific lipid mediators, including pro-inflammatory leukotriene B4, prostaglandin E2 and anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4, in the cell-free peritoneal lavages. Addition of a lipoxin A4 stable analog, partially rescued lidocaine-delayed resolution of inflammation. To identify protein components underlying lidocaine's actions in resolution, systematic proteomics was carried out using nanospray-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Lidocaine selectively up-regulated pro-inflammatory proteins including S100A8/9 and CRAMP/LL-37, and down-regulated anti-inflammatory and some pro-resolution peptides and proteins including IL-4, IL-13, TGF-â and Galectin-1. In contrast, the volatile anesthetic isoflurane promoted resolution in this system, diminishing the amplitude of PMN infiltration and shortening the resolution interval (Ri) ∼50%. In addition, isoflurane down-regulated a panel of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, as well as proteins known to be active in cell migration and chemotaxis (i.e., CRAMP and cofilin-1). The distinct impact of lidocaine and isoflurane on selective molecules may underlie their opposite actions in resolution of inflammation

  6. Anesthetics impact the resolution of inflammation.

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    Nan Chiang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Local and volatile anesthetics are widely used for surgery. It is not known whether anesthetics impinge on the orchestrated events in spontaneous resolution of acute inflammation. Here we investigated whether a commonly used local anesthetic (lidocaine and a widely used inhaled anesthetic (isoflurane impact the active process of resolution of inflammation.Using murine peritonitis induced by zymosan and a systems approach, we report that lidocaine delayed and blocked key events in resolution of inflammation. Lidocaine inhibited both PMN apoptosis and macrophage uptake of apoptotic PMN, events that contributed to impaired PMN removal from exudates and thereby delayed the onset of resolution of acute inflammation and return to homeostasis. Lidocaine did not alter the levels of specific lipid mediators, including pro-inflammatory leukotriene B(4, prostaglandin E(2 and anti-inflammatory lipoxin A(4, in the cell-free peritoneal lavages. Addition of a lipoxin A(4 stable analog, partially rescued lidocaine-delayed resolution of inflammation. To identify protein components underlying lidocaine's actions in resolution, systematic proteomics was carried out using nanospray-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Lidocaine selectively up-regulated pro-inflammatory proteins including S100A8/9 and CRAMP/LL-37, and down-regulated anti-inflammatory and some pro-resolution peptides and proteins including IL-4, IL-13, TGF-â and Galectin-1. In contrast, the volatile anesthetic isoflurane promoted resolution in this system, diminishing the amplitude of PMN infiltration and shortening the resolution interval (Ri approximately 50%. In addition, isoflurane down-regulated a panel of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, as well as proteins known to be active in cell migration and chemotaxis (i.e., CRAMP and cofilin-1. The distinct impact of lidocaine and isoflurane on selective molecules may underlie their opposite actions in resolution of inflammation

  7. Influence of catecholamines at different dosages on the function of the LiDCO sensor in isoflurane anesthetized horses.

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    Hopster, Klaus; Ambrisko, Tamas D; Kästner, Sabine B R

    2017-11-01

    To compare the lithium dilution method for cardiac output (LiDCO) and bolus-thermo-dilution (BTD) measurements before and during infusion of dobutamine, dopamine, phenylephrine, or noradrenaline at 2 different doses in anesthetized horses and to examine the correlation between sensor voltages (saline-blood exposed) and possible measurement errors. Prospective experimental study. University teaching hospital. Nine Warmblood horses. Following 90 minutes of equilibration, 3 different doses of dobutamine (0.5-3 μg/kg/min), dopamine (1-5 μg/kg/min), phenylephrine (0.5-3 μg/kg/min), or noradrenaline (0.1-0.5 μg/kg/min) were administered for 15 minutes in anesthetized horses, and measurements using the LiDCO were performed at the lowest and highest doses. Pairs of LiDCO and BTD measurements were collected and sensor voltages exposed to blood and saline were measured before and at the end of each infusion period. Agreement between LiDCO and BTD was assessed with the Bland-Altman method. The biases (2 standard deviations) before infusion of dobutamine, dopamine, phenylephrine, and noradrenaline were 1.1 (5.7), 1.6 (7.3), 0.2 (6.6), and 1.5 (4.1) L/min, respectively, and minimally and nonsignificantly changed following low-dose catecholamine infusions. Following infusion of higher doses, biases were significantly higher compared to baseline with 10.7 (7.8), 11.2 (11.9), 6.9 (11.7), and 3.5 (3.8) L/min, respectively. The difference between saline- and blood-exposed sensor voltage decreased during infusion of high doses of catecholamines with correlations (rs = 0.62) between cardiac output differences and sensor voltage differences (saline-blood). This study demonstrated that catecholamines could lead to overestimation in a dose-dependent fashion in LiDCO measurements. Monitoring changes in sensor voltage differences (saline-blood) is a valuable and clinically applicable tool to predict errors in LiDCO measurements. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  8. Exposure of postoperative nurses to exhaled anesthetic gases.

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    Sessler, D I; Badgwell, J M

    1998-11-01

    The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has established recommended exposure limits of 25 parts per million (ppm) as a time-weighted average for nitrous oxide and a ceiling of 2 ppm for volatile anesthetics. We quantified exposure of postanesthetic nurses to exhaled anesthetic gases. This study was conducted in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) of a medium-sized hospital. PACU air exchanges averaged 8 vol/h; however, much of this air was recirculated. We evaluated 50 adults anesthetized with either isoflurane (n = 19) or desflurane (n = 31). Roughly half the patients were tracheally extubated in the operating room, whereas the others were extubated just after admission to the PACU. Exhaled anesthetic gases were sampled through a 20-m hose attached to the participating nurses' shoulders (breathing zone). We also evaluated nursing exposure to exhaled anesthetic gases during recovery of 15 patients who had been anesthetized with nitrous oxide. Exposure was quantified with lapel dosimeters. Anesthetic and recovery durations were each approximately 1 h, with most patients being tracheally extubated in the PACU. Breathing-zone anesthetic concentrations in the patients given isoflurane exceeded NIOSH recommendations in 37% of the patients, representing 12% of recovery time. Breathing-zone anesthetic concentrations in the patients given desflurane, however, exceeded NIOSH limits in 87% of the patients, representing 49% of recovery time. Altogether, noncompliant episodes were detected in 68% of these patients, representing 35% of the entire recovery duration. Breathing-zone anesthetic concentrations in the patients given nitrous oxide exceeded NIOSH limits in 53% of the patients. Our data suggest that postoperative nurses' exposure to exhaled anesthetic gases exceeds NIOSH limits under some circumstances. Some epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to waste anesthetic gases may be associated with reproductive toxicity. Accordingly, the

  9. The Role of SUMO-Conjugating Enzyme Ubc9 in the Neuroprotection of Isoflurane Preconditioning Against Ischemic Neuronal Injury.

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    Tong, Li; Wu, Zhixin; Ran, Mingzi; Chen, Yu; Yang, Lujia; Zhang, Haopeng; Zhang, Lina; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2015-01-01

    Preconditioning with volatile anesthetics can create an ischemia tolerance against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated whether ubiquitin conjugase 9 (Ubc9), the E2 conjugase for SUMOylation, is associated with neuroprotection induced by isoflurane preconditioning (IsoPC). In vitro, Ubc9 protein expression was evaluated at 4 and 24 h after reoxygenation. The role of Ubc9 in the neuroprotective effect was assessed in the presence or absence of Ubc9 small interfering RNA (siRNA). In vivo, rats were preconditionally exposed for 1 h to 2% isoflurane for five consecutive days followed by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neurobehavioral scores and infarction volume were determined at different times after reperfusion. The role of Ubc9 in ischemic tolerance was evaluated by intracerebroventricular microinjection with the Ubc9 siRNA. We showed that isoflurane preconditioning improved the cell viability of the SH-SY5Y cells that were challenged by oxygen-glucose deprivation. It also reduced brain infarct volumes and improved neurologic outcomes in the focal cerebral ischemic rat. The expression of Ubc9 was upregulated by isoflurane preconditioning. Knockdown of Ubc9 significantly attenuated the isoflurane preconditioning-induced neuroprotective effects. Isoflurane preconditioning-induced neuroprotection against ischemic injuries is mediated by Ubc9. These results suggest a novel mechanism for isoflurane preconditioning-induced tolerance to cerebral ischemia.

  10. Activation of the canonical nuclear factor-κB pathway is involved in isoflurane-induced hippocampal interleukin-1β elevation and the resultant cognitive deficits in aged rats

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    Li, Zheng-Qian; Rong, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Ya-Jie; Ni, Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China); Tian, Xiao-Sheng [Neuroscience Research Institute and Department of Neurobiology, Key Laboratory for Neuroscience, Ministry of Education and Ministry of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Mo, Na [Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100021 (China); Chui, De-Hua, E-mail: dchui@bjmu.edu.cn [Neuroscience Research Institute and Department of Neurobiology, Key Laboratory for Neuroscience, Ministry of Education and Ministry of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Guo, Xiang-Yang, E-mail: puthmzk@163.com [Department of Anesthesiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Isoflurane induces hippocampal IL-1β elevation and cognitive deficits in aged rats. •Isoflurane transiently activates the canonical NF-κB pathway in aged rat hippocampus. •NF-κB inhibitor mitigates isoflurane-induced IL-1β elevation and cognitive deficits. •We report a linkage between NF-κB signaling, IL-1β expression, and cognitive changes. -- Abstract: Although much recent evidence has demonstrated that neuroinflammation contributes to volatile anesthetic-induced cognitive deficits, there are few existing mechanistic explanations for this inflammatory process. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane on canonical nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling, and to explore its association with hippocampal interleukin (IL)-1β levels and anesthetic-related cognitive changes in aged rats. After a 4-h exposure to 1.5% isoflurane in 20-month-old rats, increases in IκB kinase and IκB phosphorylation, as well as a reduction in the NF-κB inhibitory protein (IκBα), were observed in the hippocampi of isoflurane-exposed rats compared with control rats. These events were accompanied by an increase in NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation at 6 h after isoflurane exposure and hippocampal IL-1β elevation from 1 to 6 h after isoflurane exposure. Nevertheless, no significant neuroglia activation was observed. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate markedly suppressed the IL-1β increase and NF-κB signaling, and also mitigated the severity of cognitive deficits in the Morris water maze task. Overall, our results demonstrate that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits may stem from upregulation of hippocampal IL-1β, partially via activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway, in aged rats.

  11. Physiological disturbance may contribute to neurodegeneration induced by isoflurane or sevoflurane in 14 day old rats.

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    Binbin Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Volatile anesthetics are widely used in pediatric anesthesia but their potential neurotoxicity raise significant concerns regarding sequelae after anesthesia. However, whether physiological disturbance during anesthetic exposure contributes to such side effects remains unknown. The aim of the current study is to compare the neurotoxic effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane in 14 day old rat pups under spontaneous breathing or ventilated conditions. METHODS: Postnatal 14 day rats were assigned to one of five groups: 1 spontaneous breathing (SB + room air (control, n = 17; 2 SB + isoflurane (n = 35; 3 SB + sevoflurane (n = 37; 4 mechanical ventilation (MV + isoflurane (n = 29; 5 MV + sevoflurane (n = 32. Anesthetized animal received either 1.7% isoflurane or 2.4% seveoflurane for 4 hours. Arterial blood gases and blood pressure were monitored in the anesthetized groups. Neurodegeneration in the CA3 region of hippocampus was assessed with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated DNA nick-end labeling immediately after exposure. Spatial learning and memory were evaluated with the Morris water maze in other cohorts 14 days after experiments. RESULTS: Most rats in the SB groups developed physiological disturbance whereas ventilated rats did not but become hyperglycemic. Mortality from anesthesia in the SB groups was significantly higher than that in the MV groups. Cell death in the SB but not MV groups was significantly higher than controls. SB + anesthesia groups performed worse on the Morris water maze behavioral test, but no deficits were found in the MV group compared with the controls. CONCLUSIONS: These findings could suggest that physiological disturbance induced by isoflurane or sevoflurane anesthesia may also contribute to their neurotoxicity.

  12. Isoflurane provides neuroprotection in neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain injury by suppressing apoptosis.

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    Zhao, De-An; Bi, Ling-Yun; Huang, Qian; Zhang, Fang-Min; Han, Zi-Ming

    Isoflurane is halogenated volatile ether used for inhalational anesthesia. It is widely used in clinics as an inhalational anesthetic. Neonatal hypoxic ischemia injury ensues in the immature brain that results in delayed cell death via excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Isoflurane has shown neuroprotective properties that make a beneficial basis of using isoflurane in both cell culture and animal models, including various models of brain injury. We aimed to determine the neuroprotective effect of isoflurane on hypoxic brain injury and elucidated the underlying mechanism. A hippocampal slice, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid with glucose and oxygen deprivation, was used as an in vitro model for brain hypoxia. The orthodromic population spike and hypoxic injury potential were recorded in the CA1 and CA3 regions. Amino acid neurotransmitters concentration in perfusion solution of hippocampal slices was measured. Isoflurane treatment caused delayed elimination of population spike and improved the recovery of population spike; decreased frequency of hypoxic injury potential, postponed the onset of hypoxic injury potential and increased the duration of hypoxic injury potential. Isoflurane treatment also decreased the hypoxia-induced release of amino acid neurotransmitters such as aspartate, glutamate and glycine induced by hypoxia, but the levels of γ-aminobutyric acid were elevated. Morphological studies showed that isoflurane treatment attenuated edema of pyramid neurons in the CA1 region. It also reduced apoptosis as evident by lowered expression of caspase-3 and PARP genes. Isoflurane showed a neuro-protective effect on hippocampal neuron injury induced by hypoxia through suppression of apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-RAGE antibody attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction in aged rats.

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    Shi, Chengmei; Yi, Duan; Li, Zhengqian; Zhou, Yongde; Cao, Yiyun; Sun, Yan; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2017-03-30

    Several animal studies demonstrated that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane could influence the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, which involved the cognitive impairment. Increasing evidence has also shown that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) played a major role in maintaining the integrity of BBB. The present study aimed to determine whether the RAGE-specific antibody protects against BBB disruption and cognitive impairment induced by isoflurane exposure in aged rats. 108 aged rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) control group (Control); (2) 4h of 2% isoflurane exposure group (ISO); (3) RAGE antibody (20μL, 2.5μg/μL) treated+4h of 2% isoflurane exposure group (anti-RAGE+ISO); (4) RAGE antibody (20μL, 2.5μg/μL) treated group (anti-RAGE). The isoflurane anesthesia resulted in the upregulation of hippocampal RAGE expression, disruption of BBB integrity, neuroinflammation, and beta-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation in aged rats. In addition, significant cognitive deficits in the Morris water maze test was also observed. The antibody pretreatment resulted in significant improvements in BBB integrity. Furthermore, the expression of RAGE and proinflammatory mediators, as well as, Aβ accumulation were attenuated. Moreover, the antibody administration attenuated the isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats. These results demonstrate that RAGE signaling is involved in BBB damage after isoflurane exposure. Thus, the RAGE antibody represents a novel therapeutic intervention to prevent isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Disparity of isoflurane effects on left and right ventricular afterload and hydraulic power generation in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerdt, P M; Gandhi, C D; Dickstein, M L

    1998-09-01

    The interaction between myocardial and vascular effects of anesthetics has a potential impact on how these drugs influence performance of the heart. Most studies have focused on volatile anesthetic effects on the left ventricle (LV) and systemic circulation. Whether the right ventricle (RV) and pulmonary circulation respond in a similar fashion, however, is unclear. In the present study, we therefore examined the dose-related effects of isoflurane on LV and RV contractility and total afterload and related changes to simultaneous effects on the hydraulic power generated by each chamber. Two groups of swine were studied: one received no additional treatment before isoflurane (ISO, n = 6), and the other received hexamethonium, atropine, and propranolol to produce autonomic blockade before isoflurane administration (ISO+AB, n = 4). For each experiment, measurements were made of RV and LV regional segment lengths and pressures, along with proximal aortic and pulmonary arterial (PA) blood flow and pressure during the administration of 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) isoflurane. Contractility was assessed by calculating the regional preload recruitable stroke work slope (PRSW). Afterload was characterized in both nonpulsatile and pulsatile terms by calculating aortic input impedance magnitude (Z). From these data, total arterial resistance (R), characteristic impedance (ZC), and vascular compliance (C) were determined with reference to a three-element Windkessel model of the circulation. Additionally, steady-state (WSS), oscillatory (WOS), and total (WT) hydraulic power output of each ventricle was calculated. In the ISO group, isoflurane produced a nearly threefold greater decrease of peak systolic pressure in the LV than in the RV, yet the dose-related decrease of regional PRSW was virtually the same in both chambers. In the aorta, isoflurane produced a maximal 25% reduction in R at 1.0 MAC and doubled C without a significant change

  15. Effect of Bronchoconstriction-induced Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatch on Uptake and Elimination of Isoflurane and Desflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzschmar, Moritz; Kozian, Alf; Baumgardner, James E; Borges, Joao Batista; Hedenstierna, Göran; Larsson, Anders; Hachenberg, Thomas; Schilling, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Increasing numbers of patients with obstructive lung diseases need anesthesia for surgery. These conditions are associated with pulmonary ventilation/perfusion (VA/Q) mismatch affecting kinetics of volatile anesthetics. Pure shunt might delay uptake of less soluble anesthetic agents but other forms of VA/Q scatter have not yet been examined. Volatile anesthetics with higher blood solubility would be less affected by VA/Q mismatch. We therefore compared uptake and elimination of higher soluble isoflurane and less soluble desflurane in a piglet model. Juvenile piglets (26.7 ± 1.5 kg) received either isoflurane (n = 7) or desflurane (n = 7). Arterial and mixed venous blood samples were obtained during wash-in and wash-out of volatile anesthetics before and during bronchoconstriction by methacholine inhalation (100 μg/ml). Total uptake and elimination were calculated based on partial pressure measurements by micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry and literature-derived partition coefficients and assumed end-expired to arterial gradients to be negligible. VA/Q distribution was assessed by the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Before methacholine inhalation, isoflurane arterial partial pressures reached 90% of final plateau within 16 min and decreased to 10% after 28 min. By methacholine nebulization, arterial uptake and elimination delayed to 35 and 44 min. Desflurane needed 4 min during wash-in and 6 min during wash-out, but with bronchoconstriction 90% of both uptake and elimination was reached within 15 min. Inhaled methacholine induced bronchoconstriction and inhomogeneous VA/Q distribution. Solubility of inhalational anesthetics significantly influenced pharmacokinetics: higher soluble isoflurane is less affected than fairly insoluble desflurane, indicating different uptake and elimination during bronchoconstriction.

  16. Exceptionally Stable Fluorous Emulsions for the Intravenous Delivery of Volatile General Anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Jun-Pil; Parlato, Maria C.; Perkins, Mark G.; Mecozzi, Sandro; Pearce, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Intravenous delivery of volatile fluorinated anesthetics has a number of potential advantages when compared to the current inhalation method of administration. We reported previously that the IV delivery of sevoflurane can be achieved through an emulsion composed of a linear fluorinated diblock copolymer, a stabilizer, and the anesthetic. However, this original emulsion was subject to particle size growth that would limit its potential clinical utility. We hypothesized that the use of bulkier fluorous groups and smaller poly(ethylene glycol) moieties in the polymer design would result in improved emulsion stability while maintaining anesthetic functionality. Methods The authors prepared emulsions incorporating sevoflurane, perfluorooctyl bromide as a stabilizing agent, and combinations of linear fluorinated diblock copolymer and a novel dibranched fluorinated diblock copolymer. Emulsion stability was assessed using dynamic light scattering. The ability of the emulsions to induce anesthesia was tested in vivo by administering them intravenously to fifteen male Sprague-Dawley rats and measuring loss of the forepaw righting reflex. Results 20% (volume/volume) sevoflurane emulsions incorporating mixtures of dibranched- and linear diblock copolymers had improved stability, with those containing an excess of the dibranched polymers displaying stability of particle size for over one year. The ED50s for loss of forepaw righting reflex were all similar, and ranged between 0.55 and 0.60 ml/kg body weight. Conclusions Hemifluorinated dibranched polymers can be used to generate exceptionally stable sevoflurane nanoemulsions, as required of formulations intended for clinical use. Intravenous delivery of the emulsion in rats resulted in induction of anesthesia with rapid onset and smooth and rapid recovery. PMID:22354241

  17. Combining isoflurane anesthesia with midazolam and butorphanol in rats.

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    Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Uchida, Kaho; Maesato, Shizuka; Sato, Reiichiro; Kanai, Eiichi; Inomata, Tomo

    2016-07-29

    Representative inhalant anesthetic agent, isoflurane is commonly used during surgery in rats. However, isoflurane mediates relatively strong respiratory depression. In human and veterinary medicine, sedatives and analgesics are co-administered to complement the anesthetic action of inhalant anesthesia. The present study aimed to establish the novel balanced anesthesia that combines midazolam and butorphanol with isoflurane (MBI) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 2 groups, and administered either isoflurane monoanesthesia or isoflurane with midazolam (2.5 mg/kg, ip) and butorphanol (2.0 mg/kg, ip). The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) in each group was evaluated. Induction and recovery times were measured in each group. Adverse reactions during induction were also recorded. In each group, vital signs were assessed for 1 h under 1.5×MAC of isoflurane. Instability of vital signs was assessed under each anesthesia by calculating coefficient of variance. Compared with isoflurane monoanesthesia, MBI anesthesia caused 32% MAC reduction (isoflurane monoanesthesia: 1.30 ± 0.09%, MBI 0.87 ± 0.08%, Panesthesia resulted in a relatively stable respiratory rate without decreases in SPO2 during the anesthetic period. In summary, MB premedication is effective for attenuating respiratory depression induced by isoflurane, and achieving smooth induction. This anesthetic protocol serves as a novel option for appropriate anesthesia in rats.

  18. Comparison of percutaneous losses of sevoflurane and isoflurane in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, S H; Yasuda, N; Peterson, N; Laster, M; Taheri, S; Weiskopf, R B; Eger, E I

    1991-02-01

    We studied the percutaneous losses of sevoflurane and isoflurane during administration and elimination in seven healthy male volunteers. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with fentanyl, midazolam, and/or thiopental, and nitrous oxide for 30 min, after which 1% sevoflurane and 0.4% isoflurane in 65% nitrous oxide were administered for 30 min. Inspired, end-tidal, and mixed-expired gas samples were collected during administration and for 5-7 days of elimination. To measure percutaneous loss, each subject's arm was enclosed in a glass cylinder sealed at both ends and with two ports, one for flushing with nitrogen and one for obtaining gas samples during the 30 min of administration and the first 150 min of elimination. Anesthetic concentrations in all samples were determined using gas chromatography. The surface area of the arm was measured and the total surface area was calculated. During administration and elimination, percutaneous loss of isoflurane was significantly greater than that of sevoflurane (P less than 0.05). For both volatile agents, losses during elimination were greater than during administration (P less than 0.05), but even when combined, these losses were too small to affect kinetic or metabolic studies based on mass balance.

  19. Xenon and Other Volatile Anesthetics Change Domain Structure in Model Lipid Raft Membranes

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    Weinrich, Michael; Worcester, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics have been in clinical use for over 160 years, but the molecular mechanisms of action continue to be investigated. Direct interactions with ion channels received much attention after it was found that anesthetics do not change the structure of homogeneous model membranes. However, it was recently found that halothane, a prototypical anesthetic, changes domain structure of a binary lipid membrane. The noble gas xenon is an excellent anesthetic and provides a pivotal test ...

  20. Mitochondrial targets for volatile anesthetics against cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury

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    Bhawana eAgarwal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are critical modulators of cell function and are increasingly recognized as proximal sensors and effectors that ultimately determine the balance between cell survival and cell death. Volatile anesthetics (VA are long known for their cardioprotective effects, as demonstrated by improved mitochondrial and cellular functions, and by reduced necrotic and apoptotic cell death during cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR injury. The molecular mechanisms by which VA impart cardioprotection are still poorly understood. Because of the emerging role of mitochondria as therapeutic targets in diseases, including ischemic heart disease, it is important to know if VA induced cytoprotective mechanisms are mediated at the mitochondrial level. In recent years, considerable evidence points to direct effects of VA on mitochondrial channel/transporter protein functions and electron transport chain (ETC complexes as potential targets in mediating cardio-protection. This review furnishes an integrated overview of targets that VA impart on mitochon-drial channels/transporters and ETC proteins that could provide a basis for cation regulation and homeostasis, mitochondrial bioenergetics, and reactive oxygen species (ROS emission in redox signaling for cardiac cell protection during IR injury.

  1. Hypercapnic hyperventilation shortens emergence time from isoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Derek J; Gopalakrishnan, Nishant A; Orr, Joseph A; White, Julia L; Westenskow, Dwayne R

    2007-03-01

    To shorten emergence time after a procedure using volatile anesthesia, 78% of anesthesiologists recently surveyed used hyperventilation to rapidly clear the anesthetic from the lungs. Hyperventilation has not been universally adapted into clinical practice because it also decreases the Paco2, which decreases cerebral bloodflow and depresses respiratory drive. Adding deadspace to the patient's airway may be a simple and safe method of maintaining a normal or slightly increased Paco2 during hyperventilation. We evaluated the differences in emergence time in 20 surgical patients undergoing 1 MAC of isoflurane under mild hypocapnia (ETco2 approximately 28 mmHg) and mild hypercapnia (ETco2 approximately 55 mmHg). The minute ventilation in half the patients was doubled during emergence, and hypercapnia was maintained by insertion of additional airway deadspace to keep the ETco2 close to 55 mmHg during hyperventilation. A charcoal canister adsorbed the volatile anesthetic from the deadspace. Fresh gas flows were increased to 10 L/min during emergence in all patients. The time between turning off the vaporizer and the time when the patients opened their eyes and mouths, the time of tracheal extubation, and the time for normalized bispectral index to increase to 0.95 were faster whenever hypercapnic hyperventilation was maintained using rebreathing and anesthetic adsorption (P anesthesia can be shortened significantly by using hyperventilation to rapidly clear the anesthetic from the lungs and CO2 rebreathing to induce hypercapnia during hyperventilation. The device should be considered when it is important to provide a rapid emergence, especially after surgical procedures where a high concentration of the volatile anesthetic was maintained right up to the end of the procedure, or where surgery ends abruptly and without warning.

  2. Xenon and other volatile anesthetics change domain structure in model lipid raft membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Michael; Worcester, David L

    2013-12-19

    Inhalation anesthetics have been in clinical use for over 160 years, but the molecular mechanisms of action continue to be investigated. Direct interactions with ion channels received much attention after it was found that anesthetics do not change the structure of homogeneous model membranes. However, it was recently found that halothane, a prototypical anesthetic, changes domain structure of a binary lipid membrane. The noble gas xenon is an excellent anesthetic and provides a pivotal test of the generality of this finding, extended to ternary lipid raft mixtures. We report that xenon and conventional anesthetics change the domain equilibrium in two canonical ternary lipid raft mixtures. These findings demonstrate a membrane-mediated mechanism whereby inhalation anesthetics can affect the lipid environment of transmembrane proteins.

  3. Xenon and Other Volatile Anesthetics Change Domain Structure in Model Lipid Raft Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Michael; Worcester, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics have been in clinical use for over 160 years, but the molecular mechanisms of action continue to be investigated. Direct interactions with ion channels received much attention after it was found that anesthetics do not change the structure of homogeneous model membranes. However, it was recently found that halothane, a prototypical anesthetic, changes domain structure of a binary lipid membrane. The noble gas xenon is an excellent anesthetic and provides a pivotal test of the generality of this finding, extended to ternary lipid raft mixtures. We report that xenon and conventional anesthetics change the domain equilibrium in two canonical ternary lipid raft mixtures. These findings demonstrate a membrane-mediated mechanism whereby inhalation anesthetics can affect the lipid environment of trans-membrane proteins. PMID:24299622

  4. Clinical Evalualtion in Isoflurane and Sevoflurane Anesthesia in Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Flavia Ruxanda; Lucia Victoria Bel; Cristian Adrian Raţiu; Viorel Miclăuş; Cosmin Peştean; Liviu Ioan Oana

    2016-01-01

    The present study focused on evaluation of induction, maintenance and emergence of inhaled anesthesia and comparison of these anesthetics times for isoflurane and sevoflurane. The biological material consisted of 12 Wistar rats divided into 2 groups, each containing a number of 6 rats. One group was anesthetized with isoflurane and the other with sevoflurane. We monitorized the rats during all stages of anesthesia, observing how the induction established, the state of the rats throughout the ...

  5. α2-Adrenergic Receptor and Isoflurane Modulation of Presynaptic Ca2+ Influx and Exocytosis in Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masato; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hemmings, Hugh C

    2016-09-01

    Evidence indicates that the anesthetic-sparing effects of α2-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists involve α2A-AR heteroreceptors on nonadrenergic neurons. Since volatile anesthetics inhibit neurotransmitter release by reducing synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis, the authors hypothesized that α2-AR agonists inhibit nonadrenergic SV exocytosis and thereby potentiate presynaptic inhibition of exocytosis by isoflurane. Quantitative imaging of fluorescent biosensors of action potential-evoked SV exocytosis (synaptophysin-pHluorin) and Ca influx (GCaMP6) were used to characterize presynaptic actions of the clinically used α2-AR agonists dexmedetomidine and clonidine, and their interaction with isoflurane, in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Dexmedetomidine (0.1 μM, n = 10) or clonidine (0.5 μM, n = 8) inhibited action potential-evoked exocytosis (54 ± 5% and 59 ± 8% of control, respectively; P exocytosis were blocked by the subtype-nonselective α2-AR antagonist atipamezole or the α2A-AR-selective antagonist BRL 44408 but not by the α2C-AR-selective antagonist JP 1302. Dexmedetomidine inhibited exocytosis and presynaptic Ca influx without affecting Ca coupling to exocytosis, consistent with an effect upstream of Ca-exocytosis coupling. Exocytosis coupled to both N-type and P/Q-type Ca channels was inhibited by dexmedetomidine or clonidine. Dexmedetomidine potentiated inhibition of exocytosis by 0.7 mM isoflurane (to 42 ± 5%, compared to 63 ± 8% for isoflurane alone; P exocytosis is inhibited by α2A-AR activation in proportion to reduced Ca entry. These effects are additive with those of isoflurane, consistent with a role for α2A-AR presynaptic heteroreceptor inhibition of nonadrenergic synaptic transmission in the anesthetic-sparing effects of α2A-AR agonists.

  6. Alterações hemodinâmicas e intracranianas em cães com hemorragia aguda, anestesiados com isofluorano Hemodynamic and intracranial alterations in dogs with acute hemorrhage anesthetized with isoflurane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.T. Nishimori

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudaram-se possíveis alterações hemodinâmicas e intracranianas em cães submetidos à hemorragia aguda e anestesiados pelo isofluorano. Verificou-se também a influência do anestésico no mecanismo de auto-regulação cerebral. Utilizaram-se 20 cães adultos que foram induzidos à anestesia geral com isofluorano por máscara naso-oral a 3,5V% (volume %. Após a intubação orotraqueal, reajustou-se o vaporizador para 2,1V%. Induziu-se a hipovolemia retirando-se volume total de 35ml/kg de sangue. Avaliaram-se pressão intracraniana (PIC, temperaturas intracraniana (TIC e corpórea (T, pressão de perfusão cerebral (PPC, pressões arteriais sistólica (PAS, diastólica (PAD e média (PAM, freqüências cardíaca (FC e respiratória (FR, índices cardíaco (IC e sistólico (IS, pressão venosa central (PVC, pressão da artéria pulmonar (PAP, concentração de dióxido de carbono ao final da expiração (ETCO2 e saturação de oxihemoglobina (SpO2. Imediatamente após a hipovolemia, houve redução significativa da PIC, PPC, PAS, PAD, PAM, IC, IS e PAP. Após 10 minutos, houve aumento gradativo das médias, permanecendo neste patamar até o final do período experimental. Concluiu-se que a hemorragia aguda promoveu redução das variáveis hemodinâmicas, sendo possível verificar a ativação de mecanismos compensatórios. Além disso, houve redução da perfusão sangüínea e ativação do mecanismo de auto-regulação cerebral, conseqüentes à hipovolemia associada à anestesia com isofluorano.Intracranial and hemodynamic alterations in 20 adult dogs anesthetized with isoflurane and submitted to acute hemorrhage were studied. Anesthetic influence on cerebral auto-regulation mechanism was also observed. General anesthesia was induced with at 3.5V% (volume % isoflurane. Thereafter, orotracheal intubation was performed and vaporizer was calibrated to 2.1V%. To induce hypovolemia, a total amount of 35 ml/kg-1 of blood was taken from each

  7. Clinical Evalualtion in Isoflurane and Sevoflurane Anesthesia in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Ruxanda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on evaluation of induction, maintenance and emergence of inhaled anesthesia and comparison of these anesthetics times for isoflurane and sevoflurane. The biological material consisted of 12 Wistar rats divided into 2 groups, each containing a number of 6 rats. One group was anesthetized with isoflurane and the other with sevoflurane. We monitorized the rats during all stages of anesthesia, observing how the induction established, the state of the rats throughout the anestesia and the moment of the first recovery signs, the moment the rats became active as well as the moment of full recovery from anesthesia. Both isoflurane and sevoflurane rapidly induced the anesthesia, without excitation signs and the emergence was significantly faster in sevoflurane group in comparison to the isoflurane group, being accompanied by horipilation in both anesthetics.

  8. Failure of Isoflurane Cardiac Preconditioning in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Mice Involves Aberrant Regulation of MicroRNA-21, Endothelial Nitric-oxide Synthase, and Mitochondrial Complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhi-Dong; Li, Yingchuan; Qiao, Shigang; Bai, Xiaowen; Warltier, David C; Kersten, Judy R; Bosnjak, Zeljko J; Liang, Mingyu

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes impairs the cardioprotective effect of volatile anesthetics, yet the mechanisms are still murky. We examined the regulatory effect of isoflurane on microRNA-21, endothelial nitric-oxide synthase, and mitochondrial respiratory complex I in type 2 diabetic mice. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was produced in obese type 2 diabetic (db/db) and C57BL/6 control mice ex vivo in the presence or absence of isoflurane administered before ischemia. Cardiac microRNA-21 was quantified by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptional-polymerase chain reaction. The dimers and monomers of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase were measured by Western blot analysis. Mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence was determined in Langendorff-perfused hearts. Body weight and fasting blood glucose were greater in db/db than C57BL/6 mice. Isoflurane decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 35 ± 8 mmHg in control to 23 ± 9 mmHg (P = 0.019, n = 8 mice/group, mean ± SD) and elevated ±dP/dt 2 h after post-ischemic reperfusion in C57BL/6 mice. These beneficial effects of isoflurane were lost in db/db mice. Isoflurane elevated microRNA-21 and the ratio of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase dimers/monomers and decreased mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels 5 min after ischemia in C57BL/6 but not db/db mice. MicroRNA-21 knockout blocked these favorable effects of isoflurane, whereas endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout had no effect on the expression of microRNA-21 but blocked the inhibitory effect of isoflurane preconditioning on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Failure of isoflurane cardiac preconditioning in obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice is associated with aberrant regulation of microRNA-21, endothelial nitric-oxide synthase, and mitochondrial respiratory complex I.

  9. Establishment of a porcine right ventricular infarction model for cardioprotective actions of xenon and isoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, M; Roehl, A B; Baumert, J H; Bantes, B; Bleilevens, C; Bernstein, N; Steendijk, P; Rossaint, R

    2008-10-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function is an important determinant of post-operative outcome. Consequences of RV infarction might be limited by pre-conditioning with volatile anesthetic drugs. Therefore, we used a porcine model of RV ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury to study the influence of isoflurane and xenon on the extent and degree of myocardial injury. IR injury was induced by a 90-min ligation of the distal right coronary artery and 120-min reperfusion in thiopental anesthetized pigs. A control group (n=12) was compared with two groups, which received either 0.55 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) isoflurane (n=10) or xenon (n=12) starting 60 min before ischemia. Myocardial injury was described by three criteria: the infarct size related to area at risk (IS/AAR), the infiltration of neutrophils as determined by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and the plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6), myoglobin and troponin-T (TnT). IS/AAR was reduced from 58.3+/-6.2% in the control group to 41.8+/-7.8% after isoflurane and 42.7+/-8.5% after xenon pre-treatment, which equals an absolute reduction of 16.5% [95% confidence interval (CI): 10.9-22.1] and 15.5% (95% CI: 10.1-20.9). The maximum increase of TnT could be observed within the xenon group. Both treatment groups were characterized by lower MPO activity, in the infarct and periinfarct region and lower plasma concentrations of TNFalpha and IL-6. It could be demonstrated for the first time in a model of RV infarction that the continuous application of isoflurane or xenon before, during and after ischemia reduced the extent (size) and severity (inflammation) of myocardial injury.

  10. Volatile Anesthetics and the Treatment of Severe Bronchospasm: A Concept of Targeted Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondoñedo, Jarred R.; McNeil, John S.; Amin, Samir D.; Herrmann, Jacob; Simon, Brett A.; Kaczka, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Status asthmaticus (SA) is a severe, refractory form of asthma that can result in rapid respiratory deterioration and death. Treatment of SA with inhaled anesthetics is a potentially life-saving therapy, but remarkably few data are available about its mechanism of action or optimal administration. In this paper, we will review the clinical use of inhaled anesthetics for treatment of SA, the potential mechanisms by which they dilate constricted airways, and the side effects associated with their administration. We will also introduce the concept of ‘targeted’ delivery of these agents to the conducting airways, a process which may maximize their therapeutic effects while minimizing associated systemic side effects. Such a delivery regimen has the potential to define a rapidly translatable treatment paradigm for this life-threatening disorder. PMID:26744597

  11. Effects of isoflurane and desflurane on neurogenic motor- and somatosensory-evoked potential monitoring for scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, J M; Péréon, Y; Fayet, G; Guihéneuc, P

    1996-11-01

    Most techniques used to monitor spinal cord tracts are sensitive to the effects of anesthesia, particularly to volatile anesthetic agents. The aim of this prospective study was to show that evoked potentials recorded from the peripheral nerves after spinal cord stimulation, so-called neurogenic motor evoked potentials, are resistant to clinical concentrations of isoflurane or desflurane, compared with somatosensory-evoked potentials. Twenty-three patients were studied during surgery to correct scoliosis. The background anesthetic consisted of a continuous infusion of propofol. Isoflurane (n = 12) or desflurane (n = 11) were then introduced to achieve 0.5 and 1.0 end-tidal minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC), both in 50% oxygen-nitrous oxide and in 100% oxygen. Somatosensory-evoked potentials were elicited and recorded using a standard method, defining cortical P40 and subcortical P29. Neurogenic motor-evoked potentials were elicited by electric stimulation of the spinal cord via needle electrodes placed by the surgeon in the rostral part of the surgical field. Responses were recorded from needle electrodes inserted in the right and left popliteal spaces close to the sciatic nerve. Stimulus intensity was adjusted to produce a supramaximal response; that is, an unchanged response in amplitude with subsequent increases in stimulus intensity. Measurements were obtained before introducing volatile agents and 20 min after obtaining a stable level of each concentration. Isoflurane and desflurane in both 50% oxygen-nitrous oxide and 100% oxygen were associated with a significant decrease in the amplitude and an increase in the latency of the cortical P40, whereas subcortical P29 latency did not vary significantly. Typical neurogenic motor-evoked potentials were obtained in all patients without volatile anesthetic agents, consisting of a biphasic wave, occurring 15 to 18 ms after stimulation, with an amplitude ranging from 1.3 to 4.1 microV. Latency or peak

  12. Anesthesia with Dexmedetomidine and Low-dose Isoflurane Increases Solute Transport via the Glymphatic Pathway in Rat Brain When Compared with High-dose Isoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benveniste, Helene; Lee, Hedok; Ding, Fengfei; Sun, Qian; Al-Bizri, Ehab; Makaryus, Rany; Probst, Stephen; Nedergaard, Maiken; Stein, Elliot A; Lu, Hanbing

    2017-12-01

    The glymphatic pathway transports cerebrospinal fluid through the brain, thereby facilitating waste removal. A unique aspect of this pathway is that its function depends on the state of consciousness of the brain and is associated with norepinephrine activity. A current view is that all anesthetics will increase glymphatic transport by inducing unconsciousness. This view implies that the effect of anesthetics on glymphatic transport should be independent of their mechanism of action, as long as they induce unconsciousness. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the supplementary effect of dexmedetomidine, which lowers norepinephrine, with isoflurane only, which does not. Female rats were anesthetized with either isoflurane (N = 8) or dexmedetomidine plus low-dose isoflurane (N = 8). Physiologic parameters were recorded continuously. Glymphatic transport was quantified by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebrospinal fluid and gray and white matter volumes were quantified from T1 maps, and blood vessel diameters were extracted from time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiograms. Electroencephalograms were recorded in separate groups of rats. Glymphatic transport was enhanced by 32% in rats anesthetized with dexmedetomidine plus low-dose isoflurane when compared with isoflurane. In the hippocampus, glymphatic clearance was sixfold more efficient during dexmedetomidine plus low-dose isoflurane anesthesia when compared with isoflurane. The respiratory and blood gas status was comparable in rats anesthetized with the two different anesthesia regimens. In the dexmedetomidine plus low-dose isoflurane rats, spindle oscillations (9 to 15 Hz) could be observed but not in isoflurane anesthetized rats. We propose that anesthetics affect the glymphatic pathway transport not simply by inducing unconsciousness but also by additional mechanisms, one of which is the repression of norepinephrine release.

  13. The volatile anesthetic methoxyflurane protects motoneurons against excitotoxicity in an in vitro model of rat spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, A; Bianchetti, E; Nistri, A

    2015-01-29

    Neuroprotection of the spinal cord during the early phase of injury is an important goal to determine a favorable outcome by prevention of delayed pathological events, including excitotoxicity, which otherwise extend the primary damage and amplify the often irreversible loss of motor function. While intensive care and neurosurgical intervention are important treatments, effective neuroprotection requires further experimental studies focused to target vulnerable neurons, particularly motoneurons. The present investigation examined whether the volatile general anesthetic methoxyflurane might protect spinal locomotor networks from kainate-evoked excitotoxicity using an in vitro rat spinal cord preparation as a model. The protocols involved 1h excitotoxic stimulation on day 1 followed by electrophysiological and immunohistochemical testing on day 2. A single administration of methoxyflurane applied together with kainate (1h), or 30 or even 60 min later prevented any depression of spinal reflexes, loss of motoneuron excitability, and histological damage. Methoxyflurane per se temporarily decreased synaptic transmission and motoneuron excitability, effects readily reversible on washout. Spinal locomotor activity recorded as alternating electrical discharges from lumbar motor pools was fully preserved on the second day after application of methoxyflurane together with (or after) kainate. These data suggest that a volatile general anesthetic could provide strong electrophysiological and histological neuroprotection that enabled expression of locomotor network activity 1 day after the excitotoxic challenge. It is hypothesized that the benefits of early neurosurgery for acute spinal cord injury (SCI) might be enhanced if, in addition to injury decompression and stabilization, the protective role of general anesthesia is exploited. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Isoflurane facilitates synaptic NMDA receptor endocytosis in mice primary neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y; Wu, X; Zhang, G; Xu, Z; Zhang, Y; Gautam, V; Kovacs, D M; Wu, A; Yue, Y; Xie, Z

    2013-05-01

    Inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been reported to induce caspase activation and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ), however, the down-stream consequences of these effects are largely unknown. Isoflurane has also been shown to impair learning and memory, however, the up-stream mechanisms of these effects remain largely to be determined. Facilitation of synaptic NMDA receptor endocytosis can reduce synaptic function, leading to learning and memory impairment. We therefore set out to determine the effects of isoflurane on synaptic NMDA receptor endocytosis. Primary neurons from wild-type and Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice were treated with 2% isoflurane for six hours. Synaptic surface levels of NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) and NR2B internalization were determined by surface and cleavable biotinylation assay, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. Here we show that isoflurane can induce caspase-3 activation, increase levels of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme and cause accumulation of Aβ in the primary neurons. Isoflurane facilitates synaptic NR2B endocytosis as evidenced by reducing surface NR2B levels, increasing NR2B internalization, and decreasing the ratio of synaptic surface NR2B to synapsin in mice primary neurons. Moreover, caspase activation inhibitor Z-VAD and γ-secretase inhibitor L-685,458 attenuated the isoflurane-facilitated NR2B endocytosis. These results suggest that isoflurane induces caspase activation and Aβ accumulation, leading to facilitation of synaptic NMDA receptor endocytosis, which potentially serve as the upstream mechanism of the isoflurane-induced impairment of learning and memory. These findings will encourage further studies to determine the underlying mechanism by which isoflurane and other anesthetics promote Alzheimer's disease neuropathogenesis and induce cognitive dysfunction.

  15. Anesthetic Cardioprotection: The Role of Adenosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Stephanie; Hughes, Kelly; Eckle, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Brief periods of cardiac ischemia and reperfusion exert a protective effect against subsequent longer ischemic periods, a phenomenon coined ischemic preconditioning. Similar, repeated brief episodes of coronary occlusion and reperfusion at the onset of reperfusion, called post-conditioning, dramatically reduce infarct sizes. Interestingly, both effects can be achieved by the administration of any volatile anesthetic. In fact, cardio-protection by volatile anesthetics is an older phenomenon than ischemic pre- or post-conditioning. Although the mechanism through which anesthetics can mimic ischemic pre- or post-conditioning is still unknown, adenosine generation and signaling are the most redundant triggers in ischemic pre- or postconditioning. In fact, adenosine signaling has been implicated in isoflurane-mediated cardioprotection. Adenosine acts via four receptors designated as A1, A2a, A2b, and A3. Cardioprotection has been associated with all subtypes, although the role of each remains controversial. Much of the controversy stems from the abundance of receptor agonists and antagonists that are, in fact, capable of interacting with multiple receptor subtypes. Recently, more specific receptor agonists and new genetic animal models have become available paving way towards new discoveries. As such, the adenosine A2b receptor was shown to be the only 1 of the adenosine receptors whose cardiac expression is induced by ischemia in both mice and humans and whose function is implicated in ischemic pre- or post-conditioning. In the current review, we will focus on adenosine signaling in the context of anesthetic cardioprotection and will highlight new discoveries, which could lead to new therapeutic concepts to treat myocardial ischemia using anesthetic preconditioning. PMID:24502579

  16. Effects of xenon and isoflurane on apoptosis and inflammation in a porcine myocardial infarction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopka, Sasa; Mertens, Christine; Roehl, Anna Bettina; Schiffl, Katharina; Rossaint, Rolf; Classen-Linke, Irmgard

    2013-03-01

    Volatile anaesthetics can reduce the infarction size in myocardial tissue when administered before and during experimentally induced ischaemia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether xenon is beneficial compared to isoflurane in limiting myocardial tissue apoptosis and inflammation induced by experimental ischaemia-reperfusion injury in a porcine right ventricular infarction model. Twenty-one animals used for this study randomly received isoflurane, xenon or thiopental, (n=6-8 per group). Myocardial infarction was induced for 90min, followed by reperfusion for 120min. Tissues from the left and right ventricles were removed from the sites of infarction, reperfusion and remote areas, and processed for immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis (caspase-3 staining) and neutrophilic infiltration (naphthol AS-D chloroacetate-specific esterase) were assessed and evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using an ANOVA of repeated measures. Density of apoptotic cells were higher in tissues from animals that were anesthetized with xenon. This effect was significant in comparison to isoflurane (p=0.0177). Neutrophilic infiltration was significantly higher in the right compared to the left ventricle (p<0.001), whereas no significant differences in the number of granulocytes based on the anaesthetic regime or the different tissue areas were found. We conclude that xenon, in the early phase of ischaemia and reperfusion, induces a significant increase in apoptosis compared to isoflurane. Therefore, clinical use of this anaesthetic in cardiocompromised patients should be taken with care until more long-term studies have been carried out. The increased neutrophilic infiltration in the right vs. the left ventricle indicates the right ventricle being more susceptible to ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Nitrous Oxide and Nitrous Oxide-Free Low-Flow Anesthesia Using Bispectral Index Monitoring: Effects on Hemodynamics, Recovery Times, Volatile Anesthetic Consumption and Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Bengü Gülhan Köksal; Volkan Hanc›; Gülay Erdo¤an

    2010-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we aimed to compare the effects of desfluraneN2O and desflurane-fentanyl combinations on hemodynamics, recovery times, volatile anesthetic consumption and costs in low-flow desflurane anesthesia by bispectral index (BIS) monitoring of depth of anesthesia. Methods: After approval of ethics committee and obtaining patient consents, 60 patients were divided into two equal groups randomly. Non-invasive blood pressure measurement, ECG, SpO2 and BIS were ...

  18. Influence of acepromazine on the cardiovascular actions of dobutamine in isoflurane-anesthetized horses Influência da acepromazina sobre os efeitos cardiovasculares da dobutamina em cavalos anestesiados com isofluorano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Raposo Monteiro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of acepromazine (ACP on the effectiveness of dobutamine (DBT in increasing blood pressure during isoflurane (ISO anesthesia was evaluated in six horses. On separate occasions, the horses were randomly assigned to receive NaCl 0.9% (Control, ACP 0.025mg kg-1 and ACP 0.05mg kg-1. The experimental treatment was administered prior to induction of anesthesia. Maintenance of anesthesia was performed under conditions of normocapnia with ISO in oxygen. Dobutamine was administered at progressively increasing infusion rates until mean arterial pressure (MAP reached 70mmHg or until a maximum infusion rate of 5.0µg kg-1 min-1. Compared with baseline, DBT increased heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressures in all treatments. However, these variables did not differ among treatments. The target MAP (70mmHg was not reached in 2/6, 2/5 and 0/6 horses in the Control, ACP0.025 and ACP0.05 treatments, respectively. The mean dose of DBT to achieve target MAP was 3.5±1.8, 3.7±1.6 and 2.7±1.4µg kg-1 min-1 in the Control, ACP0.025 and ACP0.05 treatments, respectively (P>0.05. Under the conditions of this study, premedication with ACP does not interfere with the effectiveness of DBT in increasing blood pressure in horses anesthetized with ISO.A influência da acepromazina (ACP sobre a capacidade da dobutamina (DBT em elevar a pressão arterial durante a anestesia com isofluorano (ISO foi avaliada em seis equinos. Em ocasiões diferentes, os animais receberam aleatoriamente NaCl 0,9% (Controle, ACP 0,025mg kg-1 e ACP 0,05mg kg-1. O tratamento experimental foi administrado previamente à indução da anestesia. A manutenção da anestesia foi realizada em condições de normocapnia com ISO em oxigênio. A administração de DBT foi iniciada em doses progressivamente crescentes até que o valor de pressão arterial média (PAM atingisse 70mmHg ou até a dose máxima de 5,0µg kg-1 min-1. Comparado ao basal, a administração da DBT

  19. Comparative pharmacodynamic modeling of desflurane, sevoflurane and isoflurane.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreuer, S.; Bruhn, J.; Wilhelm, W.; Grundmann, U.; Rensing, H.; Ziegeler, S.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We compared dose-response curves of the hypnotic effects of desflurane, sevoflurane and isoflurane. In addition, we analyzed the k(e0) values of the different anesthetics. The EEG parameters Bispectral index (BIS, Aspect Medical Systems, Natick, MA, version XP) and Narcotrend index

  20. Effect of Isoflurane on Neutrophil Phagocytic Function During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny Clark

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: General anesthesia has been considered an independent risk factor for postcesarean infection, but the mechanism for this association has not been delineated. The purpose of this prospective investigation was to determine if phagocytic response of neutrophils was impaired by in vitro exposure to isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic.

  1. Evaluation of isoflurane and propofol anesthesia for intraabdominal transmitter placement in nesting female canvasback ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machin, K L; Caulkett, N A

    2000-04-01

    Heart rate, occurrence of apnea, body temperature, quality of anesthesia and nest abandonment were compared during either propofol or isoflurane anesthesia of nesting female canvasback ducks (Aythya valisineria) at 15 to 18 days of incubation. One hundred eighteen canvasbacks were assigned randomly to three treatments so that nest abandonment could be compared among treatments from May to July 1995 and 1996. Sterile dummy silicone implants were placed during an abdominal laparotomy while ducks were anesthetized with either propofol or isoflurane, or ducks were flushed from the nest but not captured (control). Propofol was delivered through an intravenous catheter, while isoflurane was delivered in oxygen. Propofol provided smooth, rapid induction and recovery, whereas ducks recovering from isoflurane tended to struggle. At the nest, ducks in the propofol group were given additional boluses until they were lightly anesthetized, whereas birds that received isoflurane were released. All birds survived surgery but one death occurred prior to surgery in 1995 using propofol during a period without ventilation and monitoring. Adequate artificial ventilation is recommended to prevent complications. Heart rate declined significantly in both years during isoflurane anesthesia and in 1995 during propofol anesthesia but not 1996. During both isoflurane and propofol anesthesia, body temperature declined significantly over time. Nest abandonment was significantly different among treatments and occurred in all treatment groups in both years, but propofol (15%) and control groups (8%) had lower than expected abandonment compared to isoflurane (28%). Propofol offers several advantages over isoflurane for field use; equipment is easily portable, lower anesthetic cost, and ambient temperature does not alter physical characteristics of the drug. Advantages over isoflurane, including lower nest abandonment following intraabdominal radio transmitter placement, make propofol a good

  2. Captopril Pretreatment Produces an Additive Cardioprotection to Isoflurane Preconditioning in Attenuating Myocardial Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rabbits and in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pretreatment with the angiotensin-converting inhibitor captopril or volatile anesthetic isoflurane has, respectively, been shown to attenuate myocardial ischemia reperfusion (MI/R injury in rodents and in patients. It is unknown whether or not captopril pretreatment and isoflurane preconditioning (Iso may additively or synergistically attenuate MI/R injury. Methods and Results. Patients selected for heart valve replacement surgery were randomly assigned to five groups: untreated control (Control, captopril pretreatment for 3 days (Cap3d, or single dose captopril (Cap1hr, 1 hour before surgery with or without Iso (Cap3d+Iso and Cap1hr+Iso. Rabbit MI/R model was induced by occluding coronary artery for 30 min followed by 2-hour reperfusion. Rabbits were randomized to receive sham operation (Sham, MI/R (I/R, captopril (Cap, 24 hours before MI/R, Iso, or the combination of captopril and Iso (Iso+Cap. In patients, Cap3d+Iso but not Cap1hr+Iso additively reduced postischemic myocardial injury and attenuated postischemic myocardial inflammation. In rabbits, Cap or Iso significantly reduced postischemic myocardial infarction. Iso+Cap additively reduced cellular injury that was associated with improved postischemic myocardial functional recovery and reduced myocardial apoptosis and attenuated oxidative stress. Conclusion. A joint use of 3-day captopril treatment and isoflurane preconditioning additively attenuated MI/R by reducing oxidative stress and inflammation.

  3. Specific binding sites for alcohols and anesthetics on ligand-gated ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Maria Paola; Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron

    2000-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels are a target for inhaled anesthetics and alcohols in the central nervous system. The inhibitory strychnine-sensitive glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors are positively modulated by anesthetics and alcohols, and site-directed mutagenesis techniques have identified amino acid residues important for the action of volatile anesthetics and alcohols in these receptors. A key question is whether these amino acids are part of an alcohol/anesthetic-binding site. In the present study, we used an alkanethiol anesthetic to covalently label its binding site by mutating selected amino acids to cysteine. We demonstrated that the anesthetic propanethiol, or alternatively, propyl methanethiosulfonate, covalently binds to cysteine residues introduced into a specific second transmembrane site in glycine receptor and γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor subunits and irreversibly enhances receptor function. Moreover, upon permanent occupation of the site by propyl disulfide, the usual ability of octanol, enflurane, and isoflurane to potentiate the function of the ion channels was lost. This approach provides strong evidence that the actions of anesthetics in these receptors are due to binding at a single site. PMID:10908659

  4. [The ozone layer and its modification by N2O and inhalation anesthetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, J; Fabian, P

    1991-08-01

    As a result of human activities the ozone layer in the stratosphere, which is necessary for life on earth, has changed. The main causes of ozone destruction are chlorofluorcarbons (CFCs) 11 and 12. Recently, caring anesthetists have wondered if and to what degree N2O and popular potent inhalation anesthetics may also contribute to ozone loss. Having consulted the literature, we attempt to answer that question. The ozone-destroying N2O is chiefly produced by burning fossil elements and nitrogenous fertilizing used in agriculture; the share of medically used N2O lies below 2%. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane are halogenated anesthetics that contain ozone-destroying halogens (bromine, chlorine, fluorine) to different extents. Complicated experimental calculations for these volatile anesthetics result in a potential for ozone destruction of 0.36 for halothane and 0.02 for enflurane and isoflurane if the potential for ozone destruction by CFCs is set at 1.0. The lifespan of the inhalation anesthetics in the troposphere is with less than 3 years, dramatically less than that of CFCs (70-140 years). The two most important CFCs, 11 and 12, are considered to be currently produced in a quantity of about 800,000 tons per year. On the other hand, the worldwide production of inhalation anesthetics is said to be only 2,000 tons. In view of the experimental calculations and the low worldwide production, the small greenhouse effect, the shorter lifespan in the troposphere, and the low potential for ozone destruction, the negative effects of medically used N2O and inhalation anesthetics on the ozone layer seem negligible. All in all, the inhalation anesthetics are considered to be responsible for only 0.0005% of the ozone destruction at present.

  5. Identification of cytochrome P450 2E1 as the predominant enzyme catalyzing human liver microsomal defluorination of sevoflurane, isoflurane, and methoxyflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharasch, E D; Thummel, K E

    1993-10-01

    Renal and hepatic toxicity of the fluorinated ether volatile anesthetics is caused by biotransformation to toxic metabolites. Metabolism also contributes significantly to the elimination pharmacokinetics of some volatile agents. Although innumerable studies have explored anesthetic metabolism in animals, there is little information on human volatile anesthetic metabolism with respect to comparative rates or the identity of the enzymes responsible for defluorination. The first purpose of this investigation was to compare the metabolism of the fluorinated ether anesthetics by human liver microsomes. The second purpose was to test the hypothesis that cytochrome P450 2E1 is the specific P450 isoform responsible for volatile anesthetic defluorination in humans. Microsomes were prepared from human livers. Anesthetic metabolism in microsomal incubations was measured by fluoride production. The strategy for evaluating the role of P450 2E1 in anesthetic defluorination involved three approaches: for a series of 12 human livers, correlation of microsomal defluorination rate with microsomal P450 2E1 content (measured by Western blot analysis), correlation of defluorination rate with microsomal P450 2E1 catalytic activity using marker substrates (para-nitrophenol hydroxylation and chlorzoxazone 6-hydroxylation), and chemical inhibition by P450 isoform-selective inhibitors. The rank order of anesthetic metabolism, assessed by fluoride production at saturating substrate concentrations, was methoxyflurane > sevoflurane > enflurane > isoflurane > desflurane > 0. There was a significant linear correlation of sevoflurane and methoxyflurane defluorination with antigenic P450 2E1 content (r = 0.98 and r = 0.72, respectively), but not with either P450 1A2 or P450 3A3/4. Comparison of anesthetic defluorination with either para-nitrophenol or chlorzoxazone hydroxylation showed a significant correlation for sevoflurane (r = 0.93, r = 0.95) and methoxyflurane (r = 0.78, r = 0

  6. Manipulations of extracellular Loop 2 in α1 GlyR ultra-sensitive ethanol receptors (USERs) enhance receptor sensitivity to isoflurane, ethanol, and lidocaine, but not propofol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Anna; Muchhala, Karan H.; Trang, Janice; Asatryan, Liana; Trudell, James R.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Alkana, Ronald L.; Davies, Daryl L.

    2015-01-01

    We recently developed Ultra-Sensitive Ethanol Receptors (USERs) as a novel tool for investigation of single receptor subunit populations sensitized to extremely low ethanol concentrations that do not affect other receptors in the nervous system. To this end, we found that mutations within the extracellular Loop 2 region of glycine receptors (GlyRs) and γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) can significantly increase receptor sensitivity to micro-molar concentrations of ethanol resulting in up to a 100-fold increase in ethanol sensitivity relative to wild type (WT) receptors. The current study investigated: 1) Whether structural manipulations of Loop 2 in α1 GlyRs could similarly increase receptor sensitivity to other anesthetics; and 2) If mutations exclusive to the C-terminal end of Loop 2 are sufficient to impart these changes. We expressed α1 GlyR USERs in Xenopus oocytes and tested the effects of three classes of anesthetics, isoflurane (volatile), propofol (intravenous), and lidocaine (local), known to enhance glycine-induced chloride currents using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. Loop 2 mutations produced a significant 10-fold increase in isoflurane and lidocaine sensitivity, but no increase in propofol sensitivity compared to WT α1 GlyRs. Interestingly, we also found that structural manipulations in the C-terminal end of Loop 2 were sufficient and selective for α1 GlyR modulation by ethanol, isoflurane, and lidocaine. These studies are the first to report the extracellular region of α1 GlyRs as a site of lidocaine action. Overall, the findings suggest that Loop 2 of α1 GlyRs is a key region that mediates isoflurane and lidocaine modulation. Moreover, the results identify important amino acids in Loop 2 that regulate isoflurane, lidocaine, and ethanol action. Collectively, these data indicate the commonality of the sites for isoflurane, lidocaine, and ethanol action, and the structural requirements for allosteric modulation on

  7. Adenosine Receptor Adora2b Plays a Mechanistic Role in the Protective Effect of the Volatile Anesthetic Sevoflurane during Liver Ischemia/Reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Tiago F; Köhler, David; Schad, Jessica; de Oliveira, Claudia Bernardo; Konrad, Franziska; Hoch-Gutbrod, Michaela; Streienberger, Ariane; Rosenberger, Peter; Straub, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Liver ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury is characterized by hepatic tissue damage and an inflammatory response. This is accompanied by the formation and vascular sequestration of platelet-neutrophil conjugates (PNCs). Signaling through Adora2b adenosine receptors can provide liver protection. Volatile anesthetics may interact with adenosine receptors. This study investigates potential antiinflammatory effects of the volatile anesthetic sevoflurane during liver IR. Experiments were performed ex vivo with human blood and in a liver IR model with wild-type, Adora2a, and Adora2b mice. The effect of sevoflurane on platelet activation, PNC formation and sequestration, cytokine release, and liver damage (alanine aminotransferase release) was analyzed using flow cytometry, luminometry, and immunofluorescence. Adenosine receptor expression in liver tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Ex vivo experiments indicate that sevoflurane inhibits platelet and leukocyte activation (n = 5). During liver IR, sevoflurane (2 Vol%) decreased PNC formation 2.4-fold in wild-type (P < 0.05) but not in Adora2b mice (n ≥ 5). Sevoflurane reduced PNC sequestration 1.9-fold (P < 0.05) and alanine aminotransferase release 3.5-fold (P < 0.05) in wild-type but not in Adora2b mice (n = 5). In Adora2a mice, sevoflurane also inhibited PNC formation and cytokine release. Sevoflurane diminished cytokine release (n ≥ 3) and increased Adora2b transcription and expression in liver tissue of wild-types (n = 4). Our experiments highlight antiinflammatory and tissue-protective properties of sevoflurane during liver IR and reveal a mechanistic role of Adora2b in sevoflurane-associated effects. The targeted use of sevoflurane not only as an anesthetic but also to prevent IR damage is a promising approach in the treatment of critically ill patients.

  8. Propofol and magnesium attenuate isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation via inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition pore

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    Zhang Yiying

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP and induce caspase activation and apoptosis, which may lead to learning and memory impairment. Cyclosporine A, a blocker of mPTP opening might attenuate the isoflurane-induced mPTP opening, lessening its ripple effects. Magnesium and anesthetic propofol are also mPTP blockers. We therefore set out to determine whether propofol and magnesium can attenuate the isoflurane-induced caspase activation and mPTP opening. Methods We investigated the effects of magnesium sulfate (Mg2+, propofol, and isoflurane on the opening of mPTP and caspase activation in H4 human neuroglioma cells stably transfected to express full-length human amyloid precursor protein (APP (H4 APP cells and in six day-old wild-type mice, employing Western blot analysis and flowcytometry. Results Here we show that Mg2+ and propofol attenuated the isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in H4-APP cells and mouse brain tissue. Moreover, Mg2+ and propofol, the blockers of mPTP opening, mitigated the isoflurane-induced mPTP opening in the H4-APP cells. Conclusion These data illustrate that Mg2+ and propofol may ameliorate the isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity by inhibiting its mitochondrial dysfunction. Pending further studies, these findings may suggest the use of Mg2+ and propofol in preventing and treating anesthesia neurotoxicity.

  9. Monitoring cerebral oxygenation and local field potential with a variation of isoflurane concentration in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong-Hyuk; Shin, Teo Jeon; Kim, Seonghyun; Bae, Jayyoung; Cho, Dongrae; Ham, Jinsil; Park, Ji-Young; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Jeong, Seongwook; Lee, Boreom; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to investigate experimentally how anesthetic levels affect cerebral metabolism measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and to identify a robust marker among NIRS parameters to discriminate various stages of anesthetic depth in rats under isoflurane anesthesia. In order to record the hemodynamic changes and local field potential (LFP) in the brain, fiber-optic cannulae and custom-made microelectrodes were implanted in the frontal cortex of the skull. The NIRS and LFP signals were continuously monitored before, during and after isoflurane anesthesia. As isoflurane concentration is reduced, the level of oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin concentrations of the frontal cortex decreased gradually, while deoxyhemoglobin increased. The reflectance ratio between 730nm and 850nm and burst suppression ratio (BSR) correspond similarly with the change of oxyhemoglobin during the variation of isoflurane concentration. These results suggest that NIRS signals in addition to EEG may provide a possibility of developing a new anesthetic depth index.

  10. Isoflurane depresses baroreflex control of heart rate in decerebrate rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong S; Morrow, Don; Andresen, Michael C; Chang, Kyoung S K

    2002-05-01

    Isoflurane inhibits baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) by poorly understood mechanisms. The authors examined whether suprapontine central nervous system cardiovascular regulatory sites are required for anesthetic depression. The effects of isoflurane (1 and 2 rat minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]) on the baroreflex control of HR were determined in sham intact and midcollicular-transected decerebrate rats. Intravenous phenylephrine (0.2-12 microg/kg) and nitroprusside (1-60 microg/kg) were used to measure HR responses to peak changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP). Sigmoidal logistic curve fits to HR-MAP data assessed baroreflex sensitivity (HR/MAP), HR range, lower and upper HR plateau, and MAP at half the HR range (BP50). Four groups (two brain intact and two decerebrate) were studied before, during, and after isoflurane. To assess sympathetic and vagal contributions to HR baroreflex, beta-adrenoceptor (1 mg/kg atenolol) or muscarinic (0.5 mg/kg methyl atropine) antagonists were administered systemically. Decerebration did not alter resting MAP and HR or baroreflex parameters. Isoflurane depressed baroreflex slope and HR range in brain-intact and decerebrate rats. In both groups, 1 MAC reduced HR range by depressing peak reflex tachycardia. Maximal reflex bradycardia during increases in blood pressure was relatively preserved. Atenolol during 1 MAC did not alter maximum reflex tachycardia. In contrast, atropine during 1 MAC fully blocked reflex bradycardia. Therefore, 1 MAC predominantly depresses sympathetic components of HR baroreflex. Isoflurane at 2 MAC depressed both HR plateaus and decreased BP50 in both groups. Isoflurane depresses HR baroreflex control by actions that do not require suprapontine central nervous system sites. Isoflurane actions seem to inhibit HR baroreflex primarily by the sympathetic nervous system.

  11. The Physiologic Effects of Isoflurane, Sevoflurane, and Hypothermia Used for Anesthesia in Neonatal Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Monika K; Chum, Helen H; Chang, Angela G; Jampachairsi, Katechan; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2016-01-01

    Information regarding effective anesthetic regimens for neonatal rat pups is limited. Here we investigated whether isoflurane or sevoflurane anesthesia maintains physiologic parameters more consistently than does hypothermia anesthesia in neonatal rat pups. Rat pups (age, 4 d) were randomly assigned to receive isoflurane, sevoflurane, or hypothermia. Physiologic parameters monitored at 1, 5, 10, and 15 min included heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and oxygen saturation (%SpO2). Other parameters evaluated were loss and return of righting reflex, paw withdrawal reflex, and maternal acceptance. Corticosterone and glucose were sampled at 20 min and 24 h after anesthesia induction. Once a surgical plane of anesthesia was achieved, a skin incision was made on the right lateral thigh. After the procedure, all pups were accepted and cared for by their dam. Isoflurane- and sevoflurane-treated pups maintained higher HR, RR, %SpO2, and glucose levels than did hypothermia-treated pups. For both the isoflurane and sevoflurane groups, HR and RR were significantly lower at 10 and 15 min after anesthesia than at 1 min. Compared with hypothermia, isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia provided shorter times to loss of and return of the righting reflex. Although corticosterone did not differ among the groups, glucose levels were higher at 20 min after anesthesia induction than at 24 h in all anesthetic groups. We conclude that both isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia maintain physiologic parameters (HR, RR, %SpO2) more consistently than does hypothermia anesthesia in 4-d-old rat pups.

  12. Isoflurane induced cognitive impairment in aged rats through hippocampal calcineurin/NFAT signaling

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    Ni, Cheng; Li, Zhengqian; Qian, Min; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xiangyang, E-mail: puthmzk@163.com

    2015-05-15

    Calcineurin (CaN) over-activation constrains synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Upon CaN activation, NFAT imports into the nucleus and guides its downstream genes, which also affect neuronal and synaptic function. Aberrant CaN/NFAT signaling involves in neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, but its role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) remains uninvestigated. Inhaled anesthetic isoflurane facilitates the development of POCD, and the present study investigated the role of CaN/NFAT signaling in isoflurane induced cognitive impairment of aged rats, and the therapeutic effects of CaN inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA). The results indicated that hippocampal CaN activity increased and peaked at 6 h after isoflurane exposure, and NFAT, especially NFATc4, imported into the nucleus following CaN activation. Furthermore, phamacological inhibition of CaN by CsA markedly attenuated isoflurane induced aberrant CaN/NFATc4 signaling in the hippocampus, and rescued relevant spatial learning and memory impairment of aged rats. Overall, the study suggests hippocampal CaN/NFAT signaling as the upstream mechanism of isoflurane induced cognitive impairment, and provides potential therapeutic target and possible treatment methods for POCD. - Highlights: • Isoflurane induces hippocampal calcineurin activation. • Isoflurane induces hippocampal NFAT, especially NFATc4, nuclear import. • Cyclosporine A attenuates isoflurane induced aberrant calcineurin/NFAT signaling. • Cyclosporine A rescues isoflurane induced cognitive impairment. • Calcineurin/NFAT signaling is the upstream mechanism of isoflurane induced synaptic dysfunction and cognitive impairment.

  13. Isoflurane administration before ischemia and during reperfusion attenuates ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury of isolated rabbit lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R; Ishibe, Y; Ueda, M; Hang, Y

    1999-09-01

    To investigate the effects of isoflurane on ischemia/ reperfusion (IR)-induced lung injury, we administered isoflurane before ischemia or during reperfusion. Isolated rabbit lungs were divided into the following groups: control (n = 6), perfused and ventilated for 120 min without ischemia; ISO-control (n = 6), 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) isoflurane was administered for 30 min before 120 min continuous perfusion; IR (n = 6), ischemia for 60 min, followed by 60 min reperfusion; IR-ISO1 and IR-ISO2, ischemia followed by reperfusion and 1 MAC (n = 6) or 2 MAC (n = 6) isoflurane for 60 min; ISO-IR (n = 6), 1 MAC isoflurane was administered for 30 min before ischemia, followed by IR. During these maneuvers, we measured total pulmonary vascular resistance (Rt), coefficient of filtration (Kfc), and lung wet to dry ratio (W/D). The results indicated that administration of isoflurane during reperfusion inhibited an IR-induced increase in Kfc and W/D ratio. Furthermore, isoflurane at 2 MAC, but not 1 MAC, significantly inhibited an IR-induced increase in Rt. The administration of isoflurane before ischemia significantly attenuated the increase in IR-induced Kfc, W/D, and Rt. Our results suggest that the administration of isoflurane before ischemia and during reperfusion protects against ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury in isolated rabbit lungs.

  14. A Transmembrane Amino Acid in the GABAA Receptor β2 Subunit Critical for the Actions of Alcohols and Anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Mandy L.; Borghese, Cecilia M.; Trudell, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohols and inhaled anesthetics enhance the function of GABAA receptors containing α, β, and γ subunits. Molecular analysis has focused on the role of the α subunits; however, there is evidence that the β subunits may also be important. The goal of our study was to determine whether Asn265, which is homologous to the site implicated in the α subunit (Ser270), contributes to an alcohol and volatile anesthetic binding site in the GABAA receptor β2 subunit. We substituted cysteine for Asn265 and exposed the mutant to the sulfhydryl-specific reagent octyl methanethiosulfonate (OMTS). We used two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology in Xenopus laevis oocytes and found that, after OMTS application, GABA-induced currents were irreversibly potentiated in mutant α1β2(N265C)γ2S receptors [but not α1β2(I264C)γ2S], presumably because of the covalent linking of octanethiol to the thiol group in the substituted cysteine. It is noteworthy that this effect was blocked when OMTS was applied in the presence of octanol. We found that potentiation by butanol, octanol, or isoflurane in the N265C mutant was nearly abolished after the application of OMTS, suggesting that an alcohol and volatile anesthetic binding site at position 265 of the β2 subunit was irreversibly occupied by octanethiol and consequently prevented butanol or isoflurane from binding and producing their effects. OMTS did not affect modulation or direct activation by pentobarbital, but there was a partial reduction of allosteric modulation by flunitrazepam and alphaxalone in mutant α1β2(N265C)γ2S receptors after OMTS was applied. Our findings provide evidence that Asn265 may contribute to an alcohol and anesthetic binding site. PMID:20826568

  15. Intraocular pressure and its correlation with blood gas parameters in crested caracaras (Caracara plancus anesthetized with isoflurane and sevoflurane Pressão intra-ocular e sua correlação com parâmetros hemogasométricos em caracarás (Caracara plancus anestesiados com isofluorano e sevofluorano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Ribeiro

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The intraocular pressure (IOP and its correlations with arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2 and arterial pH were studied in five crested caracaras (Caracara plancus anesthetized with isoflurane (ISO and sevoflurane (SEV. Baseline IOP values were measured in both eyes (M0. Brachial artery was previously catheterized to obtain blood gas and cardiorespiratory analysis. Anesthesia was induced with 5% ISO and maintained with 2.5% for 40 minutes. IOP measurements and blood samples were evaluated in different moments until the end of the procedure. After recovering, a second anesthesia was induced with 6% SEV and maintained with 3.5%. Parameters were evaluated at the same time points of the previous procedure. IOP reduced significantly (P= 0.012 from M0 at all time points and no significative changes were observed between ISO and SEV anesthesias. Correlation between IOP and PaCO2 and between PIO and blood pH were found only for SEV. IOP and blood pH decreased in parallel with IOP, whereas values of PaCO2 increased in caracaras anesthetized with isoflurane and sevoflurane.Avaliou-se a pressão intra-ocular (PIO e estimaram-se as correlações entre PIO e pressão de dióxido de carbono (PaCO2 e pH arterial de cinco caracarás (Caracara plancus, anestesiados com isofluorano (ISO ou sevofluorano (SEV. Valores basais da PIO foram aferidos em ambos os olhos (M0. Cateterizou-se previamente a artéria braquial para obtenção de parâmetros hemogasométricos e cardiorrespiratórios. Anestesia foi induzida com ISO a 5V% e mantida por 40 minutos com 2,5V%. PIO e amostras de sangue foram avaliadas em diferentes momentos até o final do procedimento. Após recuperação, uma segunda anestesia foi realizada com SEV a 6% e mantida com 3,5%. Os parâmetros foram aferidos nos mesmos momentos estabelecidos previamente. A PIO decresceu significativamente (P=0,012 de M0 em todos os momentos e não houve diferença estatística entre ISO e SEV. Correla

  16. Nitrous Oxide and Nitrous Oxide-Free Low-Flow Anesthesia Using Bispectral Index Monitoring: Effects on Hemodynamics, Recovery Times, Volatile Anesthetic Consumption and Costs

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    Bengü Gülhan Köksal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we aimed to compare the effects of desfluraneN2O and desflurane-fentanyl combinations on hemodynamics, recovery times, volatile anesthetic consumption and costs in low-flow desflurane anesthesia by bispectral index (BIS monitoring of depth of anesthesia. Methods: After approval of ethics committee and obtaining patient consents, 60 patients were divided into two equal groups randomly. Non-invasive blood pressure measurement, ECG, SpO2 and BIS were monitored. All patients received 10 L .min-1 100% oxygen with mask for 5 minute before intubation. 2 mg.kg-1 propofol, 2 μg.kg-1 fentanyl and 0.6 mg.kg-1 rocuronium bromide were administered at induction in both groups. Desfluran 6% was chosen for anesthesia maintenance. Group 1 received 50% O2-N2O mixture in 6 L.min-1 and Group 2 received 50% O2-air mixture in 6 L.min-1 as carrier gas. Low-flow anesthesia (1 L.min-1 was started after a 10-min period of initial high flow (6 L.min-1. In Group 2, infusion of fentanyl was begun in 1 μg.kg.hour-1 rate. Desflurane level was adjusted at a main BIS value of 40-60. Blood pressure, heart rate, FiO2, etO2, FiN22, EtN2O, FiCO2, EtCO2, Fidesfluran and Etdesflurane were recorded. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of heart rate, arterial blood pressure, settings of desfluran and recovery time. BIS values (p<0.001 and anesthetic agent costs (p<0.001 were higher in Group 2. Conclusion: Using fentanyl infusion instead of nitrous oxide in low flow-anesthesia with desflurane did not alter the hemodynamic parameters. Fentanyl infusion with medical air-oxygen as carrier gas is an alternative technique, but increases BIS values and anesthetic agent costs. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2010; 48: 132-8

  17. Day-surgery patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain than those anesthetized with sevoflurane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, Terry

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been recent studies suggesting that patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain compared with patients anesthetized with volatile anesthetics. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind study, 80 patients undergoing day-case diagnostic laparoscopic gynecological surgery were either anesthetized with IV propofol or sevoflurane. The primary outcome measured was pain on a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Patients anesthetized with propofol had less pain compared with patients anesthetized with sevoflurane (P = 0.01). There was no difference in any of the other measured clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The patients anesthetized with propofol appeared to have less pain than patients anesthetized with sevoflurane.

  18. Cerebral blood volume and blood flow responses to hyperventilation in brain tumors during isoflurane or propofol anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenic, Aleksa; Craen, Rosemary A; Lee, Ting-Yim; Gelb, Adrian W

    2002-03-01

    Using computerized tomography, we measured absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) in tumor, peri-tumor, and contralateral normal regions, at normocapnia and hypocapnia, in 16 rabbits with brain tumors (VX2 carcinoma), under isoflurane or propofol anesthesia. In both anesthetic groups, CBV and CBF were highest in the tumor region and lowest in the contralateral normal tissue. For isoflurane, a significant decrease in both CBV and CBF was observed in all tissue regions with hyperventilation (P hyperventilation for all regions (P > 0.10). In addition, there were no differences between CBV values for isoflurane at hypocapnia when compared with CBV values for propofol at normo- or hypocapnia (P > 0.34 and P > 0.35, respectively, in the tumor regions). Our results indicate that propofol increases cerebral vascular tone in both neoplastic and normal tissue vessels compared with isoflurane. CBV and CBF during normocapnia were significantly greater in all regions (tumor, peri-tumor, and contralateral normal tissue) with isoflurane than with propofol. CBV and CBF remained responsive to hyperventilation only with isoflurane. In rabbits with brain tumors, brain blood flow and volume were significantly larger in all regions (tumor, peri-tumor, and contralateral normal tissue) with isoflurane than with propofol during normocapnia, and remained responsive to a reduction in PaCO(2). Consequently, during hypocapnia, brain blood flow and volume values with isoflurane were similar to values with propofol.

  19. A novel approach to scavenging anesthetic gases in rodent surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Jeffrey C; Krageschmidt, Dale A; Blanco, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory animal procedures using gas anesthetics may amass elevated waste gas concentrations in operating rooms if controls are not implemented for capturing and removing the vapors. Area sampling using an infrared analyzer indicated isoflurane concentrations likely to exceed occupational exposure guidelines. Our study showed environmental concentrations of oxygen as high as 40% and isoflurane concentrations >100 ppm when no controls or merely passive controls were utilized. These extraneous isoflurane emissions were determined to be originating from the pre-procedural induction process as well as the gas delivery nose cone. A novel waste gas collection cylinder was designed to enclose the gas delivery nose cone and animal head during the administration of anesthetic gases. The vented cylinder utilized a house vacuum to remove the waste anesthetic gases from the surgical field. A commercially available induction chamber designed to be actively and externally exhausted was used to lower concentrations during the induction process. With implementation of local exhaust ventilation controls, waste anesthetic gas concentrations decreased to below recommended occupational exposure levels. In vitro (sham) testing compared favorably to in vivo measurements validating the reduction capability of active ventilation during rodent anesthetic administration. In vivo isoflurane reductions for the induction chamber emissions, the operating room, and the surgeon's breathing zone were 95%, 60%, and 53%, respectively. The same measurements for an in vitro procedure were 98%, 84%, and 87%, respectively.

  20. Physiological alteration, quality of anesthesia and economy of isoflurane in domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deori, Parag; Sarma, Kushal Konwar; Nath, Parsha Jyoti; Singh, Chandan Kumar; Nath, Rita

    2017-05-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of isoflurane anesthesia on physiological parameters, assessment of anesthetic qualities, and economy of use of isoflurane in domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus). In this study, 18 apparently healthy adult domestic chickens were selected randomly and divided into three groups. The birds were anesthetized by masked induction with isoflurane at a dose rate of 3.5%, 4%, and 5% and were maintained with 1.5%, 2%, and 2.5% isoflurane with oxygen by endotracheal intubation in Groups I, II, and III, respectively. Physiological parameters, viz., cloacal temperature, heart rate, and respiration rate were recorded at 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min. The quality of anesthesia was assessed on the basis of induction time, induction behavior, quality of sedation, production of analgesia, degree of muscle relaxation, palpebral reflex, recovery time, and recovery behavior. The economy of anesthesia was calculated in terms of quantity of isoflurane utilized during 60 min of study. Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance, Duncan's multiple range tests. There was significant decrease (peconomy without causing any deleterious effect on the birds. The physiological parameters observed in this study can serve as reference values for the wild and endangered birds.

  1. A case report of personal exposures to isoflurane during animal anesthesia procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, James

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare personal exposures to isoflurane from participants' breathing zone samples during animal anesthesia procedures by the method of anesthetic gas delivery and the waste anesthetic gas (WAG) control method utilized. WAG control methods included passive scavenging using charcoal canisters, active scavenging using a building vacuum system, and various local exhaust ventilation systems such as laboratory fume hoods and capture hoods. Methods of anesthesia delivery included induction chambers, face masks (also known as nose cones), and intubation. Personal breathing zone samples were collected using 3M 3520 Organic Vapor Diffusion Monitors and submitted to an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 17025 accredited laboratory for analysis. When using face masks and induction chambers as the method of anesthesia delivery, local exhaust ventilation systems were found to be the best WAG control method to mitigate personal exposures to isoflurane. Personal exposures to isoflurane were well-controlled when animals were intubated, regardless of whether passive scavenging with an adsorptive charcoal canister or active scavenging with a building vacuum system was used. Personal exposures to isoflurane were highest when induction chambers and face masks were used for anesthesia delivery, and passive scavenging with adsorptive charcoal canisters were used as the control method. This study served to identify best practice WAG control methods for research and veterinary procedures that involve isoflurane anesthesia.

  2. A Mitochondrion-Targeted Antioxidant Ameliorates Isoflurane-Induced Cognitive Deficits in Aging Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoru; Zhang, Hui; Hao, Shuangying; Ji, Muhuo; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    Isoflurane possesses neurotoxicity and can induce cognitive deficits, particularly in aging mammals. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) have been linked to the early pathogenesis of this disorder. However, the role of mtROS remains to be evaluated due to a lack of targeted method to treat mtROS. Here, we determined in aging mice the effects of the mitochondrion-targeted antioxidant SS-31, on cognitive deficits induced by isoflurane, a general inhalation anesthetic. We further investigated the possible mechanisms underlying the effects of SS-31 on hippocampal neuro-inflammation and apoptosis. The results showed that isoflurane induced hippocampus-dependent memory deficit, which was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction including reduced ATP contents, increased ROS levels, and mitochondrial swelling. Treatment with SS-31 significantly ameliorated isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits through the improvement of mitochondrial integrity and function. Mechanistically, SS-31 treatment suppressed pro-inflammatory responses by decreasing the levels of NF-κB, NLRP3, caspase 1, IL-1β, and TNF-α; and inhibited the apoptotic pathway by decreasing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, reducing the release of cytochrome C, and blocking the cleavage of caspase 3. Our results indicate that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits may be attenuated by mitochondrion-targeted antioxidants, such as SS-31. Therefore, SS-31 may have therapeutic potentials in preventing injuries from oxidative stresses that contribute to anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity.

  3. Isoflurane and postoperative respiratory depression following laparoscopic surgery: A retrospective propensity matched analysis

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    Alexandre N. Cavalcante

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Episodes of respiratory depression during the immediate postoperative recovery period (Phase I post-anesthesia recovery have been associated with respiratory complications during Phase II recovery. Using multivariable analyses in several surgical cohorts, we previously identified potential associations between patient and perioperative factors and increased risk for Phase I respiratory depression. The aim of this study is to use the propensity matched analysis to specifically assess for a potential association between the use of isoflurane and episodes of Phase I respiratory depression after laparoscopic operations. The electronic medical records of 8,567 patients who underwent laparoscopic operations between January 1, 2010 and July 31, 2014, lasting ≥90 minutes, were retrospectively analyzed. Propensity-matched patients anesthetized without isoflurane were identified for 3,403 patients anesthetized with isoflurane. Compared to the use of desflurane, sevoflurane or propofol infusion, maintenance of anesthesia with isoflurane was associated with an increased likelihood of Phase I respiratory depression (OR 95% CI, 1.32, 1.15-1.50, p < 0.001 and longer Phase I recovery (126 vs. 110 minutes, p < 0.001. The use of isoflurane was associated with increased rates of postoperative respiratory depression and postoperative recovery when compared to sevoflurane, desflurane, or propofol infusion.

  4. A Mitochondrion-Targeted Antioxidant Ameliorates Isoflurane-Induced Cognitive Deficits in Aging Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wu

    Full Text Available Isoflurane possesses neurotoxicity and can induce cognitive deficits, particularly in aging mammals. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS have been linked to the early pathogenesis of this disorder. However, the role of mtROS remains to be evaluated due to a lack of targeted method to treat mtROS. Here, we determined in aging mice the effects of the mitochondrion-targeted antioxidant SS-31, on cognitive deficits induced by isoflurane, a general inhalation anesthetic. We further investigated the possible mechanisms underlying the effects of SS-31 on hippocampal neuro-inflammation and apoptosis. The results showed that isoflurane induced hippocampus-dependent memory deficit, which was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction including reduced ATP contents, increased ROS levels, and mitochondrial swelling. Treatment with SS-31 significantly ameliorated isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits through the improvement of mitochondrial integrity and function. Mechanistically, SS-31 treatment suppressed pro-inflammatory responses by decreasing the levels of NF-κB, NLRP3, caspase 1, IL-1β, and TNF-α; and inhibited the apoptotic pathway by decreasing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, reducing the release of cytochrome C, and blocking the cleavage of caspase 3. Our results indicate that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits may be attenuated by mitochondrion-targeted antioxidants, such as SS-31. Therefore, SS-31 may have therapeutic potentials in preventing injuries from oxidative stresses that contribute to anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity.

  5. Activity-dependent depression of neuronal sodium channels by the general anaesthetic isoflurane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtell, K.; Gingrich, K. J.; Ouyang, W.; Herold, K. F.; Hemmings, H. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms by which volatile anaesthetics such as isoflurane alter neuronal function are poorly understood, in particular their presynaptic mechanisms. Presynaptic voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) have been implicated as a target for anaesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release. We hypothesize that state-dependent interactions of isoflurane with Nav lead to increased inhibition of Na+ current (INa) during periods of high-frequency neuronal activity. Methods The electrophysiological effects of isoflurane, at concentrations equivalent to those used clinically, were measured on recombinant brain-type Nav1.2 expressed in ND7/23 neuroblastoma cells and on endogenous Nav in isolated rat neurohypophysial nerve terminals. Rate constants determined from experiments on the recombinant channel were used in a simple model of Nav gating. Results At resting membrane potentials, isoflurane depressed peak INa and shifted steady-state inactivation in a hyperpolarizing direction. After membrane depolarization, isoflurane accelerated entry (τcontrol=0.36 [0.03] ms compared with τisoflurane=0.33 [0.05] ms, P1.9] ms, PNav. A simple model of Nav gating involving stabilisation of fast inactivation, accounts for this novel form of activity-dependent block. Conclusions Isoflurane stabilises the fast-inactivated state of neuronal Nav leading to greater depression of INa during high-frequency stimulation, consistent with enhanced inhibition of fast firing neurones. PMID:26089447

  6. Emulsified halothane produces long-term epidural anesthetic effect: a study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengshan; Liao, Daqing; Liu, Jin; Xiao, Lin; Guo, Jiao; Yi, Mingliang; Zhou, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that volatile anesthetics could produce local anesthesia. Emulsified isoflurane at 8% has been reported to produce epidural anesthetic effect in rabbits. This study was designed to investigate the long-term epidural anesthetic effect of emulsified halothane in rabbits. In this study, 40 healthy adult rabbits (weighting 2.0-2.5 kg) with an epidural catheter were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10/group), receiving epidural administration of 1% lidocaine (lido group), 8% emulsified isoflurane 1ml (8% E-iso group), 8% emulsified halothane (8% E-Halo group) and 12% emulsified halothane (12% E-Halo group). After administration, sensory and motor functions as well as consciousness state were assessed until 60 minutes after sensory and motor function returned to its baseline or at least for 180 min. After epidural anesthesia, all the rabbits were continuously observed for 7 days and sacrificed for pathological evaluations. As a result, all the four study solutions produced typical epidural anesthesia. Onset times of sensory and motor function blockade were similar among the four groups (P>0.05). Duration of sensory blockade in 12% E-Halo group (83±13 min) was significantly longer than other groups: 51±12 min in 8% E-Halo group (Prabbits from 8% E-Halo, 8% E-iso and lido groups while there were four rabbits in 12% E-Halo group (4/10) showed a light sedation. For all the rabbits, no pathological injury was found. The present study demonstrates that emulsified halothane produces reversible concentration-dependent epidural anesthesia and at 12% (v/v), emulsified halothane could produce long-term anesthesia without pathological injury.

  7. Ventricular arrhythmias and mortality associated with isoflurane and sevoflurane in a porcine model of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro-Purriños, Marta; Fernández-Vázquez, Felipe; de Prado, Armando Perez; Altónaga, Jose R; Cuellas-Ramón, Carlos; Ajenjo-Silverio, Jose M; Orden, Asuncion; Gonzalo-Orden, Jose M

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia of the myocardium can lead to reversible or irreversible injury depending on the severity and duration of the preceding ischemia. Here we compared sevoflurane and isoflurane with particular reference to their hemodynamic effects and ability to modify the effects of acute severe myocardial ischemia and reperfusion on ventricular arrhythmias and mortality in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. Female Large White pigs were premedicated with ketamine, midazolam, and atropine. Propofol was given intravenously for the anesthetic induction, and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane or sevoflurane. Endovascular, fluoroscopy-guided, coronary procedures were performed to occlude the midleft anterior descending artery by using a coronary angioplasty balloon. After 75 min, the balloon catheter system was withdrawn and the presence of adequate reperfusion flow was verified. The pigs were followed for 2 mo, and overall mortality rate was calculated. The isoflurane group showed lower arterial pressure throughout the procedure, with the difference reaching statistical significance after induction of myocardial ischemia. The ventricular fibrillation rate was higher in isoflurane group (81.3%) than the sevoflurane group (51.7%; relative risk, 1.57 [1.03 to 2.4]). Overall survival was lower in the isoflurane group (75%) than the sevoflurane group (96.4%). In conclusion, in this porcine model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, sevoflurane was associated with higher hemodynamic stability and fewer ventricular arrhythmias and mortality than was isoflurane.

  8. Xenon neurotoxicity in rat hippocampal slice cultures is similar to isoflurane and sevoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Heather; Bickler, Philip E

    2013-08-01

    Anesthetic neurotoxicity in the developing brain of rodents and primates has raised concern. Xenon may be a nonneurotoxic alternative to halogenated anesthetics, but its toxicity has only been studied at low concentrations, where neuroprotective effects predominate in animal models. An equipotent comparison of xenon and halogenated anesthetics with respect to neurotoxicity in developing neurons has not been made. Organotypic hippocampal cultures from 7-day-old rats were exposed to 0.75, 1, and 2 minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC) partial pressures (60% xenon at 1.2, 2.67, and 3.67 atm; isoflurane at 1.4, 1.9, and 3.8%; and sevoflurane at 3.4 and 6.8%) for 6 h, at atmospheric pressure or in a pressure chamber. Cell death was assessed 24 h later with fluorojade and fluorescent dye exclusion techniques. Xenon caused death of hippocampal neurons in CA1, CA3, and dentate regions after 1 and 2 MAC exposures, but not at 0.75 MAC. At 1 MAC, xenon increased cell death 40% above baseline (P xenon, isoflurane, and sevoflurane. Xenon causes neuronal cell death in an in vitro model of the developing rodent brain at 1 MAC, as does isoflurane and sevoflurane at similarly potent concentrations. Preconditioning with a subtoxic dose of isoflurane eliminates this toxicity.

  9. [THE USE OF VOLATILE AGENTS FOR SEDATION IN CHILDREN IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, B D; Ostreikov, I F; Shtatnov, M K; Apostolidi, E Y; Nikitin, V V; Nadbitova, R A

    2015-01-01

    Sedation is a controllable level of medication depression of consciousness during which protective reflexes, adequate breathing, and responsiveness to physical stimuli and verbal commands are retained A number of physical and psychological factors affect the psyche of patients in the intensive care unit. Central nervous system (CNS) is a primary target of action of anesthetics and analgesics, and the bi-spectral index reflects the level of sedation of CNS, regardless of what drug caused sedation. The aim of this study was to use volatile anesthetics sevoflurane and isoflurane in children for sedation in the intensive care unit. Constant use of the inhalation route of administration helps to maintain the desired level of sedation depth for the required period of time in patients who are on long-term sedation and is practical for correction.

  10. Comparative immunohistochemical assessment of the effect of repetitive anesthesia with isoflurane and sevoflurane on rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxanda, Flavia; Gal, Adrian Florin; Raţiu, Cristian; Miclăuş, Viorel; Rus, Vasile; Oana, Liviu Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics are used in human, as well as veterinary medical practice. In the present study we investigated the effect of isoflurane and sevoflurane on rat hepatocytes. A total of 40 Wistar female rats were used in this study. Animals were divided in groups of 5 rats. Groups IM, SM served as control groups. Groups I1, I2, I3 were used to study isoflurane and S1, S2, S3 for sevoflurane study. They were anesthetized 3 times, for 2h long, at 2 days interval with a concentration of: 1.5% isoflurane (I1, I2, I3) and 2% sevoflurane (S1, S2, S3). The oxygen supply throughout the anesthesia was 1LO2/min. Groups IM, IS, I1, S1 were sacrificed immediately after the last anesthesia. Groups I2, S2 were sacrificed 6h after the last anesthesia, and groups I3, S3, 24h post-anesthesia. Liver samples were harvested to highlight caspase-3 in apoptotic hepatocytes. Following isoflurane administration, there were less than 1% cells in apoptosis highlighted in rat livers from groups IM, I1 and I2. At 24h post-anesthesia (group I3), a small number of apoptotic hepatocytes was highlighted (around 3.23% cells in apoptosis), with a strictly periacinar disposition, randomly distributed in a small number of hepatic lobules. After sevoflurane administration, less than 1% apoptotic hepatocytes were identified at all control moments throughout the study. The results suggest that the anesthetics do not present a considerable hepatotoxicity. The comparative assessment of the two anesthetics shows that sevoflurane is superior to isoflurane. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Photoacoustic microscopy of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygen-metabolic responses to anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rui; Li, Jun; Ning, Bo; Sun, Naidi; Wang, Tianxiong; Zuo, Zhiyi; Hu, Song

    2017-02-01

    General anesthetics are known to have profound effects on cerebral hemodynamics and neuronal activities. However, it remains a challenge to directly assess anesthetics-induced hemodynamic and oxygen-metabolic changes from the true baseline under wakefulness at the microscopic level, due to the lack of an enabling technology for high-resolution functional imaging of the awake mouse brain. To address this challenge, we have developed head-restrained photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), which enables simultaneous imaging of the cerebrovascular anatomy, total concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin (CHb and sO2), and blood flow in awake mice. From these hemodynamic measurements, two important metabolic parameters, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), can be derived. Side-by-side comparison of the mouse brain under wakefulness and anesthesia revealed multifaceted cerebral responses to isoflurane, a volatile anesthetic widely used in preclinical research and clinical practice. Key observations include elevated cerebral blood flow (CBF) and reduced oxygen extraction and metabolism.

  12. Plasma corticosterone, insulin and glucose changes induced by brief exposure to isoflurane, diethyl ether and CO2 in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardooz, H; Rostamkhani, F; Zaringhalam, J; Faraji Shahrivar, F

    2010-01-01

    The impact of anesthetic agents on endocrine and metabolic factors is an important issue. The present study has compared the effects of a short-term exposure to diethyl ether, isoflurane, or CO2 on plasma corticosterone, insulin and glucose concentrations since the duration of anesthetic exposure may have an effect on those factors. Male rats were divided into fed and fasted groups. The experimental rats were briefly exposed to diethyl ether, isoflurane, or CO2 (the degree of anesthesia was identical), while a control group was not exposed to the anesthetics. In the fed rats, diethyl ether exposure increased the levels of plasma glucose. CO2 exposure decreased plasma corticosterone and increased plasma glucose levels. Isoflurane exposure caused no changes in plasma corticosterone, glucose, or insulin levels. In the fasted rats, diethyl ether exposure increased plasma corticosterone and reduced plasma insulin levels. The plasma corticosterone and insulin levels were significantly increased by CO2) exposure. Isoflurane exposure decreased plasma insulin levels. A brief exposure to either diethyl ether or CO2 changed the plasma corticosterone, glucose, and insulin levels in fed and/or fasted rats. However, isoflurane exposure had the least effect on the concentration of these factors in both the fed and fasted states.

  13. Volatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sánchez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The action consists of moving with small kicks a tin of cola refresh -without Brand-from a point of the city up to other one. During the path I avoid bollards, the slope differences between sidewalks, pedestrians, parked motorcycles, etc. Volatility wants to say exactly that the money is getting lost. That the money is losing by gentlemen and by ladies who are neither financial sharks, nor big businessmen… or similarly, but ingenuous people, as you or as me, who walk down the street.

  14. Effects of constant rate infusion of anesthetic or analgesic drugs on general anesthesia with isoflurane: A retrospective study in 200 dogs Efeitos da infusão intravenosa contínua de fármacos anestésicos ou analgésicos sobre a anestesia geral com isoflurano: Estudo retrospectivo em 200 cães

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    Sofia de Amorim Cerejo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Constant rate infusion (CRI shows several advantages in balanced anesthesia, such as reduction of requirement for inhaled anesthetics and control of pain. The most commonly used drugs in these protocols are local anesthetics, dissociative, and opioids, which may be administered alone or in combinations. We evaluated the records of 200 dogs that underwent various surgical procedures with anesthetic or analgesic CRI in the perioperative period during 2011 and 2012 at the Veterinary Hospital of Franca University (Unifran, and identified possible complications during the transoperative period. Records evaluated included clinical state, laboratory tests, drugs used in premedication and induction, and CRI protocol. Acepromazine and morphine were the main drugs used in premedication. Propofol was used to induce anesthesia alone or in combination with other agents. We evaluated records of the 25 different CRI protocols. Fentanyl was the main drug employed in CRI, either alone or in combination. There were 128 episodes of anesthetic complications during CRI;the most common were hypotension, hypertension, and tachycardia, which occurred in 43 (32%, 35 (26.3%, and 19 (14.2% dogs, respectively. Cardiac arrhythmia was reported in only 4 dogs. Signs of respiratory depression were present in dogs treated with 6 different CRI protocols. The consumption of isoflurane (vol % reduced between 15.7% and 21.05% after 30minutes of the CRI in the fentanyl and fentanyl–lidocaine–ketamine CRI groups (pO uso de técnicas de infusão contínua (IC possui inúmeras vantagens na anestesia balanceada, como a redução do requerimento de anestésicos inalatórios e controle da dor. Os fármacos mais comumente utilizados nestes protocolos são os anestésicos locais, dissociativos e opioides, que podem ser administrados isoladamente ou em associações. Foram avaliados os prontuários de 200 cães que foram submetidos a diversos procedimentos cirúrgicos com IC de anest

  15. Effects of laparoscopy on the cardiorespiratory system of brown brocket deer (Mazama gouazoubira anesthetized with ketamine/ xylazine/ midazolam combination and isoflurane Efeitos da laparoscopia sobre o sistema cardiorrespiratório de veados-catingueiro (Mazama gouazoubira anestesiados com a associação cetamina/xilazina/midazolam e isofluorano

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    Marina Salles Munerato

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopy is not widely used as a tool to perform assisted reproduction techniques in South American cervids; thus, scarce information in literature is available regarding its effects and appropriate anesthetic protocols to perform it. This study evaluated the effect of laparoscopy on heart rate (HR, respiration rate (RR, saturation of oxyhemoglobin (SpO2 and rectal temperature (RT of six female brown brocket deer (Mazama gouazoubira anesthetized with ketamine (5mg/kg, xylazine (0.3mg/kg, midazolam (0.5mg/kg combination i.v. and isoflurane. Twelve laparoscopies were performed and each animal was used twice with a 40-day interval. After anesthetized, the animals were placed in dorsal recumbency to perform laparoscopy procedure using abdominal CO2 insufflations (14.2 ± 2.39mmHg; M ± SE. The main events of the laparoscopy procedure were divided into three periods: animal without (P1 and with abdominal insufflation (P2 and abdominal insufflation with the hips raised at 45º (P3. As a control, the animals were anesthetized again 40 days after the last laparoscopy, and were maintained in a dorsal recumbency for the same average duration of the previous anesthesia and no laparoscopy procedure was conducted. The period of anesthesia for the controls was also divided into P1, P2, and P3 considering the average duration of these periods in previous laparoscopies performed. Data were analyzed through the (ANOVA variance analysis followed by Tukey test and values at PA laparoscopia ainda é pouco utilizada como ferramenta para técnicas de reprodução assistida em cervídeos sul-americanos, não havendo informações sobre seus efeitos e protocolos anestésicos seguros para sua realização. Objetivaramse avaliar as possíveis alterações na freqüência cardíaca (FC, respiratória (FR, saturação de oxihemoglobina (SpO2 e temperatura retal (TR durante a laparoscopia para visualização dos órgãos reprodutivos de seis fêmeas de veado

  16. Evidence for the use of isoflurane as a replacement for chloral hydrate anesthesia in experimental stroke: an ethical issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maud, Pétrault; Thavarak, Ouk; Cédrick, Lachaud; Michèle, Bastide; Vincent, Bérézowski; Olivier, Pétrault; Régis, Bordet

    2014-01-01

    Since an ethical issue has been raised regarding the use of the well-known anesthetic agent chloral hydrate, owing to its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in animals, attention of neuroscientists has turned to finding out an alternative agent able to meet not only potency, safety, and analgesic efficacy, but also reduced neuroprotective effect for stroke research. The aim of this study was to compare the potential of chloral hydrate and isoflurane for both modulating the action of the experimental neuroprotectant MK801 and exerting analgesia. After middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats, no difference was observed in 24 h survival rate, success of ischemia, or infarct volume reduction between both anesthetics. However, isoflurane exerted a more pronounced analgesic effect than chloral hydrate as evidenced by formalin test 3 hours after anesthesia onset, thus encouraging the use of isoflurane in experimental stroke models.

  17. Evidence for the Use of Isoflurane as a Replacement for Chloral Hydrate Anesthesia in Experimental Stroke: An Ethical Issue

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    Pétrault Maud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since an ethical issue has been raised regarding the use of the well-known anesthetic agent chloral hydrate, owing to its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in animals, attention of neuroscientists has turned to finding out an alternative agent able to meet not only potency, safety, and analgesic efficacy, but also reduced neuroprotective effect for stroke research. The aim of this study was to compare the potential of chloral hydrate and isoflurane for both modulating the action of the experimental neuroprotectant MK801 and exerting analgesia. After middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats, no difference was observed in 24 h survival rate, success of ischemia, or infarct volume reduction between both anesthetics. However, isoflurane exerted a more pronounced analgesic effect than chloral hydrate as evidenced by formalin test 3 hours after anesthesia onset, thus encouraging the use of isoflurane in experimental stroke models.

  18. Benefits of 21% Oxygen Compared with 100% Oxygen for Delivery of Isoflurane to Mice (Mus musculus) and Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Laura A; Hampel, Joe A; Khoury, Basma M; Kang, Stacey; Machado-Aranda, David; Raghavendran, Krishnan; Nemzek, Jean A

    2017-03-01

    At research institutions, isoflurane delivered by precision vaporizer to a face mask is the standard for rodent surgery and for procedures with durations that exceed a few minutes. Pure oxygen is often used as the carrier gas for isoflurane anesthesia, despite documented complications from long-term 100% oxygen use in humans and known occupational safety risks. We therefore examined the effect of anesthetic delivery gas on physiologic variables in mice and rats. Rodents were anesthetized for 60 min with isoflurane delivered in either 21% or 100% oxygen by means of a nose cone. We noted no difference between carrier gasses in physiologic variables in mice, including body temperature, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, surgical recovery time, pH, or PaCO2. However, blood gas analysis revealed evidence of a ventilation-perfusion mismatch in the 100% oxygen group. Pressure-volume hysteresis and histomorphometric analyses confirmed the presence of increased atelectasis in mice that received 100% oxygen. Unlike mice, rats that received isoflurane in 100% oxygen had acute respiratory acidosis and elevated mean arterial pressure, but atelectasis was similar between carrier gasses. Our data suggest that both 100% and 21% oxygen are acceptable for the delivery of isoflurane to mice. However, mice anesthetized for studies focused on lung physiology or architecture would benefit from the delivery of isoflurane in 21% oxygen to reduce absorption atelectasis and the potential associated downstream inflammatory effects. For rats, delivery of isoflurane in 21% and 100% oxygen both caused perturbations in physiologic variables, and choosing a carrier gas is not straightforward.

  19. Effect of Local and General Anesthetics on Interfacial Water.

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    Nenad Kundacina

    Full Text Available Water undergoes structural change as it interfaces with hydrophilic surfaces, including the many hydrophilic surfaces within the cell. This interfacial water has become known as "Exclusion Zone (EZ water" or "fourth-phase water" [1].We tested the hypothesis that anesthetics diminish the amount of EZ water, and that this change may correlate with functional changes in anesthesia. By using the local anesthetics Lidocaine and Bupivacaine as well as a general inhalational anesthetic, Isoflurane, we tracked the EZ size as these anesthetics were introduced.All three anesthetics diminished EZ size in a concentration-dependent manner at concentrations of 0.18 mM and greater for Bupivacaine, 0.85 mM and greater for Lidocaine, and 0.2% for Isoflurane. At extremely low (micromolar concentrations, however, all three anesthetics increased EZ size.The sharp increase of EZ size associated with micromolar anesthetic concentrations follows a similar pattern to induction of general anesthesia, from the excitation stage (Stage II to the depression and overdose stages of surgical anesthesia (Stages III and IV. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that anesthetics may act on water, a fundamental organizational component common to all cells.

  20. Recovery of older patients undergoing ambulatory anaesthesia with isoflurane or sevoflurane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mahajan, V A

    2007-06-01

    Delayed recovery of cognitive function is a well-recognized phenomenon in older patients. The potential for the volatile anaesthetic used to contribute to alterations in postoperative cognitive function in older patients following minor surgical procedures has not been determined. We compared emergence from isoflurane and sevoflurane anaesthesia in older surgical patients undergoing urological procedures of short duration.

  1. Quantifying the effects of inactin vs Isoflurane anesthesia on gastrointestinal motility in rats using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging and spatio-temporal maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailiani, A C; Neuberger, T; Brasseur, J G; Banco, G; Wang, Y; Smith, N B; Webb, A G

    2014-10-01

    Anesthetics are commonly applied in animal studies of gastrointestinal (GI) function. Different anesthetics alter smooth-muscle motility in different ways. The aim of this study is to quantify and compare non-invasively with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the motility patterns of the rat gut when anesthetized with inactin vs isoflurane anesthetics in the fed state. Rats were given an oral gavage of MRI contrast agent for improved visualization of the GI tract. Two-dimensional images through the jejunum of the pre- and postanesthetized rat in the fed state were acquired every 168 ms. Image registration, segmentation, and postprocessing algorithms were applied to produce spatio-temporal maps that were used to quantify peristaltic and segmental motions in the jejunum region interspersed between periods of inactivity. There were significantly longer periods of inactivity in the rats treated with isoflurane than in those treated with inactin (179.9 ± 22.4 s vs 17.7 ± 10.3 s). The speed of propagation and wavelength of peristalsis, and the frequency and speed of pattern switching of segmental motility, were higher (p < 0.05) in rats treated with inactin. Isoflurane and inactin anesthetics produce significantly different motility behavior with the rat's GI tract in the fed state. Isoflurane anesthetic, results in a reduced frequency of occurrence of motility periods and an overall reduced level of motility in comparison with inactin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Sulfato de atropina nos parâmetros hemodinâmicos e hemogasométricos de cães anestesiados com clorpromazina, dexmedetomidina e isoflurano Hemodynamic and hemogasometric in the atropine administration in dogs anesthetized with chlorpromazine and dexmedetomidine and isoflurane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Niederauer Flôres

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Seis cães, pesando 17,9kg (±3,9, foram anestesiados em duas ocasiões, com intervalo de sete dias, obedecendo estudo cego. A indução e a manutenção anestésica foram realizadas com isoflurano em ventilação mecânica. Depois da instrumentação, a concentração final de isoflurano foi fixada em 1,3V% durante o estudo. Após período de estabilização de 30 minutos, foram mensurados os parâmetros hemodinâmicos e hemogasométricos (M-15; na seqüência, administrou-se atropina (grupo atropina ou cloreto de sódio 0,9% (grupo salina. Passados 15 minutos, os parâmetros foram avaliados novamente (M0 e aplicou-se clorpromazina e dexmedetomidina (Clor-Dex. As variáveis foram mensuradas por mais 65 minutos depois da Clor-Dex. Empregou-se ANOVA de uma via e teste Student Newman Keuls para valores entre tempos dentro de cada grupo e teste t pareado para avaliação das médias entre grupos (P£0,05. A freqüência cardíaca foi maior no grupo atropina depois da administração de Clor-Dex, e houve redução nos valores de Índice Cardíaco (IC em ambos os grupos. Embora os valores médios de IC tenham sido maiores no grupo atropina, não houve diferença significativa entre grupos administração de Clor-Dex promoveu aumento da pressão arterial em cães tratados com atropina. A pressão arterial média (PAM foi significativamente maior no grupo atropina dos 5 aos 65 minutos após administração de Clor-Dex, assim como o Índice de Resistência Periférica Total (IRPT aumentou em ambos os grupos depois da Clor-Dex.. Os parâmetros hemogasométricos não apresentaram diferenças significativas. A administração de atropina antes da clorpromazina e da dexmedetomidina resultou em aumento da pressão arterial. A bradicardia induzida pela administração da associação de fármacos foi prevenida pelo anticolinérgico, porém a redução do débito cardíaco não foi prevenida.Six dogs weighing 17.9 ±3.9 kg were anesthetized on two occasions

  3. Best anesthetics for assessing left ventricular systolic function by echocardiography in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachon, Ronald E; Scharf, Bruce A; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2015-06-15

    Our review of the literature of the major cardiovascular journals for the past three years showed that for all studies using anesthesia for mouse echocardiography, the predominant anesthetic was isoflurane, which was used in 76% of the studies. The goal of this investigation was to determine if isoflurane is indeed the best anesthetic. Accordingly, we compared isoflurane with 2,2,2-tribromoethanol (Avertin), ketamine-xylazine, and ketamine on different days in the same 14 mice, also studied in the conscious state without anesthesia. A randomized crossover study design was employed to compare the effects on left ventricular (LV) systolic function and heart rate of the four different anesthetic agents assessed by transthoracic echocardiography. As expected, each anesthetic depressed LV ejection fraction and heart rate when compared with values in conscious mice. Surprisingly, isoflurane was not the best, but actually second to last in maintaining normal LV function and heart rate. The anesthetic with the least effect on LV function and heart rate was ketamine alone at a dose of 150 mg/kg, followed by Avertin at 290 mg/kg, isoflurane at 3% induction and 1 to 2% maintenance, and lastly ketamine-xylazine at 100 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. In summary, these results indicate that ketamine alone exerts the least depressant effects on LV function and heart rate, with Avertin second, suggesting that these anesthetics should be used when it is not feasible to study the animals in the conscious state as opposed to the most commonly used anesthetic, isoflurane. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Distribution of the 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor antagonist [{sup 18}F]FPWAY in blood and brain of the rat with and without isoflurane anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokugawa, Joji; Lang, Lixin [Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Positron Emission Tomography Department, Bethesda, MD (United States); Ravasi, Laura [Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Positron Emission Tomography Department, Bethesda, MD (United States); University of Milan, Institute of Radiology Sciences, Milan (Italy); Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Schmidt, Kathleen C.; Sokoloff, Louis [National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Cerebral Metabolism, Bethesda, MD (United States); Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V. [Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bethesda, MD (United States); Eckelman, William C. [Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Positron Emission Tomography Department, Bethesda, MD (United States); Molecular Tracer LLC, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2007-02-15

    To determine whether brain and plasma equilibrium of a proposed PET tracer for 5-HT{sub 1A}, [{sup 18}F]FPWAY, can be achieved in a sufficiently short time for practical use of the brain to plasma equilibrium distribution ratio (DR) to monitor receptor availability with and without isoflurane anesthesia. Awake (n=4) and isoflurane-anesthetized (n=4) rats were administered a continuous 60 min intravenous infusion of [{sup 18}F]FPWAY with timed arterial blood sampling. Brains of the isoflurane-anesthetized rats were scanned with the ATLAS small animal PET scanner; awake rats were not. All rats were killed at 60 min and scanned postmortem for 15 min, followed by brain slicing for autoradiography. Several regions of interest (ROIs) were defined in the PET images as well as in the autoradiographic images. Regional DRs were calculated as total activity in the brain ROI divided by plasma [{sup 18}F]FPWAY activity. DRs in the anesthetized animals were constant between 30 and 60 min, indicating that near equilibrium between brain and plasma had been achieved by {proportional_to}30 min. DRs determined from postmortem PET data were higher in the isoflurane-anesthetized rats by 24% (not significant) and 33% (p=0.065) in whole brain and hippocampus, respectively. DRs determined from autoradiographic data were greater in isoflurane-anesthetized rats in medial hippocampus, lateral hippocampus, and cerebellum by 33% (p=0.054), 63% (p<0.01), and 32% (p<0.05), respectively. [{sup 18}F]FPWAY could be an appropriate ligand for monitoring changes in receptor availability in the serotonergic system using a bolus/infusion paradigm. One possible explanation for higher DRs in anesthetized rats may be a reduction in endogenous 5-HT secretion under isoflurane anesthesia. (orig.)

  5. Effects of common anesthetic agents on [(18)F]flumazenil binding to the GABAA receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palner, Mikael; Beinat, Corinne; Banister, Sam

    2016-01-01

    in preclinical imaging studies and clinical imaging studies involving patient populations that do not tolerate relatively longer scan times. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of anesthesia on the binding of [(18)F]flumazenil to GABAA receptors in mice. METHODS: Brain and whole blood...... radioactivity concentrations were measured ex vivo by scintillation counting or in vivo by PET in four groups of mice following administration of [(18)F]flumazenil: awake mice and mice anesthetized with isoflurane, dexmedetomidine, or ketamine/dexmedetomidine. Dynamic PET recordings were obtained for 60 min...... in mice anesthetized by either isoflurane or ketamine/dexmedetomidine. Static PET recordings were obtained at 25 or 55 min after [(18)F]flumazenil injection in awake or dexmedetomidine-treated mice acutely anesthetized with isoflurane. The apparent distribution volume (VT*) was calculated...

  6. Blood profiles in unanesthetized and anesthetized guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wendy R; Johnston, Matthew S; Higgins, Sarah; Izzo, Angelo A; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-01-01

    The guinea pig is a common animal model that is used in biomedical research to study a variety of systems, including hormonal and immunological responses, pulmonary physiology, corticosteroid response and others. However, because guinea pigs are evolutionarily a prey species, they do not readily show behavioral signs of disease, which can make it difficult to detect illness in a laboratory setting. Minimally invasive blood tests, such as complete blood counts and plasma biochemistry assays, are useful in both human and veterinary medicine as an initial diagnostic technique to rule in or rule out systemic illness. In guinea pigs, phlebotomy for such tests often requires that the animals be anesthetized first. The authors evaluated hematological and plasma biochemical effects of two anesthetic agents that are commonly used with guinea pigs in a research setting: isoflurane and a combination of ketamine and xylazine. Hematological and plasma biochemical parameters were significantly different when guinea pigs were under either anesthetic, compared to when they were unanesthetized. Plasma proteins, liver enzymes, white blood cells and red blood cells appeared to be significantly altered by both anesthetics, and hematological and plasma biochemical differences were greater when guinea pigs were anesthetized with the combination of ketamine and xylazine than when they were anesthetized with isoflurane. Overall these results indicate that both anesthetics can significantly influence hematological and plasma biochemical parameters in guinea pigs.

  7. Isoflurane abolishes spontaneous firing of serotonin neurons and masks their pH/CO2 chemosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceman, Kimberly E.; Johansen, Sara L.; Wu, Yuanming; Harris, Michael B.; Richerson, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurons from the mouse and rat rostral medulla are stimulated by increased CO2 when studied in culture or brain slices. However, the response of 5-HT neurons has been variable when animals are exposed to hypercapnia in vivo. Here we examined whether halogenated inhalational anesthetics, which activate TWIK-related acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels, could mask an effect of CO2 on 5-HT neurons. During in vivo plethysmography in mice, isoflurane (1%) markedly reduced the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) by 78–96% depending upon mouse strain and ambient temperature. In a perfused rat brain stem preparation, isoflurane (1%) reduced or silenced spontaneous firing of medullary 5-HT neurons in situ and abolished their responses to elevated perfusate Pco2. In dissociated cell cultures, isoflurane (1%) hyperpolarized 5-HT neurons by 6.52 ± 3.94 mV and inhibited spontaneous firing. A subsequent decrease in pH from 7.4 to 7.2 depolarized neurons by 4.07 ± 2.10 mV, but that was insufficient to reach threshold for firing. Depolarizing current restored baseline firing and the firing frequency response to acidosis, indicating that isoflurane did not block the underlying mechanisms mediating chemosensitivity. These results demonstrate that isoflurane masks 5-HT neuron chemosensitivity in vitro and in situ and markedly decreases the HCVR in vivo. The use of this class of anesthetic has a particularly potent inhibitory effect on chemosensitivity of 5-HT neurons. PMID:25695656

  8. Xenon and isoflurane reduce left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehl, Anna B; Funcke, Sandra; Becker, Michael M; Goetzenich, Andreas; Bleilevens, Christian; Rossaint, Rolf; Steendijk, Paul; Hein, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Xenon and isoflurane are known to have cardioprotective properties. We tested the hypothesis that these anesthetics positively influence myocardial remodeling 28 days after experimental perioperative myocardial infarction and compared their effects. A total of 60 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 60 min of coronary artery occlusion and 120 min of reperfusion. Prior to ischemia, the animals were randomized for the different narcotic regimes (0.6 vol% isoflurane, 70 vol% xenon, or intraperitoneal injection of s-ketamine). Acute injury was quantified by echocardiography and troponin I. After 4 weeks, left ventricular function was assessed by conductance catheter to quantify hemodynamic compromise. Cardiac remodeling was characterized by quantification of dilatation, hypertrophy, fibrosis, capillary density, apoptosis, and expression of fetal genes (α/β myosin heavy chains, α-skeletal actin, periostin, and sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase). Whereas xenon and isoflurane impeded the acute effects of ischemia-reperfusion on hemodynamics and myocardial injury at a comparable level, differences were found after 4 weeks. Xenon in contrast to isoflurane or ketamine anesthetized animals demonstrated a lower remodeling index (0.7 ± 0.1 vs. 0.9 ± 0.3 and 1.0 ± 0.3g/ml), better ejection fraction (62 ± 9 vs. 49 ± 7 and 35 ± 6%), and reduced expression of β-myosin heavy chain and periostin. The effects on hypertrophy, fibrosis, capillary density, and apoptosis were comparable. Compared to isoflurane and s-ketamine, xenon limited progressive adverse cardiac remodeling and contractile dysfunction 28 days after perioperative myocardial infarction.

  9. Activity-dependent depression of neuronal sodium channels by the general anaesthetic isoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtell, K; Gingrich, K J; Ouyang, W; Herold, K F; Hemmings, H C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms by which volatile anaesthetics such as isoflurane alter neuronal function are poorly understood, in particular their presynaptic mechanisms. Presynaptic voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) have been implicated as a target for anaesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release. We hypothesize that state-dependent interactions of isoflurane with Na(v) lead to increased inhibition of Na(+) current (I(Na)) during periods of high-frequency neuronal activity. The electrophysiological effects of isoflurane, at concentrations equivalent to those used clinically, were measured on recombinant brain-type Na(v)1.2 expressed in ND7/23 neuroblastoma cells and on endogenous Na(v) in isolated rat neurohypophysial nerve terminals. Rate constants determined from experiments on the recombinant channel were used in a simple model of Na(v) gating. At resting membrane potentials, isoflurane depressed peak I(Na) and shifted steady-state inactivation in a hyperpolarizing direction. After membrane depolarization, isoflurane accelerated entry (τ(control)=0.36 [0.03] ms compared with τ(isoflurane)=0.33 [0.05] ms, P1.9] ms, P<0.005) from apparent fast inactivation, resulting in enhanced depression of I(Na), during high-frequency stimulation of both recombinant and endogenous nerve terminal Na(v). A simple model of Na(v) gating involving stabilisation of fast inactivation, accounts for this novel form of activity-dependent block. Isoflurane stabilises the fast-inactivated state of neuronal Na(v) leading to greater depression of I(Na) during high-frequency stimulation, consistent with enhanced inhibition of fast firing neurones. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. [New anesthetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F

    2000-01-01

    Since the introduction of cocaine local analgesia in 1886, and the subsequent development of procaine (1904) and other closely related ester-type compounds, dentistry has prided itself on being as close to 'painless' as possible. In the late 1940s the newest group of the local anesthetic compounds, the amides, was introduced. The initial amide local analgesic, lignocaine (Xylocaine), revolutionised pain control in dentistry worldwide. In succeeding years other amide-type local anesthetics, mepivacaine, prilocaine, bupivacaine and etidocaine, were introduced. They gave the dental practitioner a local anesthetic armamentarium which provided pulpal analgesia for periods of from 20 minutes (mepivacaine) to as long as three hours (bupivacaine and etidocaine with adrenaline). In addition these popular drugs proved to be more rapid-acting than the older ester-type drug and, at least from the perspective of allergenicity, more safe. In 1976, in Germany, the newest amide local analgesic, carticaine HCl was introduced into dentistry. Articaine (the generic name was changed) possesses properties similar to lignocaine but has additional properties which made the drug quite attractive to the general dental practitioner. In 1986 articaine was introduced in North America (Canada) where it has become the most used local anesthetic, supplanting lignocaine. Articaine has been approved for use in the United Kingdom. In this introductory discussion we review the development of articaine and discuss its place in the dental local analgesic armamentarium.

  11. Propofol Compared to Isoflurane Inhibits Mitochondrial Metabolism in Immature Swine Cerebral Cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Atkinson, D. B.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-08

    Anesthetics used in infants and children are implicated in development of neurocognitive disorders. Although propofol induces neuroapoptosis in developing brain, the underlying mechanisms require elucidation and may have an energetic basis. We studied substrate utilization in an immature swine model anesthetized with either propofol or isoflurane for 4 hours. Piglets were infused with 13-Carbon labeled glucose and leucine in the common carotid artery in order to assess citric acid cycle (CAC) metabolism in the parietal cortex. The anesthetics produced similar systemic hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen saturation by near-infrared-spectroscopy. Compared to isoflurane, propofol depleted ATP and glycogen stores. Propofol also decreased pools of the CAC intermediates, citrate and α-ketoglutarate, while markedly increasing succinate along with decreasing mitochondrial complex II activity. Propofol also inhibited acetyl-CoA entry into the CAC through pyruvate dehydrogenase, while promoting glycolytic flux with marked accumulation of lactate. Although oxygen supply appeared similar between the anesthetic groups, propofol yielded a metabolic phenotype which resembled a hypoxic state. Propofol impairs substrate flux through the CAC in the immature cerebral cortex. These impairments occurred without systemic metabolic perturbations which typically accompany propofol infusion syndrome. These metabolic abnormalities may play a role in neurotoxity observed with propofol in the vulnerable immature brain.

  12. Influence of isoflurane exposure in pregnant rats on the learning and memory of offsprings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Dong, Yunxia; Zhao, Guangyi; Wang, Yuan; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhao, Ping

    2018-01-11

    About 2% of pregnant women receive non-obstetric surgery under general anesthesia each year. During pregnancy, general anesthetics may affect brain development of the fetus. This study aimed to investigate safe dosage range of isoflurane. Forty-eight SpragueDawley (SD) pregnant rats were randomly divided into 3 groups and inhaled 1.3% isoflurane (the Iso1 group), 2.0% isoflurane (the Iso2 group) and 50% O2 alone (the control group) for 3 h, respectively. Their offsprings were subjected to Morris water maze at day 28 and day 90 after birth to evaluate learning and memory. The expression of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated cAMP-response element binding protein (p-CREB) was detected in the hippocampus dentate gyrus. Less offsprings of Iso2 group were able to cross the platform than that of the control group (P learning and memory of the offspring; exposure to isoflurane at 2.0% causes damage to spatial memory associated with inhibition of CREB phosphorylation in the granular cell layer of hippocampus dentate gyrus.

  13. Minimum Alveolar Concentration and Cardiopulmonary Effects of Isoflurane in Ring-tailed Lemurs (Lemur catta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Balko, Julie A; Williams, Cathy V

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and cardiopulmonary effects of isoflurane in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). The MAC of isoflurane was determined by using a tail-clamp stimulus in adult ring-tailed lemurs (6 male, 4 female). Once MAC was determined, another group of 10 adult ring-tailed lemurs (5 male, 5 female) were anesthetized and instrumented similarly as the previous group and maintained at 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 times MAC for 15 min each with no external stimulation. Five lemurs were exposed to increasing concentrations (that is, 0.5 times MAC increasing to 2 times MAC), and the other 5 animals were exposed to decreasing concentrations. MAC of isoflurane for ringtailed lemurs was 1.9%. The animals became hypotensive, but no significant differences were found in heart rate or systolic, mean, and diastolic blood pressures at the different multiples of MAC examined. At 1 MAC, all lemurs developed a moderate respiratory acidosis, which became more severe at 2 MAC. Given these findings, isoflurane at 0.5 to 2 times MAC in ringtailed lemurs does not result in predictable depression of blood pressure, but hypoventilation occurs at 1 MAC or greater.

  14. Physiologic effects of three different protocols of isoflurane anesthesia in captive brown brocket deer (Mazama gouazoubira).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munerato, Marina Salles; Duarte, José Maurício Barbanti; Pereira, Gener Tadeu; Marques, José Antônio

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluates the cardiorespiratory and physiologic effects of three different protocols of chemical restraint using isoflurane in captive brown brocket deer (Mazama gouazoubira). Six adult deer, two males and four females, aged 3-6 yr old and weighing 16.3 +/- 1.5 kg (mean +/- SD), were used. The deer were physically restrained and anesthetized using one of three protocols: protocol 1 (P1), anesthesia was induced directly with isoflurane using a facemask and maintained for 1 hr with isoflurane delivered by endotracheal tube; protocol 2 (P2), oral premedication with midazolam was followed 1 hr later by induction and maintenance of anesthesia with isoflurane, as in P1; and protocol 3 (P3), intravenous anesthesia using a combination of ketamine, xylazine, and atropine was followed by isoflurane anesthesia, as in P1. Cardiorespiratory variables were recorded during physical restraint (TO); 5 min after intubation (T5); and every 10 min during anesthesia (T15-T55). Venous and arterial blood gas analysis was conducted at TO (venous blood only), T15, T35, and T55. Data were analyzed by the appropriate statistical tests. P values < 0.05 were considered significant. Under P1, three deer regurgitated during induction and one of them died because of aspiration pneumonia. The end-tidal isoflurane concentration differed significantly between P1, P2, and P3 (2.6 +/- 0.2, 2.3 +/- 0.5, and 0.9 +/- 0.3%, respectively). Hypotension was observed during anesthesia (T15-T55). Respiratory acidosis occurred at all times and protocols, and pH was significantly lower in P1 compared to P2 and P3. Metabolic acidosis was also observed following physical restraint (T0-T35) in all protocols. The use of isoflurane via facemask for anesthesia induction is not a safe method in deer that are not premedicated. Isoflurane used alone or in combination with midazolam and ketamine-xylazine-atropine combination causes hypotension and dose-dependent respiratory acidosis.

  15. Washout times of desflurane, sevoflurane and isoflurane from the GE Healthcare Aisys® and Avance®, Carestation®, and Aestiva® anesthesia system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae W; Wingate, Jamie R; Fernandez, Allison M; Whitaker, Emmett; Tham, Robert Q

    2013-12-01

    Malignant hyperthermia susceptible patients may experience a fatal reaction to volatile anesthetic gases. This study sought to determine the washout characteristics of desflurane, sevoflurane, and isoflurane from the Aisys® , Avance® , and Aestiva® anesthesia machines. (GE Healthcare, Madison, WI, USA). All machines were inspected by a GE Healthcare engineer prior to testing. The machines were primed with desflurane 7 vol%, sevoflurane 2.5 vol%, and isoflurane 1.2 vol% on three separate occasions for 2 h each with each gas. The Aisys® and Avance® were tested with and without an Advanced Breathing System (ABS™ , GE Healthcare, Madison, WI, USA). The Aestiva® was tested without modification to its breathing system. Additionally, the Aisys was evaluated with desflurane 1.2 vol% and the Avance with a preflushed fresh gas line was tested with an autoclaved ABS. After priming, disposable components of the patient breathing system were replaced. The fresh gas flow was increased to 15 lpm. Gas measurements were recorded until the concentration was 4 parts per million (p.p.m). The fastest median washout time was achieved by the Avance in 3 min or less without an ABS or with an autoclaved ABS. The longest median time was 35 min for the Aestiva® . Clearance of desflurane was the most time consuming for all machines. This study demonstrates that saturated vapor pressure and priming concentration exert a greater effect on washout times than gas solubility. The Aisys utilizes an electronic vaporizer system that may expose the breathing system to retained saturated vapor. The breathing systems for all machines may hinder washout of gases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane anesthesia on arteriovenous shunt flow in the lower limb of diabetic patients without autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoro, Takaaki; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Koji; Hironaka, Yasuo; Kakutani, Tetsuya; Hatano, Yoshio

    2007-07-01

    Failure of sympathetic nerve control caused by diabetic neuropathy results in vasodilation of arteriovenous shunts. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the function of arteriovenous anastomoses was disordered in mild diabetic patients without apparent neuropathy, and that volatile anesthetics opened arteriovenous shunts more greatly in nondiabetic patients than diabetic patients. Autonomic system function was assessed by cardiovascular reflex tests. Arterial-venous oxygen content difference (A-VDeltaO2) and partial oxygen pressure index (Pvo2/Pao2, the ratio of oxygen tension in femoral vein blood to that in femoral artery blood) were measured before and during isoflurane or sevoflurane anesthesia in 16 diabetic and 22 nondiabetic patients. Skin temperatures of the foot and leg were measured in 14 diabetic and 15 nondiabetic patients using thermography before and during anesthesia. Pvo2/Pao2 before anesthesia was significantly higher in diabetic patients. In nondiabetics, venous oxygen content significantly increased and A-VDeltaO2 markedly decreased during anesthesia, but these parameters were unchanged in diabetics. Foot temperatures were higher in diabetics before anesthesia, and increased gradually and significantly in both groups during anesthesia, but with a greater increase in nondiabetic patients. Induction of anesthesia caused a larger decrease in leg temperature in diabetics than in nondiabetics. Diabetic patients have a higher Pvo2/Pao2 and a small core-to-peripheral temperature gradient before anesthesia, suggesting latent dysfunction of the autonomic nerve system, even in the absence of autonomic neuropathy. Volatile anesthesia opens the arteriovenous shunt in nondiabetics to a greater extent than in diabetic patients.

  17. Propofol Shares the Binding Site with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane on Leukocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Koichi; Bu, Weiming; Xi, Jin; Shimaoka, Motomu; Eckenhoff, Roderic

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that propofol interacted with the leukocyte adhesion molecule leukocyte function–associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and inhibited the production of interleukin-2 via LFA-1 in a dependent manner. However, the binding site(s) of propofol on LFA-1 remains unknown. Methods First, the inhibition of LFA-1's ligand binding by propofol was confirmed in an ELISA-type assay. The binding site of propofol on LFA-1 was probed with a photolabeling experiment using a photoactivatable propofol analog called azi-propofol-m. The adducted residues of LFA-1 by this compound were determined using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. In addition, the binding of propofol to the ligand-binding domain of LFA-1 was examined using 1-aminoanthracene (1-AMA) displacement assay. Furthermore, the binding site(s) of 1-AMA and propofol on LFA-1 was studied using the docking program GLIDE. Results We demonstrated that propofol impaired the binding of LFA-1 to its ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1. The photolabeling experiment demonstrated that the adducted residues were localized in the allosteric cavity of the ligand-binding domain of LFA-1 called “lovastatin site. ” The shift of fluorescence spectra was observed when 1-AMA was coincubated with the low-affinity conformer of LFA-1 ligand-binding domain (wild-type [WT] αL I domain), not with the high-affinity conformer, suggesting that 1-AMA bound only to WT αL I domain. In the 1-AMA displacement assay, propofol decreased 1-AMA fluorescence signal (at 520 nm), suggesting that propofol competed with 1-AMA and bound to the WT αL I domain. The docking simulation demonstrated that both 1-AMA and propofol bound to the lovastatin site, which agreed with the photolabeling experiment. Conclusions We demonstrated that propofol bound to the lovastatin site in LFA-1. Previously we showed that the volatile anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane bound to this site. Taken together, the lovastatin site is an

  18. [Comparison of waste anesthetic gases in operating rooms with or without an scavenging system in a Brazilian University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Leandro Gobbo; Braz, José Reinaldo Cerqueira; Cavalcante, Guilherme Aparecido Silva; Souza, Kátina Meneghetti; Lucio, Lorena Mendes de Carvalho; Braz, Mariana Gobbo

    Occupational exposure to waste anesthetic gases in operating room (OR) without active scavenging system has been associated with adverse health effects. Thus, this study aimed to compare the trace concentrations of the inhaled anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane in OR with and without central scavenging system. Waste concentrations of isoflurane and sevoflurane were measured by infrared analyzer at different locations (near the respiratory area of the assistant nurse and anesthesiologist and near the anesthesia station) and at two times (30 and 120minutes after the start of surgery) in both OR types. All isoflurane and sevoflurane concentrations in unscavenged OR were higher than the US recommended limit (2 parts per million), regardless of the location and time evaluated. In scavenged OR, the average concentrations of isoflurane were within the limit of exposure, except for the measurements near the anesthesia station, regardless of the measurement times. For sevoflurane, concentrations exceeded the limit value at all measurement locations and at both times. The exposure to both anesthetics exceeded the international limit in unscavenged OR. In scavenged OR, the concentrations of sevoflurane, and to a lesser extent those of isoflurane, exceeded the recommended limit value. Thus, the OR scavenging system analyzed in the present study decreased the anesthetic concentrations, although not to the internationally recommended values. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. [The effect of anesthetic concentration on burst-suppression of the EEG in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Jia, Xiaofeng; Ding, Haiyan

    2012-04-01

    The term "burst-suppression" is used to describe the electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern characterized by theta or delta waves, at times intermixed with faster waves, and intervening periods of relative quiescence. Burst-suppression pattern can reflect the seriously suppressed brain activity under deep anesthesia. To investigate the relationship between burst-suppression features and anesthetic concentration, we adopted four straightforward indexes, i. e., burst-suppression ratio (BSR), burst frequency, burst amplitude and suppression amplitude, and used them to analyze the EEG recordings in ten isoflurane-anesthetized rats. It was found that all the four burst-suppression indexes changed along with anesthetic concentration, that BSR and burst amplitude increased with higher concentration of isoflurane while burst frequency and suppression amplitude decreased, and that BSR was the most sensitive and consistent measurement to indicate isoflurane concentration so it constituted a valuable tool for timely evaluation of burst-suppression feature under deep anesthesia. The result also showed that the composition of carrier gas (i. e. pure oxygen vs. mixed oxygen) did not influence the effect of anesthesia significantly; and the four indexes of burst-suppression features could keep relatively stable within 60 min under the isoflurane concentration of 2%. The present study provides quantitative information of burst-suppression features under different anesthetic depth and may help to develop a clinically satisfied system that could quantify the characteristics of EEG and rigorously evaluate the cerebral state of patients.

  20. A comparison of the immunological effects of propofol and isoflurane for maintenance of anesthesia in healthy dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Tomihari, Mizuki; NISHIHARA, Akira; Shimada, Terumasa; YANAGAWA, Masashi; Miyoshi, Masafumi; MIYAHARA, Kazurou; Oishi, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Most anesthetics have an immuno-suppressive effect on cellular and neurohumoral immunity, and research shows that total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol has a greater immuno-protective effect than inhalational anesthesia in human medicine. However, in veterinary clinics, these effects remain ambiguous. To clarify the details, we focused on propofol and isoflurane, investigating clinical blood hematology and immunological profiles drawn from healthy dogs under and after two anesthes...

  1. [Awakening from anesthesia and recovery of cognitive function after desflurane or isoflurane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscar, M; Allhoff, T; Ott, E; Conzen, P; Peter, K

    1996-02-01

    Desflurane is a new volatile anaesthetic with an extremely low blood/gas partition coefficient of 0.42. This should provide a rapid recovery from anaesthesia. We studied 100 adult patients, ASA class I or II, undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery randomly assigned to anaesthesia with desflurane (n = 50) or isoflurane (n = 50) supplemented by nitrous oxide in oxygen. Clorazepat was given for premedication, fentanyl and thiopental for induction of anaesthesia, followed by maintenance with desflurane or isoflurane as clinically appropriate. Emergence from anaesthesia was measured as well as return of cognitive functions (extended Aldrete score, digit symbol substitution test, and visual analogue scales [VAS]). While the demographic characteristics and administrated doses of fentanyl and thiopental were comparable, the recovery profiles in both groups were different. After discontinuation of the volatile anaesthetics, times to extubation and ability to follow simple commands were significantly shorter after desflurane than after isoflurane. Extended Aldrete scores, estimation of the patients' physical condition, results of the digit symbol substitution test, measuring cognitive functions, and rates of drowsiness and weakness on VAS showed better recovery with less impairment of cognitive function in the desflurane group than in isoflurane patients even 120 min after anaesthesia. VAS pain scores and doses of analgesic drugs given within the first 2 postoperative hours, however, showed no significant differences. Desflurane patients were also judged fit for discharge from the recovery room significantly faster. Our results demonstrate that desflurane anaesthesia, even when supplemented by premedication, intraoperative opioids, and nitrous oxide may offer clinical advantages over isoflurane as far as the post-anaesthetic recovery profile is concerned.

  2. Quantifying the interaction of rocuronium (Org 9426) with etomidate, fentanyl, midazolam, propofol, thiopental, and isoflurane using closed-loop feedback control of rocuronium infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkkola, K T; Tammisto, T

    1994-04-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the interactions of rocuronium with etomidate, fentanyl, midazolam, propofol, thiopental, and isoflurane using closed-loop feedback control of infusion of rocuronium. Sixty patients were randomly assigned to one of six sequences where anesthesia was maintained with etomidate, fentanyl, midazolam, propofol, or thiopental and nitrous oxide, or with isoflurane and nitrous oxide. The possible interaction of rocuronium with the anesthetics was quantified by determining the asymptotic steady-state rate of infusion (Iss) of rocuronium necessary to produce a constant 90% neuromuscular block. This was accomplished by applying nonlinear curve fitting to data on the cumulative dose requirement during the initial 90-min period after bolus administration of rocuronium. Patient characteristics and controller performance, i.e., the ability of the controller to maintain the neuromuscular block constant at the set-point, did not differ significantly between the groups. Iss values calculated per lean body mass were 0.64 +/- 0.22, 0.60 +/- 0.15, 0.61 +/- 0.21, 0.67 +/- 0.31, 0.63 +/- 0.15, and 0.39 +/- 0.17 mg.kg-1.h-1 in the etomidate, fentanyl, midazolam, propofol, thiopental, and isoflurane groups, respectively. The isoflurane group had a lower steady-state rate of infusion of rocuronium than the other five groups (P < 0.05). Compared to intravenous anesthetics, etomidate, fentanyl, midazolam, propofol, or thiopental, isoflurane reduced the infusion requirement of rocuronium by 35%-40%.

  3. Effects of Moderate Hyperventilation on Jugular Bulb Gases under Propofol or Isoflurane Anesthesia during Supratentorial Craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lan; Li, Shu-Qin; Ji, Nan; Luo, Fang

    2015-05-20

    The optimal ventilated status under total intravenous or inhalation anesthesia in neurosurgical patients with a supratentorial tumor has not been ascertained. The purpose of this study was to intraoperatively compare the effects of moderate hyperventilation on the jugular bulb oxygen saturation (SjO 2 ), cerebral oxygen extraction ratio (O 2 ER), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) in patients with a supratentorial tumor under different anesthetic regimens. Twenty adult patients suffered from supratentorial tumors were randomly assigned to receive a propofol infusion followed by isoflurane anesthesia after a 30-min stabilization period or isoflurane followed by propofol. The patients were randomized to one of the following two treatment sequences: hyperventilation followed by normoventilation or normoventilation followed by hyperventilation during isoflurane or propofol anesthesia, respectively. The ventilation and end-tidal CO 2 tension were maintained at a constant level for 20 min. Radial arterial and jugular bulb catheters were inserted for the blood gas sampling. At the end of each study period, we measured the change in the arterial and jugular bulb blood gases. The mean value of the jugular bulb oxygen saturation (SjO 2 ) significantly decreased, and the oxygen extraction ratio (O 2 ER) significantly increased under isoflurane or propofol anesthesia during hyperventilation compared with those during normoventilation (SjO 2 : t = -2.728, P = 0.011 or t = -3.504, P = 0.001; O 2 ER: t = 2.484, P = 0.020 or t = 2.892, P = 0.009). The SjO 2 significantly decreased, and the O 2 ER significantly increased under propofol anesthesia compared with those values under isoflurane anesthesia during moderate hyperventilation (SjO 2 : t = -2.769, P = 0.012; O 2 ER: t = 2.719, P = 0.013). In the study, no significant changes in the SjO 2 and the O 2 ER were observed under propofol compared with those values under isoflurane during normoventilation. Our

  4. Effects of Moderate Hyperventilation on Jugular Bulb Gases under Propofol or Isoflurane Anesthesia during Supratentorial Craniotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Meng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The optimal ventilated status under total intravenous or inhalation anesthesia in neurosurgical patients with a supratentorial tumor has not been ascertained. The purpose of this study was to intraoperatively compare the effects of moderate hyperventilation on the jugular bulb oxygen saturation (SjO 2 , cerebral oxygen extraction ratio (O 2 ER, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, and heart rate (HR in patients with a supratentorial tumor under different anesthetic regimens. Methods: Twenty adult patients suffered from supratentorial tumors were randomly assigned to receive a propofol infusion followed by isoflurane anesthesia after a 30-min stabilization period or isoflurane followed by propofol. The patients were randomized to one of the following two treatment sequences: hyperventilation followed by normoventilation or normoventilation followed by hyperventilation during isoflurane or propofol anesthesia, respectively. The ventilation and end-tidal CO 2 tension were maintained at a constant level for 20 min. Radial arterial and jugular bulb catheters were inserted for the blood gas sampling. At the end of each study period, we measured the change in the arterial and jugular bulb blood gases. Results: The mean value of the jugular bulb oxygen saturation (SjO 2 significantly decreased, and the oxygen extraction ratio (O 2 ER significantly increased under isoflurane or propofol anesthesia during hyperventilation compared with those during normoventilation (SjO 2 : t = -2.728, P = 0.011 or t = -3.504, P = 0.001; O 2 ER: t = 2.484, P = 0.020 or t = 2.892, P = 0.009. The SjO 2 significantly decreased, and the O 2 ER significantly increased under propofol anesthesia compared with those values under isoflurane anesthesia during moderate hyperventilation (SjO 2 : t = -2.769, P = 0.012; O 2 ER: t = 2.719, P = 0.013. In the study, no significant changes in the SjO 2 and the O 2 ER were observed under propofol compared with those values under

  5. Isoflurane anesthesia of wild-caught goliath birdeater spiders (Theraphosa blondi) and Chilean rose spiders (Grammostola rosea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Trevor T; Mitchell, Mark A; Guichard, Clare M; Singh, Rimme S

    2009-06-01

    Anesthesia is used in theraphosid spiders to facilitate medical procedures (e.g., physical examination, sample collection, surgery); however, most information on this subject is anecdotal. This study was conducted to systematically determine the anesthetic parameters of wild-caught, subadult goliath birdeater spiders (Theraphosa blondi) (n = 11) and Chilean rose spiders (Grammostola rosea) (n = 12). Each spider was placed in a 3-L gas anesthetic chamber and subjected to an induction of 5% isoflurane at a rate of 1 L/min oxygen. Anesthetic depth was monitored by evaluating the righting reflex every 5 min. Animals were recovered in 100% oxygen. Induction, recovery, and overall anesthetic times were determined. After an 8-wk washout period, the procedure was repeated. For both species, median induction time was 10 min. Median recovery time was 30 min for T. blondi and 12.5 min for G. rosea.

  6. The effect of the anaesthetic agent isoflurane on the rate of neutrophil apoptosis in vitro.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tyther, R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Volatile anaesthetic agents influence neutrophil function, and potentially, the inflammatory response to surgery. AIM: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of isoflurane (1-4%) on human polymorphonuclear neutrophil apoptosis in vitro. METHODS: Venous blood from 12 healthy volunteers was exposed to 0, 1, and 4% isoflurane delivered via a 14G Wallace flexihub internal jugular cannula, at a fresh gas flow of 0.51\\/min for 5 minutes. Isolated neutrophils were assessed for apoptosis at 1, 12, and 24 hours in culture using dual staining with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide (Annexin-V FITC assay). Data were analysed using paired, one-tailed Student\\'s t-tests. p<0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: At 1 hour apoptosis was inhibited in the 1% (5.1 [6.8]%; p=0.017) and 4% (4.8 [4.5]%; p=0.008) isoflurane groups compared to control (11.3 [6.9]%). At 12 and 24 hours, a dose-dependent inhibition of apoptosis was demonstrated, i.e. 4% > 1% > 0%. CONCLUSION: Human neutrophil apoptosis is inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro by isoflurane in clinical concentrations.

  7. Early postnatal exposure to isoflurane causes cognitive deficits and disrupts development of newborn hippocampal neurons via activation of the mTOR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunchai; Jiang, Danye; Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Lim, Sanghee; Kwak, Minhye; Gray, Christy D; Xu, Michael; Choi, Jun H; Junn, Sue; Kim, Jieun; Xu, Jing; Schaefer, Michele; Johns, Roger A; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-Li; Mintz, C David

    2017-07-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that early postnatal exposure to anesthetics can lead to lasting deficits in learning and other cognitive processes. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon has not been clarified and there is no treatment currently available. Recent evidence suggests that anesthetics might cause persistent deficits in cognitive function by disrupting key events in brain development. The hippocampus, a brain region that is critical for learning and memory, contains a large number of neurons that develop in the early postnatal period, which are thus vulnerable to perturbation by anesthetic exposure. Using an in vivo mouse model we demonstrate abnormal development of dendrite arbors and dendritic spines in newly generated dentate gyrus granule cell neurons of the hippocampus after a clinically relevant isoflurane anesthesia exposure conducted at an early postnatal age. Furthermore, we find that isoflurane causes a sustained increase in activity in the mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway, and that inhibition of this pathway with rapamycin not only reverses the observed changes in neuronal development, but also substantially improves performance on behavioral tasks of spatial learning and memory that are impaired by isoflurane exposure. We conclude that isoflurane disrupts the development of hippocampal neurons generated in the early postnatal period by activating a well-defined neurodevelopmental disease pathway and that this phenotype can be reversed by pharmacologic inhibition.

  8. The neurochemical profile of the hippocampus in isoflurane-treated and unanesthetized rat pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menshanov Petr N.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In vivo study of cerebral metabolism in neonatal animals by high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS is an important tool for deciphering the developmental origins of adult diseases. Up to date, all in vivo spectrum acquisition procedures have been performed in neonatal rodents under anesthesia. However, it is still unknown if the inhaled anesthetic isoflurane, which is commonly used in magnetic resonance imaging studies, could affect metabolite levels in the brain of neonatal rats. Moreover, the unanesthetized MRS preparation that uses neonatal rodent pups is still lacking.

  9. Sister chromatid exchanges induced by inhaled anesthetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White,A.E.; Takehisa, S.; Eger II, E.I.; Wolff, S.; Stevens, W.C.

    1970-05-01

    There is sufficient evidence that anesthetics may cause cancer to justify a test of their carcinogenic potential. Baden et al., using the Ames test, a rapid and inexpensive genetic indicator of carcinogenicity, have shown that among currently used anesthetics fluorxene alone caused bacterial mutations. The authors used the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) technique, another rapid assay of mutagenic-carcinogenic potential. The frequency of sister chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster ovary cells increases when the cell cultures are exposed to mutagen-carcinogens, particulary in the presence of a metabolic activating system. With this test system a one-hour exposure to 1 MAC nitrous oxide, diethyl ether, trichloroethylene, halothane, enflurane, isoflurane, methoxyflurane, or chloroform did not increase SCE values. Divinyl ether, fluroxene and ethyl vinyl ether increased SCE values in the same circumstances. Results of this study of mammalian cells suggest that no currently used anesthetic is a mutagen-carcinogen. The results also suggest that anesthetics containing a vinyl moiety may be mutagen-carcinogens.

  10. Effect of propofol, sevoflurane, and isoflurane on postoperative cognitive dysfunction following laparoscopic cholecystectomy in elderly patients: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ying-Jie; Wu, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2017-05-01

    To compare the incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in elderly surgical patients (>60years) receiving different anesthetics (propofol, sevoflurane, or isoflurane) and to identify potential biomarkers of POCD in this patient population. Prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. University-affiliated teaching hospital. One hundred and fifty elderly patients scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Elderly patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly assigned to receive propofol, sevoflurane, or isoflurane anesthesia. Cognitive function was assessed using neuropsychological tests at baseline (1day before surgery [D0]), and on postoperative day 1 (D1) and day 3 (D3). Plasma S-100β and Aβ1-40 protein, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations were assessed before induction of anesthesia (T0), after extubation (T1), and 1h (T2) and 24h (T3) postoperatively. The incidence of POCD was significantly lower in the propofol group compared to the isoflurane group and the sevoflurane group at D1 and D3 (propofol vs. isoflurane: D1 and D3, Ppropofol vs. sevoflurane: D1, P=0.012; D3, P=0.013). The incidence of POCD was significantly lower in the sevoflurane group compared to the isoflurane group at D1 (P=0.041), but not at D3. Postoperatively, plasma S-100β and Aβ1-40 protein, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α concentrations were significantly decreased in the propofol group compared to the isoflurane group. Propofol anesthesia may be an option for elderly surgical patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Carbon monoxide production from five volatile anesthetics in dry sodalime in a patient model: halothane and sevoflurane do produce carbon monoxide; temperature is a poor predictor of carbon monoxide production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, Christiaan; Perez, Roberto S. G. M.; de Lange, Jaap J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Desflurane and enflurane have been reported to produce substantial amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) in desiccated sodalime. Isoflurane is said to produce less CO and sevoflurane and halothane should produce no CO at all.The purpose of this study is to measure the maximum amounts of CO

  12. Isoflurane Exposure Rescues Short-term Learning and Memory in Sleep-Disturbed Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zena Chatila

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is known to play an important role in cognition, learning and memory. As Drosophila melanogaster have stable circadian rhythms and behavioral states similar to those of human sleep, they have been a useful model to investigate the effects of sleep on learning and memory. General anesthesia has been shown to cause cognitive impairments in humans. However, anesthesia also induces a behavioral state similar to sleep and may activate sleep pathways. This study examined learning and memory after an acute exposure of isoflurane in a Drosophila mutant model of restless leg syndrome. There were two possible outcomes: isoflurane (an anesthetic could have impaired cognitive functioning or enhanced learning and memory by activating sleep pathways. Given the acute cognitive impairments often observed postoperatively, we believed the former outcome to be the most likely. Flies with fragmented sleep had impaired performance on an aversive phototaxic suppression learning and memory task compared to wildtype flies. This deficit was rescued with isoflurane exposure, as no differences in learning were observed between mutant and wildtype flies treated with anesthesia. This result suggests that anesthesia exposure can ameliorate impaired learning and memory due to sleep fragmentation. Further investigations are required to determine the type of memory impacted by anesthesia and the mechanisms by which anesthesia induces this effect.

  13. Differential modulation of thalamo-parietal interactions by varying depths of isoflurane anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongrae Cho

    Full Text Available The thalamus is thought to relay peripheral sensory information to the somatosensory cortex in the parietal lobe. Long-range thalamo-parietal interactions play an important role in inducing the effect of anesthetic. However, whether these interaction changes vary with different levels of anesthesia is not known. In the present study, we investigated the influence of different levels of isoflurane-induced anesthesia on the functional connectivity between the thalamus and the parietal region. Microelectrodes were implanted in rats to record local field potentials (LFPs. The rats underwent different levels of isoflurane anesthesia [deep anesthesia: isoflurane (ISO 2.5 vol%, light anesthesia (ISO 1 vol%, awake, and recovery state] and LFPs were recorded from four different brain areas (left parietal, right parietal, left thalamus, and right thalamus. Partial directed coherence (PDC was calculated for these areas. With increasing depth of anesthesia, the PDC in the thalamus-to-parietal direction was significantly increased mainly in the high frequency ranges; however, in the parietal-to-thalamus direction, the increase was mainly in the low frequency band. For both directions, the PDC changes were prominent in the alpha frequency band. Functional interactions between the thalamus and parietal area are augmented proportionally to the anesthesia level. This relationship may pave the way for better understanding of the neural processing of sensory inputs from the periphery under different levels of anesthesia.

  14. Evaluation of Common Anesthetic and Analgesic Techniques for Tail Biopsy in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carissa P; Carver, Scott; Kendall, Lon V

    2012-01-01

    Tail biopsy in mice is a common procedure in genetically modified mouse colonies. We evaluated the anesthetic and analgesic effects of various agents commonly used to mitigate pain after tail biopsy. We used a hot-water immersion assay to evaluate the analgesic effects of isoflurane, ice-cold ethanol, ethyl chloride, buprenorphine, and 2-point local nerve blocks before studying their effects on mice receiving tail biopsies. Mice treated with ethyl chloride spray, isoflurane and buprenorphine, and 2-point local nerve blocks demonstrated increased tail-flick latency compared with that of untreated mice. When we evaluated the behavior of adult and preweanling mice after tail biopsy, untreated mice demonstrated behavioral changes immediately after tail biopsy that lasted 30 to 60 min before returning to normal. The use of isoflurane, isoflurane and buprenorphine, buprenorphine, 2-point nerve block, or ethyl chloride spray in adult mice did not significantly improve their behavioral response to tail biopsy. Similarly, the use of buprenorphine and ethyl chloride spray in preweanling mice did not improve their behavioral response to tail biopsy compared with that of the untreated group. However, immersion in bupivacaine for 30 s after tail biopsy decreased tail grooming behavior during the first 30 min after tail biopsy. The anesthetic and analgesic regimens tested provide little benefit in adult and preweanling mice. Given that tail biopsy results in pain that lasts 30 to 60 min, investigators should carefully consider the appropriate anesthetic or analgesic regimen to incorporate into tail-biopsy procedures for mice. PMID:23294888

  15. New patents on topical anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantisani, Carmen; Macaluso, Laura; Frascani, Federica; Paolino, Giovanni; D'Andrea, Vito; Richetta, Antonio G; Calvieri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesia is defined as a total or partial loss of sensation and it may be general, local or topical, depending on the method of drug administration and area of the body affected. General anesthesia is a reversible state of unconsciousness produced by anesthetic agents, characterized by amnesia, muscle relaxation and loss of sensitivity to pain of the whole body. General anesthetic drugs can be classified into two main groups according to their predominant molecular pharmacological effects: volatile and intravenous agents. Local anesthesia produce a reversible loss of sensation in a portion of the body and it reversibly block impulse conduction along nerve axons and other excitable membrane. All local anesthetics (LA) are membrane stabilizing drugs; they reversibly decrease the rate of depolarization and repolarization of excitable membranes. They act mainly by inhibiting sodium influx through sodium-specific ion channels in the neuronal cell membrane, in particular the voltage-gated sodium channels. When the influx of sodium is interrupted, an action potential cannot arise and signal conduction is inhibited. The main local anesthetic (LA) agents for skin anesthesia are benzocaine (aminoester), prilocaine and lidocaine (aminoamides) which are commercially available as gels, ointments and creams (benzocaine and eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine) or as a bioadhesive (lidocaine) with different compositions (vehicles and excipients) for adults or pediatric use. Topical anesthetics decrease anxiety, pain and discomfort during cutaneous procedures and provide effective analgesia with rapid onset, prolonged duration and minimal side effects. This article outlines the different classes of topical anesthetics available and gives an overview of the mechanism of action, metabolism of each different class, of the possible complications that can occur because of their use and their possible treatment options and new patents.

  16. Determination of minimum alveolar concentration for isoflurane and sevoflurane in a rodent model of human metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dinesh; Walton, Meredith E; Lipinski, William J; Koch, Lauren G; Lydic, Ralph; Britton, Steve L; Mashour, George A

    2012-02-01

    Morbid obesity affects the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of anesthetics, which may result in inappropriate dosing. We hypothesized that obesity significantly alters the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) for isoflurane and sevoflurane. To test this hypothesis, we used a rodent model of human metabolic syndrome developed through artificial selection for inherent low aerobic capacity runners (LCR) and high aerobic capacity runners (HCR). The LCR rats are obese, display phenotypes homologous to those characteristic of human metabolic syndrome, and exhibit low running endurance. In contrast, HCR rats have high running endurance and are characterized by improved cardiovascular performance and overall health. Male and female LCR (n = 10) and HCR (n = 10) rats were endotracheally intubated and maintained on mechanical ventilation with either isoflurane or sevoflurane. A bracketing design was used to determine MAC; sensory stimulation was induced by tail clamping. An equilibration period of 30 minutes was provided before and between the consecutive tail clamps. Two-tailed parametric (unpaired t test) and nonparametric (Mann-Whitney test) statistics were used for the comparison of MAC between LCR and HCR rats. The data are reported as mean ± sd along with the 95% confidence interval. A P value of Obesity and associated comorbidities do not affect anesthetic requirements as measured by MAC in a rodent model of metabolic syndrome. By contrast, high aerobic capacity is associated with a higher MAC for isoflurane and may be a risk factor for subtherapeutic dosing.

  17. Comparing the Effects of Isoflurane and Alpha Chloralose upon Mouse Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Lucy C.; Klaunberg, Brenda A.

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging of mice requires that the physiology of the mouse (body temperature, respiration and heart rates, blood pH level) be maintained in order to prevent changes affecting the outcomes of functional scanning, namely blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) measures and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The anesthetic used to sedate mice for scanning can have major effects on physiology. While alpha chloralose has been commonly used for functional imaging of rats, its effects on physiology are not well characterized in the literature for any species. In this study, we anesthetized or sedated mice with isoflurane or alpha chloralose for up to two hours, and monitored physiological parameters and arterial blood gasses. We found that, when normal body temperature is maintained, breathing rates for both drugs decrease over the course of two hours. In addition, alpha chloralose causes a substantial drop in heart rate and blood pH with severe hypercapnia (elevated blood CO2) that is not seen in isoflurane-treated animals. We suggest that alpha chloralose does not maintain normal mouse physiology adequately for functional brain imaging outcome measures. PMID:27148970

  18. Comparing the Effects of Isoflurane and Alpha Chloralose upon Mouse Physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie A Low

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging of mice requires that the physiology of the mouse (body temperature, respiration and heart rates, blood pH level be maintained in order to prevent changes affecting the outcomes of functional scanning, namely blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD measures and cerebral blood flow (CBF. The anesthetic used to sedate mice for scanning can have major effects on physiology. While alpha chloralose has been commonly used for functional imaging of rats, its effects on physiology are not well characterized in the literature for any species. In this study, we anesthetized or sedated mice with isoflurane or alpha chloralose for up to two hours, and monitored physiological parameters and arterial blood gasses. We found that, when normal body temperature is maintained, breathing rates for both drugs decrease over the course of two hours. In addition, alpha chloralose causes a substantial drop in heart rate and blood pH with severe hypercapnia (elevated blood CO2 that is not seen in isoflurane-treated animals. We suggest that alpha chloralose does not maintain normal mouse physiology adequately for functional brain imaging outcome measures.

  19. Effects of dopamine and dobutamine on isoflurane-induced hypotension in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnellbacher, Rodney W; da Cunha, Anderson F; Beaufrère, Hugues; Queiroz, Patricia; Nevarez, Javier G; Tully, Thomas N

    2012-07-01

    To assess the effects of dopamine and dobutamine on the blood pressure of isoflurane-anesthetized Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis). 8 Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. A randomized crossover study was conducted. Each bird was anesthetized (anesthesia maintained by administration of 2.5% isoflurane in oxygen) and received 3 doses of each drug during a treatment period of 20 min/dose. Treatments were constant rate infusions (CRIs) of dobutamine (5, 10, and 15 μg/kg/min) and dopamine (5, 7, and 10 μg/kg/min). Direct systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure measurements, heart rate, esophageal temperature, and end-tidal partial pressure of CO(2) were recorded throughout the treatment periods. Mean ± SD of the systolic, mean, and diastolic arterial blood pressures at time 0 (initiation of a CRI) were 132.9 ± 22.1 mm Hg, 116.9 ± 20.5 mm Hg, and 101.9 ± 22.0 mm Hg, respectively. Dopamine resulted in significantly higher values than did dobutamine for the measured variables, except for end-tidal partial pressure of CO(2). Post hoc multiple comparisons revealed that the changes in arterial blood pressure were significantly different 4 to 7 minutes after initiation of a CRI. Overall, dopamine at rates of 7 and 10 μg/kg/min and dobutamine at a rate of 15 μg/kg/min caused the greatest increases in arterial blood pressure. Dobutamine CRI at 5, 10, and 15 μg/kg/min and dopamine CRI at 5, 7, and 10 μg/kg/min may be useful in correcting severe hypotension in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots caused by anesthesia maintained with 2.5% isoflurane.

  20. The effects of halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane on Ca2+ current and transient outward K+ current in subendocardial and subepicardial myocytes from the rat left ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rithalia, Amber; Hopkins, Philip M; Harrison, Simon M

    2004-12-01

    Halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane abbreviate ventricular action potential duration (APD), and for halothane this effect is greater in the subendocardium than in the subepicardium. In this study we investigated mechanisms underlying the regional effects of these anesthetics on APD. The effect of 0.6 mM halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane on the action potential, L-type Ca(2+) current, transient outward K(+) current (I(to)), and steady-state current was recorded in rat left ventricular subendocardial and subepicardial myocytes. Halothane and isoflurane (but not sevoflurane) reduced APD significantly (P subendocardial than subepicardial myocytes. Peak L-type Ca(2+) current did not differ between regions and, compared with control, was reduced significantly in both regions by 40% (P subendocardial (1.12 +/- 0.05 nA) myocytes. In subepicardial myocytes, peak I(to) was reduced significantly by halothane (P subendocardial myocytes with the three anesthetics. The steady-state current was increased significantly (P subendocardial myocytes by halothane and isoflurane could underlie their transmural effects on APD.

  1. Differential effects of hyperventilation on cerebral blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation during sevoflurane, isoflurane, or propofol anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinohara, Hiroshi; Kadoi, Yuji; Ide, Masanobu; Kuroda, Masataka; Saito, Shigeru; Mizutani, Akio

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the degree of increase in middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation when modulating hyperventilation during orthopedic surgery under sevoflurane, isoflurane, or propofol anesthesia. Twenty-four patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery were randomly divided into sevoflurane, isoflurane, and propofol groups. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, isoflurane, or propofol administration with 33% oxygen and 67% nitrous oxide at anesthetic drug concentrations adequate to maintain bispectral values between 45 and 50. A 2.0-MHz transcranial Doppler probe was attached to the patient's head at the temporal window, and mean blood flow velocity in the MCA (V (mca)) was continuously measured. The extremity was exsanguinated with an Esmarch bandage, and the pneumatic tourniquet was inflated to a pressure of 450 mmHg. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, V (mca) and arterial blood gases were measured every minute for 10 min after release of the tourniquet in all three groups. Immediately after tourniquet release, the patients' respiratory rates were increased to tightly maintain end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO(2)) at 35 mmHg. No change in partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PaCO(2)) was observed pre- and posttourniquet deflation in any of the three groups. Increase in V (mca) in the isoflurane group was greater than that in the other two groups after tourniquet deflation. In addition, during the study period, no difference in V (mca) after tourniquet deflation was observed between the propofol and sevoflurane groups. Hyperventilation could prevent an increase in V (mca) in the propofol and sevoflurane groups after tourniquet deflation. However, hyperventilation could not prevent an increase in V (mca) in the isoflurane group.

  2. Severity classification of repeated isoflurane anesthesia in C57BL/6JRj mice—Assessing the degree of distress

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    Bert, Bettina; Dietze, Silke; Palme, Rupert; Fink, Heidrun; Thöne-Reineke, Christa

    2017-01-01

    According to the EU Directive 2010/63, the severity of a procedure has to be classified as mild, moderate or severe. General anesthesia is thought to be mild, but the Directive does not differentiate between single and repeated anesthesia. Therefore, we investigated the impact of repeated administration of isoflurane, the most commonly used inhalation anesthetic, on the well-being of adult C57BL/6JRj mice, in comparison to single administrations and to untreated animals, when applied six times for 45 min at an interval of 3–4 days. For the animals anesthetized, excitations, phases of anesthesia, and vital parameters were monitored. Well-being after anesthesia was assessed using a behavioral test battery including luxury behavior like burrowing and nest building behavior, the Mouse Grimace Scale (MGS), the free exploratory paradigm for anxiety-related behavior, home cage activity and the rotarod test for activity, as well as food intake and body weight. Additionally, hair corticosterone and fecal corticosterone metabolites were measured. Our results show that nest building behavior, home cage activity, body weight, and corticosterone concentrations were not influenced by anesthesia, whereas changes in burrowing behavior, the MGS, food intake, and the free exploratory behavior indicated that the well-being of the mice was more affected by repeated than single isoflurane anesthesia. This effect depended on the sex of the animals, with female mice being more susceptible than male mice. However, repeated isoflurane anesthesia caused only short-term mild distress and impairment of well-being, mainly in the immediate postanesthetic period. Well-being stabilized at 8 days after the last anesthesia, at the latest. Therefore, we conclude that when using our anesthesia protocol, the severity of both single and repeated isoflurane anesthesia in C57BL/6JRj mice can be classified as mild. However, within the mild severity category, repeated isoflurane anesthesia ranks higher

  3. High throughput modular chambers for rapid evaluation of anesthetic sensitivity

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    Eckmann David M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anesthetic sensitivity is determined by the interaction of multiple genes. Hence, a dissection of genetic contributors would be aided by precise and high throughput behavioral screens. Traditionally, anesthetic phenotyping has addressed only induction of anesthesia, evaluated with dose-response curves, while ignoring potentially important data on emergence from anesthesia. Methods We designed and built a controlled environment apparatus to permit rapid phenotyping of twenty-four mice simultaneously. We used the loss of righting reflex to indicate anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. After fitting the data to a sigmoidal dose-response curve with variable slope, we calculated the MACLORR (EC50, the Hill coefficient, and the 95% confidence intervals bracketing these values. Upon termination of the anesthetic, Emergence timeRR was determined and expressed as the mean ± standard error for each inhaled anesthetic. Results In agreement with several previously published reports we find that the MACLORR of halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane in 8–12 week old C57BL/6J mice is 0.79% (95% confidence interval = 0.78 – 0.79%, 0.91% (95% confidence interval = 0.90 – 0.93%, and 1.96% (95% confidence interval = 1.94 – 1.97%, respectively. Hill coefficients for halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane are 24.7 (95% confidence interval = 19.8 – 29.7%, 19.2 (95% confidence interval = 14.0 – 24.3%, and 33.1 (95% confidence interval = 27.3 – 38.8%, respectively. After roughly 2.5 MACLORR • hr exposures, mice take 16.00 ± 1.07, 6.19 ± 0.32, and 2.15 ± 0.12 minutes to emerge from halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane, respectively. Conclusion This system enabled assessment of inhaled anesthetic responsiveness with a higher precision than that previously reported. It is broadly adaptable for delivering an inhaled therapeutic (or toxin to a population while monitoring its vital signs, motor reflexes, and providing precise control

  4. Tepoxalin on renal function and liver enzymes in cats exposed to hypotension with isoflurane

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    Gabrielle Coelho Freitas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the possible renal and hepatic toxicity of tepoxalin administered before or after isoflurane-induced hypotension, as well as for five consecutive days. Twelve healthy mixed-breed cats, adult males, weighing 4.0±0.8kg were allocated into two groups. They received 25mgkg-1 of tepoxalin orally, two hours before the anesthetic procedure (PRE or after the procedure (POST and daily for five days. Cats were anesthetized with isoflurane and the concentration was increased until mean arterial pressure reached 40-60mmHg and kept at this level for 60 minutes. During hypotension, the physiological variables were measured at time 0 and every 10 minutes until 60 minutes, and bleeding time was measured at time 0, 30 and 60 minutes. Blood samples were drawn for a hemogram and determination of concentrations of alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, urea, creatinine and Na+ at baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours and 7 days post-hypotension. Urine was collected at baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours and 7 days post-hypotension for determination of concentrations of creatinine, gamma-glutamyltransferase, urine specific gravity, protein, albumin and Na+. During the anesthetic procedure there were no important variations in physiological variables and bleeding time. There were differences only in fractional excretion of Na+, which was elevated at 7 days of evaluation in PRE and in the urine protein/creatinine ratio in PRE, which was higher than in POST at 24 and 48 hours post-hypotension. We conclude that tepoxalin does not cause alterations in hepatic enzymes but can cause discrete renal injury, resulting in proteinuria, in cats subjected to 60min of hypotension.

  5. Atmospheric chemistry of isoflurane, desflurane, and sevoflurane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads P. Sulbæk; Nielsen, Ole John; Karpichev, Boris

    2012-01-01

    The smog chamber/Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique was used to measure the rate coefficients k(Cl + CF(3)CHClOCHF(2), isoflurane) = (4.5 ± 0.8) × 10(-15), k(Cl + CF(3)CHFOCHF(2), desflurane) = (1.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-15), k(Cl + (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F, sevoflurane) = (1.1 ± 0.1) × 1...

  6. Sensitivity to isoflurane anesthesia increases in autism spectrum disorder Shank3+/∆c mutant mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changsheng; Schaefer, Michele; Gray, Christy; Yang, Ya; Furmanski, Orion; Liu, Sufang; Worley, Paul; Mintz, C David; Tao, Feng; Johns, Roger A

    Autism is a heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, impaired communication skills, and restricted and repetitive behavior. The abnormal behaviors of these patients can make their anesthetic and perioperative management difficult. Evidence in the literature suggests that some patients with autism or specific autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibit altered responses to pain and to anesthesia or sedation. A genetic mouse model of one particular ASD, Phelan McDermid Syndrome, has been developed that has a Shank3 haplotype truncation (Shank3+/Δc). These mice exhibit important characteristics of autism that mimic human autistic behavior. Our study demonstrates that a Shank3+/ΔC mutation in mice is associated with a reduction in both the MAC and RREC50 of isoflurane and down regulation of NR1 in vestibular nuclei and PSD95 in spinal cord. Decreased expression of NR1 and PSD95 in the central nervous system of Shank3+/ΔC mice could help reduce the MAC and RREC50 of isoflurane, which would warrant confirmation in a clinical study. If Shank3 mutations are found to affect anesthetic sensitivity in patients with ASD, better communication and stricter monitoring of anesthetic depth may be necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Solubility of haloether anesthetics in human and animal blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Joao H N; Brosnan, Robert J; Fukushima, Fabíola B; Hodges, Joanne; Liu, Hong

    2012-07-01

    Anesthetic blood solubility predicts pharmacokinetics for inhaled agents and is essential for determination of blood anesthetic concentrations from end-tidal gas concentrations using Henry's Law. Though used to model anesthetic effects in humans, there are limited interspecies solubility comparisons that include modern haloethers. This study aimed to measure hematocrit-adjusted blood:gas anesthetic partition coefficients (λ B:G) for desflurane, sevoflurane, isoflurane, and methoxyflurane in humans and animals. Whole blood was collected from 20 rats, 8 horses, and 4 each of cats, cattle, humans, dogs, goats, pigs, rabbits, and sheep. Plasma or cell volume was removed to adjust all samples to a packed cell volume of 40%. A single-agent calibration gas headspace was added to blood in a glass syringe and was mixed and equilibrated at 37°C for 2 h. Agent concentrations in the calibration gas and syringe headspace were measured using gas chromatography. Anesthetic solubility in saline, citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine, and olive oil were similarly measured. Except for goats, all animal species had at least one λ B:G measurement that differed significantly from humans. For each agent, λ B:G positively correlated with serum triglyceride concentrations, but this only explained 25% of interspecies variability. Desflurane was significantly less soluble in blood than sevoflurane in some species (e.g., humans) but not in others (e.g., rabbits). Anesthetic partition coefficients differ significantly between humans and most animals for haloether anesthetics. Because of their similar λ B:G values, goats may be a better animal model for inhaled anesthetic pharmacokinetics in people.

  8. Anesthetic management of an orangutan (Pongo abelii/pygmaeus) undergoing laparoscopic tubal ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Paula K

    2006-12-01

    An adult hybrid orangutan (Pongo abelii/pygmaeus) was presented to a veterinary teaching hospital for laparoscopic tubal ligation. The orangutan was immobilized with the use of injectable anesthetic agents, then orotracheally intubated. Anesthesia was maintained with the use of isoflurane in oxygen, and positive-pressure ventilation was used to ensure adequate gas exchange. Parameters monitored included arterial blood pressure, ECG, capnometry, and arterial blood gases. Anesthesia was uneventful, and recovery was smooth.

  9. Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of anesthetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Jodi; Le, Cathy; Lamers, Vanessa; Eckelman, Matthew

    2012-05-01

    Anesthesiologists must consider the entire life cycle of drugs in order to include environmental impacts into clinical decisions. In the present study we used life cycle assessment to examine the climate change impacts of 5 anesthetic drugs: sevoflurane, desflurane, isoflurane, nitrous oxide, and propofol. A full cradle-to-grave approach was used, encompassing resource extraction, drug manufacturing, transport to health care facilities, drug delivery to the patient, and disposal or emission to the environment. At each stage of the life cycle, energy, material inputs, and emissions were considered, as well as use-specific impacts of each drug. The 4 inhalation anesthetics are greenhouse gases (GHGs), and so life cycle GHG emissions include waste anesthetic gases vented to the atmosphere and emissions (largely carbon dioxide) that arise from other life cycle stages. Desflurane accounts for the largest life cycle GHG impact among the anesthetic drugs considered here: 15 times that of isoflurane and 20 times that of sevoflurane on a per MAC-hour basis when administered in an O(2)/air admixture. GHG emissions increase significantly for all drugs when administered in an N(2)O/O(2) admixture. For all of the inhalation anesthetics, GHG impacts are dominated by uncontrolled emissions of waste anesthetic gases. GHG impacts of propofol are comparatively quite small, nearly 4 orders of magnitude lower than those of desflurane or nitrous oxide. Unlike the inhaled drugs, the GHG impacts of propofol primarily stem from the electricity required for the syringe pump and not from drug production or direct release to the environment. Our results reiterate previous published data on the GHG effects of these inhaled drugs, while providing a life cycle context. There are several practical environmental impact mitigation strategies. Desflurane and nitrous oxide should be restricted to cases where they may reduce morbidity and mortality over alternative drugs. Clinicians should avoid

  10. Reflex penile erection in anesthetized mice: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, J; Edmunds, N J

    2008-07-31

    Ejaculatory-like rhythmic contractions of the bulbospongiosus (BS) muscle and penile erection can be elicited in the urethane-anesthetized rat, following spinal cord transection, upon electrical stimulation (ES) of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN). The aim of this work was to investigate this reflex in anesthetized mice. Adult C57BL6 mice were anesthetized with isoflurane. The BS muscle and corpus cavernosum were instrumented to allow quantification of the BS muscle electromyographic activity (BS EMG) and intracavernosal pressure respectively. The femoral artery and jugular vein were catheterized to allow measurement of blood pressure and compound administration. ES of the DPN, via bipolar silver electrodes, reliably evoked erectile responses in mice with intact spinal cords. The overall amplitude of the erectile response was frequency- and pulse duration-dependent. Erectile responses were abolished by bilateral cut of the sensory branch of the pudendal nerve. Transection of the spinal cord potentiated the erectile responses and increased the area under the curve of the BS EMG when compared with those animals with intact spinal cords. However, no coordinated rhythmic contractions of the BS muscle during or after the ES could be observed, with or without spinal transection. Melanotan-II failed to enhance the erectile response induced by ES of the DPN, in mice with intact spinal cords. ES of the DPN in isoflurane-anesthetized mice could be a useful model in which to study the interplay between brain and spinal cord in the control of reflex penile erection, and could take advantage of knockout mice models. However, the lack of efficacy of Melanotan-II suggests that further experiments are necessary to confirm the future utility of this model. In contrast to rats, the expulsion reflex could not be reliably elicited in mice with or without spinal transection. This latter finding suggests the existence of fundamental differences in the organization of the spinal network

  11. Topical anesthetic creams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaweski, Susan

    2008-06-01

    Topical anesthetic creams have positive applications in plastic surgery. For certain procedures, they can replace injected local anesthetics. By replacing injections with a topical cream, the negative effects associated with injections, such as pain, needle anxiety, and edema at the surgical site, are eliminated. A variety of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved topical anesthetic creams are available for use; however, much care must be taken when prescribing and administering these drugs, as anesthetic creams compounded in nonstandard doses can result in severe toxicity and death. When used appropriately, topical anesthetic creams can provide a safe and effective alternative to other forms of anesthesia. This article provides an overview of topical anesthetic creams, including availability, composition, safety, and efficacy.

  12. Comparison of use of an infrared anesthetic gas monitor and refractometry for measurement of anesthetic agent concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrisko, Tamas D; Klide, Alan M

    2011-10-01

    To assess agreement between anesthetic agent concentrations measured by use of an infrared anesthetic gas monitor (IAGM) and refractometry. SAMPLE-4 IAGMs of the same type and 1 refractometer. Mixtures of oxygen and isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, or N(2)O were used. Agent volume percent was measured simultaneously with 4 IAGMs and a refractometer at the common gas outlet. Measurements obtained with each of the 4 IAGMs were compared with the corresponding refractometer measurements via the Bland-Altman method. Similarly, Bland-Altman plots were also created with either IAGM or refractometer measurements and desflurane vaporizer dial settings. Bias ± 2 SD for comparisons of IAGM and refractometer measurements was as follows: isoflurane, -0.03 ± 0.18 volume percent; sevoflurane, -0.19 ± 0.23 volume percent; desflurane, 0.43 ± 1.22 volume percent; and N(2)O, -0.21 ± 1.88 volume percent. Bland-Altman plots comparing IAGM and refractometer measurements revealed nonlinear relationships for sevoflurane, desflurane, and N(2)O. Desflurane measurements were notably affected; bias ± limits of agreement (2 SD) were small (0.1 ± 0.22 volume percent) at < 12 volume percent, but both bias and limits of agreement increased at higher concentrations. Because IAGM measurements did not but refractometer measurements did agree with the desflurane vaporizer dial settings, infrared measurement technology was a suspected cause of the nonlinear relationships. Given that the assumption of linearity is a cornerstone of anesthetic monitor calibration, this assumption should be confirmed before anesthetic monitors are used in experiments.

  13. [Pollution of the workplace by anesthetic gases. Causes and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothmann, W; Shimada, K; Goerig, M; Fuhlrott, M; Schulte am Esch, J

    1991-06-01

    Waste anesthetic gas concentrations were measured in areas corresponding to the breathing zones of the anesthetists and operating room nurses for personal exposure (n = 27, time-weighted values) and during special work practices (n = 65). Leaks related to anesthetic machines and high-pressure nitrous oxide components were investigated during (n = 60) and after anesthesia (n = 85). The effect of a local scavenging system on occupational exposure during inhalation induction of anesthesia in children was studied (n = 60). Concentrations of nitrous oxide, halothane, isoflurane, and enflurane were determined by using active dosimeters (SKC 222) and different infrared gas-analyzers. Factors that increase waste anesthetic gas concentrations in operating rooms can be divided into several categories, such as low air conditioning systems, anesthetists' work practices, equipment leakage, including leakage from high-pressure nitrous oxide systems, and inadequate scavenging devices. Equipment leakage is almost invariably present in low-pressure components of the anesthesia machine because so many seals and joints are necessary to permit disassembly for cleaning and replacement. Waste anesthetic gases are also distributed in the exhaled air of patients recovering from anesthesia. To restrict the levels, exposure must be as low as can be achieved with reasonable efforts. Thus, the anesthetic equipment should be designed to avoid leakage, leakage tests should be performed before the use of anesthetic machines, and waste anesthetic gases should be scavenged by central as well as by local systems. Regular and periodic use of a trace gas analyzer permits direct observation of gas leakage and enables anesthetists to modify their work technique in order to reduce avoidable leakage.

  14. Lactato sanguíneo na avaliação dos efeitos da peridural torácica em cães anestesiados pelo isoflurano Blood lactate in the evaluation of the thoracic epidural effects in isoflurane anesthetized dogs

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    Beatriz Perez Floriano

    2010-03-01

    evaluate the tissue perfusion through blood lactate in dogs submitted to thoracic peridural anesthesia. For such, eight dogs with MAC previously determined for isoflurano, were divided into two experimental groups and were induced and maintained with isofluorane. The dogs had their spinal low lumbar space reached with an epidural catheter, inserted to the T1-T2 interval, with later application of ropivacaine in two different volumes, one for each group: 0.25ml kg-1 (GR1 and 0.33ml kg-1 (GR2. The animals were monitored at nine total moments of anesthesia and electrostimulation in the radio-ulnar region was made to detect the presence of the local block, with evaluation of the following parameters: lactate levels, mean arterial pressure, hemogasometric variables, heart rate and respiratory rate. Respiratory depression was observed, caused by the block, as well as an increase on the pH and slight reduction of HR and MAP. There was a significant decrease in lactate levels after anesthetic induction and a return to its basal levels after recovery, on both groups. There was no correlation between lactate and other evaluated parameters. The changes in lactate levels are probably related to the inhalant anesthesia, assuming an influence of isofluorane on this parameter. There was no influence of the local block on tissue perfusion, analized through blood lactate measures.

  15. TREK-1 mediates isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haiyun; Peng, Zhengwu; Yang, Liu; Liu, Xue; Xie, Yaning; Cai, Yanhui; Xiong, Lize; Zeng, Yi

    2017-09-05

    There are growing concerns that anaesthetic exposure can cause extensive apoptotic degeneration of neurons and the impairment of normal synaptic development and remodelling. However, little attention has been paid to exploring the possible cytotoxicity of inhalation anaesthetics, such as isoflurane, in astrocytes. In this research, we determined that prolonged exposure to an inhalation anaesthetic caused cytotoxicity in astrocytes, and we identified the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for this process. Astrocytes were exposed to isoflurane, and astrocytic survival was then measured via LDH release assays, MTT assays, and TUNEL staining. TWIK-related potassium (K+) channel-1 (TREK-1) over-expression and knockdown models were also created using lentiviruses. The levels of TREK-1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured via Western blot and qRT-PCR. Prolonged exposure to isoflurane decreased primary astrocytic viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, with prolonged exposure to isoflurane, the TREK-1 level increased, and the BDNF level was reduced. TREK-1 knockdown promoted the survival of astrocytes and increased BDNF expression following isoflurane exposure. Overdoses of and prolonged exposure to isoflurane induce cytotoxicity in primary astrocytes. TREK-1 plays an important role in isoflurane-induced cultured astrocytic cytotoxicity by down-regulating the expression of BDNF.

  16. Induction of ischemic stroke in awake freely moving mice reveals that isoflurane anesthesia can mask the benefits of a neuroprotection therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eSeto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetics such as isoflurane are commonly used to sedate experimental animals during the induction of stroke. Since these agents are known to modulate synaptic excitability, inflammation and blood flow, they could hinder the development and discovery of new neuroprotection therapies. To address this issue, we developed a protocol for inducing photothrombotic occlusion of cerebral vessels in fully conscious mice and tested two potential neuroprotectant drugs (a GluN2B or α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonist. Our data show in vehicle treated mice that just 20 minutes of exposure to isoflurane during stroke induction can significantly reduce ischemic cortical damage relative to mice that were awake during stroke. When comparing potential stroke therapies, none provided any level of neuroprotection if the stroke was induced with anesthesia. However, if mice were fully conscious during stroke, the α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonist reduced ischemic damage by 23% relative to vehicle treated controls, whereas the GluN2B antagonist had no significant effect. These results suggest that isoflurane anesthesia can occlude the benefits of certain stroke treatments and warrant caution when using anesthetics for pre-clinical testing of neuroprotective agents.

  17. Scientometrics of anesthetic drugs and their techniques of administration, 1984–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlassakov KV

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kamen V Vlassakov, Igor Kissin Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The aim of this study was to assess progress in the field of anesthetic drugs over the past 30 years using scientometric indices: popularity indices (general and specific, representing the proportion of articles on a drug relative to all articles in the field of anesthetics (general index or the subfield of a specific class of anesthetics (specific index; index of change, representing the degree of growth in publications on a topic from one period to the next; index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000 biomedical journals covered by PubMed; and index of ultimate success, representing a publication outcome when a new drug takes the place of a common drug previously used for the same purpose. Publications on 58 topics were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. Our analysis showed that during 2009–2013, out of seven anesthetics with a high general popularity index (≥2.0, only two were introduced after 1980, ie, the inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane and the local anesthetic ropivacaine; however, only sevoflurane had a high index of expectations (12.1. Among anesthetic adjuncts, in 2009–2013, only one agent, sugammadex, had both an extremely high index of change (>100 and a high index of expectations (25.0, reflecting the novelty of its mechanism of action. The index of ultimate success was positive with three anesthetics, ie, lidocaine, isoflurane, and propofol, all of which were introduced much longer than 30 years ago. For the past 30 years, there were no new anesthetics that have produced changes in scientometric indices indicating real progress. Keywords: anesthetics, anesthetic adjuvants, mortality, safety margins, therapeutic indices

  18. Effect of anthracyclines and isoflurane on QTc interval

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    A. Venugopal

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Anthracycline chemotherapy can produce significant prolongation of QTc interval. In addition, use of 0.5% end tidal concentration of isoflurane can further augment the QTc interval significantly.

  19. A Comparative Study of Cardioprotective Effect of Three Anesthetic Agents by Measuring Serum Level of Troponin-T after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

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    Vali Imantalab

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac surgery is associated with some degree of myocardial injury. Preconditioning first described in 1986 was pharmacologic and non- pharmacologic. Among the long list of anesthetic drugs, isoflurane as an inhaling agent along with midazolam and propofol as injectable substances have been documented to confer some preconditioning effects on myocardium. Objectives: In this study cardiac Troponin T (cTnT ,as a reliable marker, was used for evaluating myocardial injury. Methods: This prospective double blind study was comprised of 60 patients scheduled for CABG and were randomly assigned into three groups who received infusion of propofol or midazolam or isoflorane. Surgical procedures and anesthetics were similar for 3 groups. cTnT measured preoperatively and at 12, 24 and 36hr after arrival in ICU. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in mean cTnT levels between three groups in the preoperative period and 12-24 hours after arrival in ICU. However, mean cTnT in 3 groups at 36 hours after arrival in ICU were different (P< 0.013 and cTnT level was significantly higher in midazolam group (P<0.001 and lowest in isoflurane group (P=0.002. Conclusion: There were significant differences on cTnT levels between anesthetic groups of isofluran, midazolam and propofol at 36 hr after surgery. Preconditioning effect of isoflurane was higher than the other two groups.

  20. Hypercapnic hyperventilation shortens emergence time from Propofol and Isoflurane anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Yaraghi, Ahmad; Golparvar, Mohammad; Talakoub, Reihanak; Sateie, Hossein; Mehrabi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to compare the effects of hypercapnic hyperventilation and normocapnic normoventilation on emergence time from propofol and isoflurane anesthesia. Methods: In this clinical trial, the differences in emergence time were evaluated in 80 patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery in Alzahra University hospital, Isfahan, Iran, in 2011-2012. Patients were randomly divided into four groups (groups 1-4) receiving isoflurane hypercapnic hyperventilation, isoflu...

  1. Anesthetizing the obese child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anette; Lenz, Katja; Abildstrøm, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing. The focus of this review is the special anesthetic considerations regarding the perioperative management of obese children. With obesity the risk of comorbidity such as asthma, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and diabetes increases...

  2. Isoflurane and Sevoflurane Induce Severe Hepatic Insulin Resistance in a Canine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella P Kim

    Full Text Available Anesthesia induces insulin resistance, which may contribute to elevated blood glucose and adverse post-operative outcomes in critically ill patients, and impair glycemic control in surgical patients with diabetes. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which anesthesia impairs insulin sensitivity. Here we investigate the effects of anesthesia on insulin sensitivity in metabolic tissues.Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed in 32 lean (control diet; n = 16 conscious versus n = 16 anesthetized and 24 fat-fed (6 weeks fat-feeding; n = 16 conscious versus n = 8 anesthetized adult male mongrel dogs in conjunction with tracer methodology to differentiate hepatic versus peripheral insulin sensitivity. Propofol was administered as an intravenous bolus (3mg/kg to initiate anesthesia, which was then maintained with inhaled sevoflurane or isoflurane (2-3% for the duration of the procedure.Anesthesia reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity by approximately 50% in both lean and fat-fed animals as compared to conscious animals, and insulin action at the liver was almost completely suppressed during anesthesia such that hepatic insulin sensitivity was decreased by 75.5% and; 116.2% in lean and fat-fed groups, respectively.Inhaled anesthesia induces severe hepatic insulin resistance in a canine model. Countermeasures that preserve hepatic insulin sensitivity may represent a therapeutic target that could improve surgical outcomes in both diabetic and healthy patients.

  3. Time-Dependent Decline in Multifocal Electroretinogram Requires Faster Recording Procedures in Anesthetized Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nina Buus; Christiansen, Anders Tolstrup; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The time-dependent effect of anesthetics on the retinal function is debated. We hypothesize that in anesthetized animals there is a time-dependent decline that requires optimized multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) recording procedures. METHODS: Conventional and four-frame global-flash mf...... by determining the necessary time-of-delay from intraocular injection of a drug to full effect. TRANSLATIONAL RELEVANCE: General anesthesia is a possible source of error in mfERG recordings. Therefore, it is important to investigate the translational relevance of the results to mfERG recordings in children......ERG recordings were obtained approximately 15, 60, and 150 minutes after the induction of propofol anesthesia (20 pigs) and isoflurane anesthesia (nine pigs). In six of the propofol-anesthetized pigs, the mfERG recordings were split in 3-minute segments. Two to 4 weeks after initial recordings, an intraocular...

  4. The role of electrostatic interactions in governing anesthetic action on the torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Douglas E; Claycomb, Robert J

    2002-08-01

    Isoflurane and normal alkanols reduce the apparent agonist dissociation constant (Kd) of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) at clinically relevant concentrations, whereas cyclopropane and butane do not. This suggests that electrostatic (hydrogen bonding and/or dipolar) interactions modulate anesthetic potency in this model receptor system. To further define the nature of these interactions, we quantified the potencies with which a heterologous group of general anesthetics reduces the nAChR's apparent Kd for acetylcholine. We assessed the importance that an anesthetic's molecular volume, ability to donate a hydrogen bond (hydrogen bond acidity), ability to accept a hydrogen bond (hydrogen bond basicity), and dipole moment play in determining aqueous potency. We found that aqueous anesthetic potency increases with molecular volume and decreases with hydrogen bond basicity but is unaffected by dipole moment and hydrogen bond acidity. These results suggest that anesthetics reduce the apparent agonist Kd of the nAChR by binding to a site that has a dipolarity and ability to accept hydrogen bonds that are similar to those of water, but a hydrogen bond-donating capacity that is less. Anesthetics representing a wide range of chemical classes reduce the apparent agonist dissociation constant of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with aqueous potencies that are governed by their molecular volumes and hydrogen bond basicities. However, neither their hydrogen bond acidities nor dipole moments influence aqueous potency.

  5. Hipotermia dan Waktu Pemulihannya dalam Anestesi Gas Isofluran dengan Induksi Ketamin-Xylazin pada Anjing (HYPOTHERMIA AND ITS RECOVERY IN GAS ISOFLURANE ANESTHESIA WITH KETAMINE-XYLAZINE INDUCTION ON DOGS

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    Gagak Donny Satria

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common effect occurred during anaesthesia is the decrease of body temperature. Technologicaldevelopment has enabled the used the latest innovations in order to to increase the efficacy and the safetyof anaesthesia. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ketamine-xylazine injection onhypothermia and its recovery at dog which anesthetized with isoflurane. Ten healthy dogs were dividedinto two groups with each group consisted offive dogs. In Group A, dogs were given premedication (atropinesulfate 0.04 mg/kg and then anaesthetized with isoflurane gas (4% for induction dose and 1% for themaintenance dose. In Group B dogs were given premedication atropine sulfate (0.04 mg/kg and ketamineHCl induction solution (10 mg/kg mixed with xylazine HCl (2 mg/kg, and anaesthetized with isofluranegas (maintenance dose of 1%. Adaptation period was conducted in one week. Body temperature wasmeasured before, during, and after the duration of anaesthesia. The data was analyzed statistically by arepeated Anova test. This study found that the mean body temperature of dogs in Group A decreased from37,88±0,51 oC to 34,64±0,95 oC over a period of anaesthesia, and the recovery time was over 40 minutespost-anaesthesia. In Group B, body temperature decreased from 38.06±0.42 oC to 34.96±1.23 oC, and therecovery time was 90 minutes. In conclusion, the use of ketamine-xylazine in isoflurane anaesthesiaprocedures on dogs, would need post-anaesthesia preparation procedure regarding with hypothermia andits recovery.

  6. Scientometrics of anesthetic drugs and their techniques of administration, 1984–2013

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    Vlassakov, Kamen V; Kissin, Igor

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess progress in the field of anesthetic drugs over the past 30 years using scientometric indices: popularity indices (general and specific), representing the proportion of articles on a drug relative to all articles in the field of anesthetics (general index) or the subfield of a specific class of anesthetics (specific index); index of change, representing the degree of growth in publications on a topic from one period to the next; index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed; and index of ultimate success, representing a publication outcome when a new drug takes the place of a common drug previously used for the same purpose. Publications on 58 topics were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. Our analysis showed that during 2009–2013, out of seven anesthetics with a high general popularity index (≥2.0), only two were introduced after 1980, ie, the inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane and the local anesthetic ropivacaine; however, only sevoflurane had a high index of expectations (12.1). Among anesthetic adjuncts, in 2009–2013, only one agent, sugammadex, had both an extremely high index of change (>100) and a high index of expectations (25.0), reflecting the novelty of its mechanism of action. The index of ultimate success was positive with three anesthetics, ie, lidocaine, isoflurane, and propofol, all of which were introduced much longer than 30 years ago. For the past 30 years, there were no new anesthetics that have produced changes in scientometric indices indicating real progress. PMID:25525336

  7. Are anesthetic accidents unavoidable?

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    Van De Walle, J

    1978-01-01

    Fatal anesthetic accidents still occur frequently. Origins and causes are being reviewed especially in the light of lawsuits against anesthetists. The importance of utmost continuous supervision and care for both the vital functions: respiration and circulation, is stressed. General recommendations for security during anesthesia are advanced.

  8. Halogenated Ether, Alcohol, and Alkane Anesthetics Activate TASK-3 Tandem Pore Potassium Channels Likely through a Common Mechanism.

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    Luethy, Anita; Boghosian, James D; Srikantha, Rithu; Cotten, Joseph F

    2017-06-01

    The TWIK-related acid-sensitive potassium channel 3 (TASK-3; KCNK9) tandem pore potassium channel function is activated by halogenated anesthetics through binding at a putative anesthetic-binding cavity. To understand the pharmacologic requirements for TASK-3 activation, we studied the concentration-response of TASK-3 to several anesthetics (isoflurane, desflurane, sevoflurane, halothane, α-chloralose, 2,2,2-trichloroethanol [TCE], and chloral hydrate), to ethanol, and to a panel of halogenated methanes and alcohols. We used mutagenesis to probe the anesthetic-binding cavity as observed in a TASK-3 homology model. TASK-3 activation was quantified by Ussing chamber voltage clamp analysis. We mutagenized the residue Val-136, which lines the anesthetic-binding cavity, its flanking residues (132 to 140), and Leu-122, a pore-gating residue. The 2-halogenated ethanols activate wild-type TASK-3 with the following rank order efficacy (normalized current [95% confidence interval]): 2,2,2-tribromo-(267% [240-294]) > 2,2,2-trichloro-(215% [196-234]) > chloral hydrate (165% [161-176]) > 2,2-dichloro- > 2-chloro ≈ 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol > ethanol. Similarly, carbon tetrabromide (296% [245-346]), carbon tetrachloride (180% [163-196]), and 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropanol (200% [194-206]) activate TASK-3, whereas the larger carbon tetraiodide and α-chloralose inhibit. Clinical agents activate TASK-3 with the following rank order efficacy: halothane (207% [202-212]) > isoflurane (169% [161-176]) > sevoflurane (164% [150-177]) > desflurane (119% [109-129]). Mutations at and near residue-136 modify TCE activation of TASK-3, and interestingly M159W, V136E, and L122D were resistant to both isoflurane and TCE activation. TASK-3 function is activated by a multiple agents and requires a halogenated substituent between ∼30 and 232 cm3/mol volume with potency increased by halogen polarizeability. Val-136 and adjacent residues may mediate anesthetic binding and stabilize an open state

  9. Changes in heart rate variability during anaesthesia induction using sevoflurane or isoflurane with nitrous oxide.

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    Nishiyama, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic balance using heart rate variability (HRV) during induction of anaesthesia between sevoflurane and isoflurane in combination with nitrous oxide. 40 individuals aged from 30 to 60 years, scheduled for general anaesthesia were equally divided into sevoflurane or isoflurane groups. After 100% oxygen inhalation for a few minutes, anaesthesia was induced with nitrous oxide 3 L min-1, oxygen 3 L min-1 and sevoflurane or isoflurane. Sevoflurane or isoflurane concentration was increased by 0.5% every 2 to 3 breaths until 5% was attained for sevoflurane, or 3% for isoflurane. Vecuronium was administered to facilitate tracheal intubation. After intubation, sevoflurane was set to 2% while isoflurane was set to 1% with nitrous oxide with oxygen (1:1) for 5 min. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane provoked a decrease in blood pressure, total power, the low frequency component (LF), and high frequency component (HF) of HRV. Although the heart rate increased during isoflurane anaesthesia, it decreased under sevoflurane. The power of LF and HF also decreased in both groups. LF was higher in the isoflurane group while HF was higher in the sevoflurane group. The LF/HF ratio increased transiently in the isoflurane group, but decreased in the sevoflurane group. Anaesthesia induction with isoflurane-nitrous oxide transiently increased cardiac sympathetic activity, while sevoflurane-nitrous oxide decreased both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. The balance of cardiac parasympathetic/sympathetic activity was higher in sevoflurane anaesthesia.

  10. Economic and Environmental Considerations During Low Fresh Gas Flow Volatile Agent Administration After Change to a Nonreactive Carbon Dioxide Absorbent.

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    Epstein, Richard H; Dexter, Franklin; Maguire, David P; Agarwalla, Niraj K; Gratch, David M

    2016-04-01

    Reducing fresh gas flow (FGF) during general anesthesia reduces costs by decreasing the consumption of volatile anesthetics and attenuates their contribution to greenhouse gas pollution of the environment. The sevoflurane FGF recommendations in the Food and Drug Administration package insert relate to concern over potential toxicity from accumulation in the breathing circuit of compound A, a by-product of the reaction of the volatile agent with legacy carbon dioxide absorbents containing strong alkali such as sodium or potassium hydroxide. Newer, nonreactive absorbents do not produce compound A, making such restrictions moot. We evaluated 4 hypotheses for sevoflurane comparing intervals before and after converting from a legacy absorbent (soda lime) to a nonreactive absorbent (Litholyme): (1) intraoperative FGF would be reduced; (2) sevoflurane consumption per minute of volatile agent administration would be reduced; (3) cost savings due to reduced sevoflurane consumption would (modestly) exceed the incremental cost of the premium absorbent; and (4) residual wastage in discarded sevoflurane bottles would be trash after filling vaporizers. The time from reaching a PICO2 = 3 mm Hg for 3 minutes until agent exhaustion (PICO2 = 5 mm Hg for 5 minutes) was evaluated. A total of N = 20,235 cases were analyzed (80.2% sevoflurane, 15.1% desflurane, and 4.7% isoflurane). Intraoperative FGF was reduced for cases in which sevoflurane was administered by 435 mL/min (95% confidence interval [CI], 391 to 479 mL/min; P 50%) canisters. We showed that an anesthesia department can transition to a premium, nonreactive carbon dioxide absorbent in a manner that is at least cost neutral by reducing FGF below the lower flow limits recommended in the sevoflurane package insert. This was achieved, in part, by electronically monitoring PICO2, automatically notifying the anesthesia technicians when to change the absorbent, and by providing personalized feedback via e-mail to the anesthesia

  11. Estudo comparativo entre sevofluorano, halotano e isofluorano em Gallus domesticus Comparite evaluation with sevoflurane, halothane and isoflurane in Gallus domesticus

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    Luciana Dambrosio Guimarães

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizados 30 frangos com 20 semanas de idade, pesando em média 2,90 ± 0,65kg divididos aleatoriamente em três grupos. A indução da anestesia foi realizada com máscara facial artesanal conectada ao sistema de Maggil Modificado, utilizando entre 3,0 e 3,5 vezes a dose anestésica mínima (DAM de cada agente e fluxo diluente de O2 de 2l/min, sendo que posteriormente os animais foram intubados e mantidos com valores de aproximadamente 1,7DAM durante 65 minutos. O isofluorano causou maior depressão respiratória e hipotensão; o halotano proporcionou maiores valores de pressão arterial e temperatura corporal e o sevofluorano, menor depressão respiratória e hipotensão em relação ao grupo do isofluorano, sendo considerado o agente mais indicado para a utilização em aves. A indução e recuperação foram mais rápidas com o sevofluorano, embora sem diferença significativa estatisticamente.For the comparison 30 twenty-week-old chicken were used. They weigh na averdage of 2.90 ± 0.65kg aleatorily divided into 3 groups. The anesthetic induction was accomplished with a home-made facial mask connected with the modified circuit of Maggil using values between 3.0 e 3.5 a minimal anesthetic dose (MAD for each agent. Posteriorly, the animals were intubated and anesthesia was maintained with values approximately 1.7DAM during 65 minutes. Isoflurane caused further respiratory depression and hypotension when it is compared to the other two anesthetic agents. The group of halothane presented higher values of blood pressure and body temperature and the group of sevoflurane, lower respiratory depression and hypotension in relation to the group of isoflurane. The induction and recuperation were faster with the sevoflurane, although without expressive diference statistically. The sevoflurane is the most indicated anesthetic agent.

  12. Hypercapnic hyperventilation shortens emergence time from Propofol and Isoflurane anesthesia.

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    Yaraghi, Ahmad; Golparvar, Mohammad; Talakoub, Reihanak; Sateie, Hossein; Mehrabi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the effects of hypercapnic hyperventilation and normocapnic normoventilation on emergence time from propofol and isoflurane anesthesia. In this clinical trial, the differences in emergence time were evaluated in 80 patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery in Alzahra University hospital, Isfahan, Iran, in 2011-2012. Patients were randomly divided into four groups (groups 1-4) receiving isoflurane hypercapnic hyperventilation, isoflurane normocapnic normoventilation, propofol hypercapnic hyperventilation, and propofol normocapnic normoventilation, respectively. Hypercapnia was maintained by adding CO2 to the patient's inspired gas during hyperventilation. The emergence time and the duration of stay in recovery room in the four groups were measured and compared by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and least significant difference tests. The average emergence time in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were (11.3 ± 3.2), (15.2 ± 3.8), (9 ± 4.2) and (11.8 ± 5.3) min, respectively. These differences were significant (P = 0.001). In patients receiving propofol hypercapnic hyperventilation, the emergence time was faster than in other groups. There was also a significant difference in duration of stay in recovery room between the groups (P = 0.004). Patients who received isoflurane hypercapnic hyperventilation had a shortest length of stay in the recovery room. The emergence time after intravenous anesthesia with propofol can be shortened significantly by using hyperventilation and hypercapnia, without any side effects.

  13. Effects of chemical restraint on electroretinograms recorded sequentially in awake, sedated, and anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Kate S; Good, Kathryn L; Kass, Philip H; Park, Shin Ae; Nestorowicz, Natalia; Ofri, Ron

    2013-07-01

    To quantitatively and qualitatively compare electroretinography (ERG) recordings in awake, sedated, and anesthetized dogs. Six 6-month-old Beagles. A brief ERG protocol for dogs was used. Following 1-minute and subsequent 5-minute dark adaptation, mixed rod-cone responses were recorded bilaterally with a handheld multispecies ERG device with dogs in each of 3 states of consciousness: awake, sedated (dexmedetomidine and butorphanol), and anesthetized (atropine and hydromorphone, followed by propofol and midazolam and anesthetic maintenance with isoflurane). Low- and high-frequency noise levels were quantified via Fourier analysis, and the effect of consciousness state on signal amplitude, implicit time, and noise was analyzed via repeated-measures ANOVA. In addition, 13 veterinary ophthalmologists who were unaware of the dogs' consciousness states subjectively graded the ERG recording quality, and scores for each tracing were compared. ERG amplitudes were highest in awake dogs and lowest in anesthetized dogs. Implicit times were shortest in awake dogs and longest in anesthetized dogs. Differences in b-wave amplitudes and a-wave implicit times were significant. Neither low- nor high-frequency noise levels differed significantly among consciousness states. Furthermore, no significant differences were identified among observers' scores assigned to ERG tracings. Anesthesia and sedation resulted in significant attenuation and delay of ERG responses in dogs. Chemical restraint of dogs had no consistently significant effect on low- or high-frequency noise levels or on observer perception of signal quality.

  14. Anaphylaxis to general anesthetics.

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    Moneret-Vautrin, D Anne; Mertes, P Michel

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of hypersensitivity reactions to anesthetics is estimated 1 in 13,000 anesthetics up to 1 in 3,180. The rate of mortality ranges between 3 and 9%. 90% of reactions appear at anesthesia induction. Cardiovascular collapse and bronchospasm are more frequent in IgE-dependent reactions. The leading causes are neuromuscular blocking agents (50-70% of cases). IgE-dependent reactions are predominant. Previous sensitization by other compounds containing quaternary ions is suspected. Cross-reactions are frequent. Latex allergy is the second cause, followed by antibiotics and beta-lactams in general. The incidence of anaphylaxis to vital dyes and chlorhexidine increases. Anaphylaxis to intravenous hypnotics, plasma substitutes, aprotinin, protamine and other drugs can occur. Any suspected hypersensitivity reaction during anesthesia must be extensively investigated to confirm the nature of the reaction, to identify the responsible drug, to study cross-reactivity in cases of anaphylaxis to a neuromuscular blocking agent and to provide recommendations for future anesthetic procedures. Tryptase assay at the time of the reaction has to be implemented by thorough investigations carried out weeks later: prick tests and intradermal tests, quantification of specific IgE to compounds containing quaternary ammonium ions, histamine release test or cytometric analysis of basophile activation. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. [Induction of anesthesia with halogen-containing anesthetic agents in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, V A; Korotkova, P V; Mikhel'son, V A; Tsypin, L E; Grebennikov, V A

    2006-01-01

    The study has comparatively evaluated the effectiveness and safety of halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane in children during induction. Seventy hundred and eight patients aged 1-14 years who had ASA I-II anesthetic risks were examined. Gas induction was performed as monoanesthesia through the semi-open circuit with high gas flow (100% O2 6 l/min) in combination with halothane (n = 236), enflurane (n = 236), or isoflurane (n = 236) without N2O. The authors have compared the following criteria: the speed and comfort of induction, the parameters of hemodynamics and external respiration, and the rate of adverse reactions and complications during induction. The studies have established that in terms of comfort, safety, and the rate clinical effect achievement, the drugs of choice for gas induction in children are enflurane and, to a lesser extent, halothane. Gas induction with isoflurane should not be performed in children since the agent rather frequently exerts an irritant action on the upper airways, which reduces the speed of initial narcosis and increases the likelihood of one or another adverse reactions; however; it has advantages as a less hemodynamic effect.

  16. Evaluation of an oscillometric blood pressure monitor for use in anesthetized sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trim, Cynthia M; Hofmeister, Erik H; Peroni, John F; Thoresen, Merrilee

    2013-11-01

    To determine the accuracy of an oscillometric blood pressure monitor in anesthetized sheep. Prospective study. Twenty healthy adult sheep, 11 males and nine females, weighing 63.6 ± 8.6 kg. After premedication with buprenorphine or transdermal fentanyl, anesthesia was induced with ketamine-midazolam and maintained with isoflurane and ketamine, 1.2 mg kg(-1) hour(-1), ± lidocaine, 3 mg kg(-1) hour(-1). Invasive blood pressure measurements were obtained from an auricular arterial catheter and noninvasive measurements were from a cuff on the metatarsus or antebrachium. Simultaneous invasive and noninvasive measurements were recorded over a range (55-111 mmHg) of mean arterial pressures (MAP). Isoflurane concentration was increased to decrease MAP and decreasing the isoflurane concentration and infusing dobutamine achieved higher pressures. Invasive and noninvasive measurements were compared. Correlation (R(2)) was good between the two methods of measurement (average of three consecutive readings) for systolic (SAP) (0.87), diastolic (DAP) (0.86), and mean (0.90) arterial pressures (p oscillometric monitor slightly overestimated SAP and underestimated DAP and MAP for both average values and the first reading. This oscillometric model provided MAP measurements that were acceptable by ACVIM standards. MAP measurements with this monitor were lower than those found with the invasive technique so a clinical diagnosis of hypotension may be made in sheep that are not hypotensive. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  17. Intracranial pressure and cerebral hemodynamic in patients with cerebral tumors: a randomized prospective study of patients subjected to craniotomy in propofol-fentanyl, isoflurane-fentanyl, or sevoflurane-fentanyl anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kurt D; Landsfeldt, Uffe; Cold, Georg Emil; Petersen, Carsten B; Mau, Søren; Hauerberg, John; Holst, Peter; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2003-02-01

    A critical point during craniotomy is opening of dura, where a high intracranial pressure (ICP) results in swelling of cerebral tissue. Controlled studies concerning ICP, degree of dural tension, and degree of cerebral swelling are therefore warranted. In an open-label study, 117 patients with supratentorial cerebral tumors were randomized to propofol-fentanyl (group 1), isoflurane-fentanyl (group 2), or sevoflurane-fentanyl anesthesia (group 3). Normo- to moderate hypocapnia was applied, with a target level of arterial carbon dioxid tension of 30-40 mmHg. Mean arterial blood pressure was stabilized with intravenous ephedrine (2.5-5 mg) if necessary. Subdural ICP, mean arterial blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), arteriovenous oxygen difference (AVDo2), internal jugular vein oxygen saturation were monitored before and after a 10-min period of hyperventilation, and the carbon dioxide reactivity was calculated. Furthermore, the tension of dura before and during hyperventilation and the degree of cerebral swelling during hyperventilation and after opening of the dura were estimated by the neurosurgeon. No differences were found between groups with regard to demographics, neuroradiologic examination, positioning of the head, and time to ICP measurement. Before and during hyperventilation, ICP was significantly lower and mean arterial blood pressure and CPP significantly higher in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P hyperventilation was significantly lower in group 1 compared with group2 (P hyperventilation, subdural ICP and AVDo2 are lower and CPP higher in propofol-anesthetized patients compared with patients anesthetized with isoflurane or sevoflurane. These findings were associated with less tendency for cerebral swelling after opening of dura in the propofol group. The carbon dioxide reactivity in patients anesthetized with isoflurane and sevoflurane was significantly higher than in the propofol group. The differences in subdural ICP between the

  18. Early Exposure to General Anesthesia with Isoflurane Downregulates Inhibitory Synaptic Neurotransmission in the Rat Thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joksovic, Pavle M; Lunardi, Nadia; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence supports the idea that common general anesthetics (GAs) such as isoflurane (Iso) and nitrous oxide (N2O; laughing gas) are neurotoxic and may harm the developing mammalian brain, including the thalamus; however, to date very little is known about how developmental exposure to GAs may affect synaptic transmission in the thalamus which, in turn, controls the function of thalamocortical circuitry. To address this issue we used in vitro patch-clamp recordings of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) from intact neurons of the nucleus reticularis thalami (nRT) in brain slices from rat pups (postnatal age P10-P18) exposed at age of P7 to clinically relevant GA combinations of Iso and N2O. We found that rats exposed to a combination of 0.75 % Iso and 75 % N2O display lasting reduction in the amplitude and faster decays of eIPSCs. Exposure to sub-anesthetic concentrations of 75 % N2O alone or 0.75 % Iso alone at P7 did not affect the amplitude of eIPSCs; however, Iso alone, but not N2O, significantly accelerated decay of eIPSCs. Anesthesia with 1.5 % Iso alone decreased amplitudes, caused faster decay and decreased the paired-pulse ratio of eIPSCs. We conclude that anesthesia at P7 with Iso alone or in combination with N2O causes plasticity of eIPSCs in nRT neurons by both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. We hypothesize that changes in inhibitory synaptic transmission in the thalamus induced by GAs may contribute to altered neuronal excitability and consequently abnormal thalamocortical oscillations later in life.

  19. Assessment of occupational exposure of medical personnel to inhalatory anesthetics in Poland

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    Małgorzata Kucharska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Despite common use of inhalatory anesthetics, such as nitrous oxide (N2O, halothane, sevoflurane, and the like, occupational exposure to these substances in operating theatres was not monitored in Poland until 2006. The situation changed when maximum admissible concentration (MAC values for anesthetics used in Poland were established in 2005 for N2O, and in 2007 for sevoflurane, desflurane and isoflurane. The aim of this work was to assess occupational exposure in operating rooms on the basis of reliable and uniform analytical procedures. Material and Methods: The method for the determination of all anesthetics used in Poland, i.e. nitrous oxide, sevoflurane, isoflurane, desflurane, and halothane, was developed and validated. The measurements were performed in 2006-2010 in 31 hospitals countrywide. The study covered 117 operating rooms; air samples were collected from the breathing zone of 146 anesthesiologists, and 154 nurses, mostly anaesthetic. The measurements were carried out during various surgical operations, mostly on adult patients but also in hospitals for children. Results: Time weighted average concentrations of the anesthetics varied considerably, and the greatest differences were noted for N2O (0.1-1438.5 mg/m3; 40% of the results exceeded the MAC value. Only 3% of halothane, and 2% of sevoflurane concentrations exceeded the respective MAC values. Conclusions: Working in operating theatres is dangerous to the health of the operating staff. The coefficient of combined exposure to anesthesiologists under study exceeded the admissible value in 130 cases, which makes over 40% of the whole study population. Most of the excessive exposure values were noted for nitrous oxide. Med Pr 2014;65(1:43–54

  20. Local Anesthetic Microencapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-04

    local anesthetic by Freud and Koller in 1884 (Ritchie and Grune 1980), local anes- thetics have played an important role in clinical medicine. Local...J * ana , NCO C L) ..0C%j U C - r_ c 00 4- C) LU- V~~ 0 )a IrL LUI ii;:7-7 73 -04 &001 EE 4-- 4)4 m’ CJ ou u o 0>’. U L o_ 0 0 -l -L 0 4) U U 0 0 4-L

  1. Evaluation of noninvasive oscillometric blood pressure monitoring in anesthetized boid snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Wrenn, Amy; DeVoe, Ryan S

    2009-03-01

    To determine the accuracy of a noninvasive oscillometric monitor in the measurement of arterial blood pressure in anesthetized boid snakes. Evaluation study. 4 boa constrictors (Boa constrictor), 2 carpet pythons (Morelia spilota), and 2 reticulated pythons (Python reticulatus). After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, each snake was instrumented with an arterial catheter connected to a pressure transducer and oscilloscope to obtain invasive measurements of systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP), and mean (MAP) arterial blood pressure as well as a pressure waveform. A cuff connected to an oscillometric device was placed on the tail immediately distal to the vent for noninvasive measurements. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and invasive and noninvasive measurements of SAP, DAP, and MAP were obtained every 5 minutes for 45 minutes. Delivered isoflurane concentration was increased in 15-minute increments to induce hypotension. Repeatability of each device and fixed and proportional biases between devices were calculated. Throughout most of the measured ranges of blood pressures, the oscillometric unit overestimated the SAP and underestimated the DAP and MAP, compared with respective direct measurements. When the invasively determined SAP was > 100 mm Hg, the oscillometric unit underestimated all 3 variables. Fixed bias was significant for SAP and DAP, and proportional bias was significant for SAP and MAP. When using an oscillometric blood pressure monitor on anesthetized boid snakes, veterinarians can potentially monitor changes in blood pressure, although the displayed readings may underestimate DAP and MAP and overestimate SAP. Indirect measurements of blood pressure made with the oscillometric device cannot substitute for direct measurements.

  2. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

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    Mark Verlinde

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk factors for perioperative nerve injury include regional block technique, patient risk factors, and local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Surgery can lead to nerve damage by use of tourniquets or by direct mechanical stress on nerves, such as traction, transection, compression, contusion, ischemia, and stretching. Current literature suggests that the majority of perioperative nerve injuries are unrelated to regional anesthesia. Besides the blockade of sodium channels which is responsible for the anesthetic effect, systemic local anesthetics can have a positive influence on the inflammatory response and the hemostatic system in the perioperative period. However, next to these beneficial effects, local anesthetics exhibit time and dose-dependent toxicity to a variety of tissues, including nerves. There is equivocal experimental evidence that the toxicity varies among local anesthetics. Even though the precise order of events during local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity is not clear, possible cellular mechanisms have been identified. These include the intrinsic caspase-pathway, PI3K-pathway, and MAPK-pathways. Further research will need to determine whether these pathways are non-specifically activated by local anesthetics, or whether there is a single common precipitating factor.

  3. Mouse current vocalization threshold measured with a neurospecific nociception assay: The effect of sex, morphine, and isoflurane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spornick, Nicholas; Guptill, Virginia; Koziol, Deloris; Wesley, Robert; Finkel, Julia; Quezado, Zenaide M.N.

    2012-01-01

    Sine-wave electrical stimulation at frequencies 2000, 250, and 5 Hz to respectively evaluate Aβ, Aδ, and C sensory neurons has recently been added to the armamentarium used to evaluate sensory neurons. We developed an automated nociception assay using sine-wave stimulation methodology to determine current vocalization threshold in response to 2000, 250, and 5 Hz and examine the effects of sex, analgesics, and anesthetics in mice. At baseline, males had significantly higher mean current vocalization thresholds compared with female mice at 2000, 250, and 5 Hz (p ≤ 0.019). By 1 h after intrathecal injections of morphine there were significant increases in current vocalization threshold percent changes from baseline that varied with doses (p = 0.0001) and frequency used (p 250 Hz (p 2000 Hz (p = 0.0002). Forty-five minutes after exposure, there were no effects of isoflurane on current vocalization thresholds at any frequency. Therefore, our findings suggest that this automated nociception assay using sine-wave stimulation in mice, can be valuable for measurements of the effects of sex, opioids, and anesthetics on the response to electrical stimuli that preferentially stimulate Aβ, Aδ, and C-sensory fibers in vivo. This investigation suggests the validation of this assay and supports its use to examine mechanisms of nociception in mice. PMID:21864576

  4. Multiple synaptic and membrane sites of anesthetic action in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices

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    MacIver M Bruce

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anesthesia is produced by a depression of central nervous system function, however, the sites and mechanisms of action underlying this depression remain poorly defined. The present study compared and contrasted effects produced by five general anesthetics on synaptic circuitry in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices. Results At clinically relevant and equi-effective concentrations, presynaptic and postsynaptic anesthetic actions were evident at glutamate-mediated excitatory synapses and at GABA-mediated inhibitory synapses. In addition, depressant effects on membrane excitability were observed for CA1 neuron discharge in response to direct current depolarization. Combined actions at several of these sites contributed to CA1 circuit depression, but the relative degree of effect at each site was different for each anesthetic studied. For example, most of propofol's depressant effect (> 70 % was reversed with a GABA antagonist, but only a minor portion of isoflurane's depression was reversed ( 50 %, but thiopental by only Conclusions These results, in as much as they may be relevant to anesthesia, indicate that general anesthetics act at several discrete sites, supporting a multi-site, agent specific theory for anesthetic actions. No single effect site (e.g. GABA synapses or mechanism of action (e.g. depressed membrane excitability could account for all of the effects produced for any anesthetic studied.

  5. Isoflurane anesthesia initiated at the onset of reperfusion attenuates oxidative and hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A Sosunov

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates that in mice subjected to hypoxia-ischemia (HI brain injury isoflurane anesthesia initiated upon reperfusion limits a release of mitochondrial oxidative radicals by inhibiting a recovery of complex-I dependent mitochondrial respiration. This significantly attenuates an oxidative stress and reduces the extent of HI brain injury. Neonatal mice were subjected to HI, and at the initiation of reperfusion were exposed to isoflurane with or without mechanical ventilation. At the end of HI and isoflurane exposure cerebral mitochondrial respiration, H2O2 emission rates were measured followed by an assessment of cerebral oxidative damage and infarct volumes. At 8 weeks after HI navigational memory and brain atrophy were assessed. In vitro, direct effect of isoflurane on mitochondrial H2O2 emission was compared to that of complex-I inhibitor, rotenone. Compared to controls, 15 minutes of isoflurane anesthesia inhibited recovery of the compex I-dependent mitochondrial respiration and decreased H2O2 production in mitochondria supported with succinate. This was associated with reduced oxidative brain injury, superior navigational memory and decreased cerebral atrophy compared to the vehicle-treated HI-mice. Extended isoflurane anesthesia was associated with sluggish recovery of cerebral blood flow (CBF and the neuroprotection was lost. However, when isoflurane anesthesia was supported with mechanical ventilation the CBF recovery improved, the event associated with further reduction of infarct volume compared to HI-mice exposed to isoflurane without respiratory support. Thus, in neonatal mice brief isoflurane anesthesia initiated at the onset of reperfusion limits mitochondrial release of oxidative radicals and attenuates an oxidative stress. This novel mechanism contributes to neuroprotective action of isoflurane. The use of mechanical ventilation during isoflurane anesthesia counterbalances negative effect of isoflurane anesthesia on

  6. Isoflurane anaesthesia in an African wild dog, Lycaon pictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmann, G F

    2000-12-01

    Anaesthesia was required in a captive female African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) for surgical wound treatment. After it was immobilised with a medetomidine-ketamine combination, bradycardia, hypothermia, systolic hypertension and metabolic acidosis were observed. Surgical anaesthesia was maintained with a 1% end-tidal isoflurane concentration. A decrease in the arterial blood pressure, rectal temperature and pH occurred during maintenance of anaesthesia.

  7. Minocycline attenuates cognitive impairment induced by isoflurane anesthesia in aged rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feijuan Kong

    Full Text Available Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD is a clinical phenomenon characterized by cognitive deficits in patients after anesthesia and surgery, especially in geriatric surgical patients. Although it has been documented that isoflurane exposure impaired cognitive function in several aged animal models, there are few clinical interventions and treatments available to prevent this disorder. Minocycline has been well established to exert neuroprotective effects in various experimental animal models and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, we hypothesized that pretreatment with minocycline attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive decline in aged rats. In the present study, twenty-month-old rats were administered minocycline or an equal volume of saline by intraperitoneal injection 12 h before exposure to isoflurane. Then the rats were exposed to 1.3% isoflurane for 4 h. Two weeks later, spatial learning and memory of the rats were examined using the Morris Water Maze. We found that pretreatment with minocycline mitigated isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits and suppressed the isoflurane-induced excessive release of IL-1β and caspase-3 in the hippocampal CA1 region at 4 h after isoflurane exposure, as well as the number of TUNEL-positive nuclei. In addition, minocycline treatment also prevented the changes of synaptic ultrastructure in the hippocampal CA1 region induced by isoflurane. In conclusion, pretreatment with minocycline attenuated isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats.

  8. Anesthetic protocols for common emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Vicki L

    2005-03-01

    Anesthesia, sedation, and pain management should be taken seriously in the emergency patient. Proper knowledge of the drugs available and their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are necessary to administer anesthesia safely to critical patients. A proactive approach regarding monitoring, titration of anesthetic drugs, and anticipation of life-threatening complications helps in achieving successful anesthetic outcomes.

  9. What is the optimal anesthetic protocol for measurements of cerebral autoregulation in spontaneously breathing mice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenghui; Schuler, Beat; Vogel, Olga; Arras, Margarete; Vogel, Johannes

    2010-12-01

    Autoregulation, an important feature of the cerebral circulation, is affected in many diseases. Since genetically modified mice are a fundamental tool in biomedical research, including neuro(bio)logy also in this specie measurements of cerebral autoregulation (CA) are mandatory. However, this requires anesthesia that unfortunately significantly impacts cerebral perfusion and consequently might distort CA measurements directly or by altering arterial pCO(2). The latter can be avoided by artificial ventilation but requires several control measurements of blood gases, each consuming at least 100 μl of blood or 5% of a mouse's blood volume. To avoid such diagnostic hemorrhage, we systematically analyzed the effect of different common anesthetic protocols used for rodents in spontaneously breathing mice on CA measured with Laser speckle perfusion imaging. Halothane, Isoflurane and Pentobarbital abrogated CA and Ketamin/Xylazine as well as Chloralose had a moderate reproducibility. In contrast, the rather rarely used anesthetic Ethomidate applied in low doses combined with local anesthetics had the best reproducibility. Although with this anesthesia the lower CA limit was lower than with Ketamin/Xylazine and Chloralose as reported in the handful of papers so far dealing with CA in mice, we suggest Ethomidate as the anesthetic of choice for CA measurements in spontaneously breathing mice.

  10. Evaluation of the Aesthetics of Physical Methods of Euthanasia of Anesthetized Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Debra L; Johnson, Steven W

    2011-01-01

    Dissection of living brain tissue for in vitro experiments requires the use of a rapid euthanasia method. However, the method must not subject animals to unnecessary pain and must be aesthetically acceptable to experimenters. The purposes of the current study were to assess the aesthetics of 6 euthanasia methods, measure the procedure duration, and evaluate brain for pathology after each procedure. We digitally recorded euthanasia of isoflurane-anesthetized rats by 6 physical methods: anesthetic overdose, cardiac exsanguination, decapitation, closed intrathoracic transection of the great vessels and heart, thoracic percussion, and thoracotomy with rupture of great vessels. Volunteer researchers and animal caretakers watched the video and completed an associated questionnaire. Anesthetic overdose and cardiac exsanguinations were rated most aesthetically pleasing, although these procedures took the longest to complete. In contrast, decapitation and thoracic percussion were the least aesthetically pleasing, but these methods were the quickest. No demographic factor was identified that could predict whether a given euthanasia procedure would be favored for aesthetic reasons, and participants provided a wide variety of rationales for the aesthetic ratings they assigned. Although all of these euthanasia methods meet the criteria of approved methods of euthanasia of anesthetized rats as defined by the AVMA, aesthetic features and the scientific need for rapid euthanasia are both considerations in selecting a method. PMID:22330717

  11. Characteristics of electromechanical window in anesthetized rabbit models of short QT and long QT syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limprasutr, Vudhiporn; Saengklub, Nakkawee; Meedech, Pradtana; Kijtawornrat, Anusak; Hamlin, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    The current regulatory guidelines recommend the use of QT interval to assess the risk of arrhythmogenic potential of new chemical entities. Recently, the electromechanical window (EMW), the difference in duration between electrical and mechanical systole, has been proposed as markers for drug-induced torsades de pointes (TdP); however, data of EMW in short QT model are not available. This study aimed to characterize the EMW as a marker for drug-induced ventricular arrhythmias in anesthetized rabbit model of long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2) and short QT syndrome (SQTS) infused with reference compounds known to lengthen or shorten QT intervals. After rabbits were anesthetized with isoflurane, body surface electrocardiograms and left ventricular pressure were recorded. The LQT2 was produced by intravenous infusion with dofetilide (n = 6), quinidine (n = 6) and sotalol (n = 6) whereas the SQTS was induced by intravenous escalating concentrations of nicorandil (n = 7), pinacidil (n = 5) and cromakalim (n = 5). The EMW in anesthetized rabbits ranged from 1.3 to 53.3 msec. All three drugs known to lengthen QT intervals prolonged QT and QTcF interval while the EMW was markedly decreased to negative values. Pinacidil significantly produced QT and QTcF shortening and significantly abbreviated the EMW (p QT intervals (p QT-prolonging drugs while it is more positive in the presence of QT-shortening drugs. The results suggest that the EMW in anesthetized rabbits can be used in drug safety evaluation in addition to the QT interval.

  12. Dexmedetomidine as the primary anesthetic agent during cardiac surgery in an infant with a family history of malignant hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymen Naguib

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant hyperthermia (MH is an acute hypermetabolic crisis triggered in susceptible patients by the administration of succinylcholine or a volatile anesthetic agent. When providing anesthetic care for MH-susceptible agents, a total intravenous anesthetic (TIVA technique is frequently chosen. When choosing the components for TIVA, several options exist including the combination of propofol or dexmedetomidine with an opioid. We present our experience with the use of dexmedetomidine as a key component of the anesthetic regimen in a 5-month-old infant with a family history of MH. Previous reports of the use of dexmedetomidine in MH-susceptible patients are reviewed and its benefits in such patients discussed.

  13. Narcotics and local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerling, S G

    1993-12-01

    The recognition and alleviation of animal pain is a growing veterinary and public concern. Pain can be of an acute or chronic nature with different behavioral manifestations. Physiologically, pain is a dynamic and complex phenomenon that produces changes in the central and autonomic nervous systems as well as in the endocrine system. Horses and other animals appear to possess an endogenous pain-suppressing system involving the brainstem and spinal cord. This system can modulate pain perception and the responses to it. The recently discovered endogenous opioid peptides (endorphins and enkephalins) appear to play a role in this system, which is activated by stress. Opioids (narcotic analgesics) act to selectively depress pain-sensitive cells. Opioid analgesics may act via multiple opioid receptors. Each subclass of opioid receptor has a different pharmacologic profile. Classical opioids that act at mu (morphine) receptors typically produce analgesia, increased locomotor activity, cardiorespiratory stimulation, and a decrease in intestinal peristalsis in the horse. Opioids that act at kappa receptors produce analgesia, sedation, ataxia, and minimal autonomic effects in the horse. Owing to their lack of excitatory actions, the kappa opioids represent a potentially useful class of analgesics for use in equine species. Local anesthetics depress all excitable cells and can diminish sensory, motor, and muscular function. They do not act selectively on pain fibers, although pain is among the first sensations lost following a nerve block. Local anesthetic activity is enhanced by increased extraneuronal pH, nerve cooling, increased nervous activity, coadministration of a vasoconstrictor or hyaluronidase, delayed systemic absorption, prolonged drug metabolism, and by using agents with high lipid solubility. Procaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine are among the most widely used and studied agents in horses. These agents and/or their metabolites can be readily detected in urine; in

  14. Antihistaminic and cardiorespiratory effects of diphenhydramine hydrochloride in anesthetized dogs undergoing excision of mast cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Andrea; Valverde, Alexander; Sinclair, Melissa; Mosley, Cornelia; Singh, Ameet; Mutsaers, Anthony J; Hanna, Brad; Johnson, Ron; Gu, Yu; Beaudoin-Kimble, Michelle

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of IV diphenhydramine hydrochloride administration on cardiorespiratory variables in anesthetized dogs undergoing mast cell tumor (MCT) excision. DESIGN Randomized, blinded clinical trial. ANIMALS 16 client-owned dogs with MCTs. PROCEDURES In a standardized isoflurane anesthesia session that included mechanical ventilation, dogs received diphenhydramine hydrochloride (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], IV; n = 8) or an equivalent volume of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (IV; control treatment; 8) 10 minutes after induction. Cardiorespiratory variables were recorded throughout anesthesia and MCT excision, and blood samples for determination of plasma diphenhydramine and histamine concentrations were collected prior to premedication (baseline), throughout anesthesia, and 2 hours after extubation. RESULTS Cardiorespiratory values in both treatment groups were acceptable for anesthetized dogs. Mean ± SD diastolic arterial blood pressure was significantly lower in the diphenhydramine versus control group during tumor dissection (52 ± 10 mm Hg vs 62 ± 9 mm Hg) and surgical closure (51 ± 10 mm Hg vs 65 ± 9 mm Hg). Mean arterial blood pressure was significantly lower in the diphenhydramine versus control group during surgical closure (65 ± 12 mm Hg vs 78 ± 11 mm Hg), despite a higher cardiac index value. Plasma histamine concentrations were nonsignificantly higher than baseline during maximal manipulation of the tumor and surgical preparation in the diphenhydramine group and during surgical dissection in the control group. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE IV administration of diphenhydramine prior to MCT excision had no clear clinical cardiorespiratory benefits over placebo in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs.

  15. Anesthetic services in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majstorović Branislava M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanation the topic: Due to the development of knowledge and technology our world is becoming a global city where rapidly occur changes in political and economic milieu, such as the introduction of corporate capitalism in the economic crisis, contemporary migrations etc. Health care as a public good on one hand and as the highest individual value of each individual on the other hand, changes and suffers changes. Health care system policy insists on partnership relation of the individual with medical service providers. This refers to the a secure and accessible modern treatment of each individual and to the state as to rationalize and reduce medical costs with effective methods of treatment. Topic position in scientific/professional public: Anesthesiology is evolving along with the surgical disciplines. Highly sophisticated with organized service, anesthesiology is equally important because of the multiplicity of anesthetic services in the surgical treatment of the disease in terms of teamwork and multidisciplinary treatment of the disease. The intention is to provide a description of work, education and our results in the economic, geopolitical and cultural context of the Serbian health system policy as well as to improve safe performance, availability and cost rationalization in anesthesia. The health care system is territorially organized in Serbia. In hospitals, Serbia employs 940 anesthesiologists (1:7,575 inhabitants. According to data from the Regional Medical Chamber of Belgrade,382 anesthesiologists were registered in Belgrade out of total. Anesthesia department network is well organized in all surgical hospitals. Anesthesia services are available depending on the place of residence, type of surgical illness or injury, and the distance to the nearest clinic. Sub-specializations in the field of anesthesiology have not been introduced although pediatric, neurosurgery and cardiosurgical anesthesia have spontaniously singled, as well as

  16. Effects of isoflurane anesthesia and pilocarpine on rat parotid saliva flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jacob Dronninglund; Nauntofte, Birgitte; Josipovic, M

    2011-01-01

    rats was 50% slower than that of the sham-irradiated rats. In conclusion, 1.5% isoflurane was found to be a good compromise between proper anesthesia and isoflurane-induced inhibition of saliva secretion. Pilocarpine induces saliva secretion in a dose-dependent matter, with supra-maximal stimulation...

  17. Isoflurane produces antidepressant effects and induces TrkB signaling in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antila, Hanna; Ryazantseva, Maria; Popova, Dina

    2017-01-01

    A brief burst-suppressing isoflurane anesthesia has been shown to rapidly alleviate symptoms of depression in a subset of patients, but the neurobiological basis of these observations remains obscure. We show that a single isoflurane anesthesia produces antidepressant-like behavioural effects in ...

  18. Isoflurane produces antidepressant effects and induces TrkB signaling in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antila, Hanna; Ryazantseva, Maria; Popova, Dina

    2017-01-01

    A brief burst-suppressing isoflurane anesthesia has been shown to rapidly alleviate symptoms of depression in a subset of patients, but the neurobiological basis of these observations remains obscure. We show that a single isoflurane anesthesia produces antidepressant-like behavioural effects...

  19. Xenon as an anesthetic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Bryan D; Wright, Elizabeth Laura

    2010-10-01

    Discovered in 1898 by British chemists, xenon is a rare gas belonging to the noble gases of the periodic table. Xenon is used in many different ways, from high-intensity lamps to jet propellant, and in 1939, its anesthetic properties were discovered. Xenon exerts its anesthetic properties, in part, through the noncompetitive inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Currently, xenon is being used primarily throughout Europe; however, the high price of manufacturing and scavenging the noble gas has discouraged more widespread use. As technology in anesthetic delivery improves, xenon is being investigated further as a possible replacement for nitrous oxide as an inhalational agent. This article reviews the anesthetic properties of xenon and current and potential research about the gas.

  20. Dexmedetomidine mitigates isoflurane-induced neurodegeneration in fetal rats during the second trimester of pregnancy

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    Zhi-yuan Su

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dexmedetomidine has significant neuroprotective effects. However, whether its protective effects can reduce neurotoxicity caused by isoflurane in fetal brain during the second trimester of pregnancy remains unclear. In this study, timed-pregnancy rats at gestational day 14 spontaneously inhaled 1.5% isoflurane for 4 hours, and were intraperitoneally injected with dexmedetomidine at dosages of 5, 10, 20, and 20 μg/kg 15 minutes before inhalation and after inhalation for 2 hours. Our results demonstrate that 4 hours after inhaling isoflurane, 20 μg/kg dexmedetomidine visibly mitigated isoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis, reversed downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression, and lessened decreased spatial learning and memory ability in adulthood in the fetal rats. Altogether, these findings indicate that dexmedetomidine can reduce neurodegeneration induced by isoflurane in fetal rats during the second trimester of pregnancy. Further, brain-derived neurotrophic factor participates in this process.

  1. Volatility Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Gustavo Fruet; Scherrer, Cristina; Papailias, Fotis

    The price discovery literature investigates how homogenous securities traded on different markets incorporate information into prices. We take this literature one step further and investigate how these markets contribute to stochastic volatility (volatility discovery). We formally show...... that the realized measures from homogenous securities share a fractional stochastic trend, which is a combination of the price and volatility discovery measures. Furthermore, we show that volatility discovery is associated with the way that market participants process information arrival (market sensitivity......). Finally, we compute volatility discovery for 30 actively traded stocks in the U.S. and report that Nyse and Arca dominate Nasdaq....

  2. Activation of D1 dopamine receptors induces emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Norman E.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND A recent study showed that methylphenidate induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. Methylphenidate inhibits dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake transporters. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that selective dopamine receptor activation induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. METHODS In adult rats, we tested the effects of chloro-APB (D1 agonist) and quinpirole (D2 agonist) on time to emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia. We then performed a dose–response study to test for chloro-APB-induced restoration of righting during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. SCH-23390 (D1 antagonist) was used to confirm that the effects induced by chloro-APB are specifically mediated by D1 receptors. In a separate group of animals, spectral analysis was performed on surface electroencephalogram recordings to assess neurophysiological changes induced by chloro-APB and quinpirole during isoflurane general anesthesia. RESULTS Chloro-APB decreased median time to emergence from 330s to 50s. The median difference in time to emergence between the saline control group (n=6) and the chloro-APB group (n = 6) was 222s (95% CI: 77–534s, Mann-Whitney test). This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0082). During continuous isoflurane anesthesia, chloro-APB dose-dependently restored righting (n = 6) and decreased electroencephalogram delta power (n = 4). These effects were inhibited by pretreatment with SCH-23390. Quinpirole did not restore righting (n = 6) and had no significant effect on the electroencephalogram (n = 4) during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. CONCLUSIONS Activation of D1 receptors by chloro-APB decreases time to emergence from isoflurane anesthesia, and produces behavioral and neurophysiological evidence of arousal during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. These findings suggest that selective activation of a D1 receptor-mediated arousal mechanism is sufficient to induce emergence from isoflurane general

  3. Comparing charcoal and zeolite reflection filters for volatile anaesthetics: A laboratory evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturesson, Louise W; Frennström, Jan O; Ilardi, Marcella; Reinstrup, Peter

    2015-08-01

    A modified heat-moisture exchanger that incorporates a reflecting filter for use with partial rebreathing of exhaled volatile anaesthetics has been commercially available since the 1990 s. The main advantages of the device are efficient delivery of inhaled sedation to intensive care patients and reduced anaesthetic consumption during anaesthesia. However, elevated arterial CO2 values have been observed with an anaesthetic conserving device compared with a conventional heat and moisture exchanger, despite compensation for larger apparatus dead space. The objective of this study is to thoroughly explore the properties of two reflecting materials (charcoal and zeolites). A controlled, prospective, observational laboratory study. Lund University Hospital, Sweden, from December 2011 to December 2012. None. Three filters, with identical volumes, were compared using different volatile anaesthetics at different conditions of temperature and moisture. The filtering materials were charcoal or zeolite. Glass spheres were used as an inert control. Consumption of volatile anaesthetics using different reflecting materials in filters at different conditions regarding temperature and moisture. CO2 reflection by the filtering materials: glass spheres, charcoal or zeolite. Isoflurane consumption in an open system was 60.8 g h(-1). The isoflurane consumption in dry, warm air was 39.8 g h(-1) with glass spheres. Changing to charcoal and zeolite had a profound effect on isoflurane consumption, 11.8 and 10.7 g h(-1), respectively. Heating and humidifying the air as well as the addition of N2O created only minor changes in consumption. The percentage of isoflurane conserved by the charcoal filter was independent of the isoflurane concentration (0.5 to 4.5%). Reflection of sevoflurane, desflurane and halothane by the charcoal filter was similar to reflection of isoflurane. Both charcoal and zeolite filters had CO2 reflecting properties and end-tidal CO2 increased by 3 to 3.7% compared

  4. Electrocardiographic study on geriatric dogs undergoing general anesthesia with isoflurane

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andreza Conti-Patara; Denise Tabacchi Fantoni; Silvia Renata Gaido Cortopassi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the degree of influence of anesthetic agents commonly used during anesthesia on the heart conduction systems of geriatric dogs, with or without the presence of...

  5. Anesthesia and Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy: review of 117 anesthetic exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Leal G; Lorenz, Jessica D; Weingarten, Toby N; Scavonetto, Federica; Bojanić, Katarina; Selcen, Duygu; Sprung, Juraj

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are associated with life-threatening perioperative complications, including rhabdomyolysis, hyperkalemia, and hyperthermia. Current recommendations contraindicate use of succinylcholine and volatile anesthetics; however, the latter recommendation remains controversial. To review the perioperative outcomes of patients with DMD and BMD. We reviewed records of patients with DMD or BMD who underwent anesthetic management at our institution from January 1990 through December 2011. We identified 47 patients (DMD, 37; BMD, 10) who underwent 117 anesthetic exposures (DMD, 101; BMD, 16). Volatile anesthetic agents were used 66 times (DMD, 59; BMD, 7). One patient with undiagnosed BMD received succinylcholine and developed acute rhabdomyolysis and hyperkalemic cardiac arrest. All other major complications were attributed to the procedure (i.e., large bleeding), to preexisting comorbidities (i.e., respiratory failure, cardiac disease), or to both. Use of succinylcholine in children with dystrophinopathy is contraindicated. These patients have significant comorbidities and are frequently undergoing extensive operations; complications related to these factors can develop, as evidenced by our series. These complications may occur with use of volatile and nonvolatile anesthetics. However, because most of our patients were older than 8 years at the time of surgery, our observation cannot be generalized to younger dystrophin-deficient children. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Anesthetics interacting with lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeiras, Cátia; Serro, Ana Paula; Luzyanin, Konstantin; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2013-01-23

    The exact mechanism by which anesthetics induce cell membrane-mediated modifications is still an open question. Although the fluidization effect of the anesthetic molecules on the cellular membrane is widely recognized, it is not known if anesthetics show any preference for specific membrane domains, namely the lipid rafts. The importance of these membrane micro-domains derives from the fact that they have been associated with cell signaling pathways, as well as with specific drug interactions. The objective of this work is to contribute for the elucidation of this question through the comparison of the anesthetic interactions with membranes of various lipid compositions. Liposomes prepared with an equimolar mixture of POPC, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, were chosen as models for lipid rafts. The interactions of these liposomes with two local anesthetics, tetracaine and lidocaine, and one general anesthetic, propofol, were studied. The effect of cholesterol was investigated by comparing anesthetic interactions with POPC/SM liposomes and POPC/SM/CHOL liposomes. The following experimental techniques were used: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, differential scanning calorimetry and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance. Although the liposomes investigated by the different techniques are not in the same conditions, it is possible to assemble the information obtained from all experimental techniques employed to reach a general conclusion. Tetracaine interacts more with raftlike domains, lidocaine induces stronger modifications on POPC/SM liposomes and the results for propofol are not fully conclusive but it seems to be the least prone to lipid interactions. The results were compared with those obtained with DMPC-containing liposomes, reported in a previous work. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Computerized monitoring of depth of anaesthesia with isoflurane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C E; Christensen, K N; Rosenfalck, A

    1989-01-01

    Changes in brain activity were studied at different depths of isoflurane anaesthesia. Ten healthy women (ASA group I) were investigated during non-critical surgery. Two channels of the EEG were stored on tape simultaneously with alveolar concentration of carbon dioxide, inspired oxygen concentrat......Changes in brain activity were studied at different depths of isoflurane anaesthesia. Ten healthy women (ASA group I) were investigated during non-critical surgery. Two channels of the EEG were stored on tape simultaneously with alveolar concentration of carbon dioxide, inspired oxygen...... concentration, mean arterial pressure, ECG and temperature. Signal processing was made offline. Spectral information from 2-s EEG segments was extracted using autoregressive modelling. Repetitive hierarchical clustering was used to define a common learning set of basic patterns. With this learning set, the EEG...... was classified, and the results presented in a class probability histogram. The basic patterns were related to the clinical depth of anaesthesia in all patients and assigned specific colours. Using this colour code, the class probability histogram showed a high degree of simplicity. Decreasing or increasing...

  8. Anesthetic Care in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Camila B; Merchant, Amina I; Schwalbach, Teresa; Pinto, Emilia F V; Jeque, Emilia C; McQueen, K A Kelly

    2016-05-01

    The World Bank and Lancet Commission in 2015 have prioritized surgery in Low-Income Countries (LIC) and Lower-Middle Income Countries (LMICs). This is consistent with the shift in the global burden of disease from communicable to noncommunicable diseases over the past 20 years. Essential surgery must be performed safely, with adequate anesthesia monitoring and intervention. Unfortunately, a huge barrier to providing safe surgery includes the paucity of an anesthesia workforce. In this study, we qualitatively evaluated the anesthesia capacity of Mozambique, a LIC in Africa with limited access to anesthesia and safe surgical care. Country-based solutions are suggested that can expand to other LIC and LMICs. A comprehensive review of the Mozambique anesthesia system was conducted through interviews with personnel in the Ministry of Health (MOH), a school of medicine, a public central referral hospital, a general first referral hospital, a private care hospital, and leaders in the physician anesthesia community. Personnel databases were acquired from the MOH and Maputo Central Hospital. Quantitative results reveal minimal anesthesia capacity (290 anesthesia providers for a population of >25 million or 0.01:10,000). The majority of physician anesthesiologists practice in urban settings, and many work in the private sector. There is minimal capacity for growth given only 1 Mozambique anesthesia residency with inadequate resources. The most commonly perceived barriers to safe anesthesia in this critical shortage are lack of teachers, lack of medical student interest in and exposure to anesthesia, need for more schools, low allocation to anesthesia from the list of available specialist prospects by MOH, and low public payments to anesthesiologists. Qualitative results show assets of a good health system design, a supportive environment for learning in the residency, improvement in anesthetic care in past decades, and a desire for more educational opportunities and teachers

  9. Effects of anesthetic agents on brain blood oxygenation level revealed with ultra-high field MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Ciobanu

    Full Text Available During general anesthesia it is crucial to control systemic hemodynamics and oxygenation levels. However, anesthetic agents can affect cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in a drug-dependent manner, while systemic hemodynamics is stable. Brain-wide monitoring of this effect remains highly challenging. Because T(2*-weighted imaging at ultra-high magnetic field strengths benefits from a dramatic increase in contrast to noise ratio, we hypothesized that it could monitor anesthesia effects on brain blood oxygenation. We scanned rat brains at 7T and 17.2T under general anesthesia using different anesthetics (isoflurane, ketamine-xylazine, medetomidine. We showed that the brain/vessels contrast in T(2*-weighted images at 17.2T varied directly according to the applied pharmacological anesthetic agent, a phenomenon that was visible, but to a much smaller extent at 7T. This variation is in agreement with the mechanism of action of these agents. These data demonstrate that preclinical ultra-high field MRI can monitor the effects of a given drug on brain blood oxygenation level in the absence of systemic blood oxygenation changes and of any neural stimulation.

  10. Effects of halothane, isoflurane and enflurane on isolated rat heart muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, F S; Carceles, M D; Laorden, M L; Hernandez, J

    1989-05-01

    Since the effects in the intact organism are complicated by central as well as peripheral effects, we compared the direct cardiac effects of three commonly used inhalational anaesthetics--halothane, isoflurane and enflurane--on isolated heart muscle. Concentration-response curves for inotropic, chronotropic and ventricular automaticity effects of halothane, isoflurane and enflurane (0.1-2% v/v) on electrically stimulated left atria, right atria and right ventricles of the rat were obtained. All three inhalational anaesthetics significantly decreased contractile force; the inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) of enflurane was 0.55 +/- 0.06% v/v, significantly lower than halothane (0.96 +/- 0.08% v/v) and isoflurane (0.67 +/- 0.05% v/v). Similar results were obtained on atrial nomotopic rate. Halothane, isoflurane and enflurane produced negative chronotropic effects in this preparation. On the other hand, halothane and isoflurane significantly reduced the ventricular ectopic automaticity. However enflurane (0.3, 0.5, 1% v/v) increased ventricular rate. There were statistically significant differences between the IC50 values of atrial and ventricular rate for halothane and isoflurane. These results indicate: (a) direct negative inotropic and chronotropic effects for the three inhalational anaesthetics tested; (b) anti-dysrhythmic actions for halothane and isoflurane; and (c) dysrhythmogenic effects of enflurane.

  11. Protective effects of salidroside against isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L; Ma, Z; Dong, M; Ma, J; Jiang, A; Sun, X

    2017-12-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction, which is associated with a wide range of cognitive functions including working memory, long-term memory, information processing, attention, and cognitive flexibility, is a major clinical issue in geriatric surgical patients. The aim of the current study was to determine the protective role and possible mechanisms of salidroside against isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to five groups and were treated with or without salidroside before isoflurane exposure. Open-field and fear conditioning tests were conducted to evaluate the cognitive function of the rats. Moreover, the hippocampus tissues were obtained for biochemical analysis. The results showed that the isoflurane anesthesia decreased the freezing time to context significantly at 48 h after the isoflurane exposure in the fear conditioning test. Salidroside could ameliorate isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction. Further analysis demonstrated salidroside markedly suppressed the release of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. Moreover, salidroside reversed the decreased activity of choline acetyltransferase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and content of acetylcholine, as well as the increased activity of acetylcholine esterase and content of malondialdehyde in hippocampal tissue of isoflurane-exposed rats. According to the results, we concluded that that salidroside has a protective effect against isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction by inhibiting excessive inflammatory responses, decreasing oxidative stress, and regulating the cholinergic system.

  12. Awake nonhuman primate brain PET imaging with minimal head restraint: evaluation of GABAA-benzodiazepine binding with 11C-flumazenil in awake and anesthetized animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandiego, Christine M; Jin, Xiao; Mulnix, Tim; Fowles, Krista; Labaree, David; Ropchan, Jim; Huang, Yiyun; Cosgrove, Kelly; Castner, Stacy A; Williams, Graham V; Wells, Lisa; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Carson, Richard E

    2013-11-01

    Neuroreceptor imaging in the nonhuman primate (NHP) is valuable for translational research approaches in humans. However, most NHP studies are conducted under anesthesia, which affects the interpretability of receptor binding measures. The aims of this study were to develop awake NHP imaging with minimal head restraint and to compare in vivo binding of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA)-benzodiazepine radiotracer (11)C-flumazenil under anesthetized and awake conditions. We hypothesized that (11)C-flumazenil binding potential (BPND) would be higher in isoflurane-anesthetized monkeys. The small animal PET scanner was fitted to a mechanical device that raised and tilted the scanner 45° while the awake NHP was tilted back 35° in a custom chair for optimal brain positioning, which required acclimation of the animals to the chair, touch-screen tasks, intravenous catheter insertion, and tilting. For PET studies, the bolus-plus-constant infusion method was used for (11)C-flumazenil administration. Two rhesus monkeys were scanned under the awake (n = 6 scans) and isoflurane-anesthetized (n = 4 scans) conditions. An infrared camera was used to track head motion during PET scans. Under the awake condition, emission and head motion-tracking data were acquired for 40-75 min after injection. Anesthetized monkeys were scanned for 90 min. Cortisol measurements were acquired during awake and anesthetized scans. Equilibrium analysis was used for both the anesthetized (n = 4) and the awake (n = 5) datasets to compute mean BPND images in NHP template space, using the pons as a reference region. The percentage change per minute in radioactivity concentration was calculated in high- and low-binding regions to assess the quality of equilibrium. The monkeys acclimated to procedures in the NHP chair necessary to perform awake PET imaging. Image quality was comparable between awake and anesthetized conditions. The relationship between awake and anesthetized values was BPND (awake

  13. Isoflurane reduces the carbachol-evoked Ca2+ influx in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Alexandra; Xu, Fang; Garavito-Aguilar, Zayra V; Blanck, Thomas J J; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2004-10-01

    The authors previously reported that the isoflurane-caused reduction of the carbachol-evoked cytoplasmic Ca transient increase ([Ca]cyt) was eliminated by K or caffeine-pretreatment. In this study the authors investigated whether the isoflurane-sensitive component of the carbachol-evoked [Ca]cyt transient involved Ca influx through the plasma membrane. Perfused attached human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to carbachol (1 mm, 2 min) in the absence and presence of isoflurane (1 mm) and in the absence and presence of extracellular Ca (1.5 mm). The authors studied the effect of the nonspecific cationic channel blocker La (100 microm), of the L-type Ca channel blocker nitrendipine (10 microm), and of the N-type Ca channel blocker omega-conotoxin GVIA (0.1 microm) on isoflurane modulation of the carbachol-evoked [Ca]cyt transient. [Ca]cyt was detected with fura-2 and experiments were carried out at 37 degrees C. Isoflurane reduced the peak and area of the carbachol-evoked [Ca]cyt transient in the presence but not in the absence of extracellular Ca. La had a similar effect as the removal of extracellular Ca. Omega-conotoxin GVIA and nitrendipine did not affect the isoflurane sensitivity of the carbachol response although nitrendipine reduced the magnitude of the carbachol response. The current data are consistent with previous observations in that the carbachol-evoked [Ca]cyt transient involves both Ca release from intracellular Ca stores and Ca entry through the plasma membrane. It was found that isoflurane attenuates the carbachol-evoked Ca entry. The isoflurane sensitive Ca entry involves a cationic channel different from the L- or N- type voltage-dependent Ca channels. These results indicate that isoflurane attenuates the carbachol-evoked [Ca]cyt transient at a site at the plasma membrane that is distal to the muscarinic receptor.

  14. PERTURBATION OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE CALCIUM FUNCTION IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELLS BY VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile organic solvents such as toluene (TOL) and trichloroethylene perturb nervous system function and share characteristic effects with other central nervous system depressants such as anesthetic gasses, ethanol, benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Recently, mechanistic studies...

  15. [Anesthetic management in bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozian, Alf; Schilling, Thomas; Hachenberg, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    In daily practice, acute and chronic pulmonary diseases are common issues presenting to the anesthetist. Respiratory physiology in general is affected by both general and regional anesthesia, which results in an increased number of perioperative complications in pulmonary risk patients. Therefore, anesthetic management of patients with bronchial asthma needs to address different clinical topics: the physical appearance of pulmonary disease, type and extent of surgical intervention as well as effects of therapeutic drugs, anesthetics and mechanical ventilation on respiratory function. The present work describes important precautions in preoperative scheduling of the asthmatic patient. In the operative course, airway manipulation and a number of anesthetics are able to trigger intraoperative bronchial spasm with possibly fatal outcome. It is essential to avoid these substances to prevent asthma attack. If asthmatic status occurs, appropriate procedures according to therapeutic standards have to be applied to the patient. Postoperatively, sufficient pain therapy avoids pulmonary complications and improves outcome. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  16. A conserved behavioral state barrier impedes transitions between anesthetic-induced unconsciousness and wakefulness: evidence for neural inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Eliot B; Sun, Yi; Moore, Jason T; Hung, Hsiao-Tung; Meng, Qing Cheng; Perera, Priyan; Joiner, William J; Thomas, Steven A; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Sehgal, Amita; Kelz, Max B

    2010-07-30

    One major unanswered question in neuroscience is how the brain transitions between conscious and unconscious states. General anesthetics offer a controllable means to study these transitions. Induction of anesthesia is commonly attributed to drug-induced global modulation of neuronal function, while emergence from anesthesia has been thought to occur passively, paralleling elimination of the anesthetic from its sites in the central nervous system (CNS). If this were true, then CNS anesthetic concentrations on induction and emergence would be indistinguishable. By generating anesthetic dose-response data in both insects and mammals, we demonstrate that the forward and reverse paths through which anesthetic-induced unconsciousness arises and dissipates are not identical. Instead they exhibit hysteresis that is not fully explained by pharmacokinetics as previously thought. Single gene mutations that affect sleep-wake states are shown to collapse or widen anesthetic hysteresis without obvious confounding effects on volatile anesthetic uptake, distribution, or metabolism. We propose a fundamental and biologically conserved concept of neural inertia, a tendency of the CNS to resist behavioral state transitions between conscious and unconscious states. We demonstrate that such a barrier separates wakeful and anesthetized states for multiple anesthetics in both flies and mice, and argue that it contributes to the hysteresis observed when the brain transitions between conscious and unconscious states.

  17. A conserved behavioral state barrier impedes transitions between anesthetic-induced unconsciousness and wakefulness: evidence for neural inertia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliot B Friedman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available One major unanswered question in neuroscience is how the brain transitions between conscious and unconscious states. General anesthetics offer a controllable means to study these transitions. Induction of anesthesia is commonly attributed to drug-induced global modulation of neuronal function, while emergence from anesthesia has been thought to occur passively, paralleling elimination of the anesthetic from its sites in the central nervous system (CNS. If this were true, then CNS anesthetic concentrations on induction and emergence would be indistinguishable. By generating anesthetic dose-response data in both insects and mammals, we demonstrate that the forward and reverse paths through which anesthetic-induced unconsciousness arises and dissipates are not identical. Instead they exhibit hysteresis that is not fully explained by pharmacokinetics as previously thought. Single gene mutations that affect sleep-wake states are shown to collapse or widen anesthetic hysteresis without obvious confounding effects on volatile anesthetic uptake, distribution, or metabolism. We propose a fundamental and biologically conserved concept of neural inertia, a tendency of the CNS to resist behavioral state transitions between conscious and unconscious states. We demonstrate that such a barrier separates wakeful and anesthetized states for multiple anesthetics in both flies and mice, and argue that it contributes to the hysteresis observed when the brain transitions between conscious and unconscious states.

  18. Optimal Anesthetic Regime for Motionless Three-Dimensional Image Acquisition During Longitudinal Studies of Adult Nonpigmented Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Nicola; Parker, Jennifer; Wilson, Carole; Frankel, Paul

    2017-04-01

    With many live imaging techniques, it is crucial that a deep level of anesthesia is reached and maintained throughout image acquisition without reducing zebrafish viability. This is particularly true for three-dimensional tomographic imaging modalities. Currently, the most commonly used anesthetic in the zebrafish community, MS-222 (tricaine methanesulfonate), does not allow this. We show, using a combination of both MS-222 and isoflurane, that we can significantly improve the anesthetic regime required for motionless image acquisition of live adult zebrafish. We have benchmarked this against the requirements of our novel quantitative imaging platform, compressive sensing optical projection tomography. Using nonpigmented transgenic zebrafish, we show that a combination of 175 ppm of both anesthetics improves the maintenance of deep anesthesia for prolonged periods of time and it can be used repeatedly to enable longitudinal imaging. Importantly, it does not affect the health or viability of the adult zebrafish. We also show that nonpigmented fish, with a mutated form of the gene transparent, took significantly longer to reach deep anesthesia. The anesthetic regime presented in this study should lead to significant improvements in accuracy and information achievable from imaging live adult zebrafish and in its application to longitudinal studies.

  19. The effect of xenon on isoflurane protection against experimental myocardial infarction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumert, J.H.; Hein, M.; Gerets, C.; Baltus, T.; Hecker, K.E.; Rossaint, R.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate if the protective effects of xenon and isoflurane against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion damage would be additive. DESIGN: A prospective, randomized laboratory investigation. SETTING: An animal laboratory of a university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-six pigs (female

  20. Comparing anesthesia with isoflurane and fentanyl/fluanisone/midazolam in a rat model of cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels; Malte, Christian Lind; Tønnesen, Else

    2016-01-01

    CA model. We hypothesize that isoflurane anesthesia improves short-term outcome following resuscitation from CA compared with a subcutaneous fentanyl/fluanisone/midazolam anesthesia. METHODS: Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to anesthesia with isoflurane (n=11) or fentanyl...... samples for Endothelin-1 and cathecolamines were drawn before and after CA. KEY FINDINGS: Compared with fentanyl/fluanisone/midazolam anesthesia, isoflurane resulted in a shorter time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), less use of epinephrine, increased coronary perfusion pressure during CPR......, higher mean arterial pressure post ROSC, increased plasma levels of Endothelin-1 and decreased levels of epinephrine. The choice of anesthesia did not affect ROSC rate or systemic O2 consumption. CONCLUSION: Isoflurane reduces time to ROSC, increases coronary perfusion pressure, and improves hemodynamic...

  1. Mechanism of the dissolution of enflurane and isoflurane into human, dog and bovine blood

    OpenAIRE

    多田, 恵一

    1987-01-01

    This study was performed to elucidate the difference in the mechanism of the dissolution of enflurane and isoflurane into human, dog and bovine blood in terms of changes in the hematocrit using the highly accurate analytical method of direct gas chromatography. With enflurane, as the hematocrit increased, the blood-gas partition coefficient for human and bovine blood decreased linearly (P < 0.001), and that for dog blood increased linearly (P < 0.001). With isoflurane, as the hematocrit incre...

  2. Recovery index, attentiveness and state of memory after xenon or isoflurane anaesthesia: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Langer Sebastian; Schäfer Claudia; Schultz Kati; Jakubetz Jens; Stuttmann Ralph; Ullmann Utz; Hilbert Peter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Performance of patients immediately after anaesthesia is an area of special interest and so a clinical trial was conducted to compare Xenon with Isoflurane anaesthesia. In order to assess the early cognitive recovery the syndrome short test (SST) according to Erzigkeit (Geromed GmbH) was applied. Methods ASA I and II patients undergoing long and short surgical interventions were randomised to receive either general anaesthesia with Xenon or Isoflurane. The primary endpoint...

  3. Unstable volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casas, Isabel; Gijbels, Irène

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce the break-preserving local linear (BPLL) estimator for the estimation of unstable volatility functions for independent and asymptotically independent processes. Breaks in the structure of the conditional mean and/or the volatility functions are common...... in Finance. Nonparametric estimators are well suited for these events due to the flexibility of their functional form and their good asymptotic properties. However, the local polynomial kernel estimators are not consistent at points where the volatility function has a break. The estimator presented...

  4. Evaluation of Mice Undergoing Serial Oral Gavage While Awake or Anesthetized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carissa P; Boyd, Kelli L; Wallace, Jeanne M

    2016-11-01

    Although oral gavage is the most straightforward approach to achieve precise enteric administration in rodents, it is associated with potential adverse consequences. Here we compare the effects of serial oral gavage in awake compared with anesthetized mice. Female C57BL/6J mice (n = 20 per group) were assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups (control, awake gavage, or anesthetized gavage) and gavaged daily with 0.2 mL of saline (with no manipulation on weekends) for a total of 18 treatment days. Body weight and clinical appearance were monitored throughout the treatment period, after which mice were euthanized and necropsied. Endpoints evaluated included adrenal gland weight, plasma corticosterone, lymphocyte:neutrophil ratio, and esophageal histopathology. Mean body weight did not differ between groups. Compared with other groups, the awake gavage group had more mice removed (3 of 20) prior to study completion due to body weight loss greater than 10%, with corresponding gross and histopathologic lesions attributed to the gavage procedure. Mice gavaged when awake had an over 20-fold higher incidence of incomplete retention of the administered saline than did anesthetized mice. Of the mice that completed the study, esophageal inflammation was not apparent at necropsy regardless of treatment, with the exception of a single mouse in the awake gavage group. Although WBC and lymphocyte counts were lower in mice in the anesthetized gavage group compared with other groups, none of the endpoints measured to evaluate stress (adrenal gland weight, neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio, plasma corticosterone) differed. These findings support the use of brief isoflurane anesthesia when performing serial oral gavage in mice.

  5. Chasing volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Rossi, Eduardo; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    estimate alternative specifications of the model using a set of daily bipower measures for 7 stock indexes and 16 individual NYSE stocks. The estimates of the jump component confirm that the probability of jumps dramatically increases during the financial crisis. Compared to other realized volatility...... models, the introduction of the jump component provides a sensible improvement in the fit, as well as for in-sample and out-of-sample volatility tail forecasts....

  6. Isoflurane Preconditioning Induces Neuroprotection by Up-Regulation of TREK1 in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Ischemic Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kun; Kong,Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the neuroprotection and mechanism of isoflurane on rats with spinal cord ischemic injury. Total 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the four groups (n=10). Group A was sham-operation group; group B was ischemia group; group C was isoflurane preconditioning group; group D was isoflurane preconditioning followed by ischemia treatment group. Then the expressions of TWIK-related K+ channel 1 (TREK1) in the four groups were detected by immunofluorescent ...

  7. The effects of general anesthetics on ESR spectra of spin labels in phosphatidylcholine vesicles containing purified Na,K-ATPase or microsomal protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, Makiko, E-mail: shibu@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan); Hiraoki, Toshifumi [Division of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University (Japan); Kimura, Kunie; Fukushima, Kazuaki [Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan); Suzuki, Kuniaki [Department of Molecular Cell Pharmacology, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the effects of general anesthetics on liposome using ESR spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two spin labels, 5-DSA and 16-DSA, were located in different position in liposome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anesthetics did not change the environment around the spin labels in the liposome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anesthetics remained on the surface of the lipid bilayer of liposome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteins in the liposome did not change the effects of anesthetics on liposome. - Abstract: We investigated the effects of general anesthetics on liposome containing spin labels, 5-doxyl stearic acid (5-DSA) and 16-doxyl stearic acid (16-DSA), and purified Na,K-ATPase or membrane protein of microsome using an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The spectra of 16-DSA in liposomes with both proteins showed three sharp signals compared with 5-DSA. The difference in the order parameter S value of 5-DSA and 16-DSA suggested that the nitroxide radical location of 5-DSA and 16-DSA were different in the membrane bilayer. The results were almost the same as those obtained in liposomes without proteins. The addition of sevoflurane, isoflurane, halothane, ether, ethanol and propofol increased the intensity of the signals, but the clinical concentrations of anesthetics did not significantly alter the S and {tau} values, which are indices of the fluidity of the membrane. These results suggest that anesthetics remain on the surface of the lipid bilayer and do not act on both the inside hydrophobic area and the relatively hydrophilic area near the surface. These results and others also suggest that the existence of Na,K-ATPase and microsomal proteins did not affect the environment around the spin labels in the liposome and the effects of anesthetics on liposome as a model membrane.

  8. Anesthetic preconditioning in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Gerasimenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of myocardial protection in cardiac surgery is a challenge due to an increased number of interventions and severity of their complications related to the patient's status, pathophysiology of the artificial circulation and the used techniques for replacement of vital functions. Oxidative stress and formation of active oxygen species, as a consequence of the above mentioned processes, may result in systemic injury, such as acute heart failure, central nervous system dysfunction and acute renal injury. Short ischemic episodes before prolonged hypoxia with subsequent reperfusion can decrease cardiomyocyte injury. This phenomenon has been referred to as ischemic preconditioning. A similar effect is caused by inhalation anesthetics. Experimental and clinical data on anesthetic preconditioning suggest that inhalation anesthesia with halogen-containing agents may be used as a method to protect the myocardium from damage by active oxygen species produced during the periods of oxidative stress in cardiac surgery. Studies analyzed in this review have shown benefits of inhalation anesthetics, compared to total intravenous anesthesia, such as effective cardiac protection and, what is most important, in potential reduction of mortality after coronary bypass grafting. The level of evidence for the effects of anesthetic preconditioning on long-term mortality in these studies was not high enough; therefore, a large multicenter randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm these results.

  9. Cardiorespiratory parameters in the awake pigeon and during anaesthesia with isoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botman, Julie; Dugdale, Alex; Gabriel, Fabien; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    To determine baseline cardiovascular and respiratory variables in the awake pigeon, and to assess those variables during anaesthesia at the individual minimal anaesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane during spontaneous breathing. Prospective, experimental trial. Seven healthy adult pigeons weighing a mean ± standard deviation (SD) of 438 ± 38 g. Heart rate (HR), heart rhythm, respiratory rate (fR), end-expired carbon dioxide tension (Pe'CO2), indirect systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and cloacal temperature (T) were measured in birds in the awake state (after acclimatization to handling). Two weeks later, the pigeons were anaesthetized with isoflurane in order to determine their MAC and evaluate the same cardiovascular and respiratory variables during a further 40 minutes of isoflurane anaesthesia. In the awake pigeon, mean ± SD HR, SAP, fR, Pe'CO2 and T were, respectively, 155 ± 28 beats minute(-1), 155 ± 21 mmHg, 34 ± 6 breaths minute(-1), 38 ± 8 mmHg (5.1 ± 1.1 kPa) and 41.8 ± 0.5 °C. Mean isoflurane MAC was 1.8 ± 0.4%. During maintenance of anaesthesia at MAC, although no significant decreases between values obtained in the awake and anaesthetized states emerged in HR or respiratory rate, significant decreases in SAP and cloacal temperature and an increase in Pe'CO2 were observed. No arrhythmia was identified in awake pigeons, whereas second- and third-degree atrioventricular blocks occurred under isoflurane. Isoflurane MAC in pigeons appeared to be higher than in other avian species. Isoflurane anaesthesia in pigeons resulted in hypercapnia, hypotension, mild hypothermia and second- and third-degree atrioventricular blocks. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  10. Anaesthetic-induced cardioprotection in an experimental model of the Takotsubo syndrome - isoflurane vs. propofol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oras, J; Redfors, B; Ali, A; Lundgren, J; Sihlbom, C; Thorsell, A; Seeman-Lodding, H; Omerovic, E; Ricksten, S-E

    2017-03-01

    Takotsubo syndrome (TS) is an acute cardiac condition with a substantial mortality for which no specific treatment is available. We have previously shown that isoflurane attenuates the development of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in an experimental TS-model. We compared the effects of equi-anaesthetic doses of isoflurane, propofol and ketamine+midazolam on haemodynamics, global and regional LV systolic function and the activation of intracellular metabolic pathways in experimental TS. We hypothesized that cardioprotection in experimental TS is specific for isoflurane. Forty-five rats were randomized to isoflurane (0.6 MAC, n = 15), propofol (bolus 200 mg/kg+360 mg/kg/h, n = 15) or ketamine (100 mg/kg)+midazolam (10 mg/kg, n = 15) anaesthesia. Arterial pressure, heart rate and body temperature were continuously measured and arterial blood gas analysis was performed intermittently. TS was induced by intraperitoneal injection of isoprenaline, 50 mg/kg. LV echocardiography was performed 90 min after isoprenaline injection. Apical cardiac tissue was analysed by global discovery proteomics and pathway analysis. Isoprenaline-induced changes in arterial blood pressure, heart rate or body temperature did not differ between groups. LV ejection fraction was higher and extent of LV akinesia was lower with isoflurane, when compared with the propofol and the ketamine+midazolam groups. In this TS-model, the proteomic analysis revealed an up-regulation of pathways involved in inflammation, coagulation, endocytosis and lipid metabolism. This up-regulation was clearly attenuated with isoflurane compared to propofol. In an experimental model of TS, isoflurane, but not propofol, exerts a cardioprotective effect. The proteomic analysis suggests that inflammation might be involved in pathogenesis of TS. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Comparison of the efficacy and cardiorespiratory effects of medetomidine-based anesthetic protocols in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cathy V; Glenn, Kelly M; Levine, Jay F; Horne, William A

    2003-06-01

    The relative efficacies and cardiorespiratory effects of three injectable anesthetic combinations containing medetomidine were evaluated in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). In addition, the direct effects of medetomidine on heart rate and blood pressure were evaluated in lemurs anesthetized with isoflurane. For injectable anesthesia, captive adult ring-tailed lemurs were anesthetized with medetomidine and ketamine (0.04-0.06 mg/kg, i.m. and 3 mg/kg, i.m., respectively), medetomidine, butorphanol, and ketamine (0.04 mg/kg, i.m., 0.4 mg/kg, i.m., and 3 mg/kg, i.m., respectively), or medetomidine, butorphanol, and midazolam (0.04 mg/kg, i.m., 0.4 mg/kg, i.m., and 0.3 mg/kg, i.m., respectively). For inhalation anesthesia, lemurs were mask-induced and maintained with isoflurane for 30 min before receiving medetomidine (0.04 mg/kg, i.m.). Sedation produced by medetomidine-ketamine was unpredictable and of short duration. Both medetomidine-butorphanol-ketamine (MBK) and medetomidine-butorphanol-midazolam (MBMz) provided adequate anesthesia for routine physical exams; however, the effects of MBMz lasted longer than those of MBK. Heart rates and respiratory rates were within clinically normal ranges for all groups, and lemurs remained normotensive throughout the study. Common side effects such as hypertension and bradycardia associated with the use of alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonist combinations in other species were not observed. Likewise, medetomidine administration had no effect on HR in lemurs receiving isoflurane. Lemurs in all groups were well ventilated and remained well oxygenated throughout the procedures, though arterial partial pressure of O2 was lowest in the MBMz group. All three injectable medetomidine combinations were effective in ring-tailed lemurs but only MBK and MBMz provided adequate depth and duration of anesthesia for use as sole regimes. For many clinical procedures in lemurs, MBMz offers advantages over MBK because of its longer duration of

  12. Neuromuscular blocking drugs do not alter the pupillary light reflex of anesthetized humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A T; Krejci, S T; Larson, M D

    1997-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that systemically administered neuromuscular blocking drugs acutely alter resting pupil size or the direct reflex response to light in anesthetized humans. Patients were randomized to receive an intravenous injection of saline (0.15 mL/kg), pancuronium bromide (0.1 mg/kg), or vecuronium bromide (0.15 mg/kg) after induction of general anesthesia and tracheal intubation. The University of California, San Francisco, Moffitt-Long Hospitals. Healthy adults (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II) of either sex scheduled for elective surgery requiring general anesthesia, tracheal intubation, and muscle relaxation of an anticipated duration of 2 or more hours. Measurements of resting pupil size, direct reflex response to light, and constriction velocity were obtained in double-blinded fashion using infrared pupillometry. Pupillary size, reflex amplitude, and constriction velocity were not altered by the presence of either vecuronium or pancuronium. Tetanic stimuli and concomitant isoflurane administration respectively increased and decreased pupillary light reflex amplitude, indicating that pupillary responses were not fixed. We conclude that systemically administered neuromuscular blocking drugs (vecuronium and pancuronium) do not acutely affect the pupillary light reflex in healthy, anesthetized patients.

  13. The in vitro zebrafish heart as a model to investigate the chronotropic effects of vapor anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyek, Matthew R; Schmidt, Michael K; Wilfart, Florentin M; Croll, Roger P; Smith, Frank M

    2017-12-01

    In addition to their intended clinical actions, all general anesthetic agents in common use have detrimental intrasurgical and postsurgical side effects on organs and systems, including the heart. The major cardiac side effect of anesthesia is bradycardia, which increases the probability of insufficient systemic perfusion during surgery. These side effects also occur in all vertebrate species so far examined, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. The zebrafish heart is a powerful model for studying cardiac electrophysiology, employing the same pacemaker system and neural control as do mammalian hearts. In this study, isolated zebrafish hearts were significantly bradycardic during exposure to the vapor anesthetics sevoflurane (SEVO), desflurane (DES), and isoflurane (ISO). Bradycardia induced by DES and ISO continued during pharmacological blockade of the intracardiac portion of the autonomic nervous system, but the chronotropic effect of SEVO was eliminated during blockade. Bradycardia evoked by vagosympathetic nerve stimulation was augmented during DES and ISO exposure; nerve stimulation during SEVO exposure had no effect. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the cardiac chronotropic effect of SEVO occurs via a neurally mediated mechanism, while DES and ISO act directly upon cardiac pacemaker cells via an as yet unknown mechanism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Anesthetic gases and global warming: Potentials, prevention and future of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadani, Hina; Vyas, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Global warming refers to an average increase in the earth's temperature, which in turn causes changes in climate. A warmer earth may lead to changes in rainfall patterns, a rise in sea level, and a wide range of impacts on plants, wildlife, and humans. Greenhouse gases make the earth warmer by trapping energy inside the atmosphere. Greenhouse gases are any gas that absorbs infrared radiation in the atmosphere and include: water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), halogenated fluorocarbons (HCFCs), ozone (O3), perfluorinated carbons (PFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Hazardous chemicals enter the air we breathe as a result of dozens of activities carried out during a typical day at a healthcare facility like processing lab samples, burning fossil fuels etc. We sometimes forget that anesthetic agents are also greenhouse gases (GHGs). Anesthetic agents used today are volatile halogenated ethers and the common carrier gas nitrous oxide known to be aggressive GHGs. With less than 5% of the total delivered halogenated anesthetic being metabolized by the patient, the vast majority of the anesthetic is routinely vented to the atmosphere through the operating room scavenging system. The global warming potential (GWP) of a halogenated anesthetic is up to 2,000 times greater than CO2. Global warming potentials are used to compare the strength of different GHGs to trap heat in the atmosphere relative to that of CO2. Here we discuss about the GWP of anesthetic gases, preventive measures to decrease the global warming effects of anesthetic gases and Xenon, a newer anesthetic gas for the future of anesthesia.

  15. Effects of isoflurane anesthesia and pilocarpine on rat parotid saliva flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jacob Dronninglund; Nauntofte, Birgitte; Josipovic, M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of isoflurane on unstimulated and pilocarpine-stimulated parotid saliva secretion. Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 350-400 g were randomized into two groups, and the saliva flow rate and lag phase were measured at two doses of isoflur......The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of isoflurane on unstimulated and pilocarpine-stimulated parotid saliva secretion. Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 350-400 g were randomized into two groups, and the saliva flow rate and lag phase were measured at two doses...... of isoflurane in a crossover study design. Increasing the isoflurane concentration from 1% to 2% was associated with a 19% decrease in saliva secretion rate, and the lag to saliva secretion was increased by 155%. To clarify whether the effect of isoflurane (1.5%) on the parotid flow varied with stimulus...... intensity, we measured the parotid flow induced by seven different doses of pilocarpine on sham-irradiated rats and rats irradiated with single doses of 15 Gy. A maximal pilocarpine response was obtained with 1.5 mg/kg in both irradiated and sham-irradiated rats; however, the parotid flow of the irradiated...

  16. Effects of anesthetic induction with a benzodiazepine plus ketamine hydrochloride or propofol on hypothermia in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornkamp, Jennifer L; Robertson, Sheilah; Isaza, Natalie M; Harrison, Kelly; DiGangi, Brian A; Pablo, Luisito

    2016-04-01

    To assess the effect of anesthetic induction with a benzodiazepine plus ketamine or propofol on hypothermia in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy without heat support. 23 adult sexually intact female dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Baseline rectal temperature, heart rate, and respiratory rate were recorded prior to premedication with buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg, IM) and acepromazine (0.05 mg/kg, IM). Anesthesia was induced with midazolam or diazepam (0.25 mg/kg, IV) plus ketamine (5 mg/kg, IV; n = 11) or propofol (4 mg/kg, IV; 12) and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Rectal temperature was measured at hospital intake, prior to premedication, immediately after anesthetic induction, and every 5 minutes after anesthetic induction. Esophageal temperature was measured every 5 minutes during anesthesia, beginning 30 minutes after anesthetic induction. After anesthesia, dogs were covered with a warm-air blanket and rectal temperature was measured every 10 minutes until normothermia (37°C) was achieved. Dogs in both treatment groups had lower rectal temperatures within 5 minutes after anesthetic induction and throughout anesthesia. Compared with dogs that received a benzodiazepine plus ketamine, dogs that received a benzodiazepine plus propofol had significantly lower rectal temperatures and the interval from discontinuation of anesthesia to achievement of normothermia was significantly longer. Dogs in which anesthesia was induced with a benzodiazepine plus propofol or ketamine became hypothermic; the extent of hypothermia was more profound for the propofol combination. Dogs should be provided with adequate heat support after induction of anesthesia, particularly when a propofol-benzodiazepine combination is administered.

  17. High-fat diet reduces neuroprotection of isoflurane post-treatment: Role of carboxyl-terminal modulator protein-Akt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai; Deng, Jiao; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2014-11-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) contributes to the increased prevalence of obesity and hyperlipidemia in young adults, a possible cause for their recent increase in stroke. Isoflurane post-treatment provides neuroprotection. Isoflurane post-treatment induced neuroprotection in HFD-fed mice was determined. Six-week old CD-1 male mice were fed HFD or regular diet (RD) for 5 or 10 weeks. Their hippocampal slices (400 µm) were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Some slices were exposed to isoflurane for 30 min immediately after OGD. Some mice had a 90-min middle cerebral arterial occlusion and were post-treated with 2% isoflurane for 30 min. OGD time-dependently induced cell injury. This injury was dose-dependently reduced by isoflurane. The effect was apparent at 1% or 2% isoflurane in RD-fed mice but required 3% isoflurane in HFD-fed mice. HFD influenced the isoflurane effects in DG. OGD increased carboxyl-terminal modulator protein (CTMP), an Akt inhibitor, and decreased Akt signaling. Isoflurane reduced these effects. LY294002, an Akt activation inhibitor, attenuated the isoflurane effects. HFD increased CTMP and reduced Akt signaling. Isoflurane improved neurological outcome in the RD-fed mice but not in the HFD-fed mice. HFD attenuated isoflurane post-treatment-induced neuroprotection possibly because of decreased prosurvival Akt signaling. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  18. Anesthetic Related Advances with Cyclodextrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Welliver

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins encapsulate and electrostatically bind to lipophilic molecules. The exterior of cyclodextrins are water-soluble and maintain aqueous solubility despite encapsulation of non-aqueous soluble molecules. This unique ability to encapsulate lipophilic molecules and maintain water solubility confers numerous pharmacologic advantages for both drug delivery and removal. Cyclodextrins, a component part of supramolecular chemistry, may be in its infancy of anesthetic application but recent advances have been described as novel and revolutionary. A review of current research coupled with an understanding of cyclodextrin properties is necessary to fully appreciate the current uses and future potentials of these unique molecules.

  19. Strabismus complications from local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, David L

    2008-01-01

    Strabismus developing after retrobulbar or peribulbar anesthesia for both anterior and posterior segment eye surgery may be due to myotoxicity to an extraocular muscle from the local anesthetic agent. Initial paresis often causes diplopia immediately after surgery, but later progressive segmental fibrosis occurs, and/or hypertrophy of the muscle, producing diplopia in the opposite direction from the direction of the initial diplopia. The inferior rectus muscle is most commonly affected. Usually a large recession on an adjustable suture of the involved muscle(s) yields good alignment. Using topical anesthesia or sub-Tenon's anesthesia can avoid this complication.

  20. Monitoring of the ventilatory status of anesthetized birds of prey by using end-tidal carbon dioxide measured with a microstream capnometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarchelier, Marion; Rondenay, Yves; Fitzgerald, Guy; Lair, Stéphane

    2007-03-01

    The relationship between end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PETCO2), arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2), and blood pH in isoflurane-anesthetized raptors was evaluated. PaCO2 and pH were determined in serial arterial samples from isoflurane anesthetized birds and compared with concurrent end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide measured with a Microstream sidestream capnograph. Forty-eight paired samples, taken from 11 birds of prey (weighing 416-2,062 g), were used to determine correlations coefficients between PaCO2 and PETCO2, and between PETCO2 and pH. Limits of agreement between PaCO2 and PETCO2 also were calculated. Strong correlations were observed between PaCO2 and PETCO2 (r = 0.94; P birds weighing > 400 g and receiving manual positive ventilation with a Bain system. In our study, the linear relationship observed between the pH and the end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide suggested that the monitoring of end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide also can be useful to prevent respiratory acidosis.

  1. Effects of nitrous oxide on the rat heart in vivo: another inhalational anesthetic that preconditions the heart?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Nina C.; Toma, Octavian; Awan, Saqib; Frässdorf, Jan; Preckel, Benedikt; Schlack, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For nitrous oxide, a preconditioning effect on the heart has yet not been investigated. This is important because nitrous oxide is commonly used in combination with volatile anesthetics, which are known to precondition the heart. The authors aimed to clarify (1) whether nitrous oxide

  2. HEART RATE AND INDIRECT BLOOD PRESSURE RESPONSES TO FOUR DIFFERENT FIELD ANESTHETIC PROTOCOLS IN WILD-BORN CAPTIVE CHIMPANZEES (PAN TROGLODYTES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atencia, Rebeca; Stöhr, Eric J; Drane, Aimee L; Stembridge, Mike; Howatson, Glyn; Del Rio, Pablo Rodriguez Lopez; Feltrer, Yedra; Tafon, Babila; Redrobe, Sharon; Peck, Bruce; Eng, Jaclyn; Unwin, Steve; Sanchez, Carlos R; Shave, Rob E

    2017-09-01

    Limited data are available on hemodynamic responses to anesthetic protocols in wild-born chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Accordingly, this study characterized the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure responses to four anesthetic protocols in 176 clinically healthy, wild-born chimpanzees undergoing routine health assessments. Animals were anesthetized with medetomidine-ketamine (MK) (n = 101), tiletamine-zolazepam (TZ) (n = 30), tiletamine-zolazepam-medetomidine (TZM) (n = 24), or medetomidine-ketamine (maintained with isoflurane) (MKI) (n = 21). During each procedure, HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were regularly recorded. Data were grouped according to anesthetic protocol, and mean HR, SBP, and DBP were calculated. Differences between mean HR, SBP, and DBP for each anesthetic protocol were assessed using the Kruskall-Wallis test and a Dunn multiple comparisons post hoc analysis. To assess the hemodynamic time course response to each anesthetic protocol, group mean data (±95% confidence interval [CI]) were plotted against time postanesthetic induction. Mean HR (beats/min [CI]) was significantly higher in TZ (86 [80-92]) compared to MKI (69 [61-78]) and MK (62 [60-64]) and in TZM (73 [68-78]) compared to MK. The average SBP and DBP values (mm Hg [CI]) were significantly higher in MK (130 [126-134] and 94 [91-97]) compared to TZ (104 [96-112] and 58 [53-93]) and MKI (113 [103-123] and 78 [69-87]) and in TZM (128 [120-135] and 88 [83-93]) compared to TZ. Time course data were markedly different between protocols, with MKI showing the greatest decline over time. Both the anesthetic protocol adopted and the timing of measurement after injection influence hemodynamic recordings in wild-born chimpanzees and need to be considered when monitoring or assessing cardiovascular health.

  3. Anxiety in preoperative anesthetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela Millán, Jaquelyn; Barrera Serrano, José René; Ornelas Aguirre, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Preoperative anxiety is a common and poorly evaluated condition in patients who will undergo an anesthetic and surgical intervention. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anxiety in a group of patients undergoing elective surgery, as assessed by the Amsterdam Anxiety Preoperative and Information (AAPI) scale. We studied 135 patients scheduled for elective surgery applying the AAPI scale 24 h before the surgical procedure to evaluate the presence of anxiety and patient characteristics. A descriptive analysis with mean +/- standard deviation for categorical variables was done. For intragroup differences, chi(2) test was used. Pearson correlation for the association between anxiety and postoperative complications was carried out. A value of p =0.05 was considered significant. One hundred six patients were surgically treated, 88% were female (average age 44 +/- 12 years). Some degree of preoperative anxiety was present in 72 patients (76%; p = 0.001) with a grade point average on the AAPI scale equal to 17 +/- 7 points, of which 95 (70%, OR = 5.08; p = 0.002) were females. Results of this study suggest the presence of high levels of preoperative anxiety in patients scheduled for elective surgery. The origin of the anxiety appears to be related to many factors that can be evaluated in pre-anesthetic consultation. Further study is needed to prevent the presence of this disorder.

  4. Xenon pretreatment may prevent early memory decline after isoflurane anesthesia and surgery in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela P Vizcaychipi

    Full Text Available Postoperative cognitive decline (POCD is a common complication following surgery, but its aetiology remains unclear. We hypothesized that xenon pretreatment prevents POCD by suppressing the systemic inflammatory response or through an associated protective signaling pathway involving heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72 and PI3-kinase. Twenty-four hours after establishing long-term memory using fear conditioning training, C57BL/6 adult male mice (n = 12/group received one of the following treatments: 1 no treatment group (control; 2 1.8% isoflurane anesthesia; 3 70% xenon anesthesia; 4 1.8% isoflurane anesthesia with surgery of the right hind leg tibia that was pinned and fractured; or 5 pretreatment with 70% xenon for 20 minutes followed immediately by 1.8% isoflurane anesthesia with the surgery described above. Assessments of hippocampal-dependent memory were performed on days 1 and 7 after treatment. Hsp72 and PI3-kinase in hippocampus, and plasma IL-1β, were measured using western blotting and ELISA respectively, from different cohorts on day 1 after surgery. Isoflurane induced memory deficit after surgery was attenuated by xenon pretreatment. Xenon pretreatment prevented the memory deficit typically seen on day 1 (P = 0.04 but not on day 7 (P = 0.69 after surgery under isoflurane anesthesia, when compared with animals that underwent surgery without pretreatment. Xenon pretreatment modulated the expression of Hsp72 (P = 0.054 but had no significant effect on PI3-kinase (P = 0.54, when compared to control. Xenon pretreatment also reduced the plasma level increase of IL-1β induced by surgery (P = 0.028. Our data indicated that surgery and/or Isoflurane induced memory deficit was attenuated by xenon pretreatment. This was associated with a reduction in the plasma level of IL-1β and an upregulation of Hsp72 in the hippocampus.

  5. Recovery index, attentiveness and state of memory after xenon or isoflurane anaesthesia: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langer Sebastian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Performance of patients immediately after anaesthesia is an area of special interest and so a clinical trial was conducted to compare Xenon with Isoflurane anaesthesia. In order to assess the early cognitive recovery the syndrome short test (SST according to Erzigkeit (Geromed GmbH was applied. Methods ASA I and II patients undergoing long and short surgical interventions were randomised to receive either general anaesthesia with Xenon or Isoflurane. The primary endpoint was the validated SST which covering memory disturbances and attentiveness. The test was used on the day prior to intervention, one and three hours post extubation. The secondary endpoint was the recovery index (RI measured after the end of the inhalation of Xenon or Isoflurane. In addition the Aldrete score was evaluated up to 180 min. On the first post-operative day the patients rated the quality of the anaesthetic using a scoring system from 1-6. Results The demographics of the groups were similar. The sum score of the SST delivered a clear trend one hour post extubation and a statistically significant superiority for Xenon three hours post extubation (p Conclusions The results show that recovery from anaesthesia and the early return of post-operative cognitive functions are significantly better after Xenon anaesthesia compared to Isoflurane. The results of the RI for Xenon are similar with the previously published results. Trial Registration The trial was registered with the number ISRCTN01110844 http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/pf/01110844.

  6. Recovery from propofol infusion as the main agent for outpatient arthroscopy. A comparison with isoflurane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurmond, W. W.; van Leeuwen, L.; Helmers, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Propofol by continuous intravenous infusion has been compared with isoflurane as the main anaesthetic agent for outpatient arthroscopy of the knee. In 40 unpremedicated patients, anaesthesia was induced with propofol 2 mg/kg and vecuronium bromide 0.1 mg/kg and maintained after tracheal intubation

  7. Preliminary investigation into the ventilatory effects of midazolam in isoflurane-anaesthetised goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George F. Stegmann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The ventilatory effects of intravenous midazolam (MDZ were evaluated in isoflurane- anaesthetised goats. Eight female goats aged 2–3 years were fasted from food and water for 12 h. Anaesthesia was then induced using a face mask with isoflurane in oxygen, whilst the trachea was intubated with a cuffed tracheal tube and anaesthesia maintained with isoflurane at 1.5% end-tidal concentration. Ventilation was spontaneous. The goats were treated with either a saline placebo (PLC or MDZ intravenously at 0.2 mg/kg. Analysis of variance for repeated measures was used for the analysis of data. Significance was taken at the 0.05 level. Differences between treatments were not statistically significant (p > 0.05 for tidal volume, ventilation rate, tidal volume/kg (VT/kg and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure. Within treatments, VT and VT/kg differed 5 min after MDZ administration; this was statistically significant (p < 0.05. The occurrence of apnoea in the MDZ-treated goats was statistically significant (p = 0.04 compared with the PLC treated goats. Intravenous MDZ at 0.2 mg/kg administered to isoflurane-anaesthetised goats may result in transient apnoea and a mild decrease in VT and VT/kg.

  8. Pricing Volatility Referenced Assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan De Genaro Dario

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatility swaps are contingent claims on future realized volatility. Variance swaps are similar instruments on future realized variance, the square of future realized volatility. Unlike a plain vanilla option, whose volatility exposure is contaminated by its asset price dependence, volatility and variance swaps provide a pure exposure to volatility alone. This article discusses the risk-neutral valuation of volatility and variance swaps based on the framework outlined in the Heston (1993 stochastic volatility model. Additionally, the Heston (1993 model is calibrated for foreign currency options traded at BMF and its parameters are used to price swaps on volatility and variance of the BRL / USD exchange rate.

  9. Severe autonomic dysreflexia induced cardiac arrest under isoflurane anesthesia in a patient with lower thoracic spine injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of severe autonomic dysreflexia (AD progressing to cardiac arrest and death under isoflurane anesthesia. Though AD in chronic cervical spine injury is a common entity, occurrence of such an event in the stage of flaccid paralysis in lower dorsal spinal cord injury is rare, especially under general anesthesia. Manipulation of urinary bladder catheter under light plane of isoflurane anesthesia might be the precipitating factor. Increasing concentration of isoflurane failed to abort the episode or might have aggravated it. High level of suspicion and vigilance is necessary to prevent, diagnose and treat such a condition.

  10. Effects of isoflurane, sevoflurane and methoxyflurane on the electroencephalogram of the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlhone, Amanda E; Beausoleil, Ngaio J; Johnson, Craig B; Mellor, David J

    2014-11-01

    Anaesthetics have differing effects on mammalian electroencephalogram (EEG) but little is known about the effects on avian EEG. This study explored how inhalant anaesthetics affect chicken EEG. Experimental study. Twelve female Hyline Brown chickens aged 6-11 weeks. Each chicken was anaesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, and methoxyflurane. For each, anaesthesia was adjusted to 1, 1.5 and 2 times Minimum Anaesthetic Concentration (MAC). Total Power (Ptot), Median Frequency (F50), Spectral Edge Frequency (F95) and Burst Suppression Ratio (BSR) were calculated at each volume concentration. BSR data were analyzed using doubly repeated measures anova. Neither isoflurane nor sevoflurane could be included in analysis of F50, F95 and Ptot because of extensive burst suppression; Methoxyflurane data were analyzed using RM anova. There was a significant interaction between anaesthetic and concentration on BSR [F(4,22) = 10.65, p methoxyflurane caused virtually no burst suppression. Methoxyflurane concentration had a significant effect on F50 [F(2,20) = 3.83, p = 0.04], F95 [F(2,20) = 4.03, p = 0.03] and Ptot [F(2,20) = 5.22, p = 0.02]. Decreasing methoxyflurane from 2 to 1 MAC increased F50 and F95. Ptot increased when concentration decreased from 1.5 to 1 MAC and tended to be higher at 1 MAC than at 2 MAC. Isoflurane and sevoflurane suppressed chicken EEG in a dose-dependent manner. Higher concentrations of methoxyflurane caused an increasing degree of synchronization of EEG. Isoflurane and sevoflurane suppressed EEG activity to a greater extent than did methoxyflurane at equivalent MAC multiples. Isoflurane caused less suppression than sevoflurane at intermediate concentrations. These results indicate the similarity between avian and mammalian EEG responses to inhalant anaesthetics and reinforce the difference between MAC and anaesthetic effects on brain activity in birds. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary

  11. Topical anesthetics for cosmetic and laser dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Snehal P; Goldberg, David J

    2005-01-01

    Many effective and simple topical anesthetic products are available today and commonly used in medical and non-medical settings. The increased use of topical anesthetics, especially by non-physicians in the medical and non-medical settings, has resulted in increased rates of complications including ineffective anesthesia, allergy, and even potential fatalities. This review focuses on various techniques and formulations for topical anesthesia and their appropriate applications in cosmetic and laser dermatology. In addition, the history, pharmacology, and clinical complications of topical anesthetics are discussed.

  12. Minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs administered a single intramuscular injection of racemic or S (+-ketamine after premedication with acepromazine-morphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Feres Bressan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (ISOMAC in twenty three dogs premedicated with acepromazine (0.02mgkg-1 and morphine (0.5mgkg-1 and administered racemic (RK or S(+-ketamine (SK. Dogs randomly received a single dose (3mgkg-1, IM of either RK or SK 15minutes after anesthetic induction with propofol. The ISOMAC was determined by the up-and-down method. Approximately 20 minutes after administration of RK or SK, a surgical noxious stimulus was applied and the response evaluated. The ISOMAC was 0.50±0.01% in the RK group (n=10 and 0.31±0.04% in the SK group (n=13. The ISOMAC was 38% lower in the SK group compared to the RK group. Results of the present study revealed that in dogs premedicated with acepromazine and morphine, IM administration of 3mgkg-1 ketamine approximately 20 minutes before the noxious stimulus produced clinically important reduction in the ISOMAC and the MAC-sparing effect was significantly greater with SK compared to RK.

  13. Effects of anesthesia with isoflurane on plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone in samples obtained from the cavernous sinus and jugular vein of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmalt, James L; Duke-Novakovski, Tanya; Schott, Harold C; van der Kolk, Johannes H

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of anesthesia on plasma concentrations and pulsatility of ACTH in samples obtained from the cavernous sinus and jugular vein of horses. ANIMALS 6 clinically normal adult horses. PROCEDURES Catheters were placed in a jugular vein and into the cavernous sinus via a superficial facial vein. The following morning (day 1), cavernous sinus blood samples were collected every 5 minutes for 1 hour (collection of first sample = time 0) and jugular venous blood samples were collected at 0, 30, and 60 minutes. On day 2, horses were sedated with xylazine hydrochloride and anesthesia was induced with propofol mixed with ketamine hydrochloride. Horses were positioned in dorsal recumbency. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and a continuous rate infusion of butorphanol tartrate. One hour after anesthesia was induced, the blood sample protocol was repeated. Plasma ACTH concentrations were quantified by use of a commercially available sandwich assay. Generalized estimating equations that controlled for horse and an expressly automated deconvolution algorithm were used to determine effects of anesthesia on plasma ACTH concentrations and pulsatility, respectively. RESULTS Anesthesia significantly reduced the plasma ACTH concentration in blood samples collected from the cavernous sinus. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Mean plasma ACTH concentrations in samples collected from the cavernous sinus of anesthetized horses were reduced. Determining the success of partial ablation of the pituitary gland in situ for treatment of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction may require that effects of anesthesia be included in interpretation of plasma ACTH concentrations in cavernous sinus blood.

  14. Confounding effects of volatile anesthesia on CBV assessment in rodent forebrain following ethanol challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feng; Li, Zhixin; Treistman, Steven N; Kim, Young Ro; King, Jean A; Fox, Gerard B; Ferris, Craig F

    2007-09-01

    To compare and contrast the pattern and characteristics of the cerebral blood volume (CBV) response to ethanol (EtOH) in rats under awake and anesthetized conditions. Acute EtOH (0.75 g/kg) challenge-induced CBV changes were measured using a contrast-enhanced functional MRI CBV method in 15 male Sprague Dawley rats under three experimental conditions: 1.0% to 1.2% isoflurane (N = 5); 0.8% halothane (N = 5); and awake with no anesthetic (N = 5). Physiological parameters were collected from bench settings in nine rats from the above different conditions. Four parameters: 1) area under the curve (AUC%); 2) the maximum signal change (Max%); 3) EtOH absorption rate (alpha(2)); and 4) EtOH elimination rate (alpha(1)) were employed to compare EtOH-induced MRI signals between the awake and anesthetized groups. Both awake and anesthetized animals responded with an increase in CBV to EtOH challenge. However, the presence of anesthesia promoted a significant preferential flow to subcortical areas not seen in the awake condition. Unclear mechanisms of anesthesia add a layer of uncertainty to the already complex interpretation of EtOH's influence on neuronal activity, cellular metabolism, and hemodynamic coupling. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Volatile fluorinated nanoemulsions: a chemical route to controlled delivery of inhalation anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Ibrahim E; Jenkins, Claire L; Davies, Alun; Clark, Jeffrey N; Wilkes, Antony R; Hall, Judith E; Paul, Alison

    2015-02-15

    Novel dispersions of the volatile inhalation anesthetic sevoflurane have been formulated that can provide controlled, sustainable release of anesthetic over clinically useful timescales. The emulsions can be simply formed with manual shaking, reproducibly yielding droplets of the order of 250 nm diameter, i.e. within the nanoemulsion range. Using a custom flow-rig, release of anesthetic gas from the emulsion has been evaluated, and clinically useful levels achieved through appropriate stirring of the formulation. Stirring can also be used to temporarily increase or decrease the amount of anesthetic released. Once consideration of the unusual nature of the fluorinated systems (phase separation by sedimentation rather than creaming), and the highly perturbed environment of their evaluation (under stirring and flow of gas), the observed behavior regarding sevoflurane evaporation can be reasonably well explained by existing theoretical models. Links between anesthetic release and emulsion structure have been defined, providing the basis for future development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Human error in anesthetic mishaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaba, D M

    1989-01-01

    While adverse outcomes linked to anesthesia are uncommon in healthy patients, they do occasionally happen. There is rarely a single cause. Anesthesia and surgery bring the patient into a complex world in which innumerable small failings can converge to produce an eventual catastrophe. And for all the technology involved, the anesthesiologist remains the cornerstone of safe anesthesia care, protecting the patient from harm regardless of its source. Responding to the demands of the operating room environment requires on-the-spot decision making in a complex, uncertain, and risky setting. Only responsible, professional human beings acting in concert can perform this task; no machine that we devise now or in the foreseeable future will suffice. I have outlined the components of a dynamic decision-making process that successfully protects patients in almost all cases. However, being human, anesthesiologists do make errors along the way--errors we are just beginning to understand. Sometimes these errors are due to faulty vigilance or incompetence, but usually they are made by appropriately trained, competent practitioners. Anesthesiologists can err in many ways, and recognizing these ways makes it easier to analyze the events leading to an anesthetic accident. More importantly, it better equips us to eliminate or minimize them in the future--and this is the real challenge.

  17. LOCAL ANESTHETICS IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    risto Daskalov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant problem in the dental medicine is pain alleviation. Many studies in the dental anesthesiology result in the production of new agents for locoregional anesthesia. Objective: This article aim to present the results of the last studies on the effect of the local anesthetics used in the oral surgery on patients with cardiovascular diseases. Material: A general review of the existing literature on the effect of the adrenaline, included as vasoconstrictor in the local anesthetics, used in patients with cardiovascular diseases is made. The benefits of vasoconstrictors for the quality of the anesthetic effect are proven. Conclusion: A small amount of adrenaline in the anesthetic solution does not result in complications development in patients with controlled cardiovascular diseases. Articaine is recommended agent of first choice for local anesthesia in the oral surgery.

  18. Management of exposure to waste anesthetic gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2010-04-01

    Anesthetic agents were developed in the 1700s, and nitrous oxide was first used in 1884. Research on the effects of waste anesthetic gas exposure started appearing in the literature in 1967. Short-term exposure causes lethargy and fatigue, and long-term exposure may be linked to spontaneous abortion, congenital abnormalities, infertility, premature births, cancer, and renal and hepatic disease. Today, perioperative staff members are exposed to trace amounts of waste anesthetic gas, and although this exposure cannot be eliminated, it can be controlled. Health care facilities are required to develop, implement, measure, and control practices to reduce anesthetic gas exposure to the lowest practical level. Exposure levels must be measured every six months and maintained at less than 25 parts per million for nitrous oxide and 2 parts per million for halogenated agents to be compliant with Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards. Copyright 2010 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F

    1994-12-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago, Horace Wells opened the door to local anesthetics. Since then, many advances have been made in pain control. The development of dentistry's most important drugs is highlighted here.

  20. A systematic review of the effects of sedatives and anesthetics in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Ankichetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review is to determine the effects of perioperative sedatives and anesthetics in surgical patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA on respiratory events, medication requirements, hemodynamics, pain, emergence, and hospital stay. We searched The Cochrane CENTRAL Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from 1950 to June 2010 for relevant articles. All prospective and retrospective studies were eligible for inclusion if the effects of perioperative administration of sedation and anesthetics on medication requirements, pain, emergence, hemodynamics, respiratory events, and length of hospital stay in OSA patients were reported. T0 he search strategy yielded 18 studies of 1467 patients. Of these, 456 patients were documented as having OSA. Few adverse respiratory effects were reported. Eight out of 700 (1.14% patients undergoing middle ear surgery with midazolam and fentanyl had impaired upper airway patency and were retrospectively diagnosed as having OSA by polysomnography. Also, intraoperative snoring causing uvular edema in the postoperative period was described in an OSA patient undergoing upper limb surgery when propofol was administered with midazolam and fentanyl for sedation. A decrease in oxygen saturation in the postoperative period was described with propofol and isoflurane in 21 OSA patients undergoing uvulo-palato-pharyngoplasty and tonsillectomy surgery (P<0.05. Perioperative alpha 2 agonists were shown to decrease the use of anesthetics (P<0.05, analgesics (P=0.008 and anti-hypertensives (P<0.001 in OSA patients. Contradictory reports regarding emergence occurred with intraoperative dexmedetomidine. Intraoperative opioids decreased the analgesic consumption (P=0.03 and pain scores (P<0.05 in the postoperative period. There was limited data on the length of hospital stay. There were few adverse effects reported when patients with known OSA underwent elective

  1. Opioid induced hyperalgesia in anesthetic settings

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Yeomans, David C

    2014-01-01

    Pain is difficult to investigate and difficult to treat, in part, because of problems in quantification and assessment. The use of opioids, combined with classic anesthetics to maintain hemodynamic stability by controlling responses to intraoperative painful events has gained significant popularity in the anesthetic field. However, several side effects profiles concerning perioperative use of opioid have been published. Over the past two decades, many concerns have arisen with respect to opio...

  2. Local Anesthetics: Review of Pharmacological Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel E; Reed, Kenneth L

    2012-01-01

    Local anesthetics have an impressive history of efficacy and safety in medical and dental practice. Their use is so routine, and adverse effects are so infrequent, that providers may understandably overlook many of their pharmacotherapeutic principles. The purpose of this continuing education article is to provide a review and update of essential pharmacology for the various local anesthetic formulations in current use. Technical considerations will be addressed in a subsequent article. PMID:22822998

  3. Propofol increased the interleukin-6 to interleukin-10 ratio more than isoflurane after surgery in long-term alcoholic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Von Dossow, V; Baur, S; Sander, M

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of an anaesthetic regimen on the immune response in 40 long-term alcoholic patients undergoing surgery. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either propofol or isoflurane during surgery. Plasma cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 were measured at defined...... times and rates of post-operative infections were documented. The IL-6/IL-10 ratio significantly increased with propofol compared with isoflurane on day 1 after surgery and the IL-10 level significantly increased with isoflurane on day 1 after surgery. The overall post-operative infection rate...... was significantly higher in isoflurane-treated patients. Our findings indicate that propofol anaesthesia might be the more favourable regimen, with the IL-6/IL-10 ratio indicating an attenuation of the immune imbalance after surgery in long-term alcoholic patients. These results support the undertaking...

  4. Effects of Anesthetic Membrane Solutes on Orientational Order in Lecithin Bilayer Membranes: a Deuterium NMR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phonphok, Nason

    The interaction of eight n-alkanols and three volatile anesthetics with bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) has been studied by deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (^2H NMR). At comparable temperatures and concentrations of solute in the bilayer, order parameters measured at the 1-methylene segment of the n-alkanols, and average order parameters for the whole alkyl chain, show a maximum for n-dodecanol. This maximum in orientational ordering also occurs for n-dodecanol at the much lower levels of solute concentration which produce anesthesia. For both n-dodecanol and n-tetradecanol, orientational ordering shows a maximum at the C-4 to C-7 methylene segments, with labels at both ends of the n-alkanol exhibiting reduced order. Unlike the longer chain n-alkanols, ordering in n-butanol decreases from the hydroxyl group end to the methyl group end of the molecule. The quadrupole splittings observed in DMPC-water systems containing perdeuterated ether, chloroform and n-hexane show that these volatile anesthetics are also ordered in the bilayer in the L _{alpha} phase. The temperature dependence of the quadrupole splitting ^2H_2O in DMPC bilayers at low hydration indicates that both the n-alkanols and volatile anesthetics do not affect water structure in the L_alpha phase, but they do so below the main phase transition. Orientational ordering at nine inequivalent sites in the headgroup region of DMPC, as well as the acyl chains, has also been measured. Every anesthetic produces a disordering at the beta-methylene of the choline, the 3-methylene segment and the 1-R site (except chloroform) of the glycerol backbone. Molecular and conformational ordering at the interfacial region of DMPC in the L _alpha phase have been examined by analysing ^2H-NMR data from multiple sites in the most rigid region of the DMPC molecule. It was found that these anesthetics change the conformation at the glycerol moiety of DMPC without changing the molecular order parameter rm S

  5. Blood contamination of used dental anesthetic cartridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romito, L; Svetanoff, E; Palenik, C J

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine the levels of blood contamination found in and/or on used dental anesthetic cartridges and to measure antibacterial effects after exposure to a local anesthetic solution. The study analyzed a total of 1000 used cartridges from an oral surgery clinic, containing 1 of 3 anesthetic types. Blood testing included visual observations (using a dissecting microscope) and chemical analyses. From each cartridge, either 0.5 ml of residual anesthetic solution or a combination of anesthetic solution plus added saline was removed. Using reagent strip dipsticks, the solutions were analyzed for minute amounts of blood. Visual examinations were scored on a positive or negative scale. In addition, 4 types of bacteria were mixed with lidocaine or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for up to 30 days, and viable cell counts decreases were measured for the 2 solutions. A majority of the cartridges evaluated contained lidocaine, and while only 7 of the 1000 cartridges examined contained visible blood, the reagent strips detected blood in more than 76% of all cartridges. Lidocaine and PBS produced similar bacterial death rates. The authors concluded that blood contamination levels in the absence of pronounced antibacterial activity indicate that dental anesthetic cartridges could be considered a potential type of regulated medical waste.

  6. High fat diet reduces neuroprotection of isoflurane post-treatment: role of carboxyl-terminal modulator protein-Akt signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hai; Deng, Jiao; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2014-01-01

    Objective High fat diet (HFD) contributes to the increased prevalence of obesity and hyperlipidemia in young adults, a possible cause for their recent increase in stroke. Isoflurane post-treatment provides neuroprotection. We determined whether isoflurane post-treatment induced neuroprotection in HFD-fed mice. Design and Methods Six-week old CD-1 male mice were fed HFD or regular diet (RD) for 5 or 10 weeks. Their hippocampal slices (400 ?m) were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)....

  7. Effects of deuteration on the metabolism of halogenated anesthetics in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, L.P.; Malek, R.S.; Larsen, E.R.

    1979-08-01

    The authors studied the effects of substituting deuterium for hydrogen in several volatile anesthetics on their metabolism in the Fischer rat. Substitution of deuterium in the ethyl portion of methoxyflurane increased the metabolic production of fluoride ion by 19 percent when administered at a concentration of 0.05%. Total replacement of hydrogen by deuterium resulted in a 29% decrease in the amount of fluoride produced, while deuteration of only the methoxyl group produced a 33% decrease in fluoride produced. Deuteration of halothane resulted in a 15 or 26% decrease in serum bromide at 0.75% or 1.0%, respectively. Deuteration in the ethyl portions of enflurane and two experimental agents, CF2HOCF2CFBrH and CF2HOCF2CCl2H resulted in 65, 76, and 29% decreases in urinary fluoride, respectively. Anesthesia with deuterated chloroform at a concentration of 0.36% produced a 35% decrease in serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT). It is concluded that deuteration of volatile anesthetics changes their metabolism, in most cases producing decreases in metabolism. This effect may lessen the organ toxicity believed to occur with some of these anesthetics.

  8. Cardiovascular function during maintenance of anaesthesia with isoflurane or alfaxalone infusion in greyhounds experiencing blood loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisis, Anthea L; Smart, Lisa; Drynan, Eleanor; Hosgood, Giselle

    2015-03-01

    To compare adequacy of oxygen delivery and severity of shock during maintenance of anaesthesia with isoflurane or alfaxalone infusion in greyhounds experiencing blood loss. Prospective, randomised study. Twenty-four greyhounds (ASA I). All greyhounds were premedicated with methadone (0.2 mg kg(-1) ) intramuscularly. Anaesthesia was induced with alfaxalone 2.5 mg kg(-1) intravenously. Following endotracheal intubation, the dogs were connected to an anaesthetic circle circuit delivering oxygen. Dogs were allocated to receive inhaled isoflurane or an intravenous infusion of alfaxalone for maintenance of anaesthesia. Isoflurane was initially administered to achieve an end-tidal concentration of 1.4% and alfaxalone was initially administered at 0.13 mg kg(-1)  minute(-1) . The dose of isoflurane or alfaxalone was adjusted during instrumentation to produce a clinically equivalent depth of anaesthesia. All dogs were mechanically ventilated to normocapnia (Pa CO2 35-40 mmHg; 4.67-5.33 kPa). Passive warming maintained core body temperature between 37 and 38 °C. Measured and calculated indices of cardiovascular function, including mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), cardiac index (CI), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), oxygen delivery index (D˙O2I), oxygen consumption index (V˙O2I) and oxygen extraction ratio (OER), were determined at baseline (60 minutes after start of anaesthesia) and after removal of 32 mL kg(-1) and 48 mL kg(-1) of blood. In all dogs, blood loss resulted in a significant decrease in MAP, CI, D˙O2 , and a significant increase in SVRI, V˙O2I , and OER. The changes in each of the indices did not differ significantly between dogs receiving isoflurane and dogs receiving alfaxalone. No difference in oxygen delivery or severity of shock was observed when either inhaled isoflurane or intravenous alfaxalone infusion was used for maintenance of anaesthesia in greyhounds experiencing blood loss. There appears to be no clinical advantage to

  9. Allergic response to metabisulfite in lidocaine anesthetic solution.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, J. R.; Maestrello, C. L.; Campbell, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    True allergies to local anesthetics are rare. It is common for practitioners to misdiagnose a serious adverse event to local anesthetics as an allergic reaction. The most likely causes for an allergic response are the preservative, antioxidant, or metabolites and not the anesthetic itself. This case report illustrates the need for practitioners to understand the many potential allergens in local anesthetics and to correctly diagnose patients that are truly allergic to the local anesthetic.

  10. Intraoperative end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in cats undergoing ovariectomy that received tramadol, buprenorphine or a combination of both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Luca; Mollo, Antonio; Contiero, Barbara; Busetto, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the end-tidal concentration of isoflurane required to maintain heart and respiratory rate within ± 20% of basal measurement in cats undergoing ovariectomy that received buprenorphine, tramadol or a combination of both. Methods Thirty cats, divided into three groups, were enrolled in a simple operator-blinded, randomised study. Cats received acepromazine (0.03 mg/kg) and one of the following treatments: buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg), tramadol (2 mg/kg) or a combination of both. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane titrated in order to maintain heart and respiratory rate within the target values recorded before premedication. Results Groups were similar for age, weight, dose of propofol administered, sedation and recovery scores. Cats receiving tramadol with buprenorphine were extubated earlier after isoflurane discontinuation. No statistical differences were detected in end-tidal fraction of isoflurane between buprenorphine alone or with tramadol. In cats that received tramadol or buprenorphine alone, ovarian pedicle traction caused a statistical increase in end-tidal isoflurane concentration compared with that measured during incision and suture of the skin. In cats that received the combination of tramadol plus buprenorphine no differences among surgical time points were observed. Conclusions and relevance Tramadol added to buprenorphine did not provide any advantage in decreasing the end-tidal fraction of isoflurane compared with buprenorphine alone, although it is speculated there may be an infra-additive interaction between tramadol and buprenorphine in cats.

  11. Differences between acceleromyography and electromyography during neuromuscular function monitoring in anesthetized Beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Daniel M; Martin-Flores, Manuel; Tomak, Emily A; Martin, Matthew J; Campoy, Luis; Gleed, Robin D

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative neuromuscular monitoring is essential for studies of potency and duration of neuromuscular blocking agents, and for detecting residual paralysis in anesthetized patients. This investigation evaluates whether there are systematic differences between acceleromyography (AMG) and electromyography (EMG); two quantitative methods for monitoring neuromuscular block. Prospective. Ten healthy Beagle dogs. Dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane and dexmedetomidine. Both ulnar nerves were stimulated with a train-of-four (TOF) pattern every 15 seconds. The magnitude of the first twitch (T1) and the TOF ratio (magnitude of T4/T1; TOFR) were quantified simultaneously with AMG and EMG, applied randomly to each extremity. The extent of maximal block (T1 depression) and onset time were measured by AMG and EMG during TOF monitoring after the administration of cisatracurium (0.05 mg kg(-1)). In addition, recovery of T1 to 25% and 75%, the recovery index (time between T1 of 25% and 75%), and recovery of the TOFR to 0.9 were used to characterize recovery from cisatracurium and were compared between monitors. Regression and Bland-Altman plots for T1 and TOFR were also created. Maximal block and onset time were not different between monitors. Time to recovery of T1 to 25% and 75%, and time to TOF ratio 0.9 was significantly shorter with AMG. The recovery index was not different between monitors. When the TOFR returned to 0.9 with AMG, EMG still measured considerable residual block (TOFR 0.47). Electromyography consistently detected residual NMB when recovery from NMB was complete as assessed by AMG. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  12. Developmental Neurotoxicity of Alcohol and Anesthetic Drugs Is Augmented by Co-Exposure to Caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E. Creeley

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic and anti-epileptic drugs used in pediatric and obstetric medicine and several drugs, including alcohol, that are abused by pregnant women, trigger widespread neuroapoptosis in the developing brain of several animal species, including non-human primates. Caffeine (CAF is often administered to premature infants to stimulate respiration, and these infants are also exposed simultaneously to anesthetic drugs for procedural sedation and/or surgical procedures. Pregnant women who abuse alcohol or other apoptogenic drugs also may heavily consume CAF. We administered CAF to infant mice alone or in combination with alcohol, phencyclidine, diazepam, midazolam, ketamine, or isoflurane, which are drugs of abuse and/or drugs frequently used in pediatric medicine, and found that CAF weakly triggers neuroapoptosis by itself and markedly potentiates the neuroapoptogenic action of each of these other drugs. Exposure of infant mice to CAF + phencyclidine resulted in long-term impairment in behavioral domains relevant to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, whereas exposure to CAF + diazepam resulted in long-term learning/memory impairment. At doses used in these experiments, these behavioral impairments either did not occur or were substantially less pronounced in mice exposed to CAF alone or to phencyclidine or diazepam alone. CAF currently enjoys the reputation of being highly beneficial and safe for use in neonatal medicine. Our data suggest the need to consider whether CAF may have harmful as well as beneficial effects on the developing brain, and the need for research aimed at understanding the full advantage of its beneficial effects while avoiding its potentially harmful effects.

  13. Selected clinical, biochemical, and electrolyte alterations in anesthetized captive tigers (Panthera tigris) and lions (Panthera leo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sabrina; Seddighi, M Reza; Steeil, James C; Sura, Patricia; Whittemore, Jacqueline C; Gompf, Rebecca E; Elliott, Sarah B; Ramsay, Edward C

    2014-06-01

    A prospective study to assess changes in selected plasma biochemistry and electrolyte values, plasma insulin and aldosterone concentrations, and electrocardiography (ECG) was performed on eight female captive tigers (Panthera tigris) and three lions (Panthera leo) undergoing general anesthesia for elective laparoscopic ovariectomy. Each animal was sedated with medetomidine (18-25 microg/kg) and midazolam (0.06-0.1 mg/kg) intramuscularly, and anesthesia was induced with ketamine (1.9-3.5 mg/kg) intramuscularly and maintained with isoflurane. Venous blood samples were collected and analyzed for plasma biochemistry parameters and insulin and aldosterone concentrations. An ECG was recorded at the time of each blood sample collection. Mean plasma potassium, glucose, phosphorus, and aldosterone concentrations increased during anesthesia (P < or = 0.05). One tiger developed hyperkalemia (6.5 mmol/L) 2.5 hr after anesthetic induction. Plasma insulin concentrations were initially below the low end of the domestic cat reference interval (72-583 pmol/L), but mean insulin concentration increased (P < or = 0.05) over time compared with the baseline values. Three tigers and two lions had ECG changes that were representative of myocardial hypoxemia. Based on these results, continuous monitoring of clinical and biochemical alterations during general anesthesia in large nondomestic felids is warranted, and consideration should be given to reversal of medetomidine in these animals should significant changes in electrolytes or ECG occur.

  14. Comparison between invasive blood pressure and a non-invasive blood pressure monitor in anesthetized sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Daniel; Barletta, Michele; Mathews, Lindsey; Graham, Lynelle; Quandt, Jane

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring blood pressure under general anesthesia in animals is important to prevent hypotension and poor tissue perfusion. Thirteen sheep were enrolled to evaluate the accuracy of the petMAP, a portable non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitor. Animals were anesthetized with midazolam, fentanyl, ketamine, propofol and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen for ovariectomy. Invasive and non-invasive (petMAP) blood pressure measurements were recorded simultaneously every 5 minutes. Agreement between IBP and NIBP was assessed by evaluation of bias and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) using the Bland-Altman method and correlation coefficient. None of the measurements met the criteria for good agreement between invasive and non-invasive readings established by the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation. Systolic blood pressure readings obtained at the left thoracic limb site and mean blood pressure at the right pelvic limb site met the bias and LOA criteria established by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. ACCURACY OF NONINVASIVE ANESTHETIC MONITORING IN THE ANESTHETIZED GIRAFFE (GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mads F.; Grondahl, Carsten; Stegmann, George F.

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of pulse oximetry, capnography, and oscillometric blood pressure during general anesthesia in giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis). Thirty-two giraffes anesthetized for physiologic experiments were instrumented with a pulse oximeter transmittance probe positioned on......, and hypotension, but not for hypoxemia. Noninvasive anesthetic monitoring should be interpreted with caution in giraffes and, ideally, invasive monitoring should be employed....

  16. [Monitoring occupational exposure to volatile anaesthetics in the operating theatre: environmental and biological measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovesti, S; Ferrari, A; Faggiano, D; Vivoli, G

    2005-01-01

    Concentrations of nitrous oxide (N2O) and isoflurane were measured in environmental and urinary samples from subjects occupationally exposed to volatile anaesthetics in operating theatres in a hospital in northern Italy. The aim was to establish whether: an automatic analyzer (Brüel & Kjaer 1302 spectrometer) can be used for fixed position sampling ("anaesthetist zone" and "surgeon/instrument nurse zone"); periodic monitoring of anaesthetics will reduce exposure; exposure to N2O and isoflurane is within legal limits; exposure differs between anaesthetists and surgeons/instrument nurses. Exposure to anaesthetics was monitored twice at six-month intervals. In the first test time spent in the operating theatre was noted and exposure levels were measured automatically. In the second test levels were monitored with passive personal sampling devices. Environmental concentrations of N2O determined by the spectrometer were correlated to urinary levels. Urinary levels of N2O calculated from the regression line were the same as those obtained with the personal samplers. Environmental and urinary levels of N2O decreased significantly from the first to second test. In the second sampling 70% of subjects had levels of exposure to N2O and isoflurane within prescribed environmental limits (50 ppm for N2O and 0.5 ppm for isoflurane). At the first test anaesthetists had significantly higher levels of exposure to N2O than surgeons/instrument nurses. The survey demonstrated that: fixed position sampling data related to time spent in the operating theatre can be used to gauge individual exposure levels; exposure levels decrease after tests following implementation of preventive measures; monitoring needs to be repeated because exposure levels often exceed legal limits; occupational exposure decreases when pollution in the anaesthetic zone is reduced.

  17. Isoflurane anaesthesia in an African wild dog, Lycaon pictus : short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.F. Stegmann

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesia was required in a captive female African wild dog (Lycaon pictus for surgical wound treatment. After it was immobilised with a medetomidine-ketamine combination, bradycardia, hypothermia, systolic hypertension and metabolic acidosis were observed. Surgical anaesthesia was maintained with a 1 %end-tidal isoflurane concentration. A decrease in the arterial blood pressure, rectal temperature and pHoccurred during maintenance of anaesthesia.

  18. The effect of remifentanil on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ben-zhen; Chu, Qin-jun; Yu, Jing-rui; Yao, Yu-sheng; Tan, Ling

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of remifentanil on the isoflurane end-tidal concentration required to eliminate movement reaction upon surgical incision in children. Prospective, double blinded, serial study. Operating room of a university-affiliated hospital. Patients of ASA status 1 or 2, aged 4 to 7 years, scheduled for either inguinal hernia repair or orchidopexy surgery with general anesthesia. After endotracheal intubation, 108 children serially received 1 of 6 dose (nil, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, or 0.25 μg kg(-1) min(-1)) of remifentanil. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was adjusted according to a Dixon's up-and-down approach. Twenty-five minutes after starting the remifentanil infusion, the surgical incision was performed. The response of patients was classified as either "response" or "no response." Response was defined as a purposeful response in response to skin incision. The MAC of isoflurane were 1.50 ± 0.16%, 1.33 ± 0.27%, 0.93 ± 0.13%, 0.73 ± 0.27%, 0.63 ± 0.19%, and 0.60 ± 0.15% for remifentanil infusion rates of nil, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 μg kg(-1) min(-1), respectively. The MAC of isoflurane decreased with increasing infusion rate of remifentanil, showing an initial step reduction followed by a ceiling effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of DNA damage after exposure to inhalation anesthetics in human peripheral lymphocytes and sperm cells in vitro by comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymak, C; Kadioglu, E; Coskun, E; Basar, H; Basar, M

    2012-12-01

    In this study, genotoxic activities of four halogenated anesthetics (halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane) were investigated in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and sperm cells in vitro by alkaline comet assay. For this purpose, sperm or lymphocyte suspension was exposed to different concentrations (0.1 mM, 1 mM, 10 mM and 100 mM) of anesthetic agents and 1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as controls. The DNA strand breaks as well as alkali-labile sites were measured as percentage tail intensity with comet assay. The results of this study demonstrate that all analyzed drugs were capable of inducing DNA damage on PBLs in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. However, the results in sperm cells were slightly different since we did not observe any genotoxic effect for desflurane in any of the exposure doses, and the genotoxic effect of halothane was not dose dependent. This experimental study points out to the presence of DNA damage after exposure to halogenated anesthetics in both PBLs and sperm cells, although this effect seems to be higher in PBLs.

  20. Age-related iso-MAC charts for isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickalls, R W D; Mapleson, W W

    2003-08-01

    The motivation for this study was the current difficulty in estimating the total age-related MAC for a patient in a clinical setting. Age-related iso-MAC charts for isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane were developed for the clinically useful MAC range (0.6-1.6), age range 5-95 yr, and put in a convenient form for use by practising anaesthetists. The charts are based on Mapleson's meta-analysis (1996) of the available MAC data and can be used to allow for the contribution of nitrous oxide to the total MAC. The charts indicate the influence of age on anaesthetic requirements, showing, for example, that a total MAC of 1.2 using isoflurane and nitrous oxide 67% in oxygen requires an end-expired isoflurane concentration of only 0.25% in a patient of 95 yr vs 1% in a 5-yr-old patient. Colleagues found the charts to be helpful and simple to use clinically. The iso-MAC charts show clearly how patient age can be used to guide the choice of end-expired agent concentration. They also allow a consistent total MAC to be maintained when changing the inspired nitrous oxide concentration, thereby reducing the chance of inadvertent awareness, particularly at the extremes of age.

  1. Effects of nitrous oxide on cerebral haemodynamics and metabolism during isoflurane anaesthesia in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algotsson, L.; Messeter, K. (Department of Anaesthesiology, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)); Rosen, I. (Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)); Holmin, T. (Department of Surgery, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden))

    1992-01-01

    Seven normoventilated and five hyperventilated healthy adults undergoing cholecystectomy and anaesthetized with methohexitone, fentanyl and pancuronium were studied with measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cereal metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRo[sub 2]), and quantified electroencephalography (EEG) under two sets of conditions: (1) 1.7% end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in air/oxygen: (2) 0.85% end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in nitrous oxide (N[sub 2]O)/oxygen. The object was to study the effects of N[sub 2]O during isoflurane anaesthesia on cerebral circulation, metabolism and neuroelectric activity. N[sub 2]O in the anaesthetic gas mixture caused a 43% (P<0.05) increase in CBF during normocarbic conditions but no significant change during hypocapnia. CMRo[sub 2] was not significantly altered by N[sub 2]O. EEG demonstrated an activated pattern with decreased low frequency activity and increased high frequency activity. The results confirm that N[sub 2]O is a potent cerebral vasodilator in man, although the mechanisms underlying the effects on CBF are still unclear. (au).

  2. Endogenous Lunar Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Liu, Y.; Barnes, J. J.; Boyce, J. W.; Day, J. M. D.; Elardo, S. M.; Hui, H.; Magna, T.; Ni, P.; Tartese, R.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The chapter will begin with an introduction that defines magmatic volatiles (e.g., H, F, Cl, S) versus geochemical volatiles (e.g., K, Rb, Zn). We will discuss our approach of understanding both types of volatiles in lunar samples and lay the ground work for how we will determine the overall volatile budget of the Moon. We will then discuss the importance of endogenous volatiles in shaping the "Newer Views of the Moon", specifically how endogenous volatiles feed forward into processes such as the origin of the Moon, magmatic differentiation, volcanism, and secondary processes during surface and crustal interactions. After the introduction, we will include a re-view/synthesis on the current state of 1) apatite compositions (volatile abundances and isotopic compositions); 2) nominally anhydrous mineral phases (moderately to highly volatile); 3) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of lunar pyroclastic glass beads; 4) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of lunar basalts; 5) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of melt inclusions; and finally 6) experimental constraints on mineral-melt partitioning of moderately to highly volatile elements under lunar conditions. We anticipate that each section will summarize results since 2007 and focus on new results published since the 2015 Am Min review paper on lunar volatiles [9]. The next section will discuss how to use sample abundances of volatiles to understand the source region and potential caveats in estimating source abundances of volatiles. The following section will include our best estimates of volatile abundances and isotopic compositions (where permitted by available data) for each volatile element of interest in a number of important lunar reservoirs, including the crust, mantle, KREEP, and bulk Moon. The final section of the chapter will focus upon future work, outstanding questions

  3. Knowledge about local anesthetics in odontology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Alvarez, Rodrigo; Campos Sepúlveda, Alfonso Efraín; Martínez González, Adrian Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the level of knowledge of local anesthetics frequently used in the surgical clinic by third and fourth year dental students in daily practice. The importance of pharmacology in dental practice in underscored by potential drug toxicity. The study was performed with 244 third and fourth grade career dental students (CDS). Eleven items regarding the knowledge over local anesthetics at the clinic; i.e., the appropriate doses, possible toxic effects and side effects were examined. The reference questionnaire which is in a validation process, is a way to evaluate student knowledge about most drugs used in odontology practice such as: NSAIDs, antibiotics and local anesthetics. The results were found to be unsatisfactory with a high percentage of students failing (less than six of eleven items correct). We conclude that determination of practice knowledge is an essential step in informing the institution about cognitive deficiencies identified in order to plan learning solutions.

  4. Anesthetic drugs in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    The structural defects associated with the various forms of congenital heart disease lead to pathological and functional changes that place patients at risk for adverse events, and in fact the perioperative incidence of morbidity and mortality has been documented to be increased in children with congenital heart disease. Patients with congenital heart disease can present to the anesthesiologist in a relatively precarious state of balance of several hemodynamic factors, including preload, ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, pulmonary vascular resistance, heart rate, and cardiac rhythm. Anesthetic drugs can affect each of these, and an ideal anesthetic drug for such patients does not exist. The purpose of this article is to review the hemodynamic effects of anesthetic drugs and how they may contribute to the occurrence of adverse events in children with congenital heart disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Isoflurane and ketamine:xylazine differentially affect intraocular pressure-associated scotopic threshold responses in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choh, Vivian; Gurdita, Akshay; Tan, Bingyao; Feng, Yunwei; Bizheva, Kostadinka; McCulloch, Daphne L; Joos, Karen M

    2017-10-01

    Amplitudes of electroretinograms (ERG) are enhanced during acute, moderate elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) in rats anaesthetised with isoflurane. As anaesthetics alone are known to affect ERG amplitudes, the present study compares the effects of inhalant isoflurane and injected ketamine:xylazine on the scotopic threshold response (STR) in rats with moderate IOP elevation. Isoflurane-anaesthetised (n = 9) and ketamine:xylazine-anaesthetised (n = 6) rats underwent acute unilateral IOP elevation using a vascular loop anterior to the equator of the right eye. STRs to a luminance series (subthreshold to -3.04 log scotopic cd s/m 2 ) were recorded from each eye of Sprague-Dawley rats before, during, and after IOP elevation. Positive STR (pSTR) amplitudes for all conditions were significantly smaller (p = 0.0001) for isoflurane- than for ketamine:xylazine-anaesthetised rats. In addition, ketamine:xylazine was associated with a progressive increase in pSTR amplitudes over time (p = 0.0028). IOP elevation was associated with an increase in pSTR amplitude (both anaesthetics p ketamine:xylazine and isoflurane were similar (66.3 ± 35.5 vs. 54.2 ± 24.1 µV, respectively). However, the fold increase in amplitude during IOP elevation was significantly higher in the isoflurane- than in the ketamine:xylazine-anaesthetised rats (16.8 ± 29.7x vs. 2.1 ± 2.7x, respectively, p = 0.0004). The anaesthetics differentially affect the STRs in the rat model with markedly reduced amplitudes with isoflurane compared to ketamine:xylazine. However, the IOP-associated enhancement is of similar absolute magnitude for the two anaesthetics, suggesting that IOP stress and anaesthetic effects operate on separate retinal mechanisms.

  6. The effects of anesthetic regimen in 90% hepatectomy in rats Os efeitos do regime anestésico na hepatectomia de 90% em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Oscar Kieling

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the influence of the anesthetic regimen on anesthetic recovery, survival, and blood glucose levels following a 90% partial hepatectomy in rats. METHODS: Thirty adult male Wistar rats were divided into two groups according to their anesthetic regimens: intraperitoneal ketamine and xylazine or inhaled isoflurane. In order to prevent hypoglycemia, glucose was administered intraperitoneally and glucose (20% was added to the drinking water. RESULTS: Anesthetic recovery time was longer in the ketamine and xylazine group. The survival rate after 72 hours was lower (log rank=0.0001 in the ketamine and xylazine group (0.0% than in the isoflurane group (26.7%. The blood glucose after six hours was lower (p=0.017 in the ketamine and xylazine group (63±31.7 mg/dL than in the isoflurane group (98±21.2 mg/dL. The prolonged anesthesia recovery time associated with ketamine and xylazine decreased the survival rate and blood glucose levels after 90% hepatectomy. CONCLUSION: Isoflurane anesthesia reduced the recovery time and incidence of hypoglycemia and increased the survival rate in the early hours, providing a therapeutic window that is suitable for experimental studies.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a influência do regime anestésico sobre a recuperação anestésica, a sobrevida em 72 horas e a glicemia após hepatectomia parcial de 90% em ratos. MÉTODOS: Trinta ratos Wistar machos adultos foram distribuídos em dois grupos conforme o regime anestésico: combinação de ketamina e xilazina intraperitoneal ou isoflurano inalatório. Para prevenção de hipoglicemia foi administrada glicose intraperitoneal e adicionado glicose (20% na água de beber. RESULTADOS: A recuperação anestésica no grupo ketamina e xilazina foi mais prolongada. Durante primeira hora após hepatectomia, nenhum rato anestesiado com ketamina e xilazina despertou. Todos do grupo isoflurano estavam ativos minutos após final da cirurgia. A sobrevida em 72 horas foi menor

  7. A technique to anesthetize turtles with ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belló, A A; Belló-Klein, A

    1991-10-01

    A technique to anesthetize turtles with ether is presented, in which a plastic cannula is passed through the glottis into the trachea. This procedure avoids apnea and allows ether vapours obtained from a chamber to be introduced, by the animal respiratory movements or by means of a pump, into the animal lungs. The anesthesia is rapidly obtained and lasts from 45-90 minutes. The time of recovery from anesthesia ranged from 60-90 minutes. With this technique no deaths were observed and the same animal could be anesthetized repeatedly.

  8. Asymmetric Realized Volatility Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Allen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we document that realized variation measures constructed from high-frequency returns reveal a large degree of volatility risk in stock and index returns, where we characterize volatility risk by the extent to which forecasting errors in realized volatility are substantive. Even though returns standardized by ex post quadratic variation measures are nearly Gaussian, this unpredictability brings considerably more uncertainty to the empirically relevant ex ante distribution of returns. Explicitly modeling this volatility risk is fundamental. We propose a dually asymmetric realized volatility model, which incorporates the fact that realized volatility series are systematically more volatile in high volatility periods. Returns in this framework display time varying volatility, skewness and kurtosis. We provide a detailed account of the empirical advantages of the model using data on the S&P 500 index and eight other indexes and stocks.

  9. Nitrous oxide added at the end of isoflurane anesthesia hastens early recovery without increasing the risk for postoperative nausea and vomiting: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mraovic, Boris; Simurina, Tatjana; Gan, Tong J

    2018-02-01

    2O and GO2 groups, 5.1 mg; 95% CI, 0.8 to 9.4, P = 0.019). Adding N2O during the last 30 min of an isoflurane-based inhalational anesthetic reduced the time to extubation, eye opening, and orientation.

  10. Administration and monitoring of intravenous anesthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahinovic, Marko M.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The importance of accuracy in controlling the dose-response relation for intravenous anesthetics is directly related to the importance of optimizing the efficacy and quality of anesthesia while minimizing adverse drug effects. Therefore, it is important to measure and control all

  11. Effects of anesthetics on the coronary circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, S.; Vermeyen, K.; Adriaensen, H.

    1990-01-01

    The coronary circulation holds a unique position among the different vascular beds because it perfuses the organ that generates the perfusion pressure for the entire circulation. Therefore the maintenance of an adequate perioperative coronary flow is one of the primary goals of good anesthetic

  12. Exploring microsolvation of the anesthetic propofol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leon, I.; Cocinero, E. J.; Millan, J.; Jaeqx, S.; Rijs, A. M.; Lesarri, A.; Castano, F.; Fernandez, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is a broadly used general anesthetic. By combining spectroscopic techniques such as 1- and 2-color REMPI, UV/UV hole burning, infrared ion-dip spectroscopy (IRIDS) obtained under cooled and isolated conditions with high-level ab initio calculations, detailed

  13. Anesthetic complications in a rehabilitation hospital: is the incidence related to the pre-anesthetic visit?

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartzman, Ulises Prieto y; Batista, Kátia Torres; Duarte, Leonardo Teixeira D.; Saraiva,Renato Ângelo; Fernandes, Maria do Carmo Barreto C.; Costa, Verônica Vieira da; Ferreira, Luciana Souto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:Approximately 234 million surgeries are done annually worldwide. There is a growing concern for the safety of the anesthetic act, and the pre-anesthetic consultation emerges as an important and widely recommended activity, used as a preventive measure for the emergence of a complication.Objectives:To describe the complications related to anesthesia, to identify the factors that contribute to its appearance and to reflect on ways to improve clinical practice.Methods:700 patients, ...

  14. THE EFFECT OF LOCAL ANESTHETICS ON TEAR PRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Anesthetics are drugs which bring about the state of anesthesia and anesthesia is a measure, which produces insensitivity to external expression or a reversible lack of awareness which can be general or local . General anesthetics act on all parts of the body while local anesthetics act on some parts of the ...

  15. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during isoflurane-induced hypotension in patients subjected to surgery for cerebral aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J B; Cold, G E; Hansen, E S

    1987-01-01

    ). Controlled hypotension to an average MAP of 50-55 mm Hg was induced by increasing the dose of isoflurane, and maintained at an inspired concentration of 2.2 +/- 0.2%. This resulted in a significant decrease in CMRO2 (to 1.73 +/- 0.16 ml/100 g min-1), while CBF was unchanged. After the clipping......Cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen were measured during isoflurane-induced hypotension in 10 patients subjected to craniotomy for clipping of a cerebral aneurysm. Flow and metabolism were measured 5-13 days after the subarachnoid haemorrhage by a modification...... of the aneurysm the isoflurane concentration was reduced to 0.75%. There was a significant increase in CBF, although CMRO2 was unchanged, compared with pre-hypotensive values. These changes might offer protection to brain tissue during periods of induced hypotension....

  16. Evaluation of the effects of dorsal versus lateral recumbency on the cardiopulmonary system during anesthesia with isoflurane in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Michelle G; Malka, Shachar; Pascoe, Peter J; Solano, Adrian M; Kass, Philip H; Ohmura, Hajime; Jones, James H

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of dorsal versus lateral recumbency on the cardiopulmonary system during isoflurane anesthesia in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). 6 adult 1.1- to 1.6-kg red-tailed hawks. A randomized, crossover study was used to evaluate changes in respiratory rate, tidal volume, minute ventilation, heart rate, mean arterial and indirect blood pressures, and end-tidal Pco(2) measured every 5 minutes plus Paco(2) and Pao(2) and arterial pH measured every 15 minutes throughout a 75-minute study period. Respiratory rate was higher, tidal volume lower, and minute ventilation not different in lateral versus dorsal recumbency. Position did not affect heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, or indirect blood pressure, although heart rate decreased during the anesthetic period. Birds hypoventilated in both positions and Paco(2) differed with time and position × time interaction. The Petco(2) position × time interaction was significant and Petco(2) was a mean of 7 Torr higher than Paco(2). The Paco(2) in dorsal recumbency was a mean of 32 Torr higher than in lateral recumbency. Birds in both positions developed respiratory acidosis. Differences in tidal volume with similar minute ventilation suggested red-tailed hawks in dorsal recumbency might have lower dead space ventilation. Despite similar minute ventilation in both positions, birds in dorsal recumbency hypoventilated more yet maintained higher Pao(2), suggesting parabronchial ventilatory or pulmonary blood flow distribution changes with position. The results refute the hypothesis that dorsal recumbency compromises ventilation and O(2) transport more than lateral recumbency in red-tailed hawks.

  17. Chaos analysis of EEG during isoflurane-induced loss of righting in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce eMaciver

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that electroencephalogram (EEG signals generate chaotic strange attractors and the shape of these attractors correlate with depth of anesthesia. We applied chaos analysis to frontal cortical and hippocampal micro-EEG signals from implanted microelectrodes (layer 4 and CA1, respectively. Rats were taken to and from loss of righting reflex (LORR with isoflurane and behavioral measures were compared to attractor shape. Resting EEG signals at LORR differed markedly from awake signals, more similar to slow wave sleep signals, and easily discerned in raw recordings (high amplitude slow waves, and in fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT; increased delta power, in good agreement with previous studies. EEG activation stimulated by turning rats on their side, to test righting, produced signals quite similar to awake resting state EEG signals. That is, the high amplitude slow wave activity changed to low amplitude fast activity that lasted for several seconds, before returning to slow wave activity. This occurred regardless of whether the rat was able to right itself, or not. Testing paw pinch and tail clamp responses produced similar EEG activations, even from deep anesthesia when burst suppression dominated the spontaneous EEG. Chaotic attractor shape was far better at discerning between these awake-like signals, at loss of responses, than was FFT analysis. Comparisons are provided between FFT and chaos analysis of EEG during awake walking, slow wave sleep, and isoflurane-induced effects at several depths of anesthesia. Attractors readily discriminated between natural sleep and isoflurane-induced ‘delta’ activity. Chaotic attractor shapes changed gradually through the transition from awake to LORR, indicating that this was not an on/off like transition, but rather a point along a continuum of brain states.

  18. Effects of acepromazine or dexmedetomidine on fentanyl disposition in dogs during recovery from isoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Stephanie; Kerr, Carolyn; McDonell, Wayne; Valverde, Alexander; Johnson, Ron; Knych, Heather; Edginton, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To describe fentanyl pharmacokinetics during isoflurane anesthesia and on recovery from anesthesia with concurrent administration of acepromazine, dexmedetomidine or saline in dogs. Experimental blinded, randomized, crossover study. Seven adult hound dogs. Dogs were administered intravenous (IV) fentanyl as a bolus (5 μg kg(-1)) followed by an infusion (5 μg kg(-1) hour(-1)) for 120 minutes during isoflurane anesthesia and emergence from anesthesia, and for 60 minutes after extubation during recovery from anesthesia. At the time of extubation, dexmedetomidine (2.5 μg kg(-1)), acepromazine (0.05 mg kg(-1)) or saline were administered IV. Venous blood was sampled during the maintenance and recovery periods. Fentanyl plasma concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and population pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Mean fentanyl plasma concentrations were 1.6-4.5 ng mL(-1) during isoflurane anesthesia and 1.6-2.0 ng mL(-1) during recovery from anesthesia. Recovery from isoflurane anesthesia without sedation was associated with an increase in the volume of the central compartment from 0.80 to 1.02 L kg(-1). After administration of acepromazine, systemic clearance of fentanyl increased from 31.5 to 40.3 mL minute(-1) kg(-1) and the volume of the central compartment increased from 0.70 to 0.94 L kg(-1). Administration of dexmedetomidine did not significantly change fentanyl pharmacokinetics. Inter-individual variability for fentanyl parameter estimates in all treatments ranged from 2.2% to 54.5%, and residual error ranged from 6.3% to 13.4%. The dose rates of fentanyl used in this study achieved previously established analgesic plasma concentrations for the duration of the infusion. Despite alterations in fentanyl pharmacokinetics, differences in fentanyl plasma concentrations among treatments during recovery from anesthesia were small and were unlikely to be of clinical significance. © 2015 Association of

  19. Isoflurane reduces motile sperm counts in the Sprague-Dawley rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Sarah N; Cappon, Gregg D; Chapin, Robert E; Jamon, Raul T; Winton, Timothy R; Nowland, William S

    2012-01-01

    Animal and care use practices are constantly evolving. These can have unexpected consequences on the data collected from such procedures. One example is the recent change in our animal facility, based on recommendations from the Newcastle Consensus Meeting on Carbon Dioxide Euthanasia of Laboratory Animals, from CO(2) to isoflurane for anesthesia. The current study was conducted to determine the effects of isoflurane on sperm motility, as compared to two different CO(2) euthanasia procedures. Sperm motility was evaluated after euthanasia by a standard 5-minute CO(2) euthanasia procedure, an extended 10-minute CO(2) euthanasia procedure, or by isoflurane anesthesia followed by exsanguination (iso/exsanguination). The 5-minute CO(2) procedure produced sperm motility of 94.3 ± 1.7% motile sperm with 65.6 ± 16.8 sperm/field. By comparison, iso/exsanguination reduced that count to 3.3 ± 2.3 sperm/field and only 60.7 ± 32.0% motile sperm. The reduction in sperm motility after iso/exsanguination appeared to have been due primarily to the reduction in the number of sperm expelled from the vas deferens (3.3), compared to that after 5-minute CO(2) (65.6). This reduction in number of sperm available for evaluation, in the presence of a constant level of background debris, which was counted by the computer optics system as nonmotile sperm, resulted in an apparent reduction in motility. Using the extended 10-minute CO(2) procedure produced sperm data in between the other two extremes: 77.6 ± 36.1% motile sperm with 34.6 ± 28.3 sperm/field. The results of this study support the hypothesis that isoflurane inhibits contraction of the smooth muscle of the vas deferens, resulting in a decreased number of expelled sperm. Given these findings, it is important that careful consideration be taken to select an appropriate anesthesia/euthanasia method.

  20. Identification of causal relations between haemodynamic variables, auditory evoked potentials and isoflurane by means of fuzzy logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E W; Nebot, A; Caminal, P

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a possible relationship between haemodynamic variables, auditory evoked potentials (AEP) and inspired fraction of isoflurane (ISOFl). Two different models (isoflurane and mean arterial pressure) were identified using the fuzzy inductive reasoning (FIR......) methodology. A fuzzy model is able to identify non-linear and linear components of a causal relationship by means of optimization of information content of available data. Nine young female patients undergoing hysterectomy under general anaesthesia were included. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR...

  1. Ketamine-Based Anesthetic Protocols and Evoked Potential Monitoring: A Risk/Benefit Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta eStoicea

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery, ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist related to phencyclidine, has been linked to multiple adverse reactions sometimes described as out of body and near death experiences, including emergence phenomena, delusions, hallucinations, delirium, and confusion. Due to these effects, ketamine has been withdrawn from mainstream anesthetic use in adult patients. Evoked potentials (EPs are utilized to monitor neural pathways during surgery, detect intraoperative stress or damage, detect and define the level of neural lesions, and define abnormalities. Unfortunately, many of the volatile anesthetics commonly used during spinal and neurologic procedures suppress EP amplitude and monitoring.. Ketamine has been found in several preclinical and clinical studies to actually increase EP amplitude and thus has been used as an analgesic adjunct in procedures where EP monitoring is critical. Once the gap in our knowledge of ketamine’s risks has been sufficiently addressed in animal models, informed clinical trials should be conducted in order to properly incorporate ketamine-based anesthetic regimens during EP-monitored neurosurgeries.

  2. Ketamine-Based Anesthetic Protocols and Evoked Potential Monitoring: A Risk/Benefit Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Versteeg, Gregory; Florescu, Diana; Joseph, Nicholas; Fiorda-Diaz, Juan; Navarrete, Víctor; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist related to phencyclidine, has been linked to multiple adverse reactions sometimes described as “out of body” and “near death experiences,” including emergence phenomena, delusions, hallucinations, delirium, and confusion. Due to these effects, ketamine has been withdrawn from mainstream anesthetic use in adult patients. Evoked potentials (EPs) are utilized to monitor neural pathways during surgery, detect intraoperative stress or damage, detect and define the level of neural lesions, and define abnormalities. Unfortunately, many of the volatile anesthetics commonly used during spinal and neurologic procedures suppress EP amplitude and monitoring. Ketamine has been found in several preclinical and clinical studies to actually increase EP amplitude and thus has been used as an analgesic adjunct in procedures where EP monitoring is critical. Once the gap in our knowledge of ketamine's risks has been sufficiently addressed in animal models, informed clinical trials should be conducted in order to properly incorporate ketamine-based anesthetic regimens during EP-monitored neurosurgeries. PMID:26909017

  3. Anesthetic consideration in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Narejo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of inherited rare skin disease, characterized by bullae formation in the skin or mucous membranes. The fundamental abnormality is collagen degeneration leads to splitting of various epidermal layers. Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB is one of the major forms of epidermolysis bullosa. These patients often admitted to the hospital for corrective surgeries, change of dressing, contracture release, and skin grafting. Anesthetic management of these cases is always a challenge. We are reporting a case of 5-year-old boy diagnosed as a case of DEB scheduled for upper lip contracture release, skin grafting and debridement of nonhealing scars under anesthesia. In this case, we have focused mainly on the anesthetic management, preparation of the monitoring, transportation, difficulties in establishing the venous accesses, and airway management.

  4. Opioid induced hyperalgesia in anesthetic settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Yeomans, David C

    2014-11-01

    Pain is difficult to investigate and difficult to treat, in part, because of problems in quantification and assessment. The use of opioids, combined with classic anesthetics to maintain hemodynamic stability by controlling responses to intraoperative painful events has gained significant popularity in the anesthetic field. However, several side effects profiles concerning perioperative use of opioid have been published. Over the past two decades, many concerns have arisen with respect to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which is the paradoxical effect wherein opioid usage may decrease pain thresholds and increase atypical pain unrelated to the original, preexisting pain. This brief review focuses on the evidence, mechanisms, and modulatory and pharmacologic management of OIH in order to elaborate on the clinical implication of OIH.

  5. Anesthetic pregnanes counteract androgen-induced defeminization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mariscal, G; Fernandez-Guasti, A; Beyer, C

    1982-01-01

    The capacity of various pregnanes for counteracting androgen-induced defeminization was evaluated in an attempt to define some cellular mechanisms involved in the defeminization process. 5-day-old female rats received 60 microgram testosterone propionate (TP) along with one of various pregnanes: progesterone, 5 beta-pregnandione, 5 beta, 3 alpha-pregnanolone, 5 beta, 3 beta-pregnanolone, 5 alpha-pregnandione, 5 alpha, 3 beta-pregnanolone, 5 alpha, 3 alpha-pregnanolone or chlormadinone acetate. Protection against defeminization was defined as a significantly smaller proportion of anovulatory animals in a group compared to the control TP group. Data were analyzed at 60, 90 and 120 days of age. The anesthetic potency of the pregnanes was evaluated in 5-day-old male rats through the analysis of EEG and EMG records. Anesthetic pregnanes - progesterone, 5 beta-pregnandione and 5 beta, 3 alpha-pregnanolone - counteracted defeminization while nonanesthetic pregnanes - 5 alpha-pregnanes, chlormadinone acetate and 5 beta, 3 beta-pregnanolone - did not. The results show a clear relation between anesthetic capacity and protection against defeminization.

  6. Lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination reduce isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Acevedo-Arcique

    Full Text Available The effects of intravenous (i.v. lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination delivered as a bolus followed by a constant rate infusion (CRI on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (MACISO in dogs were evaluated. Seven healthy adult dogs were included. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. For each dog, baseline MAC (MACISO/BASAL was determined after a 90-minute equilibration period. Thereafter, each dog received one of the following treatments (loading dose, CRI: lidocaine 2 mg kg(-1, 100 µg kg(-1 minute(-1; dexmedetomidine 2 µg kg(-1, 2 µg kg(-1 hour(-1; or their combination. MAC was then determined again after 45- minutes of treatment by CRI. At the doses administered, lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination significantly reduced MACISO by 27.3% (range: 12.5-39.2%, 43.4% (33.3-53.3% and 60.9% (46.1-78.1%, respectively, when compared to MACISO/BASAL. The combination resulted in a greater MACISO reduction than the two drugs alone. Their use, at the doses studied, provides a clinically important reduction in the concentration of ISO during anaesthesia in dogs.

  7. Minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs administered two morphine doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Coelho

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of intramuscular 0.5mg kg-1 (MOR0.5 and 1.0mg kg-1 (MOR1.0 morphine premedication on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (ISOMAC in dogs. Eighteen client-owned female dogs were scheduled for elective ovariohysterectomy. Dogs received intramuscular MOR0.5 or MOR1.0 as premedication and propofol IV for induction of anesthesia. Isoflurane was delivered for maintenance of anesthesia and dogs were maintained under normocapnia and normothermia. Determinations of the ISOMAC were conducted by use of the “up-and-down” method. Noxious stimulus (placement of Backhaus towel clamps, a midline skin incision and subcutaneous tissue dissection was delivered approximately 50 minutes after premedication with MOR0.5 or MOR1.0. The calculated ISOMAC was 0.98±0.15% in MOR0.5 and 0.80±0.08% in MOR1.0. The ISOMAC was significantly lower in MOR1.0 compared with MOR0.5 (P=0.010. Results of this study suggested that intramuscular premedication with morphine 0.5 and 1.0mg kg-1 decreases the ISOMAC in a dose-related manner in dogs.

  8. Active research fields in anesthesia: a document co-citation analysis of the anesthetic literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Milan P; Kaufmann, Mark; Kindler, Christoph H

    2008-05-01

    The expansion of science has resulted in an increased information flow and in an exponentially growing number of connections between knowledge in different research fields. In this study, we used methods of scientometric analysis to obtain a conceptual network that forms the structure of active scientific research fields in anesthesia. We extracted from the Web of Science (Institute for Scientific Information) all original articles (n = 3275) including their references (n = 79,972) that appeared in 2003 in all 23 journals listed in the Institute for Scientific Information Journal Citation Reports under the subject heading "Anesthesiology." After identification of highly cited references (> or = 5), pairs of co-cited references were created and grouped into uniformly structured clusters of documents using a single linkage and variable level clustering method. In addition, for each such cluster of documents, we identified corresponding front papers published in 2003, each of which co-cited at least two documents of the cluster core. Active anesthetic research fields were then named by examining the titles of the documents in both the established clusters and in their corresponding front papers. These research fields were sorted according to the proportion of recent documents in their cluster core (immediacy index) and were further analyzed. Forty-six current anesthetic research fields were identified. The research field named "ProSeal laryngeal mask airway" showed the highest immediacy index (100%) whereas the research fields "Experimental models of neuropathic pain" and "Volatile anesthetic-induced cardioprotection" exhibited the highest level of co-citation strength (level 9). The research field with the largest cluster core, containing 12 homogeneous papers, was "Postoperative nausea and vomiting." The journal Anesthesia & Analgesia published most front papers while Anesthesiology published most of the fundamental documents used as references in the front papers

  9. Long-term anesthetic protocol in rats: feasibility in electrophysiology studies in visual prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga-Rivera, Alejandro; Tatarinoff, Veronica; Lovell, Nigel H; Morley, John W; Suaning, Gregg J

    2017-11-17

    Electrical stimulation of excitable cells provides therapeutic benefits for a variety of medical conditions, including restoration of partial vision to those blinded via some types of retinal degeneration. To improve visual percepts elicited by the current technology, researchers are conducting acute electrophysiology experiments, mainly in cats. However, the rat can provide a model of a range of retinal diseases and possesses a sufficiently large eye to be used in this field. This article presents a long-term anesthetic protocol to enable electrophysiology experiments to further the development of visual prostheses. Six Long-Evans rats (aged between 14 and 16 weeks) were included in this study. Surgical anesthesia was maintained for more than 15 h by combining constant intravenous infusion of ketamine (24.0-34.5 mg/kg/h), xylazine (0.9-1.2 mg/kg/h), and inhaled isoflurane in oxygen (<0.5%). Overall heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature remained between 187-233 beats/min, 45-58 breaths/min, and 36-38 °C, respectively. Neural responses to 200-ms light pulses were recorded from the superior colliculus using a 32-channel neural probe at the beginning and before termination of the experiment. Robust responses were recorded from distinct functional types of retinal pathways. In addition, a platinum electrode was implanted in the retrobulbar space. The retina was electrically stimulated, and the activation threshold was determined to be 5.24 ± 0.24 μC/cm2 . This protocol may be used not only in the field of visual prosthesis research, but in other research areas requiring longer term acute experiments. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  10. A longitudinal study for investigating the exposure level of anesthetics that impairs neurobehavioral performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scapellato, Maria Luisa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Fedeli, Ugo; Carrieri, Mariella; Maccà, Isabella; Scoizzato, Luca; Bartolucci, Giovanni Battista

    2008-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence on the level of anesthetics that impairs neurobehavioral performance, leading to differences in exposure standards (25 or 50 ppm for N(2)O). Thirty-eight operating room nurses and 23 unexposed nurses were asked to provide information on confounding variables: age, gender, years of schooling, alcohol and coffee consumption, smoking, length of work, symptoms (Euroquest) and results of Block Design test. Afterward, all workers were repeatedly examined (on Monday and Friday of a working week, before and after workshift) for stress and arousal (Mood Scale) and complex reaction times (Color Word Vigilance, CWV), the latter being the outcome. Individual exposure was assessed through urinary end-shift concentrations of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and isoflurane. According to the highest value of urinary excretion of N(2)O in the week, exposed workers were subdivided in three groups ( or =13 and or = 27 microg/l). The values of 13 and 27 microg/l correspond to environmental concentrations of 25 and 50 ppm, respectively. In order to take into account the pre-existing abilities of exposed and reference workers, and investigate the neurobehavioral changes over time, longitudinal data were analyzed by a two-stage regression model and analysis of variance for repeated measures (MANOVA). The former method, controlling for confounding factors and Monday morning CWV (which conveyed the pre-existing ability of the subjects), showed that, with respect to unexposed nurses, reaction times were significantly (p or = 27 microg/l. Therefore, at MANOVA, all subjects were categorized in two classes (N(2)O urinary concentrations or = 27 microg/l), and CWV results were adjusted for the confounding variables and effects of stress and arousal, taken concurrently with CWV. CWV significantly (peffect) in workers with urinary N(2)O 27 microg/l.

  11. Effects of dose-dependent levels of isoflurane on cerebral blood flow in healthy subjects studied using positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlünzen, L; Cold, G E; Rasmussen, Mads

    2006-01-01

    in the insula and decreased in the thalamus, the cuneus and lingual gyrus. Compared with flow distribution in awake volunteers, 1 MAC of isoflurane significantly raised relative activity in the anterior cingulate and insula regions. In contrast, a significant relative flow reduction was identified......, insula regions, cerebellum, lingual gyrus and thalamus....

  12. Dose-response and concentration-response relation of rocuronium infusion during propofol nitrous oxide and isoflurane nitrous oxide anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kansanaho, M; Olkkola, KT; Wierda, JMKH

    The dose-response and concentration-response relation of rocuronium infusion was studied in 20 adult surgical patients during proporfol-nitrous oxide and isoflurane (1 MAC) -nitrous oxide anaesthesia. Neuromuscular block was kept constant, initially at 90% and then at 50% with a closed-loop feedback

  13. Propofol increased the interleukin-6 to interleukin-10 ratio more than isoflurane after surgery in long-term alcoholic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Von Dossow, V; Baur, S; Sander, M

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of an anaesthetic regimen on the immune response in 40 long-term alcoholic patients undergoing surgery. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either propofol or isoflurane during surgery. Plasma cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 were measured at defin...

  14. Elamipretide (SS-31 Ameliorates Isoflurane-Induced Long-Term Impairments of Mitochondrial Morphogenesis and Cognition in Developing Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Jun Yang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are supposed to be involved in the early pathogenesis of general anesthesia (GA-induced neurotoxicity and long-term cognitive deficits in developing brains. However, effective pharmacologic agents targeted on mitochondria during GA exposure are lacking. This study explores the protective effects of mitochondrion-targeted antioxidant elamipretide (SS-31 on mitochondrial morphogenesis and cognition in developing rats exposed to isoflurane. Rat pups at postnatal day (PND 7 were exposed to 1.5% isoflurane for 6 h following intraperitoneal administration of elamipretide or vehicle with 30 min interval. The hippocampus was immediately removed for biochemical assays. Histopathological studies were conducted at PND 21, and behavioral tests were performed at PND 40 or 60. We found that early exposure to isoflurane caused remarkable reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation, mitochondrial deformation and neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus. The injury occurrence ultimately gave rise to long-term cognitive deficits in developing rats. Interestingly, pretreatment with elamipretide not only provided protective effect against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damages, but also attenuated isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits. Our data support the notion that mitochondrial damage is an early and long lasting event of GA-induced injury and suggest that elamipretide might have clinically therapeutic benefits for pediatric patients undertaking GA.

  15. Comparison of isoflurane and propofol for maintenance of anesthesia in dogs with intracranial disease undergoing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caines, Deanne; Sinclair, Melissa; Valverde, Alexander; Dyson, Doris; Gaitero, Luis; Wood, Darren

    2014-09-01

    To compare isoflurane and propofol for maintenance of anesthesia and quality of recovery in client-owned dogs with intracranial disease undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prospective, randomized, clinical trial. Twenty-five client-owned dogs with intracranial pathology, 13 females and 12 males, ages 11 months to 13 years, weighing between 3.0 and 48.0 kg. Each dog was randomly assigned to receive propofol or isoflurane for maintenance of anesthesia. All dogs were not premedicated, were administered propofol intravenously to effect for induction, intubated and mechanically ventilated to maintain an end-tidal carbon dioxide tension 30-35 mmHg (4.0-4.7 kPa). Temperature and cardiac output were measured pre- and post-MRI. Scores for mentation, neurological status, ease of maintenance, and recovery were obtained pre- and post-anesthesia. Pulse oximetry, end-tidal gases, arterial blood pressure, heart rate (HR) and requirements for dopamine administration to maintain mean arterial pressure (MAP) >60 mmHg were recorded throughout anesthesia. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was 0.73 ± 0.35% and propofol infusion rate was 292 ± 119 μg kg(-1)  minute(-1) . Cardiac index was higher, while HR was lower, with propofol than isoflurane in dogs younger than 5 years, but not in older dogs. Dogs maintained with isoflurane were 14.7 times more likely to require dopamine than propofol dogs. Mentation and maintenance scores and temperature were not different. MAP and diastolic arterial pressure were higher in the propofol group. Recovery scores were better with propofol, although times to extubation were similar. Change in neurological score from pre- to post-anesthesia was not different between treatments. Dogs maintained with propofol during MRI had higher arterial pressures, decreased requirements for dopamine, and better recovery scores, compared to dogs maintained with isoflurane. Propofol anesthesia offered cardiovascular and recovery advantages over

  16. Relationship between pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic airway resistance in patients undergoing general anesthesia: A prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamitsu Ikeda

    Full Text Available Surgery patients in Japan undergo routine spirometry testing prior to general anesthesia. The use of a flow sensor during general anesthesia has recently become common. However, it is not certain whether the information derived from flow-volume curves is being adequately used for mechanical ventilation management during general anesthesia. So far, there have been no attempts to calculate airway resistance using flow-volume curves. Therefore, we performed a prospective, observational study to investigate the relationship between pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic airway resistance in patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia. We calculated pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic airway resistance in each patient, based on the slopes of flow-volume curves obtained prior to and during general anesthesia. We also calculated endotracheal tube resistance to correct the intra-anesthetic airway resistance values calculated. A total of 526 patients were included in the study, and 98 patients had a forced expiratory volume in the first second/forced vital capacity ratio of < 70%. Pre-anesthetic airway resistance was significantly higher in patients with airflow obstruction than in those without airflow obstruction (p < 0.001, whereas no significant difference in intra-anesthetic airway resistance was found between patients with and without airflow obstruction during mechanical ventilation (p = 0.48. Pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic airway resistance values were closer to each other in patients without airflow obstruction, with a mean difference < 1.0 cmH2O L-1s-1, than in those with airflow obstruction, although these respiratory parameters were significantly different (p < 0.001. Intra-anesthetic airway resistance was not related to the FEV1/FVC ratio, regardless of the degree to which the FEV1/FVC ratio reflected pre-anesthetic airway resistance. As compared with patients with airflow obstruction, the mean difference between pre-anesthetic

  17. Anesthetic management of a child with complete atrioventricular septal defect and single ventricle posted for noncardiac surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Aabid Hussain; Ali, Zulfiqar; Dar, Bashir Ahmad; Naqash, Imtiaz A.; Bashir, Samreena

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defects are associated with various physiological disturbances. They pose anesthetic challenges for both cardiac and noncardiac surgeries. Atrioventricular septal defects are due to a developmental failure in the separation of atria and the ventricles into separate chambers and failure in the separation of mitral and tricuspid valves. We present a case of a child (1½ years), weighing 10 kg, diagnosed as congenital hydrocephalus who was planned for ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Child was having an oxygen saturation of 76% on room air. Anesthesia was induced with morphine and propofol. After tracheal intubation, saturation improved to 93%. Anesthesia was maintained with a combination of oxygen and nitrous oxide along with isoflurane. Measures were taken to maintain normovolemia and avoid hypotension, hypoxia, tachycardia, cardiac dysrhythmias and acidosis. The patient remained hemodynamically stable, maintaining arterial blood gasses within normal limits. The overall intraoperative course remained uneventful. At the end of the procedure, patient was reversed with neostigmine 60 mcg/kg and glycopyrrolate 10 mcg/kg. Extubation was done after the child was alert and opening eyes and was shifted to intensive care on oxygen inhalation for further monitoring. PMID:27746571

  18. Selective impairment of central mediation of baroreflex in anesthetized young adult Fischer 344 rats after chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, He; Lin, Min; Liu, Jianyu; Gozal, David; Scrogin, Karie E; Wurster, Robert; Chapleau, Mark W; Ma, Xiuying; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2007-11-01

    Baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) is impaired after chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). However, the location and nature of this response remain unclear. We examined baroreceptor afferent, vagal efferent, and central components of the baroreflex circuitry. Fischer 344 (F344) rats were exposed to room air (RA) or CIH for 35-50 days and were then anesthetized with isoflurane, ventilated, and catheterized for measurement of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and HR. Baroreceptor function was characterized by measuring percent changes of integrated aortic depressor nerve (ADN) activity (Int ADNA) relative to the baseline value in response to sodium nitroprusside- and phenylephrine-induced changes in MAP. Data were fitted to a sigmoid logistic function curve. HR responses to electrical stimulation of the left ADN and the right vagus nerve were assessed under ketamine-acepromazine anesthesia. Compared with RA controls, CIH significantly increased maximum baroreceptor gain or maximum slope, maximum Int ADNA, and Int ADNA range (maximum - minimum Int ADNA), whereas other parameters of the logistic function were unchanged. In addition, CIH increased the maximum amplitude of bradycardic response to vagal efferent stimulation and decreased the time from stimulus onset to peak response. In contrast, CIH significantly reduced the maximum amplitude of bradycardic response to left ADN stimulation and increased the time from stimulus onset to peak response. Therefore, CIH decreased central mediation of the baroreflex but augmented baroreceptor afferent function and vagal efferent control of HR.

  19. Isoflurane leakage from non-rebreathing rodent anaesthesia circuits: comparison of emissions from conventional and modified ports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J C; Bolon, B

    2006-04-01

    Chronic exposure to low levels of fluorocarbon-based waste anaesthetic gas (WAG) has been linked to a multitude of human health problems. We have shown that isoflurane exhaust from passive gas-scavenging canisters is often quite high when using conventional rodent anaesthesia protocols and equipment. Another likely source of WAG build-up in rodent procedure rooms is leakage at the interface between the breathing circuit and the animal's face. We evaluated this possibility using three non-rebreathing circuits: traditional Bain, modified Bain, and Mapleson (type E). For the Mapleson E circuit, a conical rodent facemask was attached and used in one of two configurations: normal aperture, or aperture modified with a latex diaphragm (cut from an unpowdered surgical glove) to reduce the orifice diameter and tighten the seal. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized with isoflurane (5% for induction, 2% or 3.5% for maintenance) in oxygen (2 L/min for induction, 1 L/min for maintenance). Isoflurane leakage was assessed by real-time spectrophotometry. In 94% of the trials, three configurations - traditional Bain, modified Bain, and Mapleson E with unmodified mask - permitted isoflurane leakage approaching or exceeding 100 ppm at the face/port interface. In contrast, the Mapleson circuit with diaphragm-modified mask emitted significantly (Pisoflurane (peak of 9.5+/-1.7 ppm [mean+/-standard error]). These data indicate that (1) WAG leakage from standard rodent non-rebreathing circuits is substantial, and that (2) a simple, rapid, and economical modification to a conventional rodent facemask can significantly reduce WAG exposure to workers performing many rodent anaesthesia procedures in one session.

  20. Instabilidade hemodinâmica grave durante o uso de isoflurano em paciente portador de escoliose idiopática: relato de caso Severe hemodynamic instability during the use of isoflurane in a patient with idiopathic scoliosis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Bechara de Souza Hobaika

    2007-04-01

    ámica grave causada por isoflurano en pacientes previamente saludables. Anafilaxia, taquicardia supraventricular con repercusión hemodinámica y sensibilidad cardiaca aumentada al isoflurano son discutidas como posibles causas de la inestabilidad hemodinámica. Actualmente, existen evidencias de que el isoflurano pude interferir en el sistema de acoplamiento y desacoplamiento de la contratilidad miocárdica a través de la reducción del Ca2+ citosólico y/o deprimiendo la función de las proteínas contráctiles. Los mecanismos moleculares fundamentales de este proceso deben ser elucidados todavía. El relato sugiere que la administración del isoflurano fue la causa de las alteraciones hemodinámicas presentadas por el paciente y que este, probablemente, presentó una sensibilidad cardiovascular no común al fármaco.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Isoflurane is considered a safe inhalational anesthetic. It has a low level of biotransformation, and low hepatic and renal toxicity. In clinical concentrations, it has minimal negative inotropic effect, causes a small reduction in systemic vascular resistance, and, rarely, can cause cardiac arrhythmias. The objective of this report was to present a case of severe hemodynamic instability in a patient with idiopathic scoliosis. CASE REPORT: Male patient, 13 years old, ASA physical status I, with no prior history of allergy to medications, scheduled for surgical repair of idiopathic scoliosis. After anesthetic induction with fentanyl, midazolam, propofol, and atracurium, 1% isoflurane with 100% oxygen was initiated for anesthesia maintenance. After five minutes, the patient presented severe hypotension (MAP = 26 mmHg associated with sinus tachycardia (HR = 166 bpm that did not respond to the administration of vasopressors and fluids. Lung and heart auscultation, pulse oxymetry, capnography, nasopharyngeal temperature, and arterial blood gases did not change. The patient was treated for anaphylaxis and the surgery was cancelled. The

  1. Towards optimized anesthesia protocols for stereotactic surgery in rats: Analgesic, stress and general health effects of injectable anesthetics. A comparison of a recommended complete reversal anesthesia with traditional chloral hydrate monoanesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüske, Christin; Sander, Svenja Esther; Hamann, Melanie; Kershaw, Olivia; Richter, Franziska; Richter, Angelika

    2016-07-01

    Although injectable anesthetics are still widely used in laboratory rodents, scientific data concerning pain and distress during and after stereotactic surgery are rare. However, optimal anesthesia protocols have a high impact on the quality of the derived data. We therefore investigated the suitability of recommended injectable anesthesia with a traditionally used monoanesthesia for stereotactic surgery in view of optimization and refinement in rats. The influence of the recommended complete reversal anesthesia (MMF; 0.15mg/kg medetomidine, 2mg/kg midazolam, 0.005mg/kg fentanyl; i.m.) with or without reversal and of chloral hydrate (430mg/kg, 3.6%, i.p.) on various physiological, biochemical and behavioral parameters (before, during, after surgery) was analyzed. Isoflurane was also included in stress parameter analysis. In all groups, depth of anesthesia was sufficient for stereotactic surgery with no animal losses. MMF caused transient exophthalmos, myositis at the injection site and increased early postoperative pain scores. Reversal induced agitation, restlessness and hypothermia. Even the low concentrated chloral hydrate led to peritonitis and multifocal liver necrosis, corresponding to increased stress hormone levels and loss in body weight. Increased stress response was also exerted by isoflurane anesthesia. Pronounced systemic toxicity of chloral hydrate strongly questions its further use in rodent anesthesia. In view of undesired effects of MMF and isoflurane, thorough consideration of anesthesia protocols for particular research projects is indispensable. Reversal should be restricted to emergency situations. Our data support further refinement of the current protocols and the importance of sham operated controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of the effects of halothane, isoflurane and methoxyflurane on the electroencephalogram of the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C B; Taylor, P M

    1998-11-01

    We have investigated in eight ponies the effects of three different end-tidal concentrations of halothane, isoflurane and methoxyflurane on median (F50) and 95% spectral edge (F95) frequencies of the EEG and the second differential (DD) of the middle latency auditory evoked potential (MLAEP). The three concentrations of each agent were chosen to represent approximately the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC), 1.25 MAC and 1.5 MAC for each agent. During halothane anaesthesia, F95 decreased progressively as halothane concentration increased, from mean 13.9 (SD 2.6) at 0.8% to 11.9 (1.1) at 1.2%. DD was lower during anaesthesia with the highest concentration (21 (6.5)) compared with the lowest (27.6 (11.4)). There were no significant changes in F50. During isoflurane anaesthesia, there was a small, but significant increase in F95 between the intermediate and highest concentrations (10.2 (1.5) to 10.8 (1.6)). There were no changes in F50 and DD. Values of F95, F50 and DD at all isoflurane concentrations were similar to those of halothane at the highest concentration. During methoxyflurane anaesthesia, F95 and F50 decreased progressively as methoxyflurane concentration was increased, from 21.3 (0.7) and 6.5 (1), respectively, at 0.26%, to 20.1 (0.6) and 5.6 (0.8), respectively, at 0.39%. DD was lower during anaesthesia with the highest concentration of methoxyflurane (25.7 (7.8)) compared with the lowest (39.7 (20.6)). Values of F95, F50 and DD at all methoxyflurane concentrations were higher than those seen with halothane at the lowest concentration. The different relative positions of the dose-response curves for EEG and MLAEP changes compared with antinociception (MAC) changes suggest differences in the mechanisms of action of these three agents. These differences may explain the incomplete adherence to the Meyer-Overton rule.

  3. Mechanical ventilation of the anesthetized patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damico, Nicole K

    2015-03-01

    Patients who require general anesthesia to undergo a surgical procedure often require mechanical ventilation during the perioperative period. Ventilators incorporated into modern anesthesia machines offer various options for patient management. The unique effects of general anesthesia and surgery on pulmonary physiology must be considered when selecting an individualized plan for mechanical ventilation during the perioperative period. In this article, the pulmonary effects of general anesthesia are reviewed and available options for mechanical ventilation of the anesthetized patient during the perioperative period are presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gestational trophoblastic disease with hyperthyroidism: Anesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Khanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of hyperthyroidism with gestational trophoblastic disease is a known albeit rare clinical condition. We herein report the successful anesthetic management of such a case in our institute. There are only few case reports in literature of this association. Often, the diagnosis of hyperthyroid state is retrospective one, as it can be missed in the emergency scenario of patient requiring molar evacuation. This case report highlights the perioperative management and optimization of hyperthyroid state prior to surgical evacuation of the invasive hydatidiform mole.

  5. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  6. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Brannigan, Grace; Economou, Nicoleta J.; Xi, Jin; Hall, Michael A.; Liu, Renyu; Rossi, Matthew J.; Dailey, William P.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Loll, Patrick J.; (Drexel-MED); (UPENN)

    2009-10-21

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  7. New insights into the mechanism of methoxyflurane nephrotoxicity and implications for anesthetic development (part 1): Identification of the nephrotoxic metabolic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharasch, Evan D; Schroeder, Jesara L; Liggitt, H Denny; Park, Sang B; Whittington, Dale; Sheffels, Pamela

    2006-10-01

    Methoxyflurane nephrotoxicity results from biotransformation; inorganic fluoride is a toxic metabolite. Concern exists about potential renal toxicity from volatile anesthetic defluorination, but many anesthetics increase fluoride concentrations without consequence. Methoxyflurane is metabolized by both dechlorination to methoxydifluoroacetic acid (MDFA, which may degrade to fluoride) and O-demethylation to fluoride and dichloroacetatic acid. The metabolic pathway responsible for methoxyflurane nephrotoxicity has not, however, been identified, which was the aim of this investigation. Experiments evaluated methoxyflurane metabolite formation and effects of enzyme induction or inhibition on methoxyflurane metabolism and toxicity. Rats pretreated with phenobarbital, barium sulfate, or nothing were anesthetized with methoxyflurane, and renal function and urine methoxyflurane metabolite excretion were assessed. Phenobarbital effects on MDFA metabolism and toxicity in vivo were also assessed. Metabolism of methoxyflurane and MDFA in microsomes from livers of pretreated rats was determined in vitro. Phenobarbital pretreatment increased methoxyflurane nephrotoxicity in vivo (increased diuresis and blood urea nitrogen and decreased urine osmolality) and induced in vitro hepatic microsomal methoxyflurane metabolism to inorganic fluoride (2-fold), dichloroacetatic acid (1.5-fold), and MDFA (5-fold). In contrast, phenobarbital had no influence on MDFA renal effects in vivo or MDFA metabolism in vitro or in vivo. MDFA was neither metabolized to fluoride nor nephrotoxic. Barium sulfate diminished methoxyflurane metabolism and nephrotoxicity in vivo. Fluoride from methoxyflurane anesthesia derives from O-demethylation. Phenobarbital increases in methoxyflurane toxicity do not seem attributable to methoxyflurane dechlorination, MDFA toxicity, or MDFA metabolism to another toxic metabolite, suggesting that nephrotoxicity is attributable to methoxyflurane O-demethylation. Fluoride

  8. Improving Garch Volatility Forecasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, F.J.G.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many researchers use GARCH models to generate volatility forecasts. We show, however, that such forecasts are too variable. To correct for this, we extend the GARCH model by distinguishing two regimes with different volatility levels. GARCH effects are allowed within each regime, so that our model

  9. [Infant boy with propionic acidemia: anesthetic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ródenas, L; Hernández-Palazón, J; Burguillos-López, S; Sánchez-Ortega, J L; Castaño-Collado, I; García-Ferreira, J

    2005-01-01

    A 12-month-old boy diagnosed with propionic acidemia underwent gastrostomy. The patient's general state was good and he was alert, but with reduced muscular tone (unstable when seated with support, floppy head) and with dystonic movements in all extremities. An electroencephalogram showed slightly slowed brain activity. The patient was being treated with a low protein diet, phenobarbital, L-carnitine, L-isoleucine, and biotin. Surgery was carried out in satisfactory conditions with general anesthesia without opioids combined with infiltration of the surgical wound with local anesthetic. Recovery from anesthesia was rapid and free of complications. Propionic acidemia is caused by mitochondrial propionyl coenzyme carboxylase deficiency. Most patients have episodes of severe metabolic ketoacidosis as a result of excessive protein intake, delayed development, vomiting, gastroesophageal reflux, lethargy, hypotonia, and convulsions. The anesthetic approach involves avoiding triggers of metabolic acidosis (such as fasting, dehydration, hypoxemia, and hypotension) and preventing airway complications. Agents that metabolize propionic acid (such as succinylcholine, benzylisoquinoline neuromuscular blocking agents, and propofol) are not used, as they can exacerbate acidemia. We also believe that using local or regional anesthesia in combination with general anesthesia without opiates is safe and effective for controlling pain during surgery and postoperative recovery, as that combination avoids respiratory depression in these patients, who are highly sensitive to opiates.

  10. [Anesthetic Management in Thoracic Trauma Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozian, Alf; Bergmann, Astrid; Hachenberg, Thomas; Schilling, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    In daily practice, management of patients with blunt thoracic trauma is challenging for the anesthetist. Injuries of airways, lungs, diaphragm, heart and large vessels are the main difficulties.Respiratory and circulatory physiology in general is affected by general anesthesia, which may result in an increased number of perioperative complications. Therefore, anesthetic management of patients with thoracic trauma needs to address different clinical topics: management of difficult airways, intrinsic effects of anesthetics and mechanical ventilation on respiratory and cardiac function, the adequate replacement of blood loss as well as type and extent of the surgical intervention. Postoperatively, sufficient pain therapy avoids pulmonary complications and can improve outcome.Therefore, a high degree of (patho-)physiological understanding and manual skills are required in this scenario. Interdisciplinary cooperation during diagnostic, treatment and in the perioperative course is a prerequisite for a successful management.The present work describes the main characteristics of thoracic trauma and discusses important precautions and typical problems the anesthetist has to face in the clinical setting. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Anesthetic protocol for videolaparoscopic surgery in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbinotto, Rosi Pereira; Trindade, Manoel Roberto Maciel; Meyer, Fabíola Schons; Muller, Ana Lucia Letti; Rosa, Arlindo da; Nunes, André Gorgen; da Silva, Rodrigo

    2010-02-01

    To describe the anesthetic protocol and the intubation technique without visualizing the trachea in rabbits, in order to enable the videolaparoscopic surgical procedure. The experiment was performed on 33 female rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), aged from 5 to 7 months. It consisted of general anesthesia and endotracheal intubation by manual palpation of the trachea of the rabbits, without using the laryngoscope, orally, for later videolaparoscopic surgical access to the abdominal cavity. The mean values and standard deviation of vital parameters of the animals were 223.8 + or - 15.61 beats per minute for heart rate; 35 + or - 9 movements per minute for respiratory rate; 96.94 + or - 0.99% of oxymetry and 42.82 + or - 4.02 mmHg for capnometry; 16.7 + or - 4.3 minutes for pneumoperitoneum (duration of surgery) and 1 hour and 14 + or - 8.52 minutes for time of observation (from induction to recovery from anesthesia). All animals were intubated in at most three attempts. No animals were lost after the introduction of this anesthetic technique. This protocol proved adequate, safe and easy to perform, on rabbits submitted to videolaparoscopic surgery.

  12. Qualitative screening for volatile organic compounds in human blood using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottzein, Anne Kathrin; Musshoff, Frank; Madea, Burkhard

    2010-04-01

    A fast and simple screening procedure using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) in full-scan mode for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) is presented. The development of a fast and simple screening technique for the simultaneous determination of various volatiles is of great importance, because of their widespread use, frequent occurrence in forensic toxicological questions and the fact that there is often no hint on involved substances at the crime scene. To simulate a screening procedure, eight VOC with different chemical characteristics were chosen (isoflurane, halothane, hexane, chloroform, benzene, isooctane, toluene and xylene). To achieve maximum sensitivity, variables that influence the SPME process, such as type of fiber, extraction and desorption temperature and time, agitation and additives were optimized by preliminary studies and by means of a central composite design. The limits of detection and recoveries ranged from 2.9 microg/l (xylene) to 37.1 microg/l (isoflurane) and 7.9% (chloroform) to 61.5% (benzene), respectively. This procedure can be used to answer various forensic and toxicological questions. The short time taken for the whole analytical procedure may make its eventual adoption for routine analysis attractive. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Effect of intravenous infusion of dexmedetomidine combined with inhalation of isoflurane on arterial oxygenation and intrapulmonary shunt during single-lung ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Rui; Yin, Hong; Xia, Zhong-yuan; Mao, Qing-jun; Chen, Gong-da; Xu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the changes in arterial oxygenation and intrapulmonary shunt during one-lung ventilation (OLV) with intravenous infusion of dexmedetomidine combined with isoflurane inhalation. ASA I-II 60 patients aged 18-70 year, undergoing OLV during elective thoracic surgery were randomly allocated to two groups: (1) isoflurane + saline (group NISO, n = 30) and (2) isoflurane + dexmedetomidine (group DISO, n = 30). After induction, anesthesia was maintained with intravenous infusion of remifentanil 0.1-0.2 μg kg(-1) min(-1) and inhalation isoflurane (1.0-2.0%). In addition, anesthesia was maintained with intravenous infusion of dexmedetomidine 0.7 μg kg(-1) h(-1) in DISO group and saline 0.25 ml kg(-1) h(-1) in NISO group. Bispectral Index values were maintained within 40-60 by changing the concentration of isoflurane in all groups. Arterial blood gas samples and central venous blood gas samples were taken as follows: during two-lung ventilation before OLV and during the first 40 min of OLV. 45 Patients completed the study, with 23 patients in DISO group and 22 patients in NISO group. The two groups were comparable in terms of demographic variables, hemodynamic, PaO2, Qs/QT, end expiration isoflurane and BIS levels during the operation. Compared with patients in the group NISO, there were significant increases with PaO2, significant decrease with Qs/QT, significant decrease with end expiration isoflurane, and significant decrease with HR in the group DISO during the first 40 min of OLV (P < 0.05). Dexmedetomidine infusions decrease the requirement for isoflurane, decrease intrapulmonary shunt, and moderate the change in PaO2 and may be useful in managing OLV.

  14. New insights into the mechanism of methoxyflurane nephrotoxicity and implications for anesthetic development (part 2): Identification of nephrotoxic metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharasch, Evan D; Schroeder, Jesara L; Liggitt, H Denny; Ensign, Dustin; Whittington, Dale

    2006-10-01

    Methoxyflurane nephrotoxicity results from its metabolism, which occurs by both dechlorination (to methoxydifluoroacetic acid [MDFA]) and O-demethylation (to fluoride and dichloroacetic acid [DCAA]). Inorganic fluoride can be toxic, but it remains unknown why other anesthetics, commensurately increasing systemic fluoride concentrations, are not toxic. Fluoride is one of many methoxyflurane metabolites and may itself cause toxicity and/or reflect formation of other toxic metabolite(s). This investigation evaluated the disposition and renal effects of known methoxyflurane metabolites. Rats were given by intraperitoneal injection the methoxyflurane metabolites MDFA, DCAA, or sodium fluoride (0.22, 0.45, 0.9, or 1.8 mmol/kg followed by 0.11, 0.22, 0.45, or 0.9 mmol/kg on the next 3 days) at doses relevant to metabolite exposure after methoxyflurane anesthesia, or DCAA and fluoride in combination. Renal histology and function (blood urea nitrogen, urine volume, urine osmolality) and metabolite excretion in urine were assessed. Methoxyflurane metabolite excretion in urine after injection approximated that after methoxyflurane anesthesia, confirming the appropriateness of metabolite doses. Neither MDFA nor DCAA alone had any effects on renal function parameters or necrosis. Fluoride at low doses (0.22, then 0.11 mmol/kg) decreased osmolality, whereas higher doses (0.45, then 0.22 mmol/kg) also caused diuresis but not significant necrosis. Fluoride and DCAA together caused significantly greater tubular cell necrosis than fluoride alone. Methoxyflurane nephrotoxicity seems to result from O-demethylation, which forms both fluoride and DCAA. Because their co-formation is unique to methoxyflurane compared with other volatile anesthetics and they are more toxic than fluoride alone, this suggests a new hypothesis of methoxyflurane nephrotoxicity. This may explain why increased fluoride formation from methoxyflurane, but not other anesthetics, is associated with toxicity. These

  15. MAC-sparing effect of nitrous oxide in sevoflurane anesthetized sheep and its reversal with systemic atipamezole administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanu, Antonio; Melosu, Valentino; Careddu, Giovanni Mario; Sotgiu, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an anesthetic gas with antinociceptive properties and reduces the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) for volatile anesthetic agents, potentially through mechanisms involving central alpha2-adrenoceptors. We hypothesized that 70% N2O in the inspired gas will significantly reduce the MAC of sevoflurane (MACSEVO) in sheep, and that this effect can be reversed by systemic atipamezole. Materials and methods Animals were initially anesthetized with SEVO in oxygen (O2) and exposed to an electrical current as supramaximal noxious stimulus in order to determine MACSEVO (in duplicates). Thereafter, 70% N2O was added to the inspired gas and the MAC re-determined in the presence of N2O (MACSN). A subgroup of sheep were anesthetized a second time with SEVO/N2O for re-determination of MACSN, after which atipamezole (0.2 mg kg-1, IV) was administered for MACSNA determinations. Sheep were anesthetized a third time, initially with only SEVO/O2 to re-determine MACSEVO, after which atipamezole (0.2 mg kg-1, IV) was administered for determination of MACSA. Results MACSEVO was 2.7 (0.3)% [mean (standard deviation)]. Addition of N2O resulted in a 37% reduction of MACSEVO to MACSN of 1.7 (0.2)% (p <0.0001). Atipamezole reversed this effect, producing a MACSNA of 3.1 (0.7)%, which did not differ from MACSEVO (p = 0.12). MACSEVO did not differ from MACSA (p = 0.69). Cardiorespiratory variables were not different among experimental groups except a lower ETCO2 in animals exposed to SEVO/N2O. Conclusions N2O produces significant MACSEVO-reduction in sheep; this effect is completely reversed by IV atipamezole confirming the involvement of alpha2-adrenoreceptors in the MAC-sparing action of N2O. PMID:29315308

  16. Influência do sevoflurano e do isoflurano na recuperação do bloqueio neuromuscular produzido pelo cisatracúrio Influencia del sevoflurano y del isoflurano en la recuperación del bloqueo neuromuscular producido por el cisatracúrio The influence of sevoflurane and isoflurane on the recovery from cisatracurium-induced neuromuscular block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica de Fátima de Assunção Braga

    2002-09-01

    índice de recuperación (T1(25-75% fueron respectivamente: Grupo I (66,2 ± 13,42 min y 23,6 ± 5,02 min, Grupo II (54,4 ± 6,58 min y 14,9 ± 3,82 min y Grupo III (47,2 ± 7,43 y 16,2 ± 2,93. En relación a la duración clínica hubo diferencia significante entre los grupos I y II, I y III, y II y III. Para el índice de recuperación hubo diferencia significante entre el grupo I y los demás grupos. CONCLUSIONES: La recuperación del bloqueo neuromuscular producido por el cisatracúrio fue más lenta durante la anestesia con los agentes volátiles de que con el propofol, siendo el efecto más pronunciado con el sevoflurano.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The effects of neuromuscular blockers on the neuromuscular junction are potentiated by volatile anesthetics. This study aimed at evaluating the influence of sevoflurane and isoflurane on the recovery of cisatracurium- induced neuromuscular block. METHODS: Ninety ASA I and II patients undergoing elective surgeries under general anesthesia were included in this study. Patients were allocated in three groups: Group I (sevoflurane, Group II (isoflurane and Group III (propofol. All patients were premedicated with intramuscular midazolam (0.1 mg.kg-1 30 min before surgery. Anesthesia was induced with alfentanil (50 µg.kg-1, propofol (2.5 mg.kg-1 and cisatracurium (0.15 mg.kg-1. Patients were then ventilated under mask with 100% O2 until disappearance of all TOF responses when laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation were performed. Volatile agents for anesthetic maintenance were introduced immediately after tracheal intubation in 2% and 1% concentrations, respectively, for sevoflurane and isoflurane, as well as the propofol continuous infusion (7 to 10 mg.kg-1.h-1 for Group III. All patients received a 50% mixture of O2 and N2O. Neuromuscular function was monitored by adductor pollicis muscle acceleromyography with TOF stimulation at 15-second intervals. Clinical duration of neuromuscular block (T1(25% and recovery index (RI

  17. Isoflurane Exposure Induces Cell Death, Microglial Activation and Modifies the Expression of Genes Supporting Neurodevelopment and Cognitive Function in the Male Newborn Piglet Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, Kevin D; Hassell, Jane; Fleiss, Bobbi; Kawano, Go; Ezzati, Mojgan; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Hristova, Mariya; Bennett, Kate; Fierens, Igor; Burnett, Ryan; Chaban, Badr; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Oliver-Taylor, Aaron; Tachsidis, Ilias; Rostami, Jamshid; Gressens, Pierre; Sanders, Robert D; Robertson, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of the brain to general anesthesia during early infancy may adversely affect its neural and cognitive development. The mechanisms mediating this are complex, incompletely understood and may be sexually dimorphic, but include developmentally inappropriate apoptosis, inflammation and a disruption to cognitively salient gene expression. We investigated the effects of a 6h isoflurane exposure on cell death, microglial activation and gene expression in the male neonatal piglet brain. Piglets (n = 6) were randomised to: (i) naive controls or (ii) 6h isoflurane. Cell death (TUNEL and caspase-3) and microglial activation were recorded in 7 brain regions. Changes in gene expression (microarray and qPCR) were assessed in the cingulate cortex. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded throughout. Isoflurane anesthesia induced significant increases in cell death in the cingulate and insular cortices, caudate nucleus, thalamus, putamen, internal capsule, periventricular white matter and hippocampus. Dying cells included both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Significantly, microglial activation was observed in the insula, pyriform, hippocampus, internal capsule, caudate and thalamus. Isoflurane induced significant disruption to the expression of 79 gene transcripts, of these 26 are important for the control of transcription and 23 are important for the mediation of neural plasticity, memory formation and recall. Our observations confirm that isoflurane increases apoptosis and inflammatory responses in the neonatal piglet brain but also suggests novel additional mechanisms by which isoflurane may induce adverse neural and cognitive development by disrupting the expression of genes mediating activity dependent development of neural circuits, the predictive adaptive responses of the brain, memory formation and recall.

  18. Influence of isoflurane on the diastolic pressure-flow relationship and critical occlusion pressure during arterial CABG surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Hinz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of isoflurane on the determinants of blood flow during Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG surgery are not completely understood. This study characterized the influence of isoflurane on the diastolic Pressure-Flow (P-F relationship and Critical Occlusion Pressure (COP during CABG surgery. Twenty patients undergoing CABG surgery were studied. Patients were assigned to an isoflurane or control group. Hemodynamic and flow measurements during CABG surgery were performed twice (15 minutes after the discontinuation of extracorporeal circulation (T15 and again 15 minutes later (T30. The zero flow pressure intercept (a measure of COP was extrapolated from a linear regression analysis of the instantaneous diastolic P-F relationship. In the isoflurane group, the application of isoflurane significantly increased the slope of the diastolic P-F relationship by 215% indicating a mean reduction of Coronary Vascular Resistance (CVR by 46%. Simultaneously, the Mean Diastolic Aortic Pressure (MDAP decreased by 19% mainly due to a decrease in the systemic vascular resistance index by 21%. The COP, cardiac index, heart rate, Left Ventricular End-Diastolic Pressure (LVEDP and Coronary Sinus Pressure (CSP did not change significantly. In the control group, the parameters remained unchanged. In both groups, COP significantly exceeded the CSP and LVEDP at both time points. We conclude that short-term application of isoflurane at a sedative concentration markedly increases the slope of the instantaneous diastolic P-F relationship during CABG surgery implying a distinct decrease with CVR in patients undergoing CABG surgery.

  19. Evaluation of local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of Cinchona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of an aqueous extract of Cinchona officinalis (C. officinalis) in experimental animal models. Methods: Various doses of the aqueous extract was tested for its local anesthetic activity in guinea pigs and frogs using intracutaneous and plexus anesthesia, ...

  20. Anesthetic equipment, facilities and services available for pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Facilities and equipment are known to contribute to improved patient care and outcome. Hospitals for sub‑specialized pediatric anesthetic service are routinely available worldwide. In Nigeria, such hospitals now exist. It is therefore relevant to study the facilities and equipment available for pediatric anesthetic ...

  1. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10... § 346.10 Local anesthetic active ingredients. The active ingredient of the product consists of any of...) Lidocaine 2 to 5 percent. (g) Pramoxine hydrochloride 1 percent. (h) Tetracaine 0.5 to 1 percent. (i...

  2. Idiosyncratic Volatility Puzzle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslanidis, Nektarios; Christiansen, Charlotte; Lambertides, Neophytos

    In this paper, we scrutinize the cross-sectional relation between idiosyncratic volatility and stock returns. As a novelty, the idiosyncratic volatility is obtained by conditioning upon macro-Önance factors as well as upon traditional asset pricing factors. The macro-Önance factors are constructed...... from a large pool of macroeconomic and Önancial variables. Cleaning for macro-Önance e§ects reverses the puzzling negative relation between returns and idiosyncratic volatility documented previously. Portfolio analysis shows that the e§ects from macro-Önance factors are economically strong...

  3. Asteroid volatiles inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Jones, T. D.; Herbert, F.

    1989-01-01

    Asteroids appear in light of telescopic and meteority studies to be the most accessible repositories of early solar system history available. In the cooler regions of the outer asteroid belt, apparently unaffected by severe heating, the C, P, and D populations appear to harbor significant inventories of volatiles; the larger primordial belt population may have had an even greater percentage of volatile-rich, low-albedo asteroids, constituting a potent asteroid for veneering early terrestrial planet atmospheres. The volatile-rich asteroids contain carbon, structurally bound and adsorbed water, as well as remnants of interstellar material predating the solar system.

  4. Comparison of two species-specific oscillometric blood pressure monitors with direct blood pressure measurement in anesthetized cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerejo, Sofia A; Teixeira-Neto, Francisco J; Garofalo, Natache A; Rodrigues, Jéssica C; Celeita-Rodríguez, Nathalia; Lagos-Carvajal, Angie P

    2017-07-01

    To compare the performance of 2 species-specific oscillometric blood pressure (OBP) monitors (petMAPclassic and petMAPgraphic ) with direct blood pressure measurement in anesthetized cats. Prospective, experimental study. Veterinary teaching hospital. Eight adult cats (3.2-5.5 kg). During isoflurane anesthesia, OBP cuffs were placed on the thoracic limb and on the base of the tail while invasive blood pressure (IBP) was recorded from a dorsal pedal artery. End-tidal isoflurane concentrations, with or without intravenous dopamine (n = 8), norepinephrine (n = 1), or phenylephrine (n = 1) were adjusted to change invasive mean arterial pressure (MAP) between 40 to 100 mm Hg. Data were analyzed by the Bland-Altman method and 4-quadrant plots. Mean biases and limits of agreement (LOA: ± 1.96 SD) (mm Hg) recorded between the petMAPclassic (thoracic limb) and IBP for systolic arterial pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), and MAP were 4.2 ± 28.5, -6.1 ± 13.2, and -1.9 ± 14.6, respectively; mean biases and LOA (mm Hg) recorded with the tail cuff were 7.2 ± 31.3 (SAP), -6.1 ± 11.6 (DAP), and -1.1 ± 11.7 (MAP). Mean biases and LOA (mm Hg) between petMAPgraphic (thoracic limb) and IBP were 7.7 ± 27.0 (SAP), -4.3 ± 11.5 (DAP), 0.2 ± 13.0 (MAP); values recorded with the tail cuff were 10.9 ± 29.6 (SAP), -4.4 ± 11.7 (DAP), and -0.1 ± 12.1 (MAP). Concordance rates after excluding arterial pressure changes ≤ 5 mm Hg was ≥ 93% for both devices. Although both OBP monitors provide unacceptable SAP estimations, MAP values derived from both monitors and DAP measured by the petMAPgraphic result in acceptable agreement with the reference method according to the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (mean bias ≤ 5 mm Hg with LOA ≤ ± 16 mm Hg). Both monitors provide acceptable trending ability for SAP, DAP, and MAP. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  5. Particulate contamination of local anesthetic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, R L; Lubow, R M

    1981-05-01

    Particulate contamination was found in one particular lot number of local anesthetic, lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. The contaminants were noticed in several cartridges of each container and varied in size from minute to several millimeters. Analysis of the foreign matter revealed the particles to be of a way or puttylike consistency; however, the sterility of the solution was not altered and the pH was still within acceptable limits. The contaminant was most likely wax or a combination of wax, silicone, and glycerin, which are constituents of the rubber stopper and its associated lubricants. This problem was most likely due to temperature changes during storage and shipment, but it was also possibly due to manufacturing discrepancies.

  6. Anesthetic considerations in damage control surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, A A; Coveler, L A

    1997-08-01

    The damage control patient is a special subset of the acute trauma population that presents unique challenges for every clinician involved. Communication between team members is critical, but the knowledge of and respect for each other's role lead to prompt, cost-efficient, high-quality care. The anesthesiologist's early goal is control of the airway and prevention of airway catastrophes by early recognition of the difficult airway. The introduction of airway adjuncts such as the laryngeal mask airway and esophageal Combitube has given trauma teams additional options in an airway crisis. Recent insights into the physiologic effects of the intra-abdominal compartment syndrome have improved anesthetic care as well. Ongoing developments in pain management help to improve patient comfort and outcome. By using available therapeutic modalities, as well as serving as a team manager and communications expert, the anesthesiologist provides added value to clinical care during damage control surgery.

  7. A Novel Anesthetic Technique for PEVAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlin, Stuart A; Grissom, Ruth A; LeCroy, Christopher; Pouliot, Susan M; Harlin, Scott A

    2016-07-01

    Percutaneous endovascular aneurysm repair (PEVAR) continues to evolve. Device profiles continue to decline, further reducing the physiological insult of the procedure. Anesthesia, however, has not evolved with a large proportion of patients continuing to receive general anesthesia for their increasingly less invasive procedures. We report on a novel anesthetic technique providing outstanding anesthesia in patients undergoing PEVAR in an outpatient setting. The total anesthesia used was remarkably cost effective. Six patients underwent PEVAR in an outpatient setting. The patients received moderate intravenous (IV) access sedation using versed and fentanyl in combination with bilateral ilioinguinal nerve blocks. Patients received 25 mL bilaterally of 0.5% bupivicaine with epinephrine. All patients were American Society of Anesthesiologists class III. None received central venous access, arterial, or urinary catheters. Standard noninvasive monitoring was used. A board-certified anesthesiologist was present at all times during the procedures. All patients underwent successful repair. Average cost per case for anesthetic supplies averaged around $7.00. The fentanyl dose ranged from 100 to 200 μg with an average dose of 130 μg. Versed dose ranged from 2 to 3 mg with an average dose of 2.4 mg. No patient required conversion to general anesthesia. Postoperative pain relief was excellent. Two patients required pain medication before discharge. Two patients required oral narcotic analgesic the night of discharge. No patients required narcotics after that time. Bilateral ilioinguinal nerve block, when combined with moderate IV sedation allows outstanding anesthesia for patients undergoing PEVAR. This novel combination has not been reported previously. The technique provides safe, effective, care for of a subset of patients not requiring general anesthesia. It offers a greatly reduced cost when compared with general anesthesia. Additional benefits include prolonged pain

  8. Non-volatile memories

    CERN Document Server

    Lacaze, Pierre-Camille

    2014-01-01

    Written for scientists, researchers, and engineers, Non-volatile Memories describes the recent research and implementations in relation to the design of a new generation of non-volatile electronic memories. The objective is to replace existing memories (DRAM, SRAM, EEPROM, Flash, etc.) with a universal memory model likely to reach better performances than the current types of memory: extremely high commutation speeds, high implantation densities and retention time of information of about ten years.

  9. Cardiovascular effects of epidural morphine or ropivacaine in isoflurane-anaesthetised pigs during surgical devascularisation of the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.F. Stegmann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular effects of non-abdominal and abdominal surgery during isoflurane anaesthesia (A-group or isoflurane anaesthesia supplemented with either epidural ropivacaine (AR-group; 0.75 % solution, 0.2 mℓ/kg or morphine (AM-group; 0.1 mg/kg diluted in saline to 0.2mℓ/kg were evaluated in 28 healthy pigs with a mean body weight of 30.3 kg SD ± 4.1 during surgical devascularisation of the liver. Anaesthesia was induced with the intramuscular injection of midazolam (0.3 mg/kg and ketamine (10 mg/kg. Anaesthesia was deepened with intravenous propofol to enable tracheal intubation and maintained with isoflurane on a circle rebreathing circuit. The vaporiser was set at 2.5% for the A-group and 1.5% for the AR- and AM-groups. Differences between treatment groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05 for any of the variables. Differences between AM- and AR-groups were marginally significant heart rate (HR (P = 0.06 and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP (P = 0.08. Within treatment groups, differences for the A-group were statistically significant (P<0.05 between non-abdominal and abdominal surgery for HR, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure (DIA and MAP. Within the AM-group differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for DIA and MAP, and within the AR group differences for all variables were not statistically significant (P > 0.05. It was concluded that in isoflurane-anaesthetised pigs, the epidural administration of ropivacaine decreased heart rate and improved arterial blood pressure during surgery.

  10. Effect of fentanyl target-controlled infusions on isoflurane minimum anaesthetic concentration and cardiovascular function in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavez, Juan C; Hawkins, Michelle G; Pascoe, Peter J; Knych, Heather K DiMaio; Kass, Philip H

    2011-07-01

    To determine the impact of three different target plasma concentrations of fentanyl on the minimum anaesthetic concentration (MAC) for isoflurane in the red-tailed hawk and the effects on the haemodynamic profile. Experimental study. Six healthy adult red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) of unknown sex with body weights (mean ± SD) of 1.21 ± 0.15 kg. This study was undertaken in two phases. In the first phase anaesthesia was induced with isoflurane in oxygen via facemask and maintained with isoflurane delivered in oxygen via a Bain circuit. Following instrumentation baseline determination of the MAC for isoflurane was made for each animal using the bracketing method and a supramaximal electrical stimulus. End-tidal isoflurane concentration (E'Iso) was then set at 0.75 × MAC and after an appropriate equilibration period a bolus of fentanyl (20 μg kg(-1)) was administered intravenously (IV) in order to determine the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl in the isoflurane-anaesthetized red-tailed hawk. During the second phase anaesthesia was induced in a similar manner and E'Iso was set at 0.75 × MAC for each individual. Fentanyl was infused IV to achieve target plasma concentrations between 8 and 32 ng mL(-1). At each fentanyl plasma concentration, the MAC for isoflurane and cardiovascular variables were determined. Data were analyzed by use of repeated-measures anova. Mean ± SD fentanyl plasma concentrations and isoflurane MACs were 0 ± 0, 8.51 ± 4, 14.85 ± 4.82 and 29.25 ± 11.52 ng mL(-1), and 2.05 ± 0.45%, 1.42 ± 0.53%, 1.14 ± 0.31% and 0.93 ± 0.32% for the target concentrations of 0, 8, 16 and 32 ng mL(-1), respectively. At these concentrations fentanyl significantly (p = 0.0016) decreased isoflurane MAC by 31%, 44% and 55%, respectively. Dose had no significant effect on heart rate, systolic, diastolic or mean arterial blood pressure. Fentanyl produced a dose-related decrease of isoflurane MAC with minimal effects on measured cardiovascular parameters in

  11. Randomized, controlled trial comparing the effects of anesthesia with propofol, isoflurane, desflurane and sevoflurane on pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Ortiz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain is the primary complaint and the main reason for prolonged recovery after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The authors hypothesized that patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy will have less pain four hours after surgery when receiving maintenance of anesthesia with propofol when compared to isoflurane, desflurane, or sevoflurane. Methods: In this prospective, randomized trial, 80 patients scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were assigned to propofol, isoflurane, desflurane, or sevoflurane for the maintenance of anesthesia. Our primary outcome was pain measured on the numeric analog scale four hours after surgery. We also recorded intraoperative use of opioids as well as analgesic consumption during the first 24 h after surgery. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in pain scores four hours after surgery (p = 0.72. There were also no statistically significant differences in pain scores between treatment groups during the 24 h after surgery (p = 0.45. Intraoperative use of fentanyl and morphine did not vary significantly among the groups (p = 0.21 and 0.24, respectively. There were no differences in total morphine and hydrocodone/APAP use during the first 24 h (p = 0.61 and 0.53, respectively. Conclusion: Patients receiving maintenance of general anesthesia with propofol do not have less pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy when compared to isoflurane, desflurane, or sevoflurane.

  12. Evaluation of the Cerebral State Index in Cats under Isoflurane Anaesthesia: Dose-Effect Relationship and Prediction of Clinical Signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana R. Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the cerebral state index (CSI in reflecting different levels of isoflurane anaesthesia was evaluated in ten cats subjected to four end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (EtIso, each maintained for 15 minutes (0.8%, 1.2%, 1.6%, or 2.0% EtIso. The CSI, hemodynamic data, ocular reflexes, and eye position were recorded for each EtIso concentration. Pharmacodynamic analysis of CSI with EtIso was performed, as well as prediction probability analysis with a clinical scale based on the eye reflexes. The CSI values showed great variability. Between all parameters, burst suppression ratio showed the better fitting with the sigmoidal concentration-effect model (R2=0.93 followed by CSI (R2=0.82 and electromyographic activity (R2=0.79. EtIso was the variable with better prediction of the clinical scale of anaesthesia (prediction probability value of 0.94. Although the CSI values decrease with increasing isoflurane concentrations, the huge variability in CSI values may be a strong limitation for its use in cats and it seems to be no better than EtIso as a predictor of clinical signs.

  13. Allergy to local anesthetics in dentistry. Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluga, Juan Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Local anesthetics are drugs frequently used in dentistry. Although they are usually well-tolerated drugs, sometimes, they can cause adverse reactions of different kinds and severity. True incidence of local anesthetics' allergic reactions is unknown. To evaluate the incidence of immediate adverse events in subjects who required local anesthetic injection to receive dental treatment; to assess the incidence of anaphylactic allergic reactions among those recorded as adverse events; to analyze the relationship between these patients' atopic antecedents and documented allergic reactions. A prospective, open-label, non-comparative study including a total of 5,018 subjects who received local anesthetics during dental treatment, despite their age, was carried on in 7 either private or public odontological assistance centers. All the reactions that could appear during the first hour following the anesthetic act were assessed. Twenty-five adverse reactions were diagnosed, representing 0.5% of the studied population. None of them was due to an allergic cause. Most of them (22/25) were mild, quickly reversible, psychogenic or vasovagal reactions. One of the cases was related to defects of the anesthetic technique. The remaining two cases, which were initially considered as possibly due to an allergic cause, were discarded after being studied with skin and dose provocative challenge tests with the anesthetic. The allergic reactions to the local anesthetics are very rare and most of the adverse reactions are psychogenic/vasovagal. These facts should be known by the physician and by the dentist in order to minimize the frequent fears and "myths" about the use of local anesthetics at the dentist office.

  14. Peri-operative body temperatures in isoflurane-anaesthetized rabbits following ketamine-midazolam or ketamine-medetomidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grint, Nicola J; Murison, Pamela J

    2007-05-01

    To investigate alterations in peri-operative body temperatures and oesophageal-skin temperatures in isoflurane-anaesthetized rabbits following either ketamine-midazolam or ketamine-medetomidine induction of anaesthesia. Fifty client-owned rabbits, (25 male, 25 female) of different breeds anaesthetized for elective neutering (age range: 3-42 months; mass range: 1.15-4.3 kg). Randomized, blinded clinical study. Pre-anaesthetic rectal temperature was measured. A 24 SWG catheter was placed in a marginal ear vein after local anaesthesia. Ketamine (15 mg kg(-1)) with medetomidine (0.25 mg kg(-1)) (group KMT) or with midazolam (3 mg kg(-1)) (group KMZ) was injected intramuscularly (IM). Following endotracheal intubation anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Carprofen (3 mg kg(-1)) and glucose saline (5 mL kg(-1) hour(-1)) were administered through the intravenous catheter. Room temperature and humidity, skin temperature (from tip of pinna) and oesophageal temperature were measured during anaesthesia. Ovariohysterectomy or castration was performed. Rectal temperature was taken when isoflurane was discontinued (time zero) and 30, 60 and 120 minutes thereafter. Atipamezole (0.5 mg kg(-1)) was administered IM to rabbits in group KMT at zero plus 30 minutes. Mass, averaged room temperature and duration of anaesthesia data were compared using a two-tailed t-test. Age, averaged room humidity, rectal temperature decrease, oesophageal temperature decrease and oesophageal-skin difference data were compared using a Kruskal-Wallis test. p < 0.05 was considered significant. The averaged oesophageal-skin temperature difference was significantly greater in group KMT [median 9.85 degrees C (range 6.42-13.85 degrees C)] than in group KMZ [4.38 degrees C (2.83-10.43 degrees C)]. Rectal temperature decreased over the anaesthetic period was not significantly different between the two groups; however, oesophageal temperature decrease was significantly less in group KMT [1

  15. Effects of Moderate Hyperventilation on Jugular Bulb Gases under Propofol or Isoflurane Anesthesia during Supratentorial Craniotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Lan Meng; Shu-Qin Li; Nan Ji; Fang Luo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The optimal ventilated status under total intravenous or inhalation anesthesia in neurosurgical patients with a supratentorial tumor has not been ascertained. The purpose of this study was to intraoperatively compare the effects of moderate hyperventilation on the jugular bulb oxygen saturation (SjO 2 ), cerebral oxygen extraction ratio (O 2 ER), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) in patients with a supratentorial tumor under different anesthetic regimens. ...

  16. Challenges Encountered Using Ophthalmic Anesthetics in Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuse, T.; Law, J.; Alexander, D.; Moynihan, S.; LeBlanc, C.; Langford, K.; Magalhaes, L.

    2015-01-01

    On orbit, ophthalmic anesthetics are used for tonometry and off-nominal corneal examinations. Proparacaine has been flown traditionally. However, the manufacturers recently changed its storage requirements from room temperature storage to refrigerated storage to preserve stability and prolong the shelf-life. Since refrigeration on orbit is not readily available and there were stability concerns about flying proparacaine unrefrigerated, tetracaine was selected as an alternative ophthalmic anesthetic in 2013. We will discuss the challenges encountered flying and using these anesthetics on the International Space Station.

  17. Comparison of anesthetic agents in the sea otter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, T.D.; Kocher, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    Five anesthetic agents (CI744, etorphine, fentanyl, ketamine hydrochloride, and halothane) were tested to establish the dosage of a safe, effective, short-acting anesthetic for use in the sea otter. Etorphine, at a dosage of 0.75 mg per adult otter and used in conjunction with diazepam, at a dosage of 1.25 mg per adult otter, met most of the requirements for use under field conditions. Halothane, administered through an anesthetic machine, proved to be effective for use in a veterinary hospital.

  18. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs, clinical update 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, Stanley F

    2006-12-01

    Local anesthetics are the safest most effective drugs in medicine for the control and management of pain. They also represent the most important drugs in dentistry. Today, dentistry has a spectrum of local anesthetics that permit pain control to be tailored to the specific needs of the patient: short-, intermediate-, and long-acting drugs. Bupivacaine has become a standard part of the armamentarium for postsurgical pain control while articaine has become the second-most used local anesthetic in the United States since its introduction in 2000. Despite an increase in anecdotal reports of paresthesia since articaine's introduction there is yet, no supporting scientific evidence.

  19. Anesthetic consideration in downs syndrome--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, B; Kulkarni, A H; Rao, S T; Mairpadi, A

    2008-09-01

    Downs syndrome constitutes to be the most common chromosomal disorder. Patients with Downs's syndrome are posted for several surgeries including dental procedures and even for facial reconstruction. They are associated with several congenital anomalies in different organ system. There is also increased incidence of atlanto axial instability and risk of spinal cord injury. These children are susceptible to infection and they are also considered to be hypersensitive to the effect or atropine. These all factors modify the anesthetic implication and also anesthetic management in these cases. We have highlighted all these factors and reviewed the anesthetic implication of these child posted for several procedures under anesthesia.

  20. Rotational Spectra of Halogenated Ethers Used as Volatile Anaesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Toribio, Alicia; Lesarri, Alberto; Suenram, Richard D.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2009-06-01

    Following previous microwave investigations by Suenram et al., we will report on the rotational spectrum of several halogenated ethers used as volatile anaesthetics, including sevoflurane ((CF_3)_2CH-O-CH_2F), isoflurane (CF_3CHCl-O-CHF_2), enflurane (CHFClCF_2-O-CHF_2) and methoxyflurane (CHCl_2CF_2-O-CH_3). This study has been conducted in the 6-18 GHz centimetre-wave region using Balle-Flygare-type FT-microwave spectroscopy. The results will include the analysis of the rotational spectra of minor species in natural abundance (^{13}C and ^{18}O in some cases), structural calculations and auxiliary ab initio modelling. The conformational and structural conclusions will be compared with previous gas-phase electron diffraction and solid-state X-ray diffraction analysis. R. D. Suenram, D. J. Brugh, F. J. Lovas and C. Chu, 51st OSU Int. Symp. On Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 1999, RB07

  1. EEG-based detection of awakening from isoflurane anesthesia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortelainen, Jukka; Väyrynen, Eero; Jia, Xiaofeng; Seppänen, Tapio; Thakor, Nitish

    2012-01-01

    In animal studies, reliable measures for depth of anesthesia are frequently required. Previous findings suggest that the continuous depth of anesthesia indices developed for humans might not be adequate for rats whose EEG changes during anesthesia represent more of quick transitions between discrete states. In this paper, the automatic EEG-based detection of awakening from anesthesia was studied in rats. An algorithm based on Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) is proposed for the assessment of the switch-like change in the signal characteristics occurring just before the awakening. The method was tested with EEGs recorded from ten rats recovering from isoflurane anesthesia. The algorithm was shown to be able to detect the sudden change in the EEG related to the moment of awakening with a precision comparable to careful visual inspection. Our findings suggest that monitoring such signal changes may offer an interesting alternative to the application of continuous depth of anesthesia indices when avoiding the awakening of the animal during e.g. a clinical experiment.

  2. Effect of Butorphanol on Anaesthesia Induction by Isoflurane in the Green Iguana (Iguana iguana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Š. Trnková

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 10 clinically healthy green iguanas (5 males and 5 females, body weight ranging from 1 350 to 2 770 g were given butorphanol by intramuscular injection following 24 h fasting. Inhalation anaesthesia was administered by mask (5% isoflurane with oxygen, 1.0 l/min, once reactions to external stimuli had decreased (15.45 ± 1.54 min later. Tracheal intubation was performed as soon as the iguanas exhibited complete tolerance to mechanical stimuli. A second study was performed 4 weeks later using the same green iguanas with no pre-medication. Marked individual reactions to masking were observed during both experiments. Some iguanas exhibited breath holding which prolonged anaesthetic induction. Physical stimulation was used in these cases in order to stimulate spontaneous breathing. The mean anaesthetic induction time was similar in both groups of green iguanas (4.34 ± 0.47 and 4.93 ± 0.88 min. There was also a comparable interval from masking to safe tracheal intubation in both experimental groups (15.21 ± 4.26 and 14.31 ± 1.39 min. In view of the results, pre-medication with butorphanol cannot be considered an effective method of anaesthetic induction in green iguanas.

  3. Anesthetic management of late pressure angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Furtado

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Late pressure angioedema is a rare form of angioedema in which light pressure stimulus can lead to edema after 1-12 h. This uncommon and unreported entity is especially important in patients who undergo general anesthesia, for whom the usual harmless supine position, intravenous catheter insertion, standard monitoring, airway management and ventilation can lead to life threatening consequences as the trigger is a physical stimulus. Case report: In this report, we describe a successful perioperative anesthetic management of a 30 year old patient, proposed for intra-ocular lens insertion, with a severe form of the disease with peri-oral, tongue and limb edema presentation. Conclusion: Due to lack of quality evidence, our conduct was based on the pathophysiology mechanisms of the syndrome, histamine and pro-inflammatory cytokines release, with special focus on a careful peri-operative assessment and prophylaxis, minimization of all the possible pressure stimulus, especially in the airway structures, and a strict post-operative monitoring.

  4. Anesthetic issues for robotic cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy K Bernstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As innovative technology continues to be developed and is implemented into the realm of cardiac surgery, surgical teams, cardiothoracic anesthesiologists, and health centers are constantly looking for methods to improve patient outcomes and satisfaction. One of the more recent developments in cardiac surgical practice is minimally invasive robotic surgery. Its use has been documented in numerous publications, and its use has proliferated significantly over the past 15 years. The anesthesiology team must continue to develop and perfect special techniques to manage these patients perioperatively including lung isolation techniques and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE. This review article of recent scientific data and personal experience serves to explain some of the challenges, which the anesthetic team must manage, including patient and procedural factors, complications from one-lung ventilation (OLV including hypoxia and hypercapnia, capnothorax, percutaneous cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass, TEE guidance, as well as methods of intraoperative monitoring and analgesia. As existing minimally invasive techniques are perfected, and newer innovations are demonstrated, it is imperative that the cardiothoracic anesthesiologist must improve and maintain skills to guide these patients safely through the robotic procedure.

  5. Stochastic volatility selected readings

    CERN Document Server

    Shephard, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Neil Shephard has brought together a set of classic and central papers that have contributed to our understanding of financial volatility. They cover stocks, bonds and currencies and range from 1973 up to 2001. Shephard, a leading researcher in the field, provides a substantial introduction in which he discusses all major issues involved. General Introduction N. Shephard. Part I: Model Building. 1. A Subordinated Stochastic Process Model with Finite Variance for Speculative Prices, (P. K. Clark). 2. Financial Returns Modelled by the Product of Two Stochastic Processes: A Study of Daily Sugar Prices, 1961-7, S. J. Taylor. 3. The Behavior of Random Variables with Nonstationary Variance and the Distribution of Security Prices, B. Rosenberg. 4. The Pricing of Options on Assets with Stochastic Volatilities, J. Hull and A. White. 5. The Dynamics of Exchange Rate Volatility: A Multivariate Latent Factor ARCH Model, F. X. Diebold and M. Nerlove. 6. Multivariate Stochastic Variance Models. 7. Stochastic Autoregressive...

  6. Understanding Interest Rate Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volker, Desi

    This thesis is the result of my Ph.D. studies at the Department of Finance of the Copenhagen Business School. It consists of three essays covering topics related to the term structure of interest rates, monetary policy and interest rate volatility. The rst essay, \\Monetary Policy Uncertainty...... and Interest Rates", examines the role of monetary policy uncertainty on the term structure of interest rates. The second essay, \\A Regime-Switching A ne Term Structure Model with Stochastic Volatility" (co-authored with Sebastian Fux), investigates the ability of the class of regime switching models...... with and without stochastic volatility to capture the main stylized features of U.S. interest rates. The third essay, \\Variance Risk Premia in the Interest Rate Swap Market", investigates the time-series and cross-sectional properties of the compensation demanded for holding interest rate variance risk. The essays...

  7. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT FOR A PATIENT WITH ACUTE INTERMITTENT PORPHYRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Savić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria is a rare metabolic disorder resulting from a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase, enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Its inheritance is autosomal dominant. A deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase is not sufficient by its self to produce acute intermittent porphyria, and other activating factors must also be present. These include some drugs, hormones, infection, injury and alcohol. Besides others, anesthetics have been implicated in the triggering of a number of severe porphyric reactions. Although there is no clinical evidence, the fear of hypothesized porphyrinogenicity of repetitive anesthetics exposures still remains. Despite these doubts, we report here the case of uneventful repeated exposure to anesthetics in a patient suffering from acute intermittent porphyria, within a fifteen- month period. On both occasions, the patient was safely exposed to certain anesthetics included: propofol, sevoflurane, rocuronium, midazolam and fentanyl.

  8. Cardioprotective Effects Induced by Preconditioning with Halogenated Anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papurica Marius

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous studies discuss the protective effects of halogenated anesthetics on myocyte injury induced by the ischemia-reperfusion syndrome of the heart. This mechanism is known as pharmacological preconditioning.

  9. Pricing Volatility of Stock Returns with Volatile and Persistent Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jie

    In this paper a two-component volatility model based on the component's first moment is introduced to describe the dynamic of speculative return volatility. The two components capture the volatile and persistent part of volatility respectively. Then the model is applied to 10 Asia-Pacific stock m......, a positive or risk-premium effect exists between return and the volatile component, yet the persistent component is not significantly priced for return dynamic process....... markets. Their in-mean effects on return are also tested. The empirical results show that the persistent component accounts much more for volatility dynamic process than the volatile component. However the volatile component is found to be a significant pricing factor of asset returns for most markets...

  10. Pricing Volatility of Stock Returns with Volatile and Persistent Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jie

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a two-component volatility model based on first moments of both components to describe the dynamics of speculative return volatility. The two components capture the volatile and the persistent part of volatility, respectively. The model is applied to 10 Asia-Pacific stock ma...... markets. A positive or risk-premium effect exists between the return and the volatile component, yet the persistent component is not significantly priced for the return dynamic process....... markets. Their in-mean effects on returns are tested. The empirical results show that the persistent component is much more important for the volatility dynamic process than is the volatile component. However, the volatile component is found to be a significant pricing factor of asset returns for most...

  11. Anesthetic considerations for patients with postpolio syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Donna

    2011-10-01

    Postpolio syndrome is a disorder related to the recurrence of neuromuscular symptoms in survivors of paralytic poliomyelitis. A comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology is necessary for the anesthesia provider to develop a safe anesthetic plan. This case report discusses the anesthetic challenges and considerations in patients with postpolio syndrome, focusing on the importance of careful pharmacologic dosing of opioids, and neuromuscular agents as well as perioperative and postoperative issues related to aspiration risks, cold intolerance, and positioning.

  12. SEVOFLURANE, DESFLURANE, AND XENON NEW INHALED ANESTHETICS IN VETERINARY MEDICINE

    OpenAIRE

    Cláudio Correa Natalini

    2001-01-01

    Inhalation anesthesia is widely used in veterinary medicine. New inhalation anesthetics that present less untoward effects, are more potent and produce a safe and easily changeable anesthetic plane are desirable over the older agents presently available. In this review some of the physical and chemical aspects of inhalation anesthesia is revisited. Because the agents used in inhalation anesthesia are gases or vapors, the physics of vaporization, delivery and administration of these agents sho...

  13. Contamination of the operating room by waste anesthetic gases

    OpenAIRE

    新, 太喜治; 清水, 信義; 河上, 靖登; 冨田,校朗; 光岡,利人; 塚原, 恒子; 折田,薫三

    1980-01-01

    A survey was undertaken to evaluate the possible relationship between abnormal pregnancy and exposure to waste anesthetic gases. The results indicate that during the years 1976-1979, 36 per cent of pregnant operating room nurses suffered from threatend abortion, compared with 10 per cent in the control group. Our measurement of waste anesthetic gases showed that trace concentrations of 100ppm of nitrous oxide and 2.0 ppm of halothane were present in the operating room atomosphere. The contami...

  14. Intravenous lipid emulsion for treatment of local anesthetic toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Caroline Kosh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available M Caroline Kosh, April D Miller, Jill E Michels, , Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Sciences, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina Campus, Columbia, South Carolina, USADate of Preparation: 14th July 2010 Conflict of interest: None declaredClinical question: Is intravenous lipid emulsion a safe and effective therapy for the reversal and treatment of local anesthetic toxicity?Results: Systematic reviews, human case reports, and experimental animal studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy in successfully reversing cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, and cardiac collapse seen with severe systemic local anesthetic toxicity. There are fewer data to support treatment of neurologic toxicities associated with local anesthetics.Implementation: Intravenous lipid emulsion 20% should be available whenever patients receive large doses of local anesthetics in operating rooms and emergency departments. Various dosing protocols have been published in the medical literature. Although the dosing protocols are based on low-level evidence, a lack of major adverse events makes lipid emulsion an appropriate therapy for treating cardiotoxic symptoms induced by local anesthetics.Keywords: intravenous lipid emulsion, local anesthetics

  15. Water solvent and local anesthetics: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, R. C.; Gomes, D. E. B.; Pascutti, P. G.; Ito, A. S.; Taft, C. A.; Ota, A. T.

    There are various experimental studies regarding the toxicity and the time of action of local anesthetics, which contain general insights about their pharmacological and physicochemical properties. Although a detailed microscopic analysis of the local anesthetics would contribute to understanding these properties, there are relatively few theoretical studies about these molecules. In this article, we present the results from calculations performed for three local anesthetics: tetracaine, procaine, and lidocaine, both in their charged and uncharged forms, in aqueous environment. We have used the density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations to study the structural characteristics of these compounds. The radial distribution function g(r) was used to examine the structure of water molecules surrounding different regions of the local anesthetics. We demonstrated the nonhomogeneous character of the anesthetics with respect to their affinity to water solvent molecules as well as the modifications in their affinity to water caused by changes in their charge state. We also observed that the biological potency of the anesthetics is more related to the behavior of specific groups within the molecule, which are responsible for the interaction with the lipid phase of membranes, rather than the general properties of the molecule as a whole.

  16. Latent Integrated Stochastic Volatility, Realized Volatility, and Implied Volatility: A State Space Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Christian; Christensen, Bent Jesper

    We include simultaneously both realized volatility measures based on high-frequency asset returns and implied volatilities backed out of individual traded at the money option prices in a state space approach to the analysis of true underlying volatility. We model integrated volatility as a latent...... process is downward biased. Implied volatility performs better than any of the alternative realized measures when forecasting future integrated volatility. The results are largely similar across the stock market (S&P 500), bond market (30-year U.S. T-bond), and foreign currency exchange market ($/£ )....

  17. Avaliação comparativa entre a anestesia geral com halotano e isoflurano sobre a pressão arterial em cães Comparartive evaluation of the general anesthesia with halothane and isoflurane on the arterial pressure in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Corrêa Natalini

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available As alterações produzidas pelo halotano e isoflurano sobre as pressões arteriais sistólica, diastólica e média foram avaliadas em 34 caninos de ambos os sexos e de diferentes pesos corporais e raças, todos submetidos a procedimentos cirúrgicos ortopédicos, divididos em dois grupos de 17 animais, submetidos a jejum prévio de 12 horas antes da indução anestésica. Os animais de ambos os grupos receberam sulfato de atropina 0,04mg/kg, associado ao sulfato de morfina 1,5mg/kg, administrados por via intramuscular e indução anestésica com propofol 6mg/kg por via intravenosa e a anestesia geral foi mantida com halotano no grupo I e o isoflurano no grupo II. Em ambos os grupos, o óxido nitroso na proporção 2:1 com oxigênio foi utilizado como gás diluente do anestésico volátil. Decorridos 15 minutos do início da anestesia volátil, as pressões sistólica, diastólica e média foram mensuradas pelo método oscilométrico indireto até o período de 90 minutos. Observou-se que as pressões arteriais sistólica e diastólica do grupo II foi maior a partir dos 45 minutos de manutenção com os anestésicos voláteis, não ocorrendo diferença significativa na freqüência cardíaca. Conclui-se que a manutenção anestésica com isoflurano produz valores de pressão arterial sistólica e diastólica superiores à manutenção com halotano que causou hipotensão arterial dos 45 aos 75 minutos de anestesia volátil.Changes in arterial systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure were evaluated and compared in 34 dogs anesthetized with halothane or isoflurane and submitted to orthopedic surgeries. Two groups were formed each with 17 dogs. These animals were fasted for 12 hours before anesthesia induction. Anesthetic technique was premedication with 0.04mg/kg atropine intramuscular combined 1.5mg/kg morphine intramuscular. Anesthesia was induced with 6.0mg/kg propofol intravenously. Anesthesia was maintained with halothane in group I and

  18. ACCURACY OF NONINVASIVE ANESTHETIC MONITORING IN THE ANESTHETIZED GIRAFFE (GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Mads F; Grøndahl, Carsten; Stegmann, George F; Sauer, Cathrine; Secher, Niels H; Hasenkam, J Michael; Damkjær, Mads; Aalkjær, Christian; Wang, Tobias

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of pulse oximetry, capnography, and oscillometric blood pressure during general anesthesia in giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis). Thirty-two giraffes anesthetized for physiologic experiments were instrumented with a pulse oximeter transmittance probe positioned on the tongue and a capnograph sampling line placed at the oral end of the endotracheal tube. A human size 10 blood pressure cuff was placed around the base of the tail, and an indwelling arterial catheter in the auricular artery continuously measured blood pressure. Giraffes were intermittently ventilated using a Hudson demand valve throughout the procedures. Arterial blood for blood gas analysis was collected at multiple time points. Relationships between oxygen saturation as determined by pulse oximetry and arterial oxygen saturation, between arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide, and between oscillometric pressure and invasive arterial blood pressure were assessed, and the accuracy of pulse oximetry, capnography, and oscillometric blood pressure monitoring evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis. All three noninvasive methods provided relatively poor estimates of the reference values. Receiver operating characteristic curve fitting was used to determine cut-off values for hypoxia, hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and hypotension for dichotomous decision-making. Applying these cut-off values, there was reasonable sensitivity for detection of hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and hypotension, but not for hypoxemia. Noninvasive anesthetic monitoring should be interpreted with caution in giraffes and, ideally, invasive monitoring should be employed.

  19. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure titration on gas exchange, respiratory mechanics and hemodynamics in anesthetized horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrósio, Aline M; Ida, Keila K; Souto, Maria Tmr; Oshiro, Alexandre H; Fantoni, Denise T

    2013-11-01

    To assess if positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration improves gas exchange and respiratory mechanics, without hemodynamic impairment in horses during anesthesia. Prospective, randomized study. Thirteen isoflurane-anesthetized healthy horses. After 60 minutes of anesthesia with spontaneous breathing, mechanical ventilation was initiated with an inspiratory-expiratory ratio of 1:2, PEEP of 5 cmH2O, tidal volume of 10-20 mL kg(-1) and respiratory rate adjusted to maintain normocapnia. Constant PEEP of 5 cmH2O was continued (control group; n = 6) or titrated (PEEP group; n = 7) by increasing and decreasing PEEP from 5 to 20 cmH2O at 15-minute intervals. The horses were instrumented with an arterial catheter to measure blood pressure and allow collection of blood for pH and blood gas analysis and a Swan-Ganz catheter for measurement of cardiac output (CO) using thermodilution. Cardiopulmonary assessment was recorded before PEEP titration and after 15 minutes at each PEEP value. In the PEEP group, static compliance (range) (Cst 278-463 mL cmH2O(-1)) was significantly higher and the shunt fraction (Q·s/Q·t 7-20%) and the alveolar-arterial oxygen difference [P(A-a)O2 95-325 mmHg] were significantly lower than in the control group [Cst of 246-290 mL cmH2O(-1), Q·s/Q·t of 16-19%, P(A-a)O2 of 253-310 mmHg; p respiratory mechanics impairment during inhalation anesthesia can be treated using PEEP titration from 5 to 20 cmH2O, without clinically important hemodynamic effects in healthy horses. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  20. A comparison of the cardiopulmonary effects of pressure controlled ventilation and volume controlled ventilation in healthy anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni, Denise T; Ida, Keila K; Lopes, Thomas F T; Otsuki, Denise A; Auler, José Otávio C; Ambrósio, Aline M

    2016-07-01

    To compare the effects of pressure controlled ventilation (PCV) with volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) on lung compliance, gas exchange, and hemodynamics in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs. Prospective randomized study. Veterinary teaching hospital. Forty client-owned bitches undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy. Dogs were randomly assigned to be ventilated with 100% oxygen using PCV (n = 20) or VCV (n = 20). The respiratory rate was 20/min and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was 5 cm H2 O, with a tidal volume of 10 mL/kg. Cardiac output (CO) was measured using thermodilution. Cardiopulmonary and blood gas data were obtained during spontaneous ventilation and after 30 (T30) and 60 minutes (T60) of controlled ventilation. In dogs ventilated with PCV, at T30 and T60, PIP was lower (11.4 ± 1.9 and 11.1 ± 1.5 cm H2 O, respectively) and static compliance (CST ) was higher (51 ± 7 and 56 ± 6 mL/cm H2 O, respectively) than in VCV group (PIP of 14.3 ± 1.3 and 15.5 ± 1.4 cm H2 O; CST of 34 ± 8 and 33 ± 9 mL/cm H2 O, P ventilation, both groups had decreased alveolar-arterial oxygen difference at T30 and T60 (PCV: 128 ± 32 mm Hg vs 108 ± 20 and 104 ± 16 mm Hg, respectively; VCV: 131 ± 38 mm Hg vs 109 ± 19 and 107 ± 14 mm Hg, respectively; P ventilation, both ventilatory modes effectively improved gas exchange without hemodynamic impairment. PCV resulted in higher lung CST and lower PIP compared to VCV. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  1. Volatility in Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Sizova, Natalia; Tauchen, George

    Stock market volatility clusters in time, carries a risk premium, is fractionally inte- grated, and exhibits asymmetric leverage effects relative to returns. This paper develops a first internally consistent equilibrium based explanation for these longstanding empirical facts. The model is cast...

  2. The effect of sub-anesthetic and anesthetic ketamine on water maze memory acquisition, consolidation and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Maryam; Yadollahi Khales, Golnaz; Rastegar, Karim; Zarifkar, Asadollah

    2012-02-29

    Ketamine, a non-selective inhibitor of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) channels is used in anesthetic or sub-anesthetic doses to induce analgesia, amnesia, to suppress fear, anxiety and depression. Although the ketamine's effect on memory acquisition is known, its effects on other aspects of memory are controversial. Morris water maze is a task which assesses spatial learning and memory. This study was aimed to assess the ketamine's differential effect on water maze memory acquisition, consolidation and retrieval. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-350 g) were trained in water maze single training session. 24h later a probe trial which was consisted of a single trial without platform was done. To assess the effect of ketamine on water maze memory acquisition it was administered before training; to assess its effect on memory consolidation it was administered immediately after training and to assess its effect on memory retrieval it was injected before probe trial. Ketamine both in sub-anesthetic and anesthetic doses impaired water maze memory acquisition, its anesthetic dose but not sub-anesthetic dose impaired memory consolidation and on retrieval stage, both doses deteriorated memory retrieval. It seems that NMDA receptor activity is not just necessary during water maze memory acquisition but also their post-learning reactivation is required to maintain memory consolidation and retrieval. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of an infrared anaesthetic agent analyser (Datex-Ohmeda) with refractometry for measurement of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolff, Andrea S; Moens, Yves P S; Driessen, Bernd; Ambrisko, Tamas D

    2014-07-01

    To assess agreement between infrared (IR) analysers and a refractometer for measurements of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane concentrations and to demonstrate the effect of customized calibration of IR analysers. In vitro experiment. Six IR anaesthetic monitors (Datex-Ohmeda) and a single portable refractometer (Riken). Both devices were calibrated following the manufacturer's recommendations. Gas samples were collected at common gas outlets of anaesthesia machines. A range of agent concentrations was produced by stepwise changes in dial settings: isoflurane (0-5% in 0.5% increments), sevoflurane (0-8% in 1% increments), or desflurane (0-18% in 2% increments). Oxygen flow was 2 L minute(-1) . The orders of testing IR analysers, agents and dial settings were randomized. Duplicate measurements were performed at each setting. The entire procedure was repeated 24 hours later. Bland-Altman analysis was performed. Measurements on day-1 were used to yield calibration equations (IR measurements as dependent and refractometry measurements as independent variables), which were used to modify the IR measurements on day-2. Bias ± limits of agreement for isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane were 0.2 ± 0.3, 0.1 ± 0.4 and 0.7 ± 0.9 volume%, respectively. There were significant linear relationships between differences and means for all agents. The IR analysers became less accurate at higher gas concentrations. After customized calibration, the bias became almost zero and the limits of agreement became narrower. If similar IR analysers are used in research studies, they need to be calibrated against a reference method using the agent in question at multiple calibration points overlapping the range of interest. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  4. A phase I, dose-escalation trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of emulsified isoflurane in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Han; Li, Rui; Liu, Jin; Zhang, Wensheng; Liao, Tianzhi; Yi, Xiaoqian

    2014-03-01

    This first-in-human volunteer phase I clinical trial aimed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and anesthesia efficacy of emulsified isoflurane (EI), an intravenously injectable formulation of isoflurane. Seventy-eight healthy volunteers were recruited in this open-label, single-bolus, dose-escalation, phase I trial and were allocated into 16 cohorts. Each volunteer received a single bolus injection of EI. The dose started with 0.3 mg/kg (for isoflurane) and was planned to end with 64.6 mg/kg. Postdose vital signs, physical examination, laboratory tests, chest radiograph, 12-lead electrocardiogram, and development of any adverse event were closely monitored as safety measurements. Effectiveness in producing sedation/anesthesia was assessed by Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation and Bispectral Index. The dose escalation ended as planned. The most common adverse events associated with EI were injection pain (77 of 78, 98.7%) and transient tachycardia (22 of 78, 25.6%). Only at high doses (≥38.3 mg/kg) did EI cause transient hypotension (5 of 78, 6.4%) or apnea (11 of 78, 14.1%), but all the affected volunteers recovered uneventfully. Fast onset of unconsciousness (typically 40 s after injection) was developed in all volunteers receiving doses of 22.6 mg/kg or greater. Waking-up time and depression in Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation correlated well with EI dose. None of the postdose tests revealed any abnormal result. EI is safe for intravenous injection in human volunteers in the dose range of 0.3 to 64.6 mg/kg. At doses of 22.6 mg/kg or higher, EI produced rapid onset of unconsciousness in all volunteers followed by fast, predictable, and complete recovery.

  5. Nobiletin ameliorates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Junying; Zhang, Haiyan; Lu, Jing; Lei, Weifu

    2016-12-01

    A recent study reported that nobiletin is an active ingredient in Fructus Aurantii immaturus and Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae, which may be capable of preventing ischemic stroke. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the neuroprotective effects of nobiletin, and to evaluate whether it could ameliorate isoflurane‑induced cognitive impairment via antioxidant, anti‑inflammatory and anti‑apoptotic effects in aging rats. Male Sprague‑Dawley rats (age, 18 months) were used to analyze the neuroprotective effects of nobiletin. Morris water maze test was used to determine cognitive competence. Enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis were also used to quantify nuclear factor‑κB, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, IL‑1β, IL‑6, glutathione, (GSH), GSH‑peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde concentration and relevant protein expression levels Cognitive competence was increased in isoflurane-treated rats following treatment with nobiletin. In addition, as expected, nobiletin exerted antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti‑apoptotic effects on isoflurane‑induced cognitive impairment in aging rats. Treatment with nobiletin induced the activation of phosphorylated (p)‑Akt, p‑cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein expression and reduced the levels of B‑cell lymphoma 2‑associated X protein (Bax) in isoflurane‑induced rats. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nobiletin may ameliorate isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment through antioxidant, anti‑inflammatory and anti‑apoptotic effects via modulation of Akt, Bax, p‑CREB and BDNF in aging rats. These findings provide support for the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of nobiletin treatment on isoflurane-induced damage.

  6. Ion Mobility Studies on the Negative Ion-Molecule Chemistry of Isoflurane and Enflurane

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Méndez, Ramón; Watts, Peter; Howse, David C.; Procino, Immacolata; McIntyre, Henry; Mayhew, Chris A.

    2017-05-01

    In the present work we present an investigation of the negative ion-molecule chemistry of the anaesthetics isoflurane, ISOF, and enflurane, ENF, in an ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry (IMS/MS), in both air and nitrogen. Hexachloroethane (HCE) was introduced in both air and nitrogen to produce Cl- as a reactant ion. This study was undertaken owing to uncertainties in the chemical processes, which lead to the cluster ions reported in other work (Eiceman et al. Anal. Chem. 61, 1093-1099, 1). In particular for ISOF the product ion observed was ISOF.Cl-, and it was suggested that the Cl- was formed by dissociative electron attachment (DEA) although there was mention of a chlorine containing contaminant. We show in this study that ISOF and ENF do not produce Cl- in an IMS system either by capture of free electrons or reaction with O2 -. This demonstrates that the Cl- containing ions, reported in the earlier study, must have been the result of a chlorine containing contaminant as suggested. The failure of ISOF and ENF to undergo DEA was initially surprising given the high calculated electron affinities, but further calculations showed that this was a result of the large positive vertical attachment energies (VAEs). This experimental work has been supported by electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP level, and is consistent with those obtained in a crossed electron-molecular beam two sector field mass spectrometer. An unusual observation is that the monomer complexes of ISOF and ENF with O2 - are relatively unstable compared with the dimer complexes.

  7. Dexmedetomidine dose-dependently enhances local anesthetic action of lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kentaro; Koga, Yoshihisa; Nakao, Shinichi; Sugiyama, Kazuna

    2014-03-01

    The combination of α2-adrenoceptor agonists, such as dexmedetomidine (DEX) and clonidine, with local anesthetics has been found to extend the duration of peripheral nerve blocks, probably owing to the resultant local vasoconstriction in the peripheral nerves. However, because the clear elucidation of the effect of DEX requires examination of the local anesthetic effect with DEX alone and the combination of various concentrations of DEX with local anesthetics, we evaluated the local anesthetic effect of various concentrations of DEX alone and with a local anesthetic. The present study assessed the tail-flick (TF) latencies after injection of the appropriate drug in male Sprague-Dawley rats, using an epidural model that allowed constant pain stimulation intensity, dispersion of the anesthetic, and a precise injection site and dose. Lidocaine alone, lidocaine with 2.5-ppm DEX, lidocaine with 5.0-ppm DEX, lidocaine with 7.5-ppm DEX, and DEX alone were administered at the predetermined dose. The TF latency changes over time were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Comparisons among the groups were analyzed using ANOVA followed by a post hoc Dunnett's multiple comparison test or Tukey's multiple comparison test. The addition of DEX to lidocaine increased the TF latency and dose-dependently prolonged its duration as follows: 0-ppm DEX, 20 minutes; 2.5-ppm, 40 minutes; 5.0-ppm, 40 minutes; and 7.5-ppm, 50 minutes. DEX alone did not change the TF latency. Our results have demonstrated that DEX dose-dependently enhances the local anesthetic action of lidocaine in a rat TF model. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Strain differences in toxic effects of long-lasting isoflurane anaesthesia between Wistar rats and Sprague Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller-Matula, J M; Jilma, B

    2008-11-01

    We investigated if long-lasting (5 h) anaesthesia with isoflurane has different pharmacological effects in two different rat strains: Wistar and Sprague Dawley. The mean blood pressure was 34% higher in Sprague Dawley rats as compared to the Wistar rats (p = 0.04). In Wistar rats, the pH value decreased to 7.1, lactate increased by 53%, creatinine increased 2.7-fold, alanine amino transferase and aspartate amino transferase increased more than 4-fold and lactate dehydrogenase increased 9-fold (p ketamin/xylazine in the described study design.

  9. Electrocardiographic study on geriatric dogs undergoing general anesthesia with isoflurane Estudo eletrocardiográfico em cães geriátricos submetidos à anestesia geral com isofluorano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreza Conti-Patara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to clarify the degree of influence of anesthetic agents commonly used during anesthesia on the heart conduction systems of geriatric dogs, with or without the presence of electrocardiographic changes in the pre-anesthetic electrocardiogram and also to determine the possible causes of ST-segment and T-wave changes during anesthesia, by monitoring ventilation and oxygenation. 36 geriatric dogs were evaluated. In addition to electrocardiographic evaluation, the pre-anesthetic study included serum levels of urea, creatinine, total protein, albumin and electrolytes. The pre-anesthetic medication consisted of acepromazine (0.05mg kg-1 in association with meperidine (3.0mg kg-1 by IM injection. Anesthesia was induced with propofol (3.0 to 5.0mg kg-1 by IV injection and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen. During the anesthesia, the animals were monitored by continued computerized electrocardiogram. Systemic blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, end-tidal carbon dioxide, partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood, arterial oxygen saturation, partial pressure of arterial oxygen and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin were closely monitored. During maintenance anesthesia, normal sinus rhythm was more common (78%. ST-segment and T-wave changes during the anesthetic procedure were quite common and were related to hypoventilation. The use of isoflurane did not result in arrhythmia, being therefore a good choice for this type of animal; Electrocardiographic findings of ST-segment and T-wave changes during the maintenance anesthesia were evident in animals with hypercapnia, a disorder that should be promptly corrected with assisted or controlled ventilation to prevent complicated arrhythmias.Os objetivos deste estudo foram esclarecer a influência dos agentes anestésicos comumente utilizados durante a anestesia no sistema de condução cardíaco em cães idosos, com ou sem alterações eletrocardiográficas pr

  10. Lunar Magmatic Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekvasil, H.; McCubbin, F. M.; Lindsley, D. H.

    2009-05-01

    Samples returned from the Apollo Missions prompted a variety of experimental investigations (e.g., [1-4]) which form the basis of our current understanding of lunar compositional evolution. The observed low abundances of solidus temperature-suppressing volatiles justified volatile-free experiments. However, the low-pressure nature of the samples makes it unlikely that volatiles were retained during magma ascent and eruption. In an effort to re-assess the lunar mantle volatile budget, we are focusing on the mineral apatite because of its incorporation of F, Cl, and OH as essential structural constituents and its greater ability to retain such volatiles relative to melt. Apatite grains analyzed from magnesian- and alkali-suite rocks (14161,7111, 14161,7269 and 14161,7264), KREEPy impact melt rocks associated with magnesian- and alkali-suite rocks (14161,7233; 14161,7110; 14161,7062; 12033,634-25; SaU 169-4), and mare basalts (79195; 12037,224; 74246; 12023,147,1; 10084; LAP 02205; LAP 03632; NWA 2977) by electron microprobe using the technique of [5,6] show two distinct compositional groups. Apatite from the mare basalts analyzed are primarily mixtures of fluor- "missing component" (OH?) apatite with low Cl abundance, while that from the magnesian- and alkali-suite rocks are fluor-chlor mixtures. Apatite/basaltic melt partition coefficients for F, Cl, and H2O from the data of [7] provide first estimates of magmatic volatile abundances in lunar magmas. They suggest that magmatic water may have been more abundant than F and Cl at the stage of apatite crystallization in mare basalts. In contrast, at this stage, the magmas that produced the Mg-and alkali suite minerals were F- and Cl-dominated. These results have wide-reaching implications regarding the chemical and physical evolution of the Moon and therefore, the next generation of experimental investigations. [1] Walker et al. 1973 EPSL 20, 325-336. [2] Walker et al. 1975 GCA 39, 1219-1235. [3] Longhi 1992 GCA 69

  11. Dynamic Volatility Arbitrage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorn, Jochen

    concepts, next to nothing is known about position reverting strategies and how, and -even more important- in which context they are applied in practice. In the recent market downturn only one sector generated signicant profits for the leading investment banks: Volatility trading activities, namely on Forex......This article aims to shed a light on innovative fund management concepts which emerged after the crisis. Two main strategies seem to dominate the financial turmoil: Absolute return concepts and long/short trading techniques. While there already exists exhaustive literature on absolute return......, interest rates and commodities. If an investor positions himself on the (volatility) market within a long/short trading framework, he typically bets on a traditional mispricing arbitrage. However as this corresponds to a call spread with equal exercise prices, this strategy alone would not generate enough...

  12. True resistance to local anesthetics, a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noyan Ashraf M.A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report a case with apparent resistance to local anesthetics. While regional anesthetics failure are often attributed to technical failure, the clinical presentation and medical history of this patient suggests a true resistance to local anesthetics. Case report: A 28 years old man was scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery for right sided tibial bone fracture, and decision of spinal anesthesia was made. There was a questionable history of multiple prior episodes of local anesthetic unresponsiveness (Interscalan block, local infiltration for lipoma resection and dental surgery. Spinal anesthesia was performed and sensory or motor blockade was not obtained despite any evidence of technical problems. The surgical procedure performed under general anesthesia and skin analgesia (local infiltration of lidocaine 2% and bupivacaine 0.5% to forearm, did not achieve, the day after surgery. Conclusion: While the failure rate of spinal anesthesia has been shown range from 4 to 13% and is often attributed to technical failure, this particular case showed a true resistance to local anesthetics.

  13. Anesthetic Alterations of Collective Terahertz Oscillations in Tubulin Correlate with Clinical Potency: Implications for Anesthetic Action and Post-Operative Cognitive Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Travis J A; Kurian, Philip; Preto, Jordane; Sahu, Kamlesh; Hameroff, Stuart R; Klobukowski, Mariusz; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2017-08-29

    Anesthesia blocks consciousness and memory while sparing non-conscious brain activities. While the exact mechanisms of anesthetic action are unknown, the Meyer-Overton correlation provides a link between anesthetic potency and solubility in a lipid-like, non-polar medium. Anesthetic action is also related to an anesthetic's hydrophobicity, permanent dipole, and polarizability, and is accepted to occur in lipid-like, non-polar regions within brain proteins. Generally the protein target for anesthetics is assumed to be neuronal membrane receptors and ion channels, however new evidence points to critical effects on intra-neuronal microtubules, a target of interest due to their potential role in post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Here we use binding site predictions on tubulin, the protein subunit of microtubules, with molecular docking simulations, quantum chemistry calculations, and theoretical modeling of collective dipole interactions in tubulin to investigate the effect of a group of gases including anesthetics, non-anesthetics, and anesthetic/convulsants on tubulin dynamics. We found that these gases alter collective terahertz dipole oscillations in a manner that is correlated with their anesthetic potency. Understanding anesthetic action may help reveal brain mechanisms underlying consciousness, and minimize POCD in the choice and development of anesthetics used during surgeries for patients suffering from neurodegenerative conditions with compromised cytoskeletal microtubules.

  14. [Costs of anesthetics and other drugs in anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majstorović, Branislava M; Kastratović, Dragana A; Milaković, Branko D; Marković, Srdan Z; Mijajlović, Milos S; Vucović, Dragan S

    2012-01-01

    Drugs are real and transparent costs of treatment, which are subject to constant monitoring and changes. The study was aimed at measuring and analyzing consumption of anesthetics and other drugs in anesthesia in the Clinical Centre of Serbia. This paper is part of a five-year (2005-2009), academic, pharmacoeconomic retrospective-prospective study (the 4th phase). We calculated the costs of anesthetics and other drugs in all anesthetized patients at the Institute of Anesthesia and Reanimation, Clinical Center of Serbia in 2006. The data, obtained from the Clinical Centre of Serbia Database, were analyzed by descriptive statistical methods using computer program Microsoft Office Excel 2003 and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows. The amount of money spent for the application of 33,187 general and 16,394 local anesthesia and 20,614 anesthesiology procedures was 83,322,046.36 RSD (Euros 1,054,705.4), which was 5.93% of the funds allocated for all drugs used at the Clinical Center of Serbia. Of the total fund for drugs, 57.8% was spent for anesthetics (local anesthetics 1.20%) and muscle relaxants, whereas 42.2% was spent for other drugs in anesthesia. The highest amount was spent at the Emergency Center (35.8%), then at the Cardio-surgery (11.9%) and the Neurosurgery (10.9%) because of the large number and length of surgical interventions. There is no space for rationalizing the costs of anesthetics and other drugs in anesthesia.

  15. Anesthetic Management of a Patient With Takayasu Arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Yamamoto, Toru; Shiiba, Shunji; Harano, Nozomu; Sago, Teppei; Nunomaki, Masahito; Watanabe, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis is a rare chronic progressive panendarteritis involving the aorta and its main branches. Anesthesia in patients with this disease can be complicated by severe uncontrolled hypertension, end-organ dysfunction, and stenosis of major blood vessels. In this case, general anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane and remifentanil without complications. To prevent intraoperative complications, we conducted intubation with a rigid video laryngoscope with careful consideration of the concentrations of analgesics and sedatives used. This case demonstrates the importance of anesthetic techniques for maintaining adequate tissue perfusion without hemodynamic changes in the anesthetic management of patients with Takayasu arteritis.

  16. Local anesthetic use in the pregnant and postpartum patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayans, Edgar P; Stuart, Hunter R; Carsten, David; Ly, Quen; Kim, Hanna

    2010-10-01

    The use of systemically absorbed drugs in the gravid and in the lactating patient is of concern to the dentist. This article reviews concerns for the health and safety of the mother, developing fetus, and neonate involving local anesthetics. The available literature on the use of local anesthetics for dentistry in the pregnant and postpartum patient is also reviewed. In addition, the physiology of the pregnant and postpartum woman is discussed because this is essential to understanding potential interplay with local anesthesia and the stress of a dental appointment. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Anesthetic management of craniosynostosis repair in patient with Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niraj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by craniosynostosis, midface hypoplasia and syndactyly. In general, patients present in early childhood for craniofacial reconstruction surgery. Anesthetic implications include difficult airway, airway hyper-reactivity; however, possibility of raised intracranial pressure especially when operating for craniosynostosis and associated congenital heart disease should not be ignored. Most of the cases described in literature talk of management of syndactyly. We describe the successful anesthetic management of a patient of Aperts syndrome with craniosynostosis posted for bicornual strip craniotomy and fronto-orbital advancement in a 5-year-old child.

  18. Effects of physical exercise on object recognition memory in adult rats of postnatal isoflurane exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yan FANG

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate effects of physical exercise (PE on object recognition memory in adult rats of postnatal isoflurane (Iso exposures. Methods One hundred and ten postnatal 7-day SD rats (P7 were randomly divided into four groups: normal control group (Naive, Naive+PE group (received physical exercise in P21: a treadmill exercise 30min each day, 5 times/week, for 6 weeks, Iso group (three times of 2-hour Iso exposure in P7, P9, and P11, and Iso+PE group (received PE in P21 after postnatal Iso exposures. In P67, behavioral testing was conducted including open field and object recognition task (ORT, recording the time (Discrimination Ratios, DR that rats spent on exploring each object, evaluating effects of PE on object recognition memory. Results There was no significant difference in influence of PE on open field testing in all of the groups (P>0.05. Compared with Naive, there was no group difference in DR (P>0.05 for all groups, but the DR of Iso male rats was significantly higher than that of Naive female rats in P67, with significant difference (P=0.034. Compared with non-PE groups, whether or not postnatal Iso exposures, the DR of PE male groups was significantly higher (compared with Naive and Iso group: P67, P=0.050, P=0.017; P95, P=0.037, P=0.019; in female rats, the DR for ISO+PE group was lower than that of Iso group in P67 (P=0.036, but the DR of Naive+PE group was higher than that of Naive group in P95 (P=0.004. Compared with male rats, the DR of non-PE female rats was significantly higher in P67 (vis. Naive and Iso group: P=0.022, P=0.011; but in P95, the DR of non- Iso female groups was significantly higher than that of male groups (vis. Naive and Naive+PE: P=0.008, P=0.017. Conclusions There is no obvious impact of postnatal Iso exposures on object recognition memory of adult rats. These results also indicate that postnatal PE could improve object recognition memory of non-spatial learning in adult rats. In addition, exercise

  19. Midazolam / ketamine induction and isoflurane maintenance of anaesthesia in a 2-month-old, hand-raised African buffalo (Syncerus caffer : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.F. Stegmann

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of a midazolam / ketamine combination for induction of anaesthesia in a 2-month-old, hand-raised buffalo calf (Syncerus caffer described to allow endotracheal intubation for the maintenance of anaesthesia with isoflurane and oxygen. Intraoperative complications were hypotension and hypothermia. For postoperative analgesia meloxicam and butorphanol was administered intramuscularly.

  20. Randomized controlled trial of total intravenous anesthesia with propofol versus inhalation anesthesia with isoflurane-nitrous oxide: postoperative nausea with vomiting and economic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, K.; Hassink, E. A.; Bonsel, G. J.; Moen, J.; Kalkman, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    To assess the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting after total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol versus inhalational anesthesia with isoflurane-nitrous oxide, the authors performed a randomized trial in 2,010 unselected surgical patients in a Dutch academic institution. An

  1. Reduced Magmatic Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, M. M.; Withers, A. C.; Ardia, P.; Stanley, B. D.; Foley, N.

    2012-12-01

    Volatiles in Earth's upper mantle are dominated by H2O and CO2, but under more reduced conditions likely deeper in the mantle, other volatile species may be important or dominant. However, the speciation, solubilities, and effect on physical properties of reduced magmatic volatiles are poorly constrained. Here we summarize results from an experimental campaign to better understand reduced volatiles in magmas. Experiments emphasize spectroscopic and SIMS characterization of dissolved species in experiments for which fluid fugacities are known, thereby facilitating thermodynamic parameterization. Experimental determinations of molecular H2 solubility in basaltic and andesitic liquids show concentrations that are proportional to H2 fugacity. Because H2 increases with fH2 whereas dissolved H2O increases with fH2O1/2, the relative importance of H2 increases with pressure and for more hydrous magmas. At 1 GPa and IW-1, solubility in basalt reaches 0.3 wt.% (equivalent to 2.7 wt.% H2O). Solubilities at pressures of the deep upper mantle have not been explored experimentally (as is also true for H2O and CO2), but H2 could become the dominant hydrous species at 400 km and deeper, and so deep hydrous melts may have chiefly H2 rather than H2O or OH. Experiments suggest an extremely low partial specific density (0.18 kg/m3) for dissolved H2 at low pressure, and so appreciable dissolved H2 in melt atop the 410 km discontinuity or in the lower mantle may promote positive buoyancy. Solubilities of reduced C-species remain poorly known. In contrast to results in Na2O-SiO2 liquids (Mysen et al., 2009), experiments with a haplobasaltic liquid at controlled CH4 fugacities indicated very small (<0.05 wt.%) CH4 solubilities even at very reduced conditions (

  2. Electronic dental anesthesia in a patient with suspected allergy to local anesthetics: report of case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F; Quinn, C L

    1988-01-01

    A 56-year-old patient with alleged allergy to local anesthetics required restorative dental treatment. Electronic dental anesthesia was used successfully, in lieu of injectable local anesthetics, to manage intraoperative pain associated with the restoration of vital mandibular teeth.

  3. Flavored Anesthetic Masks for Inhalational Induction in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aakriti; Mathew, Preethy Joseph; Bhardwaj, Neerja

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of masking the odor of inhalational agents using fruit flavors on the anxiety behavior and compliance of children for inhalational induction. A prospective randomized double blind, placebo controlled study was conducted on 60 unpremedicated children in the age group of 4-12 y. Thirty children received anesthetic masks smeared with a flavor of child's choice while the other 30 children were induced using masks without flavor. Anxiety was assessed using modified Yale Pre-operative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS) in the pre-op room and during inhalational induction. Mask acceptance was graded by Induction Compliance Checklist (ICC). The cost-effectiveness of flavored anesthetic masks was compared to that of commercially available pre-scented masks. The baseline anxiety in the two groups was comparable. The number of children demonstrating high levels of anxiety at anesthetic induction was similar in flavored and non-flavored mask groups (p 0.45). The compliance to mask induction was also equally good (p 0.99). The authors found significant difference in the cost of flavored mask (INR 56.45 per mask) as compared to commercially available pre-scented masks (INR 660 per mask). The authors observed a placebo effect that reduced the pre-op anxiety in the control group which probably made the quality of induction equivalent with flavored and non-flavored masks. Therefore, using a flavored anesthetic mask is cost-effective than using a commercially available pre-scented mask.

  4. Dental and anesthetic management of a child with epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Rathna Prabhu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa (EB is a wide spectrum of rare genetic disorders characterized by marked fragility of the skin and mucous membranes in which vesculobullous lesions occur in response to trauma, heat, or no apparent cause. This case report deals with the dental and anesthetic management of a 10-year-old girl with dystrophic EB.

  5. Combined low dose local anesthetics and opioids versus single use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-24

    Sep 24, 2014 ... stay of the patients. Therefore, reducing the side effects associated with intrathecal anesthesia is quite helpful to support better postoperative management. Combined low dose local anesthetics and opioids versus single use of LA for transurethral urological surgery: A meta‑analysis. Y Ding, M Li, L Chen1, ...

  6. Anesthetic Challenges in an Adult with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Jacqueline; Jansen, Nicholas

    2014-06-15

    The mucopolysaccharidoses are a group of lysosomal storage diseases with many skeletal and airway features that pose a challenge to anesthetists. We present the anesthetic management of a woman with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI undergoing cervical spine surgery and review the perioperative issues that may arise with this disease.

  7. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome: Anesthetic management in the obstetric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Motiaa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS is an autonomic disorder which is characterized by postural tachycardia and orthostatic symptoms without associated hypotension. We report a case of a parturient, after her consent, with POTS, who underwent a cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. The anesthetic implications are also discussed.

  8. The differential impact of two anesthetic techniques on cortisol levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-18

    Jun 18, 2011 ... Conclusion: Using plasma cortisol as a measure, bupivacaine-based epidural anesthesia significantly reduces the stress response to surgical ... refusal to participate in the study, allergy to local and/or general anesthetic .... cerebrospinal fluid, 3 ml of 2% lidocaine with epinephrine. 5 μg/ml was injected ...

  9. The Anesthetic Efficacy of the Intraosseous Injection in Irreversible Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of an intraosseous injection in teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis . Fifty...one healthy human subjects with symptomatic maxillary or mandibular posterior teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis were used in this study. The

  10. Combined low dose local anesthetics and opioids versus single use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The combination of reduced dose of local anesthetics (LA) and highly lipid‑soluble synthetic opioids for patients undergoing transurethral surgery could reduce block duration and side‑effects. However, it remains unclear what are the most appropriate levels of low dose and the extent to which the side‑effects ...

  11. Trigeminal nerve injury associated with injection of local anesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren; Jensen, Rigmor H.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2011-01-01

    Background. The authors used comprehensive national registry and clinical data to conduct a study of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), in particular neurosensory disturbance (NSD), associated with local anesthetics used in dentistry. Methods. The study included data sets of annual sales of local ane...

  12. 'Butamben, a specific local anesthetic and aspecific ion channel modulator'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekwilder, Jeroen Petrus

    2008-01-01

    Butamben is a local anesthetic with some unusual characteristics. Epidural application in the form of a suspension leads to long-term selective pain suppression, leaving the motor system intact. The mechanism behind this selective behavior is not understood. In order to see whether this selectivity

  13. Evaluation of local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of Cinchona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    synthesis in the hypothalamus. CONCLUSION. In conclusion, the present study showed that an aqueous extract of plant C. officinalis had local anesthetic and anti-pyretic activity in guinea pigs, frogs, and rats. Because this is a preliminary report, further studies are needed to analyze the possible mechanisms of action.

  14. Local anesthetics inhibit glutamate release from rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Chung, Chih-Yang; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Shieh, Jiann-Sing; Wang, Su-Jane

    2013-09-01

    Local anesthetics have been widely used for regional anesthesia and the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Recent studies have also demonstrated that low-dose systemic local anesthetic infusion has neuroprotective properties. Considering the fact that excessive glutamate release can cause neuronal excitotoxicity, we investigated whether local anesthetics might influence glutamate release from rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Results showed that two commonly used local anesthetics, lidocaine and bupivacaine, exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of 4-AP-evoked release of glutamate. The effects of lidocaine or bupivacaine on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca²⁺ ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor dl-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on the action of lidocaine or bupivacaine. Both lidocaine and bupivacaine reduced the depolarization-induced increase in [Ca²⁺]C but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of lidocaine or bupivacaine on evoked glutamate release was prevented by blocking the Ca(v)2.2 (N-type) and Ca(v)2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but it was not affected by blocking of the ryanodine receptors or the mitochondrial Na⁺/Ca²⁺ exchange. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) also prevented the action of lidocaine or bupivacaine. These results show that local anesthetics inhibit glutamate release from rat cortical nerve terminals. This effect is linked to a decrease in [Ca²⁺]C caused by Ca²⁺ entry through presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca²⁺ channels and the suppression of the PKA and PKC signaling cascades. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Political institutions and economic volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, Jeroen; de Haan, Jakob

    We examine the effect of political 'institutions' on economic growth volatility, using data from more than 100 countries over the period 1960 to 2005, taking into account various control variables as suggested in previous studies. Our indicator of volatility is the relative standard deviation of the

  16. Oscillatory patterns in hippocampus under light and deep isoflurane anesthesia closely mirror prominent brain states in awake animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Brian; Wang, Yingxue; Pastalkova, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus exhibits a variety of distinct states of activity under different conditions. For instance the rhythmic patterns of activity orchestrated by the theta oscillation during running and REM sleep are markedly different from the large irregular activity (LIA) observed during awake resting and slow wave sleep. We found that under different levels of isoflurane anesthesia activity in the hippocampus of rats displays two distinct states, which have several qualities that mirror the theta and LIA states. These data provide further evidence that the two states are intrinsic modes of the hippocampus; while also characterizing a preparation that could be useful for studying the natural activity states in hippocampus. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Allergies and pseudoallergic reactions to anesthetics. The clinical symptoms, risk factors and the diagnostic possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, A D; Treudler, R; Blume-Peytavi, U; Zouboulis, C C; Schaffartzik, W; Orfanos, C E

    1997-11-01

    Nearly all drugs currently used during the course of general anaesthesia may lead to hypersensitivity reactions of various types. There may be an acute type I allergic reactions or to a more or less severe pseudo-allergic reactions, in rare cases with lethal outcome. Routine preoperative testing appears of little predictive value, in spite of the high frequency of so-called risk factors (atopy, other kind of allergy) among the evaluated group of patients. Careful allergological testing should be performed 4 to 6 weeks after any incidents of suspected drug intolerance, in order to discover the underlying causative agent. Skin testing is of diagnostic value for neuromuscular blockers and intravenous narcotics. RAST- and RIA-tests and/or mediator releasing tests may also used additionally. Together with all other administered drugs, all the routinely used neuromuscular blockers (suxamethonium, vecuronium, pancuronium, alcuronium, atracurium, mivacurium) should be tested, since they often represent the cause for such reactions. For other classes of drugs (for example, volatile anesthetics and opioids) the clinical relevance of skin testing still remains uncertain. For less severe incidents seen during general anaesthesia such as pruritus, or exanthema, skin testing seems to be less relevant.

  18. Emerging non-volatile memories

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Seungbum; Wouters, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the fundamentals of emerging non-volatile memories and provides an overview of future trends in the field. Readers will find coverage of seven important memory technologies, including Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM), Ferromagnetic RAM (FMRAM), Multiferroic RAM (MFRAM), Phase-Change Memories (PCM), Oxide-based Resistive RAM (RRAM), Probe Storage, and Polymer Memories. Chapters are structured to reflect diffusions and clashes between different topics. Emerging Non-Volatile Memories is an ideal book for graduate students, faculty, and professionals working in the area of non-volatile memory. This book also: Covers key memory technologies, including Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM), Ferromagnetic RAM (FMRAM), and Multiferroic RAM (MFRAM), among others. Provides an overview of non-volatile memory fundamentals. Broadens readers' understanding of future trends in non-volatile memories.

  19. A Review of Volatility and Option Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Sovan Mitra

    2009-01-01

    The literature on volatility modelling and option pricing is a large and diverse area due to its importance and applications. This paper provides a review of the most significant volatility models and option pricing methods, beginning with constant volatility models up to stochastic volatility. We also survey less commonly known models e.g. hybrid models. We explain various volatility types (e.g. realised and implied volatility) and discuss the empirical properties.

  20. Assessing the impact on global climate from general anesthetic gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads P. Sulbæk; Nielsen, Ole John; Wallington, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Although present in the atmosphere with a combined concentration approximately 100,000 times lower than carbon dioxide (i.e., the principal anthropogenic driver of climate change), halogenated organic compounds are responsible for a warming effect of approximately 10% to 15% of the total anthropo......Although present in the atmosphere with a combined concentration approximately 100,000 times lower than carbon dioxide (i.e., the principal anthropogenic driver of climate change), halogenated organic compounds are responsible for a warming effect of approximately 10% to 15% of the total...... anthropogenic radiative forcing of climate, as measured relative to the start of the industrial era (approximately 1750). The family of anesthetic gases includes several halogenated organic compounds that are strong greenhouse gases. In this short report, we provide an overview of the state of knowledge...... regarding the impact of anesthetic gas release on the environment, with particular focus on its contribution to the radiative forcing of climate change....

  1. Refractometry for quality control of anesthetic drug mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabenow, Jennifer M; Maske, Mindy L; Vogler, George A

    2006-07-01

    Injectable anesthetic drugs used in rodents are often mixed and further diluted to increase the convenience and accuracy of dosing. We evaluated clinical refractometry as a simple and rapid method of quality control and mixing error detection of rodent anesthetic or analgesic mixtures. Dilutions of ketamine, xylazine, acepromazine, and buprenorphine were prepared with reagent-grade water to produce at least 4 concentration levels. The refraction of each concentration then was measured with a clinical refractometer and plotted against the percentage of stock concentration. The resulting graphs were linear and could be used to determine the concentration of single-drug dilutions or to predict the refraction of drug mixtures. We conclude that refractometry can be used to assess the concentration of dilutions of single drugs and can verify the mixing accuracy of drug combinations when the components of the mixture are known and fall within the detection range of the instrument.

  2. Dissociative anesthetic combination reduces intraocular pressure (IOP in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewaldo de Mattos-Junior

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluate the effects of three anesthetic combinations, ketamine-midazolam, ketamine-xylazine and tiletamine-zolazepam, on IOP in rabbits. In a experimental, blind, randomized, crossover study, six rabbits were anesthetized with each of 3 treatments in random order. Groups KM (ketamine, 30 mg/kg + midazolam, 1 mg/kg; KX (ketamine, 30 mg/kg + xylazine, 3 mg/kg; and TZ (tiletamine + zolazepam, 20 mg/kg. The drugs were mixed in the same syringe injected intramuscularly (IM into the quadriceps muscle. IOP was measured before drug administration (baseline and at 5-minute intervals for 30 minutes. The data were analyzed by a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA followed by Bonferroni test. All groups had significant decreases in IOP compared to baseline (p 0.05. Administration of either ketamine-midazolam, ketamine-xylazine, or tiletamine-zolazepam similarly decrease IOP in rabbits within 30 minutes of injection.

  3. [Ropivacaine (naropin), local anesthetic of choice for epidural blockade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovechkin, A M; Gnezdilov, A V; Syrovegin, A V; Kukushkin, M L; Gasanov, I N

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study, carried out in 132 patients with intense acute radicular pain, was search for an optimal local anesthetic to be used in combination with a steroid for therapeutic epidural blockade. Comparative analysis of analgesia attained by epidural injections of 5 ml 2% lidocaine, 4 ml 0.5% bupivacaine, and 4 ml 1% ropivacaine showed the advantages of the latter drug in stable arrest of radicular pain immediately after injection. The duration of analgesia after blockade was 1.4 +/- 0.5, 3.1 +/- 0.3, and 9.5 +/- 1.2 h, respectively. Use of ropivacaine eliminated the main shortcoming of epidural blockade in the treatment of patients with radicular pain, consisting in temporary pain relapse after discontinuation of the local anesthetic effect before development of antiinflammatory effect of the steroid.

  4. Effect of certain anesthetic agents on mallard ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, D.R.; Greenwood, R.J.

    1972-01-01

    Four anesthetic agents used in human or veterinary medicine and 3 experimental anesthetic preparations were evaluated for effectiveness in inducing narcosis when administered orally to game-farm mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).Tribromoethanol was the only compound to satisfy criteria of initial tests. Mean duration of the induction, immobilization, and recovery periods was 2.4 minutes, 8.7 minutes, and 1.3 hours, respectively, at the median effective dosage for immobilization (ED50; 100 mg./kg. of body weight). The median lethal dosage (LD50) was 400 mg./kg. of body weight.Tribromoethanol was also tested on mallards during the reproductive season. Effects on the hatchability of eggs or the survival of young were not detected.

  5. Carborane-derived local anesthetics are isomer dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracke, George R; VanGordon, Monika R; Sevryugina, Yulia V; Kueffer, Peter J; Kabytaev, Kuanysh; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Clinically there is a need for local anesthetics with a greater specificity of action on target cells and longer duration. We have synthesized a series of local anesthetic derivatives we call boronicaines in which the aromatic phenyl ring of lidocaine was replaced with ortho-, meta-, C,C'-dimethyl meta- and para-carborane clusters. The boronicaine derivatives were tested for their analgesic activity and compared with lidocaine using standard procedures in mice following a plantar injection. The compounds differed in their analgesic activity in the following order: ortho-carborane = C,C'-dimethyl meta-carborane > para-carborane > lidocaine > meta-carborane derivative. Both ortho-boronicaine and C,C'-dimethyl meta-boronicaine had longer durations of analgesia than lidocaine. Differences in analgesic efficacies are rationalized by variations in chemical structure and protein binding characteristics. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. [Anesthetic management of a patient with Ludwig's angina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinohana, M; Saitoh, T; Fukuzato, Y; Kawamoto, K; Inamura, T

    1999-07-01

    A 71-year-old woman with cellulitis of the floor of the mouth, referred to as "Ludwig's angina", underwent emergency tracheostomy under general anesthesia, for the control of airway narrowing caused by sublingual and submandibular swelling with tongue elevation. Because difficult airway had been suspected by preoperative assessment, feasible options of intubation in our hospital, including laryngeal mask, fiberoptic intubation and transtracheal jet ventilation, were prepared prior to induction of anesthesia. Anesthetic induction was carried out with propofol and suxamethonium, and subsequently tracheal intubation could be performed with difficulty under condition of partial visualization of vocal cord. Anesthetic maintenance with local anesthesia and continuous infusion of propofol 6 mg.kg-1.hr-1 was carried out during tracheostomy procedure, and this procedure was done uneventfully. Because airway control still remains a top priority in Ludwig's angina, feasible options of airway control should be prepared before induction of anesthesia if tracheostomy was required in a patient with this disease.

  7. Effects of anesthetics on piperidine levels in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, T; Okano, Y; Fukunaga, K; Takahama, K; Hitoshi, T; Kasé, Y

    1981-04-24

    Piperidine is one of the biogenic amines possessing potent pharmacological activity. Recent interest has focused on its possible role as an endogenous hypnogenic substance. Using a mass fragmentographic technique with deuterium-labelled piperidine as an internal standard, piperidine concentrations in brains of waking and deeply anesthetized mice were analyzed to compare piperidine levels in the brain under distinctly different states of consciousness. A rapid and significant increase in piperidine concentrations was found in the brain but not in blood of mice anesthetized with any one of pentobarbital, urethane, ether and halothane. The results, showing that CNS depression is accompanied by accumulation of piperidine in the brain, are consistent with the idea that piperidine may have a close connection with the mechanisms controlling the level of consciousness.

  8. Mechanics and Morphology of Silk Drawn from Anesthetized Spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, B.; Vollrath, F.

    CO2 and N2 anesthetized Nephila spiders produced dragline silk with mechanical properties that differed from control silk as a function of time under anesthesia. Silk from CO2 spiders had a significantly lower breaking strain and breaking energy, significantly higher initial modulus, and marginally lower breaking stress. At the onset of anesthesia the silk diameter became highly variable. During deep anesthesia silk either became thinner or retained cross-section but fibrillated.

  9. Anesthetic Management for Prolonged Incidental Surgery in Advanced Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kundu, Riddhi; Subramaniam, Rajeshwari; Sardar, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    In spite of advances in perioperative management, operative procedures in patients with chronic liver disease pose a significant challenge for the anesthesiologist due to multisystem involvement, high risk of postoperative hepatic decompensation, and mortality. We describe the anesthetic management of an elderly patient with advanced liver disease (model for end-stage liver disease 16) for prolonged abdominal surgery. The use of invasive hemodynamic monitoring, point-of-care biochemical, and ...

  10. Efficacy of Topical Anesthetics in the Treatment of Ingrown Nail

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma Gülru Erdoğan; Münevver Güven; Aysel Gürler

    2011-01-01

    Background and Design: One of the reasons for preferring conservative methods for ingrown nails is lack of local anesthesia for the painful step. Moreover, ingrown nail is a painful condition per se. It may be very difficult to intervene patients with high basal pain levels. Here, we aimed to assess the efficacy of topical anesthetics (2.5% lidocaine, 2.5% prilocaine mixture and 20% benzocaine gel) by determining basal pain level and pain during and after manipulation in patients with severe ...

  11. Anesthetic Management in a Gravida with Type IV Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Vue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is an inherited disorder of the connective tissues caused by abnormalities in collagen formation. OI may present many challenges to the anesthesiologist. A literature review reveals a wide range of implications, from basic positioning to management of the difficult airway. We present the anesthetic management of a 25-year-old gravid woman with OI, fetal demise, and possible uterine rupture, admitted for an exploratory laparotomy.

  12. Stress-Induced Urticaria Associated with Local Anesthetic Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Tauberg, James A. H.; Nique, Thomas A.; Giovannitti, Joseph A.

    1983-01-01

    A case is reported in which chronic urticaria developed following local anesthetic administration in a 21-year old Chinese-American male who had presented for routine dental care. An in-depth medical history and intradermal skin-testing failed to disclose a reason for this reaction. Referral to an allergist revealed a previously unknown underlying emotional tension which contributed to the development of chronic urticaria. A brief trial of hydroxyzine (Vistaril), an antihistaminic and anxioly...

  13. ANESTHETIC CONSIDERATION S IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMON ARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a spectrum of diseases that includes emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway disease. It i s characterized by progressive increased resistance to breathing. Patients with marked obstructive pulmonary disease are at increased risk for both intraoperative and Postoperative pulmonary complications. These patients require thorough preoperative prepa ration, meticulous intraoperative management & postoperative care. This article describes anesthetic considerations in a patient with COPD.

  14. Anesthetic Efficacy in Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Allegretti,Carlos E.; Sampaio, Roberta M.; Horliana, Anna C. R. T.; Armonia, Paschoal L.; Rocha,Rodney G.; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Inferior alveolar nerve block has a high failure rate in the treatment of mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine, 2% lidocaine and 2% mepivacaine, all in combination with 1:100,000 epinephrine, in patients with irreversible pulpitis of permanent mandibular molars during a pulpectomy procedure. Sixty-six volunteers from the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, ...

  15. Assessment of patient satisfaction with the preoperative anesthetic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebremedhn EG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Endale Gebreegziabher Gebremedhn, Vidhya Nagaratnam Department of Anesthesia, School of Medicine, Gondar College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: The evaluation of patient satisfaction is a core aspect of the continuous quality improvement in anesthesia service that can be affected by the preoperative anesthetist visit. This visit enables the anesthetist to know about the patient's general health status and the nature of surgery, to choose the type of anesthesia, and to discuss perioperative complications and their management with the patient. Patients have sometimes complained about the information given during the preoperative anesthetic evaluation in the University of Gondar teaching and referral hospital. The aim of this study was to determine the level of patient satisfaction with the preoperative anesthetist visit. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from February 15 to April 15, 2013. All consecutive elective patients who were operated upon under anesthesia during the study period were interviewed 24 hours after operation. A pretested questionnaire and checklists, which were developed based on the hospital's anesthetic evaluation sheet, were used for data collection. Results: A total of 116 elective patients were operated upon under anesthesia during the study period. Of these, 102 patients were included in our study, with a response rate of 87.9%. Anesthetists introduced themselves to ~24% patients; provided information about anesthesia to ~32%, postoperative complications to ~21%, postoperative analgesia to ~18, and postoperative nausea and vomiting to ~21%; and spent adequate time with ~74%. Patients' questions were answered by the anesthetist in ~65% of cases, and ~65% of patients had reduced anxiety after the anesthetist visit. The patients' overall satisfaction with the preoperative anesthetist visit was ~65%. Conclusion and recommendation: Patient satisfaction with the

  16. Option Pricing using Realized Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentoft, Lars Peter

    Inverse Gaussian distributed innovations is the corresponding benchmark model when only daily data is used. Finally, we perform an empirical analysis using stock options for three large American companies, and we show that in all cases our model performs significantly better than the corresponding......In the present paper we suggest to model Realized Volatility, an estimate of daily volatility based on high frequency data, as an Inverse Gaussian distributed variable with time varying mean, and we examine the joint properties of Realized Volatility and asset returns. We derive the appropriate...

  17. Isoflurano em emulsão lipídica por via venosa promove estabilidade cardiovascular respiratória em modelo experimental Isoflurano en emulsión lipídica por vía venosa promueve estabilidad cardiovascular respiratoria en modelo experimental Intravenous isoflurane in lipid emulsion promotes cardiovascular and respiratory stability. Experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Andrade da Silva Telles Mathias

    2004-10-01

    halothane in lipid emulsion induces anesthesia with hemodynamic and respiratory stability. This investigation aimed at establishing the induction dose of isoflurane in 10% lipid emulsion and at observing cardiovascular and respiratory effects in experimental anesthesia. METHODS: This study involved 7 male piglets. Animals received intravenous propofol for invasive surgical preparations: femoral artery and jugular vein dissection and esophageal ecodopplercardiographic sensor. Heart rate (HR, electrocardiography (ECG, systolic (SBP, diastolic (DBP, mean (MBP blood pressure and central venous pressure (CVP, cardiac index (CI and bispectral index (BIS were recorded. Inspired and expired gases fractions were continuously evaluated. Isoflurane lipid emulsion was injected until bispectral index had decreased to 40 ± 5 (BIS40. Animals were kept anesthetized and submitted to laparotomy for gastric suture. RESULTS: Total volume to reach BIS40 was 25.6 ± 11.2 mL (2.56 mL isoflurane. Mean time to reach BIS40 was 15.6 ± 6.9 minutes. The higher the infusion rate the shorter the time to reach BIS40. Cardiovascular and respiratory conditions were stable throughout the experiment. Heart rate has increased with increased end tidal isoflurane. CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous isoflurane in lipid emulsion has promoted bispectral index decrease, hemodynamic and respiratory stability and direct correlation with its expired fraction. Intravenous isoflurane in lipid emulsion may be a safe modality for this anesthetic delivery.

  18. The bonding of anesthetics and antibiotics on the carboxymethylcellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodić-Grabovac Branka B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of biologically active material is one of the most interesting trends in the chemical modification of cellulose. The possibility of obtaining biologically active cellulosic material by sorption of procaine hydrochloride and gentamicin sulphate on CMC was investigated in this paper. The sorption of therapeutics on CMC samples with different degree of substitution was carried out in water solutions of anesthetic and antibiotic, while the desorption was done in 0.95% NaCl solution. The amount of bonded and released therapeutics was determined by UV spe-ctrophotometry. It was found that degree of substitution of car-boxymethylcellulose and concentration of chemotherapeutic water solution have significant influence on the amount of bonded anesthetic and antibiotic. The maximum amount of bonded chemotherapeutic was 72.15 mg of procaine hydrochloride and 165.49 mg of gentamicin sulphate per gram CMC. In both cases the amounts of bonded chemotherape-utics correspond to the concentration of local anesthetic and antibiotic preparation that are used in therapeutic purposes.

  19. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy for the Evaluation of Anesthetic Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hernandez-Meza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard-of-care guidelines published by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA recommend monitoring of pulse oximetry, blood pressure, heart rate, and end tidal CO2 during the use of anesthesia and sedation. This information can help to identify adverse events that may occur during procedures. However, these parameters are not specific to the effects of anesthetics or sedatives, and therefore they offer little, to no, real time information regarding the effects of those agents and do not give the clinician the lead-time necessary to prevent patient “awareness.” Since no “gold-standard” method is available to continuously, reliably, and effectively monitor the effects of sedatives and anesthetics, such a method is greatly needed. Investigation of the use of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS as a method for anesthesia or sedation monitoring and for the assessment of the effects of various anesthetic drugs on cerebral oxygenation has started to be conducted. The objective of this paper is to provide a thorough review of the currently available published scientific studies regarding the use of fNIRS in the fields of anesthesia and sedation monitoring, comment on their findings, and discuss the future work required for the translation of this technology to the clinical setting.

  20. Anesthetic Efficacy in Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Carlos E; Sampaio, Roberta M; Horliana, Anna C R T; Armonia, Paschoal L; Rocha, Rodney G; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block has a high failure rate in the treatment of mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine, 2% lidocaine and 2% mepivacaine, all in combination with 1:100,000 epinephrine, in patients with irreversible pulpitis of permanent mandibular molars during a pulpectomy procedure. Sixty-six volunteers from the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, randomly received 3.6 mL of local anesthetic as a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). The subjective signal of lip numbness, pulpal anesthesia and absence of pain during the pulpectomy procedure were evaluated respectively, by questioning the patient, stimulation using an electric pulp tester and a verbal analogue scale. All patients reported the subjective signal of lip numbness. Regarding pulpal anesthesia success as measured with the pulp tester, the success rate was respectively 68.2% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 63.6% for lidocaine. Regarding patients who reported no pain or mild pain during the pulpectomy, the success rate was, respectively 72.7% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 54.5% for lidocaine. These differences were not statistically significant. Neither of the solutions resulted in 100% anesthetic success in patients with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars.

  1. Post-anesthetic cortical blindness in cats: twenty cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, J; Weil, A B; Packer, R A; Lantz, G C

    2012-08-01

    The medical records of 20 cats with post-anesthetic cortical blindness were reviewed. Information collected included signalment and health status, reason for anesthesia, anesthetic protocols and adverse events, post-anesthetic visual and neurological abnormalities, clinical outcome, and risk factors. The vascular anatomy of the cat brain was reviewed by cadaver dissections. Thirteen cats were anaesthetised for dentistry, four for endoscopy, two for neutering procedures and one for urethral obstruction. A mouth gag was used in 16/20 cats. Three cats had had cardiac arrest, whereas in the remaining 17 cases, no specific cause of blindness was identified. Seventeen cats (85%) had neurological deficits in addition to blindness. Fourteen of 20 cats (70%) had documented recovery of vision, whereas four (20%) remained blind. Two cats (10%) were lost to follow up while still blind. Ten of 17 cats (59%) with neurological deficits had full recovery from neurological disease, two (12%) had mild persistent deficits and one (6%) was euthanased as it failed to recover. Four cats (23%) without documented resolution of neurological signs were lost to follow up. Mouth gags were identified as a potential risk factor for cerebral ischemia and blindness in cats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Methylparaben concentration in commercial Brazilian local anesthetics solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique Rodriguez da Silva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To detect the presence and concentration of methylparaben in cartridges of commercial Brazilian local anesthetics. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twelve commercial brands (4 in glass and 8 in plastic cartridges of local anesthetic solutions for use in dentistry were purchased from the Brazilian market and analyzed. Different lots of the commercial brands were obtained in different Brazilian cities (Piracicaba, Campinas and São Paulo. Separation was performed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with UV-Vis detector. The mobile phase used was acetonitrile:water (75:25 - v/v, pH 4.5, adjusted with acetic acid at a flow rate of 1.0 ml.min-1. RESULTS: When detected in the solutions, the methylparaben concentration ranged from 0.01% (m/v to 0.16% (m/v. One glass and all plastic cartridges presented methylparaben. CONCLUSION: 1. Methylparaben concentration varied among solutions from different manufacturers, and it was not indicated in the drug package inserts; 2. Since the presence of methylparaben in dental anesthetics is not regulated by the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA and this substance could cause allergic reactions, it is important to alert dentists about its possible presence.

  3. Quantitation of the interaction of rocuronium bromide with etomidate, fentanyl, midazolam, propofol, thiopentone, and isoflurane using closed-loop feedback control of infusion of rocuronium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkkola, K T; Tammisto, T

    1994-01-01

    Sixty patients were randomly assigned to one of six groups (n = 10 in each case) in which anaesthesia was induced and maintained with etomidate, fentanyl, midazolam, propofol or with thiopentone and N2O, or isoflurane and N2O. After obtaining control measurements, rocuronium 0.6 mg kg-1 was given for intubation followed by an infusion, controlled by closed-loop feedback at 90% block. The steady-state rates of infusion were (in the same order) 0.64 +/- 0.22, 0.60 +/- 0.15, 0.61 +/- 0.21, 0.67 +/- 0.31, 0.63 +/- 0.15 and 0.39 +/- 0.17 mg kg-1 h-1 (Mean +/- SD). The intravenous agents did not interact with recuronium to any clinically significant degree. Isoflurane reduced the requirements by 35-40%.

  4. An evaluation of new circle system of anesthesia. Quantitative anesthesia with isoflurane in new zealand rabbits Avaliação de um novo sistema circular de anestesia: anestesia quantitativa com isuflorane em coelhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuber M. Fonseca

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available A small circuit system of anesthesia was developed by Fonseca and Goldenberg in 1993. The authors used in this study New Zealand White (NZW rabbits under closed system anesthetic regiment by insoflurane. Twenty male adult New Zealand rabbits were distributed in two groups of ten animals. No premedicant drugs were given. Endotraqueal intubation was made after intravenous administration of propofol (10mg/kg. Insoflurane was used to anesthesia management, administred by lowflow closed system technique with cooper kettle vaporizer, fixed by pre-calculated vaporizing flow in double times intervals. The group II underwent surgical periostal scratching in the medial tibial surface at the proximal shaft. Rabbits breathed spontaneously. Hypotensio, hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis were characteristic of the cardiopulmonary effects of the anesthesia. The corneal reflex and pinch reflex was useful as reliable indicators of anesthesic depth. Manual or mechanical ventilation should be considered as a way of improving alveolar ventilation and normalize blood-gas values. The system developed by Fonseca and Goldenberg was considered suitable for anesthesic management in rabbits.Um sistema circular de anestesia para animais de pequeno porte foi desenvolvido por FONSECA e GOLDENBERG, em 1993. No presente estudo foram utilizados 20 coelhos brancos linhagem Nova Zelândia, submetidos ao sistema com isoflurane, distribuidos em dois grupos de 10 animais. O grupo I, controle, que foi apenas anestesiado e o grupo II foi submetido a raspagem periostal da parte proximal e medial da tíbia. Não foi administrada droga pré-anestésica. Após administração do propofol intravenoso (10mg/kg procedeu-se a intubação endotraqueal. O isuflorane foi administrado lentamente no sistema circular de anestesia. Os animais respiravam espontaneamente. Houve efeitos cardiorespiratórios conseqüentes da anestesia, tais como, hipotensão, hipercapnia e acidose respiratória. O

  5. Gene knockout of the alpha6 subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor: lack of effect on responses to ethanol, pentobarbital, and general anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homanics, G E; Ferguson, C; Quinlan, J J; Daggett, J; Snyder, K; Lagenaur, C; Mi, Z P; Wang, X H; Grayson, D R; Firestone, L L

    1997-04-01

    The alpha6 subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)-R) has been implicated in mediating the intoxicating effects of ethanol and the motor ataxic effects of general anesthetics. To test this hypothesis, we used gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to create mice lacking a functional alpha6 gene. Homozygous mice are viable and fertile and have grossly normal cerebellar cytoarchitecture. Northern blot and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated that the targeting event disrupted production of functional alpha6 mRNA. Autoradiography of histological sections of adult brains demonstrated that diazepam-insensitive binding of [3H]Ro15-4513 to the cerebellar granule cell layer of wild-type mice was completely absent in homozygous mice. Cerebellar GABA(A)-R density was unchanged in the mutant mice; however, the apparent affinity for muscimol was markedly reduced. Sleep time response to injection of ethanol after pretreatment with vehicle or Ro15-4513 did not differ between genotypes. Sleep time response to injection of pentobarbital and loss of righting reflex and response to tail clamp stimulus in mice anesthetized with volatile anesthetics also did not differ between genotypes. Thus, the alpha6 subunit of the GABA(A)-R is not required for normal development, viability, and fertility and does not seem to be a critical or unique component of the neuronal pathway mediating the hypnotic effect of ethanol and its antagonism by Ro15-4513 in mice. Similarly, the alpha6 subunit does not seem to be involved in the behavioral responses to general anesthetics or pentobarbital.

  6. Stochastic volatility and stochastic leverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veraart, Almut; Veraart, Luitgard A. M.

    This paper proposes the new concept of stochastic leverage in stochastic volatility models. Stochastic leverage refers to a stochastic process which replaces the classical constant correlation parameter between the asset return and the stochastic volatility process. We provide a systematic...... treatment of stochastic leverage and propose to model the stochastic leverage effect explicitly, e.g. by means of a linear transformation of a Jacobi process. Such models are both analytically tractable and allow for a direct economic interpretation. In particular, we propose two new stochastic volatility...... models which allow for a stochastic leverage effect: the generalised Heston model and the generalised Barndorff-Nielsen & Shephard model. We investigate the impact of a stochastic leverage effect in the risk neutral world by focusing on implied volatilities generated by option prices derived from our new...

  7. Effects of ketamine-xylazine and propofol-halothane anesthetic protocols on blood gases and some anesthetic parameters in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Alkattan and M. M. Helal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The anesthetic effects and side effects of ketamine–xylazine and propofol–halothane at four different anesthetics protocol were examined in twenty healthy dogs. Methods: Four treatments were conducted using five dogs in each. The first group was treated with ketamine at 15 mg/kg intramuscularly and xylazine at 5 mg/kg. The second group was treated with ketamine–xylazine same as first group, but the dogs were underwent pneumoperitoneum with CO2. The third group was anesthetized with propofol at 2 mg/kg intravenously with inhalational halothane as maintenance anesthesia. The fourth group was treated as same as the third group but underwent pneumoperitoneum with CO2. The behavioral changes, onset of action, induction time, the duration of surgical anesthesia, reflexes, and recovery period, blood gas changes (pH, paO2 and paCO2 were recorded pre treatment and 10 and 30 minutes period after treatment. Results: The results showed differences in the quality of anesthesia among the four groups. The onset of anesthesia was the shortest in the third group (0.88±0.13 min. There were no significant changes in pH and paCO2 determined in all the groups. No adverse reactions or complications were encountered during the anesthesia. The paO2 significantly increased 10 and 30 min after anesthesia in all group in comparison with respective pretreatment value. Conclusion: The anesthetic protocol of propofol as induction agent with halothane as maintenance anesthesia induced a good quality anesthesia with a short duration of action and rapid smooth recovery without complications during CO2 insufflations in dogs. [Vet World 2013; 6(2.000: 95-99

  8. Ability of pulse wave transit time to detect changes in stroke volume and to estimate cardiac output compared to thermodilution technique in isoflurane-anaesthetised dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, H; Chambers, J P

    2017-04-26

    To evaluate the ability of pulse wave transit time (PWTT) to detect changes in stroke volume (SV) and to estimate cardiac output (CO) compared with the thermodilution technique in isoflurane-anaesthetized dogs. Prospective, experimental study. Eight adult laboratory dogs. The dogs were anaesthetized with isoflurane and mechanically ventilated. Reference CO (TDCO) was measured via a pulmonary artery catheter using the thermodilution technique and reference SV (TDSV) was calculated. PWTT was calculated as the time from the electrocardiogram R-wave peak to the rise point of the pulse oximeter wave. Estimated CO (esCO) was derived from PWTT after calibration with arterial pulse pressure (both non-invasive and invasive methods) and TDCO. Haemodynamic changes were induced by administration of phenylephrine (vasoconstriction), high isoflurane (vasodilatation and negative inotropy) and dobutamine (vasodilatation and positive inotropy). Trending between percentage change in PWTT and TDSV was assessed using concordance analysis and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve. The agreement between esCO and TDCO was evaluated using the Bland-Altman method. The direction of percentage change between consecutive PWTT and the corresponding TDSV showed a concordance rate of 95%, with correlation coefficients of -0.86 (pblood pressure showed a bias (precision of agreement) of 0.58 (1.54) and 0.57 (1.59) L minute(-1) with a percentage error of ±61% and ±63%, respectively. In isoflurane-anaesthetized dogs, PWTT showed a good trending ability to detect 15% changes in SV. This technique is easy to use, inexpensive, non-invasive and could become routine anaesthetic monitoring. However, the agreement between absolute esCO and TDCO was unacceptable. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Volatile phytochemicals as mosquito semiochemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Nyasembe, Vincent O.; Torto, Baldwyn

    2014-01-01

    Plant biochemical processes result in the release of an array of volatile chemical substances into the environment, some of which are known to play important plant fitness enhancing functions, such as attracting pollinators, thermal tolerance of photosynthesis, and defense against herbivores. Cunningly, phytophagous insects have evolved mechanisms to utilize these volatiles to their own advantage, either to colonize a suitable host for feeding, reproduction and oviposition or avoid an unsuita...

  10. Vasoconstriction Potency Induced by Aminoamide Local Anesthetics Correlates with Lipid Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hui-Jin; Ok, Seong-Ho; Sohn, Jin-Young; Son, Yong Hyeok; Kim, Jun Kyu; Lee, Soo Hee; Han, Jeong Yeol; Lim, Dong Hoon; Shin, Il-Woo; Lee, Heon-Keun; Chung, Young-Kyun; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2012-01-01

    Aminoamide local anesthetics induce vasoconstriction in vivo and in vitro. The goals of this in vitro study were to investigate the potency of local anesthetic-induced vasoconstriction and to identify the physicochemical property (octanol/buffer partition coefficient, pKa, molecular weight, or potency) of local anesthetics that determines their potency in inducing isolated rat aortic ring contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves to local anesthetics (levobupivacaine, ropivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine) were obtained from isolated rat aorta. Regression analyses were performed to determine the relationship between the reported physicochemical properties of local anesthetics and the local anesthetic concentration that produced 50% (ED50) of the local anesthetic-induced maximum vasoconstriction. We determined the order of potency (ED50) of vasoconstriction among local anesthetics to be levobupivacaine > ropivacaine > lidocaine > mepivacaine. The relative importance of the independent variables that affect the vasoconstriction potency is octanol/buffer partition coefficient > potency > pKa > molecular weight. The ED50 in endothelium-denuded aorta negatively correlated with the octanol/buffer partition coefficient of local anesthetics (r2 = 0.9563; P local anesthetics is determined primarily by lipid solubility and, in part, by other physicochemical properties including potency and pKa. PMID:22778542

  11. Vasoconstriction Potency Induced by Aminoamide Local Anesthetics Correlates with Lipid Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jin Sung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoamide local anesthetics induce vasoconstriction in vivo and in vitro. The goals of this in vitro study were to investigate the potency of local anesthetic-induced vasoconstriction and to identify the physicochemical property (octanol/buffer partition coefficient, pKa, molecular weight, or potency of local anesthetics that determines their potency in inducing isolated rat aortic ring contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves to local anesthetics (levobupivacaine, ropivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine were obtained from isolated rat aorta. Regression analyses were performed to determine the relationship between the reported physicochemical properties of local anesthetics and the local anesthetic concentration that produced 50% (ED50 of the local anesthetic-induced maximum vasoconstriction. We determined the order of potency (ED50 of vasoconstriction among local anesthetics to be levobupivacaine > ropivacaine > lidocaine > mepivacaine. The relative importance of the independent variables that affect the vasoconstriction potency is octanol/buffer partition coefficient > potency > pKa > molecular weight. The ED50 in endothelium-denuded aorta negatively correlated with the octanol/buffer partition coefficient of local anesthetics (r2=0.9563; P<0.001. The potency of the vasoconstriction in the endothelium-denuded aorta induced by local anesthetics is determined primarily by lipid solubility and, in part, by other physicochemical properties including potency and pKa.

  12. Socio-economy and stock market volatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Sharif Hossain

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate how stock market return volatility behaves with respect to socioeconomic factors namely- interest rate volatility, foreign exchange rate volatility, S &P 500 index volatility, broad money supply volatility, per capita GDP, domestic investment, industry value addition, tertiary level of education, urbanization, and strike and blockades using time series data from 1976-2015. We find that interest rate volatility has significant positive impact on stock market return volatility where broad money supply volatility, foreign exchange rate volatility, tertiary level of education, and domestic investment have significant negative impact on stock market volatility based on stepwise regression. Therefore, increase in tertiary level of education and domestic investment makes the stock market more stable. From the estimated result of VAR model, results show no short run causality among these variables.