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Sample records for vol iii results

  1. Scientific computing vol III - approximation and integration

    CERN Document Server

    Trangenstein, John A

    2017-01-01

    This is the third of three volumes providing a comprehensive presentation of the fundamentals of scientific computing. This volume discusses topics that depend more on calculus than linear algebra, in order to prepare the reader for solving differential equations. This book and its companions show how to determine the quality of computational results, and how to measure the relative efficiency of competing methods. Readers learn how to determine the maximum attainable accuracy of algorithms, and how to select the best method for computing problems. This book also discusses programming in several languages, including C++, Fortran and MATLAB. There are 90 examples, 200 exercises, 36 algorithms, 40 interactive JavaScript programs, 91 references to software programs and 1 case study. Topics are introduced with goals, literature references and links to public software. There are descriptions of the current algorithms in GSLIB and MATLAB. This book could be used for a second course in numerical methods, for either ...

  2. Recent results for Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brient, J.C.

    1987-12-01

    This paper presents recent results from the Mark III detector at SPEAR, in the open charm sector. The first topic discussed is the reanalysis of the direct measurement of the D hadronic branching fractions, where a detailed study has been made of the Cabibbo suppressed and multi-π 0 's D decays backgrounds in the double tag sample. Next, the Dalitz plot analysis of the D decays to Kππ is presented, leading to the relative fractions of three-body versus pseudoscalarvector decays. 7 refs., 5 figs

  3. Results of atmospheric diffusion experiments, vol.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Michio; Hayashi, Takashi; Adachi, Takashi.

    1988-02-01

    An extensive study on 'Emergency monitoring and prediction code system' has been carried in JAERI since 1980. Six series of field experiments on atmospheric diffusion were conducted to develop and verify the prediction models for environmental concentration distribution following accidental release of radioactivity. Results of field experiments (Inland complex terrain, surface and elevated point sources) conducted in 15 - 19th October 1984 (TSUKUBA84) and in 6 - 10th November 1985 (TSUKUBA85) are contained in this volume. (author)

  4. First results from Mark III at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einsweiler, K.F.

    The paper presents data on meson decays obtained using the MARK III detector operating at SPEAR. Results on hadronic decays; decays of the etasub(e); and results on radiative decays; are all described. (U.K.)

  5. Results on the iota from Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richman, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is presented of Mark III results on the iota(1440), a possible glueball state observed in radiative J/psi decays. The measurements include a spin-parity determination using both the iota → Ksub(s) 0 K +- π +- and iota → K + K - π 0 decay modes; an upper limit on the K*anti-K content of the Kanti-Kπ Dalitz plot; branching fractions and isospin; stringent upper limits for several hadronic channels, including iota → zetaπ→etaππ; and results from a search for iota radiative decays into vector mesons. These measurements are discussed in the context of theoretical ideas about the iota and results on the E(1420), a state observed in hadronic interactions. 11 refs., 7 figs

  6. Planck 2015 results: III. LFI systematic uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.

    2016-01-01

    We present the current accounting of systematic effect uncertainties for the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) that are relevant to the 2015 release of the Planck cosmological results, showing the robustness and consistency of our data set, especially for polarization analysis. We use two complement...

  7. Planck 2013 results. III. LFI systematic uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Cruz, M; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dick, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Gaier, T C; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Kangaslahti, P; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Lindholm, V; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, D; Peel, M; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wilkinson, A; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    We present the current estimate of instrumental and systematic effect uncertainties for the Planck-Low Frequency Instrument relevant to the first release of the Planck cosmological results. We give an overview of the main effects and of the tools and methods applied to assess residuals in maps and power spectra. We also present an overall budget of known systematic effect uncertainties, which are dominated sidelobe straylight pick-up and imperfect calibration. However, even these two effects are at least two orders of magnitude weaker than the cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations as measured in terms of the angular temperature power spectrum. A residual signal above the noise level is present in the multipole range $\\ell<20$, most notably at 30 GHz, and is likely caused by residual Galactic straylight contamination. Current analysis aims to further reduce the level of spurious signals in the data and to improve the systematic effects modelling, in particular with respect to straylight and calibra...

  8. Most Recent Sampling Results for Annex III Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contains email from Scott Miller, US EPA to Scott Kramer. Subject: Most Recent Sampling Results for Annex III Building. (2:52 PM) and Gore(TM) Surveys Analytical Results U.S. Geological Survey, Montgomery, AL.

  9. Recent results on D meson decays from the MARK III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coward, D.H.

    1985-10-01

    The MARK III Collaboration recently completed the analysis of a number of decay modes of charged and neutral D mesons produced in electron-positron collisions near the peak of the psi(3770) resonance at SLAC's SPEAR storage ring. The mesons were produced nearly at rest in pairs, either D + D - or D 0 anti D 0 , at a center-of-mass energy below the threshold for DD production. The unique kinematics of the production allow us to isolate the charmed meson signal clearly and unambiguously. The data were collected with the MARK III Spectrometer, a large solid angle magnetic detector. Our data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 9.3 inverse picobarns. New results will be presented on the absolute branching ratios of D mesons into hadronic final states, branching ratios for three body decays via pseudoscalar-vector intermediate states, and branching ratios for Cabibbo allowed and Cabibbo suppressed decays. Inclusive and exclusive branching ratios for the semi-leptonic decays of D mesons will be presented, as well as the first measurement of the vector form factor in the decay D 0 → K - e + nu, evidence for interference in D + decays, and new information on the contributions of W exchange diagrams to D 0 decays

  10. Nosely III Settlement by Results of Studies in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikheev Alexey V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article peresents results of new archaeological studies of the medieval horizon of Nosely III settlement in Mari Volga region. It contains defi nitions of objects connected with the medieval layer (household pits. The authors provide results of analysis of the ceramic material represented by the local (hand-made, early wheel and “Slavicoid” ceramics and imported (wheel-made Russian and Bulgar-Horde ware and complex of items. New materials allow us to provide a more precise dating of the settlement and limit the time of its existence to 14th – 15th centuries and defi ne it as a Mari rural settlement belonging to the district of the Maly Sundyr (Vazhnanger hillfort.

  11. Results on charmed meson decays from Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserbaech, S.R.

    1987-04-01

    We report recent results on charmed meson decays, obtained using the Mark III detector at SPEAR. The first topic discussed is the observation of e + e - → D/sub s/D/sub s/* at √s = 4.14 GeV. The D/sub s/* is detected as a peak in the mass distribution recoiling from D/sub s/ +- → phiπ +- . The mass of the D/sub s/* is found to be (2109.3 +- 2.1 +- 3.1)MeV/c 2 , yielding a D/sub s/*-D/sub s/ mass difference of (137.9 +- 2.1 +- 4.3) MeV/c 2 . The production cross section times branching ratio is also measured. Next, a search for the decay D + → μ + nu/sub μ/ is described. A preliminary upper limit (90% CL) on B(D + → μ + nu/sub μ/) of 8.4 x 10 -4 is obtained, corresponding to an upper limit on the decay constant f/sub D/ of 340 MeV/c 2 . Finally, we present results of a search for the lepton family number violating decay D 0 → μe. We find B(D 0 → μe) -4 at 90% CL

  12. CIM5 Phase III base process development results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    Integrated Demonstration Runs for the Am/Cm vitrification process were initiated in the Coupled 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5) on 11/30/98 and completed on 12/9/98. Four successful runs at 60 wt% lanthanide loading were completed which met or exceeded all established criteria. The operating parameters used in these runs established the base conditions for the 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5) process and were summarized in the 5-inch CIM design basis, SRT-AMC-99-OO01. (1) In subsequent tests, a total of fourteen CIM5 runs were performed using various power inputs, ramp rates and target temperatures to define the preferred processing conditions (2) Process stability and process flexibility were the key criteria used in assessing the results for each run. A preferred set of operating parameters was defined for the CIM5 batch process and these conditions were used to generate a pre-programmed, automatic processing cycle that was used for the last six CIM.5 runs (3) These operational tests were successfully completed in the January-February time frame and were summarized in SRT-AMC-99-00584. The recommended set of operating conditions defined in Runs No.1 through No.14 was used as the starting point for further pilot system runs to determine the robustness of the process, evaluate a bubbler, and investigate off-normal conditions. CIM5 Phase III Runs No.15 through No.60 were conducted utilizing the pre-programmed, automatic processing cycle to investigate system performance. This report summarizes the results of these tests and provides a recommendation for the base process as well as a processing modification for minimizing volume expansions if americium and/or curium are subject to a thermal reduction reaction like cerium. This document summarizes the results of the base process development tests conducted in the Am/Cm Pilot Facility located in Building 672-T

  13. Stage I/II endometrial carcinomas: preoperative radiotherapy: results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Belichard, C.; Horiot, J.C.; Barillot, I.; Fraisse, J.; Collin, F.

    1996-01-01

    The AIM of this retrospective study is to analyse the indications and the results of treatment of endometrial carcinomas by preoperative radiotherapy. MATERIAL: From 1976 to 1995, 183 patients FIGO stage I or II were treated by preoperative radiotherapy consisting in 95 cases of external radiotherapy (XRT) and brachytherapy (BT) followed by surgery (S) and, in 88 cases of BT alone before surgery, XRT was indicated in cases of grade 2 or 3 and/or cervical involvement. METHODS: XRT was delivered with a 4-fields technique to 40 Gy in 20 fractions with a medial shielding at 30 Gy. BT was done with low dose rate Cs137 and Fletcher-Suit-Delclos applicators with two intra-uterine tubes and vaginal ovoieds. Complications were scored using the French-Italian syllabus. RESULTS: Five-year actuarial survival rates per stage are: Ia=91%, Ib=83%, II=71%, and per grade: G1=80%, G2=79%, G3=90%. Failures were pelvic in 5/183 (2.7%), vaginal in 4 cases (2%) and nodal in 2 cases (1%). Twelve patients developed metastases (6.5%). Complications were analysed during the radiotherapy, after the surgery and with unlimited follow-up. After BT/S, 12 grade 1, 1 grade 2 and 1 grade 3 complications were observed. In the group of patients treated by RT/BT/S, 22 grade 1, 11 grade 2, 4 grade 3 occurred. There is no statistical correlation between complications and parameters of treatment (XRT, hwt, HWT, reference dose to the bladder and rectum, dose rate of brachytherapy). SUMMARY: Preoperative irradiation is an effective and safe treatment of high risk stage I/II endometrial carcinomas. Results seem independent of the pathology grade

  14. THE FRAMEWORK RESULTING FROM THE BASEL III REGULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motocu Marius

    2013-07-01

    The Basel III criteria entering into force between 2013 and 2018 constitute one of the major challenges to which the banking sector will face. The real impact of the Basel III reform will depend on the attitude of the banks that will have to change in their strategy, their cost structure and policy of remuneration of the shareholders. A reform which will have therefore an impact on the world economy ensuring as estimated by Governors and supervisors, stability and long term economic performance. This paper will present the main adjustments proposed by the Basel Committee.

  15. Results of Radiation Therapy in Stage III Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang Woo; Shin, Byung Chul; Yum, Ha Yong; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yoo, Myung Jin [Kosin University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Purpose : The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate, treatment failure and complication of radiation therapy alone in stage III uterine cervical cancer. Materials and Methods : From January 1980 through December 1985, 227 patients with stage II uterine cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy at Kosin Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Among 227 patients, 72 patients(31.7%) were stage IIIa, and 155 patients(68.3%) were stage IIIb according to FIGO classification. Age distribution was 32-71 years(median: 62 years). Sixty nine patients(95.8%) in stage IIIa and 150 patients(96.8%) in stage IIIb were squamous cell carcinoma. Pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 8 patients (11.1%) in stage IIIa and 29 patients(18.7%) in stage IIIb. Among 72 patients with stage IIIa, 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone by conventional technique (180-200 cGy/fr). And 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy with intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR) with Cs137 sources, and among 155 patients with stage IIIb, 80 patients(51.6%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone and 75 patients(48.4%) were treated with external radiation therapy with ICR. Total radiation doses of stage IIIa and IIIb were 65-105 Gy(median : 78.5 Gy) and 65-125.5 Gy (median :83.5 Gy). Survival rate was calculated by life-table method. Results : Complete response rates were 58.3% (42 patients) in state IIIa and 56.1%(87 patients) in stage Iiib. Overall 5 year survival rates were 57% in stage IIIa and 40% in stage IIIb. Five year survival rates by radiation technique in stage IIIa and IIIb were 64%, 40% in group treated in combination of external radiation and ICR, and 50%, 40% in the group of external radiation therapy alone(P=NS). Five year survival rates by response of radiation therapy in stage IIIa and IIIb were 90%, 66% in responder group, and 10%, 7% in non-responder group (P<0.01). There were statistically no

  16. Results of Radiation Therapy in Stage III Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Chang Woo; Shin, Byung Chul; Yum, Ha Yong; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yoo, Myung Jin

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate, treatment failure and complication of radiation therapy alone in stage III uterine cervical cancer. Materials and Methods : From January 1980 through December 1985, 227 patients with stage II uterine cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy at Kosin Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Among 227 patients, 72 patients(31.7%) were stage IIIa, and 155 patients(68.3%) were stage IIIb according to FIGO classification. Age distribution was 32-71 years(median: 62 years). Sixty nine patients(95.8%) in stage IIIa and 150 patients(96.8%) in stage IIIb were squamous cell carcinoma. Pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial diagnosis was 8 patients (11.1%) in stage IIIa and 29 patients(18.7%) in stage IIIb. Among 72 patients with stage IIIa, 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone by conventional technique (180-200 cGy/fr). And 36 patients(50%) were treated with external radiation therapy with intracavitary radiotherapy(ICR) with Cs137 sources, and among 155 patients with stage IIIb, 80 patients(51.6%) were treated with external radiation therapy alone and 75 patients(48.4%) were treated with external radiation therapy with ICR. Total radiation doses of stage IIIa and IIIb were 65-105 Gy(median : 78.5 Gy) and 65-125.5 Gy (median :83.5 Gy). Survival rate was calculated by life-table method. Results : Complete response rates were 58.3% (42 patients) in state IIIa and 56.1%(87 patients) in stage Iiib. Overall 5 year survival rates were 57% in stage IIIa and 40% in stage IIIb. Five year survival rates by radiation technique in stage IIIa and IIIb were 64%, 40% in group treated in combination of external radiation and ICR, and 50%, 40% in the group of external radiation therapy alone(P=NS). Five year survival rates by response of radiation therapy in stage IIIa and IIIb were 90%, 66% in responder group, and 10%, 7% in non-responder group (P<0.01). There were statistically no

  17. The Mark III vertex chamber and prototype test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grab, C.

    1987-07-01

    A vertex chamber has been constructed for use in the Mark III experiment. The chamber is positioned inside the current main drift chamber and will be used to trigger data collection, to aid in vertex reconstruction, and to improve the momentum resolution. This paper discusses the chamber's construction and performance and tests of the prototype

  18. First low WIMP mass results in EDELWEISS III experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorza, Silvia [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Postfach 3640, Karlsruhe (Germany); Collaboration: EDELWEISS-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The EDELWEISS-III collaboration is operating an experiment for the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) dark matter in the low radioactivity environment of the Modane Underground Laboratory. It consists of twenty-four advanced high purity germanium detectors operating at 18 mK in a dilution refrigerator in order to identify rare nuclear recoils induced by elastic scattering of WIMPs from our Galactic halo. The current EDELWEISS-III program, including improvements of the background, data-acquisition and the configuration is detailed. Sources of background along with the rejection techniques are discussed. Detector performances and a first low WIMP mass analysis of data acquired in a long-term campaign are presented as well.

  19. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2009-11-09

    This study is the third phase in a series of experiments designed to reduce conservatism in the model that predicts the formation of nepheline, a crystalline phase that can reduce the durability of high level waste glass. A Phase I study developed a series of glass compositions that were very durable while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62, where nepheline is predicted to crystallize upon slow cooling. A Phase II study selected glass compositions to identify any linear effects of composition on nepheline crystallization and that were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. However, it was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results of the Phase II study alone were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator. It was recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where the only constraint limiting processing is the current nepheline discriminator. Two methods were used in selecting glasses for this Phase III nepheline study. The first was based on the relationship of the current nepheline discriminator model to the other DWPF PCCS models, and the second was based on theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. A series of 29 test glass compositions was selected for this study using a combination of the two approaches. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. After reviewing the data, the study glasses generally met the target compositions with little issue. Product Consistency Test results correlated well with the crystallization analyses in

  20. Research on condensed matter and atomic physics using major experimental facilities and devices: Physics, chemistry, biology. Reports on results. Vol. 2. 3. Solid state physics and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report in three volumes substantiates the contents of the programme survey published in September 1989. The progress reports cover the following research areas: Vol. I, (1). Atomic and molecular physics - free atoms, molecules, macromolecules, clusters, matrix-isolated atoms and molecules. (2) Physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces - epitaxy, surface structure, adsorption, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties, thin films, synthetic layer structure. Vol. II, (3). Solid-state physics, and materials science -structural research, lattice dynamics, magnetic structure and dynamics, electronic states; load; spin and pulse density fluctuations; diffusion and internal motion, defects, unordered systems and liquids. Vol. III, (4). Chemistry - bonding and structure, kinetics and reaction mechanisms, polymer research, analysis and synthesis. (5). Biology, - structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules, membrane and cell biology. (6) Development of methods and instruments - neutron sources, synchrotron sources, special accelerators, research with interlinked systems and devices. (orig.) [de

  1. Results of the initial test program for the Sandia Pulsed Reactor III (SPR III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, B.F.; Reuscher, J.A.

    1976-08-01

    This document presents a detailed discussion of the reactor including the mechanical and nuclear design characteristics. Also presented are the complete results of the Initial Approach to Critical and the Zero-and-Low Power testing programs. Reactivity worth measurements are given for such parameters as control element integral worth, Safety Block integral worth, and various materials (polyethylene, copper, lead, etc) as a function of position relative to the core. Subcritical reactivity measurements made during the approach to critical generally proved to be in reasonably good agreement with design values due to the good source-fuel-detector geometry possible with a reactor of this type. Subsequent dynamic measurements for reactivity worths are shown to be in good agreement with calculated results

  2. Influence of the diluents on the extraction behaviour of Eu(III), and tm (III) by thenoytrifluoro acetone and/or 18-crown-6 or 15-crown-5 from nitrate aqueous medium. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehata, F A; El-Hefny, N; Aly, H F [Hot Laboratories Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The effects of different diluents on the synergistic extraction of Eu(III), and Tm (III) by thenoyltrifluoroacetone (HTTA) and/or 18-crown-5 was investigated from nitrate aqueous medium. For these systems, it is found that the diluent affects the extracted species in the organic phase. The composition of the extracted species have been proposed on the basis of slope analysis method. With HTTA alone, the stoichiometry of the extracted species was found to be M(TTA){sub 3} or M(NO{sub 3}) (TTA){sub 2} (HTTA) where M=Eu(III) or Tm(III). With HTA-Crown mixture the extracted species were M(TTA){sub 3}. CE or M(NO{sub 3}) (TTA){sub 2}. CE. The respective extraction and formation constants were evaluated. Different thermodynamic parameters of Eu (III), and Tm (III) extraction were determined from the experimental results. The variations obtained in the distribution was explained in terms of the interaction between the solute and the diluents. Correlations between the extraction and formation constants of the extracted species of Eu and Tm and the physicochemical parameter of the diluents used are given and discussed. 3 figs.,1 tab.

  3. New spectroscopic results in Xe II, Xe III, and Xe IV

    OpenAIRE

    Reyna Almandos, Jorge Guillermo; Gallardo, Mario; Garavaglia, Mario J.

    1982-01-01

    New results obtained in spontaneous xenon spectrum employing a conventional pulsed gaseous laser tube as light source, are presented in this work. A total of 626 spectral lines has been ionically assigned as follows: 50 to Xe II spectrum, 103 to Xe III spectrum, arid 222 to Xe IV spectrum. 30 Lines previously assigned to Xe II were reassigned as belonging to Xe III, 94 lines were assigned with some doubts to Xe II-III spectrum and 84 lines to Xe Ill-IV spectrum. Also there were clas...

  4. Phase III Simplified Integrated Test (SIT) results - Space Station ECLSS testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Dubiel, Melissa Y.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Perry, Jay L.; Whitley, Ken M.

    1990-01-01

    During 1989, phase III testing of Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) began at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with the Simplified Integrated Test. This test, conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), was the first time the four baseline air revitalization subsystems were integrated together. This paper details the results and lessons learned from the phase III SIT. Future plans for testing at the MSFC CMIF are also discussed.

  5. Liquid plugs bouncing against a solid basis, comparison of SIMMER-III and PLEXUS results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschek, W.; Arnecke, G.; Flad, M.

    1995-01-01

    The SIMMER III code is being tested by application to problems of reactor accidents. The fluid dynamics/thermohydraulics part of the code can be applied also to evaporation/condensation, melt, and freezing phenomena. For a liquid plug bouncing against a solid basis, the momentum transfer is calculated. PLEXUS results turn out to be in significant disagreement with the SIMMER calculations. (orig.)

  6. GREET 1.5 - transportation fuel-cycle model - Vol. 1 : methodology, development, use, and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, M. Q.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents the development and use of the most recent version (Version 1.5) of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy associated with various transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter with diameters of 10 micrometers or less, and sulfur oxides) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates total energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption when various transportation fuels are used. The GREET model includes the following cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, conventional diesel, reformulated diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; soybeans to biodiesel; flared gas to methanol, dimethyl ether, and Fischer-Tropsch diesel; and landfill gases to methanol. This report also presents the results of the analysis of fuel-cycle energy use and emissions associated with alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies to be applied to passenger cars and light-duty trucks

  7. Recent results on weak decays of charmed mesons from the Mark III experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browder, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    Recent results from the Mark III experiment on weak decays of charmed mesons are presented. Measurements of the resonant substructure of D 0 → K - π + π - π + decays, the first model independent result on D s → φπ + , as well as limits on D s → ηπ + and D s → η'π + are described. The implications of these new results are also discussed. 37 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  8. A comparison of recent results from HONDO III with the JSME nuclear shipping cask benchmark calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    The results of two calculations related to the impact response of spent nuclear fuel shipping casks are compared to the benchmark results reported in a recent study by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers Subcommittee on Structural Analysis of Nuclear Shipping Casks. Two idealized impacts are considered. The first calculation utilizes a right circular cylinder of lead subjected to a 9.0 m free fall onto a rigid target, while the second calculation utilizes a stainless steel clad cylinder of lead subjected to the same impact conditions. For the first problem, four calculations from graphical results presented in the original study have been singled out for comparison with HONDO III. The results from DYNA3D, STEALTH, PISCES, and ABAQUS are reproduced. In the second problem, the results from four separate computer programs in the original study, ABAQUS, ANSYS, MARC, and PISCES, are used and compared with HONDO III. The current version of HONDO III contains a fully automated implementation of the explicit-explicit partitioning procedure for the central difference method time integration which results in a reduction of computational effort by a factor in excess of 5. The results reported here further support the conclusion of the original study that the explicit time integration schemes with automated time incrementation are effective and efficient techniques for computing the transient dynamic response of nuclear fuel shipping casks subject to impact loading. (orig.)

  9. Selected results on J/PSI hadronic decays from DM2 and Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustin, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Results from the high statistics experiments Mark III and DM2 on J/PSI hadronic decays are reviewed. Special interest is given to SU3 violating decays into two pseudoscalars and baryon-antibaryon, especially the first observation of J/PSI → Ksub(S)sup(o)Ksub(L)sup(o). The complete measurement of the vector + pseudoscalar modes allows a new determination of the eta and eta' mixing parameters, indicating the presence of a new component in the eta' wave function. The iota(1440) and theta(1700) gluonium candidates have been searched for in hadronic decays, and the Mark III experiment observes a signal in J/PSI → ω iota (or ωE)

  10. Vol draadwerk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    Die motto van Marius Crous se derde bundel,. Vol draadwerk (2012) is ontleen aan die vader van die psigoanalise, Sigmund Freud, wat lui: “Everywhere I go I find a poet has been there before me.” Vol draadwerk verskyn ses jaar ná sy vorige bundel, Aan 'n beentjie sit en kluif. (2006). Vir sy bundel, Brief uit die kolonies ...

  11. Substituting environmentally relevant flame retardants: assessment fundamentals. Vol. 1: results and summary overview; Erarbeitung von Bewertungsgrundlagen zur Substitution umweltrelevanter Flammschutzmittel. Bd. 1: Ergebnisse und zusammenfassende Uebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leisewitz, A.; Kruse, H.; Schramm, E.

    2001-04-01

    The study examines the status, trends and alternatives (substitution and reduction potentials) in the use of flame retardants in selected product sectors: construction; electronics and electrical engineering; rail vehicles; textiles/upholstery. In addition, the study characterises thirteen flame retardants in terms of material flows, applications and toxicology/ecotoxicology. Vol. I: Summary overview of flame retardant applications in Germany in 1999/2000; characterisation of 13 flame retardants in terms of substance properties and application-specific characteristics, range of applications and quantities; derivation of assessment fundamentals for flame retardants, focussing on toxicology/ecotoxicology, suitability for closed-loop substance management, and potential for substitution and reduction; summary assessment of 13 flame retardants; summary overview of flame retardant applications. Vol. II: Analysis of flame retardant applications (state of the art, trends, alternatives) in: unsaturated polyester (UP) resins (rail vehicles); polyurethane (PU) insulating foams and one component foams (OCF) (construction sector); plastics for generic uses in electronic and electrical equipment, in casings for electronic and electrical equipment and in printed circuit boards (electronics/electrical engineering); and in upholstery and mattresses (textile applications). Vol. III: Toxicological/ecotoxicological profiles of substances: Decabromodiphenyl oxide; Tetrabromobisphenol A; Bis[pentabromophenyl]ethane; Hexabromocyclodo-decane, Tris[chloropropyl]phosphate, Resorcinol-bis-diphenylphosphate; N-Hydroxymethyl-3-dimethylphosphonopropionamide, Red phosphorus, Ammonium polyphosphate, Melamin cyanurate, Aluminiumtrihydroxide, Sodium borate decahydrate, Antimony trioxide. (orig.) [German] Untersucht werden Stand, Trends und Alternativen (Substitutions- und Minderungspotentiale) beim Einsatz von Flammschutzmitteln (FSM) in ausgewaehlten Produkten aus: Baubereich, Elektrotechnik

  12. New results on charmed D, F+- and F* production and decay from the Mark III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1986-09-01

    Results on charmed meson production and decay are presented from the Mark III at SPEAR. F anti F* associated production is observed allowing a direct measurement of the F* mass. A search for the decay D + → μ + nu/sub μ/ in the recoil of hadronically tagged D +- decays provides a stringent limit on the pseudoscalar decay constant f/sub D/. New results on D 0 anti D 0 mixing from semileptonic D 0 decays and evidence for a nonresonant component in D/sub e4/ decays are also presented

  13. Research on condensed matter and atomic physics, using major experimental facilities and devices: Physics, chemistry, biology. Reports on results. Vol. 1. 1. Atomic and molecular physics. 2. Physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report in three volumes substantiates the contents of the programme survey published in September 1989. The progress reports cover the following research areas: Vol. I, (1). Atomic and molecular physics - free atoms, molecules, macromolecules, clusters, matrix-isolated atoms and molecules. (2) Physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces - epitaxy, surface structure, adsorption, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties, thin films, synthetic layer structure. Vol. II, (3). Solid-state physics, and materials science -structural research, lattice dynamics, magnetic structure and dynamics, electronic states; load; spin and pulse density fluctuations; diffusion and internal motion, defects, unordered systems and liquids. Vol. III, (4). Chemistry - bonding and structure, kinetics and reaction mechanisms, polymer research, analysis and synthesis. (5). Biology, - structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules, membrane and cell biology. (6) Development of methods and instruments - neutron sources, synchrotron sources, special accelerators, research with interlinked systems and devices. (orig.) [de

  14. Research on condensed matter and atomic physics using major experimental facilities and devices: Physics, chemistry, biology. Reports on results. Vol. 3. 4. Chemistry. 5. Biology. 6. Development of methods and instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report in three volumes substantiates the contents of the programme survey published in September 1989. The progress reports cover the following research areas: Vol. I, (1). Atomic and molecular physics - free atoms, molecules, macromolecules, clusters, matrix-isolated atoms and molecules. (2) Physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces - epitaxy, surface structure, adsorption, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties, thin films, synthetic layer structure. Vol. II, (3). Solid-state physics, and materials science -structural research, lattice dynamics, magnetic structure and dynamics, electronic states; load; spin and pulse density fluctuations; diffusion and internal motion, defects, unordered systems and liquids. Vol. III, (4). Chemistry - bonding and structure, kinetics and reaction mechanisms, polymer research, analysis and synthesis. (5). Biology, - structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules, membrane and cell biology. (6) Development of methods and instruments - neutron sources, synchrotron sources, special accelerators, research with interlinked systems and devices. (orig.) [de

  15. Layout and first results of the nanotomography endstation at the P05 beamline at PETRA III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogurreck, M.; Greving, I.; Beckmann, F.; Wilde, F.; Müller, M. [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz–Zentrum Geesthacht (Germany); Marschall, F.; Vogt, H.; Last, A. [Institute of Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Rosario, J. J. do [Institute of Advanced Ceramics, Technical University Hamburg–Harburg (Germany); Leib, E. W. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht operates the P05 Imaging Beamline at the DESY storage ring PETRA III. This beamline is dedicated to micro- and nanotomography with two endstations. This paper will present the nanotomography endstation layout and first results obtained from commissioning and test experiments. First tests have been performed with CRLs as X-ray objectives and newly developed rolled X-ray prism lenses as condenser optics. This setup allows a resolution of 100 nm half period with an effective detector pixel size of 15nm. A first tomograph of a photonic glass sample was measured in early 2014.

  16. Results of Operative and Nonoperative Treatment of Rockwood Types III and V Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joukainen, Antti; Kröger, Heikki; Niemitukia, Lea; Mäkelä, E. Antero; Väätäinen, Urho

    2014-01-01

    Background: The optimal treatment of acute, complete dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) is still unresolved. Purpose: To determine the difference between operative and nonoperative treatment in acute Rockwood types III and V ACJ dislocation. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: In the operative treatment group, the ACJ was reduced and fixed with 2 transarticular Kirschner wires and ACJ ligament suturing. The Kirschner wires were extracted after 6 weeks. Nonoperatively treated patients received a reduction splint for 4 weeks. At the 18- to 20-year follow-up, the Constant, University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale (UCLA), Larsen, and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores were obtained, and clinical and radiographic examinations of both shoulders were performed. Results: Twenty-five of 35 potential patients were examined at the 18- to 20-year follow-up. There were 11 patients with Rockwood type III and 14 with type V dislocations. Delayed surgical treatment for ACJ was used in 2 patients during follow-up: 1 in the operatively treated group and 1 in the nonoperatively treated group. Clinically, ACJs were statistically significantly less prominent or unstable in the operative group than in the nonoperative group (normal/prominent/unstable: 9/4/3 and 0/6/3, respectively; P = .02) and in the operative type III (P = .03) but not type V dislocation groups. In operatively and nonoperatively treated patients, the mean Constant scores were 83 and 85, UCLA scores 25 and 27, Larsen scores 11 and 11, and SST scores 11 and 12 at follow-up, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in type III and type V dislocations. In the radiographic analysis, the ACJ was wider in the nonoperative than the operative group (8.3 vs 3.4 mm; P = .004), and in the type V dislocations (nonoperative vs operative: 8.5 vs 2.4 mm; P = .007). There was no statistically significant difference between study groups in

  17. Investor Outlook: Significance of the Positive LCA2 Gene Therapy Phase III Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Spark Therapeutics recently reported positive phase III results for SPK-RPE65 targeting the treatment of visual impairment caused by RPE65 gene mutations (often referred to as Leber congenital amaurosis type 2, or LCA2, but may include other retinal disorders), marking an important inflection point for the field of gene therapy. The results highlight the ability to successfully design and execute a randomized trial of a gene therapy and also reinforce the potentially predictive nature of early preclinical and clinical data. The results are expected to pave the way for the first approved gene therapy product in the United States and should sustain investor interest and confidence in gene therapy for many approaches, including retina targeting and beyond.

  18. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III

  19. Aging results for PRD 49 III/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamstad, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kevlar 49/epoxy composite is growing in use as a structural material because of its high strength-to-weight ratio. Currently, it is used for the Trident rocket motor case and for various pressure vessels on the Space Shuttle. In 1979, the initial results for aging of filament-wound cylindrical pressure vessels which were manufactured with preproduction Kevlar 49 (Hamstad, 1979) were published. This preproduction fiber was called PRD 49 III. This report updates the continuing study to 10-year data and also presents 7.5-year data for spherical pressure vessels wound with production Kevlar 49. For completeness, this report will again describe the specimens of the original study with PRD 49 as well as specimens for the new study with Kevlar 49.

  20. Development of Ozone Detector for Ksr-Iii and Preliminary Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hyun Hwang

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available KARI (Korea Aerospace Research Institute has measured the ozone density profiles over the Korean Peninsular since the launch of the Korean Sounding Rocket-I (KSR-I in 1993. The purpose of ozone measurements is to obtain the stratospheric and mesospheric vertical ozone density profiles over the Korean Peninsular with solar UV radiometers. With the visible channel of the radiometer, the attitude variation of the rocket was corrected and compensated. Developed system is based on ozone detector designs onboard the KSR-I and KSR-II. We discuss the development of ozone detector which will be onboard the KSR-III and its circuit and vibration test results for EM Model.

  1. Synergistic solvent extraction investigation of Am (III), Eu (III), Zn(II), and Cs(I), using 2-heptyl-2-methyl-nonanoic acid mixed with different organophosphorus compounds from nitrate media. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, H.A.; Ramadan, A.; Abdel-Fattah, A.

    1996-01-01

    Extraction studies for investigating the effect of mixing 2-heptyl-2-methyl nonanoic acid (HA) with a number of organophosphorus compounds; namely tributyl phosphate (TBP), terphenyl phosphate oxide (TPPO); tri octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) or bis-2-(ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in benzene on the extraction of trace elements Am(III), Eu(III), Zn(II), and Cs(I) from nitrate media of ionic strength, I=0.1 M were carried out. The effect of adding different organophosphorus compounds to HA was tested to account for the presence or absence of the phenomenon of synergism. It was found that TBP, TPPO, and TOPO causing some antagonistic effects for the elements studied. Extraction enhancement was only observed with bis- (2-ethyl-hexyl) -phosphoric acid (HDEHP) for all the elements investigated. The extraction mechanisms as well as the thermodynamic parameters for the mixed extracted species are discussed. 19 figs

  2. Extraction chromatography of Am (III), Eu (III), Zn (II), and Cs (I), Using chromo sorb impregnated by 0..01 m 2-heptyl-2-methyl-nonanoic acid in benzene. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-naggar, H A; Ramadan, A; Abdel-Fattah, A [Nuclear chemistry Department, Hot laboratories Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Extraction chromatography studies were carried out for Am(III), Eu(III), Zn(II), and Cs(I) using long carboxylic acid, 2-heptyl-2-methyl nonanoic acid in benzene as an extractant chromo sorb. This was selected to act as a solid support and it was impregnated with the extractant to obtain the stationary phase. The eluting agent used was 0.1 m H N O{sub 3}. The investigation included primarily the extraction chromatography of the individual elements concerned and their elution peaks which were plotted. Group separation of the four elements into two pairs was obtained Am-Eu, and Zn-Cs. A mixture of the four elements was loaded on the column to achieve practically such promising group separations. 5 figs.

  3. Synergistic solvent extraction investigation of Am (III), Eu (III), Zn(II), and Cs(I), using 2-heptyl-2-methyl-nonanoic acid mixed with different organophosphorus compounds from nitrate media. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Naggar, H A; Ramadan, A; Abdel-Fattah, A [Nuclear Chemistry Department, Hot Laboratories Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Extraction studies for investigating the effect of mixing 2-heptyl-2-methyl nonanoic acid (HA) with a number of organophosphorus compounds; namely tributyl phosphate (TBP), terphenyl phosphate oxide (TPPO); tri octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) or bis-2-(ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in benzene on the extraction of trace elements Am(III), Eu(III), Zn(II), and Cs(I) from nitrate media of ionic strength, I=0.1 M were carried out. The effect of adding different organophosphorus compounds to HA was tested to account for the presence or absence of the phenomenon of synergism. It was found that TBP, TPPO, and TOPO causing some antagonistic effects for the elements studied. Extraction enhancement was only observed with bis- (2-ethyl-hexyl) -phosphoric acid (HDEHP) for all the elements investigated. The extraction mechanisms as well as the thermodynamic parameters for the mixed extracted species are discussed. 19 figs.

  4. Extraction chromatography of Am (III), Eu (III), Zn (II), and Cs (I), Using chromo sorb impregnated by 0..01 m 2-heptyl-2-methyl-nonanoic acid in benzene. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-naggar, H.A.; Ramadan, A.; Abdel-Fattah, A.

    1996-01-01

    Extraction chromatography studies were carried out for Am(III), Eu(III), Zn(II), and Cs(I) using long carboxylic acid, 2-heptyl-2-methyl nonanoic acid in benzene as an extractant chromo sorb. This was selected to act as a solid support and it was impregnated with the extractant to obtain the stationary phase. The eluting agent used was 0.1 m H N O 3 . The investigation included primarily the extraction chromatography of the individual elements concerned and their elution peaks which were plotted. Group separation of the four elements into two pairs was obtained Am-Eu, and Zn-Cs. A mixture of the four elements was loaded on the column to achieve practically such promising group separations. 5 figs

  5. Behavioral symptoms of eating disorders in Native Americans: results from the ADD Health Survey Wave III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H; Rosselli, Francine; Holtzman, Niki; Dierker, Lisa; Becker, Anne E; Swaney, Gyda

    2011-09-01

    To examine prevalence and correlates (gender, Body Mass Index) of disordered eating in American Indian/Native American (AI/NA) and white young adults. We examined data from the 10,334 participants (mean age 21.93 years, SD = 1.8) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (ADD Health) Wave III for gender differences among AI/NA participants (236 women, 253 men) and ethnic group differences on measures of eating pathology. Among AI/NA groups, women were significantly more likely than men to report loss of control and embarrassment due to overeating. In gender-stratified analyses, a significantly higher prevalence of AI/NA women reported disordered eating behaviors compared with white women; there were no between group differences in prevalence for breakfast skipping or having been diagnosed with an eating disorder. Among men, disordered eating behaviors were uncommon and no comparison was statistically significant. Our study offers a first glimpse into the problem of eating pathology among AI/NA individuals. Gender differences among AI/NA participants are similar to results reported in white samples. That AI/NA women were as likely as white women to have been diagnosed with an eating disorder is striking in light of well documented under-utilization of mental health care among AI/NA individuals. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. WIMP-nucleon cross-section results from the second science run of ZEPLIN-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimov, D.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Araujo, H.M., E-mail: h.araujo@imperial.ac.uk [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Barnes, E.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Belov, V.A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bewick, A. [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Burenkov, A.A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chepel, V. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); Currie, A. [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); DeViveiros, L. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); Edwards, B. [Particle Physics Department, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom); Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Horn, M.; Jones, W.G. [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Kalmus, G.E. [Particle Physics Department, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom); Kobyakin, A.S.; Kovalenko, A.G. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lebedenko, V.N. [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Lindote, A. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); Particle Physics Department, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom); Lopes, M.I. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); and others

    2012-03-13

    We report experimental upper limits on WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross sections from the second science run of ZEPLIN-III at the Boulby Underground Laboratory. A raw fiducial exposure of 1344 kg Dot-Operator days was accrued over 319 days of continuous operation between June 2010 and May 2011. A total of eight events was observed in the signal acceptance region in the nuclear recoil energy range 7-29 keV, which is compatible with background expectations. This allows the exclusion of the scalar cross-section above 4.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} pb near 50 GeV/c{sup 2} WIMP mass with 90% confidence. Combined with data from the first run, this result improves to 3.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} pb. The corresponding WIMP-neutron spin-dependent cross-section limit is 8.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} pb. The ZEPLIN programme reaches thus its conclusion at Boulby, having deployed and exploited successfully three liquid xenon experiments of increasing reach.

  7. WIMP-nucleon cross-section results from the second science run of ZEPLIN-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, D.Yu.; Araújo, H.M.; Barnes, E.J.; Belov, V.A.; Bewick, A.; Burenkov, A.A.; Chepel, V.; Currie, A.; DeViveiros, L.; Edwards, B.; Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A.; Horn, M.; Jones, W.G.; Kalmus, G.E.; Kobyakin, A.S.; Kovalenko, A.G.; Lebedenko, V.N.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    We report experimental upper limits on WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross sections from the second science run of ZEPLIN-III at the Boulby Underground Laboratory. A raw fiducial exposure of 1344 kg⋅days was accrued over 319 days of continuous operation between June 2010 and May 2011. A total of eight events was observed in the signal acceptance region in the nuclear recoil energy range 7-29 keV, which is compatible with background expectations. This allows the exclusion of the scalar cross-section above 4.8×10 -8 pb near 50 GeV/c 2 WIMP mass with 90% confidence. Combined with data from the first run, this result improves to 3.9×10 -8 pb. The corresponding WIMP-neutron spin-dependent cross-section limit is 8.0×10 -3 pb. The ZEPLIN programme reaches thus its conclusion at Boulby, having deployed and exploited successfully three liquid xenon experiments of increasing reach.

  8. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies supporting the interpretation of the results of TVO I/II PRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive Level 1 probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for the TVO I/II nuclear power units. As a part of the PRA project, uncertainties of risk models and methods were systematically studied in order to describe them and to demonstrate their impact by way of results. The uncertainty study was divided into two phases: a qualitative and a quantitative study. The qualitative study contained identification of uncertainties and qualitative assessments of their importance. The PRA was introduced, and identified assumptions and uncertainties behind the models were documented. The most significant uncertainties were selected by importance measures or other judgements for further quantitative studies. The quantitative study included sensitivity studies and propagation of uncertainty ranges. In the sensitivity studies uncertain assumptions or parameters were varied in order to illustrate the sensitivity of the models. The propagation of the uncertainty ranges demonstrated the impact of the statistical uncertainties of the parameter values. The Monte Carlo method was used as a propagation method. The most significant uncertainties were those involved in modelling human interactions, dependences and common cause failures (CCFs), loss of coolant accident (LOCA) frequencies and pressure suppression. The qualitative mapping out of the uncertainty factors turned out to be useful in planning quantitative studies. It also served as internal review of the assumptions made in the PRA. The sensitivity studies were perhaps the most advantageous part of the quantitative study because they allowed individual analyses of the significance of uncertainty sources identified. The uncertainty study was found reasonable in systematically and critically assessing uncertainties in a risk analysis. The usefulness of this study depends on the decision maker (power company) since uncertainty studies are primarily carried out to support decision making when uncertainties are

  9. Outgassing measurements and results used in designing the Doublet III Neutral Beam Injector System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, R.M.; Harvey, J.

    1979-11-01

    Material vacuum properties played an important part in designing the Neutral Beam Injector System for General Atomic's Doublet III Tokamak. Low operating vacuum tank pressures were desired to keep re-ionization of the Neutral Beam to a minimum. Plasma contamination was also a major concern, hence stringent material impurity constraints were imposed. Outgassing Rate Measurement and Residual Gas Analyses were performed on different types of materials to determine if their vacuum properties were compatible with the Neutral Beam Injector System requirements

  10. Aluminum potassium sulfate and tannic acid sclerotherapy for Goligher Grades II and III hemorrhoids: Results from a multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hidenori; Hada, Takenori; Ishiyama, Gentaro; Ono, Yoshito; Watanabe, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To show that aluminum potassium sulfate and tannic acid (ALTA) sclerotherapy has a high success rate for Grade II and III hemorrhoids. METHODS: This study was based on the clinical data of 604 patients with hemorrhoids who underwent ALTA sclerotherapy between January 2009 and February 2015. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of this treatment for Grades II and III hemorrhoids. Preoperative and postoperative symptoms, complications and success rate were all assessed retrospectively. Follow-up consisted of a simple questionnaire, physical examination and an anoscopy. Patients were followed-up at one day, one week, two weeks, one month, one year, two years, three years, four years and five years after the ALTA sclerotherapy. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-nine patients were diagnosed with Grade II hemorrhoids and 435 patients were diagnosed with Grade III hemorrhoids. The one year, three year and five year cumulative success rates of ALTA sclerotherapy for Grades II and III hemorrhoids were 95.9% and 93.1%; 89.3% and 83.7%; and 89.3% and 78.2%, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the cumulative success rates after ALTA sclerotherapy between Grades II and III hemorrhoids (P = 0.09). There were forty-seven post-operative complications (low grade fever; anal pain; urinary retention; rectal ulcer; and others). No serious or life-threatening complications occurred and all cases improved through conservative treatment. At univariate analysis there were no predictive factors of failure. CONCLUSION: ALTA sclerotherapy has had a high success rate for Grade II and III hemorrhoids during five years of post-operative treatment. However, additional studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this ALTA sclerotherapy in the management of hemorrhoidal disease. PMID:27458504

  11. Hemibody irradiation in stage III multiple myeloma: results of 20 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troussard, X.; Reman, O.; Macro, M.; Leporrier, M.; Roussel, A.

    1988-01-01

    The advanced forms of multiple myeloma of bone, stage III, or those with a large tumoral mass, characterized by a considerable number of myelomacells, pose difficult problems in treatment. Little progress has been made since the introduction of the alkylating agents, and combined chemotherapy does not seem to be any more effective in terms of survival. It is these severe forms that culminate in painful symptoms which are often difficult to eliminate. The radiosensitivity of myeloma led us to treat 20 patients affected by severe forms of the disease by total body irradiation in two stages, and we analyze here the effects of treatment and the tolerance for this technique

  12. Investor Outlook: Focus on Upcoming LCA2 Gene Therapy Phase III Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Investor interest in gene therapy has increased substantially over the past few years, and the next major catalyst for the field is likely to be Spark Therapeutics's phase III trial for the treatment of visual impairment caused by RPE65 gene mutations (often referred to as Leber congenital amaurosis type 2, or LCA2, but may include other retinal disorders). Analysis of the approach from the basic genetics, underlying visual mechanisms, clinical data, and commercialization considerations helps frame investor expectations and the potential implications for the broader field.

  13. Recent results of hadronic decays of J/psi into vector-tensor from MARK III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.J.; Blaylock, G.T.; Bolton, T.; Brown, J.S.

    1987-02-01

    From a data sample of 5.8 x 10 6 J/psi's collected by the MARK III detector at the storage ring SPEAR at SLAC, two-body decay modes of the J/psi into a vector and a tensor meson have been measured. From the studies of the tensor meson, recoiling against the ideally mixed and well understood vector mesons, quark correlations are established and compared with the theoretical expectations of the J/psi decays and the SU(3) predictions. The beginnings of a similar systematic study of the two-body vector scalar decays are also presented

  14. Deletion of the topoisomerase III gene in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus results in slow growth and defects in cell cycle control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiyang; Guo, Li; Deng, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Topoisomerase III (topo III), a type IA topoisomerase, is widespread in hyperthermophilic archaea. In order to interrogate the in vivo role of archaeal topo III, we constructed and characterized a topo III gene deletion mutant of Sulfolobus islandicus. The mutant was viable but grew more slowly...... results suggest that the enzyme may serve roles in chromosomal segregation and control of the level of supercoiling in the cell....

  15. Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer in the oldest old: results beyond clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Anasooya; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Rothenberger, David A; Kwaan, Mary; Weinberg, Armin D; Parsons, Helen M; Gupta, Pankaj; Al-Refaie, Waddah B

    2013-01-15

    Randomized trials demonstrating the benefits of chemotherapy in patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III colon cancer underrepresent persons aged ≥ 75 years. The generalizability of these studies to a growing elderly population remains unknown. Using the California Cancer Registry for 1994 through 2008, the authors conducted a population-based study of postcolectomy patients aged 50 years to 94 years with stage III (N1M0) colon adenocarcinoma. A 2-sided chi-square test and Cochran-Armitage test for trend were used to compare patient and tumor characteristics associated with receipt of chemotherapy across age groups. Multivariate regression was used to assess the association between older age and receipt of chemotherapy. Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to evaluate the association between chemotherapy and mortality, with propensity score adjustment. Approximately 44% (12,382 patients) of the study cohort was aged ≥ 75 years. Persons aged ≥ 75 years were found to be less likely to have received adjuvant chemotherapy than those aged colon cancer in the elderly. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  16. Cierny-Mader Type III chronic osteomyelitis: the results of patients treated with debridement, irrigation, vancomycin beads and systemic antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaduman, Mert

    2007-01-01

    Cierny-Mader (C-M) Type III osteomyelitis is defined as a localised lesion with both medullary and cortical involvement that is stable mechanically after debridement. The treatment of C-M Type III osteomyelitisis is difficult and requires a precise protocol to achieve a disease-free long-term follow-up. We report here the results of our study on 26 patients (19 men and 7 women; average age: 34.7 years) with C-M Type III osteomylelitis who were treated with radical debridement, irrigation, vancomycin-impregnated custom-made beads and culture-specific systemic antibiotics. Those patients with metaphyseal involvement were treated with deroofing of the cortex and debridement by means of a “trough” (16 patients); those with diaphyseal involvement were treated with both intramedullary reaming and debridement from a trough (ten patients). Antibiotic cement rods were used as an additional therapy in five patients with diaphyseal involvement. Recurrence developed in three patients and was attributed to inadequate debridement; all three patients were treated again in the same manner with success. The mean follow-up is currently 3.6 years (range: 2–6 years). All of the patients have normal clinical, radiographic and laboratory parameters, and all are ambulatory and have returned to their pretreatment level of activity or better. We conclude that C-M Type III chronic osteomyelitis can be safely treated with this protocol. PMID:17375299

  17. GLYCOL DEHYDRATOR BTEX AND VOC EMISSIONS TESTING RESULTS AT TWO UNITS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA VOL. I: TECHNICAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of the collection of emissions tests data at two triethylene glycol units to provide data for comparison to GRI-GLYCalc, a computer program developed to estimate emissions from glycol dehydrators. (NOTE: Glycol dehydrators are used in the natural gas indu...

  18. GLYCOL DEHYDRATOR BTEX AND VOC EMISSIONS TESTING RESULTS AT TWO UNITS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA VOL. II: APPENDICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of the collection of emissions test data st two triethylene glycol units to provide data for the comparison to GRI-GLYCalc, a computer program developed to estimate emissions from glycol dehydrators. [NOTE: Glycol dehydrators are used in the natural gas i...

  19. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1971. Vol. III. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    The ultimate goal of controlled nuclear fusion research is to make a new energy source available to mankind, a source that will be virtually unlimited and that gives promise of being environmentally cleaner than the sources currently exploited. This goal has stimulated research in plasma physics over the past two decades, leading to significant advances in the understanding of matter in its most common state as well as to progress in the confinement and heating of plasma. An indication of this progress is that in several countries considerable effort is being devoted to design studies of fusion reactors and to the technological problems that will be encountered in realizing these reactors. This range of research, from plasma physics to fusion reactor engineering, is shown in the present three-volume publication of the Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. The Conference was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency and was held in Madison, Wisconsin, USA from 17 to 23 June 1971. The enthusiastic co-operation of the University of Wisconsin and of the United States Atomic Energy Commission in the organization of the Conference is gratefully acknowledged. The Conference was attended by over 500 scientists from 24 countries and 3 international organizations, and 143 papers were presented. These papers are published here in the original language; English translations of the Russian papers will be published in a Special Supplement to the journal Nuclear Fusion. The series of conferences on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research has become a major international forum for the presentation and discussion of results in this important and challenging field. In addition to sponsoring these conferences, the International Atomic Energy Agency supports controlled nuclear fusion research by publishing the journal Nuclear Fusion, and has recently established an International Fusion Research Council

  20. Coastal Engineering. vol III : Breakwater design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massie, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    General considerations, types of breakwaters, rubble mound breakwaters, wave run-up and overtopping, construction materials, armor computations, te core, filter and toe constructions, rubble mound breakwater construction, optimum design, example, monolithic breakwater, construction materials, wave

  1. Results from the first science run of the ZEPLIN-III dark matter search experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedenko, V. N.; Bewick, A.; Currie, A.; Davidge, D.; Dawson, J.; Horn, M.; Howard, A. S.; Jones, W. G.; Joshi, M.; Liubarsky, I.; Quenby, J. J.; Sumner, T. J.; Thorne, C.; Walker, R. J.; Araujo, H. M.; Edwards, B.; Barnes, E. J.; Ghag, C.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Scovell, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    The ZEPLIN-III experiment in the Palmer Underground Laboratory at Boulby uses a 12 kg two-phase xenon time-projection chamber to search for the weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) that may account for the dark matter of our Galaxy. The detector measures both scintillation and ionization produced by radiation interacting in the liquid to differentiate between the nuclear recoils expected from WIMPs and the electron-recoil background signals down to ∼10 keV nuclear-recoil energy. An analysis of 847 kg·days of data acquired between February 27, 2008, and May 20, 2008, has excluded a WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering spin-independent cross section above 8.1x10 -8 pb at 60 GeVc -2 with a 90% confidence limit. It has also demonstrated that the two-phase xenon technique is capable of better discrimination between electron and nuclear recoils at low-energy than previously achieved by other xenon-based experiments.

  2. Chemistry Characterization of Jet Aircraft Engine Particulate by XPS: Results from APEX III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports XPS analysis of jet exhaust particulate from a B737, Lear, ERJ, and A300 aircraft during the APEX III NASA led field campaign. Carbon hybridization and bonding chemistry are identified by high-resolution scans about the C1s core-shell region. Significant organic content as gauged by the sp3/sp2 ratio is found across engines and platforms. Polar oxygen functional groups include carboxylic, carbonyl and phenol with combined content of 20 percent or more. By lower resolution survey scans various elements including transition metals are identified along with lighter elements such as S, N, and O in the form of oxides. Burning additives within lubricants are probable sources of Na, Ba, Ca, Zn, P and possibly Sn. Elements present and their percentages varied significantly across all engines, not revealing any trend or identifiable cause for the differences, though the origin is likely the same for the same element when observed. This finding suggests that their presence can be used as a tracer for identifying soots from aircraft engines as well as diagnostic for monitoring engine performance and wear.

  3. Sunitinib versus sorafenib in advanced hepatocellular cancer: results of a randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Lin, Deng-Yn; Park, Joong-Won; Kudo, Masatoshi; Qin, Shukui; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; Song, Xiangqun; Xu, Jianming; Poggi, Guido; Omata, Masao; Pitman Lowenthal, Susan; Lanzalone, Silvana; Yang, Liqiang; Lechuga, Maria Jose; Raymond, Eric

    2013-11-10

    Open-label, phase III trial evaluating whether sunitinib was superior or equivalent to sorafenib in hepatocellular cancer. Patients were stratified and randomly assigned to receive sunitinib 37.5 mg once per day or sorafenib 400 mg twice per day. Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Early trial termination occurred for futility and safety reasons. A total of 1,074 patients were randomly assigned to the study (sunitinib arm, n = 530; sorafenib arm, n = 544). For sunitinib and sorafenib, respectively, median OS was 7.9 versus 10.2 months (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30; one-sided P = .9990; two-sided P = .0014); median progression-free survival (PFS; 3.6 v 3.0 months; HR, 1.13; one-sided P = .8785; two-sided P = .2286) and time to progression (TTP; 4.1 v 3.8 months; HR, 1.13; one-sided P = .8312; two-sided P = .3082) were comparable. Median OS was similar among Asian (7.7 v 8.8 months; HR, 1.21; one-sided P = .9829) and hepatitis B-infected patients (7.6 v 8.0 months; HR, 1.10; one-sided P = .8286), but was shorter with sunitinib in hepatitis C-infected patients (9.2 v 17.6 months; HR, 1.52; one-sided P = .9835). Sunitinib was associated with more frequent and severe adverse events (AEs) than sorafenib. Common grade 3/4 AEs were thrombocytopenia (29.7%) and neutropenia (25.7%) for sunitinib; hand-foot syndrome (21.2%) for sorafenib. Discontinuations owing to AEs were similar (sunitinib, 13.3%; sorafenib, 12.7%). OS with sunitinib was not superior or equivalent but was significantly inferior to sorafenib. OS was comparable in Asian and hepatitis B-infected patients. OS was superior in hepatitis C-infected patients who received sorafenib. Sunitinib-treated patients reported more frequent and severe toxicity.

  4. Twenty-seven years of phase III trials for patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer: disappointing results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Oze

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few studies have formally assessed whether treatment outcomes have improved substantially over the years for patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer (ED-SCLC enrolled in phase III trials. The objective of the current investigation was to determine the time trends in outcomes for the patients in those trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched for trials that were reported between January 1981 and August 2008. Phase III randomized controlled trials were eligible if they compared first-line, systemic chemotherapy for ED-SCLC. Data were evaluated by using a linear regression analysis. RESULTS: In total, 52 trials were identified that had been initiated between 1980 and 2006; these studies involved 10,262 patients with 110 chemotherapy arms. The number of randomized patients and the proportion of patients with good performance status (PS increased over time. Cisplatin-based regimens, especially cisplatin and etoposide (PE regimen, have increasingly been studied, whereas cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine-based regimens have been less investigated. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant improvement in survival over the years. Additionally, the use of a PE regimen did not affect survival, whereas the proportion of patients with good PS and the trial design of assigning prophylactic cranial irradiation were significantly associated with favorable outcome. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The survival of patients with ED-SCLC enrolled in phase III trials did not improve significantly over the years, suggesting the need for further development of novel targets, newer agents, and comprehensive patient care.

  5. Experimental results of two stage harmonic generation with picosecond pulses on the Stanford Mark III FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, B.A.; Utah Univ., Salt Lake City; Stanford Univ., CA; Benson, S.V.; Madey, M.J.; Cutolo, A.; Naples Univ.

    1988-01-01

    We report experimental results on upper harmonic conversion using a lithium niobate and a beta barium borate crystal to quadruple the FEL light up into the visible and near infrared. The effects of finite linewidth, birefringent walk-off, and group velocity walk-off on conversion efficiency will be discussed with reference to the experimental results. (orig.)

  6. Experimental results from MK. III GCR physics programme, October-December 1969. Addendum 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddison, R. J.

    1970-06-15

    Measurements have been made in HECTOR of the effect of heating the central region of five cores, three of these being the loop cores and the later two having a larger heated central test region. These measurements have been calibrated by the use of BINAL (boron-aluminium), stainless steel and copper poison tubes. The results of these measurements of temperature coefficient and of poison tube worth are described in sections 2 and 3 respectively.

  7. Polarimetric survey of main-belt asteroids⋆. III. Results for 33 X-type objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañada-Assandri, M.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Benavidez, P.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: We present results of a polarimetric survey of main-belt asteroids at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (Casleo), San Juan, Argentina. The aims of this survey are to increase the database of asteroid polarimetry, to estimate diversity in polarimetric properties of asteroids that belong to different taxonomic classes, and to search for objects that exhibit anomalous polarimetric properties. Methods: The data were obtained with the Torino and CASPROF polarimeters at the 2.15 m telescope. The Torino polarimeter is an instrument that allows the simultaneous measurement of polarization in five different bands, and the CASPROF polarimeter is a two-hole aperture polarimeter with rapid modulation. Results: The survey began in 2003, and up to 2009 data of a sample of more than 170 asteroids were obtained. In this paper the results for 33 X-type objects are presented, several of them are being polarimetrically observed for the first time. Using these data we found polarization curves and polarimetric parameters for different groups among this taxonomic class and that there are objects with very different albedo in the sub-classes of the X taxonomic complex. Based on observations carried out at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/542/A11

  8. Differential population synthesis of early-type galaxies. III. Synthesis results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickles, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Synthesis results are presented for 12 elliptical and five lenticular galaxies which cover nearly a 6 mag range of absolute magnitude in the Fornax cluster (V = 1430 km s -1 ). The results of age, metallicity, and mass-to-light ratio (M/L) determinations are presented differentially as functions of galactic luminosity and morphology. Bright elliptical galaxies are well represented by main-sequence turnoff colors of (V-R)/sub c/roughly-equal0.37 and B-Vroughly-equal0.70, in good agreement with O'Connell's results for bright Virgo ellipticals. The relatively young main-sequence turnoff ages, of 6-10 Gyr for ellipticals of all luminosities, indicate that substantial star formation activity occurred in these galaxies for a period of 6dagger10 Gyr after the epoch of globular cluster formation. There is strong evidence for small amounts of current star formation in at least the brightest ellipticals of all luminosities, indicate that substantial star formation in at least the brightest ellipticals, variation in the amount of which may account for significant dispersion in the cluster U-V versus V color-magnitude relation. A metallicity gradient in [Fe/H] of at least 0.16 dex per absolute magnitude is derived, with the brightest ellipticals being 2 to 3 times more metal-rich than solar. The mean metallicities and turnoff ages of the faintest ellipticals are probably dependent on environment. Distance-independent upper limits to galaxy M/L ratios derived from the syntheses conform well with M/L ratios derived from velocity dispersion measurements and give no evidence for unseen mass in the nuclei of early type galaxies of any luminosity

  9. Superselective intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for stage III/IV squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity: Midterm results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, I.; Korogi, Y.; Ishii, A.; Hirai, T.; Yamura, M.; Nishimura, R.; Baba, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Shinohara, M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We performed superselective intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (SIC) according to a protocol in which drug distribution is evaluated by the use of interventional radiology (IVR)-computed tomography (CT) system, and the chemotherapy is combined with medium-dose conformal radiation therapy (CRT). We analyzed retrospectively the factors that affect the midterm survival ratio, including local response, for stage III and IV squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity. Materials and methods: Forty consecutive patients with stage III and IV squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and who had undergone both SIC and CRT were enrolled. A microcatheter was placed in the appropriate feeding artery of the tumor and cisplatin (50 mg/body) was infused twice. CRT was administered with a dual-energy (4 and 10 MV) linear accelerator. The total and daily doses delivered were 30 and 2.0 Gy, respectively. Histopathologic effects were classified into five grades: grade 0 or 1 was defined as a poor response, and grade II or higher as a good response. Age, sex, stage, local response to treatment, mode of invasion and lymph node metastasis were analyzed, and differences in the midterm survival ratio were assessed. Results: The 3-year survival ratio of the 40 cases was 67%. A good local response (III or IV) was achieved in 75% of the cases. The survival ratio of the good local response group was significantly better than that of the poor response group (p = 0.04). Mode of invasion (p = 0.03) and lymph node metastasis (p = 0.01) were also predictive of survival. In the multivariable analysis of survival, however, no variables including good local response (p = 0.12), were predictive. Conslusion: Our new protocol improved local response, but it did not contribute to the survival ratio

  10. STAR FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES. III. DOES STELLAR FEEDBACK RESULT IN CLOUD DEATH?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Wadsley, James; Pudritz, Ralph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2015-03-01

    Stellar feedback, star formation, and gravitational interactions are major controlling forces in the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). To explore their relative roles, we examine the properties and evolution of GMCs forming in an isolated galactic disk simulation that includes both localized thermal feedback and photoelectric heating. The results are compared with the three previous simulations in this series, which consists of a model with no star formation, star formation but no form of feedback, and star formation with photoelectric heating in a set with steadily increasing physical effects. We find that the addition of localized thermal feedback greatly suppresses star formation but does not destroy the surrounding GMC, giving cloud properties closely resembling the run in which no stellar physics is included. The outflows from the feedback reduce the mass of the cloud but do not destroy it, allowing the cloud to survive its stellar children. This suggests that weak thermal feedback such as the lower bound expected for a supernova may play a relatively minor role in the galactic structure of quiescent Milky-Way-type galaxies, compared to gravitational interactions and disk shear.

  11. Postoperative radiotherapy for stage I/II seminoma: results for 212 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, Glenn S.; Venkatesan, Varagur M.; Ago, C. Tetteh; Radwan, John S.; Dar, A. Rashid; Winquist, Eric W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective review of patients with Stage I and II seminoma treated at a regional cancer center was performed to assess the long term efficacy and toxicity associated with post operative radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1950 and 1995, 212 patients seen at the London Regional Cancer Centre received adjuvant radiotherapy following orchiectomy for Stage I (169) and II (43) seminoma. Median follow-up for the group was 7.5 years. Results: Progression free, cause specific, and overall survival were 95%, 98%, and 95% at 5 years, and 94%, 98%, and 94% at 10 years respectively. An increased risk of failure was noted among patients with bulky Stage II disease. No other prognostic factors for relapse were identified. Late toxicity was uncommon with only 12/212 (6%) developing any late GI toxicity potentially attributable to radiotherapy. The incidence of second malignancies (excluding second testicular tumors) was 6/212 (actuarial:1%, 1%, 6% at 5,10,15 years respectively). There was a trend toward increased acute complications for patients treated with larger volumes of radiation. No prognostic factors associated with increased risk of late toxicity or second malignancy were identified, likely a consequence of the small number of these events. Conclusion: Survival and toxicity were comparable to that reported in the literature. Post-operative radiotherapy remains a safe and efficacious adjuvant treatment for Stage I and early Stage II seminoma

  12. STAR FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES. III. DOES STELLAR FEEDBACK RESULT IN CLOUD DEATH?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Wadsley, James; Pudritz, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Stellar feedback, star formation, and gravitational interactions are major controlling forces in the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). To explore their relative roles, we examine the properties and evolution of GMCs forming in an isolated galactic disk simulation that includes both localized thermal feedback and photoelectric heating. The results are compared with the three previous simulations in this series, which consists of a model with no star formation, star formation but no form of feedback, and star formation with photoelectric heating in a set with steadily increasing physical effects. We find that the addition of localized thermal feedback greatly suppresses star formation but does not destroy the surrounding GMC, giving cloud properties closely resembling the run in which no stellar physics is included. The outflows from the feedback reduce the mass of the cloud but do not destroy it, allowing the cloud to survive its stellar children. This suggests that weak thermal feedback such as the lower bound expected for a supernova may play a relatively minor role in the galactic structure of quiescent Milky-Way-type galaxies, compared to gravitational interactions and disk shear

  13. Preliminary results of phase I/II study of simultaneous modulated accelerated (SMART) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Hong; Lee, Sang Wook; Back, Geum Mun [College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-03-15

    To present preliminary results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Twenty patients who underwent IMRT for non-metastatic NPC at the Asan Medical Center between September 2001 and December 2003 were prospectively evaluated. IMRT was delivered using the 'step and shoot' SMART technique at prescribed doses of 72 Gy (2.4 Gy/day) to the gross tumor volume (GTV), 60 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinical target volume (CTV) and metastatic nodal station, and 46 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinically negative neck region. Eighteen patients also received concurrent chemotherapy using cisplatin once per week. The median follow-up period was 27 months. Nineteen patients completed the treatment without interruption; the remaining patient interrupted treatment for 2 weeks owing to severe pharyngitis and malnutrition. Five patients (25%) had RTOG grade 3 mucositis, whereas nine (45%) had grade 3 pharyngitis. Seven patients (35%) lost more than 10% of their pretreatment weight, whereas 11 (55%) required intravenous fluids and/or tube feeding. There was no grade 3 or 4 chronic xerostomia. All patients showed complete response. Two patients had distant metastases and loco-regional recurrence, respectively. IMRT using the SMART boost technique allows parotid sparing, as shown clinically and by dosimetry, and may also be more effective biologically. A larger population of patients and a longer follow-up period are needed to evaluate ultimate tumor control and late toxicity.

  14. Survival benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy in stage III and IV bladder cancer: results of 170 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayoumi Y

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Bayoumi,1 Tarek Heikal,2 Hossam Darweish2 1Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 2Medical Oncology, Damietta Cancer Institute, Ministry of Health, Damietta, Egypt Background: Radical cystectomy (RC with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancers. However, the locoregional recurrence rate is still significantly higher for locally advanced cases post-RC. The underuse of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT in such cases after RC is related mainly to a lack of proven survival benefit. Here we are reporting our long-term Egyptian experience with bladder cancer patients treated with up-front RC with or without conformal PORT. Patients and methods: This retrospective study included 170 locally advanced bladder cancer (T3–T4, N0/N1, M0 patients who had RC performed with or without PORT at Damietta Cancer Institute during the period of 1998–2006. The treatment outcomes and toxicity profile of PORT were evaluated and compared with those of a non-PORT group of patients. Results: Ninety-two patients received PORT; 78 did not. At median follow-up of 47 months (range, 17–77 months, 33% locoregional recurrences were seen in the PORT group versus 55% in the non-PORT group (P<0.001. The overall distant metastasis rate in the whole group was 39%, with no difference between the two groups. The 5-year disease-free survival for the whole group of patients was 53%±11%, which was significantly affected by additional PORT, and 65%±13% compared with 40%±9% for the non-PORT group (P=0.04. The pathological subtypes did not affect 5-year disease-free survival significantly (P=0.9. The 5-year overall survival was 44%±10%. Using multivariate analysis, PORT, stage, and extravesical extension (positive surgical margins were found to be important prognostic factors for locoregional control. Stage and lymph node status were important prognosticators for distant metastasis

  15. Active Control of Low-Speed Fan Tonal Noise Using Actuators Mounted in Stator Vanes: Part III Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Remington, Paul J.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    A test program to demonstrate simplification of Active Noise Control (ANC) systems relative to standard techniques was performed on the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan from May through September 2001. The target mode was the m = 2 circumferential mode generated by the rotor-stator interaction at 2BPF. Seven radials (combined inlet and exhaust) were present at this condition. Several different error-sensing strategies were implemented. Integration of the error-sensors with passive treatment was investigated. These were: (i) an in-duct linear axial array, (ii) an induct steering array, (iii) a pylon-mounted array, and (iv) a near-field boom array. The effect of incorporating passive treatment was investigated as well as reducing the actuator count. These simplified systems were compared to a fully ANC specified system. Modal data acquired using the Rotating Rake are presented for a range of corrected fan rpm. Simplified control has been demonstrated to be possible but requires a well-known and dominant mode signature. The documented results here in are part III of a three-part series of reports with the same base title. Part I and II document the control system and error-sensing design and implementation.

  16. [Validity of axis III "Conflicts" of Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnostics (OPD-1)--empirical results and conclusions for OPD-2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Gudrun; Mendler, Till; Heuft, Gereon; Burgmer, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Using specific psychometric instruments, we investigate criteria-related validity of axis III ("conflicts") of OPD-1 by a priori formulated hypotheses concerning the relations to the main conflict/mode. A consecutive sample of 105 psychotherapy inpatients was examined using self-assessment scales (Inventory of Interpersonal Problems; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Test of Self-Conscious Affect; Toronto Alexithymia-Scale; Frankfurt Self Concept Scales) and videotaped OPD research interviews in the first week after admission to the hospital. Two OPD-certified raters first rated the interviews independently, then in a consensus rating. Due to the different frequency of the main conflict and mode, evaluation of 4 of 7 conflicts was possible. The a priori hypotheses could be confirmed for the conflicts Dependence versus Autonomy (both modes), Submission versus Control (active mode), Desire for Care versus Autarchy (active mode), and Self-Value (passive mode). Confirmation of the a priori hypotheses indicates validity of axis III (Conflicts) of OPD. We discuss the small numbers of some conflicts, the comparison of expert rating OPD with self-assessment and the meaning of the results for OPD-2.

  17. Preservation of water samples for arsenic(III/V) determinations: An evaluation of the literature and new analytical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Maest, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Published literature on preservation procedures for stabilizing aqueous inorganic As(III/V) redox species contains discrepancies. This study critically evaluates published reports on As redox preservation and explains discrepancies in the literature. Synthetic laboratory preservation experiments and time stability experiments were conducted for natural water samples from several field sites. Any field collection procedure that filters out microorganisms, adds a reagent that prevents dissolved Fe and Mn oxidation and precipitation, and isolates the sample from solar radiation will preserve the As(III/V) ratio. Reagents that prevent Fe and Mn oxidation and precipitation include HCl, H 2SO4, and EDTA, although extremely high concentrations of EDTA are necessary for some water samples high in Fe. Photo-catalyzed Fe(III) reduction causes As(III) oxidation; however, storing the sample in the dark prevents photochemical reactions. Furthermore, the presence of Fe(II) or SO 4 inhibits the oxidation of As(III) by Fe(III) because of complexation reactions and competing reactions with free radicals. Consequently, fast abiotic As(III) oxidation reactions observed in the laboratory are not observed in natural water samples for one or more of the following reasons: (1) the As redox species have already stabilized, (2) most natural waters contain very low dissolved Fe(III) concentrations, (3) the As(III) oxidation caused by Fe(III) photoreduction is inhibited by Fe(II) or SO4.

  18. Preservation of water samples for arsenic(III/V) determinations: an evaluation of the literature and new analytical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCleskey, R.Blaine; Nordstrom, D.Kirk; Maest, Ann S.

    2004-01-01

    Published literature on preservation procedures for stabilizing aqueous inorganic As(III/V) redox species contains discrepancies. This study critically evaluates published reports on As redox preservation and explains discrepancies in the literature. Synthetic laboratory preservation experiments and time stability experiments were conducted for natural water samples from several field sites. Any field collection procedure that filters out microorganisms, adds a reagent that prevents dissolved Fe and Mn oxidation and precipitation, and isolates the sample from solar radiation will preserve the As(III/V) ratio. Reagents that prevent Fe and Mn oxidation and precipitation include HCl, H 2 SO 4 , and EDTA, although extremely high concentrations of EDTA are necessary for some water samples high in Fe. Photo-catalyzed Fe(III) reduction causes As(III) oxidation; however, storing the sample in the dark prevents photochemical reactions. Furthermore, the presence of Fe(II) or SO 4 inhibits the oxidation of As(III) by Fe(III) because of complexation reactions and competing reactions with free radicals. Consequently, fast abiotic As(III) oxidation reactions observed in the laboratory are not observed in natural water samples for one or more of the following reasons: (1) the As redox species have already stabilized, (2) most natural waters contain very low dissolved Fe(III) concentrations, (3) the As(III) oxidation caused by Fe(III) photoreduction is inhibited by Fe(II) or SO 4

  19. OECD/NEA expert group on uncertainty analysis for criticality safety assessment: Results of benchmark on sensitivity calculation (phase III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, T.; Laville, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France); Dyrda, J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Mennerdahl, D. [E Mennerdahl Systems EMS, Starvaegen 12, 18357 Taeby (Sweden); Golovko, Y.; Raskach, K.; Tsiboulia, A. [Inst. for Physics and Power Engineering IPPE, 1, Bondarenko sq., 249033 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Lee, G. S.; Woo, S. W. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety KINS, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Bidaud, A.; Sabouri, P. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie LPSC, CNRS-IN2P3/UJF/INPG, Grenoble (France); Patel, A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Bledsoe, K.; Rearden, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL, M.S. 6170, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Gulliford, J.; Michel-Sendis, F. [OECD/NEA, 12, Bd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    The sensitivities of the k{sub eff} eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods. (authors)

  20. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledano, Alain H.; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair (κ = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis

  1. An original accelerated radiotherapy schedule in stage III to IV head and neck cancers. Results in a multicenter setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Accelerated radiotherapy delivery has recently been shown to be effective in overcoming repopulation during fractionated radiotherapy. The therapeutic ratio may be particularly favorable for 5-week regimens. This study reports the feasibility and results of a particular accelerated schedule in Stage III to IV head and neck carcinomas used in a multicenter setting. Patients and Methods: Seventy-four patients with Stage III (26 patients) or IV (48 patients) head and neck carcinomas were treated with a 5-week accelerated schedule (69.9 to 69.8 Gy in 41 to 40 fractions over a period of 35 to 36 days). Treatment began with 20 Gy in 10 daily fractions to initial involved sites, followed by bi-fractionated radiotherapy (2x1.6 Gy to 1.66 Gy/day) to a larger head and neck volume. Thirty-six (49%) patients received induction chemotherapy (median 3 cycles, range 1 to 4 cycles). Results: Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG) confluent mucositis was observed in 57 patients (77%) and Grade 3 dysphagia in 33 patients (44%). Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG-EORTC) late complications were scored in 10.5% of cases. The 5-year actuarial locoregional control rate was 56% (95% CI: 42 to 71). The 5-year overall actuarial survival was 32% (95% CI: 18 to 46). Induction chemotherapy was not associated with a more favorable outcome. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of this schedule in a multicenter setting. The oncologic results appear similar to those obtained by other accelerated regimens, while the rate of late complications seems acceptable. Five-week accelerated regimens warrant further evaluation, particularly in conjunction with concomitant chemotherapy, in the framework of prospective trials. (orig.) [de

  2. Late Results of Cox Maze III Procedure in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Associated with Structural Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Gustavo Gir; Gali, Wagner Luis; Sarabanda, Alvaro Valentim Lima; Cunha, Claudio Ribeiro da; Kessler, Iruena Moraes; Atik, Fernando Antibas

    2017-07-01

    Cox-Maze III procedure is one of the surgical techniques used in the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). To determine late results of Cox-Maze III in terms of maintenance of sinus rhythm, and mortality and stroke rates. Between January 2006 and January 2013, 93 patients were submitted to the cut-and-sew Cox-Maze III procedure in combination with structural heart disease repair. Heart rhythm was determined by 24-hour Holter monitoring. Procedural success rates were determined by longitudinal methods and recurrence predictors by multivariate Cox regression models. Thirteen patients that obtained hospital discharge alive were excluded due to lost follow-up. The remaining 80 patients were aged 49.9 ± 12 years and 47 (58.7%) of them were female. Involvement of mitral valve and rheumatic heart disease were found in 67 (83.7%) and 63 (78.7%) patients, respectively. Seventy patients (87.5%) had persistent or long-standing persistent AF. Mean follow-up with Holter monitoring was 27.5 months. There were no hospital deaths. Sinus rhythm maintenance rates were 88%, 85.1% and 80.6% at 6 months, 24 months and 36 months, respectively. Predictors of late recurrence of AF were female gender (HR 3.52; 95% CI 1.21-10.25; p = 0.02), coronary artery disease (HR 4.73 95% CI 1.37-16.36; p = 0.01) and greater left atrium diameter (HR 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.09; p = 0.02). Actuarial survival was 98.5% at 12, 24 and 48 months and actuarial freedom from stroke was 100%, 100% and 97.5% in the same time frames. The Cox-Maze III procedure, in our experience, is efficacious for sinus rhythm maintenance, with very low late mortality and stroke rates. A operação de Cox-Maze III é uma das variantes técnicas no tratamento cirúrgico da fibrilação atrial (FA). Estudar os resultados tardios da operação de Cox-Maze III, quanto à eficácia na manutenção de ritmo sinusal e taxas de mortalidade e acidente vascular cerebral (AVC). Entre janeiro de 2006 a janeiro de 2013, 93 pacientes

  3. Hysteroscopic Essure Inserts for Permanent Contraception: Extended Follow-Up Results of a Phase III Multicenter International Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnoff, Scott G; Nichols, John E; Levie, Mark

    2015-01-01

    To describe safety, tolerability, and effectiveness results through 5 years of follow-up of a Phase III trial with Essure inserts. Multicenter, nonrandomized, single-arm international study (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). Thirteen clinical study centers in the United States, Europe, and Australia. A total of 518 previously fertile women seeking permanent contraception. The objective of the hysteroscopic sterilization procedure was bilateral Essure insert placement (ESS205 model) and tubal occlusion. Women with satisfactory device location and tube occlusion (based on modified hysterosalpingography [HSG]) were instructed to discontinue alternative contraception and to rely on Essure inserts for permanent contraception. The primary endpoint for the Phase III study was the rate of pregnancies occurring during the first year of relying (i.e., HSG-confirmed occlusion) on the Essure inserts for permanent contraception (i.e., 12 months after HSG). For the full 5 years of follow-up (5 years total of relying on the Essure inserts for contraception), the endpoints of interest were safety, prevention of pregnancy, and satisfaction. No pregnancies were reported among women relying on the Essure inserts who completed the full 5 years of follow-up. As of December 5, 2007, 449 women with successful bilateral placement relying on the Essure inserts contributed a total 24 942 woman-months of follow-up for assessing effectiveness. Overall, the Essure inserts were generally well tolerated, with participant comfort rated as "good" to "excellent" by 99% of women (382 of 385) after 5 years of use. Similarly, overall satisfaction was rated as "somewhat" to "very satisfied" by 98% of women (376 of 384) after 5 years of use. The majority of adverse events reported during the 5 years of follow-up were rated as either "mild" or "moderate" in severity. Three severe events (abdominal pain with very heavy periods and irregular menstrual bleeding) were reported in 2 subjects during

  4. The Division III Financial Aid Reporting Process: Findings and Review Results, 2005-06 through 2008-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Collegiate Athletic Association (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This report marks the completion of the 2008-09 reporting cycle and the fourth year of the Division III Financial Aid Reporting Program. The report examines findings for all reporting institutions from each of the four reporting cycles, and details the outcomes of the Division III Financial Aid Committee's 2008-09 review process. Four calculations…

  5. Stage III nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: Improving results with endoscopic-assisted midfacial degloving and modification to the Fisch staging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Saurin R; Keshri, Amit; Patadia, Simple; Sahu, Rabi Narayan; Srivastava, Arun Kumar; Behari, Sanjay

    2015-10-01

    To study outcomes with endoscopic-assisted midfacial degloving for Fisch stage III nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and propose a new staging system. Retrospective study of patients with Fisch stage III juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) including preoperative angiography, intraoperative blood loss and residue/recurrence following surgery. Tertiary care superspecialty referral center. Fifteen consecutive patients with Fisch stage III JNA undergoing operations over a period of 18 months. Preoperative angiography details, intraoperative blood loss, residue/recurrence, complications of surgery. Transarterial embolization with particulate agents followed by endoscopic-assisted midfacial degloving provides excellent outcomes with Fisch stage III JNAs. The modified Fisch staging system proposed would allow better preoperative evaluation and comparison of outcomes with different treatment options for stage III JNAs. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An original accelerated radiotherapy schedule in stage III to IV head and neck cancers. Results in a multicenter setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allal, A.S. [Geneva Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Div. of Radiation Oncology; Monney, M.; Rosset, A.; Ozsahin, M. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Radiographie; Guillemin, C. [Cantonal Radiotherapy Department Sion (Switzerland)

    2000-01-01

    Background: Accelerated radiotherapy delivery has recently been shown to be effective in overcoming repopulation during fractionated radiotherapy. The therapeutic ratio may be particularly favorable for 5-week regimens. This study reports the feasibility and results of a particular accelerated schedule in Stage III to IV head and neck carcinomas used in a multicenter setting. Patients and Methods: Seventy-four patients with Stage III (26 patients) or IV (48 patients) head and neck carcinomas were treated with a 5-week accelerated schedule (69.9 to 69.8 Gy in 41 to 40 fractions over a period of 35 to 36 days). Treatment began with 20 Gy in 10 daily fractions to initial involved sites, followed by bi-fractionated radiotherapy (2x1.6 Gy to 1.66 Gy/day) to a larger head and neck volume. Thirty-six (49%) patients received induction chemotherapy (median 3 cycles, range 1 to 4 cycles). Results: Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG) confluent mucositis was observed in 57 patients (77%) and Grade 3 dysphagia in 33 patients (44%). Grade 3 or 4 (RTOG-EORTC) late complications were scored in 10.5% of cases. The 5-year actuarial locoregional control rate was 56% (95% CI: 42 to 71). The 5-year overall actuarial survival was 32% (95% CI: 18 to 46). Induction chemotherapy was not associated with a more favorable outcome. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of this schedule in a multicenter setting. The oncologic results appear similar to those obtained by other accelerated regimens, while the rate of late complications seems acceptable. Five-week accelerated regimens warrant further evaluation, particularly in conjunction with concomitant chemotherapy, in the framework of prospective trials. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Wirksamkeit der akzelerierten Bestrahlung in bezug auf die Bewaeltigung der Tumorzellrepopulation waehrend einer Radiotherapie ist vor kurzem nachgewiesen worden. Das Verhaeltnis zwischen therapeutischem Effekt und Toxizitaet duerfte fuer fuenfwoechige Schemen

  7. Liquid plugs bouncing against a solid basis, comparison of SIMMER-III and PLEXUS results; Zum Aufprall von Fluessigkeitssaeulen auf starre Hindernisse Vergleich von SIMMER-III und PLEXUS Ergebnissen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maschek, W.; Arnecke, G.; Flad, M.

    1995-08-01

    The SIMMER III code is being tested by application to problems of reactor accidents. The fluid dynamics/thermohydraulics part of the code can be applied also to evaporation/condensation, melt, and freezing phenomena. For a liquid plug bouncing against a solid basis, the momentum transfer is calculated. PLEXUS results turn out to be in significant disagreement with the SIMMER calculations. (orig.)

  8. EUROASPIRE (European Action on Secondary Prevention through Intervention to Reduce Events) III--a comparison of Irish and European results.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, M T

    2009-04-01

    The EUROASPIRE III audit was a Europe-wide study which took place in 2006\\/2007. The objective was to examine the control of risk factors in subjects with established cardiovascular disease. Here, we compare the Irish results to those of the other 21 European countries which participated. Control of blood cholesterol was significantly better in Irish participants, with 73% below the target of 4.5 mmol\\/l. Blood pressure control was less satisfactory in both Irish and European individuals, with an average of 52% of Irish participants not achieving blood pressure targets. Medication usage was high throughout, particularly anti-platelet agents, beta-blockers and, especially in Ireland, statins. Obesity figures were particularly high in Ireland and throughout Europe, with 82% Irish men and women either overweight or obese. Smoking figures in Irish women were also of concern, with 24% continuing to smoke. Cardiac rehabilitation attendance was particularly high in Ireland, with 68% attending; substantially higher than the European figure of 34%. In common with the rest of Europe, current control of body weight and blood pressure in Ireland is unsatisfactory and in need of increased consideration on the part of both patients and healthcare professionals.

  9. Myocardial perfusion imaging with Technetium-99m Sestamibi and Thallium-201. Results of the phase III clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giering, L.; Haber, S.; Joseph, J.L.; Neacy, W.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Technetium-99m-Sestamibi (MIBI) has been compared to 201 TI and coronary angiography in a large Phase III clinical trial to assess diagnostic accuracy. Exercise and rest planar (P) and SPECT (S) MIBI, and exercise and redistribution thallium-201 studies were performed in 150 healthy volunteers and 396 patients (379 males; mean age 51.3 years). Prior myocardial infarction was present in 50% of the patients. Sensitivity and specificity for angiographically defined cardiovascular diseases - CAD (>70% stenosis) for planar imaging was 90.3% and 81.3% for MIBI and 91.6% and 50.0% for 201 TI. Agreement was 88.7% MIBI and 84.0% for 201 TI. For SPECT imaging, sensitivity and specificity were 95.1% and 46.0% for MIBI and 92.3% and 39.7% for 201 TI. Agreement was 80.0% for MIBI and 76.1% for 201 TI. Tomographic normality rates were 91.4% and 92.9% for MIBI and 201 TI. Agreement for characterisation of defect type by MIBI and 201 TI SPECT was 82.5%. In females, sensitivity was comparable for both agents. Specificity of MIBI planar and SPECT imaging was higher then for 201 TI (P: 90.9% v. 66.7%; S: 76.2% v. 61.9%). The improved imaging characteristics of MIBI results in better diagnostic confidence when interpreting myocardial perfusion studies especially in women and obese patients

  10. Treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Wang Mei; Feng Qinfu; Liang Jun; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Lv Jima; Yin Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Between Jan. 2000 and Dec. 2005, fifty-eight such patients were enrolled into the database analysis, including 37 with clinical stage I and 21 with stage II disease. Fifty patients received radiotherapy alone and eight with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Forty- three patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and 15 with conventional radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 85%, 54% and 30%, and the median survival time was 26.2 months for the whole group. The corresponding figures were 88%, 60%, 36% and 30.8 months for cancer-specific survival; 84%, 64%, 31% and 30.8 months for Stage I disease; 81%, 47%, 28% and 18.8 months for Stage II disease; 95%, 57%, 33% and 30.8 months for 3D-CRT group and 53%, 44%, 24% and 15.3 months for conventional radiotherapy group. By logrank test, tumor volume, pneumonitis of Grade II or higher and weight loss more than 5% showed statistically significant impact on overall survival. Tumor volume was the only independent prognostic factor in Cox multivariable regression. Pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade II or higher were 16% and 2%, respectively. Age and lung function before treatment had a significant relationship with pneumonitis. Failure included the local recurrence (33%) and distant metastasis (21%). There was no difference between the treatment modalities and failure sites. Conclusions: For medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients, tumor volume is the most important prognostic factor for overall survival. The conformal radiotherapy marginally improves the survival. The age and pulmonary function are related to the incidence of treatment induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  11. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of HDR brachytherapy alone for T1/T2 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazer, David E.; Berle, Lisa; Graham, Roger; Chung, Maureen; Rothschild, Janice; Graves, Theresa; Cady, Blake; Ulin, Kenneth; Ruthazer, Robin; DiPetrillo, Thomas A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, toxicity, cosmetic outcome, and local control of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone without whole breast external beam irradiation for early-stage breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and August 1999, 32 women diagnosed with a total of 33 AJCC Stage I/II breast carcinomas underwent surgical breast excision and postoperative irradiation using HDR brachytherapy interstitial implantation as part of a multi-institutional clinical Phase I/II protocol. Eligible patients included those with T1, T2, N0, N1 (≤3 nodes positive), and M0 tumors of nonlobular histologic features with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular lymph node extension, and a negative postexcision mammogram. Brachytherapy catheters were placed at the initial excision, reexcision, or either sentinel or full-axillary sampling. Direct visualization, surgical clips, and ultrasound and/or CT scan assisted in the delineation of the target volume, defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. High-activity 192 Ir (3-10 Ci) was used to deliver 340 cGy/fraction, 2 fractions/d, for 5 consecutive days, to a total dose of 34 Gy to the target volume. Source position and dwell times were calculated using standard volume optimization techniques. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 33 months, and the mean patient age was 63 years. The mean tumor size was 1.3 cm, and 55% had an extensive intraductal component. Three patients had positive axillary nodes. Two patients experienced moderate perioperative pain that required narcotic analgesics. No peri- or postoperative infections occurred. No wound healing problems and no significant skin reactions related to the implant developed. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring scheme was applied to the entire 33-case cohort. In the assessment of the skin, 30 cases were Grade 0-1 and 3 cases were Grade 2. Subcutaneous toxicity was scored as 11 patients with

  12. Tolerance and Acceptance Results of a Palladium-103 Permanent Breast Seed Implant Phase I/II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Rakovitch, Eileen; Keller, Brian M.; Sankreacha, Raxa; Chartier, Carole

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To test, in a prospective Phase I/II trial, a partial breast irradiation technique using a 103 Pd permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) realized in a single 1-h procedure under sedation and local freezing. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had infiltrating ductal carcinoma ≤3 cm in diameter, surgical margin ≥2 mm, no extensive intraductal component, no lymphovascular invasion, and negative lymph nodes. Patients received a permanent seed implant, and a minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the clinical target volume, with a margin of 1.5 cm. Results: From May 2004 to April 2007, 67 patients received the PBSI treatment. The procedure was well tolerated, with 17% of patients having significant pain after the procedure. Only 1 patient (1.5%) had an acute skin reaction (Grade 3 according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria). The rates of acute moist desquamation, erythema, and indurations were 10.4%, 42%, and 27%, respectively. At 1 year the rate of Grade 1 telangiectasia was 14%. The rate of skin reaction decreased from 65% to 28% when skin received less than the 85% isodose. According to a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group questionnaire, 80-90% of patients were very satisfied with their treatment, and the remainder were satisfied. One patient (1.5%) developed an abscess, which resolved after the use of antibiotics. There was no recurrence after a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 11-49 months). Conclusions: The feasibility, safety, and tolerability of PBSI compares favorably with that of external beam and other partial breast irradiation techniques.

  13. Everolimus for Previously Treated Advanced Gastric Cancer: Results of the Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase III GRANITE-1 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Bai, Yu-Xian; Bang, Yung-Jue; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; Pan, Hong-Ming; Sahmoud, Tarek; Shen, Lin; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Chin, Keisho; Muro, Kei; Kim, Yeul Hong; Ferry, David; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Smith, Heind; Costantini, Chiara; Rizvi, Syed; Lebwohl, David; Van Cutsem, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The oral mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus demonstrated promising efficacy in a phase II study of pretreated advanced gastric cancer. This international, double-blind, phase III study compared everolimus efficacy and safety with that of best supportive care (BSC) in previously treated advanced gastric cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced gastric cancer that progressed after one or two lines of systemic chemotherapy were randomly assigned to everolimus 10 mg/d (assignment schedule: 2:1) or matching placebo, both given with BSC. Randomization was stratified by previous chemotherapy lines (one v two) and region (Asia v rest of the world [ROW]). Treatment continued until disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate, and safety. Results Six hundred fifty-six patients (median age, 62.0 years; 73.6% male) were enrolled. Median OS was 5.4 months with everolimus and 4.3 months with placebo (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.08; P = .124). Median PFS was 1.7 months and 1.4 months in the everolimus and placebo arms, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.78). Common grade 3/4 adverse events included anemia, decreased appetite, and fatigue. The safety profile was similar in patients enrolled in Asia versus ROW. Conclusion Compared with BSC, everolimus did not significantly improve overall survival for advanced gastric cancer that progressed after one or two lines of previous systemic chemotherapy. The safety profile observed for everolimus was consistent with that observed for everolimus in other cancers. PMID:24043745

  14. Bitopertin in Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia-Results From the Phase III FlashLyte and DayLyte Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugarski-Kirola, Dragana; Blaettler, Thomas; Arango, Celso; Fleischhacker, Wolfgang W; Garibaldi, George; Wang, Alice; Dixon, Mark; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Nasrallah, Henry; Lawrie, Stephen; Napieralski, Julie; Ochi-Lohmann, Tania; Reid, Carol; Marder, Stephen R

    2017-07-01

    There is currently no standard of care for treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia, although some previous results with glutamatergic agonists have been promising. Three (SunLyte [WN25308], DayLyte [WN25309], and FlashLyte [NN25310]) phase III, multicenter, randomized, 24-week, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled studies evaluated the efficacy and safety of adjunctive bitopertin in stable patients with persistent predominant negative symptoms of schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics. SunLyte met the prespecified criteria for lack of efficacy and was declared futile. Key inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of schizophrenia, score ≥40 on the sum of the 14 Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative symptoms and disorganized thought factors, unaltered antipsychotic treatment, and clinical stability. Following a 4-week prospective stabilization period, patients were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to bitopertin (5 mg and 10 mg [DayLyte] and 10 mg and 20 mg [FlashLyte]) or placebo once daily for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was mean change from baseline in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative symptom factor score at week 24. The intent-to-treat population in DayLyte and FlashLyte included 605 and 594 patients, respectively. At week 24, mean change from baseline showed improvement in all treatment arms but no statistically significant separation from placebo in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative symptom factor score and all other end points. Bitopertin was well tolerated. These studies provide no evidence for superior efficacy of adjunctive bitopertin in any of the doses tested over placebo in patients with persistent predominant negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Evaluation of Angiopoietin-2 as a biomarker in gastric cancer: results from the randomised phase III AVAGAST trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Ulrich T; Escalona-Espinosa, Laura; Consalvo, Nicola; Goede, Valentin; Schiffmann, Lars; Scherer, Stefan J; Hedge, Priti; Van Cutsem, Eric; Coutelle, Oliver; Büning, Hildegard

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the phase III AVAGAST trial, the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy improved progression-free survival (PFS) but not overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced gastric cancer. We studied the role of Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), a key driver of tumour angiogenesis, metastasis and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment, as a biomarker. Methods: Previously untreated, advanced gastric cancer patients were randomly assigned to receive bevacizumab (n=387) or placebo (n=387) in combination with chemotherapy. Plasma collected at baseline and at progression was analysed by ELISA. The role of Ang-2 as a prognostic and a predictive biomarker of bevacizumab efficacy was studied using a Cox proportional hazards model. Logistic regression analysis was applied for correlations with metastasis. Results: Median baseline plasma Ang-2 levels were lower in Asian (2143 pg ml−1) vs non-Asian patients (3193 pg ml−1), P<0.0001. Baseline plasma Ang-2 was identified as an independent prognostic marker for OS but did not predict bevacizumab efficacy alone or in combination with baseline VEGF. Baseline plasma Ang-2 correlated with the frequency of liver metastasis (LM) at any time: Odds ratio per 1000 pg ml−1 increase: 1.19; 95% CI 1.10–1.29; P<0.0001 (non-Asians) and 1.37; 95% CI 1.13–1.64; P=0.0010 (Asians). Conclusions: Baseline plasma Ang-2 is a novel prognostic biomarker for OS in advanced gastric cancer strongly associated with LM. Differences in Ang-2 mediated vascular response may, in part, account for outcome differences between Asian and non-Asian patients; however, data have to be further validated. Ang-2 is a promising drug target in gastric cancer. PMID:27031850

  16. AET III 100 kWp photovoltaic installation in Riazzino - Results of monitoring; Monitoraggio dell'impianto PV da 100 kWp AET III a Riazzino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezzonico, S.; Bura, E.

    2005-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a monitoring project that monitored the performance of the 100 kWp, grid-connected photovoltaic installation in Riazzino in southern Switzerland. The original installation, dating from 1992, was refurbished with three new inverters and new cabling. The results of a three-year monitoring project are presented and discussed. Figures are presented on the plant's power production, which illustrate the improved performance of the new inverters. Further investigations made on the power ratings of the modules and the results of infrared examination are discussed.

  17. THE MIDDLE TO UPPER PALEOLITHIC SEQUENCE OF BURAN-KAYA III (CRIMEA, UKRAINE) : NEW STRATIGRAPHIC, PALEOENVIRONMENTAL, AND CHRONOLOGICAL RESULTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pean, Stephane; Puaud, Simon; Crepin, Laurent; Prat, Sandrine; Quiles, Anita; van der Plicht, Johannes; Valladas, Helene; Stuart, Anthony J.; Drucker, Dorothee G.; Patou-Mathis, Marylene; Lanoe, Francois; Yanevich, Aleksandr; Hatté, C.; Jull, A.J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Buran-Kaya III is a rockshelter located in Crimea (Ukraine). It provides an exceptional stratigraphic sequence extending from the Middle Paleolithic to the Neolithic. Nine Paleolithic layers have been attributed to the Streletskaya or eastern Szeletian, Micoquian, Aurignacian, Gravettian, and

  18. Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia - Vol 3, No 2 (1989)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia - Vol 3, No 2 (1989) ... Synthesis and characterization of gold (III) halide complexes of some pyridine ... Molluscicidal activities of some alkaloids · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  19. Continued Benefit to Rectal Separation for Prostate Radiation Therapy: Final Results of a Phase III Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: Daniel.Hamstra@gmail.com [Texas Oncology, Texas Center for Proton Therapy, Irving, Texas (United States); Mariados, Neil [Associated Medical Professionals of NY, PLLC, Syracuse, New York (United States); Sylvester, John [21st Century Oncology, Inc, Lakewood Ranch, East Bradenton, Florida (United States); Shah, Dhiren [Western New York Urology Associates, LLC, Doing Business as Cancer Care of WNY, Cheektowaga, New York (United States); Karsh, Lawrence [The Urology Center of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Hudes, Richard [Chesapeake Urology Associates, Doing Business as Chesapeake Urology Research Associates (The Prostate Center), Owings Mills, Maryland (United States); Beyer, David [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Kurtzman, Steven [Urological Surgeons of Northern California Inc, Campbell, California (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey [The Research Foundation of State University of New York/State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York (United States); Hsi, R. Alex [Peninsula Cancer Center, Poulsbo, Washington (United States); Kos, Michael [Urology Nevada, Reno, Nevada (United States); Ellis, Rodney [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Logsdon, Mark [Sutter Health Sacramento Sierra Region, Doing Business as Sutter Institute for Medical Research, Sacramento, California (United States); Zimberg, Shawn [Advanced Radiation Centers of New York, Lake Success, New York (United States); Forsythe, Kevin [Oregon Urology Institute, Springfield, Oregon (United States); Zhang, Hong [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Soffen, Edward [CentraState Medical Center, Freehold, New Jersey (United States); Francke, Patrick [Carolina Regional Cancer Center, LLC, 21st Century Oncology, Inc, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina (United States); Mantz, Constantine [21st Century Oncology, Inc, Fort Meyers, Florida (United States); and others

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: SpaceOAR, a Food and Drug Administration–approved hydrogel intended to create a rectal–prostate space, was evaluated in a single-blind phase III trial of image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy. A total of 222 men were randomized 2:1 to the spacer or control group and received 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to the prostate with or without the seminal vesicles. The present study reports the final results with a median follow-up period of 3 years. Methods and Materials: Cumulative (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0) toxicity was evaluated using the log-rank test. Quality of life (QOL) was examined using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the mean changes from baseline in the EPIC domains were tested using repeated measures models. The proportions of men with minimally important differences (MIDs) in each domain were tested using repeated measures logistic models with prespecified thresholds. Results: The 3-year incidence of grade ≥1 (9.2% vs 2.0%; P=.028) and grade ≥2 (5.7% vs 0%; P=.012) rectal toxicity favored the spacer arm. Grade ≥1 urinary incontinence was also lower in the spacer arm (15% vs 4%; P=.046), with no difference in grade ≥2 urinary toxicity (7% vs 7%; P=0.7). From 6 months onward, bowel QOL consistently favored the spacer group (P=.002), with the difference at 3 years (5.8 points; P<.05) meeting the threshold for a MID. The control group had a 3.9-point greater decline in urinary QOL compared with the spacer group at 3 years (P<.05), but the difference did not meet the MID threshold. At 3 years, more men in the control group than in the spacer group had experienced a MID decline in bowel QOL (41% vs 14%; P=.002) and urinary QOL (30% vs 17%; P=.04). Furthermore, the control group were also more likely to have experienced large declines (twice the MID) in bowel QOL (21% vs 5%; P=.02) and urinary QOL (23% vs 8%; P=.02). Conclusions: The benefit of a hydrogel spacer in

  20. Hypofractionated intensity modulated irradiation for localized prostate cancer, results from a phase I/II feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junius, Sara; Haustermans, Karin; Bussels, Barbara; Oyen, Raymond; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Depuydt, Tom; Verstraete, Jan; Joniau, Steven; Van Poppel, Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    To assess acute (primary endpoint) and late toxicity, quality of life (QOL), biochemical or clinical failure (secondary endpoints) of a hypofractionated IMRT schedule for prostate cancer (PC). 38 men with localized PC received 66 Gy (2.64 Gy) to prostate,2 Gy to seminal vesicles (50 Gy total) using IMRT. Acute toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy (RT), at 1–3 months afterwards using RTOG acute scoring system. Late side effects were scored at 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 36 months after RT using RTOG/EORTC criteria. Quality of life was assessed by EORTC-C30 questionnaire and PR25 prostate module. Biochemical failure was defined using ASTRO consensus and nadir+2 definition, clinical failure as local, regional or distant relapse. None experienced grade III-IV toxicity. 10% had no acute genito-urinary (GU) toxicity, 63% grade I; 26% grade II. Maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) scores 0, I, II were 37%, 47% and 16%. Maximal acute toxicity was reached weeks 4–5 and resolved within 4 weeks after RT in 82%. Grade II rectal bleeding needing coagulation had a peak incidence of 18% at 16 months after RT but is 0% at 24–36 months. One developed a urethral stricture at 2 years (grade II late GU toxicity) successfully dilated until now. QOL urinary symptom scores reached a peak incidence 1 month after RT but normalized 6 months later. Bowel symptom scores before, at 1–6 months showed similar values but rose slowly 2–3 years after RT. Nadir of sexual symptom scores was reached 1–6 months after RT but improved 2–3 years later as well as physical, cognitive and role functional scales. Emotional, social functional scales were lowest before RT when diagnosis was given but improved later. Two years after RT global health status normalized. This hypofractionated IMRT schedule for PC using 25 fractions of 2.64 Gy did not result in severe acute side effects. Until now late urethral, rectal toxicities seemed acceptable as well as failure rates. Detailed analysis of

  1. Continued Benefit to Rectal Separation for Prostate Radiation Therapy: Final Results of a Phase III Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamstra, Daniel A.; Mariados, Neil; Sylvester, John; Shah, Dhiren; Karsh, Lawrence; Hudes, Richard; Beyer, David; Kurtzman, Steven; Bogart, Jeffrey; Hsi, R. Alex; Kos, Michael; Ellis, Rodney; Logsdon, Mark; Zimberg, Shawn; Forsythe, Kevin; Zhang, Hong; Soffen, Edward; Francke, Patrick; Mantz, Constantine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: SpaceOAR, a Food and Drug Administration–approved hydrogel intended to create a rectal–prostate space, was evaluated in a single-blind phase III trial of image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy. A total of 222 men were randomized 2:1 to the spacer or control group and received 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to the prostate with or without the seminal vesicles. The present study reports the final results with a median follow-up period of 3 years. Methods and Materials: Cumulative (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0) toxicity was evaluated using the log-rank test. Quality of life (QOL) was examined using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the mean changes from baseline in the EPIC domains were tested using repeated measures models. The proportions of men with minimally important differences (MIDs) in each domain were tested using repeated measures logistic models with prespecified thresholds. Results: The 3-year incidence of grade ≥1 (9.2% vs 2.0%; P=.028) and grade ≥2 (5.7% vs 0%; P=.012) rectal toxicity favored the spacer arm. Grade ≥1 urinary incontinence was also lower in the spacer arm (15% vs 4%; P=.046), with no difference in grade ≥2 urinary toxicity (7% vs 7%; P=0.7). From 6 months onward, bowel QOL consistently favored the spacer group (P=.002), with the difference at 3 years (5.8 points; P<.05) meeting the threshold for a MID. The control group had a 3.9-point greater decline in urinary QOL compared with the spacer group at 3 years (P<.05), but the difference did not meet the MID threshold. At 3 years, more men in the control group than in the spacer group had experienced a MID decline in bowel QOL (41% vs 14%; P=.002) and urinary QOL (30% vs 17%; P=.04). Furthermore, the control group were also more likely to have experienced large declines (twice the MID) in bowel QOL (21% vs 5%; P=.02) and urinary QOL (23% vs 8%; P=.02). Conclusions: The benefit of a hydrogel spacer in

  2. PARDISEKO III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, H.; Sack, C.

    1975-05-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the latest version of the PARDISEKO code, PARDISEKO III, with particular emphasis on the numerical and programming methods employed. The physical model and its relation to nuclear safety as well as a description and the results of confirming experiments are treated in detail in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre report KFK-1989. (orig.) [de

  3. Maintenance of class III trifurcated molars versus implant placement in regenerated extraction sockets: long-term results of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafiropoulos, Gregory-George K; di Prisco, Manuela Occipite; Deli, Giorgio; Hoffmann, Oliver

    2011-03-01

    Studies to date have reached differing conclusions regarding the long-term prognosis of teeth with class III furcation involvement. Replacement of such teeth with implants could be an alternative. This report compares the treatment outcomes of 2 cases with similar disease progression: 1 treated by implant therapy and 1 maintained with nonsurgical periodontal treatment. Two patients with advanced chronic periodontitis and class III furcation involvement of all molars were treated. Case 1 received a conservative periodontal and antibiotic treatment, followed by 15 years of maintenance. In case 2, the molars were extracted and replaced with implants, and the implants were observed for 7 years. Clinical attachment level (CAL), probing attachment level (PAL), bleeding on probing, plaque index, and periodontal pathogens were recorded. Despite good compliance of case 1, periodontal pathogens were not eliminated and tissue destruction was not halted. The PAL outcomes of case 2 improved over time; mean PAL loss reached 0.35 mm/y in the first 3 years and then decreased to 0.01 mm/y. While CAL outcomes did not change in case 2, case 1 showed increased CAL loss after 8 years. Based on the limited findings of this case report, extraction of molars with class III furcation involvement and subsequent implant placement may render a better predictability of treatment outcomes than nonsurgical periodontal therapy in the cases of infection with periodontal pathogens.

  4. The Feasibility of Administering a Practical Clinical Examination in Podiatry at a College of Podiatric Medicine: Results of a Field Trial Under Simulated Part III Test Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Valletta, Michael

    1978-01-01

    The results of a practical clinical examination in podiatric medicine administered to fourth-year students are presented. The examination could become the prototype of a Part III practical clinical examination under the auspices of the National Board of Podiatry Examiners. Its feasibility is established and problems and issues are discussed.…

  5. Vol 41 No 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    3 Centre for Primary Care Research. Medical Journal of Zambia, Vol. 41, No. 2: 59 - 64 (2014) ... pollutants by inhaling second-hand tobacco smoke are at risk of adverse health ..... To put the measured PM levels into perspective, a. 2.5. 5.

  6. Comparative study on the treatment of Rockwood type III acute acromioclavicular dislocation: Clinical results from the TightRope® technique vs. K-wire fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, K; Garving, C; Thometzki, T; Lichte, P; Knobe, M; Dienstknecht, T; Hofman, M; Pape, H-C

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to address the inconsistency regarding the operative treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint separation. We compared results after single- and double TightRope ® reduction with results after acromioclavicular transfixation via K-wires only and additional ligament augmentation in acute acromioclavicular (AC) joint separations graded Rockwood type III, and hypothesized that the TightRope ® technique leads to better clinical and radiological results. We conducted a retrospective clinical cohort study and included 42 consecutive patients (mean age 43 years [24-66]) diagnosed and operatively treated between 2004 and 2012 (mean follow-up was 54.6 months [15-118]). Specific shoulder scores as well as scores reflecting the patients' overall mental and physical health status were used. Radiological evaluation was also performed. The SF12 test revealed comparability between all subgroups. Specific shoulder tests and a visual analogue scale demonstrated comparable results. Radiographic measurements showed a significant reduction in the AC distance and CC distance after surgery in all subgroups. The early complication rate was 9.5% for all patients, while late complications occurred in 14.3% of all cases. Compared to the established methods, the operative TightRope ® procedures represent a safe alternative in Rockwood III injuries. All investigated techniques predominantly led to good and excellent clinical results in acute Rockwood type III AC joint instabilities. Avoidance of material removal and shorter hospital stays appear to speak in favour for the TightRope ® technique. IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Melphalan, prednisone, thalidomide and defibrotide in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma: results of a multicenter phase I/II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Antonio; Larocca, Alessandra; Genuardi, Mariella; Kotwica, Katarzyna; Gay, Francesca; Rossi, Davide; Benevolo, Giulia; Magarotto, Valeria; Cavallo, Federica; Bringhen, Sara; Rus, Cecilia; Masini, Luciano; Iacobelli, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; Mitsiades, Constantine; Anderson, Kenneth; Boccadoro, Mario; Richardson, Paul

    2010-07-01

    Defibrotide is a novel orally bioavailable polydisperse oligonucleotide with anti-thrombotic and anti-adhesive effects. In SCID/NOD mice, defibrotide showed activity in human myeloma xenografts. This phase I/II study was conducted to identify the most appropriate dose of defibrotide in combination with melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide in patients with relapsed and relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, and to determine its safety and tolerability as part of this regimen. This was a phase I/II, multicenter, dose-escalating, non-comparative, open label study. Oral melphalan was administered at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg on days 1-4, prednisone at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg also on days 1-4 and thalidomide at a dose of 50-100 mg/day continuously. Defibrotide was administered orally at three dose-levels: 2.4, 4.8 or 7.2 g on days 1-4 and 1.6, 3.2, or 4.8 g on days 5-35. Twenty-four patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma were enrolled. No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. In all patients, the complete response plus very good partial response rate was 9%, and the partial response rate was 43%. The 1-year progression-free survival and 1-year overall survival rates were 34% and 90%, respectively. The most frequent grade 3-4 adverse events included neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia and fatigue. Deep vein thrombosis was reported in only one patient. This combination of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide together with defibrotide showed anti-tumor activity with a favorable tolerability. The maximum tolerated dose of defibrotide was identified as 7.2 g p.o. on days 1-4 followed by 4.8 g p.o. on days 5-35. Further trials are needed to confirm the role of this regimen and to evaluate the combination of defibrotide with new drugs.

  8. Retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy for stage III and IV oral cancer: Analysis of therapeutic results in 112 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsudo, Kenji; Koizumi, Toshiyuki; Iida, Masaki; Iwai, Toshinori; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Oguri, Senri; Kioi, Mitomu; Hirota, Makoto; Koike, Izumi; Hata, Masaharu; Tohnai, Iwai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results and rate of organ preservation in patients with stage III or IV oral cancer treated with retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy. Materials and methods: One hundred and twelve patients with stage III and IV oral squamous cell carcinoma underwent intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy. Catheterization from the superficial temporal and occipital arteries was performed. Treatment consisted of superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy (docetaxel, total 60 mg/m 2 , cisplatin, total 150 mg/m 2 ) and daily concurrent radiotherapy (total of 60 Gy) for 6 weeks. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 46.2 months (range, 10–76 months). After intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy, primary site complete response was achieved in 98 (87.5%) of 112 cases. Five-year survival and local control rates were 71.3% and 79.3%, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 toxicities included mucositis in 92.0%, neutropenia in 30.4%, dermatitis in 28.6%, anemia in 26.8%, and thrombocytopenia in 7.1% of patients. Grade 3 toxicities included dysphagia in 72.3%, nausea/vomiting in 21.4%, fever in 8.0%, and renal failure in 0.9% of patients. Conclusion: Retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy for stage III and IV oral cancer provided good overall survival and local control

  9. Epidemiology of DSM-5 bipolar I disorder: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions - III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Carlos; Compton, Wilson M; Saha, Tulshi D; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Ruan, W June; Huang, Boji; Grant, Bridget F

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to present 12-month and lifetime prevalence, correlates, comorbidity, treatment and disability of DSM-5 bipolar I disorder. Nationally representative U.S. adult sample (N = 36,309), the 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions - III. Prevalences of 12-month and lifetime DSM-5 bipolar I disorder were 1.5% and 2.1% and did not differ between men (1.6% and 2.2%) and women (1.5% and 2.0%). Prevalences of bipolar I disorder were greater among Native Americans, and lower among Blacks, Hispanics and Asians/Pacific Islanders than whites. Rates were also lower among younger than older individuals, those previously married than currently married and with lower education and income relative to higher education and income. Bipolar I disorder was more strongly related to borderline and schizotypal personality disorders (adjusted odds ratios (AORS) = 2.2-4.7)), than to anxiety disorders (AORs = 1.3-2.9), and substance use disorders (AORs = 1.3-2.1) overall and among men and women. Quality of life was lower among individuals with bipolar I disorder relative to those without the disorder. Treatment rates among individuals with bipolar I disorder were low in the total sample (46%, SE = 2.63), among men (36.7%, SE = 3.82) and among women (55.8%, SE = 3.32). Bipolar I disorder continues to be common disabling and highly comorbid disorder among men and women, contributing substantially to low quality of life and burden of disease in our society. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Effectiveness of cellulose sulfate vaginal gel for the prevention of HIV infection: results of a Phase III trial in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Halpern

    Full Text Available This trial evaluated the safety and effectiveness of 6% cellulose sulfate vaginal gel in preventing male-to-female vaginal transmission of HIV, gonorrhea and chlamydial infection.This Phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted between November 2004 and March 2007 in Lagos and Port Harcourt, Nigeria. We enrolled 1644 HIV-antibody negative women at high risk of HIV acquisition. Study participants were randomized 1:1 to cellulose sulfate or placebo and asked to use gel plus a condom for each act of vaginal intercourse over one year of follow-up. The participants were evaluated monthly for HIV, gonorrhea and chlamydial infection, and for adverse events.The trial was stopped prematurely after the data safety monitoring board of a parallel trial concluded that cellulose sulfate might be increasing the risk of HIV. In contrast, we observed fewer infections in the active arm (10 than on placebo (13, a difference that was nonetheless not statistically significant (HR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.3-1.8; p = 0.56. Rates of gonorrhea and chlamydial infection were lower in the CS group but the difference was likewise not statistically significant (HR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.5-1.1; p = 0.19 for the combined STI outcome. Rates of adverse events were similar across study arms. No serious adverse events related to cellulose sulfate use were reported.Cellulose sulfate gel appeared to be safe in the evaluated study population but we found insufficient evidence that it prevented male-to-female vaginal transmission of HIV, gonorrhea or chlamydial infection. The early closure of the trial compromised the ability to draw definitive conclusions about the effectiveness of cellulose sulfate against HIV.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00120770.

  11. Oral minocycline for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME): results of a phase I/II clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Catherine A; Petrou, Philip; Chew, Emily Y; Meyerle, Catherine B; Wong, Wai T

    2012-06-22

    Inflammation contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of diabetic macular edema (DME). In particular, retinal microglia demonstrate increased activation and aggregation in areas of DME. Study authors investigated the safety and potential efficacy of oral minocycline, a drug capable of inhibiting microglial activation, in the treatment of DME. A single-center, prospective, open-label phase I/II clinical trial enrolled five participants with fovea-involving DME who received oral minocycline 100 mg twice daily for 6 months. Main outcome measurements included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central retinal subfield thickness (CST), and central macular volume using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and late leakage on fluorescein angiography (FA). Findings indicated that the study drug was well tolerated and not associated with significant safety issues. In study eyes, mean BCVA improved continuously from baseline at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months by +1.0, +4.0, +4.0, and +5.8 letters, respectively, while mean retinal thickness (CST) on OCT decreased by -2.9%, -5.7%, -13.9, and -8.1% for the same time points. At month 6, mean area of late leakage on FA decreased by -34.4% in study eyes. Mean changes in contralateral fellow eyes also demonstrated similar trends. Improvements in outcome measures were not correlated with concurrent changes in systemic factors. In this pilot proof-of-concept study of DME, minocycline as primary treatment was associated with improved visual function, central macular edema, and vascular leakage, comparing favorably with historical controls from previous studies. Microglial inhibition with oral minocycline may be a promising therapeutic strategy targeting the inflammatory etiology of DME. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01120899.).

  12. Intravitreal sirolimus for the treatment of geographic atrophy: results of a phase I/II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Philip A; Cunningham, Denise; Shimel, Katherine; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Cukras, Catherine A; Ferris, Frederick L; Chew, Emily Y; Wong, Wai T

    2014-12-18

    To investigate the safety and effects of intravitreal sirolimus for the potential treatment of geographic atrophy (GA). The study was a single-center, open-label, phase I/II trial enrolling six participants with bilateral GA treated with intravitreal sirolimus in only one randomly assigned eye, with the fellow eye as control. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in total GA area from baseline on color fundus photography (CFP); secondary outcomes included changes in GA area on fundus autofluorescence (FAF), visual acuity, central retinal thickness (CRT), and macular sensitivity from baseline. Although no systemic adverse events were attributed to treatment, two of six participants had ocular adverse events that were possibly associated. The treated eye of one participant developed abnormal paralesional changes on FAF that were associated with accelerated retinal thinning. This accelerated retinal thinning was also seen in the treated eye of a second participant. Because of concern that these events were associated with treatment, treatment was suspended. Comparisons of treated and fellow eyes for change in visual acuity, change in GA area, and change in CRT showed no evidence of treatment benefit and generally favored the untreated fellow eye. While paralesional FAF changes and rapid retinal thinning observed are potentially part of the natural course of GA, they may possibly be related to treatment. No general evidence of anatomical or functional benefit was detected in treated eyes. Further data on intravitreal sirolimus for GA treatment will be available from a larger phase II trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01445548.). Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  13. Self- and other-directed forms of violence and their relationship with lifetime DSM-5 psychiatric disorders: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol Related Conditions-III (NESARC-III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford, Thomas C; Chen, Chiung M; Kerridge, Bradley T; Grant, Bridget F

    2018-04-01

    A combined history of violence toward self and others has been reported in clinical and incarcerated populations. Psychiatric disorders have been implicated as risk factors. This study examines the lifetime prevalence of this combined violence in the general population and its associations with DSM-5 psychiatric disorders in comparison with other- and self-directed violence. Data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III (NESARC-III) were analyzed, including 36,309 U.S. adults ages 18 and older. Violent behavior was defined by suicide attempts; recurrent suicidal behavior; gestures, threats, or self-mutilating behavior (self-directed); and multiple items of violence toward others (other-directed) in four categories: none, self-directed only, other-directed only, and combined self-/other-directed. Multinomial logistic regression examined these violence categories in association with sociodemographics and lifetime DSM-5 psychiatric disorders. Results show that approximately 18.1% of adults reported violent behavior, including self-directed only (4.4%), other-directed only (10.9%), and combined self- and other-directed violence (2.8%). DSM-5 psychiatric disorders significantly associated with the violence typology include alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, and other drug use disorders; mood disorders; posttraumatic stress disorder; and schizotypal, antisocial, and borderline personality disorders. Findings extend the clinical literature regarding the co-occurrence of self- and other-directed violent behaviors to the general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical Outcome After DK Crush Versus Culotte Stenting of Distal Left Main Bifurcation Lesions: The 3-Year Follow-Up Results of the DKCRUSH-III Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Liang; Xu, Bo; Han, Ya-Ling; Sheiban, Imad; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Ye, Fei; Kwan, Tak W; Paiboon, Chitprapai; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Lv, Shu-Zheng; Dangas, George D; Xu, Ya-Wei; Wen, Shang-Yu; Hong, Lang; Zhang, Rui-Yan; Wang, Hai-Chang; Jiang, Tie-Ming; Wang, Yan; Sansoto, Teguh; Chen, Fang; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Li, Wei-Min; Leon, Martin B

    2015-08-24

    The present study aimed to investigate the difference in major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at 3 years after double-kissing (DK) crush versus culotte stenting for unprotected left main distal bifurcation lesions (LMDBLs). The multicenter and randomized DKCRUSH-III (Comparison of double kissing crush versus culotte stenting for unprotected distal left main bifurcation lesions: results from a multicenter, randomized, prospective study) showed that DK crush stenting was associated with fewer MACE at 1-year follow-up in patients with LMDBLs compared with culotte stenting. Here, we report the 3-year clinical outcome of the DKCRUSH-III study. A total of 419 patients with LMDBLs who were randomly assigned to either the DK crush or culotte group in the DKCRUSH-III study were followed for 3 year. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of a MACE at 3 years. Stent thrombosis (ST) was the safety endpoint. Patients were classified by simple and complex LMDBLs according to the DEFINITION (Definition and Impact of Complex Bifurcation Lesions on Clinical Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Using Drug-Eluting Stents) study criteria. At 3 years, MACE occurred in 49 patients the culotte group and in 17 patients in the DK crush group (cumulative event rates of 23.7% and 8.2%, respectively; p DK crush group (p = 0.007). Complex LMDBLs were associated with a higher rate of MACE (35.3%) at 3 years compared with a rate of 8.1% in patients with simple LMDBLs (p DK] Crush Versus Culotte Stenting for the Treatment of Unprotected Distal Left Main Bifurcation Lesions: DKCRUSH-III, a Multicenter Randomized Study Comparing Double-Stent Techniques; ChiCTR-TRC-11001877). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pre-Preliminary results from the phase III of the IAEA CRP: optimizing of reactor pressure vessel surveillance programmes and their analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumovsky, M; Gillemot, F; Kryukov, A; Levit, V

    1994-12-31

    This paper gives preliminary results and some conclusions from Phase III of the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on ``Optimizing the Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Programmes and their Analyses`` carried out during the last seven years in 15 member states. First analysis concerned: comparison of results from initial, un-irradiated materials condition, comparison of transition temperature shifts (from notch toughness testing) with respect to content of residual (P, Cu) and alloying (Ni) elements, type of material (base and weld metal), irradiation temperature (288 and 265 C), and type of fluence dependence. Special effort has been taken to the analysis of the behaviour of a chosen reference steel. (JRQ). 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Aims and procedures used for the evaluation of research results in the field of nuclear safety with regard to the application of the Atomic Energy Law. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adomat, B.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this review, being executed for the Minister of the Interior of the German Federal Republic is to inform all parties involved in the licensing procedure as well as the consulting councils on the newest nuclear safety research results and the status of their verification in a precise, short manner. In addition experts opinions are given with regard to the relevance of these research results to nuclear rules and guidelines as well as to the execution of the Atomic Law. Each report is a short evaluation of a final research report. These evaluations are executed by specialists, who are acquainted with the technical aspects of the licensing procedure of nuclear power plants in the German Federal Republic. (orig.) [de

  17. VVER-1000 coolant transient benchmark. Phase 1 (V1000CT-1). Vol. 3: summary results of exercise 2 on coupled 3-D kinetics/core thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts, as well as current applications. (authors) Recently developed best-estimate computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for the coupling of core phenomena and system dynamics need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for this purpose. The present volume is a follow-up to the first two volumes. While the first described the specification of the benchmark, the second presented the results of the first exercise that identified the key parameters and important issues concerning the thermal-hydraulic system modelling of the simulated transient caused by the switching on of a main coolant pump when the other three were in operation. Volume 3 summarises the results for Exercise 2 of the benchmark that identifies the key parameters and important issues concerning the 3-D neutron kinetics modelling of the simulated transient. These studies are based on an experiment that was conducted by Bulgarian and Russian engineers during the plant-commissioning phase at the VVER-1000 Kozloduy Unit 6. The final volume will soon be published, completing Phase 1 of this study. (authors)

  18. Results from an International Measurement Round Robin of III-V Triple Junction Solar Cells under Air Mass Zero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Chris; Goodbody, Chris; Baur, Carsten; Sharps, Paul; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Yoo, Henry; Sahlstrom, Ted; Walters, Robert; Lorentzen, Justin; hide

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an international measurement round robin of monolithic, triple-junction, GaInP/GaAs/Ge space solar cells. Eight laboratories representing national labs, solar cell vendors and space solar cell consumers, measured cells using in-house reference cells and compared those results to measurements made where each lab used the same set of reference cells. The results show that most of the discrepancy between laboratories is likely due to the quality of the standard cells rather than the measurement system or solar simulator used.

  19. A Level 1+ Probabilistic Safety Assessment of the high flux Australian reactor. Vol. 2. Appendix C: System analysis models and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This section contains the results of the quantitative system/top event analysis. Section C. 1 gives the basic event coding scheme. Section C.2 shows the master frequency file (MFF), which contains the split fraction names, the top events they belong to, the mean values of the uncertainty distribution that is generated by the Monte Carlo quantification in the System Analysis module of RISKMAN, and a brief description of each split fraction. The MFF is organized by the systems modeled, and within each system, the top events associated with the system. Section C.3 contains the fault trees developed for the system/top event models and the RISKMAN reports for each of the system/top event models. The reports are organized under the following system headings: Compressed/Service Air Supply (AIR); Containment Isolation System (CIS); Heavy Water Cooling System (D20); Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS; Electric Power System (EPS); Light Water Cooling system (H20); Helium Gas System (HE); Mains Water System (MW); Miscellaneous Top Events (MISC); Operator Actions (OPER) Reactor Protection System (RPS); Space Conditioner System (SCS); Condition/Status Switch (SWITCH); RCB Ventilation System (VENT); No. 1 Storage Block Cooling System (SB)

  20. A Level 1+ Probabilistic Safety Assessment of the high flux Australian reactor. Vol. 2. Appendix C: System analysis models and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This section contains the results of the quantitative system/top event analysis. Section C. 1 gives the basic event coding scheme. Section C.2 shows the master frequency file (MFF), which contains the split fraction names, the top events they belong to, the mean values of the uncertainty distribution that is generated by the Monte Carlo quantification in the System Analysis module of RISKMAN, and a brief description of each split fraction. The MFF is organized by the systems modeled, and within each system, the top events associated with the system. Section C.3 contains the fault trees developed for the system/top event models and the RISKMAN reports for each of the system/top event models. The reports are organized under the following system headings: Compressed/Service Air Supply (AIR); Containment Isolation System (CIS); Heavy Water Cooling System (D20); Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS); Electric Power System (EPS); Light Water Cooling system (H20); Helium Gas System (HE); Mains Water System (MW); Miscellaneous Top Events (MISC); Operator Actions (OPER) Reactor Protection System (RPS); Space Conditioner System (SCS); Condition/Status Switch (SWITCH); RCB Ventilation System (VENT); No. 1 Storage Block Cooling System (SB)

  1. Preliminary comparison with 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1991. Vol. 4: Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helton, J C [Arizona State University, Department of Mathematics, Tempe, AZ (United States); Garner, J W [Applied Physics Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rechard, R P; Rudeen, D K [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swift, P N [Tech Reps Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-04-15

    The most appropriate conceptual model for performance assessment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is believed to include gas generation due to corrosion and microbial action in the repository and a dual-porosity (matrix and fracture porosity) representation for solute transport in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation. Under these assumptions, complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) summarizing radionuclide releases to the accessible environment due to both cuttings removal and groundwater transport fall substantially below the release limits promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This is the case even when the current estimates of the uncertainty in analysis inputs are incorporated into the performance assessment. The best-estimate performance-assessment results are dominated by cuttings removal. The releases to the accessible environment due to groundwater transport make very small contributions to the total release. The variability in the distribution of CCDFs that must be considered in comparisons with the EPA release limits is dominated by the variable LAMBDA (rate constant in Poisson model for drilling intrusions). The variability in releases to the accessible environment due to individual drilling intrusions is dominated by DBDIAM (drill bit diameter). Most of the imprecisely known variables considered in the 1991 WIPP performance assessment relate to radionuclide releases to the accessible environment due to groundwater transport. For a single borehole (i.e., an E2-type scenario), whether or not a release from the repository to the Culebra even occurs is controlled by the variable SALPERM (Salado permeability), with no releases for small values (i.e., < 5 x 10{sup -21} m{sup 2}) of this variable. When SALPERM is small, the repository never fills with brine and so there is no flow up an intruding borehole that can transport radionuclides to the Culebra. Further, releases that do reach the Culebra for

  2. Preliminary comparison with 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1991. Vol. 4: Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helton, J.C.; Garner, J.W.; Rechard, R.P.; Rudeen, D.K.; Swift, P.N.

    1992-04-01

    The most appropriate conceptual model for performance assessment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is believed to include gas generation due to corrosion and microbial action in the repository and a dual-porosity (matrix and fracture porosity) representation for solute transport in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation. Under these assumptions, complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) summarizing radionuclide releases to the accessible environment due to both cuttings removal and groundwater transport fall substantially below the release limits promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This is the case even when the current estimates of the uncertainty in analysis inputs are incorporated into the performance assessment. The best-estimate performance-assessment results are dominated by cuttings removal. The releases to the accessible environment due to groundwater transport make very small contributions to the total release. The variability in the distribution of CCDFs that must be considered in comparisons with the EPA release limits is dominated by the variable LAMBDA (rate constant in Poisson model for drilling intrusions). The variability in releases to the accessible environment due to individual drilling intrusions is dominated by DBDIAM (drill bit diameter). Most of the imprecisely known variables considered in the 1991 WIPP performance assessment relate to radionuclide releases to the accessible environment due to groundwater transport. For a single borehole (i.e., an E2-type scenario), whether or not a release from the repository to the Culebra even occurs is controlled by the variable SALPERM (Salado permeability), with no releases for small values (i.e., -21 m 2 ) of this variable. When SALPERM is small, the repository never fills with brine and so there is no flow up an intruding borehole that can transport radionuclides to the Culebra. Further, releases that do reach the Culebra for larger values of

  3. Effective representation of amide III, II, I, and A modes on local vibrational modes: Analysis of ab initio quantum calculation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Seungsoo

    2016-10-28

    The Hamiltonian matrix for the first excited vibrational states of a protein can be effectively represented by local vibrational modes constituting amide III, II, I, and A modes to simulate various vibrational spectra. Methods for obtaining the Hamiltonian matrix from ab initio quantum calculation results are discussed, where the methods consist of three steps: selection of local vibrational mode coordinates, calculation of a reduced Hessian matrix, and extraction of the Hamiltonian matrix from the Hessian matrix. We introduce several methods for each step. The methods were assessed based on the density functional theory calculation results of 24 oligopeptides with four different peptide lengths and six different secondary structures. The completeness of a Hamiltonian matrix represented in the reduced local mode space is improved by adopting a specific atom group for each amide mode and reducing the effect of ignored local modes. The calculation results are also compared to previous models using C=O stretching vibration and transition dipole couplings. We found that local electric transition dipole moments of the amide modes are mainly bound on the local peptide planes. Their direction and magnitude are well conserved except amide A modes, which show large variation. Contrary to amide I modes, the vibrational coupling constants of amide III, II, and A modes obtained by analysis of a dipeptide are not transferable to oligopeptides with the same secondary conformation because coupling constants are affected by the surrounding atomic environment.

  4. Ethical Considerations Related to Return of Results from Genomic Medicine Projects: The eMERGE Network (Phase III) Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossey, Robyn; Kochan, David; Winkler, Erin; Pacyna, Joel E.; Olson, Janet; Thibodeau, Stephen; Connolly, John J.; Harr, Margaret; Behr, Meckenzie A.; Prows, Cynthia A.; Cobb, Beth; Myers, Melanie F.; Leslie, Nancy D.; Namjou-Khales, Bahram; Milo Rasouly, Hila; Wynn, Julia; Fedotov, Alexander; Chung, Wendy K.; Gharavi, Ali; Williams, Janet L.; Pais, Lynn; Holm, Ingrid; Aufox, Sharon; Smith, Maureen E.; Scrol, Aaron; Leppig, Kathleen; Jarvik, Gail P.; Wiesner, Georgia L.; Li, Rongling; Stroud, Mary; Smoller, Jordan W.; Sharp, Richard R.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.

    2018-01-01

    We examined the Institutional Review Board (IRB) process at 9 academic institutions in the electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network, for proposed electronic health record-based genomic medicine studies, to identify common questions and concerns. Sequencing of 109 disease related genes and genotyping of 14 actionable variants is being performed in ~28,100 participants from the 9 sites. Pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants in actionable genes are being returned to study participants. We examined each site’s research protocols, informed-consent materials, and interactions with IRB staff. Research staff at each site completed questionnaires regarding their IRB interactions. The time to prepare protocols for IRB submission, number of revisions and time to approval ranged from 10–261 days, 0–11, and 11–90 days, respectively. IRB recommendations related to the readability of informed consent materials, specifying the full range of potential risks, providing options for receiving limited results or withdrawal, sharing of information with family members, and establishing the mechanisms to answer participant questions. IRBs reviewing studies that involve the return of results from genomic sequencing have a diverse array of concerns, and anticipating these concerns can help investigators to more effectively engage IRBs. PMID:29301385

  5. TOWARD A NEW GEOMETRIC DISTANCE TO THE ACTIVE GALAXY NGC 4258. III. FINAL RESULTS AND THE HUBBLE CONSTANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, E. M. L.; Reid, M. J.; Moran, J. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Argon, A. L.

    2013-01-01

    We report a new geometric maser distance estimate to the active galaxy NGC 4258. The data for the new model are maser line-of-sight (LOS) velocities and sky positions from 18 epochs of very long baseline interferometry observations, and LOS accelerations measured from a 10 yr monitoring program of the 22 GHz maser emission of NGC 4258. The new model includes both disk warping and confocal elliptical maser orbits with differential precession. The distance to NGC 4258 is 7.60 ± 0.17 ± 0.15 Mpc, a 3% uncertainty including formal fitting and systematic terms. The resulting Hubble constant, based on the use of the Cepheid variables in NGC 4258 to recalibrate the Cepheid distance scale, is H 0 = 72.0 ± 3.0 km s –1 Mpc –1

  6. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy for nondisseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-wook; Back, Geum Mun; Yi, Byong Yong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Shin, Seong Soo; Kim, Jung-hun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Bong-Jae; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seung-Bae; Park, Jin-hong; Lee, Kang Kyoo; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To present preliminary results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients who underwent IMRT for nondisseminated NPC at the Asan Medical Center between September 2001 and December 2003 were prospectively evaluated. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was delivered with the 'step and shoot' SMART technique at prescribed doses of 72 Gy (2.4 Gy/day) to the gross tumor volume, 60 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinical target volume and metastatic nodal station, and 46 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinically negative neck region. Eighteen patients also received cisplatin once per week. Results: The median follow-up period was 27 months. Nineteen patients completed the treatment without interruption; the remaining patient interrupted treatment for 2 weeks owing to severe pharyngitis and malnutrition. Five patients (25%) had Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 mucositis, whereas 9 (45%) had Grade 3 pharyngitis. Seven patients (35%) lost more than 10% of their pretreatment weight, whereas 11 (55%) required intravenous fluids and/or tube feeding. There was no Grade 3 or 4 xerostomia. All patients showed complete response. Two patients had distant metastases and locoregional recurrence, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with the SMART boost technique allows parotid sparing, as shown clinically and by dosimetry, and might also be more effective biologically. A larger population of patients and a longer follow-up period are needed to evaluate ultimate tumor control and late toxicity

  7. Three Versus 6 Months of Oxaliplatin-Based Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer: Disease-Free Survival Results From a Randomized, Open-Label, International Duration Evaluation of Adjuvant (IDEA) France, Phase III Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Thierry; Vernerey, Dewi; Mineur, Laurent; Bennouna, Jaafar; Desrame, Jérôme; Faroux, Roger; Fratte, Serge; Hug de Larauze, Marine; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Chibaudel, Benoist; Bez, Jeremie; Dauba, Jérôme; Louvet, Christophe; Lepere, Céline; Dupuis, Olivier; Becouarn, Yves; Mabro, May; Egreteau, Joëlle; Bouche, Olivier; Deplanque, Gaël; Ychou, Marc; Galais, Marie Pierre; Ghiringhelli, François; Dourthe, Louis Marie; Bachet, Jean-Baptiste; Khalil, Ahmed; Bonnetain, Franck; de Gramont, Aimery; Taieb, Julien

    2018-05-20

    Purpose Reduction of adjuvant treatment duration may decrease toxicities without loss of efficacy in stage III colon cancer. This could offer clear advantages to patients and health care providers. Methods In International Duration Evaluation of Adjuvant Chemotherapy (IDEA) France, as part of the IDEA international collaboration, patient with colon cancer patients were randomly assigned to 3 and 6 months of modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6: infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) or capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CAPOX) by physician choice. The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS), and analyses were descriptive. Results A total of 2,010 eligible patients received either 3 or 6 months of chemotherapy (modified intention-to-treat population); 2,000 (99%) had stage III colon cancer (N1: 75%, N2: 25%); 1,809 (90%) received mFOLFOX6, and 201 (10%) received CAPOX. The median age was 64 years, and the median follow-up time was 4.3 years. Overall, 94% (3 months) and 78% (6 months) of patients completed treatment (fluoropyrimidines ± oxaliplatin). Maximal grade 2 and 3 neuropathy rates were 28% and 8% in the 3-month arm and 41% and 25% in the 6-month arm ( P < .001). Final rates of residual neuropathy greater than grade 1 were 3% in the 3-month arm and 7% in the 6-month arm ( P < .001). There were 578 DFS events: 314 and 264 in the 3- and 6-month arms, respectively. The 3-year DFS rates were 72% and 76% in the 3- and 6-month arms, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.24; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.46; P = .0112). In the 3 and 6-month arms, respectively, for patients who received mFOLFOX6, the 3-year DFS rates were 72% and 76% (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.51); for the T4 and/or N2 population, they were 58% and 66% (HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.82); and for the T1-3N1 population, they were 81% and 83% (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.49). Conclusion IDEA France, in which 90% of patients received mFOLFOX6, shows superiority of 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy compared

  8. Results of tests and studies of American materials in the channel of the MHD facility U-02 (Phase III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenkov, D.K.; Borodina, T.I.; Vysotsky, D.A.; Zalkind, V.I.; Kirillov, V.V.; Romanov, A.I.; Telegin, G.P.; Strekalov, N.V.

    1978-10-01

    In accordance with the US--USSR Cooperative Program in MHD joint US--USSR tests were conducted in May 1978 at the U-02 facility of an MHD generator section consisting of U.S.-built electrode blocks and USSR-built insulating walls. The main purpose of the experiment was to conduct continuous 100-hour duration tests of materials and structures of electrode blocks; in particular, to study the behavior of ceramic electrodes and insulators in operating conditions of an MHD generator, the electro-physical and thermal characteristics of the working section as a whole and electrodes in particular, and to analyze the change in the phase composition and structure of materials during the test. The main thrust of the experiment was a study of electrode material behavior. Six varieties of electrodes based on doped lanthanum chromite were tested and investigated. The electrodes were made of fine grained, hot-pressed mass (the porosity of the ceramic was 2 to 3%). The interelectrode insulators were made of magnesial and magnesial-spinel ceramic also manufactured by the hot pressing method. Results are presented and discussed

  9. Carbon ion radiotherapy for localized primary sarcoma of the extremities: Results of a phase I/II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, Shinji; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kameda, Noriaki; Okada, Tohru; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shinichirou

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for localized primary sarcomas of the extremities in a prospective study. Patients and materials: From April 2000 to May 2010, 17 (male/female: 12/5) patients with localized primary sarcoma of the extremities received CIRT. The median age was 53 years (range: 14–87 years). Nine patients had primary diseases and eight had recurrent diseases. Of the 17 patients, eight refused amputation, and the remaining nine refused surgical resection. Tumors were located in the upper limbs in four patients and lower limbs in 13. Histological diagnosis was osteosarcoma in three patients, liposarcoma in two, synovial sarcoma in two, rhabdomyosarcoma in two, pleomorphic sarcoma in two, and miscellaneous in six. The CIRT dose to the limb was 52.8 GyE for one patient, 64 GyE for three, 70.4 GyE for 13 in 16 fixed fractions over 4 weeks. Records were reviewed and outcomes including radiologic response, local control (progression-free), and survival were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 37 months (range: 11–97 months). Radiological response rate was 65% (PR in 11, SD in 5, and PD in 1). The local control rate at 5 years was 76%. The overall survival rate at 5 years was 56%. Of the 17 patients, 10 survived without disease progression. Four patients had local recurrences, one was salvaged by repeated CIRT and the other three died due to systemic diseases. Distant failure was observed in six patients. One patient suffered from femoral fracture (grade 3) and received surgical fixation 27 months after CIRT. No other severe reactions (grade 3) were observed. Conclusions: CIRT is suggested to be an effective and safe treatment for patients who refuse surgery for localized primary sarcomas of the extremities.

  10. Impact of more intensive written information in patients having radical radiation therapy: Results of a prospective randomized phase III trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zissiadis, Yvonne; Harper, Emily; Kearney, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: A diagnosis of malignancy and its treatment is a very stressful time for patients and their families. This study was conducted to determine the impact of more intensive written information on patients' anxiety levels. The secondary aim was to determine the impact of this information on patients' satisfaction levels. Materials and methods: This prospective randomized trial consisted of patients with a pathological diagnosis of cancer having radical radiotherapy (RT). Patients were randomized to receive the more intensive information (including written information and a telephone call from the research nurse) or not to receive the more intensive information at the time of their initial consultation with the radiation oncologist. Study questionnaires measuring anxiety (STAI form) were completed prior to their first consultation (baseline) at the time of simulation (pre-RT) and at the completion of radiotherapy. A second questionnaire assessing satisfaction with the information given (ISQ) was completed at the time of simulation prior to commencing RT. Results: One hundred and ninety-four patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age of the patients was 58.5 years and 70% of patients were female. Breast cancer (67%) was the commonest cancer. One hundred and two patients were randomized to receive the intensive information package and 92 patients received the standard consultation. There was no significant difference in mean State or Trait anxiety scores between any of the time intervals and no difference between the two information groups. There was no significant difference between the groups with regard to mean satisfaction scores with the overall information given, nor with any individual question. The satisfaction scores with lifestyle information given were lower than those for any other type of information in both randomization arms. Conclusion: More intensive information did not significantly change patients' anxiety scores or

  11. Results of the Promethee Method Application in Selecting the Technological System at the Majdan III Open Pit Mine / Wyniki Zastosowania Metody Promethee do Wyboru Systemu Technologicznego W Kopalni Odkrywkowej Majdan III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujić, Slobodan; Hudej, Marjan; Miljanović, Igor

    2013-12-01

    This paper discusses the application of the PROMETHEE model and the results achieved in practice, following the example of the multi-criteria selection of the technological system at the Majdan III clay mineral raw material open pit mine of the Potisje Company, Republic of Serbia. After the introduction comments, reasons are explained for selecting the new technological system, conditions and limitations for the seven alternative solutions considered are described, mathematical foundation for the PROMETHEE method and a multi-criteria model of the problem in question are presented. The solution with the following structure was ranked first and accepted by the Company management as the best: Bucket chain excavator - Conveyor belts - Spreader (ECS), alongside a decision is made on the acquisition of machinery and system construction. The system was put into operation in 2000. The experience and the data accumulated in the previous twelve years confirm that the decision made on the application of the ECS technology was just, and the conclusion lists the benefits achieved. W artykule omówiono zastosowanie modelu Promethee i przedyskutowano uzyskane w ten sposób wyniki na przykładzie wielokryterialnego wyboru systemu technologicznego do zastosowania w kopalni odkrywkowej minerałów ilastych Majdan III, należącej do przedsiębiorstwa górniczego Potisje (Republika Serbii). Po uwagach wprowadzających przedstawiono powody wyboru nowego ciągu technologicznego, omówiono warunki oraz ograniczenia dla siedmiu alternatywnych rozwiązań, podstawy matematyczne metody Promethee oraz wielokryterialny model zagadnienia. Rozwiązanie uznane za najlepsze i zaaprobowane przez zarząd przedsiębiorstwa zakłada zastosowanie następującego ciągu technologicznego: koparka łancuchowa jednonaczyniowa - przenośniki taśmowe - rozkładarka(system ECS). Podjęto także decyzje odnośnie zakupu sprzętu i instalacji systemu, który uruchomiony został w 2000 roku. Doświadczenia i

  12. Addition of Rituximab to Involved-Field Radiation Therapy Prolongs Progression-free Survival in Stage I-II Follicular Lymphoma: Results of a Multicenter Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruella, Marco [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Center for Cellular Immunotherapies, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Filippi, Andrea Riccardo [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Bruna, Riccardo [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Di Russo, Anna [Radiation Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Magni, Michele [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Caracciolo, Daniele [Division of Haematology, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Passera, Roberto [Division of Nuclear Medicine, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Matteucci, Paola; Di Nicola, Massimo [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Corradini, Paolo [Division of Haematology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Parvis, Guido [Division of Haematology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Torino (Italy); Gini, Guido; Olivieri, Attilio [Division of Haematology, Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona (Italy); Ladetto, Marco [Division of Haematology, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Tarella, Corrado, E-mail: corrado.tarella@gmail.com [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Hemato-Oncology Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Devizzi, Liliana [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Rituximab (Rit) therapy added to involved-field radiation therapy (RT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for stage I-II follicular lymphoma (FL). The results of an observational multicenter study on the Rit-RT combination in limited-stage FL are here reported. Methods and Materials: Data have been collected from 2 consecutive cohorts of 94 patients with stage I-II FL treated between 1985 and 2011 at 5 Italian institutions. All patients had grade 1-3a FL, a median age of 54 years (range: 25-82). The first 51 patients received RT alone (control group), while the subsequent series of 43 patients received 4 rituximab courses (375 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1, 8, 15, 22) before RT (Rit-RT). Molecular disease was evaluated by nested bcl-2/IgH PCR or clonal IgH rearrangement was available in 33 Rit-RT patients. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.9 years (range: 1.8-22.9), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) projections for the whole cohort were 57% and 87.5%, respectively. The 10-year PFS was significantly longer (P<.05) in the Rit-RT group (64.6%) compared to RT alone (50.7%), whereas the 10-year OS projections were not significantly different. On bivariate analysis controlling for stage, there was only a trend toward improved PFS for Rit-RT (HR, 0.55; P=.081). Follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and age were associated with OS but not with PFS on Cox regression analysis. Bone marrow molecular analysis showing PCR positivity at diagnosis was strongly associated with relapse risk upon univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This multicenter observational study suggests a potential benefit of adding rituximab to radiation therapy for stage I-II FL. The results of the currently ongoing randomized studies are required to confirm these results. The study underlines the importance of molecular disease monitoring also for patient with limited-stage disease.

  13. Addition of Rituximab to Involved-Field Radiation Therapy Prolongs Progression-free Survival in Stage I-II Follicular Lymphoma: Results of a Multicenter Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruella, Marco; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Bruna, Riccardo; Di Russo, Anna; Magni, Michele; Caracciolo, Daniele; Passera, Roberto; Matteucci, Paola; Di Nicola, Massimo; Corradini, Paolo; Parvis, Guido; Gini, Guido; Olivieri, Attilio; Ladetto, Marco; Ricardi, Umberto; Tarella, Corrado; Devizzi, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Rituximab (Rit) therapy added to involved-field radiation therapy (RT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for stage I-II follicular lymphoma (FL). The results of an observational multicenter study on the Rit-RT combination in limited-stage FL are here reported. Methods and Materials: Data have been collected from 2 consecutive cohorts of 94 patients with stage I-II FL treated between 1985 and 2011 at 5 Italian institutions. All patients had grade 1-3a FL, a median age of 54 years (range: 25-82). The first 51 patients received RT alone (control group), while the subsequent series of 43 patients received 4 rituximab courses (375 mg/m"2, days 1, 8, 15, 22) before RT (Rit-RT). Molecular disease was evaluated by nested bcl-2/IgH PCR or clonal IgH rearrangement was available in 33 Rit-RT patients. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.9 years (range: 1.8-22.9), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) projections for the whole cohort were 57% and 87.5%, respectively. The 10-year PFS was significantly longer (P<.05) in the Rit-RT group (64.6%) compared to RT alone (50.7%), whereas the 10-year OS projections were not significantly different. On bivariate analysis controlling for stage, there was only a trend toward improved PFS for Rit-RT (HR, 0.55; P=.081). Follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and age were associated with OS but not with PFS on Cox regression analysis. Bone marrow molecular analysis showing PCR positivity at diagnosis was strongly associated with relapse risk upon univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This multicenter observational study suggests a potential benefit of adding rituximab to radiation therapy for stage I-II FL. The results of the currently ongoing randomized studies are required to confirm these results. The study underlines the importance of molecular disease monitoring also for patient with limited-stage disease.

  14. Results of induction chemotherapy followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and concurrent weekly paclitaxel for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weihua; Bao Yong; Chen Ming; Zhang Li; Xu Guangchuan; Li Kaixin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plus concurrent weekly paclitaxel for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Patients with stage III NSCLC in favorable conditions were treated with 2 to 4 cycles of carboplatin (AUC=5-6, d1) combined with paclitaxel (175 mg/m 2 , d1), then followed by weekly paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) and concurrent 3DCRT within 34 weeks. The prescription dose of radiotherapy was given as high as possible while total lung V 20 ≤31% and total dose of the spinal cord ≤50 Gy. Results: ICT was well tolerated. During the concurrent chemoradiotherapy,the treatment of 4 patients was ended ahead of the schedule because of severe pulmonary and cardiac toxicities; the treatment of 2 patients was delayed for 7 and 12 days because of fatigue. Leucopenia(33/56) was in grade 1-2 except 1 patient in grade 3. Lymphocytopenia was severe (54/56,42 in grade 3). Three patients developed grade 3 acute radiation-induced esophagitis, and 3 developed grade 3-4 radiation-induced pneumonitis. There was one patients each who developed grade 2,3, and 4 late esophageal damage, respectively. Nine developed grade 2 pulmonary fibrosis. The overall response rate was 69.7%. The 1-year overall survival rate was 72.3%. The 1-year local progression-free survival rate was 62.7%. Conclusions: The schedule of ICT followed by weekly paclitaxel and concurrent 3DCRT can be well tolerated by most of the favorable patients with stage III NSCLC, and the toxicity is tolerable. Results of this study are encouraging, though long-term results should be followed up. (authors)

  15. Alternative Grading Systems. The Practitioner, Vol. III, No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leonibus, Nancy; Thomson, Scott

    After examining some of the pros and cons of traditional grading, the demands colleges make on grading practices, and the responses of people interested in grading, a number of examples of operating alternative systems are given. The alternatives include a dual (pass/withdraw grading in some courses, traditional grading in others) system, a…

  16. Results of radiation therapy combined with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy for stage III prostate cancer. Comparison of two different definitions of PSA failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsumori, Michihide; Sasaki, Yoshihide; Mizowaki, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    We herein report the clinical outcome of radical radiation therapy combined with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT) for stage III (International Union Against Cancer [UICC] 1997: UICC 97) prostate cancer. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure-free survival was assessed according to two different definitions, and the appropriateness of each definition is discussed. Between October 1997 and December 2000, 27 patients with stage III prostate cancer were enrolled in this study. The median pretreatment PSA level was 29 ng/ml (range, 7.4-430 ng/ml). The Gleason score (GS) was 7 or more in 22 patients (81%). All patients received 3 months of NHT with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) analogue, in combination with an antiandrogen (flutamide), given during the first 2 weeks, followed by 70-Gy external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in 35 fractions. The initial 46 Gy was given with a four-field technique, while the remainder was given with a dynamic conformal technique. No adjuvant hormonal therapy (AHT) was given. The median follow-up time was 63 months. PSA levels decreased to the normal range (<4 ng/ml) after irradiation in all but one patient. The 5-year PSA failure-free survival was 34.8% according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition and it was 43.0% according to the ''nadir plus 2'' definition. Discordance of the results between the two definitions was seen in two patients. The 5-year overall and cause-specific survivals were 83.0% and 93.3%, respectively. No severe acute or late adverse effects were observed. Seventy Gy of EBRT following 3 months of NHT produced therapeutic results comparable to those reported in other studies which used long-term AHT. The value of long-term AHT for Japanese men should be tested in a clinical trial. (author)

  17. The Value of Botox-A in Acute Radiation Proctitis: Results From a Phase I/II Study Using a Three-Dimensional Scoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong, Te; Waschke, Kevin; Niazi, Tamim; Richard, Carole; Parent, Josee; Liberman, Sender; Mayrand, Serge; Loungnarath, Rasmy; Stein, Barry; Devic, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation proctitis (ARP) is a common side effect of pelvic radiotherapy, and its management is challenging in daily practice. The present phase I/II study evaluates the safety and efficacy of the botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) in ARP treatment for rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant high-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (HDREBT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients, treated with neoadjuvant HDREBT, 26-Gy in 4 fractions, received the study treatment that consisted of a single injection of BTX-A into the rectal wall. The injection was performed post-HDREBT and prior to the development of ARP. The control group, 20 such patients, did not receive the BTX-A injection. Both groups had access to standard treatment with hydrocortisone rectal aerosol foam (Cortifoam) and anti-inflammatory and narcotic medication. The ARP was clinically evaluated by self-administered daily questionnaires using visual analog scores to document frequency and urgency of bowel movements, rectal burning/tenesmus, and pain symptoms before and after HDREBT. Results: At the time of this analysis, there was no observed systemic toxicity. Patient compliance with the self-administered questionnaire was 100% from week 1 to 4, 70% during week 5, and 40% during week 6. The maximum tolerated dose was established at the 100-U dose level, and noticeable mean differences were observed in bowel frequency (p = 0.016), urgency (p = 0.007), and pain (p = 0.078). Conclusions: This study confirms the feasibility and efficacy of BTX-A intervention at 100-U dose level for study patients compared to control patients. A phase III study with this dose level is planned to validate these results.

  18. Vol 12, No 1 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The) - Vol 12, No 1 (2014) ... The effect of serum angiotensin II and angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene ... with diabetic ketoacidosis · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  19. Zede Journal - Vol 29 (2012)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Archives > Vol 29 (2012) ... Leakage aware hardware and stochastic power scheduling for smart mobile devices ... Energy efficient topology for Wireless Mesh Networks · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  20. Variation in use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage III breast cancer : Results of the Dutch national breast cancer audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronk, Pauline E.R.; van Bommel, A.C.M.; Siesling, S.; Wouters, M. W.J.M.; Vrancken Peeters, M.T.F.D.; Smorenburg, Carolien H.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is important in the optimal treatment of patients with locally advanced (stage III) breast cancer (BC). The objective of this study was to examine the clinical practice of NAC for stage III BC patients in all Dutch hospitals participating in BC care.

  1. Long-term outcome of stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) versus stapled hemorrhoidopexys (STH) for grade III-IV hemorrhoids: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Simone; Spirch, Saverio; Scarpa, Marco; Ricci, Francesco; Lumachi, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Circular stapled transanal hemorrhoidopexy (STH) was first introduced by A. Longo for the correction of internal mucosal prolapse and obstructed defecation and in 1998, was proposed as alternative to conventional excisional hemorrhoidectomy. More recently, stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) has gradually gained popularity, as the Longo procedure, in the treatment of hemorrhoids. The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of STARR as alternative to STH in patients with grade III (n=218, 68.1%) and IV (n=102, 31.9%) hemorrhoids. A group of 320 consecutive patients (median age=51 years; range=16-85) underwent STH (n=281) or STARR (n=39) procedure. The rate of postoperative bleeding (53.8% vs. 74.4%, phemorrhoids and a lower incidence of prolapse, both at one year (none vs. 1.4%, p=0.593 and 2.6% vs. 5.3%, p=0.396, respectively) and at two years (none vs. 6.8%, p=0.078 and none vs. 13.2%, p=0.012, respectively). The one-year (9.0 ± 1.8 vs. 9.4 ± 0.7, p=0.171) and two-year (9.6 ± 0.8 vs. 9.1 ± 1.7, p=0.072) general satisfaction was similar but higher in STARR patients than in the STH group. In conclusion, according to our preliminary results, the STARR procedure leads to a lower incidence of complications and recurrences and should be considered for patients with grade III or IV hemorrhoids previously selected for stapled hemorrhoidectomy, as a promising alternative to STH. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Long term results of mantle irradiation(MRT) alone in 261 patients with clinical stage I-II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, A.; Byram, D.; Chao, M.; Corry, J.; Davis, S.; Kiffer, J.; Laidlaw, C.; Quong, G.; Ryan, G.; Liew, K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We report our results using MRT for clinical stage I-II HD and assess the value of published prognostic criteria in our study population. Pts and Methods: Between 1969 and 1994, 261 pts were treated with MRT alone for clinical stage I-II supradiaphragmatic HD. Pt characteristics: median age-30; M-54%/F-46%; stage IA-52%, IB-2%, IIA-37%, IIB-8%; histology LP-21%, NS-51%, MC-23%, other 5%; median ESR 18. CT abdomen and LAG were performed in 61% and 60% respectively. No pt had prior staging laparotomy. No pt received infradiaphragmatic RT. Central axis dose was 32 Gy-36 Gy. Univariate analysis was performed for prognostic factors for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival(OS). Outcome was assessed in favourable subsets as defined by: EORTC (v. favourable: CSIA, LP or NS histology, age < 40, female, no bulk, ESR < 50; favourable: CSI-II, age < 50, < 4 sites, no bulky mediastinal mass, ESR < 50 with no B symptoms or ESR < 30 with B symptoms); Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) (IA-IIA, LP or NS histology, ESR < 40, age < 50, no large mediastinal mass, no E lesion). Results: 261 pts completed RT, with 5% requiring treatment interruption for toxicity. Significant factors (P<0.05) for PFS were stage, performance status, histology, B symptoms, number of sites, ESR and bulk. Significant factors (P<0.05) for OS were age, performance status, histology and B symptoms. (The results of a multivariate analysis will be presented.) Results in our study population using published prognostic criteria (in %): Thirty-six percent progressed following RT: 8% in-field; 24% out of field only (including 10% in the paraaortic/splenic region alone); 4% marginal; Fifty-seven percent of relapsed pts remain progression free after subsequent salvage treatment. Two cases of acute leukaemia, 8 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 14 (non-skin) carcinomas occurred, of which 11 were in-field. Seventy pts have died. The cause was: HD 41%; other malignancy 20%; cardiovascular 17%; other 15

  3. Comparison between MARCH-3 and MAAP-3 thermal-hydraulic results for a severe accident in a BWR system with MARK-III containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbucci, P.; Guidi, L.; Mariotti, G.

    1988-01-01

    A comparison between results provided by the Source Term Code Package and by the MAAP-3 code for a PWR with full pressure containment was presented. Thereafter the same two methodologies were used to analyse a severe accident sequence in a typical BWR power plant equipped with a General Electric BWR 6 reactor, rated at 2894 MWt, and a MARK-III type containment. As a reference sequence the TQUV was chosen. This sequence is characterized by a transient (T) with loss of feedwater (Q) and loss of all Emergency Core Cooling Systems, both at high pressure (U) and, after the intervention of the Automatic Depressurization System (ADS), at low pressure (V). After the vessel, failure two basic scenarios for the containment response were analysed: in the first one the pedestal is always dry, in the second one it is fully flooded. Typical limestone/common sand and basaltic concrete compositions were considered. In the following sections the obtained results will be shown with the main purpose to point out the different phenomenological models of the two codes rather than to look for the true plant response to such a severe accident. After the presentation of the most important physical models and of the main assumptions for the analyses (sects. 2 and 4), the comparison will be performed for the in-vessel phase, in section 3, and for the ex-vessel phase, in section 5

  4. Results in the elderly with locally advanced rectal cancer from the ACCOR12/PRODIGE 2 phase III trial: Tolerance and efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    François, Eric; Azria, David; Gourgou-Bourgade, Sophie; Jarlier, Marta; Martel-Laffay, Isabelle; Hennequin, Christophe; Etienne, Pierre-Luc; Vendrely, Véronique; Seitz, Jean-François; Conroy, Thierry; Juzyna, Beata; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rectal cancer predominantly affects the elderly. Unfortunately, this age category is under-represented in clinical trials because clinicians are loath to include patients with a high risk of comorbidity. Patients and methods: An exploratory analysis of the ACCORD12/PRODIGE 2 phase III trial was carried out to retrospectively compare the benefit of neoadjuvant chemotherapy between the elderly (⩾70 years; n = 142) and younger patients (<70 years; n = 442), this analysis was not preplanned in the study protocol. Patients with histologically confirmed resectable stage T3 or T4 rectal adenocarcinoma were eligible with an age limit of 80 years. Results: Overall, the two age categories did not statistically differ in terms of patient’s clinical and tumor baseline characteristics. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy leads to more severe grade 3/4 toxicities (25.6% vs. 15.8%, p = 0.01) and more permanent stomas (33.3% vs. 22.8%, p = 0.014) in elderly patients who were less often operated on than younger patients (95.8% vs. 99.0%, p = 0.008). The relative number of interventions per surgery type (p = 0.18), treatment efficacy in terms of R0 resection rate (88.6% vs. 90.6%; p = 0.54) and complete pathological response (14.7% vs. 16.9%; p = 0.55) were nearly identical between the two categories. Conclusion: Altogether these results warrant the development of specific optimal therapeutic strategies for the elderly

  5. Two cycles of cisplatin-vindesine and radiotherapy for localized nonsmall cell carcinoma of the lung (stage III). Results of a prospective trial with 149 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourani, J.M.; Timsit, J.F.; Delaisement, C.; Balzon, J.C.; Caubarrere, I.; Darse, J.; Geraads, A.; Lebas, F.X.; Andrieu, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    One hundred forty-nine patients with localized nonsmall cell carcinoma of the lung (Stage III A and B) were treated with two monthly cycles of initial chemotherapy that included vindesine-cisplatin followed by 6000 cGy of thoracic irradiation. Patients with complete, partial, and minor response after initial chemotherapy were randomized into groups to receive either maintenance chemotherapy (four cycles) after radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. The objective response rate was 24% after chemotherapy and 41% after combined chemoradiotherapy (complete response, 7.5%). The overall median survival was 9 months and the 2-year survival was 14%. Survival was identical with or without maintenance chemotherapy. The 2-year survival of patients with complete response was 75% compared with 9% for patients with partial or minor response. These results suggest that only the few patients (ten) who achieve complete response have a strong probability of survival. It is therefore essential to search for other therapeutic modalities that result in an increase of the complete response rate

  6. Improved Survival With Radiation Therapy in Stage I-II Primary Mediastinal B Cell Lymphoma: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Database Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Matthew W., E-mail: matthew.jackson@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Rusthoven, Chad G.; Jones, Bernard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Kamdar, Manali [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBCL) is an uncommon lymphoma for which trials are few with small patient numbers. The role of radiation therapy (RT) after standard immunochemotherapy for early-stage disease has never been studied prospectively. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to evaluate PMBCL and the impact of RT on outcomes. Methods and Materials: We queried the SEER database for patients with stage I-II PMBCL diagnosed from 2001 to 2011. Retrievable data included age, gender, race (white/nonwhite), stage, extranodal disease, year of diagnosis, and use of RT as a component of definitive therapy. Kaplan-Meier overall survival (OS) estimates, univariate (UVA) log-rank and multivariate (MVA) Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were performed. Results: Two hundred fifty patients with stage I-II disease were identified, with a median follow-up time of 39 months (range, 3-125 months). The median age was 36 years (range, 18-89 years); 61% were female; 76% were white; 45% had stage I disease, 60% had extranodal disease, and 55% were given RT. The 5-year OS for the entire cohort was 86%. On UVA, OS was improved with RT (hazard ratio [HR] 0.446, P=.029) and decreased in association with nonwhite race (HR 2.70, P=.006). The 5-year OS was 79% (no RT) and 90% (RT). On MVA, white race and RT remained significantly associated with improved OS (P=.007 and .018, respectively). The use of RT decreased over time: 61% for the 67 patients whose disease was diagnosed from 2001 to 2005 and 53% in the 138 patients treated from 2006 to 2010. Conclusion: This retrospective population-based analysis is the largest PMBCL dataset to date and demonstrates a significant survival benefit associated with RT. Nearly half of patients treated in the United States do not receive RT, and its use appears to be declining. In the absence of phase 3 data, the use of RT should be strongly considered for its survival benefit in early

  7. Metallothionein (MT)-III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco, J; Giralt, M; Molinero, A

    1999-01-01

    Metallothionein-III is a low molecular weight, heavy-metal binding protein expressed mainly in the central nervous system. First identified as a growth inhibitory factor (GIF) of rat cortical neurons in vitro, it has subsequently been shown to be a member of the metallothionein (MT) gene family...... injected rats. The specificity of the antibody was also demonstrated in immunocytochemical studies by the elimination of the immunostaining by preincubation of the antibody with brain (but not liver) extracts, and by the results obtained in MT-III null mice. The antibody was used to characterize...... the putative differences between the rat brain MT isoforms, namely MT-I+II and MT-III, in the freeze lesion model of brain damage, and for developing an ELISA for MT-III suitable for brain samples. In the normal rat brain, MT-III was mostly present primarily in astrocytes. However, lectin staining indicated...

  8. 8 Gy single-dose radiotherapy is effective in metastatic spinal cord compression: Results of a phase III randomized multicentre Italian trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Trippa, Fabio; Casale, Michelina; Costantini, Sara; Lupattelli, Marco; Bellavita, Rita; Marafioti, Luigi; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Santacaterina, Anna; Mignogna, Marcello; Silvano, Giovanni; Fusco, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: In a previous randomized trial we showed that the short-course radiotherapy (RT) regimen of 8 Gy x 2 was feasible in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) and short life expectancy. This phase III trial was planned to determine whether in the same category of patients 8 Gy single-dose is as effective as 8 Gy x 2. Materials and methods: Three hundred and twenty-seven patients with MSCC and short life expectancy were randomly assigned to a short-course of 8 Gy x 2 or to 8 Gy single-dose RT. Median follow-up was 31 months (range, 4-58). Results: A total of 303 (93%) patients are assessable, 150 treated with the short-course and 153 with the single-dose RT. No difference in response was found between the two RT schedules adopted. Median duration of response was 5 and 4.5 months for short-course and single-dose RT (p = 0.4), respectively. The median overall survival was 4 months for all cases. Light acute toxicity was registered in a minority of cases. Late toxicity was never recorded. Conclusions: Both RT schedules adopted were effective. As already shown in several trials evaluating RT regimens in uncomplicated painful bone metastases, also MSCC patients may achieve palliation with minimal toxicity and inconvenience with a single-dose of 8 Gy.

  9. STECH VOL5 (1) FEBRUARY, 2016

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Copyright 1AARR 2012-2016: www.afrrevjo.net

    STECH VOL 5 (1) FEBRUARY, 2016. Vol. 5 (1), S/No11, February, 2016: 1-13 ..... Knowledge produce is an act of discovery which involves exploring, analyzing .... Architectural Research, Elsevier: Higher Education Press Limited Company.

  10. Radiotherapy versus concurrent 5-day cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Long-term results of a Phase III randomized trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Viorica; Coza, Ovidiu; Ghilezan, Nicolae [' Ion Chiricuta' Cancer Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; ' Iuliu Hatieganu' Univ. of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ordeanu, Claudia; Todor, Nicolae [' Ion Chiricuta' Cancer Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Traila, Alexandru [' Ion Chiricuta' Cancer Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania). Dept. of Surgery; Rancea, Alin [' Iuliu Hatieganu' Univ. of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); ' Ion Chiricuta' Cancer Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania). Dept. of Surgery

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To prove the superiority of concurrent radiochemotherapy (RTCT) over radiotherapy (RT) alone in locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Patients and Methods: In this randomized monocentric phase III study, 566 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were included: 284 in arm A (RT) and 282 in arm B (concurrent RTCT with cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} x 5 days). 238 patients (42%) were in stage IIB, 209 (37%) in stage IIIA, and 119 (21%) in stage IIIB. The median follow-up was 62.8 months. RT to the pelvis was delivered to a dose of 46 Gy/23 fractions. A cervical boost was given using the X-ray arch technique or high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy at a dose of 10 Gy. Thereafter, patients were evaluated: those with good response optionally underwent surgery and the others continued RT until 64 Gy/pelvis (with or without CT according to randomization) and 14 Gy/central tumor volume. Results: The 5-year survival rate was statistically significantly superior in the concurrent RTCT group (74%) versus the RT group (64%; p < 0.05). In patients undergoing surgery after RT or RTCT, superior results were obtained, compared to the nonoperated patients: 5-year survival rate 86% versus 53% (p < 0.01). 192 failures were recorded: 109 (38%) after RT alone versus 83 (29%) after concurrent RTCT (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The results of this study prove the obvious superiority of concurrent RTCT with 5-day cisplatin compared to RT alone in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma, regarding local control (78% vs. 67%) and 5-year survival rates (74% vs. 64%). (orig.)

  11. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  12. Toxicity report of once weekly radiation therapy for low-risk prostate adenocarcinoma: preliminary results of a phase I/II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menkarios, Cathy; Fortin, Bernard; Lambert, Carole; Vigneault, Éric; Brochet, Nicolas; Nguyen, David HA; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Jolicoeur, Marjory; Beauchemin, Marie-Claude; Villeneuve, Hugo; Van Nguyen, Thu

    2011-01-01

    Increasing clinical data supports a low α/β ratio for prostate adenocarcinoma, potentially lower than that of surrounding normal tissues. A hypofractionated, weekly radiation therapy (RT) schedule should result in improved tumour control, reduced acute toxicity, and similar or decreased late effects. We report the toxicity profile of such treatment. We conducted a multi-institution phase I/II trial of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for favourable-risk prostate cancer (T1a-T2a, Gleason ≤ 6 and PSA < 10 ng/ml). RT consisted of 45 Gy in nine 5 Gy fractions, once weekly. Primary end-points were feasibility and late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity (RTOG scale), while secondary end-points included acute GI toxicity, acute and late genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical control, and survival. Between 2006 and 2008, 80 patients were treated. No treatment interruptions occurred. The median follow-up is 33 months (range: 20-51). Maximal grade 1, 2, and 3 acute (< 3 months) GU toxicity was 29%, 31% and 5% respectively (no grade 4). Acute GI grade 1 toxicity was reported in 30% while grade 2 occurred in 14% (no grade 3 or 4). Crude late grade ≥ 3 toxicity rates at 31 months were 2% for both GU and GI toxicity. Cumulative late grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity at 3 years was 11%. Two patients had PSA failure according to the Phoenix definition. The three-year actuarial biochemical control rate is 97%. Weekly RT with 45 Gy in 9 fractions is feasible and results in comparable toxicity. Long term tumour control and survival remain to be assessed

  13. Dolutegravir in Antiretroviral-Experienced Patients With Raltegravir- and/or Elvitegravir-Resistant HIV-1: 24-Week Results of the Phase III VIKING-3 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Antonella; Maggiolo, Franco; Penco, Giovanni; Wright, David; Mills, Anthony; Grossberg, Robert; Molina, Jean-Michel; Chas, Julie; Durant, Jacques; Moreno, Santiago; Doroana, Manuela; Ait-Khaled, Mounir; Huang, Jenny; Min, Sherene; Song, Ivy; Vavro, Cindy; Nichols, Garrett; Yeo, Jane M.; Aberg, J.; Akil, B.; Arribas, J. R.; Baril, J.-G.; Blanco Arévalo, J. L.; Blanco Quintana, F.; Blick, G.; Boix Martínez, V.; Bouchaud, O.; Branco, T.; Bredeek, U. F.; Castro Iglesias, M.; Clumeck, N.; Conway, B.; DeJesus, E.; Delassus, J.-L.; De Truchis, P.; Di Perri, G.; Di Pietro, M.; Duggan, J.; Duvivier, C.; Elion, R.; Eron, J.; Fish, D.; Gathe, J.; Haubrich, R.; Henderson, H.; Hicks, C.; Hocqueloux, L.; Hodder, S.; Hsiao, C.-B.; Katlama, C.; Kozal, M.; Kumar, P.; Lalla-Reddy, S.; Lazzarin, A.; Leoncini, F.; Llibre, J. M.; Mansinho, K.; Morlat, P.; Mounzer, K.; Murphy, M.; Newman, C.; Nguyen, T.; Nseir, B.; Philibert, P.; Pialoux, G.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Ramgopal, M.; Richmond, G.; Salmon Ceron, D.; Sax, P.; Scarsella, A.; Sension, M.; Shalit, P.; Sighinolfi, L.; Sloan, L.; Small, C.; Stein, D.; Tashima, K.; Tebas, P.; Torti, C.; Tribble, M.; Troisvallets, D.; Tsoukas, C.; Viciana Fernández, P.; Ward, D.; Wheeler, D.; Wilkin, T.; Yeni, G.-P.; Louise Martin-Carpenter, J.; Uhlenbrauck, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Background. The pilot phase IIb VIKING study suggested that dolutegravir (DTG), a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase inhibitor (INI), would be efficacious in INI-resistant patients at the 50 mg twice daily (BID) dose. Methods. VIKING-3 is a single-arm, open-label phase III study in which therapy-experienced adults with INI-resistant virus received DTG 50 mg BID while continuing their failing regimen (without raltegravir or elvitegravir) through day 7, after which the regimen was optimized with ≥1 fully active drug and DTG continued. The primary efficacy endpoints were the mean change from baseline in plasma HIV-1 RNA at day 8 and the proportion of subjects with HIV-1 RNA <50 c/mL at week 24. Results. Mean change in HIV-1 RNA at day 8 was −1.43 log10 c/mL, and 69% of subjects achieved <50 c/mL at week 24. Multivariate analyses demonstrated a strong association between baseline DTG susceptibility and response. Response was most reduced in subjects with Q148 + ≥2 resistance-associated mutations. DTG 50 mg BID had a low (3%) discontinuation rate due to adverse events, similar to INI-naive subjects receiving DTG 50 mg once daily. Conclusions. DTG 50 mg BID–based therapy was effective in this highly treatment-experienced population with INI-resistant virus. Clinical Trials Registration. www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01328041) and http://www.gsk-clinicalstudywww.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com (112574). PMID:24446523

  14. Silver Clear Nylon Dressing is Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Patients With Lower Gastrointestinal Cancer: Results From a Phase III Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niazi, Tamim M. [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Vuong, Te, E-mail: tvuong@jgh.mcgill.ca [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Azoulay, Laurant [Department of Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Marijnen, Corrie [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bujko, Kryzstof [Department of Radiotherapy, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre, Warsaw (Poland); Nasr, Elie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hotel-Dieu de France Hospital (Lebanon); Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal-General-Hospital, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Cummings, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. Results: The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Conclusions: Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

  15. Results of a Randomized Controlled Multicenter Phase III Trial of Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion Compared with Best Available Care for Patients with Melanoma Liver Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Marybeth S; Zager, Jonathan; Faries, Mark; Alexander, H Richard; Royal, Richard E; Wood, Bradford; Choi, Junsung; McCluskey, Kevin; Whitman, Eric; Agarwala, Sanjiv; Siskin, Gary; Nutting, Charles; Toomey, Mary Ann; Webb, Carole; Beresnev, Tatiana; Pingpank, James F

    2016-04-01

    There is no consensus for the treatment of melanoma metastatic to the liver. Percutaneous hepatic perfusion with melphalan (PHP-Mel) is a method of delivering regional chemotherapy selectively to the liver. In this study, we report the results of a multicenter, randomized controlled trial comparing PHP-Mel with best alternative care (BAC) for patients with ocular or cutaneous melanoma metastatic to the liver. A total of 93 patients were randomized to PHP-Mel (n = 44) or BAC (n = 49). On the PHP-Mel arm, melphalan was delivered via the hepatic artery, and the hepatic effluent captured and filtered extracorporeally prior to return to the systemic circulation via a venovenous bypass circuit. PHP-Mel was repeatable every 4-8 weeks. The primary endpoint was hepatic progression-free survival (hPFS), and secondary endpoints included overall PFS (oPFS), overall survival (OS), hepatic objective response (hOR), and safety. hPFS was 7.0 months for PHP-Mel and 1.6 months for BAC (p PHP-Mel and 1.6 months for BAC (p PHP-Mel 10.6 months vs. BAC 10.0 months), likely due to crossover to PHP-Mel treatment (57.1 %) from the BAC arm, and the hOR was 36.4 % for PHP-Mel and 2.0 % for BAC (p PHP-Mel, three in the primary PHP-Mel group, and one post-crossover to PHP-Mel from BAC. This randomized, phase III study demonstrated the efficacy of the PHP-Mel procedure. hPFS, oPFS, and hOR were significantly improved with PHP-Mel. PHP with melphalan should provide a new treatment option for unresectable metastatic melanoma in the liver.

  16. Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy Using Carboplatin, Tegafur-Uracil and Leucovorin for Stage III and IV Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of GORTEC Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesneau, Melanie; Pointreau, Yoann; Chapet, Sophie; Martin, Laurent; Pommier, Pascal; Alfonsi, Marc; Laguerre, Brigitte; Feham, Nasreddine; Berger, Christine; Garaud, Pascal; Calais, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment of locally advanced, nonresectable, head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, the optimal chemotherapy regimen is still controversial. The objective of this Phase II study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a concomitant treatment using tegafur-uracil, leucovorin, carboplatin, and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 77 patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma Stage III and IVA were enrolled between October 2003 and July 2005. Of the 77 patients, 72 were eligible. They were treated with tegafur-uracil (300 mg/m 2 /d) and leucovorin (75 mg/d) from Days 1 to 19 and from Days 29 to 47 and carboplatin (70 mg/m 2 intravenously for 4 consecutive days), in three cycles every 21 days. Conventional radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Results: With a mean follow-up of 22.8 months, the 3-year locoregional control, overall survival and disease-free survival actuarial rate was 33.1%, 41.9%, and 27.2%, respectively. The compliance of the treatment was correct. The main acute toxicity was mucositis, with 62% Grade 3-4. Three patients (4.2%) died of acute toxicity. The incidence and severity of late toxicity was acceptable, with 32% Grade 3 and no Grade 4 toxicity. Conclusion: The protocol of concomitant chemoradiotherapy using tegafur-uracil, leucovorin, and carboplatin for locally advanced unresectable head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma is feasible. The compliance was correct. The incidence and severity of the acute and late toxicities were acceptable, but not improved. The efficacy of this regimen seems equivalent to the main protocols of concurrent chemoradiotherapy. It represents a possible alternative for patients without an intravenous catheter.

  17. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2–4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, Geert O.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Ende, Piet van den; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2–4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2–4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2–4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  18. Regular exercise behaviour and intention and symptoms of anxiety and depression in coronary heart disease patients across Europe: Results from the EUROASPIRE III survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prugger, Christof; Wellmann, Jürgen; Heidrich, Jan; De Bacquer, Dirk; De Smedt, Delphine; De Backer, Guy; Reiner, Željko; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Fras, Zlatko; Gaita, Dan; Jennings, Catriona; Kotseva, Kornelia; Wood, David; Keil, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Regular exercise lowers the risk of cardiovascular death in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. We aimed to investigate regular exercise behaviour and intention in relation to symptoms of anxiety and depression in CHD patients across Europe. This study was based on a multicentre cross-sectional survey. In the EUROpean Action on Secondary and Primary Prevention through Intervention to Reduce Events (EUROASPIRE) III survey, 8966 CHD patients patients exercised or intended to exercise regularly was assessed using the Stages of Change questionnaire in 8330 patients. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Total physical activity was measured by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire in patients from a subset of 14 countries. Overall, 50.3% of patients were not intending to exercise regularly, 15.9% were intending to exercise regularly, and 33.8% were exercising regularly. Patients with severe symptoms of depression less frequently exercised regularly than patients with symptoms in the normal range (20.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 14.8-26.8 vs 36.7%, 95% CI 29.8-44.2). Among patients not exercising regularly, patients with severe symptoms of depression were less likely to have an intention to exercise regularly (odds ratio 0.62, 95% CI 0.46-0.85). Symptoms of anxiety did not affect regular exercise intention. In sensitivity analysis, results were consistent when adjusting for total physical activity. Lower frequency of regular exercise and decreased likelihood of exercise intention were observed in CHD patients with severe depressive symptoms. Severe symptoms of depression may preclude CHD patients from performing regular exercise. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  19. Silver Clear Nylon Dressing is Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Patients With Lower Gastrointestinal Cancer: Results From a Phase III Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niazi, Tamim M.; Vuong, Te; Azoulay, Laurant; Marijnen, Corrie; Bujko, Kryzstof; Nasr, Elie; Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Cummings, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. Results: The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Conclusions: Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

  20. Nosologic Comparisons of DSM-IV and DSM-5 Alcohol and Drug Use Disorders: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B.; Chou, S. Patricia; Smith, Sharon M.; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Saha, Tulshi D.; Pickering, Roger P.; June Ruan, W.; Huang, Boji; Grant, Bridget F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine prevalences and concordances between Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), and Fifth Edition (DSM-5) substance use disorders (SUDs) in a newly completed U.S. epidemiologic survey. Method: The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III surveyed 36,309 civilian, noninstitutionalized adults. SUDs were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule–5. Concordances between DSM-IV and DSM-5 disorders were assessed using kappa statistics. Results: Prevalences of past-year substance-specific DSM-5 disorders (2+ criteria) were modestly higher than those of DSM-IV dependence and abuse combined for alcohol, sedatives/tranquilizers, opioids, and heroin, but lower for cannabis, cocaine, and stimulants. Lifetime prevalences were lower under DSM-5. Prevalences were similar between moderate to severe (4+ criteria) DSM-5 disorders and dependence, whereas prevalences of DSM-5 disorders at 3+ criteria (DSM-5 [3+]) were higher, particularly for cannabis. Past-year concordances were excellent for DSM-IV dependence and abuse combined versus any DSM-5 and DSM-IV dependence versus DSM-5 moderate to severe disorders; lifetime concordances were fair to excellent. Past-year concordances between DSM-IV and DSM-5 (3+) were generally similar to or modestly higher than those with any DSM-5 disorder; lifetime concordances were mostly lower. Conclusions: Findings are consistent with those informing the development of DSM-5. Future research should examine differences in patterns between past-year and lifetime disorders, particularly for cannabis. Other questions warranting investigation include whether different combinations of the same numbers of criteria carry different clinical or nosologic implications, whether changes innosology yield changes in treatment demand, and whether changes in characteristics of individuals with DSM-5 SUDs

  1. The Epidemiology of Antisocial Behavioral Syndromes in Adulthood: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B.; Chou, S. Patricia; Saha, Tulshi D.; Smith, Sharon M.; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Pickering, Roger P.; Ruan, W. June; Huang, Boji; Grant, Bridget F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present current, nationally representative U.S. findings on prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidity, disability and treatment of DSM-5 antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and syndromal adult antisocial behavior without conduct disorder before age 15 (AABS). Method Face-to-face interviews with respondents (n=36,309) in the 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III. DSM-5 alcohol, nicotine, specific drug use disorders, and selected mood, anxiety, trauma-related, eating, and personality disorders were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule–5. Results Prevalences of ASPD and AABS were 4.3% and 20.3%, highest among male, white, Native American, younger, and unmarried respondents, those with high school or less education, lower incomes, and Western residence. Both antisocial syndromes were significantly associated with 12-month and lifetime substance use, dysthymia/persistent depressive, bipolar I, posttraumatic stress and borderline and schizotypal personality disorders (ORs=1.2-7.0). ASPD was additionally associated with 12-month agoraphobia and lifetime generalized anxiety disorder; AABS, with 12-month and lifetime major depressive and 12-month generalized anxiety disorders. Both were associated with significant disability (pantisocial respondents were untreated. Conclusions One in 4 U.S. adults exhibits syndromal antisocial behavior, with similar sociodemographic and psychiatric correlates and disability regardless of whether onset occurred before age 15, illustrating the clinical and public health significance of both ASPD and AABS. In addition to laying groundwork for estimates of social and economic costs, and further etiologic and nosologic research, these findings highlight the urgency of effectively preventing and treating antisocial syndromes, including investigation of whether treatment for comorbidity hastens symptomatic remission and improves

  2. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy for stage I/II breast cancer using lung density correction: 10-year and 15-year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Lori J.; Griffith, Kent A.; Hayman, James A.; Douglas, Kathye R.; Lichter, Allen S.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) planning for breast cancer using lung density correction improves dose homogeneity. Its use obviates the need for a medial wedge, thus reducing scatter to the opposite breast. Although lung density correction is used at many centers in planning for early-stage breast cancer, long-term results of local control and survival have not been reported. Since 1984, we have used lung density correction for dose calculations at the University of Michigan. We now present our 10-year and 15-year results. Methods and Materials: The records of 867 patients with Stage I/II breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT with or without systemic therapy were reviewed. Tangential fields delivering 45-50 Gy to the whole breast calculated using lung density correction were used. A boost was added in 96.8% of patients for a total median dose of 61.8 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.6 years (range, 0.2-18.9 years), 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial rates of in-breast tumor recurrence as only first failure were 2.2%, 3.6%, and 5.4%, respectively. With surgical salvage, the 15-year cumulative rate of local control was 99.7%. Factors that significantly predicted for increased rate of local recurrence in multivariate analysis were age ≤ 35 years, hazard ratio 4.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-13.9) p = 0.004; negative progesterone receptor status, hazard ratio 6.8 (95% CI, 2.3-20.3) p = < 0.001; negative estrogen receptor status, hazard ratio 4.0 (95% CI, 1.5-11.1) p = 0.007; and lack of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, hazard ratio 7.7 (95% CI, 1.7-33.3) p = 0.008. Relapse-free survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 84.6%, 70.8%, and 55.9%, respectively; breast cancer-specific survival rates were 94.4%, 90.5%, and 86.9%, respectively; and corresponding estimates for overall survival were 89.7%, 75.7%, and 61.3%. Conclusions: Use of lung density correction was associated with high rates of local control, relapse-free survival, breast

  3. Information manager-2011-Vol 11

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Library _info_Sc_ 1

    The Information Manager Vol. ... extent while carrying out their duties on a daily basis. ... It concluded by admonishing librarians to brace up and keep pace ... Proper training should be given to .... used to information and communication technologies .... proficiency Skills .... analysis of the workplace and implementation of.

  4. Reduction of unwanted submental fat with ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid), an adipocytolytic injectable treatment: results from a phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled study*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzany, B; Griffiths, T; Walker, P; Lippert, S; McDiarmid, J; Havlickova, B

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Unwanted submental fat (SMF) is aesthetically unappealing, but methods of reduction are either invasive or lack evidence for their use. An injectable approach with ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid) is under investigation. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ATX-101 for the reduction of unwanted SMF. Methods In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III study, 363 patients with moderate/severe SMF were randomized to receive ATX-101 (1 or 2 mg cm−2) or placebo injections into their SMF at up to four treatment sessions ∽28 days apart, with a 12-week follow-up. The co-primary efficacy endpoints were the proportions of treatment responders [patients with ≥ 1-point improvement in SMF on the 5-point Clinician-Reported Submental Fat Rating Scale (CR-SMFRS)] and patients satisfied with their face and chin appearance on the Subject Self-Rating Scale (SSRS). Secondary endpoints included skin laxity, calliper measurements and patient-reported outcomes. Adverse events were monitored. Results Significantly more ATX-101 recipients met the primary endpoint criteria vs. placebo: on the clinician scale, 59·2% and 65·3% of patients treated with ATX-101 1 and 2 mg cm−2, respectively, were treatment responders vs. 23·0% for placebo (CR-SMFRS;P < 0·001); on the patient scale, 53·3% and 66·1%, respectively, vs. 28·7%, were satisfied with their face/chin appearance (SSRS;P < 0·001). Calliper measurements showed a significant reduction in SMF (P < 0·001), skin laxity was not worsened and patients reported improvements in the severity and psychological impact of SMF with ATX-101 vs. placebo. Most adverse events were transient and associated with the treatment area. Conclusions ATX-101 was effective and well tolerated for nonsurgical SMF reduction. What's already known about this topic? Unwanted submental fat (SMF) is considered aesthetically unappealing. Liposuction and face-lift are effective treatments for SMF reduction but are

  5. Bortezomib before and after high-dose therapy in myeloma : Long-term results from the phase III HOVON-65/GMMGHD-4 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Lokhorst, H. M.; Mai, E. K.; van der Holt, B.; Blau, I. W.; Zweegman, S.; Weisel, K. C.; Vellenga, E.; Pfreundschuh, M.; Kersten, M. J.; Scheid, C.; Croockewit, S.; Raymakers, R.; Hose, D.; Potamianou, A.; Jauch, A.; Hillengass, J.; Stevens-Kroef, M.; Raab, M. S.; Broijl, A.; Lindemann, H. W.; Bos, G. M. J.; Brossart, P.; Kooy, M. van Marwijk; Ypma, P.; Duehrsen, U.; Schaafsma, R. M.; Bertsch, U.; Hielscher, T.; Jarari, Le; Salwender, H. J.; Sonneveld, P.

    The Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial Group for Hematology Oncology Group-65/German-speaking Myeloma Multicenter Group-HD4 (HOVON-65/GMMG-HD4) phase III trial compared bortezomib (BTZ) before and after high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDM, PAD arm) compared with classical

  6. Bortezomib before and after high-dose therapy in myeloma: long-term results from the phase III HOVON-65/GMMGHD-4 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Lokhorst, H. M.; Mai, E. K.; van der Holt, B.; Blau, I. W.; Zweegman, S.; Weisel, K. C.; Vellenga, E.; Pfreundschuh, M.; Kersten, M. J.; Scheid, C.; Croockewit, S.; Raymakers, R.; Hose, D.; Potamianou, A.; Jauch, A.; Hillengass, J.; Stevens-Kroef, M.; Raab, M. S.; Broijl, A.; Lindemann, H. W.; Bos, G. M. J.; Brossart, P.; van Marwijk Kooy, M.; Ypma, P.; Duehrsen, U.; Schaafsma, R. M.; Bertsch, U.; Hielscher, T.; Jarari, Le; Salwender, H. J.; Sonneveld, P.

    2018-01-01

    The Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial Group for Hematology Oncology Group-65/German-speaking Myeloma Multicenter Group-HD4 (HOVON-65/GMMG-HD4) phase III trial compared bortezomib (BTZ) before and after high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDM, PAD arm) compared with classical

  7. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  8. Fermilab III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding.

  9. Lifitegrast Ophthalmic Solution 5.0% versus Placebo for Treatment of Dry Eye Disease: Results of the Randomized Phase III OPUS-2 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Joseph; Karpecki, Paul; Latkany, Robert; Luchs, Jodi; Martel, Joseph; Sall, Kenneth; Raychaudhuri, Aparna; Smith, Valerie; Semba, Charles P

    2015-12-01

    Lifitegrast is an integrin antagonist that decreases T-cell-mediated inflammation associated with dry eye disease (DED). We report the results of OPUS-2, a phase III study evaluating the efficacy and safety of lifitegrast compared with placebo for the treatment of DED. A 12-week, multicenter, randomized, prospective, double-masked, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Adults aged ≥18 years with use of artificial tears within 30 days, inferior corneal staining score ≥0.5 (0-4 scale), Schirmer tear test (without anesthesia) ≥1 and ≤10 mm, and eye dryness score ≥40 (0-100 visual analogue scale [VAS]). Subjects were randomized 1:1 after 14-day placebo run-in to lifitegrast ophthalmic solution 5.0% or placebo twice daily for 84 days. Co-primary efficacy end points were change, from baseline to day 84, in eye dryness score (VAS, both eyes) and inferior corneal fluorescein staining score in the designated study eye. Secondary end points were change, from baseline to day 84, in ocular discomfort score (0-4 scale) in study eye, eye discomfort score (VAS), total corneal staining score in the study eye, and nasal conjunctival lissamine green staining score (0-4 scale) in the study eye. Treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were recorded. A total of 718 subjects were randomized: placebo, n = 360; lifitegrast, n = 358 (intent-to-treat population). Lifitegrast-treated subjects experienced greater improvement in eye dryness than placebo-treated subjects (treatment effect, 12.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.51-16.70; P < 0.0001). There was no between-group difference in inferior corneal staining (treatment effect, 0.03; 95% CI, -0.10 to 0.17; P = 0.6186). There was nominally significant improvement of secondary symptom end points among lifitegrast-treated subjects: ocular discomfort (nominal P = 0.0005) and eye discomfort (nominal, P < 0.0001). There were no between-group differences on secondary signs: total corneal staining and nasal lissamine staining. More

  10. Results From the Phase III Randomized Trial of Onartuzumab Plus Erlotinib Versus Erlotinib in Previously Treated Stage IIIB or IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: METLung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigel, David R; Edelman, Martin J; O'Byrne, Kenneth; Paz-Ares, Luis; Mocci, Simonetta; Phan, See; Shames, David S; Smith, Dustin; Yu, Wei; Paton, Virginia E; Mok, Tony

    2017-02-01

    Purpose The phase III OAM4971g study (METLung) examined the efficacy and safety of onartuzumab plus erlotinib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer selected by MET immunohistochemistry whose disease had progressed after treatment with a platinum-based chemotherapy regimen. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned at a one-to-one ratio to receive onartuzumab (15 mg/kg intravenously on day 1 of each 21-day cycle) plus daily oral erlotinib 150 mg or intravenous placebo plus daily oral erlotinib 150 mg. The primary end point was overall survival (OS) in the intent-to-treat population. Secondary end points included median progression-free survival, overall response rate, biomarker analysis, and safety. Results A total of 499 patients were enrolled (onartuzumab, n = 250; placebo, n = 249). Median OS was 6.8 versus 9.1 months for onartuzumab versus placebo (stratified hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.65; P = .067), with a greater number of deaths in the onartuzumab arm (130 [52%] v 114 [46%]). Median progression-free survival was 2.7 versus 2.6 months (stratified HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.20; P = .92), and overall response rate was 8.4% and 9.6% for onartuzumab versus placebo, respectively. Exploratory analyses using MET fluorescence in situ hybridization status and gene expression showed no benefit for onartuzumab; patients with EGFR mutations showed a trend toward shorter OS with onartuzumab treatment (HR, 4.68; 95% CI, 0.97 to 22.63). Grade 3 to 5 adverse events were reported by 56.0% and 51.2% of patients, with serious AEs in 33.9% and 30.7%, for experimental versus control arms, respectively. Conclusion Onartuzumab plus erlotinib did not improve clinical outcomes, with shorter OS in the onartuzumab arm, compared with erlotinib in patients with MET-positive non-small-cell lung cancer.

  11. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin for stage-III and -IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Long-term results including functional outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguenin, P.; Glanzmann, C.; Taussky, D.; Luetolf, U.M.; Schmid, S.; Moe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival rate, the probability of local control, the patterns of relapse and late sequelae including self-reported quality of life in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous CDDP chemotherapy for stage-III to stage-IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Methods: From 1988 to 1994, 64 patients (median age 55.5 years) with carcinomas of different subsites, excluding the nasopharynx, were treated in a pilot study with 1.2 Gy bid (6 h interval; total dose 74.4 Gy) and simultaneous CDDP (20 mg/m 2 daily, 5 days in week 1 and 5) and followed at regular intervals. Overall survival and local control, as well as the rates of late toxicity, were estimated using the actuarial method. Median follow-up was 3.3 years for all and 5.2 years for surviving patients. To assess the quality of life, the EORTC QLQ-C 30 questionnaire and the H and N35 module questionnaire were sent to the patients surviving with no evidence of disease or second primary tumors; they were answered by 15/23 (67%). Results: Overall survival was 37% at 5 years, whereas disease-specific survival was 59%. Twenty-three patients died from uncontrolled head and neck cancer. Second primary tumors were observed in 13 patients, most frequently in the lung. Local control without salvage surgery was 74% at 5 years for all subsites and stages, and loco-regional disease-free survival was 72%. Eleven patients developed distant metastases, which was the only site of failure in 6 cases. Salvage surgery was successful in 2 cases. The actuarial estimates of ≥grade-3 late toxicity was 4% for the mandibular bone and 23% for dysphagia, and 50% of the patients experienced a permanent xerostomy. Self-reported global quality of life in surviving patients was good (mean 68 points on a scale 0 to 100); consequences of impaired salivary function had most impact on nutritional and social aspects. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated RT with concomitant CDDP is well tolerated and highly

  12. Quality of Life and Cost-Effectiveness Assessment of Radioiodine Ablation Strategies in Patients With Thyroid Cancer: Results From the Randomized Phase III ESTIMABL Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borget, Isabelle; Bonastre, Julia; Catargi, Bogdan; Déandréis, Désirée; Zerdoud, Slimane; Rusu, Daniela; Bardet, Stéphane; Leenhardt, Laurence; Bastie, Delphine; Schvartz, Claire; Vera, Pierre; Morel, Olivier; Benisvy, Daniele; Bournaud, Claire; Bonichon, Francoise; Kelly, Antony; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Leboulleux, Sophie; Journeau, Florence; Benhamou, Ellen; Schlumberger, Martin

    2015-09-10

    In the ESTIMABL phase III trial, the thyroid ablation rate was equivalent for the two thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation methods (thyroid hormone withdrawal [THW] and recombinant human TSH [rhTSH]) and the two iodine-131 ((131)I) activities (1.1 or 3.7 GBq). The objectives of this article were to present health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) results and a cost-effectiveness evaluation performed alongside this trial. HRQoL and utility were longitudinally assessed, from random assignment to the follow-up visit at 8 ± 2 months for the 752 patients with thyroid cancer, using the Short Form-36 and the EuroQoL-5D questionnaires, respectively. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from the societal perspective in the French context. Resource use (hospitalization for (131)I administration, rhTSH, sick leaves, and transportation) was collected prospectively. We used the net monetary benefit approach and computed cost-effectiveness acceptability curves for both TSH stimulation methods and (131)I activities. Sensitivity analyses of the costs of rhTSH were performed. At (131)I administration, THW caused a clinically significant deterioration of HRQoL, whereas HRQoL remained stable with rhTSH. This deterioration was transient with no difference 3 months later. rhTSH was more effective than THW in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs; +0.013 QALY/patient) but more expensive (+€474/patient). The probability that rhTSH would be cost effective at a €50,000/QALY threshold was 47% in France. The use of 1.1 GBq of (131)I instead of 3.7 GBq reduced per-patient costs by €955 (US$1,018) but with slightly decreased efficacy (-0.007 QALY/patient). rhTSH avoids the transient THW-induced deterioration of HRQoL but is unlikely to be cost effective at its current price. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. The benefit of microsatellite instability is attenuated by chemotherapy in stage II and stage III gastric cancer: Results from a large cohort with subgroup analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Young; Choi, Yoon Young; An, Ji Yeong; Shin, Hyun Beak; Jo, Ara; Choi, Hyeji; Seo, Sang Hyuk; Bang, Hui-Jae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2015-08-15

    We previously reported that the prognosis of microsatellite instability high (MSI-H) gastric cancer is similar to that of MSI-low/microsatellite stable (MSI-L/MSS) gastric cancer. The reason for this seemed to be related to the effects of chemotherapy. To verify this hypothesis, we expanded the study population and reanalyzed the prognosis of MSI-H gastric cancer. Data from 1,276 patients with Stage II and III gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy with curative intent between January 2005 and June 2010 were reviewed. The prognosis of MSI-H tumors in comparison with MSI-L/MSS tumors was analyzed, according to the administration of chemotherapy and other clinicopathologic features. A total of 361 (28.3%) patients did not receive chemotherapy (MSI-H = 47 and MSI-L/MSS = 314), whereas 915 (71.7%) patients did receive chemotherapy (MSI-H = 58 and MSI-L/MSS = 857). The hazard ratio of MSI-H versus MSI-L/MSS was 0.49 (95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.94, p = 0.031) when chemotherapy was not received and 1.16 (95% confidence interval: 0.78-1.71, p = 0.466) when chemotherapy was received. In subgroup analyses, the prognosis of MSI-H was better in Stage III, women, with lymph node metastasis, and undifferentiated histology subgroups when chemotherapy was not received. However, in patients treated with chemotherapy, prognosis was worse for MSI-H tumors in Stage III, undifferentiated histology, and diffuse type subgroups of gastric cancer. In conclusion, MSI-H tumors were associated with a good prognosis in Stage II and III gastric cancer when patients were treated by surgery alone, and the benefits of MSI-H status were attenuated by chemotherapy. © 2015 UICC.

  14. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin for stage-III and -IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Long-term results including functional outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguenin, P.; Glanzmann, C.; Taussky, D.; Luetolf, U.M. [Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Radiation Oncology Dept.; Schmid, S.; Moe, K. [Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery

    1998-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival rate, the probability of local control, the patterns of relapse and late sequelae including self-reported quality of life in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous CDDP chemotherapy for stage-III to stage-IV carcinomas of the head and neck. Methods: From 1988 to 1994, 64 patients (median age 55.5 years) with carcinomas of different subsites, excluding the nasopharynx, were treated in a pilot study with 1.2 Gy bid (6 h interval; total dose 74.4 Gy) and simultaneous CDDP (20 mg/m{sup 2} daily, 5 days in week 1 and 5) and followed at regular intervals. Overall survival and local control, as well as the rates of late toxicity, were estimated using the actuarial method. Median follow-up was 3.3 years for all and 5.2 years for surviving patients. To assess the quality of life, the EORTC QLQ-C 30 questionnaire and the H and N35 module questionnaire were sent to the patients surviving with no evidence of disease or second primary tumors; they were answered by 15/23 (67%). Results: Overall survival was 37% at 5 years, whereas disease-specific survival was 59%. Twenty-three patients died from uncontrolled head and neck cancer. Second primary tumors were observed in 13 patients, most frequently in the lung. Local control without salvage surgery was 74% at 5 years for all subsites and stages, and loco-regional disease-free survival was 72%. Eleven patients developed distant metastases, which was the only site of failure in 6 cases. Salvage surgery was successful in 2 cases. The actuarial estimates of {>=}grade-3 late toxicity was 4% for the mandibular bone and 23% for dysphagia, and 50% of the patients experienced a permanent xerostomy. Self-reported global quality of life in surviving patients was good (mean 68 points on a scale 0 to 100); consequences of impaired salivary function had most impact on nutritional and social aspects. Conclusions: Hyperfractionated RT with concomitant CDDP is well tolerated and

  15. Results of an RTOG phase III trial (RTOG 85-27) comparing radiotherapy plus etanidazole with radiotherapy alone for locally advanced head and neck carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dingjen, Lee; Cosmatos, Dennis; Marcial, Victor A; Fu, Karen K; Rotman, Marvin; Cooper, Jay S; Ortiz, Hernando G; Beitler, Jonathan J; Abrams, Ross A; Curran, Walter J; Coleman, C Norman; Wasserman, Todd H

    1995-06-15

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to determine the efficacy and toxicity of Etanidazole (ETA), a hypoxic cell sensitizer, when combined with conventional radiotherapy (RT) in the management of advanced head and neck carcinomas. Methods and Materials: From March 1988 to September 1991, 521 patients who had Stage III or IV head and neck carcinomas were randomized to receive conventional RT alone (66 Gy in 33 fractions to 74 Gy in 37 fractions, 5 fractions per week) or RT + ETA (2.0 g/m{sup 2} thrice weekly for 17 doses), of whom 504 were eligible and analyzable. Treatment assignments were stratified before randomization according to the primary site (oral cavity + hypopharynx vs. supraglottic larynx + oropharynx + nasopharynx), T-stage (T1-3 vs. T4), and N-stage (N0-2 vs. N3). Pretreatment characteristics were balanced. In the RT-alone arm, 39% of patients had T3 and 34% had T4 disease, whereas in the RT + ETA arm, 42% of patients had T3 and 33% had T4 disease. Thirty-eight percent of the RT-alone patients and 37% of the RT + ETA patients had N3 disease. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 3.38 years, with a range between 0.96 and 5.63 years. Results: One hundred and ninety-four of the 252 (77%) RT + ETA patients received at least 14 doses of the drug. Overall RT protocol compliance rate was 82% in the RT-alone arm and 86% in the RT + ETA arm. No Grade 3 or 4 central nervous system or peripheral neuropathy was observed in the RT + ETA arm. Eighteen percent of the patients developed Grade 1 and 5% developed Grade 2 peripheral neuropathy. Other drug related toxicities included nausea/vomiting (27%), low blood counts (15%), and allergy (9%). Most of these toxicities were Grade 1 and 2. The incidence of severe acute and late radiation effects were similar between the two arms. The 2-year actuarial local-regional control rate (LCR) was 40% for the RT-alone arm and 40% for the RT + ETA arm. Two-year actuarial survival was 41% for the RT-alone arm and 43

  16. Results of an RTOG phase III trial (RTOG 85-27) comparing radiotherapy plus etanidazole with radiotherapy alone for locally advanced head and neck carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Dingjen; Cosmatos, Dennis; Marcial, Victor A.; Fu, Karen K.; Rotman, Marvin; Cooper, Jay S.; Ortiz, Hernando G.; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Abrams, Ross A.; Curran, Walter J.; Coleman, C. Norman; Wasserman, Todd H.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to determine the efficacy and toxicity of Etanidazole (ETA), a hypoxic cell sensitizer, when combined with conventional radiotherapy (RT) in the management of advanced head and neck carcinomas. Methods and Materials: From March 1988 to September 1991, 521 patients who had Stage III or IV head and neck carcinomas were randomized to receive conventional RT alone (66 Gy in 33 fractions to 74 Gy in 37 fractions, 5 fractions per week) or RT + ETA (2.0 g/m 2 thrice weekly for 17 doses), of whom 504 were eligible and analyzable. Treatment assignments were stratified before randomization according to the primary site (oral cavity + hypopharynx vs. supraglottic larynx + oropharynx + nasopharynx), T-stage (T1-3 vs. T4), and N-stage (N0-2 vs. N3). Pretreatment characteristics were balanced. In the RT-alone arm, 39% of patients had T3 and 34% had T4 disease, whereas in the RT + ETA arm, 42% of patients had T3 and 33% had T4 disease. Thirty-eight percent of the RT-alone patients and 37% of the RT + ETA patients had N3 disease. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 3.38 years, with a range between 0.96 and 5.63 years. Results: One hundred and ninety-four of the 252 (77%) RT + ETA patients received at least 14 doses of the drug. Overall RT protocol compliance rate was 82% in the RT-alone arm and 86% in the RT + ETA arm. No Grade 3 or 4 central nervous system or peripheral neuropathy was observed in the RT + ETA arm. Eighteen percent of the patients developed Grade 1 and 5% developed Grade 2 peripheral neuropathy. Other drug related toxicities included nausea/vomiting (27%), low blood counts (15%), and allergy (9%). Most of these toxicities were Grade 1 and 2. The incidence of severe acute and late radiation effects were similar between the two arms. The 2-year actuarial local-regional control rate (LCR) was 40% for the RT-alone arm and 40% for the RT + ETA arm. Two-year actuarial survival was 41% for the RT-alone arm and 43% for

  17. A randomized phase III trial comparing concomitant chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone in advanced head and neck cancers - mature results: Yoodhvir Singh Nagar, Lucknow Cancer Institute, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Kumar, S.; Datta, N.R.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate contribution of concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CTRT) over and above radiotherapy alone (RT) in previously untreated stage III/IV, squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCH and N). Patients with cancers of oral cavity (OC), oropharynx (OP), supraglottis (SG) and hypopharynx (HP) were randomized into RT arm or CTRT arm. Radiotherapy was identical in both arms (70Gy/35 fractions/7 weeks). In CTRT arm concomitant cisplatin (35mg/m 2 ) was given weekly for seven cycles. Surgery was reserved for salvage purposes when required. From May 1996 to December 1998, 155 patients (RT=78, CTRT=77) were enrolled and 139 patients (RT1,CTRT=68) were assessable. Over 90% patients in both arms completed planned treatment. The complete response rate was 51% in RT arm and 71% in CTRT arm (p=0.017). The median disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in RT arm and CTRT arm were 3 months vs. 11 months (p=0.0009) and 9 months vs. 26 months (p=0.01) respectively. The 5-year DFS and OS in the two arms were 10% vs. 27% (p=0.000) and 16% vs. 29% (p=0.01) respectively. Acute grade III toxicity was comparable in both the arms (12% vs. 16%, p=0.74). Late grade I/II toxicity was higher in CTRT arm (70% vs. 51%, p=0.09). Serious late toxicities were not seen in both arms. On univariate analysis the favorable factors for immediate response were protocol (CTRT better), primary site (SG and OP better than OC and HP), T-stage (T1-T2 better), Nodes (N0 better than N+), Stage (III > IV), KPS (>80) and lesser overall treatment time (OTT). Multivariate analysis retained protocol, T stage, N stage and OTT as factors independently affecting the immediate response. Addition of concomitant weekly cisplatin (35mg/m 2 ) to radiotherapy improves the likelihood of local control, DFS and OS with acceptable acute and late toxicities and can be recommended as a standard form of treatment in advanced SCCH and N

  18. Cross sections for atomic processes, vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayanagi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Otani, Shunsuke

    1977-09-01

    This data collection book contains the data on all processes involving hydrogen and helium isotopes, their ions, electrons and photons, collected systematically and comprehensively, and is compiled subsequently to Vol. 1 as one of the works of the data collection study group in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, Japan. The items of the contents will include energy level, multiplicately excited state, radiation process, electron collision, ionic collision, recombination, collision of neutral atoms, colliding process involving molecules, and other processes. However, the first edition this time contains energy level, radiation process, electron collision and ionic collision, and the data on remaining items are now under collection. Though some criticisms have been heard about Vol. 1, the authors consider that such comprehensive collection based on systematic classification is the foundation of making a generalized data bank expected to become necessary in future. Thus the data collection book includes all relevant processes, and records the experimental data and theoretically calculated results in principle without modification by selecting them systematically. This year, investigation on data evaluation is taken up also as one of the tasks of the study group. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  19. Mature Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing 5-Flourouracil with Leucovorin to 5-Flourouracil with Levamisole as Adjuvant Therapy of Stage II and III Colorectal Cancer- The Israel Cooperative Oncology Group (ICOG Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Figer, Aviram Nissan, Adi Shani, Riva Borovick, Mariana Stiener, Mario Baras, Herbert R. Freund, Aaron Sulkes, Alexander Stojadinovic, Tamar Peretz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Survival benefit with adjuvant therapy was shown in patients with Stage III colorectal cancer (CRC. This study evaluates long-term (10-year outcome in patients with CRC randomly assigned to adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin (5FU+LV or 5-FU/Levamisole (5FU+LEV.Methods: Between 1990 and 1995, 398 patients with curatively resected Stage II-III CRC were randomly assigned to adjuvant 5FU+LV or 5FU+LEV for 12 months.Results: No difference was evident in 10-year relapse-free or overall survival between study groups. Grade III toxicity was similar between groups; however, neurotoxicity was significantly greater with 5FU+LEV (p=0.02 and gastrointestinal toxicity with 5FU+LV (p=0.03. Female patients treated with 5FU+LEV had improved overall survival.Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment of CRC is still based on leucovorin modulated fluorouracil. The long-term follow-up results of this trial indicate that the adjuvant treatment of Stage II-III CRC with 5FU+LV or 5FU+LEV is equally effective. The finding of improved survival in female subjects treated with 5FU+LEV warrants further study to determine if Levamisole is a better modulator of 5-FU than Leucovorin in this patient subset.

  20. Agrosearch 1 Vol. 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the socio-economic status of women in group ... The results of the multiple regression analysis showed that the variables (age, ... Oluwasola and Alimi, (2007) found that one of the major problems of an average .... business or financial management and business record keeping skills resulting from their ...

  1. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  2. IJAAAR 2011 VOL 7

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faculty of Agricultural Sciences Lautech Ogbomoso

    importance of nonfarm activities and income among the rural households.Result of the FGT ... size, access to credit facility, distance to market, level of urbanization and poverty status were significant ... increases inequality instead. Focus of.

  3. Vol 41 No 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    health facility) duration of service, work department, profession and ... Focus group discussions revealed ... The gaps identified need to be addressed, or could result in failure to detect .... organization, coordination and logistic problems. To the.

  4. Vol 1 No 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elearning

    The International Journal of Health Research is a peer-reviewed online international journal allowing free ... The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current topics of special interest and relevance. .... In the early stages of drug development, it .... ing the results of a method run within a.

  5. Rhodium. Suppl. Vol. B1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, W.P.; Jehn, H.; McCleverty, J.A.; Raub, C.J.; Robinson, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    The present rhodium vol. B1 is concerned largely with linary compounds and coordination complexes of this important metal, which is used either alone or in alloy form for fabrication of other materials or for heterogeneous catalysis. In first two chapters are devoted for hydrides, oxides, ternary and quaternary oxorhodates. Third chapter is on different type of complexes with nitrogen. From chapter four to seven is on halogen complexes with this metal. Next chapters are on sulphides, sulphoxide and sulphito complexes, sulphates and sulphato complexes, selenides and tellurides, borides, borane complexes, carbides, carbonato, cyno, fulminato and thiocyanato complexes. Finally, silicide, phosphides, phosphito and arsenides are treated over here. (AB)

  6. Hard processes. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, B.L.; Khoze, V.A.; Lipatov, L.N.

    1984-01-01

    Deep inelastic (hard) processes are now at the epicenter of modern high-energy physics. These processes are governed by short-distance dynamics, which reveals the intrinsic structure of elementary particles. The theory of deep inelastic processes is now sufficiently well settled. The authors' aim was to give an effective tool to theoreticians and experimentalists who are engaged in high-energy physics. This book is intended primarily for physicists who are only beginning to study the field. To read the book, one should be acquainted with the Feynman diagram technique and with some particular topics from elementary particle theory (symmetries, dispersion relations, Regge pole theory, etc.). Theoretical consideration of deep inelastic processes is now based on quantum chromodynamics (QCD). At the same time, analysis of relevant physical phenomena demands a synthesis of QCD notions (quarks, gluons) with certain empirical characteristics. Therefore, the phenomenological approaches presented are a necessary stage in a study of this range of phenomena which should undoubtedly be followed by a detailed description based on QCD and electroweak theory. The authors were naturally unable to dwell on experimental data accumulated during the past decade of intensive investigations. Priority was given to results which allow a direct comparison with theoretical predictions. (Auth.)

  7. Accelerated re-epithelialization of partial-thickness skin wounds by a topical betulin gel: Results of a randomized phase III clinical trials program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Juan P; Podmelle, Fred; Lipový, Břetislav; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver; Schumann, Hauke; Schwieger-Briel, Agnes; Zahn, Tobias R; Metelmann, Hans-Robert

    2017-09-01

    The clinical significance of timely re-epithelialization is obvious in burn care, since delayed wound closure is enhancing the risk of wound site infection and extensive scarring. Topical treatments that accelerate wound healing are urgently needed to reduce these sequelae. Evidence from preliminary studies suggests that betulin can accelerate the healing of different types of wounds, including second degree burns and split-thickness skin graft wounds. The goal of this combined study program consisting of two randomized phase III clinical trials in parallel is to evaluate whether a topical betulin gel (TBG) is accelerating re-epithelialization of split-thickness skin graft (STSG) donor site wounds compared to standard of care. Two parallel blindly evaluated, randomised, controlled, multicentre phase III clinical trials were performed in adults undergoing STSG surgery (EudraCT nos. 2012-003390-26 and 2012-000777-23). Donor site wounds were split into two equal halves and randomized 1:1 to standard of care (a non-adhesive moist wound dressing) or standard of care plus TBG consisting of 10% birch bark extract and 90% sunflower oil (Episalvan, Birken AG, Niefern-Oeschelbronn, Germany). The primary efficacy assessment was the intra-individual difference in time to wound closure assessed from digital photographs by three blinded experts. A total of 219 patients were included and treated in the two trials. Wounds closed faster with TBG than without it (15.3 vs. 16.5 days; mean intra-individual difference=-1.1 days [95% CI, -1.5 to -0.7]; p<0.0001). This agreed with unblinded direct clinical assessment (difference=-2.1 days [95% CI, -2.7 to -1.5]; p<0.0001). Adverse events possibly related to treatment were mild or moderate and mostly at the application site. TBG accelerates re-epithelialization of partial thickness wounds compared to the current standard of care, providing a well-tolerated contribution to burn care in practice. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  8. Ten- to 15-year results of the Oxford Phase III mobile unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: a prospective study from a non-designer group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisowski, L A; Meijer, L I; Bekerom, M P J van den; Pilot, P; Lisowski, A E

    2016-10-01

    The interest in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) for medial osteoarthritis has increased rapidly but the long-term follow-up of the Oxford UKAs has yet to be analysed in non-designer centres. We have examined our ten- to 15-year clinical and radiological follow-up data for the Oxford Phase III UKAs. Between January 1999 and January 2005 a total of 138 consecutive Oxford Phase III arthroplasties were performed by a single surgeon in 129 patients for medial compartment osteoarthritis (71 right and 67 left knees, mean age 72.0 years (47 to 91), mean body mass index 28.2 (20.7 to 52.2)). Both clinical data and radiographs were prospectively recorded and obtained at intervals. Of the 129 patients, 32 patients (32 knees) died, ten patients (12 knees) were not able to take part in the final clinical and radiological assessment due to physical and mental conditions, but via telephone interview it was confirmed that none of these ten patients (12 knees) had a revision of the knee arthroplasty. One patient (two knees) was lost to follow-up. The mean follow-up was 11.7 years (10 to 15). A total of 11 knees (8%) were revised. The survival at 15 years with revision for any reason as the endpoint was 90.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 85.2 to 96.0) and revision related to the prosthesis was 99.3% (95% CI 97.9 to 100). The mean total Knee Society Score was 47 (0 to 80) pre-operatively and 81 (30 to 100) at latest follow-up. The mean Oxford Knee Score was 19 (12 to 40) pre-operatively and 42 (28 to 55) at final follow-up. Radiolucency beneath the tibial component occurred in 22 of 81 prostheses (27.2%) without evidence of loosening. This study supports the use of UKA in medial compartment osteoarthritis with excellent long-term functional and radiological outcomes with an excellent 15-year survival rate. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):41-7. ©2016 Lisowski et al.

  9. Electricity from MHD, 1968. Vol. IV. Open-Cycle MHD. Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation held by the IAEA at Warsaw, 24-30 July 1968. The meeting was attended by some 300 participants from 21 countries and three international organizations. In contrast to the Symposium held two years ago, much more emphasis was placed on the economic aspects of using MHD generators in large-scale power generation. Among closed- cycle systems, the prospects of linking an ultra-high-temperature reactor with an MHD generator were explored, and the advantages gained by having a liquid-metal generator as a 'topper' in a conventional steam generating plant were presented. Comments were made about the disproportionate effect of end and boundary conditions in experimental MHD generators on the main plasma parameters, and estimates were made of the interrelationship to be expected in real generators. The estimates will have to await confirmation until results are obtained on large-scale prototype MHD systems. Progress in materials research, in design and construction of auxiliary equipment such as heat exchangers, supercooled magnets (which are- now commercially available), etc., is accompanied by sophisticated ideas of plant design. The Proceedings are complemented by three Round Table Discussions in which chosen experts from various countries discuss the outlook for closed-cycle gas, closed-cycle liquid-metal and open-cycle MHD, and give their views as to the most fruitful course to follow to achieve economic full-scale power generation. Contents: (Vol. I) 1. Closed-Cycle MHD with Gaseous Working Fluids: (a) Diagnostics (3 papers); (b) Steady-state non-equilibrium ionization (8 papers); (c) Transient non-equilibrium ionization (7 papers); (d) Pre-ionization and gas discharge (4 papers); (e) Fields and flow in MHD channels (10 papers); (0 Instabilities (8 papers); (g) Generator design and performance studies (6 papers); (Vol. II) (h) Shock waves (6 papers); (i) Power generation experiments (13 papers

  10. Quality of life after radiation therapy of cerebral low-grade gliomas of the adult: results of a randomised Phase III trial on dose response (EORTC trial 22844)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiebert, G.M. [MEDTAP International, 27 Gilbert Street, London (United Kingdom); Curran, D. [EORTC Data Centre Brussels (Belgium); Aaronson, N.K. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bolla, M. [Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire, Grenoble (France); Menten, J. [University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven (Belgium); Rutten, E.H.J.M. [University Hospital St. Radboud, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nordman, E. [Turku University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland); Silvestre, M.E. [Hospital Santa Maria, Lisbon (Portugal); Pierart, M. [EORTC Data Centre, Brussels (Belgium); Karim, A.B.M.F. [Free University Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1998-11-01

    In 1985, the EORTC Radiotherapy Co-operative Group launched a randomised phase III study comparing high-dose (59.4 Gy in 6.5 weeks) versus low-dose (45 Gy in 5 weeks) radiotherapy with conventional techniques in patients diagnosed with low-grade cerebral glioma. The primary endpoint of the study was survival. No difference in survival was observed between the two treatment strategies. A quality of life (QoL) questionnaire consisting of 47 items assessing a range of physical, psychological, social, and symptom domains was included in the trial to measure the impact of treatment over time. Patients who received high-dose radiotherapy tended to report lower levels of functioning and more symptom burden following completion of radiotherapy. These group differences were statistically significant for fatigue/malaise and insomnia immediately after radiotherapy and in leisure time and emotional functioning at 7-15 months after randomisation. These findings suggest that for conventional radiotherapy for low-grade cerebral glioma, a schedule of 45 Gy in 5 weeks not only saves valuable resources, but also spares patients a prolonged treatment at no loss of clinical efficacy. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Efficacy of S-flurbiprofen plaster in knee osteoarthritis treatment: Results from a phase III, randomized, active-controlled, adequate, and well-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yataba, Ikuko; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsushita, Isao; Matsumoto, Hideo; Hoshino, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    S-flurbiprofen plaster (SFPP) is a novel non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) patch, intended for topical treatment for musculoskeletal diseases. This trial was conducted to examine the effectiveness of SFPP using active comparator, flurbiprofen (FP) patch, on knee osteoarthritis (OA) symptoms. This was a phase III, multi-center, randomized, adequate, and well-controlled trial, both investigators and patients were blinded to the assigned treatment. Enrolled 633 knee OA patients were treated with either SFPP or FP patch for two weeks. The primary endpoint was improvement in knee pain on rising from the chair as assessed by visual analogue scale (rVAS). Safety was evaluated through adverse events (AEs). The change in rVAS was 40.9 mm in SFPP group and 30.6 mm in FP patch group (p < 0.001). The incidence of drug-related AEs at the application site was 9.5% (32 AEs, 29 mild and 3 moderate) in SFPP and 1.6% in FP patch (p < 0.001). Withdrawals due to AE were five in SFPP and one in FP patch. The superiority of SFPP in efficacy was demonstrated. Most of AEs were mild and few AEs led to treatment discontinuation. Therefore, SFPP provides an additional option for knee OA therapy.

  12. Geriatric assessment and biomarkers in patients with metastatic breast cancer receiving first-line mono-chemotherapy: Results from the randomized phase III PELICAN trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honecker, Friedemann; Harbeck, Nadia; Schnabel, Claudia; Wedding, Ulrich; Waldenmaier, Dirk; Saupe, Steffen; Jäger, Elke; Schmidt, Marcus; Kreienberg, Rolf; Müller, Lothar; Otremba, Burkhard; Dorn, Julia; Warm, Mathias; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; de Wit, Maike

    2018-03-01

    To determine predictive/prognostic factors for patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) receiving first-line monochemotherapy using biomarker analysis and geriatric assessment (GA). Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) and GA as clinical parameters, and prognostic inflammatory and nutritional index (PINI), and Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) as biomarkers were analyzed for association with clinical outcome within the randomized phase III PEg-LIposomal Doxorubicin vs. CApecitabin iN MBC (PELICAN) trial of first-line pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) or capecitabine. Of 210 patients, 38% were >65years old. GA (n=152) classified 74% as fit, 10% as compromised, and 16% as frail. Biomarkers showed no age dependency. In multivariate analysis (n=70) KPS, GA, cumulative illness rating scale-geriatrics (CIRS-G), and GPS were significantly associated with time to progression, and KPS, CIRS-G, and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) from GA, and PINI showed a significant correlation with overall survival. GA evaluation was feasible. KPS significantly correlated with efficacy outcomes. Items of a GA and biomarkers of inflammation and nutrition may have prognostic significance in patients with MBC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Valproic Acid, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, in Combination with Paclitaxel for Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Phase II/III Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Graziella Catalano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC has a median survival less than 5 months and, to date, no effective therapy exists. Taxanes have recently been stated as the main drug treatment for ATC, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid efficiently potentiates the effects of paclitaxel in vitro. Based on these data, this trial assessed the efficacy and safety of the combination of paclitaxel and valproic acid for the treatment of ATC. This was a randomized, controlled phase II/III trial, performed on 25 ATC patients across 5 centers in northwest Italy. The experimental arm received the combination of paclitaxel (80 mg/m2/weekly and valproic acid (1,000 mg/day; the control arm received paclitaxel alone. Overall survival and disease progression, evaluated in terms of progression-free survival, were the primary outcomes. The secondary outcome was the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. The coadministration of valproic acid did not influence the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. Neither median survival nor median time to progression was statistically different in the two arms. Median survival of operated-on patients was significantly better than that of patients who were not operated on. The present trial demonstrates that the addition of valproic acid to paclitaxel has no effect on overall survival and disease progression of ATC patients. This trial is registered with EudraCT 2008-005221-11.

  14. Quality of life after radiation therapy of cerebral low-grade gliomas of the adult: results of a randomised Phase III trial on dose response (EORTC trial 22844)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiebert, G.M.; Curran, D.; Aaronson, N.K.; Bolla, M.; Menten, J.; Rutten, E.H.J.M.; Nordman, E.; Silvestre, M.E.; Pierart, M.; Karim, A.B.M.F.

    1998-01-01

    In 1985, the EORTC Radiotherapy Co-operative Group launched a randomised phase III study comparing high-dose (59.4 Gy in 6.5 weeks) versus low-dose (45 Gy in 5 weeks) radiotherapy with conventional techniques in patients diagnosed with low-grade cerebral glioma. The primary endpoint of the study was survival. No difference in survival was observed between the two treatment strategies. A quality of life (QoL) questionnaire consisting of 47 items assessing a range of physical, psychological, social, and symptom domains was included in the trial to measure the impact of treatment over time. Patients who received high-dose radiotherapy tended to report lower levels of functioning and more symptom burden following completion of radiotherapy. These group differences were statistically significant for fatigue/malaise and insomnia immediately after radiotherapy and in leisure time and emotional functioning at 7-15 months after randomisation. These findings suggest that for conventional radiotherapy for low-grade cerebral glioma, a schedule of 45 Gy in 5 weeks not only saves valuable resources, but also spares patients a prolonged treatment at no loss of clinical efficacy. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Dimensionality of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder and its association with suicide attempts: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiung M; Yoon, Young-Hee; Harford, Thomas C; Grant, Bridget F

    2017-06-01

    Emerging confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) studies suggest that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) is best characterized by seven factors, including re-experiencing, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviors, and anxious and dysphoric arousal. The seven factors, however, have been found to be highly correlated, suggesting that one general factor may exist to explain the overall correlations among symptoms. Using data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III, a large, national survey of 36,309 U.S. adults ages 18 and older, this study proposed and tested an exploratory bifactor hybrid model for DSM-5 PTSD symptoms. The model posited one general and seven specific latent factors, whose associations with suicide attempts and mediating psychiatric disorders were used to validate the PTSD dimensionality. The exploratory bifactor hybrid model fitted the data extremely well, outperforming the 7-factor CFA hybrid model and other competing CFA models. The general factor was found to be the single dominant latent trait that explained most of the common variance (~76%) and showed significant, positive associations with suicide attempts and mediating psychiatric disorders, offering support to the concurrent validity of the PTSD construct. The identification of the primary latent trait of PTSD confirms PTSD as an independent psychiatric disorder and helps define PTSD severity in clinical practice and for etiologic research. The accurate specification of PTSD factor structure has implications for treatment efforts and the prevention of suicidal behaviors.

  16. Joyo progress report, vol. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Following Joyo Reactor Technology Progress Reports (Vol. 1 to Vol. 7), the name was changed to Joyo Progress Report from this volume, and the activities concerning the fast breeder experimental reactor Joyo as a whole are to be reported as quarterly report. In the fast breeder experimental reactor Joyo, the change to the core for irradiation (MK-2) from the core for breeding (MK-1) was carried out since January, 1982, in order to utilize the reactor as an irradiation facility for the development of fuel and materials. The main work was the construction of the core for irradiation by exchanging 290 fuel elements, and the exchange of upper and lower guide pipes for control rods, the reconstruction of the driving mechanism, the installation of standby neutron detector system, the acceptance and inspection of new fuel, and the transfer of spent fuel between pools were carried out. As scheduled, the core for irradiation attained the initial criticality on November 22, and the works of constructing the core were completed on December 23, 1982. Thereafter, the 100 MW performance test was begun. Various experience and valuable data were obtained in the regular inspection and the maintenance and repair works carried out at the same time, regarding the operation and maintenance of the Joyo facilities. (Kako, I.)

  17. Dolutegravir in antiretroviral-experienced patients with raltegravir- and/or elvitegravir-resistant HIV-1: 24-week results of the phase III VIKING-3 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Antonella; Maggiolo, Franco; Penco, Giovanni; Wright, David; Mills, Anthony; Grossberg, Robert; Molina, Jean-Michel; Chas, Julie; Durant, Jacques; Moreno, Santiago; Doroana, Manuela; Ait-Khaled, Mounir; Huang, Jenny; Min, Sherene; Song, Ivy; Vavro, Cindy; Nichols, Garrett; Yeo, Jane M

    2014-08-01

    The pilot phase IIb VIKING study suggested that dolutegravir (DTG), a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase inhibitor (INI), would be efficacious in INI-resistant patients at the 50 mg twice daily (BID) dose. VIKING-3 is a single-arm, open-label phase III study in which therapy-experienced adults with INI-resistant virus received DTG 50 mg BID while continuing their failing regimen (without raltegravir or elvitegravir) through day 7, after which the regimen was optimized with ≥1 fully active drug and DTG continued. The primary efficacy endpoints were the mean change from baseline in plasma HIV-1 RNA at day 8 and the proportion of subjects with HIV-1 RNA <50 c/mL at week 24. Mean change in HIV-1 RNA at day 8 was -1.43 log10 c/mL, and 69% of subjects achieved <50 c/mL at week 24. Multivariate analyses demonstrated a strong association between baseline DTG susceptibility and response. Response was most reduced in subjects with Q148 + ≥2 resistance-associated mutations. DTG 50 mg BID had a low (3%) discontinuation rate due to adverse events, similar to INI-naive subjects receiving DTG 50 mg once daily. DTG 50 mg BID-based therapy was effective in this highly treatment-experienced population with INI-resistant virus. www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01328041) and http://www.gsk-clinicalstudywww.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com (112574). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  18. The Epidemiology of Antisocial Behavioral Syndromes in Adulthood: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B; Chou, S Patricia; Saha, Tulshi D; Smith, Sharon M; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Pickering, Roger P; Ruan, W June; Huang, Boji; Grant, Bridget F

    2017-01-01

    To present current, nationally representative US findings on prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidity, disability, and treatment of DSM-5 antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and adulthood antisocial behavioral syndrome without conduct disorder before 15 years of age (AABS). Face-to-face interviews were conducted with respondents (N = 36,309) in the 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III. DSM-5 alcohol, nicotine, and specific drug use disorders and selected mood, anxiety, trauma-related, eating, and personality disorders were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-5. Prevalences of ASPD and AABS were 4.3% and 20.3%, respectively, and were highest among male, white, Native American, younger, and unmarried respondents, those with high school or less education, lower incomes, and Western residence. Both antisocial syndromes were significantly associated with 12-month and lifetime substance use, dysthymia/persistent depressive, bipolar I, posttraumatic stress, and borderline and schizotypal personality disorders (odds ratios [ORs] = 1.2-7.0). ASPD was additionally associated with 12-month agoraphobia and lifetime generalized anxiety disorder (ORs = 1.3-1.6); AABS, with 12-month and lifetime major depressive and 12-month generalized anxiety disorders (ORs = 1.2-1.3). Both were associated with significant disability (P antisocial survey respondents were untreated. One in 4 US adults exhibits syndromal antisocial behavior, with similar sociodemographic and psychiatric correlates and disability regardless of whether onset occurred before 15 years of age, illustrating the clinical and public health significance of both ASPD and AABS. In addition to laying groundwork for estimates of social and economic costs, and further etiologic and nosologic research, these findings highlight the urgency of effectively preventing and treating antisocial syndromes, including investigation of

  19. Concurrent radiation, mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil in poor prognosis carcinoma of cervix: preliminary results of a Phase I-II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.; Dembo, A.; Beale, F.; Bean, H.; Bush, R.; Herman, J.; Pringle, J.; Rawlings, G.; Sturgeon, J.; Fine, S.

    1984-09-01

    Between July 1981 and June 1983, 27 patients with advanced primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of cervix and 8 with recurrent disease were treated using a pilot regimen of combination chemotherapy (CT): Mitomycin C (MIT), 5 Fluorouracil (5 FU), and radiation therapy (RT). CT and RT doses on this Phase I-II Study were escalated to the current regimen. A split course of RT was used, either pelvic RT alone or the same pelvic RT plus para-aortic RT. CT was given by continuous IV infusion days 1 through 4 of each half-course of RT. This was followed by one application of intrauterine /sup 137/Cs when possible. Three of the 8 patients with recurrence in the pelvis or para-aortic nodes had a complete response (CR) to CT-RT and are alive without disease at 19, 19 and 22 months after treatment, respectively. Twenty of the 27 (74%) primary patients had a CR. With a median duration of follow-up of 6 months 4/20 have relapsed, 1 in RT field, 2 at distant sites, and 1 in both. The acute toxicity of this regimen was tolerable: 2/35 developed transient leukopenia with one febrile episode, 9/35 developed transient thrombocytopenia without bleeding. Symptomatic sigmoid strictures developed in two patients, one requiring surgical intervention. Typically, near complete regression of tumor is noted on completion of the external RT, reproducing the dramatic responses that have been observed in SCC of the anal canal, esophagus and head and neck, with this CT-RT regimen.

  20. Chemotherapy with or without low-dose interleukin-2 in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: results from a phase III randomized multicentric trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Laura; Bertetto, Oscar; Santo, Antonio; Naglieri, Emanuele; Lopez, Massimo; Recchia, Francesco; Lissoni, Paolo; Galliano, Marco; Testore, Franco; Porta, Camillo; Maglie, Monica; Dall'agata, Monia; Fumagalli, Luca; Ridolfi, Ruggero

    2011-10-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with IL-2-dependent cell-mediated immunodeficiency. As IL-2 is the main lymphocyte growth factor, a phase III randomized multicenter trial was conducted to evaluate the impact of subcutaneous low-dose IL-2 added to standard chemotherapy (CT) on overall survival (OS) in advanced NSCLC patients. Patients (n=241) with histologically confirmed stage IIIb or IV non-operable NSCLC underwent stratified randomization on the basis of center, ECOG PS, stage of disease and percentage of weight loss. Patients received gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) on days 1 and 8 + cisplatin (100 mg/m2) on day 2 every 21 days for a maximum of 6 cycles [chemotherapy (CT) arm]. In the CT+IL-2 arm, patients also received low-dose subcutaneous IL-2 3,000,000 IU/die on days 3-5, 9-11, 15-17. The study had 90% power to detect a 20% absolute increase in 1-year OS with 118 patients/arm. An overall response (OR) rate of 12.8% (14% in the CT+IL-2 arm and 11.4% in CT arm) was observed. Stable disease was 70 and 66.7%, and progressive disease 16 and 21.8% in the CT+IL-2 and CT arms, respectively. No differences in response were found in any subgroup analysis. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 1-year OS was 45% for the CT+IL-2 arm vs. 51% for the CT arm (p=0.456 log-rank). Median progression-free survival was 6.6 months in the CT+IL-2 arm vs. 6.9 months in the CT arm (p=0.573, log-rank). A higher number of grade 4 toxicities were reported with CT+IL-2. The most common grade ≥3 adverse events were gastrointestinal toxicity (mainly nausea and diarrhea) and myelosuppression. No relevant differences in clinical outcome were observed from the addition of IL-2 to CT. Future studies investigating the role of T-regulators in chemoimmunotherapeutic regimens could be performed.

  1. Weekly docetaxel versus CMF as adjuvant chemotherapy for older women with early breast cancer: final results of the randomized phase III ELDA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, F; Nuzzo, F; Di Rella, F; Gravina, A; Iodice, G; Labonia, V; Landi, G; Pacilio, C; Rossi, E; De Laurentiis, M; D'Aiuto, M; Botti, G; Forestieri, V; Lauria, R; De Placido, S; Tinessa, V; Daniele, B; Gori, S; Colantuoni, G; Barni, S; Riccardi, F; De Maio, E; Montanino, A; Morabito, A; Daniele, G; Di Maio, M; Piccirillo, M C; Signoriello, S; Gallo, C; de Matteis, A

    2015-04-01

    Evidence on adjuvant chemotherapy in older women with breast cancer is poor. We tested whether weekly docetaxel is more effective than standard chemotherapy. We carried out a multicenter, randomized phase III study. Women aged 65-79, operated for breast cancer, with average to high risk of recurrence, were allocated 1 : 1 to CMF (cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m², methotrexate 40 mg/m², fluorouracil 600 mg/m², days 1, 8) or docetaxel (35 mg/m(2) days 1, 8, 15) every 4 weeks, for four or six cycles according to hormone receptor status. Primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS). A geriatric assessment was carried out. Quality of life (QoL) was assessed with EORTC C-30 and BR-23 questionnaires. From July 2003 to April 2011, 302 patients were randomized and 299 (152 allocated CMF and 147 docetaxel) were eligible. After 70-month median follow-up, 109 DFS events were observed. Unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) of DFS for docetaxel versus CMF was 1.21 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.83-1.76, P = 0.32]; DFS estimate at 5 years was 0.69 with CMF and 0.65 with docetaxel. HR of death was 1.34 (95% CI 0.80-2.22, P = 0.26). There was no interaction between treatment arms and geriatric scales measuring patients' ability or comorbidities. Hematological toxicity, mucositis and nausea were worse with CMF; allergy, fatigue, hair loss, onychopathy, dysgeusia, diarrhea, abdominal pain, neuropathy, cardiac and skin toxicity were worse with docetaxel. One death was attributed to CMF and two to docetaxel. Increasing age, impairment in instrumental daily living activities, number of comorbidities and docetaxel treatment were independently associated with severe nonhematological toxicity. QoL was worse with docetaxel for nausea-vomiting, appetite loss, diarrhea, body image, future perspective, treatment side-effects and hair loss items. Weekly docetaxel is not more effective than standard CMF as adjuvant treatment of older women with breast cancer and worsens QoL and toxicity. NCT00331097

  2. Reduction of unwanted submental fat with ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid), an adipocytolytic injectable treatment: results from a phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzany, B; Griffiths, T; Walker, P; Lippert, S; McDiarmid, J; Havlickova, B

    2014-02-01

    Unwanted submental fat (SMF) is aesthetically unappealing, but methods of reduction are either invasive or lack evidence for their use. An injectable approach with ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid) is under investigation. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ATX-101 for the reduction of unwanted SMF. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III study, 363 patients with moderate/severe SMF were randomized to receive ATX-101 (1 or 2 mg cm(-2) ) or placebo injections into their SMF at up to four treatment sessions ~28 days apart, with a 12-week follow-up. The co-primary efficacy endpoints were the proportions of treatment responders [patients with ≥ 1-point improvement in SMF on the 5-point Clinician-Reported Submental Fat Rating Scale (CR-SMFRS)] and patients satisfied with their face and chin appearance on the Subject Self-Rating Scale (SSRS). Secondary endpoints included skin laxity, calliper measurements and patient-reported outcomes. Adverse events were monitored. Significantly more ATX-101 recipients met the primary endpoint criteria vs. placebo: on the clinician scale, 59·2% and 65·3% of patients treated with ATX-101 1 and 2 mg cm(-2) , respectively, were treatment responders vs. 23·0% for placebo (CR-SMFRS; P < 0·001); on the patient scale, 53·3% and 66·1%, respectively, vs. 28·7%, were satisfied with their face/chin appearance (SSRS; P < 0·001). Calliper measurements showed a significant reduction in SMF (P < 0·001), skin laxity was not worsened and patients reported improvements in the severity and psychological impact of SMF with ATX-101 vs. placebo. Most adverse events were transient and associated with the treatment area. ATX-101 was effective and well tolerated for nonsurgical SMF reduction. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

  3. Complexes of 4-chlorophenoxyacetates of Nd(III), Gd(III) and Ho(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferenc, W.; Bernat, M; Gluchowska, H.W.; Sarzynski, J.

    2010-01-01

    The complexes of 4-chlorophenoxyacetates of Nd(III), Gd(III) and Ho(III) have been synthesized as polycrystalline hydrated solids, and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopy, magnetic studies and also by X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric measurements. The analysed complexes have the following colours: violet for Nd(III), white for Gd(III) and cream for Ho(III) compounds. The carboxylate groups bind as bidentate chelating (Ho) or bridging ligands (Nd, Gd). On heating to 1173K in air the complexes decompose in several steps. At first, they dehydrate in one step to form anhydrous salts, that next decompose to the oxides of respective metals. The gaseous products of their thermal decomposition in nitrogen were also determined and the magnetic susceptibilities were measured over the temperature range of 76-303K and the magnetic moments were calculated. The results show that 4-chlorophenoxyacetates of Nd(III), Gd(III) and Ho(III) are high-spin complexes with weak ligand fields. The solubility value in water at 293K for analysed 4-chlorophenoxyacetates is in the order of 10 -4 mol/dm 3 . (author)

  4. A meta-analysis of combination therapy versus single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer: results from nine randomized Phase III trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Liang Xu,1,2,* Xiaobo Wu,3,* Chun Hu,1,2 Zhiying Zhang,4 Le Zhang,1,2 Shujing Liang,1,2 Yingchun Xu,5 Fengchun Zhang1,2 1Department of Oncology, Suzhou Kowloon Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Suzhou, 2Department of Oncology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Prevention and Cure Center of Breast Disease, Third Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang, 4Graduate School, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, 5Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nowadays, the philosophy of treating metastatic breast cancer (MBC is slowly evolving. Especially for the anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients, no standard therapy exists in this setting. Whether to choose doublet agents or single agent as salvage treatment remains fiercely debated. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to resolve this problem. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library were searched for Phase III randomized clinical trials (published before August 2015 comparing the efficacy and adverse effects between the combination therapy and single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients. The primary end point was the overall survival (OS, and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival (PFS, overall response rate (ORR, and grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The pooled hazard ratio (HR and pooled risk ratio (RR were used to evaluate the efficacy. Analyses were also performed to estimate the side effects and safety of both groups. In all, nine eligible randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. Improvements were proven in the doublet agents group on OS (HR 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.96, P=0.002, PFS (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76–0.88, P<0.001, and ORR (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.34–2.21, P<0.001. Notably, subgroup analysis

  5. Safety and hemostatic efficacy of fibrin pad in partial nephrectomy: Results of an open-label Phase I and a randomized, standard-of-care-controlled Phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nativ Ofer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bleeding severity, anatomic location, tissue characteristics, and visibility are common challenges encountered while managing intraoperative bleeding, and conventional hemostatic measures (suture, ligature, and cautery may sometimes be ineffective or impractical. While topical absorbable hemostats (TAH are useful hemostatic adjuvants, each TAH has associated disadvantages. Methods We evaluated the safety and hemostatic efficacy of a new advanced biologic combination product―fibrin pad―to potentially address some gaps associated with TAHs. Fibrin pad was assessed as adjunctive hemostat in open partial nephrectomy in single-center, open-label, Phase I study (N = 10, and as primary hemostat in multicenter, single-blind, randomized, standard-of-care (SOC-controlled Phase I/II study (N = 7 in Israel. It was used to control mild-to-moderate bleeding in Phase I and also spurting arterial bleeding in Phase I/II study. Phase I study assessed safety and Phase I/II study, proportion of successes at 10 min following randomization, analyzed by Fisher exact tests at 5% significance level. Results Phase I (N = 10: All patients completed the study. Hemostasis was achieved within 3–4 min (average = 3.1 min of a single application in all patients. Fibrin pad was found to be safe for human use, with no product-related adverse events reported. Phase I/II (N = 7: Hemostatic success at 10 min (primary endpoint was achieved in 3/4 patients treated with fibrin pad versus 0/3 patients treated with SOC. No clinically significant change in laboratory or coagulation parameters was recorded, except a case of post-procedural hemorrhage with fibrin pad, which was considered serious and related to the fibrin pad treatment, and required re-operation. Although Data Safety Monitoring Board authorized trial continuation, the sponsor decided against proceeding toward an indication for primary treatment of severe arterial

  6. Cobalt(III) complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    e, 40 µM complex, 10 hrs after dissolution, f, 40 µM complex, after irradiation dose 15 Gy. and H-atoms result in reduction of Co(III) to Co. (II). 6. It is interesting to see in complex containing multiple ligands what is the fate of electron adduct species formed by electron addition. Reduction to. Co(II) and intramolecular transfer ...

  7. samaru-main-vol 11 2011

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Library _info_Sc_ 1

    2004-07-11

    Jul 11, 2004 ... Samaru Journal of Information Studies Vol. 11 (1 & 2)2011 ... It is therefore paramount that the library ... source of primary and up to date information, both students and ... entertainment, arts, fashion, law, economy, medicine,.

  8. AJESMS_ Vol 8 2010 August 15 2011

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Mereku

    2010-08-15

    Aug 15, 2010 ... African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences Vol. 8, 2010 ... environs, a mining area in Wassa West District of Ghana .... This finding is based on autopsy data and on reports showing that blood levels in.

  9. 12-EEASA-Vol 22.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jenny

    2006-02-22

    Feb 22, 2006 ... Southern African Journal of Environmental Education, Vol. .... To this end, a planning conference on environmental .... mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, geography, agriculture, home economics and human and.

  10. NJB VOL.34 Original Lower.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    important sources of renewable biological ... The plantain (Musa paradisiaca) and banana chemicals (Nowak et ... fermentable sugars available for bio-ethanol ..... peels. Afr. J. Biochem. Res. 9(9): 104 - 109. 70. Osho et al./ Nig. J. Biotech. Vol.

  11. Afrimedic Vol. 4, No. 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vera

    The predominant age group was 30-39 years which was similar to the ones found in other hospital based. 10,11 studies .The commonest type of placenta praevia found in this study was type II which was different from. 9 the one found in another study which was type III . Uterine evacuation with dilatation and curettage was.

  12. [Summary of results of a study of heredity of intelligence in a sample of the Czech population. III. Longitudinal and genealogic study of twins and their families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drábková, H

    1993-06-01

    The author presents further results of the longitudinal study of inheritance of intelligence, its components and structure in twins. Summarized results are presented for the age period from 0-15 years as well as detailed results of individual components and the global IQ in the age group of 8-15 years. The paper follows after two previous ones published in 1988 where the applied methods and statistical evaluation were described. Evidence was provided that heredity of intelligence is involved in children from a very early age, i.e. 0-3 years. After the age of 4 heredity predominates markedly over environmental influences up to the age of 15 years investigated so far by the author. (A slight decline occurs during the prepubertal period-age 13 and 14 years.) The author found that in particular the following components of intellect are inborn: abstract thinking, logic, talent for mathematics, concentration, inquisitiveness. Very detailed tables are presented for possible comparison with data in the literature and data from adults. The author found that the development of intelligence from childhood to adult age is very irregular. This uneven character is also mostly inborn. Statistical evaluation revealed several basic types of developmental curves and extreme variants. This will, however, be discussed in another paper. The theoretical results can be used also in practice in school education, counselling psychologic and psychiatric out-patient departments.

  13. Intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy for malignant gliomas. First clinical results of Tsukuba phase I/II trial using JAERI mixed thermal-epithermal beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Shibata, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Since October 1999, a clinical trial of intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT) is in progress at JRR-4 (Japan Research Reactor-4) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using mixed thermal-epithermal beam (thermal neutron beam I: TNB-I). Compared to pure thermal beam (thermal neutron beam II: TNB-II), TNB-I has an improved neutron delivery into the deep region than TNB-II. The clinical protocol and the preliminary results will be discussed. (author)

  14. Uncontrolled non-heartbeating donors (types i-ii) with normothermic recirculation vs. heartbeating donors: evaluation of functional results and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Utrera, N; Medina-Polo, J; Pamplona-Casamayor, M; Passas-Martínez, J B; Rodríguez-Antolín, A; de la Rosa Kehrmann, F; Duarte-Ojeda, J M; Tejido-Sánchez, A; Villacampa Aubá, F; Andrés Belmonte, A

    2015-09-01

    Non-heartbeating donors (NHBD) are an alternative to heartbeating donors (HBD). Our objective was to compare functional results and kidney survival from NHBDs and HBDs. A retrospective study comparing the results of 236 normothermically preserved kidneys from type i and ii type NHBDs with the results of 250 from HBDs that were transplanted in our center between 2005 and 2012. Homogeneity between groups was tested and we evaluated the presence of delayed graft function (DGF) associated with pretransplant variables of the donor and recipient. Both groups show homogeneity in pretransplant characteristics in terms of: age, HLA incompatibilities, and recipient hemodialysis time. Average follow-up time was 33 months (range 0-87) for NHBDs and 38 months (range 0-90) for HBDs. 5.5% of NHBDs showed primary non-function (PNF) vs. 4% of HBDs (P=.42) and 80.9% of DGF vs. 46.8% of HBDs (P<.001). At the end of the follow-up, there were no statistically significant differences in the survival of grafts (92.8% for NHBD vs. 93.6% for HBD, P=.71) and recipients (99.1% NHBD vs. 98.6% HBD, P=.28). Although the DGF percentage was greater for NHBDs, final creatinine as well as graft and recipient survival were similar for both groups. Therefore, in our experience, kidneys from NHBDs have similar results to those from HBDs and are an excellent source of organs for transplantation. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of type III ELMs in JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartori, R.; Saibene, G.; Horton, L. D.; Becoulet, M.; Budny, R.; Borba, D.; Chankin, A.; Conway, G. D.; Cordey, G.; McDonald, D.; Guenther, K.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Igithkanov, Y.; Loarte, A.; Lomas, P. J.; Pogutse, O.; Rapp, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of JET experiments aimed at studying the operational space of plasmas with a Type III ELMy edge, in terms of both local and global plasma parameters. In JET, the Type III ELMy regime has a wide operational space in the pedestal n(e)-T-e diagram, and Type III ELMs are

  16. Phase I/II study of proton beam irradiation for the treatment of subfoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration: treatment techniques and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonemoto, Leslie T.; Slater, Jerry D.; Friedrichsen, Eric J.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Ing, Jeffrey; Archambeau, John O.; Teichman, Sandra; Moyers, Michael F.; Blacharski, Paul A.; Slater, James M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related macular degeneration is the prevalent etiology of subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV). The only effective treatment is laser photocoagulation, which is associated with decreased visual acuity following treatment in most patients. This study assessed both the response of subfoveal CNV to proton beam irradiation and treatment-related morbidity. We evaluated preliminary results in patients treated with an initial dose of 8 Cobalt Gray Equivalents (CGE) using a relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with subfoveal CNV received proton irradiation to the central macula with a single fraction of 8 CGE; 19 were eligible for evaluation. Treatment-related morbidity was based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria; response was evaluated by Macular Photocoagulation Study (MPS) guidelines. Fluorescein angiography was performed; visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and reading speed were measured at study entry and at 3-month intervals after treatment. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 15 months. Results: No measurable treatment-related morbidity was seen during or after treatment. Of 19 patients evaluated at 6 months, fluorescein angiography demonstrated treatment response in 10 (53%); 14 (74%) patients had improved or stable visual acuity. With a mean follow-up of 11.6 months, 11 (58%) patients have demonstrated improved or stable visual acuity. Conclusion: A macular dose of 8 CGE yielded no measurable treatment morbidity in patients studied. Fluorescein nagiography demonstrated that regressed or stabilized lesions were associated with improved visual acuity as compared with MPS results. In the next phase, a dose of 14 CGE in a single fraction will be used to further define the optimal dose fractionation schedule

  17. Evaluation of Capacity on a High Throughput Vol-oxidizer for Operability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Park, Geun Il; Lee, Jung Won; Jung, Jae Hoo; Kim, Ki Ho; Lee, Yong Soon; Lee, Do Youn; Kim, Su Sung

    2010-01-01

    KAERI is developing a pyro-process. As a piece of process equipment, a high throughput vol-oxidizer which can handle a several tens kg HM/batch was developed to supply U 3 O 8 powders to an electrolytic reduction(ER) reactor. To increase the reduction yield, UO 2 pellets should be converted into uniform powders. In this paper, we aim at the evaluation of a high throughput vol-oxidizer for operability. The evaluation consisted of 3 targets, a mechanical motion test, a heating test and hull separation test. In order to test a high throughput vol-oxidizer, By using a control system, mechanical motion tests of the vol-oxidizer were conducted, and heating rates were analyzed. Also the separation tests of hulls for recovery rate were conducted. The test results of the vol-oxidizer are going to be applied for operability. A study on the characteristics of the volatile gas produced during a vol-oxidation process is not included in this study

  18. Clusters in Nuclei. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is today one of those domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics that faces the greatest challenges, yet also contains the greatest opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physicists has decided to collaborate in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This second volume follows the successful Lect. Notes Phys. 818 (Vol.1), and comprises six extensive lectures covering the following topics: - Microscopic cluster models - Neutron halo and break-up reactions - Break-up reaction models for two- and three-cluster projectiles - Clustering effects within the di-nuclear model - Nuclear alpha-particle condensates - Clusters in nuclei: experimental perspectives By promoting new ideas and developments while retaining a pedagogical style of presentation throughout, these lectures will serve as both a reference and an advanced teaching manual for future courses and schools in the fields of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. (orig.)

  19. Clusters in Nuclei. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Christian (ed.) [Strasbourg Univ. (France). Inst. Pluridiciplinaire Hubert Curien

    2012-07-01

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is today one of those domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics that faces the greatest challenges, yet also contains the greatest opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physicists has decided to collaborate in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This second volume follows the successful Lect. Notes Phys. 818 (Vol.1), and comprises six extensive lectures covering the following topics: - Microscopic cluster models - Neutron halo and break-up reactions - Break-up reaction models for two- and three-cluster projectiles - Clustering effects within the di-nuclear model - Nuclear alpha-particle condensates - Clusters in nuclei: experimental perspectives By promoting new ideas and developments while retaining a pedagogical style of presentation throughout, these lectures will serve as both a reference and an advanced teaching manual for future courses and schools in the fields of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. (orig.)

  20. HUBBLE TARANTULA TREASURY PROJECT. III. PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG AND RESULTING CONSTRAINTS ON THE PROGRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN THE 30 DORADUS REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Cignoni, M.; Marel, R. P. van der; Panagia, N.; Sana, H.; Aloisi, A.; Arab, H.; Gordon, K. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD, 21218 (United States); Lennon, D. J. [ESA—European Space Astronomy Center, Apdo. de Correo 78, E-28691 Associate Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Zaritsky, D. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Marchi, G. De [Space Science Department, European Space Agency, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Gouliermis, D. A. [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); III, J. S. Gallagher [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Smith, L. J. [ESA/STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD, 21218 (United States); Tosi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Evans, C. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Center, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Boyer, M. [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 20771 (United States); Mink, S. E. de, E-mail: sabbi@stsci.edu [Astronomical Institute “Anton Pannekoek,”University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94249, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2016-01-15

    We present and describe the astro-photometric catalog of more than 800,000 sources found in the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP). HTTP is a Hubble Space Telescope Treasury program designed to image the entire 30 Doradus region down to the sub-solar (∼0.5 M{sub ⊙}) mass regime using the Wide Field Camera 3 and the Advanced Camera for Surveys. We observed 30 Doradus in the near-ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F555W, F658N, F775W), and near-infrared (F110W, F160W) wavelengths. The stellar photometry was measured using point-spread function fitting across all bands simultaneously. The relative astrometric accuracy of the catalog is 0.4 mas. The astro-photometric catalog, results from artificial star experiments, and the mosaics for all the filters are available for download. Color–magnitude diagrams are presented showing the spatial distributions and ages of stars within 30 Dor as well as in the surrounding fields. HTTP provides the first rich and statistically significant sample of intermediate- and low-mass pre-main sequence candidates and allows us to trace how star formation has been developing through the region. The depth and high spatial resolution of our analysis highlight the dual role of stellar feedback in quenching and triggering star formation on the giant H ii region scale. Our results are consistent with stellar sub-clustering in a partially filled gaseous nebula that is offset toward our side of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  1. Can we decrease the skin reaction in breast cancer patients using hyaluronic acid during radiation therapy? Results of phase III randomised trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Fromantin, Isabelle; De Rycke, Yann; Fourquet, Alain; Morvan, Esra; Padiglione, Solene; Falcou, Marie-Christine; Campana, Francois; Bollet, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radio-induced early skin reactions still remain a clinical challenge. Preliminary results with Hyaluronic acid, one of the most recent topical products used in this indication are proving interesting. To evaluate the efficacy of Hyaluronic acid compared to placebo. Material and methods: Breast cancer patients with grade 1-2 radio-induced dermatitis during postoperative radiotherapy were eligible. They were randomised to receive either hyaluronic acid (A) or a simple emollient (B). The primary endpoint was the clinical evaluation of the erythema (success versus failure). Secondary endpoints were the evaluation of skin colorimetry, pain, and quality of life. Results: Two-hundred patients were enroled (A = 99, B = 101). Ninety-five patients per treatment arm could be evaluated. Failures occurred in 23 patients (24%) in the hyaluronic acid arm, and 32 (34%) in the emollient arm (p = 0.15). Seventy-three patients (36.5%) prematurely stopped the treatment without any ensuing difference between the two arms. Body mass index and the size of the epithelitis were both independently associated with the failure of the local treatment. The relative reduction of colorimetric levels was 20% in the hyaluronic acid group, and 13% in the emollient group (p = 0.46). Concerning the quality of life assessment, there was a trend towards a lower level of pain in patients receiving hyaluronic acid (p = 0.053). Conclusions: The present study showed no significant difference between hyaluronic acid and simple emollient in the treatment of acute radio-induced dermatitis. There was however a trend towards an improvement in both pain level and skin colorimetry.

  2. Ultrasound-guided high dose rate conformal brachytherapy boost in prostate cancer: treatment description and preliminary results of a phase I/II clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stromberg, Jannifer; Martinez, Alvaro; Gonzalez, Jose; Edmundson, Gregory; Ohanian, Neshan; Vicini, Frank; Hollander, Jay; Gustafson, Gary; Spencer, William; Di, Yan; Brabbins, Donald

    1995-08-30

    Purpose: To improve results for locally advanced prostate cancer, a prospective clinical trial of concurrent external beam irradiation and fractionated iridium-192 (Ir-192) high dose rate (HDR) conformal boost brachytherapy was initiated. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and February 1994, 99 implants were performed on 33 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma at William Beaumont Hospital. Using AJCC staging criteria, 9 patients had T2b tumors, 17 patients had T2c tumors, and 7 patients had T3 disease. Patients were treated with (a) 45.6 Gy whole pelvis external irradiation and (b) three HDR fractions of 5.5 Gy each (18 patients) or 6 Gy each (15 patients) to the prostate. Transperineal needle implants using real-time ultrasound guidance with interactive on-line isodose distributions were performed on an outpatient basis during weeks 1, 2, and 3 of external irradiation. Acute toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) morbidity grading system. Results: This technique of concurrent external pelvic irradiation and conformal HDR brachytherapy was well tolerated. No significant intraoperative or perioperative complications occurred. Three patients (9%) experienced Grade 3 acute toxicity (two dysuria and one diarrhea). All toxicities were otherwise Grades 1 or 2 and were primarily as expected from pelvic external irradiation. Persistent implant-related toxicities included Grades 1-2 perineal pain (12%) and hematospermia (15%). Median follow-up time was 13 months. Serum prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) levels normalized in 91% of patients (29 out of 32) within 1-14 months (median 2.8 months) after irradiation. PSA levels were progressively decreasing in the other three patients at last measurement. Prospectively planned prostatic rebiopsies done at 18 months in the first 10 patients were negative in 9 out of 10 (90%). Conclusions: Acute toxicity has been acceptable with this unique approach using conformal high dose rate Ir-192

  3. Measurement of the solar neutrino capture rate with gallium metal. III. Results for the 2002-2007 data-taking period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurashitov, J. N.; Gavrin, V. N.; Gorbachev, V. V.; Gurkina, P. P.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Khairnasov, N. G.; Knodel, T. V.; Mirmov, I. N.; Shikhin, A. A.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Yants, V. E.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Bowles, T. J.; Elliott, S. R.; Teasdale, W. A.; Nico, J. S.; Cleveland, B. T.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    The Russian-American experiment SAGE began to measure the solar neutrino capture rate with a target of gallium metal in December 1989. Measurements have continued with only a few brief interruptions since that time. In this article we present the experimental improvements in SAGE since its last published data summary in December 2001. Assuming the solar neutrino production rate was constant during the period of data collection, combined analysis of 168 extractions through December 2007 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keV of 65.4 -3.0 +3.1 (stat) -2.8 +2.6 (syst) SNU. The weighted average of the results of all three Ga solar neutrino experiments, SAGE, Gallex, and GNO, is now 66.1±3.1 SNU, where statistical and systematic uncertainties have been combined in quadrature. During the recent period of data collection a new test of SAGE was made with a reactor-produced 37 Ar neutrino source. The ratio of observed to calculated rates in this experiment, combined with the measured rates in the three prior 51 Cr neutrino-source experiments with Ga, is 0.87±0.05. A probable explanation for this low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71 Ge has been overestimated. If we assume these cross sections are zero, then the standard solar model including neutrino oscillations predicts a total capture rate in Ga in the range of 63 SNU to 66 SNU with an uncertainty of about 4%, in good agreement with experiment. We derive the current value of the neutrino flux produced in the Sun by the proton-proton fusion reaction to be φ pp · =(6.0±0.8)x10 10 /(cm 2 s), which agrees well with the pp flux predicted by the standard solar model. Finally, we make several tests and show that the data are consistent with the assumption that the solar neutrino production rate is constant in time.

  4. Spectrophotometric and pH-Metric Studies of Ce(III, Dy(III, Gd(III,Yb(III and Pr(III Metal Complexes with Rifampicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Sonar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The metal-ligand and proton-ligand stability constant of Ce(III, Dy(III, Gd(III,Yb(III and Pr(III metals with substituted heterocyclic drug (Rifampicin were determined at various ionic strength by pH metric titration. NaClO4 was used to maintain ionic strength of solution. The results obtained were extrapolated to the zero ionic strength using an equation with one individual parameter. The thermodynamic stability constant of the complexes were also calculated. The formation of complexes has been studied by Job’s method. The results obtained were of stability constants by pH metric method is confirmed by Job’s method.

  5. Results of tests and studies of American materials in the channel of the MHD facility U-02 (Phase III). [LaCrO/sub 3/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burenkov, D.K.; Borodina, T.I.; Vysotsky, D.A.; Zalkind, V.I.; Kirillov, V.V.; Romanov, A.I.; Telegin, G.P.; Strekalov, N.V.

    1978-10-01

    In accordance with the US--USSR Cooperative Program in MHD joint US--USSR tests were conducted in May 1978 at the U-02 facility of an MHD generator section consisting of U.S.-built electrode blocks and USSR-built insulating walls. The main purpose of the experiment was to conduct continuous 100-hour duration tests of materials and structures of electrode blocks; in particular, to study the behavior of ceramic electrodes and insulators in operating conditions of an MHD generator, the electro-physical and thermal characteristics of the working section as a whole and electrodes in particular, and to analyze the change in the phase composition and structure of materials during the test. The main thrust of the experiment was a study of electrode material behavior. Six varieties of electrodes based on doped lanthanum chromite were tested and investigated. The electrodes were made of fine grained, hot-pressed mass (the porosity of the ceramic was 2 to 3%). The interelectrode insulators were made of magnesial and magnesial-spinel ceramic also manufactured by the hot pressing method. Results are presented and discussed.

  6. Ten Year Operating Test Results and Post-Test Analysis of a 1/10 Segment Stirling Sodium Heat Pipe, Phase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, John, H; Minnerly, Kenneth, G; Dyson, Christopher, M.

    2012-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, Stirling cycle heat sources; and with the resurgence of space nuclear power both as reactor heat removal elements and as radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly, long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high-temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc., has carried out a sodium heat pipe 10-year life test to establish long-term operating reliability. Sodium heat pipes have demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 87,000 hr (10 yr) at nearly 700 C. These life test results have demonstrated the potential for high-temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and post-test analysis of the heat pipe and sodium working fluid are described.

  7. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braendengen, Morten, E-mail: mortbrae@medisin.uio.no [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Tveit, Kjell Magne [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Bruheim, Kjersti [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Cvancarova, Milada [Department of Clinical Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Berglund, Ake [Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  8. Results of phase III clinical trial of {sup 99m}Tc-labelled recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in the detection of deep venous thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, S.P.; Boyd, S.J.; Parkes, S.L.; Quinn, R.J. [St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW (Australia)

    1998-03-01

    Full text: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of this new technique against the accepted ``gold standard`` of contrast venography in 79 patients suspected of DVT. A kit formulation has been devised in which {sup 99}mTc is labelled to rt- PA where the plasminogen binding site has been permanently inhibited but the fibrin binding site remained active. Kit preparation takes five minutes. Scintigraphic imaging is performed at four hours post-injection (10 min/scan for thighs and calves). The results of scintigraphic imaging were then compared to those of contrast venography. Mean thrombus age was 5.4 days. 58% patients were receiving intravenous heparin. Mean time interval between contrast venography and scanning was 20 hours. For the purpose of analysis, the leg was divided into proximal and distal segments for both the scintigraphic study and the contrast venography. Of the 14 thrombosed proximal segments, 13 had positive scans; in the 53 non-thrombosed proximal segments, 49 had negative scans. Thus in proximal vein thrombosis, scanning had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 92%. Of the 36 thrombosed calf vein segments, 31 had positive scans; in the 30 non-thrombosed calf segments, 28 had negative scans. Thus in calf vein thrombosis, scanning has a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 93%. Scintigraphic scanning with this new radiopharmaceutical permits accurate detection of thrombus in both proximal and calf veins. The technique detects both fresh and aged thrombi and is unaffected by heparin administration. Further work in different patient groups will need to be performed to define its clinical usefulness.

  9. Hypofractionated High-Dose Proton Beam Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Preliminary Results of A Phase I/II Clinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Masaharu; Tokuuye, Koichi; Kagei, Kenji; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To present treatment outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage I NSCLC (11 with Stage IA and 10 with Stage IB) underwent hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy. At the time of irradiation, patient age ranged from 51 to 85 years (median, 74 years). Nine patients were medically inoperable because of comorbidities, and 12 patients refused surgical resection. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients, adenocarcinoma in 14, and large cell carcinoma in 1. Tumor size ranged from 10 to 42 mm (median, 25 mm) in maximum diameter. Three and 18 patients received proton beam irradiation with total doses of 50 Gy and 60 Gy in 10 fractions, respectively, to primary tumor sites. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 died of cancer and 2 died of pneumonia at a median follow-up period of 25 months. The 2-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 74% and 86%, respectively. All but one of the irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period. Five patients showed recurrences 6-29 months after treatment, including local progression and new lung lesions outside of the irradiated volume in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. The local progression-free and disease-free rates were 95% and 79% at 2 years, respectively. No therapy-related toxicity of Grade ≥3 was observed. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy seems feasible and effective for Stage I NSCLC. Proton beams may contribute to enhanced efficacy and lower toxicity in the treatment of patients with Stage I NSCLC

  10. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brændengen, Morten; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Bruheim, Kjersti; Cvancarova, Milada; Berglund, Åke; Glimelius, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy × 25 ± 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  11. Correlation of III/V semiconductor etch results with physical parameters of high-density reactive plasmas excited by electron cyclotron resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, FRANZ; Ralf, MEYER; Markus-Christian, AMANN

    2017-12-01

    Reactive ion etching is the interaction of reactive plasmas with surfaces. To obtain a detailed understanding of this process, significant properties of reactive composite low-pressure plasmas driven by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) were investigated and compared with the radial uniformity of the etch rate. The determination of the electronic properties of chlorine- and hydrogen-containing plasmas enabled the understanding of the pressure-dependent behavior of the plasma density and provided better insights into the electronic parameters of reactive etch gases. From the electrical evaluation of I(V) characteristics obtained using a Langmuir probe, plasmas of different compositions were investigated. The standard method of Druyvesteyn to derive the electron energy distribution functions by the second derivative of the I(V) characteristics was replaced by a mathematical model which has been evolved to be more robust against noise, mainly, because the first derivative of the I(V) characteristics is used. Special attention was given to the power of the energy dependence in the exponent. In particular, for plasmas that are generated by ECR with EM modes, the existence of Maxwellian distribution functions is not to be taken as a self-evident fact, but the bi-Maxwellian distribution was proven for Ar- and Kr-stabilized plasmas. In addition to the electron temperature, the global uniform discharge model has been shown to be useful for calculating the neutral gas temperature. To what extent the invasive method of using a Langmuir probe could be replaced with the non-invasive optical method of emission spectroscopy, particularly actinometry, was investigated, and the resulting data exhibited the same relative behavior as the Langmuir data. The correlation with etchrate data reveals the large chemical part of the removal process—most striking when the data is compared with etching in pure argon. Although the relative amount of the radial variation of plasma density and

  12. Results of paclitaxel (day 1 and 8 and carboplatin given on every three weeks in advanced (stage III-IV non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salepci Taflan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both paclitaxel (P and carboplatin (C have significant activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The weekly administration of P is active, dose intense, and has a favorable toxicity profile. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 51 consecutive patients receiving C and day 1 and 8 P chemotherapy (CT regimen in advanced stage NSCLC to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity. Methods Patients treated in our institutions having pathologically proven NSCLC, no CNS metastases, adequate organ function and performance status (PS ECOG 0–2 were given P 112.5 mg/m2 intravenously (IV over 1 hour on day 1 and 8, followed by C AUC 5 IV over 1 hour, repeated in every three weeks. PC was given for maximum of 6 cycles. Results Median age was 58 (age range 39–77 and 41 patients (80% were male. PS was 0/1/2 in 29/17/5 patients and stage was IIIA/IIIB/IV in 3/14/34 patients respectively. The median number of cycles administered was 3 (1–6. Seven patients (14% did not complete the first 3 cycles either due to death, progression, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to P or lost to follow up. Best evaluable response was partial response (PR in 45% and stable disease (SD in 18%. Twelve patients (24% received local RT. Thirteen patients (25% received 2nd line CT at progression. At a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 1–20, 25 (49% patients died and 35 patients (69% progressed. Median overall survival (OS was 11 ± 2 months (95% CI; 6 to 16, 1-year OS ratio was 44%. Median time to progression (TTP was 6 ± 1 months (95% CI; 4 to 8, 1-year progression free survival (PFS ratio was 20%. We observed following grade 3 toxicities: asthenia (10%, neuropathy (4%, anorexia (4%, anemia (4%, hypersensitivity to P (2%, nausea/vomiting (2%, diarrhea (2% and neutropenia (2%. Two patients (4% died of febrile neutropenia. Doses of CT were reduced or delayed in 12 patients (24%. Conclusions P on day 1 and 8 and C every three weeks is practical and fairly

  13. Aggressive simultaneous radiochemotherapy with cisplatin and paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck tumors. Results of a phase I-II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Pelz, T.; Haensgen, G.; Dunst, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Becker, A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Dept. of Radiotherapy, Municipial Hospital, Dessau (Germany); Bloching, M.; Passmann, M. [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Lotterer, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine I, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2003-10-01

    We have tested a very aggressive combination protocol with cisplatin and escalated paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy to assess the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), overall toxicity, and response rate. Patients and Methods: The trial recruited 24 patients (21 males, three females, mean age 57 years) treated at our department from 1998 through 2001. Irradiation was administered in daily doses of 2 Gy up to 30 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily up to 70.6 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodes and 51 Gy to the clinically negative regional nodes. The chemotherapy schedule included cisplatin in a fixed dose of 20 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and 29-33 and paclitaxel at increasing dose levels of 20, 25, 30 mg/m{sup 2} twice weekly over the whole treatment time. Patients were recruited in cohorts of three to six, and the MTD was reached if two out of six patients in one cohort developed DLT. DLT was defined as any grade 4 toxicity or any grade 3 toxicity requiring treatment interruption or unplanned hospitalization or any grade 3 neurotoxicity. We recruited mainly patients with large tumors for this protocol; all patients were stage IV, and the mean tumor volume (primary + metastases) amounted to 72 {+-} 61 cm{sup 3}. The mean follow-up was 30 months (range 4-39 months). Results: One early death (peritonitis and sepsis a t day 10) occurred, and 23 patients were evaluable for acute toxicity and response. The MTD of paclitaxel was reached at the third dose level (30 mg/m{sup 2} paclitaxel twice weekly). The DLT was severe mucositis grade 3 (n = 1) and skin erythema grade 4 (n = 2). After determining the MTD, another 14 patients were treated at the recommended dose level of paclitaxel with 25 mg/m{sup 2} twice weekly. In summary, 13/23 patients (57%) developed grade 3 and 10/23 (43%) grade 2 mucositis. Two patients (9%) had grade 4, five (22%) grade 3, and 16 (69%) grade 2 dermatitis. One patient died at day 30

  14. Aggressive simultaneous radiochemotherapy with cisplatin and paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck tumors. Results of a phase I-II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Pelz, T.; Haensgen, G.; Dunst, J.; Becker, A.; Bloching, M.; Passmann, M.; Lotterer, E.

    2003-01-01

    We have tested a very aggressive combination protocol with cisplatin and escalated paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy to assess the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), overall toxicity, and response rate. Patients and Methods: The trial recruited 24 patients (21 males, three females, mean age 57 years) treated at our department from 1998 through 2001. Irradiation was administered in daily doses of 2 Gy up to 30 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily up to 70.6 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodes and 51 Gy to the clinically negative regional nodes. The chemotherapy schedule included cisplatin in a fixed dose of 20 mg/m 2 on days 1-5 and 29-33 and paclitaxel at increasing dose levels of 20, 25, 30 mg/m 2 twice weekly over the whole treatment time. Patients were recruited in cohorts of three to six, and the MTD was reached if two out of six patients in one cohort developed DLT. DLT was defined as any grade 4 toxicity or any grade 3 toxicity requiring treatment interruption or unplanned hospitalization or any grade 3 neurotoxicity. We recruited mainly patients with large tumors for this protocol; all patients were stage IV, and the mean tumor volume (primary + metastases) amounted to 72 ± 61 cm 3 . The mean follow-up was 30 months (range 4-39 months). Results: One early death (peritonitis and sepsis a t day 10) occurred, and 23 patients were evaluable for acute toxicity and response. The MTD of paclitaxel was reached at the third dose level (30 mg/m 2 paclitaxel twice weekly). The DLT was severe mucositis grade 3 (n = 1) and skin erythema grade 4 (n = 2). After determining the MTD, another 14 patients were treated at the recommended dose level of paclitaxel with 25 mg/m 2 twice weekly. In summary, 13/23 patients (57%) developed grade 3 and 10/23 (43%) grade 2 mucositis. Two patients (9%) had grade 4, five (22%) grade 3, and 16 (69%) grade 2 dermatitis. One patient died at day 30 of neutropenic infection

  15. Interstitial Lung Disease Associated with mTOR Inhibitors in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients: Results from a Large Phase III Clinical Trial Program of Everolimus and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Lopez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD has been reported with the use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi. The clinical and safety databases of three Phase III trials of everolimus in de novo kidney (A2309, heart (A2310, and liver (H2304 transplant recipients (TxR were searched using a standardized MedDRA query (SMQ search for ILD followed by a case-by-case medical evaluation. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and EMBASE. Out of the 1,473 de novo TxR receiving everolimus in Phase III trials, everolimus-related ILD was confirmed in six cases (one kidney, four heart, and one liver TxR representing an incidence of 0.4%. Everolimus was discontinued in three of the four heart TxR, resulting in ILD improvement or resolution. Outcome was fatal in the kidney TxR (in whom everolimus therapy was continued and in the liver TxR despite everolimus discontinuation. The literature review identified 57 publications on ILD in solid organ TxR receiving everolimus or sirolimus. ILD presented months or years after mTORi initiation and symptoms were nonspecific and insidious. The event was more frequent in patients with a late switch to mTORi. In most cases, ILD was reversed after prompt mTORi discontinuation. ILD induced by mTORi is an uncommon and potentially fatal event warranting early recognition and drug discontinuation.

  16. Columnar modelling of nucleation burst evolution in the convective boundary layer – first results from a feasibility study Part III: Preliminary results on physicochemical model performance using two "clean air mass" reference scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Hellmuth

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In Paper I of four papers, a revised columnar high-order model to investigate gas-aerosol-turbulence interactions in the convective boundary layer (CBL was proposed. In Paper II, the model capability to predict first-, second- and third-order moments of meteorological variables in the CBL was demonstrated using available observational data. In the present Paper III, the high-order modelling concept is extended to sulphur and ammonia chemistry as well as to aerosol dynamics. Based on the previous CBL simulation, a feasibility study is performed using two "clean air mass" scenarios with an emission source at the ground but low aerosol background concentration. Such scenarios synoptically correspond to the advection of fresh post-frontal air in an anthropogenically influenced region. The aim is to evaluate the time-height evolution of ultrafine condensation nuclei (UCNs and to elucidate the interactions between meteorological and physicochemical variables in a CBL column. The scenarios differ in the treatment of new particle formation (NPF, whereas homogeneous nucleation according to the classical nucleation theory (CNT is considered. The first scenario considers nucleation of a binary system consisting of water vapour and sulphuric acid (H2SO4 vapour, the second one nucleation of a ternary system additionally involving ammonia (NH3. Here, the two synthetic scenarios are discussed in detail, whereas special attention is payed to the role of turbulence in the formation of the typical UCN burst behaviour, that can often be observed in the surface layer. The intercomparison of the two scenarios reveals large differences in the evolution of the UCN number concentration in the surface layer as well as in the time-height cross-sections of first-order moments and double correlation terms. Although in both cases the occurrence of NPF bursts could be simulated, the burst characteristics and genesis of the bursts are completely different. It is demonstrated

  17. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with folfox-cetuximab in stage III oesophagus and cardia carcinomas: final results of the phase-II Erafox study of the Gercor group; Chimioradiotherapie concomitante par folfox-cetuximab dans les carcinomes du cardia et de l'oesophage de stade III: resultats definitifs de l'etude de phase II Erafox du groupe Gercor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lledo, G.; Mammar, V.; Michel, P. [Hopital Jean-Mermoz, Lyon (France); Dahan, L. [CHU Rouen, Rouen (France); Mineur, L.; Dupuis, O. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84000 Avignon (France); Galais, M.P. [CHU Timone, Marseille (France); Chibaudel, B. [InstitutJean-Godinot, Reims (France); Jovenin, N. [Gercor, Paris (France); Gramont, A. de [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report and discuss the results of a French national multicentre study which aimed at assessing the efficiency and tolerance of a folfox- and cetuximab-based chemotherapy concomitant with a radiotherapy for the treatment of stage-III cardia and oesophagus cancers. Patients (60 men and 19 women) have been selected according to the carcinoma type, performance index, age, weight loss over the last six months. Results are discussed in terms of response, steadiness, advancement, grade 3 and 4 toxicity, and side effects. The therapeutic efficiency corresponds to an objective response rate of 77 per cent, and tolerance profile seems to be acceptable for patients suffering from locally advanced cardia and oesophagus cancer. Short communication

  18. Natural Mallow Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composite for Ballistic Armor Against Class III-A Ammunition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Lucio Fabio Cassiano; Holanda, Luane Isquerdo Ferreira; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Gomes, Alaelson Vieira; Lima, Édio Pereira

    2017-10-01

    Epoxy matrix composites reinforced with up to 30 vol pct of continuous and aligned natural mallow fibers were for the first time ballistic tested as personal armor against class III-A 9 mm FMJ ammunition. The ballistic efficiency of these composites was assessed by measuring the dissipated energy and residual velocity after the bullet perforation. The results were compared to those in similar tests of aramid fabric (Kevlar™) commonly used in vests for personal protections. Visual inspection and scanning electron microscopy analysis of impact-fractured samples revealed failure mechanisms associated with fiber pullout and rupture as well as epoxy cracking. As compared to Kevlar™, the mallow fiber composite displayed practically the same ballistic efficiency. However, there is a reduction in both weight and cost, which makes the mallow fiber composites a promising material for personal ballistic protection.

  19. Performance Assessment of Hearing Protection and Communication Enhancement Devices: Peltor Comtac III and IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK iii TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION...Factors, Vol 41, No. 4, 664-669, Dec 1999. 9. McKinley, R. L., & Bolia, R. S., The effects of hearing protectors on reaction times in audiovisual

  20. Planck 2013 results. III. LFI systematic uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.

    2013-01-01

    power spectra.We also present an overall budget of known systematic effect uncertainties, which are dominated by sidelobe straylight pick-upand imperfect calibration. However, even these two effects are at least two orders of magnitude weaker than the cosmic microwave backgroundfluctuations as measured...

  1. Results from the ZEPLIN-III experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Anthony

    Resource identification and quantification is an essential element of both classical and quantum information theory. Entanglement is one of these resources, arising when quantum communication and nonlocal operations are expensive to perform. In the first part of this thesis we quantify the effective entanglement when operations are additionally restricted to account for both fundamental restrictions on operations, such as those arising from superselection rules, as well as experimental errors arising from the imperfections in the apparatus. For an important class of errors we find a linear relationship between the usual and effective higher dimensional generalization of concurrence, a measure of entanglement. Following the treatment of effective entanglement, we focus on a related concept of nonlocality in the presence of superselection rules (SSR). Here we propose a scheme that may be used to activate nongenuinely multipartite nonlocality, in that a single copy of a state is not multipartite nonlocal, while two or more copies exhibit nongenuinely multipartite nonlocality. The states used exhibit the more powerful genuinely multipartite nonlocality when SSR are not enforced, but not when they are, raising the question of what is needed for genuinely multipartite nonlocality. We show that whenever the number of particles is insufficient, the degrading of genuinely multipartite to nongenuinely multipartite nonlocality is necessary. While in the first few chapters we focus our attention on understanding the resources present in quantum states, in the final part we turn the picture around and instead treat operations themselves as a resource. We provide our observers with free access to classical operations - ie. those that cannot detect or generate quantum coherence. We show that the operation of interest can then be used to either generate or detect quantum coherence if and only if it violates a particular commutation relation. Using the relative entropy, the commutation relation provides us with a measure of nonclassicality of operations. We show that the measure is a sum of two contributions, the generating power and the distinguishing power, each of which is separately an essential ingredient in quantum communication and information processing. The measure also sheds light on the operational meaning of quantum discord - we show it can be interpreted as the difference in superdense coding capacity between a quantum state and a classical state.

  2. Crisis Communication (Handbooks of Communication Science Vol. 23)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Winni

    Vol. 23 - The Handbook of Communication Science General editors: Peter J. Schultz and Paul Cobley......Vol. 23 - The Handbook of Communication Science General editors: Peter J. Schultz and Paul Cobley...

  3. Antithrombin III blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003661.htm Antithrombin III blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of AT III present ...

  4. Phase II Results of RTOG 0537: A Phase II/III Study Comparing Acupuncture-like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Versus Pilocarpine in Treating Early Radiation-Induced Xerostomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Raimond K. W.; James, Jennifer L.; Sagar, Stephen; Wyatt, Gwen; Nguyen-Tân, Phuc Felix; Singh, Anurag K.; Lukaszczyk, Barbara; Cardinale, Francis; Yeh, Alexander M.; Berk, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II component of a multi-institutional phase II/III randomized trial assessed the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) in reducing radiation-induced xerostomia. Methods Head and neck cancer patients who were 3–24 months from completing radiotherapy ± chemotherapy (RT±C) and experiencing xerostomia symptoms with basal whole saliva production ≥0.1 ml/min and without recurrence were eligible. Patients received twice weekly ALTENS sessions (24 over 12 weeks) using a Codetron™ unit. The primary objective assessed the feasibility of ALTENS treatment. A patient was considered compliant if 19/24 ALTENS were delivered, with a targeted 85% compliance rate. Secondary objectives measured treatment-related toxicities and ALTENS effect on overall radiation-induced xerostomia burden using the University of Michigan Xerostomia-Related Quality of Life Scale (XeQOLS). Results Of 48 accrued patients, 47 were evaluable. Median age was 60 years; 84% were male, 70% completed RT±C for > 12 months and 21% had received prior pilocarpine. All ALTENS sessions were completed in 34 patients, but 9 and 1 completed 20–23 and 19 sessions respectively, representing a 94% total compliance rate. 6-month XeQOLS scores were available for 35 patients; 30 (86%) achieved a positive treatment response with a mean reduction of 35.9% (SD 36.1). Five patients developed grade 1–2 gastrointestinal toxicity and one had grade 1 pain event. Conclusions ALTENS treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia can be uniformly delivered in a cooperative multicenter setting and has possible beneficial treatment response. Given these results, the phase III component of this study was initiated. PMID:22252927

  5. Dynamics of structures '89. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The proceedings, comprising 3 volumes published by the Plzen Centre of the Czechoslovak Society for Science and Technology (Vol. 1 and 2) and by Skoda Works in Plzen (Vol. 3), contain 107 papers, out of which 8 fall within the INIS Subject Scope; these deal with problems related to the earthquake resistance of nuclear power plants. Attention is paid to the evaluation of seismic characteristics of nuclear power plant equipment, to the equipment testing and to calculations of its dynamic characteristics under simulated seismic stress. (Z.M.)

  6. AJESMS_ Vol 8 2010 August 15 2011

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Mereku

    2010-08-15

    Aug 15, 2010 ... African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences Vol. ... girls from two Senior High Schools in Accra, the capital of Ghana in West Africa. .... On the face of it, the Brazilian and Swedish children might seem to have the ... The two profile dimensions that have been specified for teaching, ...

  7. Water SA - Vol 30, No 3 (2004)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of a residential end-use model for estimating cold and hot water demand ... of multistage filtration using different filter media against conventional water ... (Germs et al., 2004), published in the April 2004 (Vol 30 No 2) issue of Water ...

  8. Acid-base titrations by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant with special reference to automatic titrations-III Presentation of a fully automatic titration apparatus and of results supporting the theories given in the preceding parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrsson, L; Ingman, F

    1977-02-01

    This paper forms Part III of a series in which the first two parts describe methods for evaluating titrations performed by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant. The great advantage of these methods is that they do not require an accurate calibration of the electrode system. This property makes the methods very suitable for routine work. e.g., in automatic analysis. An apparatus for performing such titrations automatically is presented. Further, results of titrations of monoprotic acids, a diprotic acid, an ampholyte, a mixture of an acid with its conjugate base, and mixtures of two acids with a small difference between the stability constants are given. Most of these titrations cannot be evaluated by the Gran or Hofstee methods but yield results having errors of the order of 0.1% if the methods proposed in Parts I and II of this series are employed. The advantages of the method of stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant combined with the proposed evaluation methods, in comparison with common methods such as titration to a preset pH, are that all the data are used in the evaluation, permitting a statistical treatment and giving better possibilities for tracing systematic errors.

  9. Soil-structure interaction Vol.3. Influence of ground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantino, C J

    1986-04-01

    This study has been performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by the Structural Analysis Division of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The study was conducted during the fiscal year 1965 on the program entitled 'Benchmarking of Structural Engineering Problems' sponsored by NRC. The program considered three separate but complementary problems, each associated with the soil-structure interaction (551) phase of the seismic response analysis of nuclear plant facilities. The reports, all entitled Soil-Structure Interaction, are presented in three separate volumes, namely: Vol. 1 Influence of Layering by AJ Philippacopoulos, Vol. 2 Influence of Lift-Off by C.A. Miller, Vol. 3 Influence of Ground Water by C.J. Costantino. The two problems presented in Volumes 2 and 3 were conducted at the City University of New York (CUNY) under subcontract to BNL. This report, Volume 3 of the report, presents a summary of the first year's effort on the subject of the influence of foundation ground water on the SSI phenomenon. A finite element computer program was developed for the two-phased formulation of the combined soil-water problem. This formulation is based on the Biot dynamic equations of motion for both the solid and fluid phases of a typical soil. Frequency dependent interaction coefficients were generated for the two-dimensional plane problem of a rigid surface footing moving against a saturated linear soil. The results indicate that interaction coefficients are significantly modified as compared to the comparable values for a dry soil, particularly for the rocking mode of response. Calculations were made to study the impact of the modified interaction coefficients on the response of a typical nuclear reactor building. The amplification factors for a stick model placed atop a dry and saturated soil were computed. It was found that pore water caused the rocking response to decrease and translational response to increase over the frequency range of interest, as

  10. Highlights of Astronomy, Vol. 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montmerle, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Part I. Invited Discourses: 1. The Herschel view of star formation; 2. Past, present and future of Chinese astronomy; 3. The zoo of galaxies; 4. Supernovae, the accelerating cosmos, and dark energy; Part II. Joint Discussion: 5. Very massive stars in the local universe; 6. 3-D views of the cycling Sun in stellar context; 7. Ultraviolet emission in early-type galaxies; 8. From meteors and meteorites to their parent bodies: current status and future developments; 9. The connection between radio properties and high-energy emission in AGNs; 10. Space-time reference systems for future research; Part III. Special Sessions: 11. Origin and complexity of massive star clusters; 12. Cosmic evolution of groups and clusters of galaxies; 13. Galaxy evolution through secular processes; 14. New era for studying interstellar and intergalactic magnetic fields; 15. The IR view of massive stars: the main sequence and beyond; 16. Science with large solar telescopes; 17. The impact hazard: current activities and future plans; 18. Calibration of star-formation rate measurements across the electromagnetic spectrum; 19. Future large scale facilities; 20. Dynamics of the star-planet relations strategic plan and the Global Office of Astronomy for Development; 21. Strategic plan and the Global Office of Astronomy for Development; 22. Modern views of the interstellar medium; 23. High-precision tests of stellar physics from high-precision photometry; 24. Communicating astronomy with the public for scientists; 25. Data intensive astronomy; 26. Unexplained spectral phenomena in the interstellar medium; 27. Light pollution: protecting astronomical sites and increasing global awareness through education.

  11. A clinical review of treatment outcomes in glioblastoma multiforme - the validation in a non-trial population of the results of a randomised Phase III clinical trial: has a more radical approach improved survival?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rock, K

    2012-01-03

    Objective: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for up to 60% of all malignant primary brain tumours in adults, occurring in 2-3 cases per 100 000 in Europe and North America. In 2005, a Phase III clinical trial demonstrated a significant improvement in survival over 2, and subsequently, 5 years with the addition of concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) to radical radiotherapy (RT) (Stupp R, Hegi M, van den Bent M, et al. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial. Lancet Oncol 2009:10:459-66). The aim of this study was to investigate if the demonstrated improved survival in the literature translated to clinical practice.Methods: This was a retrospective study including all patients with histologically proven GBM diagnosed from 1999 to 2008 and treated with adjuvant RT at our institution. A total of 273 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS v18.Results: The median survival for the whole group (n = 273) over the 10-year period was 7.6 months (95% confidence interval 6.7-8.4 months). Overall, the cumulative probability of survival at 1 and 2 years was 31.5 and 9.4%, respectively. In total, 146 patients received radical RT. 103 patients were treated with radical RT and TMZ and 43 patients received radical RT alone. The median survival for patients receiving radical RT with TMZ was 13.4 months (95% CI 10.9-15.8 months) vs 8.8 months for radical RT alone (95% CI 6.9 - 10.7 months, p = 0.006). 2-year survival figures were 21.2 vs 4.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, independent predictors of survival included KPS, RT dose, TMZ and extent of surgery. The strongest predictors of poorer outcome based on the hazard ratio were palliative RT, followed by not receiving TMZ chemotherapy, then KPS <90 and a biopsy only surgical approach.Conclusion: This paper demonstrates

  12. A clinical review of treatment outcomes in glioblastoma multiforme - the validation in a non-trial population of the results of a randomised Phase III clinical trial: has a more radical approach improved survival?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Objective: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for up to 60% of all malignant primary brain tumours in adults, occurring in 2-3 cases per 100 000 in Europe and North America. In 2005, a Phase III clinical trial demonstrated a significant improvement in survival over 2, and subsequently, 5 years with the addition of concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) to radical radiotherapy (RT) (Stupp R, Hegi M, van den Bent M, et al. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial. Lancet Oncol 2009:10:459-66). The aim of this study was to investigate if the demonstrated improved survival in the literature translated to clinical practice.Methods: This was a retrospective study including all patients with histologically proven GBM diagnosed from 1999 to 2008 and treated with adjuvant RT at our institution. A total of 273 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS v18.Results: The median survival for the whole group (n = 273) over the 10-year period was 7.6 months (95% confidence interval 6.7-8.4 months). Overall, the cumulative probability of survival at 1 and 2 years was 31.5 and 9.4%, respectively. In total, 146 patients received radical RT. 103 patients were treated with radical RT and TMZ and 43 patients received radical RT alone. The median survival for patients receiving radical RT with TMZ was 13.4 months (95% CI 10.9-15.8 months) vs 8.8 months for radical RT alone (95% CI 6.9 - 10.7 months, p = 0.006). 2-year survival figures were 21.2 vs 4.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, independent predictors of survival included KPS, RT dose, TMZ and extent of surgery. The strongest predictors of poorer outcome based on the hazard ratio were palliative RT, followed by not receiving TMZ chemotherapy, then KPS <90 and a biopsy only surgical approach.Conclusion: This paper demonstrates improved

  13. Solvent effects on extraction of aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III), with decanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Hisao; Fujii, Yukio; Mizuta, Masateru

    1986-01-01

    Extraction of aluminum(III) and indium(III) with decanoic acid in 1-octanol was carried out at 25 deg C and at an aqueous ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm -3 (NaClO 4 ). Monomeric and tetrameric aluminum(III) decanoates and monomeric indium(III) decanoate are responsible for the extraction. From a comparison of the present results with those obtained from the previous works, the polymerization of the extracted species was found to be more extensive in benzene than in 1-octanol, and the metal decanoates were highly polymerized in the following order in both solvents: Al > Ga > In. (author)

  14. MRI and contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging for evaluation of focal irreversible electroporation treatment: results from a phase I-II study in patients undergoing IRE followed by radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, Willemien van den; Bruin, D.M. de; Randen, A. van; Engelbrecht, M.R.W.; Postema, A.W.; Muller, B.G.; Zondervan, P.J.; Laguna Pes, M.P.; Reijke, T.M. de; Rosette, J.J.M.C.H. de la; Varkarakis, I.M.; Skolarikos, A.; Savci-Heijink, C.D.; Jurhill, R.R.; Wijkstra, H.

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an ablative therapy with a low side-effect profile in prostate cancer. The objective was: 1) To compare the volumetric IRE ablation zone on grey-scale transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) with histopathology findings; 2) To determine a reliable imaging modality to visualize the IRE ablation effects accurately. A prospective phase I-II study was performed in 16 patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy (RP). IRE of the prostate was performed 4 weeks before RP. Prior to, and 4 weeks after the IRE treatment, imaging was performed by TRUS, CEUS, and mpMRI. 3D-analysis of the ablation volumes on imaging and on H and E-stained whole-mount sections was performed. The volumes were compared and the correlation was calculated. Evaluation of the imaging demonstrated that with T2-weighted MRI, dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI, and CEUS, effects of IRE are visible. T2MRI and CEUS closely match the volumes on histopathology (Pearson correlation r = 0.88 resp. 0.80). However, IRE is not visible with TRUS. mpMRI and CEUS are appropriate for assessing IRE effects and are the most feasible imaging modalities to visualize IRE ablation zone. The imaging is concordant with results of histopathological examination. (orig.)

  15. Efficacy of Wobe-Mugos registered E for reduction of oral mucositis after radiotherapy. Results of a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, triple-blind phase III multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, W.; Herrmann, T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy and safety of Wobe-Mugos registered E (proteolytic enzymes) for amelioration of early side effects of radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors, particularly oral mucositis. Patients and Methods: The study was a prospective, randomized, multicenter, placebo-controlled, triple-blind phase III study with parallel groups. 69 patients with carcinomas of the oropharynx or the oral cavity were enrolled between 1996 and 2000 in five centers; 54 of these were recruited in Dresden. Of the 69 patients, 61 (Dresden: 46) were available for analysis. The proteolytic enzymes tested (Wobe-Mugos registered E) comprised papain 100 mg, trypsin 40 mg, and chymotrypsin 40 mg. Results: Wobe-Mugos registered E was well tolerated. For the maximum mucositis scores, no statistically significant differences were found between the placebo and the verum group. The average mucositis score over weeks 1-6 revealed a significant difference in favor of the placebo arm, based on an earlier onset of mucositis in the Wobe-Mugos registered E group. Conclusion: The present study failed to demonstrate any effect of treatment with Wobe-Mugos registered E on radiotherapy side effects in patients treated for head-and-neck tumors. In particular, there was no beneficial effect on radiation-induced early oral mucositis. (orig.)

  16. Highlights of Astronomy, Vol. 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Ian

    2010-11-01

    Preface; Part I. Gruber Cosmology Prize Lecture; Part II. Invited Discourses; Part III. Joint Discussions: 1. Dark matter in early-type galaxies Léon V. E. Koopmans and Tommaso Treu; 2. Diffuse light in galaxy clusters Magda Arnaboldi and Ortwin Gerhard; 3. Neutron stars - timing in extreme environments Tomaso Belloni, Mariano Méndez and Chengmin Zhang; 4. Progress in understanding the physics of Ap and related stars Margarida Cunha; 5. Modelling the Milky Way in the age of Gaia Annie C. Robin; 6. Time and astronomy Pascale Defraigne; 7. Astrophysical outflows and associated accretion phenomena Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino and Alex C. Raga; 8. Hot interstellar matter in elliptical galaxies Dong-Woo Kim and Silvia Pellegrini; 9. Are the fundamental constants varying with time? Paolo Molaro and Elisabeth Vangioni; 10. 3D views on cool stellar atmospheres - theory meets observation K. N. Nagendra, P. Bonifacio and H. G. Ludwig; 11. New advances in helio- and astero-seismology; 12. The first galaxies - theoretical predictions and observational clues; 13. Eta Carinae in the context of the most massive stars Theodore R. Gull and Augusto Damineli; 14. The ISM of galaxies in the far-infrared and sub-millimetre; 15. Magnetic fields in diffuse media Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino and Alex Lazarian; 16. IHY global campaign - whole heliosphere interval; Part IV. Special Sessions: SpS 1. IR and sub-mm spectroscopy - a new tool for studying stellar evolution Glenn Wahlgren, Hans Käufl and Florian Kerber; SpS 2. The international year of astronomy Pedro Russo, Catherine Cesarsky and Lars Lindberg Christensen; SpS 3. Astronomy in Antarctica in 2009 Michael G. Burton; SpS 4. Astronomy education between past and future J. P. De Greve; SpS 5. Accelerating the rate of astronomical discovery Ray P. Norris; SpS 6. Planetary systems as potential sites for life Régis Courtin, Alan Boss and Michel Mayor; SpS 7. Young stars, brown dwarfs, and protoplanetary disks Jane Gregorio

  17. Z Physics at LEP 1. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altarelli, G.; Kleiss, R.; Verzegnassi, C.

    1989-01-01

    The contents of this final report from the Workshop on Z Physics at LEP can be divided into two parts. The first part, comprising Vols. 1 and 2, is a relatively concise but fairly complete handbook on the physics of e + e - annihilation near the Z peak (with normal LEP luminosity and unpolarized beams, appropriate for the first phase of LEP operation). The second part (Vol. 3) is devoted to a review of the existing Monte Carlo event generators for LEP physics. A special effort has been made to co-ordinate the different parts of this report, with the aim of achieving a systematic and balanced review of the subject, rather than having simply a collection of separate contributions. (orig.)

  18. Z physics at LEP 1. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altarelli, G.; Kleiss, R.; Verzegnassi, C.

    1989-01-01

    The contents of this final report from the Workshop on Z Physics at LEP can be divided into two parts. The first part, comprising Vols. 1 and 2, is a relatively concise but fairly complete handbook on the physics of e + e - annihilation near the Z peak (with normal LEP luminosity and unpolarized beams, appropriate for the first phase of LEP operation). The second part (Vol. 3) is devoted to a review of the existing Monte Carlo event generators for LEP physics. A special effort has been made to co-ordinate the different parts of this report, with the aim of achieving a systematic and balanced review of the subject, rather than having simply a collection of separate contributions. (orig.)

  19. Fluid status monitoring with a wireless network to reduce cardiovascular-related hospitalizations and mortality in heart failure: rationale and design of the OptiLink HF Study (Optimization of Heart Failure Management using OptiVol Fluid Status Monitoring and CareLink)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachmann, Johannes; Böhm, Michael; Rybak, Karin; Klein, Gunnar; Butter, Christian; Klemm, Hanno; Schomburg, Rolf; Siebermair, Johannes; Israel, Carsten; Sinha, Anil-Martin; Drexler, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Aims The Optimization of Heart Failure Management using OptiVol Fluid Status Monitoring and CareLink (OptiLink HF) study is designed to investigate whether OptiVol fluid status monitoring with an automatically generated wireless CareAlert notification via the CareLink Network can reduce all-cause death and cardiovascular hospitalizations in an HF population, compared with standard clinical assessment. Methods Patients with newly implanted or replacement cardioverter-defibrillator devices with or without cardiac resynchronization therapy, who have chronic HF in New York Heart Association class II or III and a left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35% will be eligible to participate. Following device implantation, patients are randomized to either OptiVol fluid status monitoring through CareAlert notification or regular care (OptiLink ‘on' vs. ‘off'). The primary endpoint is a composite of all-cause death or cardiovascular hospitalization. It is estimated that 1000 patients will be required to demonstrate superiority of the intervention group to reduce the primary outcome by 30% with 80% power. Conclusion The OptiLink HF study is designed to investigate whether early detection of congestion reduces mortality and cardiovascular hospitalization in patients with chronic HF. The study is expected to close recruitment in September 2012 and to report first results in May 2014. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00769457 PMID:21555324

  20. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, G.; Rein, D.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the LHC workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentation and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol.1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol.2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol.3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  1. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, G.; Rein, D.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the LHC workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentaiton and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol. 1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol. 2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol. 3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  2. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, G.; Rein, D.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the LCH workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentation and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol. 1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol. 2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol. 3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  3. A Phase 2 Trial of Concurrent Chemotherapy and Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results and Reflections Following Early Closure of a Single-Institution Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Henderson, Randal [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Pham, Dat; Cury, James D.; Bajwa, Abubakr [Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); D' Agostino, Harry [Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Flampouri, Stella; Huh, Soon; Li, Zuofeng [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McCook, Barry [Department of Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Nichols, Romaine C. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Proton therapy has been shown to reduce radiation dose to organs at risk (OAR) and could be used to safely escalate the radiation dose. We analyzed outcomes in a group of phase 2 study patients treated with dose-escalated proton therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for stage 3 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From 2009 through 2013, LU02, a phase 2 trial of proton therapy delivering 74 to 80 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction with concurrent chemotherapy for stage 3 NSCLC, was opened to accrual at our institution. Due to slow accrual and competing trials, the study was closed after just 14 patients (stage IIIA, 9 patients; stage IIIB, 5 patients) were accrued over 4 years. During that same time period, 55 additional stage III patients were treated with high-dose proton therapy, including 7 in multi-institutional proton clinical trials, 4 not enrolled due to physician preference, and 44 who were ineligible based on strict entry criteria. An unknown number of patients were ineligible for enrollment due to insurance coverage issues and thus were treated with photon radiation. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 52 months. Results: Two-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 57% and 25%, respectively. Median lengths of overall survival and progression-free survival were 33 months and 14 months, respectively. There were no acute grade 3 toxicities related to proton therapy. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and pulmonary toxicity each occurred in 1 patient. Conclusions: Dose-escalated proton therapy with concurrent chemotherapy was well tolerated with encouraging results among a small cohort of patients. Unfortunately, single-institution proton studies may be difficult to accrue and consideration for pragmatic and/or multicenter trial design should be considered when developing future proton clinical trials.

  4. Lymph node metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: MR imaging with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (Sinerem MR) - results of a phase-III multicenter clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.; Viala, J.; Bosq, J.; Vogl, T.; Mack, M.; Casselman, J.; Depondt, M.; Mattelaer, C.; Moulin, G.; Petit, P.; Champsaur, P.; Veillon, F.; Riehm, S.; Dadashitazehozi, Y.; Hermans, R.; de Jaegere, T.; Marchal, G.; Dubrulle, F.; Chevalier, D.; Lemaitre, L.; Kubiak, C.; Helmberger, R.; Halimi, P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical usefulness of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) MR contrast media (Sinerem, Guerbet Laboratories, Aulnay-sous-Bois, France) with precontrast MRI in the diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, using histology as gold standard. Eighty-one previously untreated patients were enrolled in a multicenter phase-III clinical trial. All patients had a noncontrast MR, a Sinerem MR, and surgery within a period of 15 days. The MR exams were analyzed both on site and by two independent radiologists (centralized readers). Correlation between histology and imaging was done per lymph node groups, and per individual lymph nodes when the short axis was ≥10 mm. For individual lymph nodes, Sinerem MR showed a high sensitivity (≥88%) and specificity (≥77%). For lymph node groups, the sensitivity was ≥59% and specificity ≥81%. False-positive results were partially due to inflammatory nodes; false-negative results from the presence of undetected micrometastases. Errors of interpretation were also related to motion and/or susceptibility artifacts and problems of zone assignment. Sinerem MR had a negative predictive value (NPV) ≥90% and a positive predictive value (PPV) ≥51%. The specificity and PPV of Sinerem MR were better than those of precontrast MR. Precontrast MR showed an unexpectedly high sensitivity and NPV which were not increased with Sinerem MR. The potential contribution of Sinerem MR still remains limited by technical problems regarding motion and susceptibility artifacts and spatial resolution. It is also noteworthy that logistical problems, which could reduce the practical value of Sinerem MR, will be minimized in the future since Sinerem MR alone performed as good as the combination of precontrast and Sinerem MR. (orig.)

  5. Lymph node metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: MR imaging with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (Sinerem MR) - results of a phase-III multicenter clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigal, R.; Viala, J.; Bosq, J. [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Vogl, T.; Mack, M. [Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum, Frankfurt Main (Germany); Casselman, J.; Depondt, M.; Mattelaer, C. [Department of Radiology, Brugge (Belgium); Moulin, G.; Petit, P.; Champsaur, P. [Hopital de la Timone, Marseille (France); Veillon, F.; Riehm, S.; Dadashitazehozi, Y. [Hopital de Hautepierre, Avenue Moliere, 67098 Strasbourg (France); Hermans, R.; de Jaegere, T.; Marchal, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, KU Leuven, Heerestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Dubrulle, F.; Chevalier, D.; Lemaitre, L. [Hopital Huriez, 1 place Verdun, 59037 Lille (France); Kubiak, C.; Helmberger, R.; Halimi, P.

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical usefulness of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) MR contrast media (Sinerem, Guerbet Laboratories, Aulnay-sous-Bois, France) with precontrast MRI in the diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, using histology as gold standard. Eighty-one previously untreated patients were enrolled in a multicenter phase-III clinical trial. All patients had a noncontrast MR, a Sinerem MR, and surgery within a period of 15 days. The MR exams were analyzed both on site and by two independent radiologists (centralized readers). Correlation between histology and imaging was done per lymph node groups, and per individual lymph nodes when the short axis was {>=}10 mm. For individual lymph nodes, Sinerem MR showed a high sensitivity ({>=}88%) and specificity ({>=}77%). For lymph node groups, the sensitivity was {>=}59% and specificity {>=}81%. False-positive results were partially due to inflammatory nodes; false-negative results from the presence of undetected micrometastases. Errors of interpretation were also related to motion and/or susceptibility artifacts and problems of zone assignment. Sinerem MR had a negative predictive value (NPV) {>=}90% and a positive predictive value (PPV) {>=}51%. The specificity and PPV of Sinerem MR were better than those of precontrast MR. Precontrast MR showed an unexpectedly high sensitivity and NPV which were not increased with Sinerem MR. The potential contribution of Sinerem MR still remains limited by technical problems regarding motion and susceptibility artifacts and spatial resolution. It is also noteworthy that logistical problems, which could reduce the practical value of Sinerem MR, will be minimized in the future since Sinerem MR alone performed as good as the combination of precontrast and Sinerem MR. (orig.)

  6. Heterogeneous FDG-guided dose-escalation for locally advanced NSCLC (the NARLAL2 trial): Design and early dosimetric results of a randomized, multi-centre phase-III study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ditte Sloth; Nielsen, Tine Bjørn; Brink, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Local recurrence is frequent in locally advanced NSCLC and is primarily located in FDG-avid parts of tumour and lymph nodes. Aiming at improving local control without increasing toxicity, we designed a multi-centre phase-III trial delivering inhomogeneous dose-escalation d......Background and purpose: Local recurrence is frequent in locally advanced NSCLC and is primarily located in FDG-avid parts of tumour and lymph nodes. Aiming at improving local control without increasing toxicity, we designed a multi-centre phase-III trial delivering inhomogeneous dose...

  7. Feasibility and toxicity of concomitant radio/immunotherapy with MabThera (Rituximab {sup registered}) for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Results of a prospective phase I/II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haidenberger, Alfred; Popper, Bela-Andre; Skvortsova, Ira; Lukas, Peter [Medical Univ. Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy/Radiooncology; Fromm-Haidenberger, Sabine [Hospital Gmunden (Austria). Inst. of Radiology; Vries, Alexander de [Hospital Feldkirch (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy/Radiooncology; Steurer, Michael; Kantner, Johanna; Gunsilius, Eberhard [Medical Univ. Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Hematology

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) have a high radio- and chemosensitivity. Although initially responsive, approximately 50% of low grade B-cell lymphomas relapse after 10-15 years. Besides chemo- and radiotherapy, rituximab, a mouse/human chimeric antibody targeting CD20 antigen on the surface of B-cell lymphoma cells, is another treatment approach. In vitro data showed potentiation of radiation-induced apoptosis by addition of rituximab. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of radiotherapy with concomitant application of rituximab in NHL patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 21 patients with B-cell lymphoma (stage I: n = 11; II: n = 5; III: n = 1; IV: n = 4) were included in this study, treated with radiotherapy of 30-40 Gy and weekly application of rituximab (375 mg/m{sup 2}). Nine patients had R-CHOP chemotherapy previously, 1 patient leuceran chemotherapy, and 2 patients an initial treatment with 6 cycles of rituximab. Mean time of follow-up was 41.7 months. Results: No grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death was observed. In 1 patient, rituximab application had to be stopped after 3 cycles due to radiation-induced side effects. No late toxicities were reported. All patients were in complete remission after treatment. Progression or relapse was observed in 6 patients (28%); the mean time to progression was 27 months. The mean overall survival (OS) was 53 months. Conclusion: Combined radio/immunotherapy is feasible and safe. Treatment was well tolerated, no late toxicities were observed, and treatment outcome is promising. Randomized trials are necessary to clarify the benefit of this treatment approach and its applicability. (orig.)

  8. Motexafin Gadolinium Combined With Prompt Whole Brain Radiotherapy Prolongs Time to Neurologic Progression in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases: Results of a Phase III Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Minesh P.; Shapiro, William R.; Phan, See C.; Gervais, Radj; Carrie, Christian; Chabot, Pierre; Patchell, Roy A.; Glantz, Michael J.; Recht, Lawrence; Langer, Corey; Sur, Ranjan K.; Roa, Wilson H.; Mahe, Marc A.; Fortin, Andre; Nieder, Carsten; Meyers, Christina A.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Miller, Richard A.; Renschler, Markus F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In an international, randomized, Phase III study, patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer were randomized to WBRT with or without MGd. The primary endpoint was the interval to neurologic progression, determined by a centralized Events Review Committee who was unaware of the treatment the patients had received. Results: Of 554 patients, 275 were randomized to WBRT and 279 to WBRT+MGd. Treatment with MGd was well tolerated, and 92% of the intended doses were administered. The most common MGd-related Grade 3+ adverse events included liver function abnormalities (5.5%), asthenia (4.0%), and hypertension (4%). MGd improved the interval to neurologic progression compared with WBRT alone (15 vs. 10 months; p = 0.12, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78) and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.057, HR = 0.78). The WBRT patients required more salvage brain surgery or radiosurgery than did the WBRT+MGd patients (54 vs. 25 salvage procedures, p < 0.001). A statistically significant interaction between the geographic region and MGd treatment effect (which was in the prespecified analysis plan) and between treatment delay and MGd treatment effect was found. In North American patients, where treatment was more prompt, a statistically significant prolongation of the interval to neurologic progression, from 8.8 months for WBRT to 24.2 months for WBRT+MGd (p = 0.004, HR = 0.53), and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.06, HR = 0.73) were observed. Conclusion: In the intent-to-treat analysis, MGd exhibited a favorable trend in neurologic outcomes. MGd significantly prolonged the interval to neurologic progression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases receiving prompt WBRT. The toxicity was acceptable

  9. French multicenter phase III randomized study testing concurrent twice-a-day radiotherapy and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (BiRCF) in unresectable pharyngeal carcinoma: Results at 2 years (FNCLCC-GORTEC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Benezery, Karen; Dassonville, Olivier; Magne, Nicolas; Poissonnet, Gilles; Ramaioli, Alain; Lemanski, Claire; Bourdin, Sylvain; Tortochaux, Jacques; Peyrade, Frederic; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar; Vallicioni, Jacques; Seng Hang; Alzieu, Claude; Gery, Bernard; Chauvel, Pierre; Schneider, Maurice; Santini, Jose; Demard, Francois; Calais, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Background: Unresectable carcinomas of the oropharynx and hypopharynx still have a poor long-term prognosis. Following a previous phase II study, this phase III multicenter trial was conducted between November 1997 and March 2002. Methods: Nontreated, strictly unresectable cases were eligible. Twice-daily radiation: two fractions of 1.2 Gy/day, 5 days per week, with no split (D1 → D46). Total tumor doses: 80.4 Gy/46 day (oropharynx), 75.6 Gy/44 day (hypopharynx). Chemotherapy (arm B): Cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 (D1, D22, D43); 5FU, continuous infusion (D1 → D5), 750 mg/m 2 /day cycle 1; 430 mg/m 2 /day cycles 2 and 3. Results: A total of 163 evaluable patients. Grade 3-4 acute mucositis 82.6% arm B/69.5% arm A (NS); Grade 3-4 neutropenia 33.3% arm B/2.4% arm A (p < 0.05). Enteral nutrition through gastrostomy tube was more frequent in arm B before treatment and at 6 months (p < 0.01). At 24 months, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and specific survival (SS) were significantly better in arm B. OS: 37.8% arm B vs. 20.1% arm A (p = 0.038); DFS: 48.2% vs. 25.2% (p = 0.002); SS: 44.5% vs. 30.2% (p 0.021). No significant difference between the two arms in the amount of side effects at 1 and 2 years. Conclusion: For these unresectable cases, chemoradiation provides better outcome than radiation alone, even with an 'aggressive' dose-intensity radiotherapy schedule

  10. Effect of a prostaglandin - given rectally for prevention of radiation-induced acute proctitis - on late rectal toxicity. Results of phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertesz, Tereza; Herrmann, Markus K.A.; Christiansen, Hans; Hermann, Robert M.; Hess, Clemens F.; Hille, Andrea; Zapf, Antonia; Pradier, Olivier; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: to assess the late effect of a prostaglandin, given rectally during irradiation, on late rectal toxicity. In the acute treatment setting no significant differences in reducing the incidence of acute proctitis symptoms in patients receiving misoprostol, however, significantly more rectal bleeding had been reported. Patients and methods: a total of 100 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for prostate cancer had been entered into this phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with misoprostol or placebo suppositories. The toxicity was evaluated yearly after cessation of irradiation by the RTOG/LENT-SOMA scale. Results: the median follow-up was 50 months. 20 patients suffered from grade 1, four patients from grade 2 as well, and three patients only from grade 2 toxicity. Frequency, bleeding and urgency were the most commonly reported symptoms. In keeping with other studies and clinical experience, the symptoms peaked within the first 2 years with a median for grade 1 of 13 months and for grade 2 of 15 months. The presence of acute toxicity grade 2 showed a correlation with the development of any late toxicity (p = 0.03). Any acute rectal bleeding was significant correlated with any late rectal bleeding (p = 0.017). Conclusion: misoprostol given as once-daily suppository for prevention of acute radiation-induced proctitis does neither influence the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute nor late rectal toxicity. Misoprostol has no negative impact on the incidence and severity of late rectal bleeding, in contrast to acute rectal bleeding. The routine clinical use of misoprostol suppositories cannot be recommended. (orig.)

  11. Effect of a prostaglandin - given rectally for prevention of radiation-induced acute proctitis - on late rectal toxicity. Results of phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertesz, Tereza; Herrmann, Markus K.A.; Christiansen, Hans; Hermann, Robert M.; Hess, Clemens F.; Hille, Andrea [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Zapf, Antonia [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Pradier, Olivier [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Brest (France); Schmidberger, Heinz [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Background and purpose: to assess the late effect of a prostaglandin, given rectally during irradiation, on late rectal toxicity. In the acute treatment setting no significant differences in reducing the incidence of acute proctitis symptoms in patients receiving misoprostol, however, significantly more rectal bleeding had been reported. Patients and methods: a total of 100 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for prostate cancer had been entered into this phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with misoprostol or placebo suppositories. The toxicity was evaluated yearly after cessation of irradiation by the RTOG/LENT-SOMA scale. Results: the median follow-up was 50 months. 20 patients suffered from grade 1, four patients from grade 2 as well, and three patients only from grade 2 toxicity. Frequency, bleeding and urgency were the most commonly reported symptoms. In keeping with other studies and clinical experience, the symptoms peaked within the first 2 years with a median for grade 1 of 13 months and for grade 2 of 15 months. The presence of acute toxicity grade 2 showed a correlation with the development of any late toxicity (p = 0.03). Any acute rectal bleeding was significant correlated with any late rectal bleeding (p = 0.017). Conclusion: misoprostol given as once-daily suppository for prevention of acute radiation-induced proctitis does neither influence the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute nor late rectal toxicity. Misoprostol has no negative impact on the incidence and severity of late rectal bleeding, in contrast to acute rectal bleeding. The routine clinical use of misoprostol suppositories cannot be recommended. (orig.)

  12. Progression-free survival results in postmenopausal Asian women: subgroup analysis from a phase III randomized trial of fulvestrant 500 mg vs anastrozole 1 mg for hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer (FALCON).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Shinzaburo; Ellis, Matthew J; Robertson, John F R; Thirlwell, Jackie; Fazal, Mehdi; Shao, Zhimin

    2018-05-01

    The international, phase III FALCON study (NCT01602380) in postmenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive, locally advanced/metastatic breast cancer (LA/MBC) who had not received prior endocrine therapy, demonstrated statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) for patients who received fulvestrant 500 mg vs anastrozole 1 mg. This subgroup analysis evaluated PFS in Asian (randomized in China, Japan, or Taiwan) and non-Asian patients from the FALCON study. Eligible patients (estrogen receptor- and/or progesterone receptor-positive LA/MBC; World Health Organization performance status 0-2; ≥ 1 measurable/non-measurable lesion[s]) were randomized. PFS was assessed via Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours version 1.1, surgery/radiotherapy for disease worsening, or death (any cause). Secondary endpoints included: objective response rate, clinical benefit rate, duration of response, and duration of clinical benefit. Consistency of effect across subgroups was assessed via hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a log-rank test. Adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. Of the 462 randomized patients, the Asian and non-Asian subgroups comprised 67 and 395 patients, respectively. In the Asian subgroup, median PFS was 16.6 and 15.9 months with fulvestrant and anastrozole, respectively (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% CI 0.44-1.50). In the non-Asian subgroup, median PFS was 16.5 and 13.8 months, respectively (hazard ratio 0.79; 95% CI 0.62-1.01). Secondary outcomes were numerically improved with fulvestrant vs anastrozole in both subgroups. AE profiles were generally consistent between Asian and non-Asian subgroups. Results of this subgroup analysis suggest that treatment effects in the Asian patient subgroup are broadly consistent with the non-Asian population.

  13. Radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy superior to radiotherapy alone in the treatment of locally advanced anal cancer: results of a phase III randomized trial of the EORTC radiotherapy and gastrointestinal tract cooperative groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartelink, H.; Roelofsen, F.; Bosset, J.F.; Eschwege, F.; Rougier, Ph.; Peiffert, D.; Glabbeke, M. van; Pierart, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential gain of the concomitant use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in improving local control and reducing the need for colostomy, a randomized phase-III trial was performed in patients with locally advanced anal cancer. Material and methods: In the period 1987-1994 110 patients were randomized between radiotherapy alone and a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The patients had tumors larger than 4 cm, or T 3-4 N 0-3 , or T 1-2 N 1-3 anal cancer. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy given in 5 weeks, with a daily dose of 1.8 Gy. After a rest period of 6 weeks a boost of 15 Gy or 20 Gy was given in case of partial or complete response respectively. Chemotherapy was given during radiotherapy, 750 mg/m2 daily as continuous infusion on day 1-5 and 29-33, a single dose of Mitomycin C 15 mg/m 2 was administered on day 1. Results: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy has resulted in an increase in the complete remission rate from 54% to 80%, and from 83% to 94% if results are considered after surgical resections. This has led to a significant improvement in loco-regional control and colostomy free survival (P=0.04, P=0.003 resp.) both in favor of the combined modality treatment. No significant difference was found when severe side effects were considered. The survival rate remained similar in both treatment arms. Skin ulceration, nodal involvement and sex were the most important prognostic factors for both local control and survival. These remained significant after multivariate analysis. The improvement seen in local control by adding chemotherapy to radiotherapy remained also significant after adjusting for prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The concomitant use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy resulted in an improved local control rate and a reduction in the need for colostomy in patients with locally advanced anal cancer

  14. African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology - Vol 5, No ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology - Vol 5, No 1 (2004) ... ASYMPTOMATIC SIGNIFICANT BACTERIURIA AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN IN ... TO PARASITISM AND THE IMPLICATION ON TREATMENT APPROACH ...

  15. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2018.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  16. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2017.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  17. Workshop 96. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.).

  18. Workshop 96. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.)

  19. NJP Vol 39 no 3

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    dema, cranial nerve palsy or a combination of these signs and symptoms.4 These clinical features can also be present in some other central nervous system mor- bidities seen in our region such as meningitis, as a result. IIH can easily be misdiagnosed especially by non spe- cialist practitioners. This is more so in children ...

  20. NJP Vol 39 no 3

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-01-12

    Jan 12, 2012 ... ... programmes. Keywords: Mothers. Knowledge. Perception. Practice. Immunization. ... tury in terms of number of deaths averted per year.1 In ... vaccine dosages to infants at specified ages. ... ing to over 200,000 deaths per year.10 However, in ... responses and results presented as tables and charts.

  1. AFRIMEDIC VOL. 2, NO. 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Buchi

    Results: Majority of the respondents, 372 (97.0%), had knowledge of at least one form of contraceptive method. The best known method of contraception was the natural method, 180 (46.9%). The highest knowledge for the modern method was that of condom, 178 (46.4%), while the least known was sterilization methods, ...

  2. JRHR Vol 8 No 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    preparations put in place by the Independent National Electoral. Commission to stem the ... candidates, the party agents and even the media that cover the election, each of the ... mobilization of voters, this in turn can affect the outcome of the election results leading to conflicts and invariably fragility of the state. To guarantee ...

  3. Efficacy, patient-reported outcomes and safety profile of ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid), an injectable drug for the reduction of unwanted submental fat: results from a phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascher, B; Hoffmann, K; Walker, P; Lippert, S; Wollina, U; Havlickova, B

    2014-12-01

    Unwanted submental fat (SMF) may result in an unattractive chin profile and dissatisfaction with appearance. An approved and rigorously tested non-surgical method for SMF reduction is lacking. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ATX-101 for the pharmacological reduction of unwanted SMF in a phase III randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients (n = 360) with moderate or severe SMF were randomized to receive ATX-101 1 or 2 mg/cm(2) or placebo injected into their SMF for up to four treatments ~28 days apart, with a 12-week follow-up. Coprimary efficacy endpoints were the proportions of treatment responders, defined as a ≥1-point reduction in SMF on the Clinician-Reported Submental Fat Rating Scale (CR-SMFRS), and those satisfied with their appearance in association with their face and chin after treatment on the Subject Self-Rating Scale (SSRS score ≥4). Secondary efficacy endpoints included a ≥1-point improvement in SMF on the Patient-Reported Submental Fat Rating Scale (PR-SMFRS) and changes in the Patient-Reported Submental Fat Impact Scale (PR-SMFIS). Additional patient-reported outcomes and changes in the Skin Laxity Rating Scale were recorded. Adverse events (AEs) and laboratory test results were monitored. Compared with placebo, a greater proportion of patients treated with ATX-101 1 and 2 mg/cm(2) showed a ≥1-point improvement in CR-SMFRS (58.3% and 62.3%, respectively, vs. 34.5% with placebo; P < 0.001) and patient satisfaction (SSRS score ≥4) with the appearance of their face and chin (68.3% and 64.8%, respectively, vs. 29.3%; P < 0.001). Patient-reported secondary efficacy endpoints showed significant improvements in SMF severity (PR-SMFRS; P = 0.009 for ATX-101 1 mg/cm(2) , P < 0.001 for ATX-101 2 mg/cm(2) vs. placebo) and emotions and perceived self-image (PR-SMFIS; P < 0.001). No overall worsening of skin laxity was observed. AEs were mostly transient, mild to moderate in intensity and localized to the treatment area. ATX

  4. Dark matter detection - III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of todays particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the Universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the Universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world- wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  5. Handbook of algebra Vol. 1

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Handbook of Algebra defines algebra as consisting of many different ideas, concepts and results. Even the nonspecialist is likely to encounter most of these, either somewhere in the literature, disguised as a definition or a theorem or to hear about them and feel the need for more information. Each chapter of the book combines some of the features of both a graduate-level textbook and a research-level survey. This book is divided into eight sections. Section 1A focuses on linear algebra and discusses such concepts as matrix functions and equations and random matrices. Section 1B cover linear d

  6. Jet Joint Undertaking. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The scientific, technical, experimental and theoretical investigations related to JET tokamak are presented. The JET Joint Undertaking, Volume 2, includes papers presented at: the 15th European Conference on controlled fusion and plasma heating, the 15th Symposium on fusion technology, the 12th IAEA Conference on plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research, the 8th Topical Meeting on technology of fusion. Moreover, the following topics, concerning JET, are discussed: experience with wall materials, plasma performance, high power ion cyclotron resonance heating, plasma boundary, results and prospects for fusion, preparation for D-T operation, active gas handling system and remote handling equipment

  7. volBrain: An Online MRI Brain Volumetry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V.; Coupé, Pierrick

    2016-01-01

    The amount of medical image data produced in clinical and research settings is rapidly growing resulting in vast amount of data to analyze. Automatic and reliable quantitative analysis tools, including segmentation, allow to analyze brain development and to understand specific patterns of many neurological diseases. This field has recently experienced many advances with successful techniques based on non-linear warping and label fusion. In this work we present a novel and fully automatic pipeline for volumetric brain analysis based on multi-atlas label fusion technology that is able to provide accurate volumetric information at different levels of detail in a short time. This method is available through the volBrain online web interface (http://volbrain.upv.es), which is publically and freely accessible to the scientific community. Our new framework has been compared with current state-of-the-art methods showing very competitive results. PMID:27512372

  8. volBrain: an online MRI brain volumetry system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose V. Manjon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The amount of medical image data produced in clinical and research settings is rapidly growing resulting in vast amount of data to analyze. Automatic and reliable quantitative analysis tools, including segmentation, allow to analyze brain development and to understand specific patterns of many neurological diseases. This field has recently experienced many advances with successful techniques based on non-linear warping and label fusion. In this work we present a novel and fully automatic pipeline for volumetric brain analysis based on multi-atlas label fusion technology that is able to provide accurate volumetric information at different levels of detail in a short time. This method is available through the volBrain online web interface (http://volbrain.upv.es, which is publically and freely accessible to the scientific community. Our new framework has been compared with current state-of-the-art methods showing very competitive results.

  9. volBrain: An Online MRI Brain Volumetry System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V; Coupé, Pierrick

    2016-01-01

    The amount of medical image data produced in clinical and research settings is rapidly growing resulting in vast amount of data to analyze. Automatic and reliable quantitative analysis tools, including segmentation, allow to analyze brain development and to understand specific patterns of many neurological diseases. This field has recently experienced many advances with successful techniques based on non-linear warping and label fusion. In this work we present a novel and fully automatic pipeline for volumetric brain analysis based on multi-atlas label fusion technology that is able to provide accurate volumetric information at different levels of detail in a short time. This method is available through the volBrain online web interface (http://volbrain.upv.es), which is publically and freely accessible to the scientific community. Our new framework has been compared with current state-of-the-art methods showing very competitive results.

  10. Phase I/II 90Y-Zevalin (yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8) radioimmunotherapy dosimetry results in relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiseman, G.A.; Dunn, W.L.; White, C.A.; Berlfein, J.R.; Ding, E.; Grillo-Lopez, A.J.; Stabin, M.; Erwin, W.; Spies, S.; Dahlbom, M.; Silverman, D.H.S.; Raubitschek, A.; Karvelis, K.; Schultheiss, T.; Witzig, T.E.; Belanger, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dosimetry studies in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were performed to estimate the radiation absorbed dose to normal organs and bone marrow from 90 Y-Zevalin (yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8) treatment in this phase I/II, multicenter trial. The trial was designed to determine the dose of Rituximab (chimeric anti-CD20, Rituxan, IDEC-C2B8, MabThera), the unlabeled antibody given prior to the radioconjugate to clear peripheral blood B cells and optimize distribution, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose of 90 Y-Zevalin [7.4, 11, or 15 MBq/kg (0.2, 0.3, or 0.4 mCi/kg)]. Patients received 111 In-Zevalin (indium-111 ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-In2B8) on day 0 followed by a therapeutic dose of 90 Y-Zevalin on day 7. Both doses were preceded by an infusion of the chimeric, unlabeled antibody Rituximab. Following administration of 111 In-Zevalin, serial anterior/posterior whole-body scans were acquired. Major-organ radioactivity versus time estimates were calculated using regions of interest. Residence times were computed and entered into the MIRDOSE3 computer software program to calculate estimated radiation absorbed dose to each organ. Initial analyses of estimated radiation absorbed dose were completed at the clinical site. An additional, centralized dosimetry analysis was performed subsequently to provide a consistent analysis of data collected from the seven clinical sites. In all patients with dosimetry data (n=56), normal organ and red marrow radiation absorbed doses were estimated to be well under the protocol-defined upper limit of 20 Gy and 3 Gy, respectively. Median estimated radiation absorbed dose was 3.4 Gy to liver (range 1.2-7.8 Gy), 2.6 Gy to lungs (range 0.72-4.4 Gy), and 0.38 Gy to kidneys (range 0.07-0.61 Gy). Median estimated tumor radiation absorbed dose was 17 Gy (range 5.8-67 Gy). No correlation was noted between hematologic toxicity and the following variables: red marrow radiation absorbed dose, blood T 1/2 , blood AUC

  11. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy alone in stage III-IV unresectable head and neck cancer. Results of a randomized phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Fodor, Janos; Hitre, Erika; Remenar, Eva; Kasler, Miklos; Oberna, Ferenc; Goedeny, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In this phase II randomized study, the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by concurrent CRT was compared with those after standard CRT alone in patients with locally advanced, unresectable head and neck cancer. Between January 2007 and June 2009, 66 patients with advanced (stage III or IV) unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx) were randomly assigned to two groups: one receiving two cycles of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil ICT followed by CRT with three cycles of cisplatin and one treated by CRT alone. Response rate, local tumor control (LTC), locoregional tumor control (LRTC), overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and toxicity results were assessed. Three patients from the ICT + CRT group did not appear at the first treatment, so a total of 63 patients were evaluated in the study (30 ICT + CRT group and 33 CRT group). Three patients died of febrile neutropenia after ICT. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 63 months (range 53-82 months). The rate of radiologic complete response was 63 % following ICT + CRT, whereas 70 % after CRT alone. There were no significant differences in the 3-year rates of LTC (56 vs. 57 %), LRTC (42 vs. 50 %), OS (43 vs. 55 %), and PFS (41 vs. 50 %) in the ICT + CRT group and in the CRT group, respectively. The rate of grade 3-4 neutropenia was significantly higher in the ICT + CRT group than in the CRT group (37 and 12 %; p = 0.024). Late toxicity (grade 2 or 3 xerostomia) developed in 59 and 42 % in the ICT + CRT and CRT groups, respectively. The addition of ICT to CRT did not show any advantage in our phase II trial, while the incidence of adverse events increased. The three deaths as a consequence of ICT call attention to the importance of

  12. Aprepitant, granisetron, and dexamethasone for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting after high-dose melphalan in autologous transplantation for multiple myeloma: results of a randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Thomas; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Neben, Kai; Freiberger, Anja; Hüsing, Johannes; Gronkowski, Martina; Thalheimer, Markus; Pelzl, Le Hang; Mikus, Gerd; Burhenne, Jürgen; Ho, Anthony D; Egerer, Gerlinde

    2014-10-20

    The optimal regimen to prevent chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) for patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) is unclear. To evaluate the effect of aprepitant in addition to a standard regimen, we conducted this randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trial. Patients with multiple myeloma were randomly assigned at a one-to-one ratio to receive either aprepitant (125 mg orally on day 1 and 80 mg orally on days 2 to 4), granisetron (2 mg orally on days 1 to 4), and dexamethasone (4 mg orally on day 1 and 2 mg orally on days 2 to 3) or matching placebo, granisetron (2 mg orally on days 1 to 4), and dexamethasone (8 mg orally on day 1 and 4 mg orally on days 2 to 3). Melphalan 100 mg/m(2) was administered intravenously on days 1 to 2. ASCT was performed on day 4. The primary end point (complete response) was defined as no emesis and no rescue therapy within 120 hours of melphalan administration. Quality of life was assessed by modified Functional Living Index-Emesis (FLIE) questionnaire on days -1 and 6. Overall, 362 patients were available for the efficacy analysis (181 in each treatment arm). Significantly more patients receiving aprepitant reached the primary end point (58% v 41%; odds ratio [OR], 1.92; 95% CI, 1.23 to 3.00; P = .0042). Absence of major nausea (94% v 88%; OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.09 to 5.15; P = .026) and emesis (78% v 65%; OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.25 to 3.18; P = .0036) within 120 hours was increased by aprepitant. Mean total FLIE score (± standard deviation) was 114 ± 18 for aprepitant and 106 ± 26 for placebo (P < .001). The addition of aprepitant resulted in significantly less CINV and had a positive effect on quality of life. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Sixteen years follow-up results of a randomized phase II trial of neoadjuvant fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FAC) compared with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil (CMF) in stage III breast cancer: GOCS experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, José Pablo; Leone, Julieta; Vallejo, Carlos Teodoro; Pérez, Juan Eduardo; Romero, Alberto Omar; Machiavelli, Mario Raul; Romero Acuña, Luis; Domínguez, María Ester; Langui, Mario; Fasce, Hebe Margot; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Ortiz, Eduardo; Iturbe, Julián; Zwenger, Ariel Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) allows direct evaluation of the tumor's sensitivity to therapy, eradication of micrometastatic disease and the possibility of performing breast conserving surgery. The aim of this study was to describe long-term results of NAC in stage III breast cancer patients. We evaluated 126 patients that participated in a phase II randomized trial of neoadjuvant FAC compared with CMF. Chemotherapy was administered for three cycles prior to definitive surgery and radiotherapy, and then for six cycles as adjuvant. Median follow-up was 4.5 years (range 0.2-16.4). Objective response rate (OR) was similar in both groups (61 % for FAC, 66 % for CMF, P = NS). There were no differences in median disease free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS) (5.1 vs 3.3 years and 6.7 vs 6.3 years for FAC and CMF, respectively). After 16 years of follow-up, 53 patients are still alive. Multivariate analysis showed that the number of pathologically involved lymph nodes (pLN) was the only factor associated with both, DFS and OS (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.0005, respectively). Both regimens were well tolerated, CMF had higher incidence of grade 3-4 leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and stomatitis, whereas alopecia was more common in FAC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report long-term outcomes of FAC and CMF in the neoadjuvant setting. Within the sensitivity of our study, both regimens showed similar OR, long-term toxicity, DFS, and OS rate at 16 years. After 5 years, the hazard of death seems to decline. The prolonged follow-up of this study provides a unique opportunity to evaluate factors that predict long-term outcomes. After 16 years of follow-up, the number of pLN remains the most powerful predictor of survival.

  14. Phase I results of a phase I/II study of weekly nab-paclitaxel in paediatric patients with recurrent/refractory solid tumours: A collaboration with innovative therapies for children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Lucas; Casanova, Michela; Chisholm, Julia C; Berlanga, Pablo; Chastagner, Pascal B; Baruchel, Sylvain; Amoroso, Loredana; Melcón, Soledad Gallego; Gerber, Nicolas U; Bisogno, Gianni; Fagioli, Franca; Geoerger, Birgit; Glade Bender, Julia L; Aerts, Isabelle; Bergeron, Christophe; Hingorani, Pooja; Elias, Ileana; Simcock, Mathew; Ferrara, Stefano; Le Bruchec, Yvan; Slepetis, Ruta; Chen, Nianhang; Vassal, Gilles

    2018-06-21

    nab-Paclitaxel has demonstrated efficacy in adults with solid tumours and preclinical activity in paediatric solid tumour models. Results from phase I of a phase I/II study in paediatric patients with recurrent/refractory solid tumours treated with nab-paclitaxel are reported. Patients with recurrent/refractory extracranial solid tumours received nab-paclitaxel on days 1, 8 and 15 every 4 weeks at 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, or 270 mg/m 2 (rolling-6 dose-escalation) to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Sixty-four patients were treated. Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 3 dizziness at 120 mg/m 2 and grade 4 neutropenia >7 days at 270 mg/m 2 . The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse events were haematologic, including neutropenia (36%), leukopenia (36%) and lymphopenia (25%). Although the MTD was not reached, 270 mg/m 2 was declared non-tolerable due to grade 3/4 toxicities during cycles 1-2 (neutropenia, n = 5/7; skin toxicity, n = 2/7; peripheral neuropathy, n = 1/7). Of 58 efficacy-evaluable patients, complete response occurred in one patient (2%; Ewing sarcoma) and partial responses in four patients (7%; rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, renal tumour with pulmonary metastases [high-grade, malignant] and sarcoma not otherwise specified); all responses occurred at ≥210 mg/m 2 . Thirteen patients (22%) had stable disease (5 lasting ≥16 weeks) per RECIST. nab-Paclitaxel 240 mg/m 2 qw3/4 (nearly double the adult recommended monotherapy dose for this schedule in metastatic breast cancer) was selected as the RP2D based on the tolerability profile, pharmacokinetics and antitumour activity. Phase II is currently enrolling patients with recurrent/refractory neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV: NCT01962103. 2013-000144-26. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Polarization at LEP. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, G.; Altarelli, G.; Blondel, A.; Coignet, G.; Keil, E.; Plane, D.E.; Treille, D.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains a collection of papers covering the most important part of studies carried out by five study groups in view of a programme of experiments with polarized beams at LEP, the Large Electron-Positron collider under construction at CERN. The emphasis is on precision measurements at the Z peak. Such measurements are shown to be of considerable theoretical interest as well as very clean from the point of view of theoretical and experimental uncertainties. The measurement of the beam polarization can certainly be performed with sufficient accuracy, thanks to the availability of both e + and e - beam polarization. The normalization of the data taken with different beam helicities poses certain constraints that are described. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the possibility of providing longitudinally polarized beams in the LEP machine: The design of new wigglers and spin rotators, the study of correction procedures and results of numerical simulations are presented. (orig.)

  16. Antithrombin III for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Mikkel; Wetterslev, Jørn; Ravn, Frederikke B

    2016-01-01

    Background: Critical illness is associated with uncontrolled inflammation and vascular damage which can result in multiple organ failure and death. Antithrombin III (AT III) is an anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory properties but the efficacy and any harmful effects of AT III supplementation...... in critically ill patients are unknown. This review was published in 2008 and updated in 2015.  Objectives: To examine: 1. The effect of AT III on mortality in critically ill participants. 2. The benefits and harms of AT III. We investigated complications specific and not specific to the trial intervention......, bleeding events, the effect on sepsis and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and the length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and in hospital in general.  Search methods: We searched the following databases from inception to 27 August 2015: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials...

  17. Experiment data of 200% recirculation pump discharge line break integral test run 961 with HPCS failure at ROSA-III and comparison with results of suction line break tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Tasaka, Kanji; Nakamura, Hideo; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Murata, Hideo; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1984-03-01

    This report presents the experimental data of RUN 961, a 200% double-ended break test at the recirculation pump discharge line in the ROSA-III test facility. The ROSA-III test facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/424) system of the BWR/6. The facility has the electrically heated core, the break simulator and the scaled ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System). The MSIV (Main Steam Isolation Valve) closure and the ECCS actuation were tripped by the liquid level in the upper downcomer. The PCT (Peak Cladding Temperature) was 894 K, which was 107 K higher than a 200% pump suction line break test (RUN 926) due to the smaller depressurization rate. The effect of break location on transient LOCA phenomena was clarified by comparing the discharge and suction break tests. The whole core was quenched 71 s after LPCI actuation and the effectiveness of ECCS has been confirmed. (author)

  18. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  19. Effects of induction docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B nasopharyngeal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy: Final results of 2 parallel phase 2 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lin; Zhang, Youwang; Hu, Chaosu; Guo, Ye; Lu, Jiade J

    2017-06-15

    The effects of docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil (TPF) induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) on locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) are unclear. This study examined the long-term outcomes of the addition of this regimen to CCRT for stage III and IVA/B NPC. Two parallel, single-arm phase 2 trials were performed synchronously to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of TPF-based induction chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B NPC. The induction chemotherapy, which preceded standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy/platinum-based chemoradiation, consisted of 3 cycles of docetaxel (75 mg/m 2 on day 1), cisplatin (75 mg/m 2 on day 1), and a continuous infusion of fluorouracil (500 mg/m 2 /d on days 1-5) every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint for both trials was 5-year overall survival (OS). Between January 2007 and July 2010, 52 eligible patients with stage III NPC and 64 eligible patients with nonmetastatic stage IV NPC were accrued to the 2 trials. With a median follow-up of 67 months, the 5-year OS, progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and local progression-free survival (LPFS) rates were all improved in comparison with historical benchmarks for patients with stage III or IVA/IVB NPC. Multivariate analyses indicated that T and N classifications (T1/T2 vs T3/T4 and N3 vs N0-N2) were the only significant prognosticators for OS. The number of induction chemotherapy cycles was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting LPFS. TPF-based induction chemotherapy appears to significantly improve outcomes in comparison with historical data when it is administered before CCRT for locoregionally advanced NPC. A phase 3 trial is currently being performed to confirm this benefit. Cancer 2017;123:2258-2267. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  20. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume III. Technical sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Forty-five papers from Vol. III of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Two papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  1. Introduction to "Global Tsunami Science: Past and Future, Volume III"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Fritz, Hermann M.; Tanioka, Yuichiro; Geist, Eric L.

    2018-04-01

    Twenty papers on the study of tsunamis are included in Volume III of the PAGEOPH topical issue "Global Tsunami Science: Past and Future". Volume I of this topical issue was published as PAGEOPH, vol. 173, No. 12, 2016 and Volume II as PAGEOPH, vol. 174, No. 8, 2017. Two papers in Volume III focus on specific details of the 2009 Samoa and the 1923 northern Kamchatka tsunamis; they are followed by three papers related to tsunami hazard assessment for three different regions of the world oceans: South Africa, Pacific coast of Mexico and the northwestern part of the Indian Ocean. The next six papers are on various aspects of tsunami hydrodynamics and numerical modelling, including tsunami edge waves, resonant behaviour of compressible water layer during tsunamigenic earthquakes, dispersive properties of seismic and volcanically generated tsunami waves, tsunami runup on a vertical wall and influence of earthquake rupture velocity on maximum tsunami runup. Four papers discuss problems of tsunami warning and real-time forecasting for Central America, the Mediterranean coast of France, the coast of Peru, and some general problems regarding the optimum use of the DART buoy network for effective real-time tsunami warning in the Pacific Ocean. Two papers describe historical and paleotsunami studies in the Russian Far East. The final set of three papers importantly investigates tsunamis generated by non-seismic sources: asteroid airburst and meteorological disturbances. Collectively, this volume highlights contemporary trends in global tsunami research, both fundamental and applied toward hazard assessment and mitigation.

  2. International Journal of Humanistic Studies - Vol 3 (2004)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Humanistic Studies - Vol 3 (2004). Journal Home > Archives > Vol 3 (2004). Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  3. Errata Resonance, Vol.20, No.12, 2015. Rajaram Nityananda, Sun ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Resonance, Vol.20, No.12, 2015. Rajaram Nityananda, Sun, Sky and Clouds: Where Light and Matter Meet. Page 1121: The correct Figure 5 is reproduced below: Resonance, Vol.20, No.11, 2015. Anil Kumar, Felix Bloch (1905–1983). Page 956: Para 1, Line 5, 'also from Zürich' should be read as 'from nearby Bern'.

  4. Continuing Medical Education - Vol 27, No 1 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education - Vol 27, No 1 (2009). Journal Home > Archives > Vol 27, No 1 (2009). Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Addiction treatment · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. R Meyer ...

  5. Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 28, No 2 (2018)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 28, No 2 (2018). Journal Home > Archives > Vol 28, No 2 (2018). Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Prevalence of opportunistic intestinal parasites and associated factors among HIV patients while receiving ART at Arba Minch Hospital in southern Ethiopia: a ...

  6. Economic and Policy Review - Vol 13, No 3 (2007)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Economic and Policy Review - Vol 13, No 3 (2007). Journal Home > Archives > Vol 13, No 3 ... Snagging the wheel of progress: Corruption, New anti-corruption drive and Nigeria\\'s quest for development. S B Kura ... Book Review: challenges of African growth opportunities, constraints and strategic directions. S I Owualah ...

  7. ACHEMA yearbook '88. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, D.

    1987-01-01

    Volume 1 entitled 'Chemical Engineering Research and Education' covers the research activities of some 381 scientific institutes from 25 countries. The compact summaries and reports provide a quick reference guide to the activities of the individual institutes in the fields of research and education together with a list of the major publications of these institutes over the last three years. Volume 1 also serves as a guide to help users locate the appropriate scientific institutes in Europe which might be possible partners with regard to the solution of technical problems or the practical application of research results. Innovation also depends on information channels which contribute towards transposing research findings into practice. The ACHEMA yearbook is an excellent channel of information which is conceived for active and intense use. For the first time the information contained in Volume 1 is also worldwide accessible online through the data bank DERES (Dechema Research Institutes Data Bank), which has been set up by DECHEMA. (orig./HK) [de

  8. Zechstein salt Denmark. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyngsie Jacobsen, F.; Soenderholm, M.; Springer, N.; Gutzon Larsen, J.; Lagoni, P.; Fabricius, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Salt Research Project EFP-81 has mainly been aiming upon an elucidation of the stratigraphy of the Danish Zechstein evaporites. Also an attempt to clarify the connection between the fabric and the strength of the strongly deformed domal rock salt is performed. The unravelling of the stratigraphy is carried out by means of renewed interpretations of new and old data from all the wells drilling in the Danish Permian basin in connection with a revaluation of the core descriptions. By means of trace elements analysis it is possible to some extent to distinguish between Zestein 1 and 2 ''grey salt''. A description of the transition zone between Zechstein 1 and 2 is carried out. New methods of fabric analyses are introduced and the strength measurements of the rock salt are treated statistically in connection with new defined rock salt parameters. An investigation of fluid inclusions in halite and quartz crystals from dome salt has resulted in the determination of salinity and chemical composition of the brines present in the salt. Temperatures and corresponding pressures during the evolution of the salt pillow and salt dome have been established. The dehydration conditions of natural carnallite in situ are clarified. (author)

  9. SRP engineering and design history, Vol III, 200 F and H Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banick, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    This volume combines the record of events relating to the development of design for both the 200-F and H Areas. Chronologically, the definition of plant facilities was first established for the 200-F Area. The second area, 200-H, was projected initially to be a supplementary plutonium separations facility. This history explains the differences in character and capacity of the manufacturing facilities in both areas as production requirements and experience with separations processes advanced

  10. SRP engineering and design history, Vol III, 200 F and H Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banick, C.J.

    2000-04-17

    This volume combines the record of events relating to the development of design for both the 200-F and H Areas. Chronologically, the definition of plant facilities was first established for the 200-F Area. The second area, 200-H, was projected initially to be a supplementary plutonium separations facility. This history explains the differences in character and capacity of the manufacturing facilities in both areas as production requirements and experience with separations processes advanced.

  11. Fundamentals of interfacial and colloid science Vol III: Liquid-fluid interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyklema, J.

    2000-01-01

    This volume deals with various aspects of surface tensions and interfacial tensions. Together with the phenomenon of adsorption (enrichment of molecules at interfaces), these tensions constitute the basic characteristics of interfaces. The authors try to keep the treatment systematic and deductive.

  12. History of the Kansas Extension Service From 1868 to 1964; (Vol. I, II, III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teagarden, Earl H., Comp.

    The comprehensive history of the Kansas Extension Service from 1868 is presented in three volumes and includes administration, information dissemination, club work, special area reports, personnel training, and continuing education. Administration involves such aspects as personnel, finances, organizational changes, cooperation with other agencies…

  13. There is no role for hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of children with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic brainstem tumors: results of a pediatric oncology group phase III trial comparing conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandell, Lynda R.; Kadota, Richard; Freeman, Carolyn; Douglass, Edwin C.; Fontanesi, James; Cohen, Michael E.; Kovnar, Edward; Burger, Peter; Sanford, Robert A.; Kepner, James; Friedman, Henry; Kun, Larry E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In June 1992, POG began accrual to a phase III study, POG-9239, designed to compare the time to disease progression, overall survival, and toxicities observed in children with newly diagnosed brainstem tumor treated with 100 mg/m 2 of infusional cisplatin and randomized to either conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients eligible for study were those between 3 and 21 years of age with previously untreated tumors arising in the pons. Histologic confirmation of diagnosis was not mandatory, provided that the clinical and MRI scan findings were typical for a diffusely infiltrating pontine lesion. Treatment consisted of a six-week course of local field radiotherapy with either once a day treatment of 180 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 5400 cGy (arm 1) or a twice a day regimen of 117 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 7020 cGy (the second of the three hyperfractionated dose escalation levels of POG-8495) (arm 2). Because of previously reported poor results with conventional radiotherapy alone, cisplatin was included as a potential radiosensitizer in an attempt to improve progression-free and ultimate survival rates. Based on results of the phase I cisplatin dose escalation trial, POG-9139, 100 mg/m 2 was chosen for this trial and was delivered by continuous infusion over a 120-hour period, beginning on the first day of radiotherapy and repeated during weeks 3 and 5. One hundred thirty eligible patients were treated on protocol, 66 on arm 1 and 64 on arm 2. Results: The results we report are from time of diagnosis through October 1997. For patients treated on arm 1, the median time to disease progression (defined as time to off study) was 6 months (range 2-15 months) and the median time to death 8.5 months (range 3-24 months); survival at 1 year was 30.9% and at 2 years, 7.1%. For patients treated on arm 2, the corresponding values were 5 months (range 1-12 months) and 8 months (range 1-23 months), with 1- and 2-year

  14. Is it time to rethink the role of hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of children with newly-diagnosed brainstem glioma?: Results of a Pediatric Oncology Group Phase III trial comparing conventional VS. hyperfractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandell, L.; Kadota, R.; Douglass, E.C.; Fontanesi, J.; Freeman, C.; Cohen, M.; Kovnar, E.; Burger, P.; Sanford, R.A.; Kepner, J.; Friedman, H.; Kun, L.

    1997-01-01

    Purposes/Objective: In June 1992, POG began accrual to a Phase III study, POG 9239, designed to compare the time to disease progression, overall survival, and toxicities observed in children with newly diagnosed brainstem glioma treated with 100 mg/m 2 of infusional Cisplatin and randomized to either conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The trial was closed in March 1996, having achieved its accrual goal. Materials and Methods: Patients (pts) eligible for study were those between 3 and 21 years of age with previously untreated tumors arising in the pons. Histologic confirmation of diagnosis was not mandatory, provided that the clinical and MRI scan findings were typical for diffusely infiltrating pontine glioma. Treatment (Rx) consisted of a six-week course of local field radiotherapy with either once a day treatment (Rx 1) of 180 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 5400 cGy or a twice a day regimen (Rx 2) of 117 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 7020 cGy (the second of the three hyperfractionated dose escalation levels of POG 8495). Because of previously reported poor results with conventional radiotherapy alone, Cisplatin was included as a potential radiosensitizer in an attempt to improve progression-free and ultimate survival rates. Based on results of the Phase I Cisplatin dose escalation trial, POG 9139, 100 mg/m 2 was chosen for this trial and was delivered by continuous infusion over a 120-hour period, beginning on the first day of radiotherapy and repeated during Weeks 3 and 5. Of the 132 pts accrued to the study, 94 are eligible for review based upon time since entry, 47 in each Rx arm. In Rx 1, there were 23 males and 24 females, ranging in age from 40 to 161 mo (median, 77 mo); in Rx 2, there were 20 males and 27 females, ranging in age from 41 to 212 mo (median, 77 mo). As of 4/18/96, the study coordinator had not yet verified eligibility and assessed the evaluability of the remaining pts. Results: All results are from time of diagnosis

  15. Preliminary evaluation of rotational Vol-oxidizer for hot cell operation - 5320

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.H.; Lee, J.W.; Cho, Y.Z.; Ahn, D.H.; Song, K.C.

    2015-01-01

    KAERI is developing a mechanical head-end process for pyro-processing. As a piece of the processing equipment, a vol-oxidizer that can handle several tens of kg of HM/batch is under development to supply U 3 O 8 powders to an electrolytic reduction (ER) reactor. To operate a vol-oxidizer in a hot cell, the reactor should be optimized by the mechanical design, and the vol-oxidizer should have a high hull recovery rate. In addition, a vol-oxidizer for hot cell demonstrations that handles the spent fuel of high radiation virulence in a limited space should have a small size and not scatter in its outlet. In this paper, we aim at a preliminary evaluation of a rotational vol-oxidizer for hot cell operation. To evaluate the preliminary situation, we produced a theoretical equation of an optimum reactor size, and verification tests were conducted using an acryl vessel and zircaloy-4 tube according to various weights and lengths. In addition, we predicted the terminal velocity of U 3 O 8 using the terminal velocity of SiO 2 , which will determine the optimum air flux, and through an oxidation experiment, we verified the theory form to detect the existence of U 3 O 8 powder in a discharge filter. In addition, hull separation tests were conducted using a reactor and hulls with a 50 kg HM/batch for the recovery rate of the hulls. The results indicate that we obtained an appropriate air flux so as to not cause U 3 O 8 powder dispersion from using a Stokes equation and density ratio equation prior to the demonstration. The optimum flow and experimental results of the hull separation test have been applied for the design of the demonstration oxidizer, and the operation conditions of the oxidizer were produced. (authors)

  16. Timely management of developing class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Yelampalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial, and definitive treatment tends to be delayed for severe class III cases. Developing class III patients with moderate to severe anterior crossbite and deep bite may need early intervention in some selected cases. Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e. true class III malocclusion, or as a result of premature occlusal contacts causing forward functional shift of the mandible, which is known as pseudo class III malocclusion. These cases, if not treated at the initial stage of development, interfere with normal growth of the jaw bases and may result in severe facial deformities. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. This paper deals with the selection of an appropriate appliance from the various current options available for early intervention in developing class III malocclusion through two case reports.

  17. Physics at LEP2. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altarelli, G.; Sjoestrand, T.; Zwirner, F.

    1995-01-01

    This is final report of the Workshop on Physics at LEP2, held at CERN during 1995. The first part of vol. 1 is devoted to aspects of machine physics of particular relevance to experiments, including the energy, luminosity and interaction regions, as well as the measurement of beam energy. The second part of vol. 1 is a relatively concise, but fairly complete, handbook on the physics of e + e - annihilation above the WW threshold and up to √s∼200 GeV. It contains discussions on WW cross-sections and distributions, W mass determination, Standard Model processes, QCD and gamma-gamma physics, as well as aspects of discovery physics, such as Higgs, new particle searches, triple gauge boson couplings and Z'. The second volume contains a review of the existing Monte Carlo generators for LEP2 physics. These include generators for WW physics, QCD and gamma-gamma processes, Bhabha scattering and discovery physics. A special effort was made to co-ordinate the different parts, with a view to achieving a systematic and balanced review of the subject, rather than just publishing a collection of separate contributions. (orig.)

  18. Physics at LEP2. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altarelli, G.; Sjoestrand, T.; Zwirner, F.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of the Workshop on Physics at LEP2, held at CERN during 1995. The first part of vol. 1 is devoted to aspects of machine physics of particular relevance to experiments, including the energy, luminosity and interaction regions, as well as the measurement of beam energy. The second part of vol. 1 is a relatively concise, but fairly complete, handbook on the physics of e + e - annihilation above the WW threshold and up to √s∼200 GeV. It contains discussions on WW cross-sections and distributions, W mass determination, Standard Model processes, QCD and gamma-gamma physics, as well as aspects of discovery physics, such as Higgs, new particle searches, triple gauge boson couplings and Z'. The second volume contains a review of the existing Monte Carlo generators for LEP2 physics. These include generators for WW physics, QCD and gamma-gamma processes, Bhabha scattering and discovery physics. A special effort was made to co-ordinate the different parts, with a view to achieving a systematic and balanced review of the subject, rather than just publishing a collection of separate contributions. (orig.)

  19. Physics at LEP2. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altarelli, G [ed.; Sjoestrand, T [ed.; Zwirner, F [ed.

    1995-02-19

    This is final report of the Workshop on Physics at LEP2, held at CERN during 1995. The first part of vol. 1 is devoted to aspects of machine physics of particular relevance to experiments, including the energy, luminosity and interaction regions, as well as the measurement of beam energy. The second part of vol. 1 is a relatively concise, but fairly complete, handbook on the physics of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation above the WW threshold and up to {radical}s{approx}200 GeV. It contains discussions on WW cross-sections and distributions, W mass determination, Standard Model processes, QCD and gamma-gamma physics, as well as aspects of discovery physics, such as Higgs, new particle searches, triple gauge boson couplings and Z`. The second volume contains a review of the existing Monte Carlo generators for LEP2 physics. These include generators for WW physics, QCD and gamma-gamma processes, Bhabha scattering and discovery physics. A special effort was made to co-ordinate the different parts, with a view to achieving a systematic and balanced review of the subject, rather than just publishing a collection of separate contributions. (orig.).

  20. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report

  1. Editorial Vol 2 - issue 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yngve Nordkvelle

    2006-01-01

    between these types of scientific theory. On one hand most teachers act on the grounds of “rules of thumb”, believing there is a good reason to claim that “If I do A, B will follow”. These are dimensions of the personal knowledge teachers carry without giving it much thought. University teachers are no exception in this respect. Even if they seek to build their research on scientific theories, their lives are just as based on personal knowledge as any layperson. When it comes to teaching, university teachers are equally attached do unreflected traditions, habits and unjustified patterns of action. The last paper deals with how scientific interventions into education seeks to challenge established “ways of doing things”, by changing methods of assessment. The paper suggests that giving students proper feedback on their written essays pays off significantly: more students pass the exam, and with better results. Raaheim has screened the available literature on what seems to have a positive effect on student learning when writing papers, and shows how using a different method improves the studying conditions for students. He offers a technological innovation that illuminates the recursive process between the developmental levels of technologies. The obligation of educators is to improve the chances for learners to fulfil their aims. Even if education never can become a scientific theory on par with “substantial” theories, the obligation is still there to increase the chance for making A be followed by B. Literature: Illich, I. (1995: In the Vineyard of the text. A Commentary to Hugh's Didascalicon. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago. Mitcham, C. (1994: Thinking through technology : the path between engineering and philosophy . University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

  2. Fabrication and Characterization of 5 vol.% (Al2O3p + 8 vol.% (Al2O3f/A336 Hybrid Micron and Nano-Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Luyang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites are fabricated by adding two reinforcements into matrix materials so that the expected excellent properties can be achieved through the combined advantages of short fibres, and different size particles (micron or nano, which provide a high degree of design freedom. In this paper, hybrid preforms were produced with the different size reinforcement of the Al2O3 particles and short fibres. The Al-Si alloy-based hybrid composites reinforced by 5 vol. % Al2O3 particles and 8 vol. % Al2O3 fibres were fabricated by preform-squeezing casting route. The structure and performance of composite materials were studied with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The results show that the reinforcements, both particles and fibres, distribute homogeneously in the matrix materials, and the properties of composites are found to improve in comparison with the matrix Al-Si alloy.

  3. African Zoology - Vol 4, No 1 (1969)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The haematoza of South African birds. III. The carmine bee-eater Merops Nubicoides Des Murs and Pucheran · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. JH Oosthuizen, MB Markus ...

  4. AFRREV IJAH, Vol.3 (1) January, 2014

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    2014-01-09

    Jan 9, 2014 ... consequences of the people‟s seemingly endless wait for democratic dividends in ... Nigerian Federal Government and by private institutions through a .... (iii) a level of civil and political liberties – freedom of expression,.

  5. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy alone in stage III-IV unresectable head and neck cancer. Results of a randomized phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Fodor, Janos [National Institute of Oncology, Center of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Hitre, Erika [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Chemotherapy and Clinical Pharmacology, Budapest (Hungary); Remenar, Eva; Kasler, Miklos [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Surgery, Budapest (Hungary); Oberna, Ferenc [Bacs-Kiskun County Hospital, Department of Oral, Maxillofacial and Head and Neck Surgery, Kecskemet (Hungary); Goedeny, Maria [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-08-15

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In this phase II randomized study, the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by concurrent CRT was compared with those after standard CRT alone in patients with locally advanced, unresectable head and neck cancer. Between January 2007 and June 2009, 66 patients with advanced (stage III or IV) unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx) were randomly assigned to two groups: one receiving two cycles of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil ICT followed by CRT with three cycles of cisplatin and one treated by CRT alone. Response rate, local tumor control (LTC), locoregional tumor control (LRTC), overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and toxicity results were assessed. Three patients from the ICT + CRT group did not appear at the first treatment, so a total of 63 patients were evaluated in the study (30 ICT + CRT group and 33 CRT group). Three patients died of febrile neutropenia after ICT. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 63 months (range 53-82 months). The rate of radiologic complete response was 63 % following ICT + CRT, whereas 70 % after CRT alone. There were no significant differences in the 3-year rates of LTC (56 vs. 57 %), LRTC (42 vs. 50 %), OS (43 vs. 55 %), and PFS (41 vs. 50 %) in the ICT + CRT group and in the CRT group, respectively. The rate of grade 3-4 neutropenia was significantly higher in the ICT + CRT group than in the CRT group (37 and 12 %; p = 0.024). Late toxicity (grade 2 or 3 xerostomia) developed in 59 and 42 % in the ICT + CRT and CRT groups, respectively. The addition of ICT to CRT did not show any advantage in our phase II trial, while the incidence of adverse events increased. The three deaths as a consequence of ICT call attention to the importance of

  6. III-V microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Nougier, JP

    1991-01-01

    As is well known, Silicon widely dominates the market of semiconductor devices and circuits, and in particular is well suited for Ultra Large Scale Integration processes. However, a number of III-V compound semiconductor devices and circuits have recently been built, and the contributions in this volume are devoted to those types of materials, which offer a number of interesting properties. Taking into account the great variety of problems encountered and of their mutual correlations when fabricating a circuit or even a device, most of the aspects of III-V microelectronics, from fundamental p

  7. Complexation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides with hydrophilic N-donor ligands for Am(III)/Cm(III) and An(III)/Ln(III) separation; Komplexierung von trivalenten Actiniden und Lanthaniden mit hydrophilen N-Donorliganden zur Am(III)/Cm(III)- bzw. An(III)/Ln(III)-Trennung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Christoph

    2017-07-24

    The implementation of actinide recycling processes is considered in several countries, aiming at the reduction of long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of used nuclear fuel. This requires the separation of the actinides from the fission and corrosion products. The separation of the trivalent actinides (An(III)) Am(III) and Cm(III), however, is complicated by the presence of the chemically similar fission lanthanides (Ln(III)). Hydrophilic N-donor ligands are employed as An(III) or Am(III) selective complexing agents in solvent extraction to strip An(III) or Am(III) from an organic phase loaded with An(III) and Ln(III). Though they exhibit excellent selectivity, the complexation chemistry of these ligands and the complexes formed during solvent extraction are not sufficiently characterized. In the present thesis the complexation of An(III) and Ln(III) with hydrophilic N-donor ligands is studied by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), UV/Vis, vibronic sideband spectroscopy and solvent extraction. TRLFS studies on the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with the Am(III) selective complexing agent SO{sub 3}-Ph-BTBP (tetrasodium 3,3{sup '},3'',3{sup '''}-([2,2{sup '}-bipyridine]-6,6{sup '}-diylbis(1,2,4-triazine-3,5,6-triyl)) tetrabenzenesulfonate) revealed the formation of [M(SO{sub 3}-Ph-BTBP){sub n}]{sup (4n-3)-} complexes (M = Cm(III), Eu(III); n = 1, 2). The conditional stability constants were determined in different media yielding two orders of magnitude larger β{sub 2}-values for the Cm(III) complexes, independently from the applied medium. A strong impact of ionic strength on the stability and stoichiometry of the formed complexes was identified, resulting from the stabilization of the pentaanionic [M(SO{sub 3}-Ph-BTBP){sub 2}]{sup 5-} complex with increasing ionic strength. Thermodynamic studies of Cm(III)-SO{sub 3}-Ph-BTBP complexation showed that the proton concentration of the applied medium impacts

  8. Effects upon metabolic pathways and energy production by Sb(III and As(III/Sb(III-oxidase gene aioA in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxin Li

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 is a heterotrophic arsenite [As(III]/antimonite [Sb(III]-oxidizing strain. The As(III oxidase AioAB is responsible for As(III oxidation in the periplasm and it is also involved in Sb(III oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. In addition, Sb(III oxidase AnoA and cellular H2O2 are also responsible for Sb(III oxidation in strain GW4. However, the deletion of aioA increased the Sb(III oxidation efficiency in strain GW4. In the present study, we found that the cell mobility to Sb(III, ATP and NADH contents and heat release were also increased by Sb(III and more significantly in the aioA mutant. Proteomics and transcriptional analyses showed that proteins/genes involved in Sb(III oxidation and resistance, stress responses, carbon metabolism, cell mobility, phosphonate and phosphinate metabolism, and amino acid and nucleotide metabolism were induced by Sb(III and were more significantly induced in the aioA mutant. The results suggested that Sb(III oxidation may produce energy. In addition, without periplasmic AioAB, more Sb(III would enter bacterial cells, however, the cytoplasmic AnoA and the oxidative stress response proteins were significantly up-regulated, which may contribute to the increased Sb(III oxidation efficiency. Moreover, the carbon metabolism was also activated to generate more energy against Sb(III stress. The generated energy may be used in Sb transportation, DNA repair, amino acid synthesis, and cell mobility, and may be released in the form of heat.

  9. Long-term results and prognostic factors in patients with stage III-IVA squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy from a single institution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudaka, Wataru; Nagai, Yutaka; Toita, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the longer-term efficacy and safety of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) incorporating high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) with a lower cumulative radiotherapy (RT) protocol and analyzed prognostic risk factors for survival among patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage III-IVA squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the cervix. Ninety-nine patients with FIGO stage III-IVA SCC of the cervix between 1997 and 2008 were treated with CCRT using cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 for 5 days every 3 weeks or 40 mg/m 2 weekly. Acute and late toxicities were evaluated. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analysis. Median age was 53.5 years. Median follow-up period was 58 months (range 6-170 months). Pathologically complete response was achieved in 93 patients (96.9%). The 5-year OS and DFS were 72.0 and 69.3%, respectively. The 5-year local and distant DFS were 83.0 and 75.1%, respectively. Thirty-one patients (31.3%) experienced recurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size and pretreatment hemoglobin level remained an independent risk factor for OS and DFS. Acute toxicity was moderate. In terms of late adverse effects, 2 patients (2.0%) suffered from grade 4 late intestinal toxicity because of radiation enterocolitis, with both requiring intestinal surgery. Our study demonstrates that the CCRT schedule in patients with FIGO stage III-IVA SCC is efficacious and safe. In addition, the assessment of tumor size and pretreatment anemia can provide valuable prognostic information. (author)

  10. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  11. Summary of Session III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002

  12. Basel III and Asset Securitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mpundu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asset securitization via special purpose entities involves the process of transforming assets into securities that are issued to investors. These investors hold the rights to payments supported by the cash flows from an asset pool held by the said entity. In this paper, we discuss the mechanism by which low- and high-quality entities securitize low- and high-quality assets, respectively, into collateralized debt obligations. During the 2007–2009 financial crisis, asset securitization was seriously inhibited. In response to this, for instance, new Basel III capital and liquidity regulations were introduced. Here, we find that we can explicitly determine the transaction costs related to low-quality asset securitization. Also, in the case of dynamic and static multipliers, the effects of unexpected negative shocks such as rating downgrades on asset price and input, debt obligation price and output, and profit will be quantified. In this case, we note that Basel III has been designed to provide countercyclical capital buffers to negate procyclicality. Moreover, we will develop an illustrative example of low-quality asset securitization for subprime mortgages. Furthermore, numerical examples to illustrate the key results will be provided. In addition, connections between Basel III and asset securitization will be highlighted.

  13. Numerical study of the THM effects on the near-field safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository - BMT1 of the DECOVALEX III project. Part 1: conceptualization and characterization of the problems and summary of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chijimatsu, M.; Nguyen, T.S.; Jing, L.; De Jonge, J.; Kohlmeier, M.; Millard, A.; Rejeb, A.; Rutqvist, J.; Souley, M.; Sugita, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Geological disposal of the spent nuclear fuel uses often the concept of multiple barrier systems. In order to predict the performance of these barriers, mathematical models have been developed, verified and validated against analytical solutions, laboratory tests and field experiments within the international DECOVALEX III project. These models in general consider the full coupling of thermal (T), hydraulic (H) and mechanical (M) processes that would prevail in the geological media around the repository. For Bench Mark Test no. 1 (BMT1) of the DECOVALEX III project, seven multinational research teams studied the implications of coupled THM processes on the safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository at the near-field and are presented in three accompany papers in this issue. This paper is the first of the three companion papers, which provides the conceptualization and characterization of the BMT1 as well as some general conclusions based on the findings of the numerical studies. It also shows the process of building confidence in the mathematical models by calibration with a reference T-H-M experiment with realistic rock mass conditions and bentonite properties and measured outputs of thermal, hydraulic and mechanical variables

  14. A background to risk analysis. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    This 4-volumes report gives a background of ideas, principles, and examples which might be of use in developing practical methods for risk analysis. Some of the risk analysis techniques described are somewhat experimental. The report is written in an introductory style, but where some point needs further justification or evaluation, this is given in the form of a chapter appendix. In this way, it is hoped that the report can serve two purposes, - as a basis for starting risk analysis work and as a basis for discussing effectiveness of risk analysis procedures. The report should be seen as a preliminary stage, prior to a program of industrial trials of risk analysis methods. Vol. 4 treats human error in plant operation. (BP)

  15. A background to risk analysis. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    This 4-volumes report gives a background of ideas, principles, and examples which might be of use in developing practical methods for risk analysis. Some of the risk analysis techniques described are somewhat experimental. The report is written in an introductory style, but where some point needs further justifi- cation or evaluation, this is given in the form of a chapter appenix. In this way, it is hoped that the report can serve two purposes, - as a basis for starting risk analysis work and as a basis for discussing effectiveness of risk analysis procedures. The report should be seen as a preliminary stage, prior to a program of industrial trials of risk analysis methods. Vol. 3 contains chapters on quantification of risk, failure and accident probability, risk analysis and design, and examles of risk analysis for process plant. (BP)

  16. A background to risk analysis. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    This 4-volumes report gives a background of ideas, principles and examples which might be of use in developing practical methods for risk analysis. Some of the risk analysis techniques described are somewhat experimental. The report is written in an introductory style, but where some point needs further justification or evaluation, this is given in the form of a chapter appendix. In this way, it is hoped that the report can serve two purposes, - as a basis for starting risk analysis work and as a basis for discussing effectiveness of risk analysis procedures. The report should be seen as a preliminary stage, prior to a program of industrial trials of risk analysis methods. Vol. 2 treats generic methods of qualitative failure analysis. (BP)

  17. A background risk analysis. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    This 4-volumes report gives a background of ideas, principles, and examples which might be of use in developing practical methods for risk analysis. Some of the risk analysis techniques, described are somewhat experimental. The report is written in an introductory style, but where some point needs further justification or evaluation, this is given in the form of a chapter appendix. In this way, it is hoped that the report can serve two purposes, - as a basis for starting risk analysis work and as a basis for discussing effectiveness of risk analysis procedures. The report should be seen as a preliminary stage, prior to a program of industrial trials of risk analysis methods. Vol. 1 contains a short history of risk analysis, and chapters on risk, failures, errors and accidents, and general procedures for risk analysis. (BP)

  18. Advances in boundary elements. Vol. 1-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brebbia, C.A.; Connor, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains some of the edited papers presented at the 11th Boundary Element Conference, held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, during August 1989. The papers are arranged in three different books comprising the following topics: Vol. 1: Computations and Fundamentals - comprises sections on fundamentals, adaptive techniques, error and convergence, numerical methods and computational aspects. (283 p.). Vol. 2: Field and fluid flow solutions - includes the following topics: potential problems, thermal studies, electrical and electromagnetic problems, wave propagation, acoustics and fluid flow. (484 p.). Vol. 3: Stress analysis - deals with advances in linear problems, nonlinear problems, fracture mechanics, contact mechanics, optimization, geomechanics, plates and shells, vibrations and industrial applications. (450 p). (orig./HP)

  19. Magnetic interactions in iron (III) porphyrin chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, J.; Subramanian, Japyesan; Fuhrhop, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    Intermolecular exchange interactions in iron(III) porphyrin chlorides (porphyrin = OEP, proto, TPP) have been studied by X-ray structure, EPR and magnetic susceptibility studies. The crystal structure of Fe(III)OEP-Cl was found to be different from that of the other two. Different types of exchange broadened EPR-spectra are obtained which are attributable to the arrangement in the crystals. The EPR results correlate well with magnetic susceptibility data. (orig.) [de

  20. Interaction of Eu(III) and Cm(III) with mucin. A key component of the human mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Claudia; Barkleit, Astrid [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the potential health risks caused by the ingestion of lanthanides (Ln) and actinides (An), investigations into the chemical behavior of these metals in the human gastrointestinal tract are necessary. Mucin is an important part of the protective mucosa layer in the digestive system. We have recently reported that mucin interacts strongly with Eu(III) and Cm(III), representatives of Ln(III) and An(III), respectively, under in vivo conditions. In order to investigate the complexation behavior of this protein with Ln(III)/An(III), TRLFS measurements were performed on Eu(III)/Cm(III)-mucin solutions with different protein concentrations and at different pH. The results indicate the formation of at least two independent mucin species. At higher pH, the formation of hydroxide species was also observed.

  1. Interaction of Eu(III) and Cm(III) with mucin. A key component of the human mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, Claudia; Barkleit, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the potential health risks caused by the ingestion of lanthanides (Ln) and actinides (An), investigations into the chemical behavior of these metals in the human gastrointestinal tract are necessary. Mucin is an important part of the protective mucosa layer in the digestive system. We have recently reported that mucin interacts strongly with Eu(III) and Cm(III), representatives of Ln(III) and An(III), respectively, under in vivo conditions. In order to investigate the complexation behavior of this protein with Ln(III)/An(III), TRLFS measurements were performed on Eu(III)/Cm(III)-mucin solutions with different protein concentrations and at different pH. The results indicate the formation of at least two independent mucin species. At higher pH, the formation of hydroxide species was also observed.

  2. Safety results from a phase III study (TURANDOT trial by CECOG) of first-line bevacizumab in combination with capecitabine or paclitaxel for HER-2-negative locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, I; Inbar, M J; Kahán, Z; Greil, R; Beslija, S; Stemmer, S M; Kaufman, B; Zvirbule, Z; Steger, G G; Messinger, D; Brodowicz, T; Zielinski, C

    2012-11-01

    We report safety data from a randomised, phase III study (CECOG/BC.1.3.005) evaluating first-line bevacizumab plus paclitaxel or capecitabine for locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. Patients aged ≥18 years with human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative breast adenocarcinoma were randomised to Arm A: bevacizumab 10 mg/kg days 1 and 15; paclitaxel 90 mg/m(2) days 1, 8, and 15, every 4 weeks; or Arm B: bevacizumab 15 mg/kg day 1; capecitabine 1000 mg/m(2) b.i.d., days 1-14, every 3 weeks, until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or consent withdrawal. A post hoc interim safety analysis included 561 patients (Arm A: 284, Arm B: 277). The regimens demonstrated similar frequencies of all-grade and serious adverse events (SAEs), but different safety profiles. Treatment-related events occurred in 85.2% (Arm A) and 78.0% (Arm B) of patients. Fatigue was most common in Arm A (30.6% versus 23.5% Arm B), and hand-foot syndrome (HFS) most common in Arm B (49.5% versus 2.5% Arm A). Diarrhoea (Arm A: 0.4%, Arm B: 1.4%) and pulmonary embolism (Arm A: 0.7%, Arm B: 1.1%) were the most frequently reported SAEs. These findings are in-line with safety data for bevacizumab plus paclitaxel or capecitabine, reported in previous phase III trials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Decitabine improves progression-free survival in older high-risk MDS patients with multiple autosomal monosomies: results of a subgroup analysis of the randomized phase III study 06011 of the EORTC Leukemia Cooperative Group and German MDS Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübbert, Michael; Suciu, Stefan; Hagemeijer, Anne; Rüter, Björn; Platzbecker, Uwe; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; Germing, Ulrich; Salih, Helmut R; Muus, Petra; Pflüger, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Hans-Eckart; Bogatyreva, Lioudmila; Aul, Carlo; de Witte, Theo; Ganser, Arnold; Becker, Heiko; Huls, Gerwin; van der Helm, Lieke; Vellenga, Edo; Baron, Frédéric; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Wijermans, Pierre W

    2016-01-01

    In a study of elderly AML patients treated with the hypomethylating agent decitabine (DAC), we noted a surprisingly favorable outcome in the (usually very unfavorable) subgroup with two or more autosomal monosomies (MK2+) within a complex karyotype (Lübbert et al., Haematologica 97:393-401, 2012). We now analyzed 206 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients (88 % of 233 patients randomized in the EORTC/GMDSSG phase III trial 06011, 61 of them with RAEBt, i.e. AML by WHO) with cytogenetics informative for MK status.. Endpoints are the following: complete/partial (CR/PR) and overall response rate (ORR) and progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Cytogenetic subgroups are the following: 63 cytogenetically normal (CN) patients, 143 with cytogenetic abnormalities, 73 of them MK-negative (MK-), and 70 MK-positive (MK+). These MK+ patients could be divided into 17 with a single autosomal monosomy (MK1) and 53 with at least two monosomies (MK2+). ORR with DAC in CN patients: 36.1 %, in MK- patients: 16.7 %, in MK+ patients: 43.6 % (MK1: 44.4 %, MK2+ 43.3 %). PFS was prolonged by DAC compared to best supportive care (BSC) in the CN (hazard ratio (HR) 0.55, 99 % confidence interval (CI), 0.26; 1.15, p = 0.03) and MK2+ (HR 0.50; 99 % CI, 0.23; 1.06, p = 0.016) but not in the MK-, MK+, and MK1 subgroups. OS was not improved by DAC in any subgroup. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time in a randomized phase III trial that high-risk MDS patients with complex karyotypes harboring two or more autosomal monosomies attain encouraging responses and have improved PFS with DAC treatment compared to BSC.

  4. Calculus III essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Calculus III includes vector analysis, real valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple integrations, vector fields, and infinite series.

  5. Extraction and separation studies of Ga(III, In(III and Tl(III using the neutral organophosphorous extractant, Cyanex-923

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. DHADKE

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The neutral extractant, Cyanes-923 has been used for the extraction and separation of gallium(III, indium(III and thallium(III from acidic solution. These metal ions were found to be quantitatively extracted with Cyanex-923 in toluene in the pH range 4.5–5.5, 5.0–6.5 and 1.5–3.0, respectively, and from the organic phase they can be stripped with 2.0 mol dm-3 HNO3, 3.0 mol dm-3 HNO3 and 3.0 mol dm-3 HCl, respectively. The effect of pH equilibration period, diluents, diverse ions and stripping agents on the extraction of Ga(III, In(III and Tl(III has been studied. The stroichiometry of the extracted species of these metal ions was determined on the basis of the slope analysis method. The reaction proceed by solvation and the probable extracted species found were [MCl3. 3Cyanex-923] [where M = Ga(III or In(III ] and [HTlCl4. 3Cyanex-923]. Based on these results a sequential procedure for the separation of Ga(III, In(III and Tl(III from each other was developed.

  6. Study of Type III ELMs in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, R [EFDA Close Support Unit, Garching, 2 Boltzmannstrasse, Garching (Germany); Saibene, G [EFDA Close Support Unit, Garching, 2 Boltzmannstrasse, Garching (Germany); Horton, L D [Association Euratom-IPP, MPI fuer Plasmaphysik, 2 Boltzmannstrasse, Garching (Germany); Becoulet, M [Association Euratom-CEA, CE Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance, CEDEX (France); Budny, R [PPPL, Princeton University, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Borba, D [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Centro de Fusao Nuclear, 1096 Lisbon, CODEX (Portugal); Chankin, A [Association Euratom-IPP, MPI fuer Plasmaphysik, 2 Boltzmannstrasse, Garching (Germany); Conway, G D [Association Euratom-IPP, MPI fuer Plasmaphysik, 2 Boltzmannstrasse, Garching (Germany); Cordey, G [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); McDonald, D [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Guenther, K [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Hellermann, M G von [FOM-Rijnhuizen, Ass. Euratom-FOM, TEC, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Igithkanov, Yu [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Teilinstitut Greifswald, EURATOM Ass., D-17491, Greifswald (Germany); Loarte, A [EFDA Close Support Unit, Garching, 2 Boltzmannstrasse, Garching (Germany); Lomas, P J [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Pogutse, O [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rapp, J [EFDA Close Support Unit, Culham, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents the results of JET experiments aimed at studying the operational space of plasmas with a Type III ELMy edge, in terms of both local and global plasma parameters. In JET, the Type III ELMy regime has a wide operational space in the pedestal n{sub e} - T{sub e} diagram, and Type III ELMs are observed in standard ELMy H-modes as well as in plasmas with an internal transport barrier (ITB). The transition from an H-mode with Type III ELMs to a steady state Type I ELMy H-mode requires a minimum loss power, P{sub TypeI}. P{sub TypeI} decreases with increasing plasma triangularity. In the pedestal n{sub e} - T{sub e} diagram, the critical pedestal temperature for the transition to Type I ELMs is found to be inversely proportional to the pedestal density (T{sub crit} {proportional_to} 1/n) at a low density. In contrast, at a high density, T{sub crit}, does not depend strongly on density. In the density range where T{sub crit} {proportional_to} 1/n, the critical power required for the transition to Type I ELMs decreases with increasing density. Experimental results are presented suggesting a common mechanism for Type III ELMs at low and high collisionality. A single model for the critical temperature for the transition from Type III to Type I ELMs, based on the resistive interchange instability with magnetic flutter, fits well the density and toroidal field dependence of the JET experimental data. On the other hand, this model fails to describe the variation of the Type III n{sub e} - T{sub e} operational space with isotopic mass and q{sub 95}. Other results are instead suggestive of a different physics for Type III ELMs. At low collisionality, plasma current ramp experiments indicate a role of the edge current in determining the transition from Type III to Type I ELMs, while at high collisionality, a model based on resistive ballooning instability well reproduces, in term of a critical density, the experimentally observed q{sub 95} dependence of the

  7. Charm physics at BES III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yifang

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of J/Ψ and the τ lepton in 70's, the study of τ-charm physics became very active: several dedicated e + e - colliders were built and tremendous progress were obtained. In this paper, the main reasoning,the content and the characteristics of the τ-charm physics study are discussed, together with the scientific motivations and the latest results of the recently completed upgrade of the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPC II) and the new Beijing Spectrometer (BES III). (authors)

  8. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 4.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    African Health Sciences Vol 10 No 4 December 2010. 353. Effect of ... Key words: Rumex steudelii, Antifertility, Folliculogenesis, Endometrium, uterus, ovary, ovarian follicles, corpus luteum,. Rats. ..... first cycle in intrauterine growth-related and.

  9. African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology - Vol 5, No ...

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    African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology - Vol 5, No 3 (2004) ... In Peripheral Leukocyte And Body Fluids Of Onchocerciasis Patients Treated With ... A Study Of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria In Pregnancy In Ile - Ife, Southwestern ...

  10. Southern African Journal of Environmental Education - Vol 8 (1988)

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    Southern African Journal of Environmental Education - Vol 8 (1988) ... An interaction of archaeology with school history in a museum education context ... The child in the outdoor classroom · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  11. Gender and Behaviour - Vol 5, No 2 (2007)

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    Gender and Behaviour. ... Gender and Behaviour - Vol 5, No 2 (2007) ... Home Type, Age and Gender on The Antisocial Behaviour of Secondary School Students. ... Gender-Wise Comparison on Emotional Intelligence and Marital Satisfaction.

  12. International Journal of Development and Policy Studies - Vol 2, No ...

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    International Journal of Development and Policy Studies - Vol 2, No 1 (2006) .... Locating oppressive use of language: a study of linguistic violence on nigerian ... trafficking - poverty link based on urban development and planning process ...

  13. Pan African Medical Journal - Vol 16, No 1 (2014)

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    Pan African Medical Journal - Vol 16, No 1 (2014) .... Cancer incidence in Morocco: report from Casablanca registry 2005-2007 · EMAIL FREE FULL .... Maladie de Leo-Buerger faisant suite à une intoxication au cannabis · EMAIL FREE FULL ...

  14. International Journal of Health Research - Vol 2, No 4 (2009)

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    International Journal of Health Research - Vol 2, No 4 (2009) ... Psychosocial characteristics of patients admitted to a drug rehabilitation unit in Nigeria · EMAIL ... Hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities of fruit pulp of limonia acidissima linn ...

  15. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 14, No 18 (2015)

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    African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 14, No 18 (2015). Journal Home ... Isolation of microalgae species from arid environments and evaluation of their potentials for biodiesel production · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  16. Wind tunnel evaluation of Hi-Vol TSP effectiveness data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Wind tunnel evaluation of EPA's Hi-Vol TSP sampler for sampling effectiveness with regards to aerodynamic particle diameter (5 to 35 microns), wind speed (2, 8, 24...

  17. African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 21 ...

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    African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences - Vol 21, No 3 (2015) ... Factors Influencing the Health of Men in Polygynous Relationship · EMAIL FULL ... Views of HIV Positive Pregnant Women on Accessibility of the Prevention of ...

  18. Studies in Gender and Development in Africa - Vol 2 (2008)

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    Studies in Gender and Development in Africa - Vol 2 (2008) ... I don't love my husband” Advice Columns as Teaching Resource for Gender and Sexuality: Experiences from the University of Cape Coast, Ghana ... Current Issue Atom logo

  19. African Journal of Chemical Education - Vol 7, No 1 (2017)

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    African Journal of Chemical Education - Vol 7, No 1 (2017). Journal Home ... Hybridization and molecular geometry: A number game · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ... AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO ...

  20. African Research Review - Vol 4, No 4 (2010)

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    African Research Review - Vol 4, No 4 (2010) .... Educational Policy and Technological Development in Africa: An X-Ray of Problems and Solutions in the .... Tradition and Art Appreciation: A Boost to Cultural Tourism in Nigeria · EMAIL FREE ...

  1. South African Journal of Higher Education - Vol 19 (2005)

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    South African Journal of Higher Education - Vol 19 (2005) ... The 'idea of engagement' and 'the African University in the 21st Century': Some ... The challenges of knowledge production by researchers in Public Administration, a South African ...

  2. African Health Sciences - Vol 13, No 2 (2013)

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    African Health Sciences. ... African Health Sciences - Vol 13, No 2 (2013) ... S Musisi, D Akena, E Nakimuli-Mpungu, C Abbo, J Okello, 205-218 .... Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking pattern among brothelbased female sex workers in ...

  3. African Health Sciences - Vol 15, No 4 (2015)

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    African Health Sciences. ... African Health Sciences - Vol 15, No 4 (2015) .... H Madubedube, Andre P Kengne, Rajiv T Erasmus, Tahir S Pillay, Tandi E ... on lung function and cardiorespiratory fitness in both cigarette and hookah smokers.

  4. West African Journal of Industrial and Academic Research - Vol 4 ...

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    West African Journal of Industrial and Academic Research - Vol 4, No 1 (2012) ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ... on Gas Turbine Engine Data · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  5. West African Journal of Industrial and Academic Research - Vol 17 ...

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    West African Journal of Industrial and Academic Research - Vol 17, No 1 (2017) ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ... The effect of electricity and gas losses on Nigeria`s Gross Domestic Product · EMAIL ...

  6. Research in Hospitality Management - Vol 5, No 2 (2015)

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    Research in Hospitality Management - Vol 5, No 2 (2015) ... Hotel quality in the European Capital of Culture: Leeuwarden 2018 · EMAIL FREE FULL ... Consumer patronage and willingness-to-pay at different levels of restaurant attributes: A ...

  7. Jolivet: Complete Flute Music, Vol. 2 / Guy S. Rickards

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rickards, Guy S.

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Jolivet: Complete Flute Music, Vol. 2. Kroumata Percussion Ensemble, Tapiola Sinfonietta, Paavo Järvi". BIS CD 739 (64 minutes: DDD). Item marked from CD630 (6/94), CD272, remainder new to UK

  8. Southern African Business Review - Vol 21, No 1 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Business Review - Vol 21, No 1 (2017) ... Pre-packaged applications in business reorganisations: International principles · EMAIL ... Microcredit supply under Islamic Banking in Khartoum State, Sudan · EMAIL FREE FULL ...

  9. Tanzania Veterinary Journal - Vol 32, No 1 (2017)

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    Tanzania Veterinary Journal - Vol 32, No 1 (2017) ... factors for porcine cysticercosis transmission and animal welfare in selected villages in Nyasa, Tanzania ... Thoracic radiographic anatomy in sheep · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  10. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care - Vol 23 ...

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    Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care - Vol 23, No 1-2 (2011) ... The Nigerian National Health Bill 2011: Delay of Presidential Assent to an Act: ... Knowledge And Practice of Occupational Safety Among Quarry Workers in A ...

  11. African Heath Sciences Vol 8 No 1.p65

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Harriet

    African Health Sciences Vol 8 No 1 March 2008. 36 ... Objective:To highlight difficulties in the diagnosis and management of non-traumatic perforation of small bowel. Material and ..... of three operations for typhoid perforation. Br J Surg. 1997;.

  12. GLOBAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES VOL 8, NO

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ada

    GLOBAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES VOL 8, NO. ... media. From the over fifty tertiary institutions in the country graduates are churned .... few were collected at the contact addresses, ... acquisition is paramount for successful job hunting.

  13. Nigerian Journal of Chemical Research Vol. 20, 2015 39 Seasonal ...

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    Dr M Waziri

    Vol. 20, 2015. 39. Seasonal Variations in Physicochemical Properties of Water, Sediment and Fish of ... The levels of some physicochemical parameters in the dam water were determined in wet and dry seasons .... Water, Waste and Health in ...

  14. African Research Review - Vol 5, No 1 (2011)

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    African Research Review - Vol 5, No 1 (2011) .... Gender and Occupational Preferences among Senior High School Students in Cross River State ... Academic Achievement in Physics · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  15. Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction in sedimentary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovely, Derek R.

    2002-01-01

    Although it was previously considered that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms must come into direct contact with Fe(III) oxides in order to reduce them, recent studies have suggested that electron-shuttling compounds and/or Fe(III) chelators, either naturally present or produced by the Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms themselves, may alleviate the need for the Fe(III) reducers to establish direct contact with Fe(III) oxides. Studies with Shewanella alga strain BrY and Fe(III) oxides sequestered within microporous beads demonstrated for the first time that this organism releases a compound(s) that permits electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides which the organism cannot directly contact. Furthermore, as much as 450 w M dissolved Fe(III) was detected in cultures of S. alga growing in Fe(III) oxide medium, suggesting that this organism releases compounds that can solublize Fe(III) from Fe(III) oxide. These results contrast with previous studies, which demonstrated that Geobacter metallireducens does not produce electron-shuttles or Fe(III) chelators. Some freshwater aquatic sediments and groundwaters contained compounds, which could act as electron shuttles by accepting electrons from G. metallireducens and then transferring the electrons to Fe(III). However, other samples lacked significant electron-shuttling capacity. Spectroscopic studies indicated that the electron-shuttling capacity of the waters was not only associated with the presence of humic substances, but water extracts of walnut, oak, and maple leaves contained electron-shuttling compounds did not appear to be humic substances. Porewater from a freshwater aquatic sediment and groundwater from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer contained dissolved Fe(III) (4-16 w M), suggesting that soluble Fe(III) may be available as an electron acceptor in some sedimentary environments. These results demonstrate that in order to accurately model the mechanisms for Fe(III) reduction in sedimentary environments it will be necessary

  16. The role of Ce(III) in BZ oscillating reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Paulo A.; Varela, Hamilton; Faria, Roberto B.

    2012-03-01

    Herein we present results on the oscillatory dynamics in the bromate-oxalic acid-acetone-Ce(III)/Ce(IV) system in batch and also in a CSTR. We show that Ce(III) is the necessary reactant to allow the emergence of oscillations. In batch, oscillations occur with Ce(III) and also with Ce(IV), but no induction period is observed with Ce(III). In a CSTR, no oscillations were found using a freshly prepared Ce(IV), but only when the cerium-containing solution was aged, allowing partial conversion of Ce(IV) to Ce(III) by reaction with acetone.

  17. Antithrombin III for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Mikkel; Wetterslev, Jørn; Ravn, Frederikke B

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Antithrombin III (AT III) is an anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory properties. We assessed the benefits and harms of AT III in critically ill patients. METHODS: We searched from inception to 27 August 2015 in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CAB, BIOSIS and CINAHL. We included randomized...... participants). However, for all other outcome measures and analyses, the results did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to support AT III substitution in any category of critically ill participants including those with sepsis and DIC. AT III did not show an impact...

  18. TJOG Vol 26 No 2.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III-R) and been very ... later included in the 4th edition (DSM-IV) as the prevalence of ..... Washington, DC. APA. 1987. Classification of Diseases, 10th edn (ICD-10), ... Gynaecology for Postgraduates, 6th edn.

  19. Enhancement of the fluorescence of the samarium (III) complex by gadolinium (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun-Xiang, C.; Zhang-Hua, L.

    1988-01-01

    The increase in sensitivity and selectivity of reactions in which colored species are formed by the addition of different metal ions is an area of research that has recently been developed. This phenomenon, which is sometimes called cocolaration effect, has been explained by the formation of mixed metal complex. The authors found an analogous phenomenon of reactions forming fluorescent complexes. The complexes of Sm(III)-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA)-phenanthroline (Phen)-Triton-X-100 (TX-100) and Gd(III) (or La(III), Lu(III) and Y(III))-TTA-Phen-TX-100 had practically no fluorescence separately. Instead, a fluorescence-enhancement phenomenon caused by adding Gd or La, Lu and Y ions to the system was observed for the first time. The intensity of the enhanced fluorescence of Sm(III) complex was increased in the following order: La< Y< Lu< Gd. By analogy with cocoloration effect, the authors call this new fluorescence-enhancement phenomenon the co-fluorescence effect. The object of this work was to study the enhancement effect of Gd(III) on the fluorescence of the Sm(III)-TTA-Phen-TX-100 system. The recommended fluorimetric method has been applied to the determination of trace amounts of samarium in ytterbium oxide with satisfactory results. A general reaction mechanism for the system studied was proposed

  20. Economic Outcomes of Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffolds Versus Everolimus-Eluting Stents in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: 1-Year Results From the ABSORB III Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Suzanne J; Lei, Yang; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja; Vilain, Katherine; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Kereiakes, Dean J; Ellis, Stephen G; Stone, Gregg W; Cohen, David J

    2017-04-24

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the economic impact of the Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold compared with the Xience everolimus-eluting stent in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The ABSORB III trial (Everolimus-Eluting Bioresorbable Scaffolds for Coronary Artery Disease) demonstrated that the Absorb scaffold was noninferior to the Xience stent with respect to target lesion failure at 1 year. Whether health care costs differ between the Absorb scaffold and the Xience stent is unknown. We performed a prospective health economic study alongside the ABSORB III trial, in which patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for stable or unstable angina were randomized to receive the Absorb scaffold (n = 1,322) or Xience stent (n = 686). Resource use data were collected through 1 year of follow-up. Costs were assessed using resource-based accounting (for procedures), MedPAR data (for other index hospitalization costs), and Medicare reimbursements (for follow-up costs and physician fees). Initial procedural costs were higher with the Absorb scaffold than the Xience stent ($6,316 ± 1,892 vs. $6,103 ± 1,895; p = 0.02), driven mainly by greater balloon catheter use and the higher cost of the scaffold in the Absorb group. Nonetheless, index hospitalization costs ($15,035 ± 2,992 for Absorb vs. $14,903 ± 3,449 for Xience; p = 0.37) and total 1-year costs ($17,848 ± 6,110 for Absorb vs. $17,498 ± 7,411 for Xience; p = 0.29) were similar between the 2 groups. Although initial procedural costs were higher with the Absorb scaffold, there were no differences in total 1-year health care costs between the 2 cohorts. Longer term follow-up is needed to determine whether meaningful cost savings emerge after scaffold resorption. (A Clinical Evaluation of Absorb™ BVS, the Everolimus-Eluting Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold in the Treatment of Subjects With de Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions; NCT01751906). Copyright © 2017

  1. Immunogenicity, reactogenicity and safety of 2 doses of an adjuvanted herpes zoster subunit vaccine administered 2, 6 or 12 months apart in older adults: Results of a phase III, randomized, open-label, multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Himal; Poder, Airi; Campora, Laura; Geeraerts, Brecht; Oostvogels, Lidia; Vanden Abeele, Carline; Heineman, Thomas C

    2018-01-02

    In phase III trials, 2 doses of a herpes zoster (HZ) subunit vaccine (HZ/su; 50 µg varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E [gE] and AS01 B Adjuvant System) administered 2-months apart in older adults (≥50 and ≥70 years) demonstrated >90% efficacy in preventing HZ and had a clinically acceptable safety profile. Here we report immunogenicity, reactogenicity and safety following administration of 2 HZ/su doses at intervals longer than 2 months. In this Phase III, open-label trial conducted in the US and Estonia, 354 adults ≥50 years were randomized 1:1:1 to receive 2 HZ/su doses 2, 6, or 12 months apart. gE-specific humoral immune responses were evaluated at pre-vaccination, 1 and 12 months post-dose 2. Co-primary objectives were to compare immune responses to HZ/su 1 month post-dose 2 when given 6-months or 12-months apart to those administered 2-months apart. For each participant, safety information was collected from dose 1 to 12 months post-dose 2. 346 participants completed the study and 343 were included in the according-to-protocol cohort for immunogenicity. One month post-dose 2, vaccine response rates were 96.5% (97.5% confidence interval [CI]: 90.4; 99.2) and 94.5% (97.5% CI: 87.6; 98.3) for the 0, 6- and 0, 12-month schedules, respectively, both schedules meeting the pre-defined criterion. Non-inferiority of anti-gE geometric mean concentrations was demonstrated for HZ/su administered on 0, 6-month compared to a 0, 2-month schedule; however, HZ/su administered on a 0, 12-month schedule did not meet the non-inferiority criterion. Injection site pain was the most commonly reported solicited adverse event (AE). 26 participants each reported at least 1 serious AE; none were assessed as related to vaccination. Immune responses to HZ/su administered at 0, 6-month were non-inferior to those elicited by a 0, 2-month schedule. HZ/su exhibited a clinically acceptable safety profile for all dosing intervals. Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01751165

  2. Tofacitinib improves pruritus and health-related quality of life up to 52 weeks: Results from 2 randomized phase III trials in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Steven R; Thaçi, Diamant; Gooderham, Melinda; Augustin, Matthias; de la Cruz, Claudia; Mallbris, Lotus; Buonanno, Marjorie; Tatulych, Svitlana; Kaur, Mandeep; Lan, Shuping; Valdez, Hernan; Mamolo, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor that improves clinical measures of psoriasis. We sought to assess patient-reported outcomes in tofacitinib-treated patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis over 52 weeks. In 2 identical, phase III studies (Oral treatment for Psoriasis Trial Pivotal 1 [NCT01276639], n = 901, and Pivotal 2 [NCT01309737], n = 960), patients were randomized 2:2:1 to receive 5 or 10 mg of tofacitinib or placebo, twice daily. At week 16, placebo-treated patients were re-randomized to tofacitinib. Dermatology Life Quality Index score, Itch Severity Item score, Patient Global Assessment score, and patient satisfaction were assessed. Baseline Dermatology Life Quality Index score indicated substantial health-related quality of life impairment. At week 16, a greater proportion of patients achieved Dermatology Life Quality Index score of 1 or less (no effect of psoriasis on health-related quality of life) with tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg twice daily versus placebo (Oral treatment for Psoriasis Trial Pivotal 1/2: 26.7%/28.6% and 40.2%/48.2% vs 4.6%/6.0%, respectively; P tofacitinib doses versus placebo (P tofacitinib versus placebo (P Tofacitinib demonstrated improvement in health-related quality of life and patient-reported symptoms that persisted over 52 weeks. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Workshop Arboretum Volčji potok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Kučan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From its constitution onwards, the Volčji Potok Arboretum has been caught between various conflicting orientations. It is both a scientific, research and educational institution, and a cultural monument with exquisite garden and landscape design features and areas of great natural value and built cultural heritage, as well as commercial venue. At the same time, it functions as a park and an area for mass events, a garden centre and nursery. This variety of functions has helped Arboretum to survive the pressures of time; however, partial and uncoordinated interventions have threatened its original mission and its image and generated a number of conflicting situations. The workshop, organised on the initiative of the Institute for the Protection of Cultural Heritage of Slovenia, which involved students from the Faculty of Architecture and students from the Department of Landscape Architecture of the Biotechnical Faculty in mixed groups, generated eight proposals to solve some of the most urgent problems by introducing optimised development with clearly defined goals and priorities.

  4. One-Year Clinical Outcomes of Patients Presenting With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Caused by Bifurcation Culprit Lesions Treated With the Stentys Self-Apposing Coronary Stent: Results From the APPOSITION III Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundeken, Maik J; Lu, Huangling; Vos, Nicola; IJsselmuiden, Alexander; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; Wessely, Rainer; Dengler, Thomas; La Manna, Alessio; Silvain, Johanne; Montalescot, Gilles; Spaargaren, René; Tijssen, Jan G P; de Winter, Robbert J; Wykrzykowska, Joanna J; Amoroso, Giovanni; Koch, Karel T

    2017-08-01

    To investigate outcomes in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) after treatment with the Stentys self-apposing stent (Stentys SAS; Stentys S.A.) for bifurcation culprit lesions. The nitinol, self-expanding Stentys was initially developed as a dedicated bifurcation stent. The stent facilitates a provisional strategy by accommodating its diameter to both the proximal and distal reference diameters and offering an opportunity to "disconnect" the interconnectors, opening the stent toward the side branch. The APPOSITION (a post-market registry to assess the Stentys self-expanding coronary stent in acute myocardial infarction) III study was a prospective, multicenter, international, observational study including STEMI patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with the Stentys SAS. Clinical endpoints were evaluated and stratified by bifurcation vs non-bifurcation culprit lesions. From 965 patients included, a total of 123 (13%) were documented as having a bifurcation lesion. Target-vessel revascularization (TVR) rates were higher in the bifurcation subgroup (16.4% vs 10.0%; P=.04). Although not statistically significant, other endpoints were numerically higher in the bifurcation subgroup: major adverse cardiac events (MACE; 12.7% vs 8.8%), myocardial infarction (MI; 3.4% vs 1.8%), and definite/probable stent thrombosis (ST; 5.8% vs 3.1%). However, when postdilation was performed, clinical endpoints were similar between bifurcation and non-bifurcation lesions: MACE (8.7% vs 8.4%), MI (1.2% vs 0.7%), and definite/probable ST (3.7% vs 2.4%). The use of the Stentys SAS was safe and feasible for the treatment of bifurcation lesions in the setting of primary PCI for STEMI treatment with acceptable 1-year cardiovascular event rates, which improved when postdilation was performed.

  5. Tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase inhibitor, for the treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis: Long-term efficacy and safety results from 2 randomized phase-III studies and 1 open-label long-term extension study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Kim A; Krueger, James G; Feldman, Steven R; Langley, Richard G; Thaci, Diamant; Torii, Hideshi; Tyring, Stephen; Wolk, Robert; Gardner, Annie; Mebus, Charles; Tan, Huaming; Luo, Yingchun; Gupta, Pankaj; Mallbris, Lotus; Tatulych, Svitlana

    2016-05-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor being investigated for psoriasis. We sought to report longer-term tofacitinib efficacy and safety in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. Data from 2 identical phase-III studies, Oral-treatment Psoriasis Trial Pivotal 1 and 2, were pooled with data from these patients in an ongoing open-label long-term extension study. Patients (n = 1861) were randomized 2:2:1 to tofacitinib 5 mg, 10 mg, or placebo twice daily (BID). At week 16, placebo patients were rerandomized to tofacitinib. Pivotal study participants could enroll into the long-term extension where they received tofacitinib at 10 mg BID for 3 months, after which dosing could be 5 or 10 mg BID. At week 28, the proportions of patients randomized to tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg BID achieving 75% or greater reduction in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score from baseline were 55.6% and 68.8%, and achieving Physician Global Assessment of clear or almost clear were 54.7% and 65.9%. Efficacy was maintained in most patients through 24 months. Serious adverse events and discontinuations because of adverse events were reported in less than 11% of patients over 33 months of tofacitinib exposure. There was no dose comparison beyond week 52. Oral tofacitinib demonstrated sustained efficacy in patients with psoriasis through 2 years, with 10 mg BID providing greater efficacy than 5 mg BID. No unexpected safety findings were observed. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of post-traumatic stress disorder on the risk of developing prescription opioid use disorder: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ahmed N; Foll, Bernard Le; Imtiaz, Sameer; Rehm, Jürgen

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of baseline post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and each symptoms cluster on the risk of developing opioid use disorder (OUD) in those exposed to opioid painkillers and to assess the effect of comorbid PTSD and OUD on functioning, OUD severity, and treatment seeking compared with individuals with OUD only. We obtained data from 4025 individuals exposed to opioid painkillers from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions III. We matched individuals with baseline PTSD with individuals without PTSD on demographics, developmental background, family history, personalities, and exposure to stressful life events with propensity score methodology. We controlled for clinical diagnoses and other risk factors that may have occurred after PTSD onset. Quality of life was assessed with the SF-12; the number of diagnostic criteria met indicated OUD severity. Baseline PTSD predicted OUD after controlling for matching variables and other risk factors, including baseline mood/anxiety disorders and other substance use disorders (odds ratio[OR]: 1.58; 95% confidence interval[CI]: 1.14-2.17; p=0.02). Among individuals with PTSD, arousal/reactivity cluster predicted OUD. Individuals with comorbid PTSD and OUD had lower mean scores on the SF-12 scale and greater severity of OUD than individuals with OUD. There were no differences in help-seeking. Baseline PTSD increases the risk of developing OUD after exposure to opioid painkillers. Clinicians should screen for PTSD diagnosis and arousal/reactivity symptoms prior to prescribing painkillers. Integrated treatments are strongly recommended for patients with this dual diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. U uranium. Suppl. Vol. D3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haug, H.O.

    1982-01-01

    This volume of the uranium series of the Gmelin handbook deals with the anion exchange of uranium. Compounds of the valence states of III, IV, V and VI of uranium in halide, nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, and carbonate media as well as in media containing organic complexing agents are treated. The literature cited covers the period from about 1947 to the end of 1980. (RB) [de

  8. Prediction of ROSA-III experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Kunihisa

    1978-06-01

    ROSA-III experiment with the simulated BWR system is to investigate thermal hydraulic behavior as well as ECCS performance in a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. RUN 701 assumes average core power, high and low pressure core sprays and low pressure injection of ECCS. Prediction of experiment RUN 701 was made with computer code RELAP-4J. The results indicate the need for ROSA-III pump characteristics to be clarified and for liquid level formation model to be improved. Comparison of the prediction results with the experimental data should reveal the areas of modifications in calculation model. (auth.)

  9. A randomized phase II/III study of adverse events between sequential (SEQ) versus simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma; preliminary result on acute adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songthong, Anussara P; Kannarunimit, Danita; Chakkabat, Chakkapong; Lertbutsayanukul, Chawalit

    2015-08-08

    To investigate acute and late toxicities comparing sequential (SEQ-IMRT) versus simultaneous integrated boost intensity modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Newly diagnosed stage I-IVB NPC patients were randomized to receive SEQ-IMRT or SIB-IMRT, with or without chemotherapy. SEQ-IMRT consisted of two sequential radiation treatment plans: 2 Gy x 25 fractions to low-risk planning target volume (PTV-LR) followed by 2 Gy x 10 fractions to high-risk planning target volume (PTV-HR). In contrast, SIB-IMRT consisted of only one treatment plan: 2.12 Gy and 1.7 Gy x 33 fractions to PTV-HR and PTV-LR, respectively. Toxicities were evaluated according to CTCAE version 4.0. Between October 2010 and November 2013, 122 eligible patients were randomized between SEQ-IMRT (54 patients) and SIB-IMRT (68 patients). With median follow-up time of 16.8 months, there was no significant difference in toxicities between the two IMRT techniques. During chemoradiation, the most common grade 3-5 acute toxicities were mucositis (15.4% vs 13.6%, SEQ vs SIB, p = 0.788) followed by dysphagia (9.6% vs 9.1%, p = 1.000) and xerostomia (9.6% vs 7.6%, p = 0.748). During the adjuvant chemotherapy period, 25.6% and 32.7% experienced grade 3 weight loss in SEQ-IMRT and SIB-IMRT (p = 0.459). One-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 95.8% and 95.5% in SEQ-IMRT and 98% and 90.2% in SIB-IMRT, respectively (p = 0.472 for OS and 0.069 for PFS). This randomized, phase II/III trial comparing SIB-IMRT versus SEQ-IMRT in NPC showed no statistically significant difference between both IMRT techniques in terms of acute adverse events. Short-term tumor control and survival outcome were promising.

  10. A randomized phase II/III study of adverse events between sequential (SEQ) versus simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma; preliminary result on acute adverse events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Songthong, Anussara P.; Kannarunimit, Danita; Chakkabat, Chakkapong; Lertbutsayanukul, Chawalit

    2015-01-01

    To investigate acute and late toxicities comparing sequential (SEQ-IMRT) versus simultaneous integrated boost intensity modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Newly diagnosed stage I-IVB NPC patients were randomized to receive SEQ-IMRT or SIB-IMRT, with or without chemotherapy. SEQ-IMRT consisted of two sequential radiation treatment plans: 2Gy x 25 fractions to low-risk planning target volume (PTV-LR) followed by 2Gy x 10 fractions to high-risk planning target volume (PTV-HR). In contrast, SIB-IMRT consisted of only one treatment plan: 2.12Gy and 1.7Gy x 33 fractions to PTV-HR and PTV-LR, respectively. Toxicities were evaluated according to CTCAE version 4.0. Between October 2010 and November 2013, 122 eligible patients were randomized between SEQ-IMRT (54 patients) and SIB-IMRT (68 patients). With median follow-up time of 16.8 months, there was no significant difference in toxicities between the two IMRT techniques. During chemoradiation, the most common grade 3–5 acute toxicities were mucositis (15.4 % vs 13.6 %, SEQ vs SIB, p = 0.788) followed by dysphagia (9.6 % vs 9.1 %, p = 1.000) and xerostomia (9.6 % vs 7.6 %, p = 0.748). During the adjuvant chemotherapy period, 25.6 % and 32.7 % experienced grade 3 weight loss in SEQ-IMRT and SIB-IMRT (p = 0.459). One-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 95.8 % and 95.5 % in SEQ-IMRT and 98 % and 90.2 % in SIB-IMRT, respectively (p = 0.472 for OS and 0.069 for PFS). This randomized, phase II/III trial comparing SIB-IMRT versus SEQ-IMRT in NPC showed no statistically significant difference between both IMRT techniques in terms of acute adverse events. Short-term tumor control and survival outcome were promising

  11. Meningococcal polysaccharide A O-acetylation levels do not impact the immunogenicity of the quadrivalent meningococcal tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine: results from a randomized, controlled phase III study of healthy adults aged 18 to 25 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupisan, Socorro; Limkittikul, Kriengsak; Sosa, Nestor; Chanthavanich, Pornthep; Bianco, Véronique; Baine, Yaela; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we compared the immunogenicities of two lots of meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) that differed in serogroup A polysaccharide (PS) O-acetylation levels and evaluated their immunogenicities and safety in comparison to a licensed ACWY polysaccharide vaccine (Men-PS). In this phase III, partially blinded, controlled study, 1,170 healthy subjects aged 18 to 25 years were randomized (1:1:1) to receive one dose of MenACWY-TT lot A (ACWY-A) (68% O-acetylation), MenACWY-TT lot B (ACWY-B) (92% O-acetylation), or Men-PS (82% O-acetylation). Immunogenicity was evaluated in terms of serum bactericidal activity using rabbit complement (i.e., rabbit serum bactericidal activity [rSBA]). Solicited symptoms, unsolicited adverse events (AEs), and serious AEs (SAEs) were recorded. The immunogenicities, in terms of rSBA geometric mean titers, were comparable for both lots of MenACWY-TT. The vaccine response rates across the serogroups were 79.1 to 97.0% in the two ACWY groups and 73.7 to 94.1% in the Men-PS group. All subjects achieved rSBA titers of ≥1:8 for all serogroups. All subjects in the two ACWY groups and 99.5 to 100% in the Men-PS group achieved rSBA titers of ≥1:128. Pain was the most common solicited local symptom and was reported more frequently in the ACWY group (53.9 to 54.7%) than in the Men-PS group (36.8%). The most common solicited general symptoms were fatigue and headache, which were reported by 28.6 to 30.3% and 26.9 to 31.0% of subjects, respectively. Two subjects reported SAEs; one SAE was considered to be related to vaccination (blighted ovum; ACWY-B group). The level of serogroup A PS O-acetylation did not affect vaccine immunogenicity. MenACWY-TT (lot A) was not inferior to Men-PS in terms of vaccine response and was well tolerated.

  12. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadia M. Al-Hummayani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month.

  13. Ammonium diphosphitoindate(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Hamchaoui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, NH4[In(HPO32], is built up from InIII cations (site symmetry 3m. adopting an octahedral environment and two different phosphite anions (each with site symmetry 3m. exhibiting a triangular–pyramidal geometry. Each InO6 octahedron shares its six apices with hydrogen phosphite groups. Reciprocally, each HPO3 group shares all its O atoms with three different metal cations, leading to [In(HPO32]− layers which propagate in the ab plane. The ammonium cation likewise has site symmetry 3m.. In the structure, the cations are located between the [In(HPO32]− layers of the host framework. The sheets are held together by hydrogen bonds formed between the NH4+ cations and the O atoms of the framework.

  14. Fast ejendom III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Hansen, Carsten

    Bogen er det tredje bind af tre planlagte bind om fast ejendom: I Overdragelsen, II Bolighandlen og III Ejerbeføjelsen. Fremstillingens giver et grundigt overblik over centrale områder af en omfattende regulering af fast ejendom, med angivelse af litteratur, hvor læseren kan søge yderligere...... oplysning. En ejer af fast ejendom er på særdeles mange områder begrænset i sin råden sammenlignet med ejeren af et formuegode i almindelighed. Fremstillingen tager udgangspunkt i ejerens perspektiv (fremfor samfundets eller myndighedernes). Både den privatretlige og offentligretlige regulering behandles......, eksempelvis ejendomsdannelsen, servitutter, naboretten, hævd, zoneinddelingen, den fysiske planlægning, beskyttelse af natur, beskyttelse af kultur, forurening fra fast ejendom, erstatning for forurening, jordforurening, ekspropriation, byggeri og adgang til fast ejendom....

  15. Marine environment news Vol. 4, no. 1, June 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    The last six months have been a frenetically busy time for us in Monaco. Our Marine Programmes have been positively reviewed by the Standing Advisory Group on Nuclear Applications (SAGNA) and by an External Evaluation of our Programme. Both Groups report to the Director General, Mr Mohammed ElBaradei, and we hope that new investment in personnel and equipment may eventually result from their evaluations and feedback. We were honoured by the visit of His Serene Highness Prince Albert II of Monaco in March 2006 to our facilities. HSH continues to take a personal interest in MEL's isotopic and pollutant analyses of biota and environmental samples from the Arctic environment which we sampled during His Highness' cruise in June 2005 (see Vol. 3. No 2. MEL Newsletter). This issue also shows that MEL has hosted several important workshops and meetings. The US Research Vessel Endeavour visited the port of Monaco in April and MEL hosted an informal reception for the crew. The visit was in connection with ongoing, joint MEL-US studies in ocean carbon sinks in the Mediterranean (the MEDFLUX programme). More recently, MEL has been involved in discussion with Gulf Member States for a Marine Radioactivity Baseline Study. Finally, I am pleased to note that our MEL Newsletter is clearly having a positive outreach with Member States, since we are currently witnessing a doubling in Member States requests through the TC Concept Proposals (2007-2008) for fellowships, courses and capacity building in marine environment

  16. Detection of COL III in Parchment by Amino Acid Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Poulsen Sommer, Dorte; Larsen, René

    2016-01-01

    Cultural heritage parchments made from the reticular dermis of animals have been subject to studies of deterioration and conservation by amino acid analysis. The reticular dermis contains a varying mixture of collagen I and III (COL I and III). When dealing with the results of the amino acid...... analyses, till now the COL III content has not been taken into account. Based on the available amino acid sequences we present a method for determining the amount of COL III in the reticular dermis of new and historical parchments calculated from the ratio of Ile/Val. We find COL III contents between 7...... and 32 % in new parchments and between 0.2 and 40 % in the historical parchments. This is consistent with results in the literature. The varying content of COL III has a significant influence on the uncertainty of the amino acid analysis. Although we have not found a simple correlation between the COL...

  17. Metallic Corrosion. Vol. 1, 2 and 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The three volumes of the Congress Proceedings form the basis for the discussion of the prevailing problems in all areas of applied and basic research and their application in evera-day life and industry. The sequence of the contents of the three volumes corresponds to the scientific and technical Congress topics. Volume I contains basic and applied research on corrosion processes, testing and prevention Volume II starts with corrosion protection techniques, covers solutions to problems in specific industrial fields, and collects papers on economics, education, information and R and D programmes. Volume III contains all plenary lectures held on various topics. (orig.)

  18. Semiconducting III-V compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Hilsum, C; Henisch, Heinz R

    1961-01-01

    Semiconducting III-V Compounds deals with the properties of III-V compounds as a family of semiconducting crystals and relates these compounds to the monatomic semiconductors silicon and germanium. Emphasis is placed on physical processes that are peculiar to III-V compounds, particularly those that combine boron, aluminum, gallium, and indium with phosphorus, arsenic, and antimony (for example, indium antimonide, indium arsenide, gallium antimonide, and gallium arsenide).Comprised of eight chapters, this book begins with an assessment of the crystal structure and binding of III-V compounds, f

  19. Localización empresarial en Aragón: una aplicación empírica de la ayuda a la decisión multicriterio tipo ELECTRE I y III. Robustez de los resultados obtenidos = Industrial Location Decisions in Aragon: an Empirical Application of a Multi-criterion Methodology of Aid to the Decision using ELECTRE Methods I and III. Robustness of the Obtained Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Cebrián, Lucía Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La decisión de la localización es una de las opciones estratégicas más importantes que tienen que tomar las empresas, con influencia directa sobre su competitividad. Por este motivo, se han desarrollado numerosas metodologías que ayudan en la toma de estas decisiones. En este trabajo, se realiza una aplicación empírica de una metodología de ayuda a la decisión multicriterio; específicamente, se ha optado por el método ELECTRE en sus versiones I y III, con el fin de seleccionar el mejor emplazamiento para una empresa. Para esta aplicación, se utilizan como alternativas de localización las Comarcas de Aragón, como factores de localización se utilizan 8 criterios y como peso o importancia de esos factores los obtenidos mediante una encuesta. Además, se aporta evidencia sobre la consistencia de los resultados obtenidos. Como se aprecia en el trabajo, aunque la tipología de los problemas a los que van destinados ambos métodos son distintos, los resultados obtenidos pueden ser considerados como consistentes. = The location decision is one of the most important strategic decisions that have to take the firms, with direct influence on their competitiveness. For this reason, many methodologies have been developed to help in the decision making. In this paper, we make an empirical application of a multi-criterion methodology of aid to the decision; specifically, ELECTRE method has been chosen in its versions I and III, in order to select the best place for a firm. The alternatives are counties in Aragon (Spain, and we use eight criteria. The weight has been obtained by surveys. In addition, evidence is contributed about the consistency of the obtained results. Though the typology of the problems to which both methods are destined are different, the obtained results can be considered consistent.

  20. Proceedings of the 1. Arabic conference on chemical applications (Chemia 2). Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    The conference of chemical application was held on 1-5 Nov 1997 in Cairo, This vol.2 contains of chemical application on nuclear materials. Studies on these vol.This second volume covers papers presented on the subjects

  1. Hybrid III-V/silicon lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, P.; Jany, C.; Le Liepvre, A.; Accard, A.; Lamponi, M.; Make, D.; Levaufre, G.; Girard, N.; Lelarge, F.; Shen, A.; Charbonnier, P.; Mallecot, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Gentner, J.-.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Olivier, S.; Descos, A.; Ben Bakir, B.; Messaoudene, S.; Bordel, D.; Malhouitre, S.; Kopp, C.; Menezo, S.

    2014-05-01

    The lack of potent integrated light emitters is one of the bottlenecks that have so far hindered the silicon photonics platform from revolutionizing the communication market. Photonic circuits with integrated light sources have the potential to address a wide range of applications from short-distance data communication to long-haul optical transmission. Notably, the integration of lasers would allow saving large assembly costs and reduce the footprint of optoelectronic products by combining photonic and microelectronic functionalities on a single chip. Since silicon and germanium-based sources are still in their infancy, hybrid approaches using III-V semiconductor materials are currently pursued by several research laboratories in academia as well as in industry. In this paper we review recent developments of hybrid III-V/silicon lasers and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of several integration schemes. The integration approach followed in our laboratory makes use of wafer-bonded III-V material on structured silicon-on-insulator substrates and is based on adiabatic mode transfers between silicon and III-V waveguides. We will highlight some of the most interesting results from devices such as wavelength-tunable lasers and AWG lasers. The good performance demonstrates that an efficient mode transfer can be achieved between III-V and silicon waveguides and encourages further research efforts in this direction.

  2. Radiometric titration of thallium(III) with EDTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, V.R.S.; Pulla Rao, Ch.; Tataiah, G.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactive solutions containing very small amounts of thallium(III) can be determined by radiometric titration using ammonia as hydrolysing agent. Aqueous solution of thallium(I) (both inactive and radioactive) is treated with bromine water till the appearance of the brown colour of bromine, and the solution is warmed to 80 deg C to expel the excess bromine. By this procedure all thallium(I) is quantitatively oxidised to thallium(III). An aqueous solution of ammonia is added to precipitate thallium(III) as thallic oxide. It is then filtered, washed with water to free it from bromide and then dissolved in 2N HCl and the solution is then standardised. 2 ml of this solution is transferred to a 20 ml volumetric flask, 1 ml of radioactive thallium(III) solution to be standardised is added as well as incremental amounts of EDTA solution and mixed thoroughly. Uncomplexed thallium(III) is then precipitated by the addition of an ammonia solution and diluted to 20 ml. Required amount of this mixture is centrifuged. The beta activity of the supernatant aliquot is measured using a GM counter. Quantitative determination of Tl(III) in the range of 1-10 μM can be carried out. The interference of cations such as Au(III), iron(III), Ga(III) can be eliminated by pretreatment of the Tl(III) solution before carrying out radiometric titration. The results obtained are reproducible and accurate to +-3%. (T.I.)

  3. The steam generator programme of PISC III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birac, C.; Herkenrath, H.

    1990-12-01

    The PISC III Actions are intended to extend the results and methodologies of the previous PISC excercises, i.e. the validation of the capabilities of the various examination techniques when used on real defects in real components under real conditions of inspection. Being aware of the important safety role that steam generator tubes play as barrier between primary and secondary cooling system and of the industrial problems that the degradation of these tubes can create, the PISC III Management Board agreed to include in the PISC III Programme a special Action on Steam Generator Tubes Testing (SGT). It was decided to organize the programme in three phases, including Round Robin Tests (RRT): - capability tests on loose tubes, - capability tests on transportable mock-ups, - reliability tests on fixed mock-ups including some interesting SURRY tubes

  4. WISC-III e WAIS-III na avaliação da inteligência de cegos WISC-III/WAIS-III en ciegos WISC-III and WAIS-III in intellectual assessment of blind people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth do Nascimento

    2007-12-01

    verbal scales. After adaptations in stimuli and instructions, scales were applied to 120 children and 52 adults in Belo Horizonte MG Brazil. Results show that modified verbal scales had a good internal consistency (alpha > 0.80 and the factorial analysis clearly indicated the presence of a single principal component. Actually it explains a total of 81% and 64% for WISC III and WAIS III respectively. Since adaptations do not affect the factorial structure of the above-mentioned scales, professionals may use the modified scales to measure the intelligence of blind people.

  5. Proceedings of the second international conference on environmental impact assessment of all economical activities. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Proceedings of the conference consist of 3 volumes: Vol. 1 - 'Environmental Impact Assessment of all Economical Activities including Industry'; Vol. 2 - 'Air Pollution Control and Prevention'; Vol. 3 - Waste Management and Environmental Problems in Construction Industry'. Out of 32 papers contained in Vol. 2, 4 were inputted to INIS. They deal with nuclear fusion as a potential energy source, with environmental aspects of disposal of ashes from power plants in the Czech Republic, and with land reclamation after mining activities. (Z.S.)

  6. Proceedings of the second international conference on environmental impact assessment of all economical activities. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Proceedings of the conference consist of 3 volumes: Vol. 1 - 'Environmental Impact Assessment of all Economical Activities including Industry'; Vol. 2 - 'Air Pollution Control and Prevention'; Vol. 3 - Waste Management and Environmental Problems in Construction Industry'. Out of 32 papers contained in Vol. 1, 2 were inputted to INIS. They deal with models of radionuclide transport in food chains and the use of aerial monitoring in the study of environmental contamination. (Z.S.)

  7. Dynamics of structures '89. Vol. 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The proceedings, comprising 3 volumes published by the Plzen Centre of the Czechoslovak Society for Science and Technology (Vol. 1 and 2) and by Skoda Works in Plzen (Vol. 3), contain 107 papers, out of which 8 fall within the INIS Subject Scope; these deal with problems related to the earthquake resistance of nuclear power plants. Attention is paid to the evaluation of seismic characteristics of nuclear power plant equipment, to the equipment testing and to calculations of its dynamic characteristics under simulated seismic stress. (Z.M.)

  8. Distribution and Translocation of 141Ce (III) in Horseradish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoshan; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Fang, Min; Huang, Xiaohua

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Rare earth elements (REEs) are used in agriculture and a large amount of them contaminate the environment and enter foods. The distribution and translocation of 141Ce (III) in horseradish was investigated in order to help understand the biochemical behaviour and toxic mechanism of REEs in plants. Method The distribution and translocation of 141Ce (III) in horseradish were investigated using autoradiography, liquid scintillation counting (LSC) and electron microscopic autoradiography (EMARG) techniques. The contents of 141Ce (III) and nutrient elements were analysed using an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). Results The results from autoradiography and LSC indicated that 141Ce (III) could be absorbed by horseradish and transferred from the leaf to the leaf-stalk and then to the root. The content of 141Ce (III) in different parts of horseradish was as follows: root > leaf-stalk > leaf. The uptake rates of 141Ce (III) in horseradish changed with the different organs and time. The content of 141Ce (III) in developing leaves was greater than that in mature leaves. The results from EMARG indicated that 141Ce (III) could penetrate through the cell membrane and enter the mesophyll cells, being present in both extra- and intra-cellular deposits. The contents of macronutrients in horseradish were decreased by 141Ce (III) treatment. Conclusions 141Ce (III) can be absorbed and transferred between organs of horseradish with time, and the distribution was found to be different at different growth stages. 141Ce (III) can enter the mesophyll cells via apoplast and symplast channels or via plasmodesmata. 141Ce (III) can disturb the metabolism of macronutrients in horseradish. PMID:17921527

  9. Monte Carlo studies of ZEPLIN III

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, J; Davidge, D C R; Gillespie, J R; Howard, A S; Jones, W G; Joshi, M; Lebedenko, V N; Sumner, T J; Quenby, J J

    2002-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of a two-phase xenon dark matter detector, ZEPLIN III, has been achieved. Results from the analysis of a simulated data set are presented, showing primary and secondary signal distributions from low energy gamma ray events.

  10. Adsorption behavior of Am(III) on granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yingjie; Feng Xiaogui; Liang Junfu; Chen Jing; Su Rui; Wang Ju; Liu Chunli

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of Am(III) on granite (sampled from drilling well BS01 at Beishan (BS) area--a potential candidate site for China's high-level radioactive waste repository, the granite sample's depth about 300 m) was studied in BS03 well groundwater by a batch technique at (25±1) degree C. The influences of pH, sulphate ion, total carbonate ion, humic acid, and concentration of the Am(III) on the adsorption behavior were also studied, and the possible adsorption mechanism was discussed. Experimental results show that the adsorption distribution rate of Am(III) on granite increases with increasing pH of aqueous phase. The chemical composition of the groundwater is the main factor which influences the species of Am(III) and adsorption behavior. The adsorption mechanism of Am(III) on granite is surface complexation. The adsorption isotherm of Am(III) on granite can be described by Freundlich's equation. (authors)

  11. The groningen longitudinal glaucoma study III. The predictive value of frequency-doubling perimetry and GDx nerve fibre analyser test results for the development of glaucomatous visual field loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeg, G. P.; Jansonius, N. M.

    Purpose To investigate whether frequency-doubling perimetry (FDT) and nerve fibre analyser (GDx) test results are able to predict glaucomatous visual field loss in glaucoma suspect patients. Methods A large cohort of glaucoma suspect patients (patients with ocular hypertension or a positive family

  12. Results of left thoracoscopic Collis gastroplasty with laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for the surgical treatment of true short oesophagus in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and Type III-IV hiatal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaresi, Marialuisa; Mattioli, Benedetta; Perrone, Ottorino; Daddi, Niccolò; Di Simone, Massimo Pierluigi; Mattioli, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding surgery for true short oesophagus (TSOE). We compared the results of thoracoscopic Collis gastroplasty-laparoscopic Nissen procedure for the treatment of TSOE with the results of standard laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. Between 1995 and 2013, the Collis-Nissen procedure was performed in 65 patients who underwent minimally invasive surgery when the length of the abdominal oesophagus, measured intraoperatively after maximal oesophageal mediastinal mobilization, was ≤1.5 cm. The results of the Collis-Nissen procedure were frequency-matched according to age, sex and period of surgical treatment with those of 65 standard Nissen fundoplication procedures in patients with a length of the abdominal oesophagus >1.5 cm. Postoperative mortality and morbidity were evaluated according to the Accordion classification. The patients underwent a timed clinical-instrumental follow-up that included symptoms assessment, barium swallow and endoscopy. Symptoms, oesophagitis and global results were graded according to semi-quantitative scales. The results were considered to be excellent in the absence of symptoms and oesophagitis, good if symptoms occurred two to four times a month in the absence of oesophagitis, fair if symptoms occurred two to four times a week in the presence of hyperaemia, oedema and/or microscopic oesophagitis and poor if symptoms occurred on a daily basis in the presence of any grade of endoscopic oesophagitis, hiatal hernia of any size or type, or the need for antireflux medical therapy. The follow-up time was calculated from the time of surgery to the last complete follow-up. The postoperative mortality rate was 1.5% for the Collis-Nissen and 0 for the Nissen procedure. The postoperative complication rate was 24% for the Collis-Nissen and 7% for Nissen (P = 0.001) procedure. The complication rate for the Collis-Nissen procedure was 43% in the first 32 cases and 6% in the last 33 cases (P < 0.0001). The median follow-up period

  13. CRC Handbook of Medical Physics, vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggener, R.G.; Kereiakes, J.G.; Shalek, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this work, the care and testing of measurement and diagnostic instruments are described in detail. Difficulties encountered with therapeutic and diagnostic calibrations are explored and solutions are suggested. VOLUME III Physics Teaching for Radiologic Technologists, Physics Teaching for Diagnostic Radiology Residents, Physics Teaching for Nuclear Medicine Residents, Physics Teaching for Radiotherapy Residents, Degree Programs in Medical Physics, Radiobiology Teaching, Non-Degree Medical Physics Training and American Board of Radiology Certifications, Radioactivity and Production of Medical Isotopes, Practical Medical Physics Consulting, Radiologic Terminology, Nuclear Medicine Imaging Techniques, Description of Radiotherapy Procedures, Medical Applications of Ultrasonography and Thermography, Glossary of Medical and Anatomical Terms Used in Medical Physics, Equipment List for Medical Physics and Acquisition Priority. Bibliography of Reference Materials. Index

  14. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume III. Country data, LY-PO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    The World Energy Data System contains organized data on those countries and international organizations that may have critical impact on the world energy scene. Included in this volume, Vol. III, are Libya, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, and Portugal. The following topics are covered for most of the countries: economic, demographic, and educational profiles; energy policy; indigenous energy resources and uses; forecasts, demand, exports, imports of energy supplies; environmental considerations of energy supplies; power production facilities; energy industries; commercial applications of energy; research and development activities of energy; and international activities.

  15. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF INHALED NITRIC OXIDE USE IN PATIENTS WITH PULMONARY HYPERTENSION AND CHRONIC HEART FAILURE III-IV FUNCTIONAL CLASS, SURVIVED LEFT VENTRICULAR MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: RESULTS OF NON-RANDOMIZED COMAPARIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Pavlenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim – assessment of the influence of inhaled nitric oxide (NO on the course of pulmonary hypertension (PH in patients with chronic heartfailure (CHF III–IV functional class (FC, myocardial infarction (MI.Materials and methods. Results of comparative non-randomized study that included 45 patients (26 men and 19 women aged 51 to 98 years with PH III–IV functional class, left ventricular myocardial infarction. In the study, patients underwent physical examination and Doppler echocardiography, and assessed FC LH (carried out with six-minute walking test, to determine the degree of dyspnea by Borg.Results. Symptoms of CHF and PH regressed in both groups of patients against the background of the therapy. Conclusion. It is established that the use of inhaled NO is a safe therapy and helps to reduce mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAPmean in patients with PH and CHF III–IV FC, myocardial infarction. The method of inhaled NO is simple and easy to use.

  16. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF INHALED NITRIC OXIDE USE IN PATIENTS WITH PULMONARY HYPERTENSION AND CHRONIC HEART FAILURE III-IV FUNCTIONAL CLASS, SURVIVED LEFT VENTRICULAR MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: RESULTS OF NON-RANDOMIZED COMAPARIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Pavlenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim – assessment of the influence of inhaled nitric oxide (NO on the course of pulmonary hypertension (PH in patients with chronic heartfailure (CHF III–IV functional class (FC, myocardial infarction (MI.Materials and methods. Results of comparative non-randomized study that included 45 patients (26 men and 19 women aged 51 to 98 years with PH III–IV functional class, left ventricular myocardial infarction. In the study, patients underwent physical examination and Doppler echocardiography, and assessed FC LH (carried out with six-minute walking test, to determine the degree of dyspnea by Borg.Results. Symptoms of CHF and PH regressed in both groups of patients against the background of the therapy. Conclusion. It is established that the use of inhaled NO is a safe therapy and helps to reduce mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAPmean in patients with PH and CHF III–IV FC, myocardial infarction. The method of inhaled NO is simple and easy to use.

  17. South African Journal of Education - Vol 28, No 4 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Education - Vol 28, No 4 (2008) ... in Italian high-school prospective mathematics and physics teachers · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... Critical thinking: are the ideals of OBE failing us or are we failing the ideals of OBE?

  18. Schostakowitsch. Orchesterlieder (Vol. 2), Neeme Järvi / Werner Pfister

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pfister, Werner

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Schostakowitsch. Orchesterlieder (Vol. 2): Sechs Romanzen op. 21, Sechs Gedichte op. 143a, Suite auf Verse von Michelangelo Buonarroti op. 145a. Göteborger Sinfoniker, Neeme Järvi". DG CD 447 085-2 (WD: 71'06") DDD

  19. Afican Health Sciences Vol 9 No 2.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    African Health Sciences Vol 9 No 2 June 2009 ... Background:The under five mortality rate (U5MR) is measure of wellbeing and decreasing the U5MR by two .... under three scenarios 1-3. ... Negative indicates increase in childhood mortalities.

  20. Afican Health Sciences Vol 9 No 1.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    African Health Sciences Vol 9 No 1 March 2009. 41 compounds isolated from the extracts can be applied as weed killers and have been tested on the water hyacinth .... dispensing serial dilutions of the test extract, concentrations ranging from 5.0 mg/ml to 50.0 mg/ ml. McFarland No.1 standard was used in the preparation ...

  1. Ghana Medical Journal - Vol 47, No 2 (2013)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Medical Journal - Vol 47, No 2 (2013). Journal Home > Archives ... DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. AB Olokoba, W Gashau, S Bwala, A Adamu, FK Salawu, 79-81 ... DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. EY Bonney, NA Addo, NAA Ntim, F Addo-Yobo, P Bondzie, KE Aryee, J Barnor, J brandful, V Bekoe, SA Ohene, W Ampofo, 82-86 ...

  2. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 12, No 21 (2013)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 12, No 21 (2013) ... Studies of the genetics of inheritance of stem rust resistance in bread wheat · EMAIL FREE .... Evaluation of the effect of ginger modified cassava starch as thickener in the formulation of ...

  3. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management - Vol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management - Vol 22, No 5 (2018) .... Growth Performance of Five Bean (Phaseolus spp) Varieties as Influenced by Organic ...

  4. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management - Vol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management - Vol 22, No 4 (2018) ... Evaluating the effect of mobility speed on the performance of three handover algorithms in ...

  5. South African Medical Journal - Vol 88, No 3 (1998)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis and anorexia nervosa · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Christopher Paul Szabo, 275-276. Books Advances in Pediatric Pulmonology. Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine Vol. 7 · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  6. Perception and acceptance of technological risks. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renn, O

    1981-01-01

    Vol. 3 discusses the problem of attitudes towards nuclear power. Data are compiled for five communities in North-Rhine Westphalia with nuclear facilities and the control community of Kerpen, which has no nuclear power plant. At the same time, the empirical and theoretical investigations are comprehensively evaluated.

  7. Nigerian Journal of Chemical Research 29 Vol. 15, 2010 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp

    Nigerian Journal of Chemical Research. 29. Vol. 15, 2010. Antibacterial & Antifungal Studies On Some Coordination Compound Of Metals. With Ampicillin. Pranay Guru. Department of Engineering Chemistry, People's College of Research & Technology, Bhopal. (M. P.) India, email:pranayguru@rediffmail.com. ABSTRACT.

  8. AFRREV STECH, Vol. 3(1) February, 2014

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    Indexed African Journals Online: www.ajol.info. AFRREV STECH. An International Journal of Science and Technology. Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. Vol. 3 (1), S/No 6, February, 2014: 1-11. ISSN 2225-8612 (Print) ISSN 2227-5444 (Online). EFFECTS OF DEFORESTATION ON NATURAL. BIO-DIVERSITY IN DELTA NORTH ...

  9. AJESMS Vol 9 2011 October 23 2012 final

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    2011-10-23

    Oct 23, 2011 ... African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences Vol. ... alveolar re-circulation and gravity orientation are key factors in determining the ..... Comp. Biomed. Res. 3, pp 675-689. Pich, J. (1972). Theory of ...

  10. Journal of EEA, Vol. 30, 2013 SIEVE TRAY EFFICIENCY USING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    Journal of EEA, Vol. 30, 2013. SIEVE TRAY EFFICIENCY USING CFD MODELING AND SIMULATION ... ABSTRACT. In this work, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) .... per unit volume, MG is the molecular weight of the gas/vapor, kL and kG ...

  11. 59 East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Vol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharm-chem

    East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Vol. 16 (2013). There is a misconception that traditional medicine is unique to developing countries of Africa, Asia and. South America. This is certainly not true. Traditional medicine, often referred to as "alternative medicine", is widely used in developed countries ...

  12. (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2, 2012 DEPLETING FOREST RESOURCES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    deteriorating forest resources of Nigeria and its impact on climate change. Key words: Forest Resources, ... Mangrove Forest. Sub Total. 905,930 .... South America” Global Biogeographical Cycle vol 9, pp 329-350. Miller, K. R., Reid, W. V., ...

  13. Shostakovich: The Orchestral Songs Vol. 2 / Michael Tanner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tanner, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Shostakovich: The Orchestral Songs Vol. 2: Six Romances on texts by Japanese poets, Op. 21. Six Poems on Marina Tsvetayeva, Op. 143. Suite on Verses of Michelangelo, Op. 145. Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järvi". DG 447 085-2GH (71 minutes:DDD)

  14. Mizan Law Review - Vol 5, No 2 (2011)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mizan Law Review - Vol 5, No 2 (2011) ... Ethiopian Law of International Carriage by Air: An Overview · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... Comment: Overview of the Core Changes in the New Ethiopian Urban Land Leasehold Proclamation · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  15. Afican Health Sciences Vol 10 No 1.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    African Health Sciences Vol 10 No 1 March 2010. 89. Rethinking ... There is a worsening scarcity of Human Resource for ... This is not in any way lowering standards of oncologic diagnosis but filling the otherwise ... for health ratios stand at 0.8 health workers per 1000 ... cancer occurs 10-15years earlier in black women.

  16. South African Journal of Education - Vol 31, No 1 (2011)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Education - Vol 31, No 1 (2011) ... How an analysis of reviewers' reports can enhance the quality of submissions to a journal of education ... Doctoral learning: a case for a cohort model of supervision and support ...

  17. Full dimensional (15-dimensional) quantum-dynamical simulation of the protonated water-dimer III: Mixed Jacobi-valence parametrization and benchmark results for the zero point energy, vibrationally excited states, and infrared spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell, Oriol; Brill, Michael; Gatti, Fabien; Lauvergnat, David; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2009-06-21

    Quantum dynamical calculations are reported for the zero point energy, several low-lying vibrational states, and the infrared spectrum of the H(5)O(2)(+) cation. The calculations are performed by the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method. A new vector parametrization based on a mixed Jacobi-valence description of the system is presented. With this parametrization the potential energy surface coupling is reduced with respect to a full Jacobi description, providing a better convergence of the n-mode representation of the potential. However, new coupling terms appear in the kinetic energy operator. These terms are derived and discussed. A mode-combination scheme based on six combined coordinates is used, and the representation of the 15-dimensional potential in terms of a six-combined mode cluster expansion including up to some 7-dimensional grids is discussed. A statistical analysis of the accuracy of the n-mode representation of the potential at all orders is performed. Benchmark, fully converged results are reported for the zero point energy, which lie within the statistical uncertainty of the reference diffusion Monte Carlo result for this system. Some low-lying vibrationally excited eigenstates are computed by block improved relaxation, illustrating the applicability of the approach to large systems. Benchmark calculations of the linear infrared spectrum are provided, and convergence with increasing size of the time-dependent basis and as a function of the order of the n-mode representation is studied. The calculations presented here make use of recent developments in the parallel version of the MCTDH code, which are briefly discussed. We also show that the infrared spectrum can be computed, to a very good approximation, within D(2d) symmetry, instead of the G(16) symmetry used before, in which the complete rotation of one water molecule with respect to the other is allowed, thus simplifying the dynamical problem.

  18. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.vigier@ec.europa.eu [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laplace, Annabelle [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Renard, Catherine [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Miguirditchian, Manuel [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, Francis [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-06-15

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10{sup −4.0}, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl{sub 3} precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO{sub 2} powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation. - Highlights: • Precipitation of Uranium (III) is quantitative in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%). • The salt is oxoacid with a water dissociation constant of 10{sup −4.0} at 705 °C. • Volatility of uranium chloride is strongly reduced in reductive conditions. • Coprecipitation of U(III) and Nd(III) leads to a consecutive precipitation of the two elements.

  19. Basel III D: Swiss Finish to Basel III

    OpenAIRE

    Christian M. McNamara; Natalia Tente; Andrew Metrick

    2014-01-01

    After the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) introduced the Basel III framework in 2010, individual countries confronted the question of how best to implement the framework given their unique circumstances. Switzerland, with a banking industry that is both heavily concentrated and very large relative to the size of its overall economy, faced a special challenge. It ultimately adopted what is sometimes referred to as the “Swiss Finish” to Basel III – enhanced requirements applicable...

  20. Biomarker analyses and final overall survival results from a phase III, randomized, open-label, first-line study of gefitinib versus carboplatin/paclitaxel in clinically selected patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in Asia (IPASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Masahiro; Wu, Yi-Long; Thongprasert, Sumitra; Sunpaweravong, Patrapim; Leong, Swan-Swan; Sriuranpong, Virote; Chao, Tsu-Yi; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Chu, Da-Tong; Saijo, Nagahiro; Duffield, Emma L; Rukazenkov, Yuri; Speake, Georgina; Jiang, Haiyi; Armour, Alison A; To, Ka-Fai; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Mok, Tony S K

    2011-07-20

    The results of the Iressa Pan-Asia Study (IPASS), which compared gefitinib and carboplatin/paclitaxel in previously untreated never-smokers and light ex-smokers with advanced pulmonary adenocarcinoma were published previously. This report presents overall survival (OS) and efficacy according to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarker status. In all, 1,217 patients were randomly assigned. Biomarkers analyzed were EGFR mutation (amplification mutation refractory system; 437 patients evaluable), EGFR gene copy number (fluorescent in situ hybridization; 406 patients evaluable), and EGFR protein expression (immunohistochemistry; 365 patients evaluable). OS analysis was performed at 78% maturity. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess biomarker status by randomly assigned treatment interactions for progression-free survival (PFS) and OS. OS (954 deaths) was similar for gefitinib and carboplatin/paclitaxel with no significant difference between treatments overall (hazard ratio [HR], 0.90; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.02; P = .109) or in EGFR mutation-positive (HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.33; P = .990) or EGFR mutation-negative (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.63; P = .309; treatment by EGFR mutation interaction P = .480) subgroups. A high proportion (64.3%) of EGFR mutation-positive patients randomly assigned to carboplatin/paclitaxel received subsequent EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PFS was significantly longer with gefitinib for patients whose tumors had both high EGFR gene copy number and EGFR mutation (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.67) but significantly shorter when high EGFR gene copy number was not accompanied by EGFR mutation (HR, 3.85; 95% CI, 2.09 to 7.09). EGFR mutations are the strongest predictive biomarker for PFS and tumor response to first-line gefitinib versus carboplatin/paclitaxel. The predictive value of EGFR gene copy number was driven by coexisting EGFR mutation (post hoc analysis). Treatment-related differences observed for PFS in the EGFR

  1. Outcome of tyrosinaemia type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, C J; Holme, E; Standing, S; Preece, M A; Green, A; Ploechl, E; Ugarte, M; Trefz, F K; Leonard, J V

    2001-12-01

    Tyrosinaemia type III is a rare disorder caused by a deficiency of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, the second enzyme in the catabolic pathway of tyrosine. The majority of the nine previously reported patients have presented with neurological symptoms after the neonatal period, while others detected by neonatal screening have been asymptomatic. All have had normal liver and renal function and none has skin or eye abnormalities. A further four patients with tyrosinaemia type III are described. It is not clear whether a strict low tyrosine diet alters the natural history of tyrosinaemia type III, although there remains a suspicion that treatment may be important, at least in infancy.

  2. FY 2000 report on the results of the survey on the biomass-derived energy conversion technology. III; 2000 nendo biomass shigen wo genryo to suru energy henkan gijutsu ni kansuru chosa. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    In relation to the biomass-derived energy conversion technology which was regarded as promising from the results of the survey already made, the survey was made on the present situation and subjects of the technical development, social needs, energy efficiency, economical efficiency and the future. Studies were conducted on the development of technology for effective biomass utilization and the conceptual design and evaluation of a system for effective biomass utilization. As to the effective biomass utilization technology, the survey was made on the biomass combustion power generation technology/gasification power generation technology, gasification methanol synthesis of biomass, biomass gasification dimethyl ether synthesis, technology of ethanol production by alcohol fermentation via saccharification of biomass, methy-esterification of grease biomass, especially palm oil, and diesel oil production via reformation of by-product glycerin, and energy production from biomass using super- (sub- ) critical reaction. As to the system for effective biomass utilization, the survey was carried out of the regional outline, resource amount and sampling amount, selection of the conversion technology, and economical efficiency of Takatsuki city, Osaka, Shimokawa town, Hokkaido, Yufutsu/Hidaka region, Hokkaido, and Aogaki town, Hyogo. (NEDO)

  3. Quality of life of palliative chemotherapy naive patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the stomach or esophagogastric junction treated with irinotecan combined with 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid: results of a randomised phase III trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curran, Desmond

    2009-09-01

    PURPOSE: The quality of life (QL) of advanced gastric cancer patients receiving irinotecan, folinic acid and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (IF arm) or cisplatin with 5-FU (CF arm) is presented. METHODS: Patients with measurable or evaluable advanced gastric cancer received IF weekly for 6\\/7 weeks or CF q4 weeks. QL was assessed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 at baseline, subsequently every 8 weeks until progression and thereafter every 3 months until death. The QL data were analysed using several statistical methods including summary measures and pattern-mixture modelling. RESULTS: A total of 333 patients were randomised and treated (IF 170, CF 163). The time-to-progression for IF and CF was 5.0 and 4.2 months (P = 0.088), respectively. The overall compliance rates for QL questionnaire completion were 60 and 56% in the IF and CF arms, respectively. Significant treatment differences were observed for the physical functioning scale (P = 0.024), nausea\\\\vomiting (P = 0.001) and EQ-5D thermometer (P = 0.020) in favour of the IF treatment arm. CONCLUSION: There was a trend in favour of IF over CF in time-to-progression. The IF group also demonstrated a better safety profile than CF and a better QL on a number of multi-item scales, suggesting that IF offers an alternative first-line platinum-free treatment option for advanced gastric cancer.

  4. Thermodecomposition of lanthanides (III) and ytrium (III) glucoheptonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giolito, J.

    1987-01-01

    The lanthanides (III) and yttrium (III) glucoheptonates as well the D-glucoheptono 1-4 lactone were studied using common analytical methods, elemental microanalysis of carbon and hydrogen, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. These compounds were prepared from the reaction between the lanthanides (III) and yttrium (III) hydroxides and glucoheptonic acid aqueous solution obtained by means of the delta lactone hydrolysis of this acid. After stoichiometric reaction the compounds were precipitated by the addition of absolute ethanol, washed with the same solvent and dried in desiccator. Thermogravimetric the (TG) curves of the lanthanides glucoheptonates of the ceric group present thermal profiles with enough differences permitting an easy caracterization of each compound and the yttrium (III) glucoheptonate TG curve showed a great similarity with the erbium (III) compound TG curve. The differential scanning calometry (DSC) curves showed endothermic and exothermic peaks by their shape, height and position (temperature) permit an easy and rapid identification of each compound specially if DSC and TG curves were examined simultaneously. (author) [pt

  5. Efficacy and safety of a fixed-dose combination of mometasone furoate and formoterol fumarate in subjects with moderate to very severe COPD: results from a 52-week Phase III trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashkin DP

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Donald P Tashkin1, Dennis E Doherty2, Edward Kerwin3, Carlos E Matiz-Bueno4, Barbara Knorr5, Tulin Shekar5, Sibabrata Banerjee5, Heribert Staudinger51David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 2Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 3Clinical Research Institute of Southern Oregon, Medford, OR USA; 4Fundación Salud Bosque, Bogota, Colombia; 5Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp, Whitehouse Station, NJ USABackground: A clinical trial of mometasone furoate/formoterol fumarate (MF/F administered via a metered-dose inhaler in subjects with moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD investigated the efficacy and safety of a fixed-dose combination of MF/F.Methods: This multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial had a 26-week treatment period and a 26-week safety extension. Subjects (n = 1055; ≥40 years were current or ex-smokers randomized to twice-daily treatment with inhaled MF/F 400/10 µg, MF/F 200/10 µg, MF 400 µg, F 10 µg, or placebo. The coprimary endpoints of the trial were mean changes from baseline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 over 0–12 hours (AUC0–12 FEV1 with MF/F versus MF, and in morning predose FEV1 with MF/F versus F. Key secondary endpoints were quality of life (Saint George’s Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ], symptom-free nights, and partly stable COPD at 26 weeks, as well as time to first COPD exacerbation.Results: Significant improvements in FEV1 AUC0–12 occurred at endpoint with MF/F 400/10 and MF/F 200/10 versus MF 400 (P ≤ 0.007. Significant bronchodilation occurred in 5 minutes with MF/F, and serial spirometry demonstrated sustained FEV1 improvements with MF/F over the treatment period. Significant improvements in morning predose FEV1 occurred with both MF/F doses, and these effects were further investigated by excluding results for subjects whose morning FEV1 data were collected >2 days after the last

  6. Adjuvant Lapatinib and Trastuzumab for Early Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Positive Breast Cancer: Results From the Randomized Phase III Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Eileen; Baselga, José; de Azambuja, Evandro; Dueck, Amylou C.; Viale, Giuseppe; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Goldhirsch, Aron; Armour, Alison; Pritchard, Kathleen I.; McCullough, Ann E.; Dolci, Stella; McFadden, Eleanor; Holmes, Andrew P.; Tonghua, Liu; Eidtmann, Holger; Dinh, Phuong; Di Cosimo, Serena; Harbeck, Nadia; Tjulandin, Sergei; Im, Young-Hyuck; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Diéras, Véronique; Hillman, David W.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Jackisch, Christian; Lang, Istvan; Untch, Michael; Smith, Ian; Boyle, Frances; Xu, Binghe; Gomez, Henry; Suter, Thomas; Gelber, Richard D.; Perez, Edith A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lapatinib (L) plus trastuzumab (T) improves outcomes for metastatic human epidermal growth factor 2–positive breast cancer and increases the pathologic complete response in the neoadjuvant setting, but their role as adjuvant therapy remains uncertain. Methods In the Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization trial, patients with centrally confirmed human epidermal growth factor 2–positive early breast cancer were randomly assigned to 1 year of adjuvant therapy with T, L, their sequence (T→L), or their combination (L+T). The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS), with 850 events required for 80% power to detect a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.8 for L+T versus T. Results Between June 2007 and July 2011, 8,381 patients were enrolled. In 2011, due to futility to demonstrate noninferiority of L versus T, the L arm was closed, and patients free of disease were offered adjuvant T. A protocol modification required P ≤ .025 for the two remaining pairwise comparisons. At a protocol-specified analysis with a median follow-up of 4.5 years, a 16% reduction in the DFS hazard rate was observed with L+T compared with T (555 DFS events; HR, 0.84; 97.5% CI, 0.70 to 1.02; P = .048), and a 4% reduction was observed with T→L compared with T (HR, 0.96; 97.5% CI, 0.80 to 1.15; P = .61). L-treated patients experienced more diarrhea, cutaneous rash, and hepatic toxicity compared with T-treated patients. The incidence of cardiac toxicity was low in all treatment arms. Conclusion Adjuvant treatment that includes L did not significantly improve DFS compared with T alone and added toxicity. One year of adjuvant T remains standard of care. PMID:26598744

  7. Does Zinc Sulfate Prevent Therapy-Induced Taste Alterations in Head and Neck Cancer Patients? Results of Phase III Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N01C4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halyard, Michele Y.; Jatoi, Aminah; Sloan, Jeff A.; Bearden, James D.; Vora, Sujay A.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Perez, Edith A.; Soori, Gammi; Zalduendo, Anthony C.; Zhu, Angela; Stella, Philip J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Taste alterations (dysgeusia) are well described in head and neck cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy (RT). Anecdotal observations and pilot studies have suggested zinc may mitigate these symptoms. This multi-institutional, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to provide definitive evidence of this mineral's palliative efficacy. Methods and Materials: A total of 169 evaluable patients were randomly assigned to zinc sulfate 45 mg orally three times daily vs. placebo. Treatment was to be given throughout RT and for 1 month after. All patients were scheduled to receive ≥2,000 cGy of external beam RT to ≥30% of the oral cavity, were able to take oral medication, and had no oral thrush at study entry. Changes in taste were assessed using the previously validated Wickham questionnaire. Results: At baseline, the groups were comparable in age, gender, and planned radiation dose (<6,000 vs. ≥6,000 cGy). Overall, 61 zinc-treated (73%) and 71 placebo-exposed (84%) patients described taste alterations during the first 2 months (p = 0.16). The median interval to taste alterations was 2.3 vs. 1.6 weeks in the zinc-treated and placebo-exposed patients, respectively (p = 0.09). The reported taste alterations included the absence of any taste (16%), bitter taste (8%), salty taste (5%), sour taste (4%), sweet taste (5%), and the presence of a metallic taste (10%), as well as other descriptions provided by a write in response (81%). Zinc sulfate did not favorably affect the interval to taste recovery. Conclusion: Zinc sulfate, as prescribed in this trial, did not prevent taste alterations in cancer patients who were undergoing RT to the oral pharynx

  8. Effects of briakinumab treatment for moderate to severe psoriasis on health-related quality of life and work productivity and activity impairment: results from a randomized phase III study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, K A; Sundaram, M; Bao, Y; Williams, D A; Gu, Y; Signorovitch, J E; Wang, Y; Valdes, J M; Mulani, P M

    2014-06-01

    Psoriasis is known to have a significant negative impact on a patient's health-related quality of life, including social, recreational and work activities. To evaluate the effects of briakinumab on quality of life and work productivity measures in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. Patients received either briakinumab (n = 981) or placebo (n = 484) during the 12-week induction phase of trial M06-890. At week 12, patients with a Physician's Global Assessment score of 'Clear' or 'Minimal' entered the 40-week maintenance phase and were to receive briakinumab every 4 weeks, briakinumab every 12 weeks, or placebo. At weeks 12 and 52, treatment groups were compared using mean change from baseline in health-related quality of life and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire scores and the percentage of patients with minimum clinically important differences. At week 12, more than half of the briakinumab-treated patients achieved improvements meeting or exceeding minimum clinically important differences for Dermatology Life Quality Index (75.9%), and psoriasis- (64.8%), and psoriatic arthritis-related (54.1%) pain scores; 48.4% achieved improvements for activity impairment. Although improvements in quality of life and work productivity measures were maintained at week 52 for both briakinumab regimens, responder rates were consistently greater in the every-4-week group than in the every-12-week group. Briakinumab treatment resulted in clinically significant improvements in quality of life and work productivity in adults with moderate to severe psoriasis. Maintenance therapy was associated with a more pronounced benefit for the every-4-week briakinumab regimen. © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  9. Health-Related Quality-of-Life Results From the Open-Label, Randomized, Phase III ASPIRE Trial Evaluating Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone Versus Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone in Patients With Relapsed Multiple Myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A Keith; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Masszi, Tamás; Špička, Ivan; Oriol, Albert; Hájek, Roman; Rosiñol, Laura; Siegel, David S; Niesvizky, Ruben; Jakubowiak, Andrzej J; San-Miguel, Jesus F; Ludwig, Heinz; Buchanan, Jacqui; Cocks, Kim; Yang, Xinqun; Xing, Biao; Zojwalla, Naseem; Tonda, Margaret; Moreau, Philippe; Palumbo, Antonio

    2016-11-10

    Purpose To determine the effects of carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (KRd) versus lenalidomide and dexamethasone (Rd) on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in the Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone Versus Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone for the Treatment of Patients With Relapsed Multiple Myeloma (ASPIRE) trial. Methods Patients with relapsed multiple myeloma were randomly assigned to receive KRd or Rd. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and myeloma-specific module were administered at baseline; day 1 of cycles 3, 6, 12, and 18; and after treatment. The Global Health Status/Quality of Life (GHS/QoL) scale and seven subscales (fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, physical functioning, role functioning, disease symptoms, and adverse effects of treatment) were compared between groups using a mixed model for repeated measures. The percentages of responders with ≥ 5- or 15-point GHS/QoL improvement at each cycle were compared between groups. Results Baseline questionnaire compliance was excellent (94.1% of randomly assigned patients). KRd patients had higher GHS/QoL scores versus Rd patients over 18 treatment cycles (two-sided P < .001). The minimal important difference was met at cycle 12 (5.6 points) and approached at cycle 18 (4.8 points). There was no difference between groups for the other prespecified subscales from ASPIRE. A higher proportion of KRd patients met the GHS/QoL responder definition (≥ 5-point improvement) with statistical differences at cycle 12 (KRd v Rd patients, 25.5% v 17.4%, respectively) and 18 (KRd v Rd patients, 24.2% v 12.9%, respectively). Conclusion KRd improves GHS/QoL without negatively affecting patient-reported symptoms when compared with Rd. These data further support the benefit of KRd in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma.

  10. Alleviation of insulin resistance and liver damage by oral administration of Imm124-E is mediated by increased Tregs and associated with increased serum GLP-1 and adiponectin: results of a phase I/II clinical trial in NASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizrahi M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Meir Mizrahi,1 Yehudit Shabat,1 Ami Ben Ya'acov,1 Gadi Lalazar,1 Tomer Adar,1 Victor Wong,2 Brian Muller,2 Grant Rawlin,2 Yaron Ilan11Liver Unit, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; 2Immuron Limited, North Melbourne, AustraliaBackground: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is considered to be part of the nonalcoholic fatty liver disorders and its incidence is increasing. Imm124-E (Immuron Ltd, Melbourne, Australia, containing hyperimmune bovine colostrum, has been shown to exert an immunomodulatory effect and to alleviate target organ damage in animal models of NASH. The aim of our study was to determine the safety and efficacy of oral administration of Imm124-E to patients with insulin resistance and NASH.Methods: In an open-label trial, ten patients with biopsy-proven NASH and insulin resistance were orally treated with Imm124-E for 30 days.Results: Oral administration of Imm124-E was safe, and no side effects were noted. Alleviation of insulin resistance was reflected by significantly improved hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c values in all ten treated patients. For between five and eight responders, the following effects were noted: a decrease in fasting glucose levels; improved oral glucose tolerance test (OGGT and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA scores; and alleviation in lipid profile. These effects were accompanied by increased serum levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, adiponectin and T regulatory cells.Conclusion: Hyperimmune colostrum alleviates NASH.Keywords: NASH, anti-LPS, diabetes, adipokines, regulatory T cells

  11. Phase III Randomized Study of Rituximab/Carmustine, Etoposide, Cytarabine, and Melphalan (BEAM) Compared With Iodine-131 Tositumomab/BEAM With Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Relapsed Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Results From the BMT CTN 0401 Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vose, Julie M.; Carter, Shelly; Burns, Linda J.; Ayala, Ernesto; Press, Oliver W.; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Mineshi, Shin; Ambinder, Richard; Fenske, Timothy; Horowitz, Mary; Fisher, Richard; Tomblyn, Marcie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This clinical trial evaluated standard-dose radioimmunotherapy with a chemotherapy-based transplantation regimen followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation versus rituximab with the same regimen in patients with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Patients and Methods Patients with chemotherapy-sensitive persistent or relapsed DLBCL were randomly assigned to receive iodine-131 tositumomab (dosimetric dose of 5 mCi on day −19 and therapeutic dose of 0.75 Gy on day −12), carmustine 300 mg/m2 (day −6), etoposide 100 mg/m2 twice daily (days −5 to −2), cytarabine 100 mg/m2 twice daily (days −5 to −2), and melphalan 140 mg/m2 (day −1; B-BEAM) or rituximab 375 mg/m2 on days −19 and −12 and the same chemotherapy regimen (R-BEAM). Results Two hundred twenty-four patients were enrolled, with 113 patients randomly assigned to R-BEAM and 111 patients assigned to B-BEAM. Two-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates, the primary end point, were 48.6% (95% CI, 38.6% to 57.8%) for R-BEAM and 47.9% (95% CI, 38.2% to 57%; P = .94) for B-BEAM, and the 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 65.6% (95% CI, 55.3% to 74.1%) for R-BEAM and 61% (95% CI, 50.9% to 69.9%; P = .38) for B-BEAM. The 100-day treatment-related mortality rates were 4.1% (95% CI, 0.2% to 8.0%) for R-BEAM and 4.9% (95% CI, 0.8% to 9.0%; P = .97) for B-BEAM. The maximum mucositis score was higher in the B-BEAM arm (0.72) compared with the R-BEAM arm (0.31; P < .001). Conclusion The B-BEAM and R-BEAM regimens produced similar 2-year PFS and OS rates for patients with chemotherapy-sensitive relapsed DLBCL. No differences in toxicities other than mucositis were noted. PMID:23478060

  12. Second-order contributions to the structure functions in deep inelastic scattering III The singlet

    CERN Document Server

    González-Arroyo, A

    1980-01-01

    For pt.II see ibid., vol.159, p.512 (1979). Pointlike QCD predictions for the singlet part of the structure functions are given up to next- to-leading order of perturbation theory. This generalises the result obtained in pt.I (see ibid., vol.153, p.161, 1979) which deals with the non-singlet case. An interesting by-product is an exact and simple analytical expression for the anomalous dimension matrix to second non-trivial order in the QCD coupling constant. (18 refs).

  13. Separation of valence forms of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) by coprecipitation with iron(III) hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazirmadov, B.; Khamidov, B.O.; Egorova, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    The sorption of 9.62·10 -5 M of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) with iron hydroxide in 1 M potassium nitrate and potassium chloride was investigated in relation to the pH of the medium. Experimental data on the sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) with iron(III) hydroxide made it possible to determine the region of practically complete concentration of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) (pH = 3-6.5). The results from spectrophotometric investigations, calculated data on the distribution of the hydroxocationic forms of chromium(III) and the anions of chromium(IV), and their sorption by iron-(III) hydroxide made it possible to characterize the sorbability of the cationic and anionic forms of chromium in various degrees of oxidation. On this basis a method was developed for the separation of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) by coprecipitation on iron(III) hydroxide and their separation from the iron(III) hydroxide support

  14. Studies of. gamma. -ray irradiation effects on tris(. beta. -diketonato)iron(III) and cobalt(III) coordination compounds by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Y.; Endo, K.; Sano, H. (Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1981-06-01

    Both absorption Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements on tris(..beta..-diketonato)iron(III) and cobalt(III) compounds indicate that ligands which have phenyl group as a substituent are more stable to ..gamma..-ray radiolysis, in accordance with previous results of emission Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of /sup 57/Co-labelled tris (..beta..-diketonato)cobalt(III) compounds.

  15. Transformational III-V Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Nour, Maha A.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible electronics using III-V materials for nano-electronics with high electron mobility and optoelectronics with direct band gap are attractive for many applications. This thesis describes a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS

  16. Complexes of lanthanum(III), cerium(III), samarium(III) and dysprosium(III) with substituted piperidines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manhas, B S; Trikha, A K; Singh, H; Chander, M

    1983-11-01

    Complexes of the general formulae M/sub 2/Cl/sub 6/(L)/sub 3/.C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH and M/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 6/(L)/sub 2/.CH/sub 3/OH have been synthesised by the reactions of chlorides and nitrates of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Dy(III) with 2-methylpiperidine, 3-methylpiperidine and 4-methylpiperidine. These complexes have been characterised on the basis of their elemental analysis, and IR and electronic reflectance spectra. IR spectral data indicate the presence of coordinated ethanol and methanol molecules and bidentate nitrate groups. Coordination numbers of the metal ions vary from 5 to 8. 19 refs.

  17. Celestine III and the North

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Kjersgaard

    2008-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår pave Cølestin IIIs forhold til de nordiske kongeriger i perioden 1191-1198. Artiklen viser, at paven, som i forskningen traditionelt år har stået i skyggen af sin berømte, energiske og især: yngre efterfølger, Innocens III, har været på forkant med udviklingen i de nordiske rig...

  18. SGN III code conversion from Apollo to HP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hae Cho

    1996-04-01

    SGN III computer code is used to analyze transient behavior of reactor coolant system, pressurizer and steam generators in the event of main steam line break (MSLB), and to calculate mass and energy release for containment design. This report firstly describes detailed work carried out for installation of SFN III on Apollo DN 10000 and code validation results after installation. Secondly, a series of work is also describes in relation to installation of SGN III on HP 9000/700 series as well as relevant code validation results. Attached is a report on software verification and validation results. 8 refs. (Author) .new

  19. Synthesis of Er(III)/Yb(III)-doped BiF3 upconversion nanoparticles for use in optical thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Peng; Yu, Jae Su

    2018-03-23

    The authors describe an ethylene glycol assisted precipitation method for synthesis of Er(III)/Yb(III)-doped BiF 3 nanoparticles (NPs) at room temperature. Under 980-nm light irradiation, the NPs emit upconversion (UC) emission of Er(III) ions as a result of a two-photon absorption process. The temperature-dependent green emissions (peaking at 525 and 545 nm) are used to establish an unambiguous relationship between the ratio of fluorescence intensities and temperature. The NPs have a maximum sensitivity of 6.5 × 10 -3  K -1 at 619 K and can be applied over the 291-691 K temperature range. The results indicate that these NPs are a promising candidate for optical thermometry. Graphical abstract Schematic of the room-temperature preparation of Er(III)/Yb(III)-doped BiF 3 nanoparticles with strongly temperature-dependent upconversion emission.

  20. Clinical and Radiation Oncology. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurga, L.; Adam, Z.; Autrata, R.

    2010-01-01

    The work is two-volume set and has 1,658 pages. It is divided into 5 sections: I. Principles Clinical and radiation oncology. II. Hematological Malignant tumors. III. Solid tumors. IV. Treatment options metastatic Disease. V. Clinical practice in oncology. Second volume contains following sections a chapters: Section III: Solid nodes, it contains following chapters: (38) Central nervous system tumors; (39) Tumors of the eye, orbits and adnexas; (40) Head and neck carcinomas; (41) Lung carcinomas and pleural mesothelioma; (42) Mediastinal tumors; (43) Tumors of the esophagus; (44) Gastric carcinomas; (45) Carcinoma of the colon, rectum and anus; (46) Small intestinal cancer; (47) Liver and biliary tract carcinomas; (48) Tumors of the pancreas; (49) Tumors of the kidney and upper urinary tract; (50) Bladder tumors of the bladder, urinary tract and penis; (51) Prostate Carcinoma; (52) Testicular tumors; (53) Malignant neoplasm of the cervix, vulva and vagina; (54) Endometrial carcinoma; (55) Malignant ovarian tumors; (56) Gestational trophoblastic disease; (57) Breast carcinoma - based on a evidence-based approach; (58) Thyroid and parathyroid carcinomas; (59) Dental tumors of endocrine glands; (60) Tumors of the locomotory system; (61) Malignant melanoma; (62) Carcinomas of the skin and skin adnexa; (63) Malignant tumors in immunosuppressed patients; (64) Tumors of unknown primary localization; (65) Children's oncology; (66) Geriatric Oncology; (67) Principles of long-term survival of patients with medically and socially significant types of malignant tumors after treatment. Section IV: Options of metastic disease disease, it contains following chapters: (68) Metastases to the central nervous system; (69) Metastases in the lungs; (70) Metastases in the liver; (71) Metastases into the skeleton. Section V: Clinical practice in oncology, it contains following chapters: (72) Acute conditions in oncology; (73) Prevention and management of radiation and chemical toxicity

  1. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant III (EGFRvIII) Positivity in EGFR-Amplified Glioblastomas: Prognostic Role and Comparison between Primary and Recurrent Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsberg, Jörg; Hentschel, Bettina; Kaulich, Kerstin; Gramatzki, Dorothee; Zacher, Angela; Malzkorn, Bastian; Kamp, Marcel; Sabel, Michael; Simon, Matthias; Westphal, Manfred; Schackert, Gabriele; Tonn, Jörg C; Pietsch, Torsten; von Deimling, Andreas; Loeffler, Markus; Reifenberger, Guido; Weller, Michael

    2017-11-15

    Purpose: Approximately 40% of all glioblastomas have amplified the EGFR gene, and about half of these tumors express the EGFRvIII variant. The prognostic role of EGFRvIII in EGFR -amplified glioblastoma patients and changes in EGFRvIII expression in recurrent versus primary glioblastomas remain controversial, but such data are highly relevant for EGFRvIII-targeted therapies. Experimental Design: EGFR -amplified glioblastomas from 106 patients were assessed for EGFRvIII positivity. Changes in EGFR amplification and EGFRvIII status from primary to recurrent glioblastomas were evaluated in 40 patients with EGFR -amplified tumors and 33 patients with EGFR -nonamplified tumors. EGFR single-nucleotide variants (SNV) were assessed in 27 patients. Data were correlated with outcome and validated in 150 glioblastoma patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium. Results: Sixty of 106 EGFR -amplified glioblastomas were EGFRvIII-positive (56.6%). EGFRvIII positivity was not associated with different progression-free or overall survival. EGFRvIII status was unchanged at recurrence in 35 of 40 patients with EGFR -amplified primary tumors (87.5%). Four patients lost and one patient gained EGFRvIII positivity at recurrence. None of 33 EGFR- nonamplified glioblastomas acquired EGFR amplification or EGFRvIII at recurrence. EGFR SNVs were frequent in EGFR -amplified tumors, but were not linked to survival. Conclusions: EGFRvIII and EGFR SNVs are not prognostic in EGFR -amplified glioblastoma patients. EGFR amplification is retained in recurrent glioblastomas. Most EGFRvIII-positive glioblastomas maintain EGFRvIII positivity at recurrence. However, EGFRvIII expression may change in a subset of patients at recurrence, thus repeated biopsy with reassessment of EGFRvIII status is recommended for patients with recurrent glioblastoma to receive EGFRvIII-targeting agents. Clin Cancer Res; 23(22); 6846-55. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Thermometric studies on the Fe(III)-EDTA chelate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dot, K

    1978-02-01

    A DeltaH of -11.5 +/- 0.5 kJ/mole has been determined for the formation of the Fe(III)-EDTA chelate at 25.0 degrees and mu = 0.1(= [HClO(4)] + [NaClO(4)]) by a direct thermometric titration procedure. The entropy change, DeltaS, has been calculated to be 440 J.mole(-1) .deg(-1) by combining the result of the heat measurements with the free energy change obtained from the stability constant previously determined. A relationship between the DeltaS values and the standard partial molal entropies of the tervalent metal ions is discussed. In addition, conditions for the thermometric titration of Fe(III) with NA(4)EDTA at room temperature have been investigated. Iron(III) can be determined in the presence of fairly large amounts of phosphate, Cr(III), Mn(II) and Al(III).

  3. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11, No. 1 through Vol. 15, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1975-04-01

    This issue of the Index to Nuclear Safety covers only articles included in Nuclear Safety, Vol. 11, No. 1, through Vol. 15, No. 6. This index is presented in three sections as follows: Chronological List of Articles by Volume; Permuted Title (KWIC) Index; and Author Index. (U.S.)

  4. Doublet III: status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, J.M.

    1980-04-01

    A synopsis is presented of the experimental results from the ohmic heating phase of Doublet III, with emphasis on the production of good target plasmas for the upcoming neutral beam injection phase. The program plan for the device over the life of the US-Japan cooperative program is discussed, as is the status of the preliminary investigation into replacing the present vacuum vessel by one better suited for ETF simulation

  5. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  6. From Editor vol 11, No.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2010-07-01

    of a new prototype of visualization in support of movie retrieval. The goal of information visualization is unveiling of large amounts of data or abstract data set using visual presentation. With this knowledge the main goal is to develop a 2D presentation of information on movies from the IMDB (Internet Movie Database as our movie search engine. The aim is to amplify the perception of users over the retrieval environment while preserving the output quality at an acceptable meaningful level. Visualization ideas deal with visualization of information seeking results. The 9th article is arrived to us from USA and written by James O. BARBRE III on Borderless Educational Practices In The Development Of Commerce, from the Social Studies and Social Foundations Indiana University East, School of Education. This paper addresses online MBA (Master of Business Administration degrees and the nature of its presence alongside the more traditional face-to-face MBA program. While the MBA was not originally a global phenomenon, the development of so many online programs has made it one. Through this analysis, the MBA is first situated historically with subsequent challenges that have encouraged and/or forced it to go undergo changes in its structure over the last several decades. The approach to this analysis utilizes the lens of neo-realistic principles for organizational effectiveness at the international level. The article is which numbered as 10, from UAE. Article is entitled as “Students’ First Impression Of Second Life: A case from the United Arab Emirates, written by Salam ABDALLAH, MIS Department of Abu Dhabi University. His paper dealt with second Life. Virtual worlds are believed to impact the future of higher education and therefore, universities across the world are immersing themselves inside virtual worlds to establish a unique learning and research environments. This research examines the viability of Second Life as an educational platform from the perspective of

  7. Clinical and Radiation Oncology. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurga, L.; Adam, Z.; Autrata, R.

    2010-01-01

    The work is two-volume set and has 1,658 pages. It is divided into 5 sections: I. Principles Clinical and radiation oncology. II. Hematological Malignant tumors. III. Solid tumors. IV. Treatment options metastatic Disease. V. Clinical practice in oncology. First volume contains following sections a chapters: Section I: Principles of clinical and radiation oncology, it contains following chapters: (1) The history of clinical/experimental and radiation oncology in the Czech Republic; (2) The history of clinical/experimental and radiation oncology in the Slovak Republic - development and development of oncology in Slovakia; (3) Clinical and radiation oncology as part of evidence-based medicine; (4) Molecular biology; (5) Tumor Disease; (6) Epidemiology and prevention of malignant tumors; (7) Diagnosis, staging, stratification and monitoring of patients in oncology; (8) Imaging methods in oncology; (9) Principles of surgical treatment of cancer diseases; (10) Symptomatology and signaling of malignant tumors - systemic, paraneoplastic and paraendocrine manifestations of tumor diseases; (11) Principles of radiation oncology; (12 Modeling radiobiological effects of radiotherapy; (13) Principles of anticancer chemotherapy; (14) Hormonal manipulation in the treatment of tumors; (15) Principles of biological and targeted treatment of solid tumors; (16) Method of multimodal therapy of malignant tumors; (17) Evaluation of treatment response, performance evaluation criteria (RECIST); (18) Adverse effects of cancer chemotherapy and the principles of their prevention and treatment; (19) Biological principles of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; (20) Design, analysis and ethical aspects of clinical studies in oncology; (21) Fundamentals of biostatistics for oncologists; (22) Information infrastructure for clinical and radiological oncology based on evidence; (23) Pharmacoeconomic aspects in oncology; (24) Respecting patient preferences when deciding on the strategy and

  8. Development of an EGFRvIII specific recombinant antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gordon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EGF receptor variant III (EGFRvIII is the most common variant of the EGF receptor observed in human tumors. It results from the in frame deletion of exons 2-7 and the generation of a novel glycine residue at the junction of exons 1 and 8. This novel juxtaposition of amino acids within the extra-cellular domain of the EGF receptor creates a tumor specific and immunogenic epitope. EGFRvIII expression has been seen in many tumor types including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, breast adenocarcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer, but has been rarely observed in normal tissue. Because this variant is tumor specific and highly immunogenic, it can be used for both a diagnostic marker as well as a target for immunotherapy. Unfortunately many of the monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against EGFRvIII have cross reactivity to wild type EGFR or other non-specific proteins. Furthermore, a monoclonal antibody to EGFRvIII is not readily available to the scientific community. Results In this study, we have developed a recombinant antibody that is specific for EGFRvIII, has little cross reactivity for the wild type receptor, and which can be easily produced. We initially designed a recombinant antibody with two anti-EGFRvIII single chain Fv's linked together and a human IgG1 Fc component. To enhance the specificity of this antibody for EGFRvIII, we mutated tyrosine H59 of the CDRH2 domain and tyrosine H105 of the CDRH3 domain to phenylalanine for both the anti-EGFRvIII sequence inserts. This mutated recombinant antibody, called RAbDMvIII, specifically detects EGFRvIII expression in EGFRvIII expressing cell lines as well as in EGFRvIII expressing GBM primary tissue by western blot, immunohistochemistry (IHC and immunofluorescence (IF and FACS analysis. It does not recognize wild type EGFR in any of these assays. The affinity of this antibody for EGFRvIII peptide is 1.7 × 107 M-1 as

  9. Radiotracers in medical applications, vols 1-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayudu, G.V.S.

    1983-01-01

    These volumes will serve as a basis for instruction and reference for professionals such as radiopharmaceutical chemists, radiopharmacologists, radiopharmacists, radiobiochemists, and others involved in the medical applications of radiotracers. Vol. I: Topics include radiohalogenated compounds, including radioiodine; Tc-labeled compounds; and in-house prepared radiopharmaceuticals. The charge particle range vs. energy in every element is tabulated for protons for cyclotrons users. Discussions are also provided on nonimaging radiotracer methods; 11 C, 13 N, 15 O, 67 Ga. 111 In, 75 Se, /SUP 123m/ Te compounds; radioactive noble gases; and miscellaneous radiotracers for imaging. Vol. II: Pertinent nuclear science data such as radiation dosimetry, radionuclide production modes, radionuclides for therapy, human experimentation regulations and consent forms, and radiotracer laboratory designs are presented

  10. DESY: DORIS-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1991-07-15

    The DORIS electron-positron ring at the Hamburg DESY Laboratory has a long tradition - first beams were stored at the end of 1973 in the initial double-ring configuration. A six-month upgrade in 1982 resulted in the single-ring DORIS-II, attaining higher energies and improved collision rates. During its 28-year career so far, DORIS has made important contributions, particularly in heavy flavour physics, and, after a further upgrade, this looks set to continue.

  11. DESY: DORIS-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The DORIS electron-positron ring at the Hamburg DESY Laboratory has a long tradition - first beams were stored at the end of 1973 in the initial double-ring configuration. A six-month upgrade in 1982 resulted in the single-ring DORIS-II, attaining higher energies and improved collision rates. During its 28-year career so far, DORIS has made important contributions, particularly in heavy flavour physics, and, after a further upgrade, this looks set to continue

  12. Sample exchange/evaluation (SEE) report - Phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, W.I.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase III of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) program. The SEE program is used to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site's high level waste tanks

  13. Specific Reagent for Cr(III): Imaging Cellular Uptake of Cr(III) in Hct116 Cells and Theoretical Rationalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Firoj; Saha, Sukdeb; Maity, Arunava; Taye, Nandaraj; Si, Mrinal Kanti; Suresh, E; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Das, Amitava

    2015-10-15

    A new rhodamine-based reagent (L1), trapped inside the micellar structure of biologically benign Triton-X 100, could be used for specific recognition of Cr(III) in aqueous buffer medium having physiological pH. This visible light excitable reagent on selective binding to Cr(III) resulted in a strong fluorescence turn-on response with a maximum at ∼583 nm and tail of that luminescence band extended until 650 nm, an optical response that is desired for avoiding the cellular autofluorescence. Interference studies confirm that other metal ions do not interfere with the detection process of Cr(III) in aqueous buffer medium having pH 7.2. To examine the nature of binding of Cr(III) to L1, various spectroscopic studies are performed with the model reagent L2, which tend to support Cr(III)-η(2)-olefin π-interactions involving two olefin bonds in molecular probe L1. Computational studies are also performed with another model reagent LM to examine the possibility of such Cr(III)-η(2)-olefin π-interactions. Presumably, polar functional groups of the model reagent LM upon coordination to the Cr(III) center effectively reduce the formal charge on the metal ion and this is further substantiated by results of the theoretical studies. This assembly is found to be cell membrane permeable and shows insignificant toxicity toward live colon cancer cells (Hct116). Confocal laser scanning microscopic studies further revealed that the reagent L1 could be used as an imaging reagent for detection of cellular uptake of Cr(III) in pure aqueous buffer medium by Hct116 cells. Examples of a specific reagent for paramagnetic Cr(III) with luminescence ON response are scanty in the contemporary literature. This ligand design helped us in achieving the turn on response by utilizing the conversion from spirolactam to an acyclic xanthene form on coordination to Cr(III).

  14. Correction of a severe Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Seher Gündüz; Kama, Jalan Devecioglu; Baran, Sedat

    2004-08-01

    The success of early orthopedic treatment in patients with Class III anomalies depends on facial skeletal development and type of treatment. This case report describes the treatment of a 12.6-year-old girl who had a severe Class III malocclusion with a 6-mm anterior crossbite, a deep overbite, a narrow maxilla, and unerupted maxillary canines. The treatment plan included rapid palatal expansion to expand the maxilla, reverse headgear to correct the maxillary retrognathia, a removable anterior inclined bite plane to correct the anterior crossbite and the deep overbite, and fixed edgewise appliances to align the teeth. One canine was brought into alignment, but the other was placed in occlusion in its transposed position. Ideal overjet and overbite relationships were established, and the final esthetic result was pleasing.

  15. Irradiation test of FPGA for BES III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yixin; Liang Hao; Xue Jundong; Liu Baoying; Liu Qiang; Yu Xiaoqi; Zhou Yongzhao; Hou Long

    2005-01-01

    The irradiation effect of FPGA, applied in Front-end Electronics for experiments of High-Energy Physics, is a serious problem. The performance of FPGA, used in the front-end card of Muon Counters of BES III project, needs to be evaluated under irradiation. SEUs on Altera ACEX 1K FPGA, observed in the experiment under the irradiation of γ ray, 14 and 2.5 MeV neutrons, was investigated. The authors calculated involved cross-section and provided reasonable analysis and evaluation for the result of the experiment. The conclusion about feasibility of applying ACEX 1K FPGA in the front-end card of the readout system of Muon Counters for BES III was given. (authors)

  16. Making progress with PISC III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, S.; Nichols, R.; McDonald, N.

    1989-01-01

    The thirdphase of the Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components (PISC III) was begun in 1986 with the aim of assessing inspection capability and reliability for actual defects in full scale components under realistic nuclear power plant conditions. It is organized by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the Ispra Joint Research Centre of the European Communities Commission. The objectives and status of each of the seven areas of PISC III are given. The areas are: real contaminated structures; full scale vessel tests; nozzles and dissimilar metal welds; austenitic steel testing; steam generator integrity testing; mathematical modelling of non-destructive examination; and human reliability studies. (U.K.)

  17. Graphics Gems III IBM version

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, David

    1994-01-01

    This sequel to Graphics Gems (Academic Press, 1990), and Graphics Gems II (Academic Press, 1991) is a practical collection of computer graphics programming tools and techniques. Graphics Gems III contains a larger percentage of gems related to modeling and rendering, particularly lighting and shading. This new edition also covers image processing, numerical and programming techniques, modeling and transformations, 2D and 3D geometry and algorithms,ray tracing and radiosity, rendering, and more clever new tools and tricks for graphics programming. Volume III also includes a

  18. Immunogenicity and safety of a novel MMR vaccine (live, freeze-dried) containing the Edmonston-Zagreb measles strain, the Hoshino mumps strain, and the RA 27/3 rubella strain: Results of a randomized, comparative, active controlled phase III clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Ashwani; Mitra, Monjori; Joshi, Himanshu Arvind; Nayak, Uma Siddhartha; Siddaiah, Prashanth; Babu, T Ramesh; Mahapatro, Samarendra; Sanmukhani, Jayesh; Gupta, Gaurav; Mittal, Ravindra; Glueck, Reinhard

    2017-07-03

    This phase III clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of the single-dose and multi-dose formulations of a novel MMR vaccine (live, freeze-dried) developed by M/s Cadila Healthcare Limited, India (Cadila MMR vaccine), containing the Hoshino mumps strain, compared to that of an existing MMR vaccine (live, freeze-dried) developed by M/s Serum Institute of India Limited, India (Serum MMR vaccine). These two vaccines have similar measles and rubella strains, but different mumps strains (Hoshino in Cadila MMR vaccine, and L-Zagreb in Serum MMR vaccine). Three hundred and twenty-eight subjects of either sex, aged 15-18 months, were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive either the Cadila or Serum MMR vaccine. Immunogenicity assessments (IgG antibodies against measles, mumps, and rubella viruses) were done at baseline and 42 d after vaccination. Solicited (local and systemic) and unsolicited adverse events were recorded for up to 42 d following vaccination. The Cadila MMR vaccine was found to be non-inferior to the Serum MMR vaccine in terms of end-of-study proportion of subjects seropositive for anti-measles antibodies (100.0% in both groups), anti-mumps antibodies (94.5% vs. 94.0%), and anti-rubella antibodies (95.5% vs. 91.0%). Both vaccines were well tolerated by all study participants; the most common adverse event reported in both groups was fever, followed by rash. The results of this phase III clinical trial show that the novel Cadila MMR vaccine is non-inferior to the Serum MMR vaccine.

  19. Comparison of PM collection efficiency of Gent and Airmatrics MiniVol portable air sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, Bilkis A.; Biswas, Swapan K.

    2005-01-01

    Gent PM sampler was developed as an integral part of several International Atomic Energy Agency sponsored coordinated research programmes (CRP) for collecting air particulate samples. On the other hand, the MiniVol Portable Air Sampler is a commercial ambient air sampler for particulate matter and non-reactive gases used by different agencies. Air quality management system requires comparable air quality data to be collected by different stake holders for assessment and regulatory purposes. In order to compare the characteristics of Gent sampler with the MiniVol Portable Air Sampler, the reproducibility of the sample mass collection efficiency were examined and the measured mass concentrations were compared. It was found that in case of PM 10 both samplers collect almost same fraction of PM 10 mass when the Gent sampler was operated at 16 litre per minute flow rate. But in case of fine fraction, Portable sampler collects 70% higher PM 2.5 mass concentration compared to the Gent PM 2.2 mass concentrations. This is because, the Gent sampler was typically operated at 16 to 17 lpm resulting in an estimated 50% cut point of 2.2 μm.(author)

  20. East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal - Vol 65 (1999)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SESSION III – IRRIGATION, DRAINAGE AND WATER HARVESTING - Water ... DRAINAGE AND WATER HARVESTING - Rainwater management for dry spell ... WATER CONSERVATION - Conservation tillage systems for dryland farming: ...

  1. Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Nuclear Sciences and Applications. Vol.1,2,3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, H.F.

    2000-01-01

    The publication has been set up as a textbook for nuclear sciences and applications vol.1: (1) radiochemistry; (2) radiation chemistry; (3) isotope production; (4) waste management; vol.2: (1) nuclear and reactor; (2) physics; (3) plasma physics; (4) instrumentation and devices; (5) trace and ultra trace analysis; (6) environmental; vol.3: (1) radiation protection; (2) radiation health hazards; (3) nuclear safety; (4) biology; (5) agriculture

  2. Anestesia volátil e monitorização anestésica.

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre, Nuno; Costa, Margarida; Mascarenhas, Ramiro

    2009-01-01

    Os autores apresentam um texto de apoio à disciplina de anestesiologia do curso de Medicina Veterinária .Neste texto são abordadas diversas temáticas da anestesia volátil tais como: equipamentos utilizados em anestesia volátil, farmacologia dos anestésicos voláteis. A monitorização dos pacientes é abordada na vertente mecânica ou intrumental e na componente básica.

  3. Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Nuclear Sciences and Applications. Vol.1,2,3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, H F [ed.

    2000-07-01

    The publication has been set up as a textbook for nuclear sciences and applications vol.1: (1) radiochemistry; (2) radiation chemistry; (3) isotope production; (4) waste management; vol.2: (1) nuclear and reactor; (2) physics; (3) plasma physics; (4) instrumentation and devices; (5) trace and ultra trace analysis; (6) environmental; vol.3: (1) radiation protection; (2) radiation health hazards; (3) nuclear safety; (4) biology; (5) agriculture.

  4. Multigrid methods III

    CERN Document Server

    Trottenberg, U; Third European Conference on Multigrid Methods

    1991-01-01

    These proceedings contain a selection of papers presented at the Third European Conference on Multigrid Methods which was held in Bonn on October 1-4, 1990. Following conferences in 1981 and 1985, a platform for the presentation of new Multigrid results was provided for a third time. Multigrid methods no longer have problems being accepted by numerical analysts and users of numerical methods; on the contrary, they have been further developed in such a successful way that they have penetrated a variety of new fields of application. The high number of 154 participants from 18 countries and 76 presented papers show the need to continue the series of the European Multigrid Conferences. The papers of this volume give a survey on the current Multigrid situation; in particular, they correspond to those fields where new developments can be observed. For example, se­ veral papers study the appropriate treatment of time dependent problems. Improvements can also be noticed in the Multigrid approach for semiconductor eq...

  5. The content and ratio of type I and III collagen in skin differ with age ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    III ratio and changes in skin tension, elasticity, and healing. Also, the content of type I, III collagen and type I/III ratio are significantly altered in hypertrophic scar tissue compared to uninjured age-matched controls, resulting in a different structural ...

  6. WAIS-III IQs, Horn's Theory, and Generational Changes from Young Adulthood to Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Alan S.

    2001-01-01

    Examined age changes in intellectual ability in the range from 16 to 89 years through 2 studies that involved IQs on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale III (WAIS-III). Results are interpreted in the context of the fluid-crystallized intelligence theory of J. Horn. Studies used WAIS-III standardization data for 2,450 adults and longitudinal data…

  7. Problems of nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    Theses of proceedings of the 9 Topical Meeting on problems of nuclear power plant safety are presented. Reports include results of neutron-physical experiments carried out for reactor safety justification. Concepts of advanced reactors with improved safety are considered. Results of researches on fuel cycles are given too

  8. MALAYSIAN LICHENS—III*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. GROBNHART

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Amongst the lichens sent by the late Mr C. C. Schroter at Tjibodas (West Java, a peculiar blue-grey species drew my attention. At first sight I intended to assign it provisionally to Collemaceae indeterminatae, but on closer examination I doubted whether it was really a species of Collemaceae. Therefore. I examined it more carefully, with the following result. The granular thallus grows in smaller to larger patches over mosses, lichens, and detritus on bark. Soredia and isidia are absent and the thallus is not surrounded by a dark hypothalline line. The granular appearance of the thallus is caused by the relatively large gonidia, which belong to Stygonemataceae. The yellowish green cells are rounded, angular to semilunate, 8—12µ, wide and 10—15 µ long; one or more of them are enclosed within a gelatinous, colourless to pale citrine sheeth 4—6 µ thick. These clusters of gonidia are held together by the thalline hyphae constituting in this way a homoiomeric thallus. There is some resemblance with the thallus of Moriolaceae but in this family the gonidia are totally surrounded with a network of short hyphae lying close together. In the thallus of Cyanoporina, as I call this new lichen, such a network does not exist. The hyphae lie irregularly around the gonidia and cover them but partly. These gonidial hyphae are 2—3µ thick and possess very short cells. The thalline hyphae are 3 µ, thick, with inconspicuous lumen. Even with the aid of a dissecting microscope the perithecia are almost* invisible. Most of them are covered by the granules of the thallus. Yet the thallus is abundantly fruiting and in sections perithecia are always present. They are globose, 110—130µ in diameter, pale fulvescent to yellowish, with a pseudoparenchymatic wall 10—12 µ thick, composed of densely interwoven hyphae. I could, not discover a pore. The paraphyses are diffluent and only fragments were found.

  9. General and special engineering materials science. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondracek, G.; Hofmann, P.

    1983-04-01

    The report about general and special engineering materials science is the result of lectures given by the authors in two terms in 1982 at Instituto Balseiro, San Carlos de Bariloche, the graduated college of the Universidad de Cuyo and Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Republica Argentina. These lectures were organised in the frame of the project ''nuclear engineering'' (ARG/78/020) of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Some chapters of the report are written in English, others in Spanish. The report is subdivided into three volumes. The present volume III concerns special engineering materials science and considers nuclear materials with respect to off-normal (''accident'') reactor operation conditions including nuclear materials in loss-of-coolant accident and nuclear materials in core melt accidents. (orig./IHOE) [de

  10. Chemical Thermodynamics Vol. 12 - Chemical Thermodynamics of tin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamsjaeger, Heinz; GAJDA, Tamas; Sangster, James; Saxena, Surendra K.; Voigt, Wolfgang; Perrone, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This is the 12th volume of a series of expert reviews of the chemical thermodynamics of key chemical elements in nuclear technology and waste management. This volume is devoted to the inorganic species and compounds of tin. The tables contained in Chapters III and IV list the currently selected thermodynamic values within the NEA TDB Project. The database system developed at the NEA Data Bank, see Section II.6, assures consistency among all the selected and auxiliary data sets. The recommended thermodynamic data are the result of a critical assessment of published information. The values in the auxiliary data set, see Tables IV-1 and IV-2, have been adopted from CODATA key values or have been critically reviewed in this or earlier volumes of the series

  11. Proceedings of the second international conference on environmental impact assessment of all economical activities. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Proceedings of the conference consist of 3 volumes: Vol. 1 - 'Environmental Impact Assessment of all Economical Activities including Industry'; Vol. 2 - 'Air Pollution Control and Prevention'; Vol. 3 - Waste Management and Environmental Problems in Construction Industry'. Out of 39 papers contained in Vol. 3, 3 were inputted to INIS. They deal with the use of portable radioisotope X-ray fluorescence analyzers in the determination of building material contamination by toxic elements, with underground waste repositories and ground water contamination, and the impact of the Temelin nuclear power plant on the hydrosphere and other environmental components. (Z.S.)

  12. Position-controlled epitaxial III-V nanowires on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roest, Aarnoud L; Verheijen, Marcel A; Wunnicke, Olaf; Serafin, Stacey; Wondergem, Harry; Bakkers, Erik P A M [Philips Research Laboratories, Professor Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Delft University of Technology, PO Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-06-14

    We show the epitaxial integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires with silicon technology. The wires are grown by the VLS mechanism with laser ablation as well as metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. The hetero-epitaxial growth of the III-V nanowires on silicon was confirmed with x-ray diffraction pole figures and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. We show preliminary results of two-terminal electrical measurements of III-V nanowires grown on silicon. E-beam lithography was used to predefine the position of the nanowires.

  13. Position-controlled epitaxial III-V nanowires on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roest, Aarnoud L; Verheijen, Marcel A; Wunnicke, Olaf; Serafin, Stacey; Wondergem, Harry; Bakkers, Erik P A M

    2006-01-01

    We show the epitaxial integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires with silicon technology. The wires are grown by the VLS mechanism with laser ablation as well as metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. The hetero-epitaxial growth of the III-V nanowires on silicon was confirmed with x-ray diffraction pole figures and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. We show preliminary results of two-terminal electrical measurements of III-V nanowires grown on silicon. E-beam lithography was used to predefine the position of the nanowires

  14. Synthesis, characterization and stability of Cr(III) and Fe(III) hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papassiopi, N.; Vaxevanidou, K.; Christou, C.; Karagianni, E.; Antipas, G.S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe(III)–Cr(III) hydroxides enhance groundwater quality better than pure Cr(III) compounds. • Crystalline Cr(OH) 3 ·3H 2 O was unstable, with a solubility higher than 50 μg/l. • Amorphous Cr(OH) 3 (am) was stable with a solubility lower than 50 μg/l in the range 5.7 0.75 Cr 0.25 (OH) 3 , the stability region was extended to 4.8 3 ·xH 2 O whereas in the presence of iron the precipitate is a mixed Fe (1−x) Cr x (OH) 3 phase. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterisation and stability of mixed (Fe x ,Cr 1−x )(OH) 3 hydroxides as compared to the stability of Cr(OH) 3 . We established that the plain Cr(III) hydroxide, abiding to the approximate molecular formula Cr(OH) 3 ·3H 2 O, was crystalline, highly soluble, i.e. unstable, with a tendency to transform into the stable amorphous hydroxide Cr(OH) 3 (am) phase. Mixed Fe 0.75 Cr 0.25 (OH) 3 hydroxides were found to be of the ferrihydrite structure, Fe(OH) 3 , and we correlated their solubility to that of a solid solution formed by plain ferrihydrite and the amorphous Cr(III) hydroxide. Both our experimental results and thermodynamic calculations indicated that mixed Fe(III)–Cr(III) hydroxides are more effective enhancers of groundwater quality, in comparison to the plain amorphous or crystalline Cr(III) hydroxides, the latter found to have a solubility typically higher than 50 μg/l (maximum EU permitted Cr level in drinking water), while the amorphous Cr(OH) 3 (am) phase was within the drinking water threshold in the range 5.7 0.75 Cr 0.25 (OH) 3 hydroxides studied were of extended stability in the 4.8 < pH < 13.5 range

  15. Effect of Eu(III) on the degradation of malic acid by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nankawa, T.; Ozaki, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Francis, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The transuranic elements, such as Am(III) and Cm(III), are highly toxic because they emit high-energy α particles and have long half-lives. To estimate their long-term environmental behavior, we need to elucidate degradation of actinide-organic complexes by microorganisms. We studied the biodegradation of Eu(III)-malic acid complexes by Pseudomonas fluorescens. Malic acid is ubiquitous in the environment and is one of the microbial metabolites that is part of the tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Europium(III) is a good analogue for Am(III) and Cm(III). To investigate the effect of Eu(III) on the degradation of malic acid by P. fluorescens, we compared the degradation behavior of Eu(III)-malic acid complexes to that of Fe(III) and Al(III)-malic acid complexes. In the medium containing 1 mM malic acid and 0-0.5 mM Fe(III), malic acid was degraded completely. In the medium containing 1 mM malic acid and 0.05-0.5 mM Al(III), malic acid was degraded until the concentration of malic acid became equal to that of Al(III), indicating that Al(III)-malic acid complex with 1: 1 molar ratio was recalcitrant to biodegradation. In the medium containing 1 mM malic acid and 0.05-0.5 mM Eu(III), degradation of malic acid was not observed. The effect of metals on degradation of malic acid was in the order of Fe(III) < Al(III) < Eu(III). The stability constants of 1:1 Fe(III)-, Al(III)-, and Eu(III)-malic acid complexes are 7.1, 4.6, and 4.9, respectively. These results indicate that degradability of malic acid does not depend on the stability constants of metal-malic acid complexes. We found that 10 mM malic acid was degraded in the presence of 0.05 and 0.1 mM Eu(III) but 1 mM malic acid was not degraded in the presence of 0.05 and 0.1 mM Eu(III). The degradation rate of malic acid increased with a decreasing ratio of Eu(III) to malic acid. (authors)

  16. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  17. Ion temperatures in TORTUR III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, F.B.

    1985-12-01

    Spatially resolved ion-energy distributions are presented for discharges in the TORTUR III tokamak. The measurements are performed in an active method, using a neutral hydrogen probing beam of 20-30 keV, to enhance charge-exchange processes along its path, as well as by the usual passive method. Ion temperatures can amount up to 1 keV

  18. AJESMS_ Vol 8 2010 August 15 2011

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Mereku

    2010-08-15

    Aug 15, 2010 ... students from two co-educational schools were used for the study, Analysis of result using t-test showed ... motivation in learning (Pintrich and Schunk, 1996). .... Strategies and show intrinsic interest in their academic work.

  19. AFRREV IJAH, Vol.1 (4) November, 2012

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    questionnaires administered to teachers and students. The results ... introductory vocational skills in agriculture. .... translating theory in the classroom into practice. ... educational institutions are being encouraged to provide relevant form of.

  20. AFRREV IJAH, Vol.1 (4) November, 2012

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    consolidation exercise in the Nigerian banking industry created a competitive environment and to .... 231 firms listed on the Australian Stock Exchange (ASE). ... statistics and correlation analysis, results indicate that strategic integration.