WorldWideScience

Sample records for void shape size

  1. Coupling effects of void size and void shape on the growth of prolate ellipsoidal microvoid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minsheng Huang; Zhenhuan Li; Cheng Wang

    2005-01-01

    The combined effects of void size and void shape on the void growth are studied by using the classical spectrum method. An infinite solid containing an isolated prolate spheroidal void is considered to depict the void shape effect and the Fleck-Hutchinson phenomenological strain gradient plasticity theory is employed to capture the size effects. It is found that the combined effects of void size and void shape are mainly controlled by the remote stress triaxiality. Based on this, a new size-dependent void growth model similar to the Rice-Tracey model is proposed and an important conclusion about the size-dependent void growth is drawn: the growth rate of the void with radius smaller than a critical radius rc may be ignored. It is interesting that rc is a material constant independent of the initial void shape and the remote stress triaxiality.

  2. Shapes and Sizes of Voids in the LCDM Universe: Excursion Set Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Shandarin, S; Heitmann, K; Habib, S; Shandarin, Sergei; Feldman, Hume A.; Heitmann, Katrin

    2006-01-01

    We study the global distribution and morphology of dark matter voids in a LCDM universe using density fields generated by N-body simulations. Voids are defined as isolated regions of the low-density excursion set specified via density thresholds, the density thresholds being quantified by the corresponding filling factors, i.e., the fraction of the total volume in the excursion set. Our work encompasses a systematic investigation of the void volume function, the volume fraction in voids, and the fitting of voids to corresponding ellipsoids and spheres. We emphasize the relevance of the percolation threshold to the void volume statistics of the density field both in the high redshift, Gaussian random field regime, as well as in the present epoch. By using measures such as the Inverse Porosity, we characterize the quality of ellipsoidal fits to voids, finding that such fits are a poor representation of the larger voids that dominate the volume of the void excursion set.

  3. Size-Effects in Void Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2005-01-01

    The size-effect on ductile void growth in metals is investigated. The analysis is based on unit cell models both of arrays of cylindrical voids under plane strain deformation, as well as arrays of spherical voids using an axisymmetric model. A recent finite strain generalization of two higher order...

  4. Size-Effects in Void Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2005-01-01

    The size-effect on ductile void growth in metals is investigated. The analysis is based on unit cell models both of arrays of cylindrical voids under plane strain deformation, as well as arrays of spherical voids using an axisymmetric model. A recent finite strain generalization of two higher order...... strain gradient plasticity models is implemented in a finite element program, which is used to study void growth numerically. The results based on the two models are compared. It is shown how gradient effects suppress void growth on the micron scale when compared to predictions based on conventional...... models. This increased resistance to void growth, due to gradient hardening, is accompanied by an increase in the overall strength for the material. Furthermore, for increasing initial void volume fraction, it is shown that the effect of gradients becomes more important to the overall response but less...

  5. Void shape effects and voids starting from cracked inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2011-01-01

    Numerical, axisymmetric cell model analyses are used to study the growth of voids in ductile metals, until the mechanism of coalescence with neighbouring voids sets in. A special feature of the present analyses is that extremely small values of the initial void volume fraction are considered, dow...

  6. The darkness that shaped the void: dark energy and cosmic voids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, E. G. Patrick; van de Weygaert, Rien; Dolag, Klaus; Pettorino, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    We assess the sensitivity of void shapes to the nature of dark energy that was pointed out in recent studies and also investigate whether or not void shapes are useable as an observational probe in galaxy redshift surveys. Our focus is on the evolution of the mean void ellipticity and its underlying

  7. The darkness that shaped the void : Dark energy and cosmic voids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, E. G. Patrick; van de Weygaert, Rien; Dolag, Klaus; Pettorino, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    We assess the sensitivity of void shapes to the nature of dark energy that was pointed out in recent studies and also investigate whether or not void shapes are useable as an observational probe in galaxy redshift surveys. Our focus is on the evolution of the mean void ellipticity and its underlying

  8. Elastic–plastic void expansion in near-self-similar shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2011-01-01

    For void growth in an elastic–plastic strain hardening material the preferred shape of the void is calculated, dependent on the macroscopic stress state. Axisymmetric cell model analyses are carried out with a very small initial void size relative to the cell dimensions. Large deformations of the...

  9. The darkness that shaped the void: dark energy and cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, E G Patrick; Dolag, Klaus; Pettorino, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We assess the sensitivity of void shapes to the nature of dark energy that was pointed out in recent studies. We investigate whether or not void shapes are useable as an observational probe in galaxy redshift surveys. We focus on the evolution of the mean void ellipticity and its underlying physical cause. Methods: We analyse the morphological properties of voids in five sets of cosmological N-body simulations, each with a different nature of dark energy. Comparing voids in the dark matter distribution to those in the halo population, we address the question of whether galaxy redshift surveys yield sufficiently accurate void morphologies. Voids are identified using the parameter free Watershed Void Finder. The effect of redshift distortions is investigated as well. Results: We confirm the statistically significant sensitivity of voids in the dark matter distribution. We identify the level of clustering as measured by \\sigma_8(z) as the main cause of differences in mean void shape . We find that in the h...

  10. Size effects on void growth in single crystals with distributed voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Kysar, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of void size on void growth in single crystals with uniformly distributed cylindrical voids is studied numerically using a finite deformation strain gradient crystal plasticity theory with an intrinsic length parameter. A plane strain cell model is analyzed for a single crystal...

  11. Statistical geometry of lattice chain polymers with voids of defined shapes: Sampling with strong constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming; Chen, Rong; Liang, Jie

    2008-02-01

    Proteins contain many voids, which are unfilled spaces enclosed in the interior. A few of them have shapes compatible to ligands and substrates and are important for protein functions. An important general question is how the need for maintaining functional voids is influenced by, and affects other aspects of proteins structures and properties (e.g., protein folding stability, kinetic accessibility, and evolution selection pressure). In this paper, we examine in detail the effects of maintaining voids of different shapes and sizes using two-dimensional lattice models. We study the propensity for conformations to form a void of specific shape, which is related to the entropic cost of void maintenance. We also study the location that voids of a specific shape and size tend to form, and the influence of compactness on the formation of such voids. As enumeration is infeasible for long chain polymer, a key development in this work is the design of a novel sequential Monte Carlo strategy for generating large number of sample conformations under very constraining restrictions. Our method is validated by comparing results obtained from sampling and from enumeration for short polymer chains. We succeeded in accurate estimation of entropic cost of void maintenance, with and without an increasing number of restrictive conditions, such as loops forming the wall of void with fixed length, with additionally fixed starting position in the sequence. Additionally, we have identified the key structural properties of voids that are important in determining the entropic cost of void formation. We have further developed a parametric model to predict quantitatively void entropy. Our model is highly effective, and these results indicate that voids representing functional sites can be used as an improved model for studying the evolution of protein functions and how protein function relates to protein stability.

  12. Plasticity size effects in voided crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussein, M. I.; Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof;

    The shear and equi-biaxial straining responses of periodic voided single crystals are analysed using discrete dislocation plasticity and a continuum strain gradient crystal plasticity theory. In the discrete dislocation formulation the dislocations are all of edge character and are modelled as line...... predictions of the two formulations for all crystal types and void volume fractions considered when the material length scale in the non-local plasticity model chosen to be $0.325\\mu m$ (around ten times the slip plane spacing in the discrete dislocation models)....

  13. Plasticity size effects in voided crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussein, M. I.; Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    singularities in an elastic material. The lattice resistance to dislocation motion, dislocation nucleation, dislocation interaction with obstacles and annihilation are incorporated through a set of constitutive rules. Over the range of length scales investigated, both the discrete dislocation and strain...... predictions of the two formulations for all crystal types and void volume fractions considered when the material length scale in the non-local plasticity model chosen to be $0.325\\mu m$ (around ten times the slip plane spacing in the discrete dislocation models)....

  14. Plasticity size effects in voided crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussein, M.I.; Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2008-01-01

    as line singularities in an elastic material. The lattice resistance to dislocation motion, dislocation nucleation, dislocation interaction with obstacles and annihilation are incorporated through a set of constitutive rules. Over the range of length scales investigated, both the discrete dislocation...... between predictions of the two formulations for all crystal types and void volume fractions considered when the material length scale in the non-local plasticity model is chosen to be 0.325 mu m (about 10 times the slip plane spacing in the discrete dislocation models)....

  15. Effect of initial void shape on ductile failure in a shear field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2015-01-01

    For voids in a shear field unit cell model analyses have been used to show that ductile failure is predicted even though the stress triaxiality is low or perhaps negative, so that the void volume fraction does not grow during deformation. Here, the effect of the void shape is studied by analyzing...

  16. An observational signal of the void shape correlation and its link to the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jounghun

    2014-01-01

    The shapes of cosmic voids are prone to distortions by the external tidal forces since their low-densities imply a lower internal resistance. This susceptibility of the void shapes to the tidal distortions makes them useful as an indicator of the large-scale tidal and density fields, despite the practical difficulty in defining them. Using the void catalog constructed by Pan et al. (2012) from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR7), we detect a clear 4 sigma signal of spatial correlations of the void shapes on the scale of 20 Mpc/h and show that the signal is robust against the projection of the void shapes onto the plane of sky. By constructing a simple analytic model for the void shape correlation, within the framework of tidal torque theory, we demonstrate that the void shape correlation function scales linearly with the two-point correlation function of the linear density field. We also find a direct observational evidence for the cross-correlation of the void shapes with the ...

  17. Effects of void size and gas content on electrical breakdown in lightweight, mechanically compliant, void-filled dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. A.; Lagasse, R. R.; Russick, E. M.; Schroeder, J. L.

    2002-03-01

    Dielectric potting materials (encapsulants) are used to prevent air breakdown in high-voltage electrical devices. We report breakdown strengths in void-filled encapsulants, stressed with unipolar voltage pulses of the order of 10 μs duration. High strengths, on the order of 100 kV mm-1, are measured under these test conditions. The materials studied include low-density open celled gel-derived foams with cell sizes of 4 μm or less, closed celled CO2-blown polystyrene and urethane foams, and epoxies containing 48 vol % of hollow glass microballoon (GMB) fillers. These last specimens varied the void gas (N2 or SO2) and also the void diameters (tens to hundreds of μm). Our measurements are thought to be directly sensitive to the rate of field-induced ionization events in the void gas; however, the breakdown strengths of the materials tested appeared to vary in direct proportion with the conventional Paschen-law gas-discharge inception threshold, the electric stress at which gas-ionization avalanches become possible. The GMB-epoxy specimens displayed this type of dependence of breakdown strength on the void-gas density and void size, but the measurements were an order of magnitude above the conventional predictions. Small-celled foams also showed increased breakdown strengths with decreased cell size, although their irregular void geometry prevented a direct comparison with the more uniformly structured microballoon-filled encapsulants. The experimental observations are consistent with a breakdown mechanism in which the discharge of a few voids can launch a full breakdown in the composite material.

  18. Nonlocal plasticity effects on interaction of different size voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2004-01-01

    A nonlocal elastic-plastic material model is used to show that the rate of void growth is significantly reduced when the voids are small enough to be comparable with a characteristic material length. For a very small void in the material between much larger voids the competition between...... an increased growth rate due to the stress concentrations around the larger voids and a reduced growth rate due to the nonlocal effects is studied. The analyses are based on an axisymmetric unit cell model with special boundary conditions, which allow for a relatively simple investigation of a full three...

  19. Study of void sizes and loading configurations effects on shock initiation due to void collapse in heterogeneous energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sidhartha; Rai, Nirmal; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    In heterogeneous energetic materials, presence of porosity has been seen to increase its sensitivity towards shock initiation and ignition. Under the application of shock load, the viscoplastic deformation of voids and its collapse leads to the formation of local high temperature regions known as hot spots. The chemical reaction triggers at the hot spot depending on the local temperature and grows eventually leading to ignition and formation of detonation waves in the material. The temperature of the hot spot depends on various factors such as shock strength, void size, void arrangements, loading configuration etc. Hence, to gain deeper understanding on shock initiation and ignition study due to void collapse, a parametric study involving various factors which can affect the hot spot temperature is desired. In the current work, effects of void sizes, shock strength and loading configurations has been studied for shock initiation in HMX using massively parallel Eulerian code, SCIMITAR3D. The chemical reaction and decomposition for HMX has been modeled using Henson-Smilowitz multi step mechanism. The effect of heat conduction has also been taken into consideration. Ignition threshold criterion has been established for various factors as mentioned. The critical hot spot temperature and its size which can lead to ignition has been obtained from numerical experiments.

  20. The void-size effect on plastic flow localization in the Gurson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Wen; Yonggang, Huang; Keh-Chih, Hwang

    2004-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that the size of microvoids has a significant effect on the void growth rate. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether the void size effect can influence the plastic flow localization in ductile materials. We have used the extended Gurson's dilatational plasticity theory, which accounts for the void size effect, to study the plastic flow localization in porous solids with long cylindrical voids. The localization model of Rice is adopted, in which the material inside the band may display a different response from that outside the band at the incipient plastic flow localization. The present study shows that it has little effect on the shear band angle.

  1. THE VOID-SIZE EFFECT ON PLASTIC FLOW LOCALIZATION IN THE GURSON MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Jie; HUANG Yonggang; HWANG Keh-Chih

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the size of microvoids has a significant effect on the void growth rate. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether the void size effect can influence the plastic flow localization in ductile materials. We have used the extended Gurson's dilatational plasticity theory, which accounts for the void size effect, to study the plastic flow localization in porous solids with long cylindrical voids. The localization model of Rice is adopted, in which the material inside the band may display a different response from that outside the band at the incipient plastic flow localization. The present study shows that it has little effect on the shear band angle.

  2. Extension of the gurson model accounting for the void size effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Wen; Keh-Chih Hwang; Yonggang Huang

    2005-01-01

    A continuum model of solids with cylindrical microvoids is proposed based on the Taylor dislocation model.The model is an extension of Gurson model in the sense that the void size effect is accounted for. Beside the void volume fraction f, the intrinsic material length l becomes a parameter representing voids since the void size comes into play in the Gurson model. Approximate yield functions in analytic forms are suggested for both solids with cylindrical microvoids and with spherical microvoids. The application to uniaxial tension curves shows a precise agreement between the approximate analytic yield function and the "exact" parametric form of integrals.

  3. Magnetic pattern at supergranulation scale: the Void Size Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Berrilli, Francesco; Del Moro, Dario

    2014-01-01

    The large-scale magnetic pattern of the quiet sun is dominated by the magnetic network. This network, created by photospheric magnetic fields swept into convective downflows, delineates the boundaries of large scale cells of overturning plasma and exhibits voids in magnetic organization. Such voids include internetwork fields, a mixed-polarity sparse field that populate the inner part of network cells. To single out voids and to quantify their intrinsic pattern a fast circle packing based algorithm is applied to 511 SOHO/MDI high resolution magnetograms acquired during the outstanding solar activity minimum between 23 and 24 cycles. The computed Void Distribution Function shows a quasi-exponential decay behavior in the range 10-60 Mm. The lack of distinct flow scales in such a range corroborates the hypothesis of multi-scale motion flows at the solar surface. In addition to the quasi-exponential decay we have found that the voids reveal departure from a simple exponential decay around 35 Mm.

  4. Effect of Void Size on the Detonation Pressure of Emulsion Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirosaki, Yoshikazu; Murata, Kenji; Kato, Yukio; Itoh, Shigeru

    2002-07-01

    To study the effect of void size, detonation pressure as well as detonation velocity was measured using PVDF pressure gauge for the emulsion explosives sensitized with plastic balloons of five different size ranging from 0.05mm to 2.42mm. The experimental results were compared with the detonation pressure and velocity calculated using KHT code. The experimental results showed that the detonation pressure and velocity were strongly affected by void size, and that the fraction of ammonium nitrate reacted in the reaction zone was strongly dependent on void size.

  5. Void probability as a function of the void's shape and scale-invariant models. [in studies of spacial galactic distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde, E.; Gaztanaga, E.

    1992-01-01

    The dependence of counts in cells on the shape of the cell for the large scale galaxy distribution is studied. A very concrete prediction can be done concerning the void distribution for scale invariant models. The prediction is tested on a sample of the CfA catalog, and good agreement is found. It is observed that the probability of a cell to be occupied is bigger for some elongated cells. A phenomenological scale invariant model for the observed distribution of the counts in cells, an extension of the negative binomial distribution, is presented in order to illustrate how this dependence can be quantitatively determined. An original, intuitive derivation of this model is presented.

  6. Effect of endocrine treatment on voiding and prostate size in men with prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise L; Klarskov, Peter; Mommsen, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and quantify changes in voiding parameters and prostate size in men with prostate cancer from before the start of endocrine treatment and during long-term follow-up.......The aim of this study was to assess and quantify changes in voiding parameters and prostate size in men with prostate cancer from before the start of endocrine treatment and during long-term follow-up....

  7. A variational constitutive model for the distribution and interactions of multi-sized voids

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxing

    2013-07-29

    The evolution of defects or voids, generally recognized as the basic failure mechanism in most metals and alloys, has been intensively studied. Most investigations have been limited to spatially periodic cases with non-random distributions of the radii of the voids. In this study, we use a new form of the incompressibility of the matrix to propose the formula for the volumetric plastic energy of a void inside a porous medium. As a consequence, we are able to account for the weakening effect of the surrounding voids and to propose a general model for the distribution and interactions of multi-sized voids. We found that the single parameter in classical Gurson-type models, namely void volume fraction is not sufficient for the model. The relative growth rates of voids of different sizes, which can in principle be obtained through physical or numerical experiments, are required. To demonstrate the feasibility of the model, we analyze two cases. The first case represents exactly the same assumption hidden in the classical Gurson\\'s model, while the second embodies the competitive mechanism due to void size differences despite in a much simpler manner than the general case. Coalescence is implemented by allowing an accelerated void growth after an empirical critical porosity in a way that is the same as the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model. The constitutive model presented here is validated through good agreements with experimental data. Its capacity for reproducing realistic failure patterns is shown by simulating a tensile test on a notched round bar. © 2013 The Author(s).

  8. Calculated Grain Size-Dependent Vacancy Supersaturation and its Effect on Void Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Foreman, A. J. E.

    1974-01-01

    In order to study the effect of grain size on void formation during high-energy electron irradiations, the steady-state point defect concentration and vacancy supersaturation profiles have been calculated for three-dimensional spherical grains up to three microns in size. In the calculations...... of vacancy supersaturation as a function of grain size, the effects of internal sink density and the dislocation preference for interstitial attraction have been included. The computations show that the level of vacancy supersaturation achieved in a grain decreases with decreasing grain size. The grain size...... dependence of the maximum vacancy supersaturation in the centre of the grains is found to be very similar to the grain size dependence of the maximum void number density and void volume swelling measured in the central regions of austenitic stainless steel grains. This agreement reinforces the interpretation...

  9. Microstructural characterization of XLPE electrical insulation in power cables: determination of void size distributions using TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, L.; Stevens, G. C.

    2003-10-01

    In an effort to progress in our understanding of the ageing mechanisms of high voltage cables submitted to electrical and thermal stresses, we present a quantitative study of voids, the defects which are considered to be partly responsible for cable failure. We propose a method based on large data sets of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of replicated samples allowing for the determination of void concentration distribution as a function of void size in the mesoscopic to microscopic range at any point in the cable insulation. A theory is also developed to calculate the effect of etching on the apparent size of the voids observed. We present the first results of this sort ever obtained on two industrial cables, one of which was aged in an AC field. Results clearly indicate that a much larger concentration of voids occur near the inner semiconductor compared to the bulk of the insulation, independently of ageing. An effect of ageing can also be seen near the inner semiconductor, resulting in an increase in the total void internal surface area and a slight shift of the concentration curve towards larger voids, with the peak moving from about 40 nm to about 50 nm.

  10. A model for shape memory alloys with the possibility of voids

    CERN Document Server

    Fremond, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of a mathematical model for the thermomechanical evolution of metallic shape memory alloys. The main novelty of our approach consists in the fact that we include the possibility for these materials to exhibit voids during the phase change process. Indeed, in the engineering paper has been recently proved that voids may appear when the mixture is produced by the aggregations of powder. Hence, the composition of the mixture varies (under either thermal or mechanical actions) in this way: the martensites and the austenite transform into one another whereas the voids volume fraction evolves. The first goal of this contribution is hence to state a PDE system capturing all these modelling aspects in order then to establish the well-posedness of the associated initial-boundary value problem.

  11. Constitutive modeling of rate dependence and microinertia effects in porous-plastic materials with multi-sized voids (MSVs)

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxing

    2012-11-27

    Micro-voids of varying sizes exist in most metals and alloys. Both experiments and numerical studies have demonstrated the critical influence of initial void sizes on void growth. The classical Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model summarizes the influence of voids with a single parameter, namely the void-volume fraction, excluding any possible effects of the void-size distribution. We extend our newly proposed model including the multi-sized void (MSV) effect and the void-interaction effect for the capability of working for both moderate and high loading rate cases, where either rate dependence or microinertia becomes considerable or even dominant. Parametric studies show that the MSV-related competitive mechanism among void growth leads to the dependence of the void growth rate on void size, which directly influences the void\\'s contribution to the total energy composition. We finally show that the stress-strain constitutive behavior is also affected by this MSV-related competitive mechanism. The stabilizing effect due to rate sensitivity and microinertia is emphasized. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Constitutive modeling of rate dependence and microinertia effects in porous-plastic materials with multi-sized voids (MSVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. X.; El Sayed, T.

    2013-01-01

    Micro-voids of varying sizes exist in most metals and alloys. Both experiments and numerical studies have demonstrated the critical influence of initial void sizes on void growth. The classical Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model summarizes the influence of voids with a single parameter, namely the void-volume fraction, excluding any possible effects of the void-size distribution. We extend our newly proposed model including the multi-sized void (MSV) effect and the void-interaction effect for the capability of working for both moderate and high loading rate cases, where either rate dependence or microinertia becomes considerable or even dominant. Parametric studies show that the MSV-related competitive mechanism among void growth leads to the dependence of the void growth rate on void size, which directly influences the void's contribution to the total energy composition. We finally show that the stress-strain constitutive behavior is also affected by this MSV-related competitive mechanism. The stabilizing effect due to rate sensitivity and microinertia is emphasized.

  13. Effect of Grain Size on Void Formation during High-Energy Electron Irradiation of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain

    1974-01-01

    Thin foils of an ‘ experimental ’ austenitic stainless steel, with and without dispersions of aluminium oxide particles, are irradiated with 1 MeV electrons in a High Voltage Electron Microscope at 600°C. Evidence of grain size dependent void nucleation, void concentration, and void volume swelling...

  14. Void shape control in GaN re-grown on hexagonally patterned mask-less GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Romanov, A. E.; Suihkonen, S.; Svensk, O.; Törmä, P. T.; Sopanen, M.; Lipsanen, H.; Odnoblyudov, M. A.; Bougrov, V. E.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of GaN re-growth on hexagonally patterned GaN templates. Sapphire was used as the original substrate and the samples were grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The re-growth on the patterned templates results in the formation of voids at the GaN/sapphire interface. Our extensive scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-based experimental investigations show that the void shape can be controlled from nearly vertical to fully inclined configurations. It was found that the initial hexagon hole diameter plays a key role in determining the final profile of the void sidewalls. X-ray diffraction analysis of the GaN layers indicates that the layers with inclined sidewall voids have an improved crystalline quality. Knowledge of the void configurations in the GaN layers and a possibility to control their shape can help in enhancing light extraction from the light emitting structures.

  15. Analysis of threading dislocations in void shape controlled GaN re-grown on hexagonally patterned mask-less GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Romanov, A. E.; Suihkonen, S.; Svensk, O.; Sintonen, S.; Sopanen, M.; Lipsanen, H.; Nevedomsky, V. N.; Bert, N. A.; Odnoblyudov, M. A.; Bougrov, V. E.

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we analyze the behavior of threading dislocations in GaN layers re-grown on hexagonally patterned mask-less GaN. The growth mode of the material with patterned hexagonal morphology changes with the diameter and the periodicity of the hexagonal patterns. The growth mode directly affects the shape of the voids that are formed in this kind of lateral epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy has been used to study threading dislocations in GaN layers with voids having different sizes and sidewall angles. The results show that a significant number of threading dislocations near the tapered void's surface undergo a 90° reorientation in their propagation trajectory whereas almost no dislocations bend in the case of smaller voids having more vertical sidewalls. Different types of dislocations in the vicinity of the voids have also been identified using the invisibility g·b criteria. The full width at half maximum values for XRD ω-scan recorded in (002) reflection drop from 256″ to 181″ as the void sidewall inclination changes from 85° to 60°. A similar dropping trend in the full width at half maximum values for asymmetric diffraction reflections has also been observed.

  16. Why a steady state void size distribution in irradiated UO2? A modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, S.; Martin, G.; Sabathier, C.

    2016-05-01

    In UO2 pellets irradiated in standard water reactor, Xe nano-bubbles nucleate, grow, coarsen and finally reach a quasi steady state size distribution: transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations typically report a concentration around 10-4 nm-3 and a radius around 0.5 nm. This phenomenon is often considered as a consequence of radiation enhanced diffusion, precipitation of gas atoms and ballistic mixing. However, in UO2 thin foils irradiated with energetic ions at room temperature, a nano-void population whose size distribution reaches a similar steady state can be observed, although quasi no foreign atoms are implanted nor significant cation vacancy diffusion expected in conditions. Atomistic simulations performed at low temperature only address the first stage of the process, supporting the assumption of void heterogeneous nucleation: 25 keV sub-cascades directly produce defect aggregates (loops and voids) even in the absence of gas atoms and thermal diffusion. In this work a semi-empirical stochastic model is proposed to enlarge the time scale covered by simulation up to damage levels where every point in the material undergoes the superposition of a large number of sub-cascade impacts. To account for the accumulation of these impacts, simple rules inferred from the atomistic simulation results are used. The model satisfactorily reproduces the TEM observations of nano-voids size and concentration, which paves the way for the introduction of a more realistic damage term in rate theory models.

  17. Ultrasonic Techniques for Air Void Size Distribution and Property Evaluation in Both Early-Age and Hardened Concrete Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaicheng Guo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Entrained air voids can improve the freeze-thaw durability of concrete, and also affect its mechanical and transport properties. Therefore, it is important to measure the air void structure and understand its influence on concrete performance for quality control. This paper aims to measure air void structure evolution at both early-age and hardened stages with the ultrasonic technique, and evaluates its influence on concrete properties. Three samples with different air entrainment agent content were specially prepared. The air void structure was determined with optimized inverse analysis by achieving the minimum error between experimental and theoretical attenuation. The early-age sample measurement showed that the air void content with the whole size range slightly decreases with curing time. The air void size distribution of hardened samples (at Day 28 was compared with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM C457 test results. The air void size distribution with different amount of air entrainment agent was also favorably compared. In addition, the transport property, compressive strength, and dynamic modulus of concrete samples were also evaluated. The concrete transport decreased with the curing age, which is in accordance with the air void shrinkage. The correlation between the early-age strength development and hardened dynamic modulus with the ultrasonic parameters was also evaluated. The existence of clustered air voids in the Interfacial Transition Zone (ITZ area was found to cause severe compressive strength loss. The results indicated that this developed ultrasonic technique has potential in air void size distribution measurement, and demonstrated the influence of air void structure evolution on concrete properties during both early-age and hardened stages.

  18. Size-effects at a crack-tip interacting with a number of voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2008-01-01

    of the characteristic material length relative to the initial void radius. For a case showing the multiple void mechanism, it is found that the effect of the material length can change the behaviour towards the void by void mechanism. A material model with three characteristic length scales is compared with a one...

  19. Shape and Size from the Mist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Gundu, Phanindra Narayan

    2010-01-01

    Process optimization often depends on the correct estimation of particle size, their shape and their concentration. In case of the backlight microscopic system, which we investigate here, particle images suffer from out-of-focus blur. This gives a bias towards overestimating the particle size whe...

  20. Application of a model of plastic porous materials including void shape effects to the prediction of ductile failure under shear-dominated loadings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morin, Léo; Leblond, Jean Baptiste; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    An extension of Gurson's famous model (Gurson, 1977) of porous plastic solids, incorporating void shape effects, has recently been proposed by Madou and Leblond (Madou and Leblond, 2012a, 2012b, 2013; Madou et al., 2013). In this extension the voids are no longer modelled as spherical but ellipso......An extension of Gurson's famous model (Gurson, 1977) of porous plastic solids, incorporating void shape effects, has recently been proposed by Madou and Leblond (Madou and Leblond, 2012a, 2012b, 2013; Madou et al., 2013). In this extension the voids are no longer modelled as spherical...... and coworkers (Tvergaard, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2015a; Dahl et al., 2012; Nielsen et al., 2012) involving the shear loading of elementary porous cells, where softening due to changes of the void shape and orientation was very apparent. It is found that with a simple, heuristic modelling of the phenomenon...

  1. Purification of Nanoparticles by Size and Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James D.; Rizzello, Loris; Avila-Olias, Milagros; Gaitzsch, Jens; Contini, Claudia; Magoń, Monika S.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Producing monodisperse nanoparticles is essential to ensure consistency in biological experiments and to enable a smooth translation into the clinic. Purification of samples into discrete sizes and shapes may not only improve sample quality, but also provide us with the tools to understand which physical properties of nanoparticles are beneficial for a drug delivery vector. In this study, using polymersomes as a model system, we explore four techniques for purifying pre-formed nanoparticles into discrete fractions based on their size, shape or density. We show that these techniques can successfully separate polymersomes into monodisperse fractions.

  2. Towards a better understanding of dielectric barrier discharges in ferroelectrets: Paschen breakdown fields in micrometer sized voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Scott; Mellinger, Axel

    2014-04-01

    Charged cellular polypropylene foams (i.e., ferro- or piezoelectrets) demonstrate high piezoelectric activity upon being electrically charged. When an external electric field is applied, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) occur, resulting in a separation of charges which are subsequently deposited on dielectric surfaces of internal micrometer sized voids. This deposited space charge is responsible for the piezoelectric activity of the material. Previous studies have indicated charging fields larger than predicted by Townsend's model of Paschen breakdown applied to a multilayered electromechanical model; a discrepancy which prompted the present study. The actual breakdown fields for micrometer sized voids were determined by constructing single cell voids using polypropylene spacers with heights ranging from 8 to 75 μm, "sandwiched" between two polypropylene dielectric barriers and glass slides with semi-transparent electrodes. Subsequently, a bipolar triangular charging waveform with a peak voltage of 6 kV was applied to the samples. The breakdown fields were determined by monitoring the emission of light due to the onset of DBDs using an electron multiplying CCD camera. The breakdown fields at absolute pressures from 101 to 251 kPa were found to be in good agreement with the standard Paschen curves. Additionally, the magnitude of the light emission was found to scale linearly with the amount of gas, i.e., the height of the voids. Emissions were homogeneous over the observed regions of the voids for voids with heights of 25 μm or less and increasingly inhomogeneous for void heights greater than 40 μm at high electric fields.

  3. On grain size dependent void swelling in pure copper irradiated with fission neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Zinkle, S.J.

    2001-01-01

    in pure copper irradiated with fission neutrons at 623K to a dose level of approx0.3 dpa (displacement peratom). The post-irradiation defect microstructure including voids was investigated using transmission electron microscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy. The evolution of void swelling...

  4. On grain-size-dependent void swelling in pure copper irradiated with fission neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Zinkle, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    in pure copper irradiated with fission neutrons at 623 K to a dose level of about 0.3 displacement per atom. The post-irradiation defect microstructure including voids was investigated using transmission electron microscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy. The evolution of void swelling...

  5. Electrochemical charging of CdSe quantum dot films: dependence on void size and counterion proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Simon C; Wang, Hai; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Houtepen, Arjan J

    2013-03-26

    Films of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) show great promise for application in optoelectronic devices. Great advances have been made in recent years in designing efficient QD solar cells and LEDs. A very important aspect in the design of devices based on QD films is the knowledge of their absolute energy levels. Unfortunately, reported energy levels vary markedly depending on the employed measurement technique and the environment of the sample. In this report, we determine absolute energy levels of QD films by electrochemical charge injection. The concomitant change in optical absorption of the film allows quantification of the number of charges in quantum-confined levels and thereby their energetic position. We show here that the size of voids in the QD films (i.e., the space between the quantum dots) determines the amount of charges that may be injected into the films. This effect is attributed to size exclusion of countercharges from the electrolyte solution. Further, the energy of the QD levels depends on subtle changes in the QD film and the supporting electrolyte: the size of the cation and the QD ligand length. These nontrivial effects can be explained by the proximity of the cation to the QD surface and a concomitant lowering of the electrochemical potential. Our findings help explain the wide range of reported values for QD energy levels and redefine the limit of applicability of electrochemical measurements on QD films. Finally, the finding that the energy of QD levels depends on ligand length and counterion size may be exploited in optimized designs of QD sensitized solar cells.

  6. Sizes and Shapes of Neptune's Inner Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkoschka, E.

    2002-09-01

    I measured resolved images of the inner Neptunian satellites by Voyager 2. The best-fitting tri-axial radii are 48x30x26 km for Naiad, 54x50x26 km for Thalassa, 90x74x64 km for Despina, 102x92x72 km for Galatea, and 108x102x84 km for Larissa. These sizes are within uncertainty limits by Thomas and Veverka (1991) who provided a shape for Larissa (104x89 km), radii with assumed spherical shapes for Despina (74 km) and Galatea (79 km) and estimated radii based on assumed albedos for Naiad (29 km) and Thalassa (40 km). The uncertainties of the new radii are smaller. Estimates of volumes and masses of Naiad and Galatea need to be increased by some 50 percent, which is interesting since Galatea's gravity is considered to cause the unique arcs of Neptune's Adams ring. The moderately elongated shapes of the medium-sized satellites Despina and Galatea, and the strongly elongated shapes of the small satellites Naiad and Thalassa are typical for bodies of their size, although the shape of Thalassa is almost oblate (like a lens) while the shapes of other, strongly elongated satellites such as Naiad are closer to prolate (like a cigar). While previous uncertainties allowed the same reflectivity for the inner six Neptunian satellites, this is no longer true. There is a trend of albedos increasing with distance from Neptune, similar to the trend observed for the Uranian satellites. By estimating phase curves, I predict brighter albedos for inner six Neptunian satellites (0.07-0.10) than for the inner 10 Uranian satellites (0.05-0.07), opposite to previous estimates, which could be tested using recent images by the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observatories. The measured shapes of the inner Neptunian satellites cause orbital light curves, even if their surfaces lack spatial albedo variations. Indeed, photometry by Thomas and Veverka (1991) reveals amplitudes and phases of the light curves consistent with those inferred from the measured shapes, although most data are

  7. Isotoxal star-shaped polygonal voids and rigid inclusions in nonuniform antiplane shear fields. Part II: Singularities, annihilation and invisibility

    CERN Document Server

    Corso, Francesco Dal; Bigoni, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Notch stress intensity factors and stress intensity factors are obtained analytically for isotoxal star-shaped polygonal voids and rigid inclusions (and also for the corresponding limit cases of star-shaped cracks and stiffeners), when loaded through remote inhomogeneous (self-equilibrated, polynomial) antiplane shear stress in an infinite linear elastic matrix. Usually these solutions show stress singularities at the inclusion corners. It is shown that an infinite set of geometries and loading conditions exist for which not only the singularity is absent, but the stress vanishes ('annihilates') at the corners. Thus the material, which even without the inclusion corners would have a finite stress, remains unstressed at these points in spite of the applied remote load. Moreover, similar conditions are determined in which a star-shaped crack or stiffener leaves the ambient stress completely unperturbed, thus reaching a condition of 'quasi-static invisibility'. Stress annihilation and invisibility define optimal...

  8. Coupled Crystal Plasticity-Phase Field Fracture Simulation Study on Damage Evolution Around a Void: Pore Shape Versus Crystallographic Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Martin; Wicke, Marcel; Shanthraj, Pratheek; Roters, Franz; Brueckner-Foit, Angelika; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-03-01

    Various mechanisms such as anisotropic plastic flow, damage nucleation, and crack propagation govern the overall mechanical response of structural materials. Understanding how these mechanisms interact, i.e. if they amplify mutually or compete with each other, is an essential prerequisite for the design of improved alloys. This study shows—by using the free and open source software DAMASK (the Düsseldorf Advanced Material Simulation Kit)—how the coupling of crystal plasticity and phase field fracture methods can increase the understanding of the complex interplay between crystallographic orientation and the geometry of a void. To this end, crack initiation and propagation around an experimentally obtained pore with complex shape is investigated and compared to the situation of a simplified spherical void. Three different crystallographic orientations of the aluminum matrix hosting the defects are considered. It is shown that crack initiation and propagation depend in a non-trivial way on crystallographic orientation and its associated plastic behavior as well as on the shape of the pore.

  9. The size and shape of Dante's Purgatorio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnaghi-Delfino, Paola; Norando, Tullia

    2015-07-01

    Where is Mount Purgatory? How high is it? How large is the island upon which it was situated? In the previous century Rodolfo Benini and Ideale Capasso developed a series of hypothesis and calculations to find answers to these questions. Each used data derived from mathematics, astronomy, history of science and cartography, but they completely disagreed on the location and on the overall size and shape of the island. In this paper we review the main points of these two scholars, then we rework the calculations and estimates, according with a new astronomical hypothesis presented by Giulio Magli and Claudio Facciolo.

  10. Application of a model of plastic porous materials including void shape effects to the prediction of ductile failure under shear-dominated loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Léo; Leblond, Jean-Baptiste; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-09-01

    An extension of Gurson's famous model (Gurson, 1977) of porous plastic solids, incorporating void shape effects, has recently been proposed by Madou and Leblond (Madou and Leblond, 2012a, 2012b, 2013; Madou et al., 2013). In this extension the voids are no longer modelled as spherical but ellipsoidal with three different axes, and changes of the magnitude and orientation of these axes are accounted for. The aim of this paper is to show that the new model is able to predict softening due essentially to such changes, in the absence of significant void growth. This is done in two steps. First, a numerical implementation of the model is proposed and incorporated into the SYSTUS® and ABAQUS® finite element programmes (through some freely available UMAT (Leblond, 2015) in the second case). Second, the implementation in SYSTUS® is used to simulate previous "numerical experiments" of Tvergaard and coworkers (Tvergaard, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2015a; Dahl et al., 2012; Nielsen et al., 2012) involving the shear loading of elementary porous cells, where softening due to changes of the void shape and orientation was very apparent. It is found that with a simple, heuristic modelling of the phenomenon of mesoscopic strain localization, the model is indeed able to reproduce the results of these numerical experiments, in contrast to Gurson's model disregarding void shape effects.

  11. Void Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Nelson D.; Paz, Dante; Lares, Marcelo; Ceccarelli, Laura; Lambas, Diego Garcí A.; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Li, Baojiu

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic voids are becoming key players in testing the physics of our Universe.Here we concentrate on the abundances and the dynamics of voids as these are among the best candidatesto provide information on cosmological parameters. Cai, Padilla & Li (2014)use the abundance of voids to tell apart Hu & Sawicki f(R) models from General Relativity. An interestingresult is that even though, as expected, voids in the dark matter field are emptier in f(R) gravity due to the fifth force expellingaway from the void centres, this result is reversed when haloes are used to find voids. The abundance of voids in this casebecomes even lower in f(R) compared to GR for large voids. Still, the differences are significant and thisprovides a way to tell apart these models. The velocity field differences between f(R) and GR, on the other hand, arethe same for halo voids and for dark matter voids.Paz et al. (2013), concentrate on the velocity profiles around voids. First they show the necessityof four parameters to describe the density profiles around voids given two distinct voidpopulations, voids-in-voids and voids-in-clouds. This profile is used to predict peculiar velocities around voids,and the combination of the latter with void density profiles allows the construction of modelvoid-galaxy cross-correlation functions with redshift space distortions. When these modelsare tuned to fit the measured correlation functions for voids and galaxies in the SloanDigital Sky Survey, small voids are found to be of the void-in-cloud type, whereas largerones are consistent with being void-in-void. This is a novel result that is obtaineddirectly from redshift space data around voids. These profiles can be used toremove systematics on void-galaxy Alcock-Pacinsky tests coming from redshift-space distortions.

  12. Effects of Cure Pressure Induced Voids on the Mechanical Strength of Carbon/Epoxy Laminates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling LIU; Boming ZHANG; Zhanjun WU; Dianfu WANG

    2005-01-01

    This work aims at designing a set of curing pressure routes to produce laminates with various void contents. The effects of various consolidation pressures resulting in different void contents on mechanical strength of carbon/epoxy laminates have been examined. Characterization of the voids, in terms of void volume fraction, void distribution,size, and shape, was performed by standard test, ultrasonic inspection and metallographic analysis. The interlaminar shear strength was measured by the short-beam method. An empirical model was used to predict the strength vs porosity. The predicted strengths conform well with the experimental data and voids were found to be uniformly distributed throughout the laminate.

  13. Sizing and shaping the nucleus: mechanisms and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevtić, Predrag; Edens, Lisa J; Vuković, Lidija D; Levy, Daniel L

    2014-06-01

    The size and shape of the nucleus are tightly regulated, indicating the physiological significance of proper nuclear morphology, yet the mechanisms and functions of nuclear size and shape regulation remain poorly understood. Correlations between altered nuclear morphology and certain disease states have long been observed, most notably many cancers are diagnosed and staged based on graded increases in nuclear size. Here we review recent studies investigating the mechanisms regulating nuclear size and shape, how mitotic events influence nuclear morphology, and the role of nuclear size and shape in subnuclear chromatin organization and cancer progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of atomic scale changes in the free volume void size of three-dimensional colorectal cancer cell culture using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axpe, Eneko; Lopez-Euba, Tamara; Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara; Merida, David; Garcia, Jose Angel; Plaza-Izurieta, Leticia; Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora; Plazaola, Fernando; Bilbao, Jose Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provides a direct measurement of the free volume void sizes in polymers and biological systems. This free volume is critical in explaining and understanding physical and mechanical properties of polymers. Moreover, PALS has been recently proposed as a potential tool in detecting cancer at early stages, probing the differences in the subnanometer scale free volume voids between cancerous/healthy skin samples of the same patient. Despite several investigations on free volume in complex cancerous tissues, no positron annihilation studies of living cancer cell cultures have been reported. We demonstrate that PALS can be applied to the study in human living 3D cell cultures. The technique is also capable to detect atomic scale changes in the size of the free volume voids due to the biological responses to TGF-β. PALS may be developed to characterize the effect of different culture conditions in the free volume voids of cells grown in vitro.

  15. DUAL-CHANNEL PARTICLE SIZE AND SHAPE ANALYZER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arjen van der Schoot

    2004-01-01

    @@ Fig. 1 shows a newly developed analyzer (Ankersmid CIS-100) that brings together two different measurement channels for accurate size and shape measurement of spherical and non-spherical particles. The size of spherical particles is measured by a HeNe Laser Beam; the size of non-spherical particles is analyzed by Dynamic Video Analysis of the particles' shape.

  16. New Statistical Perspective to The Cosmic Void Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Pycke, Jean-Renaud

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we obtain the size distribution of voids as a 3-parameter redshift independent log-normal void probability function (VPF) directly from the Cosmic Void Catalog (CVC). Although many statistical models of void distributions are based on the counts in randomly placed cells, the log-normal VPF that we here obtain is independent of the shape of the voids due to the parameter-free void finder of the CVC. We use three void populations drawn from the CVC generated by the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) Mocks which are tuned to three mock SDSS samples to investigate the void distribution statistically and the effects of the environments on the size distribution. As a result, it is shown that void size distributions obtained from the HOD Mock samples are satisfied by the 3-parameter log-normal distribution. In addition, we find that there may be a relation between hierarchical formation, skewness and kurtosis of the log-normal distribution for each catalog. We also show that the shape of the 3-paramet...

  17. Locating voids beneath pavement using pulsed electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinway, W. J.; Echard, J. D.; Luke, C. M.

    1981-11-01

    The feasibility of using pulsed electromagnetic wave technology for locating and sizing voids beneath reinforced and nonreinforced portland cement concrete pavements is determined. The data processing techniques developed can be implemented to provide information for void depth and sizing to + or - 1/2 in. and spatial location within + or - 6 in. A very short pulse radar directly connected to a microcomputer was chosen as the equipment necessary to obtain measurements. This equipment has the required accuracy and reliability, and is a cost effective solution for the void locating problem. The radar provides a signal return from voids that has unique characteristics that can be examined to provide information regarding the location, depth, and shape of the void. The microcomputer provides a means of real time processing to extract the information from the radar signal return and record the results. Theoretical modeling of signal returns from voids led to suitable techniques for locating and sizing voids beneath the pavement. Analysis and application of these techniques to radar measurements verified the theoretical predictions that radar can be used to determine the location, size, and shape of actual voids.

  18. Isotoxal star-shaped polygonal voids and rigid inclusions in nonuniform antiplane shear fields. Part I: Formulation and full-field solution

    CERN Document Server

    Corso, Francesco Dal; Bigoni, Davide

    2016-01-01

    An infinite class of nonuniform antiplane shear fields is considered for a linear elastic isotropic space and (non-intersecting) isotoxal star-shaped polygonal voids and rigid inclusions perturbing these fields are solved. Through the use of the complex potential technique together with the generalized binomial and the multinomial theorems, full-field closed-form solutions are obtained in the conformal plane. The particular (and important) cases of star-shaped cracks and rigid-line inclusions (stiffeners) are also derived. Except for special cases (addressed in Part II), the obtained solutions show singularities at the inclusion corners and at the crack and stiffener ends, where the stress blows-up to infinity, and is therefore detrimental to strength. It is for this reason that the closed-form determination of the stress field near a sharp inclusion or void is crucial for the design of ultra-resistant composites.

  19. Shaping micron-sized cold neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Frédéric, E-mail: Frederic.Ott@cea.fr [CEA, IRAMIS, Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); CNRS, IRAMIS, Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Kozhevnikov, Sergey [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, ul. Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, Moscow oblast 141980 (Russian Federation); Thiaville, André [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Univ. Paris—Sud, CNRS UMR 8502, 91405 Orsay (France); Torrejón, Jacob [Unité Mixte de Physique, CNRS/Thales, Campus de l’Ecole Polytechnique, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Vázquez, Manuel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-11

    In the field of neutron scattering, the need for micro-sized (1–50 µm) thermal or cold neutron beams has recently appeared, typically in the field of neutron imaging to probe samples with a high spatial resolution. We discuss various possibilities of producing such micro-sized neutron beams. The advantages and drawbacks of the different techniques are discussed. We show that reflective optics offers the most flexible way of producing tiny neutron beams together with an enhanced signal to background ratio. The use of such micro beams is illustrated by the study of micrometric diameter magnetic wires.

  20. Variation in avian brain shape: relationship with size and orbital shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Soichiro; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Miki, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Seiji; Endo, Hideki

    2013-11-01

    There is wide variation in brain shape among birds. Differences in brain dimensions reflect species-specific sensory capacities and behavioral repertoires that are shaped by environmental and biological factors during evolution. Most previous studies aimed at defining factors impacting brain shape have used volumetric or linear measurements. However, few have explored the quantitative indices of three-dimensional (3D) brain geometry that are absolutely imperative to understanding avian evolutionary history. This study aimed: (i) to explore the relationship between brain shape and overall brain size; and (ii) to assess the relationship between brain shape and orbital shape. Avian brain endocasts were reconstructed from computed tomography images and analyzed using 3D geometric morphometrics. Principal component analysis revealed dominant regional variations in avian brain shape and shape correlations between the telencephalon and cerebellum, between the cerebellum and myelencephalon, and between the diencephalon and optic tectum. Brain shape changes relative to total brain size were determined by multivariate regression analysis. Larger brain size was associated with a relatively slender telencephalon and differences in brain orientation. The correlation between brain shape and orbital shape was assessed by two-block partial least-squares analysis. Relatively round brains with a ventrally flexed brain base were associated with rounder orbits, while narrower brains with a flat brain base were associated with more elongated orbits. The shapes of functionally associated avian brain regions are correlated, and orbital size and shape are dominant factors influencing the overall shape of the avian brain.

  1. Palate size and shape in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delice, Mehtap; Gurbuz, Ozlem; Oflezer, Ceyhan; Kurt, Erhan; Mandali, Gamze

    2016-10-30

    The palate is considered typical of the structures in which schizophrenia-related minor physical anomalies may occur. In this study, we aimed to compare the dimensions and form of palate in patients with schizophrenia with nonpsychiatric controls in a blinded manner. Dental stone casts of 127 patients with schizophrenia and 127 controls were prepared from impressions of the maxillary dental arch. Palate dimensions were measured on the stone casts using a digital caliper and palatometer. Palate length did not differ significantly between the groups, but there was a significant difference in palate width and depth, which were significantly higher in the schizophrenia group. As a result of using multivariate analysis for assessing independent risk factors affecting patients with schizophrenia, furrowed palate shape, palate width, and ellipsoid maxillary dental arch shape were found to be significant. This study also revealed that patients with schizophrenia demonstrate certain gender-related predilections in the differences of palate parameters compared to same-sex controls. As the palate develops in conjunction with both the face and brain, our study findings can significantly contribute to the assumption that there might be structural abnormalities of the palate that could represent specific markers of embryological dysmorphogenesis underlying schizophrenia.

  2. A constitutive model for elastoplastic solids containing primary and secondary voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrègue, D.; Pardoen, T.

    In many ductile metallic alloys, the damage process controlled by the growth and coalescence of primary voids nucleated on particles with a size varying typically between 1 and 100 μm, is affected by the growth of much smaller secondary voids nucleated on inclusions with a size varying typically between 0.1 and 3 μm. The goal of this work is first to quantify the potential effect of the growth of these secondary voids on the coalescence of primary voids using finite element (FE) unit cell calculations and second to formulate a new constitutive model incorporating this effect. The nucleation and growth of secondary voids do essentially not affect the growth of the primary voids but mainly accelerate the void coalescence process. The drop of the ductility caused by the presence of secondary voids increases if the nucleation strain decreases and/or if their volume fraction increases and/or if the primary voids are flat. A strong coupling is indeed observed between the shape of the primary voids and the growth of the second population enhancing the anisotropy of the ductility induced by void shape effects. The new micromechanics-based coalescence condition for internal necking introduces the softening induced by secondary voids growing in the ligament between two primary voids. The FE cell calculations were used to guide and assess the development of this model. The use of the coalescence condition relies on a closed-form model for estimating the evolution of the secondary voids in the vicinity of a primary cavity. This coalescence criterion is connected to an extended Gurson model for the first population including the effect of the void aspect ratio. With respect to classical models for single void population, this new constitutive model improves the predictive potential of damage constitutive models devoted to ductile metal while requiring only two new parameters, i.e. the initial porosity of second population and a void nucleation stress, without any additional

  3. Size and shape of Saturn's moon Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Stiles, Bryan; Hensley, Scott; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randolph L.; Lunine, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Cassini observations show that Saturn's moon Titan is slightly oblate. A fourth-order spherical harmonic expansion yields north polar, south polar, and mean equatorial radii of 2574.32 ± 0.05 kilometers (km), 2574.36 ± 0.03 km, and 2574.91 ± 0.11 km, respectively; its mean radius is 2574.73 ± 0.09 km. Titan's shape approximates a hydrostatic, synchronously rotating triaxial ellipsoid but is best fit by such a body orbiting closer to Saturn than Titan presently does. Titan's lack of high relief implies that most—but not all—of the surface features observed with the Cassini imaging subsystem and synthetic aperture radar are uncorrelated with topography and elevation. Titan's depressed polar radii suggest that a constant geopotential hydrocarbon table could explain the confinement of the hydrocarbon lakes to high latitudes.

  4. Image analysis of aggregate,mastic and air void phases for asphalt mixture%Image analysis of aggregate, mastic and air void phases for asphalt mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ADHIKARI Sanjeev; YOU Zhan-ping; HAO Pei-wen; WANG Hai-nian

    2013-01-01

    The shape characterization and spatial distribution of aggregate,mastic and air void phases for asphalt mixture were analyzed.Three air void percentage asphalt mixtures,4%,7% and 8%,respectively,were cut into cross sections and polished.X-ray scanning microscope was used to capture aggregate,mastic,air void phase by the image.The average of polygon diameter was chosen as a threshold to determine which aggregates would be retained on a given sieve.The aggregate morphological image from scanned image was utilized by digital image processing method to calculate the gradation of aggregate and simulate the real gradation.Analysis result shows that the air void of asphalt mixture has influence on the correlation between calculation gradation and actual gradation.When comparing 4.75 mm sieve size of 4%,7% and 8% air void asphalt mixtures,7% air void asphalt mixture has 55% higher than actual size gradation,8% air void asphalt mixture has 8% higher than actual size gradation,and 4% air void asphalt mixture has 3.71% lower than actual size gradation.4% air void asphalt mixture has the best correlation between calculation gradation and actual gradation comparing to other specimens.The air void percentage of asphalt mixture has no obvious influence on the air void orientation,and three asphalt mixtures show the similar air orientation along the same direction.4 tabs,7 figs,17 refs.

  5. Recent advances in understanding nuclear size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Richik N; Chen, Pan; Levy, Daniel L

    2016-04-25

    Size and shape are important aspects of nuclear structure. While normal cells maintain nuclear size within a defined range, altered nuclear size and shape are associated with a variety of diseases. It is unknown if altered nuclear morphology contributes to pathology, and answering this question requires a better understanding of the mechanisms that control nuclear size and shape. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate nuclear morphology, focusing on nucleocytoplasmic transport, nuclear lamins, the endoplasmic reticulum, the cell cycle, and potential links between nuclear size and size regulation of other organelles. We then discuss the functional significance of nuclear morphology in the context of early embryonic development. Looking toward the future, we review new experimental approaches that promise to provide new insights into mechanisms of nuclear size control, in particular microfluidic-based technologies, and discuss how altered nuclear morphology might impact chromatin organization and physiology of diseased cells.

  6. Size and shape as linear combinations of untransformed measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, R.; Steerneman, A.G.M.; van Vark, G.N.

    2001-01-01

    A numerical specification of 'size' and 'shape' is of interest for making interpretations in morphometrics. Starting from a, possibly large, set m(1), ..., m(r) of size measurements, e.g. m(1) = height, m(2) = sitting height, etc., a preliminary analysis provides the set x(1),...,x(p) of size measur

  7. Cluster dynamics largely shapes protoplanetary disc sizes

    CERN Document Server

    Vincke, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    It is still on open question to what degree the cluster environment influences the sizes of protoplanetary discs surrounding young stars. Particularly so for the short-lived clusters typical for the solar neighbourhood in which the stellar density and therefore the influence of the cluster environment changes considerably over the first 10 Myr. In previous studies often the effect of the gas on the cluster dynamics has been neglected, this is remedied here. Using the code NBody6++ we study the stellar dynamics in different developmental phases - embedded, expulsion, expansion - including the gas and quantify the effect of fly-bys on the disc size. We concentrate on massive clusters ($M_{\\text{cl}} \\geq 10^3 - 6 \\cdot 10^4 M_{\\text{Sun}}$), which are representative for clusters like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) or NGC 6611. We find that not only the stellar density but also the duration of the embedded phase matters. The densest clusters react fastest to the gas expulsion and drop quickly in density, here 98...

  8. Size and shape effects on Curie temperature of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A simplified model was developed to describe the Curie temperature suppression of ferromagnetic nanoparticles. Based on a size and shape dependent model of cohesive energy, the critical temperature variations of ferromagnetic nanoparticles were deduced. It is predicted that the Curie temperature of nanoparticles depends on both size and shape conditions, among which the temperature suppression is strongly influenced by the particle size and the shape effect is comparably minor. The calculation values for freestanding nanoparticles are in good agreement with other theoretical model and the experimental results. The model is also potential for predictions for the nanoparticles embedded in different substrates.

  9. Modelling the void deformation and closure by hot forging of ingot castings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Kotas, Petr;

    2012-01-01

    After solidification and cooling cast ingots contain voids due to improper feeding and volume shrinkage. Such voids are normally unwanted, so besides of forming the ingot to the desired shape, one of the purposes of the post processing of the ingot by hot forging is to close such voids by mechani......After solidification and cooling cast ingots contain voids due to improper feeding and volume shrinkage. Such voids are normally unwanted, so besides of forming the ingot to the desired shape, one of the purposes of the post processing of the ingot by hot forging is to close such voids...... and focuses on how the voids deform depending on their size and distribution in the ingot as well ashow the forging forces are applied....

  10. How river rocks round: resolving the shape-size paradox.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Domokos

    Full Text Available River-bed sediments display two universal downstream trends: fining, in which particle size decreases; and rounding, where pebble shapes evolve toward ellipsoids. Rounding is known to result from transport-induced abrasion; however many researchers argue that the contribution of abrasion to downstream fining is negligible. This presents a paradox: downstream shape change indicates substantial abrasion, while size change apparently rules it out. Here we use laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to show quantitatively that pebble abrasion is a curvature-driven flow problem. As a consequence, abrasion occurs in two well-separated phases: first, pebble edges rapidly round without any change in axis dimensions until the shape becomes entirely convex; and second, axis dimensions are then slowly reduced while the particle remains convex. Explicit study of pebble shape evolution helps resolve the shape-size paradox by reconciling discrepancies between laboratory and field studies, and enhances our ability to decipher the transport history of a river rock.

  11. How river rocks round: resolving the shape-size paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Domokos, G; Sipos, A Á; Török, Á

    2013-01-01

    River-bed sediments display two universal downstream trends: fining, in which particle size decreases; and rounding, where pebble shapes evolve toward ellipsoids. Rounding is known to result from transport-induced abrasion; however many researchers argue that the contribution of abrasion to downstream fining is negligible. This presents a paradox: downstream shape change indicates substantial abrasion, while size change apparently rules it out. Here we use laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to show quantitatively that pebble abrasion is a curvature-driven flow problem. As a consequence, abrasion occurs in two well-separated phases: first, pebble edges rapidly round without any change in axis dimensions until the shape becomes entirely convex; and second, axis dimensions are then slowly reduced while the particle remains convex. Explicit study of pebble shape evolution helps resolve the shape-size paradox by reconciling discrepancies between laboratory and field studies, and enhances our ability to ...

  12. Void Shapes Controlled by Using Interruption-Free Epitaxial Lateral Overgrowth of GaN Films on Patterned SiO2 AlN/Sapphire Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-An Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available GaN epitaxial layers with embedded air voids grown on patterned SiO2 AlN/sapphire templates were proposed. Using interruption-free epitaxial lateral overgrowth technology, we realized uninterrupted growth and controlled the shape of embedded air voids. These layers showed improved crystal quality using X-ray diffraction and measurement of etching pits density. Compared with conventional undoped-GaN film, the full width at half-maximum of the GaN (0 0 2 and (1 0 2 peaks decreased from 485 arcsec to 376 arcsec and from 600 arcsec to 322 arcsec, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy results showed that the coalesced GaN growth led to bending threading dislocation. We also proposed a growth model based on results of scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Alignment of voids in the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the shapes and mutual alignment of voids in the large-scale matter distribution of a Lambda cold dark matter (Lambda CDM) cosmology simulation. The voids are identified using the novel watershed void finder (WVF) technique. The identified voids are quite non-spherical and slightly pro

  14. Alignment of voids in the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the shapes and mutual alignment of voids in the large-scale matter distribution of a Lambda cold dark matter (Lambda CDM) cosmology simulation. The voids are identified using the novel watershed void finder (WVF) technique. The identified voids are quite non-spherical and slightly

  15. The size and shape of the foramen magnum in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Zdilla

    2017-01-01

    Results and Conclusions: The study demonstrates that, within each distinct population, the size of the FM is significantly larger in males than in females; however, there are no significant differences in the shapes of the foramina between sexes. However, when comparing different populations to one another, there are significant differences with regard to both the size and shape of the FM. This study also presents a new model of FM ontogeny. Specifically, the growth occurring between the anterior and posterior foraminal boundaries before 5 years of age predicts the ultimate shape of the adult FM.

  16. Particle size and shape distributions of hammer milled pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, Tyler Lott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Matthews, Austin Colter [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williams, Christopher Luke [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ryan, John Chadron Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Particle size and shape distributions impact particle heating rates and diffusion of volatized gases out of particles during fast pyrolysis conversion, and consequently must be modeled accurately in order for computational pyrolysis models to produce reliable results for bulk solid materials. For this milestone, lodge pole pine chips were ground using a Thomas-Wiley #4 mill using two screen sizes in order to produce two representative materials that are suitable for fast pyrolysis. For the first material, a 6 mm screen was employed in the mill and for the second material, a 3 mm screen was employed in the mill. Both materials were subjected to RoTap sieve analysis, and the distributions of the particle sizes and shapes were determined using digital image analysis. The results of the physical analysis will be fed into computational pyrolysis simulations to create models of materials with realistic particle size and shape distributions. This milestone was met on schedule.

  17. Particle size and shape distributions of hammer milled pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, Tyler Lott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Matthews, Austin Colter [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williams, Christopher Luke [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ryan, John Chadron Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Particle size and shape distributions impact particle heating rates and diffusion of volatized gases out of particles during fast pyrolysis conversion, and consequently must be modeled accurately in order for computational pyrolysis models to produce reliable results for bulk solid materials. For this milestone, lodge pole pine chips were ground using a Thomas-Wiley #4 mill using two screen sizes in order to produce two representative materials that are suitable for fast pyrolysis. For the first material, a 6 mm screen was employed in the mill and for the second material, a 3 mm screen was employed in the mill. Both materials were subjected to RoTap sieve analysis, and the distributions of the particle sizes and shapes were determined using digital image analysis. The results of the physical analysis will be fed into computational pyrolysis simulations to create models of materials with realistic particle size and shape distributions. This milestone was met on schedule.

  18. Potato Size and Shape Detection Using Machine Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Guiping

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To reduce the error and faster classification by mechanizing in classifying the potato shape and size through machine vision using the extraction of characters procedure to identify the size, and using the shape detection procedure to identify the shape. Test results in potato size detection revealed 40/191 = 0.210mm/pixel as length scale or calibration factor (40/M where 40 is the table tennis ball size (40mm and 191 as image pixels table tennis (M; measurement results revealed that between the algorithm results and the manual measurements, the absolute error was <3mm, while the relative error rate was <4%; and the measurement results based on the ellipse axis length can accurately calculate the actual long axis and short axis of potato. Potato shape detection revealed the analysis of 228 images composed of 114 positive and 114 negatives side, only 2 have been incorrectly classified, mainly because the Extracted ratio (R of the potato image of those two positive and negative images are near 0.67, respectively 0.671887, 0.661063, 0.667604, and 0.67193. The comparison to establish a calibration system method using both basic rectangle and ellipse R ratio methods to detect the potato size and shape, revealed that the basic rectangle method has better effect in the case of fixed place. Moreover, the ellipse axis method was observed to be more stable with an error rate of 7%. Therefore it is recommended that the ellipse axis method should be used to detect the shape of potato for differentiation into round, long cylindrical, and oval shapes, with the accuracy level of 98.8%.

  19. An experimental study of the size effect on adiabatic gas-liquid two-phase flow patterns and void fraction in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Renqiang; Chung, J. N.

    2007-03-01

    Adiabatic gas-liquid flow patterns and void fractions in microchannels were experimentally investigated. Using nitrogen and water, experiments were conducted in rectangular microchannels with hydraulic diameters of 0.209mm, 0.412mm and 0.622mm, respectively. Gas and liquid superficial velocities were varied from 0.06-72.3m/s and 0.02-7.13m/s, respectively. The main objective is focused on the effects of microscale channel sizes on the flow regime map and void fraction. The instability of flow patterns was observed. Four groups of flow patterns including bubbly slug flow, slug-ring flow, dispersed-churn flow, and annular flow were observed in microchannels of 0.412mm and, 0.622mm. In the microchannel of 0.209mm, the bubbly slug flow became the slug flow and the dispersed-churn flow disappeared. The current flow regime maps showed the transition lines shifted to higher gas superficial velocity due to a dominant surface tension effect as the channel size was reduced. The regime maps presented by other authors for minichannels were found to not be applicable for microchannels. Time-averaged void fractions were measured by analyzing 8000 high speed video images for each flow condition. The void fractions hold a nonlinear relationship with the homogeneous void fraction as opposed to the relatively linear trend for the minichannels. A new correlation was developed to predict the nonlinear relationship that fits most of the current experimental data and those of the 0.1mm diameter tube reported by Kawahara et al. [Int. J. Multiphase Flow 28, 1411 (2002)] within ±15%.

  20. Nanocatalysis: size- and shape-dependent chemisorption and catalytic reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Behafarid, Farzad

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, the field of catalysis has experienced an astonishing transformation, driven in part by more demanding environmental standards and critical societal and industrial needs such as the search for alternative energy sources. Thanks to the advent of nanotechnology, major steps have been made towards the rational design of novel catalysts. Striking new catalytic properties, including greatly enhanced reactivities and selectivities, have been reported for nanoparticle (NP) catalysts as compared to their bulk counterparts. However, in order to harness the power of these nanocatalysts, a detailed understanding of the origin of their enhanced performance is needed. The present review focuses on the role of the NP size and shape on chemisorption and catalytic performance. Since homogeneity in NP size and shape is a prerequisite for the understanding of structure-reactivity correlations, we first review different synthesis methods that result in narrow NP size distributions and shape controlled NPs. Next, size-dependent phenomena which influence the chemical reactivity of NPs, including quantum size-effects and the presence of under-coordinated surface atoms are examined. The effect of the NP shape on catalytic performance is discussed and explained based on the existence of different atomic structures on the NP surface with distinct chemisorption properties. The influence of additional factors, such as the oxidation state of the NPs and NP-support interactions, is also considered in the frame of the size- and shape-dependency that these phenomena present. Ultimately, our review highlights the importance of achieving a systematic understanding of the factors that control the activity and selectivity of a catalyst in order to avoid trial and error methods in the rational design of the new generation of nanocatalysts with properties tunable at the atomic level.

  1. The sizes of mini-voids in the local universe: an argument in favor of a warm dark matter model?

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhonov, A V; Yepes, G; Hoffman, Y

    2009-01-01

    Using high-resolution simulations within the Cold and Warm Dark Matter models we study the evolution of small scale structure in the Local Volume, a sphere of 8 Mpc radius around the Local Group. We compare the observed spectrum of mini-voids in the Local Volume with the spectrum of mini-voids determined from the simulations. We show that the \\LWDM model can easily explain both the observed spectrum of mini-voids and the presence of low-mass galaxies observed in the Local Volume, provided that all haloes with circular velocities greater than 20 km/s host galaxies. On the contrary within the \\LCDM model the distribution of the simulated mini-voids reflects the observed one if haloes with maximal circular velocities larger than $35 \\kms$ host galaxies. This assumption is in contradiction with observations of galaxies with circular velocities as low as 20 km/s in our Local Universe. A potential problem of the \\LWDM model could be the late formation of the haloes in which the gas can be efficiently photo-evaporat...

  2. Geometry and scaling of cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Gaite, Jose

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Cosmic voids are observed in the distribution of galaxies and, to some extent, in the dark matter distribution. If these distributions have fractal geometry, it must be reflected in the geometry of voids; in particular, we expect scaling sizes of voids. However, this scaling is not well demonstrated in galaxy surveys yet. AIMS: Our objective is to understand the geometry of cosmic voids in relation to a fractal structure of matter. We intend to distinguish monofractal voids from multifractal voids, regarding their scaling properties. We plan to analyse voids in the distributions of mass concentrations (halos) in a multifractal and their relation to galaxy voids. METHODS: We make a statistical analysis of point distributions based on the void probability function and correlation functions. We assume that voids are spherical and devise a simple spherical void finder. For continuous mass distributions, we employ the methods of fractal geometry. We confirm the analytical predictions with numerical simula...

  3. The Perceived Size and Shape of Objects in Peripheral Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Joseph; Burleigh, Alistair; Ruta, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how we perceive the size and shape of objects in far peripheral vision. Observations made during an artistic study of visual space suggest that objects appear smaller and compressed in the periphery compared with central vision. To test this, we conducted three experiments. In Experiment 1, we asked participants to draw how a set of peripheral discs appeared when viewed peripherally without time or eye movement constraints. In Experiment 2, we used the method of constant stimuli to measure when a briefly presented peripheral stimulus appeared bigger or smaller compared with a central fixated one. In Experiment 3, we measured how accurate participants were in discriminating shapes presented briefly in the periphery. In Experiment 1, the peripheral discs were reported as appearing significantly smaller than the central disc, and as having an elliptical or polygonal contour. In Experiment 2, participants judged the size of peripheral discs as being significantly smaller when compared with the central disc across most of the peripheral field, and in Experiment 3, participants were quite accurate in reporting the shape of the peripheral object, except in the far periphery. Our results show that objects in the visual periphery are perceived as diminished in size when presented for long and brief exposures, suggesting diminution is an intrinsic feature of the structure of the visual space. Shape distortions, however, are reported only with longer exposures. PMID:27698981

  4. Sizes, shapes, and albedos of the inner satellites of Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2003-04-01

    Based on 87 resolved Voyager images of the five innermost satellites of Neptune, their shapes were measured and fit by tri-axial ellipsoids with the semi-axes of 48 × 30 × 26 km for Naiad, 54 × 50 × 26 km for Thalassa, 90 × 74 × 64 km for Despina, 102 × 92 × 72 km for Galatea, and 108 × 102 × 84 km for Larissa. Thomas and Veverka published a similar shape for Larissa (104 × 89 km, J. Geophys. Res. 96, 19261-19268, 1991). The other satellites had no published shapes. Using Voyager photometry of the six inner satellites by the same authors and the revised sizes, including the published size of Proteus, the reflectivity within this inner system was found to vary by about 30%. Geometric albedos in the visible are estimated between 0.07 for Naiad and 0.10 for Proteus. The rotational lightcurves of these satellites seem to be due to satellite shapes.

  5. Responsibility voids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hees, M.V.B.P.M; Braham, Matthew

    We present evidence for the existence of 'responsibility voids' in committee decision-making, that is, the existence of situations where no member of a committee can individually be held morally responsible for the outcome. We analyse three types of reasons (causal, normative and epistemic) for the

  6. Nanocontainers made of Various Materials with Tunable Shape and Size

    OpenAIRE

    Xianglong Zhao; Guowen Meng; Fangming Han; Xiangdong Li; Bensong Chen; Qiaoling Xu; Xiaoguang Zhu; Zhaoqin Chu; Mingguang Kong; Qing Huang

    2013-01-01

    Nanocontainers have great potentials in targeted drug delivery and nanospace-confined reactions. However, the previous synthetic approaches exhibited limited control over the morphology, size and materials of the nanocontainers, which are crucial in practical applications. Here, we present a synthetic approach to multi-segment linear-shaped nanopores with pre-designed morphologies inside anodic aluminium oxide (AAO), by tailoring the anodizing duration after a rational increase of the applied...

  7. Simulation of grain size effects in nanocrystalline shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Rajeev; Quek, Siu Sin; Wu, David T.

    2015-06-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that martensitic transformation in nanocrystalline shape memory alloys can be suppressed for small grain sizes. Motivated by these results, we study the grain size dependence of martensitic transformations and stress-strain response of nanocrystalline shape memory alloys within the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory. A GL model for a square to rectangle transformation in polycrystals is extended to account for grain boundary effects. We propose that an inhibition of the transformation in grain boundary regions can occur, if the grain boundary energy of the martensite is higher than that of the austenite phase. We show that this inhibition of transformation in grain boundary regions has a strong influence on domain patterns inside grains. Although the transformation is inhibited only at the grain boundaries, it leads to a suppression of the transformation even inside the grains as grain size is decreased. In fact, below a critical grain size, the transformation can be completely suppressed. We explain these results in terms of the extra strain gradient cost associated with grain boundaries, when the transformation is inhibited at grain boundaries. On the other hand, no significant size effects are observed when transformation is not inhibited at grain boundaries. We also study the grain size dependence of the stress strain curve. It is found that when the transformation is inhibited at grain boundaries, a significant reduction in the hysteresis associated with stress-strain curves during the loading-unloading cycles is observed. The hysteresis for this situation reduces even further as the grain size is reduced, which is consistent with recent experiments. The simulations also demonstrate that the mechanical behavior is influenced by inter-granular interactions and the local microstructural neighbourhood of a grain has a stronger influence than the orientation of the grain itself.

  8. Size and shape variability in human molars during odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, W; Yano, W; Nagaoka, T; Abe, M; Nakatsukasa, M

    2014-03-01

    Under the patterning cascade model (PCM) of cusp development inspired by developmental genetic studies, it is predicted that the location and the size of later-forming cusps are more variable than those of earlier-forming ones. Here we assessed whether differences in the variability among cusps in total and each particular crown component (enamel-dentin junction [EDJ], outer enamel surface [OES], and cement-enamel junction [CEJ]) could be explained by the PCM, using human maxillary permanent first molars (UM1) and second deciduous molars (um2). Specimens were µCT-scanned, and 3D models of EDJ and OES were reconstructed. Based on these models, landmark-based 3D geometric morphometric analyses were conducted. Size variability in both tooth types was generally consistent with the above prediction, and the differences in size variation among cusps were smaller for the crown components completed in later stages of odontogenesis. With a few exceptions, however, the prediction was unsupported regarding shape variability, and UM1 and um2 showed different patterns. Our findings suggested that the pattern of size variability would be caused by temporal factors such as the order of cusp initiation and the duration from the beginning of mineralization to the completion of crown formation, whereas shape variability may be affected by both topographic and temporal factors.

  9. Nuclear export of RNA: Different sizes, shapes and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tobias; Ngo, Linh H; Wickramasinghe, Vihandha O

    2017-09-01

    Export of protein-coding and non-coding RNA molecules from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is critical for gene expression. This necessitates the continuous transport of RNA species of different size, shape and function through nuclear pore complexes via export receptors and adaptor proteins. Here, we provide an overview of the major RNA export pathways in humans, highlighting the similarities and differences between each. Its importance is underscored by the growing appreciation that deregulation of RNA export pathways is associated with human diseases like cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Nanocontainers made of Various Materials with Tunable Shape and Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xianglong; Meng, Guowen; Han, Fangming; Li, Xiangdong; Chen, Bensong; Xu, Qiaoling; Zhu, Xiaoguang; Chu, Zhaoqin; Kong, Mingguang; Huang, Qing

    2013-07-01

    Nanocontainers have great potentials in targeted drug delivery and nanospace-confined reactions. However, the previous synthetic approaches exhibited limited control over the morphology, size and materials of the nanocontainers, which are crucial in practical applications. Here, we present a synthetic approach to multi-segment linear-shaped nanopores with pre-designed morphologies inside anodic aluminium oxide (AAO), by tailoring the anodizing duration after a rational increase of the applied anodizing voltage and the number of voltage increase during Al foil anodization. Then, we achieve nanocontainers with designed morphologies, such as nanofunnels, nanobottles, nano-separating-funnels and nanodroppers, with tunable sizes and diverse materials of carbon, silicon, germanium, hafnium oxide, silica and nickel/carbon magnetic composite, by depositing a thin layer of materials on the inner walls of the pre-designed AAO nanopores. The strategy has far-reaching implications in the designing and large-scale fabrication of nanocontainers, opening up new opportunities in nanotechnology applications.

  11. Nanocontainers made of various materials with tunable shape and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xianglong; Meng, Guowen; Han, Fangming; Li, Xiangdong; Chen, Bensong; Xu, Qiaoling; Zhu, Xiaoguang; Chu, Zhaoqin; Kong, Mingguang; Huang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Nanocontainers have great potentials in targeted drug delivery and nanospace-confined reactions. However, the previous synthetic approaches exhibited limited control over the morphology, size and materials of the nanocontainers, which are crucial in practical applications. Here, we present a synthetic approach to multi-segment linear-shaped nanopores with pre-designed morphologies inside anodic aluminium oxide (AAO), by tailoring the anodizing duration after a rational increase of the applied anodizing voltage and the number of voltage increase during Al foil anodization. Then, we achieve nanocontainers with designed morphologies, such as nanofunnels, nanobottles, nano-separating-funnels and nanodroppers, with tunable sizes and diverse materials of carbon, silicon, germanium, hafnium oxide, silica and nickel/carbon magnetic composite, by depositing a thin layer of materials on the inner walls of the pre-designed AAO nanopores. The strategy has far-reaching implications in the designing and large-scale fabrication of nanocontainers, opening up new opportunities in nanotechnology applications.

  12. Growing actin networks regulated by obstacle size and shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bo; Lin, Ji; Qian, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Growing actin networks provide the driving force for the motility of cells and intracellular pathogens. Based on the molecular-level processes of actin polymerization, branching, capping, and depolymerization, we have developed a modeling framework to simulate the stochastic and cooperative behaviors of growing actin networks in propelling obstacles, with an emphasis on the size and shape effects on work capacity and filament orientation in the growing process. Our results show that the characteristic size of obstacles changes the protrusion power per unit length, without influencing the orientation distribution of actin filaments in growing networks. In contrast, the geometry of obstacles has a profound effect on filament patterning, which influences the orientation of filaments differently when the drag coefficient of environment is small, intermediate, or large. We also discuss the role of various parameters, such as the aspect ratio of obstacles, branching rate, and capping rate, in affecting the protrusion power of network growth.

  13. Size and shape effects on magnetic properties of Ni nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuemin He; Huigang Shi

    2012-01-01

    Pure Ni nanoparticles ranging in size from 24 to 200nm are prepared via thermal decomposition of nickel acetylacetonate in oleylamine.The as-prepared Ni particles change from spherical to dendritic or starlike with increasing precursor concentration.The particles are stable because the organic coating occurs in situ.Magnetic measurement reveals that all the Ni nanoparticles are ferromagnetic and show ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transitions at their Curie points.The saturation magnetization Ms is sizedependent,with a maximum value of 52.01 and 82.31 emu/g at room temperature and 5 K,respectively.The coercivity decreases at first and then increases with increasing particle size,which is attributed to the competition between size effect and shape anisotropy.The Curie temperature Tc is 593,612,622,626 and 627 K for the 24,50,96,165 and 200 nm Ni nanoparticles,respectively.A theoretical model is proposed to explain the size-dependence of Ni nanoparticle Curie temperature.

  14. Sub-micron free-standing metal slabs with dielectric nano-voids of arbitrary shapes embedded beneath atomically-flat surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Kiang Wei; Shen, Zexiang; Olivo, Malini

    2011-05-23

    Thin metal slabs with plasmonic nano-voids buried within the skin depth (slab. By artificially varying the topography of the capping metal surface from ultra-smooth to moderately-rough, we show structural symmetricity in a nano-void-metal system can render the overall plasmonic responses becoming profoundly influenced by the surface smoothness. The current fabrication technique is thus of primary importance to the preparation of any kind of smooth nano-void-passivated metal slabs.

  15. Grain Constraint and Size Effects in Shape Memory Alloy Microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueland, Stian Melhus

    Shape memory alloys exhibit interesting and useful properties, such as the shape memory effect and superelasticity. Among the many alloy families that have been shown to exhibit shape memory properties the ones based on copper are interesting because they are relatively inexpensive and show excellent properties when made as single crystals. However, the performance ofthese alloys is severely compromised by the introduction of grain boundaries, to the point where they are too poor for commercial applications. This thesis studies the mechanical properties of fine Cobased wires with a bamboo microstructure, i.e., where triple junctions are absent and grain boundaries run perpendicular to the wire axis. These microwires are not single crystals, but their microstructure is not as complex as that of polycrystals either: we call this new class of shape memory alloys oligocrystals. This thesis seeks to better understand the relationship between microstructure and properties in these alloys through a combination of mechanical testing, in situ experiments and modeling. First, in situ scanning electron microscopy, together with finite element modeling, is used to understand the role of grain constraint on the martensitic transformation. Grain constraints are observed to be much less severe in oligocrystalline wires as compared to polycrystals. Oligocrystalline microwires are then thermomechanically tested and shown to exhibit excellent properties that approach those of single crystals. Next, property evolution during cycling is investigated, revealing training effects as well as fatigue life and fracture. Finally, size effects in damping and transformation morphology are studied and it is shown that a transition from a many-domain to a single domain martensite morphology takes place when the wire diameter is decreased. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs@mit.edu)

  16. The elite athlete - assessing body shape, size, proportion and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, D A; Ackland, T R; Schreiner, A B

    1995-03-01

    In the quest to optimize performance of the elite athlete the sport scientist has sought to determine the ideal physique for a given sport or event. For some sports, specific structural characteristics offer definite performance advantages; for example in rowing, in addition to height, a large arm span has been identified as important. In other sports. such as long distance running, low levels of adiposity or 'fatness' appear to be linked with faster running times. There are four areas where appraisal of the athlete's physique can provide useful information: (1) identification of talented athletes; (2) to assess and monitor the growing athlete; (3) to monitor training and performance; and (4) to determine 'race weight' in weight-category sports. As a research tool a particular method must be reliable and valid. Other considerations include how expensive the method is, if it is suitable for a field situation and if large amounts of data on a number of subjects can be collected quickly. The method should be safe for both the athlete and the tester and provide useful feedback for the athlete or coach. Anthropometry, with training is able to fulfil most of these criteria and is the most widely used method of physique assessment in sports science. Large anthropometric data bases have been collected on elite athletes at Olympic games and world championships according to a standard protocol. Kinanthropometry, which has developed from anthropometry, is concerned with measurement and evaluation of different aspects of human movement and individual variation in body shape, size, proportion and composition. For the assessment of adiposity a sum of skinfolds, usually over six sites, is most commonly used rather than percentage body fat formulae. Muscle mass can be assessed indirectly through girth and corrected girth measurements. Limb lengths and breadths are used to assess skeletal structure and proportional differences in limb size. The anthropometric methods most commonly

  17. Sizing up the nucleus: nuclear shape, size and nuclear-envelope assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Micah; Witkin, Keren L; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2009-05-15

    The nucleus is one of the most prominent cellular organelles, yet surprisingly little is known about how it is formed, what determines its shape and what defines its size. As the nuclear envelope (NE) disassembles in each and every cell cycle in metazoans, the process of rebuilding the nucleus is crucial for proper development and cell proliferation. In this Commentary, we summarize what is known about the regulation of nuclear shape and size, and highlight recent findings that shed light on the process of building a nucleus, including new discoveries related to NE assembly and the relationship between the NE and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Throughout our discussion, we note interesting aspects of nuclear structure that have yet to be resolved. Finally, we present an idea - which we refer to as ;the limited flat membrane hypothesis' - to explain the formation of a single nucleus that encompasses of all of the cell's chromosomes following mitosis.

  18. Calcium Pectinate Beads Formation: Shape and Size Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon-Beng Lee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the inter-relationship between process variables and the size and shape of pectin solution droplets upon detachment from a dripping tip as well as Ca-pectinate beads formed after gelation via image analysis. The sphericity factor (SF of the droplets was generally smaller than 0.05. There was no specific trend between the SF of the droplets and the pectin concentration or the dripping tip radius. The SF the beads formed from high-concentration pectin solutions and a small dripping tip was smaller than 0.05. The results show that the Reynolds number and Ohnesorge number of the droplets fall within the operating region for forming spherical beads in the shape diagram, with the exception to the lower boundary. The lower boundary of the operating region has to be revised to Oh = 2.3. This is because the critical viscosity for Ca-pectinate bead formation is higher than that of Ca-alginate beads. On the other hand, the radius of the droplets and beads increased as the dripping tip radius increased. The bead radius can easily be predicted by Tate’s law equation.

  19. Electron Structure: Shape, Size and GPDs in QED

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Gerald A

    2014-01-01

    The shape of the electron is studied using lowest-order perturbation theory. Quantities used to probe the structure of the proton: form factors, generalized parton distributions, transverse densities, Wigner distributions and the angular momentum content are computed for the electron-photon component of the electron wave function. The influence of longitudinally polarized photons, demanded by the need for infrared regularization via a non-zero photon mass, is included. The appropriate value of the photon mass depends on experimental conditions, and consequently the size of the electron (as defined by the slope of its Dirac form factor) bound in a hydrogen atom is found to be about four times larger than when the electron is free. The shape of the electron, as determined from the transverse density and generalized parton distributions is shown to not be round, and the free electron is shown to be far less round than the bound electron. An electron distribution function (analogous to the quark distribution func...

  20. On the size, shape, and density of dwarf planet Makemake

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, M E

    2013-01-01

    A recent stellar occultation by dwarf planet Makemake provided an excellent opportunity to measure the size and shape of one of the largest objects in the Kuiper belt. The analysis of these results provided what were reported to be precise measurements of the lengths of the projected axes, the albedo, and even the density of Makemake, but these results were, in part, derived from qualitative arguments. We reanalyzed the occultation timing data using a quantitative statistical description, and, in general, find the previously reported results on the shape of Makemake to be unjustified. In our solution, in which we use our inference from photometric data that Makemake is being viewed nearly pole-on, we find a 1 sigma upper limit to the projected elongation of Makemake of 1.02, with measured equatorial diameter of 1434 +/- 14 km and a projected polar diameter of 1422 +/- 14 km, yielding an albedo of 0.81+0.01/-0.02$. If we remove the external constraint on the pole position of Makemake, we find instead a 1 sigma...

  1. Atomistic insights into dislocation-based mechanisms of void growth and coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Changwen; Buttry, Daniel A.; Sharma, Pradeep; Kouris, Demitris A.

    2011-09-01

    One of the low-temperature failure mechanisms in ductile metallic alloys is the growth of voids and their coalescence. In the present work we attempt to obtain atomistic insights into the mechanisms underpinning cavitation in a representative metal, namely Aluminum. Often the pre-existing voids in metallic alloys such as Al have complex shapes (e.g. corrosion pits) and the defromation/damage mechanisms exhibit a rich size-dependent behavior across various material length scales. We focus on these two issues in this paper through large-scale calculations on specimens of sizes ranging from 18 thousand to 1.08 million atoms. In addition to the elucidation of the dislocation propagation based void growth mechanism we highlight the observed length scale effect reflected in the effective stress-strain response, stress triaxiality and void fraction evolution. Furthermore, as expected, the conventionally used Gurson's model fails to capture the observed size-effects calling for a mechanistic modification that incorporates the mechanisms observed in our (and other researchers') simulation. Finally, in our multi-void simulations, we find that, the splitting of a big void into a distribution of small ones increases the load-carrying capacity of specimens. However, no obvious dependence of the void fraction evolution on void coalescence is observed.

  2. CT measurements of SAP voids in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Sara; Bentz, Dale P.; Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2010-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning is used to determine the SAP void distribution in hardened concrete. Three different approaches are used to analyse a binary data set created from CT measurement. One approach classifies a cluster of connected, empty voxels (volumetric pixel of a 3D image......) as one void, whereas the other two approaches are able to classify a cluster of connected, empty voxels as a number of individual voids. Superabsorbent polymers (SAP) have been used to incorporate air into concrete. An advantage of using SAP is that it enables control of the amount and size...... of the created air voids. The results indicate the presence of void clusters. To identify the individual voids, special computational approaches are needed. The addition of SAP results in a dominant peak in two of the three air void distributions. Based on the position (void diameter) of the peak, it is possible...

  3. CT measurements of SAP voids in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Sara; Bentz, Dale P.; Hasholt, Marianne Tange;

    2010-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning is used to determine the SAP void distribution in hardened concrete. Three different approaches are used to analyse a binary data set created from CT measurement. One approach classifies a cluster of connected, empty voxels (volumetric pixel of a 3D image......) as one void, whereas the other two approaches are able to classify a cluster of connected, empty voxels as a number of individual voids. Superabsorbent polymers (SAP) have been used to incorporate air into concrete. An advantage of using SAP is that it enables control of the amount and size...... of the created air voids. The results indicate the presence of void clusters. To identify the individual voids, special computational approaches are needed. The addition of SAP results in a dominant peak in two of the three air void distributions. Based on the position (void diameter) of the peak, it is possible...

  4. Testing Gravity using Void Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Padilla, Nelson; Li, Baojiu

    2016-10-01

    We investigate void properties in f(R) models using N-body simulations, focusing on their differences from General Relativity (GR) and their detectability. In the Hu-Sawicki f(R) modified gravity (MG) models, the halo number density profiles of voids are not distinguishable from GR. In contrast, the same f(R) voids are more empty of dark matter, and their profiles are steeper. This can in principle be observed by weak gravitational lensing of voids, for which the combination of a spectroscopic redshift and a lensing photometric redshift survey over the same sky is required. Neglecting the lensing shape noise, the f(R) model parameter amplitudes fR0=10-5 and 10-4 may be distinguished from GR using the lensing tangential shear signal around voids by 4 and 8 σ for a volume of 1 (Gpc/h)3. The line-of-sight projection of large-scale structure is the main systematics that limits the significance of this signal for the near future wide angle and deep lensing surveys. For this reason, it is challenging to distinguish fR0=10-6 from GR. We expect that this can be overcome with larger volume. The halo void abundance being smaller and the steepening of dark matter void profiles in f(R) models are unique features that can be combined to break the degeneracy between fR0 and σ8.

  5. The Effect of Nearby Voids on Galaxy Number Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Bucklein, Brian K; Hintz, Eric G

    2016-01-01

    The size, shape and degree of emptiness of void interiors sheds light on the details of galaxy formation. A particularly interesting question is whether void interiors are completely empty or contain a dwarf population. However the nearby voids that are most conducive for dwarf searches have large angular diameters, on the order of a steradian, making it difficult to redshift-map a statistically significant portion of their volume to the magnitude limit of dwarf galaxies. As part of addressing this problem, we investigate here the usefulness of number counts in establishing the best locations to search inside nearby (d < 300 Mpc) galaxy voids, utilizing Wolf plots of log(n < m) vs. m as the basic diagnostic. To illustrate expected signatures, we consider the signature of three void profiles, "cut out", "built up", and "universal profile" carved into Monte-Carlo Schechter function models. We then investigate the signatures of voids in the Millennium Run dark matter simulation and the Sloan Digital Sky Su...

  6. Understanding the shape of the Earth and measuring its size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltatzis, Evangelos; Galanaki, Angeliki

    2016-04-01

    Most elementary students have problems and misconceptions regarding the shape of the Earth. Teachers often contribute to this confusion telling the students that the Earth is almost spherical, but not explaining to them, how the Earth can be spherical while it appears. It would be helpful for students to understand how humanity came with the idea of the spherical Earth (to be precise the Earth is ellipsoid). Historically, most cultures describe the Earth as flat. That changes with the ancient Greek culture. We don't know exactly how the Greeks first understood the spherical shape of the Earth, but some Greek philosophers give some arguments why the Earth must be a sphere. We can discuss these arguments and observations with the students. First, if someone travels in the south, he can see the southern constellations rise higher above the horizon. We can give students pictures of the night sky in southern regions and compare them with observations of ''their'' night sky. Second, in the lunar eclipse we can see the round shadow of the Earth. Third, whenever a ship is on the horizon, his low part is invisible . This is known as "hull-down". Moreover, the low part of mountains is invisible from the sea, due to the curvature of the Earth. It is always better to make these observations in real life but it can also be done via videos and pictures. The realization of the spherical shape of the Earth was sine qua non for the first good measurement of its size. In the second part of the project, following the ancient mathematician Eratosthenes's steps, students can measure the size of the Earth, , find pleasure in doing experimental work and realize how important mathematics is in everyday life. Two sticks, situated a long distance away from each other, can give us approximately the circumference , the radius and the diameter of the Earth. Eratosthenes used geometry combined to the knowledge of ancient Greek culture that the Earth is spherical (360°). He knew the distance

  7. The void galaxy survey: photometry, structure and identity of void galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygu, B.; Peletier, R. F.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kreckel, K.; van de Weygaert, R.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    We analyse photometry from deep B-band images of 59 void galaxies in the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), together with their near-infrared 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm Spitzer photometry. The VGS galaxies constitute a sample of void galaxies that were selected by a geometric-topological procedure from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 data release, and which populate the deep interior of voids. Our void galaxies span a range of absolute B-magnitude from MB = -15.5 to -20, while at the 3.6 μm band their magnitudes range from M3.6 = -18 to -24. Their B-[3.6] colour and structural parameters indicate these are star-forming galaxies. A good reflection of the old stellar population, the near-infrared band photometry also provide a robust estimate of the stellar mass, which for the VGS galaxies we confirm to be smaller than 3 × 1010 M⊙. In terms of the structural parameters and morphology, our findings align with other studies in that our VGS galaxy sample consists mostly of small late-type galaxies. Most of them are similar to Sd-Sm galaxies, although a few are irregularly shaped galaxies. The sample even includes two early-type galaxies, one of which is an AGN. Their Sérsic indices are nearly all smaller than n = 2 in both bands and they also have small half-light radii. In all, we conclude that the principal impact of the void environment on the galaxies populating them mostly concerns their low stellar mass and small size.

  8. Spin alignment of dark matter haloes in the shells of the largest voids

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, A J; Gottlöber, S; Patiri, S G; Yepes, G; Prada, F

    2007-01-01

    Using the high resolution cosmological N-body simulation MareNostrum Universe we study the orientation of shape and angular momentum of galaxy-size dark matter haloes around large voids. We find that haloes located on the shells of the largest cosmic voids have angular momenta that tend to be preferentially perpendicular to the direction that joins the centre of the halo and the centre of the void. This alignment has been found in spiral galaxies around voids using galaxy redshift surveys. We measure for the first time the strength of this alignment, showing how it falls off with increasing distance to the centre of the void. We also confirm the correlation between the intensity of this alignment and the halo mass. The analysis of the orientation of the halo main axes confirms the results of previous works. Moreover, we find a similar alignment for the baryonic matter inside dark matter haloes, which is much stronger in their inner parts.

  9. PRECISION COSMOGRAPHY WITH STACKED VOIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavaux, Guilhem [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Wandelt, Benjamin D. [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis, boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

    2012-08-01

    We present a purely geometrical method for probing the expansion history of the universe from the observation of the shape of stacked voids in spectroscopic redshift surveys. Our method is an Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test based on the average sphericity of voids posited on the local isotropy of the universe. It works by comparing the temporal extent of cosmic voids along the line of sight with their angular, spatial extent. We describe the algorithm that we use to detect and stack voids in redshift shells on the light cone and test it on mock light cones produced from N-body simulations. We establish a robust statistical model for estimating the average stretching of voids in redshift space and quantify the contamination by peculiar velocities. Finally, assuming that the void statistics that we derive from N-body simulations is preserved when considering galaxy surveys, we assess the capability of this approach to constrain dark energy parameters. We report this assessment in terms of the figure of merit (FoM) of the dark energy task force and in particular of the proposed Euclid mission which is particularly suited for this technique since it is a spectroscopic survey. The FoM due to stacked voids from the Euclid wide survey may double that of all other dark energy probes derived from Euclid data alone (combined with Planck priors). In particular, voids seem to outperform baryon acoustic oscillations by an order of magnitude. This result is consistent with simple estimates based on mode counting. The AP test based on stacked voids may be a significant addition to the portfolio of major dark energy probes and its potentialities must be studied in detail.

  10. The life and death of cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Sutter, P M; Falck, Bridget; Onions, Julian; Hamaus, Nico; Knebe, Alexander; Srisawat, Chaichalit; Schneider, Aurel

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the formation, growth, merger history, movement, and destruction of cosmic voids detected via the watershed transform in a cosmological N-body dark matter {\\Lambda}CDM simulation. By adapting a method used to construct halo merger trees, we are able to trace individual voids back to their initial appearance and record the merging and evolution of their progenitors at high redshift. For the scales of void sizes captured in our simulation, we find that the void formation rate peaks at scale factor 0.3, which coincides with a growth in the void hierarchy and the emergence of dark energy. Voids of all sizes appear at all scale factors, though the median initial void size decreases with time. When voids become detectable they have nearly their present-day volumes. Almost all voids have relatively stable growth rates and suffer only infrequent minor mergers. Dissolution of a void via merging is very rare. Instead, most voids maintain their distinct identity as annexed subvoids of a larger parent. The...

  11. Development of Criteria and Identification of Particle Cluster Size Based on Measurements of Void Fraction in Gas-Solid Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Roelant; Seckin Gokaltun

    2009-06-30

    A circulating fluidized bed (CFB) built at FIU was used to study particle motion in the riser in order to simulate flow regimes in a cold gasifier. High speed imaging was used in order to capture the dynamics of the particles flowing in the riser. The imaging method used here is called the shadow sizing technique which allowed the determination of particle areas and trajectories at various flow rates in the riser. The solid volume fraction and particle velocities calculated using the images acquired during the experiments can be related to granular temperature in order to detect formations of clusters in the riser section of the CFB. The shadow sizing technique was observed to be an effective method in detecting dynamics of particles in motion and formation of clusters when supported with high-speed imaging.

  12. Clinical experience with the N-shaped ileal neobladder: assessment of complications, voiding patterns, and quality of life in our series of 58 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joniau, S; Benijts, J; Van Kampen, M; De Waele, M; Ooms, J; Van Cleynenbreugel, B; Van Poppel, H

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess complications, voiding patterns, and quality of life in patients with an orthotopic bladder substitution, using an N-shaped ileal neobladder. Between May 1996 and December 2002, 58 patients (52 men and 6 women) underwent an orthotopic ileal neobladder reconstruction after radical cystectomy. The mean age was 47 for the female and 60 for the male patients. In all patients an N-shaped ileal pouch was constructed. This pouch has not yet been described in the literature before. All procedures were performed by the same surgeon (HVP) and the mean follow-up was 38 months. Complications were registered as early (occurring within 3 months) or late (occurring after 3 months), and as pouch-related and non-pouch-related. The patients took part in a pelvic floor re-education programme for as long as they were incontinent. All patients completed a retrospective Quality of Life questionnaire, based on the QLQ-C30 questionnaire, which was validated by the EORTC's Study Group on Quality of Life. In 38% of the patients, early complications occurred, whereas 48% had late complications. The most frequent early complications were diarrhea (24%) and pyelonephritis (9%). Diarrhea was again the most frequently mentioned non-pouch-related complication (19%). The most frequently observed pouch-related late complication was ileo-urethral stenosis. This occurred in five patients. All of these 5 patients were re-operated using a minimally invasive approach. Daytime continence was achieved in 95% of patients and nighttime continence in 66%. Hyper-continence with subsequent need for CISC was observed in 5 out of 6 women (83%) and 0 out of 52 men (0%). The retrospective QoL questionnaire learned that the impact of bladder removal and orthotopic bladder substitution has acceptable impact on patient's everyday life. Diarrhea was mentioned as being the most discomforting complication by most of the patients. We describe a modified orthotopic

  13. Voids in cosmological simulations over cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtak, Radosław; Powell, Devon; Abel, Tom

    2016-06-01

    We study evolution of voids in cosmological simulations using a new method for tracing voids over cosmic time. The method is based on tracking watershed basins (contiguous regions around density minima) of well-developed voids at low redshift, on a regular grid of density field. It enables us to construct a robust and continuous mapping between voids at different redshifts, from initial conditions to the present time. We discuss how the new approach eliminates strong spurious effects of numerical origin when voids' evolution is traced by matching voids between successive snapshots (by analogy to halo merger trees). We apply the new method to a cosmological simulation of a standard Λ-cold-dark-matter cosmological model and study evolution of basic properties of typical voids (with effective radii 6 h-1 Mpc < Rv < 20 h-1 Mpc at redshift z = 0) such as volumes, shapes, matter density distributions and relative alignments. The final voids at low redshifts appear to retain a significant part of the configuration acquired in initial conditions. Shapes of voids evolve in a collective way which barely modifies the overall distribution of the axial ratios. The evolution appears to have a weak impact on mutual alignments of voids implying that the present state is in large part set up by the primordial density field. We present evolution of dark matter density profiles computed on isodensity surfaces which comply with the actual shapes of voids. Unlike spherical density profiles, this approach enables us to demonstrate development of theoretically predicted bucket-like shape of the final density profiles indicating a wide flat core and a sharp transition to high-density void walls.

  14. Redshift-space distortions around voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Taylor, Andy; Peacock, John A.; Padilla, Nelson

    2016-11-01

    We have derived estimators for the linear growth rate of density fluctuations using the cross-correlation function (CCF) of voids and haloes in redshift space. In linear theory, this CCF contains only monopole and quadrupole terms. At scales greater than the void radius, linear theory is a good match to voids traced out by haloes; small-scale random velocities are unimportant at these radii, only tending to cause small and often negligible elongation of the CCF near its origin. By extracting the monopole and quadrupole from the CCF, we measure the linear growth rate without prior knowledge of the void profile or velocity dispersion. We recover the linear growth parameter β to 9 per cent precision from an effective volume of 3( h-1Gpc)3 using voids with radius >25 h-1Mpc. Smaller voids are predominantly sub-voids, which may be more sensitive to the random velocity dispersion; they introduce noise and do not help to improve measurements. Adding velocity dispersion as a free parameter allows us to use information at radii as small as half of the void radius. The precision on β is reduced to 5 per cent. Voids show diverse shapes in redshift space, and can appear either elongated or flattened along the line of sight. This can be explained by the competing amplitudes of the local density contrast, plus the radial velocity profile and its gradient. The distortion pattern is therefore determined solely by the void profile and is different for void-in-cloud and void-in-void. This diversity of redshift-space void morphology complicates measurements of the Alcock-Paczynski effect using voids.

  15. Multiple void interaction of pipeline steel in triaxial stress fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-wen QIU; Ze-xi YUAN; Gui-feng ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional unit cell models were developed to study the damage induced by void growth in ductile materials. Special emphasis is given to the influence of the void shape and random spatial void arrangements. The periodical void arrays of body cen-tered cubic are investigated by analyzing representative unit cells. The isotropic behavior of the matrix material is modeled using v. Mises plasticity. The cell models are analyzed by the large strain finite element method under monotonic loading while keeping the constant stress triaxiality. Results showed that when void density increased, effects of void aspects on void growth gradu-ally diminished.

  16. Effects of nano-void density, size and spatial population on thermal conductivity: a case study of GaN crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X. W.; Jones, R. E.

    2012-08-01

    The thermal conductivity of a crystal is sensitive to the presence of surfaces and nanoscale defects. While this opens tremendous opportunities to tailor thermal conductivity, true ‘phonon engineering’ of nanocrystals for a specific electronic or thermoelectric application can only be achieved when the dependence of thermal conductivity on the defect density, size and spatial population is understood and quantified. Unfortunately, experimental studies of the effects of nanoscale defects are quite challenging. While molecular dynamics simulations are effective in calculating thermal conductivity, the defect density range that can be explored with feasible computing resources is unrealistically high. As a result, previous work has not generated a fully detailed understanding of the dependence of thermal conductivity on nanoscale defects. Using GaN as an example, we have combined a physically motivated analytical model and highly converged large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of defects on thermal conductivity. An analytical expression for thermal conductivity as a function of void density, size, and population has been derived and corroborated with the model, simulations, and experiments.

  17. Variation in skull size and shape of the Common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis): allometric and non-allometric shape changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urošević, A.; Ljubisavljević, K.; Ivanović, A.

    2014-01-01

    We analysed patterns of skull size and shape variation among populations of the Common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis) in the Central Balkans, particularly the effecs of insularity and the presence of the ecologically similar lacertid lizard species P. melisellensis. Two components of shape variation

  18. Variation in skull size and shape of the Common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis): allometric and non-allometric shape changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urošević, A.; Ljubisavljević, K.; Ivanović, A.

    2014-01-01

    We analysed patterns of skull size and shape variation among populations of the Common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis) in the Central Balkans, particularly the effecs of insularity and the presence of the ecologically similar lacertid lizard species P. melisellensis. Two components of shape variation

  19. Void Profile from Planck Lensing Potential Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantavat, Teeraparb; Sawangwit, Utane; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2017-02-01

    We use the lensing potential map from Planck CMB lensing reconstruction analysis and the “Public Cosmic Void Catalog” to measure the stacked void lensing potential. We have made an attempt to fit the HSW void profile parameters from the stacked lensing potential. In this profile, four parameters are needed to describe the shape of voids with different characteristic radii R V . However, we have found that after reducing the background noise by subtracting the average background, there is a residue lensing power left in the data. The inclusion of the environment shifting parameter, {γ }V, is necessary to get a better fit to the data with the residue lensing power. We divide the voids into two redshift bins: cmass1 (0.45Digital Sky Survey voids reside in an underdense region.

  20. The dark matter of galaxy voids

    CERN Document Server

    Sutter, P M; Wandelt, Benjamin D; Weinberg, David H; Warren, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    How do observed voids relate to the underlying dark matter distribution? To examine the spatial distribution of dark matter contained within voids identified in galaxy surveys, we apply Halo Occupation Distribution models representing sparsely and densely sampled galaxy surveys to a high-resolution N-body simulation. We compare these galaxy voids to voids found in the halo distribution, low-resolution dark matter, and high-resolution dark matter. We find that voids at all scales in densely sampled surveys - and medium- to large-scale voids in sparse surveys - trace the same underdensities as dark matter, but they are larger in radius by ~20%, they have somewhat shallower density profiles, and they have centers offset by ~0.4Rv rms. However, in void-to-void comparison we find that shape estimators are less robust to sampling, and the largest voids in sparsely sampled surveys suffer fragmentation at their edges. We find that voids in galaxy surveys always correspond to underdensities in the dark matter, though ...

  1. The dark matter of galaxy voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, P. M.; Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Weinberg, David H.; Warren, Michael S.

    2014-03-01

    How do observed voids relate to the underlying dark matter distribution? To examine the spatial distribution of dark matter contained within voids identified in galaxy surveys, we apply Halo Occupation Distribution models representing sparsely and densely sampled galaxy surveys to a high-resolution N-body simulation. We compare these galaxy voids to voids found in the halo distribution, low-resolution dark matter and high-resolution dark matter. We find that voids at all scales in densely sampled surveys - and medium- to large-scale voids in sparse surveys - trace the same underdensities as dark matter, but they are larger in radius by ˜20 per cent, they have somewhat shallower density profiles and they have centres offset by ˜ 0.4Rv rms. However, in void-to-void comparison we find that shape estimators are less robust to sampling, and the largest voids in sparsely sampled surveys suffer fragmentation at their edges. We find that voids in galaxy surveys always correspond to underdensities in the dark matter, though the centres may be offset. When this offset is taken into account, we recover almost identical radial density profiles between galaxies and dark matter. All mock catalogues used in this work are available at http://www.cosmicvoids.net.

  2. Effect of particle shape and size on flow properties of lactose powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowei Fu; Deborah Huck; Lisa Makein; Brian Armstrong; Ulf Willen; Tim Freeman

    2012-01-01

    The shape and size of particles are understood to affect the bulk behaviour of powders,though there are but few studies that present quantitative information on the relationship between particle shape and the flow properties of powder.This is due in part to the lack of techniques for rapidly determining both particle shape and the range of flow characteristics that describe the response of powders to the stress and shear experienced during their processing.This study presents data that quantifies the influence of particle shape/size of three different lactose powders on their respective flow and bulk characteristics.Two of the samples differ in size but have similar shapes; the third sample is more spherical but similar in size to one of the other two samples.The results demonstrate that in addition to particle size,particle shape significantly affect the flow characteristics of a powder over a wide range of stress conditions.

  3. Computerized voiding diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, J M; McNett, J; Badlani, G H

    1993-01-01

    An electronic, computerized voiding diary, "Compu-Void" (patent pending) was developed in order to simplify, augment, and automate patients' recording of bladder symptomatology. A voiding diary as a tool has the potential to provide essential information for a more complete diagnostic and therefore therapeutic picture for each patient. Two major problems with the standard written voiding diary have been a lack of patient compliance and the limited amount of information it garners. Twenty-five women with various types of voiding dysfunctions were compared to twenty-five age and parity-matched control women in order to determine patient preferences of the Compu-Void when compared to the standard written voiding diary, compliance with each method, and amount and quality of information obtained with each method. Over 90% of subjects and over 70% of control group patients preferred the Compu-Void over the written diary (P Compu-Void exceeded that obtained with the written method.

  4. Shaping nanoparticles with laser light: a multi-step approach to produce nanoparticle ensembles with narrow shape and size distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, D Blazquez; Hubenthal, F; Traeger, F [Institut fuer Physik and Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology - CINSaT, Universitaet Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, 34132 Kassel (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    In this paper we present a multi-step laser tailoring process in order to narrow the size distribution of self-assembled supported metal nanoparticles. The method exploits the shape and size dependent optical absorption coefficients of metal particles. Silver nanoparticles were prepared by deposition of atoms on dielectric substrates followed by diffusion and nucleation. This results in ensembles of oblate nanoparticles with broad size and shape distributions. Post-growth irradiation allows tailoring the average size of the nanoparticles by laser-induced surface diffusion and evaporation of surface atoms of the nanoparticles. This makes it possible to shrink large particles to the desired size and remove all nanoparticles that are too small. We demonstrate here that the size distribution of silver nanoparticles can be narrowed significantly by subsequently applying different laser wavelengths.

  5. Assessment of uterine shape and size using Kurz's Cavimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, A

    1988-06-01

    The Kurz's Cavimeter was used to determine uterine shape and dimensions in 509 women prior to IUD insertion. The women were separated into six groups, depending on parity. A slight increase was noted in total uterine length due to endometrial cavity length and transverse fundal diameter in relationship to parity. However, the differences did not reach statistical significance.

  6. Head shape evolution in monitor lizards (Varanus): interactions between extreme size disparity, phylogeny and ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, G H; Keogh, J S

    2014-02-01

    Characterizing patterns of observed current variation, and testing hypotheses concerning the potential drivers of this variation, is fundamental to understanding how morphology evolves. Phylogenetic history, size and ecology are all central components driving the evolution of morphological variation, but only recently have methods become available to tease these aspects apart for particular body structures. Extant monitor lizards (Varanus) have radiated into an incredible range of habitats and display the largest body size range of any terrestrial vertebrate genus. Although their body morphology remains remarkably conservative, they have obvious head shape variation. We use two-dimensional geometric morphometric techniques to characterize the patterns of dorsal head shape variation in 36 species (375 specimens) of varanid, and test how this variation relates to size, phylogenetic history and ecology as represented by habitat. Interspecific head shape disparity is strongly allometric. Once size effects are removed, principal component analysis shows that most shape variation relates to changes in the snout and head width. Size-corrected head shape variation has strong phylogenetic signal at a broad level, but habitat use is predictive of shape disparity within phylogenetic lineages. Size often explains shape disparity among organisms; however, the ability to separate size and shape variation using geometric morphometrics has enabled the identification of phylogenetic history and habitat as additional key factors contributing to the evolution of head shape disparity among varanid lizards.

  7. Precision cosmography with stacked voids

    CERN Document Server

    Lavaux, Guilhem

    2011-01-01

    We present a purely geometrical method for probing the expansion history of the Universe from the observation of the shape of stacked voids in spectroscopic re dshift surveys. Our method is an Alcock-Pasczinsky test based on the average sphericity of voids posited on the local isotropy of the Universe. It works by comparing the temporal extent of cosmic voids along the line of sight with their angular, spatial extent. We describe the algorithm that we use to detect and stack voids in redshift shells on the light cone and test it on mock light cones produced from N-body simulations. We establish a robust statistical model for estimating the average stretching of voids in redshift space and quantify the contamination by peculiar velocities. Finally, we assess the capability of this approach to constrain dark energy parameters in terms of the figure of merit (FoM) of the dark energy task force and in particular of the proposed Euclid mission which is particularly suited for this technique since it is a spectrosc...

  8. The Influence of Age and Sex on Genetic Associations with Adult Body Size and Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Thomas W; Justice, Anne E; Graff, Mariaelisa

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially b...

  9. Patients' evaluation of shape, size and colour of solid dosage forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, A.B.A.; Møller-Sonnergaard, J.; Christrup, L.L.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the swallow ability and the patient preferences of tablets and capsules with different sizes, shapes, surfaces and colours. Method: Patients were asked to swallow tablets with different surface and size, while tablets with different shape and colour we...

  10. Size and shape control in the overgrowth of gold nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, Fulvio; Matteini, Paolo; Rossi, Francesca; Pini, Roberto, E-mail: r.pini@ifac.cnr.i [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    We report on a new sustainable approach to manipulate the optical behaviour and geometrical properties of gold nanorods in aqueous solutions by fine control of their overgrowth. In our approach, the overgrowth is realized by modulation of the reduction of the gold ions which are left as Au{sup 1+} after the primary step of the synthesis (typically as much as {approx}80% of the gold ions available in the growth solution). The progress of the reduction requires the gradual addition of ascorbic acid, which transforms the Au{sup 1+} into Au{sup 0} and may be performed in the original growth solution with no need for any further manipulation. By control of the total amount and rate of administration of the ascorbic acid, we prove the possibility to realize a systematic modulation of the average lengths, diameters, shapes (rod or dog-bone like), and light extinction of the nanoparticles. A slow overgrowth leads to a gradual enlargement of the lengths and diameters at almost constant shape. In contrast, a faster overgrowth results into a more complex modification of the overall shape of the gold nanorods.

  11. Universal void density profiles from simulation and SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Nadathur, S; Diego, J M; Iliev, I T; Gottlöber, S; Watson, W A; Yepes, G

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the universality and self-similarity of void density profiles, for voids in realistic mock luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalogues from the Jubilee simulation, as well as in void catalogues constructed from the SDSS LRG and Main Galaxy samples. Voids are identified using a modified version of the ZOBOV watershed transform algorithm, with additional selection cuts. We find that voids in simulation are self-similar, meaning that their average rescaled profile does not depend on the void size, or -- within the range of the simulated catalogue -- on the redshift. Comparison of the profiles obtained from simulated and real voids shows an excellent match. The profiles of real voids also show a universal behaviour over a wide range of galaxy luminosities, number densities and redshifts. This points to a fundamental property of the voids found by the watershed algorithm, which can be exploited in future studies of voids.

  12. Universal void density profiles from simulation and SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadathur, S.; Hotchkiss, S.; Diego, J. M.; Iliev, I. T.; Gottlöber, S.; Watson, W. A.; Yepes, G.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the universality and self-similarity of void density profiles, for voids in realistic mock luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalogues from the Jubilee simulation, as well as in void catalogues constructed from the SDSS LRG and Main Galaxy samples. Voids are identified using a modified version of the ZOBOV watershed transform algorithm, with additional selection cuts. We find that voids in simulation are self-similar, meaning that their average rescaled profile does not depend on the void size, or - within the range of the simulated catalogue - on the redshift. Comparison of the profiles obtained from simulated and real voids shows an excellent match. The profiles of real voids also show a universal behaviour over a wide range of galaxy luminosities, number densities and redshifts. This points to a fundamental property of the voids found by the watershed algorithm, which can be exploited in future studies of voids.

  13. The Development of Voiding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Henning

    2011-01-01

    The thesis addresses some new aspeccts in the development of voiding function from midgestation into early childhood.......The thesis addresses some new aspeccts in the development of voiding function from midgestation into early childhood....

  14. The Void Galaxy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, R; Platen, E; Beygu, B; van Gorkom, J H; van der Hulst, J M; Aragon-Calvo, M A; Peebles, P J E; Jarrett, T; Rhee, G; Kovac, K; Yip, C -W

    2011-01-01

    The Void Galaxy Survey (VGS) is a multi-wavelength program to study $\\sim$60 void galaxies. Each has been selected from the deepest interior regions of identified voids in the SDSS redshift survey on the basis of a unique geometric technique, with no a prior selection of intrinsic properties of the void galaxies. The project intends to study in detail the gas content, star formation history and stellar content, as well as kinematics and dynamics of void galaxies and their companions in a broad sample of void environments. It involves the HI imaging of the gas distribution in each of the VGS galaxies. Amongst its most tantalizing findings is the possible evidence for cold gas accretion in some of the most interesting objects, amongst which are a polar ring galaxy and a filamentary configuration of void galaxies. Here we shortly describe the scope of the VGS and the results of the full analysis of the pilot sample of 15 void galaxies.

  15. Supplemental topics on voids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, H.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several topics concerning voids are presented, supplementing the report of Rood (1988). The discovery of the Coma supercluster and void and the recognition of the cosmological significance of superclusters and voids are reviewed. Galaxy redshift surveys and redshift surveys for the Abell clusters and very distant objects are discussed. Solar system and extragalactic dynamics are examined. Also, topics for future observational research on voids are recommended. 50 references.

  16. Universal density profile for cosmic voids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P M; Wandelt, Benjamin D

    2014-06-27

    We present a simple empirical function for the average density profile of cosmic voids, identified via the watershed technique in ΛCDM N-body simulations. This function is universal across void size and redshift, accurately describing a large radial range of scales around void centers with only two free parameters. In analogy to halo density profiles, these parameters describe the scale radius and the central density of voids. While we initially start with a more general four-parameter model, we find two of its parameters to be redundant, as they follow linear trends with the scale radius in two distinct regimes of the void sample, separated by its compensation scale. Assuming linear theory, we derive an analytic formula for the velocity profile of voids and find an excellent agreement with the numerical data as well. In our companion paper [Sutter et al., arXiv:1309.5087 [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. (to be published)

  17. A new geometrical approach to void statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, M C

    2014-01-01

    Modelling cosmic voids as spheres in Euclidean space, the notion of a de-Sitter configuration space is introduced. It is shown that a uniform distribution over this configuration space yields a power-law approximating the void size distribution in an intermediate range of volumes, as well as an estimate for the fractal dimension of the large scale structure.

  18. The lensing and temperature imprints of voids on the cosmic microwave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Neyrinck, Mark; Mao, Qingqing; Peacock, John A.; Szapudi, Istvan; Berlind, Andreas A.

    2017-04-01

    We have searched for the signature of cosmic voids in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), in both the Planck temperature and lensing-convergence maps; voids should give decrements in both. We use ZOBOV voids from the Data Release 12 Sloan Digital Sky Survey CMASS galaxy sample. We base our analysis on N-body simulations, to avoid a posteriori bias. For the first time, we detect the signature of voids in CMB lensing: the significance is 3.2σ, close to Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) in both amplitude and projected density-profile shape. A temperature dip is also seen, at modest significance (2.3σ), with an amplitude about six times the prediction. This temperature signal is induced mostly by voids with radii between 100 and 150 h-1 Mpc, while the lensing signal is mostly contributed by smaller voids - as expected; lensing relates directly to density, while integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (ISW) depends on gravitational potential. The void abundance in observations and simulations agree as well. We also repeated the analysis excluding lower significance voids: no lensing signal is detected with an upper limit of about twice the ΛCDM prediction. But the mean temperature decrement now becomes non-zero at the 3.7σ level (similar to that found by Granett et al.), with an amplitude about 20 times the prediction. However, the observed dependence of temperature on void size is in poor agreement with simulations, whereas the lensing results are consistent with ΛCDM theory. Thus, the overall tension between theory and observations does not favour non-standard theories of gravity, despite the hints of an enhanced amplitude for the ISW effect from voids.

  19. Relationship among grain size, annealing twins and shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaixia; Peng, Huabei; Zhang, Chengyan; Wang, Shanling; Wen, Yuhua

    2016-07-01

    In order to clarify the relationship among grain size, annealing twins and the shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys, the Fe-21.63Mn-5.60Si-9.32Cr-5.38Ni (weight %) alloy with a grain size ranging from 48.9 μm-253.6 μm was obtained by adjusting the heating temperature or heating time after 20% cold-rolling. The densities of grain boundaries and annealing twins increase with a decrease in grain size, whereas the volume fraction and width of stress-induced ɛ martensite after 9% deformation at Ms + 10 K decrease. This result indicates that grain refinement raises the constraint effects of grain boundaries and annealing twins upon martensitic transformation. In this case, the ability to suppress the plastic deformation and facilitate the stress-induced ɛ martensite transformation deteriorates after grain refinement owing to the enhancement of the constraint effects. It is demonstrated by the result that the difference at Ms + 10 K between the critical stress for plastic yielding and that for inducing martensitic transformation is smaller for the specimen with a grain size of 48.9 μm than for the specimen with a grain size of 253.6 μm. Therefore, the shape memory effect declined by decreasing the grain size.

  20. Cosmic voids and void lensing in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez, C.; Clampitt, J.; Kovacs, A.; Jain, B.; García-Bellido, J.; Nadathur, S.; Gruen, D.; Hamaus, N.; Huterer, D.; Vielzeuf, P.; Amara, A.; Bonnett, C.; DeRose, J.; Hartley, W. G.; Jarvis, M.; Lahav, O.; Miquel, R.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sheldon, E.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D' Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.

    2016-10-26

    Galaxies and their dark matter halos populate a complicated filamentary network around large, nearly empty regions known as cosmic voids. Cosmic voids are usually identified in spectroscopic galaxy surveys, where 3D information about the large-scale structure of the Universe is available. Although an increasing amount of photometric data is being produced, its potential for void studies is limited since photometric redshifts induce line-of-sight position errors of $\\sim50$ Mpc/$h$ or more that can render many voids undetectable. In this paper we present a new void finder designed for photometric surveys, validate it using simulations, and apply it to the high-quality photo-$z$ redMaGiC galaxy sample of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES-SV) data. The algorithm works by projecting galaxies into 2D slices and finding voids in the smoothed 2D galaxy density field of the slice. Fixing the line-of-sight size of the slices to be at least twice the photo-$z$ scatter, the number of voids found in these projected slices of simulated spectroscopic and photometric galaxy catalogs is within 20% for all transverse void sizes, and indistinguishable for the largest voids of radius $\\sim 70$ Mpc/$h$ and larger. The positions, radii, and projected galaxy profiles of photometric voids also accurately match the spectroscopic void sample. Applying the algorithm to the DES-SV data in the redshift range $0.2voids with comoving radii spanning the range 18-120 Mpc/$h$, and carry out a stacked weak lensing measurement. With a significance of $4.4\\sigma$, the lensing measurement confirms the voids are truly underdense in the matter field and hence not a product of Poisson noise, tracer density effects or systematics in the data. It also demonstrates, for the first time in real data, the viability of void lensing studies in photometric surveys.

  1. Hydride formation thermodynamics and hysteresis in individual Pd nanocrystals with different size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrenova, Svetlana; Wadell, Carl; Nugroho, Ferry A A; Gschneidtner, Tina A; Diaz Fernandez, Yuri A; Nalin, Giammarco; Świtlik, Dominika; Westerlund, Fredrik; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles may depend on their size and shape and are traditionally assessed in ensemble-level experiments, which accordingly may be plagued by averaging effects. These effects can be eliminated in single-nanoparticle experiments. Using plasmonic nanospectroscopy, we present a comprehensive study of hydride formation thermodynamics in individual Pd nanocrystals of different size and shape, and find corresponding enthalpies and entropies to be nearly size- and shape-independent. The hysteresis observed is significantly wider than in bulk, with details depending on the specifics of individual nanoparticles. Generally, the absorption branch of the hysteresis loop is size-dependent in the sub-30 nm regime, whereas desorption is size- and shape-independent. The former is consistent with a coherent phase transition during hydride formation, influenced kinetically by the specifics of nucleation, whereas the latter implies that hydride decomposition either occurs incoherently or via different kinetic pathways.

  2. The size, shape, and dynamics of cellular blebs

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Fong Yin; Mahadevan, L

    2015-01-01

    A cellular bleb grows when a portion of the cell membrane detaches from the underlying cortex under the influence of a cytoplasmic pressure. We develop a quantitative model for the growth and dynamics of these objects in a simple two-dimensional setting. In particular, we first find the minimum cytoplasmic pressure and minimum unsupported membrane length for a stationary bleb to nucleate and grow as a function of the membrane-cortex adhesion. We next show how a bleb may travel around the periphery of the cell when the cytoplasmic pressure varies in space and time in a prescribed way and find that the traveling speed is governed by the speed of the pressure change induced by local cortical contraction while the shape of the traveling bleb is governed by the speed of cortical healing. Finally, we relax the assumption that the pressure change is prescribed and couple it hydrodynamically to the cortical contraction and membrane deformation. By quantifying the phase space of bleb formation and dynamics, our framew...

  3. Size and shape controllable preparation of graphene sponge by freezing, lyophilizing and reducing in container

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO LianQin; YU BaoWei; ZHANG XiaoLiang; WU RuiHan; LIU XiaoYang; LIAO Rong; YANG ShengTao

    2016-01-01

    Graphene sponge (GS) is a porous 3D structure of graphene.Although hydrothermal reduction,chemical vapor deposition,solution reduction and high temperature annealing could be used for the preparation of GS,the size and shape cannot be well controlled.Herein,we reported a facile method to prepare GS under mild condition in a size and shape controllable way.Graphene oxide was lyophilized to form the spongy structure and reduced by steamy hydrazine hydrate to produce GS.The size and shape of GS prepared were nearly identical to that of the container.The reduction degree of GS could be regulated by the reduction temperature and time.

  4. Stokes-Brinkman formulation for prediction of void formation in dual-scale fibrous reinforcements: a BEM/DR-BEM simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño, Iván David; Power, Henry; Nieto-Londoño, César; Flórez, Whady Felipe

    2017-02-01

    A numerical study of voids formation in dual-scale fibrous reinforcements is presented. Flow fields in channels (Stokes) and tows (Brinkman) are solved via direct Boundary Element Method and Dual Reciprocity Boundary Element Method, respectively. The present approach uses only boundary discretization and Dual Reciprocity domain interpolation, which is advantageous in this type of moving boundary problems and leads to an accurate representation of the moving interfaces. A problem admitting analytical solution, previously solved by domain-meshing techniques, is used to assess the accuracy of the present approach, obtaining satisfactory results. Fillings of Representative Unitary Cells at constant pressure are considered to analyze the influence of capillary ratio, jump stress coefficient and two formulations (Stokes-Brinkman and Stokes-Darcy) on the filling process, void formation and void characterization. Filling times, fluid front shapes, void size and shape, time and space evolution of the saturation, are influenced by these parameters, but voids location is not.

  5. The impact of cigarette pack shape, size and opening: evidence from tobacco company documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnowski, Kathy; Hammond, David

    2013-09-01

    To use tobacco industry documents on cigarette pack shape, size and openings to identify industry findings on associations with brand imagery, product attributes, consumer perceptions and behaviour. Internal tobacco industry research and marketing documents obtained through court disclosure contained in the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library were searched using keywords related to pack shapes, sizes and opening methods. The search identified 66 documents related to consumer research and marketing plans on pack shape, size and openings, drawn from 1973 to 2002. Industry research consistently found that packs that deviated from the traditional flip-top box projected impressions of 'modern', 'elegant' and 'unique' brand imagery. Alternative pack shape and openings were identified as an effective means to communicate product attributes, particularly with regard to premium quality and smooth taste. Consumer studies consistently found that pack shape, size and opening style influenced perceptions of reduced product harm, and were often used to communicate a 'lighter' product. Slim, rounded, oval and booklet packs were found to be particularly appealing among young adults, and several studies demonstrated increased purchase interest for tobacco products presented in novel packaging shape or opening. Evidence from consumer tracking reports and company presentations indicate that pack innovations in shape or opening method increased market share of brands. Consumer research by the tobacco industry between 1973 and 2002 found that variations in packaging shape, size and opening method could influence brand appeal and risk perceptions and increase cigarette sales. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Size and Shape of Ammonium Perchlorate and their Influence on Properties of Composite Propellant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Jain

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the composite propellant compositions contain solid loading up to 86 per cent. The main solid ingredients of composite propellant are ammonium perchlorate (AP and aluminium powder. Therefore, it is a must to characterise these to improve processibility and quality of composite propellant. Effect of particle size on propellants slurry viscosity and ballistic parameters are well documented, however, the effect of oxidizer particle shape is not reported. In the present study, different methods for size and shape characterisation are discussed and effect of size and shape of AP on composite propellant properties are studied. The data indicate that as size of AP decreases, propellant slurry viscosity increases and burn rate increases. The particles having higher shape factor provides less endof mix (EOM viscosity of propellant slurry and burn rate. Further, effect of size of ground AP on shape is also investigated. From the data thus obtained, it is inferred that as size of ground AP decreases, shape factor decreases, and particles become more irregular in shape.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(3, pp.294-299, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1523

  7. Size and refinement edge-shape effects of graphene quantum dots on UV–visible absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ruiqiang; Qi, Shifei; Jia, Jianfeng [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Key Laboratory of Magnetic Molecules and Magnetic Information Materials, Ministry of Education, Linfen 041004 (China); Torre, Bryna [Department of Physics, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Zeng, Hao [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Department of Physics, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Wu, Haishun [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Key Laboratory of Magnetic Molecules and Magnetic Information Materials, Ministry of Education, Linfen 041004 (China); Xu, Xiaohong, E-mail: xuxiaohong_ly@163.com [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Key Laboratory of Magnetic Molecules and Magnetic Information Materials, Ministry of Education, Linfen 041004 (China)

    2015-02-25

    Highlights: • The size effect affects both the visible light absorption and the zigzag edge state. • Zigzag edge state is important than armchair edge state for visible light absorption. • The Seam atoms should be noted for the randomly shaped GQDs. - Abstract: Using the ab initio density-functional theory method, we calculated the size effect and edge shape effect on UV–visible light absorption of different shapes of graphene quantum dots (GQDs). There are two interesting findings in this study. First, the edge shape effect increase with increasing the size of square GQDs. Second, the Seam atoms, located at the boundary between zigzag and armchair edges, hardly contribute to the strongest visible light absorption. This refinement of the edge-shape effect can be found in rectangular, triangular and hexagonal GQDs. This new finding will be useful in applications of GQDs in the visible light absorption nanodevices.

  8. Shape and size of the body vs. musculoskeletal stress markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myszka, Anna; Piontek, Janusz

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the relationship between the degree of development of muscle attachment sites (musculoskeletal stress markers - MSM1) and the length and circumference measurements of long bones and the body build expressed with the reconstructed values of body height (BH) and body mass (BM). The bone material (102 male and 99 female skeletons) used in the study was collected in the medieval burial ground in Cedynia, Poland. The authors analyzed 10 musculoskeletal stress markers located on the scapula (2), humerus (2), radius (2), femur (2) and tibia (2). The frequency and the degree of expression of muscle attachment size was carried out using the scale prepared by Myszka (2007). The scale encompassed three degrees of expression of muscle attachment size. Only changes of robusticity type (nonpathological changes) were taken into account. The assessment of body build of individuals was carried out according to the method proposed by Vancata & Charvátová (2001). Body height was reconstructed from the length of the humerus and femur using eight equations. Body mass was reconstructed from the measurements of the breadth of the proximal and distal sections of the femur and tibia (mechanical method) using twenty one equations. The equations were developed for different reference populations. The same equations were used for men and women. The correlation between the MSM and the length and circumference measurements of the bones was analyzed using the principal components analysis and the Gamma correlation coefficient. The strength of the correlation between the reconstructed body build traits (BH, BM) and the moderate degree of musculoskeletal stress markers expression was studied based on the principal components method and the Pearson correlation coefficient. A linear correlation was found between musculoskeletal stress markers and the circumference measurements and the reconstructed body mass, but no relationship with body height and the

  9. The influence of size and shape of microorganism on pulsed electric field inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hag, Ayman H; Jayaram, Shesha H; Gonzalez, Oscar Rodriguez; Griffiths, M W

    2011-09-01

    In this paper the effect of microorganism size and shape on the killing efficiency of pulsed electric field (PEF) is investigated both experimentally and using a transient finite element program. The effect of cell size, membrane thickness, cell shape (spherical, elliptical, and cylindrical) on the calculated transmembrane voltage is studied. It has been found that both the cell size and cell membrane thickness have significant effect on the induced field across the cell membrane. The findings of the simulation results have been evaluated by comparing the trends with some experimental results. Five different types of microorganisms that have different shapes and dimensions have been inoculated with water at a conductivity level of 100 μS/cm and have been treated with the application of a pulsed electric field of 70 kV/cm. Significant difference in bacteria reduction was noticed between the treated cells which could be attributed to the cell size and shape.

  10. Voids in cosmological simulations over cosmic time

    CERN Document Server

    Wojtak, Radosław; Abel, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We study evolution of voids in cosmological simulations using a new method for tracing voids over cosmic time. The method is based on tracking watershed basins (contiguous regions around density minima) of well developed voids at low redshift, on a regular grid of density field. It enables us to construct a robust and continuous mapping between voids at different redshifts, from initial conditions to the present time. We discuss how the new approach eliminates strong spurious effects of numerical origin when voids evolution is traced by matching voids between successive snapshots (by analogy to halo merger trees). We apply the new method to a cosmological simulation of a standard LambdaCDM cosmological model and study evolution of basic properties of typical voids (with effective radii between 6Mpc/h and 20Mpc/h at redshift z=0) such as volumes, shapes, matter density distributions and relative alignments. The final voids at low redshifts appear to retain a significant part of the configuration acquired in in...

  11. The Hierarchical Structure and Dynamics of Voids

    CERN Document Server

    Aragon-Calvo, M A

    2012-01-01

    Contrary to the common view voids have very complex internal structure and dynamics. Here we show how the hierarchy of structures in the density field inside voids is reflected by a similar hierarchy of structures in the velocity field. Voids defined by dense filaments and clusters can de described as simple expanding domains with coherent flows everywhere except at their boundaries. At scales smaller that the void radius the velocity field breaks into expanding sub-domains corresponding to sub- voids. These sub-domains break into even smaller sub-sub domains at smaller scales resulting in a nesting hierarchy of locally expanding domains. The ratio between the magnitude of the velocity field responsible for the expansion of the void and the velocity field defining the sub voids is approximately one order of magnitude. The small-scale components of the velocity field play a minor role in the shaping of the voids but they define the local dynamics directly affecting the processes of galaxy formation and evoluti...

  12. Effect of Lithium Ions on Copper Nanoparticle Size, Shape, and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Deok Jang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper nanoparticles were synthesized using lithium ions to increase the aqueous electrical conductivity of the solution and precisely control the size, shape, and size distribution of the particles. In this study, the conventional approach of increasing particle size by the concentration of copper ions and PGPPE in a copper chloride solution was compared to increasing the concentration of lithium chloride when the copper chloride concentration was held constant. Particle size and shape were characterized by TEM, and the size distribution of the particles at different concentrations was obtained by particle size analysis. Increasing the concentration of copper ion in the solution greatly increased the aqueous electric conductivity and the size of the particles but led to a wide size distribution ranging from 150 nm to 400 nm and rough particle morphology. The addition of lithium ions increased the size of the particles, but maintains them in a range of 250 nm. In addition the particles exhibited spherical shape as determined by TEM. The addition of lithium ions to the solution has the potential to synthesize nanoparticles with optimal characteristics for printing applications by maintaining a narrow size range and spherical shape.

  13. Online tomato sorting based on shape, maturity, size, and surface defects using machine vision

    OpenAIRE

    ARJENAKI, Omid Omidi; MOGHADDAM, Parviz Ahmadi; MOTLAGH, Asad Moddares

    2013-01-01

    Online sorting of tomatoes according to their features is an important postharvest procedure. The purpose of this research was to develop an efficient machine vision-based experimental sorting system for tomatoes. Relevant sorting parameters included shape (oblong and circular), size (small and large), maturity (color), and defects. The variables defining shape, maturity, and size of the tomatoes were eccentricity, average of color components, and 2-D pixel area, respectively. Tomato defects ...

  14. Cosmic voids and void lensing in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, C.; Clampitt, J.; Kovacs, A.; Jain, B.; García-Bellido, J.; Nadathur, S.; Gruen, D.; Hamaus, N.; Huterer, D.; Vielzeuf, P.; Amara, A.; Bonnett, C.; DeRose, J.; Hartley, W. G.; Jarvis, M.; Lahav, O.; Miquel, R.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sheldon, E.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; DES Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    Cosmic voids are usually identified in spectroscopic galaxy surveys, where 3D information about the large-scale structure of the Universe is available. Although an increasing amount of photometric data is being produced, its potential for void studies is limited since photometric redshifts induce line-of-sight position errors of ≥50 Mpc h-1which can render many voids undetectable. We present a new void finder designed for photometric surveys, validate it using simulations, and apply it to the high-quality photo-z redMaGiC galaxy sample of the DES Science Verification data. The algorithm works by projecting galaxies into 2D slices and finding voids in the smoothed 2D galaxy density field of the slice. Fixing the line-of-sight size of the slices to be at least twice the photo-z scatter, the number of voids found in simulated spectroscopic and photometric galaxy catalogues is within 20 per cent for all transverse void sizes, and indistinguishable for the largest voids (Rv ≥ 70 Mpc h-1). The positions, radii, and projected galaxy profiles of photometric voids also accurately match the spectroscopic void sample. Applying the algorithm to the DES-SV data in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.8, we identify 87 voids with comoving radii spanning the range 18-120 Mpc h-1, and carry out a stacked weak lensing measurement. With a significance of 4.4σ, the lensing measurement confirms that the voids are truly underdense in the matter field and hence not a product of Poisson noise, tracer density effects or systematics in the data. It also demonstrates, for the first time in real data, the viability of void lensing studies in photometric surveys.

  15. Measurement of Size-dependent Dynamic Shape Factors of Quartz Particles in Two Flow Regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Jennifer M.; Bell, David M.; Imre, D.; Kleiber, Paul; Grassian, Vicki H.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2016-08-02

    Understanding and modeling the behavior of quartz dust particles, commonly found in the atmosphere, requires knowledge of many relevant particles properties, including particle shape. This study uses a single particle mass spectrometer, a differential mobility analyzer, and an aerosol particle mass analyzer to measure quartz aerosol particles mobility, aerodynamic, and volume equivalent diameters, mass, composition, effective density, and dynamic shape factor as a function of particle size, in both the free molecular and transition flow regimes. The results clearly demonstrate that dynamic shape factors can vary significantly as a function of particle size. For the quartz samples studied here, the dynamic shape factors increase with size, indicating that larger particles are significantly more aspherical than smaller particles. In addition, dynamic shape factors measured in the free-molecular (χv) and transition (χt) flow regimes can be significantly different, and these differences vary with the size of the quartz particles. For quartz, χv of small (d < 200 nm) particles is 1.25, while χv of larger particles (d ~ 440 nm) is 1.6, with a continuously increasing trend with particle size. In contrast χt, of small particles starts at 1.1 increasing slowly to 1.34 for 550 nm diameter particles. The multidimensional particle characterization approach used here goes beyond determination of average properties for each size, to provide additional information about how the particle dynamic shape factor may vary even for particles with the same mass and volume equivalent diameter.

  16. Theoretical studies on bioaerosol particle size and shape measurement from spatial scattering profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunxia Feng; Lihua Huang; Jianbo Wang; Yongkai Zhao; Huijie Huang

    2011-01-01

    @@ A method of clarifying bioaerosol particles is proposed based on T-matrix.Size and shape characterizations are simultaneously acquired for individual bioaerosol particles by analyzing the spatial distribution of scattered light.The particle size can be determined according to the scattering intensity,while shape information can be obtained through asymmetry factor(AF).The azimuthal distribution of the scattered light for spherical particles is symmetrical,whereas it is asymmetrical for non-spherical ones,and the asymmetry becomes intense with increasing asphericity.The calculated results denote that the 50-100 scattering angle is an effective range to classify the bioaerosol particles that we axe concerned of.The method is very useful in real-time environmental monitoring of particle sizes and shapes.%A method of clarifying bioaerosol particles is proposed based on T-matrix. Size and shape characterizations are simultaneously acquired for individual bioaerosol particles by analyzing the spatial distribution of scattered light. The particle size can be determined according to the scattering intensity, while shape information can be obtained through asymmetry factor (AF). The azimuthal distribution of the scattered light for spherical particles is symmetrical, whereas it is asymmetrical for non-spherical ones, and the asymmetry becomes intense with increasing asphericity. The calculated results denote that the 5°-10° scattering angle is an effective range to classify the bioaerosol particles that we are concerned of. The method is very useful in real-time environmental monitoring of particle sizes and shapes.

  17. Void Statistics and Void Galaxies in the 2dFGRS

    CERN Document Server

    von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M

    2007-01-01

    For the 2dFGRS we study the properties of voids and of fainter galaxies within voids that are defined by brighter galaxies. Our results are compared with simulated galaxy catalogues from the Millenium simulation coupled with a semianalytical galaxy formation recipe. We derive the void size distribution and discuss its dependence on the faint magnitude limit of the galaxies defining the voids. While voids among faint galaxies are typically smaller than those among bright galaxies, the ratio of the void sizes to the mean galaxy separation reaches larger values. This is well reproduced in the mock galaxy samples studied. We provide analytic fitting functions for the void size distribution. Furthermore, we study the galaxy population inside voids defined by objects with $B_J -5\\log{h}< -20$ and diameter larger than 10 \\hMpc. We find a clear bimodality of the void galaxies similar to the average comparison sample. We confirm the enhanced abundance of galaxies in the blue cloud and a depression of the number of ...

  18. A Cosmic Watershed: the WVF Void Detection Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Platen, Erwin; Jones, Bernard J T

    2007-01-01

    On megaparsec scales the Universe is permeated by an intricate filigree of clusters, filaments, sheets and voids, the Cosmic Web. For the understanding of its dynamical and hierarchical history it is crucial to identify objectively its complex morphological components. One of the most characteristic aspects is that of the dominant underdense Voids, the product of a hierarchical process driven by the collapse of minor voids in addition to the merging of large ones. In this study we present an objective void finder technique which involves a minimum of assumptions about the scale, structure and shape of voids. Our void finding method, the Watershed Void Finder (WVF), is based upon the Watershed Transform, a well-known technique for the segmentation of images. Importantly, the technique has the potential to trace the existing manifestations of a void hierarchy. The basic watershed transform is augmented by a variety of correction procedures to remove spurious structure resulting from sampling noise. This study c...

  19. Body shape and size depictions of African American women in JET magazine, 1953-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson-Andoh, Nana A; Gray, James J; Soto, José A; Parker, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Depictions of Caucasian women in the mainstream media have become increasingly thinner in size and straighter in shape. These changes may be inconsistent with the growing influence of African American beauty ideals, which research has established as more accepting of larger body sizes and more curvaceous body types than Caucasians. The present study looked at trends in the portrayal of African American women featured in JET magazine from 1953 to 2006. Beauty of the Week (BOW) images were collected and analyzed to examine body size (estimated by independent judges) and body shape (estimated by waist-to-hip ratio). We expected body sizes to increase and body shapes to become more curvaceous. Results revealed a rise in models' body size consistent with expectations, but an increase in waist-to-hip ratio, contrary to prediction. Our findings suggest that the African American feminine beauty ideal reflects both consistencies with and departures from mainstream cultural ideals.

  20. Shape determination of microcalcifications in simulated digital mammography images with varying pixel size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschin, Mark; Bath, Magnus; Hemdal, Bengt; Tingberg, Anders

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to study how the pixel size of digital detectors can affect shape determination of microcalcifications in mammography. Screen-film mammograms containing microcalcifications clinically proven to be indicative of malignancy were digitised at 100 lines/mm using a high-resolution Tango drum scanner. Forty microcalcifications were selected to cover an appropriate range of sizes, shapes and contrasts typically found of malignant cases. Based on the measured MTF and NPS of the combined screen-film and scanner system, these digitised images were filtered to simulate images acquired with a square sampling pixel size of 10 μm x 10 μm and a fill factor of one. To simulate images acquired with larger pixel sizes, these finely sampled images were re-binned to yield a range of effective pixel sizes from 20 μm up to 140 μm. An alternative forced-choice (AFC) observer experiment was conducted with eleven observers for this set of digitised microcalcifications to determine how pixel size affects the ability to discriminate shape. It was found that observer score increased with decreasing pixel size down to 60 μm (p<0.01), at which point no significant advantage was obtained by using smaller pixel sizes due to the excessive relative noise-per-pixel. The relative gain in shape discrimination ability at smaller pixel sizes was larger for microcalcifications that were smaller than 500 μm and circular.

  1. The sparkling Universe: a scenario for cosmic void motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Laura; Ruiz, Andrés N.; Lares, Marcelo; Paz, Dante J.; Maldonado, Victoria E.; Luparello, Heliana E.; Garcia Lambas, Diego

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic voids are prominent features of the Universe, encoding relevant information of the growth and evolution of structure through their dynamics. Here, we perform a statistical study of the global motion of cosmic voids using both a numerical simulation and observational data. Their relation to large-scale mass flows and the physical effects that drive those motions. We analyse the bulk motions of voids, finding void mean bulk velocities in the range 300-400 km s-1, depending on void size and the large-scale environment. Statistically, small voids move faster, and voids in relatively higher density environments have higher bulk velocities. Also, we find large-scale overdensities (underdensities) along (opposite to) the void motion direction, suggesting that void motions respond to a pull-push mechanism. Our analysis suggests that their relative motions are generated by large-scale density fluctuations. In agreement with linear theory, voids embedded in low (high) density regions mutually recede (attract) each other, providing the general mechanism to understand the bimodal behaviour of void motions. We have also inferred void motions in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using linear theory, finding that their estimated motions are in qualitatively agreement with the results of the simulation. Our results suggest a scenario of galaxies and galaxy systems flowing away from void centres with the additional, and more relevant, contribution of the void bulk motion to the total velocity.

  2. Absorption Efficiencies of Forsterite. I: DDA Explorations in Grain Shape and Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sean S.; Wooden, Diane; Harker, David E.; Kelley, Michael S.; Woodward, Charles E.; Murphy, Jim R.

    2013-01-01

    We compute the absorption efficiency (Q(sub abs)) of forsterite using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) in order to identify and describe what characteristics of crystal grain shape and size are important to the shape, peak location, and relative strength of spectral features in the 8 - 40 micron wavelength range. Using the DDSCAT code, we compute Q(sub abs) for non-spherical polyhedral grain shapes with a(sub eff) = 0.1 micron. The shape characteristics identified are: 1) elongation/reduction along one of three crystallographic axes; 2) asymmetry, such that all three crystallographic axes are of different lengths; and 3) the presence of crystalline faces that are not parallel to a specific crystallographic axis, e.g., non-rectangular prisms and (di)pyramids. Elongation/reduction dominates the locations and shapes of spectral features near 10, 11, 16, 23.5, 27, and 33.5 micron, while asymmetry and tips are secondary shape effects. Increasing grain sizes (0.1 - 1.0 micron) shifts the 10, 11 micron features systematically towards longer wavelengths and relative to the 11 micron feature increases the strengths and slightly broadens the longer wavelength features. Seven spectral shape classes are established for crystallographic a-, b-, and c-axes and include columnar and platelet shapes plus non-elongated or equant grain shapes. The spectral shape classes and the effects of grain size have practical application in identifying or excluding columnar, platelet or equant forsterite grain shapes in astrophysical environs. Identification of the shape characteristics of forsterite from 8 - 40 micron spectra provides a potential means to probe the temperatures at which forsterite formed.

  3. ABSORPTION EFFICIENCIES OF FORSTERITE. I. DISCRETE DIPOLE APPROXIMATION EXPLORATIONS IN GRAIN SHAPE AND SIZE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, Sean S. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee, 1421 Circle Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996-2366 (United States); Wooden, Diane H. [Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States); Harker, David E. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Kelley, Michael S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Woodward, Charles E. [Minnesota Institute of Astrophysics, 116 Church Street S. E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Murphy, Jim R., E-mail: slindsay@utk.edu, E-mail: diane.h.wooden@nasa.gov, E-mail: dharker@uscd.edu, E-mail: msk@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: chelsea@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: murphy@nmsu.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States)

    2013-03-20

    We compute the absorption efficiency (Q{sub abs}) of forsterite using the discrete dipole approximation in order to identify and describe what characteristics of crystal grain shape and size are important to the shape, peak location, and relative strength of spectral features in the 8-40 {mu}m wavelength range. Using the DDSCAT code, we compute Q{sub abs} for non-spherical polyhedral grain shapes with a{sub eff} = 0.1 {mu}m. The shape characteristics identified are (1) elongation/reduction along one of three crystallographic axes; (2) asymmetry, such that all three crystallographic axes are of different lengths; and (3) the presence of crystalline faces that are not parallel to a specific crystallographic axis, e.g., non-rectangular prisms and (di)pyramids. Elongation/reduction dominates the locations and shapes of spectral features near 10, 11, 16, 23.5, 27, and 33.5 {mu}m, while asymmetry and tips are secondary shape effects. Increasing grain sizes (0.1-1.0 {mu}m) shifts the 10 and 11 {mu}m features systematically toward longer wavelengths and relative to the 11 {mu}m feature increases the strengths and slightly broadens the longer wavelength features. Seven spectral shape classes are established for crystallographic a-, b-, and c-axes and include columnar and platelet shapes plus non-elongated or equant grain shapes. The spectral shape classes and the effects of grain size have practical application in identifying or excluding columnar, platelet, or equant forsterite grain shapes in astrophysical environs. Identification of the shape characteristics of forsterite from 8 to 40 {mu}m spectra provides a potential means to probe the temperatures at which forsterite formed.

  4. Mandibular size and shape variation in the hominins at Dmanisi, Republic of Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Matthew M; Gordon, Adam D; Collard, Nicole J

    2006-07-01

    The hominin fossils of Dmanisi, Republic of Georgia, present an ideal means of assessing levels of skeletal size and shape variation in a fossil hypodigm belonging to the genus Homo because they have been recovered from a spatially and temporally restricted context. We compare variation in mandible size and shape at Dmanisi to that of extant hominoids and extinct hominins. We use height and breadth measurements of the mandibular corpus at the first molar and the symphysis to assess size, and analyze shape based on size-adjusted (using a geometric mean) versions of these four variables. We compare size and shape variation at Dmanisi relative to all possible pairs of individuals within each comparative taxon using an exact resampling procedure of the ratio of D2600 to D211 and the average Euclidean distance (AED) between D2600 and D211, respectively. Comparisons to extant hominoids were conducted at both the specific and subspecific taxonomic levels and to extinct hominins by adopting both a more, and less speciose, hominin taxonomy. Results indicate that the pattern of variation for the Dmanisi hominins does not resemble that of any living species: they exhibit significantly more size variation when compared to modern humans, and they have significantly more corpus shape variation and size variation in corpus heights and overall mandible size than any extant ape species. When compared to fossil hominins they are also more dimorphic in size (although this result is influenced by the taxonomic hypothesis applied to the hominin fossil record). These results highlight the need to re-examine expectations of levels of sexual dimorphism in members of the genus Homo and to account for marked size and shape variation between D2600 and D211 under the prevailing view of a single hominin species at Dmanisi.

  5. A thermo dynamical model for the shape and size effect on melting of boron carbide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniammal, Paneerselvam; Arivuoli, Dakshanamoorthy

    2012-02-01

    The size and shape dependence of the melting temperature of Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles has been investigated with a numerical thermo dynamical approach. The problem considered in this paper is the inward melting of nanoparticles with spherical and cylindrical geometry. The cylindrical Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles, whose melting point has been reported to decrease with decreasing particle radius, become larger than spherical shaped nanoparticle. Comparative investigation of the size dependence of the melting temperature with respect to the two shapes is also been done. The melting temperature obtained in the present study is approximately a dealing function of radius, in a good agreement with prediction of thermo dynamical model.

  6. A Review of Discrete Element Method (DEM) Particle Shapes and Size Distributions for Lunar Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2010-01-01

    As part of ongoing efforts to develop models of lunar soil mechanics, this report reviews two topics that are important to discrete element method (DEM) modeling the behavior of soils (such as lunar soils): (1) methods of modeling particle shapes and (2) analytical representations of particle size distribution. The choice of particle shape complexity is driven primarily by opposing tradeoffs with total number of particles, computer memory, and total simulation computer processing time. The choice is also dependent on available DEM software capabilities. For example, PFC2D/PFC3D and EDEM support clustering of spheres; MIMES incorporates superquadric particle shapes; and BLOKS3D provides polyhedra shapes. Most commercial and custom DEM software supports some type of complex particle shape beyond the standard sphere. Convex polyhedra, clusters of spheres and single parametric particle shapes such as the ellipsoid, polyellipsoid, and superquadric, are all motivated by the desire to introduce asymmetry into the particle shape, as well as edges and corners, in order to better simulate actual granular particle shapes and behavior. An empirical particle size distribution (PSD) formula is shown to fit desert sand data from Bagnold. Particle size data of JSC-1a obtained from a fine particle analyzer at the NASA Kennedy Space Center is also fitted to a similar empirical PSD function.

  7. THE INSTABILITY OF THE DIFFUSION-CONTROLLED GRAIN-BOUNDARY VOID IN STRESSED SOLID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华; 李中华

    2003-01-01

    As atoms migrate along a void surface and grain-boundary, driven by various thermodynamic forces, the grain-boundary void changes its shape and volume. When the void changes its configuration, the free energy of the system also changes. In this article, the free energy is calculated for an evolving grain-boundary void filled with gas in a stressed solid. Then the instability conditions and the equilibrium shape of the void are determined as a function of the grain-boundary and surface energies, the void volume, the externally applied stresses, as well as the internal pressure built up by the gas filled in the void.

  8. Influences of Substrate Adhesion and Particle Size on the Shape Memory Effect of Polystyrene Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Lewis M; Killgore, Jason P; Li, Zhengwei; Long, Rong; Sanders, Aric W; Xiao, Jianliang; Ding, Yifu

    2016-04-19

    Formulations and applications of micro- and nanoscale polymer particles have proliferated rapidly in recent years, yet knowledge of their mechanical behavior has not grown accordingly. In this study, we examine the ways that compressive strain, substrate surface energy, and particle size influence the shape memory cycle of polystyrene particles. Using nanoimprint lithography, differently sized particles are programmed into highly deformed, temporary shapes in contact with substrates of differing surface energies. Atomic force microscopy is used to obtain in situ measurements of particle shape recovery kinetics, and scanning electron microscopy is employed to assess differences in the profiles of particles at the conclusion of the shape memory cycle. Finally, finite element models are used to investigate the growing impact of surface energies at smaller length scales. Results reveal that the influence of substrate adhesion on particle recovery is size-dependent and can become dominating at submicron length scales.

  9. A horse's eye view: size and shape discrimination compared with other mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomonaga, Masaki; Kumazaki, Kiyonori; Camus, Florine; Nicod, Sophie; Pereira, Carlos; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Mammals have adapted to a variety of natural environments from underwater to aerial and these different adaptations have affected their specific perceptive and cognitive abilities. This study used a computer-controlled touchscreen system to examine the visual discrimination abilities of horses, particularly regarding size and shape, and compared the results with those from chimpanzee, human and dolphin studies. Horses were able to discriminate a difference of 14% in circle size but showed worse discrimination thresholds than chimpanzees and humans; these differences cannot be explained by visual acuity. Furthermore, the present findings indicate that all species use length cues rather than area cues to discriminate size. In terms of shape discrimination, horses exhibited perceptual similarities among shapes with curvatures, vertical/horizontal lines and diagonal lines, and the relative contributions of each feature to perceptual similarity in horses differed from those for chimpanzees, humans and dolphins. Horses pay more attention to local components than to global shapes. PMID:26601679

  10. Collapse of elongated voids in porous energetic materials: Effects of void orientation and aspect ratio on initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Nirmal Kumar; Schmidt, Martin J.; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2017-04-01

    The sensitivity of porous energetic materials depends on mesostructural heterogeneities such as voids, defects, cracks, and grain boundaries. The mesostructure of pressed explosives contains voids of arbitrary shapes including elongated voids of various orientations and aspect ratios. Mesoscale simulations to date have analyzed the effect of void morphology on the sensitivity of energetic materials for idealized shapes such as cylindrical, conical, and elliptical. This work analyzes the sensitivity behavior of elongated voids in an HMX matrix subject to shock loading. Simulations show that sensitivity of elongated voids depends strongly on orientation as well as aspect ratio. Ranges of orientations and aspects ratios are identified that enhance or inhibit initiation. Insights obtained from single elongated void analyses are used to identify sensitive locations in an imaged mesostructure of a pressed explosive sample.

  11. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2016-07-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  12. The Role of Grain Size and Shape on the Electrical Conductivity of Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, T.; Genareau, K. D.; Cloer, S.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic lightning is a common, yet understudied, phenomenon. The exact mechanisms of electric charge generation and transmission in explosive eruption plumes are poorly understood. Ash is a probable charge carrier, and thus, the physical properties of ash may factor into charge generation and transmission. Specifically, the shape and size of ash grains, volatiles bound within the grains, and the efficiency of grains to act as ice nuclei may be contributing factors. To examine the relationship between conductivity and grain size/shape, this research compares conductivity measurements to grain size distribution and shape from five minimally processed ash samples collected from explosive eruptions in Alaska, U.S.A. (Katmai, 1912; Crater Peak, 1992; Augustine, 2006; Okmok, 2008; Redoubt, 2009) that produced volcanic lightning and a set of homogenized (with respect to grain size and shape) ash samples from Lathrop Wells (Nevada, U.S.A.), Taupo (New Zealand), and the Valles Caldera (New Mexico, U.S.A.). Grain size distribution was measured using a laser diffractometer particle size analyzer and grain shapes (aspect ratios, concavity indices) were characterized using backscattered electron images that were processed with ImageJ freeware. The resistance of minimally compressed samples was measured using a current amplifier and converted to conductivity. A general effective media (GEM) equation was then applied using the assumption that the grains are oblate ellipsoids under the influence of minimal compaction. Preliminary analyses suggest that compaction, and therefore shape and contact points, controls ash conductivity and not bulk composition, as homogenized samples provide variable resistance measurements from 1.6 x 10-3 to 9.9 x 10-1 S/m. Non-homogenized Alaskan samples are hypothesized to have higher concavity indices and conductivities when compared to the homogenized samples, due to wider variations in grain size and shape, and these data will be presented.

  13. Tracing the gravitational potential using cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Nadathur, Seshadri; Crittenden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The properties of large underdensities in the distribution of galaxies in the Universe, known as cosmic voids, are potentially sensitive probes of fundamental physics. We use data from the MultiDark suite of N-body simulations and multiple halo occupation distribution mocks to study the relationship between galaxy voids and the gravitational potential $\\Phi$. We find that the majority of galaxy voids correspond to local density minima in larger-scale overdensities, and thus lie in potential wells. However, a subset of voids can be identified that closely trace maxima of the gravitational potential and thus stationary points of the velocity field. We identify a new void observable, $\\lambda_v$, which depends on a combination of the void size and the average galaxy density contrast within the void, and show that it provides a good proxy indicator of the potential at the void location. A simple linear scaling of $\\Phi$ as a function of $\\lambda_v$ is found to hold, independent of the redshift and properties of t...

  14. Voiding dysfunction - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sripathi V

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In a child who is toilet trained the sudden onset of daytime wetting with frequency or urgency is alarming to the parents. Initially this subject was subdivided into a number of descriptive clinical conditions which led to a lot of confusion in recognition and management. Subsequently, the term elimination dysfunction was coined by Stephen Koff to emphasise the association between recurrent urinary infection, wetting, constipation and bladder overactivity. From a urodynamic point of view, in voiding dysfunction, there is either detrusor overactivity during bladder filling or dyssynergic action between the detrusor and the external sphincter during voiding. Identifying a given condition as a ′filling phase dysfunction′ or ′voiding phase dysfunction′ helps to provide appropriate therapy. Objective clinical criteria should be used to define voiding dysfunction. These include bladder wall thickening, large capacity bladder and infrequent voiding, bladder trabeculation and spinning top deformity of the urethra and a clinically demonstrated Vincent′s curtsy. The recognition and treatment of constipation is central to the adequate treatment of voiding dysfunction. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimuation for the treatment of detrusor overactivity, biofeedback with uroflow EMG to correct dyssynergic voiding, and behavioral therapy all serve to correct voiding dysfunction in its early stages. In established neurogenic bladder disease the use of Botulinum Toxin A injections into the detrusor or the external sphincter may help in restoring continence especially in those refractory to drug therapy. However in those children in whom the upper tracts are threatened, augmentation of the bladder may still be needed.

  15. Event-related potentials during word mapping to object shape predict toddlers’ vocabulary size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina eBorgström

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available What role does attention to different object properties play in early vocabulary development? This longitudinal study using event-related potentials in combination with behavioral measures investigated 20- and 24-month-olds’ (n = 38; n = 34; overlapping n = 24 ability to use object shape and object part information in word-object mapping. The N400 component was used to measure semantic priming by images containing shape or detail information. At 20 months, the N400 to words primed by object shape varied in topography and amplitude depending on vocabulary size, and these differences predicted productive vocabulary size at 24 months. At 24 months, when most of the children had vocabularies of several hundred words, the relation between vocabulary size and the N400 effect in a shape context was weaker. Detached object parts did not function as word primes regardless of age or vocabulary size, although the part-objects were identified behaviorally. The behavioral measure, however, also showed relatively poor recognition of the part-objects compared to the shape-objects. These three findings provide new support for the link between shape recognition and early vocabulary development.

  16. Modeling cosmic void statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the internal structure and spatial distribution of cosmic voids is crucial when considering them as probes of cosmology. We present recent advances in modeling void density- and velocity-profiles in real space, as well as void two-point statistics in redshift space, by examining voids identified via the watershed transform in state-of-the-art ΛCDM n-body simulations and mock galaxy catalogs. The simple and universal characteristics that emerge from these statistics indicate the self-similarity of large-scale structure and suggest cosmic voids to be among the most pristine objects to consider for future studies on the nature of dark energy, dark matter and modified gravity.

  17. The Genetic Basis of Baculum Size and Shape Variation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Nicholas G.; Ingels, Jesse; Hillhouse, Andrew; Wardwell, Keegan; Chang, Peter L.; Cheverud, James M.; Lutz, Cathleen; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W.; Dean, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid divergence of male genitalia is a preeminent evolutionary pattern. This rapid divergence is especially striking in the baculum, a bone that occurs in the penis of many mammalian species. Closely related species often display diverse baculum morphology where no other morphological differences can be discerned. While this fundamental pattern of evolution has been appreciated at the level of gross morphology, nearly nothing is known about the genetic basis of size and shape divergence. Quantifying the genetic basis of baculum size and shape variation has been difficult because these structures generally lack obvious landmarks, so comparing them in three dimensions is not straightforward. Here, we develop a novel morphometric approach to quantify size and shape variation from three-dimensional micro-CT scans taken from 369 bacula, representing 75 distinct strains of the BXD family of mice. We identify two quantitative trait loci (QTL) that explain ∼50% of the variance in baculum size, and a third QTL that explains more than 20% of the variance in shape. Together, our study demonstrates that baculum morphology may diverge relatively easily, with mutations at a few loci of large effect that independently modulate size and shape. Based on a combination of bioinformatic investigations and new data on RNA expression, we prioritized these QTL to 16 candidate genes, which have hypothesized roles in bone morphogenesis and may enable future genetic manipulation of baculum morphology. PMID:26935419

  18. The Genetic Basis of Baculum Size and Shape Variation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas G. Schultz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The rapid divergence of male genitalia is a preeminent evolutionary pattern. This rapid divergence is especially striking in the baculum, a bone that occurs in the penis of many mammalian species. Closely related species often display diverse baculum morphology where no other morphological differences can be discerned. While this fundamental pattern of evolution has been appreciated at the level of gross morphology, nearly nothing is known about the genetic basis of size and shape divergence. Quantifying the genetic basis of baculum size and shape variation has been difficult because these structures generally lack obvious landmarks, so comparing them in three dimensions is not straightforward. Here, we develop a novel morphometric approach to quantify size and shape variation from three-dimensional micro-CT scans taken from 369 bacula, representing 75 distinct strains of the BXD family of mice. We identify two quantitative trait loci (QTL that explain ∼50% of the variance in baculum size, and a third QTL that explains more than 20% of the variance in shape. Together, our study demonstrates that baculum morphology may diverge relatively easily, with mutations at a few loci of large effect that independently modulate size and shape. Based on a combination of bioinformatic investigations and new data on RNA expression, we prioritized these QTL to 16 candidate genes, which have hypothesized roles in bone morphogenesis and may enable future genetic manipulation of baculum morphology.

  19. The Genetic Basis of Baculum Size and Shape Variation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Nicholas G; Ingels, Jesse; Hillhouse, Andrew; Wardwell, Keegan; Chang, Peter L; Cheverud, James M; Lutz, Cathleen; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W; Dean, Matthew D

    2016-05-03

    The rapid divergence of male genitalia is a preeminent evolutionary pattern. This rapid divergence is especially striking in the baculum, a bone that occurs in the penis of many mammalian species. Closely related species often display diverse baculum morphology where no other morphological differences can be discerned. While this fundamental pattern of evolution has been appreciated at the level of gross morphology, nearly nothing is known about the genetic basis of size and shape divergence. Quantifying the genetic basis of baculum size and shape variation has been difficult because these structures generally lack obvious landmarks, so comparing them in three dimensions is not straightforward. Here, we develop a novel morphometric approach to quantify size and shape variation from three-dimensional micro-CT scans taken from 369 bacula, representing 75 distinct strains of the BXD family of mice. We identify two quantitative trait loci (QTL) that explain ∼50% of the variance in baculum size, and a third QTL that explains more than 20% of the variance in shape. Together, our study demonstrates that baculum morphology may diverge relatively easily, with mutations at a few loci of large effect that independently modulate size and shape. Based on a combination of bioinformatic investigations and new data on RNA expression, we prioritized these QTL to 16 candidate genes, which have hypothesized roles in bone morphogenesis and may enable future genetic manipulation of baculum morphology.

  20. Common Noctule Bats Are Sexually Dimorphic in Migratory Behaviour and Body Size but Not Wing Shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, M Teague; Bauer, Karla; Blank, Dominik; Baldwin, Justin W; Dechmann, Dina K N

    2016-01-01

    Within the large order of bats, sexual size dimorphism measured by forearm length and body mass is often female-biased. Several studies have explained this through the effects on load carrying during pregnancy, intrasexual competition, as well as the fecundity and thermoregulation advantages of increased female body size. We hypothesized that wing shape should differ along with size and be under variable selection pressure in a species where there are large differences in flight behaviour. We tested whether load carrying, sex differential migration, or reproductive advantages of large females affect size and wing shape dimorphism in the common noctule (Nyctalus noctula), in which females are typically larger than males and only females migrate long distances each year. We tested for univariate and multivariate size and shape dimorphism using data sets derived from wing photos and biometric data collected during pre-migratory spring captures in Switzerland. Females had forearms that are on average 1% longer than males and are 1% heavier than males after emerging from hibernation, but we found no sex differences in other size, shape, or other functional characters in any wing parameters during this pre-migratory period. Female-biased size dimorphism without wing shape differences indicates that reproductive advantages of big mothers are most likely responsible for sexual dimorphism in this species, not load compensation or shape differences favouring aerodynamic efficiency during pregnancy or migration. Despite large behavioural and ecological sex differences, morphology associated with a specialized feeding niche may limit potential dimorphism in narrow-winged bats such as common noctules and the dramatic differences in migratory behaviour may then be accomplished through plasticity in wing kinematics.

  1. Void Coalescence Processes Quantified Through Atomistic and Multiscale Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, R E; Seppala, E T; Dupuy, L M; Belak, J

    2007-01-12

    Simulation of ductile fracture at the atomic scale reveals many aspects of the fracture process including specific mechanisms associated with void nucleation and growth as a precursor to fracture and the plastic deformation of the material surrounding the voids and cracks. Recently we have studied void coalescence in ductile metals using large-scale atomistic and continuum simulations. Here we review that work and present some related investigations. The atomistic simulations involve three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. No pronounced shear flow is found in the coalescence process. We also discuss a technique for optimizing the calculation of fine-scale information on the fly for use in a coarse-scale simulation, and discuss the specific case of a fine-scale model that calculates void growth explicitly feeding into a coarse-scale mechanics model to study damage localization.

  2. Voids' System in the Woven Composite Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pavla VOZKOVA

    2006-01-01

    Composites are common material constructions for high-tech use now. Mechanical properties of woven reinforced composites are influenced by voids inside the structure.Voids could be classified to the two sections. Long and thin cracks are more dangerous than pores. It is important to find relations between preparation and place of occurrence of voids. This paper classifies defects according to rise mechanism, point of occurrence, orientation, size and affect to the properties. Image analysis was used for observing samples. Future work would be oriented not only to observing real samples, but also to calculate mechanical properties from real and ideal structures in 3D woven reinforced composites.

  3. Simultaneous Topology, Shape, and Sizing Optimisation of Plane Trusses with Adaptive Ground Finite Elements Using MOEAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norapat Noilublao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel integrated design strategy to accomplish simultaneous topology shape and sizing optimisation of a two-dimensional (2D truss. An optimisation problem is posed to find a structural topology, shape, and element sizes of the truss such that two objective functions, mass and compliance, are minimised. Design constraints include stress, buckling, and compliance. The procedure for an adaptive ground elements approach is proposed and its encoding/decoding process is detailed. Two sets of design variables defining truss layout, shape, and element sizes at the same time are applied. A number of multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs are implemented to solve the design problem. Comparative performance based on a hypervolume indicator shows that multiobjective population-based incremental learning (PBIL is the best performer. Optimising three design variable types simultaneously is more efficient and effective.

  4. Laboratory simulation and modeling of size, shape distributed interstellar graphite dust analogues: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruah, Manash J.; Gogoi, Ankur; Ahmed, Gazi A.

    2016-06-01

    The computation of the light scattering properties of size and shape distributed interstellar graphite dust analogues using discrete dipole approximation (DDA) is presented. The light scattering properties of dust particles of arbitrary shapes having sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 μm were computed using DDSCAT 7.3.0 software package and an indigenously developed post-processing tool for size and shape averaging. In order to model realistic samples of graphite dust and compute their light scattering properties using DDA, different target geometries were generated to represent the graphite particle composition in terms of surface smoothness, surface roughness and aggregation or their combination, for using as the target for DDSCAT calculations. A comparison of the theoretical volume scattering function at 543.5 nm and 632.8 nm incident wavelengths with laboratory simulation is also presented in this paper.

  5. Topology optimization with flexible void area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Aage, Niels; Sigmund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for including fixed-area flexible void domains into the minimum compliance topology optimization problem. As opposed to the standard passive elements approach of rigidly specifying void areas within the design domain, the suggested approach allows these areas...... to be flexibly reshaped and repositioned subject to penalization on their moments of inertia, the positions of their centers of mass, and their shapes. The flexible void areas are introduced through a second, discrete design variable field, using the same discretization as the standard field of continuous...... density variables. The formulation is based on a combined approach: The primary sub-problem is to minimize compliance, subject to a volume constraint, with a secondary sub-problem of minimizing the disturbance from the flexible void areas. The design update is performed iteratively between the two...

  6. Role of nanoparticle size, shape and surface chemistry in oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amrita; Qi, Jianping; Gogoi, Rohan; Wong, Jessica; Mitragotri, Samir

    2016-09-28

    Nanoparticles find intriguing applications in oral drug delivery since they present a large surface area for interactions with the gastrointestinal tract and can be modified in various ways to address the barriers associated with oral delivery. The size, shape and surface chemistry of nanoparticles can greatly impact cellular uptake and efficacy of the treatment. However, the interplay between particle size, shape and surface chemistry has not been well investigated especially for oral drug delivery. To this end, we prepared sphere-, rod- and disc-shaped nanoparticles and conjugated them with targeting ligands to study the influence of size, shape and surface chemistry on their uptake and transport across intestinal cells. A triple co-culture model of intestinal cells was utilized to more closely mimic the intestinal epithelium. Results demonstrated higher cellular uptake of rod-shaped nanoparticles in the co-culture compared to spheres regardless of the presence of active targeting moieties. Transport of nanorods across the intestinal co-culture was also significantly higher than spheres. The findings indicate that nanoparticle-mediated oral drug delivery can be potentially improved with departure from spherical shape which has been traditionally utilized for the design of nanoparticles. We believe that understanding the role of nanoparticle geometry in intestinal uptake and transport will bring forth a paradigm shift in nanoparticle engineering for oral delivery and non-spherical nanoparticles should be further investigated and considered for oral delivery of therapeutic drugs and diagnostic materials.

  7. Draining the Local Void

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, Luca; Shaya, Edward J; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Karachentsev, Igor D

    2016-01-01

    Two galaxies that lie deep within the Local Void provide a test of the expectation that voids expand. The modest (M_B~-14) HI bearing dwarf galaxies ALFAZOAJ1952+1428 and KK246 have been imaged with Hubble Space Telescope in order to study the stellar populations and determine distances from the luminosities of stars at the tip of the red giant branch. The mixed age systems have respective distances of 8.39 Mpc and 6.95 Mpc and inferred line-of-sight peculiar velocities of -114 km/s and -66 km/s toward us and away from the void center. These motions compound on the Milky Way motion of ~230 km/s away from the void. The orbits of the two galaxies are reasonably constrained by a numerical action model encompassing an extensive region that embraces the Local Void. It is unambiguously confirmed that these two void galaxies are moving away from the void center at several hundred km/s.

  8. Size and Shape Dependence on Melting Temperature of Gallium Nitride Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paneerselvam Antoniammal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of variation of the size and shape effect on the melting property of gallium nitride nanoparticles with their spherical and cylindrical geometrical feature is theoretically explored. A numerical thermodynamical model has been devoted for the study. A comparative investigation is made between the two shapes, at the range of ~3 nm dia. The cylindrical GaN nanoparticles, whose melting point has been reported to decrease with decreasing particle radius, become larger than spherical-shaped nanoparticles. The melting temperature obtained in the present study is in line with the function of radius of curvature.

  9. Dark matter in voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Richard; Doroshkevich, Andrei G.; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    1995-07-01

    The theory of the formation of large-scale structure in the universe through the action of gravitational instability imply the existence of substantial amounts of baryonic dark matter, of the order of 50% of the total baryon content in the universe, in the ``voids'' or under-dense regions seen in the large-scale distribution of galaxies. We discuss also the large-scale structure of dark matter expected in voids and the present and future possibilities for the observation of this baryonic dark matter in ``voids.''

  10. Dark matter in voids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, R. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Doroshkevich, A.G. [Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Teoretical Astrophysics Centrum, Blegsdamsvej 17, Copenhagen DK 2100 (Denmark); Turchaninov, V.I. [Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-07-01

    The theory of the formation of large-scale structure in the universe through the action of gravitational instability imply the existence of substantial amounts of baryonic dark matter, of the order of 50% of the total baryon content in the universe, in the ``voids`` or under-dense regions seen in the large-scale distribution of galaxies. We discuss also the large-scale structure of dark matter expected in voids and the present and future possibilities for the observation of this baryonic dark matter in ``voids.`` {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. Void growth in metals: Atomistic calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traiviratana, Sirirat [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Bringa, Eduardo M. [Materials Science Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Benson, David J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Meyers, Marc A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); NanoEngineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)], E-mail: mameyers@ucsd.edu

    2008-09-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations in monocrystalline and bicrystalline copper were carried out with LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator) to reveal void growth mechanisms. The specimens were subjected to tensile uniaxial strains; the results confirm that the emission of (shear) loops is the primary mechanism of void growth. It is observed that many of these shear loops develop along two slip planes (and not one, as previously thought), in a heretofore unidentified mechanism of cooperative growth. The emission of dislocations from voids is the first stage, and their reaction and interaction is the second stage. These loops, forming initially on different {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} planes, join at the intersection, if the Burgers vector of the dislocations is parallel to the intersection of two {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} planes: a <1 1 0> direction. Thus, the two dislocations cancel at the intersection and a biplanar shear loop is formed. The expansion of the loops and their cross slip leads to the severely work-hardened region surrounding a growing void. Calculations were carried out on voids with different sizes, and a size dependence of the stress threshold to emit dislocations was obtained by MD, in disagreement with the Gurson model which is scale independent. This disagreement is most marked for the nanometer sized voids. The scale dependence of the stress required to grow voids is interpreted in terms of the decreasing availability of optimally oriented shear planes and increased stress required to nucleate shear loops as the void size is reduced. The growth of voids simulated by MD is compared with the Cocks-Ashby constitutive model and significant agreement is found. The density of geometrically necessary dislocations as a function of void size is calculated based on the emission of shear loops and their outward propagation. Calculations are also carried out for a void at the interface between two grains to simulate polycrystalline

  12. On-line digital holographic measurement of size and shape of microparticles for crystallization processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, Taslima; Darakis, Emmanouil; Rajendran, Arvind; Kariwala, Vinay; Asundi, Anand K.; Naughton, Thomas J.

    2008-09-01

    Crystallization is a widely used chemical process that finds applications in pharmaceutical industries. In an industrial crystallization process, it is not only important to produce pure crystals but also to control the shape and size of the crystals, as they affect the efficiency of downstream processes and the dissolution property of the drug. The effectiveness of control algorithms depend on the availability of on-line, real-time information about these critical properties. In this paper, we investigate the use of lens-less in-line digital holographic microscopy for size and shape measurements for crystallization processes. For this purpose, we use non-crystalline spherical microparticles and carbon fibers with known sizes present in a liquid suspension as test systems. We propose an algorithm to extract size and shape information for a population of microparticles from the experimentally recorded digital holograms. The measurements obtained from the proposed method show good agreement with the corresponding known size and shape of the particles.

  13. Brassinosteroid Regulates Seed Size and Shape in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen-Bo; Huang, Hui-Ya; Hu, Yu-Wei; Zhu, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Lin, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Seed development is important for agriculture productivity. We demonstrate that brassinosteroid (BR) plays crucial roles in determining the size, mass, and shape of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds. The seeds of the BR-deficient mutant de-etiolated2 (det2) are smaller and less elongated than those of wild-type plants due to a decreased seed cavity, reduced endosperm volume, and integument cell length. The det2 mutant also showed delay in embryo development, with reduction in both the size and number of embryo cells. Pollination of det2 flowers with wild-type pollen yielded seeds of normal size but still shortened shape, indicating that the BR produced by the zygotic embryo and endosperm is sufficient for increasing seed volume but not for seed elongation, which apparently requires BR produced from maternal tissues. BR activates expression of SHORT HYPOCOTYL UNDER BLUE1, MINISEED3, and HAIKU2, which are known positive regulators of seed size, but represses APETALA2 and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR2, which are negative regulators of seed size. These genes are bound in vivo by the BR-activated transcription factor BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1), and they are known to influence specific processes of integument, endosperm, and embryo development. Our results demonstrate that BR regulates seed size and seed shape by transcriptionally modulating specific seed developmental pathways. PMID:23771896

  14. Penis size interacts with body shape and height to influence male attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautz, Brian S; Wong, Bob B M; Peters, Richard A; Jennions, Michael D

    2013-04-23

    Compelling evidence from many animal taxa indicates that male genitalia are often under postcopulatory sexual selection for characteristics that increase a male's relative fertilization success. There could, however, also be direct precopulatory female mate choice based on male genital traits. Before clothing, the nonretractable human penis would have been conspicuous to potential mates. This observation has generated suggestions that human penis size partly evolved because of female choice. Here we show, based upon female assessment of digitally projected life-size, computer-generated images, that penis size interacts with body shape and height to determine male sexual attractiveness. Positive linear selection was detected for penis size, but the marginal increase in attractiveness eventually declined with greater penis size (i.e., quadratic selection). Penis size had a stronger effect on attractiveness in taller men than in shorter men. There was a similar increase in the positive effect of penis size on attractiveness with a more masculine body shape (i.e., greater shoulder-to-hip ratio). Surprisingly, larger penis size and greater height had almost equivalent positive effects on male attractiveness. Our results support the hypothesis that female mate choice could have driven the evolution of larger penises in humans. More broadly, our results show that precopulatory sexual selection can play a role in the evolution of genital traits.

  15. Size effects in the magnetic anisotropy of embedded cobalt nanoparticles: from shape to surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, Simón; Tamion, Alexandre; Tournus, Florent; Dupuis, Véronique; Hillenkamp, Matthias

    2015-10-06

    Strong size-dependent variations of the magnetic anisotropy of embedded cobalt clusters are evidenced quantitatively by combining magnetic experiments and advanced data treatment. The obtained values are discussed in the frame of two theoretical models that demonstrate the decisive role of the shape in larger nanoparticles and the predominant role of the surface anisotropy in clusters below 3 nm diameter.

  16. Size effects in the magnetic anisotropy of embedded cobalt nanoparticles: from shape to surface

    OpenAIRE

    Simón Oyarzún; Alexandre Tamion; Florent Tournus; Véronique Dupuis; Matthias Hillenkamp

    2015-01-01

    Strong size-dependent variations of the magnetic anisotropy of embedded cobalt clusters are evidenced quantitatively by combining magnetic experiments and advanced data treatment. The obtained values are discussed in the frame of two theoretical models that demonstrate the decisive role of the shape in larger nanoparticles and the predominant role of the surface anisotropy in clusters below 3 nm diameter.

  17. Twin study of genetic and environmental influences on adult body size, shape, and composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, K; Visscher, P M; Erbas, B;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the genetic and environmental influences on adult body size, shape, and composition in women and men, and to assess the impact of age. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study of 325 female and 299 male like-sex healthy twin pairs, on average 38 y old (18-67 ...

  18. Lower Bounds on Q for Finite Size Antennas of Arbitrary Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of the lower bound on the radiation Q for an arbitrarily shaped finite size antenna of non-zero volume is formulated in terms of equivalent electric and magnetic currents densities distributed on a closed surface coinciding with antenna exterior surface. When these equivalent currents...

  19. Size and shape effects in β-NaGdF4: Yb3+, Er3+ nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noculak, Agnieszka; Podhorodecki, Artur

    2017-04-01

    Three sets of β-NaGdF4:Yb3+, Er3+ nanocrystals (NCs) with different shapes (spherical and more complex flower shapes), different sizes (6-17 nm) and Yb3+ concentrations (2%-15%) were synthesized by a co-precipitation method using oleic acid as a stabilizing agent. The uncommon, single-crystalline flower-shaped NCs were obtained by simply adjusting the fluorine-to-lanthanides molar ratio. Additionally, some of the NCs with different sizes have been covered by the un-doped shell. The crystal phase, shapes and sizes of all NCs were examined using transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction methods. Simultaneously, upconversion luminescence and lifetimes, under 980 nm excitation, were measured and the changes in green to red (G/R) emission ratios as well as emission decay times were correlated with the evolution of nanocrystal sizes and surface to volume ratios. Three different mechanisms responsible for the changes in G/R ratios were presented and discussed.

  20. Object Conveyance Algorithm for Multiple Mobile Robots based on Object Shape and Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnomo Sejati

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a determination method of a number of a team for multiple mobile robot object conveyance. The number of robot on multiple mobile robot systems is the factor of complexity on robots formation and motion control. In our previous research, we verified the use of the complex-valued neural network for controlling multiple mobile robots in object conveyance problem. Though it is a significant issue to develop effective determination team member for multiple mobile robot object conveyance, few studies have been done on it. Therefore, we propose an algorithm for determining the number of the team member on multiple mobile robot object conveyance with grasping push. The team member is determined based on object weight to obtain appropriate formation. First, the object shape and size measurement is carried out by a surveyor robot that approaches and surrounds the object. During surrounding the object, the surveyor robot measures its distance to the object and records for estimating the object shape and size. Since the object shape and size are estimated, the surveyor robot makes initial push position on the estimated push point and calls additional robots for cooperative push. The algorithm is validated in several computer simulations with varying object shape and size. As a result, the proposed algorithm is promising for minimizing the number of the robot on multiple mobile robot object conveyance.

  1. Children's Concepts of the Shape and Size of the Earth, Sun and Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Children's understandings of the shape and relative sizes of the Earth, Sun and Moon have been extensively researched and in a variety of ways. Much is known about the confusions which arise as young people try to grasp ideas about the world and our neighbouring celestial bodies. Despite this, there remain uncertainties about the conceptual models…

  2. What drives sound symbolism? Different acoustic cues underlie sound-size and sound-shape mappings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoeferle, Klemens; Li, Jixing; Maggioni, Emanuela; Spence, Charles

    2017-07-17

    Sound symbolism refers to the non-arbitrary mappings that exist between phonetic properties of speech sounds and their meaning. Despite there being an extensive literature on the topic, the acoustic features and psychological mechanisms that give rise to sound symbolism are not, as yet, altogether clear. The present study was designed to investigate whether different sets of acoustic cues predict size and shape symbolism, respectively. In two experiments, participants judged whether a given consonant-vowel speech sound was large or small, round or angular, using a size or shape scale. Visual size judgments were predicted by vowel formant F1 in combination with F2, and by vowel duration. Visual shape judgments were, however, predicted by formants F2 and F3. Size and shape symbolism were thus not induced by a common mechanism, but rather were distinctly affected by acoustic properties of speech sounds. These findings portray sound symbolism as a process that is not based merely on broad categorical contrasts, such as round/unround and front/back vowels. Rather, individuals seem to base their sound-symbolic judgments on specific sets of acoustic cues, extracted from speech sounds, which vary across judgment dimensions.

  3. Apparatus for determining the shape and/or size of little particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, J.H.; Lubking, G.W.; Vellekoop, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to an apparatus for determining the shape and/or size of small particles, comprising a cell into which the particles are placed, at least one light source for illuminating the particles, and at least one one-dimensional image sensor for measuring an image of the illuminated

  4. Self-similar voiding solutions of a single layered model of folding rocks

    CERN Document Server

    Dodwell, Timothy; Budd, Christopher; Hunt, Giles

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we derive an obstacle problem with a free boundary to describe the formation of voids at areas of intense geological folding. An elastic layer is forced by overburden pressure against a V-shaped rigid obstacle. Energy minimization leads to representation as a nonlinear fourth-order ordinary differential equation, for which we prove their exists a unique solution. Drawing parallels with the Kuhn-Tucker theory, virtual work, and ideas of duality, we highlight the physical significance of this differential equation. Finally we show this equation scales to a single parametric group, revealing a scaling law connecting the size of the void with the pressure/stiffness ratio. This paper is seen as the first step towards a full multilayered model with the possibility of voiding.

  5. Void Coalescence Processes Quantified through Atomistic and Multiscale Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, R E; Seppala, E T; Dupuy, L M; Belak, J

    2005-12-31

    Simulation of ductile fracture at the atomic scale reveals many aspects of the fracture process including specific mechanisms associated with void nucleation and growth as a precursor to fracture and the plastic deformation of the material surrounding the voids and cracks. Recently we have studied void coalescence in ductile metals using large-scale atomistic and continuum simulations. Here we review that work and present some related investigations. The atomistic simulations involve three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. No pronounced shear flow is found in the coalescence process.

  6. Shape--but not size--codivergence between male and female copulatory structures in Onthophagus beetles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L M Macagno

    Full Text Available Genitalia are among the fastest evolving morphological traits in arthropods. Among the many hypotheses aimed at explaining this observation, some explicitly or implicitly predict concomitant male and female changes of genital traits that interact during copulation (i.e., lock and key, sexual conflict, cryptic female choice and pleiotropy. Testing these hypotheses requires insights into whether male and female copulatory structures that physically interact during mating also affect each other's evolution and patterns of diversification. Here we compare and contrast size and shape evolution of male and female structures that are known to interact tightly during copulation using two model systems: (a the sister species O. taurus (1 native, 3 recently established populations and O. illyricus, and (b the species-complex O. fracticornis-similis-opacicollis. Partial Least Squares analyses indicated very little to no correlation between size and shape of copulatory structures, both in males and females. Accordingly, comparing shape and size diversification patterns of genitalia within each sex showed that the two components diversify readily--though largely independently of each other--within and between species. Similarly, comparing patterns of divergence across sexes showed that relative sizes of male and female copulatory organs diversify largely independent of each other. However, performing this analysis for genital shape revealed a signature of parallel divergence. Our results therefore suggest that male and female copulatory structures that are linked mechanically during copulation may diverge in concert with respect to their shapes. Furthermore, our results suggest that genital divergence in general, and co-divergence of male and female genital shape in particular, can evolve over an extraordinarily short time frame. Results are discussed in the framework of the hypotheses that assume or predict concomitant evolutionary changes in male and

  7. Particle size, shape and activity for photocatalysis on titania anatase nanoparticles in aqueous surroundings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye-Fei; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2011-10-05

    TiO(2) nanoparticles have been widely utilized in photocatalysis, but the atomic level understanding on their working mechanism falls much short of expectations. In particular, the correlation between the particle structure and the photocatalytic activity is not established yet, although it was observed that the activity is sensitive to the particle size and shape. This work, by investigating a series of TiO(2) anatase nanoparticles with different size and shape as the photocatalyst for water oxidation, correlates quantitatively the particle size and shape with the photocatalytic activity of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations combined with the periodic continuum solvation model have been utilized to compute the electronic structure of nanoparticles in aqueous solution and provide the reaction energetics for the key elementary reaction. We demonstrate that the equilibrium shape of nanoparticle is sensitive to its size from 1 to 30 nm, and the sharp crystals possess much higher activity than the flat crystals in OER, which in combination lead to the morphology dependence of photocatalytic activity. The conventionally regarded quantum size effect is excluded as the major cause. The physical origin for the shape-activity relationship is identified to be the unique spatial separation/localization of the frontier orbitals in the sharp nanoparticles, which benefits the adsorption of the key reaction intermediate (i.e., OH) in OER on the exposed five-coordinated Ti of {101} facet. The theoretical results here provide a firm basis for maximizing photocatalytic activity via nanostructure engineering and are also of significance for understanding photocatalysis on nanomaterials in general.

  8. Phase Diagram of Continuous Binary Nanoalloys: Size, Shape, and Segregation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mingjin; Lu, Haiming; Jiang, Haiping; Cao, Zhenhua; Meng, Xiangkang

    2017-02-01

    The phase diagrams of continuous binary nanoalloys are important in providing guidance for material designs and industrial applications. However, experimental determination of the nano-phase diagram is scarce since calorimetric measurements remain quite challenging at the nanoscale. Based on the size-dependent cohesive energy model, we developed a unified nano-thermodynamic model to investigate the effects of the size, shape, and segregation on the phase diagrams of continuous binary nanoalloys. The liquidus/solidus dropped in temperature, two-phase zone was narrowed, and the degree of surface segregation decreased with decrease in the size or increase in the shape factor. The congruent melting point of Cu-Au nanoalloys with and without segregation is linearly shifted to higher Au component and lower temperature with decreasing size or increasing shape factor. By reviewing surface segregated element of different binary nanoalloys, two segregation rules based on the solid surface energy and atomic size have been identified. Moreover, the established model can be employed to describe other physicochemical properties of nanoalloys, e.g. the cohesive energy, catalytic activation energy, and order-disorder transition temperature, and the validity is supported by available other theoretical prediction, experimental data and molecular dynamic simulations results. This will help the experimentalists by guiding them in their attempts to design bimetallic nanocrystals with the desired properties.

  9. Advances in synthesis of calcium phosphate crystals with controlled size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kaili; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2014-10-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) materials have a wide range of applications, including biomaterials, adsorbents, chemical engineering materials, catalysts and catalyst supports and mechanical reinforcements. The size and shape of CaP crystals and aggregates play critical roles in their applications. The main inorganic building blocks of human bones and teeth are nanocrystalline CaPs; recently, much progress has been made in the application of CaP nanocrystals and their composites for clinical repair of damaged bone and tooth. For example, CaPs with special micro- and nanostructures can better imitate the biomimetic features of human bone and tooth, and this offers significantly enhanced biological performances. Therefore, the design of CaP nano-/microcrystals, and the shape and hierarchical structures of CaPs, have great potential to revolutionize the field of hard tissue engineering, starting from bone/tooth repair and augmentation to controlled drug delivery devices. Previously, a number of reviews have reported the synthesis and properties of CaP materials, especially for hydroxyapatite (HAp). However, most of them mainly focused on the characterizations and physicochemical and biological properties of HAp particles. There are few reviews about the control of particle size and size distribution of CaPs, and in particular the control of nano-/microstructures on bulk CaP ceramic surfaces, which is a big challenge technically and may have great potential in tissue engineering applications. This review summarizes the current state of the art for the synthesis of CaP crystals with controlled sizes from the nano- to the macroscale, and the diverse shapes including the zero-dimensional shapes of particles and spheres, the one-dimensional shapes of rods, fibers, wires and whiskers, the two-dimensional shapes of sheets, disks, plates, belts, ribbons and flakes and the three-dimensional (3-D) shapes of porous, hollow, and biomimetic structures similar to biological bone and tooth

  10. [Relationships between size and shape of the face with somatic type in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zviagin, V N; Negasheva, M A

    2006-01-01

    We studied correlations between size of the face, different complexes of somatic signs and constitutional types according to the I.B. Galant's scheme basing on the materials of a complex anthropometric examination of 1153 Russian girls 16-21 years of age. We found a mean level of correlations (maximum 0.5 of the coefficient of canonic correlation) between the parameters of various morphological subsystems "face-body" The factorial analysis allowed us to obtain two integrative indices describing a total size and shape of the face. Statistical processing revealed a trend to macroprosopia in the groups from leptosomic to megalosomic constitutional types of girls from the Galant's scheme (p face. For application in forensic-medical practice we present equations for individual estimation of the variant of a total size and shape of the face as well as female somatotype.

  11. Solar granulation and statistical crystallography: A modeling approach using size-shape relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The irregular polygonal pattern of solar granulation is analyzed for size-shape relations using statistical crystallography. In contrast to previous work which has assumed perfectly hexagonal patterns for granulation, more realistic accounting of cell (granule) shapes reveals a broader basis for quantitative analysis. Several features emerge as noteworthy: (1) a linear correlation between number of cell-sides and neighboring shapes (called Aboav-Weaire's law); (2) a linear correlation between both average cell area and perimeter and the number of cell-sides (called Lewis's law and a perimeter law, respectively) and (3) a linear correlation between cell area and squared perimeter (called convolution index). This statistical picture of granulation is consistent with a finding of no correlation in cell shapes beyond nearest neighbors. A comparative calculation between existing model predictions taken from luminosity data and the present analysis shows substantial agreements for cell-size distributions. A model for understanding grain lifetimes is proposed which links convective times to cell shape using crystallographic results.

  12. Modeling development and quantitative trait mapping reveal independent genetic modules for leaf size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert L; Leong, Wen Fung; Brock, Marcus T; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Edwards, Christine E; Maloof, Julin; Welch, Stephen; Weinig, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    Improved predictions of fitness and yield may be obtained by characterizing the genetic controls and environmental dependencies of organismal ontogeny. Elucidating the shape of growth curves may reveal novel genetic controls that single-time-point (STP) analyses do not because, in theory, infinite numbers of growth curves can result in the same final measurement. We measured leaf lengths and widths in Brassica rapa recombinant inbred lines (RILs) throughout ontogeny. We modeled leaf growth and allometry as function valued traits (FVT), and examined genetic correlations between these traits and aspects of phenology, physiology, circadian rhythms and fitness. We used RNA-seq to construct a SNP linkage map and mapped trait quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found genetic trade-offs between leaf size and growth rate FVT and uncovered differences in genotypic and QTL correlations involving FVT vs STPs. We identified leaf shape (allometry) as a genetic module independent of length and width and identified selection on FVT parameters of development. Leaf shape is associated with venation features that affect desiccation resistance. The genetic independence of leaf shape from other leaf traits may therefore enable crop optimization in leaf shape without negative effects on traits such as size, growth rate, duration or gas exchange.

  13. The influence of size, shape, and surface coating on the stability of aqueous nanoparticle suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulvihill, M.J.; Habas, S.E.; La Plante, I.J.; Wan, J.; Mokari, T.

    2010-09-03

    In response to the rapid development and emerging commercialization of nanoparticles, fundamental studies concerning the fate of nanoparticles in the environment are needed. Precise control over the nanoparticle size, shape, and surface coating of cadmium selenide particles modified with thiolate ligands has been used to analyze the effects of nanoparticle design on their stability in aqueous environments. Nanoparticle stability was quantified using the concept of critical coagulation concentration (CCC) in solutions of sodium chloride. These investigations characterized the instability of the ligand coatings, which varied directly with chain length of the capping ligands. The stability of the ligand coatings were characterized as a function of time, pH, and ionic strength. Ligand dissociation has been shown to be a primary mechanism for nanoparticle aggregation when short-chain (C2-C6) ligands are used in the ligand shell. Stable nanoparticle suspensions prepared with long chain ligands (C11) were used to characterize nanoparticle stability as a function of size and shape. A linear relationship between particle surface area and the CCC was discovered and was found to be independent of nanoparticle shape. Quantitative analysis of nanoparticle size, shape, and surface coating demonstrated the importance of ligand stability and particle surface area for the prediction of nanoparticle stability.

  14. Deducing growth mechanisms for minerals from the shapes of crystal size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Drits, V.A.; Srodon, J.

    1998-01-01

    Crystal size distributions (CSDs) of natural and synthetic samples are observed to have several distinct and different shapes. We have simulated these CSDs using three simple equations: the Law of Proportionate Effect (LPE), a mass balance equation, and equations for Ostwald ripening. The following crystal growth mechanisms are simulated using these equations and their modifications: (1) continuous nucleation and growth in an open system, during which crystals nucleate at either a constant, decaying, or accelerating nucleation rate, and then grow according to the LPE; (2) surface-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with an essentially unlimited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (3) supply-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with a specified, limited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (4) supply- or surface-controlled Ostwald ripening in a closed system, during which the relative rate of crystal dissolution and growth is controlled by differences in specific surface area and by diffusion rate; and (5) supply-controlled random ripening in a closed system, during which the rate of crystal dissolution and growth is random with respect to specific surface area. Each of these mechanisms affects the shapes of CSDs. For example, mechanism (1) above with a constant nucleation rate yields asymptotically-shaped CSDs for which the variance of the natural logarithms of the crystal sizes (??2) increases exponentially with the mean of the natural logarithms of the sizes (??). Mechanism (2) yields lognormally-shaped CSDs, for which ??2 increases linearly with ??, whereas mechanisms (3) and (5) do not change the shapes of CSDs, with ??2 remaining constant with increasing ??. During supply-controlled Ostwald ripening (4), initial lognormally-shaped CSDs become more symmetric, with ??2 decreasing with increasing ??. Thus, crystal growth mechanisms often can be deduced by noting trends in ?? versus ??2 of CSDs for

  15. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depression & spatial complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Weygaert, Rien; Shandarin, S.; Saar, E.; Einasto, J.

    2016-01-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do theyrepresent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probesand measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive tothe natu

  16. A Mathematical Model for Calculating Deviations of the Shape, Size and Geometric Relationship of Flat Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Kravchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a variety of objectives for measuring deviations of flatness, size and mutual arrangement of flat surfaces, namely: processing accuracy control, machinery condition monitoring, treatment process control in terms of shape deviation, comparative analysis of machine rigidity. If for a processing accuracy control it is sufficient to obtain the flatness deviation, as the maximum adjoining surface deviation, the choice of the adjoining surface as a zero reference datum deviation leads to considerable difficulties in creating devices and in particular devices for measuring size and shape variations. The flat surface is characterized by mutual arrangement of its points and can be represented by equation in the selected coordinate system. The objective of this work is to provide analytical construction of the vector field F, which describes the real surface with an appropriate approximation upon modelling the face milling of the flat surfaces of body parts in conditions of anisotropic rigidity of technological system. To determine the numerical value of shape and size deviation characteristics the average surfaces can serve a basis for the zero reference values of vectors. A mean value theorem allows to obtain measurement information about deviations in shape, size and arrangement of processed flat surfaces in terms of metrology, as well as about the process parameters such as depth of cut, feed, cutting speed, anisotropic rigidity of technological system that characterize the specific processing conditions. The machining center MS 12-250 was used to carry out a number of experiments with processing the surfaces of the prism-shaped body parts (300x300x250 and the subsequent measurements of flatness on the IS-49 optical line to prove the correlation between expected and observed values of the vectors of flatness deviations.

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study on Male Genital Shape and Size in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baku Takahara

    Full Text Available Male genital morphology of animals with internal fertilization and promiscuous mating systems have been one of the most diverse and rapidly evolving morphological traits. The male genital morphology in general is known to have low phenotypic and genetic variations, but the genetic basis of the male genital variation remains unclear. Drosophila melanogaster and its closely related species are morphologically very similar, but the shapes of the posterior lobe, a cuticular projection on the male genital arch are distinct from each other, representing a model system for studying the genetic basis of male genital morphology. In this study, we used highly inbred whole genome sequenced strains of D. melanogaster to perform genome wide association analysis on posterior lobe morphology. We quantified the outline shape of posterior lobes with Fourier coefficients obtained from elliptic Fourier analysis and performed principal component analysis, and posterior lobe size. The first and second principal components (PC1 and PC2 explained approximately 88% of the total variation of the posterior lobe shape. We then examined the association between the principal component scores and posterior lobe size and 1902142 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. As a result, we obtained 15, 14 and 15 SNPs for PC1, PC2 and posterior lobe size with P-values smaller than 10(-5. Based on the location of the SNPs, 13, 13 and six protein coding genes were identified as potential candidates for PC1, PC2 and posterior lobe size, respectively. In addition to the previous findings showing that the intraspecific posterior shape variation are regulated by multiple QTL with strong effects, the present study suggests that the intraspecific variation may be under polygenic regulation with a number of loci with small effects. Further studies are required for investigating whether these candidate genes are responsible for the intraspecific posterior lobe shape variation.

  18. Children's Concepts of the Shape and Size of the Earth, Sun and Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2013-02-01

    Children's understandings of the shape and relative sizes of the Earth, Sun and Moon have been extensively researched and in a variety of ways. Much is known about the confusions which arise as young people try to grasp ideas about the world and our neighbouring celestial bodies. Despite this, there remain uncertainties about the conceptual models which young people use and how they theorise in the process of acquiring more scientific conceptions. In this article, the relevant published research is reviewed critically and in-depth in order to frame a series of investigations using semi-structured interviews carried out with 248 participants aged 3-18 years from China and New Zealand. Analysis of qualitative and quantitative data concerning the reasoning of these subjects (involving cognitive categorisations and their rank ordering) confirmed that (a) concepts of Earth shape and size are embedded in a 'super-concept' or 'Earth notion' embracing ideas of physical shape, 'ground' and 'sky', habitation of and identity with Earth; (b) conceptual development is similar in cultures where teachers hold a scientific world view and (c) children's concepts of shape and size of the Earth, Sun and Moon can be usefully explored within an ethnological approach using multi-media interviews combined with observational astronomy. For these young people, concepts of the shape and size of the Moon and Sun were closely correlated with their Earth notion concepts and there were few differences between the cultures despite their contrasts. Analysis of the statistical data used Kolmogorov-Smirnov Two-Sample Tests with hypotheses confirmed at K-S alpha level 0.05; rs : p < 0.01.

  19. Biofilter media gas pressure loss as related to media particle size and particle shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.; Røjgaard Andreasen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    Pressure loss (ΔP) is a key parameter for estimating biofilter energy consumption. Accurate predictions of ΔP as a function of air velocity (V) are therefore essential, to assess energy consumption and minimize operation costs. This paper investigates the combined impact of medium particle size...... and shape on the V - ΔP relationship. V - ΔP measurements were performed using three commercially available materials with different particle shapes: crushed granite (very angular particles), gravel (particles of intermediate roundness) and Leca® (almost spherical particles). A total of 21 different...

  20. Synthesis and Optical Properties of CuO Nanocrystals with Controllable Shapes and Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goraya Neelinder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly dispersed copper oxide (CuO nanoparticles had been successfully prepared by a hydrothermal technique where different adding temperatures of NaOH were taken. The as-prepared CuO nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that the adding temperature of NaOH has an important influence on the shape and size of CuO nanocrystals The influence of reaction conditions on morphology of CuO nanocrystals was discussed. Furthermore, different shapes of obtained CuO nanocrystals exhibit different Raman properties.

  1. Effects of shape and size of cobalt ferrite nanostructures on their MRI contrast and thermal activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Lin, Yen Po; Aslam, Mohammed; Prasad, P. V.; Schultz-Sikma, Elise A.; Edelman, Robert; Meade, Thomas; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2010-01-01

    Cobalt ferrite magnetic nanostructures were synthesized via a high temperature solution phase method. Spherical nanostructures of various sizes were synthesized with the help of seed mediated growth of the nanostructures in organic phase, while faceted irregular (FI) cobalt ferrite nanostructures were synthesized via the same method but in the presence of a magnetic field. Magnetic properties were characterized by SQUID magnetometry, relaxivity measurements and thermal activation under RF field, as a function of size and shape. The results show that the saturation magnetization of the nanostructures increases with an increase in size, and the FI nanostructures exhibit lower saturation magnetization than their spherical counterparts. The relaxivity coefficient of cobalt ferrite nanostructures increases with increase in size; while FI nanostructures show a higher relaxivity coefficient than spherical nanostructures with respect to their saturation magnetization. In the case of RF thermal activation, the specific absorption rate (SAR) of nanostructures increases with increase in the size. The contribution sheds light on the role of size and shape on important magnetic properties of the nanostructures in relation to their biomedical applications. PMID:21850276

  2. A multidimensional stability model for predicting shallow landslide size and shape across landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milledge, David G; Bellugi, Dino; McKean, Jim A; Densmore, Alexander L; Dietrich, William E

    2014-11-01

    The size of a shallow landslide is a fundamental control on both its hazard and geomorphic importance. Existing models are either unable to predict landslide size or are computationally intensive such that they cannot practically be applied across landscapes. We derive a model appropriate for natural slopes that is capable of predicting shallow landslide size but simple enough to be applied over entire watersheds. It accounts for lateral resistance by representing the forces acting on each margin of potential landslides using earth pressure theory and by representing root reinforcement as an exponential function of soil depth. We test our model's ability to predict failure of an observed landslide where the relevant parameters are well constrained by field data. The model predicts failure for the observed scar geometry and finds that larger or smaller conformal shapes are more stable. Numerical experiments demonstrate that friction on the boundaries of a potential landslide increases considerably the magnitude of lateral reinforcement, relative to that due to root cohesion alone. We find that there is a critical depth in both cohesive and cohesionless soils, resulting in a minimum size for failure, which is consistent with observed size-frequency distributions. Furthermore, the differential resistance on the boundaries of a potential landslide is responsible for a critical landslide shape which is longer than it is wide, consistent with observed aspect ratios. Finally, our results show that minimum size increases as approximately the square of failure surface depth, consistent with observed landslide depth-area data.

  3. The evolution of body size and shape in the human career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Mark; Hatala, Kevin G.; Richmond, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    Body size is a fundamental biological property of organisms, and documenting body size variation in hominin evolution is an important goal of palaeoanthropology. Estimating body mass appears deceptively simple but is laden with theoretical and pragmatic assumptions about best predictors and the most appropriate reference samples. Modern human training samples with known masses are arguably the ‘best’ for estimating size in early bipedal hominins such as the australopiths and all members of the genus Homo, but it is not clear if they are the most appropriate priors for reconstructing the size of the earliest putative hominins such as Orrorin and Ardipithecus. The trajectory of body size evolution in the early part of the human career is reviewed here and found to be complex and nonlinear. Australopith body size varies enormously across both space and time. The pre-erectus early Homo fossil record from Africa is poor and dominated by relatively small-bodied individuals, implying that the emergence of the genus Homo is probably not linked to an increase in body size or unprecedented increases in size variation. Body size differences alone cannot explain the observed variation in hominin body shape, especially when examined in the context of small fossil hominins and pygmy modern humans. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Major transitions in human evolution’. PMID:27298459

  4. The evolution of body size and shape in the human career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungers, William L; Grabowski, Mark; Hatala, Kevin G; Richmond, Brian G

    2016-07-05

    Body size is a fundamental biological property of organisms, and documenting body size variation in hominin evolution is an important goal of palaeoanthropology. Estimating body mass appears deceptively simple but is laden with theoretical and pragmatic assumptions about best predictors and the most appropriate reference samples. Modern human training samples with known masses are arguably the 'best' for estimating size in early bipedal hominins such as the australopiths and all members of the genus Homo, but it is not clear if they are the most appropriate priors for reconstructing the size of the earliest putative hominins such as Orrorin and Ardipithecus The trajectory of body size evolution in the early part of the human career is reviewed here and found to be complex and nonlinear. Australopith body size varies enormously across both space and time. The pre-erectus early Homo fossil record from Africa is poor and dominated by relatively small-bodied individuals, implying that the emergence of the genus Homo is probably not linked to an increase in body size or unprecedented increases in size variation. Body size differences alone cannot explain the observed variation in hominin body shape, especially when examined in the context of small fossil hominins and pygmy modern humans.This article is part of the themed issue 'Major transitions in human evolution'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. A Cosmic Void Catalog of SDSS DR12 BOSS Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qingqing; Berlind, Andreas A.; Scherrer, Robert J.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Scoccimarro, Román; Tinker, Jeremy L.; McBride, Cameron K.; Schneider, Donald P.; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor

    2017-02-01

    We present a cosmic void catalog using the large-scale structure galaxy catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This galaxy catalog is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 and is the final catalog of SDSS-III. We take into account the survey boundaries, masks, and angular and radial selection functions, and apply the ZOBOV void finding algorithm to the Galaxy catalog. We identify a total of 10,643 voids. After making quality cuts to ensure that the voids represent real underdense regions, we obtain 1,228 voids with effective radii spanning the range 20–100 {h}-1 {Mpc} and with central densities that are, on average, 30% of the mean sample density. We release versions of the catalogs both with and without quality cuts. We discuss the basic statistics of voids, such as their size and redshift distributions, and measure the radial density profile of the voids via a stacking technique. In addition, we construct mock void catalogs from 1000 mock galaxy catalogs, and find that the properties of BOSS voids are in good agreement with those in the mock catalogs. We compare the stellar mass distribution of galaxies living inside and outside of the voids, and find no large difference. These BOSS and mock void catalogs are useful for a number of cosmological and galaxy environment studies.

  6. Urban Skylines: building heights and shapes as measures of city size

    CERN Document Server

    Schläpfer, Markus; Bettencourt, Luís M A

    2015-01-01

    The shape of buildings plays a critical role in the energy efficiency, lifestyles, land use and infrastructure systems of cities. Thus, as most of the world's cities continue to grow and develop, understanding the interplay between the characteristics of urban environments and the built form of cities is essential to achieve local and global sustainability goals. Here, we compile and analyze the most extensive data set of building shapes to date, covering more than 4.8 million individual buildings across several major cities in North America. We show that average building height increases systematically with city size and follows theoretical predictions derived from urban scaling theory. We also study the allometric relationship between surface area and volume of buildings in terms of characteristic shape parameters. This allows us to demonstrate that the reported trend towards higher (and more voluminous) buildings effectively decreases the average surface-to-volume ratio, suggesting potentially significant ...

  7. Size, shape and age-related changes of the mandibular condyle during childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlo, Christoph A. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Stolzmann, Paul [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Habernig, Sandra; Kellenberger, Christian J. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Mueller, Lukas [University of Zurich, Clinics for Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, Zurich (Switzerland); Saurenmann, Traudel [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    To determine age-related differences in the size and shape of the mandibular condyle in children to establish anatomical reference values. A total of 420 mandibular condyles in 210 children (mean age, 7 years) were retrospectively analysed by using computed tomography (CT) imaging. The greatest left-right (LRD) and anterior-posterior (APD) diameters and the anteversion angles (AA) were measured by two readers. An APD/LRD ratio was calculated. The shape of the condyles was graded into three types on sagittal images. Correlations of parameters with the children's age were assessed by using Pearson's correlation analyses. The LRD (mean, 14.1 {+-} 2.4 mm), APD (mean, 7.3 {+-} 1.0 mm) and LRD/APD ratio (mean, 1.9 {+-} 0.3) increased (r{sub LRD} = 0.70, p < 0.01; r{sub APD} = 0.56, p < 0.01; r{sub rat} = 0.28, p < 0.01) while the AA (mean, 27 {+-} 7 ) decreased significantly (r{sub antang} = -0.26, p < 0.001) with age. The condylar shape as determined on sagittal images correlated significantly with age (r = 0.69, p < 0.05). Boys had significantly higher anteversion angles (p < 0.01), greater LRDs (p < 0.05) and greater mean ratios (p < 0.05). The mandibular condyle is subject to significant age-related changes in size and shape during childhood. As the size of the condyles increases with age, the anteversion angles decrease and the shape of the condyle turns from round to oval. (orig.)

  8. The dentition: the outcomes of morphogenesis leading to variations of tooth number, size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, A H; Jernvall, J; Smith, R N; Hughes, T E; Townsend, G C

    2014-06-01

    The clinical importance of variations of tooth number, size and shape is seen in many dental disciplines. Early diagnosis allows optimal patient management and treatment planning, with intervention at an appropriate time to prevent complications in development and so reduce later treatment need. Understanding the process of dental morphogenesis and the variations in outcomes is an important contribution to the multidisciplinary clinical team approach to treatment. Tooth number, size and shape are determined during the initiation and morphogenetic stages of odontogenesis. The molecular evidence of repetitive signalling throughout initiation and morphogenesis is reflected clinically in the association of anomalies of number, size and shape. This association has been statistically modelled from epidemiological evidence and confirmed by 2D and 3D measurement of human dental study casts. In individuals with hypodontia, the teeth that are formed are smaller than the population mean and often show reduced and simplified shape. In contrast, in individuals with supernumerary teeth, the other teeth are larger than average and may show an enhanced shape. Clinical observations in humans and studies of laboratory animals gave rise to the concept of morphogenetic fields within the dentition. The findings, which can also be considered as reflecting gene expression territories, have been developed to incorporate field, clone and homeobox theories. The clinical distribution of developmental anomalies tends to follow the pattern of these fields or territories. Improved care for patients with these anomalies will come not only from utilizing a multidisciplinary clinical team but also by expanding the approach to include other relevant scientific disciplines. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depressions & spatial complexity

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-01-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do they represent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probes and measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive to the nature of dark energy, while their substructure and galaxy population provides a direct key to the nature of dark matter. Also, the pristine environment of void interiors is an important testing ground for our understanding of environmental influences on galaxy formation and evolution. In this paper, we review the key aspects of the structure and dynamics of voids, with a particular focus on the hierarchical evolution of the void population. We demonstrate how the rich structural pattern of the Cosmic Web is related to the complex evolution and buildup of voids.

  10. Does life history shape sexual size dimorphism in anurans? A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of sexual size dimorphism (SSD is likely constrained by life history. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we examined correlations between SSD among anurans and their life history traits, including egg size, clutch size, mating combat, and parental care behaviour. We used sexual dimorphism index (SDI = Body-sizefemale /Body-sizemale –1 as the measurement for SSD. Body size, life history and phylogenetic data were collected from published literature. Data were analysed at two levels: all anuran species and within individual families. Results Female-biased SSD is the predominant form in anurans. SSD decreases along with the body size increase, following the prediction of Rensch’s rule, but the magnitude of decrease is very small. More importantly, female body size is positively correlated with both fecundity related traits, egg size and clutch size, and SDI is also positively correlated with clutch size, suggesting fecundity advantage may have driven the evolution of female body size and consequently leads to the evolution of female-biased SSD. Furthermore, the presence of parental care, male parental care in particular, is negatively correlated with SDI, indicating that species with parental care tend to have a smaller SDI. A negative correlation between clutch size and parental care further suggests that parental care likely reduces the fecundity selection pressure on female body size. On the other hand, there is a general lack of significant correlation between SDI and the presence of male combat behaviour, which is surprising and contradictory to previous studies. Conclusions We find clear evidence to support the ‘fecundity advantage hypothesis’ and the ‘parental care hypothesis’ in shaping SSD in anurans. Nevertheless, the relationships of both parental care and combat behaviour to the evolution of SSD are complex in anurans and the extreme diversity of life history traits may have masked

  11. One-pot size and shape controlled synthesis of DMSO capped iron oxide nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debanjan Guin; Sunkara V Manorama; S Radha; A K Nigam

    2006-11-01

    We report here the capping of iron oxide nanoparticles with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to make chloroform soluble iron oxide nanoparticles. Size and shape of the capped iron oxide nanoparticles are well controlled by simply varying the reaction parameters. The synthesized nanocrystallites were characterized by thermal analysis (TG–DTA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for evaluating phase, structure and morphology. 1H NMR spectra of the synthesized samples confirm DMSO, and the capping of DMSO on the ferrite samples. Shift of the S=O stretching frequency in Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectra indicates that the bonding between DMSO and ferrite is through an oxygen moiety. The magnetic measurements of all the synthesized samples were investigated with a SQUID magnetometer which shows that the magnetic properties are strongly dependent on the size as well as shape of the iron oxide.

  12. A morphological analysis of the skull size and shape of Kerivoulinae (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Son Truong; Motokawa, Masaharu; Oshida, Tatsuo; Endo, Hideki

    2016-02-01

    Southeast Asia is a region of high biodiversity, containing species of plants and animals that are yet to be discovered. In this region, bats of the subfamily Kerivoulinae are widespread and diverse with six species recorded in Vietnam. However, the taxonomy of the Kerivoulinae in Asia is complicated. In our study, we used diagnostic characters and multivariate analysis to determine morphological differences between the genera Kerivoula and Phoniscus. We showed that the two genera are distinguishable by the size of second upper incisors, the shape of skull, nasal sinus, canines, second upper and lower premolars. In addition, the two genera can be osteometrically separated by measurements of the braincase height, interorbital width and shape of anterior palatal emargination. Our data clearly revealed the morphological variations in the skull shape of Kerivoula hardwickii in Vietnam. This suggests a possible separation into three morphotypes, representing cryptic species supported by statistical differences with wide variation in skull shape, size and teeth. These results demonstrated Kerivoula hardwickii can be separated three subspecies, and the result will serve as the basis for the future assessment and classification of this group in Southeast Asia.

  13. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  14. Effect of additives on size and shape of lithium carbonate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborga, P.; Brito, I.; Graber, T. A.

    2017-02-01

    Generally, properties such internal structure, shape, and size distribution influence the reactivity, fluidity and wettability of the crystals, and may be modified by the use of additives such as polyelectrolytes or surfactants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different additives on the size and morphology of lithium carbonate crystals obtained by reactive crystallization from solutions of LiCl and Na2CO3. The additives used were: polyethylenimine (PEI), polyethylene glycol (PEG), poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid), (P4SA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS). Obtained crystals were observed using scanning electron microscopy, the crystal size distribution was determined by a size image analyzer, and the crystal structure were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the presence of PEI, PEG and P4SA, increased the length of the lithium carbonate particles. The presence of SDS decreases the crystals size. Using SDBS as additive, the crystals had a needle-like shape, Finally PAA allowed the production of Li2CO3 spherulites. Crystal structure of lithium carbonate did not change in the presence of the tested additives.

  15. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2017-09-12

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  16. Evaluation of Decontamination Factor of Aerosol in Pool Scrubber according to Bubble Shape and Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Hyun Joung; Ha, Kwang Soon; Jang, Dong Soon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The scrubbing pool could play an important role in the wet type FCVS because a large amount of aerosol is captured in the water pool. The pool scrubbing phenomena have been modelled and embedded in several computer codes, such as SPARC (Suppression Pool Aerosol Removal Code), BUSCA (BUbble Scrubbing Algorithm) and SUPRA (Suppression Pool Retention Analysis). These codes aim at simulating the pool scrubbing process and estimating the decontamination factors (DFs) of the radioactive aerosol and iodine gas in the water pool, which is defined as the ratio of initial mass of the specific radioactive material to final massy after passing through the water pool. The pool scrubbing models were reviewed and an aerosol scrubbing code has been prepared to calculate decontamination factor through the pool. The developed code has been verified using the experimental results and parametric studies the decontamination factor according to bubble shape and size. To evaluate the decontamination factor more accurate whole pool scrubber phenomena, the code was improved to consider the variety shape and size of bubbles. The decontamination factor were largely evaluated in ellipsoid bubble rather than in sphere bubble. The pool scrubbing models will be enhanced to apply more various model such as aerosol condensation of hygroscopic. And, it is need to experiment to measure to bubble shape and size distribution in pool to improve bubble model.

  17. A real-time monitoring system for airborne particle shape and size analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, P. H.; Alexander-Buckley, K.; Hirst, E.; Saunders, S.; Clark, J. M.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes a new instrument for the study of airborne particles. The instrument performs a rapid analysis of the transient spatial intensity distribution of laser-light scattered by individual aerosol particles drawn from an ambient environment and uses this to characterize the particles in terms of both size and shape parameters. Analyses are carried out at peak particle throughput rates of up to 10,000 particles per second, and semiquantitative data relating to the size and shape (or more correctly asymmetry) spectra of the sampled particles are provided to the user via a graphical display which is refreshed or updated at 5-s intervals. In addition to the real-time display of data, continuous data recording allows subsequent replay of measurements at either normal or high speed. Preliminary experimental results are given for aerosols of both spherical and nonspherical particle types, and these suggest the instrument may find use in environmental monitoring of aerosols or clouds where some real-time semiquantitative assessment of particulate size and shape spectra may be desirable as an aid to characterizing the aerosol and its constituent particulate species.

  18. Photophysical properties of Au-CdTe hybrid nanostructures of varying sizes and shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Sen, Tapasi; Mandal, Sadananda; Patra, Amitava

    2012-12-07

    We design well-defined metal-semiconductor nanostructures using thiol-functionalized CdTe quantum dots (QDs)/quantum rods (QRs) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein-conjugated Au nanoparticles (NPs)/nanorods (NRs) in aqueous solution. The main focus of this article is to address the impacts of size and shape on the photophysical properties, including radiative and nonradiative decay processes and energy transfers, of Au-CdTe hybrid nanostructures. The red shifting of the plasmonic band and the strong photoluminescence (PL) quenching reveal a strong interaction between plasmons and excitons in these Au-CdTe hybrid nanostructures. The PL quenching of CdTe QDs varies from 40 to 86 % by changing the size and shape of the Au NPs. The radiative as well as the nonradiative decay rates of the CdTe QDs/QRs are found to be affected in the presence of both Au NPs and NRs. A significant change in the nonradiative decay rate from 4.72×10(6) to 3.92×10(10) s(-1) is obtained for Au NR-conjugated CdTe QDs. It is seen that the sizes and shapes of the Au NPs have a pronounced effect on the distance-dependent energy transfer. Such metal-semiconductor hybrid nanostructures should have great potentials for nonlinear optical properties, photovoltaic devices, and chemical sensors.

  19. Cosmic Voids: structure, dynamics and galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2009-01-01

    In this review we discuss several aspects of Cosmic Voids. Voids are a major component of the large scale distribution of matter and galaxies in the Universe. They are of instrumental importance for understanding the emergence of the Cosmic Web. Their relatively simple shape and structure makes them into useful tools for extracting the value of a variety cosmic parameters, possibly including even that of the influence of dark energy. Perhaps most promising and challenging is the issue of the galaxies found within their realm. Not only does the pristine environment of voids provide a promising testing ground for assessing the role of environment on the formation and evolution of galaxies, the dearth of dwarf galaxies may even represent a serious challenge to the standard view of cosmic structure formation.

  20. Cosmic Voids and Void Lensing in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, C; Kovacs, A; Jain, B; García-Bellido, J; Nadathur, S; Gruen, D; Hamaus, N; Huterer, D; Vielzeuf, P; Amara, A; Bonnett, C; DeRose, J; Hartley, W G; Jarvis, M; Lahav, O; Miquel, R; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E S; Sheldon, E; Wechsler, R H; Zuntz, J; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Annis, J; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bernstein, R A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Krause, E; Kuehn, K; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Melchior, P; Plazas, A A; Reil, K; Romer, A K; Sanchez, E; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Walker, A R; Weller, J

    2016-01-01

    Galaxies and their dark matter halos populate a complicated filamentary network around large, nearly empty regions known as cosmic voids. Cosmic voids are usually identified in spectroscopic galaxy surveys, where 3D information about the large-scale structure of the Universe is available. Although an increasing amount of photometric data is being produced, its potential for void studies is limited since photometric redshifts induce line-of-sight position errors of $\\sim50$ Mpc/$h$ or more that can render many voids undetectable. In this paper we present a new void finder designed for photometric surveys, validate it using simulations, and apply it to the high-quality photo-$z$ redMaGiC galaxy sample of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES-SV) data. The algorithm works by projecting galaxies into 2D slices and finding voids in the smoothed 2D galaxy density field of the slice. Fixing the line-of-sight size of the slices to be at least twice the photo-$z$ scatter, the number of voids found in these ...

  1. Integration of in situ Imaging and Chord Length Distribution Measurements for Estimation of Particle Size and Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Agimelen, Okpeafoh S; McGinty, John; Tachtatzis, Christos; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Haley, Ian; Sefcik, Jan; Mulholland, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient processing of particulate products across various manufacturing steps requires that particles possess desired attributes such as size and shape. Controlling the particle production process to obtain required attributes will be greatly facilitated using robust algorithms providing the size and shape information of the particles from in situ measurements. However, obtaining particle size and shape information in situ during manufacturing has been a big challenge. This is because the problem of estimating particle size and shape (aspect ratio) from signals provided by in-line measuring tools is often ill posed, and therefore it calls for appropriate constraints to be imposed on the problem. One way to constrain uncertainty in estimation of particle size and shape from in-line measurements is to combine data from different measurements such as chord length distribution (CLD) and imaging. This paper presents two different methods for combining imaging and CLD data obtained with in-line tools in order to ...

  2. Effect of grain size on superelasticity in Fe-Mn-Al-Ni shape memory alloy wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Omori

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of grain size on superelastic properties in Fe-34Mn-15Al-7.5Ni alloy wires with a ⟨110⟩ fiber-texture were investigated by cyclic tensile tests. It was confirmed that the critical stress for induced martensitic transformation and the superelastic strain are functions of relative grain size d/D (d: mean grain diameter, D: wire diameter, and that the critical stress is proportional to (1–d/D2 as well as in Cu-based shape memory alloys. A large superelastic strain of about 5% was obtained in the specimen with a large relative grain size over d/D = 1.

  3. Shape-controlled synthesis of highly monodisperse and small size gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU YunZhi; DU YuKou; YANG Ping; LI JinRu; JIANG Long

    2007-01-01

    We describe here that fine control of nanoparticle shape and size can be achieved by systematic variation of experimental parameters in the seeded growth procedure in aqueous solution. Cubic and spherical gold nanoparticles are obtained respectively. In particularly, the Au cubes are highly monodisperse in 33±2 nm diameter. The experimental methods involve the preparation of Au seed particles and the subsequent addition of an appropriate quantity of Au seed solution to the aqueous growth solutions containing desired quantities of CTAB and ascorbic acid (AA). Here, AA is a weak reducing agent and CTAB is not only a stable agent for nanoparticles but also an inductive agent for leading increase in the face of nanoparticle. Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to characterize the nanoparticles. The results show that the different size gold nanoparticles displayed high size homogenous distribution and formed mono-membrane at the air/solid interface.

  4. Direct observation of hierarchical nucleation of martensite and size-dependent superelasticity in shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lifeng; Ding, Xiangdong; Li, Ju; Lookman, Turab; Sun, Jun

    2014-02-21

    Martensitic transformation usually creates hierarchical internal structures beyond mere change of the atomic crystal structure. Multi-stage nucleation is thus required, where nucleation (level-1) of the underlying atomic crystal lattice does not have to be immediately followed by the nucleation of higher-order superstructures (level-2 and above), such as polysynthetic laths. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we directly observe the nucleation of the level-2 superstructure in a Cu-Al-Ni single crystal under compression, with critical super-nuclei size L2c around 500 nm. When the sample size D decreases below L2c, the superelasticity behavior changes from a flat stress plateau to a continuously rising stress-strain curve. Such size dependence definitely would impact the application of shape memory alloys in miniaturized MEMS/NEMS devices.

  5. Effect of surfactants on the size and shape of cobalt nanoparticles synthesized by thermal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Huiping; Huang, Yuqiang; Lee, Hyosook; Suh, Yong Jae; Kim, Chongoh

    2006-04-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles with various morphologies were synthesized by thermal decomposition of cobalt acetate in the presence of various surfactants at 260 °C. A combination of surfactants consisting of sufficient amount of oleic acid together with polyvinylpyrrolidone and oleylamine resulted in well-dispersed cubic cobalt nanoparticles of ~25 nm in average size. When 1,2-dodecanediol was added as a reducing agent to the surfactant mixture, triangular-prism-shaped nanoparticles of ~50 nm in average size were synthesized. Furthermore, an injection of trioctylphosphine into the reactor as an additional surfactant decreased the particle size to ~10 nm. The XRD pattern of the prism-like particles corresponded to hexagonal close-packed crystalline phase of cobalt.

  6. The cross-sectional size and shape of human terminal scalp hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, P E; Thompson, J R

    1997-02-01

    Change in size of the hair shaft with distance form the scalp has been investigated, using a rotatory profile method of diameter measurement, in terminal human scalp hair of long-haired young Caucasian women. As the whole length of hairs having completed anagen are rarely found intact, two types of hair were investigated: those including segments produced at the onset of anagen ('anagen hairs'), and those including segments produced at the end of anagen ('telogen hairs'). In addition, a method of determining the cause of any size variation has been described and employed. Changes were found in the major axis of the hair cross-section, cross-sectional area and ellipticity with distance from the scalp, while the minor cross-sectional axis remained constant. It was established that these changes were the result of intrafollicular rather than extrafollicular mechanisms. Finally, a composite picture of the cross-sectional size and shape of the 'average' whole anagen hair of the study has been constructed. From the distal tip towards the scalp for approximately 6-8 cm, there was an abrupt increase in size, representing a starting-up phase of early anagen. Following this, the hair was at its greatest cross-sectional size and ellipticity which then progressively decreased through anagen (20% decrease for cross-sectional area and 13% for ellipticity). In contrast, the minor axis of the hair cross-section, remained constant throughout anagen. The hair was not therefore a uniformly sized cylinder. It was approximately spear-shaped, being broadened out in one plane distally where it was more elliptical. Subsequently as anagen progressed the hair shaft became smaller and more circular.

  7. Structure Sensitivity Study of Waterborne Contaminant Hydrogenation Using Shape- and Size-Controlled Pd Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2013-03-01

    Catalytic reduction with Pd has emerged as a promising technology to remove a suite of contaminants from drinking water, such as oxyanions, disinfection byproducts, and halogenated pollutants, but low activity is a major challenge for application. To address this challenge, we synthesized a set of shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles and evaluated the activity of three probe contaminants (i.e., nitrite, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and diatrizoate) as a function of facet type (e.g., (100), (110), (111)), ratios of low- to high-coordination sites, and ratios of surface sites to total Pd (i.e., dispersion). Reduction results for an initial contaminant concentration of 100 μM show that initial turnover frequency (TOF0) for nitrite increases 4.7-fold with increasing percent of (100) surface Pd sites (from 0% to 95.3%), whereas the TOF0 for NDMA and for diatrizoate increases 4.5- and 3.6-fold, respectively, with an increasing percent of terrace surface Pd sites (from 79.8% to 95.3%). Results for an initial nitrite concentration of 2 mM show that TOF0 is the same for all shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles. Trends for TOF0 were supported by results showing that all catalysts but one were stable in shape and size up to 12 days; for the exception, iodide liberation in diatrizoate reduction appeared to be responsible for a shape change of 4 nm octahedral Pd nanoparticles. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations for the free energy change of hydrogen (H2), nitrite, and nitric oxide (NO) adsorption and a two-site model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism suggest that competition of adsorbates for different Pd sites can explain the TOF0 results. Our study shows for the first time that catalytic reduction activity for waterborne contaminant removal varies with the Pd shape and size, and it suggests that Pd catalysts can be tailored for optimal performance to treat a variety of contaminants for drinking water. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Size- and shape-dependent clinical and mycological efficacy of silver nanoparticles on dandruff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar MF

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad F Anwar,1 Deepak Yadav,2 Swati Jain,3 Sumeet Kapoor,4 Shweta Rastogi,5 Indu Arora,6 Mohammed Samim1 1Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, 2Faculty of Medicine, Jamia Hamdard University, New Delhi, 3Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh, 4Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, 5Department of Chemistry, Hans Raj College, 6Department of Biomedical Sciences, Rajguru College of Applied Sciences for Women, University of Delhi, Delhi, India Abstract: Dandruff is a prominent scalp problem caused by the growth of fungus Malassezia furfur, potentially cascading into dermal inflammation, itching, and tissue damage. The present work outlines a detailed analysis of the treatment of scalp infection using silver nanomaterials (Ag NMs, and focuses on biocidal activity owing to manipulation of size, shape, and structure. Monodisperse silver spherical nanoparticles (NPs and nanorods (NRs were synthesized by chemical routes that were characterized using analytical and spectroscopic techniques. Ag NMs demonstrated enhanced biocidal tendencies compared to market available drugs, itracanozole and ketoconazole, showing greater zones of inhibition. The obtained 20 nm and 50 nm spherical-shaped NPs and 50 nm NRs showed concentration-, size-, and shape-dependent antifungal activity, with 20 nm spherical-shaped NPs exhibiting excellent potency. Minimum inhibitory concentration for 20 nm was lowest at 0.2 mg/mL in comparison to 0.3 mg/mL for NRs. Primary irritation index was 0.33 and 0.16 for 20 nm and 50 nm spherical-shaped NPs, respectively, while 50 nm rod-shaped NMs exhibited negligible redness. An in vivo model for M. furfur infection was generated by passing fungi subcutaneously in rats’ skin. Again, 20 nm particles showed best normalization of skin after 10 days on regular dosing, in comparison with bigger and rod-shaped particles. The statistical clinical score was

  9. Biochar particle size, shape, and porosity act together to influence soil water properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon; Masiello, Caroline A; Gonnermann, Helge M

    2017-01-01

    Many studies report that, under some circumstances, amending soil with biochar can improve field capacity and plant-available water. However, little is known about the mechanisms that control these improvements, making it challenging to predict when biochar will improve soil water properties. To develop a conceptual model explaining biochar's effects on soil hydrologic processes, we conducted a series of well constrained laboratory experiments using a sand matrix to test the effects of biochar particle size and porosity on soil water retention curves. We showed that biochar particle size affects soil water storage through changing pore space between particles (interpores) and by adding pores that are part of the biochar (intrapores). We used these experimental results to better understand how biochar intrapores and biochar particle shape control the observed changes in water retention when capillary pressure is the main component of soil water potential. We propose that biochar's intrapores increase water content of biochar-sand mixtures when soils are drier. When biochar-sand mixtures are wetter, biochar particles' elongated shape disrupts the packing of grains in the sandy matrix, increasing the volume between grains (interpores) available for water storage. These results imply that biochars with a high intraporosity and irregular shapes will most effectively increase water storage in coarse soils.

  10. Computational lfuid dynamics simulation of intracranial aneurysms - comparing size and shape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zifeng Yang; Hongtao Yu; George P Huang; Ryan Schwieterman; Bryan Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the hemodynamics of an anatomic internal carotid artery aneurysm derived from a patient-specific model and then manipulate into two phantom morphologies: one growing uniformly by size and the other changing shape unevenly. Methods: The computational model of the saccular, internal carotid artery, aneurysm was constructed from 3D rotational, digitally subtracted, catheter angiography images. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed under pulsatile cardiac flow conditions. Velocity vectors, streamlines, pressure, and wall shear stress (WSS) and its variance distributions were quantitatively visualized. Results: The maximum pressure andWSS from the time-averaged distribution on the inside saccular surface of the original case are 415.38 and 17.61 Pa. In contrast, the bi-lobed shape gives rise to higher peak values of pressure (461.00 Pa) andWSS (33.20 Pa) on the saccular dome. Conversely, the evenly enlarged aneurysm actually results in a slightly lower peak pressure (399.58 Pa) and drastically decreasedWSS (9.81 Pa). Conclusions:The current study indicates that the size of the aneurysm should not be the only determining factor for the rupture risk consideration, the irregularity of the aneurysm shape and the corresponding aberrant hemodynamics might be a more important factor to consider for risk assessment.

  11. Properties of spontaneous mutational variance and covariance for wing size and shape in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, David; Fierst, Janna

    2013-04-01

    We estimated mutational variance-covariance matrices, M, for wing shape and size in two genotypes of Drosophila melanogaster after 192 generations of mutation accumulation. We characterized 21 potentially independent aspects of wing shape and size using geometric morphometrics, and analyzed the data using a likelihood-based factor-analytic approach. We implement a previously unused analysis that describes those directions with the greatest difference in evolvability between pairs of matrices. There are significant mutational effects on 19 of 21 possible aspects of wing form, consistent with the high dimensionality of standing genetic variation for wing shape previously identified in D. melanogaster. Mutations have partially recessive effects, consistent with average dominance around 0.25. Sex-specific matrices are relatively similar, although male-specific matrices are slightly larger, as expected due to dosage compensation on the X chromosome. Genotype-specific matrices are quite different. Matrices may differ both because of sampling error based on small samples of mutations with large phenotypic effects, and because of the mutational properties of the genotypes. Genotypic differences are likely to be involved, as the two genotypes have different molecular mutation rates and properties. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Voids in Ly{\\alpha} Forest Tomographic Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, Casey W; White, Martin; Lee, Khee-Gan

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method of finding cosmic voids using tomographic maps of Ly{\\alpha} forest flux. We identify cosmological voids with radii of 2 - 12 $h^{-1}$Mpc in a large N-body simulation at $z = 2.5$, and characterize the signal of the high-redshift voids in density and Ly{\\alpha} forest flux. The void properties are similar to what has been found at lower redshifts, but they are smaller and have steeper radial density profiles. Similarly to what has been found for low-redshift voids, the radial velocity profiles have little scatter and agree very well with the linear theory prediction. We run the same void finder on an ideal Ly{\\alpha} flux field and tomographic reconstructions at various spatial samplings. We compare the tomographic map void catalogs to the density void catalog and find good agreement even with modest-sized voids ($r > 6 \\, h^{-1}$Mpc). Using our simple void-finding method, the configuration of the ongoing CLAMATO survey covering 1 deg$^2$ would provide a sample of about 100 high-redshi...

  13. Systematic classification of unseeded batch crystallization systems for achievable shape and size analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, David; Nagy, Zoltan K.

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of the current work is to develop a systematic classification scheme for crystallization systems considering simultaneous size and shape variations, and to study the effect of temperature profiles on the achievable final shape of crystals for various crystallization systems. A classification method is proposed based on the simultaneous consideration of the effect of temperature profiles on nucleation and growth rates of two different characteristic crystal dimensions. Hence the approach provides direct indication of the extent in which crystal shape may be controlled for a particular system class by manipulating the supersaturation. A multidimensional population balance model (PBM) was implemented for unseeded crystallization processes of four different compounds. The effect between the nucleation and growth mechanisms on the final aspect ratio (AR) was investigated and it was shown that for nucleation dominated systems the AR is independent of the supersaturation profile. The simulation results confirmed experimentally also show that most crystallization systems tend to achieve an equilibrium shape hence the variation in the aspect ratio that can be achieved by manipulating the supersaturation is limited, in particular when nucleation is also taken into account as a competing phenomenon.

  14. Climate associated size and shape changes in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) populations from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Vargas, Ronald Enrique; Ya-Umphan, Phubeth; Phumala-Morales, Noppawan; Komalamisra, Narumon; Dujardin, Jean-Pierre

    2010-05-01

    In spite of the adult body size variability of Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) and its likely association with life history and vectorial capacity, the causes of size variation itself have been only partially identified. In particular, possible important factors such as climatic variation have not received much attention. The objective of this 2-year study was to describe from field collections the relationship of Ae. aegypti metric properties with available climatic data. The study took place in a dengue hyperendemic area of Thailand. Fourth instar larvae (L(4)) and pupae were collected from the same breeding places allowing the comparisons between seven successive collections, four in 2007 and three in 2008. Climatic data were relative humidity (RH) and temperature (T). They were considered for the periods covering either the pre-imaginal development or, assuming heritability of size, the previous generation. The pre-imaginal period was further subdivided into embryonic and larval phases of development. Size was estimated by traditional and geometric techniques, the latter based on 18 landmarks collected at the intersections of veins also allowing estimation of shape. The shape variation of the wing followed similar patterns as for size and was shown to be a passive allometric change. No significant correlation of size or shape could be disclosed with T. In contrast, significant correlation with RH was found during two periods of examination: (i) the period affecting the generation previous to the time of collection, suggesting possible selective mechanisms on genitors, and (ii) the one occurring during pre-imaginal development. The subdivision of the latter into embryonic and larval phases allowed to evidence a possible selecting effect on embryonic development. The selection would act through the resistance to water loss which is known to depend on the relative surface of the cuticle. In conclusion, our data highlight the importance of the emerged period of Ae

  15. Ecological and evolutionary influences on body size and shape in the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiari, Ylenia; Glaberman, Scott; Tarroso, Pedro; Caccone, Adalgisa; Claude, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Oceanic islands are often inhabited by endemic species that have undergone substantial morphological evolutionary change due to processes of multiple colonizations from various source populations, dispersal, and local adaptation. Galápagos marine iguanas are an example of an island endemic exhibiting high morphological diversity, including substantial body size variation among populations and sexes, but the causes and magnitude of this variation are not well understood. We obtained morphological measurements from marine iguanas throughout their distribution range. These data were combined with genetic and local environmental data from each population to investigate the effects of evolutionary history and environmental conditions on body size and shape variation and sexual dimorphism. Our results indicate that body size and shape are highly variable among populations. Sea surface temperature and island perimeter, but not evolutionary history as depicted by phylogeographic patterns in this species, explain variation in body size among populations. Conversely, evolutionary history, but not environmental parameters or island size, was found to influence variation in body shape among populations. Finally, in all populations except one, we found strong sexual dimorphism in body size and shape in which males are larger, with higher heads than females, while females have longer heads than males. Differences among populations suggest that plasticity and/or genetic adaptation may shape body size and shape variation in marine iguanas. This study will help target future investigations to address the contribution of plasticity versus genetic adaptation on size and shape variation in marine iguanas.

  16. Ductile damage of porous materials with two populations of voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Pierre-Guy; Monerie, Yann; Suquet, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    This study is devoted to the modelling of ductile damage in uranium dioxide. This polycrystalline material contains two populations of voids of well separated size. The problem addressed here is the prediction of the effective flow surface of a Gurson material containing randomly oriented oblate voids. The case of spherical voids is considered first and the variational approach of Gurson is generalized by adding a compressible component to his original velocity field. The case of aligned oblate voids is then considered and a suitable generalization of a velocity field due to Gologanu et al. (ASME J. Engrg. Mater. Technol. 116 (1994) 290-297) is proposed. The extension to randomly oriented voids is achieved by averaging over all orientations. In each case, rigorous upper bounds and approximate estimates are derived and compared (in the case of spherical voids) with Finite Element simulations. To cite this article: P.-G. Vincent et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  17. Size- and shape-dependent plasmonic properties of aluminum nanoparticles for nanosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Jyoti; Soni, R. K.

    2013-11-01

    The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of aluminum nanospheres, nanorods, and nanodisks was studied using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. From the simulation results, optimal dimensions of nanospheres, nanodisks, and nanorods for refractive index sensitivity (RIS), line shape broadening (FWHM), and figure-of-merit (FOM) are calculated for aluminum-based plasmonic nanosensors. Our calculated results show that aluminum is an efficient plasmonic material for refractive index sensing from deep-UV to near infrared wavelengths. The RIS of aluminum nanospheres of optimal size is greater than gold and silver nanospheres. Further, RIS or FOM can be optimized in different spectral region by varying shape and dimensions. The optimization reveals higher FOM for nanospheres in the deep-UV region and for nanorods and nanodisks in the broad visible-NIR region.

  18. Grain-size effect in micromechanical modelling of hysteresis in shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw; Petryk, Henryk [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research (IPPT), Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-10-15

    Size effects in pseudoelastic polycrystalline shape memory alloys are studied by considering a representative spherical laminated domain (subgrain) and its interfacial energy at three scales: at the subgrain boundaries, at the austenite-martensite interfaces, and at the twin boundaries. Two sources of interfacial energy are accounted for, namely the atomic-scale energy of twin and phase boundaries and the elastic strain energy at microstructured interfaces, the latter being predicted theoretically. The evolution of microstructure of the representative domain is determined using the incremental energy minimization rule applied to the sum of the increments in the Helmholtz free energy and rate-independent dissipation. The size-dependent part of dissipation is estimated by assuming that negative increments in interfacial energy, associated with annihilation of interfaces, cannot be reverted back into the bulk free energy and are thus dissipated. Simple analytic formula for the interfacial energy dissipated in a complete forward-reverse transformation cycle is derived and combined with a micromechanical model of a polycrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy. A numerical example illustrating size-dependent hysteresis in the stress-induced martensitic transformation is presented. (orig.)

  19. Flow rate of polygonal grains through a bottleneck: Interplay between shape and size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Goldberg

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We report two-dimensional simulations of circular and polygonal grains passing through an aperture at the bottom of a silo. The mass flow rate for regular polygons is lower than for disks\\red{,} as observed by other authors. We show that both the exit velocity of the grains and the packing fraction are lower for polygons, which leads to the reduced flow rate. We point out the importance of the criteria used to define when two objects of different shape are considered to be of the same size. Depending on this criteria, the mass flow rate may vary significantly for some polygons. Moreover, the particle flow rate is non-trivially related to a combination of mass flow rate, particle shape and particle size. For some polygons, the particle flow rate may be lower or higher than that of the corresponding disks depending on the size comparison criteria. Received: 18 May 2015, Accepted: 30 October 2015; Edited by: F. Melo; Reviewed by: J.-N. Roux, Universite Parsi Est, Laboratoire Navier, Champs-sur-Marne, France; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4279/PIP.070016 Cite as: E Goldberg, C M Carlevaro, L A Pugnaloni, Papers in Physics 7, 070016 (2015

  20. Effects of shape and size of agar gels on heating uniformity during pulsed microwave treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Reyes, Nohemí; Temis-Pérez, Ana L; López-Malo, Aurelio; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Sosa-Morales, María Elena

    2015-05-01

    Model gel systems with different shape (sphere, cylinder, and slab) and size (180 and 290 g) were prepared with agar (5%) and sucrose (5%). Dielectric constant (ε'), loss factor (ε"), thermophysical properties, and temperature distribution of the model system were measured. Each agar model system was immersed and suspended in water, and then, heated in a microwave oven with intermittent heating until the core temperature reached 50 °C. The ε' and ε" of agar gels decreased when frequency increased. The density and thermal conductivity values of the agar gels were 1033 kg/m(3) and 0.55 W/m °C, respectively. The temperature distribution of sphere, cylinder, and slab was different when similar power doses were applied. The slab reached 50 °C in less time (10 min) and showed a more uniform heating than spheres and cylinders in both sizes. Agar model systems of 180 g heated faster than those of 290 g. The coldest point was the center of the model systems in all studied cases. Shape and size are critical food factors that affect the heating uniformity during microwave heating processes.

  1. Three dimensional dental epithelial-mesenchymal constructs of predetermined size and shape for tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weibo; Ahluwalia, Ivy P; Yelick, Pamela C

    2010-11-01

    While it is known that precise dental epithelial-mesenchymal (DE-DM) cell interactions provide critical functions in tooth development, reliable methods to establish proper DE-DM cell interactions for tooth regeneration have yet to be established. To address this challenge, and to generate bioengineered teeth of predetermined size and shape, in this study, we characterize three dimensional (3D) pre-fabricated DE-DM cell constructs. Human dental pulp cell seeded Collagen gel layers were co-cultured with porcine DE cells suspended in Growth Factor Reduced (GFR) Matrigel. The resulting 3D DE-DM cell layers were cultured in vitro, or implanted and grown subcutaneously in vivo in nude rats. Molecular, histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses of harvested implants revealed organized DE-DM cell interactions, the induced expression of dental tissue-specific markers Amelogenin (AM) and Dentin Sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), and basement membrane markers Laminin 5 and collagen IV, and irregular mineralized tissue formation after 4 weeks. We anticipate that these studies will facilitate the eventual establishment of reliable methods to elaborate dental tissues, and full sized teeth of specified sized and shape.

  2. Experimental investigation of granule size and shape dynamics in twin-screw granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Bellandi, Giacomo; Gernaey, Krist V; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2014-11-20

    A twin-screw granulator (TSG), a promising equipment for continuous high shear wet granulation (HSWG), achieves the desired level of mixing by a combination of the appropriate screw configuration and a suitable set of process settings (e.g. feed rate, screw speed, etc.), thus producing a certain granule size and shape distribution (GSSD). However, the primary sizing and shaping mechanism behind the resulting distribution is not well understood due to the opacity of the multiphase system in the granulator. This study experimentally characterised the GSSD dynamics along the TSG barrel length in order to understand the function of individual screw modules and process settings, as well as their interaction. Particle size analysis of granules collected at the outlet of the TSG suggested significant interaction between the process and screw configuration parameters influencing the heterogeneity in the GSSD. By characterising the samples collected along the screw length, a variable influence of the screw modules at different process conditions was observed. At low liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S), the first kneading module seemed to play a significant role in mixing, whereas the second kneading module was found to be more involved in reshaping the granules. At high L/S and high throughput, aggregation mainly took place in the second kneading module changing the GSSD. The results obtained from this study will be further used for the calibration and validation of a mechanistic model and, hence, support future development of a more detailed understanding of the HSWG process in a TSG.

  3. Failure by void coalescence in metallic materials containing primary and secondary voids subject to intense shearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2011-01-01

    , subject to shear dominated loading. To account for both length scales involved in this study, a continuum model that includes the softening effect of damage evolution in shear is used to represent the matrix material surrounding the primary voids. Here, a recently extended Gurson-type model is used, which......Failure under intense shearing at close to zero stress triaxiality is widely observed for ductile metallic materials, and is identified in experiments as smeared-out dimples on the fracture surface. Numerical cell-model studies of equal sized voids have revealed that the mechanism governing...... secondary damage that co-exists with or nucleation in the ligaments between larger voids that coalesce during intense shearing. A numerical cell-model study is carried out to gain a parametric understanding of the overall material response for different initial conditions of the two void populations...

  4. Neurogenic voiding dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Petros; Apostolidis, Apostolos

    2017-05-01

    This review aims to analyze and discuss all recently published articles associated with neurogenic voiding discussion providing readers with the most updated knowledge and trigger for further research. They include the proposal of a novel classification system for the pathophysiology of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) which combines neurological defect in a distinct anatomic location, and data on bowel dysfunction, autonomic dysreflexia and urine biomarkers; review of patient-reported outcome measures in NLUTD; review of the criteria for the diagnosis of clinically significant urinary infections; novel research findings on the pathophysiology of NLUTD; and review of data on minimally and more invasive treatments. Despite the extended evidence base on NLUTD, there is a paucity of high-quality new research concerning voiding dysfunction as opposed to storage problems. The update aims to inform clinicians about new developments in clinical practice, as well as ignite discussion for further clinical and basic research in the aforementioned areas of NLUTD.

  5. Influence of shape and size of the particles on jigging separation of plastics mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Fernando; Castilho, Ana

    2016-02-01

    Plastics are popular for numerous applications due to their high versatility and favourable properties such as endurance, lightness and cheapness. Therefore the generation of plastic waste is constantly increasing, becoming one of the larger categories in municipal solid waste. Almost all plastic materials are recyclable, but for the recycling to be possible it is necessary to separate the different types of plastics. The aim of this research was to evaluate the performance of the jig separation of bi-component plastic mixtures. For this study six granulated plastics had been used: Polystyrene (PS), Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET-S, PET-D) and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC-M, PVC-D). Plastics mixtures were subjected to jigging in a laboratorial Denver mineral jig. The results showed that the quality of the jigging separation varies with the mixture, the density differences and with the size and shape of the particles. In the case of particles with more regular shapes the quality of separation of bi-component plastic mixtures improved with the increase of the particle size. For lamellar particles the influence of particle size was minimal. In general, the beneficiation of plastics with similar densities was not effective, since the separation efficiency was lower than 25%. However, in bi-component plastic mixtures that join a low density plastic (PS) with a high density one (PMMA, PET-S, PET-D, PVC-M and PVC-D), the quality of the jigging separation was greatly improved. The PS grade in the sunk was less than 1% for all the plastic mixtures. Jigging proved to be an effective method for the separation of bi-component plastic mixtures. Jigging separation will be enhanced if the less dense plastic, that overflows, has a lamellar shape and if the denser plastic, that sinks, has a regular one.

  6. Effects of particle shape and size on nanofluid properties for potential Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengku Mohd Tengku Amran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR in oil and gas industry is very important to increase oil recovery and prolong the lifetime of a reservoir but it has been very costly and losing properties of EOR agent due to harsh condition. Nanoparticles have been used in EOR application since they are not degradable in reservoir condition and used in smaller amount compared to polymer usage. Commonly, EOR techniques are focusing on increasing the sweep efficiency by controlling the mobility ratio between reservoir fluid and injected fluid. Thus, this research aimed to analyze the nanofluid viscosity at different particle size and shape, volumetric concentration and types of dispersing fluid, as well as to determine the oil recovery performance at different nanofluid concentration. The nanofluid viscosity was investigated at nanoparticle sizes of 15nm and 60nm and shapes of 15nm spherical-solid and porous. Five nanofluid samples with concentration ranging from 0.1wt.% to 7wt.% were used to investigate the effect of volumetric concentration. Distilled water, ethanol, ethylene glycol (EG and brine were used for the effect of dispersing fluids. Oil recovery was investigated at five different concentrations of nanofluid samples through flooding test. It was found that viscosity of nanofluid increased with decreasing particle size and increasing volumetric concentration. Solid shape particle and increasing dispersing fluid viscosity resulted in higher nanofluid viscosity. The higher the nanofluid concentration, the higher the oil recovery obtained. It can be concluded that nanofluid properties have been significantly affected by the environment and the particle used for potential EOR application.

  7. WormSizer: high-throughput analysis of nematode size and shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad T Moore

    Full Text Available The fundamental phenotypes of growth rate, size and morphology are the result of complex interactions between genotype and environment. We developed a high-throughput software application, WormSizer, which computes size and shape of nematodes from brightfield images. Existing methods for estimating volume either coarsely model the nematode as a cylinder or assume the worm shape or opacity is invariant. Our estimate is more robust to changes in morphology or optical density as it only assumes radial symmetry. This open source software is written as a plugin for the well-known image-processing framework Fiji/ImageJ. It may therefore be extended easily. We evaluated the technical performance of this framework, and we used it to analyze growth and shape of several canonical Caenorhabditis elegans mutants in a developmental time series. We confirm quantitatively that a Dumpy (Dpy mutant is short and fat and that a Long (Lon mutant is long and thin. We show that daf-2 insulin-like receptor mutants are larger than wild-type upon hatching but grow slow, and WormSizer can distinguish dauer larvae from normal larvae. We also show that a Small (Sma mutant is actually smaller than wild-type at all stages of larval development. WormSizer works with Uncoordinated (Unc and Roller (Rol mutants as well, indicating that it can be used with mutants despite behavioral phenotypes. We used our complete data set to perform a power analysis, giving users a sense of how many images are needed to detect different effect sizes. Our analysis confirms and extends on existing phenotypic characterization of well-characterized mutants, demonstrating the utility and robustness of WormSizer.

  8. The effect of nanoparticle size, shape, and surface chemistry on biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Alexandre; Tang, Peter S; Chan, Warren C W

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of the interactions between nanoparticles and biological systems is of significant interest. Studies aimed at correlating the properties of nanomaterials such as size, shape, chemical functionality, surface charge, and composition with biomolecular signaling, biological kinetics, transportation, and toxicity in both cell culture and animal experiments are under way. These fundamental studies will provide a foundation for engineering the next generation of nanoscale devices. Here, we provide rationales for these studies, review the current progress in studies of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems, and provide a perspective on the long-term implications of these findings.

  9. A computerized voiding diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, J M; McNett, J; Badlani, G H

    1996-11-01

    To examine a group of subject and control patient's preferences and compliance with regard to the Compu-Void (CV) electronic voiding diary as compared to the written diary (WD) and to compare the two methods with respect to the type of information obtained and whether the order of use of each method influenced results in the subject group. Thirty-six women between the ages of 20 and 84 with bladder symptoms were compared to a group of 36 age-matched women. In 100% of subjects and 95% of control patients, CV entries exceeded the number made with the WD in voiding events and, in subjects, in incontinence episodes recorded (P < .005 and P < .005, respectively). Over 98% of subjects and over 80% of controls preferred the CV (P < .0005). The order of use of each method in subjects made no significant difference with regard to the volume of information obtained (P < .407), number of leakage events recorded (P < .494) or fluid intake patterns (P < .410). Patients' compliance with each method was not affected by the order of use. Our results suggest an increased volume of data and greater patient compliance in reporting bladder symptoms and events using the CV and that the order of use is not important.

  10. Dynamic light scattering study of peanut agglutinin: Size, shape and urea denaturation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sagarika Dev; Avadhesha Surolia

    2006-12-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) is a homotetrameric protein with a unique open quaternary structure. PNA shows non-two state profile in chaotrope induced denaturation. It passes through a monomeric molten globule like state before complete denaturation (Reddy et al 1999). This denaturation profile is associated with the change in hydrodynamic radius of the native protein. Though the molten globule-like state is monomeric in nature it expands in size due to partial denaturation. The size and shape of the native PNA as well as the change in hydrodynamic radius of the protein during denaturation has been studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The generation of two species is evident from the profile of hydrodynamic radii. This study also reveals the extent of compactness of the intermediate state.

  11. The impact of size and shape of particles of undergrowth and herbs mixtures on aerodynamic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Panasiewicz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the size and shape of a selected group of herbs (dried juniper berries Juniperus communis, dry blueberries Vaccinium myrtillus, petals of cornflower Centaurea cyanus on the value of the volatility coefficient, the coefficient of sphericity and the critical speed was analysed in the presented research. A laboratory anemometer to measure the speed of air was used. The determination of the volatility coefficient of particular size fractions was conducted on the basis of critical speed values, calculated as an average established after five measurements. The established aerodynamic properties of particular mixtures allow the determination and the assessment of differences among fractions of valuable resources and different impurities. The presented data might constitute a basis to determine the scope of differences among them and establish interrelations which allow the application of proper parameters for the pneumatic separation process in practice.

  12. Measuring shape and size of micrometric particles from the analysis of the forward scattered field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, S.; Paroli, B.; Pullia, A.; Potenza, M. A. C., E-mail: marco.potenza@unimi.it [Department of Physics and CIMAINA, University of Milan, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Sanvito, T. [DISAT Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); EOS s.r.l., viale Ortles 22/4, 20139 Milan (Italy); Delmonte, B. [DISAT Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy)

    2016-06-14

    Characterizing nano- and micro-particles in fluids still proves to be a significant challenge for both science and industry. Here, we show how to determine shape and size distributions of polydisperse water suspensions of micron-sized particles by the analysis of the field scattered in the forward direction by single particles illuminated by a laser beam. We exploit the novel Single Particle Extinction and Scattering method in connection with shear conditions which give preferred orientations to the particles passing through the scattering volume. Water suspensions of calibrated non-spherical particles, polydisperse standard monophasic mineral samples of quartz and kaolinite, and a mixture of quartz and illite are studied in detail. Application and limitation of the method are discussed.

  13. Influence of graphite particle size and its shape on performance of carbon composite bipolar plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) where polymer is used as binder and graphite is used as electric filler were prepared by means of compression molding technology. Study on the effects of graphite particle size and shape on the bipolar plate performance, such as electrical conductivity, strength, etc. showed that with decrease of graphite particle size, bulk electrical conductivity and thermometric conductivity decreased, but that flexural strength was enhanced. After spherical graphite occurrence in flake-like form, the flexural strength of the bipolar plate was enhanced, electrical conductivity increased but thermal conductivity decreased in direction paralleling pressure direction, and both electrical conductivity and thermometric conductivity reduced in direction perpendicular to pressure direction.

  14. Sizes of main-belt asteroids by combining shape models and Keck adaptive aptics observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hanuš, J; Ďurech, J

    2013-01-01

    We select 50 main-belt asteroids with a diameter between 20 and 400 km for which we have (i) shape models derived by the lightcurve inversion method (LI) and (ii) resolved observations of good quality collected with the Keck II adaptive optics (AO) system in the near-infrared. We derive the size of these asteroids by minimizing the difference between the contours from deconvolved AO images and the projected silhouettes calculated from the shape model at the time of the AO observations. We compute the volume-equivalent diameters for 48 of these asteroids. For 15 of them, we remove the ambiguity of the pole orientation typical for shape models derived by the LI. We have found that our equivalent diameters are smaller by 3%, 7%, and 2% compared with the effective diameters derived from mid-IR photometric observations provided by IRAS, WISE and AKARI. For 40 asteroids with previously determined mass estimates, we compute their bulk densities and discuss the mass-density dependence with respect to taxonomic types.

  15. The effect of alumina nanofillers size and shape on mechanical behavior of PMMA matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Hasan Somaya Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Composites with the addition of alumina nanofillers show improvement in mechanical properties. The PMMA polymer was used as a matrix and two different types of nanofillers, having extremely different shapes were added in the matrix to form the composite. Reinforcements were based on alumina nanoparticles having either spherical shape or whiskers having the length to diameter ratio of 100. The influence of alumina fillers size, shape and fillers loading on mechanical properties of prepared composite were studied using the nanoindentation measurements and dynamic mechanical analysis. It was observed that both alumina whiskers and alumina spherical nanoparticles added in the PMMA matrix improved the mechanical properties of the composite but the improvement was significantly higher with alumina whisker reinforcement. The concentration of the reinforcing alumina spherical nanoparticles and alumina whiskers in PMMA matrix varied up to 5 wt. %. The best performance was obtained by the addition of 3 wt. % of alumina whiskers in the PMMA matrix with regard to mechanical properties of the obtained composite.

  16. Subglacial bedform orientation, one-dimensional size, and directional shape measurement method accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Marco G.; Brennand, Tracy A.

    2016-04-01

    This study is an assessment of previously reported automated methods and of a new method for measuring longitudinal subglacial bedform (LSB) morphometry. It evaluates the adequacy (accuracy and precision) of orientation, length and longitudinal asymmetry data derived from the longest straight line (LSL) enclosed by the LSB's footprint, the footprint's minimum bounding rectangle longitudinal axis (RLA) and the footprint's standard deviational ellipse (SDE) longitudinal axis (LA) (new method), and the adequacy of length based on an ellipse fitted to the area and perimeter of the footprint (elliptical length). Tests are based on 100 manually mapped drumlins and mega-scale glacial lineations representing the size and shape range of LSBs in the Puget Lowland drumlin field, WA, USA. Data from manually drawn LAs are used as reference for method evaluation. With the exception of elliptical length, errors decrease rapidly with increasing footprint elongation (decreasing potential angular divergence between LAs). For LSBs with elongation methods had very small mean absolute error (MAE) in all measures (e.g., MAE method should be avoided for orientation (36% of the errors were larger than 5°). 3) Elliptical length was the least accurate of all methods (MAE of 56.1 m and 15% of the errors larger than 5%); its use should be discontinued. 4) The relative adequacy of the LSL and RLA depends on footprint shape; SDE computed with the footprint's structural vertices is relatively shape-independent and is the preferred method. This study is significant also for negative-relief, and fluvial and aeolian bedforms.

  17. Bioactivity of nanosilver in Caenorhabditis elegans: Effects of size, coat, and shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piper Reid Hunt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vivo toxicity to eukaryotes of nanosilver (AgNP spheres and plates in two sizes each was assessed using the simple model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. For each shape, smaller AgNP size correlated with higher toxicity, as indicated by reduced larval growth. Smaller size also correlated with significant increases in silver uptake for silver nanospheres. Citrate coated silver spheres of 20 nm diameter induced an innate immune response that increased or held steady over 24 h, while regulation of genes involved in metal metabolism peaked at 4 h and subsequently decreased. For AgNP spheres, coating altered bioactivity, with a toxicity ranking of polyethylene glycol (PEG > polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP ≅ branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI > citrate, but silver uptake ranking of PEG > PVP > citrate > BPEI. Our findings in C. elegans correlate well with findings in rodents for AgNP size vs. uptake and toxicity, as well as for induction of immune effectors, while using methods that are faster and far less expensive, supporting the use of C. elegans as an alternative model for early toxicity screening.

  18. Generation 9 polyamidoamine dendrimer encapsulated platinum nanoparticle mimics catalase size, shape, and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yincong; Li, Tianfu; Tian, Wende; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2013-04-30

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) encapsulated platinum nanoparticles were synthesized and used as catalase mimics. Acetylated generation 9 (Ac-G9) PAMAM dendrimer with a molecular size around 10 nm was used as a template to synthesize platinum nanoparticles. The feeding molar ratio of Pt(4+) and Ac-G9 is 2048, and the synthesized platinum nanoparticle (Ac-G9/Pt NP) has an average size of 3.3 nm. Ac-G9/Pt NP has a similar molecular size and globular shape with catalase (~11 nm). The catalytic activity of Ac-G9/Pt NP on the decomposition of H2O2 is approaching that of catalase at 37 °C. Ac-G9/Pt NP shows differential response to the changes of pH and temperature compared with catalase, which can be explained by different catalytic mechanisms of Ac-G9/Pt NP and catalase. Ac-G9/Pt NP also shows horseradish peroxidase activity and is able to scavenge free radicals such as di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium (DPPH). Furthermore, Ac-G9/Pt NP shows excellent biocompatibility on different cell lines and can down-regulate H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these cells. These results suggest that dendrimers are promising mimics of proteins with different sizes and Ac-G9/Pt NP can be used as an alternative candidate of catalase to decrease oxidation stress in cells.

  19. Biosynthesis of Inorganic Nanoparticles: A Fresh Look at the Control of Shape, Size and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Amar Dahoumane

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Several methodologies have been devised for the design of nanomaterials. The “Holy Grail” for materials scientists is the cost-effective, eco-friendly synthesis of nanomaterials with controlled sizes, shapes and compositions, as these features confer to the as-produced nanocrystals unique properties making them appropriate candidates for valuable bio-applications. The present review summarizes published data regarding the production of nanomaterials with special features via sustainable methodologies based on the utilization of natural bioresources. The richness of the latter, the diversity of the routes adopted and the tuned experimental parameters have led to the fabrication of nanomaterials belonging to different chemical families with appropriate compositions and displaying interesting sizes and shapes. It is expected that these outstanding findings will encourage researchers and attract newcomers to continue and extend the exploration of possibilities offered by nature and the design of innovative and safer methodologies towards the synthesis of unique nanomaterials, possessing desired features and exhibiting valuable properties that can be exploited in a profusion of fields.

  20. Tailoring shape and size of biogenic silver nanoparticles to enhance antimicrobial efficacy against MDR bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Madhuree; Pandey, Shipra; Giri, Ved Prakash; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Shukla, Richa; Mishra, Aradhana; Nautiyal, C S

    2017-04-01

    Spherical, rectangular, penta, and hexagonal silver nanoparticles of different dimensions were biosynthesized in an eco-friendly manner by biocontrol agent, Trichoderma viride by manipulating physical parameters, pH, temperature, and reaction time. The particles were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy; Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR). Shape and size dependent antimicrobial activity of nanoparticles against human pathogens was observed. Maximum inhibition was found with spherical nanoparticles (2-5 nm) showing 40, 51, 43, 53.9 and 55.8% against Shigella sonnei, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus. aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa respectively, where as pentagonal and hexagonal nanoparticles (50-100 nm) demonstrated 32, 41, 31, 42.84 and 42.80% of inhibition as compared to control. Nanoparticles of different geometry and dimension established enhanced antagonistic activity against pathogens with all the tested antibiotics. Excellent antimicrobial efficacy was obtained with spherical nanoparticles of 2-5 nm with ampicillin and penicillin. Shape and size played major role in enhancing antimicrobial potential of silver nanoparticles, both singly and synergistically with antibiotics which can be exploited to combat the spread of multidrug resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Size and shape dependent deprotonation potential and proton affinity of nanodiamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Amanda S.; Per, Manolo C.

    2014-11-01

    Many important reactions in biology and medicine involve proton abstraction and transfer, and it is integral to applications such as drug delivery. Unlike electrons, which are quantum mechanically delocalized, protons are instantaneously localized on specific residues in these reactions, which can be a distinct advantage. However, the introduction of nanoparticles, such as non-toxic nanodiamonds, to this field complicates matters, as the number of possible sites increases as the inverse radius of the particle. In this paper we present \\gt {{10}4} simulations that map the size- and shape-dependence of the deprotonation potential and proton affinity of nanodiamonds in the range 1.8-2.7 nm in average diameter. We find that while the average deprotonation potential and proton affinities decrease with size, the site-specific values are inhomogeneous over the surface of the particles, exhibiting strong shape-dependence. The proton affinity is strongly facet-dependent, whereas the deprotonation potential is edge/corner-dependent, which creates a type of spatial hysteresis in the transfer of protons to and from the nanodiamond, and provides new opportunities for selective functionalization.

  2. Effect of Specimen Shape and Size on the Compressive Strength of Foamed Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin M.A.S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight concrete, in the form of foamed concrete, is a versatile material that primarily consists of a cement based mortar, mixed with at least 20% volume of air. Its dry density is typically below 1600 kg/m3 with a maximum compressive strength of 15MPa. The ASTM standard provision specifies a correction factor for concrete strength of between 14 and 42Mpa, in order to compensate for a reduced strength, when the aspect height-to-diameter ratio of a specimen is less than 2.0. However, the CEB-FIP provision specifically mentions a ratio of 150mm dia. × 300mm cylinder strength to 150 mm cube strength; though, both provision requirements do not specifically clarify the applicability and/or modification of the correction factors for the compressive strength to lightweight concrete (in this case, foamed concrete. The focus of this work is to study the effect of specimen size and shape on the axial compressive strength of concrete. Specimens of various sizes and shapes were cast with square and circular cross-sections i.e., cubes, prisms, and cylinders. Their compression strength behaviours at 7 and 28 days were investigated. The results indicate that, as the CEB-FIP provision specified, even for foamed concrete, 100mm cubes (l/d = 1.0 produce a comparable compressive strength with 100mm dia. × 200mm cylinders (l/d = 2.0.

  3. Maximum collision probability considering variable size, shape, and orientation of covariance ellipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xian-Zong; Ma, Chao-Wei; Chen, Lei; Tang, Guo-Jin

    2016-09-01

    When engaging in the maximum collision probability (Pcmax) analysis for short-term conjunctions between two orbiting objects, it is important to clarify and understand the assumptions for obtaining Pcmax. Based on Chan's analytical formulae and analysis of covariance ellipse's variation of orientation, shape, and size in the two-dimensional conjunction plane, this paper proposes a clear and comprehensive analysis of maximum collision probability when considering these variables. Eight situations will be considered when calculating Pcmax according to the varied orientation, shape, and size of the covariance ellipse. Three of the situations are not practical or meaningful; the remaining ones were completely or partially discussed in some of the previous works. These situations are discussed with uniform definitions and symbols and they are derived independently in this paper. The consequences are compared and validated by the results from previous works. Finally, a practical conjunction event is presented as a test case to demonstrate the effectiveness of methodology. Comparison of the Pcmax presented in this paper with the empirical results from the curve or surface calculated by numerical method indicates that the relative error of Pcmax is less than 0.0039%.

  4. Inverse design of a proper number, shapes, sizes, and locations of coolant flow passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulikravich, George S.

    1992-01-01

    During the past several years we have developed an inverse method that allows a thermal cooling system designer to determine proper sizes, shapes, and locations of coolant passages (holes) in, say, an internally cooled turbine blade, a scram jet strut, a rocket chamber wall, etc. Using this method the designer can enforce a desired heat flux distribution on the hot outer surface of the object, while simultaneously enforcing desired temperature distributions on the same hot outer surface as well as on the cooled interior surfaces of each of the coolant passages. This constitutes an over-specified problem which is solved by allowing the number, sizes, locations and shapes of the holes to adjust iteratively until the final internally cooled configuration satisfies the over-specified surface thermal conditions and the governing equation for the steady temperature field. The problem is solved by minimizing an error function expressing the difference between the specified and the computed hot surface heat fluxes. The temperature field analysis was performed using our highly accurate boundary integral element code with linearly varying temperature along straight surface panels. Examples of the inverse design applied to internally cooled turbine blades and scram jet struts (coated and non-coated) having circular and non-circular coolant flow passages will be shown.

  5. The pattern of hominin postcranial evolution reconsidered in light of size-related shape variation of the distal humerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lague, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Previous research suggests that some hominin postcranial features do not follow a linear path of increasing modernization through geological time. With respect to the distal humerus, in particular, the earliest known hominin specimens are reportedly among the most modern in morphology, while some later humeri appear further removed from the average modern human shape. Although Plio-Pleistocene humeri vary widely in size, previous studies have failed to account for size-related shape variation when making morphometric comparisons. This study reexamines hominin postcranial evolution in light of distal humeral allometry. Using two-dimensional landmark data, the relationship between specimen size and shape among modern humans is quantified using multivariate regression and principal components analysis of size-shape space. Fossils are compared with modern human shapes expected at a given size, as well as with the overall average human shape. The null hypothesis of humeral isometry in modern humans is rejected. Subsequently, if one takes allometry into account, the apparent pattern of hominin humeral evolution does not resemble the pattern described above. All 14 of the Plio-Pleistocene hominin fossils examined here share a similar pattern of shape differences from equivalently-sized modern humans, though they vary in the extent to which these differences are expressed. The oldest specimen in the sample (KNM-KP 271; Australopithecus anamensis) exhibits the least human-like elbow morphology. Similarly primitive morphology characterizes all younger species of Australopithecus as well as Paranthropus robustus. After 2 Ma, a subtly more human-like elbow morphology is apparent among specimens attributed to early Homo, as well as among isolated specimens that may represent either Homo or Paranthropus boisei. This study emphasizes the need to consider size-related shape variation when individual fossil specimens are compared with the average shape of a comparative group

  6. Shape, size, physical properties and nature of low-perihelion near-Earth asteroid (3200) Phaethon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, Josef; Delbo, Marco; Vokrouhlicky, David; Pravec, Petr; Emery, Joshua P.; Ali-Lagoa, Victor; Bolin, Bryce T.; Devogele, Maxime; Dyvig, Ron; Galad, Adrian; Jedicke, Robert; Kornos, Leos; Kusnirak, Peter; Licandro, Javier; Reddy, Vishnu; Warner, Brian D.; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Vilagi, Jozef

    2016-10-01

    We apply the convex inversion method to the new optical data obtained by six instruments together with the already existing observations and derive convex shape model of low-perihelion near-Earth asteroid (3200) Phaethon. This shape model is then used as an input for the thermophysical modeling. We present new convex shape model and rotational state of Phaethon - sidereal rotation period of 3.603958(2) h and ecliptic coordinates of the preferred pole orientation of (319, -39) with a 5 degree uncertainty. Moreover, we derive its size (D=5.1±0.2 km), thermal inertia (Γ=600±200 J m-2s-1/2K-1), geometric visible albedo (pV=0.122±0.008), and estimate the macroscopic surface roughness by the thermophysical model. We also estimate the average size of the surface regolith to few centimeters. The Spitzer emission spectrum of Phaethon is similar to those of CV/CK carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, match with CI/CM carbonaceous chondrites is ruled out. We also study the long-term stability of Phaethon's orbit and spin axis by a numerical orbital and rotation-state integrator. We find that the Sun illumination at the perihelion passage during past thousands of years is not connected to a specific area on the surface implying non-preferential heating. Considering the most important meteor stream of the Geminids is associated with Phaethon, we predict that the meteorites dropped by Geminids are CVs or CKs. We also discuss the possible dynamical link between Phaethon and Pallas and its collisional family.

  7. The effect of cultivation on the size, shape, and persistence of disease patches in fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, J E; Gilligan, C A

    2001-06-19

    Epidemics of soil-borne plant disease are characterized by patchiness because of restricted dispersal of inoculum. The density of inoculum within disease patches depends on a sequence comprising local amplification during the parasitic phase followed by dispersal of inoculum by cultivation during the intercrop period. The mechanisms that control size, shape, and persistence have received very little rigorous attention in epidemiological theory. Here we derive a model for dispersal of inoculum in soil by cultivation that takes account into the discrete stochastic nature of the system in time and space. Two parameters, probability of movement and mean dispersal distance, characterize lateral dispersal of inoculum by cultivation. The dispersal parameters are used in combination with the characteristic area and dimensions of host plants to identify criteria that control the shape and size of disease patches. We derive a critical value for the probability of movement for the formation of cross-shaped patches and show that this is independent of the amount of inoculum. We examine the interaction between local amplification of inoculum by parasitic activity and subsequent dilution by dispersal and identify criteria whereby asymptomatic patches may persist as inoculum falls below a threshold necessary for symptoms to appear in the subsequent crop. The model is motivated by the spread of rhizomania, an economically important soil-borne disease of sugar beet. However, the results have broad applicability to a very wide range of diseases that survive as discrete units of inoculum. The application of the model to patch dynamics of weed seeds and local introductions of genetically modified seeds is also discussed.

  8. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depression & spatial complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do theyrepresent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probesand measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive tothe nature of dark energy, while their substructure and galaxy population provides a direct key to thenature of dark matter. Also, the pristine environment of void interiors is an important testing groundfor our understanding of environmental influences on galaxy formation and evolution. In this paper, we reviewthe key aspects of the structure and dynamics ofvoids, with a particular focus on the hierarchical evolution of the void population. We demonstratehow the rich structural pattern of the Cosmic Web is related to the complex evolution and buildupof voids.

  9. The Size, Shape, and Albedo of Deep Impact Target 9P/Tempel 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    A'Hearn, Michael; Lisse, Carey; Lisse, C.; Fernandez, Y.; Belton, M.; Groussin, O.; Meech, K.; van Cleve, J.

    2004-02-01

    The Deep Impact mission, the eighth mission in NASA's Discovery Program, will launch on 30 Dec 2004 and will impact the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1 on 4 July 2005. Delivering an impactor to a cometary nucleus and observing the results of the impact is a challenging task. Mission success depends critically on the ability of the DI spacecraft to navigate to the comet. Despite robust targeting algorithms, large uncertainties in size, shape, albedo distribution, and rotational state significantly degrade the probability that the impactor will land in a sunlit portion of the surface that is observable from the flyby. The uncertainties in the size, axial ratio, and rotational state further jeopardize the ability of the flyby spacecraft to point its High Resolution Instrument at the actual impact site with sufficient precision to ensure it is in the field of view. Current estimate of the comet's size using Keck LWS observations are uncertain by 50% and they have provided no information on the distribution of albedo. Although uncertainty in the phasing of the optical lightcurve represents a large part of that error, there is also a significant uncertainty due to the combination of low SNR in the data from Keck and the limited spectral range over which data could be obtained. In order to improve our estimate of the size and shape of the nucleus of Tempel 1, we must obtain data with much higher SNR and with one-hour time resolution over a significant portion of the rotation light curve when the comet is inactive. We must determine whether or not there are large variations in albedo across the surface to order to ensure that the rotational lightcurve from optical data can be used to predict the convex hull of the actual shape. Tempel 1 is available in only one Spitzer viewing widow before it is expected to be close enough to the sun to become active, namely the window from 27 Feb through 29 April 2004, before the first GO observing period, at 3.7 AU from the Sun. The expect

  10. An observational detection of the bridge effect of void filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Shim, Junsup; Hoyle, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    The bridge effect of void filaments is a phrase coined by Park & Lee (2009b) to explain the correlations found in a numerical experiment between the luminosity of the void galaxies and the degree of the straightness of their host filaments. Their numerical finding implies that a straight void filament provides a narrow channel for the efficient transportation of gas and matter particles from the surroundings into the void galaxies. To observationally confirm the presence of the bridge effect of void filaments, we identify the filamentary structures from the Sloan void catalog and determine the specific size of each void filament as a measure of its straightness. Using both classical and Bayesian statistics, we indeed detect a strong tendency that the void galaxies located in the more straight filaments are on average more luminous, which is in agreement with the numerical prediction. It is also shown that the strength of correlation increases with the spatial extent of the void filaments, which can be phy...

  11. Quantifying Effects of Voids in Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Marlana B.; Sankar, Bhavani V.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Randomness in woven ceramic matrix composite architecture has been found to cause large variability in stiffness and strength. The inherent voids are an aspect of the architecture that may cause a significant portion of the variability. A study is undertaken to investigate the effects of many voids of random sizes and distributions. Response surface approximations were formulated based on void parameters such as area and length fractions to provide an estimate of the effective stiffness. Obtaining quantitative relationships between the properties of the voids and their effects on stiffness of ceramic matrix composites are of ultimate interest, but the exploratory study presented here starts by first modeling the effects of voids on an isotropic material. Several cases with varying void parameters were modeled which resulted in a large amount of variability of the transverse stiffness and out-of-plane shear stiffness. An investigation into a physical explanation for the stiffness degradation led to the observation that the voids need to be treated as an entity that reduces load bearing capabilities in a space larger than what the void directly occupies through a corrected length fraction or area fraction. This provides explanation as to why void volume fraction is not the only important factor to consider when computing loss of stiffness.

  12. The sparkling Universe: a scenario for cosmic void motions

    CERN Document Server

    Ceccarelli, Laura; Lares, Marcelo; Paz, Dante J; Maldonado, Victoria E; Luparello, Heliana E; Lambas, Diego Garcia

    2015-01-01

    We perform a statistical study of the global motion of cosmic voids using both a numerical simulation and observational data. We analyse their relation to large--scale mass flows and the physical effects that drive those motions. We analyse the bulk motions of voids, defined by the mean velocity of haloes in the surrounding shells in the numerical simulation, and by galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We find void mean bulk velocities close to 400 km/s, comparable to those of haloes (~ 500-600 km/s), depending on void size and the large--scale environment. Statistically, small voids move faster than large ones, and voids in relatively higher density environments have higher bulk velocities than those placed in large underdense regions. Also, we analyze the mean mass density around voids finding, as expected, large--scale overdensities (underdensities) along (opposite to) the void motion direction, suggesting that void motions respond to a pull--push mechanism. This contrasts with massive ...

  13. Phase, size and shape controlled formation of aerosol generated nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, D., E-mail: d.ponce@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, Gordon Street, WC1H 0AH London (United Kingdom); Kuznetsov, M.V. [N.P. Ogarev Mordovian State University, Saransk, Republic of Mordovia 430005 (Russian Federation); Morozov, Yu.G.; Belousova, O.V. [Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region 142432 (Russian Federation); Parkin, I.P. [Department of Chemistry, Materials Chemistry Centre, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, WC1H 0AJ London (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-05

    Highlights: •Structural and magnetic characterization of aerosol Ni nanoparticles. •Experimental parameters affecting size, shape and composition are discussed. •Larger spherical particles with the highest Ni content are produced by using an Ar flow. •Coalescence rate of primary particles is accelerated by increasing Ni feeding rate. •Ni nanoparticles show bulk-like saturation magnetization values. -- Abstract: Ferromagnetic Ni nanoparticles were formed by a levitation-jet aerosol synthesis under different gas environments and metal precursor feed rates. At a constant background gas inlet temperature, it was found that a higher Ni loading resulted in enhanced particle growth through coalescence. He partial atmosphere favors surface condensation of evaporated Ni atoms over coalescence as the surface area reduction mechanism in the nanoparticles. A flow of 2.5% air in the background gas mixture was enough to oxidize 75% of the initial Ni load, inducing a drastic destabilization of particle size and shape distribution. Regardless of the background inert gas composition, necked nanoparticles were observed in samples prepared with a 1 g/h Ni feed rate, whereas discrete nanoparticles resulted from a higher feed rate of ca. 4 g/h, confirming the key role of Ni loading on the rate of coalescence. The highest saturation magnetization (51.75 A m{sup 2} kg{sup −1} measured at 300 K) and the lowest coercivity (0.008 T) were obtained under an Ar flow. Zero-field cooled and field-cooled magnetization curves measured under an applied field of 10{sup −2} T revealed that the blocking processes of nanoparticles are dominated by their particle size distributions, with some features attributable to interparticle interactions.

  14. Dermal papilla cell number specifies hair size, shape and cycling and its reduction causes follicular decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Woo; Wu, Eleanor; Morgan, Bruce A

    2013-04-01

    Although the hair shaft is derived from the progeny of keratinocyte stem cells in the follicular epithelium, the growth and differentiation of follicular keratinocytes is guided by a specialized mesenchymal population, the dermal papilla (DP), that is embedded in the hair bulb. Here we show that the number of DP cells in the follicle correlates with the size and shape of the hair produced in the mouse pelage. The same stem cell pool gives rise to hairs of different sizes or types in successive hair cycles, and this shift is accompanied by a corresponding change in DP cell number. Using a mouse model that allows selective ablation of DP cells in vivo, we show that DP cell number dictates the size and shape of the hair. Furthermore, we confirm the hypothesis that the DP plays a crucial role in activating stem cells to initiate the formation of a new hair shaft. When DP cell number falls below a critical threshold, hair follicles with a normal keratinocyte compartment fail to generate new hairs. However, neighbouring follicles with a few more DP cells can re-enter the growth phase, and those that do exploit an intrinsic mechanism to restore both DP cell number and normal hair growth. These results demonstrate that the mesenchymal niche directs stem and progenitor cell behaviour to initiate regeneration and specify hair morphology. Degeneration of the DP population in mice leads to the types of hair thinning and loss observed during human aging, and the results reported here suggest novel approaches to reversing hair loss.

  15. TRANSVERSELY ISOTROPIC HYPER-ELASTIC MATERIAL RECTANGULAR PLATE WITH VOIDS UNDER A UNIAXIAL EXTENSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程昌钧; 任九生

    2003-01-01

    The finite deformation and stress analyses for a transversely isotropic rectangularplate with voids and made of hyper-elastic material with the generalized neo-Hookean strainenergy function under a uniaxial extension are studied. The deformation functions of plateswith voids that are symmetrically distributed in a certain manner are given and the functionsare expressed by two parameters by solving the differential equations. The solution may beapproximately obtained from the minimum potential energy principle. Thus, the analyticsolutions of the deformation and stress of the plate are obtained. The growth of the void.s andthe distribution of stresses along the voids are analyzed and the influences of the degree ofanisotropy, the size of the voids and the distance between the voids are discussed. Thecharacteristics of the growth of the voids and the distribution of stresses of the plates with onevoid, three or five voids are obtained and compared.

  16. Into the Void

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    17 May 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of a chain of pits on a lava- and dust-covered plain northwest of Tharsis Tholus -- one of the many volcanic constructs in the Tharsis region of Mars. Pit chains, such as this one, are associated with the collapse of surface materials into subsurface voids formed by faulting and expansion -- or extension -- of the bedrock. Location near: 16.4oN, 92.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Winter

  17. Rare ecomorphological convergence on a complex adaptive landscape: Body size and diet mediate evolution of jaw shape in squirrels (Sciuridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelditch, Miriam Leah; Ye, Ji; Mitchell, Jonathan S; Swiderski, Donald L

    2017-03-01

    Convergence is widely regarded as compelling evidence for adaptation, often being portrayed as evidence that phenotypic outcomes are predictable from ecology, overriding contingencies of history. However, repeated outcomes may be very rare unless adaptive landscapes are simple, structured by strong ecological and functional constraints. One such constraint may be a limitation on body size because performance often scales with size, allowing species to adapt to challenging functions by modifying only size. When size is constrained, species might adapt by changing shape; convergent shapes may therefore be common when size is limiting and functions are challenging. We examine the roles of size and diet as determinants of jaw shape in Sciuridae. As expected, size and diet have significant interdependent effects on jaw shape and ecomorphological convergence is rare, typically involving demanding diets and limiting sizes. More surprising is morphological without ecological convergence, which is equally common between and within dietary classes. Those cases, like rare ecomorphological convergence, may be consequences of evolving on an adaptive landscape shaped by many-to-many relationships between ecology and function, many-to-one relationships between form and performance, and one-to-many relationships between functionally versatile morphologies and ecology. On complex adaptive landscapes, ecological selection can yield different outcomes. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. Analysis of daylight performance of solar light pipes influenced by size and shape of sunlight captures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanpeng; Jin, Rendong; Zhang, Wenming; Liu, Li; Zou, Dachao

    2009-11-01

    Experimental investigations on three different sunlight captures with diameter 150mm, 212mm, 300mm were carried out under different conditions such as sunny conditions, cloudy conditions and overcast conditions and the two different size solar light pipes with diameter 360mm and 160mm under sunny conditions. The illuminance in the middle of the sunlight capture have relationship with its size, but not linear. To improve the efficiency of the solar light pipes, the structure and the performance of the sunlight capture must be enhanced. For example, University of Science and Technology Beijing Gymnasium, Beijing 2008 Olympic events of Judo and Taekwondo, 148 solar light pipes were installed with the diameter 530mm for each light pipe. Two sunlight captures with different shape were installed and tested. From the measuring results of the illuminance on the work plane of the gymnasium, the improvement sunlight captures have better effects with the size of augmenting and the machining of the internal surface at the same time, so that the refraction increased and the efficiency of solar light pipes improved. The better effects of supplementary lighting for the gymnasium have been achieved.

  19. Variability in body size and shape of UK offshore workers: A cluster analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Arthur; Ledingham, Robert; Williams, Hector

    2017-01-01

    Male UK offshore workers have enlarged dimensions compared with UK norms and knowledge of specific sizes and shapes typifying their physiques will assist a range of functions related to health and ergonomics. A representative sample of the UK offshore workforce (n = 588) underwent 3D photonic scanning, from which 19 extracted dimensional measures were used in k-means cluster analysis to characterise physique groups. Of the 11 resulting clusters four somatotype groups were expressed: one cluster was muscular and lean, four had greater muscularity than adiposity, three had equal adiposity and muscularity and three had greater adiposity than muscularity. Some clusters appeared constitutionally similar to others, differing only in absolute size. These cluster centroids represent an evidence-base for future designs in apparel and other applications where body size and proportions affect functional performance. They also constitute phenotypic evidence providing insight into the 'offshore culture' which may underpin the enlarged dimensions of offshore workers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Shape-controlled synthesis of highly monodisperse and small size gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We describe here that fine control of nanoparticle shape and size can be achieved by systematic varia-tion of experimental parameters in the seeded growth procedure in aqueous solution. Cubic and spherical gold nanoparticles are obtained respectively. In particularly, the Au cubes are highly mono-disperse in 33±2 nm diameter. The experimental methods involve the preparation of Au seed particles and the subsequent addition of an appropriate quantity of Au seed solution to the aqueous growth solutions containing desired quantities of CTAB and ascorbic acid (AA). Here, AA is a weak reducing agent and CTAB is not only a stable agent for nanoparticles but also an inductive agent for leading increase in the face of nanoparticle. Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to characterize the nanoparticles. The results show that the different size gold nanoparticles displayed high size homogenous distribution and formed mono-membrane at the air/solid interface.

  1. The Resolved Asteroid Program - Size, shape, and pole of (52) Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merline, W. J.; Drummond, J. D.; Carry, B.; Conrad, A.; Tamblyn, P. M.; Dumas, C.; Kaasalainen, M.; Erikson, A.; Mottola, S.; Ďurech, J.; Rousseau, G.; Behrend, R.; Casalnuovo, G. B.; Chinaglia, B.; Christou, J. C.; Chapman, C. R.; Neyman, C.

    2013-07-01

    With the adaptive optics (AO) system on the 10 m Keck-II telescope, we acquired a high quality set of 84 images at 14 epochs of asteroid (52) Europa on 2005 January 20, when it was near opposition. The epochs covered its 5.63 h rotation period and, by following its changing shape and orientation on the plane of sky, we obtained its triaxial ellipsoid dimensions and spin pole location. An independent determination from images at three epochs obtained in 2007 is in good agreement with these results. By combining these two data sets, along with a single epoch data set obtained in 2003, we have derived a global fit for (52) Europa of diameters a × b × c = (379 × 330 × 249) ± (16 × 8 × 10) km, yielding a volume-equivalent spherical-diameter of √abc3 =315±7km, and a prograde rotational pole within 7° of [RA; Dec] = [257°; +12°] in an Equatorial J2000 reference frame (Ecliptic: 255°; +35°). Using the average of all mass determinations available for (52) Europa, we derive a density of 1.5 ± 0.4 g cm-3, typical of C-type asteroids. Comparing our images with the shape model of Michalowski et al. (2004, Astron. Astrophys. 416, 353), derived from optical lightcurves, illustrates excellent agreement, although several edge features visible in the images are not rendered by the model. We therefore derived a complete 3-D description of (52) Europa's shape using the KOALA algorithm by combining our 18 AO imaging epochs with 4 stellar occultations and 49 lightcurves. We use this 3-D shape model to assess these departures from ellipsoidal shape. Flat facets (possible giant craters) appear to be less distinct on (52) Europa than on other C-types that have been imaged in detail, (253) Mathilde and (511) Davida. We show that fewer giant craters, or smaller largest-sized craters, is consistent with its expected impact history. Overall, asteroid (52) Europa is still well modeled as a smooth triaxial ellipsoid with dimensions constrained by observations obtained over

  2. Tensor anisotropy as a tracer of cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to find voids in cosmological simulations based on the tidal and the velocity shear tensors definitions of the cosmic web. We use the fractional anisotropy (FA) computed from the eigenvalues of each web scheme as a void tracer. We identify voids using a watershed transform based on the local minima of the FA field without making any assumption on the shape or structure of the voids. We test the method on the Bolshoi simulation and report on the abundance and radial averaged profiles for the density, velocity and fractional anisotropy. We find that voids in the velocity shear web are smaller than voids in the tidal web, with a particular overabundance of very small voids in the inner region of filaments/sheets. We classify voids as subcompensated/overcompansated depending on the absence/presence of an overdense matter ridge in their density profile, finding that close to $65\\%$ and $35\\%$ of the total population are classified into each category, respectively. Finally, we find evidence ...

  3. Warmth Elevating the Depths: Shallower Voids with Warm Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Lin F; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Silk, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Warm dark matter (WDM) has been proposed as an alternative to cold dark matter (CDM), to resolve issues such as the apparent lack of satellites around the Milky Way. Even if WDM is not the answer to observational issues, it is essential to constrain the nature of the dark matter. The effect of WDM on haloes has been extensively studied, but the small-scale initial smoothing in WDM also affects the present-day cosmic web and voids. It suppresses the cosmic "sub-web" inside voids, and the formation of both void haloes and subvoids. In N-body simulations run with different assumed WDM masses, we identify voids with the zobov algorithm, and cosmic-web components with the origami algorithm. As dark-matter warmth increases, the initial-conditions smoothing increases, and the number of voids and subvoids is suppressed. Also, void density profiles change, their shapes become flatter inside the void radius, while edges of the voids remain unchanged. Also, filaments and walls become cleaner, as the sub-structures in be...

  4. Size And Shape of Detergent Micelles Determined By Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, Jan; Columbus, Linda; Chu, Vincent B.; Lesley, Scott A.; Doniach, Sebastian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL /Pasteur Inst., Paris /Scripps Res. Inst. /Novartis Res. Found.

    2009-04-29

    We present a systematic analysis of the aggregation number and shape of micelles formed by nine detergents commonly used in the study of membrane proteins. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements are reported for glucosides with 8 and 9 alkyl carbons (OG/NG), maltosides and phosphocholines with 10 and 12 alkyl carbons (DM/DDM and FC-10/FC-12), 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine (DHPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (LPPG), and 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate (CHAPS). The SAXS intensities are well described by two-component ellipsoid models, with a dense outer shell corresponding to the detergent head groups and a less electron dense hydrophobic core. These models provide an intermediate resolution view of micelle size and shape. In addition, we show that Guinier analysis of the forward scattering intensity can be used to obtain an independent and model-free measurement of the micelle aggregation number and radius of gyration. This approach has the advantage of being easily generalizable to protein-detergent complexes, where simple geometric models are inapplicable. Furthermore, we have discovered that the position of the second maximum in the scattering intensity provides a direct measurement of the characteristic head group-head group spacing across the micelle core. Our results for the micellar aggregation numbers and dimensions agree favorably with literature values as far as they are available. We de novo determine the shape of FC-10, FC-12, DM, LPPG, and CHAPS micelles and the aggregation numbers of FC-10 and OG to be ca. 50 and 250, respectively. Combined, these data provide a comprehensive view of the determinants of micelle formation and serve as a starting point to correlate detergent properties with detergent-protein interactions.

  5. Paramagnetic Nanocrystals: Remarkable Lanthanide-Doped Nanoparticles with Varied Shape, Size, and Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Rebecca J; Aharen, Tomoko; Murugesu, Muralee

    2012-12-20

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been developed in recent years with applications in unique and crucial areas such as biomedicine, data storage, environmental remediation, catalysis, and so forth. NaYF4 nanoparticles were synthesized and isolated with lanthanide dopant percentages, confirmed by ICP-OES measurements, of Er, Yb, Tb, Gd, and Dy that were in agreement with the targeted ratios. SEM images showed a distinct variation in particle size and shape with dopant type and percentage. HRTEM and XRD studies confirmed the particles to be crystalline, possessing both α and β phases. Magnetic measurements determined that all of the nanoparticles were paramagnetic and did not exhibit a blocking temperature from 2 to 300 K. The multifunctional properties of these nanoparticles make them suitable for many applications, such as multimodal imaging probes, up-conversion fluorescent markers, as well as MRI contrast agents.

  6. Placental dysfunction and fetal programming: the importance of placental size, shape, histopathology, and molecular composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longtine, Mark S; Nelson, D Michael

    2011-05-01

    Normal function of the placenta is pivotal for optimal fetal growth and development. Fetal programming commonly is associated with placental dysfunction that predisposes to obstetric complications and suboptimal fetal outcomes. We consider several clinical phenotypes for placental dysfunction that likely predispose to fetal programming. Some of these reflect abnormal development of the chorioallantoic placenta in size, shape, or histopathology. Others result when exogenous stressors in the maternal environment combine with maladaptation of the placental response to yield small placentas with limited reserve, as typical of early-onset intrauterine growth restriction and preeclampsia. Still others reflect epigenetic changes, including altered expression of imprinted genes, altered enzymatic activity, or altered efficiencies in nutrient transport. Although the human placenta is a transient organ that persists only 9 months, the effects of this organ on the offspring remain for a lifetime.

  7. Inhibition of apoptosis in early tooth development alters tooth shape and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-Y; Cha, Y-G; Cho, S-W; Kim, E-J; Lee, M-J; Lee, J-M; Cai, J; Ohshima, H; Jung, H-S

    2006-06-01

    Apoptosis plays important roles in various stages of organogenesis. In this study, we hypothesized that apoptosis would play an important role in tooth morphogenesis. We examined the role of apoptosis in early tooth development by using a caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, concomitant with in vitro organ culture and tooth germ transplantation into the kidney capsule. Inhibition of apoptosis at the early cap stage did not disrupt the cell proliferation level when compared with controls. However, the macroscopic morphology of mice molar teeth exhibited dramatic alterations after the inhibition of apoptosis. Crown height was reduced, and mesiodistal diameter was increased in a concentration-dependent manner with z-VAD-fmk treatment. Overall, apoptosis in the enamel knot would be necessary for the proper formation of molar teeth, including appropriate shape and size.

  8. User-centered evaluation of handle shape and size and input controls for a neutron detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Scarlett R; Castillejos, Pamela; Hallbeck, M Susan

    2011-11-01

    Current neutron detectors are big, heavy, difficult to use and are not ergonomically designed. Good handle design and easy to use control mechanisms are imperative for comfort, usability and accuracy for hand-held tools. Two studies were performed to assess these factors; Study I explored handle design (shape and size) preference and Study II evaluated the effects of control mechanisms, device orientations and word orientation on performance time. According to research findings, the recommended handle perimeter is 11 cm with a diameter range of 3.5-4.0 cm. These results demonstrated that as the handle perimeter decreased the handle becomes less preferred by first responders when using layered gloves. For control type, the fastest performance time was found with vertical push buttons and a vertical word orientation. These objective results matched the subjective results, which showed that the most preferred controller was a vertical push button control.

  9. Scalable shape- and size-controlled synthesis of metal nano-alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Bakr, Osman M.

    2016-01-21

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a continuous-flow reactor, methods of making metal nano-alloys, and metal nano-alloys. An embodiment of the continuous-flow reactor includes a first tubular component having a tubular inlet and a tubular outlet, and a heated tube-in-tube gas reactor fluidly connected to the first tubular component, wherein the heated tube-in-tube gas reactor comprises an inner tube having a gas permeable surface and an outer tube. An embodiment of the method of producing metal nano-alloys, includes contacting a reducible metal precursor and a reducing fluid in a continuous-flow reactor to form a mixed solution; and flowing the mixed solution through the continuous-flow reactor for a residence time to form the metal nano-alloys. An embodiment of the composition includes a plurality of metal nano-alloys having a monodisperse size distribution and a uniform shape distribution.

  10. The role of shape and size in the ecology of phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luigi Naselli-Flores

    2008-01-01

    @@ Phytoplankton is a polyphyletic group of photosynthetic,oxygen producing protoctists and bacteria adapted topersist in suspension and liable to passive movement by wind and current (Reynolds,2006)[1].They inhabit almost all the aquatic ecosystems of the biosphere and show an enormously wide variability of shape,size,evolutionary and phylogenctic position,as well as energy and nutrient demands.Their amazing diversity in an apparently homogeneous medium,as the pelagic environment can be perceived at a first sight,caused concern a few decades ago and puzzled aquatic biologists for years.Actually, the contemporary occurrence of many species competing for the same few resources (apparently) violated the Competitive Exclusion Principles (Hutchinson,1961)[2].

  11. Lower Bounds on Q for Finite Size Antennas of Arbitrary Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Oleksiy S

    2015-01-01

    The problem of the lower bound on the radiation Q for an arbitrarily shaped finite size antenna of non-zero volume is formulated in terms of equivalent electric and magnetic currents densities distributed on a closed surface coinciding with antenna exterior surface. When these equivalent currents radiate in free space, the magnetic current augments the electric current, so that the fields interior to the surface vanish. In contrast to approaches based solely on electric currents, the proposed technique ensures no stored energy interior to the antenna exterior surface, and thus, allows the fundamental lower bound on Q to be determined. To facilitate the computation of the bound, new expressions for the stored energy, radiated power, and Q of coupled electric and magnetic source currents in free space are derived.

  12. Influence of grain size, shape and compaction on georadar waves: example of an Aeolian dune

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemoteau, Julien; Dujardin, Jean-Rémi; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05577.x

    2012-01-01

    Many Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) profiles acquired in dry aeolian environment have shown good reflectivity inside present-day dunes. We show that the origin of this reflectivity is related to changes in grain size distribution, packing and/or grain shape in a sandy material. We integrate these three parameters into analytical models for bulk permittivity in order to predict the reflections and the velocity of GPR waves. We consider two GPR cross-sections acquired over Aeolian dunes in the Chadian desert. The 2D migration of GPR data suggests that dunes contain different kinds of bounding surfaces. We discuss and model three kinds of reflections using reasonable geological hypothesis about Aeolian sedimentation processes. The propagation and the reflection of radar waves are calculated using the 1D wavelet modelling method in spectral domain. The results of the forward modelling are in good accordance with real observed data.

  13. CTF Void Drift Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gosdin, Chris [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Avramova, Maria N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gergar, Marcus [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    This milestone report is a summary of work performed in support of expansion of the validation and verification (V&V) matrix for the thermal-hydraulic subchannel code, CTF. The focus of this study is on validating the void drift modeling capabilities of CTF and verifying the supporting models that impact the void drift phenomenon. CTF uses a simple turbulent-diffusion approximation to model lateral cross-flow due to turbulent mixing and void drift. The void drift component of the model is based on the Lahey and Moody model. The models are a function of two-phase mass, momentum, and energy distribution in the system; therefore, it is necessary to correctly model the ow distribution in rod bundle geometry as a first step to correctly calculating the void distribution due to void drift.

  14. Effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltani M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor shape and size effect on drug delivery to solid tumors are studied, based on the application of the governing equations for fluid flow, i.e., the conservation laws for mass and momentum, to physiological systems containing solid tumors. The discretized form of the governing equations, with appropriate boundary conditions, is developed for predefined tumor geometries. The governing equations are solved using a numerical method, the element-based finite volume method. Interstitial fluid pressure and velocity are used to show the details of drug delivery in a solid tumor, under an assumption that drug particles flow with the interstitial fluid. Drug delivery problems have been most extensively researched in spherical tumors, which have been the simplest to examine with the analytical methods. With our numerical method, however, more complex shapes of the tumor can be studied. The numerical model of fluid flow in solid tumors previously introduced by our group is further developed to incorporate and investigate non-spherical tumors such as prolate and oblate ones. Also the effects of the surface area per unit volume of the tissue, vascular and interstitial hydraulic conductivity on drug delivery are investigated.

  15. Magneto-optical investigation of the shape anisotropy of individual micron-sized magnetic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, T.; Conca, A.; Wolf, G.; Schultheiss, H.; Leven, B.; Hillebrands, B.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, the anisotropy of individual microstructured magnetic elements has been investigated. The investigated elements are of elliptical shape with different sizes and aspect ratios (AR), structured from a 5-nm-thick permalloy (Ni80 Fe20) film. For the measurements, a new magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometer was used. To allow for the investigation of individual microstructured elements, a micro-focused probing laser beam (spatial resolution ≈1μm) has been combined with a self-stabilizing positioning system of high accuracy, including a rotating unit. Hysteresis loops can be taken for varying orientation of the symmetry axes of the magnetic elements relative to the applied field. For the characterization of the anisotropy, the coercive field as a function of the magnetization direction is extracted from the corresponding hysteresis loops. These results make a quantitative and systematic study of the influence of the shape anisotropy on the magnetic behavior of microstructures possible. The experimental data has been compared to an extended Stoner-Wohlfarth model.

  16. Determining the composition of gold nanoparticles: a compilation of shapes, sizes, and calculations using geometric considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Taizo; Hegmann, Torsten

    2016-10-01

    Size, shape, overall composition, and surface functionality largely determine the properties and applications of metal nanoparticles. Aside from well-defined metal clusters, their composition is often estimated assuming a quasi-spherical shape of the nanoparticle core. With decreasing diameter of the assumed circumscribed sphere, particularly in the range of only a few nanometers, the estimated nanoparticle composition increasingly deviates from the real composition, leading to significant discrepancies between anticipated and experimentally observed composition, properties, and characteristics. We here assembled a compendium of tables, models, and equations for thiol-protected gold nanoparticles that will allow experimental scientists to more accurately estimate the composition of their gold nanoparticles using TEM image analysis data. The estimates obtained from following the routines described here will then serve as a guide for further analytical characterization of as-synthesized gold nanoparticles by other bulk (thermal, structural, chemical, and compositional) and surface characterization techniques. While the tables, models, and equations are dedicated to gold nanoparticles, the composition of other metal nanoparticle cores with face-centered cubic lattices can easily be estimated simply by substituting the value for the radius of the metal atom of interest.

  17. Biotemplating pores with size and shape diversity for Li-oxygen Battery Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dahyun; Ozgit-Akgun, Çagla; Akca, Esin; Thompson, Leslie E.; Tadesse, Loza F.; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Demirci, Gökhan; Miller, Robert D.; Maune, Hareem

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic porogens provide an easy way to create porous structures, but their usage is limited due to synthetic difficulties, process complexities and prohibitive costs. Here we investigate the use of bacteria, sustainable and naturally abundant materials, as a pore template. The bacteria require no chemical synthesis, come in variable sizes and shapes, degrade easier and are approximately a million times cheaper than conventional porogens. We fabricate free standing porous multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films using cultured, harmless bacteria as porogens, and demonstrate substantial Li-oxygen battery performance improvement by porosity control. Pore volume as well as shape in the cathodes were easily tuned to improve oxygen evolution efficiency by 30% and double the full discharge capacity in repeated cycles compared to the compact MWCNT electrode films. The interconnected pores produced by the templates greatly improve the accessibility of reactants allowing the achievement of 4,942 W/kg (8,649 Wh/kg) at 2 A/ge (1.7 mA/cm2). PMID:28374862

  18. Automated particle identification through regression analysis of size, shape and colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Luna, J. C.; Cooper, J. M.; Neale, S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Rapid point of care diagnostic tests and tests to provide therapeutic information are now available for a range of specific conditions from the measurement of blood glucose levels for diabetes to card agglutination tests for parasitic infections. Due to a lack of specificity these test are often then backed up by more conventional lab based diagnostic methods for example a card agglutination test may be carried out for a suspected parasitic infection in the field and if positive a blood sample can then be sent to a lab for confirmation. The eventual diagnosis is often achieved by microscopic examination of the sample. In this paper we propose a computerized vision system for aiding in the diagnostic process; this system used a novel particle recognition algorithm to improve specificity and speed during the diagnostic process. We will show the detection and classification of different types of cells in a diluted blood sample using regression analysis of their size, shape and colour. The first step is to define the objects to be tracked by a Gaussian Mixture Model for background subtraction and binary opening and closing for noise suppression. After subtracting the objects of interest from the background the next challenge is to predict if a given object belongs to a certain category or not. This is a classification problem, and the output of the algorithm is a Boolean value (true/false). As such the computer program should be able to "predict" with reasonable level of confidence if a given particle belongs to the kind we are looking for or not. We show the use of a binary logistic regression analysis with three continuous predictors: size, shape and color histogram. The results suggest this variables could be very useful in a logistic regression equation as they proved to have a relatively high predictive value on their own.

  19. Dependence of micelle size and shape on detergent alkyl chain length and head group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C Oliver

    Full Text Available Micelle-forming detergents provide an amphipathic environment that can mimic lipid bilayers and are important tools for solubilizing membrane proteins for functional and structural investigations in vitro. However, the formation of a soluble protein-detergent complex (PDC currently relies on empirical screening of detergents, and a stable and functional PDC is often not obtained. To provide a foundation for systematic comparisons between the properties of the detergent micelle and the resulting PDC, a comprehensive set of detergents commonly used for membrane protein studies are systematically investigated. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, micelle shapes and sizes are determined for phosphocholines with 10, 12, and 14 alkyl carbons, glucosides with 8, 9, and 10 alkyl carbons, maltosides with 8, 10, and 12 alkyl carbons, and lysophosphatidyl glycerols with 14 and 16 alkyl carbons. The SAXS profiles are well described by two-component ellipsoid models, with an electron rich outer shell corresponding to the detergent head groups and a less electron dense hydrophobic core composed of the alkyl chains. The minor axis of the elliptical micelle core from these models is constrained by the length of the alkyl chain, and increases by 1.2-1.5 Å per carbon addition to the alkyl chain. The major elliptical axis also increases with chain length; however, the ellipticity remains approximately constant for each detergent series. In addition, the aggregation number of these detergents increases by ∼16 monomers per micelle for each alkyl carbon added. The data provide a comprehensive view of the determinants of micelle shape and size and provide a baseline for correlating micelle properties with protein-detergent interactions.

  20. Size and shape variability in the skull of Myotis nigricans (Schinz, 1821 (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae from two geographic areas in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bornholdt

    Full Text Available We present a quantitative analysis of sexual dimorphism and geographic variation in the skull of Myotis nigricans (Schinz, 1821 assessed by geometric morphometrics. Differences in size and shape of skulls were investigated using 30 landmarks plotted on two-dimensional images of lateral and ventral views. Results of geometric morphometrics revealed sexual dimorphism in the centroid size of the skull in both views. Females were larger than males. Nevertheless, there was no sexual dimorphism in skull shape of M. nigricans. Geographic variation was detected in size and shape of the skull. South Brazilian specimens were significantly larger than Ceará specimens only in the lateral view. Differences in skull shape were statistically significant in both views: specimens from South Brazil were brevirostri and presented a more expanded skull in the posterior region while Ceará specimens were longirostri and do not present any expansion in the brain case. Ecological factors for these phenomena are discussed in the text.

  1. Three-Dimensional Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Void Coalescence during Dynamic Fracture of Ductile Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppala, E T; Belak, J; Rudd, R E

    2004-09-02

    Void coalescence and interaction in dynamic fracture of ductile metals have been investigated using three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. The interaction of the voids is not reflected in the volumetric asymptotic growth rate of the voids, as demonstrated here. Finally, the practice of using a single void and periodic boundary conditions to study coalescence is examined critically and shown to produce results markedly different than the coalescence of a pair of isolated voids.

  2. Fish Recognition Based on Robust Features Extraction from Size and Shape Measurements Using Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutasem K. Alsmadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Image recognition is a challenging problem researchers had been research into this area for so long especially in the recent years, due to distortion, noise, segmentation errors, overlap and occlusion of objects in digital images. In our study, there are many fields concern with pattern recognition, for example, fingerprint verification, face recognition, iris discrimination, chromosome shape discrimination, optical character recognition, texture discrimination and speech recognition, the subject of pattern recognition appears. A system for recognizing isolated pattern of interest may be as an approach for dealing with such application. Scientists and engineers with interests in image processing and pattern recognition have developed various approaches to deal with digital image recognition problems such as, neural network, contour matching and statistics. Approach: In this study, our aim was to recognize an isolated pattern of interest in the image based on the combination between robust features extraction. Where depend on size and shape measurements, that were extracted by measuring the distance and geometrical measurements. Results: We presented a system prototype for dealing with such problem. The system started by acquiring an image containing pattern of fish, then the image features extraction is performed relying on size and shape measurements. Our system has been applied on 20 different fish families, each family has a different number of fish types and our sample consists of distinct 350 of fish images. These images were divided into two datasets: 257 training images and 93 testing images. An overall accuracy was obtained using the neural network associated with the back-propagation algorithm was 86% on the test dataset used. Conclusion: We developed a classifier for fish images recognition. We efficiently have chosen a features extraction method to fit our demands. Our classifier successfully design and implement a

  3. The conformation of double-stranded DNA inside bacteriophages depends on capsid size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Anton S; Boz, Mustafa Burak; Harvey, Stephen C

    2007-11-01

    The packaging of double-stranded DNA into bacteriophages leads to the arrangement of the genetic material into highly-packed and ordered structures. Although modern experimental techniques reveal the most probable location of DNA inside viral capsids, the individual conformations of DNA are yet to be determined. In the current study we present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA packaging into several bacteriophages performed within the framework of a coarse-grained model. The final DNA conformations depend on the size and shape of the capsid, as well as the size of the protein portal, if any. In particular, isometric capsids with small or absent portals tend to form concentric spools, whereas the presence of a large portal favors coaxial spooling; slightly and highly elongated capsids result in folded and twisted toroidal conformations, respectively. The results of the simulations also suggest that the predominant factor in defining the global DNA arrangement inside bacteriophages is the minimization of the bending stress upon packaging.

  4. A field study investigating effects of landmarks on territory size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyampola, Piyumika S; Eason, Perri K

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined how landmarks affect territories' fundamental characteristics. In this field study, we investigated effects of landmarks on territory size, shape and location in a cichlid fish (Amatitlania siquia). We provided cans as breeding sites and used plastic plants as landmarks. During 10 min trials, we recorded locations where residents chased intruders and used those locations to outline and measure the territory. In two experiments, we observed pairs without landmarks and with either a point landmark (one plant) or linear landmark (four plants) placed near the nest can. We alternated which trial occurred first and performed the second trial 24 h after the first. Territories were approximately round without landmarks or with a point landmark but were significantly more elongated when we added a linear landmark. Without landmarks, nests were centrally located; however, with any landmark, pairs set territory boundaries closer to the landmark and thus the nest. Territory size was significantly reduced in the presence of any landmark. This reduction suggests that a smaller territory with well-defined boundaries has greater benefits than a larger territory with less well-defined borders.

  5. Junior High School Students' Ideas about the Shape and Size of the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2012-08-01

    The concept of the atom is one of the building blocks of science education. Although the concept is a foundation for students' subsequent learning experiences, it is difficult for students to comprehend because of common misconceptions and its abstractness. The purpose of this study is to examine junior high school students' (ages 12-13) ideas about the shape and size of the atom and the evolution of these ideas over 2 years. The study's sample size was 126 students, including 76 sixth-grade and 50 seventh-grade students. The educational curriculum and relevant literature guided the development of a questionnaire that consisted of three open-ended questions intended to determine students' knowledge of the structure and physical properties of the atom. After administering the questionnaire, collected data were analysed qualitatively. The study shows that students had difficulty developing a mental image of the atom, and contrary to the conclusions of other studies, students demonstrated a preference for working with complex and abstract models.

  6. Plastic superconductor bearings any size-any shape: 77 K and up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reick, Franklin G.

    1991-01-01

    'Friction free' bearings at 77 K or higher are possible using the high T(sub c) copper oxide ceramic superconductors. The conventional method for making such bearings is to use a sintered ceramic monolith. This puts great restraints on size, shape, and postforming machining. The material is hard and abrasive. It is possible to grind up ceramic superconductors and suspend the granules in a suitable matrix. Mechanical properties improve and are largely dependent on the binder. The Meissner effect is confined to individual grains containing electron vortices. Tracks, rails, levitation areas, and bearings can be made this way with conventional plastic molding and extruding machines or by painting. The parts are easily machined. The sacrifice is in bulk electrical conductivity. A percolating wick feed for LN2 is used to cool remote superconductors and large areas quite effectively. A hollow spheroid or cylinder of superconductor material is molded with the internal surfaces shielded by the Meissner effect. It can be thought of as the DC magnetic analog of the Faraday cage and the inside is the 'Meissner space'. It is selective. The AC fields are transmitted with minor attenuation. Particle size and distribution have a profound effect on final magnetic and electrical characteristics.

  7. Plastic superconductor bearings any size, any shape, 77 k and up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reick, Franklin G.

    1990-01-01

    Friction free bearings at 77 k or higher are possible using the high T(sub c) copper oxide ceramic superconductors. The conventional method for making such bearings is to use a sintered ceramic monolith. This puts great restraints on size, shape and postforming machining. The material is hard and abrasive. It's possible to grind up ceramic superconductors and suspend the granules in a suitable matrix. Mechanical properties improve and are largely dependent on the binder. The Meissner effect is confined to individual grains containing electron vortices. Tracks, rails, levitation areas and bearings can be made this way with conventional plastic molding and extruding machines or by painting. The parts are easily machined. The sacrifice is in bulk electrical conductivity. A percolating wick feel for LN2 can be used to cool remote superconductors and large areas quite effectively. A hollow spheroid or cylinder of superconductor material can be molded with the internal surfaces shielded by the Meissner effect. It might be thought of as the dc magnetic analogue of the Faraday cage and the inside can be called the Meissner space. It's selective. The ac fields are transmitted with minor attenuation. Particle size and distribution have a profound effect on final magnetic and electrical characteristics.

  8. Size dependent magnetic and optical properties in diamond shaped graphene quantum dots: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ritwika; Dhar, Namrata; Bandyopadhyay, Arka; Jana, Debnarayan

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic and optical properties of diamond shaped graphene quantum dots (DSGQDs) have been investigated by varying their sizes with the help of density functional theory (DFT). The study of density of states (DOS) has revealed that the Fermi energy decreases with increase in sizes (number of carbon atoms). The intermediate structure with 30 carbon atoms shows the highest magnetic moment (8 μB, μB being the Bohr magneton). The shifting of optical transitions to higher energy in smallest DSGQD (16 carbon atoms) bears the signature of stronger quantum confinement. However, for the largest structure (48 carbon atoms) multiple broad peaks appear in case of parallel polarization and in this case electron energy loss spectra (EELS) peak (in the energy range 0-5 eV) is sharp in nature (compared to high energy peak). This may be attributed to π plasmon and the broad peak (in the range 10-16 eV) corresponds to π + σ plasmon. A detail calculation of the Raman spectra has indicated some prominent mode of vibrations which can be used to characterize these structures (with hydrogen terminated dangling bonds). We think that these theoretical observations can be utilized for novel device designs involving DSGQDs.

  9. Ion-track membranes of fluoropolymers: Toward controlling the pore size and shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaki, T., E-mail: yamaki.tetsuya@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Nuryanthi, N. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Koshikawa, H.; Asano, M.; Sawada, S.; Hakoda, T.; Maekawa, Y. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Voss, K.-O.; Severin, D.; Seidl, T.; Trautmann, C.; Neumann, R. [Materials Research Department, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of varying the beam parameters and applying the effect of a pre-etching treatment for poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) ion-track membranes was investigated with the goal of achieving enhanced track etching for effective control of the pore size and shape. Commercially available 25 μm-thick PVDF films were irradiated at room temperature with swift heavy ions from the JAEA’s TIARA cyclotron and GSI’s UNILAC linear accelerator. Irradiation with a higher linear energy transfer (LET) beam gave faster track etching and larger pores, suggesting that the LET could be the most crucial factor determining the pore size. In-situ infra-red absorption and residual gas analyses shed light on the detailed chemistry of not only the ion-induced degradation, but also post-irradiation reactions. The pre-etching treatment effect involved oxidation of the unsaturated bonds within the latent track, which accelerated the chemical dissolution for efficient pore evolution. In other words, exposure to a gaseous oxidant, i.e., ozone, shortened the breakthrough time.

  10. Dynamics of aggregate size and shape properties under sequenced flocculation in a turbulent Taylor-Couette reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, Léa; Coufort-Saudejaud, Carole; Liné, Alain; Frances, Christine

    2017-04-01

    This paper concerns experimental investigation of the sequenced flocculation of latex particles in a Taylor-Couette reactor. The aim of this work was to investigate the evolution of both the size and the shape of aggregates under sequenced hydrodynamics. A number of studies have focused on the evolution of the aggregate size or size distribution during steps of growth-breakage-regrowth, but aggregates generally experience steps of breakage-regrowth on repeated occasions in real operating conditions (passages near the impeller or during the transfer processes, for example). The experiments conducted in this work consisted thus of an alternation of six steps with alternately low and high shear rates under turbulent conditions. The particle size distributions were monitored throughout the sequencing, and the circularity and convexity (shape parameters) distributions were measured, enabling a more precise description of the entire floc population, rather than a fractal dimension. While the aggregate size distribution was clearly controlled by hydrodynamics, the shape distributions continuously evolved during the sequencing. The main new finding of our work notes the independence between the aggregate shape and hydrodynamics. Indeed, after multiples steps of breakage-regrowth, regardless of the aggregate size distribution and hydrodynamics, the aggregate shape seemed to reach a unique steady-state morphological distribution.

  11. Scaling of voids and fractality in the galaxy distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Gaite, J; Gaite, Jose; Manrubia, Susanna C.

    2002-01-01

    We study here, from first principles, what properties of voids are to be expected in a fractal point distribution and how the void distribution is related to its morphology. We show this relation in various examples and apply our results to the distribution of galaxies. If the distribution of galaxies forms a fractal set, then this property results in a number of scaling laws to be fulfilled by voids. Consider a fractal set of dimension $D$ and its set of voids. If voids are ordered according to decreasing sizes (largest void has rank R=1, second largest R=2 and so on), then a relation between size $\\Lambda$ and rank of the form $\\Lambda (R) \\propto R^{-z}$ must hold, with $z = d/D$, and where $d$ is the euclidean dimension of the space where the fractal is embedded. The physical restriction $D 1$ in a fractal set. The average size $\\bar \\Lambda$ of voids depends on the upper ($\\Lambda_u$) and the lower ($\\Lambda_l$) cut-off as ${\\bar \\Lambda} \\propto \\Lambda_u^{1-D/d} \\Lambda_l^{D/d}$. Current analysis of v...

  12. Size effects on magnetic actuation in Ni-Mn-Ga shape-memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunand, David C; Müllner, Peter

    2011-01-11

    The off-stoichiometric Ni(2)MnGa Heusler alloy is a magnetic shape-memory alloy capable of reversible magnetic-field-induced strains (MFIS). These are generated by twin boundaries moving under the influence of an internal stress produced by a magnetic field through the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. While MFIS are very large (up to 10%) for monocrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga, they are near zero (<0.01%) in fine-grained polycrystals due to incompatibilities during twinning of neighboring grains and the resulting internal geometrical constraints. By growing the grains and/or shrinking the sample, the grain size becomes comparable to one or more characteristic sample sizes (film thickness, wire or strut diameter, ribbon width, particle diameter, etc), and the grains become surrounded by free space. This reduces the incompatibilities between neighboring grains and can favor twinning and thus increase the MFIS. This approach was validated recently with very large MFIS (0.2-8%) measured in Ni-Mn-Ga fibers and foams with bamboo grains with dimensions similar to the fiber or strut diameters and in thin plates where grain diameters are comparable to plate thickness. Here, we review processing, micro- and macrostructure, and magneto-mechanical properties of (i) Ni-Mn-Ga powders, fibers, ribbons and films with one or more small dimension, which are amenable to the growth of bamboo grains leading to large MFIS, and (ii) "constructs" from these structural elements (e.g., mats, laminates, textiles, foams and composites). Various strategies are proposed to accentuate this geometric effect which enables large MFIS in polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga by matching grain and sample sizes.

  13. EFFECT OF SPACING SIZE AND SHAPE ON OIL PUMPKIN YIELD (Cucurbita pepo L. var. oleifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvjezdana Augustinović

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of spacing size and shape on oil pumpkin yield (Cucurbita pepo L. var. oleifera was investigated in two – year field experiments during 2004 and 2005 on The College of Agriculture at Križevci experimental fields. The investigated planting distances were: 100x100, 140x70, 140 x 50, 80 x 80 and 140x30 cm. The experiment was set out by to the Latin square method with five replications, and data was analyzed using analysis of variance. Austrian cultivar Gleissdorf was tested. Number of fruits per plant, average fruit weight, number of fruits per hectare, yield of fruits per hectare, average seed weight per fruit and seed yield per hectare were established. Highly significant large number of fruits per plant in both years was established at greater spacing size (100x100 cm – 1.43 fruit/plant in 2004; 140x70 cm – 1.1 fruit/plant in 2005. Average fruit weight regularly was higher at greater spacing size (140x70 cm – 4239 g in 2004; and 100x100 cm – 4183 g in 2005 but not significant. Even though the differences were not significant between treatmants in both years the greatest number of fruits per hectare (16 167- 2004; 13 917 – 2005 and fruit yield per hectare (60.1 t/ha – 2004; 54.2 t/ha – 2005 was obtained at spacing 140x30 cm. The highest seed yield per hectare in both years (1397.2 kg/ha – 2004; 1167.6 kg/ha – 2005 was obtained at the same spacing (140x30 cm but high significant only in 2004 year.

  14. Shape-and size-controlled Ag nanoparticles stabilized by in situ generated secondary amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Meneses, E., E-mail: esther.ramirez@ibero.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongación Paseo de la Reforma 880, Lomas de Santa Fe, Distrito Federal C.P. 01219 (Mexico); Montiel-Palma, V. [Centro de Investigaciones Químicas, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001 Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Morelos C.P. 62209 (Mexico); Domínguez-Crespo, M.A.; Izaguirre-López, M.G. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada-IPN, Unidad Altamira. Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial, 89600 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Palacios-Gonzalez, E. [Laboratorio de Microscopia de Ultra alta Resolución, Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas No. 152, C.P. 07730 México D.F. (Mexico); Dorantes-Rosales, H. [Departamento de Metalurgia, E.S.I.Q.I.E.-I.P.N., Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Zacatenco, Delegación. Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ag nanoparticles were generated from Ag amido complexes AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • Ag nanoparticles were stabilized by in situ generated HN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} or HN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • 1 or 5 equiv. of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent decreases the average size of the particles. • Ethylenediamine favor the formation of spherical particles. - Abstract: Silver amides such as AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2} have been employed successfully as precursors for the yield synthesis of silver nanoparticles under mild conditions of dihydrogen gas reduction (2 atm) in organic media. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of silver nanoparticles with FCC structure, variously sized from 26 to 35 nm for AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and from 14 to 86 nm for AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, the synthesis could take place in absence of added stabilizers due to the in situ formation of secondary amines from the reaction of dihydrogen gas with the amide ligands of the silver precursor. Indeed, the presence of HNR{sub 2} (R = iPr{sub 2}, N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}) on the surface of the nanoparticle was confirmed by spectroscopic means. Finally, the addition of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent allowed not only the control of the structural characteristics of the resulting Ag nanoparticles (well-dispersed with spherical shape), but that regarding the nanoparticle size as it inhibited overgrowth, limiting it to ca. 25 nm.

  15. Effects of foreground scale in texture discrimination tasks: performance is size, shape, and content specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, B S; Sagi, D

    1993-01-01

    Textural gradients can be defined as differences across space in orientation and spatial frequency content, along with absolute luminance and contrast. In this study, stimuli were created with gradients of these types to see how changing the size and shape of the foreground region affects the psychophysical task. The foreground regions were designed as clusters of target texels alternating with interplaced background texels (of the same cluster size). This design gives rise to a texture square-wave, with texture frequency defined by the distance from the beginning of one target cluster to the next. It was found that for stimuli with vertical and horizontal Gabor patches, the relationship between the global and local orientation of the foreground region is a critical variable, indicating some global-local interaction. When the global orientation of the foreground region is orthogonal to local target texel orientation, visibility is optimal for high texture frequencies, while for parallel arrangements, low texture frequencies are most visible. The latter result was also found to a lesser degree for tasks involving contrast gradients as well as spatial-frequency gradients, but with no effect caused by varying the global orientation. The results indicate the existence of a second-stage filter that integrates (across space) responses of similar first-stage spatial filters, and then sums the resultant activities with those of orthogonal first-stage filters, whose spatial proximity are to the sides of the local orientation. The size of these integrating mechanisms may extend to more than 7 deg, with connections between smoothed activities of filters with orthogonal orientations spanning approximately 1-2 deg.

  16. The catalytic diversity of zeolites: confinement and solvation effects within voids of molecular dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounder, Rajamani; Iglesia, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    The ability of molecular sieves to control the access and egress of certain reactants and products and to preferentially contain certain transition states while excluding others based on size were captured as shape selectivity concepts early in the history of zeolite catalysis. The marked consequences for reactivity and selectivity, specifically in acid catalysis, have since inspired and sustained many discoveries of novel silicate frameworks and driven the engineering of hierarchical structures and void size to influence catalysis. The catalytic diversity of microporous voids is explored and extended here in the context of their solvating environments, wherein voids act as hosts and stabilize guests, whether reactive intermediates or transition states, by van der Waals forces. We use specific examples from acid catalysis, including activation of C-C and C-H bonds in alkanes, alkylation and hydrogenation of alkenes, carbonylation of dimethyl ether, and elimination and homologation reactions of alkanols and ethers, which involve transition states and adsorbed precursors of varying size and composition. Mechanistic interpretations of measured turnover rates enable us to assign precise chemical origins to kinetic and thermodynamic constants in rate equations and, in turn, to identify specific steps and intermediates that determine the free energy differences responsible for chemical reactivity and selectivity. These free energy differences reflect the stabilization of transition states and their relevant precursors via electrostatic interactions that depend on acid strength and van der Waals interactions that depend on confinement within voids. Their respective contributions to activation free energies are examined by Born-Haber thermochemical cycles by considering plausible transition states and the relevant precursors. These examples show that zeolite voids solvate transition states and precursors differently, and markedly so for guest moieties of different size and

  17. A Cosmic Void Catalog of SDSS DR12 BOSS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Qingqing; Scherrer, Robert J; Scoccimarro, Roman; Tinker, Jeremy L; McBride, Cameron K; Neyrinck, Mark C; Schneider, Donald P; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    We present a cosmic void catalog using the large-scale structure galaxy catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This galaxy catalog is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 and is the final catalog of SDSS-III. We take into account the survey boundaries, masks, and angular and radial selection functions, and apply the ZOBOV void finding algorithm to the galaxy catalog. After making quality cuts to ensure that the voids represent real underdense regions, we identify 1228 voids with effective radii spanning the range 20-100Mpc/h and with central densities that are, on average, 30% of the mean sample density. We discuss the basic statistics of voids, such as their size and redshift distributions, and measure the radial density profile of the voids via a stacking technique. In addition, we construct mock void catalogs from 1000 mock galaxy catalogs, and find that the properties of BOSS voids are in good agreement with those in the mock catalogs. We compare the stella...

  18. Characteristics Of Basaltic Sand: Size, Shape, And Composition As A Function Of Transport Process And Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, R. A.; Needell, Z. A.; Rose, T. R.

    2012-04-01

    Overview: The chemical and physical characteristics of sedimentary material can provide valuable clues about transport processes, distance traveled, and provenance, all of which are aspects of Martian geography that we would like to better understand. For a typical sedimentary deposit on Earth, for example, it has been shown that the ratio of feldspar to quartz can be used to assess the maturity (or transport distance) of a terrestrial deposit, because feldspar is more vulnerable to weathering than quartz. Further, chemical analysis can also be used to determine potential sediment sources, and grain-size sorting can be used to distinguish aeolian sediments (typically well-sorted) from fluvial sediments (poorly sorted in high energy environments). It is also common to use the shapes of individual quartz particles to determine transport process and distance, all of which can help us better understand the history of a sample of sedimentary material and the geological processes that created and emplaced it. These traditional sedimentological concepts are now being applied to our interpretation of Martian surface materials. Sullivan et al. [2008], for example, used grain-size and shape to assess eolian processes and to qualify transport distances of deposits found at the Spirit landing site in Gusev Crater. Stockstill-Cahill et al. [62008 used variations in mineral abundances observed in multispectral data to determine the provenance of dark dunes found in Amazonis Planitia craters. While applying our understanding of terrestrial sedimentary materials to Martian surface materials is intuitively sound and logical, the problem is that most of our current understanding is based on sediments derived from felsic materials (e.g., granite) primarily because that is the composition of most of the landmass on the Earth. However, the Martian surface is composed primarily of mafic material, or basalt, which generates much different sedimentary particles as it weathers. Instead of

  19. Morpho morphometrics: Shared ancestry and selection drive the evolution of wing size and shape in Morpho butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazot, Nicolas; Panara, Stephen; Zilbermann, Nicolas; Blandin, Patrick; Le Poul, Yann; Cornette, Raphaël; Elias, Marianne; Debat, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly wings harbor highly diverse phenotypes and are involved in many functions. Wing size and shape result from interactions between adaptive processes, phylogenetic history, and developmental constraints, which are complex to disentangle. Here, we focus on the genus Morpho (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae, 30 species), which presents a high diversity of sizes, shapes, and color patterns. First, we generate a comprehensive molecular phylogeny of these 30 species. Next, using 911 collection specimens, we quantify the variation of wing size and shape across species, to assess the importance of shared ancestry, microhabitat use, and sexual selection in the evolution of the wings. While accounting for phylogenetic and allometric effects, we detect a significant difference in wing shape but not size among microhabitats. Fore and hindwings covary at the individual and species levels, and the covariation differs among microhabitats. However, the microhabitat structure in covariation disappears when phylogenetic relationships are taken into account. Our results demonstrate that microhabitat has driven wing shape evolution, although it has not strongly affected forewing and hindwing integration. We also found that sexual dimorphism of forewing shape and color pattern are coupled, suggesting a common selective force. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. Shape measurement of bubble in a liquid metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Y.; Shen, X.; Mishima, K.; Matsubayashi, M.

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic behavior of a two-phase bubble, i.e. a steam bubble containing a droplet evaporating in the bubble, in the molten alloy was clearly visualized using high-frame-rate neutron radiography. In relation to some direct contact heat exchanger design with molten lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi), experiments have been done at JRR-3M of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) with water droplets evaporating in a stable thermally stratified Newton's alloy pool. The instantaneous shape and size of the bubble has been iteratively estimated from the void fraction distributions and total void volume by assuming a symmetrical bubble shape.

  1. Does Glass Size and Shape Influence Judgements of the Volume of Wine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechey, Rachel; Attwood, Angela S; Couturier, Dominique-Laurent; Munafò, Marcus R; Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E; Woods, Andy; Marteau, Theresa M

    2015-01-01

    Judgements of volume may influence the rate of consumption of alcohol and, in turn, the amount consumed. The aim of the current study was to examine the impact of the size and shape of wine glasses on perceptions of wine volume. Online experiment: Participants (n = 360; recruited via Mechanical Turk) were asked to match the volume of wine in two wine glasses, specifically: 1. the Reference glass holding a fixed reference volume, and 2. the Comparison glass, for which the volume could be altered until participants perceived it matched the reference volume. One of three comparison glasses was shown in each trial: 'wider' (20% wider but same capacity); 'larger' (same width but 25% greater capacity); or 'wider-and-larger' (20% wider and 25% greater capacity). Reference volumes were 125 ml, 175 ml and 250 ml, in a fully factorial within-subjects design: 3 (comparison glass) x 3 (reference volume). Non-zero differences between the volumes with which participants filled comparison glasses and the corresponding reference volumes were identified using sign-rank tests. Participants under-filled the wider glass relative to the reference glass for larger reference volumes, and over-filled the larger glass relative to the reference glass for all reference volumes. Results for the wider-and-larger glass showed a mixed pattern across reference volume. For all comparison glasses, in trials with larger reference volumes participants tended to fill the comparison glass less, relative to trials with smaller reference volumes for the same comparison glass. These results are broadly consistent with people using the relative fullness of glasses to judge volume, and suggest both the shape and capacity of wine glasses may influence perceived volume. Perceptions that smaller glasses contain more than larger ones (despite containing the same volume), could slow drinking speed and overall consumption by serving standard portions in smaller glasses. This hypothesis awaits testing.

  2. Size and shape effects on the thermodynamic properties of nanoscale volumes of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm, Bjørn A; Simon, Jean-Marc; Schnell, Sondre K; Kjelstrup, Signe; He, Jianying; Bedeaux, Dick

    2017-03-29

    Small systems are known to deviate from the classical thermodynamic description, among other things due to their large surface area to volume ratio compared to corresponding big systems. As a consequence, extensive thermodynamic properties are no longer proportional to the volume, but are instead higher order functions of size and shape. We investigate such functions for second moments of probability distributions of fluctuating properties in the grand-canonical ensemble, focusing specifically on the volume and surface terms of Hadwiger's theorem, explained in Klain, Mathematika, 1995, 42, 329-339. We resolve the shape dependence of the surface term and show, using Hill's nanothermodynamics [Hill, J. Chem. Phys., 1962, 36, 3182], that the surface satisfies the thermodynamics of a flat surface as described by Gibbs [Gibbs, The Scientific Papers of J. Willard Gibbs, Volume 1, Thermodynamics, Ox Bow Press, Woodbridge, Connecticut, 1993]. The Small System Method (SSM), first derived by Schnell et al. [Schnell et al., J. Phys. Chem. B, 2011, 115, 10911], is extended and used to analyze simulation data on small systems of water. We simulate water as an example to illustrate the method, using TIP4P/2005 and other models, and compute the isothermal compressibility and thermodynamic factor. We are able to retrieve the experimental value of the bulk phase compressibility within 2%, and show that the compressibility of nanosized volumes increases by up to a factor of two as the number of molecules in the volume decreases. The value for a tetrahedron, cube, sphere, polygon, etc. can be predicted from the same scaling law, as long as second order effects (nook and corner effects) are negligible. Lastly, we propose a general formula for finite reservoir correction to fluctuations in subvolumes.

  3. Bat distribution size or shape as determinant of viral richness in african bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël D Maganga

    Full Text Available The rising incidence of emerging infectious diseases (EID is mostly linked to biodiversity loss, changes in habitat use and increasing habitat fragmentation. Bats are linked to a growing number of EID but few studies have explored the factors of viral richness in bats. These may have implications for role of bats as potential reservoirs. We investigated the determinants of viral richness in 15 species of African bats (8 Pteropodidae and 7 microchiroptera in Central and West Africa for which we provide new information on virus infection and bat phylogeny. We performed the first comparative analysis testing the correlation of the fragmented geographical distribution (defined as the perimeter to area ratio with viral richness in bats. Because of their potential effect, sampling effort, host body weight, ecological and behavioural traits such as roosting behaviour, migration and geographical range, were included into the analysis as variables. The results showed that the geographical distribution size, shape and host body weight have significant effects on viral richness in bats. Viral richness was higher in large-bodied bats which had larger and more fragmented distribution areas. Accumulation of viruses may be related to the historical expansion and contraction of bat species distribution range, with potentially strong effects of distribution edges on virus transmission. Two potential explanations may explain these results. A positive distribution edge effect on the abundance or distribution of some bat species could have facilitated host switches. Alternatively, parasitism could play a direct role in shaping the distribution range of hosts through host local extinction by virulent parasites. This study highlights the importance of considering the fragmentation of bat species geographical distribution in order to understand their role in the circulation of viruses in Africa.

  4. Factors controlling the size and shape of stream channels in coarse noncohesive sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolman, M. Gordon; Brush, Lucien M.

    1961-01-01

    The size and shape of equilibrium channels in uniform, noncohesive sands, 0.67 mm and 2.0 mm in diameter, were studied experimentally in a laboratory flume 52 feet long in which discharge, slope, sediment load, and bed and bank material could be varied independently. For each run a straight trapezoidal channel was molded in the sand and the flume set at a predetermined slope. Introduction of the discharge was accompanied by widening and aggradation until a stable channel was established. By definition a stable equilibrium existed when channel width, water surface slope, and rate of transport became constant. The duration of individual runs ranged from 2 to 52 hours depending upon the time required for establishing equilibrium. Stability of the banks determined channel shape. In the 2.0 mm sand at a given slope and discharge, only one depth was stable. At this depth the flow was just competent to move particles along the bed of the channel. An increase in discharge produced a wider channel of the same depth and thus transport per unit width remained at a minimum. Channels in the 0.67 mm sand were somewhat more stable and permitted a 1.5 fold increase in depth above that required to start movement of the bed material. An increased transport was associated with the increase in depth. The rate of transport is adequately described in terms of the total shear or in terms of the difference between the total shear and the critical shear required to begin movement. In these experiments the finer, or 0.67 mm, sand, began to move along the bed of the channel at a constant shear stress. Incipient movement of the coarser, or 2.0 mm, sand, varied with the shear stress as well as the mean velocity. At the initiation of movement a lower shear was associated with a higher velocity and vice versa. Anabranches of braided rivers and some natural river channels formed in relatively noncohesive materials resemble the essential characteristics of the flume channels. For a given slope and

  5. Measuring Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the clustering of voids

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Yu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Tao, Charling

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the necessary methodology to optimally measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal, from voids based on galaxy redshift catalogues. To this end, we study the dependency of the BAO signal on the population of voids classified by their sizes. We find for the first time the characteristic features of the correlation function of voids including the first robust detection of BAOs in mock galaxy catalogues. These show an anti-correlation around the scale corresponding to the smallest size of voids in the sample (the void exclusion effect), and dips at both sides of the BAO peak, which can be used to determine the significance of the BAO signal without any priori model. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that there is a scale dependent bias for different populations of voids depending on the radius, with the peculiar property that the void population with the largest BAO significance corresponds to tracers with approximately zero bias on the largest scales. We further investigate the meth...

  6. A Review on Anatomical Variations of Mental Foramen (Number, Location, Shape, Symmetry, Direction and Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ezoddini-Ardakani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mental foramen is located on the anterior aspect of the mandible that permits the terminal branch of the inferior alveolar nerve and blood vessels to exit. The anatomical variations of mental foramen are of considerable importance in local anesthesia, treatment of the fractures in the parasymphysis area, orthognatic surgeries, implant placement, etc. Regarding the importance of mental foramen in dentistry (from local anesthesia to invasive surgical procedures, this study intends to review the anatomical variations of mental foramen in this study. Absence of mental foramen is rare. On the other hand, prevalence of accessory mental foramen has been estimated lower than 15% in the most studies. The position of mental foramen is normally between first and second premolar teeth or under second premolar tooth in different ethnic groups and bilateral symmetry exists in regard with location in most cases. In most studies, the ratio of distance from mental foramen to symphysis to distance from symphysis to posterior border of ramus has been reported about 1/3.5 to 1/3. Mental foramen is oval or circular in shape and its most common direction is usually posterosuperior. Its size in different studies has been estimated about 2 to 5 millimeters and asymmetry in size is possible on both sides of mandible. Due to variations of mental foramen between various ethnic groups and even different individuals in the same ethnic group, using advanced imaging techniques such as CBCT is recommended in order to gain detailed knowledge of anatomy and morphology of mental foramen before applying invasive surgeries.

  7. Adaptation to different climates results in divergent phenotypic plasticity of wing size and shape in an invasive drosophilid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Roberta Loh; Jean R. David; Vincent Debat; Blanche Christine Bitner-Mathé

    2008-12-01

    The phenotypic plasticity of wing size and wing shape of Zaprionus indianus was investigated in relation to growth temperature (17°C to 31°C) in two natural populations living under different climates, equatorial and subtropical. The two populations were clearly distinguished not only by their wing size (the populations from the colder climate being bigger in size), but also by the shape of the response curves to growth temperature i.e., their reaction norms. In this respect, the temperature at which the size of the wing was maximum was about 3°C higher in the equatorial population. Such a difference in size plasticity is already found in two other nonclosely related species, might be a general evolutionary pattern in drosophilids. Wing shape was investigated by calculating an ellipse included into the wing blade, then by considering the ratio of the two axes, and also by analysing the angular position of 10 wing-vein landmarks. For an overall shape index (ratio of the two axes of the ellipse), a regular and almost linear increase was observed with increasing temperature i.e., a more round shape at high temperatures. Wing shape was also analysed by considering the variations of the various angles according to temperature. A diversity of response curves was observed, revealing either a monotonous increase or decrease with increasing temperature, and sometimes a bell shape curve. An interesting conclusion is that, in most cases, a significant difference was observed between the two populations, and the difference was more pronounced at low temperatures. These angular variations are difficult to interpret in an evolutionary context. More comparative studies should be undertaken before reaching some general conclusions.

  8. Shape and size of jatropha beans (Jatropha curcas L. during drying at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdiney Cambuy Siqueira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to study the physical properties of the jatropha beans over the drying under six air conditions, based on measurements of roundness, sphericity, volume, superficial area, projected area and surface/volume ratio. Jatropha beans with moisture content around 0.61 (decimal d.b. were subjected to thin-layer drying in oven with forced-air circulation under six temperature conditions (36, 45, 60, 75, 90 and 105 °C and relative humidity of 31.7; 19.6; 9.4; 4.8; 2.6 and 1.5% respectively, until reaching the moisture content of 0.11 ± 0.006 (decimal d. b.. The results showed that the necessary time for jatropha beans to reach the moisture content of 0.11 ± 0.006 (decimal d.b. were 1.5; 2.25; 3.0; 4.75; 6.75 and 12.0 h for the drying temperatures of 105, 90, 75, 60, 45 and 36 °C, respectively; and the reduction in the moisture content as well as the drying conditions promoted changes in the shape and reduced the size of the jatropha beans.

  9. TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  10. Genetic, environmental and epigenetic influences on variation in human tooth number, size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Grant; Bockmann, Michelle; Hughes, Toby; Brook, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to highlight some key recent developments in studies of tooth number, size and shape that are providing better insights into the roles of genetic, environmental and epigenetic factors in the process of dental development. Advances in molecular genetics are helping to clarify how epigenetic factors influence the spatial and temporal regulation of the complex processes involved in odontogenesis. At the phenotypic level, the development of sophisticated systems for image analysis is enabling new dental phenotypes to be defined. The 2D and 3D data that are generated by these imaging systems can then be analysed with mathematical approaches, such as geometric morphometric analysis. By gathering phenotypic data and DNA from twins, it is now possible to use 'genome-wide' association studies and the monozygotic co-twin design to identify important genes in odontogenesis and also to clarify how epigenetic and environmental factors can affect this process. Given that many of the common dental anomalies affecting the human dentition are interrelated, apparently reflecting pleiotropic genetic effects, the discoveries and new directions described in this paper should have important implications for clinical dental practice in the future.

  11. Size, Shape, and Arrangement of Cellulose Microfibril in Higher Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) are imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the sub-nanometer resolution. We found that the size and shape of fundamental cellulose elementary fibril (CEF) is essentially identical in different cell wall types, i.e., primary wall (PW), parenchyma secondary wall (pSW), and sclerenchyma secondary wall (sSW), which is consistent with previously proposed 36-chain model (Ding et al., 2006, J. Agric. Food Chem.). The arrangement of individual CEFs in these wall types exhibits two orientations. In PW, CEFs are horizontally associated through their hydrophilic faces, and the planar faces are exposed, forming ribbon-like macrofibrils. In pSW and sSW, CEFs are vertically oriented, forming layers, in which hemicelluloses are interacted with the hydrophobic faces of the CEF and serve as spacers between CEFs. Lignification occurs between CEF-hemicelluloses layers in secondary walls. Furthermore, we demonstrated quantitative analysis of plant cell wall accessibility to and digestibility by different cellulase systems at real-time using chemical imaging (e.g., stimulated Raman scattering) and fluorescence microscopy of labeled cellulases (Ding et al., 2012, Science, in press).

  12. Particle size and shape modification of hydroxyapatite nanostructures synthesized via a complexing agent-assisted route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandes, Fatemeh [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    In this work, hydroxyapatite (HAP), Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, nanostructures including nanorods, nanobundles and nanoparticles have been prepared via a simple precipitation method. In the present method, Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} were used as calcium and phosphorus precursors, respectively. Besides, the Schiff bases derived from 2-hydroxyacetophenone and different diamines were used as complexing agents for the in situ formation of Ca{sup 2+} complexes. The formation mechanism of 0-D and 1-D nanostructures of HAP was also considered. When the complexing agents could coordinate to the Ca{sup 2+} ions through N and O atoms to form the [CaN{sub 2}O{sub 2}]{sup 2+} complexes, HAP nanoparticles were generated. On the other hand, nanorods and nanobundles of HAP were obtained by forming the [CaN{sub 2}]{sup 2+} as well as [CaO{sub 2}]{sup 2+} complexes in the reaction solution. This work is the first successful synthesis of pure HAP nanostructures in the presence of Schiff bases instead of using the common surfactants. - Highlights: • HAP nanostructures have been prepared by a simple precipitation method. • To control shape and particle size of HAP, different Schiff bases were employed. • 0-D and 1-D HAP nanostructures have been formed by this method.

  13. Exotic optoelectronic properties of organic semiconductors with super-controlled nanoscale sizes and molecular shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Shu; Yamao, Takeshi; Katagiri, Toshifumi

    2014-03-01

    We present several aspects of thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers (TPCOs). TPCOs are regarded as a newly occurring class of organic semiconductors. These materials are synthesized by hybridizing thiophene and phenylene rings at the molecular level with their various mutual arrangements. These materials are characterized by the super-controlled nanoscale sizes and molecular shapes. These produce peculiar crystallographic structures and high-performance optical and electronic properties. The crystals of TPCOs were obtained through both vapor phase and liquid phase. In the TPCO crystals, the molecules take upright configuration. These cause large carrier mobilities of field-effect transistors and laser oscillations under optical excitations. Spectrally-narrowed emissions (SNEs) were also achieved under weak optical excitation using a mercury lamp. The light-emitting field-effect transistors using these crystals for an active layer have shown the current-injected SNEs when the device was combined with an optical cavity and operated by an alternating-current gate-voltage method. Thus the TPCO materials will play an important role in the future in the fields of nanoscale technology and organic semiconductor materials as well as their optoelectronic device applications.

  14. Tripolyphosphate Cross-Linked Macromolecular Composites for the Growth of Shape- and Size-Controlled Apatites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fwu-Long Mi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive composites that enable the formation of calcium phosphates have received increased attention over the last decade, in the development of osteoconductive biomaterials for orthopaedic applications. In this work, tripolyphosphate (TPP-cross-linked chitosan/gelatin composites (TPP-CG were prepared for the growth of shape- and size-controlled calcium phosphates on/in the composites. The mineralization pattern of the composites, after soaking in the Ca(OH2 aqueous solution, clearly demonstrated oriented, needle-like nanocrystallites of calcium phosphates in the matrix with especially high Ca/P molar ratio (3.98 as detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX analysis. Subsequent to mineralization in a simulated body fluid (SBF, the mineralized composites showed micro-scaled spherical aggregates deposited on the surface and granule-like nanocrystallites grew in the matrix. The Ca/P molar ratio (1.72 and X-ray diffraction pattern of the nanocrystallites grown in the composites were similar to those of hydroxyapatite (HAp. Osteoblastic differentiation of ROS cells cultured on the mineralized composites allowed an enhanced expression of the chosen osteogenic marker (alkaline phosphatase, ALPase. These results indicated that the composites mineralized with micro- and nano-scaled calcium phosphates with various structural features make them attractive for bone tissue engineering applications.

  15. Hippocampal neurons respond uniquely to topographies of various sizes and shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fozdar, David Y; Chen Shaochen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Lee, Jae Young; Schmidt, Christine E, E-mail: scchen@mail.utexas.ed, E-mail: schmidt@che.utexas.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    A number of studies have investigated the behavior of neurons on microfabricated topography for the purpose of developing interfaces for use in neural engineering applications. However, there have been few studies simultaneously exploring the effects of topographies having various feature sizes and shapes on axon growth and polarization in the first 24 h. Accordingly, here we investigated the effects of arrays of lines (ridge grooves) and holes of microscale ({approx}2 {mu}m) and nanoscale ({approx}300 nm) dimensions, patterned in quartz (SiO{sub 2}), on the (1) adhesion, (2) axon establishment (polarization), (3) axon length, (4) axon alignment and (5) cell morphology of rat embryonic hippocampal neurons, to study the response of the neurons to feature dimension and geometry. Neurons were analyzed using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The topographies were found to have a negligible effect on cell attachment but to cause a marked increase in axon polarization, occurring more frequently on sub-microscale features than on microscale features. Neurons were observed to form longer axons on lines than on holes and smooth surfaces; axons were either aligned parallel or perpendicular to the line features. An analysis of cell morphology indicated that the surface features impacted the morphologies of the soma, axon and growth cone. The results suggest that incorporating microscale and sub-microscale topographies on biomaterial surfaces may enhance the biomaterials' ability to modulate nerve development and regeneration.

  16. The study of shape and size of normal sella turcica in cephalometric radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Wook Jin; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyung Hee Univ. College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    To investigate the shape and size of normal sella turcica on cephalometric radiograms. Cephalometric radiograms of 200 orthodontic patients of age ranging 6-42 years were examined. All subjects were divided into 5 groups by age, the dimensional change of sella turcica was examined according to age, and the configurations of sella turcica floor, tuberculum sella, and anterior and posterior clinoid process were also observed. The contours of sella turcica floor were flat type in 54% and concave type in 46%. The contours of tuberculum sella were right angle type in 55% and obtuse angle type in 44%; Acute angle type and plane type were very rare comprising 0.5%, 0.5% each. The configurations of anterior clinoid process were point type in 80% and round type in 20% of cases, and those of posterior clinoid processes were point type in 60% and round type in 40% of cases. The dimensional change of sella turcica according to age range had significantly positive linear trend to sella turcica length, height, and width until 25 years. After 26 years, no significant increase was found in sella turcica dimension. Especially, the sella turcica length had more proportional increase than that of sella turcica height and width. The results of this study revealed that the configuration of normal sella turcia was variable and the dimensional change of normal sella turcica had a linear tendency with age until 26 years.

  17. Eye size and shape in newborn children and their relation to axial length and refraction at 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Laurence Shen; Chua, Sharon; Tan, Pei Ting; Cai, Shirong; Chong, Yap-Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Gluckman, Peter D; Fortier, Marielle V; Ngo, Cheryl; Qiu, Anqi; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2015-07-01

    To determine if eye size and shape at birth are associated with eye size and refractive error 3 years later. A subset of 173 full-term newborn infants from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the dimensions of the internal eye. Eye shape was assessed by an oblateness index, calculated as 1 - (axial length/width) or 1 - (axial length/height). Cycloplegic autorefraction (Canon Autorefractor RK-F1) and optical biometry (IOLMaster) were performed 3 years later. Both eyes of 173 children were analysed. Eyes with longer axial length at birth had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years (p Eyes with larger baseline volumes and surface areas had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years (p Eyes which were more oblate at birth had greater increases in axial length at 3 years (p eyes had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years compared to oblate eyes (p eyes had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years compared to oblate eyes (p eye size and shape at birth and refraction, corneal curvature or myopia at 3 years. Eyes that are larger and have prolate or spherical shapes at birth exhibit smaller increases in axial length over the first 3 years of life. Eye size and shape at birth influence subsequent eye growth but not refractive error development. © 2015 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2015 The College of Optometrists.

  18. Size and temperature dependence of the line shape of ESR spectra of the XXZ antiferromagnetic chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, Hiroki; De Raedt, Hans; Bertaina, Sylvain; Miyashita, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    The electron spin resonance spectrum of the XXZ spin chain with finite length shows a double-peak structure at high temperatures around the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) frequency. This fact has been pointed out by direct numerical methods [S. El Shawish, O. Cépas, and S. Miyashita, Phys. Rev. B 81, 224421 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.224421; H. Ikeuchi, H. De Raedt, S. Bertaina, and S. Miyashita, Phys. Rev. B 92, 214431 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.214431]. The question of whether the double-peak structure survives in the thermodynamics is of particular interest. We study the size dependence of the line shape, including the even-odd effect. It is found that the peaks forming the double-peak structure are assigned to individual resonances, each of which is specified by the magnetizations of the resonating states (M ,M -1 ) . To understand dependences, we decompose the spectrum into contributions from transitions specified by the magnetization, and we characterize the structure of the spectrum by individual contributions. We analyze the size dependence of each contribution individually by extending the moment method introduced by M. Brockman et al. to each component, and we find that the mean of each peak approaches the paramagnetic resonance point with 1 /N (where N is the length of the chain), which indicates that the separation of the peaks of the double-peak structure also vanishes inversely with the system size. We also study the temperature dependence of the structure. At low temperatures, the spectrum has a single peak with a finite width at a position with a finite shift from the frequency of EPR, as pointed out by the analysis of field-theoretical works [M. Oshikawa and I. Affleck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5136 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.5136]. The study of the temperature dependence of the spectrum shows how the high-temperature spectrum changes to the low-temperature one with a drastic broadening of the spectrum.

  19. Grain size effect on the structural parameters of the stress induced epsilonhcp: martensite in iron-based shape memory alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Cristina Nascimento

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of austenitic grain size (GS reduction on the structural parameters of the epsilonhcp - martensite in stainless shape memory alloy (SMA. Rietveld refinement data showed an expansion in c-axis and a reduction in a and b-axis with thermo-mechanical cycles for all samples analyzed. Samples with 75 < GS (µm < 129 were analyzed. It was also observed an increase of the unit cell volume in this phase with GS reduction. The smallest grain size sample (GS = 75 µm presented a c/a ratio of 1.649, and approximately 90% of total shape memory recovery.

  20. Hydrodynamic discrimination of wakes caused by objects of different size or shape in a harbour seal (Phoca vitulina)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieskotten, S.; Mauck, B.; Miersch, L.

    2011-01-01

    Harbour seals can use their mystacial vibrissae to detect and track hydrodynamic wakes. We investigated the ability of a harbour seal to discriminate objects of different size or shape by their hydrodynamic signature and used particle image velocimetry to identify the hydrodynamic parameters...... to the arrangement of the vortices. We tested whether the seal used highest velocities, the steepness of the gradients and the spatial extension of the wake in a second set of experiments by varying moving speed and paddle size, respectively. The subject was still able to discriminate between the respective object...... that a seal may be using to do so. Hydrodynamic trails were generated by different sized or shaped paddles that were moved in the calm water of an experimental box to produce a characteristic signal. In a two-alternative forced-choice procedure the blindfolded subject was able to discriminate size differences...

  1. An analytical model for porous single crystals with ellipsoidal voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbiakop, A.; Constantinescu, A.; Danas, K.

    2015-11-01

    A rate-(in)dependent constitutive model for porous single crystals with arbitrary crystal anisotropy (e.g., FCC, BCC, HCP, etc.) containing general ellipsoidal voids is developed. The proposed model, denoted as modified variational model (MVAR), is based on the nonlinear variational homogenization method, which makes use of a linear comparison porous material to estimate the response of the nonlinear porous single crystal. Periodic multi-void finite element simulations are used in order to validate the MVAR for a large number of parameters including cubic (FCC, BCC) and hexagonal (HCP) crystal anisotropy, various creep exponents (i.e., nonlinearity), several stress triaxiality ratios, general void shapes and orientations and various porosity levels. The MVAR model, which involves a priori no calibration parameters, is found to be in good agreement with the finite element results for all cases considered in the rate-dependent context. The model is then used in a predictive manner to investigate the complex response of porous single crystals in several cases with strong coupling between the anisotropy of the crystal and the (morphological) anisotropy induced by the shape and orientation of the voids. Finally, a simple way of calibrating the MVAR with just two adjustable parameters is depicted in the rate-independent context so that an excellent agreement with the FE simulation results is obtained. In this last case, this proposed model can be thought as a generalization of the Gurson model in the context of porous single crystals and general ellipsoidal void shapes and orientations.

  2. Size and Shape of Chariklo from Multi-epoch Stellar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, R.; Sicardy, B.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Ortiz, J.-L.; Desmars, J.; Bérard, D.; Lellouch, E.; Meza, E.; Kervella, P.; Snodgrass, C.; Duffard, R.; Morales, N.; Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Assafin, M.; Morgado, B. E.; Colas, F.; De Witt, C.; Sickafoose, A. A.; Breytenbach, H.; Dauvergne, J.-L.; Schoenau, P.; Maquet, L.; Bath, K.-L.; Bode, H.-J.; Cool, A.; Lade, B.; Kerr, S.; Herald, D.

    2017-10-01

    We use data from five stellar occultations observed between 2013 and 2016 to constrain Chariklo’s size and shape, and the ring reflectivity. We consider four possible models for Chariklo (sphere, Maclaurin spheroid, triaxial ellipsoid, and Jacobi ellipsoid), and we use a Bayesian approach to estimate the corresponding parameters. The spherical model has a radius R = 129 ± 3 km. The Maclaurin model has equatorial and polar radii a=b={143}-6+3 {km} and c={96}-4+14 {km}, respectively, with density {970}-180+300 {kg} {{{m}}}-3. The ellipsoidal model has semiaxes a={148}-4+6 {km}, b={132}-5+6 {km}, and c={102}-8+10 {km}. Finally, the Jacobi model has semiaxes a = 157 ± 4 km, b = 139 ± 4 km, and c = 86 ± 1 km, and density {796}-4+2 {kg} {{{m}}}-3. Depending on the model, we obtain topographic features of 6–11 km, typical of Saturn icy satellites with similar size and density. We constrain Chariklo’s geometric albedo between 3.1% (sphere) and 4.9% (ellipsoid), while the ring I/F reflectivity is less constrained between 0.6% (Jacobi) and 8.9% (sphere). The ellipsoid model explains both the optical light curve and the long-term photometry variation of the system, giving a plausible value for the geometric albedo of the ring particles of 10%–15%. The derived mass of Chariklo of 6–8 × 1018 kg places the rings close to 3:1 resonance between the ring mean motion and Chariklo’s rotation period. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  3. Standardization of size, shape and internal structure of spinal cord images: comparison of three transformation methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhisa Fujiki

    Full Text Available Functional fluorescence imaging has been widely applied to analyze spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics in the brain and spinal cord. However, it is difficult to integrate spatial information obtained from imaging data in specific regions of interest across multiple samples, due to large variability in the size, shape and internal structure of samples. To solve this problem, we attempted to standardize transversely sectioned spinal cord images focusing on the laminar structure in the gray matter. We employed three standardization methods, the affine transformation (AT, the angle-dependent transformation (ADT and the combination of these two methods (AT+ADT. The ADT is a novel non-linear transformation method developed in this study to adjust an individual image onto the template image in the polar coordinate system. We next compared the accuracy of these three standardization methods. We evaluated two indices, i.e., the spatial distribution of pixels that are not categorized to any layer and the error ratio by the leave-one-out cross validation method. In this study, we used neuron-specific marker (NeuN-stained histological images of transversely sectioned cervical spinal cord slices (21 images obtained from 4 rats to create the standard atlas and also to serve for benchmark tests. We found that the AT+ADT outperformed other two methods, though the accuracy of each method varied depending on the layer. This novel image standardization technique would be applicable to optical recording such as voltage-sensitive dye imaging, and will enable statistical evaluations of neural activation across multiple samples.

  4. Spinning, Breathing, and Flapping: The Changing Size and Shape of Saturn's Middle Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, K. M.; Kivelson, M.; Sergis, N.; Khurana, K. K.; Jia, X.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    In Saturn's magnetosphere, periodic fluctuations are observed in Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR), auroral emissions, magnetic field, electron density, and energetic particle fluxes. We have extended previous Cassini investigations at Saturn by characterizing periodicities in additional plasma and magnetic field properties in Saturn's middle magnetosphere near the equatorial plane. It is customary to model perturbations in the middle magnetosphere as if they rotate rigidly, but we find that this assumption does not work well for all properties of interest and that the phase dependence of the perturbations may vary with radius and local time. We use a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation [Jia et al., 2012], which generates a rotating pattern of field aligned currents centered at 70° invariant latitude in Saturn's southern ionosphere that impose periodic variations on the entire magnetosphere, to understand how the changing size and shape affects the observed properties. In particular, we find that the dayside magnetopause roughly follows the 80 invariant latitude field lines as they move in and out. We identify three different modes of magnetospheric periodicity linked to rotation (spinning), compression (breathing), and north-south motion (flapping). All have the same ~10.7 hour period, but impose significant changes at phases that depend on the plasma property considered and the location of the measurement. Multiple modes acting concurrently can produce distinctly non-sinusoidal waveforms of the variations of plasma parameters through a rotation cycle. Within limitations of data coverage, we find good agreement between the simulation and the data in the rotation phase modulation of magnetic pressure, plasma pressure, and density perturbations.

  5. Ultrasound transducer shape has no effect on measurements of lumbar multifidus muscle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Peter R; Smith, Nicholas; Warner, Martin B; Stokes, Maria

    2012-04-01

    Evidence is currently lacking for guidance on ultrasound transducer configuration (shape) when imaging muscle to measure its size. This study compared measurements made of lumbar multifidus on images obtained using curvilinear and linear transducers. Fifteen asymptomatic males (aged 21-32 years) had their right lumbar multifidus imaged at L3. Two transverse images were taken with two transducers (5 MHz curvilinear and 6 MHz linear), and linear and cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements were made off-line. Reliability of image interpretation was shown using intra-class correlation coefficients (0.78-0.99). Muscle measurements were compared between transducers using Bland and Altman plots and paired t-tests. Relationships between CSA and linear measurements were examined using Pearson's Correlation Coefficients. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the measurements of the two transducers. Thickness and CSA measurements had small differences between transducers, with mean differences of 0.01 cm (SDdiff = 0.21 cm) and 0.03 cm(2) (SDdiff = 0.58 cm(2)) respectively. Width measures had a mean difference of 0.14 cm, with the linear transducer giving larger measures. Significant correlations (p transducers (r = 0.78-0.89). Measurements of multifidus at L3 were not influenced by the configuration of transducers of similar frequency. For the purposes of image interpretation, the curvilinear transducer produced better definition of the lateral muscle border, suggesting it as the preferable transducer for imaging lumbar multifidus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reconstructing grassland fire history using sedimentary charcoal: Considering count, size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leys, Berangere A; Commerford, Julie L; McLauchlan, Kendra K

    2017-01-01

    Fire is a key Earth system process, with 80% of annual fire activity taking place in grassland areas. However, past fire regimes in grassland systems have been difficult to quantify due to challenges in interpreting the charcoal signal in depositional environments. To improve reconstructions of grassland fire regimes, it is essential to assess two key traits: (1) charcoal count, and (2) charcoal shape. In this study, we quantified the number of charcoal pieces in 51 sediment samples of ponds in the Great Plains and tested its relevance as a proxy for the fire regime by examining 13 potential factors influencing charcoal count, including various fire regime components (e.g. the fire frequency, the area burned, and the fire season), vegetation cover and pollen assemblages, and climate variables. We also quantified the width to length (W:L) ratio of charcoal particles, to assess its utility as a proxy of fuel types in grassland environments by direct comparison with vegetation cover and pollen assemblages. Our first conclusion is that charcoal particles produced by grassland fires are smaller than those produced by forest fires. Thus, a mesh size of 120μm as used in forested environments is too large for grassland ecosystems. We recommend counting all charcoal particles over 60μm in grasslands and mixed grass-forest environments to increase the number of samples with useful data. Second, a W:L ratio of 0.5 or smaller appears to be an indicator for fuel types, when vegetation surrounding the site is before composed of at least 40% grassland vegetation. Third, the area burned within 1060m of the depositional environments explained both the count and the area of charcoal particles. Therefore, changes in charcoal count or charcoal area through time indicate a change in area burned. The fire regimes of grassland systems, including both human and climatic influences on fire behavior, can be characterized by long-term charcoal records.

  7. The effect of particle shape and size distribution on the acoustical properties of mixtures of hemp particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glé, Philippe; Gourdon, Emmanuel; Arnaud, Laurent; Horoshenkov, Kirill-V; Khan, Amir

    2013-12-01

    Hemp concrete is an attractive alternative to traditional materials used in building construction. It has a very low environmental impact, and it is characterized by high thermal insulation. Hemp aggregate particles are parallelepiped in shape and can be organized in a plurality of ways to create a considerable proportion of open pores with a complex connectivity pattern, the acoustical properties of which have never been examined systematically. Therefore this paper is focused on the fundamental understanding of the relations between the particle shape and size distribution, pore size distribution, and the acoustical properties of the resultant porous material mixture. The sound absorption and the transmission loss of various hemp aggregates is characterized using laboratory experiments and three theoretical models. These models are used to relate the particle size distribution to the pore size distribution. It is shown that the shape of particles and particle size control the pore size distribution and tortuosity in shiv. These properties in turn relate directly to the observed acoustical behavior.

  8. Effect of Size, Content and Shape of Reinforcements on the Behavior of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) Under Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknia, A.; Pramanik, A.; Dixit, A. R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites (MMCs) 6061 aluminum, reinforced with silicon carbide particles, under unidirectional tensile loading by finite element analysis. The effects of particle's shape, size and content on the tensile properties of the composites were studied and compared with each other. In addition, stress and strain distributions and possible particle fracture or debonding were investigated. It was found that, among different shapes, a certain shape of reinforcement particle provided better tensile properties for MMCs and, within each shape category, composites with smaller particle size and higher particle content (20%) also showed better properties. It was also found that when the reinforcement content was 10%, the effects of shape and size of the particles were negligible. Not only interfacial length between the reinforcement and matrix materials, but also state of matrix material, due to the presence of the reinforcement particles, affected the stiffness of the MMCs. In almost all of the cases, except for MMCs with triangular particles, when the stress increased, with the increase in the applied positive displacement, the stress distributions remained unchanged.

  9. Growth and characterization of ZnO multipods on functional surfaces with different sizes and shapes of Ag particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Kamalianfar; S A Halim; Mahmoud Godarz Naseri; M Navasery; Fasih Ud Din; J A M Zahedi; Kasra Behzad

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional ZnO multipods are successfully synthesized on functional substrates using the vapor transport method in a quartz tube.The functional surfaces,which include two different distributions of Ag nanoparticles and a layer of commercial Ag nanowires,are coated onto silicon substrates before the growth of ZnO nanostructures.The structures and morphologies of the ZnO/Ag heterostructures are investigated using X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy.The sizes and shapes of the Ag particles affect the growth rates and initial nucleations of the ZnO structures,resulting in different numbers and shapes of multipods.They also influence the orientation and growth quality of the rods.The optical properties are studied by photoluminescence,UV-vis,and Raman spectroscopy.The results indicate that the surface plasmon resonance strongly depends on the sizes and shapes of the Ag particles.

  10. Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron in continuous-flow system. Part 2: Effect of scrap iron shape and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheju, M; Balcu, I

    2010-10-15

    Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron has the advantage that two wastes are treated simultaneously. The reduction of hexavalent chromium by scrap iron was investigated in continuous system, using as reducing agent the following scrap iron shapes and sizes: (1) spiral fibers, (2) shavings, and (3) powder. The shape and size of scrap iron were found to have a significant influence on chromium and iron species concentration in column effluent, on column effluent pH and on Cr(VI) reduction mechanism. While for large scrap iron particles (spiral fibers) homogeneous reduction is the dominant Cr(VI) reduction process, for small scrap iron particles (powder) heterogeneous reduction appears to be the dominant reaction contributing to Cr(VI) reduction. All three shapes and sizes investigated in this work have both advantages and disadvantages. If found in sufficient quantities, scrap iron powder seem to be the optimum shape and size for the continuous reduction of Cr(VI), due to the following advantages: (1) the greatest reduction capacity, (2) the most important pH increase in column effluent (up to 6.3), (3) no chromium was detected in the column effluent during the first 60 h of the experiment, and (4) the lowest steady-state Cr(VI) concentration observed in column effluent (3.7 mg/L). But, despite of a lower reduction capacity in comparison with powder particles, spiral fibers and shavings have the advantage to result in large quantities from the mechanic processing of steel.

  11. Tailoring on the nanoscale : Control over size, shape, composition and self-assembly of copper chalcogenide nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stam, W.

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor materials are commonplace in everyday life and most people could not live without them. Recently, colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have gained a lot of interest, due to the possibility to precisely tune their optoelectronic properties by tuning the size and shape of the nanocrystal

  12. UV-photoactivation technique for size and shape controlled synthesis and annealing of stable gold nanoparticles in micelle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhuri Mandal; Subrata Kundu; Sujit Kumar Ghosh; Tarasankar Pal

    2002-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes have been prepared by UV-photoactivation technique using the micelle TX-100 (poly(oxyethylene) iso-octylphenyl ether) as reducing agent, stabilizing agent as well as template which has been authenticated from the plasmon absorption band and TEM picture. The heating effect on those gold nanoparticles has also been studied.

  13. Evolution of hole shape and size during short and ultrashort pulse laser deep drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Sven; Szilagyi, John; Richter, Sören; Zimmermann, Felix; Richardson, Martin; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2012-11-19

    A detailed study of the influence of the pulse duration, from the femtosecond to the nanosecond regime, on the evolution of the hole shape and depth during percussion drilling in silicon is presented. Real-time backlight imaging of the hole development is obtained for holes up to 2 mm deep with aspect ratios extending to 25:1. For low pulse energies, the hole-shape and drilling characteristics are similar for femtosecond, picoseconds and nanosecond regimes. At higher pulse energies, ns-pulses exhibit slower average drilling rates but eventually reach greater final depths. The shape of these holes is however dominated by branching and large internal cavities. For ps-pulses, a cylindrical shape is maintained with frequent small bulges on the side-walls. In contrast, fs-pulses cause only a limited number of imperfections on a tapered hole shape.

  14. Nonlocal superelastic model of size-dependent hardening and dissipation in single crystal Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lei; Rimoli, Julian J; Chen, Ying; Schuh, Christopher A; Radovitzky, Raul

    2011-02-25

    We propose a nonlocal continuum model to describe the size-dependent superelastic effect observed in recent experiments of single crystal Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys. The model introduces two length scales, one in the free energy and one in the dissipation, which account for the size-dependent hardening and dissipation in the loading and unloading response of micro- and nanopillars subject to compression tests. The information provided by the model suggests that the size dependence observed in the dissipation is likely to be associated with a nonuniform evolution of the distribution of the austenitic and martensitic phases during the loading cycle.

  15. Simulation-aided constitutive law development - Assessment of low triaxiality void nucleation models via extended finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jifeng; Kontsevoi, Oleg Y.; Xiong, Wei; Smith, Jacob

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a multi-scale computational framework has been established in order to investigate, refine and validate constitutive behaviors in the context of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) void mechanics model. The eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) has been implemented in order to (1) develop statistical volume elements (SVE) of a matrix material with subscale inclusions and (2) to simulate the multi-void nucleation process due to interface debonding between the matrix and particle phases. Our analyses strongly suggest that under low stress triaxiality the nucleation rate of the voids f˙ can be well described by a normal distribution function with respect to the matrix equivalent stress (σe), as opposed to that proposed (σbar + 1 / 3σkk) in the original form of the single void GTN model. The modified form of the multi-void nucleation model has been validated based on a series of numerical experiments with different loading conditions, material properties, particle shape/size and spatial distributions. The utilization of XFEM allows for an invariant finite element mesh to represent varying microstructures, which implies suitability for drastically reducing complexity in generating the finite element discretizations for large stochastic arrays of microstructure configurations. The modified form of the multi-void nucleation model is further applied to study high strength steels by incorporating first principles calculations. The necessity of using a phenomenological interface separation law has been fully eliminated and replaced by the physics-based cohesive relationship obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations in order to provide an accurate macroscopic material response.

  16. Size and Shape Prediction of Colloidal Metal Oxide MgBaFeO Particles from Light Scattering Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslan, Mustafa M., E-mail: maslan@engr.uky.edu; Menguec, Mustafa Pinar [University of Kentucky, Dept of Mechanical Engineering (United States); Manickavasagam, Siva; Saltiel, Craig [Synergetic Technologies Inc. (United States)

    2006-12-15

    The size and structure of colloidal metal oxide (MgBaFeO) particles are determined using an Elliptically Polarized Light Scattering (EPLS) technique. The approach is based on a hybrid experimental/theoretical study where the experimental data are compared against predictions obtained using a T-Matrix model that accounts for particle shape irregularities. A power-law distribution function with two parameters is employed to account for the particle size distribution. The refractive index of the particles in ethyl alcohol is calculated based on the Maxwell-Garnet formula. The experiments are conducted using a second-generation nephelometer. It is shown that the current EPLS measurements can effectively be used for identification of both the shape and the size of the colloids.

  17. Shape memory characteristics of Ti-Ni alloys with several specimen sizes from micrometer to millimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Shuichi; Kitamura, Kazuhiro; Nomura, Kuniaki; Fang, Dong; Tobushi, Hisaaki

    1996-02-01

    Ti-Ni shape memory alloys with nearly equiatomic compositions were made by three types of production methods, i.e., rolling, drawing and sputtering methods. These methods were used for making thin plates 0.1 mm thick, thick and thin wires 1.0 mm and 0.08 mm in diameter, and thin films 0.007 mm thick, respectively. These specimens were annealed at 673 K, 773 K, and 873 K in order to investigate the affect of annealing temperature on the shape memory characteristics in each specimen. The shape memory characteristics were compared among these specimens in order to investigate the effect of the production method.

  18. Evolution of shock through a void in foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Smidt, J. M.; Murphy, T. J.; Douglass, M. R.; Devolder, B. G.; Fincke, J. R.; Schmidt, D. W.; Cardenas, T.; Newman, S. G.; Hamilton, C. E.; Sedillo, T. J.; Los Alamos, NM 87544 Team

    2016-10-01

    Marble implosion is an experimental campaign intended to study the effects of heterogeneous mix on fusion burn. A spherical capsule is composed of deuterated plastic foam of controlled pore (or void) size with tritium fill in pores. As capsule implosion evolves, the initially separated deuterium and tritium will mix, producing DT yields. Void evolution during implosion is of interest for the Marble campaign. A shock tube, driven by the laser at Omega, was designed to study the evolution of a shock through a foam-filled ``void'' and subsequent void evolution. Targets were comprised of a 100 mg/cc CH foam tube containing a 200-µm diameter, lower density doped foam sphere. High-quality, radiographic images were obtained from both 2% iodine-doped in plastic foam and 15% tin-doped in aerogel foam. These experiments will be used to inform simulations.

  19. What Controls the Sizes and Shapes of Volcanic Ash? Integrating Morphological, Textural and Geochemical Ash Properties to Decipher Eruptive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, E. J.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash particles encompass a diverse spectrum of shapes as a consequence of differences in the magma properties and the magma ascent and eruption conditions. We show how the quantitative analysis of ash particle shapes can be a valuable tool for deciphering magma fragmentation and transport processes. Importantly, integrating morphological data with ash texture (e.g. bubble and crystal sizes) and dissolved volatile data provides valuable insights into the physical and chemical controls on the resulting ash deposit. To explore the influence of magma-water interaction (MWI) on fine ash generation, we apply this multi-component characterisation to tephra from the 2500BC Hverfjall Fires, Iceland. Here, coeval fissure vents spanned sub-aerial to shallow lacustrine environments. Differences in the size and morphology of pyroclasts thus reflect fragmentation mechanisms under different near-surface conditions. Using shape parameters sensitive to both particle roughness and internal vesicularity, we quantify the relative proportions of dense fragments, bubble shards, and vesicular grains from 2-D SEM images. We show that componentry (and particle morphology) varies as a function of grain size, and that this variation can be related back to the bubble size distribution. Although both magmatic and hydromagmatic deposits exhibit similar component assemblages, they differ in how these assemblages change with grain size. These results highlight the benefits of characterising ash deposits over a wide range of grain sizes, and caution against inferring fragmentation mechanism from a narrow grain size range. Elevated matrix glass S concentrations in hydromagmatic ash (600-1500 ppm) compared to those in magmatic ash and scoria lapilli (200-500 ppm) indicate interrupted vesiculation. In contrast to the subaerial 'dry' deposits, fragmentation during MWI likely occurred over a greater range of depths with quench rates sufficient to prevent post-fragmentation degassing. High

  20. Void Growth in Single and Bicrystalline Metals: Atomistic Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traiviratana, Sirirat; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Benson, David J.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2007-12-01

    MD simulations in monocrystalline and bicrystalline copper were carried out with LAMMPS to reveal void growth mechanisms. The specimens were subjected to both tensile uniaxial and hydrostatic strains; the results confirm that the emission of (shear) loops is the primary mechanism of void growth. However, these shear loops develop along two slip planes (and not one, as previously thought), in a heretofore unidentified mechanism of cooperative growth. The emission of dislocations from voids is the first stage, and their reaction and interaction is the second stage. These loops, forming initially on different {111} planes, join at the intersection, the Burgers vector of the dislocations being parallel to the intersection of two {111} planes: a direction. Thus, the two dislocations cancel at the intersection and a biplanar shear loop is formed. The expansion of the loops and their cross slip leads to the severely work hardened layer surrounding a growing void. Calculations were carried out on voids with different sizes, and a size dependence of the stress response to emitted dislocations was observed, in disagreement with the Gurson model[1] which is scale independent. Calculations were also carried out for a void at the interface between two grains.

  1. Patriline Differences Reveal Genetic Influence on Forewing Size and Shape in a Yellowjacket Wasp (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Vespula flavopilosa Jacobson, 1978.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Perrard

    Full Text Available The wing venation is frequently used as a morphological marker to distinguish biological groups among insects. With geometric morphometrics, minute shape differences can be detected between closely related species or populations, making this technique useful for taxonomy. However, the direct influence of genetic differences on wing morphology has not been explored within colonies of social insects. Here, we show that the father's genotype has a direct effect on wing morphology in colonies of social wasps. Using geometric morphometrics on the venation pattern, we found significant differences in wing size and shape between patrilines of yellowjackets, taking allometry and measurement error into account. The genetic influence on wing size accounted for a small part of the overall size variation, but venation shape was highly structured by the differences between patrilines. Overall, our results showed a strong genetic influence on wing morphology likely acting at multiple levels of venation pattern development. This confirmed the pertinence of this marker for taxonomic purposes and suggests this phenotype as a potentially useful marker for phylogenies. This also raises doubts about the strength of selective pressures on this phenotype, which highlights the need to understand better the role of wing venation shape in insect flight.

  2. On cavitation instabilities with interacting voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2012-01-01

    voids so far apart that the radius of the plastic zone around each void is less than 1% of the current spacing between the voids, can still affect each others at the occurrence of a cavitation instability such that one void stops growing while the other grows in an unstable manner. On the other hand...

  3. General classification of maturation reaction-norm shape from size-based processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity of size at maturation is commonly described using size–age maturation reaction norms (MRNs). MRNs for age and size at maturation are analyzed and classified into three general categories related to different size scalings of growth and mortality. The underlying model for gro...

  4. Systematic Study on the Self-Assembled Hexagonal Au Voids, Nano-Clusters and Nanoparticles on GaN (0001.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puran Pandey

    Full Text Available Au nano-clusters and nanoparticles (NPs have been widely utilized in various electronic, optoelectronic, and bio-medical applications due to their great potentials. The size, density and configuration of Au NPs play a vital role in the performance of these devices. In this paper, we present a systematic study on the self-assembled hexagonal Au voids, nano-clusters and NPs fabricated on GaN (0001 by the variation of annealing temperature and deposition amount. At relatively low annealing temperatures between 400 and 600°C, the fabrication of hexagonal shaped Au voids and Au nano-clusters are observed and discussed based on the diffusion limited aggregation model. The size and density of voids and nano-clusters can systematically be controlled. The self-assembled Au NPs are fabricated at comparatively high temperatures from 650 to 800°C based on the Volmer-Weber growth model and also the size and density can be tuned accordingly. The results are symmetrically analyzed and discussed in conjunction with the diffusion theory and thermodynamics by utilizing AFM and SEM images, EDS maps and spectra, FFT power spectra, cross-sectional line-profiles and size and density plots.

  5. Instantaneous liquid release from a rail tanker: the influence of noise shields on pool shape and pool size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmuller, Nils

    2009-05-30

    In the Netherlands, the Betuweline is a dedicated freight railway. It will, among other things, be used for transportation of all kinds of hazardous materials from the Port of Rotterdam to the German Hinterland and vice versa. The line is approximately 150 km long. Alongside the line, more than 100 km noise shields have been constructed. The question is how, and to what extent, this noise shield will affect the pool shape and size of an instantaneous release of a flammable liquid, such as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). In case of an instantaneous release of liquid from a rail tanker (50 m(3)), both risk analysts and emergency responders use a circular pool shape of about 600 m(2) would result. To assess the influence of a noise shield, a full scale test was conducted on an already constructed part of the Betuweline. A rail tanker was filled with 50 m(3) red-colored environmentally safe liquid. The liquid was instantaneously released. A very peculiar pool shape actually results due to the presence of a noise shield. A zone between the rails and the noise shield (2m wide and 90 m long) is within 2-3 min filled with 15 cm of liquid. The total pool size area was about 750 m(2). Both shape and size deviate substantially from the traditional figures. These insights are both relevant to emergency responders for disaster abatement purposes and to risk analysts for effective modeling purposes. The Dutch Ministry of Transport is examining possible strategies to deal with these results. The results of this study are based upon one single instantaneous release test. In addition, it is valuable to find out what the pool shape and size would be in case of a continuous release from the rail tanker near a noise shield.

  6. The sex-limited effects of mutations in the EGFR and TGF-β signaling pathways on shape and size sexual dimorphism and allometry in the Drosophila wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Nicholas D; Dworkin, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Much of the morphological diversity in nature-including among sexes within a species-is a direct consequence of variation in size and shape. However, disentangling variation in sexual dimorphism for both shape (SShD), size (SSD), and their relationship with one another remains complex. Understanding how genetic variation influences both size and shape together, and how this in turn influences SSD and SShD, is challenging. In this study, we utilize Drosophila wing size and shape as a model system to investigate how mutations influence size and shape as modulated by sex. Previous work has demonstrated that mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling components can influence both wing size and shape. In this study, we re-analyze this data to specifically address how they impact the relationship between size and shape in a sex-specific manner, in turn altering the pattern of sexual dimorphism. While most mutations influence shape overall, only a subset have a genotypic specific effect that influences SShD. Furthermore, while we observe sex-specific patterns of allometric shape variation, the effects of most mutations on allometry tend to be small. We discuss this within the context of using mutational analysis to understand sexual size and shape dimorphism.

  7. Size-Controlled Synthesis of Sub-10 nm PtNi3 Alloy Nanoparticles and their Unusual Volcano-Shaped Size Effect on ORR Electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lin; Rudi, Stefan; Cui, Chunhua; Heggen, Marc; Strasser, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Dealloyed Pt bimetallic core-shell catalysts derived from low-Pt bimetallic alloy nanoparticles (e.g, PtNi3 ) have recently shown unprecedented activity and stability on the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) under realistic fuel cell conditions and become today's catalyst of choice for commercialization of automobile fuel cells. A critical step toward this breakthrough is to control their particle size below a critical value (≈10 nm) to suppress nanoporosity formation and hence reduce significant base metal (e.g., Ni) leaching under the corrosive ORR condition. Fine size control of the sub-10 nm PtNi3 nanoparticles and understanding their size dependent ORR electrocatalysis are crucial to further improve their ORR activity and stability yet still remain unexplored. A robust synthetic approach is presented here for size-controlled PtNi3 nanoparticles between 3 and 10 nm while keeping a constant particle composition and their size-selected growth mechanism is studied comprehensively. This enables us to address their size-dependent ORR activities and stabilities for the first time. Contrary to the previously established monotonic increase of ORR specific activity and stability with increasing particle size on Pt and Pt-rich bimetallic nanoparticles, the Pt-poor PtNi3 nanoparticles exhibit an unusual "volcano-shaped" size dependence, showing the highest ORR activity and stability at the particle sizes between 6 and 8 nm due to their highest Ni retention during long-term catalyst aging. The results of this study provide important practical guidelines for the size selection of the low Pt bimetallic ORR electrocatalysts with further improved durably high activity.

  8. Leaf N and P stoichiometry in relation to leaf shape and plant size for Quercus acutissima provenances across China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Yang, Xiuqing; Wang, Jingyuan; Wang, G Geoff; Yu, Mukui; Wu, Tonggui

    2017-04-10

    Plant stoichiometry in relation to the structure and function of biological systems has been investigated at multiple scales. However, few studies have focused on the roles of stoichiometry for a given species. In this study, we determined leaf N and P stoichiometry, leaf shape and plant size in three Quercus acutissima common gardens with different climatic and site conditions. In the three common gardens, leaf N and P stoichiometry was significantly correlated with leaf shape and plant size, suggesting that leaf N and P stoichiometry affects the morphological performance of the leaves and stem. The scaling slopes of the relationships between leaf N and P stoichiometry and leaf shape ranged from |0.12| to |1.00|, while the slopes of the relationships between leaf N and P stoichiometry and plant size ranged from |0.95| to |2.66|. These results suggest that non-functional tissues (stem) are more susceptible to leaf nutrition than functional tissues (leaves), and leaf stoichiometry is more important in the construction of non-functional tissues (stem). Between the northernmost and southernmost common gardens, leaf N and leaf width (W), N:P and stem height (H), and N:P and stem diameter (D) showed significant covariations, which indicates that leaf N and W, N:P and plant size exhibit similar plastic responses to environmental change.

  9. Ontogenetic modulation of branch size, shape, and biomechanics produces diversity across habitats in the Bursera simaruba clade of tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Julieta A; Olson, Mark E; Aguirre-Hernández, Rebeca; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J

    2012-01-01

    Organismal size and shape inseparably interact with tissue biomechanical properties. It is therefore essential to understand how size, shape, and biomechanics interact in ontogeny to produce morphological diversity. We estimated within species branch length-diameter allometries and reconstructed the rates of ontogenetic change along the stem in mechanical properties across the simaruba clade in the tropical tree genus Bursera, measuring 376 segments from 97 branches in nine species in neotropical dry to rain forest. In general, species with stiffer materials had longer, thinner branches, which became stiffer more quickly in ontogeny than their counterparts with more flexible materials. We found a trend from short stature and flexible tissues to tall statures and stiff tissues across an environmental gradient of increasing water availability, likely reflecting a water storage-mechanical support tradeoff. Ontogenetic variation in size, shape, and mechanics results in diversity of habits, for example, rapid length extension, sluggish diameter expansion, and flexible tissues results in a liana, as in Bursera instabilis. Even species of similar habit exhibited notable changes in tissue mechanical properties with increasing size, illustrating the inseparable relationship between organismal proportions and their tissue mechanics in the ontogeny and evolution of morphological diversity.

  10. Influencing factors on the shape and size of the dayside magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrinec, S. M.; Russell, C. T.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetopause crossings by the ISEE spacecraft have been mapped to the subsolar region along conic sections derived from average fits to northward and southward IMF crossing sets. These mapped positions have been normalized by the solar wind pressure, which is derived from observations by ISEE-3 and IMP-8. Some of the scatter in the extrapolated positions is due to the assumption that a simple conic section can be used to describe the shape of the dayside magnetopause. The existence of the cusps causes deviations from this simple shape in the meridian plane. Crossings of the dayside magnetopause by the ISEE spacecraft when the interplanetary magnetic field is northward are used to examine the influence of the angle of tilt of the Earth's dipole on the magnetopause shape, and are compared with a numerical magnetopause model.

  11. Nanoscale Design of Nano-Sized Particles in Shape-Memory Polymer Nanocomposites Driven by Electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haibao; Huang, Wei Min; Liang, Fei; Yu, Kai

    2013-09-02

    In the last few years, we have witnessed significant progress in developing high performance shape memory polymer (SMP) nanocomposites, in particular, for shape recovery activated by indirect heating in the presence of electricity, magnetism, light, radio frequency, microwave and radiation, etc. In this paper, we critically review recent findings in Joule heating of SMP nanocomposites incorporated with nanosized conductive electromagnetic particles by means of nanoscale control via applying an electro- and/or magnetic field. A few different nanoscale design principles to form one-/two-/three- dimensional conductive networks are discussed.

  12. Nanoscale Design of Nano-Sized Particles in Shape-Memory Polymer Nanocomposites Driven by Electricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, we have witnessed significant progress in developing high performance shape memory polymer (SMP nanocomposites, in particular, for shape recovery activated by indirect heating in the presence of electricity, magnetism, light, radio frequency, microwave and radiation, etc. In this paper, we critically review recent findings in Joule heating of SMP nanocomposites incorporated with nanosized conductive electromagnetic particles by means of nanoscale control via applying an electro- and/or magnetic field. A few different nanoscale design principles to form one-/two-/three- dimensional conductive networks are discussed.

  13. Testing for Gender Related Size and Shape Differences of the Human Ear canal using Statistical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2002-01-01

    This work deals with the analysis of the shape of the human ear canal. It is described how a dense surface point distribution model of the human ear canal is built based on a training set of laser scanned ear impressions and a sparse set of anatomical landmarks placed by an expert. The dense...... surface models are built by using the anatomical landmarks to warp a template mesh onto all shapes in the training set. Testing the gender related differences is done by initially reducing the dimensionality using principal component analysis of the vertices of the warped meshes. The number of components...

  14. Effect of size and shape dependent anisotropy on superparamagnetic property of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles and nanoplatelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandekar, Kamlesh V.; Kant, K. Mohan

    2017-09-01

    Superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) spherical nanoparticles and rhomboidal nanoplatelets were synthesized by co-precipitation at 80 °C (S1) and hydrothermal route at 150 °C (S2). X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirms formation of cubic inverse spinel structure of as prepared cobalt ferrite samples (S1 and S2) with average crystallite size of 13 nm and 18.7 nm for S1 and S2 respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals spherical and rhomboidal shaped with average particle size 16.7 nm (S1) and 19.8 nm (S2). The zero field cooled magnetization MZFCvs. T exhibit a broad maxima at 400 K and 510 K for S1 and S2 respectively. The blocking temperature TB is obtained as 310 K and 341 K for S1 and S2 respectively, by fitting coercive field at different temperatures to T 1 / 2 law. The morphology of S1 and S2 corresponds to shape dependence of continuum approach. The effective demagnetization factors estimated as ΔN1 = 0 and ΔN2 = 0 . 749 for S1 and S2 samples respectively. The uniaxial anisotropy and shape anisotropy observed to be dominant in spherical shaped and rhomboidal shaped CoFe2O4 nanoparticles respectively. The uniaxial anisotropy constant of S1 sample is estimated as 56 (kJ/m3) at TB = 310 K whereas the effective anisotropy constant for S2 sample is 627 (kJ/m3) at TB = 341 K , in which shape anisotropy constant 605 (kJ/m3) dominates over contribution from uniaxial anisotropy constant 22 (kJ/m3) in S2 sample.

  15. Shape and size effects of ceria nanoparticles on the impact strength of ceria/epoxy resin composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqiang He; Dengsong Zhang; Hongrui Li; Jianhui Fang; Liyi Shi

    2011-01-01

    Ceria nanoparticles with various shapes (rods,cubes,and plates) and sizes were controllably synthesized and then introduced into epoxy resin. Subsequently,we investigated correlations between the shape and size of ceria nanostructures and the mechanical performance of composites. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy,scanning electron microscopy,and X-ray diffraction. Compared with commercial ceria filled composites,the composites made with morphology-controlled ceria nanostructures show a higher impact strength. It is found that epoxy resins made with high-aspect-ratio ceria nanorods show the highest impact strength,up to 17.27 kJ/m2,which is about four times that of the neat epoxy resin.

  16. Precise control over shape and size of iron oxide nanocrystals suitable for assembly into ordered particle arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterskog, Erik; Agthe, Michael; Mayence, Arnaud; Grins, Jekabs; Wang, Dong; Rana, Subhasis; Ahniyaz, Anwar; Salazar-Alvarez, German; Bergström, Lennart

    2014-10-01

    Here we demonstrate how monodisperse iron oxide nanocubes and nanospheres with average sizes between 5 and 27 nm can be synthesized by thermal decomposition. The relative importance of the purity of the reactants, the ratio of oleic acid and sodium oleate, the maximum temperature, and the rate of temperature increase, on robust and reproducible size and shape-selective iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis are identified and discussed. The synthesis conditions that generate highly monodisperse iron oxide nanocubes suitable for producing large ordered arrays, or mesocrystals are described in detail.

  17. Shape- and Size-Controlled Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Aloe vera Plant Extract and Their Antimicrobial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Logaranjan, Kaliyaperumal; Raiza, Anasdass Jaculin; Subash C B Gopinath; Chen, Yeng; Pandian, Kannaiyan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) was performed at room temperature using Aloe vera plant extract in the presence of ammoniacal silver nitrate as a metal salt precursor. The formation of AgNP was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy at different time intervals. The shape and size of the synthesized particle were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. These results were confirmed by X-ray powder diffrac...

  18. Size dependence of shape and stiffness of single sessile oil nanodroplets as measured by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munz, Martin; Mills, Tom

    2014-04-22

    This article presents results and guidelines on the quantitative analysis of size, shape, and stiffness of single sessile oil droplets in air and in water. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) facilitates the analysis of micro- and nanoscale droplets which are of growing importance for agrochemicals, cosmetics, or foodstuffs containing emulsions with nanoscale compartments or droplets. Measurement of droplet shape and stiffness provides information on the contact angle with the support surface as well as the interfacial tension of the liquid-liquid interface. In this study, micro- and nanoscale droplets were imaged both in amplitude modulation (AM) and force mapping modes. The effects of the AM mode set point ratio on the measured droplet shape are discussed, and a modified spherical cap model is suggested to extract the droplet-substrate contact angle. This model was applied to a population of different sized oil droplets imaged in water and led to the finding that the contact angle with the solid support varies with the droplet size. Force mapping was undertaken to measure the droplet stiffness as a function of the droplet size. Smaller droplets were found to be stiffer, in reasonable agreement with the Attard-Miklavcic model [Langmuir 2001, 17, 8217-8223] which describes the deformation of a sessile droplet in the nonwetting regime, i.e., by partial wrapping of the droplet around the probe surface. The model limitations are discussed in terms of the diverging droplet stiffness predicted for droplet radii similar to the probe radius as well as the error propagation associated with the droplet shape function.

  19. Correlation of Shape and Size of Sella Turcica With the Type of Facial Skeletal Class in an Iranian Group

    OpenAIRE

    Valizadeh; Shahbeig; Mohseni,; MR Azimi; Bakhshandeh

    2015-01-01

    Background In orthodontic science, diagnosis of facial skeletal type (class I, II, and III) is essential to make the correct treatment plan that is usually expensive and complicated. Sometimes results from analysis of lateral cephalometry radiographies are not enough to discriminate facial skeletal types. In this situation, knowledge about the relationship between the shape and size of the sella turcica and the type of facial skeletal class can help to make a more definitive deci...

  20. Functional traits shape size-dependent growth and mortality rates of dry forest tree species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prado-Junior, Jamir A.; Schiavini, Ivan; Vale, Vagner S.; Raymundo, Diego; Lopes, Sergio F.; Poorter, Lourens

    2016-01-01

    Aims

    Functional traits have emerged as an important tool to evaluate plant performance. However, the environmental conditions and ecological pressures that plants face change with their size, and the relationship between traits and plant performance should therefore be size-dependent, which

  1. How dispersal limitation shapes species-body size distributions in local communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, R.S.; Olff, H.

    2004-01-01

    A critical but poorly understood pattern in macroecology is the often unimodal species - body size distribution ( also known as body size - diversity relationship) in a local community ( embedded in a much larger regional species pool). Purely neutral community models that assume functional

  2. Weber's Illusion and Body Shape: Anisotropy of Tactile Size Perception on the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Matthew R.; Haggard, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The perceived distance between touches on a single skin surface is larger on regions of high tactile sensitivity than those with lower acuity, an effect known as "Weber's illusion". This illusion suggests that tactile size perception involves a representation of the perceived size of body parts preserving characteristics of the somatosensory…

  3. Mechanisms shaping size structure and functional diversity of phytoplankton communities in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Trejos, Esteban; Brandt, Gunnar; Bruggeman, Jorn; Merico, Agostino

    2015-03-01

    The factors regulating phytoplankton community composition play a crucial role in structuring aquatic food webs. However, consensus is still lacking about the mechanisms underlying the observed biogeographical differences in cell size composition of phytoplankton communities. Here we use a trait-based model to disentangle these mechanisms in two contrasting regions of the Atlantic Ocean. In our model, the phytoplankton community can self-assemble based on a trade-off emerging from relationships between cell size and (1) nutrient uptake, (2) zooplankton grazing, and (3) phytoplankton sinking. Grazing `pushes' the community towards larger cell sizes, whereas nutrient uptake and sinking `pull' the community towards smaller cell sizes. We find that the stable environmental conditions of the tropics strongly balance these forces leading to persistently small cell sizes and reduced size diversity. In contrast, the seasonality of the temperate region causes the community to regularly reorganize via shifts in species composition and to exhibit, on average, bigger cell sizes and higher size diversity than in the tropics. Our results raise the importance of environmental variability as a key structuring mechanism of plankton communities in the ocean and call for a reassessment of the current understanding of phytoplankton diversity patterns across latitudinal gradients.

  4. Testing for Gender Related Size and Shape Differences of the Human Ear canal using Statistical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær;

    2002-01-01

    This work deals with the analysis of the shape of the human ear canal. It is described how a dense surface point distribution model of the human ear canal is built based on a training set of laser scanned ear impressions and a sparse set of anatomical landmarks placed by an expert. The dense...

  5. Effect of kibble size, shape and additives on plaque in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, D.E.; Servet, E.; Hendriks, W.H.; Thomas, D.G.; Weidgraaf, K.; Biourge, V.C.

    2010-01-01

    Forty mixed-breed cats completed a parallel-group, clinical study to compare supragingival plaque accumulation using a triangular or rectangular shaped dry-expanded diet, with or without an anti-calculus agent (sodium tripolyphosphate) or an anti-plaque agent (plaquereducing nutrient). The cats were

  6. Seed size, shape and vertical distribution in the soil : indicators of seed longevity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, RM; Bakker, JP; Grandin, U; Kalamees, R; Milberg, P; Poschlod, P; Thompson, K; Willems, JH

    1998-01-01

    1. We investigated the vertical distribution of seeds in the soil, using data from nine studies in five European countries. We discovered significant correlations between seed shape and distribution in the soil. 2. The classification of the longevity of seeds of plant species has been improved by

  7. ACK filling void first algorithm and performance for asynchronous OPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanlin; Shi, Yonghe; Chen, Qianbin; Pan, Yingjun

    2007-11-01

    OPS with feedback shared FDL buffer produce large voids due to FDL buffers only supplying discrete step delay and causing FDL queue virtually occupation. By analyzing the TCP traffic and ACK packets feature, the ACK packet void filling first scheduling is presented to decrease packet loss rate and to reduce the FDL voids. When the FDL buffer void size is fit for the ACK packet, the ACK packet is scheduled to FDL immediately. An ACK and non-ACK packets difference and process flow is designed according the TCP packet frame structure. Compared with the conventional FIFO scheduling and smallest FDL void first scheduling, the algorithm reduces greatly the number of ACK occupying the FDL buffer and eliminates large numbers of ACK's bad influence on efficiency of IP data transmission under different FDL buffer depth and traffic load. The results of simulation show that the proposed scheduling makes use of ACK packets first void filling scheduling mechanism to reduce FDL excess load, increases output utilization and reduce packet loss ratio for asynchronous optical network. This approach is shown to minimize the FDL numbers with the feature of high stabilization and photonic integration and to improve real time TCP traffic performance for Internet network.

  8. Geometric and Chemical Composition Effects on Healing Kinetics of Voids in Mg-bearing Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Miao; Du, Kui; Wang, Chunyang; Wen, Shengping; Huang, Hui; Nie, Zuoren; Ye, Hengqiang

    2016-05-01

    The healing kinetics of nanometer-scale voids in Al-Mg-Er and Al-Mg-Zn-Er alloy systems were investigated with a combination of in situ transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography at different temperatures. Mg was observed completely healing the voids, which were then rejuvenated to the alloy composition with further aging, in the Al-Mg-Er alloy. On the contrary, Mg51Zn20 intermetallic compound was formed in voids in the Al-Mg-Zn-Er alloy, which leads to complete filling of the voids but not rejuvenation for the material. For voids with different geometrical aspects, different evolution processes were observed, which are related to the competition between bulk and surface diffusion of the alloys. For voids with a large size difference in their two ends, a viscous flow of surface atoms can be directly observed with in situ electron microscopy, when the size of one end becomes less than tens of nanometers.

  9. Prospective assessment of pituitary size and shape on MR imaging after suppressive hormonal therapy in central precocious puberty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, J.T. van; Sharafuddin, M.J.A.; Kao, S.C.S. [Department of Radiology-JPP 3889, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52246 (United States); Luisiri, A. [Cardinal Glennon Children' s Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Garibaldi, L.R. [Children' s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark, New Jersey (United States); St. Barnabas Medical Center, Livingston, New Jersey (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Objective. The diagnostic significance of an enlarged pituitary gland regarding both shape and size parameters on MR imaging has previously been demonstrated in children with central precocious puberty. This study was designed to assess changes in these parameters following successful suppressive therapy of central precocious puberty with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. Materials and methods. Twelve girls (mean age 7.3 years) with central precocious puberty were prospectively enrolled in our study protocol. Sagittal and coronal MR images of the pituitary region were obtained in all patients before treatment and after at least 6 months of GnRH analogue therapy (mean 18.0 months). Parameters measured included pituitary gland height, length, width, sagittal cross-sectional area, and volume. Results. All patients had excellent clinical response to treatment with arrest of secondary sexual development, normalization of serum estradiol levels, and complete obliteration of the LH response to diagnostic GnRH stimulation. No significant change occurred in any pituitary size or shape parameter following GnRH analogue therapy. Conclusion. Favorable clinical response to GnRH analogue therapy in central precocious puberty is not accompanied by significant a change in pituitary gland size and shape. (orig.)

  10. Shape and size controlled synthesis of Au nanorods: H{sub 2}S gas-sensing characterizations and antibacterial application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanh, Le Thi [College of Sciences, Hue University, 77 Nguyen Hue, Hue City (Viet Nam); Hoa, Tran Thai, E-mail: trthaihoa@yahoo.com [College of Sciences, Hue University, 77 Nguyen Hue, Hue City (Viet Nam); Cuong, Nguyen Duc [College of Sciences, Hue University, 77 Nguyen Hue, Hue City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Hospitality and Tourism, Hue University, 22 Lam Hoang, Hue City (Viet Nam); Khieu, Dinh Quang [College of Sciences, Hue University, 77 Nguyen Hue, Hue City (Viet Nam); Quang, Duong Tuan [College of Education, Hue University, 34 Le Loi, Hue City (Viet Nam); Van Duy, Nguyen; Hoa, Nguyen Duc [International Training Institute for Materials Science, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Van Hieu, Nguyen, E-mail: hieu@itims.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2015-06-25

    Highlights: • We have demonstrated a facile method to prepare colloid Au nanorods. • The size and shape of Au nanorods can be controlled via seed-mediated growth method. • The H{sub 2}S gas-sensing properties have been investigated. • The antibacterial application has been conducted. - Abstract: Controlling their size and shape is one of the important issues in the fundamental study and application of colloidal metal nanoparticles. In the current study, different sizes and shapes of Au nanorods were fabricated using a seed-mediated growth method. Material characterization by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the obtained products were made of single-crystal Au nanorods with an average diameter and length of 10 nm and 40 nm, respectively. The Au nanorod-based sensor exhibited significantly high sensitivity and fast response/recovery time to low concentrations (2.5–10 ppm) of H{sub 2}S at temperatures ranging from 300 °C to 400 °C. Additionally, they exhibited antibacterial effect at low concentration. These results suggested that the fabricated Au nanorods have excellent potential for practical application in air pollution monitoring and biomedicine.

  11. Sub-10 nm Platinum Nanocrystals with Size and Shape Control: Catalytic Study for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Kuhn, John N.; Huang, Wenyu; Aliaga, Cesar; Hung, Ling-I; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2009-03-02

    Platinum nanocubes and nanopolyhedra with tunable size from 5 to 9 nm were synthesized by controlling the reducing rate of metal precursor ions in a one-pot polyol synthesis. A two-stage process is proposed for the simultaneous control of size and shape. In the first stage, the oxidation state of the metal ion precursors determined the nucleation rate and consequently the number of nuclei. The reaction temperature controlled the shape in the second stage by regulation of the growth kinetics. These well-defined nanocrystals were loaded into MCF-17 mesoporous silica for examination of catalytic properties. Pt loadings and dispersions of the supported catalysts were determined by elemental analysis (ICP-MS) and H2 chemisorption isotherms, respectively. Ethylene hydrogenation rates over the Pt nanocrystals were independent of both size and shape and comparable to Pt single crystals. For pyrrole hydrogenation, the nanocubes enhanced ring-opening ability and thus showed a higher selectivity to n-butylamine as compared to nanopolyhedra.

  12. Nanovoid growth in BCC α-Fe: influences of initial void geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuozhi; Su, Yanqing

    2016-12-01

    The growth of voids has a great impact on the mechanical properties of ductile materials by altering their microstructures. Exploring the process of void growth at the nanoscale helps in understanding the dynamic fracture of metals. While some very recent studies looked into the effects of the initial geometry of an elliptic void on the plastic deformation of face-centered cubic metals, a systematic study of the initial void ellipticity and orientation angle in body-centered cubic (BCC) metals is still lacking. In this paper, large scale molecular dynamics simulations with millions of atoms are conducted, investigating the void growth process during tensile loading of metallic thin films in BCC α-Fe. Our simulations elucidate the intertwined influences on void growth of the initial ellipticity and initial orientation angle of the void. It is shown that these two geometric parameters play an important role in the stress-strain response, the nucleation and evolution of defects, as well as the void size/outline evolution in α-Fe thin films. Results suggest that, together with void size, different initial void geometries should be taken into account if a continuum model is to be applied to nanoscale damage progression.

  13. "Compu-Void II": the computerized voiding diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, J M; McNett, J; Badlani, G H

    1996-02-01

    We have previously described an electronic voiding diary, "Compu-Void" (Copyright, 1990) developed to automate recording of bladder symptoms (Rabin et al., 1993). Our objectives in this, the second phase of this study, were to examine a group of subject and control patients' preference and compliance with regard to the "Compu-Void" (CV) compared to the standard written voiding diary (WD), to compare the two methods with respect to the amount and type of information obtained and to determine whether or not the order of use of each recording method influenced results in the subject group. Thirty-six women between the ages of 20 and 84 with bladder symptomatology were compared to a group 36 age-matched women. In 100% of subjects and 95% of control patients, CV entries exceeded the number made with the WD in voiding events and in subjects, in incontinent episodes recorded (P < 0.0005 and P < 0.005, respectively). Over 98% of subjects and over 80% of control patients preferred CV over the WD (p < 0.0005). The order of use of each recording method in subjects made no significant difference with regard to the volume of information obtained (p < 0.407), number of urinary leakage events recorded (p < 0.494), and fluid intake patterns (p < 0.410). Patient impressions of, and compliance with each method were not affected by order of use. The only difference regarding order of use was that most subjects who used the CV first also found the WD to be tedious (61% vs 14%). Our results suggest increased volume of data and of patient compliance in reporting bladder symptoms and events using CV, and that order of use is not an important factor in determining patient impressions of the two methods. The majority of subject and control patients preferred CV over traditional methods. An updated version of the software and hardware is also included.

  14. Cell culture arrays using micron-sized ferromagnetic ring-shaped thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang, E-mail: wei@pme.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China); Lai, Mei-Feng; Ger, Tzong-Rong [Institute of NanoEngineering and MicroSystems, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-07

    Cell patterning has become an important technology for tissue engineering. In this research, domain walls are formed at the two ends of a ferromagnetic ring thin film after applying a strong external magnetic field, which can effectively attract magnetically labeled cells and control the position for biological cell. Magnetophoresis experiment was conducted to quantify the magnetic nanoparticle inside the cells. A ring-shaped magnetic thin films array was fabricated through photolithography. It is observed that magnetically labeled cells can be successfully attracted to the two ends of the ring-shaped magnetic thin film structure and more cells were attracted and further attached to the structures. The cells are co-cultured with the structure and kept proliferating; therefore, such ring thin film can be an important candidate for in-vitro biomedical chips or tissue engineering.

  15. The Influence of Age and Sex on Genetic Associations with Adult Body Size and Shape: A Large-Scale Genome-Wide Interaction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler, T.; Justice, A.E.; Graff, M.; Barata, L.; Feitosa, M.F.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially

  16. The Influence of Age and Sex on Genetic Associations with Adult Body Size and Shape: A Large-Scale Genome-Wide Interaction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.W. Winkler (Thomas W.); A.E. Justice (Anne); M.J. Graff (Maud J.L.); Barata, L. (Llilda); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); Chu, S. (Su); J. Czajkowski (Jacek); T. Esko (Tõnu); M. Fall (Magnus); T.O. Kilpeläinen (Tuomas); Y. Lu (Yingchang); R. Mägi (Reedik); E. Mihailov (Evelin); T.H. Pers (Tune); Rüeger, S. (Sina); A. Teumer (Alexander); G.B. Ehret (Georg); T. Ferreira (Teresa); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); J. Karjalainen (Juha); V. Lagou (Vasiliki); A. Mahajan (Anubha); Neinast, M.D. (Michael D.); I. Prokopenko (Inga); J. Simino (Jeannette); T.M. Teslovich (Tanya M.); R. Jansen; H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); C.C. White (Charles); D. Absher (Devin); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); S. Ahmad (Shafqat); E. Albrecht (Eva); A.C. Alves (Alexessander Couto); Bragg-Gresham, J.L. (Jennifer L.); A.J. de Craen (Anton); J.C. Bis (Joshua); A. Bonnefond (Amélie); G. Boucher (Gabrielle); G. Cadby (Gemma); Y.-C. Cheng (Yu-Ching); Chiang, C.W. (Charleston W K); G. Delgado; A. Demirkan (Ayşe); N. Dueker (Nicole); N. Eklund (Niina); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); J. Eriksson (Joel); B. Feenstra (Bjarke); K. Fischer (Krista); F. Frau (Francesca); T.E. Galesloot (Tessel); F. Geller (Frank); A. Goel (Anuj); M. Gorski (Mathias); T.B. Grammer (Tanja); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); Haitjema, S. (Saskia); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); A.U. Jackson (Anne); K.B. Jacobs (Kevin); A. Johansson (Åsa); M. Kaakinen (Marika); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); J. Lahti (Jari); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); Lehne, B. (Benjamin); Liu, Y. (Youfang); K.S. Lo; M. Lorentzon (Mattias); J. Luan (Jian'An); P.A. Madden (Pamela); M. Mangino (Massimo); B. McKnight (Barbara); Medina-Gomez, C. (Carolina); K.L. Monda (Keri); M.E. Montasser (May E.); G. Müller (Gabriele); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); Panoutsopoulou, K. (Kalliope); L. Pascoe (Laura); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); F. Renström (Frida); Rizzi, F. (Federica); L.M. Rose (Lynda); Ryan, K.A. (Kathy A.); P. Salo (Perttu); S. Sanna (Serena); H. Scharnagl (Hubert); Shi, J. (Jianxin); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); L. Southam (Lorraine); A. Stancáková (Alena); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); Sung, Y.J. (Yun Ju); I. Tachmazidou (Ioanna); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); S. Trompet (Stella); N. Pervjakova (Natalia); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); S.W. Van Der Laan (Sander W.); N. van der Velde (Nathalie); J. van Setten (Jessica); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); N. Verweij (Niek); E. Vlachopoulou (Efthymia); L. Waite (Lindsay); S.R. Wang (Sophie); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); S.H. Wild (Sarah); C. Willenborg (Christina); J.F. Wilson (James); A. Wong (Andrew); Yang, J. (Jian); L. Yengo (Loic); L.M. Yerges-Armstrong (Laura); Yu, L. (Lei); W. Zhang (Weihua); Zhao, J.H. (Jing Hua); E.A. Andersson (Ehm Astrid); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); D. Baldassarre (Damiano); Banasik, K. (Karina); Barcella, M. (Matteo); Barlassina, C. (Cristina); C. Bellis (Claire); P. Benaglio (Paola); J. Blangero (John); M. Blüher (Matthias); Bonnet, F. (Fabrice); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); H.A. Boyd (Heather); M. Bruinenberg (M.); Buchman, A.S. (Aron S.); H. Campbell (Harry); Y.D. Chen (Y.); P.S. Chines (Peter); S. Claudi-Boehm (Simone); J.W. Cole (John W.); F.S. Collins (Francis); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); L.C.P.G.M. de Groot (Lisette); M. Dimitriou (Maria); J. Duan (Jubao); S. Enroth (Stefan); E. Eury (Elodie); A.-E. Farmaki (Aliki-Eleni); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); N. Friedrich (Nele); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); B. Gigante (Bruna); N. Glorioso (Nicola); A. Go (Attie); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); J. Gräßler (Jürgen); H. Grallert (Harald); N. Grarup (Niels); Gu, Y.-M. (Yu-Mei); L. Broer (Linda); A.C. Ham (Annelies); T. Hansen (T.); T.B. Harris (Tamara); C.A. Hartman (Catharina A.); Hassinen, M. (Maija); N. Hastie (Nick); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); A.C. Heath (Andrew); A.K. Henders (Anjali); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); H.L. Hillege (Hans); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); G.K. Hovingh (Kees); J. Hui (Jennie); Husemoen, L.L. (Lise L.); Hutri-Kähönen, N. (Nina); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); T. Illig (Thomas); P.L. de Jager (Philip); S. Jalilzadeh (Shapour); T. Jorgensen (Torben); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); Juonala, M. (Markus); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M. Karaleftheri (Maria); K.T. Khaw; L. Kinnunen (Leena); T. Kittner (Thomas); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); I. Kolcic (Ivana); P. Kovacs (Peter); Krarup, N.T. (Nikolaj T.); W. Kratzer (Wolfgang); Krüger, J. (Janine); Kuh, D. (Diana); M. Kumari (Meena); T. Kyriakou (Theodosios); C. Langenberg (Claudia); L. Lannfelt (Lars); C. Lanzani (Chiara); V. Lotay (Vaneet); L.J. Launer (Lenore); K. Leander (Karin); J. Lindström (Jaana); A. Linneberg (Allan); Liu, Y.-P. (Yan-Ping); S. Lobbens (Stéphane); R.N. Luben (Robert); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); S. Männistö (Satu); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); C. Menni (Cristina); S. Merger (Sigrun); L. Milani (Lili); Montgomery, G.W. (Grant W.); A.P. Morris (Andrew); N. Narisu (Narisu); M. Nelis (Mari); K.K. Ong (Ken); A. Palotie (Aarno); L. Perusse (Louis); I. Pichler (Irene); M.G. Pilia (Maria Grazia); A. Pouta (Anneli); Rheinberger, M. (Myriam); Ribel-Madsen, R. (Rasmus); Richards, M. (Marcus); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); T.K. Rice (Treva K.); C. Rivolta (Carlo); V. Salomaa (Veikko); A.R. Sanders (Alan); M.A. Sarzynski (Mark A.); S. Scholtens (Salome); R.A. Scott (Robert); W.R. Scott (William R.); S. Sebert (Sylvain); S. Sengupta (Sebanti); B. Sennblad (Bengt); T. Seufferlein (Thomas); A. Silveira (Angela); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); J.H. Smit (Jan); T. Sparsø (Thomas); K. Stirrups (Kathy); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); H.M. Stringham (Heather); Swertz, M.A. (Morris A.); A.J. Swift (Amy); A.C. Syvänen; S.-T. Tan (Sian-Tsung); B. Thorand (Barbara); A. Tönjes (Anke); Tremblay, A. (Angelo); E. Tsafantakis (Emmanouil); P.J. van der Most (Peter); U. Völker (Uwe); M.-C. Vohl (Marie-Claude); J.M. Vonk (Judith); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); Walker, R.W. (Ryan W.); R. Wennauer (Roman); E. Widen; G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); T. Wilsgaard (Tom); A.F. Wright (Alan); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); S. Van Dijk (Suzanne); N.M. van Schoor (Natasja); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); J.P. Beilby (John); D.A. Bennett (David A.); R.N. Bergman (Richard); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); C.A. Böger (Carsten); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin); C. Bouchard (Claude); J.C. Chambers (John); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); F. Cucca (Francesco); D. Cusi (Daniele); G.V. Dedoussis (George); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); K. Hagen (Knut); D. Evans; U. de Faire (Ulf); M. Farrall (Martin); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); I. Ford (Ian); L. Franke (Lude); P.W. Franks (Paul); P. Froguel (Philippe); R.T. Gansevoort (Ron); C. Gieger (Christian); H. Grönberg (Henrik); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); P. Hall (Per); A. Hamsten (Anders); P. van der Harst (Pim); C. Hayward (Caroline); M. Heliovaara (Markku); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A. Hingorani (Aroon); A. Hofman (Albert); Hu, F. (Frank); H.V. Huikuri (Heikki); K. Hveem (Kristian); A. James (Alan); Jordan, J.M. (Joanne M.); A. Jula (Antti); M. Kähönen (Mika); E. Kajantie (Eero); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); M. Kivimaki (Mika); P. Knekt; H. Koistinen (Heikki); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); S. Koskinen (Seppo); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); W. Maerz (Winfried); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. Laakso (Markku); T.A. Lakka (Timo); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); G. Lettre (Guillaume); D.F. Levinson (Douglas); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); M.L. Lokki; Mäntyselkä, P. (Pekka); M. Melbye (Mads); A. Metspalu (Andres); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); F.L. Moll (Frans); J.C. Murray (Jeffrey); A.W. Musk (Arthur); M.S. Nieminen (Markku); I. Njølstad (Inger); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C. Palmer (Cameron); J.S. Pankow (James); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); O. Pedersen (Oluf); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); M. Perola (Markus); A. Peters (Annette); O. Polasek (Ozren); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); Psaty, B.M. (Bruce M.); Qi, L. (Lu); T. Quertermous (Thomas); Raitakari, O.T. (Olli T.); T. Rankinen (Tuomo); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); P.M. Ridker (Paul); J.D. Rioux (John); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); I. Rudan (Igor); H.M. den Ruijter (Hester ); J. Saltevo (Juha); N. Sattar (Naveed); Schunkert, H. (Heribert); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); J. Sinisalo (Juha); H. Snieder (Harold); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); T.D. Spector (Timothy); Staessen, J.A. (Jan A.); Stefania, B. (Bandinelli); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); M. Stumvoll (Michael); J.-C. Tardif (Jean-Claude); E. Tremoli (Elena); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Uusitupa (Matti); A.L.M. Verbeek; S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); J. Viikari (Jorma); Vitart, V. (Veronique); H. Völzke (Henry); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); M. Walker (Mark); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); Clegg, D.J. (Deborah J.); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); P. Gordon-Larsen (Penny); C.E. Jaquish (Cashell); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); Abecasis, G.R. (Goncalo R.); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); I. Barroso (Inês); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); M. Boehnke (Michael); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); C.S. Fox (Caroline); L. Groop (Leif); D. Hunter (David); E. Ingelsson (Erik); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); McCarthy, M.I. (Mark I.); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); J.R. O´Connell; Schlessinger, D. (David); D.P. Strachan (David); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia M.); I.M. Heid (Iris); K.E. North (Kari); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGenome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ

  17. The Influence of Age and Sex on Genetic Associations with Adult Body Size and Shape : A Large-Scale Genome-Wide Interaction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler, Thomas W.; Justice, Anne E.; Graff, Mariaelisa; Barata, Llilda; Feitosa, Mary F.; Chu, Su; Czajkowski, Jacek; Esko, Tonu; Fall, Tove; Kilpelainen, Tuomas O.; Lu, Yingchang; Magi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Pers, Tune H.; Rueeger, Sina; Teumer, Alexander; Ehret, Georg B.; Ferreira, Teresa; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Karjalainen, Juha; Lagou, Vasiliki; Mahajan, Anubha; Neinast, Michael D.; Prokopenko, Inga; Simino, Jeannette; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Jansen, Rick; Westra, Harm-Jan; White, Charles C.; Absher, Devin; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Ahmad, Shafqat; Albrecht, Eva; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Bis, Joshua C.; Bonnefond, Amelie; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cadby, Gemma; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Delgado, Graciela; Demirkan, Ayse; Dueker, Nicole; Eklund, Niina; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Joel; Feenstra, Bjarke; Fischer, Krista; Frau, Francesca; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Geller, Frank; Goel, Anuj; Gorski, Mathias; Grammer, Tanja B.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Haitjema, Saskia; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jackson, Anne U.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Johansson, Asa; Kaakinen, Marika; Kleber, Marcus E.; Lahti, Jari; Leach, Irene Mateo; Lehne, Benjamin; Liu, Youfang; Lo, Ken Sin; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luan, Jian'an; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Mangino, Massimo; McKnight, Barbara; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Monda, Keri L.; Montasser, May E.; Mueller, Gabriele; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Pascoe, Laura; Paternoster, Lavinia; Rayner, Nigel W.; Renstrom, Frida; Rizzi, Federica; Rose, Lynda M.; Ryan, Kathy A.; Salo, Perttu; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert Vernon; Southam, Lorraine; Stancakova, Alena; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Trompet, Stella; Pervjakova, Natalia; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van der Laan, Sander W.; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Setten, Jessica; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wang, Sophie R.; Wang, Zhaoming; Wild, Sarah H.; Willenborg, Christina; Wilson, James F.; Wong, Andrew; Yang, Jian; Yengo, Loic; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andersson, Ehm A.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Baldassarre, Damiano; Banasik, Karina; Barcella, Matteo; Barlassina, Cristina; Bellis, Claire; Benaglio, Paola; Blangero, John; Blueher, Matthias; Bonnet, Fabrice; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boyd, Heather A.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buchman, Aron S.; Campbell, Harry; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter S.; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cole, John; Collins, Francis S.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Dimitriou, Maria; Duan, Jubao; Enroth, Stefan; Eury, Elodie; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Forouhi, Nita G.; Friedrich, Nele; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gigante, Bruna; Glorioso, Nicola; Go, Alan S.; Gottesman, Omri; Graessler, Juergen; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Gu, Yu-Mei; Broer, Linda; Ham, Annelies C.; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hastie, Nicholas; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heath, Andrew C.; Henders, Anjali K.; Hernandez, Dena; Hillege, Hans; Holmen, Oddgeir; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hui, Jennie; Husemoen, Lise L.; Hutri-Kahonen, Nina; Hysi, Pirro G.; Illig, Thomas; De Jager, Philip L.; Jalilzadeh, Shapour; Jorgensen, Torben; Jukema, J. Wouter; Juonala, Markus; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karaleftheri, Maria; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kinnunen, Leena; Kittner, Steven J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kolcic, Ivana; Kovacs, Peter; Krarup, Nikolaj T.; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Krueger, Janine; Kuh, Diana; Kumari, Meena; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Langenberg, Claudia; Lannfelt, Lars; Lanzani, Chiara; Lotay, Vaneet; Launer, Lenore J.; Leander, Karin; Lindstrom, Jaana; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Yan-Ping; Lobbens, Stephane; Luben, Robert; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mannisto, Satu; Magnusson, Patrik K.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Andrew P.; Narisu, Narisu; Nelis, Mari; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Perusse, Louis; Pichler, Irene; Pilia, Maria G.; Pouta, Anneli; Rheinberger, Myriam; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Richards, Marcus; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rice, Treva K.; Rivolta, Carlo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Scholtens, Salome; Scott, Robert A.; Scott, William R.; Sebert, Sylvain; Sengupta, Sebanti; Sennblad, Bengt; Seufferlein, Thomas; Silveira, Angela; Slagboom, P. Eline; Smit, Jan H.; Sparso, Thomas H.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Stringham, Heather M.; Swertz, Morris A.; Swift, Amy J.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorand, Barbara; Toenjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; van der Most, Peter J.; Voelker, Uwe; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Vonk, Judith M.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Walker, Ryan W.; Wennauer, Roman; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; van Dijk, Suzanne C.; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John; Bennett, David A.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Boeger, Carsten A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bouchard, Claude; Chambers, John C.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, Denis A.; de Faire, Ulf; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Franke, Lude; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gieger, Christian; Gronberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heliovaara, Markku; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Hveem, Kristian; James, Alan L.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Jula, Antti; Kaehoenen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Kivimaki, Mika; Knekt, Paul B.; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kuusisto, Johanna; Maerz, Winfried; Martin, Nicholas G.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lind, Lars; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Mantyselka, Pekka; Melbye, Mads; Metspalu, Andres; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Moll, Frans L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Musk, Arthur W.; Nieminen, Markku S.; Njolstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Pankow, James S.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lu; Quertermous, Thomas; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M.; Rioux, John D.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Saltevo, Juha; Sattar, Naveed; Schunkert, Heribert; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sinisalo, Juha; Snieder, Harold; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Spector, Tim D.; Staessen, Jan A.; Stefania, Bandinelli; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stumvoll, Michael; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Verbeek, Andre L. M.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Vitart, Veronique; Voelzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Walker, Mark; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clegg, Deborah J.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Jaquish, Cashell E.; Rao, D. C.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Ines; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Hunter, David J.; Ingelsson, Erik; Kaplan, Robert C.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Heid, Iris M.; North, Kari E.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially

  18. The Influence of Age and Sex on Genetic Associations with Adult Body Size and Shape : A Large-Scale Genome-Wide Interaction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler, Thomas W; Justice, Anne E; Graff, Mariaelisa; Barata, Llilda; Feitosa, Mary F; Chu, Su; Czajkowski, Jacek; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Lu, Yingchang; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Pers, Tune H; Rüeger, Sina; Teumer, Alexander; Ehret, Georg B; Ferreira, Teresa; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Karjalainen, Juha; Lagou, Vasiliki; Mahajan, Anubha; Neinast, Michael D; Prokopenko, Inga; Simino, Jeannette; Teslovich, Tanya M; Jansen, Rick; Westra, Harm-Jan; White, Charles C; Absher, Devin; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Ahmad, Shafqat; Albrecht, Eva; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; de Craen, Anton J M; Bis, Joshua C; Bonnefond, Amélie; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cadby, Gemma; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chiang, Charleston W K; Delgado, Graciela; Demirkan, Ayse; Dueker, Nicole; Eklund, Niina; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Joel; Feenstra, Bjarke; Fischer, Krista; Frau, Francesca; Galesloot, Tessel E; Geller, Frank; Goel, Anuj; Gorski, Mathias; Grammer, Tanja B; Gustafsson, Stefan; Haitjema, Saskia; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Jackson, Anne U; Jacobs, Kevin B; Johansson, Åsa; Kaakinen, Marika; Kleber, Marcus E; Lahti, Jari; Leach, Irene Mateo; Lehne, Benjamin; Liu, Youfang; Lo, Ken Sin; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luan, Jian'an; Madden, Pamela A F; Mangino, Massimo; McKnight, Barbara; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Monda, Keri L; Montasser, May E; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Pascoe, Laura; Paternoster, Lavinia; Rayner, Nigel W; Renström, Frida; Rizzi, Federica; Rose, Lynda M; Ryan, Kathy A; Salo, Perttu; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert Vernon; Southam, Lorraine; Stančáková, Alena; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strawbridge, Rona J; Sung, Yun Ju; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Trompet, Stella; Pervjakova, Natalia; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van der Laan, Sander W; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Setten, Jessica; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Verweij, Niek; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Waite, Lindsay L; Wang, Sophie R; Wang, Zhaoming; Wild, Sarah H; Willenborg, Christina; Wilson, James F; Wong, Andrew; Yang, Jian; Yengo, Loïc; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andersson, Ehm A; Bakker, Stephan J L; Baldassarre, Damiano; Banasik, Karina; Barcella, Matteo; Barlassina, Cristina; Bellis, Claire; Benaglio, Paola; Blangero, John; Blüher, Matthias; Bonnet, Fabrice; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Boyd, Heather A; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buchman, Aron S; Campbell, Harry; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter S; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cole, John; Collins, Francis S; de Geus, Eco J C; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Dimitriou, Maria; Duan, Jubao; Enroth, Stefan; Eury, Elodie; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Forouhi, Nita G; Friedrich, Nele; Gejman, Pablo V; Gigante, Bruna; Glorioso, Nicola; Go, Alan S; Gottesman, Omri; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Gu, Yu-Mei; Broer, Linda; Ham, Annelies C; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hastie, Nicholas; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heath, Andrew C; Henders, Anjali K; Hernandez, Dena; Hillege, Hans; Holmen, Oddgeir; Hovingh, Kees G; Hui, Jennie; Husemoen, Lise L; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Hysi, Pirro G; Illig, Thomas; De Jager, Philip L; Jalilzadeh, Shapour; Jørgensen, Torben; Jukema, J Wouter; Juonala, Markus; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karaleftheri, Maria; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kinnunen, Leena; Kittner, Steven J; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kolcic, Ivana; Kovacs, Peter; Krarup, Nikolaj T; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Krüger, Janine; Kuh, Diana; Kumari, Meena; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Langenberg, Claudia; Lannfelt, Lars; Lanzani, Chiara; Lotay, Vaneet; Launer, Lenore J; Leander, Karin; Lindström, Jaana; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Yan-Ping; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luben, Robert; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; Magnusson, Patrik K; McArdle, Wendy L; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Andrew P; Narisu, Narisu; Nelis, Mari; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Pérusse, Louis; Pichler, Irene; Pilia, Maria G; Pouta, Anneli; Rheinberger, Myriam; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Richards, Marcus; Rice, Kenneth M; Rice, Treva K; Rivolta, Carlo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Sarzynski, Mark A; Scholtens, Salome; Scott, Robert A; Scott, William R; Sebert, Sylvain; Sengupta, Sebanti; Sennblad, Bengt; Seufferlein, Thomas; Silveira, Angela; Slagboom, P Eline; Smit, Jan H; Sparsø, Thomas H; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P; Stringham, Heather M; Swertz, Morris A; Swift, Amy J; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorand, Barbara; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; van der Most, Peter J; Völker, Uwe; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Vonk, Judith M; Waldenberger, Melanie; Walker, Ryan W; Wennauer, Roman; Widén, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wright, Alan F; Zillikens, M Carola; van Dijk, Suzanne C; van Schoor, Natasja M; Asselbergs, Folkert W; de Bakker, Paul I W; Beckmann, Jacques S; Beilby, John; Bennett, David A; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Böger, Carsten A; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bouchard, Claude; Chambers, John C; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Evans, Denis A; de Faire, Ulf; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Franke, Lude; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gieger, Christian; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heliövaara, Markku; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hveem, Kristian; James, Alan L; Jordan, Joanne M; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Kivimaki, Mika; Knekt, Paul B; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koskinen, Seppo; Kuusisto, Johanna; Maerz, Winfried; Martin, Nicholas G; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Levinson, Douglas F; Lind, Lars; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Melbye, Mads; Metspalu, Andres; Mitchell, Braxton D; Moll, Frans L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Musk, Arthur W; Nieminen, Markku S; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Lyle J; Pankow, James S; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Nancy L; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Polašek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Qi, Lu; Quertermous, Thomas; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M; Rioux, John D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; den Ruijter, Hester M; Saltevo, Juha; Sattar, Naveed; Schunkert, Heribert; Schwarz, Peter E H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Staessen, Jan A; Stefania, Bandinelli; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stumvoll, Michael; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; Verbeek, André L M; Vermeulen, Sita H; Viikari, Jorma S; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Walker, Mark; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clegg, Deborah J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Jaquish, Cashell E; Rao, D C; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Assimes, Themistocles L; Barroso, Inês; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S; Groop, Leif C; Hunter, David J; Ingelsson, Erik; Kaplan, Robert C; McCarthy, Mark I; Mohlke, Karen L; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Heid, Iris M; North, Kari E; Borecki, Ingrid B; Kutalik, Zoltán; Loos, Ruth J F

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially betw

  19. The role of size constancy for the integration of local elements into a global shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eRennig

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Visual perception depends on the visual context and is likely to be influenced by size constancy, which predicts a size and distance invariant perception of objects. However, size constancy can also result in optical illusions that allow the manipulation of the perceived size. We thus asked whether the integration of local elements into a global object can be influenced by manipulations of the visual context and size constancy? A set of stimuli was applied in healthy individuals that took advantage of the ‘Kanizsa’ illusion, in which three circles with open wedges oriented towards a center point are placed to form an illusionary perception of a triangle. In addition, a 3D-perspective view was implemented in which the global target (‘Kanizsa’ triangle was placed in combination with several distractor circles either in a close or a distant position. Subjects were engaged in a global recognition task on the location of the ‘Kanizsa’ triangle. Global recognition of ‘Kanizsa’ triangles improved with a decreasing length of the illusory contour. Interestingly, recognition of ‘Kanizsa’ triangles decreased when they were perceived as if they were located further away. We conclude that the integration of local elements into a global object is dependent on the visual context and dominated by size constancy.

  20. Cell-sized liposomes reveal how actomyosin cortical tension drives shape change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Kevin; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Tsai, Feng C; Lees, Edouard; Voituriez, Raphaël; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Sykes, Cecile

    2013-10-08

    Animal cells actively generate contractile stress in the actin cortex, a thin actin network beneath the cell membrane, to facilitate shape changes during processes like cytokinesis and motility. On the microscopic scale, this stress is generated by myosin molecular motors, which bind to actin cytoskeletal filaments and use chemical energy to exert pulling forces. To decipher the physical basis for the regulation of cell shape changes, here, we use a cell-like system with a cortex anchored to the outside or inside of a liposome membrane. This system enables us to dissect the interplay between motor pulling forces, cortex-membrane anchoring, and network connectivity. We show that cortices on the outside of liposomes either spontaneously rupture and relax built-up mechanical stress by peeling away around the liposome or actively compress and crush the liposome. The decision between peeling and crushing depends on the cortical tension determined by the amount of motors and also on the connectivity of the cortex and its attachment to the membrane. Membrane anchoring strongly affects the morphology of cortex contraction inside liposomes: cortices contract inward when weakly attached, whereas they contract toward the membrane when strongly attached. We propose a physical model based on a balance of active tension and mechanical resistance to rupture. Our findings show how membrane attachment and network connectivity are able to regulate actin cortex remodeling and membrane-shape changes for cell polarization.

  1. Collapse and coalescence of spherical voids subject to intense shearing: studied in full 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Dahl, Jonas; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2012-01-01

    for a range of initial material configurations and loading conditions. In addition, a direct comparison to corresponding 2D cell model predictions for circular cylindrical voids under plane strain shearing is presented. A quantitatively good agreement of the two model configurations (2D vs. 3D) is obtained......Micro-mechanical 2D cell model studies have revealed ductile failure during intense shearing to be governed by the interaction of neighbouring voids, which collapse to micro-cracks and continuously rotate and elongate until coalescence occurs. For a three-dimensional void structure, this implies...... shape, void orientation etc. The objective of this work is to expand the range of stress triaxiality usually faced in 3D cell model studies, such that intense shearing is covered, and to bring forward details on the porosity and void shape evolution. The overall material response is presented...

  2. Shape and size variations of Aegla uruguayana (Anomura, Aeglidae under laboratory conditions: A geometric morphometric approach to the growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria P. Diawol

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crustacean growth studies typically use modal analysis rather than focusing on the growth of individuals. In the present work, we use geometric morphometrics to determine how organism shape and size varies during the life of the freshwater crab, Aegla uruguayana Schmitt, 1942. A total of 66 individuals from diverse life cycle stages were examined daily and each exuvia was recorded. Digital images of the dorsal region of the cephalothorax were obtained for each exuvia and were subsequently used to record landmark configurations. Moult increment and intermoult period were estimated for each crab. Differences in shape between crabs of different sizes (allometry and sexes (sexual dimorphism; SD were observed. Allometry was registered among specimens; however, SD was not statistically significant between crabs of a given size. The intermoult period increased as size increased, but the moult frequency was similar between the sexes. Regarding ontogeny, juveniles had short and blunt rostrum, robust forehead region, and narrow cephalothorax. Unlike juveniles crabs, adults presented a well-defined anterior and posterior cephalothorax region. The rostrum was long and stylised and the forehead narrow. Geometric morphometric methods were highly effective for the analysis of aeglid-individual- growth and avoided excessive handling of individuals through exuvia analysis.

  3. Permeability-Selectivity Analysis of Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Membranes: Effect of Pore Size and Shape Distribution and Membrane Stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Usama; Arif, Abul Fazal Muhammad; Bashmal, Salem

    2016-08-06

    We present a modeling approach to determine the permeability-selectivity tradeoff for microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes with a distribution of pore sizes and pore shapes. Using the formulated permeability-selectivity model, the effect of pore aspect ratio and pore size distribution on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of the membrane is analyzed. A finite element model is developed to study the effect of membrane stretching on the distribution of pore sizes and shapes in the stretched membrane. The effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of membranes is also analyzed. The results show that increasing pore aspect ratio improves membrane performance while increasing the width of pore size distribution deteriorates the performance. It was also found that the effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff is greatly affected by the uniformity of pore distribution in the membrane. Stretching showed a positive shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve of membranes with well-dispersed pores while in the case of pore clustering, a negative shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve was observed.

  4. Thermal diffusivity measurement for urchin-like gold nanofluids with different solvents, sizes and concentrations/shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Muñoz, Gerardo A; Balderas-López, José Abraham; Ortega-Lopez, Jaime; Pescador-Rojas, José A; Salazar, Jaime Santoyo

    2012-12-06

    The thermal properties of nanofluids are an especially interesting research topic because of the variety of potential applications, which range from bio-utilities to next-generation heat-transfer fluids. In this study, photopyroelectric calorimetry for measuring the thermal diffusivity of urchin-like colloidal gold nanofluids as a function of particle size, concentration and shape in water, ethanol and ethylene glycol is reported. Urchin-like gold nanoparticles were synthesised in the presence of hydroquinone through seed-mediated growth with homogeneous shape and size ranging from 55 to 115 nm. The optical response, size and morphology of these nanoparticles were characterised using UV-visible spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The thermal diffusivity of these nanofluids decreased as the size of the nanoparticles increased, and the enhancement depended on the thermal diffusivity of the solvent. The opposite effect (increase in thermal diffusivity) was observed when the nanoparticle concentration was increased. These effects were more evident for urchin-like gold nanofluids than for the corresponding spherical gold nanofluids.

  5. Permeability-Selectivity Analysis of Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Membranes: Effect of Pore Size and Shape Distribution and Membrane Stretching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Usama Siddiqui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a modeling approach to determine the permeability-selectivity tradeoff for microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes with a distribution of pore sizes and pore shapes. Using the formulated permeability-selectivity model, the effect of pore aspect ratio and pore size distribution on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of the membrane is analyzed. A finite element model is developed to study the effect of membrane stretching on the distribution of pore sizes and shapes in the stretched membrane. The effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of membranes is also analyzed. The results show that increasing pore aspect ratio improves membrane performance while increasing the width of pore size distribution deteriorates the performance. It was also found that the effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff is greatly affected by the uniformity of pore distribution in the membrane. Stretching showed a positive shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve of membranes with well-dispersed pores while in the case of pore clustering, a negative shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve was observed.

  6. The shape and size of the sella turcica in skeletal Class I, Class II, and Class III Saudi subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkofide, Eman A

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the shape and measure the size of the sella turcica in Saudi subjects with different skeletal types. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of 180 individuals (90 males and 90 females) with an age range of 11-26 years were taken and distributed according to skeletal classification; 60 Class I, 60 Class II, and 60 Class III. The sella turcica on each radiograph was analysed and measured to determine the shape of the sella, in addition to the linear dimensions of length, depth, and diameter. A Student's t-test was used to calculate differences in linear dimensions, while a one-way analysis of variance was performed to study the relationship between skeletal type and sella size. The results show that the sella turcica presented with a normal morphology in the majority of subjects (67 per cent). No significant differences in linear dimensions between genders could be found. When age was evaluated, significant differences were found between the older (15 years or more) and the younger (11-14 years) age groups at the 0.01 and 0.001 levels for length, depth, and diameter. Sella size of the older age group was larger than in the younger age group. When skeletal type was compared with sella size, a significant difference was found in the diameter of sella between the Class II and Class III subjects (P sella turcica area in Saudi subjects.

  7. Shape and size controlled synthesis of uniform iron oxide nanocrystals through new non-hydrolytic routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlu; Lee, Seung Soo; Wu, Jiewei; Hinton, Carl H.; Fortner, John D.

    2016-08-01

    New, non-hydrolytic routes to synthesize highly crystalline iron oxide nanocrystals (8-40 nm, magnetite) are described in this report whereby particle size and morphology were precisely controlled through reactant (precursor, e.g. (FeO(OH)) ratios, co-surfactant and organic additive, and/or reaction time. Particle size, with high monodispersivity (oxide nanocrystals can be reproducibly synthesized through simple one-pot thermal decomposition methods. High resolution transmission electron microscope, x-ray diffraction, and superconducting quantum interference device were used to characterize the size, structure and magnetic properties of the resulting nanocrystals. For aqueous applications, materials synthesized/purified in organic solvents are broadly water dispersible through a variety of phase (aqueous) transfer method(s).

  8. The Effects of Particle Morphology (Shape and Sizes Characteristics on its Engineering Behaviour and Sustainable Engineering Performance of Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Siang Lim

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behaviour of granular soil is interestingly dependent on the characteristics of the particles. The wide range of particle shapes and size distribution of sand, by virtue of its sedimentological process of formation plays a significant factor in the influence on its engineering behaviour reflected in terms of its packing density, permeability, shear strength and dilatancy. In this study, research on well graded sand (SW, poorly graded uniform sand (SPuKahang, gap graded sand (SPg from Kahang Malaysia and also (SPuL.Buzzard Leighton Buzzard sand from UK were tested in a direct shear box. The shapes were quantified using images from a digital microscope where its morphological features can lead via statistical methods to determined correlations between strength and its physical properties. The research effort focuses in obtaining its shear strength and roughness parameters and also its extreme packing (emin and emax. Results from published studies on related matter and also the study on permeability are presented. The findings would lead to a better way to classify the shape and size distribution for the assessment of the behaviour of sand in various engineering disciplines such a good foundation soil in geotechnical engineering, as an abrasive material in mechanical engineering, as a filler of concrete in civil engineering, as a filter in chemical engineering and occurs as oil sands in petroleum engineering.

  9. Shape- and Size-Controlled Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Aloe vera Plant Extract and Their Antimicrobial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logaranjan, Kaliyaperumal; Raiza, Anasdass Jaculin; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Chen, Yeng; Pandian, Kannaiyan

    2016-11-01

    Biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) was performed at room temperature using Aloe vera plant extract in the presence of ammoniacal silver nitrate as a metal salt precursor. The formation of AgNP was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy at different time intervals. The shape and size of the synthesized particle were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. These results were confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses and further supported by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy/Raman scattering (SERS) study. UV-visible spectrum has shown a sharp peak at 420 nm and further evidenced by FTIR peak profile (at 1587.6, 1386.4, and 1076 cm-1 with corresponding compounds). The main band position with SERS was noticed at 1594 cm-1 (C-C stretching vibration). When samples were heated under microwave radiation, AgNP with octahedron shapes with 5-50 nm were found and this method can be one of the easier ways to synthesis anisotropic AgNP, in which the plant extract plays a vital role to regulate the size and shape of the nanoparticles. Enhanced antibacterial effects (two- to fourfold) were observed in the case of Aloe vera plant protected AgNP than the routinely synthesized antibiotic drugs.

  10. Packing fraction of particles with a Weibull size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses the void fraction of polydisperse particles with a Weibull (or Rosin-Rammler) size distribution. It is demonstrated that the governing parameters of this distribution can be uniquely related to those of the lognormal distribution. Hence, an existing closed-form expression that predicts the void fraction of particles with a lognormal size distribution can be transformed into an expression for Weibull distributions. Both expressions contain the contraction coefficient β. Likewise the monosized void fraction φ1, it is a physical parameter which depends on the particles' shape and their state of compaction only. Based on a consideration of the scaled binary void contraction, a linear relation for (1 - φ1)β as function of φ1 is proposed, with proportionality constant B, depending on the state of compaction only. This is validated using computational and experimental packing data concerning random close and random loose packing arrangements. Finally, using this β, the closed-form analytical expression governing the void fraction of Weibull distributions is thoroughly compared with empirical data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found. Furthermore, the present analysis yields an algebraic equation relating the void fraction of monosized particles at different compaction states. This expression appears to be in good agreement with a broad collection of random close and random loose packing data.

  11. Biofilter media gas pressure loss as related to media particle size and particle shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.; Røjgaard Andreasen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    Pressure loss (ΔP) is a key parameter for estimating biofilter energy consumption. Accurate predictions of ΔP as a function of air velocity (V) are therefore essential, to assess energy consumption and minimize operation costs. This paper investigates the combined impact of medium particle size...

  12. Covariation between human pelvis shape, stature, and head size alleviates the obstetric dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Barbara; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2015-05-05

    Compared with other primates, childbirth is remarkably difficult in humans because the head of a human neonate is large relative to the birth-relevant dimensions of the maternal pelvis. It seems puzzling that females have not evolved wider pelvises despite the high maternal mortality and morbidity risk connected to childbirth. Despite this seeming lack of change in average pelvic morphology, we show that humans have evolved a complex link between pelvis shape, stature, and head circumference that was not recognized before. The identified covariance patterns contribute to ameliorate the "obstetric dilemma." Females with a large head, who are likely to give birth to neonates with a large head, possess birth canals that are shaped to better accommodate large-headed neonates. Short females with an increased risk of cephalopelvic mismatch possess a rounder inlet, which is beneficial for obstetrics. We suggest that these covariances have evolved by the strong correlational selection resulting from childbirth. Although males are not subject to obstetric selection, they also show part of these association patterns, indicating a genetic-developmental origin of integration.

  13. Extracting the Shape and Size of Biomolecules Attached to a Surface as Suspended Discrete Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milioni, Dimitra; Tsortos, Achilleas; Velez, Marisela; Gizeli, Electra

    2017-03-22

    The ability to derive information on the conformation of surface attached biomolecules by using simple techniques such as biosensors is currently considered of great importance in the fields of surface science and nanotechnology. Here we present a nanoshape sensitive biosensor where a simple mathematical expression is used to relate acoustic measurements to the geometrical features of a surface-attached biomolecule. The underlying scientific principle is that the acoustic ratio (ΔD/ΔF) is a measure of the hydrodynamic volume of the attached entity, mathematically expressed by its intrinsic viscosity [η]. A methodology is presented in order to produce surfaces with discretely bound biomolecules where their native conformation is maintained. Using DNA anchors we attached a spherical protein (streptavidin) and a rod-shaped DNA (47bp) to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) device in a suspended way and predicted correctly through acoustic measurements their conformation, i.e., shape and length. The methodology can be widely applied to draw conclusions on the conformation of any biomolecule or nanoentity upon specific binding on the surface of an acoustic wave device.

  14. The Resolved Asteroid Program - Size, shape, and pole of (52) Europa

    CERN Document Server

    Merline, W J; Carry, B; Conrad, A; Tamblyn, P M; Dumas, C; Kaasalainen, M; Erikson, A; Mottola, S; Durech, J; Rousseau, G; Behrend, R; Casalnuovo, G B; Chinaglia, B; Christou, J C; Chapman, C R; Neyman, C

    2013-01-01

    With the adaptive optics (AO) system on the 10 m Keck-II telescope, we acquired a high quality set of 84 images at 14 epochs of asteroid (52) Europa on 2005 January 20. The epochs covered its rotation period and, by following its changing shape and orientation on the plane of sky, we obtained its triaxial ellipsoid dimensions and spin pole location. An independent determination from images at three epochs obtained in 2007 is in good agreement with these results. By combining these two data sets, along with a single epoch data set obtained in 2003, we have derived a global fit for (52) Europa of diameters (379x330x249) +/- (16x8x10) km, yielding a volume-equivalent spherical-diameter of 315 +/- 7 km, and a rotational pole within 7 deg of [RA; Dec] = [257,+12] in an Equatorial J2000 reference frame (ECJ2000: 255,+35). Using the average of all mass determinations available forEuropa, we derive a density of 1.5 +/- 0.4, typical of C-type asteroids. Comparing our images with the shape model of Michalowski et al. (...

  15. WIDE AND THICK GRAIN 1, which encodes an otubain-like protease with deubiquitination activity, influences grain size and shape in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Wang, Dekai; Duan, Penggen; Zhang, Baolan; Xu, Ran; Li, Na; Li, Yunhai

    2017-09-01

    Grain size and shape are two crucial traits that influence grain yield and grain appearance in rice. Although several factors that affect grain size have been described in rice, the molecular mechanisms underlying the determination of grain size and shape are still elusive. In this study we report that WIDE AND THICK GRAIN 1 (WTG1) functions as an important factor determining grain size and shape in rice. The wtg1-1 mutant exhibits wide, thick, short and heavy grains and also shows an increased number of grains per panicle. WTG1 determines grain size and shape mainly by influencing cell expansion. WTG1 encodes an otubain-like protease, which shares similarity with human OTUB1. Biochemical analyses indicate that WTG1 is a functional deubiquitinating enzyme, and the mutant protein (wtg1-1) loses this deubiquitinating activity. WTG1 is expressed in developing grains and panicles, and the GFP-WTG1 fusion protein is present in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Overexpression of WTG1 results in narrow, thin, long grains due to narrow and long cells, further supporting the role of WTG1 in determining grain size and shape. Thus, our findings identify the otubain-like protease WTG1 to be an important factor that determines grain size and shape, suggesting that WTG1 has the potential to improve grain size and shape in rice. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Impact of the Size and the Shape of the Word on Information Recall and Reading Speed in Electronic Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleh Kangari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of font size and word shape on information recall and reading rate of electronic content. A total of 70 undergraduate students were randomly divided into two groups. In experiment 1, one group read one chapter of an e-book with Tahoma Persian 10, and the other group read the same chapter with Tahoma Persian 12. The reading time was recorded and the participants completed pre and post tests. Experiment 2 was conducted as experiment 1, with the exception that one group read another chapter with Tahoma Persian (sans serif, and the other group read the same chapter with Times New Roman Persian (serif. In both experiments, the differences between the means of the recall scores, and the means of reading speeds for two font sizes and two word shapes were not statistically significant (α= 0.05. Designers of the educational content can change font sizes from 12 to 10 for Tahoma Persian without detrimental effect on recall and reading speed. However, in selection of typefaces they need to be more careful, because if we consider α= 0.10, the difference would become statistically significant. Therefore, some detrimental effects of san serif type face were observed on recall.

  17. Evaluation of the Strength of Railway Ballast Using Point Load Test for Various Size Fractions and Particle Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohmishi, Mehdi; Palassi, Massoud

    2016-07-01

    The ballast layer is one of the most important components of the railway track superstructure in which angular aggregates of high strength rocks are used. Ballast degradation is one of the main sources of railway problems in which the ballast aggregates are gradually degraded due to the abrasion of the sharp corners of the angular particles and splitting each individual particle into two or several small pieces under loading. In this paper, the effects of rock type, aggregate size and particle shape on the strength of the single ballast particles are investigated. For this purpose, point load test is carried out on ballast aggregates of four rock types including basalt, marl, dolomite and trachyte. According to the obtained results, as the size of the aggregates increases, the point load strength index decreases. The influence of size on the strength is more noticeable for ballasts obtained from higher strength rocks. It is also found that the shape of ballast particles has no major effect on its strength. Furthermore, our findings show that the failure pattern for ballasts of higher strength is so that each particle commonly splits into three pieces; while the dominant failure pattern for ballast particles with less strength is breaking the particle into two pieces.

  18. Size effect and scaling power-law for superelasticity in shape-memory alloys at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cortés, Jose F; Nó, Maria L; López-Ferreño, Iñaki; Hernández-Saz, Jesús; Molina, Sergio I; Chuvilin, Andrey; San Juan, Jose M

    2017-08-01

    Shape-memory alloys capable of a superelastic stress-induced phase transformation and a high displacement actuation have promise for applications in micro-electromechanical systems for wearable healthcare and flexible electronic technologies. However, some of the fundamental aspects of their nanoscale behaviour remain unclear, including the question of whether the critical stress for the stress-induced martensitic transformation exhibits a size effect similar to that observed in confined plasticity. Here we provide evidence of a strong size effect on the critical stress that induces such a transformation with a threefold increase in the trigger stress in pillars milled on [001] L21 single crystals from a Cu-Al-Ni shape-memory alloy from 2 μm to 260 nm in diameter. A power-law size dependence of n = -2 is observed for the nanoscale superelasticity. Our observation is supported by the atomic lattice shearing and an elastic model for homogeneous martensite nucleation.

  19. Influence of ageing, inclusions and voids on ductile fracture mechanism in commercial Al-alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chennakesava Reddy; S Sundar Rajan

    2005-02-01

    The objective of the paper is to study the effect of ageing, inclusions and voids on the mechanism of fracture and resultant toughness. It has been found that the voids are initiated at only a fraction of the larger inclusions present. The initiation of voids at small particles in the ductile fracture process appears to have little effect on fracture toughness. The strain hardening capacity has a marked effect on void size, and is an indicator of fracture toughness in the commercial Al alloy.

  20. How Rural Market Imperfections Shape the Relation Between Farm Size and Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heltberg, Rasmus

    The subject of this article is the alleged inverse relationship between farm size and productivity in developing countries. The recent controversy is reviewed, and a framework is provided to explain the inverse relationship based on plausible assumptions about imperfections in the markets for lab...... to account for remaining unobserved heterogenity. It is concluded that an inverse relationship is present in Pakistan, and that the market imperfections framework performs well with the data......The subject of this article is the alleged inverse relationship between farm size and productivity in developing countries. The recent controversy is reviewed, and a framework is provided to explain the inverse relationship based on plausible assumptions about imperfections in the markets for labor...

  1. 3D granulometry: grain-scale shape and size distribution from point cloud dataset of river environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Philippe; Lague, Dimitri; Gourdon, Aurélie; Croissant, Thomas; Crave, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The grain-scale morphology of river sediments and their size distribution are important factors controlling the efficiency of fluvial erosion and transport. In turn, constraining the spatial evolution of these two metrics offer deep insights on the dynamics of river erosion and sediment transport from hillslopes to the sea. However, the size distribution of river sediments is generally assessed using statistically-biased field measurements and determining the grain-scale shape of river sediments remains a real challenge in geomorphology. Here we determine, with new methodological approaches based on the segmentation and geomorphological fitting of 3D point cloud dataset, the size distribution and grain-scale shape of sediments located in river environments. Point cloud segmentation is performed using either machine-learning algorithms or geometrical criterion, such as local plan fitting or curvature analysis. Once the grains are individualized into several sub-clouds, each grain-scale morphology is determined using a 3D geometrical fitting algorithm applied on the sub-cloud. If different geometrical models can be conceived and tested, only ellipsoidal models were used in this study. A phase of results checking is then performed to remove grains showing a best-fitting model with a low level of confidence. The main benefits of this automatic method are that it provides 1) an un-biased estimate of grain-size distribution on a large range of scales, from centimeter to tens of meters; 2) access to a very large number of data, only limited by the number of grains in the point-cloud dataset; 3) access to the 3D morphology of grains, in turn allowing to develop new metrics characterizing the size and shape of grains. The main limit of this method is that it is only able to detect grains with a characteristic size greater than the resolution of the point cloud. This new 3D granulometric method is then applied to river terraces both in the Poerua catchment in New-Zealand and

  2. Depletion-Induced Shape and Size Selection of Gold Nanoparticles (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    the AO model18 as the product of the excluded volume, Ve, and the micellar osmotic pressure, Πm where the negative sign indicates a favorable...of Nanom- eter Gold Particles by Size-Exclusion Chromatography . Anal. Chem. 1999, 71 (11), 2085–2091. (15) Kim, F.; Song, J. H.; Yang, P...Nanorods by Controlled Overgrowth. Adv. Mater. 2008, 20 (20), 3882–3886. (30) Bakshi, M.; Kaur, I. Head-group-induced structural micellar transi- tions in

  3. Penis size interacts with body shape and height to influence male attractiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Mautz, Brian S.; Wong, Bob B. M.; Peters, Richard A; Jennions, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Compelling evidence from many animal taxa indicates that male genitalia are often under postcopulatory sexual selection for characteristics that increase a male’s relative fertilization success. There could, however, also be direct precopulatory female mate choice based on male genital traits. Before clothing, the nonretractable human penis would have been conspicuous to potential mates. This observation has generated suggestions that human penis size partly evolved because of female choice. ...

  4. Void growth to coalescence in a non-local material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    The size-effect in metals containing distributed spherical voids is analyzed numerically using a finite strain generalization of a length scale dependent plasticity theory. Results are obtained for stress-triaxialities relevant in front of a crack tip in an elastic-plastic metal. The influence...

  5. Void growth to coalescence in a non-local material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2008-01-01

    The size-effect in metals containing distributed spherical voids is analyzed numerically using a finite strain generalization of a length scale dependent plasticity theory. Results are obtained for stress-triaxialities relevant in front of a crack tip in an elastic-plastic metal. The influence...

  6. Coevolving parasites and population size shape the evolution of mating behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstes Niels AG

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coevolution with parasites and population size are both expected to influence the evolution of mating rates. To gain insights into the interaction between these dual selective factors, we used populations from a coevolution experiment with the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and its microsporidian parasite, Nosema whitei. We maintained each experimental population at two different population sizes. We assayed the mating behaviour of both males and females from coevolved and paired non-coevolved control populations after 24 generations of coevolution with parasites. Results Males from large, coevolved populations (i.e. ancestors were exposed to parasites showed a reduced eagerness to mate compared to males from large, non-coevolved populations. But in small populations, coevolution did not lead to decreased male mating rates. Coevolved females from both large and small populations appeared to be more willing to accept mating than non-coevolved females. Conclusions This study provides unique, experimental insights into the combined roles of coevolving parasites and population size on the evolution of mating rate. Furthermore, we find that males and females respond differently to the same environmental conditions. Our results show that parasites can be key determinants of the sexual behaviour of their hosts.

  7. Grain size effects on stability of nonlinear vibration with nanocrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Minglu; Sun, Qingping

    2017-10-01

    Grain size effects on stability of thermomechanical responses for a nonlinear torsional vibration system with nanocrystalline superelastic NiTi bar are investigated in the frequency and amplitude domains. NiTi bars with average grain size from 10 nm to 100 nm are fabricated through cold-rolling and subsequent annealing. Thermomechanical responses of the NiTi bar as a softening nonlinear damping spring in the torsional vibration system are obtained by synchronised acquisition of rotational angle and temperature under external sinusoidal excitation. It is shown that nonlinearity and damping capacity of the NiTi bar decrease as average grain size of the material is reduced below 100 nm. Therefore jump phenomena of thermomechanical responses become less significant or even vanish and the vibration system becomes more stable. The work in this paper provides a solid experimental base for manipulating the undesired jump phenomena of thermomechanical responses and stabilising the mechanical vibration system through grain refinement of NiTi SMA.

  8. Void initiation from interfacial debonding of spherical silicon particles inside a silicon-copper nanocomposite: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yi; Chen, Zengtao

    2017-02-01

    Silicon particles with diameters from 1.9 nm to 30 nm are embedded in a face-centered-cubic copper matrix to form nanocomposite specimens for simulation. The interfacial debonding of silicon particles from the copper matrix and the subsequent growth of nucleated voids are studied via molecular dynamics (MD). The MD results are examined from several different perspectives. The overall mechanical performance is monitored by the average stress-strain response and the accumulated porosity. The ‘relatively farthest-traveled’ atoms are identified to characterize the onset of interfacial debonding. The relative displacement field is plotted to illustrate both subsequent interfacial debonding and the growth of a nucleated void facilitated by a dislocation network. Our results indicate that the initiation of interfacial debonding is due to the accumulated surface stress if the matrix is initially dislocation-free. However, pre-existing dislocations can make a considerable difference. In either case, the dislocation emission also contributes to the subsequent debonding process. As for the size effect, the debonding of relatively larger particles causes a drop in the stress-strain curve. The volume fraction of second-phase particles is found to be more influential than the size of the simulation box on the onset of interfacial debonding. The volume fraction of second-phase particles also affects the shape of the nucleated void and, therefore, influences the stress response of the composite.

  9. Iron oxide nanoparticles with sizes, shapes and compositions resulting in different magnetization signatures as potential labels for multiparametric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Montferrand, Caroline; Hu, Ling; Milosevic, Irena; Russier, Vincent; Bonnin, Dominique; Motte, Laurence; Brioude, Arnaud; Lalatonne, Yoann

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles differing in their size, shape (spherical, hexagonal, rods, cubes) and composition have been synthesized and modified using caffeic acid for transfer to aqueous media and stabilization of the particle suspensions at physiological pH. A super quantum interference device and the recently patented magnetic sensor MIAplex®, which registered a signal proportional to the second derivative of the magnetization curve, were used to study the magnetization behavior of the nanoparticles. The differences in the magnetic signatures of the nanoparticles (spheres and rods) make them promising candidates for the simultaneous detection of different types of biological molecules.

  10. The growth and coalescence of ellipsoidal voids in plane strain under combined shear and tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheyvaerts, F.; Onck, P. R.; Tekogˇlu, C.; Pardoen, T.

    2011-02-01

    New extensions of a model for the growth and coalescence of ellipsoidal voids based on the Gurson formalism are proposed in order to treat problems involving shear and/or voids axis not necessarily aligned with the main loading direction, under plane strain loading conditions. These extensions are motivated and validated using 3D finite element void cell calculations with overall plane strain enforced in one direction. The starting point is the Gologanu model dealing with spheroidal void shape. A void rotation law based on homogenization theory is coupled to this damage model. The predictions of the model closely agree with the 3D cell calculations, capturing the effect of the initial void shape and orientation on the void rotation rate. An empirical correction is also introduced for the change of the void aspect ratio in the plane transverse to the main axis of the void departing from its initially circular shape. This correction is needed for an accurate prediction of the onset of coalescence. Next, a new approach is proposed to take strain hardening into account within the Thomason criterion for internal necking, avoiding the use of strain hardening-dependent fitting parameters. The coalescence criterion is generalized to any possible direction of the coalescence plane and void orientation. Finally, the model is supplemented by a mathematical description of the final drop of the stress carrying capacity during coalescence. The entire model is developed for plane strain conditions, setting the path to a 3D extension. After validation of the model, a parametric study addresses the effect of shear on the ductility of metallic alloys for a range of microstructural and flow parameters, under different stress states. In general, the presence of shear, for identical stress triaxiality, decreases the ductility, partly explaining recent experimental results obtained in the low stress triaxiality regime.

  11. Effect of Rare Earth on Void Band of Diffusion Layer and Properties of Aluminized Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; FAN Zhi-kang; HU Peng-fei; LONG Yong-qiang; LIU Hua; WEN Jiu-ba

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the addition of rare earth (RE) elements on the void band in the diffusion layer, and the resistances to both oxidation and spalling of aluminized steel were investigated through high temperature oxidation and spalling tests. The results showed that RE had significant effects on the void band in the diffusion layer and the properties of aluminized steel. After diffusion treatment, a considerable number of the voids between the middle layer and transitional layer of pure aluminized coating, aggregated into wavy-line-shaped void bands parallel to the outer surface. For the RE-added aluminized coating, only a few voids aggregated into intermittent block shapes. During high temperature oxidation at 800 ℃ for 200 h, the wavy void band of pure aluminized coating aggregated further into a linear crack parallel to the outer surface, and the internal oxidation occurred within them; the open cracks perpendicular to the surface penetrated through the diffusion layer. For the RE-added aluminized coating, only a few voids aggregated into intermittent meniscus shapes. During cyclic spalling tests, the peeling, spallation, and pulverulent cracking occurred along the void band in the diffusion layer of pure aluminized coating, but only a little spallation occurred in the diffusion layer of the RE-added aluminized coating, in which cracks perpendicular to the surface were much smaller than those of pure aluminized coating and did not penetrate through the diffusion layer. It is evident that RE addition can restrain the formation and aggregation of voids and subsequently improve the resistances to oxidation and spalling. The mechanism of the RE effect on the void band in the diffusion layer is also discussed.

  12. What tells Gravity on the shape and size of an electron

    CERN Document Server

    Burinskii, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational field of an electron, fixed by experimental values of its mass, spin, charge and magnetic moment, is given by the metric of Kerr-Newman (KN) solution. Unexpectedly, this metric contains a singular ring of the Compton radius, which should be regulated resulting in a weeak and smooth source. The consistent source takes the form of an oblate vacuum bubble, bounded by a closed string of the Compton radius. The bubble turns out to be relativistically rotating and should be filled by a coherently oscillating Higgs field in a false vacuum state. The Compton size of the bubble shrinks sharply to a "point" for relativistic particle.

  13. Modeling the deposition of bioaerosols with variable size and shape in the human respiratory tract – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sturm

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of bioaerosol particles with various size and shape in the human respiratory tract was simulated by using a probabilistic model of the lung and an almost realistic mathematical approach to particle deposition. Results obtained from the theoretical computations clearly show that biogenic particle deposition in different lung compartments does not only depend on physical particle properties, but also on breathing mode (nose or mouth breathing and inhalative flow rate (=tidal volume × breathing frequency/30. Whilst ultrafine (5 μm particles tend to accumulate in the extrathoracic region and the uppermost airways of the tracheobronchial tree, particles with intermediate size are characterized by higher penetration depth, leading to their possible accumulation in the lung alveoli. Due to their deposition in deep lung regions and insufficient clearance, some bioaerosol particles may induce severe lung diseases ranging from infections, allergies, and toxic reactions to cancer.

  14. Sodium voiding analysis in Kalimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Won-Pyo; Jeong, Kwan-Seong; Hahn, Dohee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    A sodium boiling model has been developed for calculations of the void reactivity feedback as well as the fuel and cladding temperatures in the KALIMER core after onset of sodium boiling. The sodium boiling in liquid metal reactors using sodium as coolant should be modeled because of phenomenon difference observed from that in light water reactor systems. The developed model is a multiple -bubble slug ejection model. It allows a finite number of bubbles in a channel at any time. Voiding is assumed to result from formation of bubbles that fill the whole cross section of the coolant channel except for liquid film left on the cladding surface. The vapor pressure, currently, is assumed to be uniform within a bubble. The present study is focused on not only demonstration of the sodium voiding behavior predicted by the developed model, but also confirmation on qualitative acceptance for the model. In results, the model catches important phenomena for sodium boiling, while further effort should be made for the complete analysis. (author)

  15. Size effects on cavitation instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2006-01-01

    In metal-ceramic systems the constraint on plastic flow leads to so high stress triaxialities that cavitation instabilities may occur. If the void radius is on the order of magnitude of a characteristic length for the metal, the rate of void growth is reduced, and the possibility of unstable cavi...... as the void grows to a size well above the characteristic material length....

  16. Error analysis for semi-analytic displacement derivatives with respect to shape and sizing variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyes, Peter A.; Lust, Robert V.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is fundamental to the solution of structural optimization problems. Consequently, much research has focused on the efficient computation of static displacement derivatives. As originally developed, these methods relied on analytical representations for the derivatives of the structural stiffness matrix (K) with respect to the design variables (b sub i). To extend these methods for use with complex finite element formulations and facilitate their implementation into structural optimization programs using the general finite element method analysis codes, the semi-analytic method was developed. In this method the matrix the derivative of K/the derivative b sub i is approximated by finite difference. Although it is well known that the accuracy of the semi-analytic method is dependent on the finite difference parameter, recent work has suggested that more fundamental inaccuracies exist in the method when used for shape optimization. Another study has argued qualitatively that these errors are related to nonuniform errors in the stiffness matrix derivatives. The accuracy of the semi-analytic method is investigated. A general framework was developed for the error analysis and then it is shown analytically that the errors in the method are entirely accounted for by errors in delta K/delta b sub i. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that acceptable accuracy in the derivatives can be obtained through careful selection of the finite difference parameter.

  17. Photometric Observations Constraining the Size, Shape, and Albedo of 2003 El61, a Rapidly Rotating, Pluto-Sized Object in the Kuiper Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Rabinowitz, D L; Brown, M E; Roe, H; Schwartz, M; Tourtellotte, S; Trujillo, C; Rabinowitz, David L.; Barkume, Kristina; Brown, Michael E.; Roe, Henry; Schwartz, Michael; Tourtellotte, Suzanne; Trujillo, Chad

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements at optical wavelengths of the spectral reflectance, the rotational light curve, and the solar phase curve of 2003 EL61,. With apparent visual magnitude 17.5 at 51 AU from the sun, this newly discovered member of the classical Kuiper Belt is now the third brightest KBO after Pluto and 2005 FY9. Our observations reveal an unambiguous, double-peaked rotational light curve with period 3.9154 +/- 0.0002 hours and peak to peak amplitude 0.28 +/- 0.04 mag. This is the fastest rotation period reliably determined for any body in the solar system larger than 100 km. Assuming the body has relaxed over time to the shape taken by a homogenous fluid body, our observations tightly constrain the shape and density. Given the mass we recently determined for 2003 EL61 from the orbit of a small satellite, we also constrain the size and albedo. We find a total length of 1960 to 2500 km, a mean density of 2600 to 3340 kg m-3, and a visual albedo greater than 0.6. We also measure a neutral reflectance at vis...

  18. Constraints on Cosmology and Gravity from the Dynamics of Voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Pisani, Alice; Sutter, P. M.; Lavaux, Guilhem; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Weller, Jochen

    2016-08-01

    The Universe is mostly composed of large and relatively empty domains known as cosmic voids, whereas its matter content is predominantly distributed along their boundaries. The remaining material inside them, either dark or luminous matter, is attracted to these boundaries and causes voids to expand faster and to grow emptier over time. Using the distribution of galaxies centered on voids identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and adopting minimal assumptions on the statistical motion of these galaxies, we constrain the average matter content Ωm=0.281 ±0.031 in the Universe today, as well as the linear growth rate of structure f /b =0.417 ±0.089 at median redshift z ¯=0.57 , where b is the galaxy bias (68% C.L.). These values originate from a percent-level measurement of the anisotropic distortion in the void-galaxy cross-correlation function, ɛ =1.003 ±0.012 , and are robust to consistency tests with bootstraps of the data and simulated mock catalogs within an additional systematic uncertainty of half that size. They surpass (and are complementary to) existing constraints by unlocking cosmological information on smaller scales through an accurate model of nonlinear clustering and dynamics in void environments. As such, our analysis furnishes a powerful probe of deviations from Einstein's general relativity in the low-density regime which has largely remained untested so far. We find no evidence for such deviations in the data at hand.

  19. Preparation and formation mechanisms of metallic particles with controlled size, shape, structure and surface functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu

    Due to their excellent conductivity and chemical stability, particles of silver (Ag), gold (Au), copper (Cu) and their alloys are widely used in the electronic industry. Other unique properties extend their uses to the biomedical, optical and catalysis fields. All of these applications rely on particles with well controlled size, morphology, structure, and surface properties. Chemical precipitation from homogeneous solutions was selected as the synthetic route for the investigations described in this work. Based on the evaluation of key process parameters (temperature, reactant concentrations, reactant addition rate, mixing, etc.) the general formation mechanisms of metallic particles in various selected precipitation systems were investigated and elucidated. Five different systems for preparing particles with controlled size, morphology, structure and surface functionality are discussed. The first system involves the precipitation of Ag nanoparticles with spherical and anisotropic (platy or fiber-like) morphology. It will be shown that the formation of a stable Ag/Daxad complex has a significant impact on the reaction kinetics, and that the chromonic properties of Daxad molecules are responsible for the particle anisotropy. In the second system, Au-Ag core-shell nanoparticles were prepared in aqueous solution by a two-step precipitation process. The optical properties of these particles can be tailored by varying the thickness of the Ag shell. It was also determined that the stability of the bimetallic metallic sols depends on the Cl-ion concentration in solution. The third system discussed deals with preparation by the polyol process of well dispersed Cu nanospheres with high crystallinity and excellent oxidation resistance. We show that the heterogeneous nucleation (seeding) approach has significant merit in controlling particle size and uniformity. The functionalization of Au nanoparticle surfaces with glutathione molecules is discussed in the next section. The

  20. Genomewide Association Study of African Children Identifies Association of SCHIP1 and PDE8A with Facial Size and Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyama, Mange; Kimwaga, Emmanuel; Mathayo, Joshua; Larson, Jacinda R.; Liberton, Denise K.; Lukowiak, Ken; Riccardi, Sheri L.; Li, Mao; Williams, Trevor; Li, Hong; Jones, Kenneth L.; Klein, Ophir D.; Santorico, Stephanie A.; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The human face is a complex assemblage of highly variable yet clearly heritable anatomic structures that together make each of us unique, distinguishable, and recognizable. Relatively little is known about the genetic underpinnings of normal human facial variation. To address this, we carried out a large genomewide association study and two independent replication studies of Bantu African children and adolescents from Mwanza, Tanzania, a region that is both genetically and environmentally relatively homogeneous. We tested for genetic association of facial shape and size phenotypes derived from 3D imaging and automated landmarking of standard facial morphometric points. SNPs within genes SCHIP1 and PDE8A were associated with measures of facial size in both the GWAS and replication cohorts and passed a stringent genomewide significance threshold adjusted for multiple testing of 34 correlated traits. For both SCHIP1 and PDE8A, we demonstrated clear expression in the developing mouse face by both whole-mount in situ hybridization and RNA-seq, supporting their involvement in facial morphogenesis. Ten additional loci demonstrated suggestive association with various measures of facial shape. Our findings, which differ from those in previous studies of European-derived whites, augment understanding of the genetic basis of normal facial development, and provide insights relevant to both human disease and forensics. PMID:27560698

  1. On realistic size equivalence and shape of spheroidal Saharan mineral dust particles applied in solar and thermal radiative transfer calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Otto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Realistic size equivalence and shape of Saharan mineral dust particles are derived from on in-situ particle, lidar and sun photometer measurements during SAMUM-1 in Morocco (19 May 2006, dealing with measured size- and altitude-resolved axis ratio distributions of assumed spheroidal model particles. The data were applied in optical property, radiative effect, forcing and heating effect simulations to quantify the realistic impact of particle non-sphericity. It turned out that volume-to-surface equivalent spheroids with prolate shape are most realistic: particle non-sphericity only slightly affects single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter but may enhance extinction coefficient by up to 10%. At the bottom of the atmosphere (BOA the Saharan mineral dust always leads to a loss of solar radiation, while the sign of the forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA depends on surface albedo: solar cooling/warming over a mean ocean/land surface. In the thermal spectral range the dust inhibits the emission of radiation to space and warms the BOA. The most realistic case of particle non-sphericity causes changes of total (solar plus thermal forcing by 55/5% at the TOA over ocean/land and 15% at the BOA over both land and ocean and enhances total radiative heating within the dust plume by up to 20%. Large dust particles significantly contribute to all the radiative effects reported.

  2. Intraspecific variation in body size and shape in an Andean highland anole species, Anolis ventrimaculatus (Squamata: Dactyloidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L. Calderón-Espinosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Variation in body characteristics related to lizard locomotion has been poorly studied at the intraspecific level in Anolis species. Local adaptation due to habitat heterogeneity has been reported in some island species. However, studies of mainland species are particularly scarce and suggest different patterns: high variability among highland lizards and poorly differentiated populations in one Amazonian species. We characterized inter population variation of body size and shape in the highland Andean Anolis ventrimaculatus, an endemic species from Western Colombia. A total of 15 morphometric variables were measured in specimens from the reptile collection of the Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional, Colombia. The study included individuals from seven different highland localities. We found size and shape sexual dimorphism, both of which varied among localities. Patterns of variation in body proportions among populations were different in both males and females, suggesting that either sexual or natural selective factors are different in each locality and between sexes. Since this species exhibits a fragmented distribution in highlands, genetic divergence may also be a causal factor of the observed variation. Ecological, behavioral, additional morphological as well as phylogenetic data, may help to understand the evolutionary processes behind the geographic patterns found in this species.

  3. Adsorption of volatile organic compounds by metal-organic frameworks MIL-101: influence of molecular size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Sun, Qian; Xue, Feng; Lin, Daohui

    2011-11-15

    Adsorption of gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on metal-organic frameworks MIL-101, a novel porous adsorbent with extremely large Langmuir surface area of 5870 m(2)/g and pore volume of 1.85 cm(3)/g, and the influence of VOC molecular size and shape on adsorption were investigated in this study. We observed that MIL-101 is a potential superior adsorbent for the sorptive removal of VOCs including polar acetone and nonpolar benzene, toluene, ethylbeznene, and xylenes. MIL-101 is of higher adsorption capacities for all selected VOCs than zeolite, activated carbon and other reported adsorbents. Adsorption of VOCs on MIL-101 is captured by a pore filling mechanism, showing the size and shape selectivity of VOC molecules. These prove to be a negative linear relationship between the volume adsorption capacities of VOCs and their molecular cross-sectional area values. Most VOC molecules, such as acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-xylene, enter into MIL-101 pores with the planes having the minimum diameters. However, m-xylene and o-xylene may fill into the pores with the planes having the maximum diameters because of the preferred interaction of MIL-101 with the two methyl groups of adsorbate molecules.

  4. Evaluation of the effect of Uncaria tomentosa extracts on the size and shape of human erythrocytes (in vitro).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bors, Milena; Sicińska, Paulina; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Wieteska, Paulina; Gulewicz, Krzysztof; Bukowska, Bożena

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we continued our investigations concerning the interaction of Uncaria tomentosa extracts with the human erythrocytes. The analysis of the size and shape of the erythrocytes by means of flow cytometry and phase contrast microscopy was performed. We executed our experiments using ethanolic and aqueous extracts from the leaves and bark of U. tomentosa. Disturbances were observed in the size and shape of the erythrocytes incubated with ethanolic and aqueous extracts at the concentrations of 100 μg/mL and 250 μg/mL, respectively. The observed changes were probably related to the entry of polyphenolic compounds contained in U. tomentosa extracts into erythrocyte membrane. Externalization of phosphatidylserine on the erythrocytic surfaces was also noticed during incubation with extracts at concentration of 250 μg/mL. We concluded that all of the extracts examined induced changes in the erythrocyte membrane properties, whereas ethanolic extracts from bark induced the most significant changes. The possible binding of polyphenols to the erythrocyte surface may have accounted for the protective properties of extracts against haemolysis of RBCs, which was observed in our previous study (Bors et al., 2011), but considerable incorporation of polyphenols into cell membranes can result in disturbance of phosphatidylserine transport and changes in erythrocyte shape. Nevertheless the results of the investigations showed that considerable morphological changes appear only as a result of erythrocyte exposure to high concentrations (50 ppm and 100 ppm) of the extracts studied, thus they should not lead to clinical erythrocytic damage if recommended doses of U. tomentosa preparations are administrated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. SERS Properties of Different Sized and Shaped Gold Nanoparticles Biosynthesized under Different Environmental Conditions by Neurospora crassa Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quester, Katrin; Avalos-Borja, Miguel; Vilchis-Nestor, Alfredo Rafael; Camacho-López, Marco Antonio; Castro-Longoria, Ernestina

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a surface-sensitive technique that enhances Raman scattering by molecules adsorbed on rough metal surfaces. It is known that metal nanoparticles, especially gold and silver nanoparticles, exhibit great SERS properties, which make them very attractive for the development of biosensors and biocatalysts. On the other hand, the development of ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanostructures has become the focus of research in several countries, and many microorganisms and plants have already been used to biosynthesize metallic nanostructures. However, the majority of these are pathogenic to plants or humans. Here, we report gold nanoparticles with good SERS properties, biosynthesized by Neurospora crassa extract under different environmental conditions, increasing Raman signals up to 40 times using methylene blue as a target molecule. Incubation of tetrachloroauric acid solution with the fungal extract at 60°C and a pH value of a) 3, b) 5.5, and c) 10 resulted in the formation of gold nanoparticles of a) different shapes like triangles, hexagons, pentagons etc. in a broad size range of about 10-200 nm, b) mostly quasi-spheres with some different shapes in a main size range of 6-23 nm, and c) only quasi-spheres of 3-12 nm. Analyses included TEM, HRTEM, and EDS in order to corroborate the shape and the elemental character of the gold nanoparticles, respectively. The results presented here show that these ‘green’ synthesized gold nanoparticles might have potential applicability in the field of biological sensing. PMID:24130891

  6. Size reduction and radiation pattern shaping of multi-fed DCC slot antennas used in conformal microwave array hyperthermia applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarini, Paolo F; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Martins, Carlos D; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-02-23

    The use of conformal antenna array in the treatment of superficial diseases can significantly increase patient comfort while enhancing the local control of large treatment area with irregular shapes. Originally a regular square multi-fed slot antenna (Dual Concentric Conductor - DCC) was proposed as basic unit cell of the array. The square DCC works well when the outline of the treatment area is rectangular such as in the main chest or back area but is not suitable to outline diseases spreading along the armpit and neck area. In addition as the area of the patch increases, the overall power density decreases affecting the efficiency and thus the ability to deliver the necessary thermal dose with medium power amplifier (antennas is preferable as the disease is more accurately contoured and the lower power requirement for the amplifiers correlates with system reliability, durability, linearity and overall reduced cost. For such reason we developed a set of design rules for multi-fed slot antennas with irregular contours and we implemented a design that reduce the area while increasing the perimeter of the slot, thus increasing the antenna efficiency and the power density. The simulation performed with several commercial packages (Ansoft HFSS, Imst Empire, SemcadX and CST Microwave Studio) show that the size reducing method can be applied to several shapes and for different frequencies. The SAR measurements of several DCCs are performed using an in-house high resolution scanning system with tumor equivalent liquid phantom both at 915 MHz for superficial hyperthermia systems in US) and 433 MHz (Europe). The experimental results are compared with the expected theoretical predictions and both simulated and measured patterns of single antennas of various size and shapes are then summed in various combinations using Matlab to show possible treatment irregular contours of complex diseases. The local control is expected to significantly improve while maintaining the patient

  7. SERS properties of different sized and shaped gold nanoparticles biosynthesized under different environmental conditions by Neurospora crassa extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quester, Katrin; Avalos-Borja, Miguel; Vilchis-Nestor, Alfredo Rafael; Camacho-López, Marco Antonio; Castro-Longoria, Ernestina

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a surface-sensitive technique that enhances Raman scattering by molecules adsorbed on rough metal surfaces. It is known that metal nanoparticles, especially gold and silver nanoparticles, exhibit great SERS properties, which make them very attractive for the development of biosensors and biocatalysts. On the other hand, the development of ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanostructures has become the focus of research in several countries, and many microorganisms and plants have already been used to biosynthesize metallic nanostructures. However, the majority of these are pathogenic to plants or humans. Here, we report gold nanoparticles with good SERS properties, biosynthesized by Neurospora crassa extract under different environmental conditions, increasing Raman signals up to 40 times using methylene blue as a target molecule. Incubation of tetrachloroauric acid solution with the fungal extract at 60°C and a pH value of a) 3, b) 5.5, and c) 10 resulted in the formation of gold nanoparticles of a) different shapes like triangles, hexagons, pentagons etc. in a broad size range of about 10-200 nm, b) mostly quasi-spheres with some different shapes in a main size range of 6-23 nm, and c) only quasi-spheres of 3-12 nm. Analyses included TEM, HRTEM, and EDS in order to corroborate the shape and the elemental character of the gold nanoparticles, respectively. The results presented here show that these 'green' synthesized gold nanoparticles might have potential applicability in the field of biological sensing.

  8. SERS properties of different sized and shaped gold nanoparticles biosynthesized under different environmental conditions by Neurospora crassa extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Quester

    Full Text Available Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS is a surface-sensitive technique that enhances Raman scattering by molecules adsorbed on rough metal surfaces. It is known that metal nanoparticles, especially gold and silver nanoparticles, exhibit great SERS properties, which make them very attractive for the development of biosensors and biocatalysts. On the other hand, the development of ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanostructures has become the focus of research in several countries, and many microorganisms and plants have already been used to biosynthesize metallic nanostructures. However, the majority of these are pathogenic to plants or humans. Here, we report gold nanoparticles with good SERS properties, biosynthesized by Neurospora crassa extract under different environmental conditions, increasing Raman signals up to 40 times using methylene blue as a target molecule. Incubation of tetrachloroauric acid solution with the fungal extract at 60°C and a pH value of a 3, b 5.5, and c 10 resulted in the formation of gold nanoparticles of a different shapes like triangles, hexagons, pentagons etc. in a broad size range of about 10-200 nm, b mostly quasi-spheres with some different shapes in a main size range of 6-23 nm, and c only quasi-spheres of 3-12 nm. Analyses included TEM, HRTEM, and EDS in order to corroborate the shape and the elemental character of the gold nanoparticles, respectively. The results presented here show that these 'green' synthesized gold nanoparticles might have potential applicability in the field of biological sensing.

  9. A molecular dynamics study of void initiation and growth in monocrystalline and nanocrystalline copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traiviratana, Sirirat

    MD simulations in monocrystalline and nanocrystalline copper were carried out with LAMMPS to reveal void growth mechanisms. The specimens were subjected to both tensile uniaxial and hydrostatic strains; the results confirm that the emission of (shear) loops is the primary mechanism of void growth. The expansion of the loops and their cross slip leads to the severely work hardened layer surrounding a growing void. Calculations were carried out on voids with different sizes, and a size dependence of the stress response to emitted dislocations was observed, in disagreement with the Gurson model [1] which is scale independent. The growth of voids simulated by MD is compared with the Cocks-Ashby constitutive model and significant agreement is found. The density of geometrically-necessary dislocations as a function of void size is calculated based on the emission of shear loops and their outward propagation. Calculations were also carried out for a void at the interface between two grains sharing a tilt boundary. The results show similar dislocation behaviors. A code that uses Voronoi tessellation for constructing nanocrystalline structures was developed and used to prepare the structures for simulations. Nanocrystal simulations reveal grain sliding and grain rotation as the nanocrystal deformed. Voids were nucleated at grain junctions and grew to coalescence as dislocations accommodated the material transfer. A code that can be used during post-processing to extract useful dislocation information from MD simulation data was partially developed and proved the feasibility of automatically analyzing dislocations.

  10. The star formation activity in cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Ricciardelli, Elena; Varela, Jesus; Quilis, Vicent

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of cosmic voids identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we study the star formation activity of void galaxies. The properties of galaxies living in voids are compared with those of galaxies living in the void shells and with a control sample, representing the general galaxy population. Void galaxies appear to form stars more efficiently than shell galaxies and the control sample. This result can not be interpreted as a consequence of the bias towards low masses in underdense regions, as void galaxy subsamples with the same mass distribution as the control sample also show statistically different specific star formation rates. This highlights the fact that galaxy evolution in voids is slower with respect to the evolution of the general population. Nevertheless, when only the star forming galaxies are considered, we find that the star formation rate is insensitive to the environment, as the main sequence is remarkably constant in the three samples under consideration. This fact...

  11. Correlation of Shape and Size of Sella Turcica With the Type of Facial Skeletal Class in an Iranian Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valizadeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background In orthodontic science, diagnosis of facial skeletal type (class I, II, and III is essential to make the correct treatment plan that is usually expensive and complicated. Sometimes results from analysis of lateral cephalometry radiographies are not enough to discriminate facial skeletal types. In this situation, knowledge about the relationship between the shape and size of the sella turcica and the type of facial skeletal class can help to make a more definitive decision for treatment plan. Objectives The present study was designed to investigate this relationship in patients referred to a dental school in Iran. Patients and Methods In this descriptive-analytical study, cephalometric radiographies of 90 candidates for orthodontic treatment (44 females and 46 males with an age range of 14 - 26 years and equal distribution in terms of class I, class II, and class III facial skeletal classification were selected. The shape, length, diameter, and depth of the sella turcica were determined on the radiographs. Linear dimensions were assessed by one-way analysis of variance while the correlation between the dimensions and age was investigated using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results Sella turcica had normal morphology in 24.4% of the patients while irregularity (notching in the posterior part of the dorsum sella was observed in 15.6%, double contour of sellar floor in 5.6%, sella turcica bridge in 23.3%, oblique anterior wall in 20% and pyramidal shape of the dorsum sella in 11.1% of the subjects. In total, 46.7% of class I patients had a normal shape of sella turcica, 23.3% of class II patients had an oblique anterior wall and a pyramidal shape of the dorsum sella, and 43.3% of class III individuals had sella turcica bridge (the greatest values. Sella turcica length was significantly greater in class III patients compared to class II and class I (P < 0.0001. However, depth and diameter of sella turcica were similar in class I

  12. Heterogeneity shapes invasion: host size and environment influence susceptibility to a nonnative pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Matthew J; Jules, Erik S

    2006-02-01

    Theoretical study of invasion dynamics has suggested that spatial heterogeneity should strongly influence the rate and extent of spreading organisms. However, empirical support for this prediction is scant, and the importance of understanding heterogeneity for real-world systems has remained ambiguous. This study quantified the influence of host and environmental heterogeneity on the dynamics of a 19-year disease invasion by the exotic and fatal pathogen, Phytophthora lateralis, within a stream population of its host tree, Port Orford cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana). Using dendrochronology, we reconstructed the invasion history along a 1350-m length of infected stream, which serves as the only route of pathogen dispersal. Contrary to theoretical predictions, the temporal progression of the disease invasion was not related to a host's downstream spatial position, but instead was determined by two sources of heterogeneity: host size and proximity to the stream channel. These sources of heterogeneity influenced both the epidemic and endemic dynamics of this pathogen invasion. This analysis provides empirical support for the influence of heterogeneity on the invasion dynamics of a commercially important forest pathogen and highlights the need to incorporate such natural variability into both invasion theory and methods aimed at controlling future spread.

  13. Evaluation of shape and size effects on optical properties of ZnO pigment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiomarsipour, Narges, E-mail: na.kiomarsipour@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Shahin Shahr P.O. Box 83145/115, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shoja Razavi, Reza [Department of Materials Engineering, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Shahin Shahr P.O. Box 83145/115, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghani, Kamal [Department of Chemistry, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Shahin Shahr P.O. Box 83145/115, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kioumarsipour, Marjan [Department of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    The pigment with optimized morphology would attain maximum diffuse solar reflectance at a lower film thickness and reduce the pigment volume concentration required. This factor would contribute to a reduction in overall weight and possibly extend the durability of the system to longer time scales, specially in space assets. In the present work, five different morphologies of ZnO pigment were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The ZnO pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and N{sub 2} adsorption (BET). The optical property of the ZnO pigments was investigated by UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer. The results indicated that the optical properties of ZnO powders were strongly affected by the particle size and morphology. The nanorods and microrods ZnO structures showed the minimum spectral reflectance in visible and near infrared regions, whereas the novel nanoparticle-decorated ZnO pigment revealed the maximum spectral reflectance in the same regions. The reflectance spectra of scale-like and submicrorods ZnO were in the middle of the others. The higher surface roughness led to higher light scattering in nanoparticle-decorated ZnO pigment and multiple-scattering in them. These results proved that a significant improvement in the scattering efficiency of ZnO pigment can be realized by utilizing an optimized nanoparticle-decorated pigment.

  14. Sizes and shapes of young star cluster light profiles in M83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryon, J. E.; Bastian, N.; Adamo, A.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Gallagher, J. S.; Larsen, S.; Hollyhead, K.; Silva-Villa, E.; Smith, L. J.

    2015-09-01

    We measure the radii and two-dimensional light profiles of a large sample of young, massive star clusters in M83 using archival HST/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of seven adjacent fields. We use GALFIT to fit the two-dimensional light profiles of the clusters, from which we find effective (half-light) radii, core radii, and slopes of the power-law (EFF) profile (η). We find lognormal distributions of effective radius and core radius, with medians of ≈2.5 and ≈1.3 pc, respectively. Our results provide strong evidence for a characteristic size of young, massive clusters. The average effective radius and core radius increase somewhat with cluster age. Little to no change in effective radius is observed with increasing galactocentric distance, except perhaps for clusters younger than 100 Myr. We find a shallow correlation between effective radius and mass for the full cluster sample, but a stronger correlation is present for clusters 200-300 Myr in age. Finally, the majority of the clusters are best fit by an EFF model with index η ≲ 3.0. There is no strong evidence for change in η with cluster age, mass, or galactocentric distance. Our results suggest that clusters emerge from early evolution with similar radii and are not strongly affected by the tidal field of M83. Mass-loss due to stellar evolution and/or giant molecular cloud interactions appear to dominate cluster expansion in the age range we study.

  15. Adhesion mechanisms on solar glass: Effects of relative humidity, surface roughness, and particle shape and size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, Helio R.; Jiang, Cun -Sheng; To, Bobby; Perkins, Craig; Muller, Mattthew; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.; Simpson, Lin J.

    2017-12-01

    To better understand and quantify soiling rates on solar panels, we are investigating the adhesion mechanisms between dust particles and solar glass. In this work, we report on two of the fundamental adhesion mechanisms: van der Waals and capillary adhesion forces. The adhesion was determined using force versus distance (F-z) measurements performed with an atomic force microscope (AFM). To emulate dust interacting with the front surface of a solar panel, we measured how oxidized AFM tips, SiO2 glass spheres, and real dust particles adhered to actual solar glass. The van der Waals forces were evaluated by measurements performed with zero relative humidity in a glove box, and the capillary forces were measured in a stable environment created inside the AFM enclosure with relative humidity values ranging from 18% to 80%. To simulate topographic features of the solar panels caused by factors such as cleaning and abrasion, we induced different degrees of surface roughness in the solar glass. We were able to 1) identify and quantify both the van der Waals and capillary forces, 2) establish the effects of surface roughness, relative humidity, and particle size on the adhesion mechanisms, and 3) compare adhesion forces between well-controlled particles (AFM tips and glass spheres) and real dust particles.

  16. Fluctuating fitness shapes the clone-size distribution of immune repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desponds, Jonathan; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M

    2016-01-12

    The adaptive immune system relies on the diversity of receptors expressed on the surface of B- and T cells to protect the organism from a vast amount of pathogenic threats. The proliferation and degradation dynamics of different cell types (B cells, T cells, naive, memory) is governed by a variety of antigenic and environmental signals, yet the observed clone sizes follow a universal power-law distribution. Guided by this reproducibility we propose effective models of somatic evolution where cell fate depends on an effective fitness. This fitness is determined by growth factors acting either on clones of cells with the same receptor responding to specific antigens, or directly on single cells with no regard for clones. We identify fluctuations in the fitness acting specifically on clones as the essential ingredient leading to the observed distributions. Combining our models with experiments, we characterize the scale of fluctuations in antigenic environments and we provide tools to identify the relevant growth signals in different tissues and organisms. Our results generalize to any evolving population in a fluctuating environment.

  17. Biological responses according to the shape and size of carbon nanotubes in BEAS-2B and MESO-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniu, Hisao; Saito, Naoto; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Usui, Yuki; Maruyama, Kayo; Takanashi, Seiji; Aoki, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Nomura, Hiroki; Tanaka, Manabu; Okamoto, Masanori; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of the shape and size of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and cup-stacked carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs) on biological responses in vitro. Three types of MWCNTs - VGCF(®)-X, VGCF(®)-S, and VGCF(®) (vapor grown carbon fibers; with diameters of 15, 80, and 150 nm, respectively) - and three CSCNTs of different lengths (CS-L, 20-80 μm; CS-S, 0.5-20 μm; and CS-M, of intermediate length) were tested. Human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and malignant pleural mesothelioma cells were exposed to the CNTs (1-50 μg/mL), and cell viability, permeability, uptake, total reactive oxygen species/superoxide production, and intracellular acidity were measured. CSCNTs were less toxic than MWCNTs in both cell types over a 24-hour exposure period. The cytotoxicity of endocytosed MWCNTs varied according to cell type/size, while that of CSCNTs depended on tube length irrespective of cell type. CNT diameter and length influenced cell aggregation and injury extent. Intracellular acidity increased independently of lysosomal activity along with the number of vacuoles in BEAS-2B cells exposed for 24 hours to either CNT (concentration, 10 μg/mL). However, total reactive oxygen species/superoxide generation did not contribute to cytotoxicity. The results demonstrate that CSCNTs could be suitable for biological applications and that CNT shape and size can have differential effects depending on cell type, which can be exploited in the development of highly specialized, biocompatible CNTs.

  18. Fire affects size and shape of Fabiana imbricata Shurblands in northwestern Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddi, Facundo; Ghermandi, Luciana

    2010-05-01

    Fire is a major environmental ecological agent acting in the landscape configuration and a factor that models vegetation in Mediterranean environments. Fire impacts differently in the landscape due to the intrinsic heterogeneity of the environments and the characteristics associated with each fire event. After fire, density of patches may be increased and the size of them may be reduced because fire generates areas of different successional stages. Landscape ecology seems to be the ideal theoretical approach to study the fire impact in fire prone environments. Landscape ecology has been greatly favoured by a significant progress in the last years of geographic information technologies (GIT) (remote sensing, GIS, GPS). The study area of this work is the San Ramon ranch (22,000 ha) located in Northwester Patagonia in the ecotone between the sub Antarctic forest in the West and the Patagonian steppe in the East. We studied sectors of the ranch with different fire recurrence in the last 40 years and we mapped Fabiana imbricata shrubland with GPS. This specie is a native shrub characteristic of Northwester Patagonia grasslands and its dynamic is not very known. Shrublands compete for the space with palatable grasses that are used for forage and livestock production, the main economic resource of the region. We analysed the mapped patches with GIS software, and we assessed landscape metrics to determine differences between sites with different fire recurrence. In the future we foresee the integrated use of satellite imagery with different resolution to add to GIS other important spatial variables (topography, hydrography, aspect, soil) to develop models that can explain landscape metrics, spatial configuration and the potential shrub invasion in the grassland.

  19. Asteroid 1566 Icarus’s Size, Shape, Orbit, and Yarkovsky Drift from Radar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Adam H.; Margot, Jean-Luc; Verma, Ashok K.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Naidu, Shantanu P.; Brozovic, Marina.; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2017-03-01

    Near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 1566 Icarus (a=1.08 {au}, e = 0.83, i=22\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 8) made a close approach to Earth in 2015 June at 22 lunar distances (LD). Its detection during the 1968 approach (16 LD) was the first in the history of asteroid radar astronomy. A subsequent approach in 1996 (40 LD) did not yield radar images. We describe analyses of our 2015 radar observations of Icarus obtained at the Arecibo Observatory and the DSS-14 antenna at Goldstone. These data show that the asteroid is a moderately flattened spheroid with an equivalent diameter of 1.44 km with 18% uncertainties, resolving long-standing questions about the asteroid size. We also solve for Icarus’s spin-axis orientation (λ =270^\\circ +/- 10^\\circ ,β =-81^\\circ +/- 10^\\circ ), which is not consistent with the estimates based on the 1968 light-curve observations. Icarus has a strongly specular scattering behavior, among the highest ever measured in asteroid radar observations, and a radar albedo of ˜2%, among the lowest ever measured in asteroid radar observations. The low cross section suggests a high-porosity surface, presumably related to Icarus’s cratering, spin, and thermal histories. Finally, we present the first use of our orbit-determination software for the generation of observational ephemerides, and we demonstrate its ability to determine subtle perturbations on NEA orbits by measuring Icarus’s orbit-averaged drift in semimajor axis ((-4.62+/- 0.48)× {10}-4 au My-1, or ˜60 m per revolution). Our Yarkovsky rate measurement resolves a discrepancy between two published rates that did not include the 2015 radar astrometry.

  20. The effect of voids on the hardening of body-centered cubic Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Ryosuke; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical properties of metals are affected by various types of defects. Hardening is usually described through the interaction between dislocations and obstacles, in the so-called line tension theory. The strength factor in the line tension theory represents the resistance of a defect against the dislocation motion. In order to understand hardening from the viewpoint of the microstructure, an accurate determination of the strength factor of different types of defects is essential. In the present study, the strength factor of voids in body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe was investigated by two different approaches: one based on the Orowan equation to link the measured hardness with the average size and density of voids, and the other involving direct observation of the interaction between dislocations and voids by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The strength factor of voids induced by ion irradiation estimated by the Orowan equation was 0.6, whereas the strength factor estimated by the direct TEM approach was 0.8. The difference in the strength factors measured by the two approaches is due to the positional relationship between dislocations and voids: the central region of a void is stronger than the tip. Moreover, the gliding plane and the direction of dislocation may also affect the strength factor of voids. This study determined the strength factor of voids in BCC Fe accurately, and suggested that the contribution of voids to the irradiation hardening is larger than that of dislocation loops and Cu-rich precipitates.

  1. Synthesis of submicron-sized peanut-shaped poly(methyl methacrylate)/polystyrene particles by seeded soap-free emulsion polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Shi; Tao Wang; Yan Tao Tang; Li Min Zhou; Shin Ichi Kuroda

    2011-01-01

    Submicron-sized peanut-shaped poly(methyl methacrylate)/polystyrene (PMMA/PS) particles were successfully synthesized by seeded soap-free emulsion polymerization of styrene on the spherical crosslinked PMMA seed particles. The obtained peanut-shaped particles showed a novel internal morphology: PS phase formed one domain which linked to the other domain having PMMA core encased by PS shell.

  2. SU-D-201-04: Study On the Impact of Tumor Shape and Size On Drug Delivery to Pancreatic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, M [ohns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, and KNT university, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazmara, H [KNT university, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sefidgar, M [IKI University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Subramaniam, R; Rahmim, A [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Drug delivery to solid tumors can be expressed physically using transport phenomena such as convection and diffusion for the drug of interest within extracellular matrices. We aimed to carefully model these phenomena, and to investigate the effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors in the pancreas. Methods: In this study, multiple tumor geometries as obtained from clinical PET/CT images were considered. An advanced numerical method was used to simultaneously solve fluid flow and solute transport equations. Data from n=45 pancreatic cancer patients with non-resectable locoregional disease were analyzed, and geometrical information from the tumors including size, shape, and aspect ratios were classified. To investigate effect of tumor shape, tumors with similar size but different shapes were selected and analyzed. Moreover, to investigate effect of tumor size, tumors with similar shapes but different sizes, ranging from 1 to 77 cm{sup 3}, were selected and analyzed. A hypothetical tumor similar to one of the analyzed tumors, but scaled to redu