WorldWideScience

Sample records for void reactivity response

  1. Responsibility voids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hees, M.V.B.P.M; Braham, Matthew

    We present evidence for the existence of 'responsibility voids' in committee decision-making, that is, the existence of situations where no member of a committee can individually be held morally responsible for the outcome. We analyse three types of reasons (causal, normative and epistemic) for the

  2. Void Reactivity Coefficient Analysis during Void Fraction Changes in Innovative BWR Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Slavickas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the void reactivity variation in innovative BWR fuel assemblies is presented in this paper. The innovative assemblies are loaded with high enrichment fresh UO2 and MOX fuels. UO2 fuel enrichment is increased above existing design limitations for LWR fuels (>5%. MOX fuel enrichment with fissile Pu content is established to achieve the same burnup level as that of high enrichment UO2 fuel. For the numerical analysis, the TRITON functional module of SCALE 6.1 code with the 238-group ENDF/B-VI cross section data library was applied. The investigation of the void reactivity feedback is performed in the entire 0–100% void fraction range. Higher values of void reactivity coefficient for assembly loaded with MOX fuel are found in comparison with values for assembly loaded with UO2 fuel. Moreover, coefficient values for MOX fuel are positive over 75% void fraction. The variation of the void reactivity coefficient is explained by the results of the decomposition analysis based on four-factor formula and neutron absorption reactions for main isotopes. Additionally, the impact of the moderation enhancement on the void reactivity coefficient was investigated for the innovative assembly with MOX fuel.

  3. Measurement and Analysis of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in CEFR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The sodium void reactivity effect (SVRE) is one of the important parameters in the design and safety analysis of sodium-cooled fast reactors. In some serious accident conditions, for example the total instantaneous blockage (TIB) accident,

  4. Dilational Response of Voided Polycrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Daniel J.; Cazacu, Oana; Knezevic, Marko

    2017-02-01

    Finite-element (FE) cell model computations have been used to gain insights into the ductile response of porous polycrystals. Generally, the behavior of the matrix is described by a J 2-plasticity model. In this article, we present a new computational approach to FE cell models for porous polycrystals deforming by slip based on crystal plasticity. The cell provides the homogenized dilational response, where the constitutive response of every integration point is based on a single-crystal visco-plasticity law. The calculations are performed for a body-centered cubic polycrystal with random texture. Axisymmetric tensile and compressive loadings are imposed corresponding to the fixed values of the stress triaxiality and to two possible values of the Lode parameter. The resulting numerical yield points are compared with those obtained using a J 2-FE cell and an analytical model. The predictions confirm the combined effects of the mean stress and third-invariant on yielding recently revealed by the analytical model.

  5. Experimental study of the effect of void reactivity feedback on the behavior of the scaled model boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, Khaled

    A Scaled Model Boiling Water Reactor (SMBWR) model uses low pressure (i.e., 0.095 MPa) water in a heated channel 0.5 meters in length with four electrically heated fuel simulator rods. The axial void profile in the channel is measured using conductivity probes and the power to the heaters is modulated according to the void fraction to simulate void reactivity feedback. The steam from the heated channel is passed through a valve that reduces the pressure to 0.012 MPa where the steam is condensed in conditions similar to those found in a conventional BWR condenser. The feedwater flow rate, heater power, and instrumentation in the facility are controlled and monitored through a Quadra 950 computer running LabVIEW software. The void fraction signals are analyzed to identify the different flow regimes and determine the vapor velocity in the SMBWR channel using features of the probability density function and power spectral density. The void coefficient of reactivity is modified in the BWR scale model through the LabVIEW interface and the effect on the behavior of the channel is directly observed. The system response is reported for abrupt stepwise pressure changes and abrupt stepwise power changes. The response is typical of that expected for a BWR. The void reactivity feedback effect is also examined by analyzing the frequency response of the channel void fraction at steady state.

  6. Decomposition Analysis of Void Reactivity Coefficient for Innovative and Modified BWR Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Slavickas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The decomposition analysis of void reactivity coefficient for innovative BWR assemblies is presented in this paper. The innovative assemblies were loaded with high enrichment UO2 and MOX fuels. Additionally the impact of the moderation enhancement on the void reactivity coefficient through a full fuel burnup discharge interval was investigated for the innovative assembly with MOX fuel. For the numerical analysis the TRITON functional module of SCALE code with ENDF/B-VI cross section library was applied. The obtained results indicate the influence of the most important isotopes to the void reactivity behaviour over a fuel burnup interval of 70 GWd/t for both UO2 and MOX fuels. From the neutronic safety concern positive void reactivity coefficient values are observed for MOX fuel at the beginning of the fuel irradiation cycle. For extra-moderated assembly designs, implementing 8 and 12 water holes, the neutron spectrum softening is achieved and consequently the lower void reactivity values. Variations in void reactivity coefficient values are explained by fulfilled decomposition analysis based on neutrons absorption reactions for separate isotopes.

  7. Conclusive evidence of abrupt coagulation inside the void during cyclic nanoparticle formation in reactive plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Nijdam, S.; Beckers, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this letter, we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results that confirm in a direct way our earlier explanation of an abrupt coagulation event as the cause for the void hiccup. In a recent paper, we reported on the fast and interrupted expansion of voids in a reactive dusty argon-acetylene plasma. The voids appeared one after the other, each showing a peculiar, though reproducible, behavior of successive periods of fast expansion, abrupt contraction, and continued expansion. The abrupt contraction was termed "hiccup" and was related to collective coagulation of a new generation of nanoparticles growing in the void using relatively indirect methods: electron density measurements and optical emission spectroscopy. In this letter, we present conclusive evidence using SEM of particles collected at different moments in time spanning several growth cycles, which enables us to follow the nanoparticle formation process in great detail.

  8. Study on Transient Void Behavior During Reactivity Initiated Accidents Under Low Pressure Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satou, Akira; Maruyama, Yu; Asaka, Hideaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    Series of out-of-pile experiments to obtain the knowledge on the transient void behavior during reactivity initiated accidents are in progress at JAEA. In the present series of experiments, the transient void behavior in a test section of 2 x 2 bundle geometry under atmospheric pressure condition was measured using an impedance technique. The measuring areas and the arrangement of electrodes for the impedance technique were defined on the basis of numerical analyses and scaled model experiments. The comparison was made between the impedance and differential pressure techniques for steady boiling experiments to estimate the accuracy of the impedance technique. The impedance technique showed a good agreement with the void fraction estimated from the differential pressure. The transient void behavior in the bundle geometry was measured using the impedance technique. The void fraction distribution in the bundle cross-section could be quantitatively obtained by the impedance technique. It could be properly confirmed that the transient void behavior depended on both the subcooling of inlet water and the heat generation rate of simulated fuel rods.

  9. An evaluation of sodium void reactivity for metal fuel FBR cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Hirokazu; Yokoo, Takeshi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab

    2000-07-01

    The sodium void reactivity in metal fuel FBR cores has been evaluated by a detailed method which takes into account the neutron streaming effects in the fuel subassemblies and the neutron transport corrections in whole-core systems. The neutron streaming effects caused by the heterogeneity of the fuel element structure or the coolant paths were evaluated on the basis of Benoist's anisotropic diffusion coefficient. We clarified that the sodium void reactivity is worth less than $8, even in the 1,000 MWe or 1,500 MWe-class large-scale cores. Further, we also found that, in the case of 1,500 MWe metal fuel FBRs recycling a few percent of minor actinide elements (MA), the sodium void reactivity does not exceed $10 with a suitable design that eliminates the upper and lower axial blankets. These results show that these metal fuel FBRs satisfy the safety criterion ($8-10) for avoiding the prompt criticality in the HCDA events. However, MA enrichment should be controlled to less than about two per cent, when the axial blanket is loaded to gain higher breeding performance. (author)

  10. Nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty assessment of sodium voiding reactivity coefficients of an ASTRID-like sodium fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuria, García-Herranz; Anne-Laurène, Panadero; Ana, Martinez; Sandro, Pelloni; Konstantin, Mikityuk; Andreas, Pautz

    2017-09-01

    The EU 7th Framework ESNII+ project was launched in 2013 with the strategic orientation of preparing ESNII for Horizon 2020. ESNII stands for the European Industrial Initiative on Nuclear Energy, created by the European Commission in 2010 to promote the development of a new generation of nuclear systems in order to provide a sustainable solution to cope with Europe's growing energy needs while meeting the greenhouse gas emissions reduction target. The designs selected by the ESNII+ project are technological demonstrators of Generation-IV systems. The prototype for the sodium cooled fast reactor technology is ASTRID (standing for Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration), which detailed design phase is foreseen to be initiated in 2019. The ASTRID core has a peculiar design which was created in order to tackle the main neutronic challenge of sodium cooled fast reactors: the inherent overall positive reactivity feedback in case of sodium voiding occurring in the core. Indeed, the core is claimed by its designers to have an overall negative reactivity feedback in this scenario. This feature was demonstrated for an ASTRID-like core within the ESNII+ framework studies performed by nine European institutions. In order to shift the paradigm towards best-estimate plus uncertainties, the nuclear data sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation on reactivity coefficients has to be carried out. The goal of this work is to assess the impact of nuclear data uncertainties on sodium voiding reactivity feedback coefficients in order to get a more complete picture of the actual safety margins of the ASTRID low void-core design. The nuclear data sensitivity analysis is performed in parallel using SCALE TSUNAMI-3D and the newly developed GPT SERPENT 2 module. A comparison is carried out between the two methodologies. Uncertainty on the sodium reactivity feedbacks is then calculated using TSAR module of SCALE and the necessary safety margins conclusions

  11. Effect of nonlinear void reactivity on bifurcation characteristics of a lumped-parameter model of a BWR: A study relevant to RBMK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Dinkar, E-mail: dinkar@iitk.ac.in [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Program, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India); Kalra, Manjeet Singh, E-mail: drmanjeet.singh@dituniversity.edu.in [DIT University, Dehradun 248 009 (India); Wahi, Pankaj, E-mail: wahi@iitk.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A simplified model with nonlinear void reactivity feedback is studied. • Method of multiple scales for nonlinear analysis and oscillation characteristics. • Second order void reactivity dominates in determining system dynamics. • Opposing signs of linear and quadratic void reactivity enhances global safety. - Abstract: In the present work, the effect of nonlinear void reactivity on the dynamics of a simplified lumped-parameter model for a boiling water reactor (BWR) is investigated. A mathematical model of five differential equations comprising of neutronics and thermal-hydraulics encompassing the nonlinearities associated with both the reactivity feedbacks and the heat transfer process has been used. To this end, we have considered parameters relevant to RBMK for which the void reactivity is known to be nonlinear. A nonlinear analysis of the model exploiting the method of multiple time scales (MMTS) predicts the occurrence of the two types of Hopf bifurcation, namely subcritical and supercritical, leading to the evolution of limit cycles for a range of parameters. Numerical simulations have been performed to verify the analytical results obtained by MMTS. The study shows that the nonlinear reactivity has a significant influence on the system dynamics. A parametric study with varying nominal reactor power and operating conditions in coolant channel has also been performed which shows the effect of change in concerned parameter on the boundary between regions of sub- and super-critical Hopf bifurcations in the space constituted by the two coefficients of reactivities viz. the void and the Doppler coefficient of reactivities. In particular, we find that introduction of a negative quadratic term in the void reactivity feedback significantly increases the supercritical region and dominates in determining the system dynamics.

  12. Micron-scale Reactive Atomistic Simulation of Void Collapse and Hotspot Growth in PETN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aidan; Shan, Tzu-Ray; Wixom, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    Material defects and other heterogeneities such as dislocations, micro-porosity, and grain boundaries play key roles in the shock-induced initiation of detonation in energetic materials. We performed non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effect of nanoscale voids on hotspot growth and initiation in micron-scale pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) crystals under weak shock loading (Up = 1.25 km/s; Us = 4.5 km/s). We used the ReaxFF potential implemented in LAMMPS. We built a pseudo-2D PETN crystal with dimensions 0.3 μm × 0.22 μm × 1.3 nm containing a 20 nm cylindrical void. Once the initial shockwave traversed the entire sample, the shock-front absorbing boundary condition was applied, allowing the simulation to continue beyond 1 nanosecond. Results show an exponentially increasing hotspot growth rate. The hotspot morphology is initially symmetric about the void axis, but strong asymmetry develops at later times, due to strong coupling between exothermic chemistry, temperature, and divergent secondary shockwaves emanating from the collapsing void. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly design with graphite-moderating rods to reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Hyuck; Cho, Nam Zin, E-mail: nzcho@kaist.ac.kr; Park, Hae Min; Jeong, Yong Hoon, E-mail: jeongyh@kaist.ac.kr

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The graphite rod-inserted SFR fuel assembly is proposed to achieve low sodium void reactivity. • The neutronics/thermal-hydraulics analyses are performed for the proposed SFR cores. • The sodium void reactivity is improved about 960–1030 pcm compared to reference design. - Abstract: The concept of a graphite-moderating rod-inserted sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly is proposed in this study to achieve a low sodium void reactivity coefficient. Using this concept, two types of SFR cores are analyzed; the proposed SFR type 1 core has new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions while the proposed SFR type 2 core has a B{sub 4}C absorber sandwich in the middle of the active core region as well as new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions. For the proposed SFR core designs, neutronics and thermal-hydraulic analyses are performed using the DIF3D, REBUS3, and the MATRA-LMR codes. In the neutronics analysis, the sodium void reactivity coefficient is obtained in various void situations. The two types of proposed core designs reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient by about 960–1030 pcm compared to the reference design. However, the TRU enrichment for the proposed SFR core designs is increased. In the thermal hydraulic analysis, the temperature distributions are calculated for the two types of proposed core designs and the mass flow rate is optimized to satisfy the design constraints for the highest power generating assembly. The results of this study indicate that the proposed SFR assembly design concept, which adopts graphite-moderating rods which are inserted into the fuel assembly, can feasibly minimize the sodium void reactivity coefficient. Single TRU enrichment and an identical fuel slug diameter throughout the SFR core are also achieved because the radial power peak can be flattened by varying the number of moderating rods in each core region.

  14. Influence of the void fraction in the linear reactivity model; Influencia de la fraccion de vacios en el modelo de reactividad lineal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, J.A.; Ramirez, J.R.; Alonso, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jacm@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    The linear reactivity model allows the multicycle analysis in pressurized water reactors in a simple and quick way. In the case of the Boiling water reactors the void fraction it varies axially from 0% of voids in the inferior part of the fuel assemblies until approximately 70% of voids to the exit of the same ones. Due to this it is very important the determination of the average void fraction during different stages of the reactor operation to predict the burnt one appropriately of the same ones to inclination of the pattern of linear reactivity. In this work a pursuit is made of the profile of power for different steps of burnt of a typical operation cycle of a Boiling water reactor. Starting from these profiles it builds an algorithm that allows to determine the voids profile and this way to obtain the average value of the same one. The results are compared against those reported by the CM-PRESTO code that uses another method to carry out this calculation. Finally, the range in which is the average value of the void fraction during a typical cycle is determined and an estimate of the impact that it would have the use of this value in the prediction of the reactivity produced by the fuel assemblies is made. (Author)

  15. Performance of Trasuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Interim Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Pope; Brian Boer; Gilles Youinou; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-03-01

    The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranice (TRU) in light water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles would be pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code in order assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells containing typical UO2 and MOX fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into a pin without significant quantities of uranium challenges the design from the standpoint of several key reactivity parameters, particularly void reactivity, and to some degree, the Doppler coefficient. These unit cells, while providing an indication of how a whole core of similar fuel would behave, also provide information of how individual pins of TRU-only FCM fuel would influence the reactivity behavior of a heterogeneous assembly. If these FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly with LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance of the TRU-only FCM fuel pins may be preserved. A configuration such as this would be similar to CONFU assemblies analyzed in previous studies. Analogous to the plutonium content limits imposed on MOX fuel, some amount of TRU-only FCM pins in an otherwise-uranium fuel assembly may give acceptable reactivity

  16. Development of analytical code for core disruptive accident of metallic fuel core and evaluation of upper limitation of coolant void reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Nobuyuki [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab

    2001-06-01

    In the event of HCDA (Hypothetical Core Damage Accident) the safety of the metallic core must be ensured. Coolant void reactivity, which produces a positive reactivity effect, must be restrained to exclude 'energetic sequence' (uncontrollable power generation). As this reactivity and the core performance are in a state of confrontation, an upper limit must be determined through safety analyses. The larger the coolant void reactivity becomes, the more the core performance improves. A core dynamics analysis code named CANIS has been developed to analysis metallic fuel properties, irradiation behavior, and transient behavior in the initiating phase of HCDA. ULOF (Unprotected Loss Of Flow) events, which are considered major HCDA initiators, are analyzed with various parameters of cladding failure conditions and molten fuel dispersion velocities. The results indicate, the cladding failure condition is the most sensitive safety parameter. The coolant void reactivity of 12$ is acceptable in the condition that cladding fails at 1,000 degC. And the upper value is limited to 8$ for the conservative condition of a 1,200 degC failure criteria. (author)

  17. Void Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Nelson D.; Paz, Dante; Lares, Marcelo; Ceccarelli, Laura; Lambas, Diego Garcí A.; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Li, Baojiu

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic voids are becoming key players in testing the physics of our Universe.Here we concentrate on the abundances and the dynamics of voids as these are among the best candidatesto provide information on cosmological parameters. Cai, Padilla & Li (2014)use the abundance of voids to tell apart Hu & Sawicki f(R) models from General Relativity. An interestingresult is that even though, as expected, voids in the dark matter field are emptier in f(R) gravity due to the fifth force expellingaway from the void centres, this result is reversed when haloes are used to find voids. The abundance of voids in this casebecomes even lower in f(R) compared to GR for large voids. Still, the differences are significant and thisprovides a way to tell apart these models. The velocity field differences between f(R) and GR, on the other hand, arethe same for halo voids and for dark matter voids.Paz et al. (2013), concentrate on the velocity profiles around voids. First they show the necessityof four parameters to describe the density profiles around voids given two distinct voidpopulations, voids-in-voids and voids-in-clouds. This profile is used to predict peculiar velocities around voids,and the combination of the latter with void density profiles allows the construction of modelvoid-galaxy cross-correlation functions with redshift space distortions. When these modelsare tuned to fit the measured correlation functions for voids and galaxies in the SloanDigital Sky Survey, small voids are found to be of the void-in-cloud type, whereas largerones are consistent with being void-in-void. This is a novel result that is obtaineddirectly from redshift space data around voids. These profiles can be used toremove systematics on void-galaxy Alcock-Pacinsky tests coming from redshift-space distortions.

  18. Development of Sirius facility that simulates void-reactivity feedback, and regional and core-wide stability estimation of natural circulation BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuya, M.; Inada, F.; Yasuo, A. [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., Central Research Institute (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The SIRIUS facility was designed and constructed for highly accurate simulation of core-wide and regional instabilities of the BWR. A real-time simulation was performed in the digital controller for modal point kinetics of reactor neutronics and fuel-rod conduction on the basis of measured void fractions in reactor core sections of the thermal-hydraulic loop. Stability experiments were conducted for a wide range of fluid conditions, power distributions, and fuel rod thermal conductivity time constants, including the normal operating conditions of a typical natural circulation BWR. The results showed that there is a sufficiently wide stability margin under normal operating conditions, even when void-reactivity feedback is taken into account. (author)

  19. Cure Cycle Design Methodology for Fabricating Reactive Resin Matrix Fiber Reinforced Composites: A Protocol for Producing Void-free Quality Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    For the fabrication of resin matrix fiber reinforced composite laminates, a workable cure cycle (i.e., temperature and pressure profiles as a function of processing time) is needed and is critical for achieving void-free laminate consolidation. Design of such a cure cycle is not trivial, especially when dealing with reactive matrix resins. An empirical "trial and error" approach has been used as common practice in the composite industry. Such an approach is not only costly, but also ineffective at establishing the optimal processing conditions for a specific resin/fiber composite system. In this report, a rational "processing science" based approach is established, and a universal cure cycle design protocol is proposed. Following this protocol, a workable and optimal cure cycle can be readily and rationally designed for most reactive resin systems in a cost effective way. This design protocol has been validated through experimental studies of several reactive polyimide composites for a wide spectrum of usage that has been documented in the previous publications.

  20. Dynamic Response Analysis of an Asymmetric Coupled Vehicle-Track System Generated by Voided Elastic Two-Block Sleeper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxing He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on vehicle-track coupled dynamic theory, a three-dimensional asymmetric vehicle-track coupling vibration model is developed to investigate the effect of voided elastic two-block sleepers on vehicle and track system dynamic responses. For the vehicle system, one car body, two frames, and four wheel sets are assumed to be rigid, with 35 degrees of freedom (DOF. For the track system, the rails and the concrete two-block sleepers are the main vibration components. The rails are modelled as Timoshenko beams, and the concrete two-block sleepers are assumed to be rigid mass with vertical and lateral movement. The pads under the rails and the rubber boots under the sleepers provide greater vertical and lateral elasticity for the track. The Hertz nonlinear elastic contact theory is used to calculate the normal wheel/rail force. The wheel/rail tangent creep force is first calculated using Kalker’s linear creep theory and then modified by the Shen-Hedrick-Elkins theory. The results show that the asymmetric voided elastic two-block sleepers have greater effects on the dynamic responses for fasteners and sleepers than on the car body and the wheel/rail forces under measured geometric irregularity and random irregularity. Two or more voided sleepers will greatly affect the vehicle running safety.

  1. Comparison of MCNP4B and WIMS-AECL calculations of coolant-void-reactivity effects for uniform lattices of CANDU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, K.S

    1999-05-01

    This paper compares the results of coolant-void reactivity (CVR) reactor-physics calculations performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, MCNP version 4B, with those obtained using Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) latest version of the Winfrith improved multigroup scheme (WIMS) code, WIMS-AECL version 2-5c. Cross sections derived from the evaluated nuclear data file version B-VI (ENDF/B-VI) are used for both the WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B calculations. The comparison is made for uniform lattices at room temperature containing either fresh natural uranium or mixed oxide (MOX) 37-element CANDU fuel. The MOX fuel composition corresponds roughly to that of irradiated CANDU fuel at a burnup of about 4500 MWd/tU. The level of agreement between the CVR predictions of WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is studied as a function of lattice buckling (a measure of the curvature of the neutron-flux distribution) over the range from 0.0 to 4.1 m{sup -2} . For the cases studied, it is found that the absolute k values calculated by WIMS-AECL are higher than those of MCNP4B by several mk (1 mk is a change of 0.001 in k), amounts that depend on the fuel type being modelled and the particular cross-section data used. However, the agreement between WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is much better for the CVR (i.e., the {delta}k on coolant voiding), and is relatively insensitive to the fuel type. (author)

  2. Comparison of MCNP4B and WIMS-AECL calculations of coolant-void-reactivity effects for uniform lattices of CANDU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, K.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    This paper compares the results of coolant-void reactivity (CVR) reactor-physics calculations performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, MCNP version 4B, with those obtained using Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) latest version of the Winfrith improved multigroup scheme (WIMS) code, WIMS-AECL version 2-5c. Cross sections derived from the evaluated nuclear data file version B-VT (ENDF/B-VI) are used for both the WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B calculations. The comparison is made for uniform lattices at room temperature containing either fresh natural uranium or mixed oxide (MOX) 37-element CANDU fuel. The MOX fuel composition corresponds roughly to that of irradiated CANDU fuel at a burnup of about 4500 MWd/tU. The level of agreement between the CVR predictions of WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is studied as a function of lattice buckling (a measure of the curvature of the neutron-flux distribution) over the range from 0.0 to 4.1 m{sup -2}. For the cases studied, it is found that the absolute keff values calculated by WIMS-AECL are higher than those of MCNP4B by several mk (1 mk is a change of 0.001 in keff), amounts that depend on the fuel type being modelled and the particular cross-section data used. However, the agreement between WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is much better for the CVR (i.e., the {delta}keff on coolant voiding), and is relatively insensitive to the fuel type. (author)

  3. Numerical evaluation of cavitation void ratio significance on hydrofoil dynamic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Zhengwei; Escaler, Xavier; Zhou, Lingjiu

    2015-12-01

    The added mass effects on a NACA0009 hydrofoil under cavitation conditions determined in a cavitation tunnel have been numerically simulated using finite element method (FEM). Based on the validated model, the effects of averaged properties of the cavity considered as a two-phase mixture have been evaluated. The results indicate that the void ratio of the cavity plays an increasing role on the frequency reduction ratio and on the mode shape as the mode number increases. Moreover, the sound speed shows a more important role than the average cavity density.

  4. Performance of Transuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Final Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou

    2011-09-01

    The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranics (TRU) in light-water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles are pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell and assembly calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code to assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells and assemblies containing typical UO2 and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Then, assembly calculations were performed evaluating the performance of heterogeneous arrangements of TRU-only FCM fuel pins along with UO2 pins.

  5. Complex cellular responses to reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Mark D; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W

    2005-06-01

    Genome-wide analyses of yeast provide insight into cellular responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Many deletion mutants are sensitive to at least one ROS, but no one oxidant is representative of 'oxidative stress' despite the widespread use of a single compound such as H(2)O(2). This has major implications for studies of pathological situations. Cells have a range of mechanisms for maintaining resistance that involves either induction or repression of many genes and extensive remodeling of the transcriptome. Cells have constitutive defense systems that are largely unique to each oxidant, but overlapping, inducible repair systems. The pattern of the transcriptional response to a particular ROS depends on its concentration, and 'classical' antioxidant systems that are induced by high concentrations of ROS can be repressed when cells adapt to low concentrations of ROS.

  6. Voids by Mechanical Entrapment in Liquid Molding Processes: Mechanism of Formation, Influence in the Mechanical Response and Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D. Vanegas-Jaramillo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The voids by mechanical entrapment become as one of the most common type of defects in the liquid molding processing of composites. Because of the strong influence of those kind of voids in the general performance of the manufactured part, an important amount of researches have focused on the study of the mechanisms of formation of those voids, of the influence of the those ones on the mechanical properties of the composite and of the strategies for their reduction during the process. The present paper aims to do a review of some relevant investigations that have been done in the topic of voids caused by mechanical entrapment of air in the processing of composites by LCM (Liquid composites molding with the purpose of generate a reference material addressed to researchers that are interested in this important subject matter related to the areas of processing and mechanical behavior of composites materials. They will be addressed some topics like: the mechanism of void formation by imbalance among macroflow and microflow and its relationship with the modified capillary number and the sink effect; the phenomena of compressibility, dissolution and mobilization of bubbles in dual-scale preforms; the influence of voids on the mechanical properties of the composites and on the damage mechanisms; and the most common strategies that can be implemented in the industry for the reduction of this sort of defects.

  7. Dynamic response of monolithic and laminate/particulate reactive mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Chung-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Two dynamic compression methods were applied to a monolithic metal and reactive mixtures to investigate their responses: (a) Dynamic experiments using a split Hopkinson pressure bar were applied to reactive mixtures densified by explosive consolidation in order to establish their mechanical response and failure mechanisms. (b) Laser compression and release, which can impart high stresses, up to hundreds GPa, in times of nanoseconds and fractions thereof, was applied to establish the spalling ...

  8. Size-Effects in Void Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2005-01-01

    The size-effect on ductile void growth in metals is investigated. The analysis is based on unit cell models both of arrays of cylindrical voids under plane strain deformation, as well as arrays of spherical voids using an axisymmetric model. A recent finite strain generalization of two higher order...... strain gradient plasticity models is implemented in a finite element program, which is used to study void growth numerically. The results based on the two models are compared. It is shown how gradient effects suppress void growth on the micron scale when compared to predictions based on conventional...... models. This increased resistance to void growth, due to gradient hardening, is accompanied by an increase in the overall strength for the material. Furthermore, for increasing initial void volume fraction, it is shown that the effect of gradients becomes more important to the overall response but less...

  9. Computerized voiding diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, J M; McNett, J; Badlani, G H

    1993-01-01

    An electronic, computerized voiding diary, "Compu-Void" (patent pending) was developed in order to simplify, augment, and automate patients' recording of bladder symptomatology. A voiding diary as a tool has the potential to provide essential information for a more complete diagnostic and therefore therapeutic picture for each patient. Two major problems with the standard written voiding diary have been a lack of patient compliance and the limited amount of information it garners. Twenty-five women with various types of voiding dysfunctions were compared to twenty-five age and parity-matched control women in order to determine patient preferences of the Compu-Void when compared to the standard written voiding diary, compliance with each method, and amount and quality of information obtained with each method. Over 90% of subjects and over 70% of control group patients preferred the Compu-Void over the written diary (P Compu-Void exceeded that obtained with the written method.

  10. The Development of Voiding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Henning

    2011-01-01

    The thesis addresses some new aspeccts in the development of voiding function from midgestation into early childhood.......The thesis addresses some new aspeccts in the development of voiding function from midgestation into early childhood....

  11. The Void Galaxy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, R; Platen, E; Beygu, B; van Gorkom, J H; van der Hulst, J M; Aragon-Calvo, M A; Peebles, P J E; Jarrett, T; Rhee, G; Kovac, K; Yip, C -W

    2011-01-01

    The Void Galaxy Survey (VGS) is a multi-wavelength program to study $\\sim$60 void galaxies. Each has been selected from the deepest interior regions of identified voids in the SDSS redshift survey on the basis of a unique geometric technique, with no a prior selection of intrinsic properties of the void galaxies. The project intends to study in detail the gas content, star formation history and stellar content, as well as kinematics and dynamics of void galaxies and their companions in a broad sample of void environments. It involves the HI imaging of the gas distribution in each of the VGS galaxies. Amongst its most tantalizing findings is the possible evidence for cold gas accretion in some of the most interesting objects, amongst which are a polar ring galaxy and a filamentary configuration of void galaxies. Here we shortly describe the scope of the VGS and the results of the full analysis of the pilot sample of 15 void galaxies.

  12. Supplemental topics on voids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, H.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several topics concerning voids are presented, supplementing the report of Rood (1988). The discovery of the Coma supercluster and void and the recognition of the cosmological significance of superclusters and voids are reviewed. Galaxy redshift surveys and redshift surveys for the Abell clusters and very distant objects are discussed. Solar system and extragalactic dynamics are examined. Also, topics for future observational research on voids are recommended. 50 references.

  13. A New Mechanism to Curb Over-reactive Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The human immune system is a truly amazing constellation of responses to attacks from the outside. It could defend you against millions of bacteria, microbes, viruses, toxins and parasites that would invade your body. However, there are cases where the immune response to innocuous substances is inappropriate and over-reactive, leading to diseases such as allergies and arthritis.

  14. Neutrophilic granulocytes reactive response in candida vulvovaginitis patients with intracellular microorganism persistence complications

    OpenAIRE

    YAKOVYCHUK NINA DMYTRIVNA; DJUIRIAK VALENTYNA STEPANIVNA

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphic neutrophilic granulocytes reactive response and body immune reactivity in general considerably decrease in patients suffering from candida vaginitis on the basis of intracellular microorganisms persistence.

  15. Atomistic modeling of shock-induced void collapse in copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila, L P; Erhart, P; Bringa, E M; Meyers, M A; Lubarda, V A; Schneider, M S; Becker, R; Kumar, M

    2005-03-09

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that shock-induced void collapse in copper occurs by emission of shear loops. These loops carry away the vacancies which comprise the void. The growth of the loops continues even after they collide and form sessile junctions, creating a hardened region around the collapsing void. The scenario seen in our simulations differs from current models that assume that prismatic loop emission is responsible for void collapse. We propose a new dislocation-based model that gives excellent agreement with the stress threshold found in the MD simulations for void collapse as a function of void radius.

  16. Selective impact of early parental responsivity on adolescent stress reactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Hackman

    Full Text Available Research in animals has shown that early life experience, particularly parenting behaviors, influences later-life stress reactivity. Despite the tremendous relevance of this finding to human development and brain function, it has not been tested prospectively in humans. In this study two aspects of parenting were measured at age 4 in a sample of healthy, low socioeconomic status, African American children, and stress reactivity was measured in the same children 11-14 years later using a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test (n = 55. Salivary cortisol was measured before, during and after the stressor and data were analyzed using piecewise hierarchical linear modeling. Parental responsivity, independent of the use of physical discipline, was positively related to cortisol reactivity. Effects were independent of subjective appraisals of the stressor and were also independent of other environmental risk factors and current psychosocial functioning. Therefore this study demonstrates in a novel and precise fashion that early childhood parental responsivity prospectively and independently predicts stress reactivity in adolescence.

  17. Voiding dysfunction - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sripathi V

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In a child who is toilet trained the sudden onset of daytime wetting with frequency or urgency is alarming to the parents. Initially this subject was subdivided into a number of descriptive clinical conditions which led to a lot of confusion in recognition and management. Subsequently, the term elimination dysfunction was coined by Stephen Koff to emphasise the association between recurrent urinary infection, wetting, constipation and bladder overactivity. From a urodynamic point of view, in voiding dysfunction, there is either detrusor overactivity during bladder filling or dyssynergic action between the detrusor and the external sphincter during voiding. Identifying a given condition as a ′filling phase dysfunction′ or ′voiding phase dysfunction′ helps to provide appropriate therapy. Objective clinical criteria should be used to define voiding dysfunction. These include bladder wall thickening, large capacity bladder and infrequent voiding, bladder trabeculation and spinning top deformity of the urethra and a clinically demonstrated Vincent′s curtsy. The recognition and treatment of constipation is central to the adequate treatment of voiding dysfunction. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimuation for the treatment of detrusor overactivity, biofeedback with uroflow EMG to correct dyssynergic voiding, and behavioral therapy all serve to correct voiding dysfunction in its early stages. In established neurogenic bladder disease the use of Botulinum Toxin A injections into the detrusor or the external sphincter may help in restoring continence especially in those refractory to drug therapy. However in those children in whom the upper tracts are threatened, augmentation of the bladder may still be needed.

  18. Sodium voiding analysis in Kalimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Won-Pyo; Jeong, Kwan-Seong; Hahn, Dohee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    A sodium boiling model has been developed for calculations of the void reactivity feedback as well as the fuel and cladding temperatures in the KALIMER core after onset of sodium boiling. The sodium boiling in liquid metal reactors using sodium as coolant should be modeled because of phenomenon difference observed from that in light water reactor systems. The developed model is a multiple -bubble slug ejection model. It allows a finite number of bubbles in a channel at any time. Voiding is assumed to result from formation of bubbles that fill the whole cross section of the coolant channel except for liquid film left on the cladding surface. The vapor pressure, currently, is assumed to be uniform within a bubble. The present study is focused on not only demonstration of the sodium voiding behavior predicted by the developed model, but also confirmation on qualitative acceptance for the model. In results, the model catches important phenomena for sodium boiling, while further effort should be made for the complete analysis. (author)

  19. Modeling cosmic void statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the internal structure and spatial distribution of cosmic voids is crucial when considering them as probes of cosmology. We present recent advances in modeling void density- and velocity-profiles in real space, as well as void two-point statistics in redshift space, by examining voids identified via the watershed transform in state-of-the-art ΛCDM n-body simulations and mock galaxy catalogs. The simple and universal characteristics that emerge from these statistics indicate the self-similarity of large-scale structure and suggest cosmic voids to be among the most pristine objects to consider for future studies on the nature of dark energy, dark matter and modified gravity.

  20. The Hierarchical Structure and Dynamics of Voids

    CERN Document Server

    Aragon-Calvo, M A

    2012-01-01

    Contrary to the common view voids have very complex internal structure and dynamics. Here we show how the hierarchy of structures in the density field inside voids is reflected by a similar hierarchy of structures in the velocity field. Voids defined by dense filaments and clusters can de described as simple expanding domains with coherent flows everywhere except at their boundaries. At scales smaller that the void radius the velocity field breaks into expanding sub-domains corresponding to sub- voids. These sub-domains break into even smaller sub-sub domains at smaller scales resulting in a nesting hierarchy of locally expanding domains. The ratio between the magnitude of the velocity field responsible for the expansion of the void and the velocity field defining the sub voids is approximately one order of magnitude. The small-scale components of the velocity field play a minor role in the shaping of the voids but they define the local dynamics directly affecting the processes of galaxy formation and evoluti...

  1. Draining the Local Void

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, Luca; Shaya, Edward J; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Karachentsev, Igor D

    2016-01-01

    Two galaxies that lie deep within the Local Void provide a test of the expectation that voids expand. The modest (M_B~-14) HI bearing dwarf galaxies ALFAZOAJ1952+1428 and KK246 have been imaged with Hubble Space Telescope in order to study the stellar populations and determine distances from the luminosities of stars at the tip of the red giant branch. The mixed age systems have respective distances of 8.39 Mpc and 6.95 Mpc and inferred line-of-sight peculiar velocities of -114 km/s and -66 km/s toward us and away from the void center. These motions compound on the Milky Way motion of ~230 km/s away from the void. The orbits of the two galaxies are reasonably constrained by a numerical action model encompassing an extensive region that embraces the Local Void. It is unambiguously confirmed that these two void galaxies are moving away from the void center at several hundred km/s.

  2. Dark matter in voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Richard; Doroshkevich, Andrei G.; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    1995-07-01

    The theory of the formation of large-scale structure in the universe through the action of gravitational instability imply the existence of substantial amounts of baryonic dark matter, of the order of 50% of the total baryon content in the universe, in the ``voids'' or under-dense regions seen in the large-scale distribution of galaxies. We discuss also the large-scale structure of dark matter expected in voids and the present and future possibilities for the observation of this baryonic dark matter in ``voids.''

  3. Dark matter in voids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, R. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Doroshkevich, A.G. [Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Teoretical Astrophysics Centrum, Blegsdamsvej 17, Copenhagen DK 2100 (Denmark); Turchaninov, V.I. [Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-07-01

    The theory of the formation of large-scale structure in the universe through the action of gravitational instability imply the existence of substantial amounts of baryonic dark matter, of the order of 50% of the total baryon content in the universe, in the ``voids`` or under-dense regions seen in the large-scale distribution of galaxies. We discuss also the large-scale structure of dark matter expected in voids and the present and future possibilities for the observation of this baryonic dark matter in ``voids.`` {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  4. Reactive oxygen species and the Antarctic macroalgal wound response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Ruth E; Amsler, Charles D; Dickinson, Dale A; McClintock, James B; Baker, Bill J

    2014-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly produced by algal, vascular plant, and animal cells involved in the innate immune response as cellular signals promoting defense and healing and/or as a direct defense against invading pathogens. The production of reactive species in macroalgae upon injury, however, is largely uncharacterized. In this study, we surveyed 13 species of macroalgae from the Western Antarctic Peninsula and show that the release of strong oxidants is common after macroalgal wounding. Most species released strong oxidants within 1 min of wounding and/or showed cellular accumulation of strong oxidants over an hour post-wounding. Exogenous catalase was used to show that hydrogen peroxide was a component of immediate oxidant release in one of five species, but was not responsible for the entire oxidative wound response as is common in vascular plants. The other component(s) of the oxidant cocktail released upon wounding are unknown. We were unable to detect protein nitration in extracts of four oxidant-producing species flash frozen 30 s after wounding, but a role for reactive nitrogen species such as peroxynitrite cannot be completely ruled out. Two species showed evidence for the production of a catalase-activated oxidant, a mechanism previously known only from the laboratory and from the synthetic drug isoniazid used to kill the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The rhodophyte Palmaria decipiens, which released strong oxidants after wounding, also produced strong oxidants upon grazing by a sympatric amphipod, suggesting that oxidants are involved in the response to grazing.

  5. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of reactivities for UO2 and MOX fueled PWR cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foad, Basma; Takeda, Toshikazu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to apply our improved method for calculating sensitivities and uncertainties of reactivity responses for UO2 and MOX fueled pressurized water reactor cells. The improved method has been used to calculate sensitivity coefficients relative to infinite dilution cross-sections, where the self-shielding effect is taken into account. Two types of reactivities are considered: Doppler reactivity and coolant void reactivity, for each type of reactivity, the sensitivities are calculated for small and large perturbations. The results have demonstrated that the reactivity responses have larger relative uncertainty than eigenvalue responses. In addition, the uncertainty of coolant void reactivity is much greater than Doppler reactivity especially for large perturbations. The sensitivity coefficients and uncertainties of both reactivities were verified by comparing with SCALE code results using ENDF/B-VII library and good agreements have been found.

  6. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of reactivities for UO2 and MOX fueled PWR cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foad, Basma [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Kanawa-cho 1-2-4, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui-ken, 914-0055 (Japan); Egypt Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, 3 Ahmad El Zomar St., Nasr City, Cairo, 11787 (Egypt); Takeda, Toshikazu [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Kanawa-cho 1-2-4, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui-ken, 914-0055 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to apply our improved method for calculating sensitivities and uncertainties of reactivity responses for UO{sub 2} and MOX fueled pressurized water reactor cells. The improved method has been used to calculate sensitivity coefficients relative to infinite dilution cross-sections, where the self-shielding effect is taken into account. Two types of reactivities are considered: Doppler reactivity and coolant void reactivity, for each type of reactivity, the sensitivities are calculated for small and large perturbations. The results have demonstrated that the reactivity responses have larger relative uncertainty than eigenvalue responses. In addition, the uncertainty of coolant void reactivity is much greater than Doppler reactivity especially for large perturbations. The sensitivity coefficients and uncertainties of both reactivities were verified by comparing with SCALE code results using ENDF/B-VII library and good agreements have been found.

  7. Anticipating Human Activities Using Object Affordances for Reactive Robotic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppula, Hema S; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of human perception is anticipation, which we use extensively in our day-to-day activities when interacting with other humans as well as with our surroundings. Anticipating which activities will a human do next (and how) can enable an assistive robot to plan ahead for reactive responses. Furthermore, anticipation can even improve the detection accuracy of past activities. The challenge, however, is two-fold: We need to capture the rich context for modeling the activities and object affordances, and we need to anticipate the distribution over a large space of future human activities. In this work, we represent each possible future using an anticipatory temporal conditional random field (ATCRF) that models the rich spatial-temporal relations through object affordances. We then consider each ATCRF as a particle and represent the distribution over the potential futures using a set of particles. In extensive evaluation on CAD-120 human activity RGB-D dataset, we first show that anticipation improves the state-of-the-art detection results. We then show that for new subjects (not seen in the training set), we obtain an activity anticipation accuracy (defined as whether one of top three predictions actually happened) of 84.1, 74.4 and 62.2 percent for an anticipation time of 1, 3 and 10 seconds respectively. Finally, we also show a robot using our algorithm for performing a few reactive responses.

  8. Shock compression response of Ti+B reactive powder mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, M.; Gurumurthy, A.; Kennedy, G. B.; Gokhale, A. M.; Thadhani, N. N.

    2014-05-01

    The shock compression response of Ti+2B (1:2 Ti:B stoichiometric ratio) reactive powder mixtures at ~50% theoretical material density (TMD) is investigated for shock pressures up to 5 GPa to investigate the possible shock-induced chemical reactivity of this highly exothermic mixture. The shock adiabat is produced from instrumented parallel-plate gas-gun impact experiments on encapsulated powders using poly-vinylidene fluoride (PVDF) stress gauges to measure the input and propagated stresses and wave speed in the powder. The shock compression regime is probed from crush-up to full density and onward to assess the potential onset of a shock-induced chemical reaction event in the powder mixture. A series of two-dimensional continuum meso-scale simulations on validated simulated microstructures are performed to predict the shock compression response and identify the meso-scale mechanics that are essential for reaction. The suitability of the synthetic microstructural representations is evaluated by comparing the experimental and predicted pressure traces.

  9. Heterogeneity of defensive responses after exposure to trauma: blunted autonomic reactivity in response to startling sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Wendy; Pole, Nnamdi; DePierro, Jonathan; Freed, Steven; Wallace, D Brian

    2013-10-01

    Research on threat responses, particularly among trauma-exposed individuals, has traditionally focused on increased autonomic arousal and reactivity. However, clinical features associated with trauma exposure, such as dissociation (e.g., shutting down or "spacing out") manifest as the opposite pattern: non-reactivity and blunted arousal. These clinical features suggest that the possibility of threat responses other than fight/flight, namely, immobilization may be undergirded by hyper- or hypo-arousal. The goal of this paper is to examine autonomic responses to a stressful stimulus (acoustic startle) using analytic approaches which have been previously used to examine defensive responses before: heart rate acceleration, heart rate deceleration, and skin conductance response. We examined these responses in relation to symptoms (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD, and dissociation) and trauma exposure (cumulative exposure, age of onset) in a sample of trauma-exposed college students. We found evidence of blunted reactivity, with decreased acceleration and skin conductance, but with increased deceleration, particularly among individuals who had significant symptoms and early exposure to multiple types of trauma. However, individuals with sub-clinical symptoms and more attenuated exposure had large heart rate acceleration and skin conductance responses during the task. Taken together, these findings suggest that moderate symptoms and trauma exposure are related to exaggerated autonomic responses, while extreme symptoms and trauma exposure are related to blunted autonomic responses. These findings further suggest heterogeneity of stress responses within individuals with PTSD and with trauma exposure. © 2013.

  10. Bacterial Responses to Glyoxal and Methylglyoxal: Reactive Electrophilic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhan; Park, Chankyu

    2017-01-01

    Glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MG), belonging to α-oxoaldehydes, are produced by organisms from bacteria to humans by glucose oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and DNA oxidation. Since glyoxals contain two adjacent reactive carbonyl groups, they are referred to as reactive electrophilic species (RES), and are damaging to proteins and nucleotides. Therefore, glyoxals cause various diseases in humans, such as diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, from which all living organisms need to be protected. Although the glyoxalase system has been known for some time, details on how glyoxals are sensed and detoxified in the cell have not been fully elucidated, and are only beginning to be uncovered. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on bacterial responses to glyoxal, and specifically focus on the glyoxal-associated regulators YqhC and NemR, as well as their detoxification mediated by glutathione (GSH)-dependent/independent glyoxalases and NAD(P)H-dependent reductases. Furthermore, we will address questions and future directions. PMID:28106725

  11. Platelet reactive alloantibodies responsible for immune thrombocytopenia in Malay population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd I. Armawai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alloantibodies against human platelet alloantigens (HPAs are responsible for the development of platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR in patients receiving random platelets and bleeding disorder in babies with fetal neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT. Recently, our results based on the analysis of the allelic distribution of HPAs indicated that immunization may occur among Malay. In this study, we sought to analyze the frequencies of platelet reactive alloantibodies responsible for FNAIT and PTR in Malaysia.Methods: Sera from suspected FNAIT (n = 295 and PTR (n = 74 were collected in five years period (2008-2013 and tested for the presence of platelet reactive antibodies by the use of antigen capture assay.Results: In 5/74 (5.41% platelet specific antibodies against HPA-2b (n = 1, HPA-5a (n = 1, HPA-5b (n = 1, HPA-15b (n = 2 could be identified in our PTR cohort. In FNAIT cohort, platelet specific alloantibodies could be detected in 18 sera (6.10% consisting anti-HPA-1a (n = 1, anti-HPA-3a (n = 3, anti-HPA-5a (n = 6, anti-HPA-5b (n = 6, anti-HPA-15a (n = 1, and anti-HPA-15b (n = 1.Conclusion: Our study indicates that anti-HPA-3, -HPA-5 and -HPA-15 antibodies seems to be the most platelet specific antibodies involved in FNAIT and PTR cases in Malaysian population. Since similar HPA allelic distribution among Malaysian and Indonesian populations have been observed, immunization against these three HPA systems are expected to be the most potential risk of alloimmune mediated platelet disorders in Indonesia.

  12. Void growth in metals: Atomistic calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traiviratana, Sirirat [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Bringa, Eduardo M. [Materials Science Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Benson, David J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Meyers, Marc A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); NanoEngineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)], E-mail: mameyers@ucsd.edu

    2008-09-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations in monocrystalline and bicrystalline copper were carried out with LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator) to reveal void growth mechanisms. The specimens were subjected to tensile uniaxial strains; the results confirm that the emission of (shear) loops is the primary mechanism of void growth. It is observed that many of these shear loops develop along two slip planes (and not one, as previously thought), in a heretofore unidentified mechanism of cooperative growth. The emission of dislocations from voids is the first stage, and their reaction and interaction is the second stage. These loops, forming initially on different {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} planes, join at the intersection, if the Burgers vector of the dislocations is parallel to the intersection of two {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} planes: a <1 1 0> direction. Thus, the two dislocations cancel at the intersection and a biplanar shear loop is formed. The expansion of the loops and their cross slip leads to the severely work-hardened region surrounding a growing void. Calculations were carried out on voids with different sizes, and a size dependence of the stress threshold to emit dislocations was obtained by MD, in disagreement with the Gurson model which is scale independent. This disagreement is most marked for the nanometer sized voids. The scale dependence of the stress required to grow voids is interpreted in terms of the decreasing availability of optimally oriented shear planes and increased stress required to nucleate shear loops as the void size is reduced. The growth of voids simulated by MD is compared with the Cocks-Ashby constitutive model and significant agreement is found. The density of geometrically necessary dislocations as a function of void size is calculated based on the emission of shear loops and their outward propagation. Calculations are also carried out for a void at the interface between two grains to simulate polycrystalline

  13. Void shape effects and voids starting from cracked inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2011-01-01

    Numerical, axisymmetric cell model analyses are used to study the growth of voids in ductile metals, until the mechanism of coalescence with neighbouring voids sets in. A special feature of the present analyses is that extremely small values of the initial void volume fraction are considered, dow...

  14. Reactive Oxygen Species Tune Root Tropic Responses1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Gat

    2016-01-01

    The default growth pattern of primary roots of land plants is directed by gravity. However, roots possess the ability to sense and respond directionally to other chemical and physical stimuli, separately and in combination. Therefore, these root tropic responses must be antagonistic to gravitropism. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in gravitropism of maize and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots has been previously described. However, which cellular signals underlie the integration of the different environmental stimuli, which lead to an appropriate root tropic response, is currently unknown. In gravity-responding roots, we observed, by applying the ROS-sensitive fluorescent dye dihydrorhodamine-123 and confocal microscopy, a transient asymmetric ROS distribution, higher at the concave side of the root. The asymmetry, detected at the distal elongation zone, was built in the first 2 h of the gravitropic response and dissipated after another 2 h. In contrast, hydrotropically responding roots show no transient asymmetric distribution of ROS. Decreasing ROS levels by applying the antioxidant ascorbate, or the ROS-generation inhibitor diphenylene iodonium attenuated gravitropism while enhancing hydrotropism. Arabidopsis mutants deficient in Ascorbate Peroxidase 1 showed attenuated hydrotropic root bending. Mutants of the root-expressed NADPH oxidase RBOH C, but not rbohD, showed enhanced hydrotropism and less ROS in their roots apices (tested in tissue extracts with Amplex Red). Finally, hydrostimulation prior to gravistimulation attenuated the gravistimulated asymmetric ROS and auxin signals that are required for gravity-directed curvature. We suggest that ROS, presumably H2O2, function in tuning root tropic responses by promoting gravitropism and negatively regulating hydrotropism. PMID:27535793

  15. Reactive oxygen species in response of plants to gravity stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadko, Sergiy

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) as second messengers can induce stress response of plants. Thioredoxins (Trx) and peroxiredoxins (Prx) can function as sensors and transmitters of the ROS in stress signaling and antioxidant response. 12-14 days old tissue culture of Arabidopsis thaliana have been investigated. Hypergravity stress was induced by centrifugation at 10 and 20 g during 30 and 90 min and than intensity of spontaneous chemiluminescence (SChL/ROS content), Trx and Prx activities were determined. All experiments were repeated from 3 to 5 times and the obtained data were statistically treated. In the tissue culture under development of the stress there were an increase in intensity of SChL and Trx and Prx activities. Thus, under hypergravity stress in the plant occurred early increase in the ROS level and the ROS induced the increase in the Trx and Prx activities. Prx and Trx can also participate in the formation of stress respons as acceptors and transducers of the redox signals. Increase in the activity of these enzymes primarily aimed at increasing of the total antioxidant activity in the cells to prevent of the plant to development of oxidative degradation by ROS.

  16. Neurogenic voiding dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Petros; Apostolidis, Apostolos

    2017-05-01

    This review aims to analyze and discuss all recently published articles associated with neurogenic voiding discussion providing readers with the most updated knowledge and trigger for further research. They include the proposal of a novel classification system for the pathophysiology of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) which combines neurological defect in a distinct anatomic location, and data on bowel dysfunction, autonomic dysreflexia and urine biomarkers; review of patient-reported outcome measures in NLUTD; review of the criteria for the diagnosis of clinically significant urinary infections; novel research findings on the pathophysiology of NLUTD; and review of data on minimally and more invasive treatments. Despite the extended evidence base on NLUTD, there is a paucity of high-quality new research concerning voiding dysfunction as opposed to storage problems. The update aims to inform clinicians about new developments in clinical practice, as well as ignite discussion for further clinical and basic research in the aforementioned areas of NLUTD.

  17. A computerized voiding diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, J M; McNett, J; Badlani, G H

    1996-11-01

    To examine a group of subject and control patient's preferences and compliance with regard to the Compu-Void (CV) electronic voiding diary as compared to the written diary (WD) and to compare the two methods with respect to the type of information obtained and whether the order of use of each method influenced results in the subject group. Thirty-six women between the ages of 20 and 84 with bladder symptoms were compared to a group of 36 age-matched women. In 100% of subjects and 95% of control patients, CV entries exceeded the number made with the WD in voiding events and, in subjects, in incontinence episodes recorded (P < .005 and P < .005, respectively). Over 98% of subjects and over 80% of controls preferred the CV (P < .0005). The order of use of each method in subjects made no significant difference with regard to the volume of information obtained (P < .407), number of leakage events recorded (P < .494) or fluid intake patterns (P < .410). Patients' compliance with each method was not affected by the order of use. Our results suggest an increased volume of data and greater patient compliance in reporting bladder symptoms and events using the CV and that the order of use is not important.

  18. Reactive nitrogen intermediates suppress the primary immunologic response to Listeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, S H; Wing, E J; Hoffman, R A; Simmons, R L

    1993-04-01

    Reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI), e.g., nitric oxide derived from a terminal guanido nitrogen atom of L-arginine, exhibit potent antimicrobial activity in vitro. The function of these intermediates in host defenses in vivo, however, is presently unclear. Experiments were undertaken to determine the role of RNI in the resolution of primary listerial infections of the liver. Serum RNI levels were elevated significantly in mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes. Moreover, a marked increase in RNI production was found in cultures of the parenchymal, as well as the nonparenchymal, liver cells obtained from Listeria-infected mice. RNI did not kill Listeria treated directly, however, nor were they a factor in the listericidal activity exhibited by hepatic cells. Rather, the elevated production of RNI during primary infection appeared to promote the replication of Listeria in vivo. Mice administered NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, a competitive inhibitor of RNI production, exhibited a 10- and a 100-fold reduction in the number of Listeria in their lives on days 3 and 7 postinfection, respectively. In vitro, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine stimulated the Ag-specific proliferation of T lymphocytes derived from Listeria-infected mice at concentrations that inhibited RNI production. These latter findings suggest that the elevated production of RNI during primary listerial infections suppresses host defenses by diminishing the proliferation and, consequently, the biologic response of immune cell populations.

  19. Failure by void coalescence in metallic materials containing primary and secondary voids subject to intense shearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2011-01-01

    , subject to shear dominated loading. To account for both length scales involved in this study, a continuum model that includes the softening effect of damage evolution in shear is used to represent the matrix material surrounding the primary voids. Here, a recently extended Gurson-type model is used, which......Failure under intense shearing at close to zero stress triaxiality is widely observed for ductile metallic materials, and is identified in experiments as smeared-out dimples on the fracture surface. Numerical cell-model studies of equal sized voids have revealed that the mechanism governing...... secondary damage that co-exists with or nucleation in the ligaments between larger voids that coalesce during intense shearing. A numerical cell-model study is carried out to gain a parametric understanding of the overall material response for different initial conditions of the two void populations...

  20. Plasticity size effects in voided crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussein, M. I.; Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof;

    The shear and equi-biaxial straining responses of periodic voided single crystals are analysed using discrete dislocation plasticity and a continuum strain gradient crystal plasticity theory. In the discrete dislocation formulation the dislocations are all of edge character and are modelled as line...... predictions of the two formulations for all crystal types and void volume fractions considered when the material length scale in the non-local plasticity model chosen to be $0.325\\mu m$ (around ten times the slip plane spacing in the discrete dislocation models)....

  1. Into the Void

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    17 May 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of a chain of pits on a lava- and dust-covered plain northwest of Tharsis Tholus -- one of the many volcanic constructs in the Tharsis region of Mars. Pit chains, such as this one, are associated with the collapse of surface materials into subsurface voids formed by faulting and expansion -- or extension -- of the bedrock. Location near: 16.4oN, 92.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Winter

  2. Mechano-responsive hydrogels crosslinked by reactive block copolymer micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Longxi

    Hydrogels are crosslinked polymeric networks that can swell in water without dissolution. Owing to their structural similarity to the native extracelluar matrices, hydrogels have been widely used in biomedical applications. Synthetic hydrogels have been designed to respond to various stimuli, but mechanical signals have not incorporated into hydrogel matrices. Because most tissues in the body are subjected to various types of mechanical forces, and cells within these tissues have sophisticated mechano-transduction machinery, this thesis is focused on developing hydrogel materials with built-in mechano-sensing mechanisms for use as tissue engineering scaffolds or drug release devices. Self-assembled block copolymer micelles (BCMs) with reactive handles were employed as the nanoscopic crosslinkers for the construction of covalently crosslinked networks. BCMs were assembled from amphiphilic diblock copolymers of poly(n-butyl acrylate) and poly(acrylic acid) partially modified with acrylate. Radical polymerization of acrylamide in the presence of micellar crosslinkers gave rise to elastomeric hydrogels whose mechanical properties can be tuned by varying the BCM composition and concentration. TEM imaging revealed that the covalently integrated BCMs underwent strain-dependent reversible deformation. A model hydrophobic drug, pyrene, loaded into the core of BCMs prior to the hydrogel formation, was dynamically released in response to externally applied mechanical forces, through force-induced reversible micelle deformation and the penetration of water molecules into the micelle core. The mechano-responsive hydrogel has been studied for tissue repair and regeneration purposes. Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA)-modified hyaluronic acid (HA) was photochemically crosslinked in the presence of dexamethasone (DEX)-loaded crosslinkable BCMs. The resultant HA gels (HAxBCM) contain covalently integrated micellar compartments with DEX being sequestered in the hydrophobic core. Compared

  3. CTF Void Drift Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gosdin, Chris [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Avramova, Maria N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gergar, Marcus [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    This milestone report is a summary of work performed in support of expansion of the validation and verification (V&V) matrix for the thermal-hydraulic subchannel code, CTF. The focus of this study is on validating the void drift modeling capabilities of CTF and verifying the supporting models that impact the void drift phenomenon. CTF uses a simple turbulent-diffusion approximation to model lateral cross-flow due to turbulent mixing and void drift. The void drift component of the model is based on the Lahey and Moody model. The models are a function of two-phase mass, momentum, and energy distribution in the system; therefore, it is necessary to correctly model the ow distribution in rod bundle geometry as a first step to correctly calculating the void distribution due to void drift.

  4. Quantifying Effects of Voids in Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Marlana B.; Sankar, Bhavani V.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Randomness in woven ceramic matrix composite architecture has been found to cause large variability in stiffness and strength. The inherent voids are an aspect of the architecture that may cause a significant portion of the variability. A study is undertaken to investigate the effects of many voids of random sizes and distributions. Response surface approximations were formulated based on void parameters such as area and length fractions to provide an estimate of the effective stiffness. Obtaining quantitative relationships between the properties of the voids and their effects on stiffness of ceramic matrix composites are of ultimate interest, but the exploratory study presented here starts by first modeling the effects of voids on an isotropic material. Several cases with varying void parameters were modeled which resulted in a large amount of variability of the transverse stiffness and out-of-plane shear stiffness. An investigation into a physical explanation for the stiffness degradation led to the observation that the voids need to be treated as an entity that reduces load bearing capabilities in a space larger than what the void directly occupies through a corrected length fraction or area fraction. This provides explanation as to why void volume fraction is not the only important factor to consider when computing loss of stiffness.

  5. The SHH/Gli pathway is reactivated in reactive glia and drives proliferation in response to neurodegeneration-induced lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitter, Kenneth L; Tamagno, Ilaria; Feng, Xi; Ghosal, Kaushik; Amankulor, Nduka; Holland, Eric C; Hambardzumyan, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    In response to neurodegeneration, the adult mammalian brain activates a cellular cascade that results in reactive astrogliosis and microgliosis. The mechanism through which astrocytes become reactive and the physiological consequences of their activation in response to neurodegeneration is complex. While the activation and proliferation of astrocytes has been shown to occur during massive neuronal cell death, the functional relationship between these two events has not been clearly elucidated. Here we show that in response to kainic acid- (KA) induced neurodegeneration, the mitogen sonic hedgehog (SHH) is upregulated in reactive astrocytes. SHH activity peaks at 7 days and is accompanied by increased Gli activity and elevated proliferation in several cell types. To determine the functional role of SHH-Gli signaling following KA lesions, we used a pharmacological approach to show that SHH secreted by astrocytes drives the activation and proliferation of astrocytes and microglia. The consequences of SHH-Gli signaling in KA-induced lesions appear to be independent of the severity of neurodegeneration.

  6. The catalytic diversity of zeolites: confinement and solvation effects within voids of molecular dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounder, Rajamani; Iglesia, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    The ability of molecular sieves to control the access and egress of certain reactants and products and to preferentially contain certain transition states while excluding others based on size were captured as shape selectivity concepts early in the history of zeolite catalysis. The marked consequences for reactivity and selectivity, specifically in acid catalysis, have since inspired and sustained many discoveries of novel silicate frameworks and driven the engineering of hierarchical structures and void size to influence catalysis. The catalytic diversity of microporous voids is explored and extended here in the context of their solvating environments, wherein voids act as hosts and stabilize guests, whether reactive intermediates or transition states, by van der Waals forces. We use specific examples from acid catalysis, including activation of C-C and C-H bonds in alkanes, alkylation and hydrogenation of alkenes, carbonylation of dimethyl ether, and elimination and homologation reactions of alkanols and ethers, which involve transition states and adsorbed precursors of varying size and composition. Mechanistic interpretations of measured turnover rates enable us to assign precise chemical origins to kinetic and thermodynamic constants in rate equations and, in turn, to identify specific steps and intermediates that determine the free energy differences responsible for chemical reactivity and selectivity. These free energy differences reflect the stabilization of transition states and their relevant precursors via electrostatic interactions that depend on acid strength and van der Waals interactions that depend on confinement within voids. Their respective contributions to activation free energies are examined by Born-Haber thermochemical cycles by considering plausible transition states and the relevant precursors. These examples show that zeolite voids solvate transition states and precursors differently, and markedly so for guest moieties of different size and

  7. Shock-induced hotspot formation and chemical reaction initiation in PETN containing a spherical void

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2014-05-01

    We present results of reactive molecular dynamics simulations of hotspot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shock-induced compression of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) with the ReaxFF reactive force field. A supported shockwave is driven through a PETN crystal containing a 20 nm spherical void at a sub-threshold impact velocity of 2 km/s. Formation of a hotspot due to shock-induced void collapse is observed. During void collapse, NO2 is the dominant species ejected from the upstream void surface. Once the ejecta collide with the downstream void surface and the hotspot develops, formation of final products such as N2 and H2O is observed. The simulation provides a detailed picture of how void collapse and hotspot formation leads to initiation at sub-threshold impact velocities.

  8. Frequency of Septic Complications after Voiding Cystourethrography without Prior Urine Culture in Children Three Months to Six Years of Age with Urinary Tract Infection and Clinical Response to Antibiotic Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Mejía Pavony, Juan Gonzalo; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Bustos Sánchez, Diana Carolina; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Rey Camacho, Sandra Janeth; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Vásquez Blanco, Gladys Johanna; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Lozano, Juan Manuel; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2014-01-01

    complications secondary to the development of voiding cystourethrography without urine culture in children three months to six years with UTI treated at the Hospital San Ignacio and had adequate clinical response to antibiotics. We designed a retrospective cohort study of two years. We reviewed a total of 243 medical records of patients whose data were extracted based on the data collection form. None of the 59 patients who met the inclusion criteria had septic complications. It intends to de...

  9. Testing Gravity using Void Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Padilla, Nelson; Li, Baojiu

    2016-10-01

    We investigate void properties in f(R) models using N-body simulations, focusing on their differences from General Relativity (GR) and their detectability. In the Hu-Sawicki f(R) modified gravity (MG) models, the halo number density profiles of voids are not distinguishable from GR. In contrast, the same f(R) voids are more empty of dark matter, and their profiles are steeper. This can in principle be observed by weak gravitational lensing of voids, for which the combination of a spectroscopic redshift and a lensing photometric redshift survey over the same sky is required. Neglecting the lensing shape noise, the f(R) model parameter amplitudes fR0=10-5 and 10-4 may be distinguished from GR using the lensing tangential shear signal around voids by 4 and 8 σ for a volume of 1 (Gpc/h)3. The line-of-sight projection of large-scale structure is the main systematics that limits the significance of this signal for the near future wide angle and deep lensing surveys. For this reason, it is challenging to distinguish fR0=10-6 from GR. We expect that this can be overcome with larger volume. The halo void abundance being smaller and the steepening of dark matter void profiles in f(R) models are unique features that can be combined to break the degeneracy between fR0 and σ8.

  10. PRECISION COSMOGRAPHY WITH STACKED VOIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavaux, Guilhem [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Wandelt, Benjamin D. [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis, boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

    2012-08-01

    We present a purely geometrical method for probing the expansion history of the universe from the observation of the shape of stacked voids in spectroscopic redshift surveys. Our method is an Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test based on the average sphericity of voids posited on the local isotropy of the universe. It works by comparing the temporal extent of cosmic voids along the line of sight with their angular, spatial extent. We describe the algorithm that we use to detect and stack voids in redshift shells on the light cone and test it on mock light cones produced from N-body simulations. We establish a robust statistical model for estimating the average stretching of voids in redshift space and quantify the contamination by peculiar velocities. Finally, assuming that the void statistics that we derive from N-body simulations is preserved when considering galaxy surveys, we assess the capability of this approach to constrain dark energy parameters. We report this assessment in terms of the figure of merit (FoM) of the dark energy task force and in particular of the proposed Euclid mission which is particularly suited for this technique since it is a spectroscopic survey. The FoM due to stacked voids from the Euclid wide survey may double that of all other dark energy probes derived from Euclid data alone (combined with Planck priors). In particular, voids seem to outperform baryon acoustic oscillations by an order of magnitude. This result is consistent with simple estimates based on mode counting. The AP test based on stacked voids may be a significant addition to the portfolio of major dark energy probes and its potentialities must be studied in detail.

  11. Experience, cortisol reactivity, and the coordination of emotional responses to skydiving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa eMeyer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Physiological habituation to laboratory stressors has previously been demonstrated, although the literature remains equivocal. Previous studies have found skydiving to be a salient naturalistic stressor that elicits a robust subjective and physiological stress response. However, it is uncertain whether (or how stress reactivity habituates to this stressor given that skydiving remains a risky, life-threatening challenge with every jump despite experience. While multiple components of a stress response have been documented, it is unclear whether there is an individual’s subjective emotions are related to their physiological responses. Documenting coordinated responsivity would lend insight into shared underlying mechanisms for the nature of habituation of both subjective (emotion and objective (cortisol stress responses. Therefore, we examined subjective emotion and cortisol responses in first-time compared to experienced skydivers in a predominantly male sample (total n = 44; males = 32, females = 12. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that experienced skydivers showed less reactivity and faster recovery compared to first-time skydivers. Subjective emotions were coordinated with physiological responses primarily within first-time skydivers. Pre-jump anxiety predicted cortisol reactivity within first-time, but not experienced, skydivers. Higher post-jump happiness predicted faster cortisol recovery after jumping although this effect overlapped somewhat with the effect of experience. Results suggest that experience may modulate the coordination of emotional response with cortisol reactivity to skydiving. Prior experience does not appear to extinguish the stress response but rather alters the individual’s engagement of the HPA axis.

  12. Neuroticism, cortisol reactivity, and antibody response to vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Anna C. Phillips; Carroll, Douglas; Burns, Victoria E.; Drayson, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This study examined whether neuroticism was related to the antibody response to influenza vaccination and whether the relationship was mediated by cortisol reactions to an acute laboratory mental stress. Antibody status was assessed at baseline and to a trivalent influenza vaccination in 57 students at five-weeks and five-month follow-up. Neuroticism was also measured at baseline. Cortisol was measured at rest and in response to a pressurised mental arithmetic task. At both follow-ups, hi...

  13. Geometry and scaling of cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Gaite, Jose

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Cosmic voids are observed in the distribution of galaxies and, to some extent, in the dark matter distribution. If these distributions have fractal geometry, it must be reflected in the geometry of voids; in particular, we expect scaling sizes of voids. However, this scaling is not well demonstrated in galaxy surveys yet. AIMS: Our objective is to understand the geometry of cosmic voids in relation to a fractal structure of matter. We intend to distinguish monofractal voids from multifractal voids, regarding their scaling properties. We plan to analyse voids in the distributions of mass concentrations (halos) in a multifractal and their relation to galaxy voids. METHODS: We make a statistical analysis of point distributions based on the void probability function and correlation functions. We assume that voids are spherical and devise a simple spherical void finder. For continuous mass distributions, we employ the methods of fractal geometry. We confirm the analytical predictions with numerical simula...

  14. Improvement of the dynamic response of the ITER Reactive Power Compensation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finotti, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.finotti@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Gaio, Elena [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Song, Inho; Tao, Jun; Benfatto, Ivone [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The slow response reasons of the classic ITER Reactive Power Compensation (RPC) control are explained. • The dynamic behaviors of the ac/dc converter and of the RPC are characterized. • New control concept to speed up the RPC response is developed. • Good performance of the new RPC control is verified even during fast transient conditions. - Abstract: The ITER ac/dc conversion system can absorb a total active and reactive power up to 500 MW and 950 Mvar, respectively. The Reactive Power Compensation (RPC) system is rated for a nominal power of 750 Mvar necessary to comply with the allowable reactive power limit value from the grid of 200 Mvar. This system is currently under construction and is based on Static Var Compensation technology with Thyristor Controlled Reactor (TCR) and Tuned Filters. The RPC has to minimize the demand of reactive power from the grid; its control is based on a feed-forward method, where the corrective input is the measurement of the reactive power consumption of the ac/dc converters, derived from the 50 Hz component of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the three-phase voltages and currents. The delay introduced by the FFT calculation and the slow response of the TCR could make the response speed of the RPC not sufficient to face fast variations of the reactive power demand and therefore in this paper a new controller of the RPC able to overcome this shortcoming is proposed and evaluated. It is based on the calculation of the predicted consumption of the reactive power by using the voltage reference signals coming from the Plasma Control System and the measurements of the dc current of the ac/dc converters and of the 66 kV busbar voltage, and on the speed up of the RPC control by introducing a lead–lag transfer function.

  15. Involvement of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in the wound response of Dasycladus vermicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cliff; Küpper, Frithjof C; Jacobs, Robert S

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the signaling events involved in the wound response of the marine macroalga Dasycladus vermicularis, finding nitric oxide (NO) production in relation to injury. The addition of exogenous H2O2 to aliquots of injured algae accelerated the kinetics of NO production in the wounded region. Similarly, the addition of an NO donor caused an increase in detectable H2O2 around the site of injury. By wounding or incubating uninjured algae with an NO donor, peroxidase activity was enhanced. Based on the use of selected pharmacological probes, our results indicate that H2O2 production involves the upstream activation of signaling events similar to those observed in the physiology of higher plants.

  16. Differentiating anticipatory from reactive cortisol responses to psychosocial stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engert, V.; Efanov, S.I.; Duchesne, A.; Vogel, S.; Corbo, V.; Pruessner, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Most psychosocial stress studies assess the overall cortisol response without further identifying the temporal dynamics within hormone levels. It has been shown, however, that the amplitude of anticipatory cortisol stress levels has a unique predictive value for psychological health. So far, no "bes

  17. Differentiating anticipatory from reactive cortisol responses to psychosocial stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engert, V.; Efanov, S.I.; Duchesne, A.; Vogel, S.; Corbo, V.; Pruessner, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Most psychosocial stress studies assess the overall cortisol response without further identifying the temporal dynamics within hormone levels. It has been shown, however, that the amplitude of anticipatory cortisol stress levels has a unique predictive value for psychological health. So far, no "bes

  18. On cavitation instabilities with interacting voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2012-01-01

    voids so far apart that the radius of the plastic zone around each void is less than 1% of the current spacing between the voids, can still affect each others at the occurrence of a cavitation instability such that one void stops growing while the other grows in an unstable manner. On the other hand...

  19. Alignment of voids in the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the shapes and mutual alignment of voids in the large-scale matter distribution of a Lambda cold dark matter (Lambda CDM) cosmology simulation. The voids are identified using the novel watershed void finder (WVF) technique. The identified voids are quite non-spherical and slightly pro

  20. Alignment of voids in the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the shapes and mutual alignment of voids in the large-scale matter distribution of a Lambda cold dark matter (Lambda CDM) cosmology simulation. The voids are identified using the novel watershed void finder (WVF) technique. The identified voids are quite non-spherical and slightly

  1. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas, E-mail: tke@uams.edu [Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute and Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2011-11-11

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  2. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kieber-Emmons

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs. To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I, and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  3. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses. PMID:24213131

  4. Sensitivity effects of void density and arrangements in a REBO high explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, Stuart Davis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gronbech - Jensen, Niels [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-28

    The shock response of two-dimensional model, high explosive crystals with various arrangements of circular voids is explored. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. In square lattices of voids all of one size, reducing that size or increasing the porosity while holding the other parameter fixed causes the hotspots to consume the material more quickly and detonation to occur sooner and at lower piston velocities. The early time behavior is seen to follow a very simple ignition and growth model. The hotspots are seen to collectively develop a broad pressure wave (a sonic, diffuse deflagration front) that, upon merging with the lead shock, transforms it into a detonation. The reaction yields produced by triangular lattices are not significantly different. With random void arrangements, the mean time to detonation is 15.5% larger than with the square lattice; the standard deviation of detonation delays is just 5.1%.

  5. Precision cosmography with stacked voids

    CERN Document Server

    Lavaux, Guilhem

    2011-01-01

    We present a purely geometrical method for probing the expansion history of the Universe from the observation of the shape of stacked voids in spectroscopic re dshift surveys. Our method is an Alcock-Pasczinsky test based on the average sphericity of voids posited on the local isotropy of the Universe. It works by comparing the temporal extent of cosmic voids along the line of sight with their angular, spatial extent. We describe the algorithm that we use to detect and stack voids in redshift shells on the light cone and test it on mock light cones produced from N-body simulations. We establish a robust statistical model for estimating the average stretching of voids in redshift space and quantify the contamination by peculiar velocities. Finally, we assess the capability of this approach to constrain dark energy parameters in terms of the figure of merit (FoM) of the dark energy task force and in particular of the proposed Euclid mission which is particularly suited for this technique since it is a spectrosc...

  6. Measurements of reactive gaseous rocket injector response factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Bell, W. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1977-01-01

    The results presented represent the first successful attempt at the measurement of the driving capabilities of coaxial gaseous propellant rocket injectors. The required data have been obtained by employing the modified impedance tube technique with compressed air as the oxidizer and acetylene gas as the fuel. The data describe the frequency dependence of the injector admittances, from which the frequency dependence of the injection response factors can be calculated. The measured injector admittances have been compared with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann (1967) analytical model assuming different values for the characteristic combustion time. The values of combustion time which result in a best fit between the measured and predicted data are indicated for different equivalence ratios. It is shown that for the coaxial injector system investigated in this study the characteristic combustion times vary between .7 and 1.2 msec for equivalence ratios in the range of .57 to 1.31. The experimental data clearly show that the tested injector system could indeed drive combustion instabilities over a frequency range that is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  7. "Compu-Void II": the computerized voiding diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, J M; McNett, J; Badlani, G H

    1996-02-01

    We have previously described an electronic voiding diary, "Compu-Void" (Copyright, 1990) developed to automate recording of bladder symptoms (Rabin et al., 1993). Our objectives in this, the second phase of this study, were to examine a group of subject and control patients' preference and compliance with regard to the "Compu-Void" (CV) compared to the standard written voiding diary (WD), to compare the two methods with respect to the amount and type of information obtained and to determine whether or not the order of use of each recording method influenced results in the subject group. Thirty-six women between the ages of 20 and 84 with bladder symptomatology were compared to a group 36 age-matched women. In 100% of subjects and 95% of control patients, CV entries exceeded the number made with the WD in voiding events and in subjects, in incontinent episodes recorded (P < 0.0005 and P < 0.005, respectively). Over 98% of subjects and over 80% of control patients preferred CV over the WD (p < 0.0005). The order of use of each recording method in subjects made no significant difference with regard to the volume of information obtained (p < 0.407), number of urinary leakage events recorded (p < 0.494), and fluid intake patterns (p < 0.410). Patient impressions of, and compliance with each method were not affected by order of use. The only difference regarding order of use was that most subjects who used the CV first also found the WD to be tedious (61% vs 14%). Our results suggest increased volume of data and of patient compliance in reporting bladder symptoms and events using CV, and that order of use is not an important factor in determining patient impressions of the two methods. The majority of subject and control patients preferred CV over traditional methods. An updated version of the software and hardware is also included.

  8. Supercharging SpyCatcher toward an intrinsically disordered protein with stimuli-responsive chemical reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Wen-Bin

    2017-08-03

    We report a supercharged, intrinsically disordered protein, SpyCatcher(-), possessing stimuli-responsive reactivity toward SpyTag with tunable yields ranging from 4% to 98% depending on pH, temperature, ionic strength, etc. The CD and NMR studies reveal that the reaction occurs through a folded intermediate formed probably via a different mechanism from that of SpyCatcher.

  9. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Kieber-Emmons; Anastas Pashov; Behjatolah Monzavi-Karbassi; Fariba Jousheghany; Cecile Artaud; Leah Hennings

    2011-01-01

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- an...

  10. Locomotor response to novelty as a predictor of reactivity to aversive stimuli in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David A; Kalinichev, Mikhail; Holtzman, Stephen G

    2007-05-29

    In an animal model for vulnerability to drug abuse, animals that exhibit greater motor activity in a novel environment (high responders; HR) are more sensitive to drugs of abuse and are more likely to self-administer these drugs compared to less reactive animals (low responders; LR). In the light of clinical evidence on comorbidity between drug abuse and mood disorders, we used this model to investigate whether individual differences in locomotor reactivity to novelty are related to anxiety- and depression-like responsiveness using male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were categorized as HR and LR based on motor responses to novelty during a 30-min session. Anxiety-like reactivity was then measured using the elevated plus-maze, the defensive withdrawal test and acoustic startle-induced ultrasonic vocalization test. Depression-like reactivity was measured by the forced swim test. HR rats showed less anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze and defensive withdrawal tests than LR, but the opposite was true in the acoustic startle-induced vocalization test. In response to a series of loud acoustic stimuli, HR rats were faster to begin vocalizing and did so for a longer duration compared to LR. There were only minor differences between LR and HR rats in the forced swim test. These data suggest that an HR/LR model can be used to study a link between vulnerability to drug abuse and anxiety-like reactivity. The exact nature of this link depends upon the model of anxiety used and may reflect the heterogeneous nature of anxiety-like reactivity in the rat.

  11. The effect of aging on the dynamics of reactive and proactive cognitive control of response interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Xiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A prime-target interference task was used to investigate the effects of cognitive aging on reactive and proactive control in which frequency confounds and feature repetitions were eliminated from the cognitive control measures. We used distributional analyses to explore the dynamics of the two control functions by distinguishing the strength of incorrect response capture and the efficiency of suppression control. For reactive control, within-trial conflict control and between-trial conflict adaption were analyzed. The statistical analysis showed that there were no reliable between-trial conflict adaption effects for both young and older adults. For within-trial conflict control, the results revealed that older adults showed larger interference effects on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed that the decline mainly stemmed from inefficient suppression rather than from stronger incorrect responses. For proactive control, older adults showed comparable proactive conflict resolution than young adults on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed older adults were as effective as younger adults in adjusting their responses to minimize automatic response capture and actively suppress the direct response activation based on congruency proportion information. The results suggest that older adults were less proficient at suppressing interference after conflict was detected but can anticipate and prevent inference in response to congruency proportion manipulation. The results challenge earlier views that older adults have selective deficits in proactive control but are spared in reactive control.

  12. From reactive to proactive and selective control: developing a richer model for stopping inappropriate responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Adam R

    2011-06-15

    A better understanding of the neural systems underlying impulse control is important for psychiatry. Although most impulses are motivational or emotional rather than motoric per se, it is research into the neural architecture of motor response control that has made the greatest strides. This article reviews recent developments in the cognitive neuroscience of stopping responses. Most research of this kind has focused on reactive control-that is, how subjects stop a response outright when instructed by a signal. It is argued that reactive paradigms are limited as models of control relevant to psychiatry. Instead, a set of paradigms is advocated that begins to model proactive inhibitory control-that is, how a subject prepares to stop an upcoming response tendency. Proactive inhibitory control is generated according to the goals of the subject rather than by an external signal, and it can be selectively targeted at a particular response tendency. This may have wider validity than reactive control as an experimental model for stopping inappropriate responses.

  13. Void Growth in Single and Bicrystalline Metals: Atomistic Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traiviratana, Sirirat; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Benson, David J.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2007-12-01

    MD simulations in monocrystalline and bicrystalline copper were carried out with LAMMPS to reveal void growth mechanisms. The specimens were subjected to both tensile uniaxial and hydrostatic strains; the results confirm that the emission of (shear) loops is the primary mechanism of void growth. However, these shear loops develop along two slip planes (and not one, as previously thought), in a heretofore unidentified mechanism of cooperative growth. The emission of dislocations from voids is the first stage, and their reaction and interaction is the second stage. These loops, forming initially on different {111} planes, join at the intersection, the Burgers vector of the dislocations being parallel to the intersection of two {111} planes: a direction. Thus, the two dislocations cancel at the intersection and a biplanar shear loop is formed. The expansion of the loops and their cross slip leads to the severely work hardened layer surrounding a growing void. Calculations were carried out on voids with different sizes, and a size dependence of the stress response to emitted dislocations was observed, in disagreement with the Gurson model[1] which is scale independent. Calculations were also carried out for a void at the interface between two grains.

  14. Cognitive response to a cold pressor challenge in high and low blood pressure reactive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiden, L A; Larkin, K T; Knowlton, G E

    1991-01-01

    To examine the relationship between cognitive and cardiovascular reactions to a cold pressor challenge, 20 high and 20 low blood-pressure-reactive males were identified. Subjects were trained using a think-aloud procedure and asked to report their thoughts aloud during task presentation. In comparison to low-reactors, high-reactive subjects exhibited greater increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but not heart rate, in response to the task. High-reactive subjects reported fewer distracting self-statements than low-reactors during the task. No group differences in positive, neutral, or negative self-statements were observed. These findings corroborate the importance of distraction strategies in mediating acute cardiovascular reactions to stress.

  15. Coupling effects of void size and void shape on the growth of prolate ellipsoidal microvoid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minsheng Huang; Zhenhuan Li; Cheng Wang

    2005-01-01

    The combined effects of void size and void shape on the void growth are studied by using the classical spectrum method. An infinite solid containing an isolated prolate spheroidal void is considered to depict the void shape effect and the Fleck-Hutchinson phenomenological strain gradient plasticity theory is employed to capture the size effects. It is found that the combined effects of void size and void shape are mainly controlled by the remote stress triaxiality. Based on this, a new size-dependent void growth model similar to the Rice-Tracey model is proposed and an important conclusion about the size-dependent void growth is drawn: the growth rate of the void with radius smaller than a critical radius rc may be ignored. It is interesting that rc is a material constant independent of the initial void shape and the remote stress triaxiality.

  16. Children's parasympathetic reactivity to specific emotions moderates response to intervention for early-onset aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa M; Greenberg, Mark; Bierman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Following theories that individual differences in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) denote differential sensitivity to environmental influences, this study examines whether differences in RSA reactivity to specific emotional challenges predict differential response to intervention. We present data from a randomized clinical trial of a targeted intervention for early onset aggression. In collaboration with a high-risk urban school district, 207 kindergarten children (73% African American, 66% male), identified by their teachers as having high levels of aggressive and disruptive behavior, were recruited. All children received a universal social-emotional curriculum. One hundred children were randomly assigned to an additional intervention consisting of weekly peer-based social skills training. Complete RSA data were available for 139 of the children. Teacher-reported externalizing symptoms and emotion regulation in 1st grade (post intervention) were examined controlling for baseline levels. First-grade peer nominations of aggressive behavior, controlling for baseline nominations, were also examined as outcomes. No effect of resting RSA was found. However, greater reactivity to anger was associated with higher externalizing symptoms and lower emotion regulation skills in 1st grade relative to low reactive children. Lower reactivity to fear was associated with greater improvement over time, an effect that was enhanced in the targeted intervention condition. Results suggest that measures of affective reactivity may provide insight into children's capacity to benefit from different types of interventions.

  17. CT measurements of SAP voids in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Sara; Bentz, Dale P.; Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2010-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning is used to determine the SAP void distribution in hardened concrete. Three different approaches are used to analyse a binary data set created from CT measurement. One approach classifies a cluster of connected, empty voxels (volumetric pixel of a 3D image......) as one void, whereas the other two approaches are able to classify a cluster of connected, empty voxels as a number of individual voids. Superabsorbent polymers (SAP) have been used to incorporate air into concrete. An advantage of using SAP is that it enables control of the amount and size...... of the created air voids. The results indicate the presence of void clusters. To identify the individual voids, special computational approaches are needed. The addition of SAP results in a dominant peak in two of the three air void distributions. Based on the position (void diameter) of the peak, it is possible...

  18. CT measurements of SAP voids in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Sara; Bentz, Dale P.; Hasholt, Marianne Tange;

    2010-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning is used to determine the SAP void distribution in hardened concrete. Three different approaches are used to analyse a binary data set created from CT measurement. One approach classifies a cluster of connected, empty voxels (volumetric pixel of a 3D image......) as one void, whereas the other two approaches are able to classify a cluster of connected, empty voxels as a number of individual voids. Superabsorbent polymers (SAP) have been used to incorporate air into concrete. An advantage of using SAP is that it enables control of the amount and size...... of the created air voids. The results indicate the presence of void clusters. To identify the individual voids, special computational approaches are needed. The addition of SAP results in a dominant peak in two of the three air void distributions. Based on the position (void diameter) of the peak, it is possible...

  19. Visualization of tumor vascular reactivity in response to respiratory challenges by optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoon Sup; Lee, Songhyun; Lee, Kiri; Eom, Tae Joong; Kim, Jae G.

    2016-02-01

    We previously reported the potential of using vascular reactivity during respiratory challenges as a marker to predict the response of breast tumor to chemotherapy in a rat model by using a continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy. However, it cannot visualize how the vascular reactivity from tumor vessel can predict the tumor response to its treatment. In this study, we utilized a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system to visualize vascular reactivity of both tumor and normal vasculature during respiratory challenges in a mouse model. We adapted intensity based Doppler variance algorithm to draw angiogram from the ear of mouse (8-week-old Balb/c nu/nu). Animals were anesthetized using 1.5% isoflurane, and the body temperature was maintained by a heating pad. Inhalational gas was switched from air (10min) to 100% oxygen (10min), and a pulse oximeter was used to monitor arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate. OCT angiograms were acquired 5 min after the onset of each gas. The vasoconstriction effect of hyperoxic gas on vasculature was shown by subtracting an en-face image acquired during 100% oxygen from the image acquired during air inhalation. The quantitative change in the vessel diameter was measured from the en-face OCT images of the individual blood vessels. The percentage of blood vessel diameter reduction varied from 1% to 12% depending on arterial, capillary, or venous blood vessel. The vascular reactivity change during breast tumor progression and post chemotherapy will be monitored by OCT angiography.

  20. Size-Effects in Void Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2005-01-01

    The size-effect on ductile void growth in metals is investigated. The analysis is based on unit cell models both of arrays of cylindrical voids under plane strain deformation, as well as arrays of spherical voids using an axisymmetric model. A recent finite strain generalization of two higher order...

  1. Reactive oxygen species-dependent wound responses in animals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Mittler, Ron

    2012-12-15

    Animals and plants evolved sophisticated mechanisms that regulate their responses to mechanical injury. Wound response in animals mainly promotes wound healing processes, nerve cell regeneration, and immune system responses at the vicinity of the wound site. In contrast, wound response in plants is primarily directed at sealing the wound site via deposition of various compounds and generating systemic signals that activate multiple defense mechanisms in remote tissues. Despite these differences between animals and plants, recent studies have shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play very common signaling and coordination roles in the wound responses of both systems. This review provides an update on recent findings related to ROS-regulated coordination of intercellular communications and signal transduction during wound response in plants and animals. In particular, differences and similarities in H2O2-dependent long-distance signaling between zebrafish and Arabidopsis thaliana are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Neuroticism and responsiveness to error feedback: adaptive self-regulation versus affective reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael D; Moeller, Sara K; Fetterman, Adam K

    2010-10-01

    Responsiveness to negative feedback has been seen as functional by those who emphasize the value of reflecting on such feedback in self-regulating problematic behaviors. On the other hand, the very same responsiveness has been viewed as dysfunctional by its link to punishment sensitivity and reactivity. The present 4 studies, involving 203 undergraduate participants, sought to reconcile such discrepant views in the context of the trait of neuroticism. In cognitive tasks, individuals were given error feedback when they made mistakes. It was found that greater tendencies to slow down following error feedback were associated with higher levels of accuracy at low levels of neuroticism but lower levels of accuracy at high levels of neuroticism. Individual differences in neuroticism thus appear crucial in understanding whether behavioral alterations following negative feedback reflect proactive versus reactive mechanisms and processes. Implications for understanding the processing basis of neuroticism and adaptive self-regulation are discussed.

  3. Redshift-space distortions around voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Taylor, Andy; Peacock, John A.; Padilla, Nelson

    2016-11-01

    We have derived estimators for the linear growth rate of density fluctuations using the cross-correlation function (CCF) of voids and haloes in redshift space. In linear theory, this CCF contains only monopole and quadrupole terms. At scales greater than the void radius, linear theory is a good match to voids traced out by haloes; small-scale random velocities are unimportant at these radii, only tending to cause small and often negligible elongation of the CCF near its origin. By extracting the monopole and quadrupole from the CCF, we measure the linear growth rate without prior knowledge of the void profile or velocity dispersion. We recover the linear growth parameter β to 9 per cent precision from an effective volume of 3( h-1Gpc)3 using voids with radius >25 h-1Mpc. Smaller voids are predominantly sub-voids, which may be more sensitive to the random velocity dispersion; they introduce noise and do not help to improve measurements. Adding velocity dispersion as a free parameter allows us to use information at radii as small as half of the void radius. The precision on β is reduced to 5 per cent. Voids show diverse shapes in redshift space, and can appear either elongated or flattened along the line of sight. This can be explained by the competing amplitudes of the local density contrast, plus the radial velocity profile and its gradient. The distortion pattern is therefore determined solely by the void profile and is different for void-in-cloud and void-in-void. This diversity of redshift-space void morphology complicates measurements of the Alcock-Paczynski effect using voids.

  4. An analytical model for porous single crystals with ellipsoidal voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbiakop, A.; Constantinescu, A.; Danas, K.

    2015-11-01

    A rate-(in)dependent constitutive model for porous single crystals with arbitrary crystal anisotropy (e.g., FCC, BCC, HCP, etc.) containing general ellipsoidal voids is developed. The proposed model, denoted as modified variational model (MVAR), is based on the nonlinear variational homogenization method, which makes use of a linear comparison porous material to estimate the response of the nonlinear porous single crystal. Periodic multi-void finite element simulations are used in order to validate the MVAR for a large number of parameters including cubic (FCC, BCC) and hexagonal (HCP) crystal anisotropy, various creep exponents (i.e., nonlinearity), several stress triaxiality ratios, general void shapes and orientations and various porosity levels. The MVAR model, which involves a priori no calibration parameters, is found to be in good agreement with the finite element results for all cases considered in the rate-dependent context. The model is then used in a predictive manner to investigate the complex response of porous single crystals in several cases with strong coupling between the anisotropy of the crystal and the (morphological) anisotropy induced by the shape and orientation of the voids. Finally, a simple way of calibrating the MVAR with just two adjustable parameters is depicted in the rate-independent context so that an excellent agreement with the FE simulation results is obtained. In this last case, this proposed model can be thought as a generalization of the Gurson model in the context of porous single crystals and general ellipsoidal void shapes and orientations.

  5. Nanovoid growth in BCC α-Fe: influences of initial void geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuozhi; Su, Yanqing

    2016-12-01

    The growth of voids has a great impact on the mechanical properties of ductile materials by altering their microstructures. Exploring the process of void growth at the nanoscale helps in understanding the dynamic fracture of metals. While some very recent studies looked into the effects of the initial geometry of an elliptic void on the plastic deformation of face-centered cubic metals, a systematic study of the initial void ellipticity and orientation angle in body-centered cubic (BCC) metals is still lacking. In this paper, large scale molecular dynamics simulations with millions of atoms are conducted, investigating the void growth process during tensile loading of metallic thin films in BCC α-Fe. Our simulations elucidate the intertwined influences on void growth of the initial ellipticity and initial orientation angle of the void. It is shown that these two geometric parameters play an important role in the stress-strain response, the nucleation and evolution of defects, as well as the void size/outline evolution in α-Fe thin films. Results suggest that, together with void size, different initial void geometries should be taken into account if a continuum model is to be applied to nanoscale damage progression.

  6. The life and death of cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Sutter, P M; Falck, Bridget; Onions, Julian; Hamaus, Nico; Knebe, Alexander; Srisawat, Chaichalit; Schneider, Aurel

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the formation, growth, merger history, movement, and destruction of cosmic voids detected via the watershed transform in a cosmological N-body dark matter {\\Lambda}CDM simulation. By adapting a method used to construct halo merger trees, we are able to trace individual voids back to their initial appearance and record the merging and evolution of their progenitors at high redshift. For the scales of void sizes captured in our simulation, we find that the void formation rate peaks at scale factor 0.3, which coincides with a growth in the void hierarchy and the emergence of dark energy. Voids of all sizes appear at all scale factors, though the median initial void size decreases with time. When voids become detectable they have nearly their present-day volumes. Almost all voids have relatively stable growth rates and suffer only infrequent minor mergers. Dissolution of a void via merging is very rare. Instead, most voids maintain their distinct identity as annexed subvoids of a larger parent. The...

  7. The star formation activity in cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Ricciardelli, Elena; Varela, Jesus; Quilis, Vicent

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of cosmic voids identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we study the star formation activity of void galaxies. The properties of galaxies living in voids are compared with those of galaxies living in the void shells and with a control sample, representing the general galaxy population. Void galaxies appear to form stars more efficiently than shell galaxies and the control sample. This result can not be interpreted as a consequence of the bias towards low masses in underdense regions, as void galaxy subsamples with the same mass distribution as the control sample also show statistically different specific star formation rates. This highlights the fact that galaxy evolution in voids is slower with respect to the evolution of the general population. Nevertheless, when only the star forming galaxies are considered, we find that the star formation rate is insensitive to the environment, as the main sequence is remarkably constant in the three samples under consideration. This fact...

  8. The void-size effect on plastic flow localization in the Gurson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Wen; Yonggang, Huang; Keh-Chih, Hwang

    2004-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that the size of microvoids has a significant effect on the void growth rate. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether the void size effect can influence the plastic flow localization in ductile materials. We have used the extended Gurson's dilatational plasticity theory, which accounts for the void size effect, to study the plastic flow localization in porous solids with long cylindrical voids. The localization model of Rice is adopted, in which the material inside the band may display a different response from that outside the band at the incipient plastic flow localization. The present study shows that it has little effect on the shear band angle.

  9. THE VOID-SIZE EFFECT ON PLASTIC FLOW LOCALIZATION IN THE GURSON MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Jie; HUANG Yonggang; HWANG Keh-Chih

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the size of microvoids has a significant effect on the void growth rate. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether the void size effect can influence the plastic flow localization in ductile materials. We have used the extended Gurson's dilatational plasticity theory, which accounts for the void size effect, to study the plastic flow localization in porous solids with long cylindrical voids. The localization model of Rice is adopted, in which the material inside the band may display a different response from that outside the band at the incipient plastic flow localization. The present study shows that it has little effect on the shear band angle.

  10. Systemic atherosclerosis and voiding symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniel, A Ozgur; Ergenoglu, A Mete; Meseri, Reci; Ari, Anıl; Sancar, Ceren; Itil, Ismail Mete

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of atherosclerosis on the storage and voiding symptoms of the bladder in women with overactive bladder (OAB). We retrospectively reviewed the charts of women with OAB who were evaluated between 2013 and 2015 in our urogynecology unit. Charts were assessed for history, examination findings, urinary diary, quality of life (QOL) questionnaires, urodynamic studies (UDSs), and four main risk factors for atherosclerosis: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and hyperlipidemia. In a previous study, these were defined as vascular risk factors. Cases were excluded for insufficient data, diabetes mellitus with dysregulated blood glucose, or prolapse greater than 1cm to avoid confusing bladder outlet obstruction. We included 167 eligible cases in this study. We evaluated storage and voiding symptoms such as frequency, nocturia, residual urine volume, and voiding difficulties and UDS findings such as maximum bladder capacity, first desire, strong desire, detrusor overactivity, and bladder contractility index. The vascular risk score was categorized as "no risk" if the woman did not have any of the four risk factors and "at risk" if she had any of the factors. Independent sample t-test and chi-square tests were performed for analyses. Among the participants (n=167), 71.9% had at least one vascular risk factor. Those who were at risk were facing significantly more wet-type OAB (p=0.003) and nocturia (p=0.023). Moreover, mean age (p=0.008) and mean gravidity (p=0.020) were significantly higher in the at-risk group, whereas mean total nocturia QOL questionnaire scores (p=0.029) were significantly lower. Our findings suggest that aging and atherosclerosis may be associated with severe OAB and poorer QOL. Nocturia and related parameters of poor quality can be explained by impaired bladder neck perfusion. Future trials need to assess vascular and molecular changes in women with OAB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nocturia: The circadian voiding disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wook Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nocturia is a prevalent condition of waking to void during the night. The concept of nocturia has evolved from being a symptomatic aspect of disease associated with the prostate or bladder to a form of lower urinary tract disorder. However, recent advances in circadian biology and sleep science suggest that it might be important to consider nocturia as a form of circadian dysfunction. In the current review, nocturia is reexamined with an introduction to sleep disorders and recent findings in circadian biology in an attempt to highlight the importance of rediscovering nocturia as a problem of chronobiology.

  12. Large-scale clustering of cosmic voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwan Chuen; Hamaus, Nico; Desjacques, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    We study the clustering of voids using N -body simulations and simple theoretical models. The excursion-set formalism describes fairly well the abundance of voids identified with the watershed algorithm, although the void formation threshold required is quite different from the spherical collapse value. The void cross bias bc is measured and its large-scale value is found to be consistent with the peak background split results. A simple fitting formula for bc is found. We model the void auto-power spectrum taking into account the void biasing and exclusion effect. A good fit to the simulation data is obtained for voids with radii ≳30 Mpc h-1 , especially when the void biasing model is extended to 1-loop order. However, the best-fit bias parameters do not agree well with the peak-background results. Being able to fit the void auto-power spectrum is particularly important not only because it is the direct observable in galaxy surveys, but also our method enables us to treat the bias parameters as nuisance parameters, which are sensitive to the techniques used to identify voids.

  13. The dark matter of galaxy voids

    CERN Document Server

    Sutter, P M; Wandelt, Benjamin D; Weinberg, David H; Warren, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    How do observed voids relate to the underlying dark matter distribution? To examine the spatial distribution of dark matter contained within voids identified in galaxy surveys, we apply Halo Occupation Distribution models representing sparsely and densely sampled galaxy surveys to a high-resolution N-body simulation. We compare these galaxy voids to voids found in the halo distribution, low-resolution dark matter, and high-resolution dark matter. We find that voids at all scales in densely sampled surveys - and medium- to large-scale voids in sparse surveys - trace the same underdensities as dark matter, but they are larger in radius by ~20%, they have somewhat shallower density profiles, and they have centers offset by ~0.4Rv rms. However, in void-to-void comparison we find that shape estimators are less robust to sampling, and the largest voids in sparsely sampled surveys suffer fragmentation at their edges. We find that voids in galaxy surveys always correspond to underdensities in the dark matter, though ...

  14. The dark matter of galaxy voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, P. M.; Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Weinberg, David H.; Warren, Michael S.

    2014-03-01

    How do observed voids relate to the underlying dark matter distribution? To examine the spatial distribution of dark matter contained within voids identified in galaxy surveys, we apply Halo Occupation Distribution models representing sparsely and densely sampled galaxy surveys to a high-resolution N-body simulation. We compare these galaxy voids to voids found in the halo distribution, low-resolution dark matter and high-resolution dark matter. We find that voids at all scales in densely sampled surveys - and medium- to large-scale voids in sparse surveys - trace the same underdensities as dark matter, but they are larger in radius by ˜20 per cent, they have somewhat shallower density profiles and they have centres offset by ˜ 0.4Rv rms. However, in void-to-void comparison we find that shape estimators are less robust to sampling, and the largest voids in sparsely sampled surveys suffer fragmentation at their edges. We find that voids in galaxy surveys always correspond to underdensities in the dark matter, though the centres may be offset. When this offset is taken into account, we recover almost identical radial density profiles between galaxies and dark matter. All mock catalogues used in this work are available at http://www.cosmicvoids.net.

  15. The Beckoning Void in Moravagine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen K. Bellstrom

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chapter «Mascha,» lying at the heart of Cendrars's Moravagine , contains within it a variety of images and themes suggestive of emptiness. The philosophy of nihilism is exemplified in the motivations and actions of the group of terrorists seeking to plunge Russia into revolutionary chaos. Mascha's anatomical orifice, symbolizing both a biological and a psychological fault, and the abortion of her child, paralleled by the abortion of the revolutionary ideal among her comrades, are also emblematic of the chapter's central void. Moreover, Cendrars builds the theme of hollowness by describing Moravagine with images of omission, such as «empan» (space or span, «absent,» and «étranger.» Moravagine's presence, in fact, characteristically causes an undercurrent of doubt and uncertainty about the nature of reality to become overt. It is this parodoxical presence which seems to cause the narrator (and consequently the narrative to «lose» a day at the most critical moment of the story. By plunging the reader into the narrator's lapsus memoriae , Cendrars aims at creating a feeling of the kind of mental and cosmic disorder for which Moravagine is the strategist and apologist. This technique of insufficiency is an active technique, even though it relies on the passive idea of removing explanation and connecting details. The reader is invited, or lured, into the central void of the novel and, faced with unresolvable dilemmas, becomes involved in the same disorder that was initially produced.

  16. Reactive oxygen species-mediated unfolded protein response pathways in preimplantation embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ihsan; Shah, Syed Zahid Ali; Jin, Yi; Li, Zhong-Shu; Ullah, Obaid

    2017-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated responses are critical to embryonic development in the challenging in vitro environment. ROS production increases during early embryonic development with the increase in protein requirements for cell survival and growth. The ER is a multifunctional cellular organelle responsible for protein folding, modification, and cellular homeostasis. ER stress is activated by a variety of factors including ROS. Such stress leads to activation of the adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR), which restores homeostasis. However, chronic stress can exceed the toleration level of the ER, resulting in cellular apoptosis. In this review, we briefly describe the generation and impact of ROS in preimplantation embryo development, the ROS-mediated activation mechanism of the UPR via the ER, and the subsequent activation of signaling pathways following ER stress in preimplantation embryos. PMID:28057903

  17. Universal density profile for cosmic voids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P M; Wandelt, Benjamin D

    2014-06-27

    We present a simple empirical function for the average density profile of cosmic voids, identified via the watershed technique in ΛCDM N-body simulations. This function is universal across void size and redshift, accurately describing a large radial range of scales around void centers with only two free parameters. In analogy to halo density profiles, these parameters describe the scale radius and the central density of voids. While we initially start with a more general four-parameter model, we find two of its parameters to be redundant, as they follow linear trends with the scale radius in two distinct regimes of the void sample, separated by its compensation scale. Assuming linear theory, we derive an analytic formula for the velocity profile of voids and find an excellent agreement with the numerical data as well. In our companion paper [Sutter et al., arXiv:1309.5087 [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. (to be published)

  18. Air void structure and frost resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2014-01-01

    is proportional to the product of total air content and specific surface. In all 4 cases, the conclusion is concurrent that the parameter of total surface area of air voids performs equally well or better than the spacing factor when linking air void characteristics to frost resistance (salt frost scaling...... will take place in the air void, being feed from the capillary, but without pressure build-up in the capillary. If the capillary is not connected to an air void, ice formation will take place in the capillary pore, where it can generate substantial pressure. Like this, frost resistance depends......This article compiles results from 4 independent laboratory studies. In each study, the same type of concrete is tested at least 10 times, the air void structure being the only variable. For each concrete mix both air void analysis of the hardened concrete and a salt frost scaling test...

  19. Void Profile from Planck Lensing Potential Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantavat, Teeraparb; Sawangwit, Utane; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2017-02-01

    We use the lensing potential map from Planck CMB lensing reconstruction analysis and the “Public Cosmic Void Catalog” to measure the stacked void lensing potential. We have made an attempt to fit the HSW void profile parameters from the stacked lensing potential. In this profile, four parameters are needed to describe the shape of voids with different characteristic radii R V . However, we have found that after reducing the background noise by subtracting the average background, there is a residue lensing power left in the data. The inclusion of the environment shifting parameter, {γ }V, is necessary to get a better fit to the data with the residue lensing power. We divide the voids into two redshift bins: cmass1 (0.45Digital Sky Survey voids reside in an underdense region.

  20. Cosmology with void-galaxy correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Wandelt, Benjamin D; Sutter, P M; Lavaux, Guilhem; Warren, Michael S

    2014-01-31

    Galaxy bias, the unknown relationship between the clustering of galaxies and the underlying dark matter density field is a major hurdle for cosmological inference from large-scale structure. While traditional analyses focus on the absolute clustering amplitude of high-density regions mapped out by galaxy surveys, we propose a relative measurement that compares those to the underdense regions, cosmic voids. On the basis of realistic mock catalogs we demonstrate that cross correlating galaxies and voids opens up the possibility to calibrate galaxy bias and to define a static ruler thanks to the observable geometric nature of voids. We illustrate how the clustering of voids is related to mass compensation and show that volume-exclusion significantly reduces the degree of stochasticity in their spatial distribution. Extracting the spherically averaged distribution of galaxies inside voids from their cross correlations reveals a remarkable concordance with the mass-density profile of voids.

  1. NEURAL REACTIVITY TO REWARD AS A PREDICTOR OF COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY RESPONSE IN ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie L; Kujawa, Autumn; Kennedy, Amy E; Shankman, Stewart A; Langenecker, Scott A; Phan, K Luan; Klumpp, Heide

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a well-established treatment for anxiety and depression; however, response to CBT is heterogeneous across patients and many remain symptomatic after therapy, raising the need to identify prospective predictors for treatment planning. Altered neural processing of reward has been implicated in both depression and anxiety, and improving hedonic capacity is a goal of CBT. However, little is known about how neural response to reward relates to CBT outcomes in depression and anxiety. The current study used the reward positivity (RewP) event-related potential (ERP) component to examine whether neural reactivity to reward would predict CBT response in a sample of patients with anxiety without depression (n = 30) and comorbid anxiety and depression (CAD, n = 22). Participants completed a guessing reward ERP paradigm before completing 12 weeks of standard CBT. The majority of the sample (68%; 35 out of 52 patients) responded to treatment, and those with a reduced RewP at baseline were more likely to respond to treatment. A reduced RewP was also associated with a greater pre-to-post CBT reduction in depressive symptoms among individuals with CAD, but not among individuals with pure anxiety. CBT may be most beneficial in reducing depressive symptoms for individuals who demonstrate decreased reward reactivity prior to treatment. CBT may target reward brain function, leading to greater improvement in symptoms. These effects may be strongest, and therefore most meaningful, for individuals with reward-processing deficits prior to treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Voids in cosmological simulations over cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtak, Radosław; Powell, Devon; Abel, Tom

    2016-06-01

    We study evolution of voids in cosmological simulations using a new method for tracing voids over cosmic time. The method is based on tracking watershed basins (contiguous regions around density minima) of well-developed voids at low redshift, on a regular grid of density field. It enables us to construct a robust and continuous mapping between voids at different redshifts, from initial conditions to the present time. We discuss how the new approach eliminates strong spurious effects of numerical origin when voids' evolution is traced by matching voids between successive snapshots (by analogy to halo merger trees). We apply the new method to a cosmological simulation of a standard Λ-cold-dark-matter cosmological model and study evolution of basic properties of typical voids (with effective radii 6 h-1 Mpc < Rv < 20 h-1 Mpc at redshift z = 0) such as volumes, shapes, matter density distributions and relative alignments. The final voids at low redshifts appear to retain a significant part of the configuration acquired in initial conditions. Shapes of voids evolve in a collective way which barely modifies the overall distribution of the axial ratios. The evolution appears to have a weak impact on mutual alignments of voids implying that the present state is in large part set up by the primordial density field. We present evolution of dark matter density profiles computed on isodensity surfaces which comply with the actual shapes of voids. Unlike spherical density profiles, this approach enables us to demonstrate development of theoretically predicted bucket-like shape of the final density profiles indicating a wide flat core and a sharp transition to high-density void walls.

  3. Ethylene response factor 6 is a regulator of reactive oxygen species signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Sewelam

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced in plant cells in response to diverse biotic and abiotic stresses as well as during normal growth and development. Although a large number of transcription factor (TF genes are up- or down-regulated by ROS, currently very little is known about the functions of these TFs during oxidative stress. In this work, we examined the role of ERF6 (ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR6, an AP2/ERF domain-containing TF, during oxidative stress responses in Arabidopsis. Mutant analyses showed that NADPH oxidase (RbohD and calcium signaling are required for ROS-responsive expression of ERF6. erf6 insertion mutant plants showed reduced growth and increased H2O2 and anthocyanin levels. Expression analyses of selected ROS-responsive genes during oxidative stress identified several differentially expressed genes in the erf6 mutant. In particular, a number of ROS responsive genes, such as ZAT12, HSFs, WRKYs, MAPKs, RBOHs, DHAR1, APX4, and CAT1 were more strongly induced by H2O2 in erf6 plants than in wild-type. In contrast, MDAR3, CAT3, VTC2 and EX1 showed reduced expression levels in the erf6 mutant. Taken together, our results indicate that ERF6 plays an important role as a positive antioxidant regulator during plant growth and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  4. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  5. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Ayers, Paul W., E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Gázquez, José L., E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Vela, Alberto, E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  6. Full scale stability and void fraction measurements for the ATRIUM trademark 10XM BWR fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehle, Franz; Velten, Roger; Kronenberg, Juris; Beisiegel, Achim [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Pruitt, D.W.; Greene, K.R. [AREVA NP Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Farawila, Y.M. [Farawila et al., Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes recent advances in BWR fuel testing at AREVA NP's KATHY loop including stability and void fraction measurements. The stability tests for the ATRIUM trademark 10XM bundle with corner PLFR's were expanded in scope compared with previous campaigns to include simulated reactivity and power feedback essentially reproducing BWR operational environment. The oscillation magnitude was allowed to grow to explore inlet flow reversal and cyclical dryout and rewetting. The void fraction measurements employed a gamma ray computed tomography technique that reveals not only the average but the detailed sub-channel void distribution, and the range of measured void fraction has been expanded to higher values than was previously attained. With the completion of the required licensing tests and stability performance demonstration, the ATRIUM trademark 10XM is available and fully qualified for reload supply. (orig.)

  7. Optimization of Reactive Blue 21 removal by Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Reza Sohrabi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Since Reactive Blue 21 (RB21 is one of the dye compounds which is harmful to human life, a simple and sensitive method to remove this pollutant from wastewater is using Nano Zero-Valent Iron (NZVI catalyst. In this paper, a Central Composite Rotatable Design (CCRD was employed for response surface modeling to optimize experimental conditions of the RB21 removal from aqueous solution. The significance and adequacy of the model were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Four independent variables—including catalyst amount (0.1–0.9 g, pH (3.5–9.5, removal time (30–150 s and dye concentration (10–50 mg/L—were transformed to coded values and consequently second order quadratic model was built to predict the responses. The result showed that under optimized experimental conditions the removal of RB21 was over 95%.

  8. Size effects on void growth in single crystals with distributed voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Kysar, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of void size on void growth in single crystals with uniformly distributed cylindrical voids is studied numerically using a finite deformation strain gradient crystal plasticity theory with an intrinsic length parameter. A plane strain cell model is analyzed for a single crystal...

  9. The darkness that shaped the void: dark energy and cosmic voids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, E. G. Patrick; van de Weygaert, Rien; Dolag, Klaus; Pettorino, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    We assess the sensitivity of void shapes to the nature of dark energy that was pointed out in recent studies and also investigate whether or not void shapes are useable as an observational probe in galaxy redshift surveys. Our focus is on the evolution of the mean void ellipticity and its underlying

  10. The darkness that shaped the void : Dark energy and cosmic voids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, E. G. Patrick; van de Weygaert, Rien; Dolag, Klaus; Pettorino, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    We assess the sensitivity of void shapes to the nature of dark energy that was pointed out in recent studies and also investigate whether or not void shapes are useable as an observational probe in galaxy redshift surveys. Our focus is on the evolution of the mean void ellipticity and its underlying

  11. TRANC – a novel fast-response converter to measure total reactive atmospheric nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wolff

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The input and loss of plant available nitrogen (reactive nitrogen: Nr from/to the atmosphere can be an important factor for the productivity of ecosystems and thus for its carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. We present a novel converter for reactive nitrogen (TRANC: Total Reactive Atmospheric Nitrogen Converter, which offers the opportunity to quantify the sum of all airborne reactive nitrogen compounds (∑Nr in high time resolution. The basic concept of the TRANC is the full conversion of all Nr to nitrogen monoxide (NO within two reaction steps. Initially, reduced Nr compounds are being oxidised, and oxidised Nr compounds are thermally converted to lower oxidation states. Particulate Nr is being sublimated and oxidised or reduced afterwards. In a second step, remaining higher nitrogen oxides or those generated in the first step are catalytically converted to NO with carbon monoxide used as reduction gas. The converter is combined with a fast response chemiluminescence detector (CLD for NO analysis and its performance was tested for the most relevant gaseous and particulate Nr species under both laboratory and field conditions. Recovery rates during laboratory tests for NH3 and NO2 were found to be 95 and 99%, respectively, and 97% when the two gases were combined. In-field longterm stability over an 11-month period was approved by a value of 91% for NO2. Effective conversion was also found for ammonium and nitrate containing particles. The recovery rate of total ambient Nr was tested against the sum of individual measurements of NH3, HNO3, HONO, NH4+, NO3−, and NOx using a combination of different well-established devices. The results show that the TRANC-CLD system precisely captures fluctuations in ∑Nr concentrations and also matches the sum of all individual Nr compounds measured by the different single techniques. The TRANC features a specific design with very short distance between the sample air inlet and the place where the thermal

  12. Ideological reactivity: Political conservatism and brain responsivity to emotional and neutral stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritt, Shona M; Peterson, Jordan B; Page-Gould, Elizabeth; Inzlicht, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Conservatives are often thought to have a negativity bias-responding more intensely to negative than positive information. Yet, recent research has found that greater endorsement of conservative beliefs follows from both positive and negative emotion inductions. This suggests that the role of affect in political thought may not be restricted to negative valence, and more attention should be given to how conservatives and liberals respond to a wider range of stimulation. In this vein, we examined neural responses to a full range of affective stimuli, allowing us to examine how self-reported ideology moderated these responses. Specifically, we explored the relationship between political orientation and 2 event-related potentials (1 late and 1 early) previously shown to covary with the subjective motivational salience of stimuli-in response to photographs with standardized ratings of arousal and valence. At late time points, conservatives exhibited sustained heightened reactivity, compared with liberals, specifically in response to relatively unarousing and neutral stimuli. At early time points, conservatives exhibited somewhat enhanced neural activity in response to all stimulus types compared with liberals. These results may suggest that conservatives experience a wide variety of stimuli in their environment with increased motivational salience, including positive, neutral, and low-arousal stimuli. No effects of valence were found in this investigation. Such findings have implications for the development and refinement of psychological conceptions of political orientation. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Neural Reactivity to Angry Faces Predicts Treatment Response in Pediatric Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunford, Nora; Kujawa, Autumn; Fitzgerald, Kate D; Swain, James E; Hanna, Gregory L; Koschmann, Elizabeth; Simpson, David; Connolly, Sucheta; Monk, Christopher S; Phan, K Luan

    2017-02-01

    Although cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy are evidence-based treatments for pediatric anxiety, many youth with anxiety disorders fail to respond to these treatments. Given limitations of clinical measures in predicting treatment response, identifying neural predictors is timely. In this study, 35 anxious youth (ages 7-19 years) completed an emotional face-matching task during which the late positive potential (LPP), an event-related potential (ERP) component that indexes sustained attention towards emotional stimuli, was measured. Following the ERP measurement, youth received CBT or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment, and the LPP was examined as a predictor of treatment response. Findings indicated that, accounting for pre-treatment anxiety severity, neural reactivity to emotional faces predicted anxiety severity post- CBT and SSRI treatment such that enhanced electrocortical response to angry faces was associated with better treatment response. An enhanced LPP to angry faces may predict treatment response insofar as it may reflect greater emotion dysregulation or less avoidance and/or enhanced engagement with environmental stimuli in general, including with treatment.

  14. Elevated and cross-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells in bee and wasp venom allergic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sumithra; Aslam, Aamir; Misbah, Siraj A; Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Moody, D Branch; Ogg, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The role of CD1a-reactive T cells in human allergic disease is unknown. We have previously shown that circulating CD1a-reactive T cells recognize neolipid antigens generated by bee and wasp venom phospholipase, and here tested the hypothesis that venom-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells associate with venom allergy. Circulating T cells from bee and wasp venom allergic individuals, before and during immunotherapy, were exposed to CD1a-transfected K562 cells in the presence of wasp or bee venom. T-cell response was evaluated based on IFNγ, GM-CSF, and IL-13 cytokine production. Venom allergic individuals showed significantly higher frequencies of IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-13 producing CD1a-reactive T cells responsive to venom and venom-derived phospholipase than healthy individuals. Venom-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells were cross-responsive between wasp and bee suggesting shared pathways of allergenicity. Frequencies of CD1a-reactive T cells were initially induced during subcutaneous immunotherapy, peaking by weeks 5, but then reduced despite escalation of antigen dose. Our current understanding of venom allergy and immunotherapy is largely based on peptide and protein-specific T cell and antibody responses. Here, we show that lipid antigens and CD1a-reactive T cells associate with the allergic response. These data have implications for mechanisms of allergy and approaches to immunotherapy. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Comment on: ``Influence of inter-granular void ratio on monotonic and cyclic undrained shear response of sandy soils'' by M. Belkhatir, A. Arab, H. Missoum, T. Schanz [C. R. Mecanique 338 (2010) 290-303

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Mizanur

    2011-01-01

    The authors should be commended for their interesting experimental work on sandy soils presented in Belkhatir et al. (2010) [1]. They used the inter-granular void ratio, e, to interpret the experimental results and developed some useful correlations with e. However, the Note fails to address the further development of e over a decade to a more generalized form of equivalent granular void ratio, e. This comment aims at adding missing literature on e and presents a re-interpretation of the experimental data based on e. The advantages of using e over e are significant and explained in subsequent sections.

  16. Voids in cosmological simulations over cosmic time

    CERN Document Server

    Wojtak, Radosław; Abel, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We study evolution of voids in cosmological simulations using a new method for tracing voids over cosmic time. The method is based on tracking watershed basins (contiguous regions around density minima) of well developed voids at low redshift, on a regular grid of density field. It enables us to construct a robust and continuous mapping between voids at different redshifts, from initial conditions to the present time. We discuss how the new approach eliminates strong spurious effects of numerical origin when voids evolution is traced by matching voids between successive snapshots (by analogy to halo merger trees). We apply the new method to a cosmological simulation of a standard LambdaCDM cosmological model and study evolution of basic properties of typical voids (with effective radii between 6Mpc/h and 20Mpc/h at redshift z=0) such as volumes, shapes, matter density distributions and relative alignments. The final voids at low redshifts appear to retain a significant part of the configuration acquired in in...

  17. A new geometrical approach to void statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, M C

    2014-01-01

    Modelling cosmic voids as spheres in Euclidean space, the notion of a de-Sitter configuration space is introduced. It is shown that a uniform distribution over this configuration space yields a power-law approximating the void size distribution in an intermediate range of volumes, as well as an estimate for the fractal dimension of the large scale structure.

  18. Tracing the gravitational potential using cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Nadathur, Seshadri; Crittenden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The properties of large underdensities in the distribution of galaxies in the Universe, known as cosmic voids, are potentially sensitive probes of fundamental physics. We use data from the MultiDark suite of N-body simulations and multiple halo occupation distribution mocks to study the relationship between galaxy voids and the gravitational potential $\\Phi$. We find that the majority of galaxy voids correspond to local density minima in larger-scale overdensities, and thus lie in potential wells. However, a subset of voids can be identified that closely trace maxima of the gravitational potential and thus stationary points of the velocity field. We identify a new void observable, $\\lambda_v$, which depends on a combination of the void size and the average galaxy density contrast within the void, and show that it provides a good proxy indicator of the potential at the void location. A simple linear scaling of $\\Phi$ as a function of $\\lambda_v$ is found to hold, independent of the redshift and properties of t...

  19. Simulation of dust voids in complex plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. J. Goedheer,; Land, V.

    2008-01-01

    In dusty radio-frequency (RF) discharges under micro-gravity conditions often a void is observed, a dust free region in the discharge center. This void is generated by the drag of the positive ions pulled out of the discharge by the electric field. We have developed a hydrodynamic model for dusty RF

  20. Assembly of filamentary void galaxy configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieder, Steven; van de Weijgaert, Rien; Cautun, Marius; Beygu, Burcu; Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation and evolution of filamentary configurations of dark matter haloes in voids. Our investigation uses the high-resolution Lambda cold dark matter simulation CosmoGrid to look for void systems resembling the VGS_31 elongated system of three interacting galaxies that was recently

  1. VIDE: The Void IDentification and Examination toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    Sutter, P M; Hamaus, Nico; Pisani, Alice; Wandelt, Benjamin D; Warren, Michael S; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Zivick, Paul; Mao, Qingqing; Thompson, Benjamin B

    2014-01-01

    We present VIDE, the Void IDentification and Examination toolkit, an open-source Python/C++ code for finding cosmic voids in galaxy redshift surveys and N-body simulations, characterizing their properties, and providing a platform for more detailed analysis. At its core, VIDE uses a greatly enhanced version of ZOBOV (Neyinck 2008) to calculate a Voronoi tessellation for estimating the density field and a watershed transform to construct voids. The watershed levels are used to place voids in a hierarchical tree. VIDE provides significant additional functionality for both pre- and post-processing: for example, VIDE can work with volume- or magnitude-limited galaxy samples with arbitrary survey geometries, or dark matter particles or halo catalogs in a variety of common formats. It can also randomly subsample inputs and includes a Halo Occupation Distribution model for constructing mock galaxy populations. VIDE outputs a summary of void properties in plain ASCII, and provides a Python API to perform many analysi...

  2. Modelling cross-reactivity and memory in the cellular adaptive immune response to influenza infection in the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ada W C; Cao, Pengxing; Heffernan, Jane M; McVernon, Jodie; Quinn, Kylie M; La Gruta, Nicole L; Laurie, Karen L; McCaw, James M

    2017-01-21

    The cellular adaptive immune response plays a key role in resolving influenza infection. Experiments where individuals are successively infected with different strains within a short timeframe provide insight into the underlying viral dynamics and the role of a cross-reactive immune response in resolving an acute infection. We construct a mathematical model of within-host influenza viral dynamics including three possible factors which determine the strength of the cross-reactive cellular adaptive immune response: the initial naive T cell number, the avidity of the interaction between T cells and the epitopes presented by infected cells, and the epitope abundance per infected cell. Our model explains the experimentally observed shortening of a second infection when cross-reactivity is present, and shows that memory in the cellular adaptive immune response is necessary to protect against a second infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Collapse and coalescence of spherical voids subject to intense shearing: studied in full 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Dahl, Jonas; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2012-01-01

    for a range of initial material configurations and loading conditions. In addition, a direct comparison to corresponding 2D cell model predictions for circular cylindrical voids under plane strain shearing is presented. A quantitatively good agreement of the two model configurations (2D vs. 3D) is obtained......Micro-mechanical 2D cell model studies have revealed ductile failure during intense shearing to be governed by the interaction of neighbouring voids, which collapse to micro-cracks and continuously rotate and elongate until coalescence occurs. For a three-dimensional void structure, this implies...... shape, void orientation etc. The objective of this work is to expand the range of stress triaxiality usually faced in 3D cell model studies, such that intense shearing is covered, and to bring forward details on the porosity and void shape evolution. The overall material response is presented...

  4. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species modulate innate immune response to influenza A virus in human nasal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin; Kim, Min-Ji; Park, Do Yang; Chung, Hyo Jin; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2015-07-01

    The innate immune system of the nasal epithelium serves as a first line of defense against invading respiratory viruses including influenza A virus (IAV). Recently, it was verified that interferon (IFN)-related immune responses play a critical role in local antiviral innate immunity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by exogenous pathogens has also been demonstrated in respiratory epithelial cells and modulation of ROS has been reported to be important for respiratory virus-induced innate immune mechanisms. Passage-2 normal human nasal epithelial (NHNE) cells were inoculated with IAV (WS/33, H1N1) to assess the sources of IAV-induced ROS and the relationship between ROS and IFN-related innate immune responses. Both STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation and the mRNA levels of IFN-stimulated genes, including Mx1, 2,5-OAS1, IFIT1, and CXCL10, were induced after IAV infection up to three days post infection. Similarly, we observed that mitochondrial ROS generation increased maximally at 2 days after IAV infection. After suppression of mitochondrial ROS generation, IAV-induced phosphorylation of STAT and mRNA levels of IFN-stimulated genes were attenuated and actually, viral titers of IAV were significantly higher in cases with scavenging ROS. Our findings suggest that mitochondrial ROS might be responsible for controlling IAV infection and may be potential sources of ROS generation, which is required to initiate an innate immune response in NHNE cells.

  5. OPTIMIZATION OF REACTIVE BLUE 19 DECOLORIZATION BY GANODERMA SP. USING RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1M. Mohammadian Fazli, *1A. R. Mesdaghinia, 1K. Naddafi, 1S. Nasseri , 1M. Yunesian, 2M. Mazaheri Assadi, 3S. Rezaie, 4H. Hamzehei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic dyes are extensively used in different industries. Dyes have adverse impacts such as visual effects, chemical oxygen demand, toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity characteristics. White rot fungi, due to extracellular enzyme system, are capable to degrade dyes and various xenobiotics. The aim of this study was to optimize decolorization of reactive blue 19 (RB19 dye using Ganoderma sp. fungus. Response Surface Methodology (RSM was used to study the effect of independent variables, namely glycerol concentration (15, 20 and 25 g/L, temperature (27, 30 and 33 oC and pH (5.5, 6.0 and 6.5 on color removal efficiency in aqueous solution. From RSM-generated model, the optimum conditions for RB19 decolorization were identified to be at temperature of 27oC, glycerol concentration of 19.14 mg/L and pH=6.3. At the optimum conditions, predicted decolorization was 95.3 percent. The confirmatory experiments were conducted and confirmed the results by 94.89% color removal. Thus, this statistical approach enabled to improve reactive blue 19 decolorization process by Ganoderma sp. up to 1.27 times higher than non-optimized conditions.

  6. A molecular dynamics study of void initiation and growth in monocrystalline and nanocrystalline copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traiviratana, Sirirat

    MD simulations in monocrystalline and nanocrystalline copper were carried out with LAMMPS to reveal void growth mechanisms. The specimens were subjected to both tensile uniaxial and hydrostatic strains; the results confirm that the emission of (shear) loops is the primary mechanism of void growth. The expansion of the loops and their cross slip leads to the severely work hardened layer surrounding a growing void. Calculations were carried out on voids with different sizes, and a size dependence of the stress response to emitted dislocations was observed, in disagreement with the Gurson model [1] which is scale independent. The growth of voids simulated by MD is compared with the Cocks-Ashby constitutive model and significant agreement is found. The density of geometrically-necessary dislocations as a function of void size is calculated based on the emission of shear loops and their outward propagation. Calculations were also carried out for a void at the interface between two grains sharing a tilt boundary. The results show similar dislocation behaviors. A code that uses Voronoi tessellation for constructing nanocrystalline structures was developed and used to prepare the structures for simulations. Nanocrystal simulations reveal grain sliding and grain rotation as the nanocrystal deformed. Voids were nucleated at grain junctions and grew to coalescence as dislocations accommodated the material transfer. A code that can be used during post-processing to extract useful dislocation information from MD simulation data was partially developed and proved the feasibility of automatically analyzing dislocations.

  7. Atomistic insights into dislocation-based mechanisms of void growth and coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Changwen; Buttry, Daniel A.; Sharma, Pradeep; Kouris, Demitris A.

    2011-09-01

    One of the low-temperature failure mechanisms in ductile metallic alloys is the growth of voids and their coalescence. In the present work we attempt to obtain atomistic insights into the mechanisms underpinning cavitation in a representative metal, namely Aluminum. Often the pre-existing voids in metallic alloys such as Al have complex shapes (e.g. corrosion pits) and the defromation/damage mechanisms exhibit a rich size-dependent behavior across various material length scales. We focus on these two issues in this paper through large-scale calculations on specimens of sizes ranging from 18 thousand to 1.08 million atoms. In addition to the elucidation of the dislocation propagation based void growth mechanism we highlight the observed length scale effect reflected in the effective stress-strain response, stress triaxiality and void fraction evolution. Furthermore, as expected, the conventionally used Gurson's model fails to capture the observed size-effects calling for a mechanistic modification that incorporates the mechanisms observed in our (and other researchers') simulation. Finally, in our multi-void simulations, we find that, the splitting of a big void into a distribution of small ones increases the load-carrying capacity of specimens. However, no obvious dependence of the void fraction evolution on void coalescence is observed.

  8. Cosmic voids and void lensing in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez, C.; Clampitt, J.; Kovacs, A.; Jain, B.; García-Bellido, J.; Nadathur, S.; Gruen, D.; Hamaus, N.; Huterer, D.; Vielzeuf, P.; Amara, A.; Bonnett, C.; DeRose, J.; Hartley, W. G.; Jarvis, M.; Lahav, O.; Miquel, R.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sheldon, E.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D' Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.

    2016-10-26

    Galaxies and their dark matter halos populate a complicated filamentary network around large, nearly empty regions known as cosmic voids. Cosmic voids are usually identified in spectroscopic galaxy surveys, where 3D information about the large-scale structure of the Universe is available. Although an increasing amount of photometric data is being produced, its potential for void studies is limited since photometric redshifts induce line-of-sight position errors of $\\sim50$ Mpc/$h$ or more that can render many voids undetectable. In this paper we present a new void finder designed for photometric surveys, validate it using simulations, and apply it to the high-quality photo-$z$ redMaGiC galaxy sample of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES-SV) data. The algorithm works by projecting galaxies into 2D slices and finding voids in the smoothed 2D galaxy density field of the slice. Fixing the line-of-sight size of the slices to be at least twice the photo-$z$ scatter, the number of voids found in these projected slices of simulated spectroscopic and photometric galaxy catalogs is within 20% for all transverse void sizes, and indistinguishable for the largest voids of radius $\\sim 70$ Mpc/$h$ and larger. The positions, radii, and projected galaxy profiles of photometric voids also accurately match the spectroscopic void sample. Applying the algorithm to the DES-SV data in the redshift range $0.2voids with comoving radii spanning the range 18-120 Mpc/$h$, and carry out a stacked weak lensing measurement. With a significance of $4.4\\sigma$, the lensing measurement confirms the voids are truly underdense in the matter field and hence not a product of Poisson noise, tracer density effects or systematics in the data. It also demonstrates, for the first time in real data, the viability of void lensing studies in photometric surveys.

  9. The Mechanical Response of Advanced Claddings during Proposed Reactivity Initiated Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N [ORNL; Brown, Nicholas R [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Lowden, Rick R [ORNL; ERDMAN III, DONALD L [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the failure mechanisms of advanced nuclear fuel cladding of FeCrAl at high-strain rates, similar to design basis reactivity initiated accidents (RIA). During RIA, the nuclear fuel cladding was subjected to the plane-strain to equibiaxial tension strain states. To achieve those accident conditions, the samples were deformed by the expansion of high strength Inconel alloy tube under pre-specified pressure pulses as occurring RIA. The mechanical response of the advanced claddings was compared to that of hydrided zirconium-based nuclear fuel cladding alloy. The hoop strain evolution during pressure pulses were collected in situ; the permanent diametral strains of both accident tolerant fuel (ATF) claddings and the current nuclear fuel alloys were determined after rupture.

  10. Reactive Separation of Gallic Acid: Experimentation and Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology and Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rewatkar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gallic acid is a major phenolic pollutant present in the wastewater generated from cork boiling, olive mill, and pharmaceutical industries. Experimental and statistical modelling using response surface methodology (RSM and artificial neural network (ANN were carried out for reactive separation of gallic acid from aqueous stream using tri-nbutyl phosphate (TBP in hexanol. TBP has a more significant effect on extraction efficiency as compared to temperature and pH. The optimum conditions of 2.34 g L–1, 65.65 % v/v, 19 oC, and 1.8 of initial concentration of gallic acid, concentration of TBP, temperature, and pH, respectively, were obtained using RSM. Under optimum conditions, extraction efficiency of 99.45 % was obtained for gallic acid. The ANN and RSM results were compared with experimental unseen data. Error analysis suggested the better performance of ANN for extraction efficiency predictions.

  11. Affective Reactivity in Response to Criticism in Remitted Bipolar Disorder: A Laboratory Analog of Expressed Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Amy K.; Johnson, Sheri L.; Ruggero, Camilo J.

    2010-01-01

    Potential mechanisms to explain the relationship between Expressed Emotion (EE) and poor outcome within bipolar disorder are poorly understood. One possibility is that people with bipolar disorder have difficulty regulating their affect in response to criticism. The present study examined whether participants with bipolar disorder were more affectively dysregulated than control participants when presented with a criticism by a confederate. There was a trend for people with bipolar disorder to react more negatively to the criticism, but there was also evidence that they recovered as quickly as controls. Exploratory analyses found that female gender, the perception of the criticism as more negative, being disabled, and having fewer positive relationships predicted greater reactivity to criticism among people with bipolar disorder. PMID:19459195

  12. Modelling Void Abundance in Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Voivodic, Rodrigo; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F

    2016-01-01

    We use a spherical model and an extended excursion set formalism with drifting diffusive barriers to predict the abundance of cosmic voids in the context of general relativity as well as f(R) and symmetron models of modified gravity. We detect spherical voids from a suite of N-body simulations of these gravity theories and compare the measured void abundance to theory predictions. We find that our model correctly describes the abundance of both dark matter and galaxy voids, providing a better fit than previous proposals in the literature based on static barriers. We use the simulation abundance results to fit for the abundance model free parameters as a function of modified gravity parameters, and show that counts of dark matter voids can provide interesting constraints on modified gravity. For galaxy voids, more closely related to optical observations, we find that constraining modified gravity from void abundance alone may be significantly more challenging. In the context of current and upcoming galaxy surv...

  13. Redshift-space distortions around voids

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Peacock, John A; Padilla, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    We have derived estimators for the linear growth rate of density fluctuations using the cross-correlation function of voids and haloes in redshift space, both directly and in Fourier form. In linear theory, this cross-correlation contains only monopole and quadrupole terms. At scales greater than the void radius, linear theory is a good match to voids traced out by haloes in N-body simulations; small-scale random velocities are unimportant at these radii, only tending to cause small and often negligible elongation of the redshift-space cross-correlation function near its origin. By extracting the monopole and quadrupole from the cross-correlation function, we measure the linear growth rate without prior knowledge of the void profile or velocity dispersion. We recover the linear growth parameter $\\beta$ to 9% precision from an effective volume of 3(Gpc/h)^3 using voids with radius greater than 25Mpc/h. Smaller voids are predominantly sub-voids, which may be more sensitive to the random velocity dispersion; the...

  14. Clinical utility of C-reactive protein to predict treatment response during cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Kirkpatrick, Gordon; Chen, Virginia; Skolnik, Kate; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Wilcox, Pearce; Quon, Bradley S.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale C-reactive protein (CRP) is a systemic marker of inflammation that correlates with disease status in cystic fibrosis (CF). The clinical utility of CRP measurement to guide pulmonary exacerbation (PEx) treatment decisions remains uncertain. Objectives To determine whether monitoring CRP during PEx treatment can be used to predict treatment response. We hypothesized that early changes in CRP can be used to predict treatment response. Methods We reviewed all PEx events requiring hospitalization for intravenous (IV) antibiotics over 2 years at our institution. 83 PEx events met our eligibility criteria. CRP levels from admission to day 5 were evaluated to predict treatment non-response, using a modified version of a prior published composite definition. CRP was also evaluated to predict time until next exacerbation (TUNE). Measurements and main results 53% of 83 PEx events were classified as treatment non-response. Paradoxically, 24% of PEx events were characterized by a ≥ 50% increase in CRP levels within the first five days of treatment. Absolute change in CRP from admission to day 5 was not associated with treatment non-response (p = 0.58). Adjusted for FEV1% predicted, admission log10 CRP was associated with treatment non-response (OR: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.14 to 5.91; p = 0.03) and shorter TUNE (HR: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.27; p = 0.008). The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of admission CRP to predict treatment non-response was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.83; p 75 mg/L with a specificity of 90% for treatment non-response. Conclusions Admission CRP predicts treatment non-response and time until next exacerbation. A very elevated admission CRP (>75mg/L) is highly specific for treatment non-response and might be used to target high-risk patients for future interventional studies aimed at improving exacerbation outcomes. PMID:28178305

  15. Plant responses to insect herbivory: interactions between photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species and hormonal signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerchev, Pavel I; Fenton, Brian; Foyer, Christine H; Hancock, Robert D

    2012-02-01

    Under herbivore attack plants mount a defence response characterized by the accumulation of secondary metabolites and inhibitory proteins. Significant changes are observed in the transcriptional profiles of genes encoding enzymes of primary metabolism. Such changes have often been interpreted in terms of a requirement for an increased investment of resources to 'fuel' the synthesis of secondary metabolites. While enhanced secondary metabolism undoubtedly exerts an influence on primary metabolism, accumulating evidence suggests that rather than stimulating photosynthesis insect herbivory reduces photosynthetic carbon fixation and this response occurs by a re-programming of gene expression. Within this context, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reductant/oxidant (redox) signalling play a central role. Accumulating evidence suggests that ROS signalling pathways are closely interwoven with hormone-signalling pathways in plant-insect interactions. Here we consider how insect infestation impacts on the stress signalling network through effects on ROS and cellular redox metabolism with particular emphasis on the roles of ROS in the plant responses to phloem-feeding insects.

  16. Charged vacancy induced enhanced piezoelectric response of reactive assistive IBSD grown AlN thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neha; Rath, Martando; Ilango, S.; Ravindran, T. R.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    Piezoelectric response of AlN thin films was investigated in a AlN/Ti/Si(1 0 0) layer structure prepared by ion beam sputter deposition (IBSD) in reactive assistance of N+/\\text{N}2+ ions. The samples were characterized for their microstructure, piezoelectric response and charged defects using high resolution x-ray diffraction (HR-XRD), piezo force microscopy (PFM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy respectively. Our results show that the films are highly textured along the a-axis and charged native point defects are present in the microstructure. Phase images of these samples obtained from PFM show that the films are predominantly N-polar. The measured values of piezoelectric coefficient d 33(eff) for these samples are as high as 206  ±  20 pm V-1 and 668  ±  60 pm V-1 calculated by piezo response loop for AlN films of a thickness of 235 nm and 294 nm respectively. A mechanism for high d 33(eff) values is proposed with a suitable model based on the charged defects induced enhanced polarization in the dielectric continuum of AlN.

  17. Voids' System in the Woven Composite Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pavla VOZKOVA

    2006-01-01

    Composites are common material constructions for high-tech use now. Mechanical properties of woven reinforced composites are influenced by voids inside the structure.Voids could be classified to the two sections. Long and thin cracks are more dangerous than pores. It is important to find relations between preparation and place of occurrence of voids. This paper classifies defects according to rise mechanism, point of occurrence, orientation, size and affect to the properties. Image analysis was used for observing samples. Future work would be oriented not only to observing real samples, but also to calculate mechanical properties from real and ideal structures in 3D woven reinforced composites.

  18. Practical Statistics for the Voids Between Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaninetti, L.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The voids between galaxies are identified withthe volumes of the Poisson Voronoi tessellation.Two new survival functions for the apparent radii of voids are derived. The sectional normalized area ofthe Poisson Voronoi tessellation is modelledby the Kiang function and by the exponential function. Two new survival functions with equivalent sectional radius are therefore derived; they represent an alternative to the survival function of voids between galaxies as given by the self-similar distribution. The spatial appearance of slices of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey is simulated.

  19. The symphonic structure of childhood stress reactivity: patterns of sympathetic, parasympathetic, and adrenocortical responses to psychological challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quas, Jodi A; Yim, Ilona S; Oberlander, Tim F; Nordstokke, David; Essex, Marilyn J; Armstrong, Jeffrey M; Bush, Nicole; Obradović, Jelena; Boyce, W Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Despite widespread recognition that the physiological systems underlying stress reactivity are well coordinated at a neurobiological level, surprisingly little empirical attention has been given to delineating precisely how the systems actually interact with one another when confronted with stress. We examined cross-system response proclivities in anticipation of and following standardized laboratory challenges in 664 4- to 14-year-olds from four independent studies. In each study, measures of stress reactivity within both the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system (i.e., the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system) and the corticotrophin releasing hormone system (i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) were collected. Latent profile analyses revealed six distinctive patterns that recurred across the samples: moderate reactivity (average cross-system activation; 52%-80% of children across samples), parasympathetic-specific reactivity (2%-36%), anticipatory arousal (4%-9%), multisystem reactivity (7%-14%), hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis specific reactivity (6%-7%), and underarousal (0%-2%). Groups meaningfully differed in socioeconomic status, family adversity, and age. Results highlight the sample-level reliability of children's neuroendocrine responses to stress and suggest important cross-system regularities that are linked to development and prior experiences and may have implications for subsequent physical and mental morbidity.

  20. The darkness that shaped the void: dark energy and cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, E G Patrick; Dolag, Klaus; Pettorino, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We assess the sensitivity of void shapes to the nature of dark energy that was pointed out in recent studies. We investigate whether or not void shapes are useable as an observational probe in galaxy redshift surveys. We focus on the evolution of the mean void ellipticity and its underlying physical cause. Methods: We analyse the morphological properties of voids in five sets of cosmological N-body simulations, each with a different nature of dark energy. Comparing voids in the dark matter distribution to those in the halo population, we address the question of whether galaxy redshift surveys yield sufficiently accurate void morphologies. Voids are identified using the parameter free Watershed Void Finder. The effect of redshift distortions is investigated as well. Results: We confirm the statistically significant sensitivity of voids in the dark matter distribution. We identify the level of clustering as measured by \\sigma_8(z) as the main cause of differences in mean void shape . We find that in the h...

  1. Cosmic voids and void lensing in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, C.; Clampitt, J.; Kovacs, A.; Jain, B.; García-Bellido, J.; Nadathur, S.; Gruen, D.; Hamaus, N.; Huterer, D.; Vielzeuf, P.; Amara, A.; Bonnett, C.; DeRose, J.; Hartley, W. G.; Jarvis, M.; Lahav, O.; Miquel, R.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sheldon, E.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; DES Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    Cosmic voids are usually identified in spectroscopic galaxy surveys, where 3D information about the large-scale structure of the Universe is available. Although an increasing amount of photometric data is being produced, its potential for void studies is limited since photometric redshifts induce line-of-sight position errors of ≥50 Mpc h-1which can render many voids undetectable. We present a new void finder designed for photometric surveys, validate it using simulations, and apply it to the high-quality photo-z redMaGiC galaxy sample of the DES Science Verification data. The algorithm works by projecting galaxies into 2D slices and finding voids in the smoothed 2D galaxy density field of the slice. Fixing the line-of-sight size of the slices to be at least twice the photo-z scatter, the number of voids found in simulated spectroscopic and photometric galaxy catalogues is within 20 per cent for all transverse void sizes, and indistinguishable for the largest voids (Rv ≥ 70 Mpc h-1). The positions, radii, and projected galaxy profiles of photometric voids also accurately match the spectroscopic void sample. Applying the algorithm to the DES-SV data in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.8, we identify 87 voids with comoving radii spanning the range 18-120 Mpc h-1, and carry out a stacked weak lensing measurement. With a significance of 4.4σ, the lensing measurement confirms that the voids are truly underdense in the matter field and hence not a product of Poisson noise, tracer density effects or systematics in the data. It also demonstrates, for the first time in real data, the viability of void lensing studies in photometric surveys.

  2. Cross-reactive immune response induced by the Vi capsular polysaccharide typhoid vaccine against Salmonella Paratyphi strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkanen, S H; Kantele, J M; Kantele, A

    2014-03-01

    There are no vaccines in clinical use against paratyphoid fever, caused by Salmonella Paratyphi A and B or, rarely, C. Oral Salmonella Typhi Ty21a typhoid vaccine elicits a significant cross-reactive immune response against S. Paratyphi A and B, and some reports suggest cross-protective efficacy against the disease. These findings are ascribed to the O-12 antigen shared between the strains. The Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine has been shown to elicit antibodies reactive with O-9,12. Twenty-five volunteers immunized with the parenteral Vi vaccine (Typherix(®) ) were explored for plasmablasts cross-reactive with paratyphoid strains; the responses were compared to those in 25 age- and gender-matched volunteers immunized with Ty21a (Vivotif(®) ). Before vaccination, 48/50 vaccinees had no plasmablasts reactive with the antigens. Seven days after vaccination, 15/25 and 22/25 Vi- and Ty21a-vaccinated volunteers had circulating plasmablasts producing antibodies cross-reactive with S. Paratyphi A, 18/25 and 23/25 with S. Paratyphi B and 16/25 and 9/25 with Paratyphi C, respectively. Compared to the Ty21a group, the Vi group showed significantly lower responses to S. Paratyphi A and B and higher to S. Paratyphi C. To conclude, the Vi vaccine elicited a cross-reactive plasmablast response to S. Paratyphi C (Vi antigen in common) and less marked responses to S. Paratyphi A and B than the Ty21a preparation. S. Paratyphi A and B both being Vi-negative, the result can be explained by trace amounts of bacterial cell wall O-12 antigen in the Vi preparation, despite purification. The clinical significance of this finding remains to be determined.

  3. Abacavir induced T cell reactivity from drug naïve individuals shares features of allo-immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jacqueline; Wuillemin, Natascha; Watkins, Stephan; Jamin, Heidi; Eriksson, Klara K; Villiger, Peter; Fontana, Stefano; Pichler, Werner J; Yerly, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abacavir hypersensitivity is a severe hypersensitivity reaction which occurs exclusively in carriers of the HLA-B*57∶01 allele. In vitro culture of PBMC with abacavir results in the outgrowth of abacavir-reacting CD8+ T cells, which release IFNγ and are cytotoxic. How this immune response is induced and what is recognized by these T cells is still a matter of debate. We analyzed the conditions required to develop an abacavir-dependent T cell response in vitro. The abacavir reactivity was independent of co-stimulatory signals, as neither DC maturation nor release of inflammatory cytokines were observed upon abacavir exposure. Abacavir induced T cells arose in the absence of professional APC and stemmed from naïve and memory compartments. These features are reminiscent of allo-reactivity. Screening for allo-reactivity revealed that about 5% of generated T cell clones (n = 136) from three donors were allo-reactive exclusively to the related HLA-B*58∶01. The addition of peptides which can bind to the HLA-B*57∶01-abacavir complex and to HLA-B*58∶01 during the induction phase increased the proportion of HLA-B*58∶01 allo-reactive T cell clones from 5% to 42%. In conclusion, abacavir can alter the HLA-B*57∶01-peptide complex in a way that mimics an allo-allele ('altered self-allele') and create the potential for robust T cell responses.

  4. Reactive nucleolar and Cajal body responses to proteasome inhibition in sensory ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanca, Ana; Casafont, Iñigo; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2014-06-01

    The dysfunction of the ubiquitin proteasome system has been related to a broad array of neurodegenerative disorders in which the accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates causes proteotoxicity. The ability of proteasome inhibitors to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis has emerged as a powerful strategy for cancer therapy. Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor used as an antineoplastic drug, although its neurotoxicity frequently causes a severe sensory peripheral neuropathy. In this study we used a rat model of bortezomib treatment to study the nucleolar and Cajal body responses to the proteasome inhibition in sensory ganglion neurons that are major targets of bortezomib-induced neurotoxicity. Treatment with bortezomib induced dose-dependent dissociation of protein synthesis machinery (chromatolysis) and nuclear retention of poly(A) RNA granules resulting in neuronal dysfunction. However, as a compensatory response to the proteotoxic stress, both nucleoli and Cajal bodies exhibited reactive changes. These include an increase in the number and size of nucleoli, strong nucleolar incorporation of the RNA precursor 5'-fluorouridine, and increased expression of both 45S rRNA and genes encoding nucleolar proteins UBF, fibrillarin and B23. Taken together, these findings appear to reflect the activation of the nucleolar transcription in response to proteotoxic stress Furthermore, the number of Cajal bodies, a parameter related to transcriptional activity, increases upon proteasome inhibition. We propose that nucleoli and Cajal bodies are important targets in the signaling pathways that are activated by the proteotoxic stress response to proteasome inhibition. The coordinating activity of these two organelles in the production of snRNA, snoRNA and rRNA may contribute to neuronal survival after proteasome inhibition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease.

  5. A cross-reactive monoclonal antibody to nematode haemoglobin enhances protective immune responses to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie E Nieuwenhuizen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nematode secreted haemoglobins have unusually high affinity for oxygen and possess nitric oxide deoxygenase, and catalase activity thought to be important in protection against host immune responses to infection. In this study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (48Eg against haemoglobin of the nematode Anisakis pegreffii, and aimed to characterize cross-reactivity of 4E8g against haemoglobins of different nematodes and its potential to mediate protective immunity against a murine hookworm infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the 4E8g-binding antigen in Anisakis and Ascaris extracts, which were identified as haemoglobins by peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS. Immunological cross-reactivity was also demonstrated with haemoglobin of the rodent hookworm N. brasiliensis. Immunogenicity of nematode haemoglobin in mice and humans was tested by immunoblotting. Anisakis haemoglobin was recognized by IgG and IgE antibodies of Anisakis-infected mice, while Ascaris haemoglobin was recognized by IgG but not IgE antibodies in mouse and human sera. Sequencing of Anisakis haemoglobin revealed high similarity to haemoglobin of a related marine nematode, Psuedoterranova decipiens, which lacks the four -HKEE repeats of Ascaris haemoglobin important in octamer assembly. The localization of haemoglobin in the different parasites was examined by immunohistochemistry and associated with the excretory-secretary ducts in Anisakis, Ascaris and N. brasiliensis. Anisakis haemoglobin was strongly expressed in the L3 stage, unlike Ascaris haemoglobin, which is reportedly mainly expressed in adult worms. Passive immunization of mice with 4E8g prior to infection with N. brasiliensis enhanced protective Th2 immunity and led to a significant decrease in worm burdens. CONCLUSION: The monoclonal antibody 4E8g targets haemoglobin in broadly equivalent anatomical locations in parasitic nematodes and enhances host immunity

  6. Differential vascular reactivity responses acutely following ingestion of a nitrate rich red spinach extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Cody T; Kephart, Wesley C; Holland, Angelia M; Mobley, Christopher B; McCloskey, Anna E; Shake, Joshua J; Pascoe, David D; Roberts, Michael D; Martin, Jeffrey S

    2016-12-01

    Inorganic nitrate ingestion has been posited to affect arterial blood pressure and vascular function. We sought to determine the acute effect of a red spinach extract (RSE) high in inorganic nitrate on vascular reactivity 1-h after ingestion in peripheral conduit and resistance arteries. Fifteen (n = 15; males 8, females 7) apparently healthy subjects (aged 23.1 ± 3.3 years; BMI 27.2 ± 3.7 kg/m(2)) participated in this crossover design, double-blinded study. Subjects reported to the lab ≥2-h post-prandial and consumed RSE (1000 mg dose; ~90 mg nitrate) or placebo (PBO). Venipuncture was performed on three occasions: baseline, 30-min post-ingestion and between 65 to 75-min post-ingestion. Baseline vascular measurements [i.e., calf venous occlusion plethysmography, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD)], 30-min of continuous blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) analysis, and follow-up vascular measurements beginning at 40-min post-ingestion were also performed. Humoral nitrate following RSE ingestion was significantly higher at 30- (+54 %; P = 0.039) and 65 to 75-min post-ingestion compared to baseline (+255 %, P RSE ingestion, whereas it decreased (-14.0 %; P = 0.008) following PBO ingestion. No significant differential FMD responses were detected (P > 0.05), though RH was decreased following the baseline measure in both conditions. RSE significantly increased plasma nitrate 30-min post-ingestion, but acute microvascular (i.e., resistance vasculature) reactivity increases were isolated to the lower limb and no appreciable change in brachial artery FMD was observed.

  7. Properties of Galaxies in and around Voids

    CERN Document Server

    Hopp, U

    1997-01-01

    Two surveys for intrinsically faint galaxies towards nearby voids have been conducted at the MPI für Astronomie, Heidelberg. One selected targets from a new diameter limited ($\\Phi \\ge 5''$) catalog with morphological criteria while the other used digitized objective prism Schmidt plates to select mainly HII dwarf galaxies. For some 450 galaxies, redshifts and other optical data were obtained. We studied the spatial distribution of the sample objects, their luminosity function, and their intrinsic properties. Most of the galaxies belong to already well known sheets and filaments. But we found about a dozen highly isolated galaxies in each sample (nearest neighborhood distance $\\ge 3 h_{75}^{-1} Mpc$). These tend to populate additional structures and are not distributed homogeneously throughout the voids. As our results on 'void galaxies' still suffer from small sample statistics, I also tried to combine similar existing surveys of nearby voids to get further hints on the larger structure and on the luminosit...

  8. Underground void filling by cemented mill tailings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choudhary Bhanwar Singh; Kumar Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Underground mining always create voids. These voids can cause subsidence of surface. So it is always a demand to fill the void in such a manner that the effect of underground mining can be minimized. Void filling using mill tailings especially in metal mining is one of the best techniques. The tailings produced in milling process have traditionally been disposed in tailing ponds creating a waste disposal and environ-mental problems in terms of land degradation, air and water pollution, etc. This disposal practice is more acute in the metal milling industry where the fine grinding, required for value liberation, results in the production of very fine tailings in large percentage. This paper includes discussions on the effectiveness of different paste mixes with varying cement contents in paste backfilling operations. The results revealed that material composition and use of super plasticizer strongly influenced the strength of cemented backfill.

  9. Topology optimization with flexible void area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Aage, Niels; Sigmund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for including fixed-area flexible void domains into the minimum compliance topology optimization problem. As opposed to the standard passive elements approach of rigidly specifying void areas within the design domain, the suggested approach allows these areas...... to be flexibly reshaped and repositioned subject to penalization on their moments of inertia, the positions of their centers of mass, and their shapes. The flexible void areas are introduced through a second, discrete design variable field, using the same discretization as the standard field of continuous...... density variables. The formulation is based on a combined approach: The primary sub-problem is to minimize compliance, subject to a volume constraint, with a secondary sub-problem of minimizing the disturbance from the flexible void areas. The design update is performed iteratively between the two...

  10. Neutron Imaging Calibration to Measure Void Fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Sharma, Vishaldeep [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Void fraction is an intuitive parameter that describes the fraction of vapor in a two-phase flow. It appears as a key variable in most heat transfer and pressure drop correlations used to design evaporating and condensing heat exchangers, as well as determining charge inventory in refrigeration systems. Void fraction measurement is not straightforward, however, and assumptions on the invasiveness of the measuring technique must be made. Neutron radiography or neutron imaging has the potential to be a truly non-invasive void fraction measuring technique but has until recently only offered qualitative descriptions of two-phase flow, in terms of flow maldistributions, for example. This paper describes the calibration approach necessary to employ neutron imaging to measure steady-state void fraction. Experiments were conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold Guide 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

  11. Role of exercise-induced reactive oxygen species in the modulation of heat shock protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittipaldi, S; Dimauro, I; Mercatelli, N; Caporossi, D

    2014-01-01

    The multiple roles that have been associated with heat shock proteins (HSPs), inside and outside cells are remarkable. HSPs have been found to play a fundamental role in multiple stress conditions and to offer protection from subsequent insults. Exercise, because of the physiological stresses associated with it, is one of the main stimuli associated with a robust increase of different HSPs in several tissues. Given the combination of physiological stresses induced by exercise, and the 'cross-talk' that occurs between signaling pathways in different tissues, it is likely that exercise induces the HSP expression through a combination of 'stressors', among which reactive oxygen species (ROS) could play a major role. Indeed, although an imbalance between ROS production and antioxidant levels results in oxidative stress, causing damage to lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids with a possible activation of the programed cell death pathway, at moderate concentrations ROS play an important role as regulatory mediators in signaling processes. Many of the ROS-mediated responses actually protect the cells against oxidative stress and re-establish redox homeostasis. The aim of this review is to provide a critical update on the role of exercise-induced ROS in the modulation of the HSP's response, focusing on experimental results from animal and human studies where the link between redox homeostasis and HSPs' expression in different tissues has been addressed.

  12. Reactive Transformation and Increased BDNF Signaling by Hippocampal Astrocytes in Response to MK-801.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Yu

    Full Text Available MK-801, also known as dizocilpine, is a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor antagonist that induces schizophrenia-like symptoms. While astrocytes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, astrocytic responses to MK-801 and their significance to schizotypic symptoms are unclear. Changes in the expression levels of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP, a marker of astrocyte activation in response to a variety of pathogenic stimuli, were examined in the hippocampus of rats treated with the repeated MK-801 injection (0.5 mg/10 ml/kg body weight for 6 days and in primary cultured hippocampal astrocytes incubated with MK-801 (5 or 20 μM for 24 h. Moreover, the expression levels of BDNF and its receptors TrkB and p75 were examined in MK-801-treated astrocyte cultures. MK-801 treatment enhanced GFAP expression in the rat hippocampus and also increased the levels of GFAP protein and mRNA in hippocampal astrocytes in vitro. Treatment of cultured hippocampal astrocytes with MK-801 enhanced protein and mRNA levels of BDNF, TrkB, and p75. Collectively, our results suggest that hippocampal astrocytes may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia symptoms associated with NMDA receptor hypofunction by reactive transformation and altered BDNF signaling.

  13. A Reactive 1O2 - Responsive Combined Treatment System of Photodynamic and Chemotherapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Meng, Guoqing; Zhang, Song; Liu, Xinli

    2016-07-01

    The development of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive drug delivery and drug release has gradually attracted much attention in recent years as a promising therapeutic strategy. Singlet oxygen (1O2) as the major ROS species is widely used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. In the present study, we introduce a combined treatment using ROS-sensitive thioketal (TK) linkage as a linker between upconversion nanoparticles (UNs)-based PDT and doxorubicin (DOX)-based chemotherapy. UNs can not only play a role in PDT, but can also be used as a nanocarrier for drug delivery of DOX. Moreover, the products of 1O2 during PDT are able to cleave TK linker inducing the release of DOX which can further achieve the goal of chemotherapy. By using this 1O2-responsive nanocarrier delivery system, DOX can easily reach the tumor site and be accumulated in the nuclei to effectively kill the cancer cells, and therefore decreasing the side effects of chemotherapy on the body. Thus, PDT also has the function of controlling drug release in this combination treatment strategy. Compared with monotherapy, the combination of PDT with chemotherapy also possesses excellent drug loading capability and anticancer efficiency.

  14. Application of response surface analysis for biodegradation of azo reactive textile dye using Aspergillus foetidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Praveen; Singh, Lakhvinder

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the application of experimental design methodology for the optimization of decolourization of azo reactive textile dye Remazol Red RR and reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) using fungal isolate Aspergillus foetidus. Response surface methodology (RSM), involving central composite design matrix in three most important input variables; temperature, pH and initial dye concentration was employed. A total of 20 experiments were conducted in the study towards the construction of a quadratic model. This demonstrated the benefits of approach in achieving excellent predictions, while minimizing the number of experiments required. Very high regression coefficient between the variables and the responses indicated excellent evaluation of experimental data. Under optimized conditions fungal isolate was capable to decolourize Remazol Red RR up to 86.21% and COD reduction up to 55.43% was achieved during the experimental setup. Enzymatic activity indicated excellent outcome under the optimal process conditions. The experimental values agreed with the predicted ones, indicating suitability of the model and success of RSM approach in optimizing the process.

  15. Optimization of integrated chemical-biological degradation of a reactive azo dye using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarjanto, Gatut [Advanced Wastewater Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia); Keller-Lehmann, Beatrice [Advanced Wastewater Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia); Keller, Jurg [Advanced Wastewater Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia)]. E-mail: j.keller@awmc.uq.edu.au

    2006-11-02

    The integrated chemical-biological degradation combining advanced oxidation by UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} followed by aerobic biodegradation was used to degrade C.I. Reactive Azo Red 195A, commonly used in the textile industry in Australia. An experimental design based on the response surface method was applied to evaluate the interactive effects of influencing factors (UV irradiation time, initial hydrogen peroxide dosage and recirculation ratio of the system) on decolourisation efficiency and optimizing the operating conditions of the treatment process. The effects were determined by the measurement of dye concentration and soluble chemical oxygen demand (S-COD). The results showed that the dye and S-COD removal were affected by all factors individually and interactively. Maximal colour degradation performance was predicted, and experimentally validated, with no recirculation, 30 min UV irradiation and 500 mg H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/L. The model predictions for colour removal, based on a three-factor/five-level Box-Wilson central composite design and the response surface method analysis, were found to be very close to additional experimental results obtained under near optimal conditions. This demonstrates the benefits of this approach in achieving good predictions while minimising the number of experiments required.

  16. Zipf's law for fractal voids and a new void-finder

    CERN Document Server

    Gaite, J

    2005-01-01

    Voids are a prominent feature of fractal point distributions but there is no precise definition of what is a void (except in one dimension). Here we propose a definition of voids that uses methods of discrete stochastic geometry, in particular, Delaunay and Voronoi tessellations, and we construct a new algorithm to search for voids in a point set. We find and rank-order the voids of suitable examples of fractal point sets in one and two dimensions to test whether Zipf's power-law holds. We conclude affirmatively and, furthermore, that the rank-ordering of voids conveys similar information to the number-radius function, as regards the scaling regime and the transition to homogeneity. So it is an alternative tool in the analysis of fractal point distributions with crossover to homogeneity and, in particular, of the distribution of galaxies.

  17. Youth offspring of mothers with posttraumatic stress disorder have altered stress reactivity in response to a laboratory stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Carla Kmett; Hankin, Benjamin L; Badanes, Lisa S

    2015-03-01

    Parental Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), particularly maternal PTSD, confers risk for stress-related psychopathology among offspring. Altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning is one mechanism proposed to explain transmission of this intergenerational risk. Investigation of this mechanism has been largely limited to general stress response (e.g., diurnal cortisol), rather than reactivity in response to an acute stressor. We examined cortisol reactivity in response to a laboratory stressor among offspring of mothers with a lifetime diagnosis of PTSD (n=36) and age- and gender- matched control offspring of mothers without PTSD (n=36). Youth (67% girls; mean age=11.4, SD=2.6) participated in a developmentally sensitive laboratory stressor and had salivary cortisol assessed five times (one pre-stress, one immediate post-stress, and three recovery measures, spaced 15min apart). Results were consistent with the hypothesis that offspring of mothers with PTSD would exhibit a dysregulated, blunted cortisol reactivity profile, and control offspring would display the expected adaptive peak in cortisol response to challenge profile. Findings were maintained after controlling for youth traumatic event history, physical anxiety symptoms, and depression, as well as maternal depression. This finding contributes to the existing literature indicating that attenuated HPA axis functioning, inclusive of hyposecretion of cortisol in response to acute stress, is robust among youth of mothers with PTSD. Future research is warranted in elucidating cortisol reactivity as a link between maternal PTSD and stress-related psychopathology vulnerability among offspring.

  18. Void Statistics and Void Galaxies in the 2dFGRS

    CERN Document Server

    von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M

    2007-01-01

    For the 2dFGRS we study the properties of voids and of fainter galaxies within voids that are defined by brighter galaxies. Our results are compared with simulated galaxy catalogues from the Millenium simulation coupled with a semianalytical galaxy formation recipe. We derive the void size distribution and discuss its dependence on the faint magnitude limit of the galaxies defining the voids. While voids among faint galaxies are typically smaller than those among bright galaxies, the ratio of the void sizes to the mean galaxy separation reaches larger values. This is well reproduced in the mock galaxy samples studied. We provide analytic fitting functions for the void size distribution. Furthermore, we study the galaxy population inside voids defined by objects with $B_J -5\\log{h}< -20$ and diameter larger than 10 \\hMpc. We find a clear bimodality of the void galaxies similar to the average comparison sample. We confirm the enhanced abundance of galaxies in the blue cloud and a depression of the number of ...

  19. Cluster-Void Degeneracy Breaking: Dark Energy, Planck and the Largest Cluster & Void

    CERN Document Server

    Sahlén, Martin; Silk, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Combining galaxy cluster and void abundances breaks the degeneracy between mean matter density $\\Omega_{\\rm m}$ and power spectrum normalization $\\sigma_8$. In a first for voids, we constrain $\\Omega_{\\rm m} = 0.21 \\pm 0.10$ and $\\sigma_8 = 0.95 \\pm 0.21$ for a flat $\\Lambda$CDM universe, using extreme-value statistics on the claimed largest cluster and void. The Planck-consistent results detect dark energy with two objects, independently of other dark energy probes. Cluster-void studies also offer complementarity in scale, density, and non-linearity - of particular interest for testing modified-gravity models.

  20. Examining Infants' Cortisol Responses to Laboratory Tasks among Children Varying in Attachment Disorganization: Stress Reactivity or Return to Baseline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Kristin; Dozier, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Cortisol is a hormone involved in mounting a stress response in humans. The evidence of stress reactivity among young children has been mixed, however. In the present study, the order of two laboratory tasks (i.e., Strange Situation and play) was counterbalanced, and home saliva samples were obtained. Saliva samples were also collected upon the…

  1. Examining Infants' Cortisol Responses to Laboratory Tasks among Children Varying in Attachment Disorganization: Stress Reactivity or Return to Baseline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Kristin; Dozier, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Cortisol is a hormone involved in mounting a stress response in humans. The evidence of stress reactivity among young children has been mixed, however. In the present study, the order of two laboratory tasks (i.e., Strange Situation and play) was counterbalanced, and home saliva samples were obtained. Saliva samples were also collected upon the…

  2. Specific and cross-reactive immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in mice immunized with proteoliposomes from Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Alvarez

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: The cellular and humoral immunogenicity of PLBCG and the capacity to induce cross-reactive responses against M. tuberculosis is in agreement with the protective capacity previously demonstrated by this vaccine candidate and supports the continuation of its evaluation in further stages.

  3. Model neural prostheses with integrated microfluidics: a potential intervention strategy for controlling reactive cell and tissue responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retterer, Scott T; Smith, Karen L; Bjornsson, Christopher S; Neeves, Keith B; Spence, Andrew J H; Turner, James N; Shain, William; Isaacson, Michael S

    2004-11-01

    Model silicon intracortical probes with microfluidic channels were fabricated and tested to examine the feasibility of using diffusion-mediated delivery to deliver therapeutic agents into the volume of tissue exhibiting reactive responses to implanted devices. Three-dimensional probe structures with microfluidic channels were fabricated using surface micromachining and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) techniques. In vitro functional tests of devices were performed using fluorescence microscopy to record the transient release of Texas Red labeled transferrin (TR-transferrin) and dextran (TR-dextran) from the microchannels into 1% w/v agarose gel. In vivo performance was characterized by inserting devices loaded with TR-transferrin into the premotor cortex of adult male rats. Brain sections were imaged using confocal microscopy. Diffusion of TR-transferrin into the extracellular space and uptake by cells up to 400 microm from the implantation site was observed in brain slices taken 1 h postinsertion. The reactive tissue volume, as indicated by the presence of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), was characterized using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. The reactive tissue volume extended 600, 800, and 400 microm radially from the implantation site at 1 h, 24 h, and 6 weeks following insertion, respectively. These results indicate that diffusion-mediated delivery can be part of an effective intervention strategy for the treatment of reactive tissue responses around chronically implanted intracortical probes.

  4. DIVE in the cosmic web: voids with Delaunay triangulation from discrete matter tracer distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Liang, Yu; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel parameter-free cosmological void finder (DIVE, Delaunay TrIangulation Void findEr) based on Delaunay Triangulation (DT), which efficiently computes the empty spheres constrained by a discrete set of tracers. We define the spheres as DT voids, and describe their properties, including a universal density profile together with an intrinsic scatter. We apply this technique on 100 halo catalogues with volumes of 2.5 h-1Gpc side each, with a bias and number density similar to the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey CMASS luminous red galaxies, performed with the PATCHY code. Our results show that there are two main species of DT voids, which can be characterized by the radius: they have different responses to halo redshift space distortions, to number density of tracers, and reside in different dark matter environments. Based on dynamical arguments using the tidal field tensor, we demonstrate that large DT voids are hosted in expanding regions, whereas the haloes used to construct them reside in collapsing ones. Our approach is therefore able to efficiently determine the troughs of the density field from galaxy surveys, and can be used to study their clustering. We further study the power spectra of DT voids, and find that the bias of the two populations are different, demonstrating that the small DT voids are essentially tracers of groups of haloes.

  5. Microstructural characterization of XLPE electrical insulation in power cables: determination of void size distributions using TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, L.; Stevens, G. C.

    2003-10-01

    In an effort to progress in our understanding of the ageing mechanisms of high voltage cables submitted to electrical and thermal stresses, we present a quantitative study of voids, the defects which are considered to be partly responsible for cable failure. We propose a method based on large data sets of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of replicated samples allowing for the determination of void concentration distribution as a function of void size in the mesoscopic to microscopic range at any point in the cable insulation. A theory is also developed to calculate the effect of etching on the apparent size of the voids observed. We present the first results of this sort ever obtained on two industrial cables, one of which was aged in an AC field. Results clearly indicate that a much larger concentration of voids occur near the inner semiconductor compared to the bulk of the insulation, independently of ageing. An effect of ageing can also be seen near the inner semiconductor, resulting in an increase in the total void internal surface area and a slight shift of the concentration curve towards larger voids, with the peak moving from about 40 nm to about 50 nm.

  6. 38 CFR 3.207 - Void or annulled marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Void or annulled marriage... Void or annulled marriage. Proof that a marriage was void or has been annulled should consist of: (a... marriage void, together with such other evidence as may be required for a determination. (b) Annulled....

  7. Optimisation of Reactive Black 5 dye removal by electrocoagulation process using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, W T; Aroua, M K; Szlachta, M; Lee, C S

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a regression model obtained from response surface methodology (RSM) was proposed for the electrocoagulation (EC) treatment of textile wastewater. The Reactive Black 5 dye (RB5) was used as a model dye to evaluate the performance of the model design. The effect of initial solution pH, applied current and treatment time on RB5 removal was investigated. The total number of experiments designed by RSM amounted to 27 runs, including three repeated experimental runs at the central point. The accuracy of the model was evaluated by the F-test, coefficient of determination (R(2)), adjusted R(2) and standard deviation. The optimum conditions for RB5 removal were as follows: initial pH of 6.63, current of 0.075 A, electrolyte dose of 0.11 g/L and EC time of 50.3 min. The predicted RB5 removal was 83.3% and the percentage error between experimental and predicted results was only 3-5%. The obtained data confirm that the proposed model can be used for accurate prediction of RB5 removal. The value of the zeta potential increased with treatment time, and the X-ray diffraction pattern shows that iron complexes were found in the sludge.

  8. Multidimensional fully-coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical response of reactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, M.L.; Baer, M.R.

    1995-11-01

    A summary of multidimensional modeling is presented which describes coupled thermals chemical and mechanical response of reactive and nonreactive materials. This modeling addresses cookoff of energetic material (EM) prior to the onset of ignition. Cookoff, lasting from seconds to days, sensitizes the EM whereupon combustion of confined, degraded material determines the level of violence. Such processes are dynamic, occurring over time scales of millisecond to microsecond, and thus more amenable for shock physics analysis. This work provides preignition state estimates such as the amount of decomposition, morphological changes, and quasistatic stress states for subsequent dynamic analysis. To demonstrate a fully-coupled thermal/chemical/quasistatic mechanical capability, several example simulations have been performed: (1) the one-dimensional time-to-explosion experiments, (2) the Naval Air Weapon Center`s (NAWC) small scale cookoff bomb, (3) a small hot cell experiment and (4) a rigid, highly porous, closed-cell polyurethane foam. Predictions compared adequately to available data. Deficiencies in the model and future directions are discussed.

  9. Multiple void interaction of pipeline steel in triaxial stress fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-wen QIU; Ze-xi YUAN; Gui-feng ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional unit cell models were developed to study the damage induced by void growth in ductile materials. Special emphasis is given to the influence of the void shape and random spatial void arrangements. The periodical void arrays of body cen-tered cubic are investigated by analyzing representative unit cells. The isotropic behavior of the matrix material is modeled using v. Mises plasticity. The cell models are analyzed by the large strain finite element method under monotonic loading while keeping the constant stress triaxiality. Results showed that when void density increased, effects of void aspects on void growth gradu-ally diminished.

  10. Effect of void cluster on ductile failure evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of a non-uniform void distribution in a ductile material is investigated by using a cell model analysis to study a material with a periodic pattern of void clusters. The special clusters considered consist of a number of uniformly spaced voids located along a plane perpendicular...... to the maximum principal tensile stress. A plane strain approximation is used, where the voids are parallel cylindrical holes. Clusters with different numbers of voids are compared with the growth of a single void, such that the total initial volume of the voids, and thus also the void volume fractions...... understanding, different transverse stresses on the unit cell are considered to see the influence of different levels of stress triaxiality. Also considered are different initial ratios of the void spacing to the void radius inside the clusters. And results are shown for different levels of strain hardening...

  11. Universal void density profiles from simulation and SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Nadathur, S; Diego, J M; Iliev, I T; Gottlöber, S; Watson, W A; Yepes, G

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the universality and self-similarity of void density profiles, for voids in realistic mock luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalogues from the Jubilee simulation, as well as in void catalogues constructed from the SDSS LRG and Main Galaxy samples. Voids are identified using a modified version of the ZOBOV watershed transform algorithm, with additional selection cuts. We find that voids in simulation are self-similar, meaning that their average rescaled profile does not depend on the void size, or -- within the range of the simulated catalogue -- on the redshift. Comparison of the profiles obtained from simulated and real voids shows an excellent match. The profiles of real voids also show a universal behaviour over a wide range of galaxy luminosities, number densities and redshifts. This points to a fundamental property of the voids found by the watershed algorithm, which can be exploited in future studies of voids.

  12. Universal void density profiles from simulation and SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadathur, S.; Hotchkiss, S.; Diego, J. M.; Iliev, I. T.; Gottlöber, S.; Watson, W. A.; Yepes, G.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the universality and self-similarity of void density profiles, for voids in realistic mock luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalogues from the Jubilee simulation, as well as in void catalogues constructed from the SDSS LRG and Main Galaxy samples. Voids are identified using a modified version of the ZOBOV watershed transform algorithm, with additional selection cuts. We find that voids in simulation are self-similar, meaning that their average rescaled profile does not depend on the void size, or - within the range of the simulated catalogue - on the redshift. Comparison of the profiles obtained from simulated and real voids shows an excellent match. The profiles of real voids also show a universal behaviour over a wide range of galaxy luminosities, number densities and redshifts. This points to a fundamental property of the voids found by the watershed algorithm, which can be exploited in future studies of voids.

  13. Post-void residual urine under 150 ml does not exclude voiding dysfunction in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khayyami, Yasmine; Klarskov, Niels; Lose, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: It has been claimed that post-void residual urine (PVR) below 150 ml rules out voiding dysfunction in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and provides license to perform sling surgery. The cut-off of 150 ml seems arbitrary, not evidence-based, and so we sough...

  14. Cosmic Voids: structure, dynamics and galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2009-01-01

    In this review we discuss several aspects of Cosmic Voids. Voids are a major component of the large scale distribution of matter and galaxies in the Universe. They are of instrumental importance for understanding the emergence of the Cosmic Web. Their relatively simple shape and structure makes them into useful tools for extracting the value of a variety cosmic parameters, possibly including even that of the influence of dark energy. Perhaps most promising and challenging is the issue of the galaxies found within their realm. Not only does the pristine environment of voids provide a promising testing ground for assessing the role of environment on the formation and evolution of galaxies, the dearth of dwarf galaxies may even represent a serious challenge to the standard view of cosmic structure formation.

  15. Void coalescence within periodic clusters of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, C. I. A.; Worswick, M. J.; Pilkey, A. K.; Lloyd, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of particle clustering on void damage rates in a ductile material under triaxial loading conditions is examined using three-dimensional finite element analysis. An infinite material containing a regular distribution of clustered particles is modelled using a unit cell approach. Three discrete particles are introduced into each unit cell while a secondary population of small particles within the surrounding matrix is represented using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) constitutive equations. Deformation strain states characteristic of sheet metal forming are considered; that is, deep drawing, plane strain and biaxial stretching. Uniaxial tensile stress states with varying levels of superimposed hydrostatic tension are also examined. The orientation of a particle cluster with respect to the direction of major principal loading is shown to significantly influence failure strains. Coalescence of voids within a first-order particle cluster (consisting of three particles) is a stable event while collapse of inter-cluster ligaments leads to imminent material collapse through void-sheeting.

  16. Effectiveness of tolterodine in nonneurogenic voiding dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ramesh

    2006-11-01

    The efficacy of tolterodine was analysed in children with non-neurogenic voiding dysfunction, using dysfunctional voiding symptom score (DVSS). Of 44 patients (mean age 9.3 yrs; M:F = 25:19), 36 received long acting tolterodine tartrate at a dose of 2mg OD and 8 at a dose of 4mg OD. The mean (SD) DVSS before and after the treatment was 17.1 (2.8) and 12.0 (2.4). There was a significant improvement in the mean DVSS score at the end of the treatment (Students t test P tolterodine is effective in children with voiding dysfunction. The single daily dose has good compliance and minimal side effect profile.

  17. TRANC – a novel fast-response converter to measure total reactive atmospheric nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Marx

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The input and loss of plant available nitrogen (N from/to the atmosphere can be an important factor for the productivity of ecosystems and thus for its carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. We present a novel converter for the measurement of total reactive nitrogen (TRANC: Total Reactive Atmospheric Nitrogen Converter, which offers the opportunity to quantify the sum of all airborne reactive nitrogen (Nr compounds in high time resolution. The basic concept of the TRANC is the full conversion of total Nr to nitrogen monoxide (NO within two reaction steps. Initially, reduced N compounds are being oxidised, and oxidised N compounds are thermally converted to lower oxidation states. Particulate N is being sublimated and oxidised or reduced afterwards. In a second step, remaining higher N oxides or those originated in the first step are catalytically converted to NO with carbon monoxide used as reduction gas. The converter is combined with a fast response chemiluminescence detector (CLD for NO analysis and its performance was tested for the most relevant gaseous and particulate Nr species under both laboratory and field conditions. Recovery rates during laboratory tests for NH3 and NO2 were found to be 95 and 99%, respectively, and 97% when the two gases were combined. In-field longterm stability over an 11-month period was approved by a value of 91% for NO2. Effective conversion was also found for ammonium and nitrate containing particles. The recovery rate of total ambient Nr was tested against the sum of individual measurements of NH3, HNO3, HONO, NH4+, NO3, and NOx using a combination of different well-established devices. The results show that the TRANC-CLD system precisely captures fluctuations in Nr concentrations and also matches the sum of all

  18. The humoral immune response to Chlamydia trachomatis in patients with acute reactive arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, B; Birkelund, Svend; Mordhorst, CH

    1994-01-01

    Sera from 25 patients with clinical signs of reactive arthritis were analysed for antibodies against Chlamydia trachomatis by immunoblotting. Purified elementary bodies, purified Chlamydia outer membrane complexes, and purified recombinant subcomponents were used as antigens. Antibodies against C...

  19. Responses of hypertrophied myocytes to reactive species: implications for glycolysis and electrophile metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansbury, Brian E; Riggs, Daniel W; Brainard, Robert E; Salabei, Joshua K; Jones, Steven P; Hill, Bradford G

    2011-04-15

    During cardiac remodelling, the heart generates higher levels of reactive species; yet an intermediate 'compensatory' stage of hypertrophy is associated with a greater ability to withstand oxidative stress. The mechanisms underlying this protected myocardial phenotype are poorly understood. We examined how a cellular model of hypertrophy deals with electrophilic insults, such as would occur upon ischaemia or in the failing heart. For this, we measured energetics in control and PE (phenylephrine)-treated NRCMs (neonatal rat cardiomyocytes) under basal conditions and when stressed with HNE (4-hydroxynonenal). PE treatment caused hypertrophy as indicated by augmented atrial natriuretic peptide and increased cellular protein content. Hypertrophied myocytes demonstrated a 2.5-fold increase in ATP-linked oxygen consumption and a robust augmentation of oligomycin-stimulated glycolytic flux and lactate production. Hypertrophied myocytes displayed a protected phenotype that was resistant to HNE-induced cell death and a unique bioenergetic response characterized by a delayed and abrogated rate of oxygen consumption and a 2-fold increase in glycolysis upon HNE exposure. This augmentation of glycolytic flux was not due to increased glucose uptake, suggesting that electrophile stress results in utilization of intracellular glycogen stores to support the increased energy demand. Hypertrophied myocytes also had an increased propensity to oxidize HNE to 4-hydroxynonenoic acid and sustained less protein damage due to acute HNE insults. Inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase resulted in bioenergetic collapse when myocytes were challenged with HNE. The integration of electrophile metabolism with glycolytic and mitochondrial energy production appears to be important for maintaining myocyte homoeostasis under conditions of increased oxidative stress.

  20. The role of reactive oxygen species in Anopheles aquasalis response to Plasmodium vivax infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C Bahia

    Full Text Available Malaria affects millions of people worldwide and hundreds of thousands of people each year in Brazil. The mosquito Anopheles aquasalis is an important vector of Plasmodium vivax, the main human malaria parasite in the Americas. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been shown to have a role in insect innate immune responses as a potent pathogen-killing agent. We investigated the mechanisms of free radicals modulation after A. aquasalis infection with P. vivax. ROS metabolism was evaluated in the vector by studying expression and activity of three key detoxification enzymes, one catalase and two superoxide dismutases (SOD3A and SOD3B. Also, the involvement of free radicals in the mosquito immunity was measured by silencing the catalase gene followed by infection of A. aquasalis with P. vivax. Catalase, SOD3A and SOD3B expression in whole A. aquasalis were at the same levels of controls at 24 h and upregulated 36 h after ingestion of blood containing P. vivax. However, in the insect isolated midgut, the mRNA for these enzymes was not regulated by P. vivax infection, while catalase activity was reduced 24 h after the infectious meal. RNAi-mediated silencing of catalase reduced enzyme activity in the midgut, resulted in increased P. vivax infection and prevalence, and decreased bacterial load in the mosquito midgut. Our findings suggest that the interactions between A. aquasalis and P. vivax do not follow the model of ROS-induced parasite killing. It appears that P. vivax manipulates the mosquito detoxification system in order to allow its own development. This can be an indirect effect of fewer competitive bacteria present in the mosquito midgut caused by the increase of ROS after catalase silencing. These findings provide novel information on unique aspects of the main malaria parasite in the Americas interaction with one of its natural vectors.

  1. Regulation of Rac1 and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Response to Infection of Gastrointestinal Epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerco den Hartog

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS during infection is an immediate host defense leading to microbial killing. APE1 is a multifunctional protein induced by ROS and after induction, protects against ROS-mediated DNA damage. Rac1 and NAPDH oxidase (Nox1 are important contributors of ROS generation following infection and associated with gastrointestinal epithelial injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if APE1 regulates the function of Rac1 and Nox1 during oxidative stress. Gastric or colonic epithelial cells (wild-type or with suppressed APE1 were infected with Helicobacter pylori or Salmonella enterica and assessed for Rac1 and NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production. Rac1 and APE1 interactions were measured by co-immunoprecipitation, confocal microscopy and proximity ligation assay (PLA in cell lines or in biopsy specimens. Significantly greater levels of ROS were produced by APE1-deficient human gastric and colonic cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells compared to control cells after infection with either gastric or enteric pathogens. H. pylori activated Rac1 and Nox1 in all cell types, but activation was higher in APE1 suppressed cells. APE1 overexpression decreased H. pylori-induced ROS generation, Rac1 activation, and Nox1 expression. We determined that the effects of APE1 were mediated through its N-terminal lysine residues interacting with Rac1, leading to inhibition of Nox1 expression and ROS generation. APE1 is a negative regulator of oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal epithelium during bacterial infection by modulating Rac1 and Nox1. Our results implicate APE1 in novel molecular interactions that regulate early stress responses elicited by microbial infections.

  2. Bioactivity response of Ta1-xOx coatings deposited by reactive DC magnetron sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida Alves, C F; Cavaleiro, A; Carvalho, S

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants is sometimes accompanied by failure due to periimplantitis disease and subsequently poor esthetics when soft-hard tissue margin recedes. As a consequence, further research is needed for developing new bioactive surfaces able to enhance the osseous growth. Tantalum (Ta) is a promising material for dental implants since, comparing with titanium (Ti), it is bioactive and has an interesting chemistry which promotes the osseointegration. Another promising approach for implantology is the development of implants with oxidized surfaces since bone progenitor cells interact with the oxide layer forming a diffusion zone due to its ability to bind with calcium which promotes a stronger bond. In the present report Ta-based coatings were deposited by reactive DC magnetron sputtering onto Ti CP substrates in an Ar+O2 atmosphere. In order to assess the osteoconductive response of the studied materials, contact angle and in vitro tests of the samples immersed in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) were performed. Structural results showed that oxide phases where achieved with larger amounts of oxygen (70 at.% O). More compact and smooth coatings were deposited by increasing the oxygen content. The as-deposited Ta coating presented the most hydrophobic character (100°); with increasing oxygen amount contact angles progressively diminished, down to the lowest measured value, 63°. The higher wettability is also accompanied by an increase on the surface energy. Bioactivity tests demonstrated that highest O-content coating, in good agreement with wettability and surface energy values, showed an increased affinity for apatite adhesion, with higher Ca/P ratio formation, when compared to the bare Ti substrates.

  3. Early changes in vascular reactivity in response to 56Fe irradiation in ApoE-/- mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. Roger; Yu, Tao; Gupta, Kiran; Babitz, Stephen K.; Black, Leland L.; Kabarowski, Janusz H.; Kucik, Dennis F.

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have established that radiation from a number of terrestrial sources increases the risk of atherosclerosis. The accelerated heavy ions in the galacto-cosmic radiation (GCR) that astronauts will encounter on in space, however, interact very differently with tissues than most types of terrestrial radiation, so the health consequences of exposure on deep-space missions are not clear. We demonstrated earlier that 56Fe, an important component of cosmic radiation, accelerates atherosclerotic plaque development. In the present study, we examined an earlier, pro-atherogenic event that might be predictive of later atherosclerotic disease. Decreased endothelium-dependent vasodilation is a prominent manifestation of vascular dysfunction that is thought to predispose humans to the development of structural vascular changes that precede the development of atherosclerotic plaques. To test the effect of heavy-ion radiation on endothelium-dependent vasodilation, we used the same ApoE-/- mouse model in which we previously demonstrated the pro-atherogenic effect of 56Fe on plaque development. Ten week old male ApoE mice (an age at which there is little atherosclerotic plaque in the descending aorta) were exposed to 2.6 Gy 56Fe. The mice were then fed a normal diet and housed under standard conditions. At 4-5 weeks post-irradiation, aortic rings were isolated and endothelial-dependent relaxation was measured. Relaxation in response to acetylcholine was significantly impaired in irradiated mice compared to age-matched, un-irradiated mice. This decrease in vascular reactivity following 56Fe irradiation occurred eight weeks prior to the development of statistically significant exacerbation of aortic plaque formation and may contribute to the formation of later atherosclerotic lesions.

  4. Locomotor Response to Novelty as a Predictor of Reactivity to Aversive Stimuli in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In an animal model for vulnerability to drug abuse animals that exhibit greater motor activity in a novel environment (high responders; HR) are more sensitive to drugs of abuse and are more likely to self-administer these drugs compared to less reactive animals (low responders; LR). In the light of clinical evidence on comorbidity between drug abuse and mood disorders, we used this model to investigate whether individual differences in locomotor reactivity to novelty are related to anxiety- a...

  5. Critical velocities for deflagration and detonation triggered by voids in a REBO high explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, Stuart Davis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jensen, Niels G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The effects of circular voids on the shock sensitivity of a two-dimensional model high explosive crystal are considered. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. The probability of initiating chemical reactions is found to rise more suddenly with increasing piston velocity for larger voids that collapse more deterministically. A void with radius as small as 10 nm reduces the minimum initiating velocity by a factor of 4. The transition at larger velocities to detonation is studied in a micron-long sample with a single void (and its periodic images). The reaction yield during the shock traversal increases rapidly with velocity, then becomes a prompt, reliable detonation. A void of radius 2.5 nm reduces the critical velocity by 10% from the perfect crystal. A Pop plot of the time-to-detonation at higher velocities shows a characteristic pressure dependence.

  6. Evaluation of cross-reactive antibody response to HVR1 in chronic hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Bing-Shui; Feng, Xiao-Yan; He, Jing; Wang, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Xiang-Ying; Zhang, He-Qiu; Song, Xiao-Guo; Chen, Kun; Ling, Shi-Gan; Zhu, Cui-Xia; Wei, Lai; Rao, Hui-Ying

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the presence and cross-reactive antibodies against hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients and its relationship with the progression of the disease. METHODS: Sixteen representative HVR1 proteins selected from a unique set of 1600 natural sequences were used to semiquantitate the cross-reactivity of HVR1 antibodies in the sera of HCV patients. Fifty-five chronic HCV patients including 23 with asymptomatic mild hepatitis, 18 with chronic hepatitis and 16 with liver cirrhosis patients were studied. RESULTS: The degree of the cross-reactivity of anti-HVR1 antibodies in 23 patients with mild asymptomatic hepatitis was 3.09 ± 2.68, which was significantly lower than in those with chronic hepatitis (5.44 ± 3.93, P < 0.05) and liver cirrhosis (7.44 ± 3.90, P < 0.01). No correlation was observed between the broadness of the cross-reactivity anti-HVR1 antibodies and patient’s age, infection time, serum alanine aminotransferase activity, or serum HCV-RNA concentration. It was the breath of cross-reactivity rather than the presence of anti-HVR1 antibody in HCV sera that was associated with the progression of liver disease. CONCLUSION: The broadly cross-reactive HVR1 antibodies generated in natural HCV patients can not neutralize the virus, which results in persistent infection in patients with chronic hepatitis. PMID:20845515

  7. Malposition of catheters during voiding cystourethrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathaus, V.; Konen, O.; Shapiro, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging Sapir Medical Center, Kfar-Saba and Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Veteran Pediatric Radiologist, Kfar Saba (Israel)

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report catheter malposition during voiding cystourethrography. Eight hundred forty-three voiding cystourethrography (265 males and 578 females, aged 1 week to 12 years, mean age 2 years) were performed during a period of 4 years. The conventional standard procedure was applied. In 3 cases with passed history of urinary tract infection the catheter entered directly into the ureter. In all these cases the uretero-vesical reflux was present on the same side where the catheter entered. It appears that insertion of a catheter into the ureter is possible only in the presence of an anomaly or pathology at the vesicoureteric junction. (orig.)

  8. Transient Treg-cell depletion in adult mice results in persistent self-reactive CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Sofia N; Bourges, Dorothée; Garry, Sarah; Ross, Ellen M; van Driel, Ian R; Gleeson, Paul A

    2014-12-01

    Depletion of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in adults results in chronic inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, the impact of transient Treg-cell depletion on self-reactive responses is poorly defined. Here, we studied the effect of transient depletion of Treg cells on CD4(+) T-cell responses to endogenous self-antigens. Short-term ablation of Treg cells in mice resulted in rapid activation of CD4(+) T cells, increased percentage of IFN-γ(+) and Th17 cells in lymphoid organs, and development of autoimmune gastritis. To track self-reactive responses, we analyzed the activation of naïve gastric-specific CD4(+) T cells. There was a dramatic increase in proliferation and acquisition of effector function of gastric-specific T cells in the stomach draining LNs of Treg-cell-depleted mice, compared with untreated mice, either during Treg-cell depletion or after Treg-cell reconstitution. Moreover, the hyperproliferation of gastric-specific T cells in the Treg-cell-ablated mice was predominantly antigen-dependent. Transient depletion of Treg cells resulted in a shift in the ratio of peripheral:thymic Treg cells in the reemerged Treg-cell population, indicating an altered composition of Treg cells. These findings indicate that transient Treg-cell depletion results in ongoing antigen-driven self-reactive T-cell responses and emphasize the continual requirement for an intact Treg-cell population.

  9. Initial reactivity and magnitude of the acute stress response associated with personality in wild great tits (Parus major).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Alexander T; van Oers, Kees; Naguib, Marc; Hau, Michaela

    2013-08-01

    Phenotypic correlations, such as those between functionally distinct behavioral traits, can emerge through the action of selection on individual traits, on trait combinations, and through pleiotropic mechanisms. Steroid hormones are known to have pleiotropic effects on a suite of behavioral and physiological traits, including stable individual differences in coping with stress. Characterizing the stress axis in relation to personality, however, has typically focused on estimating baseline and peak levels of glucocorticoids, principally in captive animals. In contrast, the reactivity of the stress response-how quickly it turns on and persists-may better indicate the ability of an individual to cope with challenges, particularly in free-living animals. Using wild great tits (Parus major) we tested the hypothesis that cautious individuals respond to a standardized stressor with a more reactive stress response compared to bolder individuals. Wild birds were captured and tested for exploration behavior in a novel environment-an operational measure of personality in this species-and assessed separately for their glucocorticoid response to a standardized stressor. Slower explorers exhibited a greater elevation in glucocorticoid levels within the first three minutes after capture. Further, slower explorers reached a higher maximum CORT concentration and had higher total exposure to glucocorticoids during the stressor period. These data provide evidence that the temporal reactivity of the endocrine stress response, specifically its speed and magnitude, is associated with stable behavioral traits in free-living animals.

  10. Cosmic Voids and Void Lensing in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, C; Kovacs, A; Jain, B; García-Bellido, J; Nadathur, S; Gruen, D; Hamaus, N; Huterer, D; Vielzeuf, P; Amara, A; Bonnett, C; DeRose, J; Hartley, W G; Jarvis, M; Lahav, O; Miquel, R; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E S; Sheldon, E; Wechsler, R H; Zuntz, J; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Annis, J; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bernstein, R A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Krause, E; Kuehn, K; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Melchior, P; Plazas, A A; Reil, K; Romer, A K; Sanchez, E; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Walker, A R; Weller, J

    2016-01-01

    Galaxies and their dark matter halos populate a complicated filamentary network around large, nearly empty regions known as cosmic voids. Cosmic voids are usually identified in spectroscopic galaxy surveys, where 3D information about the large-scale structure of the Universe is available. Although an increasing amount of photometric data is being produced, its potential for void studies is limited since photometric redshifts induce line-of-sight position errors of $\\sim50$ Mpc/$h$ or more that can render many voids undetectable. In this paper we present a new void finder designed for photometric surveys, validate it using simulations, and apply it to the high-quality photo-$z$ redMaGiC galaxy sample of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES-SV) data. The algorithm works by projecting galaxies into 2D slices and finding voids in the smoothed 2D galaxy density field of the slice. Fixing the line-of-sight size of the slices to be at least twice the photo-$z$ scatter, the number of voids found in these ...

  11. The sparkling Universe: a scenario for cosmic void motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Laura; Ruiz, Andrés N.; Lares, Marcelo; Paz, Dante J.; Maldonado, Victoria E.; Luparello, Heliana E.; Garcia Lambas, Diego

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic voids are prominent features of the Universe, encoding relevant information of the growth and evolution of structure through their dynamics. Here, we perform a statistical study of the global motion of cosmic voids using both a numerical simulation and observational data. Their relation to large-scale mass flows and the physical effects that drive those motions. We analyse the bulk motions of voids, finding void mean bulk velocities in the range 300-400 km s-1, depending on void size and the large-scale environment. Statistically, small voids move faster, and voids in relatively higher density environments have higher bulk velocities. Also, we find large-scale overdensities (underdensities) along (opposite to) the void motion direction, suggesting that void motions respond to a pull-push mechanism. Our analysis suggests that their relative motions are generated by large-scale density fluctuations. In agreement with linear theory, voids embedded in low (high) density regions mutually recede (attract) each other, providing the general mechanism to understand the bimodal behaviour of void motions. We have also inferred void motions in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using linear theory, finding that their estimated motions are in qualitatively agreement with the results of the simulation. Our results suggest a scenario of galaxies and galaxy systems flowing away from void centres with the additional, and more relevant, contribution of the void bulk motion to the total velocity.

  12. CTL responses of high functional avidity and broad variant cross-reactivity are associated with HIV control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Mothe

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses targeting specific HIV proteins, in particular Gag, have been associated with relative control of viral replication in vivo. However, Gag-specific CTL can also be detected in individuals who do not control the virus and it remains thus unclear how Gag-specific CTL may mediate the beneficial effects in some individuals but not in others. Here, we used a 10mer peptide set spanning HIV Gag-p24 to determine immunogen-specific T-cell responses and to assess functional properties including functional avidity and cross-reactivity in 25 HIV-1 controllers and 25 non-controllers without protective HLA class I alleles. Our data challenge the common belief that Gag-specific T cell responses dominate the virus-specific immunity exclusively in HIV-1 controllers as both groups mounted responses of comparable breadths and magnitudes against the p24 sequence. However, responses in controllers reacted to lower antigen concentrations and recognized more epitope variants than responses in non-controllers. These cross-sectional data, largely independent of particular HLA genetics and generated using direct ex-vivo samples thus identify T cell responses of high functional avidity and with broad variant reactivity as potential functional immune correlates of relative HIV control.

  13. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract

    OpenAIRE

    Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Thomas Berkemeier; Haijie Tong; Arangio, Andrea M.; Kurt Lucas; Ulrich Pöschl; Manabu Shiraiwa

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) con...

  14. Evidence of trace conditioning in comatose patients revealed by the reactivation of EEG responses to alerting sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Elsa; Nguepnjo Nguissi, Nathalie Ata; Tzovara, Athina; Viceic, Dragana; Rusca, Marco; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea O; De Lucia, Marzia

    2016-11-01

    Trace conditioning refers to a learning process occurring after repeated presentation of a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS+) and a salient unconditioned stimulus (UCS) separated by a temporal gap. Recent studies have reported that trace conditioning can occur in humans in reduced levels of consciousness by showing a transfer of the unconditioned autonomic response to the CS+ in healthy sleeping individuals and in vegetative state patients. However, no previous studies have investigated the neural underpinning of trace conditioning in the absence of consciousness in humans. In the present study, we recorded the EEG activity of 29 post-anoxic comatose patients while presenting a trace conditioning paradigm using neutral tones as CS+ and alerting sounds as UCS. Most patients received therapeutic hypothermia and all were deeply unconscious according to standardized clinical scales. After repeated presentation of the CS+ and UCS couple, learning was assessed by measuring the EEG activity during the period where the UCS is omitted after CS+ presentation. Specifically we assessed the 'reactivation' of the neural response to UCS omission by applying a decoding algorithm derived from the statistical model of the EEG activity in response to the UCS presentation. The same procedure was used in a group of 12 awake healthy controls. We found a reactivation of the UCS response in absence of stimulation in eight patients (five under therapeutic hypothermia) and four healthy controls. Additionally, the reactivation effect was temporally specific within trials since it manifested primarily at the specific latency of UCS presentation and significantly less before or after this period. Our results show for the first time that trace conditioning may manifest as a reactivation of the EEG activity related to the UCS and even in the absence of consciousness.

  15. Measurement of post-void residual urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asimakopoulos, Anastasios D.; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Kocjancic, Ervin; Tubaro, Andrea; Rosier, Peter F.; Finazzi-Agrò, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Aims To present the teaching module "Measurement of Post-void residual urine." Methods This module has been prepared by a Working Group of the ICS Urodynamics Committee. The methodology used included comprehensive literature review, consensus formation by the members of the Working Group, and review

  16. Void fraction instrument acceptance test procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, K.L.

    1994-09-15

    This acceptance test procedure (ATP) was written to test the void fraction instrument (VFI) and verify that the unit is ready for field service. The procedure verifies that the mechanical and electrical features (not specifically addressed in the software ATP) and software alarms are operating as designed.

  17. Halo abundances and shear in void models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alonso, David; García-Bellido, Juan; Haugbølle, Troels

    2012-01-01

    We study the non-linear gravitational collapse of dark matter into halos through numerical N-body simulations of Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi void models. We extend the halo mass function formalism to these models in a consistent way. This extension not only compares well with the simulated data at all ...

  18. Halo abundances and shear in void models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alonso, David; García-Bellido, Juan; Haugbølle, Troels;

    2012-01-01

    We study the non-linear gravitational collapse of dark matter into halos through numerical N-body simulations of Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi void models. We extend the halo mass function formalism to these models in a consistent way. This extension not only compares well with the simulated data at all...

  19. Void fraction instrument acceptance test procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, K.L.

    1994-09-15

    This acceptance test procedure (ATP) was written to test the void fraction instrument (VFI) and verify that the unit is ready for field service. The procedure verifies that the mechanical and electrical features (not specifically addressed in the software ATP) and software alarms are operating as designed.

  20. "Dark energy" in the Local Void

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villata, M.

    2012-05-01

    The unexpected discovery of the accelerated cosmic expansion in 1998 has filled the Universe with the embarrassing presence of an unidentified "dark energy", or cosmological constant, devoid of any physical meaning. While this standard cosmology seems to work well at the global level, improved knowledge of the kinematics and other properties of our extragalactic neighborhood indicates the need for a better theory. We investigate whether the recently suggested repulsive-gravity scenario can account for some of the features that are unexplained by the standard model. Through simple dynamical considerations, we find that the Local Void could host an amount of antimatter (˜5×1015 M ⊙) roughly equivalent to the mass of a typical supercluster, thus restoring the matter-antimatter symmetry. The antigravity field produced by this "dark repulsor" can explain the anomalous motion of the Local Sheet away from the Local Void, as well as several other properties of nearby galaxies that seem to require void evacuation and structure formation much faster than expected from the standard model. At the global cosmological level, gravitational repulsion from antimatter hidden in voids can provide more than enough potential energy to drive both the cosmic expansion and its acceleration, with no need for an initial "explosion" and dark energy. Moreover, the discrete distribution of these dark repulsors, in contrast to the uniformly permeating dark energy, can also explain dark flows and other recently observed excessive inhomogeneities and anisotropies of the Universe.

  1. The Metallicity of Void Dwarf Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreckel, K.; Croxall, K.; Groves, B.; van de Weygaert, R.; Pogge, R. W.

    2015-01-01

    The current ΛCDM cosmological model predicts that galaxy evolution proceeds more slowly in lower density environments, suggesting that voids are a prime location to search for relatively pristine galaxies that are representative of the building blocks of early massive galaxies. To test the assumptio

  2. Partial discharges in ellipsoidal and spheroidal voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crichton, George C; Karlsson, P. W.; Pedersen, Aage

    1989-01-01

    Transients associated with partial discharges in voids can be described in terms of the charges induced on the terminal electrodes of the system. The relationship between the induced charge and the properties which are usually measured is discussed. The method is illustrated by applying it to a s...

  3. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Defense/Stress Responses Activated by Chitosan in Sycamore Cultured Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Malerba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CHT is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L. cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO. We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation.

  4. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in defense/stress responses activated by chitosan in sycamore cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2015-01-29

    Chitosan (CHT) is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation.

  5. Chemistry and biology of reactive oxygen species in signaling or stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Bryan C; Chang, Christopher J

    2011-07-18

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a family of molecules that are continuously generated, transformed and consumed in all living organisms as a consequence of aerobic life. The traditional view of these reactive oxygen metabolites is one of oxidative stress and damage that leads to decline of tissue and organ systems in aging and disease. However, emerging data show that ROS produced in certain situations can also contribute to physiology and increased fitness. This Perspective provides a focused discussion on what factors lead ROS molecules to become signal and/or stress agents, highlighting how increasing knowledge of the underlying chemistry of ROS can lead to advances in understanding their disparate contributions to biology. An important facet of this emerging area at the chemistry-biology interface is the development of new tools to study these small molecules and their reactivity in complex biological systems.

  6. Immune response in lung cancer mouse model mimics human anti-Hu reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, Meleeneh; Calbo, Joaquim; Proost, Natalie; Carpenter, Catherine L.; Berns, Anton; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.

    2009-01-01

    Most patients with paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis/sensory neuronopathy PEM/SN have small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and develop antibodies against neuronal-specific Hu proteins, which are abnormally expressed in the tumor. Anti-Hu reactivity is present in ~16% of SCLC patients without PEM/SN. Here we test the hypothesis that engineered SCLC-prone mice may exhibit anti-Hu reactivity. We show that tumors from SCLC-prone mice misexpress Hu proteins, and 14% of mice harbor anti-Hu antibodies. Mice appear to show reactivity prior to clinical diagnosis of SCLC. This mouse model system will be useful to study SCLC-associated autoimmunity, its diagnostic value, and the potential protective role of oncoantigen-directed autoantibodies. PMID:19765830

  7. Adaptive Immune Responses in a Multiple Sclerosis Patient with Acute Varicella-Zoster Virus Reactivation during Treatment with Fingolimod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Harrer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fingolimod, an oral sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P receptor modulator, is approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS. The interference with S1P signaling leads to retention particularly of chemokine receptor-7 (CCR7 expressing T cells in lymph nodes. The immunological basis of varicella zoster virus (VZV infections during fingolimod treatment is unclear. Here, we studied the dynamics of systemic and intrathecal immune responses associated with symptomatic VZV reactivation including cessation of fingolimod and initiation of antiviral therapy. Key features in peripheral blood were an about two-fold increase of VZV-specific IgG at diagnosis of VZV reactivation as compared to the previous months, a relative enrichment of effector CD4+ T cells (36% versus mean 12% in controls, and an accelerated reconstitution of absolute lymphocytes counts including a normalized CD4+/CD8+ ratio and reappearance of CCR7+ T cells. In cerebrospinal fluid (CSF the lymphocytic pleocytosis and CD4+/CD8+ ratios at diagnosis of reactivation and after nine days of fingolimod discontinuation remained unchanged. During this time CCR7+ T cells were not observed in CSF. Further research into fingolimod-associated VZV reactivation and immune reconstitution is mandatory to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with this potentially life-threatening condition.

  8. Muller cell reactivity in response to photoreceptor degeneration in rats with defective polycystin-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Vogler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinal degeneration in transgenic rats that express a mutant cilia gene polycystin-2 (CMV-PKD2(1/703HA is characterized by initial photoreceptor degeneration and glial activation, followed by vasoregression and neuronal degeneration (Feng et al., 2009, PLoS One 4: e7328. It is unknown whether glial activation contributes to neurovascular degeneration after photoreceptor degeneration. We characterized the reactivity of Müller glial cells in retinas of rats that express defective polycystin-2. METHODS: Age-matched Sprague-Dawley rats served as control. Retinal slices were immunostained for intermediate filaments, the potassium channel Kir4.1, and aquaporins 1 and 4. The potassium conductance of isolated Müller cells was recorded by whole-cell patch clamping. The osmotic swelling characteristics of Müller cells were determined by superfusion of retinal slices with a hypoosmotic solution. FINDINGS: Müller cells in retinas of transgenic rats displayed upregulation of GFAP and nestin which was not observed in control cells. Whereas aquaporin-1 labeling of photoreceptor cells disappeared along with the degeneration of the cells, aquaporin-1 emerged in glial cells in the inner retina of transgenic rats. Aquaporin-4 was upregulated around degenerating photoreceptor cells. There was an age-dependent redistribution of Kir4.1 in retinas of transgenic rats, with a more even distribution along glial membranes and a downregulation of perivascular Kir4.1. Müller cells of transgenic rats displayed a slight decrease in their Kir conductance as compared to control. Müller cells in retinal tissues from transgenic rats swelled immediately under hypoosmotic stress; this was not observed in control cells. Osmotic swelling was induced by oxidative-nitrosative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and inflammatory lipid mediators. INTERPRETATION: Cellular swelling suggests that the rapid water transport through Müller cells in response to osmotic stress

  9. TNFRp55 controls regulatory T cell responses in Yersinia-induced reactive arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnelutti, Ethelina; Arias, José L; Valdez, Susana R; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Di Genaro, María S

    2013-02-01

    In addition to its well-known pro-inflammatory effects, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) displays anti-inflammatory activities through mechanisms poorly understood. Previously, we reported the development of severe chronic Yersinia enterocolitica-induced reactive arthritis (ReA) in mice lacking the TNF receptor (TNFR)p55. As regulatory T (T(reg)) cells limit chronic inflammation, here we aim to investigate the expansion and function of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T(reg) cells in the ReA animal model. The number of T(reg) cells as well as the FoxP3 mRNA expression and interleukin (IL)-10 levels were significantly decreased in joint regional lymph nodes (RLNs) of TNFRp55(-/-) mice vs wild-type (WT) mice at the arthritis onset. However, at chronic phase of arthritis, the number of T(reg) cell in TNFRp55(-/-) was similar to WT mice. To explore the in vivo function of T(reg) cells at this chronic phase in WT and TNFRp55-deficient mice, we adoptively transferred CD4(+) T cells from TNFRp55-deficient mice of day 21, into naïve WT or TNFRp55(-/-) mice. When knockout mice were used as recipients we observed higher delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and joint inflammation after heat-killed Yersinia (HKY) stimulation. Accordingly, we found higher levels of IL-17, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-6, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and IL-12/23p40 and lower IL-10 levels in RLN of paws challenged with HKY in TNFRp55(-/-) recipient mice. In addition, we found that CD4(+) T cells from TNFRp55(-/-) mice controlled antigen-specific IL-12/23(p40) production in recipient WT mice. Our results show that TNFRp55 controls the induction and function of T(reg) cells through differential regulation of cytokine production, suggesting a novel molecular target for immune intervention in ReA.

  10. Robust DNA Damage Response and Elevated Reactive Oxygen Species in TINF2-Mutated Dyskeratosis Congenita Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Pereboeva

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis Congenita (DC is an inherited multisystem premature aging disorder with characteristic skin and mucosal findings as well as a predisposition to cancer and bone marrow failure. DC arises due to gene mutations associated with the telomerase complex or telomere maintenance, resulting in critically shortened telomeres. The pathogenesis of DC, as well as several congenital bone marrow failure (BMF syndromes, converges on the DNA damage response (DDR pathway and subsequent elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Historically, DC patients have had poor outcomes following bone marrow transplantation (BMT, perhaps as a consequence of an underlying DNA hypersensitivity to cytotoxic agents. Previously, we demonstrated an activated DDR and increased ROS, augmented by chemotherapy and radiation, in somatic cells isolated from DC patients with a mutation in the RNA component of telomerase, TERC. The current study was undertaken to determine whether previous findings related to ROS and DDR in TERC patients' cells could be extended to other DC mutations. Of particular interest was whether an antioxidant approach could counter increased ROS and decrease DC pathologies. To test this, we examined lymphocytes from DC patients from different DC mutations (TERT, TINF2, and TERC for the presence of an active DDR and increased ROS. All DC mutations led to increased steady-state p53 (2-fold to 10-fold and ROS (1.5-fold to 2-fold. Upon exposure to ionizing radiation (XRT, DC cells increased in both DDR and ROS to a significant degree. Exposing DC cells to hydrogen peroxide also revealed that DC cells maintain a significant oxidant burden compared to controls (1.5-fold to 3-fold. DC cell culture supplemented with N-acetylcysteine, or alternatively grown in low oxygen, afforded significant proliferative benefits (proliferation: maximum 2-fold increase; NAC: 5-fold p53 decrease; low oxygen: maximum 3.5-fold p53 decrease. Together, our data supports a

  11. Design of capacitance sensor system for void fraction measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi-ping; NIU Gang; WANG Jing

    2005-01-01

    Simulation and optimization were applied to a capacitive sensor system based on electrical tomography technology.Sensors, consisting of Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) axial synchro driving guard electrodes and two sets of detecting electrodes, make it possible to obtain simultaneously two groups of signals of the void fraction in oil-gas two-phase flow.The computational and experimental results showed that available sensors, charactered by high resolution and fast real-time response can be used for real-time liquid-gas two-phase flow pattern determination.

  12. Evaluation and Targeted Therapy of Voiding Dysfunction in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Lane S

    2016-06-01

    Significant strides have been made over the past two decades in more precisely evaluating and managing children with voiding complaints. A thorough history should offer insight into the possible causes for the presenting complaints and this should be supplemented by physical examination, urine studies, and select imaging. Uroflowmetry and external sphincter electromyography with measurement of postvoid residual urine should allow for accurate diagnosis using categories offered by the International Children's Continence Society. This ability to make an accurate diagnosis should naturally lead to the use of treatment options (urotherapy, pharmacotherapy, biofeedback, and neuromodulation) that specifically target the responsible cause of the complaints rather than simply their symptoms.

  13. Abacavir Induced T Cell Reactivity from Drug Naïve Individuals Shares Features of Allo-Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline Adam; Natascha Wuillemin; Stephan Watkins; Heidi Jamin; Eriksson, Klara K.; Peter Villiger; Stefano Fontana; Pichler, Werner J.; Daniel Yerly

    2014-01-01

    Abacavir hypersensitivity is a severe hypersensitivity reaction which occurs exclusively in carriers of the HLA-B*57∶01 allele. In vitro culture of PBMC with abacavir results in the outgrowth of abacavir-reacting CD8+ T cells, which release IFNγ and are cytotoxic. How this immune response is induced and what is recognized by these T cells is still a matter of debate. We analyzed the conditions required to develop an abacavir-dependent T cell response in vitro. The abacavir reactivity was inde...

  14. Interdisciplinary Evaluation of Broadly-Reactive HLA Class II Restricted Epitopes Eliciting HIV-Specific CD4+T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggert, M.; Norström, M.; Lundegaard, Claus

    2011-01-01

    , the functional and immunodominant discrepancies of CD4+ T cell responses targeting promiscuous MHC II restricted HIV epitopes remains poorly defined. Thus, utilization of interdisciplinary approaches might aid revealing broadly- reactive peptides eliciting CD4 + T cell responses. Methods: We utilized the novel...... bioinformatic prediction program NetMHCIIpan to select 64 optimized MHC II restricted epitopes located in the HIV Gag, Pol, Env, Nef and Tat regions. The epitopes were selected to cover the global diversity of the virus (multiple subtypes) and the human immune system(diverse MHC II types). Optimized...

  15. Cross-reactive Legionella antigens and the antibody response during infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G; Pearlman, E

    1991-01-01

    In order to define cross-reactive Legionella antigens suitable for diagnostic purposes, we investigated sonicate antigens from two Legionella species, including two serogroups of L. pneumophila. The antigens were reacted with heterologous and homologous rabbit antisera in Western blot. Sera from...

  16. Reactive microgliosis engages distinct responses by microglial subpopulations after minor central nervous system injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirenfeldt, Martin; Babcock, Alicia Anne; Ladeby, Rune;

    2005-01-01

    Microglia are bone marrow-derived cells that constitute a facultative macrophage population when activated by trauma or pathology in the CNS. Endogenous CNS-resident microglia as well as exogenous (immigrant) bone marrow-derived cells contribute to reactive microgliosis, raising fundamental quest...

  17. Antigen-specific B cells reactivate an effective cytotoxic T cell response against phagocytosed Salmonella through cross-presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle de Wit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The eradication of facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens, like Salmonella typhi, requires the concerted action of both the humoral immune response and the cytotoxic CD8(+ T cell response. Dendritic cells (DCs are considered to orchestrate the cytotoxic CD8(+ T cell response via cross-presentation of bacterial antigens onto MHC class I molecules. Cross-presentation of Salmonella by DCs however, is accompanied by the induction of apoptosis in the DCs. Besides antibody production, B cells are required to clear Salmonella infection for other unknown reasons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that Salmonella-specific B cells that phagocytose Salmonella upon BCR-ligation reactivate human memory CD8(+ T cells via cross-presentation yielding a Salmonella-specific cytotoxic T cell response. The reactivation of CD8(+ T cells is dependent on CD4(+ T cell help. Unlike the DCs, B cell-mediated cross-presentation of Salmonella does not coincide with apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: B cells form a new player in the activation of the cytotoxic effector arm of the immune response and the generation of effective adaptive immunity in Salmonella infection.

  18. A Novel Technique for the Assessment of Preoperative Cardiovascular Risk: Reactive Hyperemic Response to Short-Term Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Schier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Perioperative vascular function has been widely studied using noninvasive techniques that measure reactive hyperemia as a surrogate marker of vascular function. However, studies are limited to a static setting with patients tested at rest. We hypothesized that exercise would increase reactive hyperemia as measured by digital thermal monitoring (DTM in association to patients' cardiometabolic risk. Methods. Thirty patients (58 ± 9 years scheduled for noncardiac surgery were studied prospectively. Preoperatively, temperature rebound (TR following upper arm cuff occlusion was measured before and 10 minutes after exercise. Data are presented as means ± SD. Statistical analysis utilized ANOVA and Fisher’s exact test, with P values <0.05 regarded as significant. Results. Following exercise, TR-derived parameters increased significantly (absolute: 0.53 ± 0.95 versus 0.04 ± 0.42∘C, P=0.04, and % change: 1.78 ± 3.29 versus 0.14 ± 1.27 %, P=0.03. All patients with preoperative cardiac risk factors had a change in TR (after/before exercise, ΔTR with values falling in the lower two tertiles of the study population (ΔTR <1.1%. Conclusion. Exercise increased the reactive hyperemic response to ischemia. This dynamic response was blunted in patients with cardiac risk factors. The usability of this short-term effect for the preoperative assessment of endothelial function warrants further study.

  19. A Cosmic Watershed: the WVF Void Detection Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Platen, Erwin; Jones, Bernard J T

    2007-01-01

    On megaparsec scales the Universe is permeated by an intricate filigree of clusters, filaments, sheets and voids, the Cosmic Web. For the understanding of its dynamical and hierarchical history it is crucial to identify objectively its complex morphological components. One of the most characteristic aspects is that of the dominant underdense Voids, the product of a hierarchical process driven by the collapse of minor voids in addition to the merging of large ones. In this study we present an objective void finder technique which involves a minimum of assumptions about the scale, structure and shape of voids. Our void finding method, the Watershed Void Finder (WVF), is based upon the Watershed Transform, a well-known technique for the segmentation of images. Importantly, the technique has the potential to trace the existing manifestations of a void hierarchy. The basic watershed transform is augmented by a variety of correction procedures to remove spurious structure resulting from sampling noise. This study c...

  20. POLAR DISK GALAXY FOUND IN WALL BETWEEN VOIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanonik, K.; Platen, E.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; van Gorkom, J. H.; van de Weygaert, R.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    2009-01-01

    We have found an isolated polar disk galaxy in what appears to be a cosmological wall situated between two voids. This void galaxy is unique as its polar disk was discovered serendipitously in an Hi survey of SDSS void galaxies, with no optical counterpart to the Hi polar disk. Yet the Hi mass in th

  1. Void Coalescence Processes Quantified Through Atomistic and Multiscale Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, R E; Seppala, E T; Dupuy, L M; Belak, J

    2007-01-12

    Simulation of ductile fracture at the atomic scale reveals many aspects of the fracture process including specific mechanisms associated with void nucleation and growth as a precursor to fracture and the plastic deformation of the material surrounding the voids and cracks. Recently we have studied void coalescence in ductile metals using large-scale atomistic and continuum simulations. Here we review that work and present some related investigations. The atomistic simulations involve three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. No pronounced shear flow is found in the coalescence process. We also discuss a technique for optimizing the calculation of fine-scale information on the fly for use in a coarse-scale simulation, and discuss the specific case of a fine-scale model that calculates void growth explicitly feeding into a coarse-scale mechanics model to study damage localization.

  2. POLAR DISK GALAXY FOUND IN WALL BETWEEN VOIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanonik, K.; Platen, E.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; van Gorkom, J. H.; van de Weygaert, R.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    2009-01-01

    We have found an isolated polar disk galaxy in what appears to be a cosmological wall situated between two voids. This void galaxy is unique as its polar disk was discovered serendipitously in an Hi survey of SDSS void galaxies, with no optical counterpart to the Hi polar disk. Yet the Hi mass in th

  3. "Dark energy" in the Local Void

    CERN Document Server

    Villata, M

    2012-01-01

    The unexpected discovery of the accelerated cosmic expansion in 1998 has filled the Universe with the embarrassing presence of an unidentified "dark energy", or cosmological constant, devoid of any physical meaning. While this standard cosmology seems to work well at the global level, improved knowledge of the kinematics and other properties of our extragalactic neighborhood indicates the need for a better theory. We investigate whether the recently suggested repulsive-gravity scenario can account for some of the features that are unexplained by the standard model. Through simple dynamical considerations, we find that the Local Void could host an amount of antimatter ($\\sim5\\times10^{15}\\,M_\\odot$) roughly equivalent to the mass of a typical supercluster, thus restoring the matter-antimatter symmetry. The antigravity field produced by this "dark repulsor" can explain the anomalous motion of the Local Sheet away from the Local Void, as well as several other properties of nearby galaxies that seem to require vo...

  4. Sub-micron free-standing metal slabs with dielectric nano-voids of arbitrary shapes embedded beneath atomically-flat surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Kiang Wei; Shen, Zexiang; Olivo, Malini

    2011-05-23

    Thin metal slabs with plasmonic nano-voids buried within the skin depth (slab. By artificially varying the topography of the capping metal surface from ultra-smooth to moderately-rough, we show structural symmetricity in a nano-void-metal system can render the overall plasmonic responses becoming profoundly influenced by the surface smoothness. The current fabrication technique is thus of primary importance to the preparation of any kind of smooth nano-void-passivated metal slabs.

  5. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Voids

    CERN Document Server

    Das, M; Iono, D; Honey, M; Ramya, S

    2014-01-01

    We present the detection of molecular gas using CO(1-0) line emission and follow up Halpha imaging observations of galaxies located in nearby voids. The CO(1-0) observations were done using the 45m telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory (NRO) and the optical observations were done using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT). Although void galaxies lie in the most under dense parts of our universe, a significant fraction of them are gas rich, spiral galaxies that show signatures of ongoing star formation. Not much is known about their cold gas content or star formation properties. In this study we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies using the NRO. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively higher IRAS fluxes or Halpha line luminosities. CO(1--0) emission was detected in four galaxies and the derived molecular gas masses lie between (1 - 8)E+9 Msun. The H$\\alpha$ imaging observations of three galaxies detected in CO emission indicates ongoing star formation and the derived star forma...

  6. Interpersonal motives and social-evaluative threat: Effects of acceptance and status stressors on cardiovascular reactivity and salivary cortisol response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy W; Jordan, Kevin D

    2015-02-01

    Social-evaluative threat evokes increases in salivary cortisol and heightened cardiovascular reactivity. However, the types or content of social threats underlying these physiological responses are not clearly delineated in direct comparisons. Based in interpersonal theory, the present study manipulated high and low levels of acceptance threat (i.e., evaluation of likability, potential for inclusion) and status threat (i.e., evaluation of competence, leadership potential) during a modified Trier Social Stress Test, using a sample of 137 undergraduates (73 women). Both acceptance threat and status threat heightened salivary cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure responses to the task. Hence, concerns about social inclusion or connection with others and concerns about social standing or status can contribute independently to physiological stress responses.

  7. Demand response strategy management with active and reactive power incentive in the smart grid: a two-level optimization approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuto Shigenobu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available High penetration of distributed generators (DGs using renewable energy sources (RESs is raising some important issues in the operation of modern po­wer system. The output power of RESs fluctuates very steeply, and that include uncertainty with weather conditions. This situation causes voltage deviation and reverse power flow. Several methods have been proposed for solving these problems. Fundamentally, these methods involve reactive power control for voltage deviation and/or the installation of large battery energy storage system (BESS at the interconnection point for reverse power flow. In order to reduce the installation cost of static var compensator (SVC, Distribution Company (DisCo gives reactive power incentive to the cooperating customers. On the other hand, photovoltaic (PV generator, energy storage and electric vehicle (EV are introduced in customer side with the aim of achieving zero net energy homes (ZEHs. This paper proposes not only reactive power control but also active power flow control using house BESS and EV. Moreover, incentive method is proposed to promote participation of customers in the control operation. Demand response (DR system is verified with several DR menu. To create profit for both side of DisCo and customer, two level optimization approach is executed in this research. Mathematical modeling of price elasticity and detailed simulations are executed by case study. The effectiveness of the proposed incentive menu is demonstrated by using heuristic optimization method.

  8. Nonlocal plasticity effects on interaction of different size voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2004-01-01

    A nonlocal elastic-plastic material model is used to show that the rate of void growth is significantly reduced when the voids are small enough to be comparable with a characteristic material length. For a very small void in the material between much larger voids the competition between...... an increased growth rate due to the stress concentrations around the larger voids and a reduced growth rate due to the nonlocal effects is studied. The analyses are based on an axisymmetric unit cell model with special boundary conditions, which allow for a relatively simple investigation of a full three...

  9. The Mechanism of Hydrogen-facilitating Initiation of Voids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚武扬; 蒋兴钢; 肖纪美

    1994-01-01

    By combining the hydrogen-induced local plastic deformation theory with the decohesive theory and the hydrogen pressure theory, a new mechanism of hydrogen-facilitating initiation of voids has been proposed. Through facilitating the local plastic deformation and reducing the cohesive strength, hydrogen promotes both initiating a nanocrack and blunting the nanocrack into a void, resulting in hydrogen-promoting initiation of the void. On the other hand, hydrogen can enhance the stability of the void through reducing the cohesive strength and forming a hydrogen pressure in the void.

  10. The Void Galaxy Survey: Photometry, structure and identity of void galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beygu, B; van der Hulst, J M; Jarrett, T H; Kreckel, K; van de Weygaert, R; van Gorkom, J H; Aragon-Calvo, M A

    2016-01-01

    We analyze photometry from deep B-band images of 59 void galaxies in the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), together with their near-infrared 3.6$\\mu$m and 4.5$\\mu$m Spitzer photometry. The VGS galaxies constitute a sample of void galaxies that were selected by a geometric-topological procedure from the SDSS DR7 data release, and which populate the deep interior of voids. Our void galaxies span a range of absolute B-magnitude from $\\rm{M_B=-15.5}$ to $\\rm{M_B=-20}$, while at the 3.6$\\mu$m band their magnitudes range from $\\rm{M_{3.6}=-18}$ to $\\rm{M_{3.6}=-24}$. Their B-[3.6] colour and structural parameters indicate these are star forming galaxies. A good reflection of the old stellar population, the near-infrared band photometry also provide a robust estimate of the stellar mass, which for the VGS galaxies we confirm to be smaller than $3 \\times 10^{10}$ M$_\\odot$. In terms of the structural parameters and morphology, our findings align with other studies in that our VGS galaxy sample consists mostly of small late-t...

  11. Core design and optimization of high performance low sodium void 1000 MWe heterogeneous oxide LMFBR cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthold, W.P.; Orechwa, Y.; Su, S.F.; Beitel, J.C.; Turski, R.; Lam, P.S.K.; Fuller, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    Radially heterogeneous core configurations are effective means to reduce sodium void reactivity. In general, radially heterogeneous cores can be designed as tightly or loosely coupled cores with center core or center blanket arrangements. Core height, number of core regions and number of fuel pins per assembly are additional variables in an optimization of basic heterogeneous core configurations. An extensive study was carried out to optimize the core configurations for 1000 MWe LMFBRs. All cores were subject to a common set of nuclear, mechanical, and thermal-hydraulic design assumptions. They were restrained by an upper sodium void reactivity limit of $2.50 and a doubling time of approximately 15 to 18 years. The screening and optimization procedures employed lead to two core layouts which were both tightly coupled. A complete nuclear analysis of these two cores (derived from a loosely coupled configuration/derived from a tightly coupled configuration) determined the fissile inventories (4268.4/4213.4 kg at BOEC), burnups (83.90/100.7 MWd/t peak), reactivity swings (0.49/1.8% ..delta..k total), power and flux distributions for different control insertion patterns, the breeding performance (15.7/15.3 yrs CSDT), the safety parameters, such as sodium void reactivity ($2.38/$2.23 at EOEC), isothermal Doppler coefficients for both sodium-in (45.6/46.1 T dk/dT x 10/sup -4/ core at EOEC) and sodium-out conditions (28.6/28.2 T dk/dT x 10/sup -4/ core at EOEC), and the transient behavior which shows very little space-dependence during a 60 cent reactivity step insertion.

  12. Void Coalescence Processes Quantified through Atomistic and Multiscale Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, R E; Seppala, E T; Dupuy, L M; Belak, J

    2005-12-31

    Simulation of ductile fracture at the atomic scale reveals many aspects of the fracture process including specific mechanisms associated with void nucleation and growth as a precursor to fracture and the plastic deformation of the material surrounding the voids and cracks. Recently we have studied void coalescence in ductile metals using large-scale atomistic and continuum simulations. Here we review that work and present some related investigations. The atomistic simulations involve three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. No pronounced shear flow is found in the coalescence process.

  13. A Cosmic Void Catalog of SDSS DR12 BOSS Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qingqing; Berlind, Andreas A.; Scherrer, Robert J.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Scoccimarro, Román; Tinker, Jeremy L.; McBride, Cameron K.; Schneider, Donald P.; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor

    2017-02-01

    We present a cosmic void catalog using the large-scale structure galaxy catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This galaxy catalog is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 and is the final catalog of SDSS-III. We take into account the survey boundaries, masks, and angular and radial selection functions, and apply the ZOBOV void finding algorithm to the Galaxy catalog. We identify a total of 10,643 voids. After making quality cuts to ensure that the voids represent real underdense regions, we obtain 1,228 voids with effective radii spanning the range 20–100 {h}-1 {Mpc} and with central densities that are, on average, 30% of the mean sample density. We release versions of the catalogs both with and without quality cuts. We discuss the basic statistics of voids, such as their size and redshift distributions, and measure the radial density profile of the voids via a stacking technique. In addition, we construct mock void catalogs from 1000 mock galaxy catalogs, and find that the properties of BOSS voids are in good agreement with those in the mock catalogs. We compare the stellar mass distribution of galaxies living inside and outside of the voids, and find no large difference. These BOSS and mock void catalogs are useful for a number of cosmological and galaxy environment studies.

  14. Voiding dysfunction in children aged five to 15 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaklajić Dragana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Voiding dysfunction in children was analyzed in 91 patients in a period from January 1st to October 1st 1998. Most of the patients had functional voiding disorder (92.31%, and only 7.69% manifested monosymptomatic night enuresis. The number of girls was bigger in the group of patients with voiding dysfunction while the boys were predominant in the group with mono-symptomatic nocturnal enuresis. More than a half of children with functional voiding disorder had repeated urinal infections (58.23%, incontinence (93.49%, need for urgent voiding (68.13%, and vesicoureteral reflux (47.61%. The most common type of voiding dysfunction was urge syndrome/urge incontinence. The incidence of dysfunctional voiding disorder was more often in children with scaring changes of kidney which were diagnosed by static scintigraphy.

  15. Modeling the Void H I Column Density Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, C V

    2003-01-01

    The equivalent width distribution function (EWDF) of \\hone absorbers specific to the void environment has been recently derived (Manning 2002), revealing a large line density of clouds (dN/dz ~500 per unit z for Log (N_HI)> 12.4). I show that the void absorbers cannot be diffuse (or so-called filamentary) clouds, expanding with the Hubble flow, as suggested by N-body/hydro simulations. Absorbers are here modeled as the baryonic remnants of sub-galactic perturbations that have expanded away from their dark halos in response to reionization at z ~ 6.5. A 1-D Lagrangian hydro/gravity code is used to follow the dynamic evolution and ionization structure of the baryonic clouds for a range of halo circular velocities. The simulation products at z=0 can be combined according to various models of the halo velocity distribution function to form a column density spectrum that can be compared with the observed. I find that such clouds may explain the observed EWDF if the halo velocity distribution function is as steep a...

  16. The void galaxy survey: photometry, structure and identity of void galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygu, B.; Peletier, R. F.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kreckel, K.; van de Weygaert, R.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    We analyse photometry from deep B-band images of 59 void galaxies in the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), together with their near-infrared 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm Spitzer photometry. The VGS galaxies constitute a sample of void galaxies that were selected by a geometric-topological procedure from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 data release, and which populate the deep interior of voids. Our void galaxies span a range of absolute B-magnitude from MB = -15.5 to -20, while at the 3.6 μm band their magnitudes range from M3.6 = -18 to -24. Their B-[3.6] colour and structural parameters indicate these are star-forming galaxies. A good reflection of the old stellar population, the near-infrared band photometry also provide a robust estimate of the stellar mass, which for the VGS galaxies we confirm to be smaller than 3 × 1010 M⊙. In terms of the structural parameters and morphology, our findings align with other studies in that our VGS galaxy sample consists mostly of small late-type galaxies. Most of them are similar to Sd-Sm galaxies, although a few are irregularly shaped galaxies. The sample even includes two early-type galaxies, one of which is an AGN. Their Sérsic indices are nearly all smaller than n = 2 in both bands and they also have small half-light radii. In all, we conclude that the principal impact of the void environment on the galaxies populating them mostly concerns their low stellar mass and small size.

  17. The Void Galaxy Survey: Galaxy Evolution and Gas Accretion in Voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreckel, Kathryn; van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.; Beygu, Burcu; van de Weygaert, Rien; van der Hulst, J. M.; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.; Peletier, Reynier F.

    2016-10-01

    Voids represent a unique environment for the study of galaxy evolution, as the lower density environment is expected to result in shorter merger histories and slower evolution of galaxies. This provides an ideal opportunity to test theories of galaxy formation and evolution. Imaging of the neutral hydrogen, central in both driving and regulating star formation, directly traces the gas reservoir and can reveal interactions and signs of cold gas accretion. For a new Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), we have carefully selected a sample of 59 galaxies that reside in the deepest underdensities of geometrically identified voids within the SDSS at distances of ~100 Mpc, and pursued deep UV, optical, Hα, IR, and HI imaging to study in detail the morphology and kinematics of both the stellar and gaseous components. This sample allows us to not only examine the global statistical properties of void galaxies, but also to explore the details of the dynamical properties. We present an overview of the VGS, and highlight key results on the HI content and individually interesting systems. In general, we find that the void galaxies are gas rich, low luminosity, blue disk galaxies, with optical and HI properties that are not unusual for their luminosity and morphology. We see evidence of both ongoing assembly, through the gas dynamics between interacting systems, and significant gas accretion, seen in extended gas disks and kinematic misalignments. The VGS establishes a local reference sample to be used in future HI surveys (CHILES, DINGO, LADUMA) that will directly observe the HI evolution of void galaxies over cosmic time.

  18. Programmed cell death in barley aleurone cells is not directly stimulated by reactive oxygen species produced in response to gibberellin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Nozomi; Ishibashi, Yushi; Kai, Kyohei; Tomokiyo, Reisa; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2014-05-01

    The cereal aleurone layer is a secretory tissue that produces enzymes to hydrolyze the starchy endosperm during germination. We recently demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced in response to gibberellins (GA), promoted GAMyb expression, which induces α-amylase expression in barley aleurone cells. On the other hand, ROS levels increase during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone cells, and GAMyb is involved in PCD of these cells. In this study, we investigated whether the ROS produced in response to GA regulate PCD directly by using mutants of Slender1 (SLN1), a DELLA protein that negatively regulates GA signaling. The wild-type, the sln1c mutant (which exhibits gibberellin-type signaling even in the absence of GA), and the Sln1d mutant (which is gibberellin-insensitive with respect to α-amylase production) all produced ROS in response to GA, suggesting that ROS production in aleurone cells in response to GA is independent of GA signaling through this DELLA protein. Exogenous GA promoted PCD in the wild-type. PCD in sln1c was induced even without exogenous GA (and so without induction of ROS), whereas PCD in Sln1d was not induced in the presence of exogenous GA, even though the ROS content increased significantly in response to GA. These results suggest that PCD in barley aleurone cells is not directly stimulated by ROS produced in response to GA but is regulated by GA signaling through DELLA protein.

  19. Collapse of elongated voids in porous energetic materials: Effects of void orientation and aspect ratio on initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Nirmal Kumar; Schmidt, Martin J.; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2017-04-01

    The sensitivity of porous energetic materials depends on mesostructural heterogeneities such as voids, defects, cracks, and grain boundaries. The mesostructure of pressed explosives contains voids of arbitrary shapes including elongated voids of various orientations and aspect ratios. Mesoscale simulations to date have analyzed the effect of void morphology on the sensitivity of energetic materials for idealized shapes such as cylindrical, conical, and elliptical. This work analyzes the sensitivity behavior of elongated voids in an HMX matrix subject to shock loading. Simulations show that sensitivity of elongated voids depends strongly on orientation as well as aspect ratio. Ranges of orientations and aspects ratios are identified that enhance or inhibit initiation. Insights obtained from single elongated void analyses are used to identify sensitive locations in an imaged mesostructure of a pressed explosive sample.

  20. DIVE in the cosmic web: voids with Delaunay Triangulation from discrete matter tracer distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Cheng; Liang, Yu; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel parameter-free cosmological void finder (\\textsc{dive}, Delaunay TrIangulation Void findEr) based on Delaunay Triangulation (DT), which efficiently computes the empty spheres constrained by a discrete set of tracers. We define the spheres as DT voids, and describe their properties, including an universal density profile together with an intrinsic scatter. We apply this technique on 100 halo catalogues with volumes of 2.5\\,$h^{-1}$Gpc side each, with a bias and number density similar to the BOSS CMASS Luminous Red Galaxies, performed with the \\textsc{patchy} code. Our results show that there are two main species of DT voids, which can be characterised by the radius: they have different responses to halo redshift space distortions, to number density of tracers, and reside in different dark matter environments. Based on dynamical arguments using the tidal field tensor, we demonstrate that large DT voids are hosted in expanding regions, whereas the haloes used to construct them reside in collap...

  1. Void fraction prediction in saturated flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco J Collado [Dpto de Ingenieria Mecanica-Motores Termicos, CPS-B, Universidad de Zaragoza, Maria de Luna 50018-Zaragoza (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: An essential element in thermal-hydraulics is the accurate prediction of the vapor void fraction, or fraction of the flow cross-sectional area occupied by steam. Recently, the author has suggested to calculate void fraction working exclusively with thermodynamic properties. It is well known that the usual 'flow' quality, merely a mass flow rate ratio, is not at all a thermodynamic property because its expression in function of thermodynamic properties includes the slip ratio, which is a parameter of the process not a function of state. By the other hand, in the classic and well known expression of the void fraction - in function of the true mass fraction of vapor (also called 'static' quality), and the vapor and liquid densities - does not appear the slip ratio. Of course, this would suggest a direct procedure for calculating the void fraction, provided we had an accurate value of the true mass fraction of vapor, clearly from the heat balance. However the classic heat balance is usually stated in function of the 'flow' quality, what sounds really contradictory because this parameter, as we have noted above, is not at all a thermodynamic property. Then we should check against real data the actual relationship between the thermodynamic properties and the applied heat. For saturated flow boiling just from the inlet of the heated tube, and not having into account the kinetic and potential terms, the uniform applied heat per unit mass of inlet water and per unit length (in short, specific linear heat) should be closely related to a (constant) slope of the mixture enthalpy. In this work, we have checked the relation between the specific linear heat and the thermodynamic enthalpy of the liquid-vapor mixture using the actual mass fraction. This true mass fraction is calculated using the accurate measurements of the outlet void fraction taken during the Cambridge project by Knights and Thom in the sixties for

  2. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lucas, Kurt; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-09-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) containing redox-active transition metals, quinones, and secondary organic aerosols can increase ROS concentrations in the ELF to levels characteristic for respiratory diseases. Ambient ozone readily saturates the ELF and can enhance oxidative stress by depleting antioxidants and surfactants. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air.

  3. Recurring priapism may be a symptom of voiding dysfunction – case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisieux Eyer de Jesus

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Recurring priapism is rare in pre-pubertal children and may be attributed to multiple causes. We propose that voiding dysfunction (VD may also justify this symptom and detail a clinical case of recurring stuttering priapism associated to overactive bladder that completely resolved after usage of anticholinergics and urotherapy. Sacral parasympathetic activity is responsible for detrusor contraction and for spontaneous erections and a relationship between erections and bladder status has been proved in healthy subjects (morning erections and models of medullar trauma. High bladder pressures and/or volumes, voiding incoordination and posterior urethritis can potentially trigger reflex erections.

  4. Effect of stress-triaxiality on void growth in dynamic fracture of metals: a molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppala, E T; Belak, J; Rudd, R E

    2003-10-07

    The effect of stress-triaxiality on growth of a void in a three dimensional single-crystal face-centered-cubic (FCC) lattice has been studied. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using an embedded-atom (EAM) potential for copper have been performed at room temperature and using strain controlling with high strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7}/sec to 10{sup 10}/sec. Strain-rates of these magnitudes can be studied experimentally, e.g. using shock waves induced by laser ablation. Void growth has been simulated in three different conditions, namely uniaxial, biaxial, and triaxial expansion. The response of the system in the three cases have been compared in terms of the void growth rate, the detailed void shape evolution, and the stress-strain behavior including the development of plastic strain. Also macroscopic observables as plastic work and porosity have been computed from the atomistic level. The stress thresholds for void growth are found to be comparable with spall strength values determined by dynamic fracture experiments. The conventional macroscopic assumption that the mean plastic strain results from the growth of the void is validated. The evolution of the system in the uniaxial case is found to exhibit four different regimes: elastic expansion; plastic yielding, when the mean stress is nearly constant, but the stress-triaxiality increases rapidly together with exponential growth of the void; saturation of the stress-triaxiality; and finally the failure.

  5. What You Find Depends on How You Measure It: Reactivity of Response Scales Measuring Predecisional Information Distortion in Medical Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurek, Martine; Kostopoulou, Olga

    2016-01-01

    "Predecisional information distortion" occurs when decision makers evaluate new information in a way that is biased towards their leading option. The phenomenon is well established, as is the method typically used to measure it, termed "stepwise evolution of preference" (SEP). An inadequacy of this method has recently come to the fore: it measures distortion as the total advantage afforded a leading option over its competitor, and therefore it cannot differentiate between distortion to strengthen a leading option ("proleader" distortion) and distortion to weaken a trailing option ("antitrailer" distortion). To address this, recent research introduced new response scales to SEP. We explore whether and how these new response scales might influence the very proleader and antitrailer processes that they were designed to capture ("reactivity"). We used the SEP method with concurrent verbal reporting: fifty family physicians verbalized their thoughts as they evaluated patient symptoms and signs ("cues") in relation to two competing diagnostic hypotheses. Twenty-five physicians evaluated each cue using the response scale traditional to SEP (a single response scale, returning a single measure of distortion); the other twenty-five did so using the response scales introduced in recent studies (two separate response scales, returning two separate measures of distortion: proleader and antitrailer). We measured proleader and antitrailer processes in verbalizations, and compared verbalizations in the single-scale and separate-scales groups. Response scales did not appear to affect proleader processes: the two groups of physicians were equally likely to bolster their leading diagnosis verbally. Response scales did, however, appear to affect antitrailer processes: the two groups denigrated their trailing diagnosis verbally to differing degrees. Our findings suggest that the response scales used to measure information distortion might influence its constituent processes, limiting

  6. Previous exposure to biologics and C-reactive protein are associated with the response to tacrolimus in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iago Rodríguez-Lago

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. Tacrolimus is a calcineurin inhibitor used in the prophylaxis of rejection after a solid organ transplant. There is some evidence for its use in inflammatory bowel disease, although there is a lack of information about the patients who will benefit the most with this drug and the prognostic factors for a favorable response. Material and Methods: We performed a multicentric retrospective study evaluating all the patients who have received tacrolimus in the last 10 years as a treatment for IBD in our area. Results: A total of 20 patients, 12 with Crohn's disease and 8 with ulcerative colitis, were included in four hospitals. The two most common indications were steroid-dependency and fistulizing Crohn's disease. The median time receiving tacrolimus was 11 months. In 12 patients the treatment was stopped. The main reasons for drug withdrawal were absence or loss of response. The median clinical follow-up was 35.5 months. Overall, a 25% achieved clinical remission and 40% were in partial response. Biologic-naïve patients demonstrated a significantly better remission rate as compared with those that were not (80 vs. 7%. Patients who achieved remission were more likely to have a significant reduction in C-reactive protein values 1 month after starting the drug. Seven patients required surgery during the follow- up period. Conclusions: Patients naïve to biologics showed a significantly better response to tacrolimus. A reduction in C-reactive protein one month after starting this drug was associated with clinical remission.

  7. Plasticity size effects in voided crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussein, M. I.; Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    singularities in an elastic material. The lattice resistance to dislocation motion, dislocation nucleation, dislocation interaction with obstacles and annihilation are incorporated through a set of constitutive rules. Over the range of length scales investigated, both the discrete dislocation and strain...... predictions of the two formulations for all crystal types and void volume fractions considered when the material length scale in the non-local plasticity model chosen to be $0.325\\mu m$ (around ten times the slip plane spacing in the discrete dislocation models)....

  8. Plasticity size effects in voided crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussein, M.I.; Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2008-01-01

    as line singularities in an elastic material. The lattice resistance to dislocation motion, dislocation nucleation, dislocation interaction with obstacles and annihilation are incorporated through a set of constitutive rules. Over the range of length scales investigated, both the discrete dislocation...... between predictions of the two formulations for all crystal types and void volume fractions considered when the material length scale in the non-local plasticity model is chosen to be 0.325 mu m (about 10 times the slip plane spacing in the discrete dislocation models)....

  9. Piezochromic phenomena of nanometer voids formed by mono-dispersed nanometer powders compacting process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Su

    Full Text Available Piezochromism describes a tendency of certain materials changing colors when they are subjected to various pressure levels. It occurs particularly in some polymers or inorganic materials, such as in palladium complexes. However, piezochromism is generally believed to work at high pressure range of 0.1-10 GPa. This research work focused on unique piezochromism responses of the nanometer voids formed by the 5-20 nm inorganic ISOH nanometer powders. It was discovered that microstructures of the nanometer voids could change color at very low pressures of only 0.002-0.01 GPa; its sensitivity to pressure was increased by tens of times. It is believed that the uniform microstructures of nanometer powders contributed to the material's high sensitivity of piezochromic phenomena. One factor which quantum optical change caused by nanometer voids affected the quantum confinement effect; another is surface Plasmon Resonance of great difference dielectric property between conductive ITO powder and insulation hydroxide.

  10. The view from the boundary: a new void stacking method

    CERN Document Server

    Cautun, Marius; Frenk, Carlos S

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new method for stacking voids and deriving their profile that greatly increases the potential of voids as a tool for precision cosmology. Given that voids are highly non-spherical and have most of their mass at their edge, voids are better described relative to their boundary rather than relative to their centre, as in the conventional spherical stacking approach. The boundary profile is obtained by computing the distance of each volume element from the void boundary. Voids can then be stacked and their profiles computed as a function of this boundary distance. This approach enhances the weak lensing signal of voids, both shear and convergence, by a factor of two when compared to the spherical stacking method. It also results in steeper void density profiles that are characterised by a very slow rise inside the void and a pronounced density ridge at the void boundary, in qualitative agreement with theoretical models of expanding spherical underdensities. The resulting boundary density profile i...

  11. Voids in Ly{\\alpha} Forest Tomographic Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, Casey W; White, Martin; Lee, Khee-Gan

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method of finding cosmic voids using tomographic maps of Ly{\\alpha} forest flux. We identify cosmological voids with radii of 2 - 12 $h^{-1}$Mpc in a large N-body simulation at $z = 2.5$, and characterize the signal of the high-redshift voids in density and Ly{\\alpha} forest flux. The void properties are similar to what has been found at lower redshifts, but they are smaller and have steeper radial density profiles. Similarly to what has been found for low-redshift voids, the radial velocity profiles have little scatter and agree very well with the linear theory prediction. We run the same void finder on an ideal Ly{\\alpha} flux field and tomographic reconstructions at various spatial samplings. We compare the tomographic map void catalogs to the density void catalog and find good agreement even with modest-sized voids ($r > 6 \\, h^{-1}$Mpc). Using our simple void-finding method, the configuration of the ongoing CLAMATO survey covering 1 deg$^2$ would provide a sample of about 100 high-redshi...

  12. The sparkling Universe: the coherent motions of cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Lambas, Diego G; Ceccarelli, Laura; Ruiz, Andrés N; Paz, Dante J; Maldonado, Victoria E; Luparello, Heliana E

    2015-01-01

    We compute the bulk motions of cosmic voids, using a $\\Lambda$CDM numerical simulation considering the mean velocities of the dark matter inside the void itself and that of the haloes in the surrounding shell. We find coincident values of these two measures in the range $\\sim$ 300-400 km/s, not far from the expected mean peculiar velocities of groups and galaxy clusters. When analysing the distribution of the pairwise relative velocities of voids, we find a remarkable bimodal behaviour consistent with an excess of both systematically approaching and receding voids. We determine that the origin of this bimodality resides in the void large scale environment, since once voids are classified into void-in-void (R-type) or void-in-cloud (S-type), R-types are found mutually receding away, while S-types approach each other. The magnitude of these systematic relative velocities account for more than 100 km/s, reaching large coherence lengths of up to 200 h$^{-1}$ Mpc . We have used samples of voids from the Sloan Digi...

  13. Effects of Voids on Concrete Tensile Fracturing: A Mesoscale Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional mesoscale modeling framework, which considers concrete as a four-phase material including voids, is developed for studying the effects of voids on concrete tensile fracturing under the plane stress condition. Aggregate is assumed to behave elastically, while a continuum damaged plasticity model is employed to describe the mechanical behaviors of mortar and ITZ. The effects of voids on the fracture mechanism of concrete under uniaxial tension are first detailed, followed by an extensive investigation of the effects of void volume fraction on concrete tensile fracturing. It is found that both the prepeak and postpeak mesoscale cracking in concrete are highly affected by voids, and there is not a straightforward relation between void volume fraction and the postpeak behavior due to the randomness of void distribution. The fracture pattern of concrete specimen with voids is controlled by both the aggregate arrangement and the distribution of voids, and two types of failure modes are identified for concrete specimens under uniaxial tension. It is suggested that voids should be explicitly modeled for the accurate fracturing simulation of concrete on the mesoscale.

  14. Survivin-specific T-cell reactivity correlates with tumor response and patient survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; Andersen, Mads H; Hofmeister-Müller, Valeska

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination directed to induce an anti-tumoral T-cell response is a field of extensive investigation in the treatment of melanoma. However, many vaccination trials in melanoma failed to demonstrate a correlation between the vaccine-specific immune response and therapy outcome. This ha...

  15. Baryon effects on void statistics in the EAGLE simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillas, Enrique; Lagos, Claudia D. P.; Padilla, Nelson; Tissera, Patricia; Helly, John; Schaller, Matthieu

    2017-10-01

    Cosmic voids are promising tools for cosmological tests due to their sensitivity to dark energy, modified gravity and alternative cosmological scenarios. Most previous studies in the literature of void properties use cosmological N-body simulations of dark matter (DM) particles that ignore the potential effect of baryonic physics. Using a spherical underdensity finder, we analyse voids using the mass field and subhalo tracers in the Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environment (EAGLE) simulations, which follow the evolution of galaxies in a Λ cold dark matter universe with state-of-the-art subgrid models for baryonic processes in a (100 cMpc)3 volume. We study the effect of baryons on void statistics by comparing results with DM-only simulations that use the same initial conditions as EAGLE. When identifying voids in the mass field, we find that a DM-only simulation produces 24 per cent more voids than a hydrodynamical one due to the action of galaxy feedback polluting void regions with hot gas, specially for small voids with rvoid ≤ 10 Mpc. We find that the way in which galaxy tracers are selected has a strong impact on the inferred void properties. Voids identified using galaxies selected by their stellar mass are larger and have cuspier density profiles than those identified by galaxies selected by their total mass. Overall, baryons have minimal effects on void statistics, as void properties are well captured by DM-only simulations, but it is important to account for how galaxies populate DM haloes to estimate the observational effect of different cosmological models on the statistics of voids.

  16. Reactive oxygen species regulatory mechanisms associated with rapid response of MC3T3-E1 cells for vibration stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ling; Gan, Xueqi; Zhu, Zhuoli; Yang, Yang; He, Yuting; Yu, Haiyang, E-mail: yhyang6812@scu.edu.cn

    2016-02-12

    Although many previous studies have shown that refractory period-dependent memory effect of vibration stress is anabolic for skeletal homeostasis, little is known about the rapid response of osteoblasts simply derived from vibration itself. In view of the potential role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating differentiated activity of osteoblasts, whether and how ROS regulates the rapid effect of vibration deserve to be demonstrated. Our findings indicated that MC3T3-E1 cells underwent decreased gene expression of Runx2, Col-I and ALP and impaired ALP activity accompanied by increased mitochondrial fission immediately after vibration loading. Moreover, we also revealed the involvement of ERK-Drp1 signal transduction in ROS regulatory mechanisms responsible for the rapid effect of vibration stress. - Highlights: • ROS contributed to the rapid response of MC3T3-E1 cells for vibration stress. • Imbalance of mitochondrial dynamics were linked to the LMHFV-derived rapid response. • The role of ERK-Drp1 signal pathway in the LMHFV-derived osteoblast rapid response.

  17. Apoplastic reactive oxygen species transiently decrease auxin signaling and cause stress-induced morphogenic response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomster, Tiina; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Sipari, Nina; Brosché, Mikael; Ahlfors, Reetta; Keinänen, Markku; Overmyer, Kirk; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2011-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are ubiquitous signaling molecules in plant stress and development. To gain further insight into the plant transcriptional response to apoplastic ROS, the phytotoxic atmospheric pollutant ozone was used as a model ROS inducer in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and gene expression was analyzed with microarrays. In contrast to the increase in signaling via the stress hormones salicylic acid, abscisic acid, jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene, ROS treatment caused auxin signaling to be transiently suppressed, which was confirmed with a DR5-uidA auxin reporter construct. Transcriptomic data revealed that various aspects of auxin homeostasis and signaling were modified by apoplastic ROS. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of auxin signaling showed that transcripts of several auxin receptors and Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional repressors were reduced in response to apoplastic ROS. The ROS-derived changes in the expression of auxin signaling genes partially overlapped with abiotic stress, pathogen responses, and salicylic acid signaling. Several mechanisms known to suppress auxin signaling during biotic stress were excluded, indicating that ROS regulated auxin responses via a novel mechanism. Using mutants defective in various auxin (axr1, nit1, aux1, tir1 afb2, iaa28-1, iaa28-2) and JA (axr1, coi1-16) responses, ROS-induced cell death was found to be regulated by JA but not by auxin. Chronic ROS treatment resulted in altered leaf morphology, a stress response known as "stress-induced morphogenic response." Altered leaf shape of tir1 afb2 suggests that auxin was a negative regulator of stress-induced morphogenic response in the rosette.

  18. The Void Galaxy Survey: Galaxy Evolution and Gas Accretion in Voids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreckel, Kathryn; van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.; Beygu, Burcu; van de Weijgaert, Marinus; van der Hulst, J. M.; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.; Peletier, Reynier F.

    2014-01-01

    Voids represent a unique environment for the study of galaxy evolution, as the lower density environment is expected to result in shorter merger histories and slower evolution of galaxies. This provides an ideal opportunity to test theories of galaxy formation and evolution. Imaging of the neutral h

  19. The Void Galaxy Survey: Galaxy Evolution and Gas Accretion in Voids

    CERN Document Server

    Kreckel, Kathryn; Beygu, Burcu; van de Weygaert, Rien; van der Hulst, J M; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Peletier, Reynier F

    2014-01-01

    Voids represent a unique environment for the study of galaxy evolution, as the lower density environment is expected to result in shorter merger histories and slower evolution of galaxies. This provides an ideal opportunity to test theories of galaxy formation and evolution. Imaging of the neutral hydrogen, central in both driving and regulating star formation, directly traces the gas reservoir and can reveal interactions and signs of cold gas accretion. For a new Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), we have carefully selected a sample of 59 galaxies that reside in the deepest underdensities of geometrically identified voids within the SDSS at distances of ~100 Mpc, and pursued deep UV, optical, Halpha, IR, and HI imaging to study in detail the morphology and kinematics of both the stellar and gaseous components. This sample allows us to not only examine the global statistical properties of void galaxies, but also to explore the details of the dynamical properties. We present an overview of the VGS, and highlight key re...

  20. The Void Galaxy Survey: Morphology and Star Formation Properties of Void Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beygu, B; van der Hulst, J M; Peletier, R; Jarrett, T; van de Weygaert, R; van Gorkom, J H; Aragón-Calvo, M

    2015-01-01

    We present the structural and star formation properties of 59 void galaxies as part of the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS). Our aim is to study in detail the physical properties of these void galaxies and study the effect of the void environment on galaxy properties. We use Spitzer 3.6 $\\rm{\\mu m}$ and B-band imaging to study the morphology and color of the VGS galaxies. For their star formation properties, we use Halpha and GALEX near-UV imaging. We compare our results to a range of galaxies of different morphologies in higher density environments. We find that the VGS galaxies are in general disk dominated and star forming galaxies. Their star formation rates are, however, often less than 1 $\\rm{M_{\\odot}}$ $\\rm{yr^{-1}}$. There are two early-type galaxies in our sample as well. In $\\rm{r_{e}}$ versus $\\rm{M_{B}}$ parameter space, VGS galaxies occupy the same space as dwarf irregulars and spirals.

  1. The Void Galaxy Survey: Star Formation Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Beygu, B; van der Hulst, J M; Jarrett, T H; Peletier, R; van de Weygaert, R; van Gorkom, J H; Aragon-Calvo, M A

    2016-01-01

    We study the star formation properties of 59 void galaxies as part of the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS). Current star formation rates are derived from $\\rm{H\\alpha}$ and recent star formation rates from near-UV imaging. In addition, infrared 3.4 $\\rm{\\mu m}$, 4.6 $\\rm{\\mu m}$, 12 $\\rm{\\mu m}$ and 22 $\\rm{\\mu m}$ WISE emission is used as star formation and mass indicator. Infrared and optical colours show that the VGS sample displays a wide range of dust and metallicity properties. We combine these measurements with stellar and HI masses to measure the specific SFRs ($\\rm{SFR/M_{*}}$) and star formation efficiencies ($\\rm{SFR/M_{HI}}$). We compare the star formation properties of our sample with galaxies in the more moderate density regions of the cosmic web, 'the field'. We find that specific SFRs of the VGS galaxies as a function of stellar and HI mass are similar to those of the galaxies in these field regions. Their $\\rm{SFR\\alpha}$ is slightly elevated than the galaxies in the field for a given total HI mass. ...

  2. Toxic effects of chlortetracycline on maize growth, reactive oxygen species generation and the antioxidant response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bei Wen; Yu Liu; Peng Wang; Tong Wu; Shuzhen Zhang; Xiaoquan Shan; Jingfen Lu

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of chlortetracycline (CTC) on maize (Zea mays L.) growth and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was studied.The root and shoot lengths and fresh weights of maize seedlings were inhibited by CTC treatment (p < 0.05).Root length was more sensitive than other parameters with the EC10 value of 0.064 mg/L.The spin trapping technique followed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis was used to quantify the ROS production.The ROS generated in maize roots after exposure to CTC was identified as hydroxyl radical (-OH).The EPR signal intensity correlated positively with the logarithm of CTC concentrations exposed (p < 0.05).The dynamic changes of malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and the antioxidative enzyme activities in maize roots were also determined.As compared to the control group,CTC was found to significantly increase MDA content.Treatment of maize roots with the ·OH scavenger sodium benzoate (SB) reduced the MDA content and enhanced the antioxidative enzyme activities.The results demonstrated the harmfulness of CTC at high dose to maize in the early developmental stage,and clarified that the inducement of ·OH is one of the mechanisms of CTC toxicity.

  3. C-reactive protein enhances IgG-mediated phagocyte responses and thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Rick; Heitink-Pollé, Katja M J; Porcelijn, Leendert; Bentlage, Arthur E H; Bruin, Marrie C A; Visser, Remco; Roos, Dirk; Schasfoort, Richard B M; de Haas, Masja; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2015-03-12

    Immune-mediated platelet destruction is most frequently caused by allo- or autoantibodies via Fcγ receptor-dependent phagocytosis. Disease severity can be predicted neither by antibody isotype nor by titer, indicating that other factors play a role. Here we show that the acute phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP), a ligand for Fc receptors on phagocytes, enhances antibody-mediated platelet destruction by human phagocytes in vitro and in vivo in mice. Without antiplatelet antibodies, CRP was found to be inert toward platelets, but it bound to phosphorylcholine exposed after oxidation triggered by antiplatelet antibodies, thereby enhancing platelet phagocytosis. CRP levels were significantly elevated in patients with allo- and autoantibody-mediated thrombocytopenias compared with healthy controls. Within a week, intravenous immunoglobulin treatment in children with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenia led to significant decrease of CRP levels, increased platelet numbers, and clinically decreased bleeding severity. Furthermore, the higher the level of CRP at diagnosis, the longer it took before stable platelet counts were reached. These data suggest that CRP amplifies antibody-mediated platelet destruction and may in part explain the aggravation of thrombocytopenia on infections. Hence, targeting CRP could offer new therapeutic opportunities for these patients.

  4. Anticipatory and reactive crouching of pea aphids in response to environmental perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Matan; Talal, Stav; Inbar, Moshe

    2014-10-01

    Animals use different strategies to deal with changing environmental conditions. While standing and feeding on their host plant, aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) may be exposed to detrimental environmental perturbations, such as strong winds. If aphids are forcibly blown off the plant and spend time on the ground, they will face additional dangers by both ground-dwelling predators and detrimental soil temperature. It is therefore adaptive for aphids to behave in a way that lowers the risk of being removed from the plant. We observed that pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris)) display a specific crouched body posture, previously undescribed, which reduces their chance of being carried off from the plant by sudden winds. We exposed aphids in the laboratory to different cues indicative of a windy environment: wind, plant vibration, and visual stimuli. We found that aphids crouch in two situations: 1) reactively, when they are being pulled by a continuous gust of wind threatening to dislodge them. 2) Anticipatorily, when environmental cues, such as plant vibration or continuous movement near their host plant, may signify that sudden wind gusts are expected. Crouching aphids were less likely to be dislodged by a sudden air stream or plant vibration than were aphids that did not crouch. Crouching thus improves the aphids' chances of remaining on their host plant under unfavorable environmental conditions.

  5. Ductile damage of porous materials with two populations of voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Pierre-Guy; Monerie, Yann; Suquet, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    This study is devoted to the modelling of ductile damage in uranium dioxide. This polycrystalline material contains two populations of voids of well separated size. The problem addressed here is the prediction of the effective flow surface of a Gurson material containing randomly oriented oblate voids. The case of spherical voids is considered first and the variational approach of Gurson is generalized by adding a compressible component to his original velocity field. The case of aligned oblate voids is then considered and a suitable generalization of a velocity field due to Gologanu et al. (ASME J. Engrg. Mater. Technol. 116 (1994) 290-297) is proposed. The extension to randomly oriented voids is achieved by averaging over all orientations. In each case, rigorous upper bounds and approximate estimates are derived and compared (in the case of spherical voids) with Finite Element simulations. To cite this article: P.-G. Vincent et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  6. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depressions & spatial complexity

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-01-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do they represent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probes and measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive to the nature of dark energy, while their substructure and galaxy population provides a direct key to the nature of dark matter. Also, the pristine environment of void interiors is an important testing ground for our understanding of environmental influences on galaxy formation and evolution. In this paper, we review the key aspects of the structure and dynamics of voids, with a particular focus on the hierarchical evolution of the void population. We demonstrate how the rich structural pattern of the Cosmic Web is related to the complex evolution and buildup of voids.

  7. Void alignment and density profile applied to measuring cosmological parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, De-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We study the orientation and density profiles of the cosmological voids with SDSS10 data. Using voids to test Alcock-Paczynski effect has been proposed and tested in both simulations and actual SDSS data. Previous observations imply that there exist an empirical stretching factor which plays an important role in the voids' orientation. Simulations indicate that this empirical stretching factor is caused by the void galaxies' peculiar velocities. Recently Hamaus et al. found that voids' density profiles are universal and their average velocities satisfy linear theory very well. In this article we first confirm that the stretching effect exists using independent analysis. We then apply the universal density profile to measure the cosmological parameters. We find that the void density profile can be a tool to measure the cosmological parameters.

  8. Reactivity of blood vessels in response to prostaglandin E2 in placentas from pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Oded; Bar, Jacob; Barnea, Ofer; Golan, Abraham; Kovo, Michal

    2012-05-01

    The authors aimed to study the contractility responses of normal and fetal growth restriction (FGR) placentas to prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) and to correlate the results to subsequent placental histological analysis. A dual-perfused single cotyledon model was used. Placentas from pregnancies complicated by FGR and from normal pregnancies were obtained. Selected cotyledons were cannulated and dually perfused. Following stabilization, three concentrations of PGE(2) (0.05, 0.1, and 0.15 mg/mL) were administered to the fetal arterial side causing contraction/relaxation response. Fetal perfusion pressure was measured continuously during these contraction and relaxation phases. Following the perfusion experiments, the placentas were analyzed for fetal or maternal origin vascular lesions. A total of 21 complete experiments were performed (16 normal, 5 FGR). In response to PGE(2) , FGR placentas exhibited lower change in the perfusion pressure and lower relaxation time constant. Basal perfusion pressure did not differ significantly between the two groups. Placental histopathology lesions, fetal or maternal origin, were more common in the FGR compared with the controls placentas, 80% versus 25%, respectively, P=  0.047. The lower vascular reactivity in response to PGE(2) and the presence of fetal and maternal vascular placental lesions suggest a mechanism explaining the altered vascular supply in FGR. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Asian dust particles induce macrophage inflammatory responses via mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashisaka, Kazuma; Fujimura, Maho; Taira, Mayu; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Baba, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Nasu, Masao; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Asian dust is a springtime meteorological phenomenon that originates in the deserts of China and Mongolia. The dust is carried by prevailing winds across East Asia where it causes serious health problems. Most of the information available on the impact of Asian dust on human health is based on epidemiological investigations, so from a biological standpoint little is known of its effects. To clarify the effects of Asian dust on human health, it is essential to assess inflammatory responses to the dust and to evaluate the involvement of these responses in the pathogenesis or aggravation of disease. Here, we investigated the induction of inflammatory responses by Asian dust particles in macrophages. Treatment with Asian dust particles induced greater production of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF- α ) compared with treatment with soil dust. Furthermore, a soil dust sample containing only particles ≤10  μ m in diameter provoked a greater inflammatory response than soil dust samples containing particles >10  μ m. In addition, Asian dust particles-induced TNF- α production was dependent on endocytosis, the production of reactive oxygen species, and the activation of nuclear factor- κ B and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Together, these results suggest that Asian dust particles induce inflammatory disease through the activation of macrophages.

  10. Asian Dust Particles Induce Macrophage Inflammatory Responses via Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation and Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Higashisaka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asian dust is a springtime meteorological phenomenon that originates in the deserts of China and Mongolia. The dust is carried by prevailing winds across East Asia where it causes serious health problems. Most of the information available on the impact of Asian dust on human health is based on epidemiological investigations, so from a biological standpoint little is known of its effects. To clarify the effects of Asian dust on human health, it is essential to assess inflammatory responses to the dust and to evaluate the involvement of these responses in the pathogenesis or aggravation of disease. Here, we investigated the induction of inflammatory responses by Asian dust particles in macrophages. Treatment with Asian dust particles induced greater production of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α compared with treatment with soil dust. Furthermore, a soil dust sample containing only particles ≤10 μm in diameter provoked a greater inflammatory response than soil dust samples containing particles >10 μm. In addition, Asian dust particles-induced TNF-α production was dependent on endocytosis, the production of reactive oxygen species, and the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Together, these results suggest that Asian dust particles induce inflammatory disease through the activation of macrophages.

  11. An optimized assay of specific IgE antibodies to reactive dyes and studies of immunologic responses in exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, U; Nilsson, R; Nordlinder, R; Belin, L

    1990-03-01

    Methods of assaying reactive dye-specific IgE antibodies were investigated with a RAST. Sera from three patients, occupationally exposed to a reactive dye, Remazol black B (Chemical Abstract registry number 17095-24-8), were used. Directly dyed disks, that is, disks without any carrier protein, resulted in poor and unreliable measures of specific IgE. In contrast, optimized preparation of conjugates between the dye and human serum albumin resulted in efficient binding of specific IgE. The patients' RAST results were strongly positive, whereas sera from 36 exposed workers but without symptoms and sera from unexposed subjects with high levels of total IgE were negative. The hapten and carrier specificity of the IgE antibodies was studied by direct RAST and RAST inhibition. In one patient, the antibodies were principally hapten specific, whereas another patient was found to have antibodies with a high degree of specificity to the carrier. The third patient's antibodies were intermediate between the other two patients' antibodies in this respect, suggesting that antibody specificity is dependent not only on the nature of the hapten but also on individual immune response factors. The study demonstrates that it is important to use an optimized preparation of dye-protein conjugates to elicit reliable results and a high degree of specific IgE binding in the RAST.

  12. Anticipatory and Reactive Response to Falls: Muscle Synergy Activation of Forearm Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzens, Greg; Kerr, Graham

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the surface electromyogram response of six forearm muscles to falls onto the outstretched hand. The extensor carpi radialis longus, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor carpi ulnaris, abductor pollicis longus, flexor carpi radialis and flexor carpi ulnaris muscles were sampled from eight volunteers who underwent ten self-initiated falls. All muscles initiated prior to impact. Co-contraction is the most obvious surface electromyogram feature. The predominant response is in the radial deviators. The surface electromyogram timing we recorded would appear to be a complex anticipatory response to falling modified by the effect on the forearm muscles following impact. The mitigation of the force of impact is probably more importantly through shoulder abduction and extension and elbow flexion rather than action of the forearm muscles.

  13. Role of reactive oxygen species in the radiation response of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, which are present in small numbers in hematopoietic tissues, can differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages and self-renew to maintain their undifferentiated phenotype. HSPCs are extremely sensitive to oxidative stressors such as anti-cancer agents, radiation, and the extensive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The quiescence and stemness of HSPCs are maintained by the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, ROS, and energy homeostasis in a special microenvironment called the stem cell niche. The present study evaluated the relationship between the production of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial function during the proliferation and differentiation of X-irradiated CD34(+ cells prepared from human placental/umbilical cord blood HSPCs. Highly purified CD34(+ HSPCs exposed to X-rays were cultured in liquid and semi-solid medium supplemented with hematopoietic cytokines. X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs treated with hematopoietic cytokines, which promote their proliferation and differentiation, exhibited dramatically suppressed cell growth and clonogenic potential. The amount of intracellular ROS in X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs was significantly higher than that in non-irradiated cells during the culture period. However, neither the intracellular mitochondrial content nor the mitochondrial superoxide production was elevated in X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs compared with non-irradiated cells. Radiation-induced gamma-H2AX expression was observed immediately following exposure to 4 Gy of X-rays and gradually decreased during the culture period. This study reveals that X-irradiation can increase persistent intracellular ROS in human CD34(+ HSPCs, which may not result from mitochondrial ROS due to mitochondrial dysfunction, and indicates that substantial DNA double-strand breakage can critically reduce the stem cell function.

  14. Gut microbiome response to short-term dietary interventions in reactive hypoglycemia subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quercia, Sara; Turroni, Silvia; Fiori, Jessica; Soverini, Matteo; Rampelli, Simone; Biagi, Elena; Castagnetti, Andrea; Consolandi, Clarissa; Severgnini, Marco; Pianesi, Mario; Fallucca, Francesco; Pozzilli, Paolo; Brigidi, Patrizia; Candela, Marco

    2017-08-14

    Reactive hypoglycemia (RH) is a metabolic disorder that provokes severe hypoglycemic episodes after meal. Over recent years, the gut microbiota (GM) has been recognized as potential target for the control of metabolic diseases, and the possibility to correct GM dysbioses through diet, favoring the recovery of metabolic homeostasis, has been considered. We investigate the impact of two short-term (3-day) nutritional interventions, based on the macrobiotic Ma-Pi 2 diet and a control Mediterranean diet, on the structure and functionality of the GM in 12 patients affected by RH. The GM composition was characterized by next-generation sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene, and the ecosystem functionality was addressed by measuring the faecal concentration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). In order to measure the short-term physiological GM fluctuation, the microbiome of 7 healthy people was characterized before and after 3 days of constant diet. While no convergence of the GM compositional profiles was observed, a significant increase in SCFA faecal levels was induced only in the Ma-Pi 2 diet group, suggesting the potential of this diet to support a short-term functional convergence of the GM, regardless of the individual compositional layout. The Ma-Pi 2 diet, with its high fiber load, was effective in increasing the production of SCFAs by the GM. Since these metabolites are known for their ability to counterbalance the metabolic deregulation in persons with glucose impairment disorders, their increased bioavailability could be of some relevance in RH. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Abdominal adiposity is the main determinant of the C-reactive response to injury in subjects undergoing inguinal hernia repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irkulla Sashidhar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and serum C-reactive protein (CRP (a sensitive marker of inflammatory activity are associated with most chronic diseases. Abdominal adiposity along with age is the strongest determinant of baseline CRP levels in healthy subjects. The mechanism of the association of serum CRP with disease is uncertain. We hypothesized that baseline serum CRP is a marker of inflammatory responsiveness to injury and that abdominal adiposity is the main determinant of this responsiveness. We studied the effect of abdominal adiposity, age and other environmental risk factors for chronic disease on the CRP response to a standardised surgical insult, unilateral hernia repair to not only test this hypothesis but to inform the factors which must be taken into account when assessing systemic inflammatory responses to surgery. Methods 102 male subjects aged 24-94 underwent unilateral hernia repair by a single operator. CRP was measured at 0, 6, 24 and 48 hrs. Response was defined as the peak CRP adjusted for baseline CRP. Results Age and waist:hip ratio (WHR were associated both with basal CRP and CRP response with similar effect sizes after adjustment for a wide-range of covariates. The adjusted proportional difference in CRP response per 10% increase in WHR was 1.50 (1.17-1.91 p = 0.0014 and 1.15(1.00-1.31 p = 0.05 per decade increase in age. There was no evidence of important effects of other environmental cardiovascular risk factors on CRP response. Conclusion Waist:hip ratio and age need to be considered when studying the inflammatory response to surgery. The finding that age and waist:hip ratio influence baseline and post-operative CRP levels to a similar extent suggests that baseline CRP is a measure of inflammatory responsiveness to casual stimuli and that higher age and obesity modulate the generic excitability of the inflammatory system leading to both higher baseline CRP and higher CRP response to surgery. The mechanism for

  16. An observational detection of the bridge effect of void filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Shim, Junsup; Hoyle, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    The bridge effect of void filaments is a phrase coined by Park & Lee (2009b) to explain the correlations found in a numerical experiment between the luminosity of the void galaxies and the degree of the straightness of their host filaments. Their numerical finding implies that a straight void filament provides a narrow channel for the efficient transportation of gas and matter particles from the surroundings into the void galaxies. To observationally confirm the presence of the bridge effect of void filaments, we identify the filamentary structures from the Sloan void catalog and determine the specific size of each void filament as a measure of its straightness. Using both classical and Bayesian statistics, we indeed detect a strong tendency that the void galaxies located in the more straight filaments are on average more luminous, which is in agreement with the numerical prediction. It is also shown that the strength of correlation increases with the spatial extent of the void filaments, which can be phy...

  17. On de-Sitter Geometry in Cosmic Void Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Gibbons, Gary W; Yoshida, Naoki; Chon, Sunmyon

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the geometrical concept of a 4-dimensional de-Sitter configuration of spheres in Euclidean 3-space and modelling voids in the Universe as spheres, we show that a uniform distribution over this configuration space implies a power-law for the void number density which is consistent with results from the excursion set formalism and from data, for an intermediate range of void volumes. We also discuss the effect of restricting the survey geometry on the void statistics. This work is a new application of de-Sitter geometry to cosmology and also provides a new geometrical perspective on self-similarity in cosmology.

  18. The sparkling Universe: a scenario for cosmic void motions

    CERN Document Server

    Ceccarelli, Laura; Lares, Marcelo; Paz, Dante J; Maldonado, Victoria E; Luparello, Heliana E; Lambas, Diego Garcia

    2015-01-01

    We perform a statistical study of the global motion of cosmic voids using both a numerical simulation and observational data. We analyse their relation to large--scale mass flows and the physical effects that drive those motions. We analyse the bulk motions of voids, defined by the mean velocity of haloes in the surrounding shells in the numerical simulation, and by galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We find void mean bulk velocities close to 400 km/s, comparable to those of haloes (~ 500-600 km/s), depending on void size and the large--scale environment. Statistically, small voids move faster than large ones, and voids in relatively higher density environments have higher bulk velocities than those placed in large underdense regions. Also, we analyze the mean mass density around voids finding, as expected, large--scale overdensities (underdensities) along (opposite to) the void motion direction, suggesting that void motions respond to a pull--push mechanism. This contrasts with massive ...

  19. New Statistical Perspective to The Cosmic Void Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Pycke, Jean-Renaud

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we obtain the size distribution of voids as a 3-parameter redshift independent log-normal void probability function (VPF) directly from the Cosmic Void Catalog (CVC). Although many statistical models of void distributions are based on the counts in randomly placed cells, the log-normal VPF that we here obtain is independent of the shape of the voids due to the parameter-free void finder of the CVC. We use three void populations drawn from the CVC generated by the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) Mocks which are tuned to three mock SDSS samples to investigate the void distribution statistically and the effects of the environments on the size distribution. As a result, it is shown that void size distributions obtained from the HOD Mock samples are satisfied by the 3-parameter log-normal distribution. In addition, we find that there may be a relation between hierarchical formation, skewness and kurtosis of the log-normal distribution for each catalog. We also show that the shape of the 3-paramet...

  20. Droplet Decomposition in a Reactive Atmosphere: Complete Responses for Large Activation Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    their qualitative features suggest that more extensive experiments should be made. Theoretical work on the problem has been done by Fendell (8] and...hence they can described at most the *corners" of the complete response surface H(D1 ,D2 ). Fendell identifies the resulting burning-rate formulas

  1. Homologous and cross-reactive immune responses to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factors in Bangladeshi children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, Firdausi; Ahmed, Firoz; Ahmed, Tanvir; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2006-08-01

    We have studied homologous (HoM) and cross-reacting (CR) immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody responses to colonization factors (CFs) in Bangladeshi children with diarrhea due to enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) strains of the CF antigen I (CFA/I) group (CFA/I, n = 25; coli surface antigen 4 [CS4], n = 8; CS14, n = 11) and the CS5 group (CS5, n = 15; CS7, n = 8), respectively. The responses to the HoM, CR, and heterologous (HeT) CF antigens in each group of patient were studied and compared to that seen in healthy children (n = 20). In the CFA/I group (CFA/I and CS14), patients responded with antibody-secreting cell (ASC) responses to HoM CFs (geometric mean, 156 to 329 ASCs/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMCs]) and to CR CFs ( approximately 15 to 38 ASCs/10(6) PBMCs) but least of all to the HeT CS5 antigen (2 to 4 ASCs/10(6) PBMCs). For the CS5 group of patients with ETEC (CS5 and CS7), likewise, responses to HoM CFs (230 to 372 ASCs/10(6) PBMCs) and CR CFs (27 to 676 ASCs/10(6) PBMCs) were seen, along with lower responses to the HeT CFA/I antigen (9 to 38 ASCs/10(6) PBMCs). Both groups of patients responded with CF-specific IgA antibodies to HoM and CR antigens in plasma but responded less to the HeT CFs. The responses in patients were seen very soon after the onset of diarrhea and peaked around 1 week after onset. Vaccinees who had received two doses of the oral, killed whole-cell ETEC vaccine (CF-BS-ETEC) responded with plasma IgA antibodies to CFA/I, a component of the vaccine, but also to the CR CS14 antigen, which was not included in the vaccine, showing that antibody responses can be stimulated by a CFA/I-containing ETEC vaccine to a CR-reacting antigen in individuals in countries where ETEC is endemic.

  2. A study of process induced voids in resistance welding of thermoplastic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, H.; Fernandez Villegas, I.; Bersee, H.E.N.

    2015-01-01

    Void formation in resistance welding of woven fabric reinforced thermoplastic composites was investigated. Void contents were measured using optical microscopy and digital image process. Un-even void distributions were observed in the joints, and more voids were found in the middle of the joints than the edges. A higher welding pressure was shown to help reduce the void generation. The mechanisms of void formation, in particular fibre de-compaction induced voids and residual moisture induced ...

  3. Aequorin-based luminescence imaging reveals differential calcium signalling responses to salt and reactive oxygen species in rice roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Wang, Yifeng; Taylor, Jemma L.; Jiang, Zhonghao; Zhang, Shu; Mei, Fengling; Wu, Yunrong; Wu, Ping; Ni, Jun

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that both salt and reactive oxygen species (ROS) stresses are able to increase the concentration of cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), which is caused by the flux of calcium (Ca2+). However, the differences between these two processes are largely unknown. Here, we introduced recombinant aequorin into rice (Oryza sativa) and examined the change in [Ca2+]i in response to salt and ROS stresses. The transgenic rice harbouring aequorin showed strong luminescence in roots when treated with exogenous Ca2+. Considering the histological differences in roots between rice and Arabidopsis, we reappraised the discharging solution, and suggested that the percentage of ethanol should be 25%. Different concentrations of NaCl induced immediate [Ca2+]i spikes with the same durations and phases. In contrast, H2O2 induced delayed [Ca2+]i spikes with different peaks according to the concentrations of H2O2. According to the Ca2+ inhibitor research, we also showed that the sources of Ca2+ induced by NaCl and H2O2 are different. Furthermore, we evaluated the contribution of [Ca2+]i responses in the NaCl- and H2O2-induced gene expressions respectively, and present a Ca2+- and H2O2-mediated molecular signalling model for the initial response to NaCl in rice. PMID:25754405

  4. Cerebro vascular reactivity (CVR) of middle cerebral artery in response to CO2 5% inhalation in preeclamptic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariri, Elaheh; Vahdat, Mansoureh; Behbahani, Afsaneh Shariati; Rohani, Mohammad; Kashanian, Maryam

    2013-07-01

    To compare the cerebro vascular reactivity (CVR) of middle cerebral artery (MCA) in response to CO2 5% inhalation between preeclamptic and normotensive pregnant women, also, between mild and severe preeclampsia. A comparative study was performed on 61 women with preeclampsia and 65 normotensive pregnant women who were in the third trimester of gestation. MCA transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to measure CVR in response to CO2 5% inhalation. Pulsatility index (PI), resistance index (RI), blood pressure, maternal age, gestational age and gravidity were also recorded. Baseline PI and RI were lower in the preeclamptic group (p < 0.05). Inhalation of CO2 5% caused significant increase in CVR among normotensive pregnant women in comparison with preeclamptic group (1.006 ± 0.229 versus 0.503 ± 0.209, p = 0.0001). Significantly, more cerebral vasodilatation was found among mild preeclamptic women in comparison with severe preeclamptic women (0.583 ± 0.193 versus 0.383 ± 0.173, p = 0.0001). The receiver operating characteristics curve analysis revealed acceptable difference between CO2 stimulation test of preeclamptic and normotensive women (Area under curve = 0.973, p = 0.0001). CVR in response to CO2 5% is less in preeclamptic pregnant women than normotensives, also, in severe preeclampsia, it is less than mild preeclampsia.

  5. Long-Chain Bases, Phosphatidic Acid, MAPKs and Reactive Oxygen Species as Nodal Signal Transducers in stress responses in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana eSaucedo-Garcia

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to their sessile condition, plants have developed sensitive, fast and successful ways to contend to environmental changes. These mechanisms operate as informational wires conforming extensive and intricate networks that are connected in several points. The responses are designed as pathways orchestrated by molecules that are transducers of protein and non-protein nature. Their chemical nature imposes selective features such as specificity, formation rate and generation site to the informational routes. Enzymes such as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK and non-protein, smaller molecules, such as long chain bases, phosphatidic acid and reactive oxygen species are recurrent transducers in the pleiotropic responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. In this review, we considered these four components as nodal points of converging signaling pathways that start from very different stimuli and evoke very different responses. These pleiotropic effects may be explained by the possibility that every one of these four mediators can be expressed from different sources, cellular location, temporality or magnitude. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the interplay of these four specific signaling components in Arabidopsis cells, with an emphasis on drought, cold and pathogen stresses.

  6. The BOLD cerebrovascular reactivity response to progressive hypercapnia in young and elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhogal, Alex A.; De Vis, Jill B.; Siero, Jeroen C.W.

    2016-01-01

    to broaden our interpretation of the BOLD-CVR response. Significant age-related differences were observed. Grey matter CVR at 7 mm Hg above resting PetCO2 was lower amongst elderly (0.19 ± 0.06%ΔBOLD/mm Hg) as compared to young subjects (0.26 ± 0.07%ΔBOLD/mm Hg). White matter CVR at 7 mm Hg above baseline...... PetCO2 showed no significant difference between young (0.04 ± 0.02%ΔBOLD/mm Hg) and elderly subjects (0.05 ± 0.03%ΔBOLD/mm Hg). We saw no significant differences in the BOLD signal response to progressive hypercapnia between male and female subjects in either grey or white matter. The observed...

  7. Behaviour of voids in a shear field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2009-01-01

    to a plane connecting the ends of the micro-crack is used as an approximate representation of contact stresses during frictionless sliding. In a previous study of the same problem the author applied hydrostatic pressure inside the nearly closed micro-crack to approximate contact conditions. The transverse...... surface loads used in the present analyses avoid the tendency to unrealistically elongate the voids. It is found that even though the model applied here gives significantly later occurrence of a maximum overall shear stress than that found by using hydrostatic pressure, the present model does predict...... a maximum in all the cases analyzed and thus illustrates the micro-mechanism leading to failure of the material by localization of plastic flow....

  8. Formation of Voids from Negative Density Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, J. C. N.; Opher, R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se estudia la formaci6n de huecos a partir de un espectro negativo de perturbaciones, tomando en cuenta la expansi6n del Universo, arrastre por fotones, enfriamiento por fotones, fotoionizaci6n, ioniza- ci6n colisional, enfriamiento Lyman a y la formaci6n y enfriamiento de moleculas H2. Nuestros resultados predicen la existencia de regiones 1/10 de Ia densidad promedio para regiones de masa lO - 1O10M . ABSTRACT. In the present paer we study the formation of voids from a negative spectrum of perturbations taking into account the expansion of the Universe, photon-drag, photon-cooling, photoionization, collisional ionization, Lyman a cooling and the formation and cooling of 112 molecules. Our results predict the existence of regions 1/10 the average density for regions of mass 1O - 1O10M@ : CLUSTERS-GALAXIES - COSMOLOGY

  9. Self-reactive IgE exacerbates interferon responses associated with autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henault, Jill; Riggs, Jeffrey M; Karnell, Jodi L; Liarski, Vladimir M; Li, Jianqing; Shirinian, Lena; Xu, Linda; Casey, Kerry A; Smith, Michael A; Khatry, Deepak B; Izhak, Liat; Clarke, Lorraine; Herbst, Ronald; Ettinger, Rachel; Petri, Michelle; Clark, Marcus R; Mustelin, Tomas; Kolbeck, Roland; Sanjuan, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Canonically, immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediates allergic immune responses by triggering mast cells and basophils to release histamine and type 2 helper cytokines. Here we found that in human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), IgE antibodies specific for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), a type of cell of the immune system linked to viral defense, which led to the secretion of substantial amounts of interferon-α (IFN-α). The concentration of dsDNA-specific IgE found in patient serum correlated with disease severity and greatly potentiated pDC function by triggering phagocytosis via the high-affinity FcɛRI receptor for IgE, followed by Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-mediated sensing of DNA in phagosomes. Our findings expand the known pathogenic mechanisms of IgE-mediated inflammation beyond those found in allergy and demonstrate that IgE can trigger interferon responses capable of exacerbating self-destructive autoimmune responses.

  10. Hybrid plasma bonding for void-free strong bonded interface of silicon/glass at 200 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlader, M M R; Kibria, M G; Zhang, F; Kim, M J

    2010-07-15

    A novel hybrid plasma bonding (HPB) that combines sequential plasma activation (reactive ion etching followed by microwave radicals) with anodic bonding has been developed to achieve void-free and strong silicon/glass bonding at low temperature. The interfacial voids were observed at the silicon/glass interface both in the anodic bonding and in the plasma activated anodic bonding, but the voids were completely disappeared in the HPB method at 200 degrees C. The bonding strength of the silicon/glass in the HPB was as high as 30 MPa at 200 degrees C, which was higher than that in the individual treatment of anodic and plasma activated bonding methods. The improved characteristic behavior of the interface in the HPB is attributed to the higher hydrophilicity and smooth surfaces of silicon and glass after sequential plasma activation. These highly reactive and clean surfaces enhance the mobility of alkaline cations from the glass surface across the interface toward the bulk of glass in the HPB. This transportation resulted in a approximately 353 nm thick alkaline depletion layer in the glass and enlarged the amorphous SiO(2) across the interface. The void-free strong bonding is attributed to the clean hydrophilic surfaces and the amorphous SiO(2) layer across the interface. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Response of bacillus sp. F26 to different reactive oxygen species stress characterized by antioxidative enzymes synthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guoliang; Hua, Zhaozhe; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2008-04-01

    The oxidative response of Bacillus sp F26 to different forms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress including H2O2, O2- * and OH * were investigated by using diverse generating source of ROS, which were characterized by synthesis of antioxidative enzymes. It was shown that the responses of cells to oxidative stress are largely dependent on species, mode (instantaneous and continual) and intensity of stress. Higher synthesis rate of catalase (CAT) is crucial for Bacillus sp F26 to resist H2O2 stress. The damage of H2O2 to cell was minor if CAT can efficiently decompose H2O2 entering into cell, furthermore, the response can stimulate cell growths and sugar consumption. Conversely, cell growth and synthesis of antioxidative enzymes are greatly inhibited when the intensity of H2O2 stress overwhelms the cell capability of clearing H2O2. Due to the difference in mode and effect on cells between O2- * and H2O2, higher synthesis rates of CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD) couldn't guarantee cells to eliminate H2O2 and O2- * efficiently. Therefore, the toxicity to cells induced by intracellular O2- * is more severe than H2O2 stress. Unlike response to H2O2 and O2- *, OH stress significantly inhibited cell growth and synthesis of antioxidative enzymes due to the fact OH * is most active ROS. Our results indicated that Bacillus sp F26 will show diverse biological behaviour in response to H2O2, O2- * and OH * of stress due to the discrepancy in chemical property. In order to survive in oxidative stress, cells will timely adjust their metabolism to adapt to new environment including regulating synthesis level of antioxidative enzymes, changing rates of cells growth and substrate consumption.

  12. The effects of impulsivity and proactive inhibition on reactive inhibition and the go process: insights from the stop signal task of vocal and manual responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leidy Janeth Castro-Meneses

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study measured proactive and reactive response inhibition and their relationships with self-reported impulsivity. We examined the domains of both vocal and manual responding using a stop signal task (SST with two stop probabilities: high and low probability stop (1/3 and 1/6 stops respectively. Our aim was to evaluate the effect stop probability would have on reactive and proactive inhibition. We tested 44 subjects and found that for the high compared to low probability stop signal condition, more proactive inhibition was evident and this was correlated with a reduction in the stop signal reaction time (SSRT. We found that reactive inhibition had a positive relationship with dysfunctional but not functional impulsivity in both vocal and manual domains of responding. These findings support the hypothesis that proactive inhibition may pre-activate the network for reactive inhibition.

  13. Study of the reactivity effect of bubble collapse in molten liquid metal cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munno, F.J.; Sheaks, O.J.

    1977-08-01

    The reactivity effect of void collapse on a Core Disruptive Accident in a sodium free fast reactor core was studied. A two-dimensional transport theory computer code was employed to obtain a reactivity model which incorporated random distributions of voids in spatial location and bubble size. This model was implemented into VENUS-II and several excursions were investigated for the purpose of assessing the effect of bubble collapse reactivity on excursion energy. In addition, comparisons were made between the VENUS-II results obtained using the transport reactivity model and those obtained using a reactivity model developed from the Behrens' formulation of the leakage effects due to the presence of bubbles. The results indicate that excursion energy is sensitive to the shape of the reactivity versus void fraction function and that reactivity models based strictly on leakage effects are probably conservative compared to models which include both self-multiplication and leakage.

  14. Single-Cell Analysis of the Plasmablast Response to Vibrio cholerae Demonstrates Expansion of Cross-Reactive Memory B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Robert C; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur R; Nakajima, Rie; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Rahman, Atiqur; Bhaumik, Siddhartha K; Harris, Levelle; O'Neal, Justin T; Trost, Jessica F; Alam, Nur Haq; Jasinskas, Algis; Dotsey, Emmanuel; Kelly, Meagan; Charles, Richelle C; Xu, Peng; Kováč, Pavol; Calderwood, Stephen B; Ryan, Edward T; Felgner, Phillip L; Qadri, Firdausi; Wrammert, Jens; Harris, Jason B

    2016-12-20

    able to uncover the basis of cross-reactivity between different V. cholerae serotypes and the likely impact of prior enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli exposure on the response to cholera, as well as identify novel antigenic targets. In addition to improving our understanding of the repertoire and function of the antibody response to cholera in humans, this study has implications for future cholera vaccination efforts. Copyright © 2016 Kauffman et al.

  15. Reactive oxygen species facilitate the EDH response in arterioles by potentiating intracellular endothelial Ca(2+) release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidgey, James; Fraser, Paul A; Aaronson, Philip I

    2016-08-01

    There is abundant evidence that H2O2 can act as an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor in the resistance vasculature. However, whilst scavenging H2O2 can abolish endothelial dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) and the associated vascular relaxation in some arteries, EDH-dependent vasorelaxation can often be mimicked only by using relatively high concentrations of H2O2. We have examined the role of H2O2 in EDH-dependent vasodilatation by simultaneously measuring vascular diameter and changes in endothelial cell (EC) [Ca(2+)]i during the application of H2O2 or carbachol, which triggers EDH. Carbachol (10µM) induced dilatation of phenylephrine-preconstricted rat cremaster arterioles was largely (73%) preserved in the presence of indomethacin (3µM) and l-NAME (300µM). This residual NO- and prostacyclin-independent dilatation was reduced by 89% upon addition of apamin (0.5µM) and TRAM-34 (10µM), and by 74% when an extracellular ROS scavenging mixture of SOD and catalase (S&C; 100Uml(-1) each) was present. S&C also reduced the carbachol-induced EC [Ca(2+)]i increase by 74%. When applied in Ca(2+)-free external medium, carbachol caused a transient increase in EC [Ca(2+)]i. This was reduced by catalase, and was enhanced when 1µM H2O2 was present in the bath. H2O2 -induced dilatation, which occurred only at concentrations ≥100µM, was reduced by a blocking antibody to TRPM2, which had no effect on carbachol-induced responses. Similarly, iberotoxin and Rp-8bromo cGMP reduced the vasodilatation induced by H2O2, but not by carbachol. Inhibiting PLC, PLA2 or CYP450 2C9 each greatly reduced the carbachol-induced increase in EC [Ca(2+)]i and vasodilatation, but adding 10µM H2O2 during PLA2 or CYP450 2C9 inhibition completely restored both responses. The nature of the effective ROS species was investigated by using Fe(2+) chelators to block the formation of ∙OH. A cell permeant chelator was able to inhibit EC Ca(2+) store release, but cell impermeant chelators

  16. Measuring the growth rate of structure around cosmic voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawken, A. J.; Michelett, D.; Granett, B.; Iovino, A.; Guzzo, L.

    2016-10-01

    Using an algorithm based on searching for empty spheres we identified 245 voids in the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). We show how by modelling the anisotropic void-galaxy cross correlation function we can probe the growth rate of structure.

  17. An Interacting Galaxy System along a Filament in a Void

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beygu, B.; Kreckel, K.; van de Weijgaert, R.; van der Hulst, J. M.; van Gorkom, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Cosmological voids provide a unique environment for the study of galaxy formation and evolution. The galaxy population in their interiors has properties significantly different from average field galaxies. As part of our Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), we have found a system of three interacting galaxies

  18. A Cosmic Void Catalog of SDSS DR12 BOSS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Qingqing; Scherrer, Robert J; Scoccimarro, Roman; Tinker, Jeremy L; McBride, Cameron K; Neyrinck, Mark C; Schneider, Donald P; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    We present a cosmic void catalog using the large-scale structure galaxy catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This galaxy catalog is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 and is the final catalog of SDSS-III. We take into account the survey boundaries, masks, and angular and radial selection functions, and apply the ZOBOV void finding algorithm to the galaxy catalog. After making quality cuts to ensure that the voids represent real underdense regions, we identify 1228 voids with effective radii spanning the range 20-100Mpc/h and with central densities that are, on average, 30% of the mean sample density. We discuss the basic statistics of voids, such as their size and redshift distributions, and measure the radial density profile of the voids via a stacking technique. In addition, we construct mock void catalogs from 1000 mock galaxy catalogs, and find that the properties of BOSS voids are in good agreement with those in the mock catalogs. We compare the stella...

  19. Tensor anisotropy as a tracer of cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to find voids in cosmological simulations based on the tidal and the velocity shear tensors definitions of the cosmic web. We use the fractional anisotropy (FA) computed from the eigenvalues of each web scheme as a void tracer. We identify voids using a watershed transform based on the local minima of the FA field without making any assumption on the shape or structure of the voids. We test the method on the Bolshoi simulation and report on the abundance and radial averaged profiles for the density, velocity and fractional anisotropy. We find that voids in the velocity shear web are smaller than voids in the tidal web, with a particular overabundance of very small voids in the inner region of filaments/sheets. We classify voids as subcompensated/overcompansated depending on the absence/presence of an overdense matter ridge in their density profile, finding that close to $65\\%$ and $35\\%$ of the total population are classified into each category, respectively. Finally, we find evidence ...

  20. The relationship between void waves and flow regime transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Drew, D.A.; Kalkach-Navarro, S.; Park, J.W.

    1992-12-31

    The results of an extensive experimental and analytical study on the relationship between void waves and flow regime transition are presented, in particular, the bubbly/slug flow regime transition. It is shown that void wave instability signals a flow regime transition.

  1. Voided stain on paper method for analysis of mouse urination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugino, Y; Kanematsu, A; Hayashi, Y; Haga, H; Yoshimura, N; Yoshimura, K; Ogawa, O

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of a quantification method using filter paper for analyzing minute voided urine of the mouse. Voided stain on paper (VSOP) method; the correlation between area of stained spot on a filter paper and amount of applied liquid was calculated. Voiding behavior of the mice was analyzed by placing the animal above the same filter paper and recording voided time and area over 2 hr. The usefulness of the VSOP method was tested in analysis of the voiding behavior of five female 7-week-old ddY mice treated with cyclophosphamide (CPM, 150 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and five control ones, in comparison with the histology of CPM-induced cystitis. Further, the voided volume of male and female ddY mouse ranging from 2 to 13 weeks was assessed. There was a linear correlation between liquid volume and stained area on the filter paper (y = 16.472x - 22.411, R(2) = 0.9981). Between control mice and those with histologically proven CPM cystitis, there was a significant difference in voided volume (362.7 +/- 51.9 and 127.8 +/- 100.0 microl, VSOP method is a useful tool for evaluating voiding behavior of the mouse, including those with small bladder capacity.

  2. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depression & spatial complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Weygaert, Rien; Shandarin, S.; Saar, E.; Einasto, J.

    2016-01-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do theyrepresent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probesand measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive tothe natu

  3. STRESS CONCENTRATION DUE TO A SPHERICAL VOID UNDER HERTZIAN CONTACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian ALACI,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper presents the method of estimating the stress concentrator effect of a spherical void from an elastic half-space. An essential part consists in estimation of FEM error by finding the contact pressure from half-plane using an analytical method. Next, the stress concentrator effect of the same void, except for placed into elastic space, is found.

  4. High gain durable anti-reflective coating with oblate voids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghsoodi, Sina; Brophy, Brenor L.; Colson, Thomas E.; Gonsalves, Peter R.; Abrams, Ze' ev

    2016-06-28

    Disclosed herein are single layer transparent coatings with an anti-reflective property, a hydrophobic property, and that are highly abrasion resistant. The single layer transparent coatings contain a plurality of oblate voids. At least 1% of the oblate voids are open to a surface of the single layer transparent coatings.

  5. The Aspen-Amsterdam void finder comparison project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colberg, Joerg M.; Pearce, Frazer; Foster, Caroline; Platen, Erwin; Brunino, Riccardo; Neyrinck, Mark; Basilakos, Spyros; Fairall, Anthony; Feldman, Hume; Gottloeber, Stefan; Hahn, Oliver; Hoyle, Fiona; Mueller, Volker; Nelson, Lorne; Plionis, Manolis; Porciani, Cristiano; Shandarin, Sergei; Vogeley, Michael S.; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2008-01-01

    Despite a history that dates back at least a quarter of a century, studies of voids in the large-scale structure of the Universe are bedevilled by a major problem: there exist a large number of quite different void-finding algorithms, a fact that has so far got in the way of groups comparing their

  6. Locating voids beneath pavement using pulsed electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinway, W. J.; Echard, J. D.; Luke, C. M.

    1981-11-01

    The feasibility of using pulsed electromagnetic wave technology for locating and sizing voids beneath reinforced and nonreinforced portland cement concrete pavements is determined. The data processing techniques developed can be implemented to provide information for void depth and sizing to + or - 1/2 in. and spatial location within + or - 6 in. A very short pulse radar directly connected to a microcomputer was chosen as the equipment necessary to obtain measurements. This equipment has the required accuracy and reliability, and is a cost effective solution for the void locating problem. The radar provides a signal return from voids that has unique characteristics that can be examined to provide information regarding the location, depth, and shape of the void. The microcomputer provides a means of real time processing to extract the information from the radar signal return and record the results. Theoretical modeling of signal returns from voids led to suitable techniques for locating and sizing voids beneath the pavement. Analysis and application of these techniques to radar measurements verified the theoretical predictions that radar can be used to determine the location, size, and shape of actual voids.

  7. Warmth Elevating the Depths: Shallower Voids with Warm Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Lin F; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Silk, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Warm dark matter (WDM) has been proposed as an alternative to cold dark matter (CDM), to resolve issues such as the apparent lack of satellites around the Milky Way. Even if WDM is not the answer to observational issues, it is essential to constrain the nature of the dark matter. The effect of WDM on haloes has been extensively studied, but the small-scale initial smoothing in WDM also affects the present-day cosmic web and voids. It suppresses the cosmic "sub-web" inside voids, and the formation of both void haloes and subvoids. In N-body simulations run with different assumed WDM masses, we identify voids with the zobov algorithm, and cosmic-web components with the origami algorithm. As dark-matter warmth increases, the initial-conditions smoothing increases, and the number of voids and subvoids is suppressed. Also, void density profiles change, their shapes become flatter inside the void radius, while edges of the voids remain unchanged. Also, filaments and walls become cleaner, as the sub-structures in be...

  8. High REDOX RESPONSIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1 Levels Result in Accumulation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Arabidopsis thaliana Shoots and Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Johnson, Joy Michal; Hieno, Ayaka; Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Godfrey, Rinesh; Obokata, Junichi; Sherameti, Irena; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Böhmer, Frank-D; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Redox Responsive Transcription Factor1 (RRTF1) in Arabidopsis is rapidly and transiently upregulated by H2O2, as well as biotic- and abiotic-induced redox signals. RRTF1 is highly conserved in angiosperms, but its physiological role remains elusive. Here we show that inactivation of RRTF1 restricts and overexpression promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in response to stress. Transgenic lines overexpressing RRTF1 are impaired in root and shoot development, light sensitive, and susceptible to Alternaria brassicae infection. These symptoms are diminished by the beneficial root endophyte Piriformospora indica, which reduces ROS accumulation locally in roots and systemically in shoots, and by antioxidants and ROS inhibitors that scavenge ROS. More than 800 genes were detected in mature leaves and seedlings of transgenic lines overexpressing RRTF1; ∼ 40% of them have stress-, redox-, ROS-regulated-, ROS-scavenging-, defense-, cell death- and senescence-related functions. Bioinformatic analyses and in vitro DNA binding assays demonstrate that RRTF1 binds to GCC-box-like sequences in the promoter of RRTF1-responsive genes. Upregulation of RRTF1 by stress stimuli and H2O2 requires WRKY18/40/60. RRTF1 is co-regulated with the phylogenetically related RAP2.6, which contains a GCC-box-like sequence in its promoter, but transgenic lines overexpressing RAP2.6 do not accumulate higher ROS levels. RRTF1 also stimulates systemic ROS accumulation in distal non-stressed leaves. We conclude that the elevated levels of the highly conserved RRTF1 induce ROS accumulation in response to ROS and ROS-producing abiotic and biotic stress signals.

  9. Bioactivity response of Ta{sub 1-x}O{sub x} coatings deposited by reactive DC magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Alves, C.F., E-mail: cristiana.alves@fisica.uminho.pt [GRF-CFUM, Physics Departament, University of Minho, Campus of Azurem, Guimaraes 4800-058 (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Coimbra 3030-788 (Portugal); Carvalho, S. [GRF-CFUM, Physics Departament, University of Minho, Campus of Azurem, Guimaraes 4800-058 (Portugal); SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Coimbra 3030-788 (Portugal)

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants is sometimes accompanied by failure due to periimplantitis disease and subsequently poor esthetics when soft–hard tissue margin recedes. As a consequence, further research is needed for developing new bioactive surfaces able to enhance the osseous growth. Tantalum (Ta) is a promising material for dental implants since, comparing with titanium (Ti), it is bioactive and has an interesting chemistry which promotes the osseointegration. Another promising approach for implantology is the development of implants with oxidized surfaces since bone progenitor cells interact with the oxide layer forming a diffusion zone due to its ability to bind with calcium which promotes a stronger bond. In the present report Ta-based coatings were deposited by reactive DC magnetron sputtering onto Ti CP substrates in an Ar + O{sub 2} atmosphere. In order to assess the osteoconductive response of the studied materials, contact angle and in vitro tests of the samples immersed in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) were performed. Structural results showed that oxide phases where achieved with larger amounts of oxygen (70 at.% O). More compact and smooth coatings were deposited by increasing the oxygen content. The as-deposited Ta coating presented the most hydrophobic character (100°); with increasing oxygen amount contact angles progressively diminished, down to the lowest measured value, 63°. The higher wettability is also accompanied by an increase on the surface energy. Bioactivity tests demonstrated that highest O-content coating, in good agreement with wettability and surface energy values, showed an increased affinity for apatite adhesion, with higher Ca/P ratio formation, when compared to the bare Ti substrates. - Highlights: • Ta{sub 1-x}O{sub x} coatings were deposited by reactive DC magnetron sputtering. • Amorphous oxide phases were achieved with higher oxygen amounts. • Contact angles progressively diminished, with increasing oxygen content. • Ta

  10. Response surface-optimized removal of Reactive Red 120 dye from its aqueous solutions using polyethyleneimine enhanced ultrafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, J; Singh, M; Sikder, J; Padarthi, V; Chakraborty, S; Curcio, S

    2015-11-01

    Retention of toxic dyes with molecular weights lower than the molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) of the ultrafiltration membranes can be improved through selective binding of the target dyes to a water-soluble polymer, followed by ultrafiltration of the macromolecular complexes formed. This method, often referred to as polymer enhanced ultrafiltration (PEUF), was investigated in the present study, using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as the chelating agent. Model azo dye Reactive Red 120 was selected as the poorly biodegradable, target contaminant, because of its frequent recalcitrant presence in colored effluents, and its eventual ecotoxicological impacts on the environment. The effects of the governing process factors, namely, cross flow rate, transmembrane pressure polymer to dye ratio and pH, on target dye rejection efficiency were meticulously examined. Additionally, each parameter level was statistically optimized using central composite design (CCD) from the response surface methodology (RSM) toolkit, with an objective to maximize performance efficiency. The results revealed high dye retention efficiency over 99%, accompanied with reasonable permeate flux over 100L/m(2)h under optimal process conditions. The estimated results were elucidated graphically through response surface (RS) plots and validated experimentally. The analyses clearly established PEUF as a novel, reasonably efficient and economical route for recalcitrant dye treatment.

  11. Thermal-mechanical-chemical responses of polymer-bonded explosives using a mesoscopic reactive model under impact loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, XinJie; Wu, YanQing; Huang, FengLei

    2017-01-05

    A mesoscopic framework is developed to quantify the thermal-mechanical-chemical responses of polymer-bonded explosive (PBX) samples under impact loading. A mesoscopic reactive model is developed for the cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX) crystal, which incorporates nonlinear elasticity, crystal plasticity, and temperature-dependent chemical reaction. The proposed model was implemented in the finite element code ABAQUS by the user subroutine VUMAT. A series of three-dimensional mesoscale models were constructed and calculated under low-strength impact loading scenarios from 100m/s to 600m/s where only the first wave transit is studied. Crystal anisotropy and microstructural heterogeneity are responsible for the nonuniform stress field and fluctuations of the stress wave front. At a critical impact velocity (≥300m/s), a chemical reaction is triggered because the temperature contributed by the volumetric and plastic works is sufficiently high. Physical quantities, including stress, temperature, and extent of reaction, are homogenized from those across the microstructure at the mesoscale to compare with macroscale measurements, which will advance the continuum-level models. The framework presented in this study has important implications in understanding hot spot ignition processes and improving predictive capabilities in energetic materials.

  12. Schisandrin B-induced glutathione antioxidant response and cardioprotection are mediated by reactive oxidant species production in rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Na; Ko, Ming

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the involvement of reactive oxidant species (ROS), presumably arising from cytochrome P-450 (CYP)-catalyzed metabolism of schisandrin B (Sch B), in triggering glutathione antioxidant response, Sch B induced reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent and CYP-catalyzed reaction and associated ROS production were examined in rat heart microsomes. Sch B analogs were also studied for comparison. Using rat heart microsomes as a source of CYP, Sch B and schisandrin C (Sch C), but not schisandrin A and dimethyl diphenyl bicarboxylate (an intermediate compound derived from the synthesis of Sch C), were found to serve as co-substrate for the CYP-catalyzed NADPH oxidation reaction, with concomitant production of ROS. The stimulation of CYP-catalyzed NADPH oxidation reaction and/or ROS production by Sch B or Sch C correlated with the increase in mitochondrial reduced glutathione level and protection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat hearts. The involvement of ROS in Sch B-induced cardioprotection was further confirmed by the suppressive effect produced by N-acetylcysteine or alpha-tocopherol pretreatment. Taken together, these results suggest that Sch B-induced glutathione antioxidant response and cardioprotection may be mediated by ROS arising from CYP-catalyzed reaction.

  13. Time dependent voiding mechanisms in polyamide 6 submitted to high stress triaxiality: experimental characterisation and finite element modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selles, Nathan; King, Andrew; Proudhon, Henry; Saintier, Nicolas; Laiarinandrasana, Lucien

    2017-08-01

    Double notched round bars made of semi-crystalline polymer polyamide 6 (PA6) were submitted to monotonic tensile and creep tests. The two notches had a root radius of 0.45 mm, which imposes a multiaxial stress state and a state of high triaxiality in the net (minimal) section of the specimens. Tests were carried out until the failure occurred from one of the notches. The other one, unbroken but deformed under steady strain rate or steady load, was inspected using the Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography (SRCT) technique. These 3D through thickness inspections allowed the study of microstructural evolution at the peak stress for the monotonic tensile test and at the beginning of the tertiary creep for the creep tests. Cavitation features were assessed with a micrometre resolution within the notched region. Spatial distributions of void volume fraction ( Vf) and void morphology were studied. Voiding mechanisms were similar under steady strain rates and steady loads. The maximum values of Vf were located between the axis of revolution of the specimens and the notch surface and voids were considered as flat cylinders with a circular basis perpendicular to the loading direction. A model, based on porous plasticity, was used to simulate the mechanical response of this PA6 material under high stress triaxiality. Both macroscopic behaviour (loading curves) and voiding micro-mechanisms (radial distributions of void volume fraction) were accurately predicted using finite element simulations.

  14. Dislocation and void segregation in copper during neutron irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Leffers, Torben; Horsewell, Andy

    1986-01-01

    High-purity (99. 999%) and fully annealed copper specimens have been irradiated in the DR-3 reactor at Riso to doses of 1 multiplied by 10**2**2 and 5 multiplied by 10**2**2 neutrons (fast)m** minus **2(2 multiplied by 10** minus **3 dpa and 1 multiplied by 10** minus **2 dpa, respectively...... were distributed between these walls. The dislocation walls were practically free of voids and generally had a void-denuded zone along them. The density of dislocations (loops and segments) was very low in the region containing voids (i. e. between the dislocation walls). Even with this low dislocation...... density, the void swelling rate was very high (approximately 2. 5% per dpa). The implications of the segregated distribution of sinks for void formation and growth are briefly discussed....

  15. Alignment of galaxy spins in the vicinity of voids

    CERN Document Server

    Slosar, Anze

    2008-01-01

    We provide limits on the alignment of galaxy orientations with the direction to the void center for galaxies lying near the edges of voids. We locate spherical voids in volume limited samples of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using the HB inspired void finder and investigate the orientation of (color selected) spiral galaxies that are nearly edge-on or face-on. In contrast with previous literature, we find no statistical evidence for departure from random orientations. Expressed in terms of the parameter c, introduced by Lee & Pen to describe the strength of such an alignment, we find that c<0.11(0.13) at 95% (99.7%) confidence limit within a context of a toy model that assumes a perfectly spherical voids with sharp boundaries.

  16. Two new methods to detect cosmic voids without density measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Elyiv, Andrii; Pollina, Giorgia; Baldi, Marco; Branchini, Enzo; Cimatti, Andrea; Moscardini, Lauro

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic voids are effective cosmological probes to discriminate among competing world models. Their precise and unbiased identification is a prerequisite to perform accurate observational tests. The identification is generally based on density or geometry criteria that, because of their very nature, are prone to shot noise errors. In this work we propose two new void finders that are based on dynamical and clustering criteria to select voids in the Lagrangian coordinates and minimise the impact of sparse sampling. The first approach exploits the Zeldovich approximation to trace back in time the orbits of galaxies located in the voids and their surroundings, whereas the second uses the observed galaxy-galaxy correlation function to relax the objects' spatial distribution to homogeneity and isotropy. In both cases voids are defined as regions of the negative velocity divergence in Lagrangian coordinates, that can be regarded as sinks of the back-in-time streamlines of the mass tracers. To assess the performance ...

  17. The cosmic web in CosmoGrid void regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Steven; van de Weygaert, Rien; Cautun, Marius; Beygu, Burcu; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2016-10-01

    We study the formation and evolution of the cosmic web, using the high-resolution CosmoGrid ΛCDM simulation. In particular, we investigate the evolution of the large-scale structure around void halo groups, and compare this to observations of the VGS-31 galaxy group, which consists of three interacting galaxies inside a large void. The structure around such haloes shows a great deal of tenuous structure, with most of such systems being embedded in intra-void filaments and walls. We use the Nexus+} algorithm to detect walls and filaments in CosmoGrid, and find them to be present and detectable at every scale. The void regions embed tenuous walls, which in turn embed tenuous filaments. We hypothesize that the void galaxy group of VGS-31 formed in such an environment.

  18. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depression & spatial complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do theyrepresent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probesand measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive tothe nature of dark energy, while their substructure and galaxy population provides a direct key to thenature of dark matter. Also, the pristine environment of void interiors is an important testing groundfor our understanding of environmental influences on galaxy formation and evolution. In this paper, we reviewthe key aspects of the structure and dynamics ofvoids, with a particular focus on the hierarchical evolution of the void population. We demonstratehow the rich structural pattern of the Cosmic Web is related to the complex evolution and buildupof voids.

  19. Cross-reactive memory CD8(+) T cells alter the immune response to heterologous secondary dengue virus infections in mice in a sequence-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumier, Coreen M; Mathew, Anuja; Bashyam, Hema S; Rothman, Alan L

    2008-02-15

    Dengue virus is the causative agent of dengue fever and the more-severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Human studies suggest that the increased risk of DHF during secondary infection is due to immunopathology partially mediated by cross-reactive memory T cells from the primary infection. To model T cell responses to sequential infections, we immunized mice with different sequences of dengue virus serotypes and measured the frequency of peptide-specific T cells after infection. The acute response after heterologous secondary infections was enhanced compared with the acute or memory response after primary infection. Also, the hierarchy of epitope-specific responses was influenced by the specific sequence of infection. Adoptive-transfer experiments showed that memory T cells responded preferentially to the secondary infection. These findings demonstrate that cross-reactive T cells from a primary infection alter the immune response during a heterologous secondary infection.

  20. Complexity of Host Micro-RNA Response to Cytomegalovirus Reactivation After Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, A; Lisboa, L F; O'Shea, D; Asberg, A; Mueller, T; Emery, V; Kumar, D; Humar, A

    2016-02-01

    Human (Homo sapiens) micro-RNAs (hsa-miRNAs) regulate virus and host-gene translation, but the biological impact in patients with human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infection is not well defined in a clinically relevant model. First, we compared hsa-miRNA expression profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 35 transplant recipients with and without CMV viremia by using a microarray chip covering 847 hsa-miRNAs. This approach demonstrated a set of 142 differentially expressed hsa-miRNAs. Next, we examined the effect of each of these miRNAs on viral growth by using human fibroblasts (human foreskin fibroblast-1) infected with the hCMV Towne strain, identifying a subset of proviral and antiviral hsa-miRNAs. miRNA-target prediction software indicated potential binding sites within the hCMV genome (e.g., hCMV-UL52 and -UL100 [UL = unique long]) and host-genes (e.g., interleukin-1 receptor, IRF1). Luciferase-expressing plasmid constructs and immunoblotting confirmed several predicted miRNA targets. Finally, we determined the expression of selected proviral and antiviral hsa-miRNAs in 242 transplant recipients with hCMV-viremia. We measured hsa-miRNAs before and after antiviral therapy and correlated hsa-miRNA expression levels to hCMV-replication dynamics. One of six antiviral hsa-miRNAs showed a significant increase during treatment, concurrent with viral decline. In contrast, six of eight proviral hsa-miRNAs showed a decrease during viral decline. Our results indicate that a complex and multitargeted hsa-miRNA response occurs during CMV replication in immunosuppressed patients. This study provides mechanistic insight and potential novel biomarkers for CMV replication. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  1. Curcumin-coordinated nanoparticles with improved stability for reactive oxygen species-responsive drug delivery in lung cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cheng-Qiong; Xing, Lei; Cui, Peng-Fei; Qiao, Jian-Bin; He, Yu-Jing; Chen, Bao-An; Jin, Liang; Jiang, Hu-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Background The natural compound curcumin (Cur) can regulate growth inhibition and apoptosis in various cancer cell lines, although its clinical applications are restricted by extreme water insolubility and instability. To overcome these hurdles, we fabricated a Cur-coordinated reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive nanoparticle using the interaction between boronic acid and Cur. Materials and methods We synthesized a highly biocompatible 4-(hydroxymethyl) phenylboronic acid (HPBA)-modified poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-grafted poly(acrylic acid) polymer (PPH) and fabricated a Cur-coordinated ROS-responsive nanoparticle (denoted by PPHC) based on the interaction between boronic acid and Cur. The mean diameter of the Cur-coordinated PPHC nanoparticle was 163.8 nm and its zeta potential was −0.31 mV. The Cur-coordinated PPHC nanoparticle improved Cur stability in physiological environment and could timely release Cur in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). PPHC nanoparticles demonstrated potent antiproliferative effect in vitro in A549 cancer cells. Furthermore, the viability of cells treated with PPHC nanoparticles was significantly increased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), which blocks Cur release through ROS inhibition. Simultaneously, the ROS level measured in A549 cells after incubation with PPHC nanoparticles exhibited an obvious downregulation, which further proved that ROS depression indeed influenced the therapeutic effect of Cur in PPHC nanoparticles. Moreover, pretreatment with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) significantly impaired the cytotoxic effect of Cur in A549 cells in vitro while causing less damage to the activity of Cur in PPHC nanoparticle. Conclusion The Cur-coordinated nanoparticles developed in this study improved Cur stability, which could further release Cur in a ROS-dependent manner in cancer cells. PMID:28182160

  2. Dengue virus-reactive CD8+ T cells display quantitative and qualitative differences in their response to variant epitopes of heterologous viral serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyam, Hema S; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L

    2006-03-01

    Reactivation of serotype cross-reactive CD8+ memory T lymphocytes is thought to contribute to the immunopathogenesis of dengue disease during secondary infection by a heterologous serotype. Using cytokine flow cytometry, we have defined four novel HLA-A*02-restricted dengue viral epitopes recognized by up to 1.5% of circulating CD8+ T cells in four donors after primary vaccination. All four donors had the highest cytokine response to the epitope NS4b 2353. We also studied the effect of sequence differences in heterologous dengue serotypes on dengue-reactive CD8+ memory T cell cytokine and proliferative responses. The D3 variant of a different NS4b epitope 2423 and the D2 variant of the NS4a epitope 2148 induced the largest cytokine response, compared with their respective heterologous sequences in all donors regardless of the primary vaccination serotype. Stimulation with variant peptides also altered the relative frequencies of the various subsets of cells that expressed IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, MIP-1beta, and combinations of these cytokines. These results indicate that the prior infection history of the individual as well as the serotypes of the primary and heterologous secondary viruses influence the nature of the secondary response. These differences in the effector functions of serotype cross-reactive memory T cells induced by heterologous variant epitopes, which are both quantitative and qualitative, may contribute to the clinical outcome of secondary dengue infection.

  3. Control of Appetitive and Aversive Taste-Reactivity Responses by an Auditory Conditioned Stimulus in a Devaluation Task: A FOS and Behavioral Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Erin C.; Agarwal, Isha; Lee, Hongjoo J.; Holland, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    Through associative learning, cues for biologically significant reinforcers such as food may gain access to mental representations of those reinforcers. Here, we used devaluation procedures, behavioral assessment of hedonic taste-reactivity responses, and measurement of immediate-early gene (IEG) expression to show that a cue for food engages…

  4. Multi-Wave Prospective Examination of the Stress-Reactivity Extension of Response Styles Theory of Depression in High-Risk Children and Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, John R. Z.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Sheshko, Dana M.; Fishman, Michael B.; Stolow, Darren

    2012-01-01

    The current study tested the stress-reactivity extension of response styles theory of depression (Nolen-Hoeksema "Journal of Abnormal Psychology" 100:569-582, 1991) in a sample of high-risk children and early adolescents from a vulnerability-stress perspective using a multi-wave longitudinal design. In addition, we examined whether obtained…

  5. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shrotriya, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence.

  6. Control of Appetitive and Aversive Taste-Reactivity Responses by an Auditory Conditioned Stimulus in a Devaluation Task: A FOS and Behavioral Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Erin C.; Agarwal, Isha; Lee, Hongjoo J.; Holland, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    Through associative learning, cues for biologically significant reinforcers such as food may gain access to mental representations of those reinforcers. Here, we used devaluation procedures, behavioral assessment of hedonic taste-reactivity responses, and measurement of immediate-early gene (IEG) expression to show that a cue for food engages…

  7. Properties of hydrogen induced voids in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, J; Fischer, T; Hieckmann, E; Hiller, M; Lavrov, E V [Institute for Applied Physics/Semiconductor Physics, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2005-06-08

    After heat treatment, silicon samples implanted with high doses of hydrogen exhibit blistering and defoliation of thin silicon layers. The process is used commercially in the fabrication of thin silicon-on-insulator layers (Smart Cut(registered)). In the present study we investigate the behaviour of hydrogen after different processing steps, which lead to thin Si layers bonded to glass substrates. A set of hydrogen implanted samples is studied by means of low temperature photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and optical microscopy (visible and infrared). The formation of Si-H bonds is detected after implantation together with a build-up of internal strain. After annealing, the relaxation of the implanted layers is found to be connected with the formation of hydrogen saturated vacancies and the formation of H{sub 2} molecules filling up larger voids. A comparison is made with hydrogen plasma treated samples, where well defined platelets on {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes are found to trap hydrogen molecules. No direct evidence of the role of {l_brace}111{r_brace} and {l_brace}100{r_brace} platelets in the blistering process is found in the implanted layers from our study. We determine considerable compressive stresses in the bonded Si layers on glass substrates. The photoluminescence is strongly enhanced in these bonded layers but red-shifted due to a strain reduced band gap.

  8. Radionuclide voiding cystography in intrarenal reflux detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzoni, G.; Perale, R.; Bui, F.; Pitter, M.; Pavanello, L.; Boscolo, R.; Passerini Glazel, G.; Macri, C.

    1986-01-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility of detecting intra-renal reflux (IRR) with a more sensitive procedure, 48 children with recurrent urinary tract infections underwent intravenous urography (IVU) and voiding cystourethrogram (VCU) using a solution containing contrast medium and sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid particles which are known to persist in the renal parenchyma for a long time. Scintigraphic images were taken at 5 and 20 hours after VCU. 18 children had no vesico-ureteral reflux, 11 showed unilateral and 19 bilateral VUR, which was therefore present in 49 renal units. Among the 49 renal refluxing units (RRUs) IRR was detected radiologically in 8; of these isotopic activity in the renal area was present in all 6 RRUs who were examined at 20 hours. Of the remaining 41 RRUs with no radiologically detectable IRR 24 were evaluated at 20 hours and 5 (21%) showed renal radioactivity. Renal scars were significantly more frequent in kidneys with radioisotopic activity at 20 hours. The results of this study indicate that radionuclide cystography using sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid is a reliable procedure for demonstrating IRR, and to this end is more sensitive than X-ray VCU. Radionuclide cystography with sulfur colloid particles should therefore be considered a simple and useful complementary procedure, which is more sensitive than X-ray VCU in the diagnosis and follow-up of IRR.

  9. Scaling of voids and fractality in the galaxy distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Gaite, J; Gaite, Jose; Manrubia, Susanna C.

    2002-01-01

    We study here, from first principles, what properties of voids are to be expected in a fractal point distribution and how the void distribution is related to its morphology. We show this relation in various examples and apply our results to the distribution of galaxies. If the distribution of galaxies forms a fractal set, then this property results in a number of scaling laws to be fulfilled by voids. Consider a fractal set of dimension $D$ and its set of voids. If voids are ordered according to decreasing sizes (largest void has rank R=1, second largest R=2 and so on), then a relation between size $\\Lambda$ and rank of the form $\\Lambda (R) \\propto R^{-z}$ must hold, with $z = d/D$, and where $d$ is the euclidean dimension of the space where the fractal is embedded. The physical restriction $D 1$ in a fractal set. The average size $\\bar \\Lambda$ of voids depends on the upper ($\\Lambda_u$) and the lower ($\\Lambda_l$) cut-off as ${\\bar \\Lambda} \\propto \\Lambda_u^{1-D/d} \\Lambda_l^{D/d}$. Current analysis of v...

  10. Partial discharges within two spherical voids in an epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illias, H. A.; Chen, G.; Bakar, A. H. A.; Mokhlis, H.; Tunio, M. A.

    2013-08-01

    A void in a dielectric insulation material may exist due to imperfection in the insulation manufacturing or long term stressing. Voids have been identified as one of the common sources of partial discharge (PD) activity within an insulation system, such as in cable insulation and power transformers. Therefore, it is important to study PD phenomenon within void cavities in insulation. In this work, a model of PD activity within two spherical voids in a homogeneous dielectric material has been developed using finite element analysis software to study the parameters affecting PD behaviour. The parameters that have been taken into account are the void surface conductivity, electron generation rate and the inception and extinction fields. Measurements of PD activity within two spherical voids in an epoxy resin under ac sinusoidal applied voltage have also been performed. The simulation results have been compared with the measurement data to validate the model and to identify the parameters affecting PD behaviour. Comparison between measurements of PD activity within single and two voids in a dielectric material have also been made to observe the difference of the results under both conditions.

  11. Measuring Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the clustering of voids

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Yu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Tao, Charling

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the necessary methodology to optimally measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal, from voids based on galaxy redshift catalogues. To this end, we study the dependency of the BAO signal on the population of voids classified by their sizes. We find for the first time the characteristic features of the correlation function of voids including the first robust detection of BAOs in mock galaxy catalogues. These show an anti-correlation around the scale corresponding to the smallest size of voids in the sample (the void exclusion effect), and dips at both sides of the BAO peak, which can be used to determine the significance of the BAO signal without any priori model. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that there is a scale dependent bias for different populations of voids depending on the radius, with the peculiar property that the void population with the largest BAO significance corresponds to tracers with approximately zero bias on the largest scales. We further investigate the meth...

  12. Baryon effects on void statistics in the EAGLE simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Paillas, Enrique; Padilla, Nelson; Tissera, Patricia; Helly, John; Schaller, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic voids are promising tools for cosmological tests due to their sensitivity to dark energy, modified gravity and alternative cosmological scenarios. Most previous studies in the literature of void properties use cosmological N-body simulations of dark matter (DM) particles that ignore the potential effect of baryonic physics. We analyse voids in the mass and subhalo density field in the EAGLE simulations, which follow the evolution of galaxies in a Lambda cold dark matter Universe with state-of-the-art subgrid models for baryonic processes. We study the effect of baryons on void statistics by comparing results with simulations that only follow the evolution of DM, but use the same initial conditions as EAGLE. When using the mass in the simulation, we find that a DM-only simulation produces 24 per cent more voids than a hydrodynamical one, but this difference comes mainly from voids with radii smaller than 5 Mpc. We do not find significant differences in the density profiles between voids in EAGLE and its...

  13. Decolorization of reactive dark blue K-R by the synergism of fungus and bacterium using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Shi, Shengnan; Ma, Fang; Yan, Bin

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential ability of decolorizing Reactive Dark Blue K-R by the synergism of fungal strain Penicillium sp. QQ and bacterial strain Exiguobacterium sp. TL. The optimal conditions for decolorization determined by response surface methodology (RSM) were as follows: 12.5% (w/v) of both strains QQ and TL, 0.19% (w/v) of glucose, 0.09% (w/v) of yeast extract, pH7.0, 37 degrees C and 200mg/L of initial dye concentration. It was shown that about 97% of 200mg/L K-R could be decolorized within 24h under these conditions. Besides, strains QQ and TL co-cultures could decolorize 10 kinds of azo dyes effectively and be still 60% color removal when salinity increased to 15%. And most of the tested metal ions showed little influence on the decolorization except for Ni(2+). The results demonstrated that strains QQ and TL co-cultures could be useful for the practical bioremediation.

  14. Optimization of supercritical methanol reactive extraction by response surface methodology and product characterization from Jatropha curcas L. seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Steven; Lee, Keat Teong

    2013-08-01

    In this study, optimization of supercritical reactive extraction directly from Jatropha seeds in a high pressure batch reactor using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) coupled with Central Composite Rotatable Design (CCRD) was performed. Four primary variables (methanol to solid ratio (SSR), reaction temperature, time and CO2 initial pressure) were investigated under the proposed constraints. It was found that all variables had significant effects towards fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) yield. Moreover, three interaction effects between the variables also played a major role in influencing the final FAME yield. Optimum FAME yield at 92.0 wt.% was achieved under the following conditions: 5.9 SSR, 300°C, 12.3 min and 20 bar CO2. Final FAME product was discovered to fulfil existing international standard. Preliminary characterization analysis proved that the solid residue can be burnt as solid fuel in the form of biochar while the liquid product can be separated as specialty chemicals or burned as bio-oil for energy production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Involvement of oxidative stress response genes in redox homeostasis, the level of reactive oxygen species, and ageing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakulic, Tamara; Temple, Mark D; Guido, Ron; Jarolim, Stefanie; Breitenbach, Michael; Attfield, Paul V; Dawes, Ian W

    2005-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants lacking oxidative stress response genes were used to investigate which genes are required under normal aerobic conditions to maintain cellular redox homeostasis, using intracellular glutathione redox potential (glutathione E(h)) to indicate the redox environment of the cells. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potentials (MMP) were also assessed by FACS using dihydroethidium and rhodamine 123 as fluorescent probes. Cells became more oxidised as strains shifted from exponential growth to stationary phase. During both phases the presence of reduced thioredoxin and the activity of glutathione reductase were important for redox homeostasis. Thioredoxin reductase contributed less during exponential phase when there was a strong requirement for active Yap1p transcription factor, but was critical during stationary phase. The absence of ROS detoxification systems, such as catalases or superoxide dismutases, had a lesser effect on glutathione E(h), but a more pronounced effect on ROS levels and MMP. These results reflect the major shift in ROS generation as cells switch from fermentative to respiratory metabolism and also showed that there was not a strong correlation between ROS production, MMP and cellular redox environment. Heterogeneity was detected in populations of strains with compromised anti-oxidant defences, and as cells aged they shifted from one cell type with low ROS content to another with much higher intracellular ROS.

  16. A few days of social separation affects yearling horses' response to emotional reactivity tests and enhances learning performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansade, Léa; Neveux, Claire; Levy, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    Learning performance is influenced by emotional reactivity, low reactivity being generally beneficial. Previous experiments show that emotional reactivity can be modified after a period of social isolation. We hypothesized that eleven days of isolation would affect yearlings' emotional reactivity and improve their learning abilities. Twenty-five yearlings were divided into two groups: 12 were continuously isolated for 11 days (isolated) and 13 stayed together (control). During the period of isolation, all yearlings underwent two learning tasks: a habituation procedure in which a novel object was presented for 120 s every day, either when the horse was alone (isolated) or with conspecifics (control); an instrumental learning task in which the yearling had to walk forwards or backwards to obtain a food reward. At the end of the isolation period, animals performed tests to assess aspects of emotional reactivity: reactivity to novelty, to humans, to social separation, to suddenness and to sensory stimuli. Results showed that isolated yearlings habituated more to the novel object than controls and performed better in the instrumental task. Moreover, they were less reactive to novelty, to social separation and to suddenness than controls. Overall, these data suggest that the better performance of isolated yearlings could be explained by a decrease in their emotional reactivity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: insert SI title.

  17. Age-related differences in memory-encoding fMRI responses after accounting for decline in vascular reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peiying; Hebrank, Andrew C; Rodrigue, Karen M; Kennedy, Kristen M; Section, Jarren; Park, Denise C; Lu, Hanzhang

    2013-09-01

    BOLD fMRI has provided a wealth of information about the aging brain. A common finding is that posterior regions of the brain manifest an age-related decrease in activation while the anterior regions show an age-related increase. Several neurocognitive models have been proposed to interpret these findings. However, one issue that has not been sufficiently considered to date is that the BOLD signal is based on vascular responses secondary to neural activity. Thus the above findings could be in part due to a vascular change, especially in view of the expected decline of vascular health with age. In the present study, we aim to examine age-related differences in memory-encoding fMRI response in the context of vascular aging. One hundred and thirty healthy subjects ranging from 20 to 89 years old underwent a scene-viewing fMRI task and, in the same session, cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) was measured in each subject using a CO2-inhalation task. Without accounting for the influence of vascular changes, the task-activated fMRI signal showed the typical age-related decrease in visual cortex and medial temporal lobe (MTL), but manifested an increase in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). In the same individuals, an age-related CVR reduction was observed in all of these regions. We then used a previously proposed normalization approach to calculate a CVR-corrected fMRI signal, which was defined as the uncorrected signal divided by CVR. Based on the CVR-corrected fMRI signal, an age-related increase is now seen in both the left and right sides of IFG; and no brain regions showed a signal decrease with age. We additionally used a model-based approach to examine the fMRI data in the context of CVR, which again suggested an age-related change in the two frontal regions, but not in the visual and MTL regions.

  18. Mechanisms of rapid reactive oxygen species generation in response to cytosolic Ca2+ or Zn2+ loads in cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Clausen

    Full Text Available Excessive "excitotoxic" accumulation of Ca(2+ and Zn(2+ within neurons contributes to neurodegeneration in pathological conditions including ischemia. Putative early targets of these ions, both of which are linked to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, are mitochondria and the cytosolic enzyme, NADPH oxidase (NOX. The present study uses primary cortical neuronal cultures to examine respective contributions of mitochondria and NOX to ROS generation in response to Ca(2+ or Zn(2+ loading. Induction of rapid cytosolic accumulation of either Ca(2+ (via NMDA exposure or Zn(2+ (via Zn(2+/Pyrithione exposure in 0 Ca(2+ caused sharp cytosolic rises in these ions, as well as a strong and rapid increase in ROS generation. Inhibition of NOX activation significantly reduced the Ca(2+-induced ROS production with little effect on the Zn(2+- triggered ROS generation. Conversely, dissipation of the mitochondrial electrochemical gradient increased the cytosolic Ca(2+ or Zn(2+ rises caused by these exposures, consistent with inhibition of mitochondrial uptake of these ions. However, such disruption of mitochondrial function markedly suppressed the Zn(2+-triggered ROS, while partially attenuating the Ca(2+-triggered ROS. Furthermore, block of the mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter (MCU, through which Zn(2+ as well as Ca(2+ can enter the mitochondrial matrix, substantially diminished Zn(2+ triggered ROS production, suggesting that the ROS generation occurs specifically in response to Zn(2+ entry into mitochondria. Finally, in the presence of the sulfhydryl-oxidizing agent 2,2'-dithiodipyridine, which impairs Zn(2+ binding to cytosolic metalloproteins, far lower Zn(2+ exposures were able to induce mitochondrial Zn(2+ uptake and consequent ROS generation. Thus, whereas rapid acute accumulation of Zn(2+ and Ca(2+ each can trigger injurious ROS generation, Zn(2+ entry into mitochondria via the MCU may do so with particular potency. This may be of particular

  19. Decay of charge deposited on the wall of gaseous void

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1992-01-01

    After partial discharge activity within a gaseous void, charges accumulate on the wall of the void. The decay of such charges due to surface currents at the void wall is studied analytically, and the factors affecting this decay are indicated. The results show that in terms of the basic time...... constant, the decay can take a considerable amount of time. The decay rate is significantly reduced by an increase in the permittivity of the bulk medium. The dominating influence of this permittivity is likewise reflected in the increased duration and thereby prolonged inhomogeneity of the electric field...

  20. Curcumin-coordinated nanoparticles with improved stability for reactive oxygen species-responsive drug delivery in lung cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo CQ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cheng-Qiong Luo,1–3,* Lei Xing,1–3,* Peng-Fei Cui,1 Jian-Bin Qiao,1 Yu-Jing He,1 Bao-An Chen,4 Liang Jin,1,2,5 Hu-Lin Jiang1–3 1State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, 3Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Discovery for Metabolic Diseases, China Pharmaceutical University, 4Department of Hematology, The Affiliated Zhongda Hospital of Southeast University, 5School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The natural compound curcumin (Cur can regulate growth inhibition and apoptosis in various cancer cell lines, although its clinical applications are restricted by extreme water insolubility and instability. To overcome these hurdles, we fabricated a Cur-coordinated reactive oxygen species (ROS-responsive nanoparticle using the interaction between boronic acid and Cur. Materials and methods: We synthesized a highly biocompatible 4-(hydroxymethyl phenylboronic acid (HPBA-modified poly(ethylene glycol (PEG-grafted poly(acrylic acid polymer (PPH and fabricated a Cur-coordinated ROS-responsive nanoparticle (denoted by PPHC based on the interaction between boronic acid and Cur. The mean diameter of the Cur-coordinated PPHC nanoparticle was 163.8 nm and its zeta potential was –0.31 mV. The Cur-coordinated PPHC nanoparticle improved Cur stability in physiological environment and could timely release Cur in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. PPHC nanoparticles demonstrated potent antiproliferative effect in vitro in A549 cancer cells. Furthermore, the viability of cells treated with PPHC nanoparticles was significantly increased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, which blocks Cur release through ROS inhibition. Simultaneously, the ROS level measured in A549 cells after incubation with PPHC nanoparticles exhibited an obvious downregulation, which further proved that ROS

  1. Phosphate-based glass fiber vs. bulk glass: Change in fiber optical response to probe in vitro glass reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massera, J; Ahmed, I; Petit, L; Aallos, V; Hupa, L

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates the effect of fiber drawing on the thermal and structural properties as well as on the glass reactivity of a phosphate glass in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-buffered (TRIS) solution and simulated body fluid (SBF). The changes induced in the thermal properties suggest that the fiber drawing process leads to a weakening and probable re-orientation of the POP bonds. Whereas the fiber drawing did not significantly impact the release of P and Ca, an increase in the release of Na into the solution was noticed. This was probably due to small structural reorientations occurring during the fiber drawing process and to a slight diffusion of Na to the fiber surface. Both the powders from the bulk and the glass fibers formed a Ca-P surface layer when immersed in SBF and TRIS. The layer thickness was higher in the calcium and phosphate supersaturated SBF than in TRIS. This paper for the first time presents the in vitro reactivity and optical response of a phosphate-based bioactive glass (PBG) fiber when immersed in SBF. The light intensity remained constant for the first 48h after which a decrease with three distinct slopes was observed: the first decrease between 48 and 200h of immersion could be correlated to the formation of the Ca-P layer at the fiber surface. After this a faster decrease in light transmission was observed from 200 to ~425h in SBF. SEM analysis suggested that after 200h, the surface of the fiber was fully covered by a thin Ca-P layer which is likely to scatter light. For immersion times longer than ~425h, the thickness of the Ca-P layer increased and thus acted as a barrier to the dissolution process limiting further reduction in light transmission. The tracking of light transmission through the PBG fiber allowed monitoring of the fiber dissolution in vitro. These results are essential in developing new bioactive fiber sensors that can be used to monitor bioresponse in situ.

  2. Effects of voids on thermal-mechanical reliability of lead-free solder joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benabou Lahouari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Reliability of electronic packages has become a major issue, particularly in systems used in electrical or hybrid cars where severe operating conditions must be met. Many studies have shown that solder interconnects are critical elements since many failure mechanisms originate from their typical response under thermal cycles. In this study, effects of voids in solder interconnects on the electronic assembly lifetime are estimated based on finite element simulations.

  3. A variational void coalescence model for ductile metals

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiq, Amir

    2011-08-17

    We present a variational void coalescence model that includes all the essential ingredients of failure in ductile porous metals. The model is an extension of the variational void growth model by Weinberg et al. (Comput Mech 37:142-152, 2006). The extended model contains all the deformation phases in ductile porous materials, i.e. elastic deformation, plastic deformation including deviatoric and volumetric (void growth) plasticity followed by damage initiation and evolution due to void coalescence. Parametric studies have been performed to assess the model\\'s dependence on the different input parameters. The model is then validated against uniaxial loading experiments for different materials. We finally show the model\\'s ability to predict the damage mechanisms and fracture surface profile of a notched round bar under tension as observed in experiments. © Springer-Verlag 2011.

  4. Void formation in ODS EUROFER produced by hot isostatic pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Y. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain)], E-mail: yanicet@fis.ucm.es; Monge, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Castro, V. de [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Munoz, A.; Leguey, T.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2009-04-30

    Positron annihilation experiments were performed on oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and non-ODS EUROFER prepared by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing. The results revealed the presence of small voids in these materials in the as-HIPed conditions. Their evolution under isochronal annealing experiments was investigated. The coincidence Doppler broadening spectra of ODS EUROFER exhibited a characteristic signature attributed to positron annihilation in Ar-decorated voids at the oxide particle/matrix interfaces. The variation of the positron annihilation parameters with the annealing temperature showed three stages: up to 623 K, between 823 and 1323 K, and above 1323 K. In the temperature range 823-1323 K void coarsening had effect. Above 1323 K some voids annealed out, but others, associated to oxide particles and small precipitates, survived to annealing at 1523 K. Transmission electron microscopy observations were also performed to verify the characteristics of the surviving defects after annealing at 1523 K.

  5. Evolution of shock through a void in foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Smidt, J. M.; Murphy, T. J.; Douglass, M. R.; Devolder, B. G.; Fincke, J. R.; Schmidt, D. W.; Cardenas, T.; Newman, S. G.; Hamilton, C. E.; Sedillo, T. J.; Los Alamos, NM 87544 Team

    2016-10-01

    Marble implosion is an experimental campaign intended to study the effects of heterogeneous mix on fusion burn. A spherical capsule is composed of deuterated plastic foam of controlled pore (or void) size with tritium fill in pores. As capsule implosion evolves, the initially separated deuterium and tritium will mix, producing DT yields. Void evolution during implosion is of interest for the Marble campaign. A shock tube, driven by the laser at Omega, was designed to study the evolution of a shock through a foam-filled ``void'' and subsequent void evolution. Targets were comprised of a 100 mg/cc CH foam tube containing a 200-µm diameter, lower density doped foam sphere. High-quality, radiographic images were obtained from both 2% iodine-doped in plastic foam and 15% tin-doped in aerogel foam. These experiments will be used to inform simulations.

  6. Towards a better understanding of dielectric barrier discharges in ferroelectrets: Paschen breakdown fields in micrometer sized voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Scott; Mellinger, Axel

    2014-04-01

    Charged cellular polypropylene foams (i.e., ferro- or piezoelectrets) demonstrate high piezoelectric activity upon being electrically charged. When an external electric field is applied, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) occur, resulting in a separation of charges which are subsequently deposited on dielectric surfaces of internal micrometer sized voids. This deposited space charge is responsible for the piezoelectric activity of the material. Previous studies have indicated charging fields larger than predicted by Townsend's model of Paschen breakdown applied to a multilayered electromechanical model; a discrepancy which prompted the present study. The actual breakdown fields for micrometer sized voids were determined by constructing single cell voids using polypropylene spacers with heights ranging from 8 to 75 μm, "sandwiched" between two polypropylene dielectric barriers and glass slides with semi-transparent electrodes. Subsequently, a bipolar triangular charging waveform with a peak voltage of 6 kV was applied to the samples. The breakdown fields were determined by monitoring the emission of light due to the onset of DBDs using an electron multiplying CCD camera. The breakdown fields at absolute pressures from 101 to 251 kPa were found to be in good agreement with the standard Paschen curves. Additionally, the magnitude of the light emission was found to scale linearly with the amount of gas, i.e., the height of the voids. Emissions were homogeneous over the observed regions of the voids for voids with heights of 25 μm or less and increasingly inhomogeneous for void heights greater than 40 μm at high electric fields.

  7. Uroflowmetry in neurologically normal children with voiding disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K M; Nielsen, K.K.; Kristensen, E S

    1985-01-01

    of neurological deficits underwent a complete diagnostic program including intravenous urography, voiding cystography and cystoscopy as well as spontaneous uroflowmetry, cystometry-emg and pressure-flow-emg study. The incidence of dyssynergia was 22%. However, neither the flow curve pattern nor single flow...... variables were able to identify children with dyssynergia. Consequently uroflowmetry seems inefficient in the screening for dyssynergia in neurological normal children with voiding disorders in the absence of anatomical bladder outlet obstruction....

  8. Low and High Surface Brightness Galaxies at Void Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Ceccarelli, L; Lambas, D G; Galaz, G; Padilla, N D

    2012-01-01

    We study the relative fraction of low and high surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs and HSBGs) at void walls in the SDSS DR7. We focus on galaxies in equal local density environments. We assume that the host dark-matter halo mass (for which we use SDSS group masses) is a good indicator of local density. This analysis allows to examine the behavior of the abundance of LSBG and HSBG galaxies at a fixed local density and distinguish the large-scale environment defined by the void geometry. We compare galaxies in the field, and in the void walls; the latter are defined as the volume of void shells of radius equal to that of the void. We find a significant decrement, a factor $\\sim 4$, of the relative fraction of blue, active star-forming LSBGs in equal mass groups at the void walls and the field. This decrement is consistent with an increase of the fraction of blue, active star-forming HSBGs. By contrast, red LSBGs and HSBGs show negligible changes. We argue that these results are consistent with a scenario where L...

  9. The Effect of Nearby Voids on Galaxy Number Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Bucklein, Brian K; Hintz, Eric G

    2016-01-01

    The size, shape and degree of emptiness of void interiors sheds light on the details of galaxy formation. A particularly interesting question is whether void interiors are completely empty or contain a dwarf population. However the nearby voids that are most conducive for dwarf searches have large angular diameters, on the order of a steradian, making it difficult to redshift-map a statistically significant portion of their volume to the magnitude limit of dwarf galaxies. As part of addressing this problem, we investigate here the usefulness of number counts in establishing the best locations to search inside nearby (d < 300 Mpc) galaxy voids, utilizing Wolf plots of log(n < m) vs. m as the basic diagnostic. To illustrate expected signatures, we consider the signature of three void profiles, "cut out", "built up", and "universal profile" carved into Monte-Carlo Schechter function models. We then investigate the signatures of voids in the Millennium Run dark matter simulation and the Sloan Digital Sky Su...

  10. ACK filling void first algorithm and performance for asynchronous OPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanlin; Shi, Yonghe; Chen, Qianbin; Pan, Yingjun

    2007-11-01

    OPS with feedback shared FDL buffer produce large voids due to FDL buffers only supplying discrete step delay and causing FDL queue virtually occupation. By analyzing the TCP traffic and ACK packets feature, the ACK packet void filling first scheduling is presented to decrease packet loss rate and to reduce the FDL voids. When the FDL buffer void size is fit for the ACK packet, the ACK packet is scheduled to FDL immediately. An ACK and non-ACK packets difference and process flow is designed according the TCP packet frame structure. Compared with the conventional FIFO scheduling and smallest FDL void first scheduling, the algorithm reduces greatly the number of ACK occupying the FDL buffer and eliminates large numbers of ACK's bad influence on efficiency of IP data transmission under different FDL buffer depth and traffic load. The results of simulation show that the proposed scheduling makes use of ACK packets first void filling scheduling mechanism to reduce FDL excess load, increases output utilization and reduce packet loss ratio for asynchronous optical network. This approach is shown to minimize the FDL numbers with the feature of high stabilization and photonic integration and to improve real time TCP traffic performance for Internet network.

  11. Reactive oxygen species (ROS and response of antioxidants as ROS-scavengers during environmental stress in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik eDas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS were initially recognized as toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism. In recent years, it has become apparent that ROS plays an important signaling role in plants, controlling processes such as growth, development and especially response to biotic and abiotic environmental stimuli. The major members of the ROS family include free radicals like O2● −, OH● and non-radicals like H2O2 and 1O2. The ROS production in plants is mainly localized in the chloroplast, mitochondria and peroxisomes. There are secondary sites as well like the endoplasmic reticulum, cell membrane, cell wall and the apoplast. The role of the ROS family is that of a double edged sword; while they act as secondary messengers in various key physiological phenomena, they also induce oxidative damages under several environmental stress conditions like salinity, drought, cold, heavy metals, UV irradiation etc., when the delicate balance between ROS production and elimination, necessary for normal cellular homeostasis, is disturbed. The cellular damages are manifested in the form of degradation of biomolecules like pigments, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and DNA, which ultimately amalgamate in plant cellular death. To ensure survival, plants have developed efficient antioxidant machinery having two arms, (i enzymatic components like superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, glutathione reductase (GR, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR; (ii non-enzymatic antioxidants like ascorbic acid (AA, reduced glutathione (GSH, α-tocopherol, carotenoids, flavonoids and the osmolyte proline. These two components work hand in hand to scavenge ROS. In this review, we emphasize on the different types of ROS, their cellular production sites, their targets, and their scavenging mechanism mediated by both the branches of the antioxidant systems, highlighting the potential

  12. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, P. S. J.; Berkemeier, T.; Tong, H.; Arangio, A. M.; Lucas, K.; Poeschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.

    2016-12-01

    The inhalation of air pollutants such as O3 and particulate matter can lead to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can cause damage to biosurfaces such as the lung epithelium unless they are effectively scavenged. Although the chemical processes that lead to ROS formation within the ELF upon inhalation of pollutants are well understood qualitatively, ROS concentrations within the ELF have hardly been quantified so far. The kinetic multi-layer model of surface and bulk chemistry in the epithelial lining fluid (KM-SUB-ELF) has been developed to describe chemical reactions and mass transport and to quantify ROS production rates and concentrations within the epithelial lining fluid. KM-SUB-ELF simulations suggest that O3 will rapidly saturate the ELF whereas antioxidants and surfactant species are effective scavengers of OH. High ambient concentrations of O3 can lead to the depletion of surfactants and antioxidants within the ELF, potentially leading to oxidative stress. KM-SUB-ELF reproduced measurements for the formation of H2O2 and OH due to the presence of iron, copper and quinones in surrogate lung lining fluid. This enabled ROS production rates and concentrations in the ELF to be quantified. We found that in polluted megacities the ROS concentration in the ELF due to inhalation of pollutants was at least as high as the concentrations in the ELF of patients suffering from respiratory diseases. Cu and Fe are found to be the most important redox-active aerosol components for ROS production upon inhalation of PM2.5 in polluted regions. Therefore, a reduction in the emission of Cu and Fe should be major targets of air pollution control. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air.

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species Response to Exercise Training and Weight Loss in Sedentary Overweight and Obese Female Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Vittorio E; Ribisl, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in cardiovascular disease and in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and its complications, and it has been shown to increase insulin resistance. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of aerobic exercise training and weight loss on ROS in overweight and obese patients as applied in a community clinical setting. Fifty healthy female clinic patients (M ± SEM: age, 41.0 ± 1.8 years; body mass index, 28.2 ± 0.8 kg/m2), free of cardiovascular events and not on drug therapy were evaluated before and after 3 months of dietary restriction (∼150 to 300 kcal/day deficit) and aerobic training (3 days/week for 1 hour at ∼75% VO2max). Measures included ROS, maximal power (kg/min) on cycle ergometry, postexercise heart rate recovery responses at 1 and 2 minutes, and selected anthropometric and hematologic variables. Significant (P training and weight loss in body weight in kilograms (-7.1%); maximal power in kg/min (+32.6%), ROS in U.CARR (Carratelli units) (-25.7%); and heart rate recovery 1 minute in beats per minute (-37.6%) following the program. Significant improvements were also noted in other anthropometric, cardiovascular, and hematologic measures. A 12-week program of nutritional and exercise intervention in overweight/obese sedentary women improves levels of oxidative stress when accompanied by weight loss and improved fitness. More than restricted caloric intake, physical activity at a relatively high intensity was effective in improving cardiovascular risk markers. The reduction in ROS may be an additional mechanism by which physical activity may contribute to preventing metabolic syndrome and subsequent atherosclerotic disease.

  14. Biochemical analysis of reactive oxygen species production and antioxidative responses in unripe avocado (Persea americana Mill var Hass) fruits in response to wounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Mercado, E; Martinez-Diaz, Y; Roman-Tehandon, N; Garcia-Pineda, E

    2009-03-01

    We analyzed the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and of detoxifying enzymes and enzymes of the ascorbate (ASC) acid cycle in avocado fruit (Pesea Americana Mill cv Hass) in response to wounding. The levels of superoxide anion (O(2-), hydroxyl radicals (OH.) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) increased at 15 min and 2 and 15 h post-wounding. Peroxidase (POD) activity had increased to high levels 24 h after wounding; in contrast, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels hat decreased significantly at 24 h post-treatment. Basic POD was the major POD form induced, and the levels of at least three apoplastic POD isozymes -increased following wounding. Using specific inhibitors, we characterized one MnSOD and two CuZnSOD isozymes. CuZnSOD activities decreased notably 12 h after treatment. The activities of dehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase increased dramatically following the wounding treatment, possibly as a means to compensate for the redox changes due to ROS production.

  15. Regulation of type I interferon responses by mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species in plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agod, Zsofia; Fekete, Tünde; Budai, Marietta M; Varga, Aliz; Szabo, Attila; Moon, Hyelim; Boldogh, Istvan; Biro, Tamas; Lanyi, Arpad; Bacsi, Attila; Pazmandi, Kitti

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generated continuously under physiological conditions have recently emerged as critical players in the regulation of immune signaling pathways. In this study we have investigated the regulation of antiviral signaling by increased mtROS production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), which, as major producers of type I interferons (IFN), are the key coordinators of antiviral immunity. The early phase of type I IFN production in pDCs is mediated by endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs), whereas the late phase of IFN response can also be triggered by cytosolic retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I), expression of which is induced upon TLR stimulation. Therefore, pDCs provide an ideal model to study the impact of elevated mtROS on the antiviral signaling pathways initiated by receptors with distinct subcellular localization. We found that elevated level of mtROS alone did not change the phenotype and the baseline cytokine profile of resting pDCs. Nevertheless increased mtROS levels in pDCs lowered the TLR9-induced secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators slightly, whereas reduced type I IFN production markedly via blocking phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), the key transcription factor of the TLR9 signaling pathway. The TLR9-induced expression of RIG-I in pDCs was also negatively regulated by enhanced mtROS production. On the contrary, elevated mtROS significantly augmented the RIG-I-stimulated expression of type I IFNs, as well as the expression of mitochondrial antiviral-signaling (MAVS) protein and the phosphorylation of Akt and IRF3 that are essential components of RIG-I signaling. Collectively, our data suggest that increased mtROS exert diverse immunoregulatory functions in pDCs both in the early and late phase of type I IFN responses depending on which type of viral sensing pathway is stimulated. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of void size and gas content on electrical breakdown in lightweight, mechanically compliant, void-filled dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. A.; Lagasse, R. R.; Russick, E. M.; Schroeder, J. L.

    2002-03-01

    Dielectric potting materials (encapsulants) are used to prevent air breakdown in high-voltage electrical devices. We report breakdown strengths in void-filled encapsulants, stressed with unipolar voltage pulses of the order of 10 μs duration. High strengths, on the order of 100 kV mm-1, are measured under these test conditions. The materials studied include low-density open celled gel-derived foams with cell sizes of 4 μm or less, closed celled CO2-blown polystyrene and urethane foams, and epoxies containing 48 vol % of hollow glass microballoon (GMB) fillers. These last specimens varied the void gas (N2 or SO2) and also the void diameters (tens to hundreds of μm). Our measurements are thought to be directly sensitive to the rate of field-induced ionization events in the void gas; however, the breakdown strengths of the materials tested appeared to vary in direct proportion with the conventional Paschen-law gas-discharge inception threshold, the electric stress at which gas-ionization avalanches become possible. The GMB-epoxy specimens displayed this type of dependence of breakdown strength on the void-gas density and void size, but the measurements were an order of magnitude above the conventional predictions. Small-celled foams also showed increased breakdown strengths with decreased cell size, although their irregular void geometry prevented a direct comparison with the more uniformly structured microballoon-filled encapsulants. The experimental observations are consistent with a breakdown mechanism in which the discharge of a few voids can launch a full breakdown in the composite material.

  17. Dynamic behavior of nano-voids in magnesium under hydrostatic tensile stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponga, Mauricio; Ramabathiran, Amuthan A.; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Ortiz, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the mechanisms responsible for nano-void growth in single crystal magnesium under dynamic hydrostatic tensile stress. A key conclusion derived from our study is that there is no secondary strain hardening near the nano-void. This behavior, which is in remarkable contrast to face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic materials, greatly limits the peak stress and explains the relatively lower spall strength of magnesium. The lack of secondary strain hardening is due to the fact that pyramidal dislocations do not interact with basal or prismatic dislocations. Our analysis also shows that for loads applied at moderate strain rates (\\overset{\\centerdot}{ɛ} ≤slant {{10}6} s-1) the peak stress, dislocation velocity and temperature distribution converge asymptotically. However at very high strain rates (\\overset{\\centerdot}{ɛ} ≥slant {{10}8} s-1), there is a sharp transition in these quantities.

  18. Determination of the equivalent intergranular void ratio - Application to the instability and the critical state of silty sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung-Kien; Benahmed, Nadia; Hicher, Pierre-Yves

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of mechanical response of natural Camargue silty sand. The analysis of test results used the equivalent intergranular void ratio instead of the global void ratio. The calculation of equivalent intergranular void ratio requires the determination of parameter b which represents, physically, the fraction of active fines participating on the chain forces network, hence the strength of the soil. A new formula for determining the parameter b by using an approach based on the coordination number distribution and probability calculation is proposed. The validation of the developed relationship was done through back-analysis of published datasets in literature on the effect of fines content on silty sand behavior. It is shown that the equivalent intergranular void ratio calculated with the b value obtained by the new formula is able to provide strong correlation to not only the critical state of but also the onset of instability of various silty sands, in different terms as peak deviator stress, peak stress ratio or cyclic resistance. Therefore, it is suggested that the use of the equivalent void ratio concept and the new b calculating formula is highly desirable in predicting of the silty sand behavior.

  19. Determination of the equivalent intergranular void ratio - Application to the instability and the critical state of silty sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Trung-Kien

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of mechanical response of natural Camargue silty sand. The analysis of test results used the equivalent intergranular void ratio instead of the global void ratio. The calculation of equivalent intergranular void ratio requires the determination of parameter b which represents, physically, the fraction of active fines participating on the chain forces network, hence the strength of the soil. A new formula for determining the parameter b by using an approach based on the coordination number distribution and probability calculation is proposed. The validation of the developed relationship was done through back-analysis of published datasets in literature on the effect of fines content on silty sand behavior. It is shown that the equivalent intergranular void ratio calculated with the b value obtained by the new formula is able to provide strong correlation to not only the critical state of but also the onset of instability of various silty sands, in different terms as peak deviator stress, peak stress ratio or cyclic resistance. Therefore, it is suggested that the use of the equivalent void ratio concept and the new b calculating formula is highly desirable in predicting of the silty sand behavior.

  20. Isolation and control of voids and void-hillocks during molecular beam epitaxial growth of HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, D.; Aqariden, F.; Frazier, J.; Gutzler, S.; Orent, T.; Shih, H. D.

    2000-06-01

    Formation of small voids and defect complexes involving small voids during the molecular beam epitaxial growth of mercury cadmium telluride on cadmium zinc telluride was investigated. Some of these defects were demonstrated to form away from the substrate-epi interface. Other defects were demonstrated to close before reaching the top surface without leaving any perturbations on the surface, thus remaining completely hidden. The voids, which formed away from the substrate-epifilm fixed interface, nucleated on defects introduced into the film already grown, leading to the formation of defect complexes, unlike the voids which nucleated at the substrate-epifilm fixed interface. These defect complexes are decorated with high density dislocation nests. The voids which closed before reaching the film surface usually also nucleated slightly away from the film-substrate interface, continued to replicate for a while as the growth progressed, but then relatively rapidly closed off at a significant depth from the film surface. These voids also appeared to form defect complexes with other kinds of defects. Correlations between these materials defects and performance of individual vertically integrated photodiode (VIP) devices were demonstrated, where the relative location of these defects with respect to the junction boundary appears to be particularly important. Elimination or reduction of fluctuations in relative flux magnitudes or substrate temperature, more likely during multi-composition layer growth, yielded films with significantly lower defect concentrations.

  1. Broadly cross-reactive antibodies dominate the human B cell response against 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza pandemic demonstrated the global health threat of reassortant influenza strains. Herein, we report a detailed analysis of plasmablast and monoclonal antibody responses induced by pandemic H1N1 infection in humans. Unlike antibodies elicited by annual influenza vaccinations, most neutralizing antibodies induced by pandemic H1N1 infection were broadly cross-reactive against epitopes in the hemagglutinin (HA) stalk and head domain of multiple influenza strains. T...

  2. Breaking the vicious circle: Onabotulinum toxin A in children with therapy-refractory dysfunctional voiding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. 't Hoen (Lisette); J. van den Hoek (Joop); K.P. Wolffenbuttel (Katja); F. van der Toorn; J.R. Scheepe (Jeroen)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction An increased activity of the external urethral sphincter or pelvic floor muscles during voluntary voiding leads to dysfunctional voiding. Frequently reported symptoms are urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections and high post-void residuals. Dysfunctional voiding is a

  3. Size-effects at a crack-tip interacting with a number of voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2008-01-01

    of the characteristic material length relative to the initial void radius. For a case showing the multiple void mechanism, it is found that the effect of the material length can change the behaviour towards the void by void mechanism. A material model with three characteristic length scales is compared with a one...

  4. A study of process induced voids in resistance welding of thermoplastic composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, H.; Fernandez Villegas, I.; Bersee, H.E.N.

    2015-01-01

    Void formation in resistance welding of woven fabric reinforced thermoplastic composites was investigated. Void contents were measured using optical microscopy and digital image process. Un-even void distributions were observed in the joints, and more voids were found in the middle of the joints tha

  5. Irradiation creep relaxation of void swelling-driven stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, M.M., E-mail: hallmm63@comcast.net [MacRay Consulting, 1366 Hillsdale Drive, Monroeville, PA (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Irradiation void swelling can cause distortion of reactor core components. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Constrained swelling can drive stresses beyond acceptable levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compressive stresses decrease irradiation swelling rates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Irradiation creep relaxes swelling-driven stresses and core restraint forces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swelling-driven creep stresses are consistent with predictions of a proposed model. - Abstract: Swelling-driven-creep test specimens are used to measure the compressive stresses that develop due to constraint of irradiation void swelling. These specimens use a previously non-irradiated 20% CW Type 316 stainless steel holder to axially restrain two Type 304 stainless steel tubular specimens that were previously irradiated in the US Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) at 490 Degree-Sign C. One specimen was previously irradiated to fluence levels in the void nucleation regime (9 dpa) and the other in the quasi-steady void growth regime (28 dpa). A lift-off compliance measurement technique was used post-irradiation to determine compressive stresses developed during reirradiation of the two specimen assemblies in Row 7 of EBR-II at temperatures of 547 Degree-Sign C and 504 Degree-Sign C, respectively, to additional damage levels each of about 5 dpa. Results obtained on the higher fluence swelling-driven-creep specimen show that compressive stress due to constraint of swelling retards void swelling to a degree that is consistent with active load uniaxial compression specimens that were irradiated as part of a previously reported multiaxial in-reactor creep experiment. Swelling results obtained on the lower fluence swelling-driven creep specimen show a much larger effect of compressive stress in reducing swelling, demonstrating that the larger effect of stress on swelling is on void nucleation as compared to void growth. Test results are

  6. Response surface optimization of electro-oxidation process for the treatment of C.I. Reactive Yellow 186 dye: reaction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, K.; Muthukumar, M.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, central composite design at five levels (-β, -1, 0, +1, +β) combined with response surface methodology has been applied to optimize C.I. Reactive Yellow 186 using electro-oxidation process with graphite electrodes in a batch reactor. The variables considered were the pH (X 1), NaCl concentration (M) (X 2), and electrolysis time (min) (X 3) on C.I. Reactive Yellow 186 were studied. A second-order empirical relationship between the response and independent variables was derived. Analysis of variance showed a high coefficient of determination value (R 2 = 0.9556 and 0.9416 for color and COD, respectively). The optimized condition of the electro-oxidation of Reactive Yellow 186 is as follows: pH 3.9; NaCl concentration 0.11 M; and electrolysis time 18 min. Under this condition, the maximal decolorization efficiency of 99 % and COD removal 73 % was achieved. Detailed physico-chemical analysis of electrode and residues of the electro-oxidation process has also been carried out UV-Visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The intermediate compounds formed during the oxidation were identified using a gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. According to these results, response surface methodology could be useful for reducing the time to treat effluent wastewater.

  7. Response surface optimization of electro-oxidation process for the treatment of C.I. Reactive Yellow 186 dye: reaction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, K.; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-05-01

    In this study, central composite design at five levels (- β, -1, 0, +1, + β) combined with response surface methodology has been applied to optimize C.I. Reactive Yellow 186 using electro-oxidation process with graphite electrodes in a batch reactor. The variables considered were the pH ( X 1), NaCl concentration (M) ( X 2), and electrolysis time (min) ( X 3) on C.I. Reactive Yellow 186 were studied. A second-order empirical relationship between the response and independent variables was derived. Analysis of variance showed a high coefficient of determination value ( R 2 = 0.9556 and 0.9416 for color and COD, respectively). The optimized condition of the electro-oxidation of Reactive Yellow 186 is as follows: pH 3.9; NaCl concentration 0.11 M; and electrolysis time 18 min. Under this condition, the maximal decolorization efficiency of 99 % and COD removal 73 % was achieved. Detailed physico-chemical analysis of electrode and residues of the electro-oxidation process has also been carried out UV-Visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The intermediate compounds formed during the oxidation were identified using a gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. According to these results, response surface methodology could be useful for reducing the time to treat effluent wastewater.

  8. Identification of a cross-reactive HLA-DRB1*0301-restricted CD4 T cell response directed against cholesterol-binding cytolysins from two different pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschen, Annette; Song, Mingxia; Schenk, Simone; Janda, Jozef; Nguyen, Xuan Duc; Osen, Wolfram; Schadendorf, Dirk; Geginat, Gernot

    2006-07-01

    Cholesterol-binding cytolysins constitute an evolutionarily conserved family of pore-forming proteins expressed by different gram-positive pathogens. Listeriolysin O, one well-characterized member of the cytolysin family, is also known to induce specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses upon infection of mice with Listeria monocytogenes. Here we describe an HLA-DRB1*0301-restricted listeriolysin O-derived T cell epitope that is conserved among several members of the cytolysin family. An HLA-DRB1*0301-restricted CD4+ T cell line, established from spleen lymphocytes of L. monocytogenes-infected HLA-DRB1*0301-transgenic mice, cross-reacted with a homologous peptide from perfringolysin O, a cytolysin expressed by Clostridium perfringens. Ex vivo analysis of infected mice revealed an even broader cross-reaction of T cells with homologous peptides derived from perfringolysin O, streptolysin O, and cereolysin O. Interestingly, a cross-reactive memory CD4+ T cell response against the homologous peptides derived from listeriolysin O and perfringolysin O could also be detected in the blood from healthy HLA-DRB1*0301+ human donors. Remarkably, this response was even present in donors who did not exhibit a memory T cell reactivity against a second, non-conserved HLA-DRB1*0301-restricted LLO-derived CD4 T cell epitope, suggesting that cytolysin-producing bacteria other than L. monocytogenes can stimulate a cross-reactive cytolysin-specific immunity.

  9. Cause Analysis on the Void under Slabs of Cement Concrete Pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Zhu, Guo Xin; Baozhu

    2017-06-01

    This paper made a systematic analysis on the influence of the construction, environment, water and loads on the void beneath road slabs, and also introduced the formation process of structural void and pumping void, and summarizes the deep reasons for the bottom of the cement concrete pavement. Based on the analysis above, this paper has found out the evolution law of the void under slabs which claimed that the void usually appeared in the slab corners and then the cross joint, resulting void in the four sides with the void area under the front slab larger than the rear one.

  10. THE INSTABILITY OF THE DIFFUSION-CONTROLLED GRAIN-BOUNDARY VOID IN STRESSED SOLID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华; 李中华

    2003-01-01

    As atoms migrate along a void surface and grain-boundary, driven by various thermodynamic forces, the grain-boundary void changes its shape and volume. When the void changes its configuration, the free energy of the system also changes. In this article, the free energy is calculated for an evolving grain-boundary void filled with gas in a stressed solid. Then the instability conditions and the equilibrium shape of the void are determined as a function of the grain-boundary and surface energies, the void volume, the externally applied stresses, as well as the internal pressure built up by the gas filled in the void.

  11. Autonomous robot for detecting subsurface voids and tunnels using microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stacy S.; Crawford, Nicholas C.; Croft, Leigh Ann; Howard, Michael; Miller, Stephen; Rippy, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    Tunnels have been used to evade security of defensive positions both during times of war and peace for hundreds of years. Tunnels are presently being built under the Mexican Border by drug smugglers and possibly terrorists. Several have been discovered at the border crossing at Nogales near Tucson, Arizona, along with others at other border towns. During this war on terror, tunnels under the Mexican Border pose a significant threat for the security of the United States. It is also possible that terrorists will attempt to tunnel under strategic buildings and possibly discharge explosives. The Center for Cave and Karst Study (CCKS) at Western Kentucky University has a long and successful history of determining the location of caves and subsurface voids using microgravity technology. Currently, the CCKS is developing a remotely controlled robot which will be used to locate voids underground. The robot will be a remotely controlled vehicle that will use microgravity and GPS to accurately detect and measure voids below the surface. It is hoped that this robot will also be used in military applications to locate other types of voids underground such as tunnels and bunkers. It is anticipated that the robot will be able to function up to a mile from the operator. This paper will describe the construction of the robot and the use of microgravity technology to locate subsurface voids with the robot.

  12. The Aspen--Amsterdam Void Finder Comparison Project

    CERN Document Server

    Colberg, Joerg M; Foster, Caroline; Platen, Erwin; Brunino, Riccardo; Neyrinck, Mark; Basilakos, Spyros; Fairall, Anthony; Feldman, Hume; Gottloeber, Stefan; Hahn, Oliver; Hoyle, Fiona; Mueller, Volker; Nelson, Lorne; Plionis, Manolis; Porciaini, Cristiano; Shandarin, Sergei; Vogeley, Michael S; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2008-01-01

    Despite a history that dates back at least a quarter of a century studies of voids in the large--scale structure of the Universe are bedevilled by a major problem: there exist a large number of quite different void--finding algorithms, a fact that has so far got in the way of groups comparing their results without worrying about whether such a comparison in fact makes sense. Because of the recent increased interest in voids, both in very large galaxy surveys and in detailed simulations of cosmic structure formation, this situation is very unfortunate. We here present the first systematic comparison study of thirteen different void finders constructed using particles, haloes, and semi--analytical model galaxies extracted from a subvolume of the Millennium simulation. The study includes many groups that have studied voids over the past decade. We show their results and discuss their differences and agreements. As it turns out, the basic results of the various methods agree very well with each other in that they...

  13. 3D Property Modeling of Void Ratio by Cokriging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Lingqing; Pan Mao; Cheng Qiuming

    2008-01-01

    Void ratio measures compactness of ground soil in geotechnical engineering. When samples are collected in certain area for mapping void ratios, other relevant types of properties such as water content may be also analyzed. To map the spatial distribution of void ratio in the area based on these types of point, observation data interpolation is often needed. Owing to the variance of sampling density along the horizontal and vertical directions, special consideration is required to handle anisotropy of estimator. 3D property modeling aims at predicting the overall distribution of property values from limited samples, and geostatistical method can he employed naturally here because they help to minimize the mean square error of estimation. To construct 3D property model of void ratio, cokriging was used considering its mutual correlation with water content, which is another important soil parameter. Moreover, K-D tree was adopted to organize the samples to accelerate neighbor query in 3D space during the above modeling process. At last, spatial configuration of void ratio distribution in an engineering body was modeled through 3D visualization, which provides important information for civil engineering purpose.

  14. Only the Lonely: H I Imaging of Void Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kreckel, K; Aragón-Calvo, M A; van Gorkom, J H; van de Weygaert, R; van der Hulst, J M; Kovač, K; Yip, C -W; Peebles, P J E

    2010-01-01

    Void galaxies, residing within the deepest underdensities of the Cosmic Web, present an ideal population for the study of galaxy formation and evolution in an environment undisturbed by the complex processes modifying galaxies in clusters and groups, as well as provide an observational test for theories of cosmological structure formation. We have completed a pilot survey for the HI imaging aspects of a new Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), imaging 15 void galaxies in HI in local (d < 100 Mpc) voids. HI masses range from 3.5 x 10^8 to 3.8 x 10^9 M_sun, with one nondetection with an upper limit of 2.1 x 10^8 M_sun. Our galaxies were selected using a structural and geometric technique to produce a sample that is purely environmentally selected and uniformly represents the void galaxy population. In addition, we use a powerful new backend of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope that allows us to probe a large volume around each targeted galaxy, simultaneously providing an environmentally constrained sample of for...

  15. Electromigration of intergranular voids in metal films for microelectronic interconnects

    CERN Document Server

    Averbuch, A; Ravve, I

    2003-01-01

    Voids and cracks often occur in the interconnect lines of microelectronic devices. They increase the resistance of the circuits and may even lead to a fatal failure. Voids may occur inside a single grain, but often they appear on the boundary between two grains. In this work, we model and analyze numerically the migration and evolution of an intergranular void subjected to surface diffusion forces and external voltage applied to the interconnect. The grain-void interface is considered one-dimensional, and the physical formulation of the electromigration and diffusion model results in two coupled fourth-order one-dimensional time-dependent PDEs. The boundary conditions are specified at the triple points, which are common to both neighboring grains and the void. The solution of these equations uses a finite difference scheme in space and a Runge-Kutta integration scheme in time, and is also coupled to the solution of a static Laplace equation describing the voltage distribution throughout the grain. Since the v...

  16. Constraints on Cosmology and Gravity from the Dynamics of Voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Pisani, Alice; Sutter, P. M.; Lavaux, Guilhem; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Weller, Jochen

    2016-08-01

    The Universe is mostly composed of large and relatively empty domains known as cosmic voids, whereas its matter content is predominantly distributed along their boundaries. The remaining material inside them, either dark or luminous matter, is attracted to these boundaries and causes voids to expand faster and to grow emptier over time. Using the distribution of galaxies centered on voids identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and adopting minimal assumptions on the statistical motion of these galaxies, we constrain the average matter content Ωm=0.281 ±0.031 in the Universe today, as well as the linear growth rate of structure f /b =0.417 ±0.089 at median redshift z ¯=0.57 , where b is the galaxy bias (68% C.L.). These values originate from a percent-level measurement of the anisotropic distortion in the void-galaxy cross-correlation function, ɛ =1.003 ±0.012 , and are robust to consistency tests with bootstraps of the data and simulated mock catalogs within an additional systematic uncertainty of half that size. They surpass (and are complementary to) existing constraints by unlocking cosmological information on smaller scales through an accurate model of nonlinear clustering and dynamics in void environments. As such, our analysis furnishes a powerful probe of deviations from Einstein's general relativity in the low-density regime which has largely remained untested so far. We find no evidence for such deviations in the data at hand.

  17. Magnetic pattern at supergranulation scale: the Void Size Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Berrilli, Francesco; Del Moro, Dario

    2014-01-01

    The large-scale magnetic pattern of the quiet sun is dominated by the magnetic network. This network, created by photospheric magnetic fields swept into convective downflows, delineates the boundaries of large scale cells of overturning plasma and exhibits voids in magnetic organization. Such voids include internetwork fields, a mixed-polarity sparse field that populate the inner part of network cells. To single out voids and to quantify their intrinsic pattern a fast circle packing based algorithm is applied to 511 SOHO/MDI high resolution magnetograms acquired during the outstanding solar activity minimum between 23 and 24 cycles. The computed Void Distribution Function shows a quasi-exponential decay behavior in the range 10-60 Mm. The lack of distinct flow scales in such a range corroborates the hypothesis of multi-scale motion flows at the solar surface. In addition to the quasi-exponential decay we have found that the voids reveal departure from a simple exponential decay around 35 Mm.

  18. Diagnostic significance of atypical category in the voided urine samples: A retrospective study in a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtar Ghadeer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Voided urine samples continue to play an important role in the surveillance of urothelial malignancy and also as a screening mode for high risk patients. In some cases, it is difficult to reliably distinguish changes induced by inflammation, stone or other reactive condition from neoplasm, and these cases are categorized as atypical. The aim of our study is to evaluate the prevalence and the significance of atypical diagnosis in the voided urine samples and also to identify the cytomorphologic features that are seen more frequently in the atypical malignant urine samples. Materials and Methods: All voided urine cytology samples with a diagnosis of atypical urothelial cells, between the period of 2000 and 2009, were obtained from the cytology database. Only those cases with histologic follow-up were included in the study. The cytology and the histology slides were retrieved and reviewed. The following parameters were evaluated: cellularity, cell clusters, nuclear membrane irregularities, hyperchromasia and India-ink type nuclei, the presence of spindle cells and the cytoplasmic characteristics. Results: Out of 72 voided urine samples included in the study, 49 cases (68% had a positive histologic diagnosis of urothelial malignancy in the follow-up histology; of these (55% were high-grade urothelial carcinoma. Increased cellularity, papillary cell clusters, nuclear membrane irregularity, hyperchromasia and India-ink type nuclei were observed more frequently in the atypical malignant urine samples, while cytoplasmic vacuolization were seen more in the negative reactive urine samples. Conclusion: The atypical category diagnosis is associated with a significant proportion of urothelial carcinoma. It should be used by the pathologist to convey concern to the clinician in difficult cases that may require close follow-up.

  19. Reactive Balance Control in Response to Perturbation in Unilateral Stance: Interaction Effects of Direction, Displacement and Velocity on Compensatory Neuromuscular and Kinematic Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Freyler

    Full Text Available Unexpected sudden perturbations challenge postural equilibrium and require reactive compensation. This study aimed to assess interaction effects of the direction, displacement and velocity of perturbations on electromyographic (EMG activity, centre of pressure (COP displacement and joint kinematics to detect neuromuscular characteristics (phasic and segmental and kinematic strategies of compensatory reactions in an unilateral balance paradigm. In 20 subjects, COP displacement and velocity, ankle, knee and hip joint excursions and EMG during short (SLR, medium (MLR and long latency response (LLR of four shank and five thigh muscles were analysed during random surface translations varying in direction (anterior-posterior (sagittal plane, medial-lateral (frontal plane, displacement (2 vs. 3 cm and velocity (0.11 vs. 0.18 m/s of perturbation when balancing on one leg on a movable platform. Phases: SLR and MLR were scaled to increased velocity (P<0.05; LLR was scaled to increased displacement (P<0.05. Segments: phasic interrelationships were accompanied by segmental distinctions: distal muscles were used for fast compensation in SLR (P<0.05 and proximal muscles to stabilise in LLR (P<0.05. Kinematics: ankle joints compensated for both increasing displacement and velocity in all directions (P<0.05, whereas knee joint deflections were particularly sensitive to increasing displacement in the sagittal (P<0.05 and hip joint deflections to increasing velocity in the frontal plane (P<0.05. COP measures increased with increasing perturbation velocity and displacement (P<0.05. Interaction effects indicate that compensatory responses are based on complex processes, including different postural strategies characterised by phasic and segmental specifications, precisely adjusted to the type of balance disturbance. To regain balance after surface translation, muscles of the distal segment govern the quick regain of equilibrium; the muscles of the proximal limb

  20. Intraspinal stimulation for bladder voiding in cats before and after chronic spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikov, Victor; Bullara, Leo; McCreery, Douglas B.

    2007-12-01

    The long-term objective of this study is to develop neural prostheses for people with spinal cord injuries who are unable to voluntarily control their bladder. This feasibility study was performed in 22 adult cats. We implanted an array of microelectrodes into locations in the sacral spinal cord that are involved in the control of micturition reflexes. The effect of microelectrode stimulation was studied under light Propofol anesthesia at monthly intervals for up to 14 months. We found that electrical stimulation in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus at S2 level or in adjacent ventrolateral white matter produced bladder contractions insufficient for inducing voiding, while stimulation at or immediately dorsal to the dorsal gray commissure at S1 level produced strong (at least 20 mmHg) bladder contractions as well as strong (at least 40 mm Hg) external urethral sphincter relaxation, resulting in bladder voiding in 14 animals. In a subset of three animals, spinal cord transection was performed. For several months after the transection, intraspinal stimulation continued to be similarly or even more effective in inducing the bladder voiding as before the transection. We speculate that in the absence of the supraspinal connections, the plasticity in the local spinal circuitry played a role in the improved responsiveness to intraspinal stimulation.

  1. Kinetic Modeling Reveals the Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and DNA Repair Processes in Shaping the Dose-Response Curve of KBrO₃-Induced DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassova, Maria A; Miller, David J; Nikolov, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a kinetic model to investigate how DNA repair processes and scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect the dose-response shape of prooxidant induced DNA damage. We used as an example chemical KBrO3 which is activated by glutathione and forms reactive intermediates that directly interact with DNA to form 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts (8-OH-dG). The single strand breaks (SSB) that can result from failed base excision repair of these adducts were considered as an effect downstream from 8-OH-dG. We previously demonstrated that, in the presence of effective base excision repair, 8-OH-dG can exhibit threshold-like dose-response dependence, while the downstream SSB can still exhibit a linear dose-response. Here we demonstrate that this result holds for a variety of conditions, including low levels of GSH, the presence of additional SSB repair mechanisms, or a scavenger. It has been shown that melatonin, a terminal scavenger, inhibits KBrO3-caused oxidative damage. Our modeling revealed that sustained exposure to KBrO3 can lead to fast scavenger exhaustion, in which case the dose-response shapes for both endpoints are not substantially affected. The results are important to consider when forming conclusions on a chemical's toxicity dose dependence based on the dose-response of early genotoxic events.

  2. The Role of Sulfhydryl Reactivity of Small Molecules for the Activation of the KEAP1/NRF2 Pathway and the Heat Shock Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albena T. Dinkova-Kostova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The KEAP1/NRF2 pathway and the heat shock response are two essential cytoprotective mechanisms that allow adaptation and survival under conditions of oxidative, electrophilic, and thermal stress by regulating the expression of elaborate networks of genes with versatile protective functions. The two pathways are independently regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (NRF2 and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, respectively. The activity of these transcriptional master regulators increases during conditions of stress and also upon encounter of small molecules (inducers, both naturally occurring as well as synthetically produced. Inducers have a common chemical property: the ability to react with sulfhydryl groups. The protein targets of such sulfhydryl-reactive compounds are equipped with highly reactive cysteine residues, which serve as sensors for inducers. The initial cysteine-sensed signal is further relayed to affect the expression of large networks of genes, which in turn can ultimately influence complex cell fate decisions such as life and death. The paper summarizes the multiple lines of experimental evidence demonstrating that the reactivity with sulfhydryl groups is a major determinant of the mechanism of action of small molecule dual activators of the KEAP1/NRF2 pathway and the heat shock response.

  3. Emotional reactivity to incentive downshift as a correlated response to selection of high and low alcohol preferring mice and an influencing factor on ethanol intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Liana M; Grahame, Nicholas J

    2015-11-01

    Losing a job or significant other are examples of incentive loss that result in negative emotional reactions. The occurrence of negative life events is associated with increased drinking (Keyes, Hatzenbuehler, & Hasin, 2011). Further, certain genotypes are more likely to drink alcohol in response to stressful negative life events (Blomeyer et al., 2008; Covault et al., 2007). Shared genetic factors may contribute to alcohol drinking and emotional reactivity, but this relationship is not currently well understood. We used an incentive downshift paradigm to address whether emotional reactivity is elevated in mice predisposed to drink alcohol. We also investigated if ethanol drinking is influenced in High Alcohol Preferring mice that had been exposed to an incentive downshift. Incentive downshift procedures have been widely utilized to model emotional reactivity, and involve shifting a high reward group to a low reward and comparing the shifted group to a consistently rewarded control group. Here, we show that replicate lines of selectively bred High Alcohol Preferring mice exhibited larger successive negative contrast effects than their corresponding replicate Low Alcohol Preferring lines, providing strong evidence for a genetic association between alcohol drinking and susceptibility to the emotional effects of negative contrast. These mice can be used to study the shared neurological and genetic underpinnings of emotional reactivity and alcohol preference. Unexpectedly, an incentive downshift suppressed ethanol drinking immediately following an incentive downshift. This could be due to a specific effect of negative contrast on ethanol consumption or a suppressive effect on consummatory behavior in general. These data suggest that either alcohol intake does not provide the anticipated negative reinforcement, or that a single test was insufficient for animals to learn to drink following incentive downshift. However, the emotional intensity following incentive

  4. Detection of atomic scale changes in the free volume void size of three-dimensional colorectal cancer cell culture using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axpe, Eneko; Lopez-Euba, Tamara; Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara; Merida, David; Garcia, Jose Angel; Plaza-Izurieta, Leticia; Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora; Plazaola, Fernando; Bilbao, Jose Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provides a direct measurement of the free volume void sizes in polymers and biological systems. This free volume is critical in explaining and understanding physical and mechanical properties of polymers. Moreover, PALS has been recently proposed as a potential tool in detecting cancer at early stages, probing the differences in the subnanometer scale free volume voids between cancerous/healthy skin samples of the same patient. Despite several investigations on free volume in complex cancerous tissues, no positron annihilation studies of living cancer cell cultures have been reported. We demonstrate that PALS can be applied to the study in human living 3D cell cultures. The technique is also capable to detect atomic scale changes in the size of the free volume voids due to the biological responses to TGF-β. PALS may be developed to characterize the effect of different culture conditions in the free volume voids of cells grown in vitro.

  5. [Development of remote wireless mobile voiding diary and a report of its objective voiding in 20 young people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhi-chen; Wei, Ben-lin; Meng, Zuo-wei

    2010-08-18

    To find out the data of the micturitions in healthy young people with the remote & mobile voiding diary monitoring system. Twenty healthy young people were studied and ten of them were female. The ages ranged from 22 to 35 years (the mean age: 27.4 years). The females were 22-33 years old (the mean age: 26.4 years ) and the males 24-35 years old (the mean age: 28.4 years). With the remote & mobile voiding diary monitoring system, their voiding information was collected. Through bluetooth, the voiding information was sent to the patient's intelligent cell phone from the collector, then stored directly by intelligent cell phone and wirelessly transmitted to the workstation in the hospital. All of them completed the voiding diaries for 7 days and the data were analyzed. The average micturition of the young healthy people was 5.6 times (3.4-7.4) per 24 hours,in which 5.3 (3.4-7.3) times were in the daytime and 0.3 (0-1.3)times in the night. The functional voiding volume was 318 mL (66-642 mL). The mean voiding volume in 24 hours was 1 724 mL (1152-2 415 mL), in which 1 289 mL (786-2 039 mL) was in the daytime and 435 mL (292-805 mL) in the night. The mean drinking volume was 1 022 mL (453-1 721 mL) in the daytime and 7 mL (0-43 mL) in the night. The nocturia index (Ni) was 1.03, the nocturnal polyuria index (NPi) 26%, and the nocturnal bladder capacity index (NBCi) 0.27. The remote & mobile voiding diary monitoring system can help us get the objective voiding information from young health people for the first time. It is reliable, maneuverable and can be widely used in clinical diagnosis.

  6. Cosmological Black Holes as Seeds of Voids in Galaxy Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, S; Stornaiolo, C; Capozziello, Salvatore; Funaro, Maria; Stornaiolo, Cosimo

    2004-01-01

    Deep surveys indicate a bubbly structure of cosmological large scale which should be the result of evolution of primordial density perturbations. Several models have been proposed to explain origin and dynamics of such features but, till now, no exhaustive and fully consistent theory has been found. We discuss a model where cosmological black holes, deriving from primordial perturbations, are the seeds for large-scale-structure voids. We give details of dynamics and accretion of the system voids-cosmological black holes from the epochs $(z\\simeq10^{3})$ till now finding that void of $40h^{-1}Mpc$ of diameter and under-density of -0.9 will fits the observations without conflicting with the homogeneity and isotropy of cosmic microwave background radiation.

  7. Avoid a Void: The Eradication of Null Dereferencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Bertrand; Kogtenkov, Alexander; Stapf, Emmanuel

    All object-oriented programs, but also those in C or Pascal as soon as they use pointers, are subject to the risk of run-time crash due to "null pointer dereferencing". Until recently this was the case even in statically typed languages. Tony Hoare has called this problem his "billion-dollar mistake". In the type system of ISO-standard Eiffel, the risk no longer exists: void safety (the absence of null pointer dereferencing) has become a property guaranteed by the type system and enforced by the compiler. The mechanism is fully implemented and major libraries and applications have been made void-safe. This presentation describes the principles of Eiffel's void safety, their implementation and the lessons gained.

  8. Dwarf Galaxies in Voids: Dark Matter Halos and Gas Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeft, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Galaxy surveys have shown that luminous galaxies are mainly distributed in large filaments and galaxy clusters. The remaining large volumes are virtually devoid of luminous galaxies. This is in concordance with the formation of the large-scale structure in Universe as derived from cosmological simulations. However, the numerical results indicate that cosmological voids are abundantly populated with dark matter haloes which may in principle host dwarf galaxies. Observational efforts have in contrast revealed, that voids are apparently devoid of dwarf galaxies. We investigate the formation of dwarf galaxies in voids by hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. Due to the cosmic ultra-violet background radiation low-mass haloes show generally are reduced baryon fraction. We determine the characteristic mass below which dwarf galaxies are baryon deficient. We show that the circular velocity below which the accretion of baryons is suppressed is approximately 40 km/s. The suppressed baryon accretion is caused by the...

  9. On the void explanations of the Cold Spot

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos-Caballero, A; Martínez-González, E; Vielva, P

    2015-01-01

    The integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) contribution induced on the cosmic microwave background by the presence of a supervoid as the one detected by Szapudi et al. (2015) is reviewed in this letter in order to check whether it could explain the Cold Spot (CS) anomaly. Two different models, previously used for the same purpose, are considered to describe the matter density profile of the void: a top hat function and a compensated profile produced by a Gaussian potential. The analysis shows that, even enabling ellipticity changes or different values for the dark-energy equation of state parameter $\\omega$, the ISW contribution due to the presence of the void does not reproduce the properties of the CS. Finally, the probability of alignment between the void and the CS is also questioned as an argument in favor of a physical connection between these two phenomena.

  10. Study of void sizes and loading configurations effects on shock initiation due to void collapse in heterogeneous energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sidhartha; Rai, Nirmal; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    In heterogeneous energetic materials, presence of porosity has been seen to increase its sensitivity towards shock initiation and ignition. Under the application of shock load, the viscoplastic deformation of voids and its collapse leads to the formation of local high temperature regions known as hot spots. The chemical reaction triggers at the hot spot depending on the local temperature and grows eventually leading to ignition and formation of detonation waves in the material. The temperature of the hot spot depends on various factors such as shock strength, void size, void arrangements, loading configuration etc. Hence, to gain deeper understanding on shock initiation and ignition study due to void collapse, a parametric study involving various factors which can affect the hot spot temperature is desired. In the current work, effects of void sizes, shock strength and loading configurations has been studied for shock initiation in HMX using massively parallel Eulerian code, SCIMITAR3D. The chemical reaction and decomposition for HMX has been modeled using Henson-Smilowitz multi step mechanism. The effect of heat conduction has also been taken into consideration. Ignition threshold criterion has been established for various factors as mentioned. The critical hot spot temperature and its size which can lead to ignition has been obtained from numerical experiments.

  11. Voiding trial outcome following pelvic floor repair without incontinence procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Won, Sara; Haviland, Miriam J.; Bargen, Emily Von; Hacker, Michele R.; Li, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Our aim was to identify predictors of postoperative voiding trial failure among patients who had a pelvic floor repair without a concurrent incontinence procedure in order to identify low-risk patients in whom postoperative voiding trials may be modified. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent pelvic floor repair without concurrent incontinence procedures at two institutions from 1 November 2011 through 13 October 2013 after abstracting demographic and clinical data from medical records. The primary outcome was postoperative retrograde voiding trial failure. We used modified Poisson regression to calculate the risk ratio (RR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI). Results Of the 371 women who met eligibility criteria, 294 (79.2 %) had complete data on the variables of interest. Forty nine (16.7%) failed the trial, and those women were less likely to be white (p = 0.04), more likely to have had an anterior colporrhaphy (p = 0.001), and more likely to have had a preoperative postvoid residual (PVR) ≥150 ml (p = 0.001). After adjusting for race, women were more likely to fail their voiding trial if they had a preoperative PVR of ≥150 ml (RR: 1.9; 95 % CI: 1.1–3.2); institution also was associated with voiding trial failure (RR: 3.0; 95 % CI: 1.6–5.4). Conclusions Among our cohort, postoperative voiding trial failure was associated with a PVR of ≥150 ml and institution at which the surgery was performed. PMID:26886553

  12. Simulation-aided constitutive law development - Assessment of low triaxiality void nucleation models via extended finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jifeng; Kontsevoi, Oleg Y.; Xiong, Wei; Smith, Jacob

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a multi-scale computational framework has been established in order to investigate, refine and validate constitutive behaviors in the context of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) void mechanics model. The eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) has been implemented in order to (1) develop statistical volume elements (SVE) of a matrix material with subscale inclusions and (2) to simulate the multi-void nucleation process due to interface debonding between the matrix and particle phases. Our analyses strongly suggest that under low stress triaxiality the nucleation rate of the voids f˙ can be well described by a normal distribution function with respect to the matrix equivalent stress (σe), as opposed to that proposed (σbar + 1 / 3σkk) in the original form of the single void GTN model. The modified form of the multi-void nucleation model has been validated based on a series of numerical experiments with different loading conditions, material properties, particle shape/size and spatial distributions. The utilization of XFEM allows for an invariant finite element mesh to represent varying microstructures, which implies suitability for drastically reducing complexity in generating the finite element discretizations for large stochastic arrays of microstructure configurations. The modified form of the multi-void nucleation model is further applied to study high strength steels by incorporating first principles calculations. The necessity of using a phenomenological interface separation law has been fully eliminated and replaced by the physics-based cohesive relationship obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations in order to provide an accurate macroscopic material response.

  13. Experimental and numerical investigation of voids distribution in VPI for ITER correction coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Juping, E-mail: ljping@ipp.ac.cn; Wu, Jiefeng; Yu, Xiaowu

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • A sample of correction coil was treated by vacuum pressure impregnation. • The voids in sample were observed by computed tomography. • The voids distributions were simulated in 2-D and 3-D model. • The calculated voids locations had a good agreement with experiment. • The simulation was not accurate in calculating the voids content. - Abstract: The experimental and numerical investigations were conducted to study the voids distribution in VPI (Vacuum Pressure Impregnation) process for correction coil. A sample of correction coil was manufactured by VPI. The voids in sample were observed with computed tomography and the average voids content was tested. The voids content is closely related to infiltration velocity and fluid properties. In former researches, the parameters affecting voids content were combined into a single parameter, namely capillary number. By calculating the capillary numbers in different areas of the sample, the voids distribution could be acquired. The corresponding numerical analyses based on Darcy law were conducted in 2-D and 3-D models. The 2-D case was used to simulate the voids distribution on the section as a simplified model, while the 3-D case demonstrated the spatial distribution of voids. The voids locations were similar in 2-D and 3-D cases, but the voids contents were different. The numerical results were compared with the actual voids distribution in sample. It was found the voids locations were close in numerical and experimental results, but the voids content did not match. The numerical simulations are available for predicting the voids locations in VPI, but not accurate in calculating the voids content.

  14. Voiding patterns in men evaluated by a questionnaire survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, P; Nielsen, K K; Bauer, T;

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire on obstructive and irritative voiding symptoms was sent to 572 men aged between 20 and 79 years, selected at random from the National Register; 337 questionnaires were completed. None of the responders had consulted a doctor because of voiding symptoms. There was a significant...... had symptoms equal in severity to those found in men undergoing prostatectomy; 29% and 11% of men in the eighth decade [corrected] had nocturia twice and 3 times or more respectively; 19% complained of urge incontinence. More information on possible treatment is needed....

  15. Effects of Heterogeneous Sink Distribution on Void Swelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leffers, Torben; Volobuyev, A. V.; Gann, V. V.

    1986-01-01

    Swelling rates are calculated for two types of material with heterogeneous distributions of dislocations and voids, namely copper irradiated with neutrons to low dose at 250 degree C and heavily cold-worked copper irradiated with 1 MeV electrons in a HVEM at 250 degree C. Both materials...... are considered to consist of non-interacting spherical components with a wall and an inner cell with different dislocation and/or void densities. We subdivide the sphere (wall plus cell) in a number of concentric shells and find a quasi-static solution for the interstitial and vacancy concentrations...

  16. Cyclic voiding cystouretrography without the use of fluoroscopic monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadioglu, Alev [ALKA Medical Imaging Center, Buyukdere Cad. Levent Apt. No: 36/16, 80200-Mecidiyekoy, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: alevkadioglu@yahoo.com; Mihmanli, Ismail [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, 34300-Istanbul (Turkey); Kantarci, Fatih [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, 34300-Istanbul (Turkey); Tekes, Aylin [ALKA Medical Imaging Center, Buyukdere Cad. Levent Apt. No: 36/16, 80200-Mecidiyekoy, Istanbul (Turkey); Uysal, Omer [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Department of Biostatistics, 34300-Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether cyclic voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) examinations can be performed without using real-time fluoroscopic monitoring. Materials and methods: VCUG examinations were performed in 209 children (133 girls and 76 boys). In each child, it was performed in a cyclic manner (three consecutive cycles) without using fluoroscopic monitoring and one radiograph was taken in each cycle of the examination. All patients were sedated by midazolam prior to examination. The degree of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) was graded for each of the kidney ureter units (KUU) (total 418 KUU) separately. Statistical analysis included the comparison of the presence and absence of VUR and three ordinal-matched comparisons of each cycle. Results: VCUG was detected in 37.3% of the children (78/209) and 28.7% (120/418) of the KUU. The absence of or same degree of VUR in three consecutive cycles were obtained in 345 KUU and the agreement was calculated as 82.5%. The same degree and presence of reflux were found in 85 and 89 refluxing KUU, the same negative findings (absence of VUR) in 306 and 298 KUU, and discordant findings in 27 and 31 KUU (between the first and second and between first and third cycles), respectively. Therefore, the agreement was 93.5 and 92.5% between the first and second cycles (p = 0.70) and between the first and the third cycles (p = 0.15), respectively. Conclusion: Both the cyclic nature of this study and the results indicated that VCUG without real-time fluoroscopic monitoring could be used where adequate fluoroscopic examination is not possible for children in whom VUR detection is necessary and impacts treatment. However, the responsibility of pediatric radiologist always must also include the task to provide proper equipment for imaging children with suspected VUR.

  17. Transcription factor IRF1 is responsible for IRF8-mediated IL-1β expression in reactive microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takahiro; Iwamoto, Shosuke; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Tamura, Tomohiko; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2015-08-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF8) plays a crucial role in the transformation of microglia to a reactive state by regulating the expression of various genes. In the present study, we show that IRF1 is required for IRF8-induced gene expression in microglia. Peripheral nerve injury induced IRF1 gene upregulation in the spinal microglia in an IRF8-dependent manner. IRF8 transduction in cultured microglia induced de novo gene expression of IRF1. Importantly, knockdown of the IRF1 gene in IRF8-transduced microglia prevented upregulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Therefore, our findings suggest that expression of IL-1β is dependent on IRF1 in IRF8-expressing reactive microglia.

  18. Mitochondria-Derived Reactive Intermediate Species Mediate Asbestos-Induced Genotoxicity and Oxidative Stress–Responsive Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Sarah X.L.; Partridge, Michael A.; Ghandhi, Shanaz A.; Davidson, Mercy M.; Sally A Amundson; Hei, Tom K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The incidence of asbestos-induced human cancers is increasing worldwide, and considerable evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important mediators of these diseases. Our previous studies suggested that mitochondria might be involved in the initiation of oxidative stress in asbestos-exposed mammalian cells. Objective: We investigated whether mitochondria are a potential cytoplasmic target of asbestos using a mitochondrial DNA–depleted (ρ0) human small airway epi...

  19. TRANSVERSELY ISOTROPIC HYPER-ELASTIC MATERIAL RECTANGULAR PLATE WITH VOIDS UNDER A UNIAXIAL EXTENSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程昌钧; 任九生

    2003-01-01

    The finite deformation and stress analyses for a transversely isotropic rectangularplate with voids and made of hyper-elastic material with the generalized neo-Hookean strainenergy function under a uniaxial extension are studied. The deformation functions of plateswith voids that are symmetrically distributed in a certain manner are given and the functionsare expressed by two parameters by solving the differential equations. The solution may beapproximately obtained from the minimum potential energy principle. Thus, the analyticsolutions of the deformation and stress of the plate are obtained. The growth of the void.s andthe distribution of stresses along the voids are analyzed and the influences of the degree ofanisotropy, the size of the voids and the distance between the voids are discussed. Thecharacteristics of the growth of the voids and the distribution of stresses of the plates with onevoid, three or five voids are obtained and compared.

  20. Shapes and Sizes of Voids in the LCDM Universe: Excursion Set Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Shandarin, S; Heitmann, K; Habib, S; Shandarin, Sergei; Feldman, Hume A.; Heitmann, Katrin

    2006-01-01

    We study the global distribution and morphology of dark matter voids in a LCDM universe using density fields generated by N-body simulations. Voids are defined as isolated regions of the low-density excursion set specified via density thresholds, the density thresholds being quantified by the corresponding filling factors, i.e., the fraction of the total volume in the excursion set. Our work encompasses a systematic investigation of the void volume function, the volume fraction in voids, and the fitting of voids to corresponding ellipsoids and spheres. We emphasize the relevance of the percolation threshold to the void volume statistics of the density field both in the high redshift, Gaussian random field regime, as well as in the present epoch. By using measures such as the Inverse Porosity, we characterize the quality of ellipsoidal fits to voids, finding that such fits are a poor representation of the larger voids that dominate the volume of the void excursion set.

  1. SURFACE EFFECT ON NANOSIZED VOID GROWTH IN A RIGID-PERFECTLY PLASTIC MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Hui; Yiheng Chen

    2008-01-01

    The influence of the surface effect on the nanosized spherical void growth in a rigid-perfectly plastic material is analyzed and the mechanism of the nanosized void growth with high triaxiality is given. Based on the Rice and Tracey model for a macro void growth, the present model is proposed to account for the nanosized void growth under a uniform remote strain rate field with consideration on the surface effect. It is concluded that the surface effect yields an evident resistant influence on the nanosized void growth. That is, this influence decays as the void radius increases. With high triaxiality, the nanosized void growth is divided into two stages:the initial stage and the mature stage. At the first stage, the void grows slowly and the influence of surface effect is relatively weak, whereas at the second stage, the influene is significant and the void grows drastically.

  2. Response of Reactive Phosphorus Burial to the Sedimentary Transition from Cretaceous Black Shales to Oceanic Red Beds in Southern Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of sedimentary transition from the Cretaceous black shales to the oceanic red beds is a new and important direction of Cretaceous research. Chemical sequential extraction is applied to study the burial records of reactive phosphorus in the black shale of the Gyabula Formation and oceanic red beds of the Chuangde Formation, Southern Tibet. Results indicate that the principal reactive phosphorus species is the authigenic and carbonate-associated phosphorus (CaP) in the Gyabula Formation and iron oxides-associated phosphorus (FeP) in the Chuangde Formation which accounts for more than half of their own total phosphorus content. While the authigenic and carbonate-associated phosphorus (CaP) is almost equal in the two Formations; the iron oxidesassociated phosphorus is about 1.6 times higher in the Chuangde Formation than that in the Gyabula Formation resulting in a higher content of the total phosphorus in the Chuangde Formation.According to the observations on the marine phosphorus cycle in Modern Ocean, it is found that preferential burial and regeneration of reactive phosphorus corresponds to highly oxic and reducing conditions, respectively, leading to the different distribution of phosphorus in these two distinct type of marine sediments. It is the redox-sensitive behavior of phosphorus cycle to the different redox conditions in the ocean and the controlling effects of phosphorus to the marine production that stimulate the local sedimentary transition from the Cretaceous black shale to the oceanic red beds.

  3. Analysis of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK)-reactive CD8(+) T cell responses in children with NPM-ALK(+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K Singh, V; Werner, S; Hackstein, H; Lennerz, V; Reiter, A; Wölfel, T; Damm-Welk, C; Woessmann, W

    2016-10-01

    Cellular immune responses against the oncoantigen anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) in patients with ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) have been detected using peptide-based approaches in individuals preselected for human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A*02:01. In this study, we aimed to evaluate nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in ALCL patients ensuring endogenous peptide processing of ALK antigens and avoiding HLA preselection. We also examined the HLA class I restriction of ALK-specific CD8(+) T cells. Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with in-vitro-transcribed RNA (IVT-RNA) encoding NPM-ALK were used as antigen-presenting cells for T cell stimulation. Responder T lymphocytes were tested in interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays with NPM-ALK-transfected autologous DCs as well as CV-1 in Origin with SV40 genes (COS-7) cells co-transfected with genes encoding the patients' HLA class I alleles and with NPM-ALK encoding cDNA to verify responses and define the HLA restrictions of specific T cell responses. NPM-ALK-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were detected in three of five ALK-positive ALCL patients tested between 1 and 13 years after diagnosis. The three patients had also maintained anti-ALK antibody responses. No reactivity was detected in samples from five healthy donors. The NPM-ALK-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were restricted by HLA-C-alleles (C*06:02 and C*12:02) in all three cases. This approach allowed for the detection of NPM-ALK-reactive T cells, irrespective of the individual HLA status, up to 9 years after ALCL diagnosis.

  4. Image analysis of aggregate,mastic and air void phases for asphalt mixture%Image analysis of aggregate, mastic and air void phases for asphalt mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ADHIKARI Sanjeev; YOU Zhan-ping; HAO Pei-wen; WANG Hai-nian

    2013-01-01

    The shape characterization and spatial distribution of aggregate,mastic and air void phases for asphalt mixture were analyzed.Three air void percentage asphalt mixtures,4%,7% and 8%,respectively,were cut into cross sections and polished.X-ray scanning microscope was used to capture aggregate,mastic,air void phase by the image.The average of polygon diameter was chosen as a threshold to determine which aggregates would be retained on a given sieve.The aggregate morphological image from scanned image was utilized by digital image processing method to calculate the gradation of aggregate and simulate the real gradation.Analysis result shows that the air void of asphalt mixture has influence on the correlation between calculation gradation and actual gradation.When comparing 4.75 mm sieve size of 4%,7% and 8% air void asphalt mixtures,7% air void asphalt mixture has 55% higher than actual size gradation,8% air void asphalt mixture has 8% higher than actual size gradation,and 4% air void asphalt mixture has 3.71% lower than actual size gradation.4% air void asphalt mixture has the best correlation between calculation gradation and actual gradation comparing to other specimens.The air void percentage of asphalt mixture has no obvious influence on the air void orientation,and three asphalt mixtures show the similar air orientation along the same direction.4 tabs,7 figs,17 refs.

  5. Impact on liquids : void collapse and jet formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gekle, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    A spectacular example of free surface flow is the impact of a solid object on a liquid: At impact a “crown” splash is created and a surface cavity (void) emerges which immediately starts to collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding liquid. Eventually the cavity closes in a single

  6. Void growth to coalescence in a non-local material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    The size-effect in metals containing distributed spherical voids is analyzed numerically using a finite strain generalization of a length scale dependent plasticity theory. Results are obtained for stress-triaxialities relevant in front of a crack tip in an elastic-plastic metal. The influence...

  7. Void growth to coalescence in a non-local material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2008-01-01

    The size-effect in metals containing distributed spherical voids is analyzed numerically using a finite strain generalization of a length scale dependent plasticity theory. Results are obtained for stress-triaxialities relevant in front of a crack tip in an elastic-plastic metal. The influence...

  8. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of void lattice formation during irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinisch, H. L.; Singh, B. N.

    2003-11-01

    Over the last decade, molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades have revealed that glissile clusters of self-interstitial crowdions are formed directly in cascades and that they migrate one-dimensionally along close-packed directions with extremely low activation energies. Occasionally, under various conditions, a crowdion cluster can change its Burgers vector and glide along a different close-packed direction. The recently developed production bias model (PBM) of microstructure evolution under irradiation has been structured specifically to take into account the unique properties of the vacancy and interstitial clusters produced in the cascades. Atomic-scale kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations have played a useful role in understanding the defect reaction kinetics of one-dimensionally migrating crowdion clusters as a function of the frequency of direction changes. This has made it possible to incorporate the migration properties of crowdion clusters and changes in reaction kinetics into the PBM. In the present paper we utilize similar KMC simulations to investigate the significant role that crowdion clusters can play in the formation and stability of void lattices. The creation of stable void lattices, starting from a random distribution of voids, is simulated by a KMC model in which vacancies migrate three-dimensionally and self-interstitial atom (SIA) clusters migrate one-dimensionally, interrupted by directional changes. The necessity of both one-dimensional migration and Burgers vectors changes of SIA clusters for the production of stable void lattices is demonstrated, and the effects of the frequency of Burgers vector changes are described.

  9. A cosmic watershed : the WVF void detection technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2007-01-01

    On megaparsec scales the Universe is permeated by an intricate filigree of clusters, filaments, sheets and voids, the cosmic web. For the understanding of its dynamical and hierarchical history it is crucial to identify objectively its complex morphological components. One of the most characteristic

  10. Structural control of void formation in dual phase steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azuma, Masafumi

    measurements, tensile tests and hole-expansion tests. The initial microstructure and the deformed microstructure were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In situ tensile tests in a SEM were applied for direct observation of the void formation...

  11. Experimental facility and void fraction calibration methods for impedance probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Fernando L. de; Rocha, Marcelo S., E-mail: floliveira@ipen.br, E-mail: msrocha@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    An experimental facility was designed and constructed with aims of to calibrate a capacitance probe for gas-liquid flow void fraction measurements. The facility is composed of a metallic hack with a vertical 2,300 mm high glass tube with 38 mm ID with stagnant water and compressed air bubbling system simulating the gas phase (vapor). At the lower part, a mixing section with a porous media element releases the air bubbles into the water, and the compressed air flow is measured by two calibrated rotameters. At the upper part a stagnant water tank separates the liquid and gas. Two pressure taps are located near the lower and upper sides of the glass tube for pressure difference measurement. The pressure difference is used for low void fraction values (0-15%) calibration methods, as described in the work. Two electrically controlled quick closing valves are installed between the porous media element and the upward separation tank for high void fraction values measurement (15-50%) used to calibrate the capacitance probe. The experimental facility design, construction, capacitance probe calibration methods and results, as well as flow pattern visualization, are presented. Finally, the capacitance probe will be installed on a natural circulation circuit mounted at the Nuclear Engineering Center (CEN/IPEN/CNEN-SP) for measurement of the instantaneous bulk void. Instantaneous signals generated by the capacitance probe will allow the determination of natural circulation loop global energy balance. (author)

  12. Impact on liquids : void collapse and jet formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gekle, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    A spectacular example of free surface flow is the impact of a solid object on a liquid: At impact a “crown” splash is created and a surface cavity (void) emerges which immediately starts to collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding liquid. Eventually the cavity closes in a single p

  13. Predictive efficacy of radioisotope voiding cystography for renal outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seok Ki; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Kwang Myeung; Choi, Whang; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-01

    As vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) could lead to renal functional deterioration when combined with urinary tract infection, we need to decide whether operative anti-reflux treatment should be performed at the time of diagnosis of VUR. Predictive value of radioisotope voiding cystography (RIVCG) for renal outcome was tested. In 35 children (18 males, 17 females), radiologic voiding cystoure-thrography (VCU), RIVCG and DMSA scan were performed. Change in renal function was evaluated using the follow-up DMSA scan, ultrasonography, and clinical information. Discriminant analysis was performed using individual or integrated variables such as reflux amount and extent at each phase of voiding on RIVCG, in addition to age, gender and cortical defect on DMSA scan at the time of diagnosis. Discriminant function was composed and its performance was examined. Reflux extent at the filling phase and reflux amount and extent at postvoiding phase had a significant prognostic value. Total reflux amount was a composite variable to predict prognosis. Discriminant function composed of reflux extent at the filling phase and reflux amount and extent at postvoiding phase showed better positive predictive value and specificity than conventional reflux grading. RIVCG could predict renal outcome by disclosing characteristic reflux pattern during various voiding phases.

  14. Compensation for air voids in photoacoustic computed tomography image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Thomas P.; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Most image reconstruction methods in photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) assume that the acoustic properties of the object and the surrounding medium are homogeneous. This can lead to strong artifacts in the reconstructed images when there are significant variations in sound speed or density. Air voids represent a particular challenge due to the severity of the differences between the acoustic properties of air and water. In whole-body small animal imaging, the presence of air voids in the lungs, stomach, and gastrointestinal system can limit image quality over large regions of the object. Iterative reconstruction methods based on the photoacoustic wave equation can account for these acoustic variations, leading to improved resolution, improved contrast, and a reduction in the number of imaging artifacts. However, the strong acoustic heterogeneities can lead to instability or errors in the numerical wave solver. Here, the impact of air voids on PACT image reconstruction is investigated, and procedures for their compensation are proposed. The contributions of sound speed and density variations to the numerical stability of the wave solver are considered, and a novel approach for mitigating the impact of air voids while reducing the computational burden of image reconstruction is identified. These results are verified by application to an experimental phantom.

  15. The Effect of Random Voids in the Modified Gurson Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Huiyang; Yazzie, Kyle; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Jiang, Hanqing

    2012-02-01

    The porous plasticity model (usually referred to as the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model or modified Gurson model) has been widely used in the study of microvoid-induced ductile fracture. In this paper, we studied the effects of random voids on the porous plasticity model. Finite-element simulations were conducted to study a copper/tin/copper joint bar under uniaxial tension using the commercial finite-element package ABAQUS. A randomly distributed initial void volume fraction with different types of distribution was introduced, and the effects of this randomness on the crack path and macroscopic stress-strain behavior were studied. It was found that consideration of the random voids is able to capture more detailed and localized deformation features, such as different crack paths and different ultimate tensile strengths, and meanwhile does not change the macroscopic stress-strain behavior. It seems that the random voids are able to qualitatively explain the scattered observations in experiments while keeping the macroscopic measurements consistent.

  16. A halo bias function measured deeply into voids without stochasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Neyrinck, Mark C; Jeong, Donghui; Wang, Xin

    2013-01-01

    We study the relationship between dark-matter haloes and matter in the MIP N-body simulation ensemble, which allows precision measurements of this relationship, even deeply into voids. What enables this is a lack of discreteness, stochasticity, and exclusion, achieved by averaging over hundreds of possible sets of initial small-scale modes, while holding fixed large-scale modes that give the cosmic web. We find (i) that dark-matter-halo formation is greatly suppressed in voids; there is an exponential downturn at low densities in the otherwise power-law matter-to-halo density bias function. Thus, the rarity of haloes in voids is akin to the rarity of the largest clusters, and their abundance is quite sensitive to cosmological parameters. The exponential downturn appears both in an excursion-set model, and in a new model in which fluctuations evolve in voids as in an open universe with an effective Omega_m proportional to a large-scale density. We also find that (ii) haloes typically populate the average halo-...

  17. Electric field theory and the fallacy of void capacitance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1991-01-01

    The concept of the capacitance of a gaseous void is discussed as applied to electrical insulation science. The most pertinent aspect of the capacitance definition is that of reference to a single-valued potential difference between surfaces. This implies that these surfaces must be surfaces...

  18. Excursion Sets and Non-Gaussian Void Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, Guido; Noreña, Jorge; Paranjape, Aseem

    2010-01-01

    Primordial non-Gaussianity (NG) affects the large scale structure (LSS) of the universe by leaving an imprint on the distribution of matter at late times. Much attention has been focused on using the distribution of collapsed objects (i.e. dark matter halos and the galaxies and galaxy clusters that reside in them) to probe primordial NG. An equally interesting and complementary probe however is the abundance of extended underdense regions or voids in the LSS. The calculation of the abundance of voids using the excursion set formalism in the presence of primordial NG is subject to the same technical issues as the one for halos, which were discussed e.g. in arXiv:1005.1203. However, unlike the excursion set problem for halos which involved random walks in the presence of one barrier $\\delta_c$, the void excursion set problem involves two barriers $\\delta_v$ and $\\delta_c$. This leads to a new complication introduced by what is called the "void-in-cloud" effect discussed in the literature, which is unique to the...

  19. Impact on liquids : void collapse and jet formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gekle, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    A spectacular example of free surface flow is the impact of a solid object on a liquid: At impact a “crown” splash is created and a surface cavity (void) emerges which immediately starts to collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding liquid. Eventually the cavity closes in a single p

  20. Effect of void structure of photocatalyst paper on VOC decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahori, Shuji; Iguchi, Yumi; Ichiura, Hideaki; Kitaoka, Takuya; Tanaka, Hiroo; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2007-02-01

    TiO2 powder-containing paper composites, called TiO2 paper, were prepared by a papermaking technique, and their photocatalytic efficiency was investigated. The TiO2 paper has a porous structure originating from the layered pulp fiber network, with TiO2 powders scattered on the fiber matrix. Under UV irradiation, the TiO2 paper decomposed gaseous acetaldehyde more effectively than powdery TiO2 and a pulp/TiO2 mixture not in paper form. Scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion analysis revealed that the TiO2 paper had characteristic unique voids ca. 10 microm in diameter, which might have contributed to the improved photocatalytic performance. TiO2 paper composites having different void structures were prepared by using beaten pulp fibers with different degrees of freeness and/or ceramic fibers. The photodecomposition efficiency was affected by the void structure of the photocatalyst paper, and the initial degradation rate of acetaldehyde increased with an increase in the total pore volume of TiO2 paper. The paper voids presumably provided suitable conditions for TiO2 catalysis, resulting in higher photocatalytic performance by TiO2 paper than by TiO2 powder and a pulp/TiO2 mixture not in paper form.

  1. The cosmic web in CosmoGrid void regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieder, Steven; van de Weygaert, Rien; Cautun, Marius; Beygu, Burcu; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We study the formation and evolution of the cosmic web, using the high-resolution CosmoGrid ΛCDM simulation. In particular, we investigate the evolution of the large-scale structure around void halo groups, and compare this to observations of the VGS-31 galaxy group, which consists of three interact

  2. Calculation of Void in the Fort Saint Vrain Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, David Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Taylor, Craig Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Coons, James Elmer [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-11

    The percent void of the Fort Saint Vrain (FSV) material is estimated to be 21.1% based on the volume of the gap at the top of the drums, the volume of the coolant channels in the FSV fuel element, and the volume of the fuel handling channel in the FSV fuel element.

  3. An HI survey of the bootes void; 2, the analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Szomoru, A; Gregg, M D; Strauss, M A

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the results of a VLA HI survey of the Bootes void and compare the distribution and HI properties of the void galaxies to those of galaxies found in a survey of regions of mean cosmic density. The Bootes survey covers 1100 Mpc^{3}, or \\sim 1\\% of the volume of the void and consists of 24 cubes of typically 2 Mpc * 2 Mpc * 1280 km/s, centered on optically known galaxies. Sixteen targets were detected in HI; 18 previously uncataloged objects were discovered directly in HI. The control sample consists of 12 cubes centered on IRAS selected galaxies with FIR luminosities similar to those of the Bootes targets and located in regions of 1 to 2 times the cosmic mean density. In addition to the 12 targets 29 companions were detected in HI. We find that the number of galaxies within 1 Mpc of the targets is the same to within a factor of two for void and control samples, and thus that the small scale clustering of galaxies is the same in regions that differ by a factor of \\sim 6 in density on larger scales. A ...

  4. The Aspen–Amsterdam Void Finder Comparison Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colberg, J¨org M.; Pearce, Frazer; Foster, Caroline; Platen, Erwin; Brunino, Riccardo; Neyrinck, Mark; Basilakos, Spyros; Faira, Anthony; Feldman, Hume; Gottlöber, Stefan; Hahn, Oliver; Hoyle, Fiona; M¨uller, V.; Nelson, Lorne; Plionis, Manolis; Porciani, Cristiano; Shandarin, Sergei; Vogeley, Michael S.; Weygaert, Rien van de

    2008-01-01

    Despite a history that dates back at least a quarter of a century studies of voids in the large–scale structure of the Universe are bedevilled by a major problem: there exist a large number of quite different void–finding algorithms, a fact that has so far got in the way of groups comparing their

  5. Low-void polyimide resins for autoclave processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Development of an advanced A-type polyimide, which can be used to produce autoclave molded, low-void content composites suitable for use at temperatures up to 316 C is reported. It consists of a mixture of methyl nadic anhydride, an 80:20 molar ratio of methylene dianaline and thiodianilene, and pyromellitic dianhydride.

  6. Answers from the Void: VIDE and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, P. M.; Hamaus, N.; Pisani, A.; Lavaux, G.; Wandelt, B. D.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss various applications ofvide, the Void IDentification and Examination toolkit, anopen-source Python/C++ code for finding cosmic voids in galaxy redshift surveysand $N$-body simulations.Based on a substantially enhanced version of ZOBOV, vide not only finds voids, but alsosummarizes their properties, extracts statisticalinformation, and providesa Python-based platform for more detailed analysis, such asmanipulating void catalogs and particle members, filtering, plotting,computing clustering statistics, stacking, comparing catalogs, andfitting density profiles.vide also provides significant additional functionality forpre-processing inputs: for example, vide can work with volume- ormagnitude-limited galaxy samples with arbitrary survey geometries,or darkmatter particles or halo catalogs in a variety of common formats.It can also randomly subsample inputsand includes a Halo Occupation Distribution model forconstructing mock galaxy populations.vide has been used for a wide variety of applications, fromdiscovering a universal density profile to estimatingprimordial magnetic fields, andis publicly available athttp://bitbucket.org/cosmicvoids/vide\\_publicandhttp://www.cosmicvoids.net.

  7. New insights in dehydration stress behavior of two maize hybrids using advanced distributed reactivity model (DRM). Responses to the impact of 24-epibrassinolide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Bojan; Janković, Marija; Nikolić, Bogdan; Dimkić, Ivica; Lalević, Blažo; Raičević, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Proposed distributed reactivity model of dehydration for seedling parts of two various maize hybrids (ZP434, ZP704) was established. Dehydration stresses were induced thermally, which is also accompanied by response of hybrids to heat stress. It was found that an increased value of activation energy counterparts within radicle dehydration of ZP434, with a high concentration of 24-epibrassinolide (24-EBL) at elevated operating temperatures, probably causes activation of diffusion mechanisms in cutin network and may increases likelihood of formation of free volumes, large enough to accommodate diffusing molecule. Many small random effects were detected and can be correlated with micro-disturbing in a space filled with water caused by thermal gradients, increasing capillary phenomena, and which can induce thermo-capillary migration. The influence of seedling content of various sugars and minerals on dehydration was also examined. Estimated distributed reactivity models indicate a dependence of reactivity on structural arrangements, due to present interactions between water molecules and chemical species within the plant. PMID:28644899

  8. The Instability of Void Fraction Waves in Vertical Gas—Liquid Two—Phase Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BaojiangSUN; DachunYAN; 等

    1999-01-01

    The measuring and analyzing results of void fraction waves in different flow regimes show that the propagating velocity of void fraction waves depends on flow regimes and mean void fraction.The disturbance at some frequencies can enhance the void fraction wave velocity.Non-linear analysis show that the instability process of bubble flow is a chaotic process.Before the bubbly flow transits to cap-bubbly flow the growth rate of void fraction waves becomes the maximum value when the disturbance frequency is around the main frequency of void fraction waves.

  9. Effects of Cure Pressure Induced Voids on the Mechanical Strength of Carbon/Epoxy Laminates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling LIU; Boming ZHANG; Zhanjun WU; Dianfu WANG

    2005-01-01

    This work aims at designing a set of curing pressure routes to produce laminates with various void contents. The effects of various consolidation pressures resulting in different void contents on mechanical strength of carbon/epoxy laminates have been examined. Characterization of the voids, in terms of void volume fraction, void distribution,size, and shape, was performed by standard test, ultrasonic inspection and metallographic analysis. The interlaminar shear strength was measured by the short-beam method. An empirical model was used to predict the strength vs porosity. The predicted strengths conform well with the experimental data and voids were found to be uniformly distributed throughout the laminate.

  10. Nonquaternary Cholinesterase Reactivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-30

    1978, 34, 523. 30. Lehninger , A. L., " Biochemistry ," Worth Publ. Inc., New York, 1970, p. 161. 31. Green, A. L.; Smith, H. J.; Biochem. J., 1958, 68...nerve agent antidotes focuses on nonquaternary cholinesterase reactivators. In principle , it should be possible to find nonquaternary hydroximic acid...elicit pronounced physiological responses. In principle , it should be possible to develop nonquaternary AChE reactivators that would not only equal

  11. On the linearity of tracer bias around voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollina, Giorgia; Hamaus, Nico; Dolag, Klaus; Weller, Jochen; Baldi, Marco; Moscardini, Lauro

    2017-07-01

    The large-scale structure of the Universe can be observed only via luminous tracers of the dark matter. However, the clustering statistics of tracers are biased and depend on various properties, such as their host-halo mass and assembly history. On very large scales, this tracer bias results in a constant offset in the clustering amplitude, known as linear bias. Towards smaller non-linear scales, this is no longer the case and tracer bias becomes a complicated function of scale and time. We focus on tracer bias centred on cosmic voids, i.e. depressions of the density field that spatially dominate the Universe. We consider three types of tracers: galaxies, galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei, extracted from the hydrodynamical simulation Magneticum Pathfinder. In contrast to common clustering statistics that focus on auto-correlations of tracers, we find that void-tracer cross-correlations are successfully described by a linear bias relation. The tracer-density profile of voids can thus be related to their matter-density profile by a single number. We show that it coincides with the linear tracer bias extracted from the large-scale auto-correlation function and expectations from theory, if sufficiently large voids are considered. For smaller voids we observe a shift towards higher values. This has important consequences on cosmological parameter inference, as the problem of unknown tracer bias is alleviated up to a constant number. The smallest scales in existing data sets become accessible to simpler models, providing numerous modes of the density field that have been disregarded so far, but may help to further reduce statistical errors in constraining cosmology.

  12. Association of persisting IgA response with yersinia triggered reactive arthritis: a study on 104 patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Toivanen, A; Lahesmaa-Rantala, R; Vuento, R; Granfors, K

    1987-01-01

    Twelve to 16 months after Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 enteritis 33 (85%) of the 39 patients who developed reactive arthritis as a postinfection complication had IgA class and 28 (72%) had IgG class anti-yersinia antibodies. In contrast, 7 (32%) of the 22 patients who did not develop arthritis were positive in the IgA test and 11 (50%) positive in the IgG test. The results were about the same when the material was divided into cases with diagnosis of yersiniosis verified by stool culture or by...

  13. A constitutive model for elastoplastic solids containing primary and secondary voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrègue, D.; Pardoen, T.

    In many ductile metallic alloys, the damage process controlled by the growth and coalescence of primary voids nucleated on particles with a size varying typically between 1 and 100 μm, is affected by the growth of much smaller secondary voids nucleated on inclusions with a size varying typically between 0.1 and 3 μm. The goal of this work is first to quantify the potential effect of the growth of these secondary voids on the coalescence of primary voids using finite element (FE) unit cell calculations and second to formulate a new constitutive model incorporating this effect. The nucleation and growth of secondary voids do essentially not affect the growth of the primary voids but mainly accelerate the void coalescence process. The drop of the ductility caused by the presence of secondary voids increases if the nucleation strain decreases and/or if their volume fraction increases and/or if the primary voids are flat. A strong coupling is indeed observed between the shape of the primary voids and the growth of the second population enhancing the anisotropy of the ductility induced by void shape effects. The new micromechanics-based coalescence condition for internal necking introduces the softening induced by secondary voids growing in the ligament between two primary voids. The FE cell calculations were used to guide and assess the development of this model. The use of the coalescence condition relies on a closed-form model for estimating the evolution of the secondary voids in the vicinity of a primary cavity. This coalescence criterion is connected to an extended Gurson model for the first population including the effect of the void aspect ratio. With respect to classical models for single void population, this new constitutive model improves the predictive potential of damage constitutive models devoted to ductile metal while requiring only two new parameters, i.e. the initial porosity of second population and a void nucleation stress, without any additional

  14. Three-Dimensional Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Void Coalescence during Dynamic Fracture of Ductile Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppala, E T; Belak, J; Rudd, R E

    2004-09-02

    Void coalescence and interaction in dynamic fracture of ductile metals have been investigated using three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. The interaction of the voids is not reflected in the volumetric asymptotic growth rate of the voids, as demonstrated here. Finally, the practice of using a single void and periodic boundary conditions to study coalescence is examined critically and shown to produce results markedly different than the coalescence of a pair of isolated voids.

  15. Voids and superstructures: correlations and induced large-scale velocity flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lares, Marcelo; Luparello, Heliana E.; Maldonado, Victoria; Ruiz, Andrés N.; Paz, Dante J.; Ceccarelli, Laura; Garcia Lambas, Diego

    2017-09-01

    The expanding complex pattern of filaments, walls and voids build the evolving cosmic web with material flowing from underdense on to high density regions. Here, we explore the dynamical behaviour of voids and galaxies in void shells relative to neighbouring overdense superstructures, using the Millenium simulation and the main galaxy catalogue in Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. We define a correlation measure to estimate the tendency of voids to be located at a given distance from a superstructure. We find voids-in-clouds (S-types) preferentially located closer to superstructures than voids-in-voids (R-types) although we obtain that voids within ∼40 h-1 Mpc of superstructures are infalling in a similar fashion independently of void type. Galaxies residing in void shells show infall towards the closest superstructure, along with the void global motion, with a differential velocity component depending on their relative position in the shell with respect to the direction to the superstructure. This effect is produced by void expansion and therefore is stronger for R-types. We also find that galaxies in void shells facing the superstructure flow towards the overdensities faster than galaxies elsewhere at the same relative distance to the superstructure. The results obtained for the simulation are also reproduced for the Sky Survey Data Release data with a linearized velocity field implementation.

  16. Comparison of voiding cystourethrography and urosonography with second-generation contrast agents in simultaneous prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świętoń, Dominik; Rybczyńska, Dorota; Czarniak, Piotr; Szarmach, Arkadiusz; Kaszubowski, Mariusz; Szurowska, Edyta

    2016-01-01

    Background The invasiveness and exposure to radiation in voiding cystourethrography led to the introduction of alternative methods of diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux, including contrast enhanced voiding urosonography. While there is a limited number of studies comparing these methods using new generation ultrasound contrast agents, none of them compared both methods simultaneously. This study is aimed at assessing agreement between contrast enhanced voiding urosonography with second-generation ultrasound contrast agents and voiding cystourethrography. Methods From April 2013 to May 2014, 83 children (37 female and 46 male), mean age 3.5 years, age range from 1 month to 17.5 years, underwent prospective simultaneous assessment by contrast enhanced voiding urosonography and voiding cystourethrography, with a total of 166 uretero-renal units evaluated. Results The sensitivity of voiding cystourethrography and contrast enhanced voiding urosonography were comparable, amounting to 88%, however, neither reached 100% for the entire studied population. The negative predictive value of voiding urosonography and voiding cystourethrography was 97%, and there was no difference between both methods. Conclusion Voiding cystourethrography and contrast enhanced voiding urosonography are comparable methods in diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux, and can be performed alternatively. However, some limitations of contrast enhanced voiding urosonography must be remembered.

  17. Antigen-Specific B Cells Reactivate an Effective Cytotoxic T Cell Response against Phagocytosed Salmonella through Cross-Presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, J.; Souwer, Y.; Jorritsma, T.; Bos, H.; ten Brinke, A.; Neefjes, J.; Ham, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The eradication of facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens, like Salmonella typhi, requires the concerted action of both the humoral immune response and the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to orchestrate the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response vi

  18. In Situ Void Fraction and Gas Volume in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 as Measured with the Void Fraction Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CW Stewart; G Chen; JM Alzheimer; PA Meyer

    1998-11-10

    The void fraction instrument (WI) was deployed in Tank 241-SY-101 three times in 1998 to confm and locate the retained gas (void) postulated to be causing the accelerating waste level rise observed since 1995. The design, operation, and data reduction model of the WI are described along with validation testing and potential sources of uncertainty. The test plans, field observations and void measurements are described in detail, including the total gas volume calculations and the gas volume model. Based on 1998 data, the void fraction averaged 0.013 i 0.001 in the mixed slurry and 0.30 ~ 0.04 in the crust. This gives gas volumes (at standard pressure and temperature) of 87 t 9 scm in the slurry and 138 ~ 22 scm in the crust for a total retained gas volume of221 *25 scm. This represents an increase of about 74 scm in the crust and a decrease of about 34 scm in the slurry from 1994/95 results. The overall conclusion is that the gas retention is occurring mainly in the crust layer and there is very little gas in the mixed slurry and loosely settled layers below. New insights on crust behavior are also revealed.

  19. Rationally Designed Vaccines Targeting the V2 Region of HIV-1 gp120 Induce a Focused, Cross-Clade-Reactive, Biologically Functional Antibody Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Powell, Rebecca; Yahyaei, Sara; Williams, Constance; Jiang, Xunqing; Li, Wei; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia; Upadhyay, Chitra; Hioe, Catarina E; Totrov, Max; Kong, Xiangpeng

    2016-12-15

    Strong antibody (Ab) responses against V1V2 epitopes of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 envelope (Env) correlated with reduced infection rates in studies of HIV, simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). In order to focus the Ab response on V1V2, we used six V1V2 sequences and nine scaffold proteins to construct immunogens which were tested using various immunization regimens for their ability to induce cross-reactive and biologically active V2 Abs in rabbits. A prime/boost immunization strategy was employed using gp120 DNA and various V1V2-scaffold proteins. The rabbit polyclonal Ab responses (i) were successfully focused on the V1V2 region, with weak or only transient responses to other Env epitopes, (ii) displayed broad cross-reactive binding activity with gp120s and the V1V2 regions of diverse strains from clades B, C, and E, (iii) included V2 Abs with specificities similar to those found in HIV-infected individuals, and (iv) remained detectable ≥1 year after the last boosting dose. Importantly, sera from rabbits receiving V1V2-scaffold immunogens displayed Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis whereas sera from rabbits receiving only gp120 did not. The results represent the first fully successful example of reverse vaccinology in the HIV vaccine field with rationally designed epitope scaffold immunogens inducing Abs that recapitulate the epitope specificity and biologic activity of the human monoclonal Abs from which the immunogens were designed. Moreover, this is the first immunogenicity study using epitope-targeting, rationally designed vaccine constructs that induced an Fc-mediated activity associated with protection from infection with HIV, SIV, and SHIV. Novel immunogens were designed to focus the antibody response of rabbits on the V1V2 epitopes of HIV-1 gp120 since such antibodies were associated with reduced infection rates of HIV, SIV, and SHIV. The vaccine-induced antibodies were broadly

  20. Cross-reactive neutralizing antibody responses to enterovirus 71 infections in young children: implications for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Liang Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71 has caused life-threatening outbreaks involving neurological and cardiopulmonary complications in Asian children with unknown mechanism. EV71 has one single serotype but can be phylogenetically classified into 3 main genogroups (A, B and C and 11 genotypes (A, B1∼B5 and C1∼C5. In Taiwan, nationwide EV71 epidemics with different predominant genotypes occurred in 1998 (C2, 2000-2001 (B4, 2004-2005 (C4, and 2008 (B5. In this study, sera were collected to measure cross-reactive neutralizing antibody titers against different genotypes. METHODS: We collected historical sera from children who developed an EV71 infection in 1998, 2000, 2005, 2008, or 2010 and measured cross-reactive neutralizing antibody titers against all 11 EV71 genotypes. In addition, we aligned and compared the amino acid sequences of P1 proteins of the tested viruses. RESULTS: Serology data showed that children infected with genogroups B and C consistently have lower neutralizing antibody titers against genogroup A (>4-fold difference. The sequence comparisons revealed that five amino acid signatures (N143D in VP2; K18R, H116Y, D167E, and S275A in VP1 are specific for genogroup A and may be related to the observed antigenic variations. CONCLUSIONS: This study documented antigenic variations among different EV71 genogroups and identified potential immunodominant amino acid positions. Enterovirus surveillance and vaccine development should monitor these positions.

  1. Genetic control of murine T cell proliferative responses to Mycobacterium leprae. V. Evidence for cross-reactivity between host antigens and Mycobacterium leprae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, D.P.; Jones, A.G.; Wade, S.; Krahenbuhl, J.L.; Gillis, T.P.; Watson, J.D.

    1988-09-01

    T cell proliferative responses to Mycobacterium leprae were measured by immunization of mice at the base of the tail with Ag and challenging lymphocytes from draining lymph nodes in culture with M. leprae. C57BL/10J and B10.BR mice were identified as low responder mice and the congenic strains B10.M, B10.Q, and B10.AKM as high responders whereas F1 (high x low) hybrid mice were found to be low responders. The cellular basis of low responsiveness did not appear to result from a defect in Ag-presenting cells or the activation of suppressor T cells by M. leprae. The influence of the environment in which T cells developed on responsiveness to M. leprae was analyzed in chimeric mice prepared by irradiating F1(C57BL/10J x B10.M) mice and reconstituting with bone marrow from C57BL/10J, B10.M, or F1 donors. Six weeks later, chimeric mice were immunized with M. leprae, lymph node cells were subsequently prepared, and H-2 phenotyped and challenged in culture with M. leprae Ag. T cell proliferative responses were found to be low in all cases, similar to those observed using lymph node cells from F1 hybrid mice. These results suggested that high responder B10.M lymphocytes developing in the irradiated F1 mice became tolerized to antigenic determinants found on M. leprae. This implied cross-reactive epitopes existed between some mouse strains and M. leprae. Low responsiveness to M. leprae in low responder and F1 hybrid mice may result from tolerance to H-2-encoded Ag that show cross-reactivity with M. leprae.

  2. Mechanical Stress Effects on Electromigration Voiding in a Meandering Test Stripe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, L. E.; Tai, B. H.; Mattila, J.; Walsh, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    Earlier experimental findings concluded that electromigratin voids in these meandering stripe test structures were not randomly distributed and that void nucleation frequenly occurred sub-surface at the metal/thermal oxide interface.

  3. Idiopathic detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in neurologically normal patients with voiding abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, T M; Djurhuus, J C; Schrøder, H D

    1982-01-01

    Symptomatology and clinical manifestations of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia are described in 23 patients without neurological disease. Their cardinal symptoms were recurrent cystitis, enuresis, frequent voiding, back pain during voiding and anal discomfort. The major objective finding was vesico...

  4. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrotriya, Shiva; Walsh, Declan; Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Thomas, Shirley; Lorton, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence. Methods MeSH (Medical Subject Heading) terms were used to search multiple electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, SCOPUS, EBM-Cochrane). Two independent reviewers selected research papers. We also included a quality Assessment (QA) score. Reports with QA scores lung, pancreas, hepatocellular cancer, and bladder) an elevated CRP also predicted prognosis. In addition there is also evidence to support the use of CRP to help decide treatment response and identify tumor recurrence. Better designed large scale studies should be conducted to examine these issues more comprehensively. PMID:26717416

  5. Antigen-Specific B Cells Reactivate an Effective Cytotoxic T Cell Response against Phagocytosed Salmonella through Cross-Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jelle de Wit; Yuri Souwer; Tineke Jorritsma; Hanny Klaasse Bos; Anja ten Brinke; Jacques Neefjes; S Marieke van Ham

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The eradication of facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens, like Salmonella typhi, requires the concerted action of both the humoral immune response and the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to orchestrate the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response via cross-presentation of bacterial antigens onto MHC class I molecules. Cross-presentation of Salmonella by DCs however, is accompanied by the induction of apoptosis in the DCs. Besides antibody pro...

  6. A pilot trial using lymphocytes genetically engineered with an NY-ESO-1-reactive T-cell receptor: long-term follow-up and correlates with response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Paul F; Kassim, Sadik H; Tran, Thai L N; Crystal, Jessica S; Morgan, Richard A; Feldman, Steven A; Yang, James C; Dudley, Mark E; Wunderlich, John R; Sherry, Richard M; Kammula, Udai S; Hughes, Marybeth S; Restifo, Nicholas P; Raffeld, Mark; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Li, Yong F; El-Gamil, Mona; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2015-03-01

    Although adoptive cell therapy can be highly effective for the treatment of patients with melanoma, the application of this approach to the treatment of other solid tumors has been limited. The observation that the cancer germline (CG) antigen NY-ESO-1 is expressed in 70% to 80% and in approximately 25% of patients with synovial cell sarcoma and melanoma, respectively, prompted us to perform this first-in-man clinical trial using the adoptive transfer of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were retrovirally transduced with an NY-ESO-1-reactive T-cell receptor (TCR) to heavily pretreated patients bearing these metastatic cancers. HLA-*0201 patients with metastatic synovial cell sarcoma or melanoma refractory to standard treatments and whose cancers expressed NY-ESO-1 received autologous TCR-transduced T cells following a lymphodepleting preparative chemotherapy. Response rates using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), as well as immunologic correlates of response, are presented in this report. Eleven of 18 patients with NY-ESO-1(+) synovial cell sarcomas (61%) and 11 of 20 patients with NY-ESO-1(+) melanomas (55%) who received autologous T cells transduced with an NY-ESO-1-reactive TCR demonstrated objective clinical responses. The estimated overall 3- and 5-year survival rates for patients with synovial cell sarcoma were 38% and 14%, respectively, whereas the corresponding estimated survival rates for patients with melanoma were both 33%. The adoptive transfer of autologous T cells transduced with a retrovirus encoding a TCR against an HLA-A*0201 restricted NY-ESO-1 epitope can be an effective therapy for some patients bearing synovial cell sarcomas and melanomas that are refractory to other treatments. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Ad35 and ad26 vaccine vectors induce potent and cross-reactive antibody and T-cell responses to multiple filovirus species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Zahn

    Full Text Available Filoviruses cause sporadic but highly lethal outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever in Africa in the human population. Currently, no drug or vaccine is available for treatment or prevention. A previous study with a vaccine candidate based on the low seroprevalent adenoviruses 26 and 35 (Ad26 and Ad35 was shown to provide protection against homologous Ebola Zaire challenge in non human primates (NHP if applied in a prime-boost regimen. Here we have aimed to expand this principle to construct and evaluate Ad26 and Ad35 vectors for development of a vaccine to provide universal filovirus protection against all highly lethal strains that have caused major outbreaks in the past. We have therefore performed a phylogenetic analysis of filovirus glycoproteins to select the glycoproteins from two Ebola species (Ebola Zaire and Ebola Sudan/Gulu,, two Marburg strains (Marburg Angola and Marburg Ravn and added the more distant non-lethal Ebola Ivory Coast species for broadest coverage. Ad26 and Ad35 vectors expressing these five filovirus glycoproteins were evaluated to induce a potent cellular and humoral immune response in mice. All adenoviral vectors induced a humoral immune response after single vaccination in a dose dependent manner that was cross-reactive within the Ebola and Marburg lineages. In addition, both strain-specific as well as cross-reactive T cell responses could be detected. A heterologous Ad26-Ad35 prime-boost regime enhanced mainly the humoral and to a lower extend the cellular immune response against the transgene. Combination of the five selected filovirus glycoproteins in one multivalent vaccine potentially elicits protective immunity in man against all major filovirus strains that have caused lethal outbreaks in the last 20 years.

  8. Reactive Hypoglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) that occurs while fasting. Signs and symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia may include ... and very important. It's also important to include physical activity in your daily routine. Your doctor can help ...

  9. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  10. Reactivity feedback coefficients Pakistan research reactor-1 using PRIDE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansoor, Ali; Ahmed, Siraj-ul-Islam; Khan, Rustam [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Inam-ul-Haq [Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics

    2017-05-15

    Results of the analyses performed for fuel, moderator and void's temperature feedback reactivity coefficients for the first high power core configuration of Pakistan Research Reactor - 1 (PARR-1) are summarized. For this purpose, a validated three dimensional model of PARR-1 core was developed and confirmed against the reference results for reactivity calculations. The ''Program for Reactor In-Core Analysis using Diffusion Equation'' (PRIDE) code was used for development of global (3-dimensional) model in conjunction with WIMSD4 for lattice cell modeling. Values for isothermal fuel, moderator and void's temperature feedback reactivity coefficients have been calculated. Additionally, flux profiles for the five energy groups were also generated.

  11. Effect of initial void shape on ductile failure in a shear field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2015-01-01

    For voids in a shear field unit cell model analyses have been used to show that ductile failure is predicted even though the stress triaxiality is low or perhaps negative, so that the void volume fraction does not grow during deformation. Here, the effect of the void shape is studied by analyzing...

  12. Void structure of concrete with superabsorbent polymers and its relation to frost resistance of concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Laustsen, Sara

    2013-01-01

    the difference between poor and satisfactory frost-resistance. Furthermore, the results indicate that voids created directly by SAP protect concrete against frost deterioration just like other air voids; if the concrete contains enough SAP voids, these alone can provide sufficient frost resistance. © 2013 RILEM....

  13. Elastic–plastic void expansion in near-self-similar shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2011-01-01

    For void growth in an elastic–plastic strain hardening material the preferred shape of the void is calculated, dependent on the macroscopic stress state. Axisymmetric cell model analyses are carried out with a very small initial void size relative to the cell dimensions. Large deformations of the...

  14. 42 CFR 457.216 - Treatment of uncashed or canceled (voided) CHIP checks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Treatment of uncashed or canceled (voided) CHIP... canceled (voided) CHIP checks. (a) Purpose. This section provides rules to ensure that States refund the... section— Canceled (voided) check means an CHIP check issued by a State or fiscal agent that prior to...

  15. The Influence of the Presence of Multiple Voids on the Discharge Patterns in Solid Epoxy Insulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim T.; Henriksen, Mogens; Larsen, Esben

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, partial discharge test results from initial long term testing on samples which contain more voids, when exposed to a high electric stress will be presented. The influence on the discharge patterns, phase- and height-analyses, of such parameter as the number of voids and the void di...

  16. Perineal surface electromyography does not typically demonstrate expected relaxation during normal voiding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Anna C; Nager, Charles W; Litman, Heather J; Fitzgerald, Mary P; Kraus, Stephen; Norton, Peggy; Sirls, Larry; Rickey, Leslie; Wilson, Tracey; Dandreo, Kimberly J; Shepherd, Jonathan; Zimmern, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    To describe perineal surface patch electromyography (EMG) activity during urodynamics (UDS) and compare activity between filling and voiding phases and to assess for a relationship between preoperative EMG activity and postoperative voiding symptoms. 655 women underwent standardized preoperative UDS that included perineal surface EMG prior to undergoing surgery for stress urinary incontinence. Pressure-flow studies were evaluated for abdominal straining and interrupted flow. Quantitative EMG values were extracted from 10 predetermined time-points and compared between fill and void. Qualitative EMG activity was assessed for the percent of time EMG was active during fill and void and for the average amplitude of EMG during fill compared to void. Postoperative voiding dysfunction was defined as surgical revision or catheterization more than 6 weeks after surgery. Fisher's exact test with a 5% two-sided significance level was used to assess differences in EMG activity and postoperative voiding dysfunction. 321 UDS had interpretable EMG studies, of which 131 (41%) had EMG values at all 10 predetermined and annotated time-points. Quantitative and qualitative EMG signals during flow were usually greater than during fill. The prevalence of postoperative voiding dysfunction in subjects with higher preoperative EMG activity during void was not significantly different. Results were similar in the 42 subjects who had neither abdominal straining during void nor interrupted flow. Perineal surface patch EMG did not measure expected pelvic floor and urethral sphincter relaxation during voiding. Preoperative EMG did not predict patients at risk for postoperative voiding dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. 46 CFR 154.1210 - Hold space, void space, cofferdam, and spaces containing cargo piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hold space, void space, cofferdam, and spaces containing... Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Area: Mechanical Ventilation System § 154.1210 Hold space, void space, cofferdam, and spaces containing cargo piping. (a) Each hold space, void space, cofferdam,...

  18. Constraining CMB-consistent primordial voids with cluster evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mathis, H; Griffiths, L M; Kunz, M

    2004-01-01

    Using cosmological simulations, we make predictions for the distribution of clusters in a plausible non-gaussian model where primordial voids nucleated during inflation act together with scale-invariant adiabatic gaussian fluctuations as seeds for the formation of large-scale structure. This model agrees with most recent observations of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and can account for the excess of power measured on cluster scales by the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI), the large empty regions apparent in nearby galaxy redshift surveys and the number of giant arcs measured in deep cluster lensing surveys. We show that the z=0 cluster mass function differs from predictions for a standard LCDM cosmology with the same sigma_8. Moreover, as massive clusters also form much earlier in the "void" scenario, we show that integrated number counts of SZ sources and simple statistics of strong lensing can easily falsify this model.

  19. On the void explanation of the Cold Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Caballero, A.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Martínez-González, E.; Vielva, P.

    2016-07-01

    The integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) contribution induced on the cosmic microwave background by the presence of a supervoid as the one detected by Szapudi et al. (2015) is reviewed in this letter in order to check whether it could explain the Cold Spot (CS) anomaly. Two different models, previously used for the same purpose, are considered to describe the matter density profile of the void: a top hat function and a compensated profile produced by a Gaussian potential. The analysis shows that, even enabling ellipticity changes or different values for the dark-energy equation of state parameter ω, the ISW contribution due to the presence of the void does not reproduce the properties of the CS.

  20. The ISW imprints of voids and superclusters on the CMB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkiss, S.; Nadathur, S.; Gottlöber, S.; Iliev, I. T.; Knebe, A.; Watson, W. A.; Yepes, G.

    2016-10-01

    We examine the stacked integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) imprints on the CMB along the lines of sight of voids and superclusters in galaxy surveys, using the Jubilee ISW simulation and mock luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalogues. We show that the expected signal in the concordance \\Lam CDM model is much smaller than the primary anisotropies arising at the last scattering surface and therefore any currently claimed detections of such an imprint cannot be caused by the ISW effect in \\Lam CDM. We look for the existence of such a signal in the Planck CMB using a catalogue of voids and superclusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), but find a result completely consistent with \\Lam CDM - i.e., a null detection.

  1. Study on voids of epoxy matrix composites sandwich structure parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Simin; Wen, Youyi; Yu, Wenjun; Liu, Hong; Yue, Cheng; Bao, Jing

    2017-03-01

    Void is the most common tiny defect of composite materials. Porosity is closely related to composite structure property. The voids forming behaviour in the composites sandwich structural parts with the carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins was researched by adjusting the manufacturing process parameters. The composites laminate with different porosities were prepared with the different process parameter. The ultrasonic non-destructive measurement method for the porosity was developed and verified through microscopic examination. The analysis results show that compaction pressure during the manufacturing process had influence on the porosity in the laminate area. Increasing the compaction pressure and compaction time will reduce the porosity of the laminates. The bond-line between honeycomb core and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins were also analyzed through microscopic examination. The mechanical properties of sandwich structure composites were studied. The optimization process parameters and porosity ultrasonic measurement method for composites sandwich structure have been applied to the production of the composite parts.

  2. Influence of voids in the hybrid layer based on self-etching adhesive systems: a 3-D FE analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Martini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of porosities at the dentin/adhesive interface has been observed with the use of new generation dentin bonding systems. These porosities tend to contradict the concept that etching and hybridization processes occur equally and simultaneously. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the micromechanical behavior of the hybrid layer (HL with voids based on a self-etching adhesive system using 3-D finite element (FE analysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three FE models (Mr were built: Mr, dentin specimen (41x41x82 μm with a regular and perfect (i.e. pore-free HL based on a self-etching adhesive system, restored with composite resin; Mp, similar to M, but containing 25% (v/v voids in the HL; Mpp, similar to Mr, but containing 50% (v/v voids in the HL. A tensile load (0.03N was applied on top of the composite resin. The stress field was obtained by using Ansys Workbench 10.0. The nodes of the base of the specimen were constrained in the x, y and z axes. The maximum principal stress (σmax was obtained for all structures at the dentin/adhesive interface. RESULTS: The Mpp showed the highest peak of σmax in the HL (32.2 MPa, followed by Mp (30 MPa and Mr (28.4 MPa. The stress concentration in the peritubular dentin was high in all models (120 MPa. All other structures positioned far from voids showed similar increase of stress. CONCLUSION: Voids incorporated into the HL raised the σmax in this region by 13.5%. This behavior might be responsible for lower bond strengths of self-etching and single-bottle adhesives, as reported in the literature.

  3. Validation uncertainty of MATRA code for subchannel void distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dae-Hyun; Kim, S. J.; Kwon, H.; Seo, K. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To extend code capability to the whole core subchannel analysis, pre-conditioned Krylov matrix solvers such as BiCGSTAB and GMRES are implemented in MATRA code as well as parallel computing algorithms using MPI and OPENMP. It is coded by fortran 90, and has some user friendly features such as graphic user interface. MATRA code was approved by Korean regulation body for design calculation of integral-type PWR named SMART. The major role subchannel code is to evaluate core thermal margin through the hot channel analysis and uncertainty evaluation for CHF predictions. In addition, it is potentially used for the best estimation of core thermal hydraulic field by incorporating into multiphysics and/or multi-scale code systems. In this study we examined a validation process for the subchannel code MATRA specifically in the prediction of subchannel void distributions. The primary objective of validation is to estimate a range within which the simulation modeling error lies. The experimental data for subchannel void distributions at steady state and transient conditions was provided on the framework of OECD/NEA UAM benchmark program. The validation uncertainty of MATRA code was evaluated for a specific experimental condition by comparing the simulation result and experimental data. A validation process should be preceded by code and solution verification. However, quantification of verification uncertainty was not addressed in this study. The validation uncertainty of the MATRA code for predicting subchannel void distribution was evaluated for a single data point of void fraction measurement at a 5x5 PWR test bundle on the framework of OECD UAM benchmark program. The validation standard uncertainties were evaluated as 4.2%, 3.9%, and 2.8% with the Monte-Carlo approach at the axial levels of 2216 mm, 2669 mm, and 3177 mm, respectively. The sensitivity coefficient approach revealed similar results of uncertainties but did not account for the nonlinear effects on the

  4. Analytical Description of Voids in Majumdar-Papapetrou Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Varela, V

    1999-01-01

    We discuss new Majumdar-Papapetrou solutions for the 3+1 Einstein-Maxwell equations, with charged dust acting as the external source of the fields. The solutions satisfy non-linear potential equations which are related to well-known wave equations of 1+1 soliton physics. Although the matter distributions are not localised, they present central structures which may be identified with voids.

  5. The Persistent Percolation of Single-Stream Voids

    CERN Document Server

    Falck, Bridget

    2014-01-01

    We study the nature of voids defined as single-stream regions that have not undergone shell-crossing. We use ORIGAMI to determine the cosmic web morphology of each dark matter particle in a suite of cosmological $N$-body simulations, which explicitly calculates whether a particle has crossed paths with others along multiple sets of axes and does not depend on a parameter or smoothing scale. The theoretical picture of voids is that of expanding underdensities with borders defined by shell-crossing. We find instead that locally underdense single-stream regions are not bounded on all sides by multi-stream regions, thus they percolate, filling the simulation volume; we show that the set of multi-stream particles also percolates. This percolation persists to high resolution, where the mass fraction of single-stream voids is low, because the volume fraction remains high; we speculate on the fraction of collapsed mass in the continuum limit of infinite resolution. By introducing a volume threshold parameter to defin...

  6. Multipole analysis of redshift-space distortions around cosmic voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Pisani, Alice; Aubert, Marie; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Weller, Jochen

    2017-07-01

    We perform a comprehensive redshift-space distortion analysis based on cosmic voids in the large-scale distribution of galaxies observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. To this end, we measure multipoles of the void-galaxy cross-correlation function and compare them with standard model predictions in cosmology. Merely considering linear-order theory allows us to accurately describe the data on the entire available range of scales and to probe void-centric distances down to about 2 h-1Mpc. Common systematics, such as the Fingers-of-God effect, scale-dependent galaxy bias, and nonlinear clustering do not seem to play a significant role in our analysis. We constrain the growth rate of structure via the redshift-space distortion parameter β at two median redshifts, β(bar z=0.32)=0.599+0.134-0.124 and β(bar z=0.54)=0.457+0.056-0.054, with a precision that is competitive with state-of-the-art galaxy-clustering results. While the high-redshift constraint perfectly agrees with model expectations, we observe a mild 2σ deviation at bar z=0.32, which increases to 3σ when the data is restricted to the lowest available redshift range of 0.15

  7. Piezoelectric performance of fluor polymer sandwiches with different void structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Kexing; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Xia, Zhongfu

    2012-06-01

    Film sandwiches, consisting of two outer layers of fluoroethylenepropylene and one middle layer of patterned porous polytetrafluoroethylene, were prepared by patterning and fusion bonding. Contact charging was conducted to render the films piezoelectric. The critical voltage to trigger air breakdown in the inner voids in the fabricated films was investigated. The piezoelectric d 33 coefficients were measured employing the quasistatic method and dielectric resonance spectrum. The results show that the critical voltage for air breakdown in the inner voids is associated with the void microstructure of the films. For the films with patterning factors of 0%, 25% and 44%, the critical values are 300, 230 and 230 kV/cm, respectively. With an increase in the patterning factor, both the piezoelectric d 33 coefficients determined from the dielectric resonance spectra and those determined from quasistatic measurements increase, which might be due to a decrease in Young's modulus for the films. The nonlinearity of d 33 becomes increasingly obvious as the patterning factor increases.

  8. Pulsed electrical breakdown of a void-filled dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. A.; Lagasse, R. R.; Schroeder, J. L.

    2002-05-01

    We report breakdown strengths in a void-filled dielectric material, epoxy containing 48 vol % hollow glass microballoon filler, which is stressed with unipolar voltage pulses of the order of 10 μs duration. The microballoon voids had mean diameters of approximately 40 μm and contained SO2 gas at roughly 30% atmospheric pressure. This void-filled material displays good dielectric strength (of the order of 100 kV mm-1) under these short-pulse test conditions. Results from a variety of electrode geometries are reported, including arrangements in which the electric stress is highly nonuniform. Conventional breakdown criteria based on mean or peak electric stress do not account for these data. A statistics-based predictive breakdown model is developed, in which the dielectric is divided into independent, microballoon-sized "discharge cells" and the spontaneous discharge of a single cell is presumed to launch full breakdown of the composite. We obtain two empirical parameters, the mean and standard deviation of the spontaneous discharge field, by fitting breakdown data from two electrode geometries having roughly uniform fields but with greatly differing volumes of electrically stressed material. This model accounts for many aspects of our data, including the inherent statistical scatter and the dependence on the stressed volume, and it provides informative predictions with electrode geometries giving highly nonuniform fields. Issues related to computational spatial resolution and cutoff distance are also discussed.

  9. Tomography of integrated circuit interconnect with an electromigration void

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Zachary H. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States); Kalukin, Andrew R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kuhn, Markus [Intel Corporation RA1-329, 5200 Northeast Elam Young Parkway, Hillsboro, Oregon 74124 (United States); Frigo, Sean P. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); McNulty, Ian [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Retsch, Cornelia C. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Wang, Yuxin [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Arp, Uwe [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Lucatorto, Thomas B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Ravel, Bruce D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States)] (and others)

    2000-05-01

    An integrated circuit interconnect was subject to accelerated-life test conditions to induce an electromigration void. The silicon substrate was removed, leaving only the interconnect test structure encased in silica. We imaged the sample with 1750 eV photons using the 2-ID-B scanning transmission x-ray microscope at the Advanced Photon Source, a third-generation synchrotron facility. Fourteen views through the sample were obtained over a 170 degree sign range of angles (with a 40 degree sign gap) about a single rotation axis. Two sampled regions were selected for three-dimensional reconstruction: one of the ragged end of a wire depleted by the void, the other of the adjacent interlevel connection (or ''via''). We applied two reconstruction techniques: the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique and a Bayesian reconstruction technique, the generalized Gaussian Markov random field method. The stated uncertainties are total, with one standard deviation, which resolved the sample to 200{+-}70 and 140{+-}30 nm, respectively. The tungsten via is distinguished from the aluminum wire by higher absorption. Within the void, the aluminum is entirely depleted from under the tungsten via. The reconstructed data show the applicability of this technique to three-dimensional imaging of buried defects in submicrometer structures relevant to the microelectronics industry. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  10. On the Star Formation Properties of Void Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moorman, Crystal M; White, Amanda; Vogeley, Michael S; Hoyle, Fiona; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2016-01-01

    We measure the star formation properties of two large samples of galaxies from the SDSS in large-scale cosmic voids on time scales of 10 Myr and 100 Myr, using H$\\alpha$ emission line strengths and GALEX FUV fluxes, respectively. The first sample consists of 109,818 optically selected galaxies. We find that void galaxies in this sample have higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs; star formation rates per unit stellar mass) than similar stellar mass galaxies in denser regions. The second sample is a subset of the optically selected sample containing 8070 galaxies with reliable HI detections from ALFALFA. For the full HI detected sample, SSFRs do not vary systematically with large-scale environment. However, investigating only the HI detected dwarf galaxies reveals a trend towards higher SSFRs in voids. Furthermore, we estimate the star formation rate per unit HI mass (known as the star formation efficiency; SFE) of a galaxy, as a function of environment. For the overall HI detected population, we notice n...

  11. Dwarf Galaxies in Voids: Dark Matter Halos and Gas Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hoeft

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Galaxy surveys have shown that luminous galaxies are mainly distributed in large filaments and galaxy clusters. The remaining large volumes are virtually devoid of luminous galaxies. This is in concordance with the formation of the large-scale structure in the universe as derived from cosmological simulations. However, the numerical results indicate that cosmological voids are abundantly populated with dark matter haloes which may in principle host dwarf galaxies. Observational efforts have in contrast revealed that voids are apparently devoid of dwarf galaxies. We investigate the formation of dwarf galaxies in voids by hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. Due to the cosmic ultraviolet background radiation low-mass haloes show generally a reduced baryon fraction. We determine the characteristic mass below which dwarf galaxies are baryon deficient. We show that the circular velocity below which the accretion of baryons is suppressed is approximately 40 kms−1. The suppressed baryon accretion is caused by the photo-heating due to the UV background. We set up a spherical halo model and show that the effective equation of the state of the gas in the periphery of dwarf galaxies determines the characteristic mass. This implies that any process which heats the gas around dwarf galaxies increases the characteristic mass and thus reduces the number of observable dwarf galaxies.

  12. VOID GROWTH AND CAVITATION IN NONLINEAR VISCOELASTIC SOLIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张赟; 黄筑平

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the growth of a pre-existing void in a nonlinear viscoelastic material subjected to remote hydrostatic tensions with different loading rates. The constitutive relation of this viscoelastic material is the one recently proposed by the present authors, which may be considered as a generalization of the non-Gaussian statistical theory in rubber elasticity. As the first order approximation, the above constitutive relation can be reduced to the "neo-Hookean" type viscoelastic one.Investigations of the influences of the material viscosity and the loading rate on the void growth, or on the cavitation are carried out. It is found that: (1) for generalized "inverse Langevin approximation"nonlinear viscoelastic materials, the cavitation limit does not exist, but there is a certain (remote)stress level at which the void will grow rapidly; (2) for generalized "Gaussian statistics" (neo-Hookean type) viscoelastic materials, the cavitation limit exists, and is an increasing function of the loading rate.The present discussions may be of importance in understanding the material failure process under high triaxial stress.

  13. Confirmation of sublunarean voids and thin layering in mare deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M. S.; Ashley, J. W.; Boyd, A. K.; Wagner, R. V.; Speyerer, E. J.; Ray Hawke, B.; Hiesinger, H.; van der Bogert, C. H.

    2012-08-01

    Typical flow thicknesses of lunar mare basalts were not well constrained in the past, because as craters and rilles age, downslope movement of loose material tends to mix and bury stratigraphy, obscuring the three dimensional nature of the maria. New Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera high resolution images unambiguously reveal thicknesses of mare basalt layers exposed in impact craters, rilles, and steep-walled pits. Pits up to one hundred meters deep present relatively unmodified, near-vertical sections of mare in three cases, and many young impact craters also expose well preserved sections of mare. Oblique views of each pit and many of these craters reveal multiple layers, 3 to 14 m thick, indicating that eruptions typically produced a series of ˜10 m thick flows (or flow lobes) rather than flows many tens to hundreds of meters thick. Additionally, these images unambiguously show that the floors of two pits extend beneath the mare surfaces, thus revealing sublunarean voids of unknown lateral extent. We also document the occurrence of pits that may be expressions of collapse into subsurface voids in non-mare impact melt deposits. These voids are compelling targets for future human and robotic exploration, with potential as temporary shelters, habitations, or geologic museums.

  14. Enthalpy and void distributions in subchannels of PHWR fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. W.; Choi, H.; Rhee, B. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Two different types of the CANDU fuel bundles have been modeled for the ASSERT-IV code subchannel analysis. From calculated values of mixture enthalpy and void fraction distribution in the fuel bundles, it is found that net buoyancy effect is pronounced in the central region of the DUPIC fuel bundle when compared with the standard CANDU fuel bundle. It is also found that the central region of the DUPIC fuel bundle can be cooled more efficiently than that of the standard fuel bundle. From the calculated mixture enthalpy distribution at the exit of the fuel channel, it is found that the mixture enthalpy and void fraction can be highest in the peripheral region of the DUPIC fuel bundle. On the other hand, the enthalpy and the void fraction were found to be highest in the central region of the standard CANDU fuel bundle at the exit of the fuel channel. This study shows that the subchannel analysis is very useful in assessing thermal behavior of the fuel bundle that could be used in CANDU reactors. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  15. A reactive transport model for the geochemical response, detection and potential mitigation of CO2 leakage into a confined aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K.; Druhan, J. L.; Vialle, S.; Benson, S. M.; Agarwal, A.

    2013-12-01

    Long-term storage of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface generally assumes that caprock formations will serve as physical barriers to upward migration of CO2. Stability and coherence of the caprocks are thus important criteria for site selection, but caprock integritycannot be guaranteed with total certainty over the lifetime of the project. As a result, carbon capture and storage projects require reliable techniques to monitor geologic storage sites for newly formed leaks, and the ability to rapidly deploy mitigation measures should leakage occur. Here, we present two-dimensional reactive transport simulations to evaluate the hydrogeochemical characteristics of a newly formed CO2 leak into an overlying reservoir. Simulations use the ToughReact multi-component reactive transport code and hypothetical reservoir characteristics. We focus on the comparatively short time period of days to months following formation of the leak to consider (1) geochemical shifts in formation water indicative of the leak, (2) hydrodynamics of pumping wells in the vicinity of the leak, and (3) delivery of a sealant to the leak through an adjacent well bore. Our results suggest that characteristic shifts in pH and dissolved inorganic carbon might be detected in down-gradient mentoring wells prior to the breakthrough of CO2, and could offer a potential means of identifying small and newly formed leaks. Injecting water into the aquifer through pumping wells in the vicinity of the leak provides a hydrodynamic control that can prevent CO2 from reaching the top of the reservoir, but this action will likely have only minor influence on the rate of leakage through the caprock defect. Injection of a hypothetical sealant through an adjacent pumping well is considered using an aqueous solute with pH-dependent equilibrium constraints such that the species is soluble in the basic pH range but forms a precipitate at neutral to acidic pH conditions associated with CO2-rich water. Injection of this

  16. Role of void space geometry in permeability evolution in crustal rocks at elevated pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Philip M.; Meredith, Philip G.; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2006-12-01

    A key consequence of the presence of void space within rock is their significant influence upon fluid transport properties. In this study, we measure changes in elastic wave velocities (P and S) contemporaneously with changes in permeability and porosity at elevated pressure for three rock types with widely different void space geometries: a high-porosity sandstone (Bentheim), a tight sandstone (Crab Orchard), and a microcracked granodiorite (Takidani). Laboratory data are then used with the permeability models of Guéguen and Dienes and Kozeny-Carman to investigate the characteristics that different void space geometries impart to measured permeabilities. Using the Kachanov effective medium theory, elastic wave velocities are inverted, permitting the recovery of crack density evolution with increasing effective pressure. The crack densities are then used as input to the microcrack permeability model of Guéguen and Dienes. The classic Kozeny-Carman approach of Walsh and Brace is also applied to the measured permeability data via a least squares fit in order to extract tortuosity data. We successfully predict the evolution of permeability with increasing effective pressure, as directly measured in experiments, and report the contrast between permeability changes observed in rock where microcracks or equant pores dominate the microstructure. Additionally, we show how these properties are affected by anisotropy of the rock types via the measured anisotropic fabrics in each rock. The combined experimental and modeling results illustrate the importance of understanding the details of how rock microstructure changes in response to an external stimulus in predicting the simultaneous evolution of different rock physical properties.

  17. Do behavioral responses mediate or moderate the relation between cardiovascular reactivity to stress and parental history of hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, Nicole L; Larkin, Kevin T; Goodie, Jeffrey L

    2002-05-01

    To examine whether differences in behavioral responses to stress mediated or moderated the relation between cardiovascular response to stress and parental history of hypertension, 64 healthy undergraduates-16 men with hypertensive parents (PH+), 16 men without hypertensive parents (PH-), 16 PH+ women, and 16 PH- women-participated in a mental arithmetic task, mirror tracing task, and 2 interpersonal role plays. PH+ participants exhibited higher resting heart rates than PH- participants and higher resting systolic blood pressures (SBPs) than PH- women. PH+ participants exhibited greater SBP responses to tasks and engaged in more negative verbal and nonverbal behavior across tasks than PH- counterparts. Differences in behavioral responding neither mediated nor moderated the observed relation between parental history status and SBP response to stress.

  18. Single-Cell Analysis of the Plasmablast Response to Vibrio cholerae Demonstrates Expansion of Cross-Reactive Memory B Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kauffman, Robert C.; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur R.; Nakajima, Rie; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M.; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Rahman, Atiqur; Bhaumik, Siddhartha K.; Harris, Levelle; O'Neal, Justin T.; Trost, Jessica F.; Alam, Nur Haq; Jasinskas, Algis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We characterized the acute B cell response in adults with cholera by analyzing the repertoire, specificity, and functional characteristics of 138 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) generated from single-cell-sorted plasmablasts. We found that the cholera-induced responses were characterized by high levels of somatic hypermutation and large clonal expansions. A majority of the expansions targeted cholera toxin (CT) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using a novel proteomics approach, we were able...

  19. Macrophages as target cells for Mayaro virus infection: involvement of reactive oxygen species in the inflammatory response during virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Mariana G; Costa, Leandro Silva DA; Campos, Holmes S; Alves, Letícia S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Poian, Andrea T DA

    2016-09-01

    Alphaviruses among the viruses that cause arthritis, consisting in a public health problem worldwide by causing localized outbreaks, as well as large epidemics in humans. Interestingly, while the Old World alphaviruses are arthritogenic, the New World alphaviruses cause encephalitis. One exception is Mayaro virus (MAYV), which circulates exclusively in South America but causes arthralgia and is phylogenetically related to the Old World alphaviruses. Although MAYV-induced arthritis in humans is well documented, the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to its pathogenesis are completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that macrophages, key players in arthritis development, are target cells for MAYV infection, which leads to cell death through apoptosis. We showed that MAYV replication in macrophage induced the expression of TNF, a cytokine that would contribute to pathogenesis of MAYV fever, since TNF promotes an inflammatory profile characteristic of arthritis. We also found a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at early times of infection, which coincides with the peak of virus replication and precedes TNF secretion. Treatment of the cells with antioxidant agents just after infection completely abolished TNF secretion, indicating an involvement of ROS in inflammation induced during MAYV infection.

  20. Reactive oxygen species regulate leaf pulvinus abscission zone cell separation in response to water-deficit stress in cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenbin; Wang, Gan; Li, Yayun; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Peng; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) plant resists water-deficit stress by shedding leaves leading to adaptive water-deficit condition. Transcriptomic, physiological, cellular, molecular, metabolic, and transgenic methods were used to study the mechanism of cassava abscission zone (AZ) cell separation under water-deficit stress. Microscopic observation indicated that AZ cell separation initiated at the later stages during water-deficit stress. Transcriptome profiling of AZ suggested that differential expression genes of AZ under stress mainly participate in reactive oxygen species (ROS) pathway. The key genes involved in hydrogen peroxide biosynthesis and metabolism showed significantly higher expression levels in AZ than non-separating tissues adjacent to the AZ under stress. Significantly higher levels of hydrogen peroxide correlated with hydrogen peroxide biosynthesis related genes and AZ cell separation was detected by microscopic observation, colorimetric detection and GC-MS analyses under stress. Co-overexpression of the ROS-scavenging proteins SOD and CAT1 in cassava decreased the levels of hydrogen peroxide in AZ under water-deficit stress. The cell separation of the pulvinus AZ also delayed in co-overexpression of the ROS-scavenging proteins SOD and CAT1 plants both in vitro and at the plant level. Together, the results indicated that ROS play an important regulatory role in the process of cassava leaf abscission under water-deficit stress.