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Sample records for voiced sound signal

  1. Analysis of the influence of sound signal processing parameters on the quality voice command recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Dyuzhayev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. For the task of voice control over different devices recognition of single (isolated voice commands is required. Typically, this control method requires high reliability (at least 95% accuracy voice recognition. It should be noted that voice commands are often pronounced in high noisiness. All presently known methods and algorithms of speech recognition do not allow to clearly determine which parameters of sound signal can provide the best results. The main part. On the first level of voice recognition is about preprocessing and extracting of acoustic features that have a number of useful features – they are easily calculated, providing a compact representation of the voice commands that are resistant to noise interference; On the next level given command is looked for in the reference dictionary. To get MFCC coefficients input file has to be divided into frames. Each frame is measured by a window function and processed by discrete Fourier transform. The resulting representation of signal in the frequency domain is divided into ranges using a set of triangular filters. The last step is to perform discrete cosine transform. Method of dynamic time warping allows to get a value that is an inverse of degree of similarity between given command and a reference. Conclusions. Research has shown that in the field of voice commands recognition optimum results in terms of quality / performance can be achieved using the following parameters of sound signal processing:8 kHz sample rate, frame duration 70–120 ms, Hamming weighting function of a window, number of Fourier samples is 512.

  2. Facing Sound - Voicing Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2013-01-01

    This article is based on examples of contemporary audiovisual art, with a special focus on the Tony Oursler exhibition Face to Face at Aarhus Art Museum ARoS in Denmark in March-July 2012. My investigation involves a combination of qualitative interviews with visitors, observations of the audienc......´s interactions with the exhibition and the artwork in the museum space and short analyses of individual works of art based on reception aesthetics and phenomenology and inspired by newer writings on sound, voice and listening....

  3. Facing soundvoicing art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansa Lønstrup

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on examples of contemporary audiovisual art with a primary focus on the Tony Oursler solo exhibition Face to Face in Aarhus Art Museum ARoS, 2012. My investigation involves a combination of qualitative interviews with visitors, observations of the audience’s interactions with the exhibition and the artwork in the museum space, and short analyses of individual works of art based on reception aesthetics, phenomenology, and newer writings on sound, voice and listening. The focus of the investigation is the quality and possible perspectives of the interaction with audiovisual works of art, articulating and sounding out their own ‘voices’. This methodological combination has been chosen to transgress the dichotomy between the aesthetic or hermeneutic artwork ‘text’ analysis and cultural theory, which focuses on the context understood as the framing, the cultural acts and agendas around the aesthetic ‘text’. The article will include experiences with another exhibition, David Lynch: The Air is on Fire (Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris, 2007 and Kunstforeningen Gl. Strand, Copenhagen, 2010- 2011. The two exhibitions are fundamentally different in their integration of sound. My field of interest concerns the exploration of sound as artistic material in audiovisual combinations and those audiovisual works of art that might cause a change in the participatory strategy of the art museum towards the audience.

  4. Mapping Phonetic Features for Voice-Driven Sound Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janer, Jordi; Maestre, Esteban

    In applications where the human voice controls the synthesis of musical instruments sounds, phonetics convey musical information that might be related to the sound of the imitated musical instrument. Our initial hypothesis is that phonetics are user- and instrument-dependent, but they remain constant for a single subject and instrument. We propose a user-adapted system, where mappings from voice features to synthesis parameters depend on how subjects sing musical articulations, i.e. note to note transitions. The system consists of two components. First, a voice signal segmentation module that automatically determines note-to-note transitions. Second, a classifier that determines the type of musical articulation for each transition based on a set of phonetic features. For validating our hypothesis, we run an experiment where subjects imitated real instrument recordings with their voice. Performance recordings consisted of short phrases of saxophone and violin performed in three grades of musical articulation labeled as: staccato, normal, legato. The results of a supervised training classifier (user-dependent) are compared to a classifier based on heuristic rules (user-independent). Finally, from the previous results we show how to control the articulation in a sample-concatenation synthesizer by selecting the most appropriate samples.

  5. Developmental Changes in Locating Voice and Sound in Space

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    Emiko Kezuka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We know little about how infants locate voice and sound in a complex multi-modal space. Using a naturalistic laboratory experiment the present study tested 35 infants at 3 ages: 4 months (15 infants, 5 months (12 infants, and 7 months (8 infants. While they were engaged frontally with one experimenter, infants were presented with (a a second experimenter’s voice and (b castanet sounds from three different locations (left, right, and behind. There were clear increases with age in the successful localization of sounds from all directions, and a decrease in the number of repetitions required for success. Nonetheless even at 4 months two-thirds of the infants attempted to search for the voice or sound. At all ages localizing sounds from behind was more difficult and was clearly present only at 7 months. Perseverative errors (looking at the last location were present at all ages and appeared to be task specific (only present in the 7 month-olds for the behind location. Spontaneous attention shifts by the infants between the two experimenters, evident at 7 months, suggest early evidence for infant initiation of triadic attentional engagements. There was no advantage found for voice over castanet sounds in this study. Auditory localization is a complex and contextual process emerging gradually in the first half of the first year.

  6. Updating signal typing in voice: addition of type 4 signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprecher, Alicia; Olszewski, Aleksandra; Jiang, Jack J; Zhang, Yu

    2010-06-01

    The addition of a fourth type of voice to Titze's voice classification scheme is proposed. This fourth voice type is characterized by primarily stochastic noise behavior and is therefore unsuitable for both perturbation and correlation dimension analysis. Forty voice samples were classified into the proposed four types using narrowband spectrograms. Acoustic, perceptual, and correlation dimension analyses were completed for all voice samples. Perturbation measures tended to increase with voice type. Based on reliability cutoffs, the type 1 and type 2 voices were considered suitable for perturbation analysis. Measures of unreliability were higher for type 3 and 4 voices. Correlation dimension analyses increased significantly with signal type as indicated by a one-way analysis of variance. Notably, correlation dimension analysis could not quantify the type 4 voices. The proposed fourth voice type represents a subset of voices dominated by noise behavior. Current measures capable of evaluating type 4 voices provide only qualitative data (spectrograms, perceptual analysis, and an infinite correlation dimension). Type 4 voices are highly complex and the development of objective measures capable of analyzing these voices remains a topic of future investigation.

  7. The Sound of Voice: Voice-Based Categorization of Speakers' Sexual Orientation within and across Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, Simone; Fasoli, Fabio; Maass, Anne; Paladino, Maria Paola; Vespignani, Francesco; Eyssel, Friederike; Bentler, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Empirical research had initially shown that English listeners are able to identify the speakers' sexual orientation based on voice cues alone. However, the accuracy of this voice-based categorization, as well as its generalizability to other languages (language-dependency) and to non-native speakers (language-specificity), has been questioned recently. Consequently, we address these open issues in 5 experiments: First, we tested whether Italian and German listeners are able to correctly identify sexual orientation of same-language male speakers. Then, participants of both nationalities listened to voice samples and rated the sexual orientation of both Italian and German male speakers. We found that listeners were unable to identify the speakers' sexual orientation correctly. However, speakers were consistently categorized as either heterosexual or gay on the basis of how they sounded. Moreover, a similar pattern of results emerged when listeners judged the sexual orientation of speakers of their own and of the foreign language. Overall, this research suggests that voice-based categorization of sexual orientation reflects the listeners' expectations of how gay voices sound rather than being an accurate detector of the speakers' actual sexual identity. Results are discussed with regard to accuracy, acoustic features of voices, language dependency and language specificity.

  8. The Sound of Voice: Voice-Based Categorization of Speakers’ Sexual Orientation within and across Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Anne; Paladino, Maria Paola; Vespignani, Francesco; Eyssel, Friederike; Bentler, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Empirical research had initially shown that English listeners are able to identify the speakers' sexual orientation based on voice cues alone. However, the accuracy of this voice-based categorization, as well as its generalizability to other languages (language-dependency) and to non-native speakers (language-specificity), has been questioned recently. Consequently, we address these open issues in 5 experiments: First, we tested whether Italian and German listeners are able to correctly identify sexual orientation of same-language male speakers. Then, participants of both nationalities listened to voice samples and rated the sexual orientation of both Italian and German male speakers. We found that listeners were unable to identify the speakers' sexual orientation correctly. However, speakers were consistently categorized as either heterosexual or gay on the basis of how they sounded. Moreover, a similar pattern of results emerged when listeners judged the sexual orientation of speakers of their own and of the foreign language. Overall, this research suggests that voice-based categorization of sexual orientation reflects the listeners' expectations of how gay voices sound rather than being an accurate detector of the speakers' actual sexual identity. Results are discussed with regard to accuracy, acoustic features of voices, language dependency and language specificity. PMID:26132820

  9. The Sound of Voice: Voice-Based Categorization of Speakers' Sexual Orientation within and across Languages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Sulpizio

    Full Text Available Empirical research had initially shown that English listeners are able to identify the speakers' sexual orientation based on voice cues alone. However, the accuracy of this voice-based categorization, as well as its generalizability to other languages (language-dependency and to non-native speakers (language-specificity, has been questioned recently. Consequently, we address these open issues in 5 experiments: First, we tested whether Italian and German listeners are able to correctly identify sexual orientation of same-language male speakers. Then, participants of both nationalities listened to voice samples and rated the sexual orientation of both Italian and German male speakers. We found that listeners were unable to identify the speakers' sexual orientation correctly. However, speakers were consistently categorized as either heterosexual or gay on the basis of how they sounded. Moreover, a similar pattern of results emerged when listeners judged the sexual orientation of speakers of their own and of the foreign language. Overall, this research suggests that voice-based categorization of sexual orientation reflects the listeners' expectations of how gay voices sound rather than being an accurate detector of the speakers' actual sexual identity. Results are discussed with regard to accuracy, acoustic features of voices, language dependency and language specificity.

  10. 33 CFR 62.47 - Sound signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sound signals. 62.47 Section 62... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.47 Sound signals. (a) Often sound signals are located on or adjacent to aids to navigation. When visual signals are obscured...

  11. Factors affecting the quality of sound recording for speech and voice analysis.

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    Vogel, Adam P; Morgan, Angela T

    2009-01-01

    The importance and utility of objective evidence-based measurement of the voice is well documented. Therefore, greater consideration needs to be given to the factors that influence the quality of voice and speech recordings. This manuscript aims to bring together the many features that affect acoustically acquired voice and speech. Specifically, the paper considers the practical requirements of individual speech acquisition configurations through examining issues relating to hardware, software and microphone selection, the impact of environmental noise, analogue to digital conversion and file format as well as the acoustic measures resulting from varying levels of signal integrity. The type of recording environment required by a user is often dictated by a variety of clinical and experimental needs, including: the acoustic measures being investigated; portability of equipment; an individual's budget; and the expertise of the user. As the quality of recorded signals is influenced by many factors, awareness of these issues is essential. This paper aims to highlight the importance of these methodological considerations to those previously uninitiated with voice and speech acoustics. With current technology, the highest quality recording would be made using a stand-alone hard disc recorder, an independent mixer to attenuate the incoming signal, and insulated wiring combined with a high quality microphone in an anechoic chamber or sound treated room.

  12. Female-pitched sound-producing voice prostheses - initial experimental and clinical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Torn, M; Verdonck-de Leeuw, IM; Festen, JM; de Vries, MP; Mahieu, HF

    2001-01-01

    In order to improve voice quality in female laryngectomees and/or laryngectomees with a hypotonic pharyngo-oesophageal segment, a sound-producing voice prosthesis was designed. The new source of voice consists of either one or two bent silicone lips which perform an oscillatory movement driven by

  13. Fractal Dimension of Voice-Signal Waveforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The fractal dimension is one important parameter that characterizes waveforms. In this paper, we derive a new method to calculate fractal dimension of digital voice-signal waveforms. We show that fractal dimension is an efficient tool for speaker recognition or speech recognition. It can be used to identify different speakers or distinguish speech. We apply our results to Chinese speaker recognition and numerical experiment shows that fractal dimension is an efficient parameter to characterize individual Chinese speakers. We have developed a semiautomatic voiceprint analysis system based on the theory of this paper and former researches.

  14. METHODS FOR QUALITY ENHANCEMENT OF USER VOICE SIGNAL IN VOICE AUTHENTICATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Faizulaieva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The reasonability for the usage of computer systems user voice in the authentication process is proved. The scientific task for improving the signal/noise ratio of the user voice signal in the authentication system is considered. The object of study is the process of input and output of the voice signal of authentication system user in computer systems and networks. Methods and means for input and extraction of voice signal against external interference signals are researched. Methods for quality enhancement of user voice signal in voice authentication systems are suggested. As modern computer facilities, including mobile ones, have two-channel audio card, the usage of two microphones is proposed in the voice signal input system of authentication system. Meanwhile, the task of forming a lobe of microphone array in a desired area of voice signal registration (100 Hz to 8 kHz is solved. The usage of directional properties of the proposed microphone array gives the possibility to have the influence of external interference signals two or three times less in the frequency range from 4 to 8 kHz. The possibilities for implementation of space-time processing of the recorded signals using constant and adaptive weighting factors are investigated. The simulation results of the proposed system for input and extraction of signals during digital processing of narrowband signals are presented. The proposed solutions make it possible to improve the value of the signal/noise ratio of the useful signals recorded up to 10, ..., 20 dB under the influence of external interference signals in the frequency range from 4 to 8 kHz. The results may be useful to specialists working in the field of voice recognition and speaker’s discrimination.

  15. Characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from sound sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

    2007-03-13

    A system for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate and animate sound sources. Electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as animate sound sources such as the human voice, or from machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The systems disclosed enable accurate calculation of transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  16. Understanding the experiences of hearing voices and sounds others do not hear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhovde, Anne Martha; Elstad, Ingunn; Talseth, Anne-Grethe

    2013-11-01

    In this article, we aim to contribute to the understanding of how people with mental illness experience hearing voices and sounds that others do not hear in daily life. We conducted in-depth interviews with 14 people and analyzed the interviews using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. The themes we arrived at included the following: hearing someone else or myself, am I losing my mind?, and daily life recurrently dominated by opposing voices. Our overall understanding of how the voices and sounds were experienced in daily life was that the intentions of others resounded intrusively in the participants and disrupted their lives. The tones and contents of these perplexing perceptions echoed and amplified past, present, and future experiences and concerns. The results elucidate the value that exploring and attempting to understand people's daily life experiences of hearing voices and sounds might have for the voice hearer, his or her family, and health care providers.

  17. Sound [signal] noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnsten, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    has been paid to, for instance, a category such as ‘sound art’ together with an equally strengthened interest in phenomena and concepts that fall outside the accepted aesthetic procedures and constructions of what we traditionally would term as musical sound – a recurring example being ‘noise’.......The article discusses the intricate relationship between sound and signification through notions of noise. The emergence of new fields of sonic artistic practices has generated several questions of how to approach sound as aesthetic form and material. During the past decade an increased attention...

  18. 33 CFR 67.10-15 - Approval of sound signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of sound signals. 67.10... Sound signals § 67.10-15 Approval of sound signals. (a) The Coast Guard approves a sound signal if: (1) It meets the requirements for sound signals in § 67.10-1 (a), (b), (c), (d), and (e) when tested...

  19. Assessments of Voice Use and Voice Quality Among College/University Singing Students Ages 18-24 Through Ambulatory Monitoring With a Full Accelerometer Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloneger, Matthew J; Hunter, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    The multiple social and performance demands placed on college/university singers could put their still-developing voices at risk. Previous ambulatory monitoring studies have analyzed the duration, intensity, and frequency (in Hertz) of voice use among such students. Nevertheless, no studies to date have incorporated the simultaneous acoustic voice quality measures into the acquisition of these measures to allow for direct comparison during the same voicing period. Such data could provide greater insight into how young singers use their voices, as well as identify potential correlations between vocal dose and acoustic changes in voice quality. The purpose of this study was to assess the voice use and the estimated voice quality of college/university singing students (18-24 years old, N = 19). Ambulatory monitoring was conducted over three full, consecutive weekdays measuring voice from an unprocessed accelerometer signal measured at the neck. From this signal, traditional vocal dose metrics such as phonation percentage, dose time, cycle dose, and distance dose were analyzed. Additional acoustic measures included perceived pitch, pitch strength, long-term average spectrum slope, alpha ratio, dB sound pressure level 1-3 kHz, and harmonic-to-noise ratio. Major findings from more than 800 hours of recording indicated that among these students (a) higher vocal doses correlated significantly with greater voice intensity, more vocal clarity and less perturbation; and (b) there were significant differences in some acoustic voice quality metrics between nonsinging, solo singing, and choral singing. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sound-Producing Voice Prostheses : 150 Years of Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerke, G. J.; Thomson, S. L.; Yarmush, ML

    2014-01-01

    Advanced laryngeal cancer sometimes necessitates the removal of the complete larynx. This procedure involves suturing the trachea to an opening in the neck, the most disturbing consequence of which is the loss of voice. Since 1859, several devices have been developed for voice restoration, based mai

  1. Sound-producing voice prostheses: 150 years of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerke, G.J.; Thomson, S.L.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced laryngeal cancer sometimes necessitates the removal of the complete larynx. This procedure involves suturing the trachea to an opening in the neck, the most disturbing consequence of which is the loss of voice. Since 1859, several devices have been developed for voice restoration, based mai

  2. Uncertainty quantification of voice signal production mechanical model and experimental updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, E.; Soize, C.; Sampaio, R.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the uncertainty quantification in a voice production mechanical model and update the probability density function corresponding to the tension parameter using the Bayes method and experimental data. Three parameters are considered uncertain in the voice production mechanical model used: the tension parameter, the neutral glottal area and the subglottal pressure. The tension parameter of the vocal folds is mainly responsible for the changing of the fundamental frequency of a voice signal, generated by a mechanical/mathematical model for producing voiced sounds. The three uncertain parameters are modeled by random variables. The probability density function related to the tension parameter is considered uniform and the probability density functions related to the neutral glottal area and the subglottal pressure are constructed using the Maximum Entropy Principle. The output of the stochastic computational model is the random voice signal and the Monte Carlo method is used to solve the stochastic equations allowing realizations of the random voice signals to be generated. For each realization of the random voice signal, the corresponding realization of the random fundamental frequency is calculated and the prior pdf of this random fundamental frequency is then estimated. Experimental data are available for the fundamental frequency and the posterior probability density function of the random tension parameter is then estimated using the Bayes method. In addition, an application is performed considering a case with a pathology in the vocal folds. The strategy developed here is important mainly due to two things. The first one is related to the possibility of updating the probability density function of a parameter, the tension parameter of the vocal folds, which cannot be measured direct and the second one is related to the construction of the likelihood function. In general, it is predefined using the known pdf. Here, it is

  3. 33 CFR 67.30-10 - Sound signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sound signals. 67.30-10 Section... Sound signals. (a) The owner of a Class “C” structure shall install a sound signal if: (1) The structure...) Sound signals required by paragraph (a) of this section must have rated range of at least one-half mile...

  4. Air conducted and body conducted sound produced by own voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    1998-01-01

    When we speak, sound reaches our ears both through the air, from the mouth to ear, and through our body, as vibrations. The ratio between the air borne and body conducted sound has been studied in a pilot experiment where the air borne sound was eliminated by isolating the ear with a large...

  5. Start/End Delays of Voiced and Unvoiced Speech Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrnstein, A

    1999-09-24

    Recent experiments using low power EM-radar like sensors (e.g, GEMs) have demonstrated a new method for measuring vocal fold activity and the onset times of voiced speech, as vocal fold contact begins to take place. Similarly the end time of a voiced speech segment can be measured. Secondly it appears that in most normal uses of American English speech, unvoiced-speech segments directly precede or directly follow voiced-speech segments. For many applications, it is useful to know typical duration times of these unvoiced speech segments. A corpus, assembled earlier of spoken ''Timit'' words, phrases, and sentences and recorded using simultaneously measured acoustic and EM-sensor glottal signals, from 16 male speakers, was used for this study. By inspecting the onset (or end) of unvoiced speech, using the acoustic signal, and the onset (or end) of voiced speech using the EM sensor signal, the average duration times for unvoiced segments preceding onset of vocalization were found to be 300ms, and for following segments, 500ms. An unvoiced speech period is then defined in time, first by using the onset of the EM-sensed glottal signal, as the onset-time marker for the voiced speech segment and end marker for the unvoiced segment. Then, by subtracting 300ms from the onset time mark of voicing, the unvoiced speech segment start time is found. Similarly, the times for a following unvoiced speech segment can be found. While data of this nature have proven to be useful for work in our laboratory, a great deal of additional work remains to validate such data for use with general populations of users. These procedures have been useful for applying optimal processing algorithms over time segments of unvoiced, voiced, and non-speech acoustic signals. For example, these data appear to be of use in speaker validation, in vocoding, and in denoising algorithms.

  6. The Prevalence of Stuttering, Voice, and Speech-Sound Disorders in Primary School Students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, David H.; McLeod, Sharynne; Reilly, Sheena

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were threefold: to report teachers' estimates of the prevalence of speech disorders (specifically, stuttering, voice, and speech-sound disorders); to consider correspondence between the prevalence of speech disorders and gender, grade level, and socioeconomic status; and to describe the level of support provided to…

  7. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF FIRMWARE FOR INPUT AND EXTRACTION OF USER’S VOICE SIGNAL IN VOICE AUTHENTICATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Faizulaieva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific task for improving the signal-to-noise ratio for user’s voice signal in computer systems and networks during the process of user’s voice authentication is considered. The object of study is the process of input and extraction of the voice signal of authentication system user in computer systems and networks. Methods and means for input and extraction of the voice signal on the background of external interference signals are investigated. Ways for quality improving of the user’s voice signal in systems of voice authentication are investigated experimentally. Firmware means for experimental unit of input and extraction of the user’s voice signal against external interference influence are considered. As modern computer means, including mobile, have two-channel audio card, two microphones are used in the voice signal input. The distance between sonic-wave sensors is 20 mm and it provides forming one direction pattern lobe of microphone array in a desired area of voice signal registration (from 100 Hz to 8 kHz. According to the results of experimental studies, the usage of directional properties of the proposed microphone array and space-time processing of the recorded signals with implementation of constant and adaptive weighting factors has made it possible to reduce considerably the influence of interference signals. The results of firmware experimental studies for input and extraction of the user’s voice signal against external interference influence are shown. The proposed solutions will give the possibility to improve the value of the signal/noise ratio of the useful signals recorded up to 20 dB under the influence of external interference signals in the frequency range from 4 to 8 kHz. The results may be useful to specialists working in the field of voice recognition and speaker discrimination.

  8. AdaBoost for Improved Voice-Band Signal Classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A good voice-band signal classification can not only enable the safe application of speech coding techniques,the implementation of a Digital Signal Interpolation (DSI)system, but also facilitate network administration and planning by providing accurate voice-band traffic analysis.A new method is proposed to detect and classify the presence of various voice-band signals on the General Switched Telephone Network ( GSTN ). The method uses a combination of simple base classifiers through the AdaBoost algorithm. The conventional classification features for voiceband data classification are combined and optimized by the AdaBoost algorithm and spectral subtraction method.Experiments show the simpleness, effectiveness, efficiency and flexibility of the method.

  9. Parameter Estimations for Signal Type Classification of Korean Disordered Voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JiYeoun Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although many signal-typing studies have been published, they are primarily based on manual inspection and experts’ judgments of voice samples’ acoustic content. Software may be required to automatically and objectively classify pathological voices into the four signal types and to facilitate experts’ opinion formation by providing specific signal type determination criteria. This paper suggests the coefficient of normalized skewness variation (CSV, coefficient of normalized kurtosis variation (CKV, and bicoherence value (BV based on the linear predictive coding (LPC residual to categorize voice signals. Its objective is to improve the performances of acoustic parameters such as jitter, shimmer, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in signal type classification. In this study, the classification and regression tree (CART was used to estimate the performances of the acoustic, CSV, CKV, and BV parameters by using the LPC residual. In the investigation of acoustic parameters such as jitter, shimmer, and the SNR, the optimal tree generated by jitter alone yielded an average accuracy of 78.6%. When the acoustic, CSV, CKV, and BV parameters together were used to generate the decision tree, the average accuracy was 82.1%. In this case, the optimal tree formed by jitter and the BV effectively discriminated between the signal types. To perform accurate acoustic pathological voice analysis, signal type quantification is of great interest. Automatic pathological voice classification can be an important objective tool as the signal type can be numerically measured. Future investigations will incorporate multiple pathological data in classification methods to improve their performance and implement more reliable detectors.

  10. [Research progress of adventitious respiratory sound signal processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xiaoming

    2013-10-01

    Adventitious respiratory sound signal processing has been an important researching topic in the field of computerized respiratory sound analysis system. In recent years, new progress has been achieved in adventitious respiratory sound signal analysis due to the applications of techniques of non-stationary random signal processing. Algorithm progress of adventitious respiratory sound detections is discussed in detail in this paper. Then the state of art of adventitious respiratory sound analysis is reviewed, and development directions of next phase are pointed out.

  11. Sequential stream segregation of voiced and unvoiced speech sounds based on fundamental frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Marion; Lavandier, Mathieu; Grimault, Nicolas; Oxenham, Andrew J

    2017-02-01

    Differences in fundamental frequency (F0) between voiced sounds are known to be a strong cue for stream segregation. However, speech consists of both voiced and unvoiced sounds, and less is known about whether and how the unvoiced portions are segregated. This study measured listeners' ability to integrate or segregate sequences of consonant-vowel tokens, comprising a voiceless fricative and a vowel, as a function of the F0 difference between interleaved sequences of tokens. A performance-based measure was used, in which listeners detected the presence of a repeated token either within one sequence or between the two sequences (measures of voluntary and obligatory streaming, respectively). The results showed a systematic increase of voluntary stream segregation as the F0 difference between the two interleaved sequences increased from 0 to 13 semitones, suggesting that F0 differences allowed listeners to segregate speech sounds, including the unvoiced portions. In contrast to the consistent effects of voluntary streaming, the trend towards obligatory stream segregation at large F0 differences failed to reach significance. Listeners were no longer able to perform the voluntary-streaming task reliably when the unvoiced portions were removed from the stimuli, suggesting that the unvoiced portions were used and correctly segregated in the original task. The results demonstrate that streaming based on F0 differences occurs for natural speech sounds, and that the unvoiced portions are correctly assigned to the corresponding voiced portions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Design of Phoneme MIDI Codes Using the MIDI Encoding Tool “Auto-F” and Realizing Voice Synthesizing Functions Based on Musical Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modegi, Toshio

    Using our previously developed audio to MIDI code converter tool “Auto-F”, from given vocal acoustic signals we can create MIDI data, which enable to playback the voice-like signals with a standard MIDI synthesizer. Applying this tool, we are constructing a MIDI database, which consists of previously converted simple harmonic structured MIDI codes from a set of 71 Japanese male and female syllable recorded signals. And we are developing a novel voice synthesizing system based on harmonically synthesizing musical sounds, which can generate MIDI data and playback voice signals with a MIDI synthesizer by giving Japanese plain (kana) texts, referring to the syllable MIDI code database. In this paper, we propose an improved MIDI converter tool, which can produce temporally higher-resolution MIDI codes. Then we propose an algorithm separating a set of 20 consonant and vowel phoneme MIDI codes from 71 syllable MIDI converted codes in order to construct a voice synthesizing system. And, we present the evaluation results of voice synthesizing quality between these separated phoneme MIDI codes and their original syllable MIDI codes by our developed 4-syllable word listening tests.

  13. [Encapsulated voices : Estonian sound recordings from the German prisoner-of-war camps in 1916-1918] / Tõnu Tannberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tannberg, Tõnu, 1961-

    2013-01-01

    Arvustus: Encapsulated voices : Estonian sound recordings from the German prisoner-of-war camps in 1916-1918 (Das Baltikum in Geschichte und Gegenwart, 5). Hrsg. von Jaan Ross. Böhlau Verlag. Köln, Weimar und Wien 2012

  14. [Encapsulated voices : Estonian sound recordings from the German prisoner-of-war camps in 1916-1918] / Tõnu Tannberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tannberg, Tõnu, 1961-

    2013-01-01

    Arvustus: Encapsulated voices : Estonian sound recordings from the German prisoner-of-war camps in 1916-1918 (Das Baltikum in Geschichte und Gegenwart, 5). Hrsg. von Jaan Ross. Böhlau Verlag. Köln, Weimar und Wien 2012

  15. Sounds like a winner: voice pitch influences perception of leadership capacity in both men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klofstad, Casey A; Anderson, Rindy C; Peters, Susan

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that non-human animals respond to information encoded in vocal signals, and the same can be said of humans. Specifically, human voice pitch affects how speakers are perceived. As such, does voice pitch affect how we perceive and select our leaders? To answer this question, we recorded men and women saying 'I urge you to vote for me this November'. Each recording was manipulated digitally to yield a higher- and lower-pitched version of the original. We then asked men and women to vote for either the lower- or higher-pitched version of each voice. Our results show that both men and women select male and female leaders with lower voices. These findings suggest that men and women with lower-pitched voices may be more successful in obtaining positions of leadership. This might also suggest that because women, on average, have higher-pitched voices than men, voice pitch could be a factor that contributes to fewer women holding leadership roles than men. Additionally, while people are free to choose their leaders, these results clearly demonstrate that these choices cannot be understood in isolation from biological influences.

  16. Plethysmogram and EEG: Effects of Music and Voice Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Tiejun; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi; Sato, Sadaka; Kojima, Junji; Lin, Juan; Reika, Sato

    2011-06-01

    We studied a relation of chaotic dynamics of finger plethysmogram to complexity of high cerebral center in both theoretical and experimental approaches. We proposed a mathematical model to describe emergence of chaos in finger tip pulse wave, which gave a theoretical prediction indicating increased chaoticity in higher cerebral center leading to an increase of chaos dynamics in plethysmograms. We designed an experiment to observe scalp-EEG and finger plethysmogram using two mental tasks to validate the relationship. We found that scalp-EEG showed an increase of the largest Lyapunov exponents (LLE) during speaking certain voices. Topographical scalp map of LLE showed enhanced arise around occipital and right cerebral area. Whereas there was decreasing tendency during listening music, where LLE scalp map revealed a drop around center cerebral area. The same tendency was found for LLE obtained from finger plethysmograms as ones of EEG under either speaking or listening tasks. The experiment gave results that agreed well with the theoretical relation derived from our proposed model.

  17. Early development of polyphonic sound encoding and the high voice superiority effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Céline; Trainor, Laurel J

    2014-05-01

    Previous research suggests that when two streams of pitched tones are presented simultaneously, adults process each stream in a separate memory trace, as reflected by mismatch negativity (MMN), a component of the event-related potential (ERP). Furthermore, a superior encoding of the higher tone or voice in polyphonic sounds has been found for 7-month-old infants and both musician and non-musician adults in terms of a larger amplitude MMN in response to pitch deviant stimuli in the higher than the lower voice. These results, in conjunction with modeling work, suggest that the high voice superiority effect might originate in characteristics of the peripheral auditory system. If this is the case, the high voice superiority effect should be present in infants younger than 7 months. In the present study we tested 3-month-old infants as there is no evidence at this age of perceptual narrowing or specialization of musical processing according to the pitch or rhythmic structure of music experienced in the infant׳s environment. We presented two simultaneous streams of tones (high and low) with 50% of trials modified by 1 semitone (up or down), either on the higher or the lower tone, leaving 50% standard trials. Results indicate that like the 7-month-olds, 3-month-old infants process each tone in a separate memory trace and show greater saliency for the higher tone. Although MMN was smaller and later in both voices for the group of sixteen 3-month-olds compared to the group of sixteen 7-month-olds, the size of the difference in MMN for the high compared to low voice was similar across ages. These results support the hypothesis of an innate peripheral origin of the high voice superiority effect.

  18. [Study of deglutition using various sound signals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, D; Parel, C; Thouvenot, J

    1990-03-01

    In man quantitative information on deglutition may be obtained with the aid of various sounds recorded by way of microphone and magnetic tapes. The different tapes, microphonic, dynamic and piezoelectric, can be compared through the use of a Doppler signal in high middle position, thus showing the backward movements of the mylohyoïdeus. The sound of the deglutition consists of 1 to 3 peaks of great amplitude: 350 +/- 180 microV or 14 +/- 3.3 mV according to the type of microphone used (the piezo gives the greatest amplitude, specially in low frequency range); duration for the main phoneburst: 48 +/- 24 ms with a prolongation with the smaller noises: so total duration amounts to 400 ms. Each sound impulsion repeated in 10 Hz range includes frequency up to 6 KHz. The direct recording on a polygraph falls into 10-60 range; upper frequencies may be eliminated by filtering. In front, the inspiratory relative time increases of 57 +/- 12% without deglutition whereas it reaches 62 +/- 16% with deglutition. In clinical situation, a magnetic tape recorder can be used. The main components in normal situation of deglutition of saliva, water or yogurt show a frequent variability. Nevertheless, a certain number of recurring impulsions can be defined according to the type of deglutition, thus further defining several basic types of deglutition. Amplitude and duration deglutition type 1 (= one impulsion) was observed in young subjects for saliva and yogurt; deglutition type 2-3 (greater than or equal to 200 ms) more frequently for water and also in oldest subjects, whatever the mode of deglutition. In some pathological situations, a significant increase of amplitude and duration was observed. Technical conditions are discussed for application in clinical situations and their control in laboratory.

  19. Denoising method of heart sound signals based on self-construct heart sound wavelet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiefeng; Zhang, Zheng

    2014-08-01

    In the field of heart sound signal denoising, the wavelet transform has become one of the most effective measures. The selective wavelet basis is based on the well-known orthogonal db series or biorthogonal bior series wavelet. In this paper we present a self-construct wavelet basis which is suitable for the heart sound denoising and analyze its constructor method and features in detail according to the characteristics of heart sound and evaluation criterion of signal denoising. The experimental results show that the heart sound wavelet can effectively filter out the noise of the heart sound signals, reserve the main characteristics of the signal. Compared with the traditional wavelets, it has a higher signal-to-noise ratio, lower mean square error and better denoising effect.

  20. Denoising method of heart sound signals based on self-construct heart sound wavelet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiefeng Cheng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the field of heart sound signal denoising, the wavelet transform has become one of the most effective measures. The selective wavelet basis is based on the well-known orthogonal db series or biorthogonal bior series wavelet. In this paper we present a self-construct wavelet basis which is suitable for the heart sound denoising and analyze its constructor method and features in detail according to the characteristics of heart sound and evaluation criterion of signal denoising. The experimental results show that the heart sound wavelet can effectively filter out the noise of the heart sound signals, reserve the main characteristics of the signal. Compared with the traditional wavelets, it has a higher signal-to-noise ratio, lower mean square error and better denoising effect.

  1. A Approach for the Separation of Voices in Composite Musical Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Robert Crawford

    The simultaneous presentation of several sound sources in a performance setting is fundamental to most music. Ensemble musical signals consist of superpositions of multiple distinct sonic events which may or may not be synchronized in time, frequency, and/or amplitude. Once the distinct events are combined and recorded in a storage medium, e.g., a digital recording, the composite signal is often unsatisfactory in some way: the recording might suffer from poor ensemble balance, performance errors, or corruption from undesired background audience noises (sneezing, talking, etc.). Although it often might be helpful to process the constituent signals independently, separating the composite signal into its parts is a nontrivial task. The research reported here considers particular aspects of the separation problem: analysis, identification, tracking, and resynthesis of a specified voice from a digital recording of a musical duet setting. Analysis is accomplished out of real-time using a quasi-harmonic, sinusoidal representation of the constituent signals, based on short-time Fourier transform (STFT) methods. The procedure is evaluated via resynthesis of a "desired" signal from the composite analysis and tracking data. Other applications include signal restoration, digital editing and splicing, musique concrete, noise reduction, and time-scale compression/expansion. This material is based upon work supported, in part, under a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  2. Voice Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice is the sound made by air passing from your lungs through your larynx, or voice box. In your larynx are your vocal cords, ... to make sound. For most of us, our voices play a big part in who we are, ...

  3. Fundamentals of Signal Processing for Sound and Vibration Engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Kihong

    2008-01-01

    Fundamentals of Signal Processing for Sound and Vibration Engineers is based on Joe Hammond's many years of teaching experience at the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton. Whilst the applications presented emphasise sound and vibration, the book focusses on the basic essentials of signal processing that ensures its appeal as a reference text to students and practitioners in all areas of mechanical, automotive, aerospace and civil engineering.  Offers an excellent introduction to signal processing for students and professionals in th

  4. Investigating the neural correlates of voice versus speech-sound directed information in pre-school children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Maria Raschle

    Full Text Available Studies in sleeping newborns and infants propose that the superior temporal sulcus is involved in speech processing soon after birth. Speech processing also implicitly requires the analysis of the human voice, which conveys both linguistic and extra-linguistic information. However, due to technical and practical challenges when neuroimaging young children, evidence of neural correlates of speech and/or voice processing in toddlers and young children remains scarce. In the current study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in 20 typically developing preschool children (average age  = 5.8 y; range 5.2-6.8 y to investigate brain activation during judgments about vocal identity versus the initial speech sound of spoken object words. FMRI results reveal common brain regions responsible for voice-specific and speech-sound specific processing of spoken object words including bilateral primary and secondary language areas of the brain. Contrasting voice-specific with speech-sound specific processing predominantly activates the anterior part of the right-hemispheric superior temporal sulcus. Furthermore, the right STS is functionally correlated with left-hemispheric temporal and right-hemispheric prefrontal regions. This finding underlines the importance of the right superior temporal sulcus as a temporal voice area and indicates that this brain region is specialized, and functions similarly to adults by the age of five. We thus extend previous knowledge of voice-specific regions and their functional connections to the young brain which may further our understanding of the neuronal mechanism of speech-specific processing in children with developmental disorders, such as autism or specific language impairments.

  5. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Sound has the power to soothe, excite, warn, protect, and inform. Indeed, the transmission and reception of audio signals pervade our daily lives. Readers will examine the mechanics and properties of sound and provides an overview of the "interdisciplinary science called acoustics." Also covered are functions and diseases of the human ear.

  6. Three-dimensional sound signals and their relevance to wave energy quantities and sound interference products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakis, Pantelis

    2003-10-01

    Signals are graphic representations of vibrations/waves and, like every representation, capture only selected attributes of the phenomenon they are meant to represent. The often assumed equivalence between signals and sound waves obscures the fact that two-dimensional signals are not fit to (a) represent wave-energy quantities consistently across frequencies, (b) account for the alternating positive/negative amplitude values of modulated waves with AM-depth>100%, and (c) represent the energy content of interference. An alternative sound-signal representation is proposed, based on the complex equation of motion describing a wave. It results in spiral sine signals and twisted-spiral complex signals, similar to complex analytic signals. Spiral sine signals offer a consistent measure of sine-wave energy across frequencies, while twisted spiral complex signals account for the negative amplitudes observed in modulated signals and map the modulation parameters onto the twisting parameters. In terms of interference, 3-D signals illustrate that amplitude fluctuations and the signal envelopes that describe them are not just boundary curves but waves that trace changes in the total instantaneous energy of a signal over time, representing the oscillation between potential and kinetic energies within a wave. Examples of 3-D animations illustrating the proposed signals are presented. a)Work completed while at the Department of Ethnomusicology, University of California, Los Angeles.

  7. The softest sound levels of the human voice in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šrámková, Hana; Granqvist, Svante; Herbst, Christian T; Švec, Jan G

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the softest sound levels of phonation presents technical and methodological challenges. This study aimed at (1) reliably obtaining normative data on sustained softest sound levels for the vowel [a:] at comfortable pitch; (2) comparing the results for different frequency and time weighting methods; and (3) refining the Union of European Phoniatricians' recommendation on allowed background noise levels for scientific and equipment manufacturers' purposes. Eighty healthy untrained participants (40 females, 40 males) were investigated in quiet rooms using a head-mounted microphone and a sound level meter at 30 cm distance. The one-second-equivalent sound levels were more stable and more representative for evaluating the softest sustained phonations than the fast-time-weighted levels. At 30 cm, these levels were in the range of 48-61 dB(C)/41-53 dB(A) for females and 49 - 64 dB(C)/35-53 dB(A) for males (5% to 95% quantile range). These ranges may serve as reference data in evaluating vocal normality. In order to reach a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 10 dB for more than 95% of the normal population, the background noise should be below 25 dB(A) and 38 dB(C), respectively, for the softest phonation measurements at 30 cm distance. For the A-weighting, this is 15 dB lower than the previously recommended value.

  8. Reverberation impairs brainstem temporal representations of voiced vowel sounds: challenging “periodicity-tagged” segregation of competing speech in rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayles, Mark; Stasiak, Arkadiusz; Winter, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory system typically processes information from concurrently active sound sources (e.g., two voices speaking at once), in the presence of multiple delayed, attenuated and distorted sound-wave reflections (reverberation). Brainstem circuits help segregate these complex acoustic mixtures into “auditory objects.” Psychophysical studies demonstrate a strong interaction between reverberation and fundamental-frequency (F0) modulation, leading to impaired segregation of competing vowels when segregation is on the basis of F0 differences. Neurophysiological studies of complex-sound segregation have concentrated on sounds with steady F0s, in anechoic environments. However, F0 modulation and reverberation are quasi-ubiquitous. We examine the ability of 129 single units in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) of the anesthetized guinea pig to segregate the concurrent synthetic vowel sounds /a/ and /i/, based on temporal discharge patterns under closed-field conditions. We address the effects of added real-room reverberation, F0 modulation, and the interaction of these two factors, on brainstem neural segregation of voiced speech sounds. A firing-rate representation of single-vowels' spectral envelopes is robust to the combination of F0 modulation and reverberation: local firing-rate maxima and minima across the tonotopic array code vowel-formant structure. However, single-vowel F0-related periodicity information in shuffled inter-spike interval distributions is significantly degraded in the combined presence of reverberation and F0 modulation. Hence, segregation of double-vowels' spectral energy into two streams (corresponding to the two vowels), on the basis of temporal discharge patterns, is impaired by reverberation; specifically when F0 is modulated. All unit types (primary-like, chopper, onset) are similarly affected. These results offer neurophysiological insights to perceptual organization of complex acoustic scenes under realistically challenging listening

  9. Reverberation impairs brainstem temporal representations of voiced vowel sounds: challenging "periodicity-tagged" segregation of competing speech in rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayles, Mark; Stasiak, Arkadiusz; Winter, Ian M

    2014-01-01

    The auditory system typically processes information from concurrently active sound sources (e.g., two voices speaking at once), in the presence of multiple delayed, attenuated and distorted sound-wave reflections (reverberation). Brainstem circuits help segregate these complex acoustic mixtures into "auditory objects." Psychophysical studies demonstrate a strong interaction between reverberation and fundamental-frequency (F0) modulation, leading to impaired segregation of competing vowels when segregation is on the basis of F0 differences. Neurophysiological studies of complex-sound segregation have concentrated on sounds with steady F0s, in anechoic environments. However, F0 modulation and reverberation are quasi-ubiquitous. We examine the ability of 129 single units in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) of the anesthetized guinea pig to segregate the concurrent synthetic vowel sounds /a/ and /i/, based on temporal discharge patterns under closed-field conditions. We address the effects of added real-room reverberation, F0 modulation, and the interaction of these two factors, on brainstem neural segregation of voiced speech sounds. A firing-rate representation of single-vowels' spectral envelopes is robust to the combination of F0 modulation and reverberation: local firing-rate maxima and minima across the tonotopic array code vowel-formant structure. However, single-vowel F0-related periodicity information in shuffled inter-spike interval distributions is significantly degraded in the combined presence of reverberation and F0 modulation. Hence, segregation of double-vowels' spectral energy into two streams (corresponding to the two vowels), on the basis of temporal discharge patterns, is impaired by reverberation; specifically when F0 is modulated. All unit types (primary-like, chopper, onset) are similarly affected. These results offer neurophysiological insights to perceptual organization of complex acoustic scenes under realistically challenging listening

  10. Reverberation impairs brainstem temporal representations of voiced vowel sounds: challenging periodicity-tagged segregation of competing speech in rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eSayles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The auditory system typically processes information from concurrently active sound sources (e.g., two voices speaking at once, in the presence of multiple delayed, attenuated and distorted sound-wave reflections (reverberation. Brainstem circuits help segregate these complex acoustic mixtures into auditory objects. Psychophysical studies demonstrate a strong interaction between reverberation and fundamental-frequency (F0 modulation, leading to impaired segregation of competing vowels when segregation is on the basis of F0 differences. Neurophysiological studies of complex-sound segregation have concentrated on sounds with steady F0s, in anechoic environments. However, F0 modulation and reverberation are quasi-ubiquitous.We examine the ability of 129 single units in the ventral cochlear nucleus of the anesthetized guinea pig to segregate the concurrent synthetic vowel sounds /a/ and /i/, based on temporal discharge patterns under closed-field conditions. We address the effects of added real-room reverberation, F0 modulation, and the interaction of these two factors, on brainstem neural segregation of voiced speech sounds. A firing-rate representation of single-vowels’ spectral envelopes is robust to the combination of F0 modulation and reverberation: local firing-rate maxima and minima across the tonotopic array code vowel-formant structure. However, single-vowel F0-related periodicity information in shuffled inter-spike interval distributions is significantly degraded in the combined presence of reverberation and F0 modulation. Hence, segregation of double-vowels’ spectral energy into two streams (corresponding to the two vowels, on the basis of temporal discharge patterns, is impaired by reverberation; specifically when F0 is modulated. All unit types (primary-like, chopper, onset are similarly affected. These results offer neurophysiological insights to perceptual organization of complex acoustic scenes under realistically challenging

  11. Songbirds use pulse tone register in two voices to generate low-frequency sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Cooper, Brenton G.; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2007-01-01

    generation alternates between the left and right sound sources. Spontaneously calling crows can also generate similar pulse characteristics with only one sound generator. Airflow recordings in zebra finches and starlings show that pulse tone sounds can be generated unilaterally, synchronously...

  12. PRODUCTION OF SOUND BY UNSTEADY THROTTLING OF FLOW INTO A RESONANT CAVITY, WITH APPLICATION TO VOICED SPEECH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, M S; McGowan, R S

    2011-04-01

    An analysis is made of the sound generated by the time-dependent throttling of a nominally steady stream of air through a small orifice into a flow-through resonant cavity. This is exemplified by the production of voiced speech, where air from the lungs enters the vocal tract through the glottis at a time variable volume flow rate Q(t) controlled by oscillations of the glottis cross-section. Voicing theory has hitherto determined Q from a heuristic, reduced complexity 'Fant' differential equation (G. Fant, Acoustic Theory of Speech Production, 1960). A new self-consistent, integro-differential form of this equation is derived in this paper using the theory of aerodynamic sound, with full account taken of the back-reaction of the resonant tract on the glottal flux Q. The theory involves an aeroacoustic Green's function (G) for flow-surface interactions in a time-dependent glottis, so making the problem non-self-adjoint. In complex problems of this type it is not usually possible to obtain G in an explicit analytic form. The principal objective of the paper is to show how the Fant equation can still be derived in such cases from a consideration of the equation of aerodynamic sound and from the adjoint of the equation governing G in the neighbourhood of the 'throttle'. The theory is illustrated by application to the canonical problem of throttled flow into a Helmholtz resonator.

  13. Sound Event Detection for Music Signals Using Gaussian Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo A. Alvarado-Durán; Mauricio A. Álvarez-López; Álvaro A. Orozco-Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new methodology for detecting sound events in music signals using Gaussian Processes. Our method firstly takes a time-frequency representation, i.e. the spectrogram, of the input audio signal. Secondly the spectrogram dimension is reduced translating the linear Hertz frequency scale into the logarithmic Mel frequency scale using a triangular filter bank. Finally every short-time spectrum, i.e. every Mel spectrogram column, is classified as “Event” or “Not Event” by ...

  14. Quantitative Multiscale Analysis using Different Wavelets in 1D Voice Signal and 2D Image

    CERN Document Server

    Shakhakarmi, Niraj

    2012-01-01

    Mutiscale analysis represents multiresolution scrutiny of a signal to improve its signal quality. Multiresolution analysis of 1D voice signal and 2D image is conducted using DCT, FFT and different wavelets such as Haar, Deubachies, Morlet, Cauchy, Shannon, Biorthogonal, Symmlet and Coiflet deploying the cascaded filter banks based decomposition and reconstruction. The outstanding quantitative analysis of the specified wavelets is done to investigate the signal quality, mean square error, entropy and peak-to-peak SNR at multiscale stage-4 for both 1D voice signal and 2D image. In addition, the 2D image compression performance is significantly found 93.00% in DB-4, 93.68% in bior-4.4, 93.18% in Sym-4 and 92.20% in Coif-2 during the multiscale analysis.

  15. Voice of the Rivers: Quantifying the Sound of Rivers into Streamflow and Using the Audio for Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J.

    2014-12-01

    I have two goals with my research. 1. I proposed that sound recordings can be used to detect the amount of water flowing in a particular river, which could then be used to measure stream flow in rivers that have no instrumentation. My locations are in remote watersheds where hand instrumentation is the only means to collect data. I record 15 minute samples, at varied intervals, of the streams with a stereo microphone suspended above the river perpendicular to stream flow forming a "profile" of the river that can be compared to other stream-flow measurements of these areas over the course of a year. Through waveform analysis, I found a distinct voice for each river and I am quantifying the sound to track the flow based on amplitude, pitch, and wavelengths that these rivers produce. 2. Additionally, I plan to also use my DVD quality sound recordings with professional photos and HD video of these remote sites in education, outreach, and therapeutic venues. The outreach aspect of my research follows my goal of bridging communication between researchers and the public. Wyoming rivers are unique in that we export 85% of our water downstream. I would also like to take these recordings to schools, set up speakers in the four corners of a classroom and let the river flow as the teacher presents on water science. Immersion in an environment can help the learning experience of students. I have seen firsthand the power of drawing someone into an environment through sound and video. I will have my river sounds with me at AGU presented as an interactive touch-screen sound experience.

  16. Sound Event Detection for Music Signals Using Gaussian Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo A. Alvarado-Durán

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a new methodology for detecting sound events in music signals using Gaussian Processes. Our method firstly takes a time-frequency representation, i.e. the spectrogram, of the input audio signal. Secondly the spectrogram dimension is reduced translating the linear Hertz frequency scale into the logarithmic Mel frequency scale using a triangular filter bank. Finally every short-time spectrum, i.e. every Mel spectrogram column, is classified as “Event” or “Not Event” by a Gaussian Processes Classifier. We compare our method with other event detection techniques widely used. To do so, we use MATLAB® to program each technique and test them using two datasets of music with different levels of complexity. Results show that the new methodology outperforms the standard approaches, getting an improvement by about 1.66 % on the dataset one and 0.45 % on the dataset two in terms of F-measure.

  17. Songbirds use pulse tone register in two voices to generate low-frequency sound

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Kenneth K; Cooper, Brenton G; Ole N. Larsen; Goller, Franz

    2007-01-01

    The principal physical mechanism of sound generation is similar in songbirds and humans, despite large differences in their vocal organs. Whereas vocal fold dynamics in the human larynx are well characterized, the vibratory behaviour of the sound-generating labia in the songbird vocal organ, the syrinx, is unknown. We present the first high-speed video records of the intact syrinx during induced phonation. The syrinx of anaesthetized crows shows a vibration pattern of the labia similar to tha...

  18. Sounding the Alert: Designing an Effective Voice for Earthquake Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, E. R.; Given, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    The USGS is working with partners to develop the ShakeAlert Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) system (http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2014/3083/) to protect life and property along the U.S. West Coast, where the highest national seismic hazard is concentrated. EEW sends an alert that shaking from an earthquake is on its way (in seconds to tens of seconds) to allow recipients or automated systems to take appropriate actions at their location to protect themselves and/or sensitive equipment. ShakeAlert is transitioning toward a production prototype phase in which test users might begin testing applications of the technology. While a subset of uses will be automated (e.g., opening fire house doors), other applications will alert individuals by radio or cellphone notifications and require behavioral decisions to protect themselves (e.g., "Drop, Cover, Hold On"). The project needs to select and move forward with a consistent alert sound to be widely and quickly recognized as an earthquake alert. In this study we combine EEW science and capabilities with an understanding of human behavior from the social and psychological sciences to provide insight toward the design of effective sounds to help best motivate proper action by alert recipients. We present a review of existing research and literature, compiled as considerations and recommendations for alert sound characteristics optimized for EEW. We do not yet address wording of an audible message about the earthquake (e.g., intensity and timing until arrival of shaking or possible actions), although it will be a future component to accompany the sound. We consider pitch(es), loudness, rhythm, tempo, duration, and harmony. Important behavioral responses to sound to take into account include that people respond to discordant sounds with anxiety, can be calmed by harmony and softness, and are innately alerted by loud and abrupt sounds, although levels high enough to be auditory stressors can negatively impact human judgment.

  19. Development of a double-membrane sound generator for application in a voice-producing element for laryngectomized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tack, J. W.; Verkerke, G. J.; van der Houwen, E. B.; Mahieu, H. F.; Schutte, H. K.

    2006-01-01

    For voice rehabilitation after total laryngectomy a shunt valve is usually placed in the tracheo-esophageal (TE) wall, thereby enabling the production of a TE voice. Some patients, however, are unable to produce a voice of sufficient quality. Furthermore, the TE voice is low pitched, which presents

  20. Voice box (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The larynx, or voice box, is located in the neck and performs several important functions in the body. The larynx is involved in swallowing, breathing, and voice production. Sound is produced when the air which ...

  1. Fetus Sound Stimulation: Cilia Memristor Effect of Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Jankovic-Raznatovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. Methods. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Results. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1 shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2 shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the “memristor” property. Conclusion. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction.

  2. Fetus sound stimulation: cilia memristor effect of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic-Raznatovic, Svetlana; Dragojevic-Dikic, Svetlana; Rakic, Snezana; Nikolic, Branka; Plesinac, Snezana; Tasic, Lidija; Perisic, Zivko; Sovilj, Mirjana; Adamovic, Tatjana; Koruga, Djuro

    2014-01-01

    This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA) circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS) and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB) and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1) shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2) shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the "memristor" property. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction.

  3. Separation and reconstruction of high pressure water-jet reflective sound signal based on ICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongtao; Sun, Yuling; Li, Meng; Zhang, Dongsu; Wu, Tianfeng

    2011-12-01

    The impact of high pressure water-jet on the different materials target will produce different reflective mixed sound. In order to reconstruct the reflective sound signals distribution on the linear detecting line accurately and to separate the environment noise effectively, the mixed sound signals acquired by linear mike array were processed by ICA. The basic principle of ICA and algorithm of FASTICA were described in detail. The emulation experiment was designed. The environment noise signal was simulated by using band-limited white noise and the reflective sound signal was simulated by using pulse signal. The reflective sound signal attenuation produced by the different distance transmission was simulated by weighting the sound signal with different contingencies. The mixed sound signals acquired by linear mike array were synthesized by using the above simulated signals and were whitened and separated by ICA. The final results verified that the environment noise separation and the reconstruction of the detecting-line sound distribution can be realized effectively.

  4. Relationship between sound signal and weld pool status in plasma arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The sound features of the weld pool status in plasma arc welding were systematically investigated after the sound signal was collected with a microphone. The results show that it is difficult to extract information about the weld pool status directly in time domain although the sound signal varies with the weld pool behaviors to some extent. The frequency spectra of the sound signal contain plenty of information about the weld pool behaviors. It is shown from the analysis of the sound generation mechanism that the sound signal of plasma arc welding is mainly caused by the weld pool oscillation, the power source fluctuation and so on. RS algorithm is designed to determine the weld pool status, and it is able to offer the feedback information for the closed-loop control of the penetration quality of plasma arc welding.

  5. The impact of voice on speech realization

    OpenAIRE

    Jelka Breznik

    2014-01-01

    The study discusses spoken literary language and the impact of voice on speech realization. The voice consists of a sound made by a human being using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, crying, screaming… The human voice is specifically the part of human sound production in which the vocal folds (vocal cords) are the primary sound source. Our voice is our instrument and identity card. How does the voice (voice tone) affect others and how do they respond, positively or negatively? ...

  6. Spatial interpolation of HRTFs and signal mixing for multichannel surround sound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Bosun

    2006-01-01

    From the point of spatial sampling, spatial interpolation of HRTFs (head-related transfer functions) and signal mixing for multichannel (surround) sound are analyzed. First, it is proved that they are mathematically equivalent. Different methods for HRTFs interpolation are equivalent to different signal mixing methods for multichannel sound. Then, a stricter derivation for the signal mixing of multichannel sound and the law of sine for stereophonic sound is given. It is pointed out that trying to reconstruct lateral HRTFs by adjacent linear interpolation is wrong. And for accurate sound image localization, the conventional equation of adjacent linear interpolation of HRTFs is revised. At last, it is also pointed out that some methods used in the analysis of HRTFs and multichannel sound can be used for reference mutually.

  7. Design of a New Voice Signal Generator with Adjustable Output Waveform%一种脉冲波形可调的声音信号发生器设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周致

    2016-01-01

    音频信号发生器是测量声音信号处理设备性能指标必不可少的仪器,文章首先论述了声音信号发生器的研究现状,然后针对现有技术存在的问题,提出一种可分别调节输出电压的占空比、频率、幅度的脉冲波形可调的声音信号发生器,且该声音信号发生器的占空比、频率、幅度可实现单一的调节。最后针对设计的信号发生器进行了实验,实验结果表明文章提出并设计的新型脉冲波形可调的声音信号发生器实用且具有明显的优势。%Audio signal generator is essential equipment to measure the sound signal and deal with equipment performance. The paper compendiously summarizes the overseas and domestic research status of voice signal generators. Then we put forward a new voice signal generator to solve the problems of existing technology, in which the duty ratio of output voltage, frequency, amplitude adjustable pulse waveform of the voice signal generator can be adjusted respectively, and the sound the duty ratio, frequency and amplitude of the signal generator can realize the single adjustment. The experimental results show that the proposed new type of pulse waveform with adjustable voice signal generator is practical and has obvious advantages.

  8. VC++-based Voice Signal Acquisition and Processing%基于VC的语音信号的采集和处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖; 余永先; 谢里佳; 刘星宇; 张炳洋

    2013-01-01

      在Windows音频设备、Matlab和Visual C++6.0的基础上,设计了基于PC机的语音信号采集和处理系统,该系统实现了对录制的语音信号进行原声效果、混响效果、回声效果、音调升高效果和音调降低处理后进行播放的功能.%On the basis of Window audio equipment Matlab and Visual C++6,the speech signal acquisition and Processing system based on personal computer it realized the recorded voice signal of raw sound effects reverberating echo sffects higher and lower tone processing after playing function

  9. Temporary threshold shifts at 1500 and 2000 Hz induced by loud voice signals communicated through earphones in the pinball industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idota, Nozomi; Horie, Seichi; Tsutsui, Takao; Inoue, Jinro

    2010-10-01

    To assess the risk of hearing loss among workers using earphones as communication devices at noisy worksites, we compared temporary threshold shifts (TTS) between ears on which workers wore earphones and ears on which no earphones were worn. We measured ambient noise and personal noise exposure as well as noise generated by and passed through earphones by applying frequency analysis at three pinball facilities during their hours of actual operation. We assessed hearing levels before and after a work shift (prework and postwork) of 54 workers by pure tone audiometry at six frequencies. The time-weighted averages for ambient noise and personal noise exposure exceeded 85 dB(A) and 90 dB(A), respectively. Overall sound pressure levels generated by and passing through earphones reached 109 dB(A). The one-third octave band spectrum of the earphone noise during the shift exceeded 90 dB(SPL) in the range of 315-2000 Hz. The number of ears demonstrating a TTS, defined as a shift of 10 dB or more in postwork over prework hearing thresholds, was significantly greater at 1500 and 2000 Hz among ears with earphones (P communication devices in noisy environments are exposed to high risk of hearing loss, particularly at the frequencies of 1500 and 2000 Hz. Ideally, hearing conservation programs for such workers should account for potential hearing losses at frequencies of 2000 Hz or lower frequencies induced by amplified voice signals.

  10. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P A; Swinteck, N; Runge, K; Deymier-Black, A; Hoying, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  11. Diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease in Human Using Voice Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Karimi Rouzbahani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A full investigation into the features extracted from voice signals of people with and without Parkinson’s disease was performed. A total of 31 people with and without the disease participated in the data collection phase. Their voice signals were recorded and processed. The relevant features were then extracted. A variety of feature selection methods have been utilized resulting in a good performance for the diagnosis of Parkinson. These features were fed to different classifiers so as to be let them decide whether the subjects have the disease or not. Three different classifiers were used in order to bring about a valid classification performance on the given data. The classification performances were compared with one another and showed that the best performance obtained using the KNN classifier with a correct rate of 0.9382. This result reveals that the use of proposed feature selection method results in a desirable precision for the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease (PD. The performances were assessed from different points of view, providing different aspects of the diagnosis, from which the physicians are able to choose one with higher accuracy in the diagnosis.   

  12. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Muddled about what makes music? Stuck on the study of harmonics? Dumbfounded by how sound gets around? Now you no longer have to struggle to teach concepts you really don t grasp yourself. Sound takes an intentionally light touch to help out all those adults science teachers, parents wanting to help with homework, home-schoolers seeking necessary scientific background to teach middle school physics with confidence. The book introduces sound waves and uses that model to explain sound-related occurrences. Starting with the basics of what causes sound and how it travels, you'll learn how musical instruments work, how sound waves add and subtract, how the human ear works, and even why you can sound like a Munchkin when you inhale helium. Sound is the fourth book in the award-winning Stop Faking It! Series, published by NSTA Press. Like the other popular volumes, it is written by irreverent educator Bill Robertson, who offers this Sound recommendation: One of the coolest activities is whacking a spinning metal rod...

  13. Reconstruction of sound source signal by analytical passive TR in the environment with airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Long; Li, Min; Yang, Debin; Niu, Feng; Zeng, Wu

    2017-03-01

    In the acoustic design of air vehicles, the time-domain signals of noise sources on the surface of air vehicles can serve as data support to reveal the noise source generation mechanism, analyze acoustic fatigue, and take measures for noise insulation and reduction. To rapidly reconstruct the time-domain sound source signals in an environment with flow, a method combining the analytical passive time reversal mirror (AP-TR) with a shear flow correction is proposed. In this method, the negative influence of flow on sound wave propagation is suppressed by the shear flow correction, obtaining the corrected acoustic propagation time delay and path. Those corrected time delay and path together with the microphone array signals are then submitted to the AP-TR, reconstructing more accurate sound source signals in the environment with airflow. As an analytical method, AP-TR offers a supplementary way in 3D space to reconstruct the signal of sound source in the environment with airflow instead of the numerical TR. Experiments on the reconstruction of the sound source signals of a pair of loud speakers are conducted in an anechoic wind tunnel with subsonic airflow to validate the effectiveness and priorities of the proposed method. Moreover the comparison by theorem and experiment result between the AP-TR and the time-domain beamforming in reconstructing the sound source signal is also discussed.

  14. Sound and sound sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    There is no difference in principle between the infrasonic and ultrasonic sounds, which are inaudible to humans (or other animals) and the sounds that we can hear. In all cases, sound is a wave of pressure and particle oscillations propagating through an elastic medium, such as air. This chapter...... is about the physical laws that govern how animals produce sound signals and how physical principles determine the signals’ frequency content and sound level, the nature of the sound field (sound pressure versus particle vibrations) as well as directional properties of the emitted signal. Many...... of these properties are dictated by simple physical relationships between the size of the sound emitter and the wavelength of emitted sound. The wavelengths of the signals need to be sufficiently short in relation to the size of the emitter to allow for the efficient production of propagating sound pressure waves...

  15. Orientation Estimation and Signal Reconstruction of a Directional Sound Source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guarato, Francesco

    with sound receivers for accomplishing investigation of the surrounding environment in order to integrate data from vision systems and in cases where vision is unfeasible. There have been developed sensor systems inspired by real animals trying to reproduce their behaviour, for it is optimized by nature......, one for each call emission, were compared to those calculated through a pre-existing technique based on interpolation of sound-pressure levels at microphone locations. The application of the method to the bat calls could provide knowledge on bat behaviour that may be useful for a bat-inspired sensor...... imitating bat's behaviour appears to be developed in the literature. Hence, the method addressed in this thesis is of value because of itself, as it shows never to be generated before, but it also constitutes an important support for both activities of investigating bats' behaviour and optimizing sensor...

  16. You're a What? Voice Actor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liming, Drew

    2009-01-01

    This article talks about voice actors and features Tony Oliver, a professional voice actor. Voice actors help to bring one's favorite cartoon and video game characters to life. They also do voice-overs for radio and television commercials and movie trailers. These actors use the sound of their voice to sell a character's emotions--or an advertised…

  17. [The acquisition and analysis of heart sound signals based on DSP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Suxia; Chen, Tianhua

    2011-04-01

    Heart sound signals acquisition is the primary basis for achieving non-invasive diagnosis of coronary heart disease. In this paper, a digital signal processor (DSP)-based on miniaturized circuit of heart sound signals acquisition and analysis platform was designed to achieve the functions of filtering, collecting, processing, displaying and the communicating with PC. With the self-developed experimental platform, we collected 228 cases of heart sounds of clinical data, and processed the signals using de-noising method with wavelet transform. These experimental results indicated that the db6 wavelet has the most obvious de-noising effect among the four most commonly used wavelets, i.e., haar, db6, sym8, and coif5. One wavelet at different levels possessed different de-noising effects, with level-5 db6 decomposition obtaining the most desirable result.

  18. Cognitive Bias for Learning Speech Sounds From a Continuous Signal Space Seems Nonlinguistic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine van der Ham

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When learning language, humans have a tendency to produce more extreme distributions of speech sounds than those observed most frequently: In rapid, casual speech, vowel sounds are centralized, yet cross-linguistically, peripheral vowels occur almost universally. We investigate whether adults’ generalization behavior reveals selective pressure for communication when they learn skewed distributions of speech-like sounds from a continuous signal space. The domain-specific hypothesis predicts that the emergence of sound categories is driven by a cognitive bias to make these categories maximally distinct, resulting in more skewed distributions in participants’ reproductions. However, our participants showed more centered distributions, which goes against this hypothesis, indicating that there are no strong innate linguistic biases that affect learning these speech-like sounds. The centralization behavior can be explained by a lack of communicative pressure to maintain categories.

  19. Cognitive Bias for Learning Speech Sounds From a Continuous Signal Space Seems Nonlinguistic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ham, Sabine; de Boer, Bart

    2015-10-01

    When learning language, humans have a tendency to produce more extreme distributions of speech sounds than those observed most frequently: In rapid, casual speech, vowel sounds are centralized, yet cross-linguistically, peripheral vowels occur almost universally. We investigate whether adults' generalization behavior reveals selective pressure for communication when they learn skewed distributions of speech-like sounds from a continuous signal space. The domain-specific hypothesis predicts that the emergence of sound categories is driven by a cognitive bias to make these categories maximally distinct, resulting in more skewed distributions in participants' reproductions. However, our participants showed more centered distributions, which goes against this hypothesis, indicating that there are no strong innate linguistic biases that affect learning these speech-like sounds. The centralization behavior can be explained by a lack of communicative pressure to maintain categories.

  20. Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring from Phonocardiograph Signal Using Repetition Frequency of Heart Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a passive, harmless, and low-cost diagnosis tool, fetal heart rate (FHR monitoring based on fetal phonocardiography (fPCG signal is alternative to ultrasonographic cardiotocography. Previous fPCG-based methods commonly relied on the time difference of detected heart sound bursts. However, the performance is unavoidable to degrade due to missed heart sounds in very low signal-to-noise ratio environments. This paper proposes a FHR monitoring method using repetition frequency of heart sounds. The proposed method can track time-varying heart rate without both heart sound burst identification and denoising. The average accuracy rate comparison to benchmark is 88.3% as the SNR ranges from −4.4 dB to −26.7 dB.

  1. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-02-14

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  2. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, Greg C. (Livermore, CA); Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

    2006-08-08

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  3. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  4. System And Method For Characterizing Voiced Excitations Of Speech And Acoustic Signals, Removing Acoustic Noise From Speech, And Synthesizi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, Greg C. (Livermore, CA); Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

    2006-04-25

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  5. A review of signal processing techniques for heart sound analysis in clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, Babatunde S

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of approaches to analysis of heart sound signals. The paper reviews the milestones in the development of phonocardiogram (PCG) signal analysis. It describes the various stages involved in the analysis of heart sounds and discrete wavelet transform as a preferred method for bio-signal processing. In addition, the gaps that still exist between contemporary methods of signal analysis of heart sounds and their applications for clinical diagnosis is reviewed. A lot of progress has been made but crucial gaps still exist. The findings of this review paper are as follows: there is a lack of consensus in research outputs; inter-patient adaptability of signal processing algorithm is still problematic; the process of clinical validation of analysis techniques was not sufficiently rigorous in most of the reviewed literature; and as such data integrity and measurement are still in doubt, which most of the time led to inaccurate interpretation of results. In addition, the existing diagnostic systems are too complex and expensive. The paper concluded that the ability to correctly acquire, analyse and interpret heart sound signals for improved clinical diagnostic processes has become a priority.

  6. Vocal registers of the countertenor voice: Based on signals recorded and analyzed in VoceVista

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenez, Raymond

    Today's countertenors possess vocal ranges similar to the mezzo-soprano, and are trained to sing with a vibrant, focused tone. Little research has been conducted on the registers of the countertenor voice. Advancement in vocal techniques in the countertenor voice from the late 20th century to the present has been rapid. This treatise attempts to define the registers of the countertenor voice, and is intended as a resource for singers and teachers. The voices of eleven North American countertenors were recorded and analyzed using VoceVista Pro software, which was developed and designed by Donald Miller. Through spectrographic and electroglottographic analysis, the registers of the countertenor voice were identified and outlined.

  7. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, John F; Burnett, Greg C; Ng, Lawrence C

    2013-05-21

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  8. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, John F; Burnett, Greg C; Ng, Lawrence C

    2013-05-21

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  9. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Burnett, Greg C. (Livermore, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

    2007-10-16

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  10. System and method for characterizing synthesizing and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Burnett, Greg C. (Livermore, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  11. A new method of heart sound signal analysis based on independent function element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xie-feng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method is presented for heart sound signal processing in statistical domain. The multiple components obtained from the conventional linear transformation are possibly irrelevant, but usually do not possess the characteristics of statistical independence. First, the definition and obtaining method of independent function element are discussed; the method of signal decomposition and reconstruction based on the independent function element, not only inherits the advantages of linear transformation, but also has the capability of signal representation in the statistical domain. After that, the application of independent function element in heart sound signal analysis is analyzed in detail. The validity and practicability of the method are demonstrated through two experiments.

  12. Face the voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2014-01-01

    will be based on a reception aesthetic and phenomenological approach, the latter as presented by Don Ihde in his book Listening and Voice. Phenomenologies of Sound , and my analytical sketches will be related to theoretical statements concerning the understanding of voice and media (Cavarero, Dolar, La...

  13. Atmospheric effects on voice command intelligibility from acoustic hail and warning devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostron, Jason H; Brungart, Timothy A; Barnard, Andrew R; McDevitt, Timothy E

    2011-04-01

    Voice command sound pressure levels (SPLs) were recorded at distances up to 1500 m. Received SPLs were related to the meteorological condition during sound propagation and compared with the outdoor sound propagation standard ISO 9613-2. Intelligibility of received signals was calculated using ANSI S3.5. Intelligibility results for the present voice command indicate that meteorological condition imposes little to no effect on intelligibility when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is low (0 dB). In these two cases the signal is firmly unintelligible or intelligible, respectively. However, at moderate SNRs, variations in received SPL can cause a fully intelligible voice command to become unintelligible, depending on the meteorological condition along the sound propagation path. These changes in voice command intelligibility often occur on time scales as short as minutes during upward refracting conditions, typically found above ground during the day or upwind of a sound source. Reliably predicting the intelligibility of a voice command in a moderate SNR environment can be challenging due to the inherent variability imposed by sound propagation through the atmosphere.

  14. REC-1000 voice module sound recording implement multistage sharing%REC-1000语音模块多段分时录放音实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢华燕

    2016-01-01

    In the core chip ISD4004 voice recording module REC-1000 has a wide range of appli-cations in many fields, not only in the use of the module can be completed consecutive singles playback capabilities, and can achieve multi-time-recording sound effects. This paper combining REC-1000 feature modules main chip with a microcontroller and working methods, explained data transfer method between each unit circuit, program download method, voice chip recording process and information storage. The results showed that the rational use of REC-1000 onboard systems and peripheral circuits, combining mi-crocontrollers and software control, the use of audio recording in special address storage allocation can be realized in various forms voice file playback effect.%以ISD4004为核心芯片的语音录放模块REC-1000在很多领域具有广泛应用,在模块的使用中不仅能完成连续单曲的录放功能,且能实现多段分时录放音效果。文章结合REC-1000模块主控芯片与微控制器的特性与工作方式,阐述了各单元电路间的数据信息传送方式,程序的下载方法,语音芯片的录放过程及信息存储方式。结果表明:合理使用REC-1000板载系统与外围电路,结合微控制器及软件控制,利用音频录放中特殊的地址存储分配方式,可实现语音文件的多形式录放。

  15. [The application of cybernetic modeling methods for the forensic medical personality identification based on the voice and sounding speech characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganov, A Sh; Kir'yanov, P A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present publication was to discuss the possibility of application of cybernetic modeling methods to overcome the apparent discrepancy between two kinds of the speech records, viz. initial ones (e.g. obtained in the course of special investigation activities) and the voice prints obtained from the persons subjected to the criminalistic examination. The paper is based on the literature sources and the materials of original criminalistics expertises performed by the authors.

  16. Voice and endocrinology

    OpenAIRE

    KVS Hari Kumar; Anurag Garg; Ajai Chandra, N. S.; Singh, S. P.; Rakesh Datta

    2016-01-01

    Voice is one of the advanced features of natural evolution that differentiates human beings from other primates. The human voice is capable of conveying the thoughts into spoken words along with a subtle emotion to the tone. This extraordinary character of the voice in expressing multiple emotions is the gift of God to the human beings and helps in effective interpersonal communication. Voice generation involves close interaction between cerebral signals and the peripheral apparatus consistin...

  17. Sound Source Distance Estimation in Rooms based on Statistical Properties of Binaural Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georganti, Eleftheria; May, Tobias; van de Par, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for the estimation of the distance of a sound source from binaural speech signals is proposed. The method relies on several statistical features extracted from such signals and their binaural cues. Firstly, the standard deviation of the difference of the magnitude spectra of the left...... and right binaural signals is used as a feature for this method. In addition, an extended set of additional statistical features that can improve distance detection is extracted from an auditory front-end which models the peripheral processing of the human auditory system. The method incorporates the above...

  18. Comparisons of jitter, shimmer, and signal-to-noise ratio from directly digitized versus taped voice samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfer, M P; Fendel, D M

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare jitter, shimmer, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measures obtained from tape-recorded samples with the same measures made on directly digitized voice samples, with use of the CSpeech acoustic analysis program. Subjects included 30 young women who phonated the vowel /a/ at a comfortable pitch and loudness level. Voice samples were simultaneously recorded and digitized, and the resulting perturbation measures for the two conditions were compared. Results indicated that there were small but statistically significant differences between percent jitter, percent shimmer, and SNR calculated from taped samples compared with the same measures calculated from directly digitized samples. It was concluded that direct digitization for clinical measures of vocal perturbation was most desirable, but that taped samples could be used, if necessary, with some caution.

  19. Detection of Voice Pathology using Fractal Dimension in a Multiresolution Analysis of Normal and Disordered Speech Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Zulfiqar; Elamvazuthi, Irraivan; Alsulaiman, Mansour; Muhammad, Ghulam

    2016-01-01

    Voice disorders are associated with irregular vibrations of vocal folds. Based on the source filter theory of speech production, these irregular vibrations can be detected in a non-invasive way by analyzing the speech signal. In this paper we present a multiband approach for the detection of voice disorders given that the voice source generally interacts with the vocal tract in a non-linear way. In normal phonation, and assuming sustained phonation of a vowel, the lower frequencies of speech are heavily source dependent due to the low frequency glottal formant, while the higher frequencies are less dependent on the source signal. During abnormal phonation, this is still a valid, but turbulent noise of source, because of the irregular vibration, affects also higher frequencies. Motivated by such a model, we suggest a multiband approach based on a three-level discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) and in each band the fractal dimension (FD) of the estimated power spectrum is estimated. The experiments suggest that frequency band 1-1562 Hz, lower frequencies after level 3, exhibits a significant difference in the spectrum of a normal and pathological subject. With this band, a detection rate of 91.28 % is obtained with one feature, and the obtained result is higher than all other frequency bands. Moreover, an accuracy of 92.45 % and an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 95.06 % is acquired when the FD of all levels is fused. Likewise, when the FD of all levels is combined with 22 Multi-Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP) parameters, an improvement of 2.26 % in accuracy and 1.45 % in AUC is observed.

  20. Stochastic Signal Processing for Sound Environment System with Decibel Evaluation and Energy Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ikuta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In real sound environment system, a specific signal shows various types of probability distribution, and the observation data are usually contaminated by external noise (e.g., background noise of non-Gaussian distribution type. Furthermore, there potentially exist various nonlinear correlations in addition to the linear correlation between input and output time series. Consequently, often the system input and output relationship in the real phenomenon cannot be represented by a simple model using only the linear correlation and lower order statistics. In this study, complex sound environment systems difficult to analyze by using usual structural method are considered. By introducing an estimation method of the system parameters reflecting correlation information for conditional probability distribution under existence of the external noise, a prediction method of output response probability for sound environment systems is theoretically proposed in a suitable form for the additive property of energy variable and the evaluation in decibel scale. The effectiveness of the proposed stochastic signal processing method is experimentally confirmed by applying it to the observed data in sound environment systems.

  1. The role of temporal and dynamic signal components in the perception of syllable-final stop voicing by children and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, Susan

    2004-04-01

    Adults whose native languages permit syllable-final obstruents, and show a vocalic length distinction based on the voicing of those obstruents, consistently weight vocalic duration strongly in their perceptual decisions about the voicing of final stops, at least in laboratory studies using synthetic speech. Children, on the other hand, generally disregard such signal properties in their speech perception, favoring formant transitions instead. These age-related differences led to the prediction that children learning English as a native language would weight vocalic duration less than adults, but weight syllable-final transitions more in decisions of final-consonant voicing. This study tested that prediction. In the first experiment, adults and children (eight and six years olds) labeled synthetic and natural CVC words with voiced or voiceless stops in final C position. Predictions were strictly supported for synthetic stimuli only. With natural stimuli it appeared that adults and children alike weighted syllable-offset transitions strongly in their voicing decisions. The predicted age-related difference in the weighting of vocalic duration was seen for these natural stimuli almost exclusively when syllable-final transitions signaled a voiced final stop. A second experiment with adults and children (seven and five years old) replicated these results for natural stimuli with four new sets of natural stimuli. It was concluded that acoustic properties other than vocalic duration might play more important roles in voicing decisions for final stops than commonly asserted, sometimes even taking precedence over vocalic duration.

  2. Neural Processing of Auditory Signals and Modular Neural Control for Sound Tropism of Walking Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Roth

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The specialized hairs and slit sensillae of spiders (Cupiennius salei can sense the airflow and auditory signals in a low-frequency range. They provide the sensor information for reactive behavior, like e.g. capturing a prey. In analogy, in this paper a setup is described where two microphones and a neural preprocessing system together with a modular neural controller are used to generate a sound tropism of a four-legged walking machine. The neural preprocessing network is acting as a low-pass filter and it is followed by a network which discerns between signals coming from the left or the right. The parameters of these networks are optimized by an evolutionary algorithm. In addition, a simple modular neural controller then generates the desired different walking patterns such that the machine walks straight, then turns towards a switched-on sound source, and then stops near to it.

  3. Neural processing of auditory signals and modular neural control for sound tropism of walking machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Pasemann, Frank; Fischer, Joern

    2005-01-01

    The specialized hairs and slit sensillae of spiders (Cupiennius salei) can sense the airflow and auditory signals in a low-frequency range. They provide the sensor information for reactive behavior, like e.g. capturing a prey. In analogy, in this paper a setup is described where two microphones...... and a neural preprocessing system together with a modular neural controller are used to generate a sound tropism of a four-legged walking machine. The neural preprocessing network is acting as a low-pass filter and it is followed by a network which discerns between signals coming from the left or the right....... The parameters of these networks are optimized by an evolutionary algorithm. In addition, a simple modular neural controller then generates the desired different walking patterns such that the machine walks straight, then turns towards a switched-on sound source, and then stops near to it....

  4. The cross-correlation of signals and spatial impression in surround sound reproduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the cross-correlation coefficients of feeding signals and auditory spatial impression(ASI) which are created by the left,right,left surround and right surround loudspeakers in 5.1 channel surround sound system is investigated by psychoacoustic experiments.The results show that for reproducing by the front left-right or left-right surround loudspeakers pair,the auditory source width(ASW) can be broadened by controlling the crosscorrelation coefficients of feeding signals to some e...

  5. Methodology for fault detection in induction motors via sound and vibration signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Arredondo, Paulo Antonio; Morinigo-Sotelo, Daniel; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Rostro-Gonzalez, Horacio; Romero-Troncoso, Rene de Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, timely maintenance of electric motors is vital to keep up the complex processes of industrial production. There are currently a variety of methodologies for fault diagnosis. Usually, the diagnosis is performed by analyzing current signals at a steady-state motor operation or during a start-up transient. This method is known as motor current signature analysis, which identifies frequencies associated with faults in the frequency domain or by the time-frequency decomposition of the current signals. Fault identification may also be possible by analyzing acoustic sound and vibration signals, which is useful because sometimes this information is the only available. The contribution of this work is a methodology for detecting faults in induction motors in steady-state operation based on the analysis of acoustic sound and vibration signals. This proposed approach uses the Complete Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition for decomposing the signal into several intrinsic mode functions. Subsequently, the frequency marginal of the Gabor representation is calculated to obtain the spectral content of the IMF in the frequency domain. This proposal provides good fault detectability results compared to other published works in addition to the identification of more frequencies associated with the faults. The faults diagnosed in this work are two broken rotor bars, mechanical unbalance and bearing defects.

  6. Auditory Sketches: Very Sparse Representations of Sounds Are Still Recognizable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Isnard

    Full Text Available Sounds in our environment like voices, animal calls or musical instruments are easily recognized by human listeners. Understanding the key features underlying this robust sound recognition is an important question in auditory science. Here, we studied the recognition by human listeners of new classes of sounds: acoustic and auditory sketches, sounds that are severely impoverished but still recognizable. Starting from a time-frequency representation, a sketch is obtained by keeping only sparse elements of the original signal, here, by means of a simple peak-picking algorithm. Two time-frequency representations were compared: a biologically grounded one, the auditory spectrogram, which simulates peripheral auditory filtering, and a simple acoustic spectrogram, based on a Fourier transform. Three degrees of sparsity were also investigated. Listeners were asked to recognize the category to which a sketch sound belongs: singing voices, bird calls, musical instruments, and vehicle engine noises. Results showed that, with the exception of voice sounds, very sparse representations of sounds (10 features, or energy peaks, per second could be recognized above chance. No clear differences could be observed between the acoustic and the auditory sketches. For the voice sounds, however, a completely different pattern of results emerged, with at-chance or even below-chance recognition performances, suggesting that the important features of the voice, whatever they are, were removed by the sketch process. Overall, these perceptual results were well correlated with a model of auditory distances, based on spectro-temporal excitation patterns (STEPs. This study confirms the potential of these new classes of sounds, acoustic and auditory sketches, to study sound recognition.

  7. Auditory Sketches: Very Sparse Representations of Sounds Are Still Recognizable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnard, Vincent; Taffou, Marine; Viaud-Delmon, Isabelle; Suied, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Sounds in our environment like voices, animal calls or musical instruments are easily recognized by human listeners. Understanding the key features underlying this robust sound recognition is an important question in auditory science. Here, we studied the recognition by human listeners of new classes of sounds: acoustic and auditory sketches, sounds that are severely impoverished but still recognizable. Starting from a time-frequency representation, a sketch is obtained by keeping only sparse elements of the original signal, here, by means of a simple peak-picking algorithm. Two time-frequency representations were compared: a biologically grounded one, the auditory spectrogram, which simulates peripheral auditory filtering, and a simple acoustic spectrogram, based on a Fourier transform. Three degrees of sparsity were also investigated. Listeners were asked to recognize the category to which a sketch sound belongs: singing voices, bird calls, musical instruments, and vehicle engine noises. Results showed that, with the exception of voice sounds, very sparse representations of sounds (10 features, or energy peaks, per second) could be recognized above chance. No clear differences could be observed between the acoustic and the auditory sketches. For the voice sounds, however, a completely different pattern of results emerged, with at-chance or even below-chance recognition performances, suggesting that the important features of the voice, whatever they are, were removed by the sketch process. Overall, these perceptual results were well correlated with a model of auditory distances, based on spectro-temporal excitation patterns (STEPs). This study confirms the potential of these new classes of sounds, acoustic and auditory sketches, to study sound recognition.

  8. Auditory Signal Processing in Communication: Perception and Performance of Vocal Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Learning and maintaining the sounds we use in vocal communication require accurate perception of the sounds we hear performed by others and feedback-dependent imitation of those sounds to produce our own vocalizations. Understanding how the central nervous system integrates auditory and vocal-motor information to enable communication is a fundamental goal of systems neuroscience, and insights into the mechanisms of those processes will profoundly enhance clinical therapies for communication disorders. Gaining the high-resolution insight necessary to define the circuits and cellular mechanisms underlying human vocal communication is presently impractical. Songbirds are the best animal model of human speech, and this review highlights recent insights into the neural basis of auditory perception and feedback-dependent imitation in those animals. Neural correlates of song perception are present in auditory areas, and those correlates are preserved in the auditory responses of downstream neurons that are also active when the bird sings. Initial tests indicate that singing-related activity in those downstream neurons is associated with vocal-motor performance as opposed to the bird simply hearing itself sing. Therefore, action potentials related to auditory perception and action potentials related to vocal performance are co-localized in individual neurons. Conceptual models of song learning involve comparison of vocal commands and the associated auditory feedback to compute an error signal that is used to guide refinement of subsequent song performances, yet the sites of that comparison remain unknown. Convergence of sensory and motor activity onto individual neurons points to a possible mechanism through which auditory and vocal-motor signals may be linked to enable learning and maintenance of the sounds used in vocal communication. PMID:23827717

  9. THE ANALYSIS AND USE OF MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF SOUND SIGNALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Abramov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available in long audio recording is practically not studied. To recognize the audio signals and their counting were analyzed and used mathematical methods such as correlation analysis, fast Fourier transform, fuzzy logic. Looking at each method in turn, were selected for the parameters gives the best recognition results when using either method. Correlation analysis allows to draw conclusions about the number of cough moments for the selected standard. Fast Fourier transform allowed to allocate these frequency ranges, which are the only cough and do not get the noise was experimentally identified 6 of these ranges. The use of fuzzy logic has improved the analysis of sound recordings and allowed to make the choice of the cough moments with more certainty, but certainty of results to achieve and failed. Used fuzzy logic, which allows to expand the boundaries of recognition, allowing graded result in coughing may cough and noise. When analyzing the data obtained for each of the mathematical method, came to the conclusion that individually cannot be used. To achieve this goal it is necessary to compile a set of mathematical rules of inference that allow to recognize the sound signals with higher accuracy. Having considered the spectrogram of a sound clip, select the zone in which it is necessary to conduct an analysis to identify the similarity of sound recordings. The zones of cough have distinct values for each of the coordinates of the spectrogram. This allowed later when synthesizing inference rules use the exact values for the parameters of these rules. Under the resulting set of rules modified the developed software. Tested and received results.

  10. The effect of climate on acoustic signals: does atmospheric sound absorption matter for bird song and bat echolocation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell-Rood, Emilie C

    2012-02-01

    The divergence of signals along ecological gradients may lead to speciation. The current research tests the hypothesis that variation in sound absorption selects for divergence in acoustic signals along climatic gradients, which has implications for understanding not only diversification, but also how organisms may respond to climate change. Because sound absorption varies with temperature, humidity, and the frequency of sound, individuals or species may vary signal structure with changes in climate over space or time. In particular, signals of lower frequency, narrower bandwidth, and longer duration should be more detectable in environments with high sound absorption. Using both North American wood warblers (Parulidae) and bats of the American Southwest, this work found evidence of associations between signal structure and sound absorption. Warbler species with higher mean absorption across their range were more likely to have narrow bandwidth songs. Bat species found in higher absorption habitats were more likely to have lower frequency echolocation calls. In addition, bat species changed echolocation call structure across seasons, using longer duration, lower frequency calls in the higher absorption rainy season. These results suggest that signals may diverge along climatic gradients due to variation in sound absorption, although the effects of absorption are modest.

  11. Fault diagnosis of motor bearing with speed fluctuation via angular resampling of transient sound signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Siliang; Wang, Xiaoxian; He, Qingbo; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yongbin

    2016-12-01

    Transient signal analysis (TSA) has been proven an effective tool for motor bearing fault diagnosis, but has yet to be applied in processing bearing fault signals with variable rotating speed. In this study, a new TSA-based angular resampling (TSAAR) method is proposed for fault diagnosis under speed fluctuation condition via sound signal analysis. By applying the TSAAR method, the frequency smearing phenomenon is eliminated and the fault characteristic frequency is exposed in the envelope spectrum for bearing fault recognition. The TSAAR method can accurately estimate the phase information of the fault-induced impulses using neither complicated time-frequency analysis techniques nor external speed sensors, and hence it provides a simple, flexible, and data-driven approach that realizes variable-speed motor bearing fault diagnosis. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed TSAAR method are verified through a series of simulated and experimental case studies.

  12. I am Recoding the Sound of My Speaking Voice. Enunciation in Alvin Lucier's I'm Sitting in a Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Vandsoe

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available ‘I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in’, states the American sound artist and composer Alvin Lucier (1931- in his canonical piece I am Sitting in a Room (1970, thereby emphasising the very act of enunciation in which someone is addressing someone else in an individual speech act. Though the question of enunciation has been touched upon in several analyses of this piece, none of them have connected it to the strong and vast theoretical field established by the French linguist Émile Benveniste (1902-1976 and further developed by numerous phenomenologically-oriented analytical approaches, particularly in relation to literary and film studies. By shifting our attention from the statement to the very act in which it is produced, the article aims not only to shed light on an essential part of Lucier’s artwork, but also to show how the theory of enunciation can prove fruitful in relation to sound studies as such. In conclusion, the article suggests that in addition to the text, the vocal performance and the recording can also be seen as communicative acts.

  13. Sight and sound persistently out of synch: stable individual differences in audiovisual synchronisation revealed by implicit measures of lip-voice integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipser, Alberta; Agolli, Vlera; Bajraktari, Anisa; Al-Alawi, Fatimah; Djaafara, Nurfitriani; Freeman, Elliot D

    2017-04-21

    Are sight and sound out of synch? Signs that they are have been dismissed for over two centuries as an artefact of attentional and response bias, to which traditional subjective methods are prone. To avoid such biases, we measured performance on objective tasks that depend implicitly on achieving good lip-synch. We measured the McGurk effect (in which incongruent lip-voice pairs evoke illusory phonemes), and also identification of degraded speech, while manipulating audiovisual asynchrony. Peak performance was found at an average auditory lag of ~100 ms, but this varied widely between individuals. Participants' individual optimal asynchronies showed trait-like stability when the same task was re-tested one week later, but measures based on different tasks did not correlate. This discounts the possible influence of common biasing factors, suggesting instead that our different tasks probe different brain networks, each subject to their own intrinsic auditory and visual processing latencies. Our findings call for renewed interest in the biological causes and cognitive consequences of individual sensory asynchronies, leading potentially to fresh insights into the neural representation of sensory timing. A concrete implication is that speech comprehension might be enhanced, by first measuring each individual's optimal asynchrony and then applying a compensatory auditory delay.

  14. Double Fourier analysis for Emotion Identification in Voiced Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Sosa, D.; Bastidas, M.; Ortiz P., D.; Quintero, O. L.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a novel analysis alternative, based on two Fourier Transforms for emotion recognition from speech. Fourier analysis allows for display and synthesizes different signals, in terms of power spectral density distributions. A spectrogram of the voice signal is obtained performing a short time Fourier Transform with Gaussian windows, this spectrogram portraits frequency related features, such as vocal tract resonances and quasi-periodic excitations during voiced sounds. Emotions induce such characteristics in speech, which become apparent in spectrogram time-frequency distributions. Later, the signal time-frequency representation from spectrogram is considered an image, and processed through a 2-dimensional Fourier Transform in order to perform the spatial Fourier analysis from it. Finally features related with emotions in voiced speech are extracted and presented.

  15. Sound vibration signal processing for detection and identification detonation (knock) to optimize performance Otto engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujono, A.; Santoso, B.; Juwana, W. E.

    2016-03-01

    Problems of detonation (knock) on Otto engine (petrol engine) is completely unresolved problem until now, especially if want to improve the performance. This research did sound vibration signal processing engine with a microphone sensor, for the detection and identification of detonation. A microphone that can be mounted is not attached to the cylinder block, that's high temperature, so that its performance will be more stable, durable and inexpensive. However, the method of analysis is not very easy, because a lot of noise (interference). Therefore the use of new methods of pattern recognition, through filtration, and the regression function normalized envelope. The result is quite good, can achieve a success rate of about 95%.

  16. A virtual auditory environment for investigating the auditory signal processing of realistic sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Favrot, Sylvain Emmanuel; Buchholz, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    of the mRIR with an acoustic signal. The derivation of the mRIRs takes into account that (i) auditory localization is most sensitive to the location of the direct sound and (ii) that auditory localization performance is rather poor for early reflections and even worse for late reverberation. Throughout...... the VAE development, special care was taken in order to achieve a realistic auditory percept and to avoid “artifacts” such as unnatural coloration. The performance of the VAE has been evaluated and optimized on a 29 loudspeaker setup using both objective and subjective measurement techniques....

  17. Design, development and test of the gearbox condition monitoring system using sound signal processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zamani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction One of the ways used for minimizing the cost of maintenance and repairs of rotating industrial equipment is condition monitoring using acoustic analysis. One of the most important problems which always have been under consideration in industrial equipment application is confidence possibility. Each dynamic, electrical, hydraulic or thermal system has certain characteristics which show the normal condition of the machine during function. Any changes of the characteristics can be a signal of a problem in the machine. The aim of condition monitoring is system condition determination using measurements of the signals of characteristics and using this information for system impairment prognostication. There are a lot of ways for condition monitoring of different systems, but sound analysis is accepted and used extensively as a method for condition investigation of rotating machines. The aim of this research is the design and construction of considered gearbox and using of obtaining data in frequency and time spectrum in order to analyze the sound and diagnosis. Materials and Methods This research was conducted at the department of mechanical biosystem workshop at Aboureihan College at Tehran University in February 15th.2015. In this research, in order to investigate the trend of diagnosis and gearbox condition, a system was designed and then constructed. The sound of correct and damaged gearbox was investigated by audiometer and stored in computer for data analysis. Sound measurement was done in three pinions speed of 749, 1050 and 1496 rpm and for correct gearboxes, damage of the fracture of a tooth and a tooth wear. Gearbox design and construction: In order to conduct the research, a gearbox with simple gearwheels was designed according to current needs. Then mentioned gearbox and its accessories were modeled in CATIA V5-R20 software and then the system was constructed. Gearbox is a machine that is used for mechanical power transition

  18. Design, development and test of the gearbox condition monitoring system using sound signal processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zamani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction One of the ways used for minimizing the cost of maintenance and repairs of rotating industrial equipment is condition monitoring using acoustic analysis. One of the most important problems which always have been under consideration in industrial equipment application is confidence possibility. Each dynamic, electrical, hydraulic or thermal system has certain characteristics which show the normal condition of the machine during function. Any changes of the characteristics can be a signal of a problem in the machine. The aim of condition monitoring is system condition determination using measurements of the signals of characteristics and using this information for system impairment prognostication. There are a lot of ways for condition monitoring of different systems, but sound analysis is accepted and used extensively as a method for condition investigation of rotating machines. The aim of this research is the design and construction of considered gearbox and using of obtaining data in frequency and time spectrum in order to analyze the sound and diagnosis. Materials and Methods This research was conducted at the department of mechanical biosystem workshop at Aboureihan College at Tehran University in February 15th.2015. In this research, in order to investigate the trend of diagnosis and gearbox condition, a system was designed and then constructed. The sound of correct and damaged gearbox was investigated by audiometer and stored in computer for data analysis. Sound measurement was done in three pinions speed of 749, 1050 and 1496 rpm and for correct gearboxes, damage of the fracture of a tooth and a tooth wear. Gearbox design and construction: In order to conduct the research, a gearbox with simple gearwheels was designed according to current needs. Then mentioned gearbox and its accessories were modeled in CATIA V5-R20 software and then the system was constructed. Gearbox is a machine that is used for mechanical power transition

  19. Voice Matching Using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Bal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of Genetic Algorithm (GA for voice recognition is described. The practical application of Genetic Algorithm (GA to the solution of engineering problem is a rapidly emerging approach in the field of control engineering and signal processing. Genetic algorithms are useful for searching a space in multi-directional way from large spaces and poorly defined space. Voice is a signal of infinite information. Digital processing of voice signal is very important for automatic voice recognition technology. Nowadays, voice processing is very much important in security mechanism due to mimicry characteristic. So studying the voice feature extraction in voice processing is very necessary in military, hospital, telephone system, investigation bureau and etc. In order to extract valuable information from the voice signal, make decisions on the process, and obtain results, the data needs to be manipulated and analyzed. In this paper, if the instant voice is not matched with same person’s reference voices in the database, then Genetic Algorithm (GA is applied between two randomly chosen reference voices. Again the instant voice is compared with the result of Genetic Algorithm (GA which is used, including its three main steps: selection, crossover and mutation. We illustrate our approach with different sample of voices from human in our institution.

  20. Adolescent females "voice" changes can signal difficulties for teachers and administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, D J

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the different preferences in learning styles of adolescent females and males, based on the pioneering work on adolescent values development by Lawrence Kohlberg and Carol Gilligan. Since values education programs are currently considered very important, educators need to explore the philosophical, psychological, and social influences on students' learning preferences before they can introduce appropriate curricula. An indication of problems in adolescent females frequently is the occurrence of voice changes, for example, girls may express viewpoints that do not represent their true beliefs and feelings. Curricular and co-curricular suggestions are presented.

  1. The impact of voice on speech realization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelka Breznik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses spoken literary language and the impact of voice on speech realization. The voice consists of a sound made by a human being using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, crying, screaming… The human voice is specifically the part of human sound production in which the vocal folds (vocal cords are the primary sound source. Our voice is our instrument and identity card. How does the voice (voice tone affect others and how do they respond, positively or negatively? How important is voice (voice tone in communication process? The study presents how certain individuals perceive voice. The results of the research on the relationships between the spoken word, excellent speaker, voice and description / definition / identification of specific voices done by experts in the field of speech and voice as well as non-professionals are presented. The study encompasses two focus groups. One consists of amateurs (non-specialists in the field of speech or voice who have no knowledge in this field and the other consists of professionals who work with speech or language or voice. The questions were intensified from general to specific, directly related to the topic. The purpose of such a method of questioning was to create relaxed atmosphere, promote discussion, allow participants to interact, complement, and to set up self-listening and additional comments.

  2. Protons at the speed of sound: Predicting specific biological signaling from physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, Bernhard; Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F.

    2016-05-01

    Local changes in pH are known to significantly alter the state and activity of proteins and enzymes. pH variations induced by pulses propagating along soft interfaces (e.g. membranes) would therefore constitute an important pillar towards a physical mechanism of biological signaling. Here we investigate the pH-induced physical perturbation of a lipid interface and the physicochemical nature of the subsequent acoustic propagation. Pulses are stimulated by local acidification and propagate – in analogy to sound – at velocities controlled by the interface’s compressibility. With transient local pH changes of 0.6 directly observed at the interface and velocities up to 1.4 m/s this represents hitherto the fastest protonic communication observed. Furthermore simultaneously propagating mechanical and electrical changes in the lipid interface are detected, exposing the thermodynamic nature of these pulses. Finally, these pulses are excitable only beyond a threshold for protonation, determined by the pKa of the lipid head groups. This protonation-transition plus the existence of an enzymatic pH-optimum offer a physical basis for intra- and intercellular signaling via sound waves at interfaces, where not molecular structure and mechano-enyzmatic couplings, but interface thermodynamics and thermodynamic transitions are the origin of the observations.

  3. Protons at the speed of sound: Predicting specific biological signaling from physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, Bernhard; Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F

    2016-05-24

    Local changes in pH are known to significantly alter the state and activity of proteins and enzymes. pH variations induced by pulses propagating along soft interfaces (e.g. membranes) would therefore constitute an important pillar towards a physical mechanism of biological signaling. Here we investigate the pH-induced physical perturbation of a lipid interface and the physicochemical nature of the subsequent acoustic propagation. Pulses are stimulated by local acidification and propagate - in analogy to sound - at velocities controlled by the interface's compressibility. With transient local pH changes of 0.6 directly observed at the interface and velocities up to 1.4 m/s this represents hitherto the fastest protonic communication observed. Furthermore simultaneously propagating mechanical and electrical changes in the lipid interface are detected, exposing the thermodynamic nature of these pulses. Finally, these pulses are excitable only beyond a threshold for protonation, determined by the pKa of the lipid head groups. This protonation-transition plus the existence of an enzymatic pH-optimum offer a physical basis for intra- and intercellular signaling via sound waves at interfaces, where not molecular structure and mechano-enyzmatic couplings, but interface thermodynamics and thermodynamic transitions are the origin of the observations.

  4. Adaptive wave field synthesis for broadband active sound field reproduction: signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Sound field reproduction is a physical approach to the reproduction of the natural spatial character of hearing. It is also useful in experimental acoustics and psychoacoustics. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. A real reflective reproduction space thus reduces the objective accuracy of WFS. Recently, adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) was defined as a combination of WFS and active compensation. AWFS is based on the minimization of reproduction errors and on the penalization of departure from the WFS solution. This paper focuses on signal processing for AWFS. A classical adaptive algorithm is modified for AWFS: filtered-reference least-mean-square. This modified algorithm and the classical equivalent leaky algorithm have similar convergence properties except that the WFS solution influences the adaptation rule of the modified algorithm. The paper also introduces signal processing for independent radiation mode control of AWFS on the basis of plant decoupling. Simulation results for AWFS are introduced for free-field and reflective spaces. The two algorithms effectively reproduce the sound field and compensate for the reproduction errors at the error sensors. The independent radiation mode control allows a more flexible tuning of the algorithm.

  5. Voice Morphing Using 3D Waveform Interpolation Surfaces and Lossless Tube Area Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavner Yizhar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Voice morphing is the process of producing intermediate or hybrid voices between the utterances of two speakers. It can also be defined as the process of gradually transforming the voice of one speaker to that of another. The ability to change the speaker's individual characteristics and to produce high-quality voices can be used in many applications. Examples include multimedia and video entertainment, as well as enrichment of speech databases in text-to-speech systems. In this study we present a new technique which enables production of a given number of intermediate voices or of utterances which gradually change from one voice to another. This technique is based on two components: (1 creation of a 3D prototype waveform interpolation (PWI surface from the LPC residual signal, to produce an intermediate excitation signal; (2 a representation of the vocal tract by a lossless tube area function, and an interpolation of the parameters of the two speakers. The resulting synthesized signal sounds like a natural voice lying between the two original voices.

  6. Voice and Speech after Laryngectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajner-Katusic, Smiljka; Horga, Damir; Musura, Maja; Globlek, Dubravka

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to compare voice and speech quality in alaryngeal patients using esophageal speech (ESOP, eight subjects), electroacoustical speech aid (EACA, six subjects) and tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis (TEVP, three subjects). The subjects reading a short story were recorded in the sound-proof booth and the speech samples…

  7. Analyzing the mediated voice - a datasession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Anna

    Broadcasted voices are technologically manipulated. In order to achieve a certain autencity or sound of “reality” paradoxically the voices are filtered and trained in order to reach the listeners. This “mis-en-scene” is important knowledge when it comes to the development of a consistent method o...... of analysis of the mediated voice...

  8. Analyzing the mediated voice - a datasession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Anna

    Broadcasted voices are technologically manipulated. In order to achieve a certain autencity or sound of “reality” paradoxically the voices are filtered and trained in order to reach the listeners. This “mis-en-scene” is important knowledge when it comes to the development of a consistent method...... of analysis of the mediated voice...

  9. A Sound Project Using Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Sharma,

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the implementation of various digital audio effects (DAFXs as a combination of user defined parameters and input sound signal.An approach to implement various effects like delay based effects, spatial effects, time varying effects and modulators is provided.A unique listening environment is provided using 3-D spatialization and localization, simulated surround sound, dialogue normalisation, dynamic range control and down-mixing.An attempt has also been made for music and voice separation to provide karaoke effect to the sound. All the implementations are provided in python which is widely adopted, open source and general purpose programming language and has a vast array ofcode libraries and development tools, and integrates well with many other programming languages, frameworks and musical applications.

  10. SOUND AND VIBRATION SIGNAL ANALYSIS USING IMPROVED SHORT-TIME FOURIER REPRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June-Yule Lee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Time-frequency imaging provides a straightforward means to understanding machinery conditions. The methods of short-time Fourier transform (STFT, Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD and smooth-windowed Wigner-Ville distribution (SWWVD are applied to the condition monitoring of rotating machines. The sound and vibration signals of a rotating fan are tested, and time-frequency images are illustrated in terms of STFT, WVD and SWWVD. The results show that the resolution of STFT is low, and the resolution of WVD is high but with interference. To overcome the interference in the WVD image, a variable smooth-windowed weighting function is applied. The smoothing window function resulted in interference attenuation but also in reducing the concentration. The SWWVD is a compromise between STFT and WVD. The SWWVD exhibits better resolution than STFT and has less interference than WVD.

  11. Enhancement of speech signals - with a focus on voiced speech models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Sidsel Marie

    This thesis deals with speech enhancement, i.e., noise reduction in speech signals. This has applications in, e.g., hearing aids and teleconference systems. We consider a signal-driven approach to speech enhancement where a model of the speech is assumed and filters are generated based on this mo......This thesis deals with speech enhancement, i.e., noise reduction in speech signals. This has applications in, e.g., hearing aids and teleconference systems. We consider a signal-driven approach to speech enhancement where a model of the speech is assumed and filters are generated based...

  12. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    are tempo, time, voice, sound and music. Our goal is to bring analytical and performative awareness to academic means of expression, and the audio paper provides us with a new and experimental platform to do so. Our thoughts about and definition of the audio paper is explained in the first text of the issue...... by introducing a new format: The Audio Paper. The purpose of the audio paper is to extend the written academic text: to present discussions and explorations of a certain argument or problem in sound. The audio paper is an extension of expressive means: Not only words and syntax are means of expression – so...

  13. Ionospheric Sounding Opportunities Using Signal Data From Preexisting Amateur Radio And Other Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushley, A. C.; Noel, J. M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Amateur radio and other transmissions used for dedicated purposes, such as the Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B), are signals that exist for another reason, but can be used for ionospheric sounding. Whether mandated and government funded or voluntarily constructed and operated, these networks provide data that can be used for scientific and operational purposes which rely on space weather data. Given the current state of the global economic environment and fiscal consequences to scientific research funding in Canada, these types of networks offer an innovative solution with preexisting hardware for more real-time and archival space-weather data to supplement current methods, particularly for data assimilation, modelling and forecasting. Furthermore, mobile ground-based transmitters offer more flexibility for deployment than stationary receivers. Numerical modelling has demonstrated that APRS and ADS-B signals are subject to Faraday rotation (FR) as they pass through the ionosphere. Ray tracingtechniques were used to determine the characteristics of individual waves, including the wave path and the state of polarization. The modelled FR was computed and converted to total electron content (TEC) along the raypaths. TEC data can be used as input for computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) in order to reconstruct electron density maps of the ionosphere.

  14. Overview on the diversity of sounds produced by clownfishes (Pomacentridae: importance of acoustic signals in their peculiar way of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orphal Colleye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clownfishes (Pomacentridae are brightly colored coral reef fishes well known for their mutualistic symbiosis with tropical sea anemones. These fishes live in social groups in which there is a size-based dominance hierarchy. In this structure where sex is socially controlled, agonistic interactions are numerous and serve to maintain size differences between individuals adjacent in rank. Clownfishes are also prolific callers whose sounds seem to play an important role in the social hierarchy. Here, we aim to review and to synthesize the diversity of sounds produced by clownfishes in order to emphasize the importance of acoustic signals in their way of life. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recording the different acoustic behaviors indicated that sounds are divided into two main categories: aggressive sounds produced in conjunction with threat postures (charge and chase, and submissive sounds always emitted when fish exhibited head shaking movements (i.e. a submissive posture. Both types of sounds showed size-related intraspecific variation in dominant frequency and pulse duration: smaller individuals produce higher frequency and shorter duration pulses than larger ones, and inversely. Consequently, these sonic features might be useful cues for individual recognition within the group. This observation is of significant importance due to the size-based hierarchy in clownfish group. On the other hand, no acoustic signal was associated with the different reproductive activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Unlike other pomacentrids, sounds are not produced for mate attraction in clownfishes but to reach and to defend the competition for breeding status, which explains why constraints are not important enough for promoting call diversification in this group.

  15. Learning to cope with degraded sounds: female zebra finches can improve their expertise in discriminating between male voices at long distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouterde, Solveig C; Elie, Julie E; Theunissen, Frédéric E; Mathevon, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    Reliable transmission of acoustic information about individual identity is of critical importance for pair bond maintenance in numerous monogamous songbirds. However, information transfer can be impaired by environmental constraints such as external noise or propagation-induced degradation. Birds have been shown to use several adaptive strategies to deal with difficult signal transmission contexts. Specifically, a number of studies have suggested that vocal plasticity at the emitter's level allows birds to counteract the deleterious effects of sound degradation. Although the communication process involves both the emitter and the receiver, perceptual plasticity at the receiver's level has received little attention. Here, we explored the reliability of individual recognition by female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), testing whether perceptual training can improve discrimination of degraded individual vocal signatures. We found that female zebra finches are proficient in discriminating between calls of individual males at long distances, and even more so when they can train themselves with increasingly degraded signals over time. In this latter context, females succeed in discriminating between males as far as 250 m. This result emphasizes that adaptation to adverse communication conditions may involve not only the emitter's vocal plasticity but also the receptor's decoding process through on-going learning. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Auditory object salience: human cortical processing of non-biological action sounds and their acoustic signal attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James W; Talkington, William J; Tallaksen, Katherine C; Frum, Chris A

    2012-01-01

    Whether viewed or heard, an object in action can be segmented as a distinct salient event based on a number of different sensory cues. In the visual system, several low-level attributes of an image are processed along parallel hierarchies, involving intermediate stages wherein gross-level object form and/or motion features are extracted prior to stages that show greater specificity for different object categories (e.g., people, buildings, or tools). In the auditory system, though relying on a rather different set of low-level signal attributes, meaningful real-world acoustic events and "auditory objects" can also be readily distinguished from background scenes. However, the nature of the acoustic signal attributes or gross-level perceptual features that may be explicitly processed along intermediate cortical processing stages remain poorly understood. Examining mechanical and environmental action sounds, representing two distinct non-biological categories of action sources, we had participants assess the degree to which each sound was perceived as object-like versus scene-like. We re-analyzed data from two of our earlier functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task paradigms (Engel et al., 2009) and found that scene-like action sounds preferentially led to activation along several midline cortical structures, but with strong dependence on listening task demands. In contrast, bilateral foci along the superior temporal gyri (STG) showed parametrically increasing activation to action sounds rated as more "object-like," independent of sound category or task demands. Moreover, these STG regions also showed parametric sensitivity to spectral structure variations (SSVs) of the action sounds-a quantitative measure of change in entropy of the acoustic signals over time-and the right STG additionally showed parametric sensitivity to measures of mean entropy and harmonic content of the environmental sounds. Analogous to the visual system, intermediate stages of the

  17. Heart sound signal collection based on FPGA%基于FPGA的心音信号采集

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓燕; 曾庆宁; 粟秀尹

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a type of heart sound collection system based on FPGA. The system consists of high performance sensor sampling heart sounds, the preproeessing circuit, the A/D conversion module and serial communication circuit. Sensors transfer heart sound signal into electrical signal, which is amplified and filtrated through the pretreatment circuit, and then sent to the FPGA after MD conversion circuit. FPGA will transfer the collected data to PC. The experiment results show that the system can collect heat sounds signal noninvasively, fast and cheaply.%设计了基于FPGA的心音采集系统,该系统包括高性能的心音传感器、预处理电路、A/D转换电路和串口通信电路。传感器托心音信号转换成电信号,通过预处理电路的放大和滤波,再经过A/D转换电路送到FPGA,FPGA把现场采集到的数据及时可靠地传递给PC。实验结果表明。该系统能无创、快速、廉价地采集心音信号。

  18. Sound Source Separation with Two Spectrograms by Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Hiroaki; Asahi, Kensaku; Sagawa, Yuji; Sugie, Noboru

    We propose a method for separating speeches using two spectrograms. First, two spectrograms are generated from voices recorded with a pair of microphones. The onsets and the offsets of the frequency components are extracted as the features using image processing techniques. Then the correspondences of the features between the spectrograms are determined and the intermicrophone time differences are calculated. Each of frequency components with the common onset/offset occurrences and time difference are grouped together as originating one of the speech signals. A set of band-pass filters are generated corresponding to each group of frequency components. Finally, each of the separated speech signals is extracted by applying the set of band-pass filters to the voice signal recorded by a microphone. Experiments were conducted with the mixture of a male speech sound and a female speech sound consisting of Japanese vowel and contain consonant. The evaluation results demonstrated that the separation was done reasonably well with the proposed method.

  19. Evidence for protonic communication at the speed of sound: An alternate mechanism for specific biological signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Fichtl, Bernhard; Schneider, Matthias F

    2015-01-01

    Local changes in pH are known to significantly alter the state and activity of proteins and in particular enzymes. pH variations induced by pulses propagating along soft interfaces (e.g. the lipid bilayer) would therefore constitute an important pillar towards a new physical mechanism of biochemical regulation and biological signaling. Here we investigate the pH-induced physical perturbation of a lipid interface and the physiochemical nature of the subsequent acoustic propagation. Pulses are stimulated by local acidification of a lipid monolayer and propagate, in analogy to sound, at velocities controlled by the two-dimensional compressibility of the interface. With transient local pH changes of 0.6 units directly observed at the interface and velocities up to 1.4 m/s this represents hitherto the fastest protonic communication observed. Furthermore simultaneously propagating mechanical and electrical changes in the lipid interface up to 8 mN/m and 100 mV are detected, exposing the thermodynamic nature of thes...

  20. Voice and endocrinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KVS Hari Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Voice is one of the advanced features of natural evolution that differentiates human beings from other primates. The human voice is capable of conveying the thoughts into spoken words along with a subtle emotion to the tone. This extraordinary character of the voice in expressing multiple emotions is the gift of God to the human beings and helps in effective interpersonal communication. Voice generation involves close interaction between cerebral signals and the peripheral apparatus consisting of the larynx, vocal cords, and trachea. The human voice is susceptible to the hormonal changes throughout life right from the puberty until senescence. Thyroid, gonadal and growth hormones have tremendous impact on the structure and function of the vocal apparatus. The alteration of voice is observed even in physiological states such as puberty and menstruation. Astute clinical observers make out the changes in the voice and refer the patients for endocrine evaluation. In this review, we shall discuss the hormonal influence on the voice apparatus in normal and endocrine disorders.

  1. Secure Recognition of Voice-Less Commands Using Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Wai Chee; Kumar, Dinesh Kant; Weghorn, Hans

    Interest in voice recognition technologies for internet applications is growing due to the flexibility of speech-based communication. The major drawback with the use of sound for internet access with computers is that the commands will be audible to other people in the vicinity. This paper examines a secure and voice-less method for recognition of speech-based commands using video without evaluating sound signals. The proposed approach represents mouth movements in the video data using 2D spatio-temporal templates (STT). Zernike moments (ZM) are computed from STT and fed into support vector machines (SVM) to be classified into one of the utterances. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed technique produces a high accuracy of 98% in a phoneme classification task. The proposed technique is demonstrated to be invariant to global variations of illumination level. Such a system is useful for securely interpreting user commands for internet applications on mobile devices.

  2. Association of trait emotional intelligence and individual fMRI-activation patterns during the perception of social signals from voice and face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreifelts, Benjamin; Ethofer, Thomas; Huberle, Elisabeth; Grodd, Wolfgang; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2010-07-01

    Multimodal integration of nonverbal social signals is essential for successful social interaction. Previous studies have implicated the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) in the perception of social signals such as nonverbal emotional signals as well as in social cognitive functions like mentalizing/theory of mind. In the present study, we evaluated the relationships between trait emotional intelligence (EI) and fMRI activation patterns in individual subjects during the multimodal perception of nonverbal emotional signals from voice and face. Trait EI was linked to hemodynamic responses in the right pSTS, an area which also exhibits a distinct sensitivity to human voices and faces. Within all other regions known to subserve the perceptual audiovisual integration of human social signals (i.e., amygdala, fusiform gyrus, thalamus), no such linked responses were observed. This functional difference in the network for the audiovisual perception of human social signals indicates a specific contribution of the pSTS as a possible interface between the perception of social information and social cognition.

  3. Penguins use the two-voice system to recognize each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, T; Jouventin, P; Hildebrand, C

    2000-06-07

    The sound-producing structure in birds is the syrinx, which is usually a two-part organ located at the junction of the bronchi. As each branch of the syrinx produces sound independently, many birds have two acoustic sources. Thirty years ago, we had anatomical, physiological and acoustical evidence of this two-voice phenomenon but no function was known. In songbirds, often these two voices with their respective harmonics are not activated simultaneously but they are obvious in large penguins and generate a beat pattern which varies between individuals. The emperor penguin breeds during the Antarctic winter, incubating and carrying its egg on its feet. Without the topographical cue of a nest, birds identify each other only by vocal means when switching duties during incubation or chick rearing. To test whether the two-voice system contains the identity code, we played back the modified call of their mate to both adults and also the modified call of their parents to chicks. Both the adults and the chicks replied to controls (two voices) but not to modified signals (one voice being experimentally suppressed). Our experiments demonstrate that the beat generated by the interaction of these two fundamental frequencies conveys information about individual identity and also propagates well through obstacles, being robust to sound degradation through the medium of bodies in a penguin colony. The two-voice structure is also clear in the call of other birds such as the king penguin, another non-nesting species, but not in the 14 other nesting penguins. We concluded that the two-voice phenomenon functions as an individual recognition system in species using few if any landmarks to meet. In penguins, this coding process, increasing the call complexity and resisting sound degradation, has evolved in parallel with the loss of territoriality.

  4. 基于线性预测原理的舱音特征提取与重构%Characteristics Acquirement and Reconstruction of Cockpit Sound Signals Based on LPC Principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程道来; 陈丹; 姚红宇; 仪垂杰; 严浩文

    2012-01-01

    在理解线性预测分析(LPC)方法及其自相关法和自协方差法两种高效解法基础上,根据舱音短时平稳特点,提出了基于LPC原理的Durbin迭代的舱音信号特征提取与重构方法,构建了舱音信号特征提取与重构方法的步骤,得到了详细图形和结果。获得了最佳预测阶数P、满足线性预测解稳定条件等有益结论。研究表明:基于线性预测分析方法得到的参数和结论为舱音信号特征识别提供了一条比较好的新途径。%Aircraft black box cockpit sound, recorded by CVR (cockpit voice recorder), is one of the main evidence to analyze accident cause for airplane crash. And the characteristics of cockpit sound are the key in wreckage aircraft accident investigation. Some researches are made in the paper. Firstly, two high effect computing solution of autocorrelation & auto covarianee and linear prediction coding (LPC) are applied in the research according to the characteristics of cockpit sound short-term stationary.; Then methods of acquirement and reconstruction of cockpit sound signal characteristics are put forward through Durbin arithmetic of LPC and the approach of acquirement and reconstruction for cockpit sound signal are formed; Thirdly, the relative figures and results in details are gained. Finally, the best predictive order number P is gotten through LPC, which meets the beneficial conclusion of LPC's stable conditions. The study shows: parameters and conclusions based on principle of LPC provide a better new method for the identification of the characteristics of cockpit sound signals.

  5. Human voice recognition depends on language ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrachione, Tyler K; Del Tufo, Stephanie N; Gabrieli, John D E

    2011-07-29

    The ability to recognize people by their voice is an important social behavior. Individuals differ in how they pronounce words, and listeners may take advantage of language-specific knowledge of speech phonology to facilitate recognizing voices. Impaired phonological processing is characteristic of dyslexia and thought to be a basis for difficulty in learning to read. We tested voice-recognition abilities of dyslexic and control listeners for voices speaking listeners' native language or an unfamiliar language. Individuals with dyslexia exhibited impaired voice-recognition abilities compared with controls only for voices speaking their native language. These results demonstrate the importance of linguistic representations for voice recognition. Humans appear to identify voices by making comparisons between talkers' pronunciations of words and listeners' stored abstract representations of the sounds in those words.

  6. Processing emotions in sounds: cross-domain aftereffects of vocal utterances and musical sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Casady; Yamauchi, Takashi

    2016-11-16

    Nonlinguistic signals in the voice and musical instruments play a critical role in communicating emotion. Although previous research suggests a common mechanism for emotion processing in music and speech, the precise relationship between the two domains is unclear due to the paucity of direct evidence. By applying the adaptation paradigm developed by Bestelmeyer, Rouger, DeBruine, and Belin [2010. Auditory adaptation in vocal affect perception. Cognition, 117(2), 217-223. doi: 10.1016/j.cognition.2010.08.008 ], this study shows cross-domain aftereffects from vocal to musical sounds. Participants heard an angry or fearful sound four times, followed by a test sound and judged whether the test sound was angry or fearful. Results show cross-domain aftereffects in one direction - vocal utterances to musical sounds, not vice-versa. This effect occurred primarily for angry vocal sounds. It is argued that there is a unidirectional relationship between vocal and musical sounds where emotion processing of vocal sounds encompasses musical sounds but not vice-versa.

  7. Time domain acoustic contrast control implementation of sound zones for low-frequency input signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellekens, Daan H. M.; Møller, Martin Bo; Olsen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Sound zones are two or more regions within a listening space where listeners are provided with personal audio. Acoustic contrast control (ACC) is a sound zoning method that maximizes the average squared sound pressure in one zone constrained to constant pressure in other zones. State-of-the-art t......Sound zones are two or more regions within a listening space where listeners are provided with personal audio. Acoustic contrast control (ACC) is a sound zoning method that maximizes the average squared sound pressure in one zone constrained to constant pressure in other zones. State......-of-the-art time domain broadband acoustic contrast control (BACC) methods are designed for anechoic environments. These methods are not able to realize a flat frequency response in a limited frequency range within a reverberant environment. Sound field control in a limited frequency range is a requirement...... to accommodate the effective working range of the loudspeakers. In this paper, a new BACC method is proposed which results in an implementation realizing a flat frequency response in the target zone. This method is applied in a bandlimited low-frequency scenario where the loudspeaker layout surrounds two...

  8. Ocultamiento del Mensaje de Señales de Voz usando la Transformada de Ondita Haar Discreta Message Concealment of Voice Signals using the Discrete Haar Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Martínez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta un método de ocultamiento del mensaje para transmisión de señales de voz utilizando codificación por medio de bancos de filtros multi-resolución de análisis y de síntesis para la Transformada de Ondita Haar Discreta. Por medio de un banco de filtros Haar multi-resolución se realiza la separación de la señal en sus componentes y después se realiza una distorsión reversible de la síntesis multi-resolución de sus señales componentes, obteniendo una señal de salida que, aunque mantiene la misma información de la señal de entrada, el mensaje de la señal de voz que esta porta queda oculto en ella misma. Este método puede aplicarse para la transmisión codificada de señales de voz ya sea en su forma digital o analógica, y por su simplicidad resulta adecuado para implementarse en sistemas electrónicos digitales, ya sea como un arreglo de compuertas programables por campo, o como circuito integrado de aplicación específica.This work introduces a message concealment method for voice signals transmission using codification through multi-resolution filter banks implementation for analysis and synthesis for the Discrete Haar Wavelet Transform. Through these multi-resolution filter banks of Haar wavelet the voice signal can be split in its components, and later a reversible distortion of the synthesis of its multi-resolution component signals is made, obtaining an output signal that, although maintains the same information of the original input signal, hides the message of the carried voice signal in itself. This method can be applied in codified transmission of voice, analog or digital signals, and due to the simplicity of the method it’s suitable to be implemented on digital electronic systems like FPGA, or ASIC.

  9. Every Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Penny

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses how the author develops an approach that allows her students, who are part of the marginalized population, to learn the power of their own voices--not just their writing voices, but their oral voices as well. The author calls it "TWIST": Thoughts, Writing folder, Inquiring mind, Supplies, and Teamwork. It is where…

  10. Every Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Penny

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses how the author develops an approach that allows her students, who are part of the marginalized population, to learn the power of their own voices--not just their writing voices, but their oral voices as well. The author calls it "TWIST": Thoughts, Writing folder, Inquiring mind, Supplies, and Teamwork. It is where…

  11. Voice restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgers, F.J.M.; Balm, A.J.M.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Tan, I.B.; Remacle, M.; Eckel, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical prosthetic voice restoration is the best possible option for patients to regain oral communication after total laryngectomy. It is considered to be the present "gold standard" for voice rehabilitation of laryngectomized individuals. Surgical prosthetic voice restoration, in essence, is alwa

  12. Voice-Specialized Speech-Language Pathologist's Criteria for Discharge from Voice Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Amanda I; Gartner-Schmidt, Jackie

    2017-08-07

    No standard protocol exists to determine when a patient is ready and able to be discharged from voice therapy. The aim of the present study was to determine what factors speech-language pathologists (SLPs) deem most important when discharging a patient from voice therapy. A second aim was to determine if responses differed based on years of voice experience. Step 1: Seven voice-specialized SLPs generated a list of items thought to be relevant to voice therapy discharge. Step 2: Fifty voice-specialized SLPs rated each item on the list in terms of importance in determining discharge from voice therapy. Step 1: Four themes emerged-outcome measures, laryngeal appearance, SLP perceptions, and patient factors-as important items when determining discharge from voice therapy. Step 2: The top five most important criteria for discharge readiness were that the patient had to be able to (1) independently use a better voice (transfer), (2) function with his or her new voice production in activities of daily living (transfer), (3) differentiate between good and bad voice, (4) take responsibility for voice, and (5) sound better from baseline. Novice and experienced clinicians agreed between 94% and 97% concerning what was deemed "very important." SLPs agree that a patient's ability to use voice techniques in conversation and real-life situations outside of the therapy room are the most important determinants for voice therapy discharge. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Emotional voices in context: A neurobiological model of multimodal affective information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Carolin; Kreifelts, Benjamin; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2011-12-01

    Just as eyes are often considered a gateway to the soul, the human voice offers a window through which we gain access to our fellow human beings' minds - their attitudes, intentions and feelings. Whether in talking or singing, crying or laughing, sighing or screaming, the sheer sound of a voice communicates a wealth of information that, in turn, may serve the observant listener as valuable guidepost in social interaction. But how do human beings extract information from the tone of a voice? In an attempt to answer this question, the present article reviews empirical evidence detailing the cerebral processes that underlie our ability to decode emotional information from vocal signals. The review will focus primarily on two prominent classes of vocal emotion cues: laughter and speech prosody (i.e. the tone of voice while speaking). Following a brief introduction, behavioral as well as neuroimaging data will be summarized that allows to outline cerebral mechanisms associated with the decoding of emotional voice cues, as well as the influence of various context variables (e.g. co-occurring facial and verbal emotional signals, attention focus, person-specific parameters such as gender and personality) on the respective processes. Building on the presented evidence, a cerebral network model will be introduced that proposes a differential contribution of various cortical and subcortical brain structures to the processing of emotional voice signals both in isolation and in context of accompanying (facial and verbal) emotional cues.

  14. Mechanics of human voice production and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2016-01-01

    As the primary means of communication, voice plays an important role in daily life. Voice also conveys personal information such as social status, personal traits, and the emotional state of the speaker. Mechanically, voice production involves complex fluid-structure interaction within the glottis and its control by laryngeal muscle activation. An important goal of voice research is to establish a causal theory linking voice physiology and biomechanics to how speakers use and control voice to communicate meaning and personal information. Establishing such a causal theory has important implications for clinical voice management, voice training, and many speech technology applications. This paper provides a review of voice physiology and biomechanics, the physics of vocal fold vibration and sound production, and laryngeal muscular control of the fundamental frequency of voice, vocal intensity, and voice quality. Current efforts to develop mechanical and computational models of voice production are also critically reviewed. Finally, issues and future challenges in developing a causal theory of voice production and perception are discussed. PMID:27794319

  15. Robust water leakage detection approach using the sound signals and pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Yuriko; Mita, Akira

    2008-03-01

    Water supply systems are essential for public health, ease of living, and industrial activity; basic to any modern city. But water leakage is a serious problem as it leads to deficient water supplies, roads caving in, leakage in buildings, and secondary disasters. Today, the most common leakage detection method is based on human expertise. An expert, using a microphone and headset, listens to the sound of water flowing in pipes and relies on their experience to determine if and where a leak exists. The purpose of this study is to propose an easy and stable automatic leak detection method using acoustics. In the present study, 10 leakage sounds, and 10 pseudo-sounds were used to train a Support Vector Machine (SVM) which was then tested using 69 sounds. Three features were used in the SVM: average Itakura Distance, maximum Itakura Distance and the largest eigenvalue as derived from Principal Component Analysis. This paper focuses on the Itakura Distance, which is a measure of the difference between AR models fitted to two data sets, and is found using the identified AR model parameters. In this study, 10 leakage sounds are used as a standard reference set of data. The average Itakura Distance is the average difference between a test datum and the 10 reference data. The maximum Itakura Distance is the maximum difference between a test datum and the 10 reference data. Using these measures and the PCA eigenvalues as features for our SVM, classification accuracy of 97.1% was obtained.

  16. Mobile voice health monitoring using a wearable accelerometer sensor and a smartphone platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Daryush D.; Zañartu, Matías; Feng, Shengran W.; Cheyne, Harold A.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Many common voice disorders are chronic or recurring conditions that are likely to result from faulty and/or abusive patterns of vocal behavior, referred to generically as vocal hyperfunction. An ongoing goal in clinical voice assessment is the development and use of noninvasively derived measures to quantify and track the daily status of vocal hyperfunction so that the diagnosis and treatment of such behaviorally based voice disorders can be improved. This paper reports on the development of a new, versatile, and cost-effective clinical tool for mobile voice monitoring that acquires the high-bandwidth signal from an accelerometer sensor placed on the neck skin above the collarbone. Using a smartphone as the data acquisition platform, the prototype device provides a user-friendly interface for voice use monitoring, daily sensor calibration, and periodic alert capabilities. Pilot data are reported from three vocally normal speakers and three subjects with voice disorders to demonstrate the potential of the device to yield standard measures of fundamental frequency and sound pressure level and model-based glottal airflow properties. The smartphone-based platform enables future clinical studies for the identification of the best set of measures for differentiating between normal and hyperfunctional patterns of voice use. PMID:22875236

  17. Identification of Mobile Phone and Analysis of Original Version of Videos through a Delay Time Analysis of Sound Signals from Mobile Phone Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Min Gu; Har, Dong Hwan

    2017-02-15

    This study designs a method of identifying the camera model used to take videos that are distributed through mobile phones and determines the original version of the mobile phone video for use as legal evidence. For this analysis, an experiment was conducted to find the unique characteristics of each mobile phone. The videos recorded by mobile phones were analyzed to establish the delay time of sound signals, and the differences between the delay times of sound signals for different mobile phones were traced by classifying their characteristics. Furthermore, the sound input signals for mobile phone videos used as legal evidence were analyzed to ascertain whether they have the unique characteristics of the original version. The objective of this study was to find a method for validating the use of mobile phone videos as legal evidence using mobile phones through differences in the delay times of sound input signals. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  18. Using the Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice. Based on a generic audio feature extraction system, and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used, a 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. This shape is output to a 3D printer...

  19. Using the Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice. Based on a generic audio feature extraction system, and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used, a 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. This shape is output to a 3D printer...

  20. Temporal voice areas exist in autism spectrum disorder but are dysfunctional for voice identity recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiak, Kamila; von Kriegstein, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The ability to recognise the identity of others is a key requirement for successful communication. Brain regions that respond selectively to voices exist in humans from early infancy on. Currently, it is unclear whether dysfunction of these voice-sensitive regions can explain voice identity recognition impairments. Here, we used two independent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies to investigate voice processing in a population that has been reported to have no voice-sensitive regions: autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Our results refute the earlier report that individuals with ASD have no responses in voice-sensitive regions: Passive listening to vocal, compared to non-vocal, sounds elicited typical responses in voice-sensitive regions in the high-functioning ASD group and controls. In contrast, the ASD group had a dysfunction in voice-sensitive regions during voice identity but not speech recognition in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus/gyrus (STS/STG)—a region implicated in processing complex spectrotemporal voice features and unfamiliar voices. The right anterior STS/STG correlated with voice identity recognition performance in controls but not in the ASD group. The findings suggest that right STS/STG dysfunction is critical for explaining voice recognition impairments in high-functioning ASD and show that ASD is not characterised by a general lack of voice-sensitive responses. PMID:27369067

  1. The electronic cry: Voice and gender in electroacoustic music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, H.M.

    2013-01-01

    The voice provides an entrance to discuss gender and related fundamental issues in electroacoustic music that are relevant as well in other musical genres and outside of music per se: the role of the female voice; the use of language versus non-verbal vocal sounds; the relation of voice, embodiment

  2. Removing the Influence of Shimmer in the Calculation of Harmonics-To-Noise Ratios Using Ensemble-Averages in Voice Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ferrer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Harmonics-to-noise ratios (HNRs are affected by general aperiodicity in voiced speech signals. To specifically reflect a signal-to-additive-noise ratio, the measurement should be insensitive to other periodicity perturbations, like jitter, shimmer, and waveform variability. The ensemble averaging technique is a time-domain method which has been gradually refined in terms of its sensitivity to jitter and waveform variability and required number of pulses. In this paper, shimmer is introduced in the model of the ensemble average, and a formula is derived which allows the reduction of shimmer effects in HNR calculation. The validity of the technique is evaluated using synthetically shimmered signals, and the prerequisites (glottal pulse positions and amplitudes are obtained by means of fully automated methods. The results demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of the correction.

  3. Brain-computer interface combining eye saccade two-electrode EEG signals and voice cues to improve the maneuverability of wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ker-Jiun; Zhang, Lan; Luan, Bo; Tung, Hsiao-Wei; Liu, Quanfeng; Wei, Jiacheng; Sun, Mingui; Mao, Zhi-Hong

    2017-07-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) largely augment human capabilities by translating brain wave signals into feasible commands to operate external devices. However, many issues face the development of BCIs such as the low classification accuracy of brain signals and the tedious human-learning procedures. To solve these problems, we propose to use signals associated with eye saccades and blinks to control a BCI interface. By extracting existing physiological eye signals, the user does not need to adapt his/her brain waves to the device. Furthermore, using saccade signals to control an external device frees the limbs to perform other tasks. In this research, we use two electrodes placed on top of the left and right ears of thirteen participants. Then we use Independent Component Analysis (ICA) to extract meaningful EEG signals associated with eye movements. A sliding-window technique was implemented to collect relevant features. Finally, we classified the features as horizontal or blink eye movements using KNN and SVM. We were able to achieve a mean classification accuracy of about 97%. The two electrodes were then integrated with off-the-shelf earbuds to control a wheelchair. The earbuds can generate voice cues to indicate when to rotate the eyeballs to certain locations (i.e., left or right) or blink, so that the user can select directional commands to drive the wheelchair. In addition, through properly designing the contents of voice menus, we can generate as many commands as possible, even though we only have limited numbers of states of the identified eye saccade movements.

  4. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Explorations and analysis of soundscapes have, since Canadian R. Murray Schafer's work during the early 1970's, developed into various established research - and artistic disciplines. The interest in sonic environments is today present within a broad range of contemporary art projects and in arch...... are tempo, time, voice, sound and music. Our goal is to bring analytical and performative awareness to academic means of expression, and the audio paper provides us with a new and experimental platform to do so....... by introducing a new format: The Audio Paper. The purpose of the audio paper is to extend the written academic text: to present discussions and explorations of a certain argument or problem in sound. The audio paper is an extension of expressive means: Not only words and syntax are means of expression – so...

  5. Voice Collection under Different Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available According to the short-time Fourier transform theory and principle of digital filtering, this paper established a mathematical model called collection of voice signal collection at different spectrum. The voice signal was a non-stationary process, while the standard Fourier transform only applied to the periodic signal, transient signals or stationary random signal. Therefore, the standard Fourier transform could not be directly used for the speech signal. By controlling the input different types and parameters, this paper analyzed the collected original voice signal spectrum with the use of MATLAB software platform. At the same time, it realized the extraction, recording and playback of the speech signal at different frequencies. Therefore, the waveforms could be displayed obviously on the graphic user interface and voice effect could be more clearly. Meanwhile, the result was verified by the hardware platforms, which consisted of TMS320VC5509A [1] chip and TLV320AIC23 voice chip. The results showed that the extraction of voice signal under different spectrum model was scientific, rational and effective.

  6. Equivalent threshold sound pressure levels for acoustic test signals of short duration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben; Daugaard, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    . The measurements were performed with two types of headphones, Telephonics TDH-39 and Sennheiser HDA-200. The sound pressure levels were measured in an IEC 318 ear simulator with Type 1 adapter (a flat plate) and a conical ring. The audiometric methods used in the experiments were the ascending method (ISO 8253...

  7. Equivalent threshold sound pressure levels for acoustic test signals of short duration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben; Daugaard, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    . The measurements were performed with two types of headphones, Telephonics TDH-39 and Sennheiser HDA-200. The sound pressure levels were measured in an IEC 318 ear simulator with Type 1 adapter (a flat plate) and a conical ring. The audiometric methods used in the experiments were the ascending method (ISO 8253...

  8. Effects on vocal range and voice quality of singing voice training: the classically trained female voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Peter; Stallinga, Rob; Södersten, Maria; Ternström, Sten

    2014-01-01

    A longitudinal study was performed on the acoustical effects of singing voice training under a given study program, using the voice range profile (VRP). Pretraining and posttraining recordings were made of students who participated in a 3-year bachelor singing study program. A questionnaire that included questions on optimal range, register use, classification, vocal health and hygiene, mixing technique, and training goals was used to rate and categorize self-assessed voice changes. Based on the responses, a subgroup of 10 classically trained female voices was selected, which was homogeneous enough for effects of training to be identified. The VRP perimeter contour was analyzed for effects of voice training. Also, a mapping within the VRP of voice quality, as expressed by the crest factor, was used to indicate the register boundaries and to monitor the acoustical consequences of the newly learned vocal technique of "mixed voice." VRPs were averaged across subjects. Findings were compared with the self-assessed vocal changes. Pre/post comparison of the average VRPs showed, in the midrange, (1) a decrease in the VRP area that was associated with the loud chest voice, (2) a reduction of the crest factor values, and (3) a reduction of maximum sound pressure level values. The students' self-evaluations of the voice changes appeared in some cases to contradict the VRP findings. VRPs of individual voices were seen to change over the course of a singing education. These changes were manifest also in the average group. High-resolution computerized recording, complemented with an acoustic register marker, allows a meaningful assessment of some effects of training, on an individual basis and for groups that comprise singers of a specific genre. It is argued that this kind of investigation is possible only within a focused training program, given by a faculty who has agreed on the goals. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bodies, Spaces, Voices, Silences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Mazzoleni

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A good architecture should not only allow functional, formal and technical quality for urban spaces, but also let the voice of the city be perceived, listened, enjoyed. Every city has got its specific sound identity, or “ISO” (R. O. Benenzon, made up of a complex texture of background noises and fluctuation of sound figures emerging and disappearing in a game of continuous fadings. For instance, the ISO of Naples is characterized by a spread need of hearing the sound return of one’s/others voices, by a hate of silence. Cities may fall ill: illness from noise, within super-crowded neighbourhoods, or illness from silence, in the forced isolation of peripheries. The proposal of an urban music therapy denotes an unpublished and innovative enlarged interdisciplinary research path, where architecture, music, medicine, psychology, communication science may converge, in order to work for rebalancing spaces and relation life of the urban collectivity, through the care of body and sound dimensions.

  10. Acoustic comparison of vowel sounds among adult females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franca, Maria Claudia

    2012-09-01

    This study consist of an experiment comparing acoustic characteristics of vowel production among females. The aim of this investigation was to explore the stability among vowels with quantification of acoustic changes in the voice related to speech production associated with an ample variety of vowel sounds. An additional goal was to establish a systematic control of variables and standardization of the data collection procedures. All data were collected in a quiet environment using the Computerized Speech Lab (CSL; Kay Elemetrics, Montvale, NJ), a computer-based system designed to measure characteristics of voice. Jitter and shimmer, measures of perturbation that reflect characteristics of voice, were applied. Two additional acoustic measures were examined: (1) noise-to-harmonic ratio (NHR), a general evaluation of presence of noise in the voice signal; and (2) voice turbulence index (VTI), related to turbulence caused by abnormal adduction of vocal folds. A systematic methodology of data collection was organized, in an effort to establish a research protocol based on relevant literature, involving (1) keeping constant fundamental frequency (F0) and intensity, (2) positioning of participants and recording equipment, and (3) environmental noise. When measured acoustic parameters of vowels were compared, results revealed that the vowel sounds had a significant effect on shimmer and VTI. Furthermore, speech sounds classified as back vowels exhibited less perturbation and noise in the acoustic signal: the high-back vowels [u] and []; and the mid-back vowels [o] and [], demonstrated most of the statistically significant reduced values of shimmer and VTI among the 12 vowels compared. Further comparisons among front and back vowels grouped in clusters associated to more and less variability led to statistically significant differences in shimmer, NHR, and VTI. Overall, speech sounds classified as back vowels exhibited less variability and noise. Based on the results of

  11. Investigation of a glottal related harmonics-to-noise ratio and spectral tilt as indicators of glottal noise in synthesized and human voice signals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Peter J

    2008-03-01

    The harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR) of the voiced speech signal has implicitly been used to infer information regarding the turbulent noise level at the glottis. However, two problems exist for inferring glottal noise attributes from the HNR of the speech wave form: (i) the measure is fundamental frequency (f0) dependent for equal levels of glottal noise, and (ii) any deviation from signal periodicity affects the ratio, not just turbulent noise. An alternative harmonics-to-noise ratio formulation [glottal related HNR (GHNR\\')] is proposed to overcome the former problem. In GHNR\\' a mean over the spectral range of interest of the HNRs at specific harmonic\\/between-harmonic frequencies (expressed in linear scale) is calculated. For the latter issue [(ii)] two spectral tilt measures are shown, using synthesis data, to be sensitive to glottal noise while at the same time being comparatively insensitive to other glottal aperiodicities. The theoretical development predicts that the spectral tilt measures reduce as noise levels increase. A conventional HNR estimator, GHNR\\' and two spectral tilt measures are applied to a data set of 13 pathological and 12 normal voice samples. One of the tilt measures and GHNR\\' are shown to provide statistically significant differentiating power over a conventional HNR estimator.

  12. Presenting multiple auditory signals using multiple sound cards in Visual Basic 6.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jason S; Spence, Charles

    2003-02-01

    In auditory research, it is often desirable to present more than two auditory stimuli at any one time. Although the technology has been available for some time, the majority of researchers have not utilized it. This article provides a simple means of presenting multiple, concurrent, independent auditory events, using two or more different sound cards installed within a single computer. By enabling the presentation of more auditory events, we can hope to gain a better understanding of the cognitive and attentional processes operating under more complex and realistic scenes, such as that embodied by the cocktail party effect. The software requirements are Windows 98SR2/Me/NT4/2000/XP, Visual Basic 6.0, and DirectX 7.0 or above. The hardware requirements are a Pentium II, 128 MB RAM, and two or more different sound cards.

  13. 33 CFR 86.05 - Sound signal intensity and range of audibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... direction of the forward axis of the whistle and at a distance of 1 meter from it, a sound pressure level in... following frequency ranges (±1 percent): (a) 130-1200 Hz, for a vessel 75 meters or more in length; (b) 250-1600 Hz, for a vessel 20 meters but less than 75 meters in length; (c) 250-2100 Hz, for a vessel...

  14. Preferences for very low and very high voice pitch in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Re

    Full Text Available Manipulations of voice pitch have been shown to alter attractiveness ratings, but whether preferences extend to very low or very high voice pitch is unknown. Here, we manipulated voice pitch in averaged men's and women's voices by 2 Hz intervals to create a range of male and female voices speaking monopthong vowel sounds and spanning a range of frequencies from normal to very low and very high pitch. With these voices, we used the method of constant stimuli to measure preferences for voice. Nineteen university students (ages: 20-25 participated in three experiments. On average, men preferred high-pitched women's voices to low-pitched women's voices across all frequencies tested. On average, women preferred men's voices lowered in pitch, but did not prefer very low men's voices. The results of this study may reflect selection pressures for men's and women's voices, and shed light on a perceptual link between voice pitch and vocal attractiveness.

  15. The Performing Voice of the Audiobook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Birgitte Stougaard; Have, Iben

    2014-01-01

    will be based on a reception aesthetic and phenomenological approach, the latter as presented by Don Ihde in his book Listening and Voice. Phenomenologies of Sound , and my analytical sketches will be related to theoretical statements concerning the understanding of voice and media (Cavarero, Dolar, La......Belle, Neumark). Finally, the article will discuss the specific artistic combination and our auditory experience of mediated human voices and sculpturally projected faces in an art museum context under the general conditions of the societal panophonia of disembodied and mediated voices, as promoted by Steven...

  16. Time domain acoustic contrast control implementation of sound zones for low-frequency input signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellekens, Daan H. M.; Møller, Martin Bo; Olsen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    -of-the-art time domain broadband acoustic contrast control (BACC) methods are designed for anechoic environments. These methods are not able to realize a flat frequency response in a limited frequency range within a reverberant environment. Sound field control in a limited frequency range is a requirement...... to accommodate the effective working range of the loudspeakers. In this paper, a new BACC method is proposed which results in an implementation realizing a flat frequency response in the target zone. This method is applied in a bandlimited low-frequency scenario where the loudspeaker layout surrounds two...

  17. Vanishing voices from Russia & Eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, T.

    2016-01-01

    These recordings were digitised as part of the Endangered Archives Programme (EAP) project EAP347: ‘Vanishing voices from the Uralic world: sound recordings for archives in Russia (in particular Udmurtia), Estonia, Finland and Hungary’. The project digitised sound collections from the Uralic speakin

  18. Effects of HPA-nonlinearity on a 4-DPSK/OFDM-signal for a digital sound broadcasting signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Christoph

    1991-10-01

    Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) in conjunction with a 4 Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK) modulation format has been proposed for the future Digital Audio Broadcasting system (DAB), that should provide compact disk sound quality in portable, vehicular and fixed receivers. With properly chosen parameters, this system should be appropriate for both terrestrial and satellite transmission. The influence of the nonlinear distorsions introduced by the High Power Amplifier (HPA) of the transmitter is examined. In particular, the degradations in power efficiency due to intermodulation effects and backoff operating, as well as spectral degradations are investigated. It is shown for three different kinds of limiting amplifier models, that even with an output backoff in the region of 5 to 6 dB, the degradation of, for example a 512 carrier 4 DPSK/OFDM system relative to the linear case is below 1.7 dB (Pb = 0.0001), while the regenerated sidelobes of the transmitted spectrum are kept below -20 dB.

  19. Fluctuations of the peak pressure level of man-made impulsive sound signals propagating in the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Romero, Marta; Gavrilov, Alexander; Duncan, Alec J

    2017-02-01

    The theory of wave propagation and fluctuations in random media has been broadly studied; however the works studying the influence of a changing underwater acoustic environment on the spatial decay and fluctuations of the peak pressure in broadband and impulsive signals are limited. Using a method based on the formulation developed by Dyer and Makris to estimate intensity fluctuations of sound signals in the ocean in conditions of saturated multipath propagation, this paper presents an approach to model peak pressure fluctuations of transient signals propagating underwater. In contrast to the formulation of Dyer and Makris, the approach presented in this work applies extreme value theory using the properties of the peak pressure as a maximum value taken from a Rayleigh distributed amplitude. The location and scale parameters obtained from the best fit to a Gumbel distribution are used to estimate the probability of the peak pressure level staying below a certain threshold. The theory was applied to measurements of signals from an airgun array and offshore impact pile driving, resulting in good agreement in both cases.

  20. The Human Voice in Speech and Singing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, Björn; Sundberg, Johan

    This chapter speech describes various aspects of the human voice as a means of communication in speech and singing. From the point of view of function, vocal sounds can be regarded as the end result of a three stage process: (1) the compression of air in the respiratory system, which produces an exhalatory airstream, (2) the vibrating vocal folds' transformation of this air stream to an intermittent or pulsating air stream, which is a complex tone, referred to as the voice source, and (3) the filtering of this complex tone in the vocal tract resonator. The main function of the respiratory system is to generate an overpressure of air under the glottis, or a subglottal pressure. Section 16.1 describes different aspects of the respiratory system of significance to speech and singing, including lung volume ranges, subglottal pressures, and how this pressure is affected by the ever-varying recoil forces. The complex tone generated when the air stream from the lungs passes the vibrating vocal folds can be varied in at least three dimensions: fundamental frequency, amplitude and spectrum. Section 16.2 describes how these properties of the voice source are affected by the subglottal pressure, the length and stiffness of the vocal folds and how firmly the vocal folds are adducted. Section 16.3 gives an account of the vocal tract filter, how its form determines the frequencies of its resonances, and Sect. 16.4 gives an account for how these resonance frequencies or formants shape the vocal sounds by imposing spectrum peaks separated by spectrum valleys, and how the frequencies of these peaks determine vowel and voice qualities. The remaining sections of the chapter describe various aspects of the acoustic signals used for vocal communication in speech and singing. The syllable structure is discussed in Sect. 16.5, the closely related aspects of rhythmicity and timing in speech and singing is described in Sect. 16.6, and pitch and rhythm aspects in Sect. 16.7. The impressive

  1. Objective Voice Parameters in Colombian School Workers with Healthy Voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lady Catherine Cantor Cutiva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To characterize the objective voice parameters among school workers, and to identi­fy associated factors of three objective voice parameters, namely fundamental frequency, sound pressure level and maximum phonation time. Materials and methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 116 Colombian teachers and 20 Colombian non-teachers. After signing the informed consent form, participants filled out a questionnaire. Then, a voice sample was recorded and evaluated perceptually by a speech therapist and by objective voice analysis with praat software. Short-term environmental measurements of sound level, temperature, humi­dity, and reverberation time were conducted during visits at the workplaces, such as classrooms and offices. Linear regression analysis was used to determine associations between individual and work-related factors and objective voice parameters. Results: Compared with men, women had higher fundamental frequency (201 Hz for teachers and 209 for non-teachers vs. 120 Hz for teachers and 127 for non-teachers and sound pressure level (82 dB vs. 80 dB, and shorter maximum phonation time (around 14 seconds vs. around 16 seconds. Female teachers younger than 50 years of age evidenced a significant tendency to speak with lower fundamental frequen­cy and shorter mpt compared with female teachers older than 50 years of age. Female teachers had significantly higher fundamental frequency (66 Hz, higher sound pressure level (2 dB and short phonation time (2 seconds than male teachers. Conclusion: Female teachers younger than 50 years of age had significantly lower F0 and shorter mpt compared with those older than 50 years of age. The multivariate analysis showed that gender was a much more important determinant of variations in F0, spl and mpt than age and teaching occupation. Objectively measured temperature also contributed to the changes on spl among school workers.

  2. Broadcast sound technology

    CERN Document Server

    Talbot-Smith, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Broadcast Sound Technology provides an explanation of the underlying principles of modern audio technology. Organized into 21 chapters, the book first describes the basic sound; behavior of sound waves; aspects of hearing, harming, and charming the ear; room acoustics; reverberation; microphones; phantom power; loudspeakers; basic stereo; and monitoring of audio signal. Subsequent chapters explore the processing of audio signal, sockets, sound desks, and digital audio. Analogue and digital tape recording and reproduction, as well as noise reduction, are also explained.

  3. Acoustic comunication systems and sounds in three species of crickets from central Italy: musical instruments for a three-voices composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monacchi, David; Valentini, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Natural soundscape has always constituted a reference in cognitive and emotional processes. The imitation of natural sounds contributed to the origin of the verbal language, which has been then subjected to an even more refined process of abstraction throughout history. The musical language also evolved along the same path of imitation. Among the many sonic elements of a natural environment, the stridulation of crickets is one of the most consistent for its timbre, articulation, diffusion and intrinsic emotional power. More than 900 species of crickets, in fact, have been described. They can be found in all parts of the world with the exception of cold regions at latitudes higher than 55° North and South. Among the many species we're working on (Order Orthoptera and Suborder Ensifera), we refer here of a comparison between the morphology of the acoustic emission systems and the corresponding waveforms/spectral patterns of sound in three widespread species from central Italy: Gryllus Bimaculatus, Acheta Domesticus (Gryllidae), and Ruspolia Nitidula (Conocephalidae). The samples of the acoustic apparatus of the target individuals, stored in ethanol, were observed under a Field Emission Gun Environmental Electron Scanning Microscope (FEG-ESEM, Quanta 200, FEI, The Netherlands). The use of this type of microscope allowed to analyze the samples without any kind of manipulation (dehydration and/or metallization), while maintaining the morphological features of the fragile acoustic apparatus. The observations were made with different sensors (SE: secondary-electron sensor and BSE: backscattered-electron sensor), and performed at low-medium vacuum with energies varying from c.ca 10 to 30kV. Male individuals have an acoustic apparatus consisting in two cuticular structures (tegmina) positioned above wings, while both male and females have receiving organs (tympanum) in forelegs. Stridulation mechanism is produced when the file and the scraper (plectrum) scrub one another

  4. Simultaneous face and voice processing in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taosheng; Pinheiro, Ana P; Zhao, Zhongxin; Nestor, Paul G; McCarley, Robert W; Niznikiewicz, Margaret

    2016-05-15

    While several studies have consistently demonstrated abnormalities in the unisensory processing of face and voice in schizophrenia (SZ), the extent of abnormalities in the simultaneous processing of both types of information remains unclear. To address this issue, we used event-related potentials (ERP) methodology to probe the multisensory integration of face and non-semantic sounds in schizophrenia. EEG was recorded from 18 schizophrenia patients and 19 healthy control (HC) subjects in three conditions: neutral faces (visual condition-VIS); neutral non-semantic sounds (auditory condition-AUD); neutral faces presented simultaneously with neutral non-semantic sounds (audiovisual condition-AUDVIS). When compared with HC, the schizophrenia group showed less negative N170 to both face and face-voice stimuli; later P270 peak latency in the multimodal condition of face-voice relative to unimodal condition of face (the reverse was true in HC); reduced P400 amplitude and earlier P400 peak latency in the face but not in the voice-face condition. Thus, the analysis of ERP components suggests that deficits in the encoding of facial information extend to multimodal face-voice stimuli and that delays exist in feature extraction from multimodal face-voice stimuli in schizophrenia. In contrast, categorization processes seem to benefit from the presentation of simultaneous face-voice information. Timepoint by timepoint tests of multimodal integration did not suggest impairment in the initial stages of processing in schizophrenia.

  5. Performance of the phonatory deviation diagram in the evaluation of rough and breathy synthesized voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Leonardo Wanderley; Freitas, Jonas Almeida de; Almeida, Anna Alice; Silva, Priscila Oliveira Costa; Alves, Giorvan Ânderson Dos Santos

    2017-07-05

    Voice disorders alter the sound signal in several ways, combining several types of vocal emission disturbances and noise. The Phonatory Deviation Diagram (PDD) is a two-dimensional chart that allows the evaluation of the vocal signal based on the combination of periodicity (jitter, shimmer, and correlation coefficient) and noise (Glottal to Noise Excitation - GNE) measurements. The use of synthesized signals, where one has a greater control and knowledge of the production conditions, may allow a better understanding of the physiological and acoustic mechanisms underlying the vocal emission and its main perceptual-auditory correlates regarding the intensity of the deviation and types of vocal quality. To analyze the performance of the PDD in the discrimination of the presence and degree of roughness and breathiness in synthesized voices. 871 synthesized vocal signals were used corresponding to the vowel /ɛ/. The perceptual-auditory analysis of the degree of roughness and breathiness of the synthesized signals was performed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Subsequently, the signals were categorized regarding the presence/absence of these parameters based on the VAS cutoff values. Acoustic analysis was performed by assessing the distribution of vocal signals according to the PDD area, quadrant, shape, and density. The equality of proportions and the chi-square tests were performed to compare the variables. Rough and breathy vocal signals were located predominantly outside the normal range and in the lower right quadrant of the PDD. Voices with higher degrees of roughness and breathiness were located outside the area of normality in the lower right quadrant and had concentrated density. The normality area and the PDD quadrant can discriminate healthy voices from rough and breathy ones. Voices with higher degrees of roughness and breathiness are proportionally located outside the area of normality, in the lower right quadrant and with concentrated density. Copyright

  6. A possible source for dissolved-phase PAH signals observed in Mytilus samples throughout Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, J.R. [Payne Environmental Consultants Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States); Driskell, W.B. [William B. Driskell Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States); Janka, D. [Auklet Charter Services Inc., Cordova, AK (United States)

    2009-07-01

    As part of the long term environmental monitoring program of Prince William Sound (PWS) following the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), the Regional Citizens' Advisory Council has monitored the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and saturated hydrocarbon (SHC) contaminants in mussel samples (Mytilus trossulus). The source of the dissolved-phase signal remains unknown, although possibilities include atmospheric dust and soot, forest fires, some upwelling/climate-driven events, residues leaching from buried EVOS oil in PWS, and harbor operations such as wastewater discharge and small oil and diesel spills. In order to evaluate whether the lower-molecular-weight PAH may be leaching from water-borne sedimentary materials, a modest scoping experiment was conducted in July 2007 using intertidal sediments. When clean seawater was partitioned for 4 days against Constantine Harbor intertidal sediments and then filtered to remove SPM, increases of dissolved naphthalene, C1-naphthalene, and biphenyl were linearly correlated with sediment loadings. These results suggest that the sediments may be a source of these 3 more water-soluble PAHs in the filtered seawater extracts. The study supports the hypothesis that sedimentary materials may contribute to the pervasive, low level, dissolved-phase signal of the lower-molecular-weight PAH. Although the hydrocarbon source for the dissolved signal is unknown, it is evident that the higher-molecular-weight PAH remains bound within a solid matrix. 30 refs., 5 tabs., 14 figs.

  7. Keeping Your Voice Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Keeping Your Voice Healthy Keeping Your Voice Healthy Patient Health Information ... heavily voice-related. Key Steps for Keeping Your Voice Healthy Drink plenty of water. Moisture is good ...

  8. Signal Processing Implementation and Comparison of Automotive Spatial Sound Rendering Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai MingsianR

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Design and implementation strategies of spatial sound rendering are investigated in this paper for automotive scenarios. Six design methods are implemented for various rendering modes with different number of passengers. Specifically, the downmixing algorithms aimed at balancing the front and back reproductions are developed for the 5.1-channel input. Other five algorithms based on inverse filtering are implemented in two approaches. The first approach utilizes binaural (Head-Related Transfer Functions HRTFs measured in the car interior, whereas the second approach named the point-receiver model targets a point receiver positioned at the center of the passenger's head. The proposed processing algorithms were compared via objective and subjective experiments under various listening conditions. Test data were processed by the multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA method and the least significant difference (Fisher's LSD method as a post hoc test to justify the statistical significance of the experimental data. The results indicate that inverse filtering algorithms are preferred for the single passenger mode. For the multipassenger mode, however, downmixing algorithms generally outperformed the other processing techniques.

  9. Lexical frequency and voice assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernestus, Mirjam; Lahey, Mybeth; Verhees, Femke; Baayen, R Harald

    2006-08-01

    Acoustic duration and degree of vowel reduction are known to correlate with a word's frequency of occurrence. The present study broadens the research on the role of frequency in speech production to voice assimilation. The test case was regressive voice assimilation in Dutch. Clusters from a corpus of read speech were more often perceived as unassimilated in lower-frequency words and as either completely voiced (regressive assimilation) or, unexpectedly, as completely voiceless (progressive assimilation) in higher-frequency words. Frequency did not predict the voice classifications over and above important acoustic cues to voicing, suggesting that the frequency effects on the classifications were carried exclusively by the acoustic signal. The duration of the cluster and the period of glottal vibration during the cluster decreased while the duration of the release noises increased with frequency. This indicates that speakers reduce articulatory effort for higher-frequency words, with some acoustic cues signaling more voicing and others less voicing. A higher frequency leads not only to acoustic reduction but also to more assimilation.

  10. Sound Hole Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Politzer, David

    2015-01-01

    The volume of air that goes in and out of a musical instrument's sound hole is related to the sound hole's contribution to the volume of the sound. Helmholtz's result for the simplest case of steady flow through an elliptical hole is reviewed. Measurements on multiple holes in sound box geometries and scales relevant to real musical instruments demonstrate the importance of a variety of effects. Electric capacitance of single flat plates is a mathematically identical problem, offering an alternate way to understand the most important of those effects. The measurements also confirm and illuminate aspects of Helmholtz's "bottle" resonator model as applied to musical instrument sound boxes and sound holes.

  11. Methods to study pre-school teachers' voice at work: simultaneous recordings with a voice accumulator and a DAT recorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Annika; Hammarberg, Britta; Granqvist, Svante; Södersten, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Long-term recordings with reliable methods are desirable for objective documentation of voice use during natural conditions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a voice accumulator (VAC) with a digital audiotape (DAT) recorder as a reference. The VAC is based on a microprocessor that accumulates information about fundamental frequency (F0) and phonation time. A contact microphone attached to the front of the neck registers vocal fold vibrations. The DAT recorder was connected to two microphones for airborne signals placed at equal distance from the mouth close to the subject's ears. The computer program Aura was used to separate the subject's voice from the background noise. The Soundswell program was used for F0 and phonation time analysis. Two tests were performed: 1) One female speech-language pathologist was recorded with the two devices simultaneously in a sound-proof booth. She read a standard text with different voice qualities and sustained vowels with increasing F0 and intensity separately. The results showed good agreement between the two methods with respect to F0 and phonation time. However, the VAC failed to register high frequencies above around 440 Hz as well as low intensities. 2) Three female pre-school teachers were recorded with the two devices simultaneously during a working day. Results showed high correlations between the two methods in terms of long-term measurements of F0 and phonation time for two subjects For one subject with subcutaneous soft tissue on the neck, the registration with the contact microphone was not reliable. It was concluded that the VAC has potential for assessment of occupational voice disorders if certain limitations of the method are considered.

  12. Deficits in voice and multisensory processing in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Juliette; Strelnikov, Kuzma; Carine, Mantoulan; Denise, Thuilleaux; Laurier, Virginie; Molinas, Catherine; Tauber, Maïthé; Barone, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare neurodevelopmental and genetic disorder that is characterized by various expression of endocrine, cognitive and behavioral problems, among which a true obsession for food and a deficit of satiety that leads to hyperphagia and severe obesity. Neuropsychological studies have reported that PWS display altered social interactions with a specific weakness in interpreting social information and in responding to them, a symptom closed to that observed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Based on the hypothesis that atypical multisensory integration such as face and voice interactions would contribute in PWS to social impairment we investigate the abilities of PWS to process communication signals including the human voice. Patients with PWS recruited from the national reference center for PWS performed a simple detection task of stimuli presented in an uni-o or bimodal condition, as well as a voice discrimination task. Compared to control typically developing (TD) individuals, PWS present a specific deficit in discriminating human voices from environmental sounds. Further, PWS present a much lower multisensory benefits with an absence of violation of the race model indicating that multisensory information do not converge and interact prior to the initiation of the behavioral response. All the deficits observed in PWS were stronger for the subgroup of patients suffering from Uniparental Disomy, a population known to be more sensitive to ASD. Altogether, our study suggests that the deficits in social behavior observed in PWS derive at least partly from an impairment in deciphering the social information carried by voice signals, face signals, and the combination of both. In addition, our work is in agreement with the brain imaging studies revealing an alteration in PWS of the "social brain network" including the STS region involved in processing human voices.

  13. Group differences in measures of voice production and revised values of maximum airflow declination rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkell, J S; Hillman, R E; Holmberg, E B

    1994-08-01

    In previous reports, aerodynamic and acoustic measures of voice production were presented for groups of normal male and female speakers [Holmberg et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 511-529 (1988); J. Voice 3, 294-305 (1989)] that were used as norms in studies of voice disorders [Hillman et al., J. Speech Hear. Res. 32, 373-392 (1989); J. Voice 4, 52-63 (1990)]. Several of the measures were extracted from glottal airflow waveforms that were derived by inverse filtering a high-time-resolution oral airflow signal. Recently, the methods have been updated and a new study of additional subjects has been conducted. This report presents previous (1988) and current (1993) group mean values of sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, maximum airflow declination rate, ac flow, peak flow, minimum flow, ac-dc ratio, inferred subglottal air pressure, average flow, and glottal resistance. Statistical tests indicate overall group differences and differences for values of several individual parameters between the 1988 and 1993 studies. Some inter-study differences in parameter values may be due to sampling effects and minor methodological differences; however, a comparative test of 1988 and 1993 inverse filtering algorithms shows that some lower 1988 values of maximum flow declination rate were due at least in part to excessive low-pass filtering in the 1988 algorithm. The observed differences should have had a negligible influence on the conclusions of our studies of voice disorders.

  14. Unvoiced/voiced classification and voiced harmonic parameters estimation using the third-order statistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Na; ZHAO Xiao-hui; DONG Jing

    2007-01-01

    Unvoiced/voiced classification of speech is a challenging problem especially under conditions of low signal-to-noise ratio or the non-white-stationary noise environment. To solve this problem, an algorithm for speech classification, and a technique for the estimation of pairwise magnitude frequency in voiced speech are proposed. By using third order spectrum of speech signal to remove noise, in this algorithm the least spectrum difference to get refined pitch and the max harmonic number is given. And this algorithm utilizes spectral envelope to estimate signal-to-noise ratio of speech harmonics. Speech classification, voicing probability, and harmonic parameters of the voiced frame can be obtained.Simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm, under complicated background noise, especially Gaussian noise, can effectively classify speech in high accuracy for voicing probability and the voiced parameters.

  15. Power flow in normal human voice production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The principal mechanisms of energy utilization in voicing are quantified using a simplified model, in order to better define voice efficiency. A control volume analysis of energy utilization in phonation is presented to identify the energy transfer mechanisms in terms of their function. Conversion of subglottal airstream potential energy into useful work done (vocal fold vibration, flow work, sound radiation), and into heat (sound radiation absorbed by the lungs, glottal jet dissipation) are described. An approximate numerical model is used to compute the contributions of each of these mechanisms, as a function of subglottal pressure, for normal phonation. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  16. Observations of corotating solar wind structures at radio sounding by signals of the Rosetta and Mars Express spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the implementation of the space projects Rosetta and Mars Express, a large-scale series of experiments has been carried out on radio sounding circumsolar plasma by decimeter ( S-band) and centimeter ( X-band) signals of the Rosetta comet probe (from October 3 to October 31, 2010) and the Mars Express satellite of Mars (from December 25, 2010 to March 27, 2011). It was found that in the phase of ingress the spacecraft behind the Sun, the intensity of the frequency fluctuations increases in accordance with a power function whose argument is the solar offset distance of radio ray path, and when the spacecraft is removed from the Sun (the egress phase), frequency fluctuations are reduced. Periodic strong increases in the fluctuation level, exceeding by a factor of 3-12 the background values of this value determined by the regular radial dependences, are imposed on the regular dependences. It was found that increasing the fluctuations of radio waves alternates with the periodicity m × T or n × T, where m = 1/2, n = 1, and T is the synodic period of the Sun's rotation ( T ≈ 27 days). It was shown that the corotating structures associated with the interaction regions of different speed fluxes are formed in the area of solar wind acceleration and at distances of 6-20 solar radii already have a quasi-stationary character.

  17. Time resolved tracking of a sound scatterer in a turbulent flow non-stationary signal analysis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mordant, N; Pinton, J F

    2001-01-01

    It is known that ultrasound techniques yield non-intrusive measurements of hydrodynamic flows. For example, the study of the echoes produced by a large number of particle insonified by pulsed wavetrains has led to a now standard velocimetry technique. In this paper, we propose to extend the method to the continuous tracking of one single particle embedded in a complex flow. This gives a Lagrangian measurement of the fluid motion, which is of importance in mixing and turbulence studies. The method relies on the ability to resolve in time the Doppler shift of the sound scattered by the continuously insonfied particle. For this signal processing problem two classes of approaches are used: time-frequency analysis and parametric high resolution methods. In the first class we consider the spectrogram and reassigned spectrogram, and we apply it to detect the motion of a small bead settling in a fluid at rest. In more non-stationary turbulent flows where methods in the second class are more robust, we have adapted an...

  18. Infants' Discrimination of Female Singing Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Giomi, Eugenia; Davila, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    There's extensive research on infant's discrimination of speaking voices but few studies have focused on infant's discrimination of singing voices. Most investigations on infants' perception of timbre in music have been based on instrumental sounds. We completed an experiment with 7-and 13-month-olds (n = 16 and n = 17…

  19. 46 CFR 32.30-1 - Voice tubes or telephone equipment-T/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Sound Powered Telephone, Voice Tube, and Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 32.30-1 Voice tubes or telephone equipment—T/ALL. Each tankships must have communication equipment... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voice tubes or telephone equipment-T/ALL....

  20. In vitro evaluation of a double-membrane-based voice-producing element for laryngectomized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tack, Johannes W.; Rakhorst, Gerhard; van der Houwen, Eduard B.; Mahieu, Hans F.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J.

    Background. A sound generator based on a double-membrane design that fits into a regular tracheoesophageal shunt valve may improve voice quality after total laryngectomy in patients rehabilitated with surgical voice prostheses. Methods. Voice-producing element (VPE) prototypes were manufactured

  1. The clinical utility of vocal dosimetry for assessing voice rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misono, Stephanie; Banks, Kathryn; Gaillard, Philippe; Goding, George S; Yueh, Bevan

    2015-01-01

    Voice rest is frequently recommended following surgical disruption of vocal fold epithelium, but patients report variable adherence to voice rest recommendations. The objective of this study was to assess the clinical utility of an ambulatory vocal dosimeter for measuring adherence to voice rest recommendations. Outcomes research. Part 1: To determine the utility of the dosimeter in nonclinical use, the relationship between self-reported voice use and dosimeter measurements was examined in normal subjects (n = 11) who prospectively logged voice use while wearing the dosimeter. Part 2: To determine clinical utility of the dosimeter, patients undergoing vocal fold surgery for which postoperative voice rest was recommended (n = 11) wore a dosimeter for 2 days prior to and 2 days after surgery. Phonation percent and sound level were compared at baseline and during voice rest. The dosimeter performed as hypothesized with both normal subjects and patients. A moderate correlation (r = 0.62) was noted between self-reported voice use and dosimeter measurements in normal subjects. In patients on voice rest, a statistically and clinically significant decrease was observed in measured voice use, both in phonation time (P = .002) and intensity of phonation (P = .004). Ambulatory vocal dosimetry may have clinical utility for assessing adherence to voice rest recommendations. This information will be useful for the design of future studies on voice rest. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. [Realization of Heart Sound Envelope Extraction Implemented on LabVIEW Based on Hilbert-Huang Transform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhixiang; Zhang, Yi; Zeng, Deping; Wang, Hua

    2015-04-01

    We proposed a research of a heart sound envelope extraction system in this paper. The system was implemented on LabVIEW based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT). We firstly used the sound card to collect the heart sound, and then implemented the complete system program of signal acquisition, pretreatment and envelope extraction on LabVIEW based on the theory of HHT. Finally, we used a case to prove that the system could collect heart sound, preprocess and extract the envelope easily. The system was better to retain and show the characteristics of heart sound envelope, and its program and methods were important to other researches, such as those on the vibration and voice, etc.

  3. The Belt voice: Acoustical measurements and esthetic correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounous, Barry Urban

    This dissertation explores the esthetic attributes of the Belt voice through spectral acoustical analysis. The process of understanding the nature and safe practice of Belt is just beginning, whereas the understanding of classical singing is well established. The unique nature of the Belt sound provides difficulties for voice teachers attempting to evaluate the quality and appropriateness of a particular sound or performance. This study attempts to provide answers to the question "does Belt conform to a set of measurable esthetic standards?" In answering this question, this paper expands on a previous study of the esthetic attributes of the classical baritone voice (see "Vocal Beauty", NATS Journal 51,1) which also drew some tentative conclusions about the Belt voice but which had an inadequate sample pool of subjects from which to draw. Further, this study demonstrates that it is possible to scientifically investigate the realm of musical esthetics in the singing voice. It is possible to go beyond the "a trained voice compared to an untrained voice" paradigm when evaluating quantitative vocal parameters and actually investigate what truly beautiful voices do. There are functions of sound energy (measured in dB) transference which may affect the nervous system in predictable ways and which can be measured and associated with esthetics. This study does not show consistency in measurements for absolute beauty (taste) even among belt teachers and researchers but does show some markers with varying degrees of importance which may point to a difference between our cognitive learned response to singing and our emotional, more visceral response to sounds. The markers which are significant in determining vocal beauty are: (1) Vibrancy-Characteristics of vibrato including speed, width, and consistency (low variability). (2) Spectral makeup-Ratio of partial strength above the fundamental to the fundamental. (3) Activity of the voice-The quantity of energy being produced. (4

  4. Sound visualization and manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    2013-01-01

    Unique in addressing two different problems - sound visualization and manipulation - in a unified way Advances in signal processing technology are enabling ever more accurate visualization of existing sound fields and precisely defined sound field production. The idea of explaining both the problem of sound visualization and the problem of the manipulation of sound within one book supports this inter-related area of study.  With rapid development of array technologies, it is possible to do much in terms of visualization and manipulation, among other technologies involved with the spatial dis

  5. The Glasgow Voice Memory Test: Assessing the ability to memorize and recognize unfamiliar voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglieri, Virginia; Watson, Rebecca; Pernet, Cyril; Latinus, Marianne; Garrido, Lúcia; Belin, Pascal

    2017-02-01

    One thousand one hundred and twenty subjects as well as a developmental phonagnosic subject (KH) along with age-matched controls performed the Glasgow Voice Memory Test, which assesses the ability to encode and immediately recognize, through an old/new judgment, both unfamiliar voices (delivered as vowels, making language requirements minimal) and bell sounds. The inclusion of non-vocal stimuli allows the detection of significant dissociations between the two categories (vocal vs. non-vocal stimuli). The distributions of accuracy and sensitivity scores (d') reflected a wide range of individual differences in voice recognition performance in the population. As expected, KH showed a dissociation between the recognition of voices and bell sounds, her performance being significantly poorer than matched controls for voices but not for bells. By providing normative data of a large sample and by testing a developmental phonagnosic subject, we demonstrated that the Glasgow Voice Memory Test, available online and accessible from all over the world, can be a valid screening tool (~5 min) for a preliminary detection of potential cases of phonagnosia and of "super recognizers" for voices.

  6. Acoustical analysis of trained and untrained singers onsite before and after prolonged voice use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christophe E.

    Controlled acoustic environments are important in voice research. Recording environment affects the quality of voice recordings. While sound booths and anechoic chambers are examples of controlled acoustic environments widely used in research, they are both costly and not portable. The long-term goal of this project is to compare the voice usage and efficiency of trained and untrained singers onsite immediately before and after vocal performance. The specific goal of this project is the further of development a Portable Sound Booth (PSB) and standardization of onsite voice recording procedures under controlled conditions. We hypothesized that the simple and controlled acoustic environment provided by the PSB would enable consistent reliable onsite voice recordings and the immediate differences as a consequence of voice usage were measurable. Research has suggested that it would be possible to conduct onsite voice recordings. Proof of concept research titled "Construction and Characterization of a Portable Sound Booth for Onsite Measurement" was conducted before initiating the full research effort. Preliminary findings revealed that: (1) it was possible to make high-quality voice recordings onsite, (2) the use of a Portable Sound Booth (PSB) required further acoustic characterization of its inherent acoustic properties, and (3) testable differences before and after performance were evident. The specific aims were to (1) develop and refine onsite objective voice measurements in the PSB and (2) evaluate use of the PSB to measure voice quality changes before and after voice usage.

  7. Signal analysis of sound produced by collision of steel balls%钢球碰撞发声的信号分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雷; 吴昊; 金季焜; 任智航; 张宏瑞; 滕保华

    2015-01-01

    分析了硬质球体之间连续发生碰撞时出现的啾啾声 ,通过建立多次碰撞的力学模型 ,定量给出了碰撞脉冲信号时间间隔减小的调频特性 ,从而解释了啾啾声的来源 .实验结果表明 :钢球连续碰撞所产生的声音信号是chirp调频信号冲激串 ,当碰撞间隔足够短时近似满足几何级数变化关系 .基于该理论模型和M atlab软件仿真 ,声音和波形图都与实验碰撞结果相符合 .%The"chirping"produced by two hard spheres colliding with each other was analyzed .A dynamic model was set up ,and the frequency modulation characteristic was given quantitatively ,thus the source of the chirping was explained .The experiment results indicated that the sound signal was chirp-frequency-modulated swash series ,when the collision time was short enough ,it changed in geo-metric ratio .According to the theoretical model and experimental parameters ,the software simulation was consistent with the real sound signal of the collision both in the wave form and the sound effect .

  8. Shocking fault component of abnormal sound signal in the fault engine extract method based on linear superposition method and cross-correlation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayong Ning

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An extracted fault component of an abnormal sound is useful for faulty diagnosis. The existing fault component extracting approaches based on time–frequency analysis should filter the original signal to eliminate the background noise. However, these approaches will significantly change the fault component. In this article, a method for extracting the fault component of an abnormal sound signal is presented. This method is based on the linear superposition method and cross-correlation analysis. The method can eliminate the background noise and acquire the waveform of fault component. According to the feature of the shocking fault component, the acquired signal was intercepted into several segments, and the cross-correlation analysis was adopted to remove the wrong segment without the fault shocking component. The correct components were then linearly superposed together to eliminate the background noise. Finally, two experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed fault component extracting method. The results show that the approach satisfactorily extracts the fault shocking component. The precise faulty component can be extracted by this method, which judges the engine condition precisely. The fault type can be diagnosed easily by this method. This method can be used in other fields to extract a particular component from a complicated signal.

  9. Measuring the `complexity’ of sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nandini Chatterjee Singh

    2011-11-01

    Sounds in the natural environment form an important class of biologically relevant nonstationary signals. We propose a dynamic spectral measure to characterize the spectral dynamics of such non-stationary sound signals and classify them based on rate of change of spectral dynamics. We categorize sounds with slowly varying spectral dynamics as simple and those with rapidly changing spectral dynamics as complex. We propose rate of spectral dynamics as a possible scheme to categorize sounds in the environment.

  10. What can vortices tell us about vocal fold vibration and voice production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Sid; Murugappan, Shanmugam; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2008-06-01

    Much clinical research on laryngeal airflow has assumed that airflow is unidirectional. This review will summarize what additional knowledge can be obtained about vocal fold vibration and voice production by studying rotational motion, or vortices, in laryngeal airflow. Recent work suggests two types of vortices that may strongly contribute to voice quality. The first kind forms just above the vocal folds during glottal closing, and is formed by flow separation in the glottis; these flow separation vortices significantly contribute to rapid closing of the glottis, and hence, to producing loudness and high frequency harmonics in the acoustic spectrum. The second is a group of highly three-dimensional and coherent supraglottal vortices, which can produce sound by interaction with structures in the vocal tract. Present work is also described that suggests that certain laryngeal pathologies, such as asymmetric vocal fold tension, will significantly modify both types of vortices, with adverse impact on sound production: decreased rate of glottal closure, increased broadband noise, and a decreased signal to noise ratio. Recent research supports the hypothesis that glottal airflow contains certain vortical structures that significantly contribute to voice quality.

  11. Voice Use Among Music Theory Teachers: A Voice Dosimetry and Self-Assessment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Isabel S; Morsomme, Dominique; Remacle, Angélique

    2017-07-25

    This study aimed (1) to investigate music theory teachers' professional and extra-professional vocal loading and background noise exposure, (2) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and background noise, and (3) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and self-evaluation data. Using voice dosimetry, 13 music theory teachers were monitored for one workweek. The parameters analyzed were voice sound pressure level (SPL), fundamental frequency (F0), phonation time, vocal loading index (VLI), and noise SPL. Spearman correlation was used to correlate vocal loading parameters (voice SPL, F0, and phonation time) and noise SPL. Each day, the subjects self-assessed their voice using visual analog scales. VLI and self-evaluation data were correlated using Spearman correlation. Vocal loading parameters and noise SPL were significantly higher in the professional than in the extra-professional environment. Voice SPL, phonation time, and female subjects' F0 correlated positively with noise SPL. VLI correlated with self-assessed voice quality, vocal fatigue, and amount of singing and speaking voice produced. Teaching music theory is a profession with high vocal demands. More background noise is associated with increased vocal loading and may indirectly increase the risk for voice disorders. Correlations between VLI and self-assessments suggest that these teachers are well aware of their vocal demands and feel their effect on voice quality and vocal fatigue. Visual analog scales seem to represent a useful tool for subjective vocal loading assessment and associated symptoms in these professional voice users. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Propagation of sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Magnus; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2017-01-01

    As an acoustic signal travels from the source to a receiver, it is affected by a variety of physical processes, all dictated by properties of the signal and the environment. The signal energy is weakened by geometric attenuation as well as absorption by the medium. The temporal and spectral...... properties can be modified by sound absorption, refraction, and interference from multi paths caused by reflections.The path from the source to the receiver may be bent due to refraction. Besides geometrical attenuation, the ground effect and turbulence are the most important mechanisms to influence...... communication sounds for airborne acoustics and bottom and surface effects for underwater sounds. Refraction becomes very important close to shadow zones. For echolocation signals, geometric attenuation and sound absorption have the largest effects on the signals....

  13. The Linear Model Research on Tibetan Six-Character Poetry's Respiratory Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonghong, Li; Yangrui, Yang; Lei, Guo; Hongzhi, Yu

    In this paper, we studied the Tibetan six-character pomes' respiratory signal during reading from the perspective of the physiological. Main contents include: 1) Selected 40 representative Tibetan six-character and four lines pomes from ldquo; The Love-songs of 6th Dalai Lama Tshang•yangGya•tsho ", and recorded speech sounds, voice and respiratory signals; 2) Designed a set of respiratory signal parameters for the study of poetry; 3) Extracted the relevant parameters of poetry respiratory signal by using the well-established respiratory signal processing platform; 4) Studied the type of breathing pattern, established the linear model of poetry respiratory signal.

  14. Waveform analysis of sound

    CERN Document Server

    Tohyama, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    What is this sound? What does that sound indicate? These are two questions frequently heard in daily conversation. Sound results from the vibrations of elastic media and in daily life provides informative signals of events happening in the surrounding environment. In interpreting auditory sensations, the human ear seems particularly good at extracting the signal signatures from sound waves. Although exploring auditory processing schemes may be beyond our capabilities, source signature analysis is a very attractive area in which signal-processing schemes can be developed using mathematical expressions. This book is inspired by such processing schemes and is oriented to signature analysis of waveforms. Most of the examples in the book are taken from data of sound and vibrations; however, the methods and theories are mostly formulated using mathematical expressions rather than by acoustical interpretation. This book might therefore be attractive and informative for scientists, engineers, researchers, and graduat...

  15. School cafeteria noise-The impact of room acoustics and speech intelligibility on children's voice levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridger, Joseph F.

    2002-05-01

    The impact of room acoustics and speech intelligibility conditions of different school cafeterias on the voice levels of children is examined. Methods of evaluating cafeteria designs and predicting noise levels are discussed. Children are shown to modify their voice levels with changes in speech intelligibility like adults. Reverberation and signal to noise ratio are the important acoustical factors affecting speech intelligibility. Children have much more difficulty than adults in conditions where noise and reverberation are present. To evaluate the relationship of voice level and speech intelligibility, a database of real sound levels and room acoustics data was generated from measurements and data recorded during visits to a variety of existing cafeterias under different occupancy conditions. The effects of speech intelligibility and room acoustics on childrens voice levels are demonstrated. A new method is presented for predicting speech intelligibility conditions and resulting noise levels for the design of new cafeterias and renovation of existing facilities. Measurements are provided for an existing school cafeteria before and after new room acoustics treatments were added. This will be helpful for acousticians, architects, school systems, regulatory agencies, and Parent Teacher Associations to create less noisy cafeteria environments.

  16. Speaking and Nonspeaking Voice Professionals: Who Has the Better Voice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitguppi, Chandala; Raj, Anoop; Meher, Ravi; Rathore, P K

    2017-04-18

    Voice professionals can be classified into two major subgroups: the primarily speaking and the primarily nonspeaking voice professionals. Nonspeaking voice professionals mainly include singers, whereas speaking voice professionals include the rest of the voice professionals. Although both of these groups have high vocal demands, it is currently unknown whether both groups show similar voice changes after their daily voice use. Comparison of these two subgroups of voice professionals has never been done before. This study aimed to compare the speaking voice of speaking and nonspeaking voice professionals with no obvious vocal fold pathology or voice-related complaints on the day of assessment. After obtaining relevant voice-related history, voice analysis and videostroboscopy were performed in 50 speaking and 50 nonspeaking voice professionals. Speaking voice professionals showed significantly higher incidence of voice-related complaints as compared with nonspeaking voice professionals. Voice analysis revealed that most acoustic parameters including fundamental frequency, jitter percent, and harmonic-to-noise ratio were significantly higher in speaking voice professionals, whereas videostroboscopy did not show any significant difference between the two groups. This is the first study of its kind to analyze the effect of daily voice use in the two subgroups of voice professionals with no obvious vocal fold pathology. We conclude that voice professionals should not be considered as a homogeneous group. The detrimental effects of excessive voice use were observed to occur more significantly in speaking voice professionals than in nonspeaking voice professionals. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radial Basis Function Networks for Conversion of Sound Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Drioli

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available In many advanced signal processing tasks, such as pitch shifting, voice conversion or sound synthesis, accurate spectral processing is required. Here, the use of Radial Basis Function Networks (RBFN is proposed for the modeling of the spectral changes (or conversions related to the control of important sound parameters, such as pitch or intensity. The identification of such conversion functions is based on a procedure which learns the shape of the conversion from few couples of target spectra from a data set. The generalization properties of RBFNs provides for interpolation with respect to the pitch range. In the construction of the training set, mel-cepstral encoding of the spectrum is used to catch the perceptually most relevant spectral changes. Moreover, a singular value decomposition (SVD approach is used to reduce the dimension of conversion functions. The RBFN conversion functions introduced are characterized by a perceptually-based fast training procedure, desirable interpolation properties and computational efficiency.

  18. Leveraging voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    researchers improve our practices and how could digital online video help offer more positive stories about research and higher education? How can academics in higher education be better to tell about our research, thereby reclaiming and leveraging our voice in a post-factual era? As higher education......This paper speculates on how researchers share research without diluting our credibility and how to make strategies for the future. It also calls for consideration of new traditions and practices for communicating knowledge to a wider audience across multiple media platforms. How might we...... continues to engage with digital and networked technologies it becomes increasingly relevant to question why and how academics could (re) position research knowledge in the digital and online media landscape of today and the future. The paper highlights methodological issues that arise in relation...

  19. Feeling voices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ammirante

    Full Text Available Two experiments investigated deaf individuals' ability to discriminate between same-sex talkers based on vibrotactile stimulation alone. Nineteen participants made same/different judgments on pairs of utterances presented to the lower back through voice coils embedded in a conforming chair. Discrimination of stimuli matched for F0, duration, and perceived magnitude was successful for pairs of spoken sentences in Experiment 1 (median percent correct = 83% and pairs of vowel utterances in Experiment 2 (median percent correct = 75%. Greater difference in spectral tilt between "different" pairs strongly predicted their discriminability in both experiments. The current findings support the hypothesis that discrimination of complex vibrotactile stimuli involves the cortical integration of spectral information filtered through frequency-tuned skin receptors.

  20. Exploring the feasibility of smart phone microphone for measurement of acoustic voice parameters and voice pathology screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uloza, Virgilijus; Padervinskis, Evaldas; Vegiene, Aurelija; Pribuisiene, Ruta; Saferis, Viktoras; Vaiciukynas, Evaldas; Gelzinis, Adas; Verikas, Antanas

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the reliability of acoustic voice parameters obtained using smart phone (SP) microphones and investigate the utility of use of SP voice recordings for voice screening. Voice samples of sustained vowel/a/obtained from 118 subjects (34 normal and 84 pathological voices) were recorded simultaneously through two microphones: oral AKG Perception 220 microphone and SP Samsung Galaxy Note3 microphone. Acoustic voice signal data were measured for fundamental frequency, jitter and shimmer, normalized noise energy (NNE), signal to noise ratio and harmonic to noise ratio using Dr. Speech software. Discriminant analysis-based Correct Classification Rate (CCR) and Random Forest Classifier (RFC) based Equal Error Rate (EER) were used to evaluate the feasibility of acoustic voice parameters classifying normal and pathological voice classes. Lithuanian version of Glottal Function Index (LT_GFI) questionnaire was utilized for self-assessment of the severity of voice disorder. The correlations of acoustic voice parameters obtained with two types of microphones were statistically significant and strong (r = 0.73-1.0) for the entire measurements. When classifying into normal/pathological voice classes, the Oral-NNE revealed the CCR of 73.7% and the pair of SP-NNE and SP-shimmer parameters revealed CCR of 79.5%. However, fusion of the results obtained from SP voice recordings and GFI data provided the CCR of 84.60% and RFC revealed the EER of 7.9%, respectively. In conclusion, measurements of acoustic voice parameters using SP microphone were shown to be reliable in clinical settings demonstrating high CCR and low EER when distinguishing normal and pathological voice classes, and validated the suitability of the SP microphone signal for the task of automatic voice analysis and screening.

  1. Scientific Bases of Human-Machine Communication by Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Ronald W.

    1995-10-01

    The scientific bases for human-machine communication by voice are in the fields of psychology, linguistics, acoustics, signal processing, computer science, and integrated circuit technology. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the basic scientific and technological issues in human-machine communication by voice and to point out areas of future research opportunity. The discussion is organized around the following major issues in implementing human-machine voice communication systems: (i) hardware/software implementation of the system, (ii) speech synthesis for voice output, (iii) speech recognition and understanding for voice input, and (iv) usability factors related to how humans interact with machines.

  2. In-vitro evaluation of a double-membrane based voice-producing element for laryngectomized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tack, Johannes W.; Rakhorst, Gerhard; van der Houwen, Eduard B.; Mahieu, Hans F.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Background: A sound generator based on a double-membrane design that fits into a regular tracheoesophageal shunt valve may improve voice quality after total laryngectomy in patients rehabilitated with surgical voice prostheses. - Methods: Voice-producing element (VPE) prototypes were manufactured

  3. Estill Voice Training and voice quality control in contemporary commercial singing: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Marco; Fussi, Franco; Crosetti, Erika; Succo, Giovanni

    2016-09-30

    Estill Voice Training (EVT) is a widely known programme for developing vocal skills based on partitioning the process of vocal production in order to reach control of specific structures in the vocal mechanism. The present retrospective small-scale exploratory study aims at reporting preliminary data about the efficacy of EVT - in terms of voice quality control on a specific vocal exercise - in contemporary commercial singers with a Certificate of Figure Proficiency (CFP). Thirty-five contemporary commercial singers (professional or semi-professional pop and rock singers) with no vocal complaints were recruited. The experimental group was composed of twenty singers who studied EVT and had a CFP. The control group was composed of fifteen singers who studied in Italian contemporary popular music institutions but were not familiar with EVT. Voice quality control was assessed through acoustic and perceptual analysis on a specific vocal exercise requiring sound pitch, perturbation and spectral energy distribution control. The acoustic analysis showed some significant differences between the two groups of singers both in sound perturbation control and spectral energy distribution control, suggesting a higher voice quality control ability for the experimental group. The perceptual evaluation confirmed a higher ability for the experimental group to produce recognizable voice qualities in this specific task. The reported preliminary results seem to suggest EVT as an effective educational system for developing voice quality control ability in contemporary commercial singers.

  4. GSM-R信令监测选择录音系统设计与实现%Design and Implementation of an Optional Voice Recording System Based on GSM-R Signaling Monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余松平; 蔡志平; 吴建进; 谷凤芝

    2014-01-01

    Traditional voice recording system based on GSM-R has limitations that communication events and part of calls can’ t be recor-ded,and the need for special support of the GSM-R network. In this paper,the Optional Voice Recording System ( OVRS) based on the GSM-R signaling monitoring is proposed,with signaling monitoring technologies to analyze the process of calling signaling,recording voice alternatively according to recording rules and tracking communication events relating to voice call,which effectively solves the a-bove problem. The OVRS is easy to plan,manage,secure,operate and maintain. First,the hardware architecture and software system de-signing of OVRS are introduced. Second,the key technologies of OVRS are elaborated,which includes the automatic identification of the signaling link,optional recording and DXC equipment control. Finally,the system implementation and experimental results are described, and the system application prospects,social benefits and future work are explained.%基于GSM-R的传统的录音系统具有通信事件和部分通话无法记录的局限,并且需要GSM-R网络的特别支持。文中提出了一种基于GSM-R信令监测的选择录音系统( OVRS),通过信令监测技术,对呼叫信令流程进行分析,根据录音规则选择性地记录语音和与语音通话相关的事件,有效解决了以上问题,具有易规划、易管理、安全保密、易操作、易维护的特点。首先介绍了OVRS系统的硬件架构和软件系统设计;然后,阐述了系统包含的信令链路自动识别、选择录音、DXC设备控制等关键技术;最后,描述了系统的实现方案和实验结果,并对该系统的应用前景和社会效益、未来的工作进行了展望。

  5. Voice-Based Control of a DC Servo Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaab Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Motors play a very important role in our life and among which is the DC servo motors. The techniques of controlling these DC motors are plenty, among which is sound. In this study, a voce-based technique was implemented to control the speed and the direction of rotation for a DC motor. Approach: A Microcontroller-based electronic control circuit was designed and implemented to achieve this goal. Results: The speed of the motor was controlled, in both directions, using pulse width modulation and a microcontroller was used to generate the right signal to be applied to the motor. Conclusion: The loudness of human voice was successfully divided into different levels where each level drives the motor at different speed."

  6. 'Inner voices': the cerebral representation of emotional voice cues described in literary texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Carolin; Kreifelts, Benjamin; Gößling-Arnold, Christina; Wertheimer, Jürgen; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    While non-verbal affective voice cues are generally recognized as a crucial behavioral guide in any day-to-day conversation their role as a powerful source of information may extend well beyond close-up personal interactions and include other modes of communication such as written discourse or literature as well. Building on the assumption that similarities between the different 'modes' of voice cues may not only be limited to their functional role but may also include cerebral mechanisms engaged in the decoding process, the present functional magnetic resonance imaging study aimed at exploring brain responses associated with processing emotional voice signals described in literary texts. Emphasis was placed on evaluating 'voice' sensitive as well as task- and emotion-related modulations of brain activation frequently associated with the decoding of acoustic vocal cues. Obtained findings suggest that several similarities emerge with respect to the perception of acoustic voice signals: results identify the superior temporal, lateral and medial frontal cortex as well as the posterior cingulate cortex and cerebellum to contribute to the decoding process, with similarities to acoustic voice perception reflected in a 'voice'-cue preference of temporal voice areas as well as an emotion-related modulation of the medial frontal cortex and a task-modulated response of the lateral frontal cortex.

  7. Are mussels able to distinguish underwater sounds? Assessment of the reactions of Mytilus galloprovincialis after exposure to lab-generated acoustic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazzana, Mirella; Celi, Monica; Maricchiolo, Giulia; Genovese, Lucrezia; Corrias, Valentina; Quinci, Enza Maria; de Vincenzi, Giovanni; Maccarrone, Vincenzo; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Mazzola, Salvatore; Buscaino, Giuseppa; Filiciotto, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the effects of lab-generated acoustic signals on the behaviour and biochemistry of Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis). The experiment was carried out in a tank equipped with a video-recording system using six groups of five mussels exposed to five acoustic treatments (each treatment was replicated three times) for 30min. The acoustic signals, with a maximum sound pressure level of 150dB rms re 1μPa, differed in frequency range as follows: low (0.1-5kHz), mid-low (5-10kHz), mid (10-20kHz), mid-high (20-40kHz) and high (40-60kHz). The exposure to sweeps did not produce any significant changes in the mussels' behaviour. Conversely, the specimens exposed to the low frequency band treatment showed significantly higher values of the following biochemical stress parameters measured in their plasma and tissues: glucose, total proteins, total haemocyte number (THC), heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) expression, and Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The responses observed in the mussels exposed to low frequency sweeps enable us to suppose a biological and ecological role for this sound, which contains the main frequencies produced by both shipping traffic and the acoustic emissions of fish.

  8. Dimensionality in voice quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bele, Irene Velsvik

    2007-05-01

    This study concerns speaking voice quality in a group of male teachers (n = 35) and male actors (n = 36), as the purpose was to investigate normal and supranormal voices. The goal was the development of a method of valid perceptual evaluation for normal to supranormal and resonant voices. The voices (text reading at two loudness levels) had been evaluated by 10 listeners, for 15 vocal characteristics using VA scales. In this investigation, the results of an exploratory factor analysis of the vocal characteristics used in this method are presented, reflecting four dimensions of major importance for normal and supranormal voices. Special emphasis is placed on the effects on voice quality of a change in the loudness variable, as two loudness levels are studied. Furthermore, the vocal characteristics Sonority and Ringing voice quality are paid special attention, as the essence of the term "resonant voice" was a basic issue throughout a doctoral dissertation where this study was included.

  9. Voice and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dramatic voice changes are those during childhood and adolescence. The larynx (or voice box) and vocal cord tissues do not fully mature until late teenage years. Hormone-related changes during adolescence are ...

  10. DLMS Voice Data Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    between operator and computer displayed on ADM-3A 20c A-I Possible Hardware Configuration for a Multistation Cartographic VDES ...this program a Voice Recognition System (VRS) which can be used to explore the use of voice data entry ( VDE ) in the DIMS or other cartographic data...Multi-Station Cartographic Voice Data Entry System An engineering development model voice data entry system ( VDES ) could be most efficiently

  11. Wavelet adaptation for automatic voice disorders sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanian Saeedi, Nafise; Almasganj, Farshad

    2013-07-01

    Early diagnosis of voice disorders and abnormalities by means of digital speech processing is a subject of interest for many researchers. Various methods are introduced in the literature, some of which are able to extensively discriminate pathological voices from normal ones. Voice disorders sorting, on the other hand, has received less attention due to the complexity of the problem. Although, previous publications show satisfactory results in classifying one type of disordered voice from normal cases, or two different types of abnormalities from each other, no comprehensive approach for automatic sorting of vocal abnormalities has been offered yet. In this paper, a solution for this problem is suggested. We create a powerful wavelet feature extraction approach, in which, instead of standard wavelets, adaptive wavelets are generated and applied to the voice signals. Orthogonal wavelets are parameterized via lattice structure and then, the optimal parameters are investigated through an iterative process, using the genetic algorithm (GA). GA is guided by the classifier results. Based on the generated wavelet, a wavelet-filterbank is constructed and the voice signals are decomposed to compute eight energy-based features. A support vector machine (SVM) then classifies the signals using the extracted features. Experimental results show that six various types of vocal disorders: paralysis, nodules, polyps, edema, spasmodic dysphonia and keratosis are fully sorted via the proposed method. This could be a successful step toward sorting a larger number of abnormalities associated with the vocal system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Writing with Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Ted

    2012-01-01

    In this Teaching Tips article, the author argues for a dialogic conception of voice, based in the work of Mikhail Bakhtin. He demonstrates a dialogic view of voice in action, using two writing examples about the same topic from his daughter, a fifth-grade student. He then provides five practical tips for teaching a dialogic conception of voice in…

  13. Tips for Healthy Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... social interaction as well as for most people’s occupation. Proper care and use of your voice will give you the best chance for having a healthy voice for your entire lifetime. Hoarseness or roughness in your voice is often ...

  14. Smartphones Offer New Opportunities in Clinical Voice Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, C; Lebacq, J; Cantarella, G; Schoentgen, J; Orlandi, S; Bandini, A; DeJonckere, P H

    2017-01-01

    Smartphone technology provides new opportunities for recording standardized voice samples of patients and sending the files by e-mail to the voice laboratory. This drastically improves the collection of baseline data, as used in research on efficiency of voice treatments. However, the basic requirement is the suitability of smartphones for recording and digitizing pathologic voices (mainly characterized by period perturbations and noise) without significant distortion. In this experiment, two smartphones (a very inexpensive one and a high-level one) were tested and compared with direct microphone recordings in a soundproof room. The voice stimuli consisted in synthesized deviant voice samples (median of fundamental frequency: 120 and 200 Hz) with three levels of jitter and three levels of added noise. All voice samples were analyzed using PRAAT software. The results show high correlations between jitter, shimmer, and noise-to-harmonics ratio measured on the recordings via both smartphones, the microphone, and measured directly on the sound files from the synthesizer. Smartphones thus appear adequate for reliable recording and digitizing of pathologic voices. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Measurement of Voice Onset Time in Maxillectomy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Hattori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective speech evaluation using acoustic measurement is needed for the proper rehabilitation of maxillectomy patients. For digital evaluation of consonants, measurement of voice onset time is one option. However, voice onset time has not been measured in maxillectomy patients as their consonant sound spectra exhibit unique characteristics that make the measurement of voice onset time challenging. In this study, we established criteria for measuring voice onset time in maxillectomy patients for objective speech evaluation. We examined voice onset time for /ka/ and /ta/ in 13 maxillectomy patients by calculating the number of valid measurements of voice onset time out of three trials for each syllable. Wilcoxon’s signed rank test showed that voice onset time measurements were more successful for /ka/ and /ta/ when a prosthesis was used (Z=−2.232, P=0.026 and Z=−2.401, P=0.016, resp. than when a prosthesis was not used. These results indicate a prosthesis affected voice onset measurement in these patients. Although more research in this area is needed, measurement of voice onset time has the potential to be used to evaluate consonant production in maxillectomy patients wearing a prosthesis.

  16. Foley Sounds vs Real Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trento, Stefano; Götzen, Amalia De

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an initial attempt to study the world of sound effects for motion pictures, also known as Foley sounds. Throughout several audio and audio-video tests we have compared both Foley and real sounds originated by an identical action. The main purpose was to evaluate if sound effects...

  17. Voice Recognition Algorithms using Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficient (MFCC) and Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Muda, Lindasalwa; Elamvazuthi, I

    2010-01-01

    Digital processing of speech signal and voice recognition algorithm is very important for fast and accurate automatic voice recognition technology. The voice is a signal of infinite information. A direct analysis and synthesizing the complex voice signal is due to too much information contained in the signal. Therefore the digital signal processes such as Feature Extraction and Feature Matching are introduced to represent the voice signal. Several methods such as Liner Predictive Predictive Coding (LPC), Hidden Markov Model (HMM), Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and etc are evaluated with a view to identify a straight forward and effective method for voice signal. The extraction and matching process is implemented right after the Pre Processing or filtering signal is performed. The non-parametric method for modelling the human auditory perception system, Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCCs) are utilize as extraction techniques. The non linear sequence alignment known as Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) intro...

  18. Experiences with Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding ma....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....... material can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. SoundShaping is based on a generic audio feature extraction system and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used. Moreover, 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules...

  19. Speaker comfort and increase of voice level in lecture rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Gade, Anders Christian; Bellester, G P

    2008-01-01

    the objectively measurable parameters of the rooms and the objective voice power produced by speakers. In rooms with different sizes, reverberation time and other physical attributes, the sound power levels produced by six speakers where measured while giving a short lecture. Relevant room acoustic parameters......Teachers often suffer health problems or tension related to their voice. These problems may be related to there working environment, including room acoustics of the lecture rooms which forces them to stress their voices. The present paper describes a first effort in finding relationships between...

  20. Studies on sound signal scattering from varying seabed sediments of the western continental shelf of India: Cochin to Mangalore

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Pathak, D.

    A study on the interaction effect of the acoustic signal with three different sediment type seabottoms off the shelf area between Cochin and Mangalore of the west coast of India is performed. Analyses by means of Probability Density Function (PDF...

  1. Voice handicap in singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murry, Thomas; Zschommler, Anne; Prokop, Jan

    2009-05-01

    The study aimed to determine the differences in responses to the Voice Handicap Index (VHI-10) between singers and nonsingers and to evaluate the ranked order differences of the VHI-10 statements for both groups. The VHI-10 was modified to include statements related to the singing voice for comparison to the original VHI-10. Thirty-five nonsingers with documented voice disorders responded to the VHI-10. A second group, consisting of 35 singers with voice complaints, responded to the VHI-10 with three statements added specifically addressing the singing voice. Data from both groups were analyzed in terms of overall subject self-rating of voice handicap and the rank order of statements from least to most important. The difference between the mean VHI-10 for the singers and nonsingers was not statistically significant, thus, supporting the validity of the VHI-10. However, the 10 statements were ranked differently in terms of their importance by both groups. In addition, when three statements related specifically to the singing voice were substituted in the original VHI-10, the singers judged their voice problem to be more severe than when using the original VHI-10. The type of statements used to assess self-perception of voice handicap may be related to the subject population. Singers with voice problems do not rate their voices to be more handicapped than nonsingers unless statements related specifically to singing are included.

  2. Experiences with Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....

  3. Experiences with voice to design ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....

  4. Habitat-induced degradation of sound signals: Quantifying the effects of communication sounds and bird location on blur ratio, excess attenuation, and signal-to-noise ratio in blackbird song

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, T.; Larsen, O N; Pedersen, Simon Boel

    1993-01-01

    The habitat-induced degradation of the full song of the blackbird (Turdus merula) was quantified by measuring excess attenuation, reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio, and blur ratio, the latter measure representing the degree of blurring of amplitude and frequency patterns over time. All three...

  5. Burst design and signal processing for the speed of sound measurement of fluids with the pulse-echo technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubberke, Frithjof H.; Baumhögger, Elmar; Vrabec, Jadran, E-mail: jadran.vrabec@upb.de [Lehrstuhl für Thermodynamik und Energietechnik, Universität Paderborn, Warburger Straße 100, 33098 Paderborn (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    The pulse-echo technique determines the propagation time of acoustic wave bursts in a fluid over a known propagation distance. It is limited by the signal quality of the received echoes of the acoustic wave bursts, which degrades with decreasing density of the fluid due to acoustic impedance and attenuation effects. Signal sampling is significantly improved in this work by burst design and signal processing such that a wider range of thermodynamic states can be investigated. Applying a Fourier transformation based digital filter on acoustic wave signals increases their signal-to-noise ratio and enhances their time and amplitude resolutions, improving the overall measurement accuracy. In addition, burst design leads to technical advantages for determining the propagation time due to the associated conditioning of the echo. It is shown that the according operation procedure enlarges the measuring range of the pulse-echo technique for supercritical argon and nitrogen at 300 K down to 5 MPa, where it was limited to around 20 MPa before.

  6. Characterizing near-surface firn using the scattered signal component of the glacier surface return from airborne radio-echo sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Anja; Grima, Cyril; Sharp, Martin; Blankenship, Donald D.; Young, Duncan A.; Cawkwell, Fiona; Dowdeswell, Julian A.

    2016-12-01

    We derive the scattered component (hereafter referred to as the incoherent component) of glacier surface echoes from airborne radio-echo sounding measurements over Devon Ice Cap, Arctic Canada, and compare the scattering distribution to firn stratigraphy observations from ground-based radar data. Low scattering correlates to laterally homogeneous firn above 1800 m elevation containing thin, flat, and continuous ice layers and below 1200 m elevation where firn predominantly consists of ice. Increased scattering between elevations of 1200-1800 m corresponds to firn with inhomogeneous, undulating ice layers. No correlation was found to surface roughness and its theoretical incoherent backscattering values. This indicates that the scattering component is mainly influenced by the near-surface firn stratigraphy, whereas surface roughness effects are minor. Our results suggest that analyzing the scattered signal component of glacier surface echoes is a promising approach to characterize the spatial heterogeneity of firn that is affected by melting and refreezing processes.

  7. Proposed use of a digital signal processor in an experimental tactile hearing aid for the profoundly deaf: preliminary communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijssen, R W; Leliveld, W H

    1989-01-01

    An experimental system for a tactile hearing aid using a digital signal processor (DSP) is being developed. This system can be used to test and evaluate not only the familiar techniques for a tactile hearing aid, such as energy level display, filterbank analysis, etc., but also novel techniques. The system is being developed especially to try out new recognition strategies, because the currently available strategies are not satisfactory. A portable tactile hearing aid that can recognize certain environmental sounds (alarm sounds) and certain features from the speech signal (such as pitch, voiced/voiceless, or even complete phonemes), being a good support for lipreading, should be the final result of the experiments.

  8. Onset and Maturation of Fetal Heart Rate Response to the Mother's Voice over Late Gestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisilevsky, Barbara S.; Hains, Sylvia M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Term fetuses discriminate their mother's voice from a female stranger's, suggesting recognition/learning of some property of her voice. Identification of the onset and maturation of the response would increase our understanding of the influence of environmental sounds on the development of sensory abilities and identify the period when…

  9. Comparison of the produced and perceived voice range profiles in untrained and trained classical singers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunter, Eric J.; Svec, Jan G.; Titze, Ingo R.

    2006-01-01

    Frequency and intensity ranges (in true decibel sound pressure level, 20 mu Pa at 1 m) of voice production in trained and untrained vocalists were compared with the perceived dynamic range (phons) and units of loudness (sones) of the ear. Results were reported in terms of standard voice range profil

  10. Automatic evaluation of voice and speech intelligibility after treatment of head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clapham, R.P.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer of the head and neck and its medical treatment and management, can have a negative impact on how a person sounds and talks. For the speech pathologist, rating a person’s speech intelligibility and voice quality is an important part of patient management. Rating someone’s speech or voice,

  11. Comparison of the produced and perceived voice range profiles in untrained and trained classical singers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunter, Eric J.; Svec, Jan G.; Titze, Ingo R.

    2006-01-01

    Frequency and intensity ranges (in true decibel sound pressure level, 20 mu Pa at 1 m) of voice production in trained and untrained vocalists were compared with the perceived dynamic range (phons) and units of loudness (sones) of the ear. Results were reported in terms of standard voice range

  12. 参量声源自解调信号失真研究%Research on self-demodulated signal distortion of parametric sound source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨天文; 黄大贵; 陈敏; 张富东; 陈祥

    2013-01-01

    The distortion problem of the self-demodulated signal of parametric sound source is analyzed theoretically according to the “Berktay far-field solution”,and the theoretical analysis result is verified with some related experiments.The results show that the “Berktay far-field solution” can predict the fundamental frequency and difference frequency at an acceptable precision;but for the main factors that cause signal distortion,such as second-order harmonic wave and sum-frequency wave,the prediction errors are too large to be accepted,which means that the “Berktay far-field solution” can not be used as the theoretical basis for analyzing the distortion.The difference frequency signal is not the main factor causing the distortion of the self-demodulated signal of parametric sound source; and the effective approach to reduce the distortion is to reduce the second-order harmonic and sum-frequency components,which can suppress the quantity and amplitude of the harmful frequency components effectively.This study reveals the main factors contributing to the self-demodulated signal distortion and their varying rule,which can provide a helpful reference for investigating the signal processing methods of parametric sound source.%针对参量声源自解调信号失真问题,根据“Berktay远场解”对其进行了理论分析,并通过实验对理论分析结果进行了验证,发现:“Berktay远场解”对自解调信号中的基频、差频可以较准确地预测,而对导致信号失真的主要因素如二次谐波、和频等的预测误差很大,不能作为失真分析的精确依据;差频不是导致参量声源自解调信号失真的主要原因,降低失真的有效途径是减小自解调信号中二次谐波、和频分量,从而使有害频率成分的数量及幅值得到有效抑制.本项研究揭示了导致参量声源自解调信号失真的主要因素及其变化规律,可为参量声源信号处理方法的研究提供有益参考.

  13. Imagining Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark; Garner, Tom Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We make the case in this essay that sound that is imagined is both a perception and as much a sound as that perceived through external stimulation. To argue this, we look at the evidence from auditory science, neuroscience, and philosophy, briefly present some new conceptual thinking on sound...... that accounts for this view, and then use this to look at what the future might hold in the context of imagining sound and developing technology....

  14. Imagining Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark; Garner, Tom Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We make the case in this essay that sound that is imagined is both a perception and as much a sound as that perceived through external stimulation. To argue this, we look at the evidence from auditory science, neuroscience, and philosophy, briefly present some new conceptual thinking on sound...... that accounts for this view, and then use this to look at what the future might hold in the context of imagining sound and developing technology....

  15. ERP correlates of Motivating Voices: Quality of Motivation and Time-Course Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zougkou, Konstantina; Weinstein, Netta; Paulmann, Silke

    2017-05-19

    Here, we conducted the first study to explore how motivations expressed through speech are processed in real-time. Participants listened to sentences spoken in two types of well-studied motivational tones (autonomy-supportive and controlling), or a neutral tone of voice. To examine this, listeners were presented with sentences that either signaled motivations through prosody (tone of voice) and words simultaneously (e.g., "You absolutely have to do it my way" spoken in a controlling tone of voice), or lacked motivationally biasing words (e.g., "Why don't we meet again tomorrow" spoken in a motivational tone of voice). Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in response to motivations conveyed through words and prosody showed that listeners rapidly distinguished between motivations and neutral forms of communication as shown in enhanced P2 amplitudes in response to motivational when compared to neutral speech. This early detection mechanism is argued to help determine the importance of incoming information. Once assessed, motivational language is continuously monitored and thoroughly evaluated. When compared to neutral speech, listening to controlling (but not autonomy-supportive) speech led to enhanced late potential ERP mean amplitudes, suggesting that listeners are particularly attuned to controlling messages. The importance of controlling motivation for listeners is mirrored in effects observed for motivations expressed through prosody only. Here, an early rapid appraisal, as reflected in enhanced P2 amplitudes, is only found for sentences spoken in controlling (but not autonomy-supportive) prosody. Once identified as sounding pressuring, the message seems to be preferentially processed, as shown by enhanced late potential amplitudes in response to controlling prosody. Taken together, results suggest that motivational and neutral language are differentially processed; further, the data suggest that listening to cues signaling pressure and control cannot be ignored

  16. Voice rest after vocal fold surgery: current practice and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, A C; Carswell, A J; Tierney, P A

    2013-08-01

    Voice rest is commonly recommended after vocal fold surgery, but there is a lack of evidence base and no standard protocol. The aim of this study was to establish common practice regarding voice rest following vocal fold surgery. An online survey was circulated via e-mail invitation to members of the ENT UK Expert Panel between October and November 2011. The survey revealed that 86.5 per cent of respondents agreed that 'complete voice rest' means no sound production at all, but there was variability in how 'relative voice rest' was defined. There was no dominant type of voice rest routinely recommended after surgery for laryngeal papillomatosis or intermediate pathologies. There was considerable variability in the duration of voice rest recommended, with no statistically significant, most popular response (except for malignant lesions). Surgeons with less than 10 years of experience were more likely to recommend fewer days of voice rest. There is a lack of consistency in advice given to patients after vocal fold surgery, in terms of both type and length of voice rest. This may arise from an absence of robust evidence on which to base practice.

  17. Singing voice outcomes following singing voice therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastolfo-Hromack, Christina; Thomas, Tracey L; Rosen, Clark A; Gartner-Schmidt, Jackie

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe singing voice therapy (SVT), describe referred patient characteristics, and document the outcomes of SVT. Retrospective. Records of patients receiving SVT between June 2008 and June 2013 were reviewed (n = 51). All diagnoses were included. Demographic information, number of SVT sessions, and symptom severity were retrieved from the medical record. Symptom severity was measured via the 10-item Singing Voice Handicap Index (SVHI-10). Treatment outcome was analyzed by diagnosis, history of previous training, and SVHI-10. SVHI-10 scores decreased following SVT (mean change = 11, 40% decrease) (P singing lessons (n = 10) also completed an average of three SVT sessions. Primary muscle tension dysphonia (MTD1) and benign vocal fold lesion (lesion) were the most common diagnoses. Most patients (60%) had previous vocal training. SVHI-10 decrease was not significantly different between MTD and lesion. This is the first outcome-based study of SVT in a disordered population. Diagnosis of MTD or lesion did not influence treatment outcomes. Duration of SVT was short (approximately three sessions). Voice care providers are encouraged to partner with a singing voice therapist to provide optimal care for the singing voice. This study supports the use of SVT as a tool for the treatment of singing voice disorders. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2546-2551, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Accuracy of pitch matching significantly improved by live voice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Roni Y; Israel-Kolatt, Rona; Gilboa, Avi; Kolatt, Tsafrir

    2013-05-01

    Singing is, undoubtedly, the most fundamental expression of our musical capacity, yet an estimated 10-15% of Western population sings "out-of-tune (OOT)." Previous research in children and adults suggests, albeit inconsistently, that imitating a human voice can improve pitch matching. In the present study, we focus on the potentially beneficial effects of the human voice and especially the live human voice. Eighteen participants varying in their singing abilities were required to imitate in singing a set of nine ascending and descending intervals presented to them in five different randomized blocked conditions: live piano, recorded piano, live voice using optimal voice production, recorded voice using optimal voice production, and recorded voice using artificial forced voice production. Pitch and interval matching in singing were much more accurate when participants repeated sung intervals as compared with intervals played to them on the piano. The advantage of the vocal over the piano stimuli was robust and emerged clearly regardless of whether piano tones were played live and in full view or were presented via recording. Live vocal stimuli elicited higher accuracy than recorded vocal stimuli, especially when the recorded vocal stimuli were produced in a forced vocal production. Remarkably, even those who would be considered OOT singers on the basis of their performance when repeating piano tones were able to pitch match live vocal sounds, with deviations well within the range of what is considered accurate singing (M=46.0, standard deviation=39.2 cents). In fact, those participants who were most OOT gained the most from the live voice model. Results are discussed in light of the dual auditory-motor encoding of pitch analogous to that found in speech. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanism of and threshold biomechanical conditions for falsetto voice onset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Deguchi

    Full Text Available The sound source of a voice is produced by the self-excited oscillation of the vocal folds. In modal voice production, a drastic increase in transglottal pressure after vocal fold closure works as a driving force that develops self-excitation. Another type of vocal fold oscillation with less pronounced glottal closure observed in falsetto voice production has been accounted for by the mucosal wave theory. The classical theory assumes a quasi-steady flow, and the expected driving force onto the vocal folds under wavelike motion is derived from the Bernoulli effect. However, wavelike motion is not always observed during falsetto voice production. More importantly, the application of the quasi-steady assumption to a falsetto voice with a fundamental frequency of several hundred hertz is unsupported by experiments. These considerations suggested that the mechanism of falsetto voice onset may be essentially different from that explained by the mucosal wave theory. In this paper, an alternative mechanism is submitted that explains how self-excitation reminiscent of the falsetto voice could be produced independent of the glottal closure and wavelike motion. This new explanation is derived through analytical procedures by employing only general unsteady equations of motion for flow and solids. The analysis demonstrated that a convective acceleration of a flow induced by rapid wall movement functions as a negative damping force, leading to the self-excitation of the vocal folds. The critical subglottal pressure and volume flow are expressed as functions of vocal fold biomechanical properties, geometry, and voice fundamental frequency. The analytically derived conditions are qualitatively and quantitatively reasonable in view of reported measurement data of the thresholds required for falsetto voice onset. Understanding of the voice onset mechanism and the explicit mathematical descriptions of thresholds would be beneficial for the diagnosis and treatment

  20. The effect of singing training on voice quality for people with quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamplin, Jeanette; Baker, Felicity A; Buttifant, Mary; Berlowitz, David J

    2014-01-01

    Despite anecdotal reports of voice impairment in quadriplegia, the exact nature of these impairments is not well described in the literature. This article details objective and subjective voice assessments for people with quadriplegia at baseline and after a respiratory-targeted singing intervention. Randomized controlled trial. Twenty-four participants with quadriplegia were randomly assigned to a 12-week program of either a singing intervention or active music therapy control. Recordings of singing and speech were made at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 6 months postintervention. These deidentified recordings were used to measure sound pressure levels and assess voice quality using the Multidimensional Voice Profile and the Perceptual Voice Profile. Baseline voice quality data indicated deviation from normality in the areas of breathiness, strain, and roughness. A greater percentage of intervention participants moved toward more normal voice quality in terms of jitter, shimmer, and noise-to-harmonic ratio; however, the improvements failed to achieve statistical significance. Subjective and objective assessments of voice quality indicate that quadriplegia may have a detrimental effect on voice quality; in particular, causing a perception of roughness and breathiness in the voice. The results of this study suggest that singing training may have a role in ameliorating these voice impairments. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Show with the Voice: An [Au]/-[o]-tophonographic Parody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D.J. Sander Scheidt

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available According to my claim that voice as a phenomenon cannot be materialised or located, neither in the (voice organ of the self nor in the (ear of the other, I coined the term [au]/[o]-tophonography for my examination of the possibilities of performing subjectivity in writing and in sound productions. Drawing on the theory of performativity in its deconstructive senses (see BUTLER, 1993, 1997, 1999/1990; DERRIDA, 1988/1972, 1997/1967, 2002/1981; SMITH, 1995 my performative epistemology reaches beyond the theoretical, including the practical and the aesthetical, aiming at questioning notions of "self", "audience", "voice", "writing" and "communication". "The show with the voice" (http://www.qualitative-research.net/fqs-texte/2-08/08-2-27_audio.mp3 is an example of this practice. It parodies the medico-scientific approach to the human voice by presenting some of its possible appearances (the "normal", the "disordered", the "homosexual" and the "transsexual" voice in an audio collage that takes the shape of a mock tutorial. Through re-contextualising and re-compiling voice samples from different sources that are usually kept apart (e.g. the lecturer's voice, the researcher's voice, the artist's voice, the autobiographer's voice I open a space for a multidisciplinary and creative perspective to the examination of voice. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0802279

  2. 移动软交换IP承载信令及语音带宽计算研究%The Bandwidth Calculation of Mobile Soft Switch Voice and Signaling Over IP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李元; 张奎; 蔡超

    2012-01-01

      It briefly describes the difference between mobile soft switch signaling and voice over IP technology and the traditional TDM bearer. Based on the R4 network architecture, it expounds the basic concept of H.248, BICC, MAP, CAP, ISUP and BSSAP, and the protocol stack and bandwidth calculation, as wel as the basic concept of Nb interface and the protocol stack and bandwidth calculation.%  简要说明了移动软交换信令、语音IP化后与传统TDM承载的不同;在给出R4网络架构的基础上,详细阐述了H.248、BICC、MAP、CAP、ISUP、BSSAP信令的基本概念、协议栈、带宽计算方法和Nb接口的基本概念、协议栈、带宽计算方法.

  3. Spectral distribution of solo voice and accompaniment in pop music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borch, Daniel Zangger; Sundberg, Johan

    2002-01-01

    Singers performing in popular styles of music mostly rely on feedback provided by monitor loudspeakers on the stage. The highest sound level that these loudspeakers can provide without feedback noise is often too low to be heard over the ambient sound level on the stage. Long-term-average spectra of some orchestral accompaniments typically used in pop music are compared with those of classical symphonic orchestras. In loud pop accompaniment the sound level difference between 0.5 and 2.5 kHz is similar to that of a Wagner orchestra. Long-term-average spectra of pop singers' voices showed no signs of a singer's formant but a peak near 3.5 kHz. It is suggested that pop singers' difficulties to hear their own voices may be reduced if the frequency range 3-4 kHz is boosted in the monitor sound.

  4. Clinical Voices - an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Weed, Ethan

    Anomalous aspects of speech and voice, including pitch, fluency, and voice quality, are reported to characterise many mental disorders. However, it has proven difficult to quantify and explain this oddness of speech by employing traditional statistical methods. In this talk we will show how the t...... the temporal dynamics of the voice in Asperger's patients enable us to automatically reconstruct the diagnosis, and assess the Autism quotient score. We then generalise the findings to Danish and American children with autism....

  5. Effects of Medications on Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENT Doctor Near You Effects of Medications on Voice Effects of Medications on Voice Patient Health Information ... entnet.org . Could Your Medication Be Affecting Your Voice? Some medications including prescription, over-the-counter, and ...

  6. Associations of Sex Hormones and Anthropometry with the Speaking Voice Profile in the Adult General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Lasse; Fuchs, Michael; Loeffler, Markus; Thiery, Joachim; Kratzsch, Juergen; Berger, Thomas; Engel, Christoph

    2017-07-21

    There is evidence that sexual hormone concentrations and anthropometric factors influence the human voice. The goal of this study was to investigate to what extent body mass index (BMI), body height, body weight, breast-to-abdomen-ratio, testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone are associated with the sound pressure level and the fundamental frequency of the speaking voice in a cross-sectional approach among adults in the general population. Speaking voice profiles with four different intensity levels, hormone concentrations, and anthropometric parameters were assessed for 2,381 individuals aged 40-79 years, who were randomly sampled from the population of a large city in Germany. Multivariate analysis was performed, adjusting for age and stratified by sex. Taller body height was associated with lower frequencies. Higher body weight was associated with lower frequencies and higher sound pressure levels. The ratio of chest to abdominal circumference was associated with the sound pressure levels in males and females: participants with larger breast-to-abdomen-ratio were found to have higher sound pressure levels. Among the sexual hormones, higher concentrations of DHEA-S were associated with lower fundamental frequencies of the voice while using the normal speaking voice. In addition, bioavailable testosterone was associated with the sound pressure level of the normal speaking voice in men and the softest speaking voice in women. Our findings suggest that BMI, body height, body weight, breast-to-abdomen-ratio, bioavailable testosterone, and DHEA-S are associated with the speaking voice in adults. No associations between testosterone and the frequency of the speaking voice were found. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Finding your mate at a cocktail party: frequency separation promotes auditory stream segregation of concurrent voices in multi-species frog choruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Nityananda

    Full Text Available Vocal communication in crowded social environments is a difficult problem for both humans and nonhuman animals. Yet many important social behaviors require listeners to detect, recognize, and discriminate among signals in a complex acoustic milieu comprising the overlapping signals of multiple individuals, often of multiple species. Humans exploit a relatively small number of acoustic cues to segregate overlapping voices (as well as other mixtures of concurrent sounds, like polyphonic music. By comparison, we know little about how nonhuman animals are adapted to solve similar communication problems. One important cue enabling source segregation in human speech communication is that of frequency separation between concurrent voices: differences in frequency promote perceptual segregation of overlapping voices into separate "auditory streams" that can be followed through time. In this study, we show that frequency separation (ΔF also enables frogs to segregate concurrent vocalizations, such as those routinely encountered in mixed-species breeding choruses. We presented female gray treefrogs (Hyla chrysoscelis with a pulsed target signal (simulating an attractive conspecific call in the presence of a continuous stream of distractor pulses (simulating an overlapping, unattractive heterospecific call. When the ΔF between target and distractor was small (e.g., ≤3 semitones, females exhibited low levels of responsiveness, indicating a failure to recognize the target as an attractive signal when the distractor had a similar frequency. Subjects became increasingly more responsive to the target, as indicated by shorter latencies for phonotaxis, as the ΔF between target and distractor increased (e.g., ΔF = 6-12 semitones. These results support the conclusion that gray treefrogs, like humans, can exploit frequency separation as a perceptual cue to segregate concurrent voices in noisy social environments. The ability of these frogs to segregate

  8. 基于改进的维奥拉积分方法提取心音信号包络%Heart sound signal envelope extraction based on modified Viola integral method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭兴明; 蒋鸿; 郑伊能

    2016-01-01

    心音是评价人体心脏功能的重要生理信号之一,分析心音信号特征对心脏疾病的早期诊断和治疗具有重要意义。分别采用希尔伯特黄变换、归一化香农能量以及维奥拉积分方法提取心音信号的特征包络,并针对维奥拉积分法存在的不足,结合香农能量方法可抑制高、低强度信号的特性,提出了一种改进的心音信号特征包络提取方法,最后采用阈值法实现了对心音信号的分段。采用改进的维奥拉积分方法对55例心音信号提取特征包络并进行分段处理,经验证该方法能有效的提取心音信号特征包络,对正常信号分段正确率达到了100%,异常信号分段正确率平均达到了95.32%,适合于心音信号分段。%Heart sound is one of the most important physiological signals evaluating human heart function,analyzing heart sound signal characteristic is of great significance for the early diagnosis and treatment of heart disease.In this paper,the Hilbert-Huang transform, normalized Shannon energy and Viola integral method are used to extract the characteristic envelope of heart sound signal.Aiming at the deficiency of Viola integral method,considering the characteristic that Shannon energy method can restrain the high and low intensity signals,a modified heart sound signal envelope extraction method is proposed.Finally,the threshold method is adopted to achieve the heart sound signal segmentation.The modified Viola integral method was adopted to extract the characteristic envelopes and conduct segmentation processing of 55 cases of heart sound signals,and the experiment result shows that the proposed method can effectively extract the envelopes of normal and abnormal heart sound signals,the segmentation accuracy is 1 00% for normal heart sound signal and 95.32% for abnormal heart sound signal,which indicates that the modified Viola integral method is suitable for heart sound signal segmentation.

  9. Effects of voice training and voice hygiene education on acoustic and perceptual speech parameters and self-reported vocal well-being in female teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilomaki, Irma; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria; Leppanen, Kirsti; Vilkman, Erkki

    2008-01-01

    Voice education programs may help in optimizing teachers' voice use. This study compared effects of voice training (VT) and voice hygiene lecture (VHL) in 60 randomly assigned female teachers. All 60 attended the lecture, and 30 completed a short training course in addition. Text reading was recorded in working environments and analyzed for fundamental frequency (F0), equivalent sound level (Leq), alpha ratio, jitter, shimmer, and perceptual quality. Self-reports of vocal well-being were registered. In the VHL group, increased F0 and difficulty of phonation and in the VT group decreased perturbation, increased alpha ratio, easier phonation, and improved perceptual and self-reported voice quality were found. Both groups equally self-reported increase of voice care knowledge. Results seem to indicate improved vocal well-being after training.

  10. Characterizing near-surface firn from the scattered signal component of glacier surface reflections detected in airborne radio-echo sounding measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, A.; Grima, C.; Sharp, M. J.; Blankenship, D. D.; Young, D. A.; Cawkwell, F.; Dowdeswell, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    With recent summer warming, surface melt on Canadian Arctic ice caps has intensified and extended to higher elevations in ice cap accumulation areas. Consequently, more meltwater percolates into the near-surface firn, and refreezes as ice layers where firn temperatures are below freezing. This process can increase firn densification rates, causing a lowering of the glacier surface height even in the absence of mass changes. Thus, knowledge of spatio-temporal variations in the near-surface firn stratigraphy is important for interpreting altimetrically-derived estimates of ice cap mass balance. We investigate the use of the scattering signal component of glacier surface reflections in airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) measurements to characterize the near-surface firn stratigraphy. The scattering signal distribution over Devon Ice Cap is compared to firn stratigraphy derived from ground-based radar data. We identify three distinct firn facies zones at different elevation ranges. The scattered signal component changes significantly between the different firn facies zones: low scattering correlates to laterally homogeneous firn containing thin, flat and continuous ice layers at elevations above 1800 m and below 1200 m, where firn consists mainly of ice. Higher scattering values are found from 1200-1800 m where the firn contains discrete, undulating ice layers. No correlation was found between the scattering component and surface roughness. Modelled scattering values for the measured roughness were significantly less than the observed values, and did not reproduce their observed spatial distribution. This indicates that the scattering component is determined mainly by the structure of near-surface firn. Our results suggest that the scattering component of surface reflections from airborne RES measurements has potential for characterizing heterogeneity in the spatial structure of firn that is affected by melting and refreezing processes.

  11. Unsound Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knakkergaard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the change in premise that digitally produced sound brings about and how digital technologies more generally have changed our relationship to the musical artifact, not simply in degree but in kind. It demonstrates how our acoustical conceptions are thoroughly challenged...... by the digital production of sound and, by questioning the ontological basis for digital sound, turns our understanding of the core term substance upside down....

  12. Increase in voice level and speaker comfort in lecture rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Gade, Anders Christian; Bellester, Gaspar Payá

    2009-01-01

    Teachers often suffer from health problems related to their voice. These problems are related to their working environment, including the acoustics of the lecture rooms. However, there is a lack of studies linking the room acoustic parameters to the voice produced by the speaker. In this pilot...... study, the main goals are to investigate whether objectively measurable parameters of the rooms can be related to an increase in the voice sound power produced by speakers and to the speakers’ subjective judgments about the rooms. In six different rooms with different sizes, reverberation times......, and other physical attributes, the sound power level produced by six speakers was measured. Objective room acoustic parameters were measured in the same rooms, including reverberation time and room gain, and questionnaires were handed out to people who had experience talking in the rooms. It is found...

  13. Image/Music/Voice: Song Dubbing in Hollywood Musicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefert, Marsha

    1995-01-01

    Uses the practice of song dubbing in the Hollywood film musical to explore the implications and consequences of the singing voice for imaging practices in the 1930s through 1960s. Discusses the ideological, technological, and socioeconomic basis for song dubbing. Discusses gender, race, and ethnicity patterns of image-sound practices. (SR)

  14. Aeroacoustics of the swinging corrugated tube: Voice of the Dragon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakiboglu, G.; Rudenko, O.; Hirschberg, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    When one swings a short corrugated pipe segment around one’s head, it produces a musically interesting whistling sound. As a musical toy it is called a “Hummer” and as a musical instrument, the “Voice of the Dragon.” The fluid dynamics aspects of the instrument are addressed, corresponding to the

  15. Sound Absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  16. Voiced Reading and Rhythm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹艳萍

    2007-01-01

    Since voiced reading is an important way in learning English,rhythm is the most critical factor that enables to read beautifully.This article illustrates the relationship between rhythm and voiced reading,the importance of rhythm,and the methods to develop the sense of rhythm.

  17. Clinical Voices - an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Weed, Ethan

    Anomalous aspects of speech and voice, including pitch, fluency, and voice quality, are reported to characterise many mental disorders. However, it has proven difficult to quantify and explain this oddness of speech by employing traditional statistical methods. In this talk we will show how...

  18. Borderline Space for Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Being on the borderline as a student in higher education is not always negative, to do with marginalisation, exclusion and having a voice that is vulnerable. Paradoxically, being on the edge also has positive connections with integration, inclusion and having a voice that is strong. Alternative understandings of the concept of borderline space can…

  19. Voice integrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, P. Mike

    1977-01-01

    The program at Naval Air Development Center was initiated to determine the desirability of interactive voice systems for use in airborne weapon systems crew stations. A voice recognition and synthesis system (VRAS) was developed and incorporated into a human centrifuge. The speech recognition aspect of VRAS was developed using a voice command system (VCS) developed by Scope Electronics. The speech synthesis capability was supplied by a Votrax, VS-5, speech synthesis unit built by Vocal Interface. The effects of simulated flight on automatic speech recognition were determined by repeated trials in the VRAS-equipped centrifuge. The relationship of vibration, G, O2 mask, mission duration, and cockpit temperature and voice quality was determined. The results showed that: (1) voice quality degrades after 0.5 hours with an O2 mask; (2) voice quality degrades under high vibration; and (3) voice quality degrades under high levels of G. The voice quality studies are summarized. These results were obtained with a baseline of 80 percent recognition accuracy with VCS.

  20. Ontario's Student Voice Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This article describes in some detail aspects of the Student Voice initiative funded and championed by Ontario's Ministry of Education since 2008. The project enables thousands of students to make their voices heard in meaningful ways and to participate in student-led research. Some students from grades 7 to 12 become members of the Student…

  1. EasyVoice: Integrating voice synthesis with Skype

    CERN Document Server

    Condado, Paulo A

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents EasyVoice, a system that integrates voice synthesis with Skype. EasyVoice allows a person with voice disabilities to talk with another person located anywhere in the world, removing an important obstacle that affect these people during a phone or VoIP-based conversation.

  2. The Speaking Voice in the General Population: Normative Data and Associations to Sociodemographic and Lifestyle Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Martin; Fuchs, Michael; Wirkner, Kerstin; Loeffler, Markus; Engel, Christoph; Berger, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Normative data concerning the speaking voice in the general population were gathered with the aim to establish standard values for clinical diagnostics. Associations between the speaking voice and sociodemographic factors were examined. This is a prospective cross-sectional population-based study. Speaking voice profiles were measured for 2472 (1154 male and 1318 female) participants between the ages of 40 and 79 years, using four speaking voice intensity levels: softest speaking voice (I), conversational voice (II), classroom voice (III), and shouting voice (IV). Smoking status and socioeconomic status were assessed. Data were analyzed using multivariate regression. The mean voice frequencies were 111.8 Hz for male and 161.3 Hz for female participants (I), 111.9 Hz for male and 168.5 Hz for female participants (II), 130.2 Hz for male and 198.0 Hz for female participants (III), and 175.5 Hz for male and 246.2 Hz for female participants (IV). Frequencies increased significantly with age for male but not for female participants. Sound pressure levels rose significantly with age at intensity levels I-III for both sexes, but decreased at intensity level IV. Frequencies and sound pressure levels were similar between nonsmokers and former smokers. Current smokers showed significantly lower frequencies as opposed to non- and former smokers. Speaking voice range and dynamics increased with higher socioeconomic status. The data are suitable as age-adjusted normative values for clinical measurement of the speaking voice. The mean fundamental speaking voice frequency of female participants was six to seven semitones lower than previously described. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of acoustic voice characteristics in smoking and nonsmoking teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šehović Ivana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Voice of vocal professionals is exposed to great temptations, i.e. there is a high probability of voice alterations. Smoking, allergies and respiratory infections greatly affect the voice, which can change its acoustic characteristics. In smokers, the vocal cords mass increases, resulting in changes in vocal fold vibratory cycle. Pathological changes of vocal folds deform the acoustic signal and affect voice production. As vocal professionals, teachers are much more affected by voice disorders than average speakers. The aim of this study was to examine the differences in acoustic parameters of voice between smoking and nonsmoking teachers, in a sample of vocal professionals. The sample consisted of 60 female subjects, aged from 25 to 59. For voice analysis we used Computer lab, model 4300, 'Kay Elemetrics Corporation'. The statistical significance of differences in the values of acoustic parameters between smokers and nonsmokers was tested by ANOVA. Results showed that in the sample of female teachers, professional use of voice combined with the smoking habit can be linked to the changes in voice parameters. Comparing smokers and nonsmokers, average values of the parameters in short-term and long-term disturbances of frequency and amplitude proved to be significantly different.

  4. Auditory gist: recognition of very short sounds from timbre cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suied, Clara; Agus, Trevor R; Thorpe, Simon J; Mesgarani, Nima; Pressnitzer, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Sounds such as the voice or musical instruments can be recognized on the basis of timbre alone. Here, sound recognition was investigated with severely reduced timbre cues. Short snippets of naturally recorded sounds were extracted from a large corpus. Listeners were asked to report a target category (e.g., sung voices) among other sounds (e.g., musical instruments). All sound categories covered the same pitch range, so the task had to be solved on timbre cues alone. The minimum duration for which performance was above chance was found to be short, on the order of a few milliseconds, with the best performance for voice targets. Performance was independent of pitch and was maintained when stimuli contained less than a full waveform cycle. Recognition was not generally better when the sound snippets were time-aligned with the sound onset compared to when they were extracted with a random starting time. Finally, performance did not depend on feedback or training, suggesting that the cues used by listeners in the artificial gating task were similar to those relevant for longer, more familiar sounds. The results show that timbre cues for sound recognition are available at a variety of time scales, including very short ones.

  5. Colour and texture associations in voice-induced synaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja eMoos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Voice-induced synaesthesia, a form of synaesthesia in which synaesthetic perceptions are induced by the sounds of people’s voices, appears to be relatively rare and has not been systematically studied. In this study we investigated the synaesthetic colour and visual texture perceptions experienced in response to different types of voice quality (e.g. nasal, whisper, falsetto. Experiences of three different groups – self-reported voice synaesthetes, phoneticians and controls – were compared using both qualitative and quantitative analysis in a study conducted online. Whilst, in the qualitative analysis, synaesthetes used more colour and texture terms to describe voices than either phoneticians or controls, only weak differences, and many similarities, between groups were found in the quantitative analysis. Notable consistent results between groups were the matching of higher speech fundamental frequencies with lighter and redder colours, the matching of whispery voices with smoke-like textures and the matching of harsh and creaky voices with textures resembling dry cracked soil. These data are discussed in the light of current thinking about definitions and categorizations of synaesthesia, especially in cases where individuals apparently have a range of different synaesthetic inducers.

  6. Color and texture associations in voice-induced synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Anja; Simmons, David; Simner, Julia; Smith, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Voice-induced synesthesia, a form of synesthesia in which synesthetic perceptions are induced by the sounds of people's voices, appears to be relatively rare and has not been systematically studied. In this study we investigated the synesthetic color and visual texture perceptions experienced in response to different types of "voice quality" (e.g., nasal, whisper, falsetto). Experiences of three different groups-self-reported voice synesthetes, phoneticians, and controls-were compared using both qualitative and quantitative analysis in a study conducted online. Whilst, in the qualitative analysis, synesthetes used more color and texture terms to describe voices than either phoneticians or controls, only weak differences, and many similarities, between groups were found in the quantitative analysis. Notable consistent results between groups were the matching of higher speech fundamental frequencies with lighter and redder colors, the matching of "whispery" voices with smoke-like textures, and the matching of "harsh" and "creaky" voices with textures resembling dry cracked soil. These data are discussed in the light of current thinking about definitions and categorizations of synesthesia, especially in cases where individuals apparently have a range of different synesthetic inducers.

  7. 基于ADPCM的数字语音存储与回放系统%Digital voice storage and replay system based on ADPCM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    With singlechip and FPGA as the cybernetics core,the system realizes voice storage and reply system. It can collect and simulate voice signals and stereo signals from earphone and lift utilization rate of memory by the use of ADPCM, which means the voice can be stored for more than 2 minutes. Based on the short⁃time Fourier transform principle,it can also achieve spectral analysis of voice signals and real⁃time display. Through using the stereo audio amplifier,each sound track can be adjusted and muted. Furthermore,some measures as pre⁃emphasis,de⁃emphasis and anti⁃aliasing filtering are used in this system to increase SNR efficiently and get good quality of the recorded voice for a longer time.%  系统以单片机和FPGA为控制核心,实现了语音存储与回放系统。能够采集模拟语音信号以及耳机立体声信号,以ADPCM(自适应差分编码)的方式提高了存储器的利用率,语音存储时间可达2 min;基于短时傅里叶变换原理,实现了语音信号的频谱分析与实时显示。同时,利用立体声音频功放播放语音,每声道音量可调并具有静噪功能。此外,系统还采用预加重、去加重、抗混叠滤波等措施,有效地提高了信噪比。语音回放质量良好,存储时间较长。

  8. When the face fits: recognition of celebrities from matching and mismatching faces and voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenage, Sarah V; Neil, Greg J; Hamlin, Iain

    2014-01-01

    The results of two experiments are presented in which participants engaged in a face-recognition or a voice-recognition task. The stimuli were face-voice pairs in which the face and voice were co-presented and were either "matched" (same person), "related" (two highly associated people), or "mismatched" (two unrelated people). Analysis in both experiments confirmed that accuracy and confidence in face recognition was consistently high regardless of the identity of the accompanying voice. However accuracy of voice recognition was increasingly affected as the relationship between voice and accompanying face declined. Moreover, when considering self-reported confidence in voice recognition, confidence remained high for correct responses despite the proportion of these responses declining across conditions. These results converged with existing evidence indicating the vulnerability of voice recognition as a relatively weak signaller of identity, and results are discussed in the context of a person-recognition framework.

  9. A study on transvelar coupling for non-nasalized sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jianwu; Wei, Jianguo; Honda, Kiyoshi; Nakai, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found that the velum in speech production may not only serve as a binary switch with on-off states for nasal and non-nasal sounds, but also partially alter the acoustic characteristics of non-nasalized sounds. The present study investigated the unique functions of the velum in the production of non-nasalized sounds by using morphological, mechanical, and acoustical measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging movies obtained from three Japanese speakers were used to measure the behaviors of the velum and dynamic changes in the pseudo-volume of the pharyngeal cavity during utterances of voiced stops and vowels. The measurements revealed no significant enlargements in the supraglottal cavity as subjects uttered voiced stops. It is found that the velum thickness varied across utterances in a way that depended on vowels, but not on consonants. The mechanical and acoustical observations in the study suggested that the velum is actively controlled to augment the voice bars of voiced stops, and nostril-radiated sound is one of the most important sources for voice bars, just as is laryngeal wall vibration. This study also proposed a two-layer diaphragm model that simulates transvelar coupling during the production of non-nasalized speech sounds. The simulation demonstrated that the model accurately represented the basic velar functions involved in speech production.

  10. Voice Savers for Music Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookman, Starr

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers are in a class all their own when it comes to voice use. These elite vocal athletes require stamina, strength, and flexibility from their voices day in, day out for hours at a time. Voice rehabilitation clinics and research show that music education ranks high among the professionals most commonly affected by voice problems.…

  11. Neural mechanisms for voice recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andics, A.V.; McQueen, J.M.; Petersson, K.M.; Gal, V.; Rudas, G.; Vidnyanszky, Z.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated neural mechanisms that support voice recognition in a training paradigm with fMRI. The same listeners were trained on different weeks to categorize the mid-regions of voice-morph continua as an individual's voice. Stimuli implicitly defined a voice-acoustics space, and training expli

  12. Inverting Comet Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment (CASSE) touchdown signals to measure the elastic modulus of comet material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W.; Faber, C.; Knapmeyer, M.; Witte, L.; Schröder, S.; Tune, J.; Möhlmann, D.; Roll, R.; Chares, B.; Fischer, H.; Seidensticker, K.

    2014-07-01

    carried out on the concrete floor of the LAMA to determine the stiffness of the landing gear based on the deceleration data measured with the accelerometer. Landings on fine-grained quartz sand and on a Mars soil simulant (brand names WF34 and MSS-D, respectively) allow quantifying the changes of the deceleration data due to interaction with the soil. The elastic moduli of the soils that were inverted from the accelerometer data agree well with data obtained by ultrasonic time-of-flight measurements, provided an effective contact area is used. To this end, the lander structure was viewed in a simplified way as a mass-spring-damper system coupled to the soil by a contact spring, whose stiffness is determined by elastic moduli of the soil and the contact radius. Analytical expressions allow a rapid inversion of the deceleration data to obtain elastic data. It is expected that the same procedure can be applied to the signal measured when landing on comet 67P.

  13. Improving the classroom listening skills of children with Down syndrome by using sound-field amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennetts, Lee K; Flynn, Mark C

    2002-03-01

    Many children with Down syndrome have fluctuating conductive hearing losses further reducing their speech, language and academic development. It is within the school environment where access to auditory information is crucial that many children with Down syndrome are especially disadvantaged. Conductive hearing impairment which is often fluctuating and undetected reduces the child's ability to extract the important information from the auditory signal. Unfortunately, the design and acoustics of the classroom leads to problems in extracting the speech signal through reduced speech intensity due to the increased distance of the student from the teacher in addition to masking from excessive background noise. One potential solution is the use of sound-field amplification which provides a uniform amplification to the teacher's voice through the use of a microphone and loudspeakers. This investigation examined the efficacy of sound-field amplification for 4 children with Down syndrome. Measures of speech perception were taken with and without the sound-field system and found that the children perceived significantly more speech in all conditions where the sound-field system was used (p classroom success.

  14. Using the Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede Hansen, Flemming; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    Digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. This project is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding material can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. The project presents...... SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice. Based on a generic audio feature extraction system, and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used, a 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. This shape is output to a 3D printer...... to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice....

  15. Implicit multisensory associations influence voice recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina von Kriegstein

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural objects provide partially redundant information to the brain through different sensory modalities. For example, voices and faces both give information about the speech content, age, and gender of a person. Thanks to this redundancy, multimodal recognition is fast, robust, and automatic. In unimodal perception, however, only part of the information about an object is available. Here, we addressed whether, even under conditions of unimodal sensory input, crossmodal neural circuits that have been shaped by previous associative learning become activated and underpin a performance benefit. We measured brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging before, while, and after participants learned to associate either sensory redundant stimuli, i.e. voices and faces, or arbitrary multimodal combinations, i.e. voices and written names, ring tones, and cell phones or brand names of these cell phones. After learning, participants were better at recognizing unimodal auditory voices that had been paired with faces than those paired with written names, and association of voices with faces resulted in an increased functional coupling between voice and face areas. No such effects were observed for ring tones that had been paired with cell phones or names. These findings demonstrate that brief exposure to ecologically valid and sensory redundant stimulus pairs, such as voices and faces, induces specific multisensory associations. Consistent with predictive coding theories, associative representations become thereafter available for unimodal perception and facilitate object recognition. These data suggest that for natural objects effective predictive signals can be generated across sensory systems and proceed by optimization of functional connectivity between specialized cortical sensory modules.

  16. Classification of High Blood Pressure Persons Vs Normal Blood Pressure Persons Using Voice Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloni

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The human voice is remarkable, complex and delicate. All parts of the body play some role in voice production and may be responsible for voice dysfunction. The larynx contains muscles that are surrounded by blood vessels connected to circulatory system. The pressure of blood in these vessels should be related with dynamic variation of vocal cord parameters. These parameters are directly related with acoustic properties of speech. Acoustic voice analysis can be used to characterize the pathological voices. This paper presents the classification of high blood pressure and normal with the aid of voice signal recorded from the patients. Various features have been extracted from the voice signal of healthy persons and persons suffering from high blood pressure. Simulation results show differences in the parameter values of healthy and pathological persons. Then an optimum feature vector is prepared and kmean classification algorithm was implemented for data classification. The 79% classification efficiency was obtained.

  17. Optical voice recorder by off-axis digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoba, Osamu; Inokuchi, Hiroki; Nitta, Kouichi; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2014-11-15

    An optical voice recorder capable of recording and reproducing propagating sound waves by using off-axis digital holography, as well as quantitative visualization, is presented. Propagating sound waves temporally modulate the phase distribution of an impinging light wave via refractive index changes. This temporally modulated phase distribution is recorded in the form of digital holograms by a high-speed image sensor. After inverse propagation using Fresnel diffraction of a series of the recorded holograms, the temporal phase profile of the reconstructed object wave at each three-dimensional position can be used to reproduce the original sound wave. Experimental results using a tuning fork vibrating at 440 Hz and a human voice are presented to show the feasibility of the proposed method.

  18. Dominant Voice in Hamlet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹

    2015-01-01

    <正>The Tragedy of Hamlet dramatizes the revenge Prince Hamlet exacts on his uncle Claudius for murdering King Hamlet,Claudius’s brother and Prince Hamlet’s father,and then succeeding to the throne and taking as his wife Gertrude,the old king’s widow and Prince Hamlet’s mother.This paper will discuss something about dominant voice in the play.Dominant voice is the major voice in the country,the society,or the whole world.Those people who have the power or

  19. Analysis of the Instantaneous Frequency of Heart Sound Signals Based on Labview2014%基于Labview2014的心音信号瞬时频率分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦博轩; 彭松

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the heart sound signals through signal processing methodology so as to provide objective foundations for physicians to diagnose the heart-sound-related heart diseases. Methods Based on Labview2014, the instantaneous frequency of heart sound was analyzed to obtain the frequency spectrum and the curve of instantaneous frequency. Results The differences between normal and abnormal heart sound was signiifcant in the aspects of the frequency spectrum and the curve of instantaneous frequency. Conclusion This methodology had proven its accuracy in the veriifcation test in revealing differences between normal and abnormal heart sound, which contributed to convenient and efifcient diagnosis of heart-sound-related heart diseases for physicians.%目的:利用信号处理手段对心音信号进行分析,为医生诊断心音相关心脏疾病提供客观依据。方法基于Labview2014开发平台对心音进行瞬时频率分析,给出其能量图谱以及瞬时频率曲线。结果正常与异常心音的瞬时频率曲线及功率谱有明显差异。结论经试验验证,该方法能够准确描述正常与异常心音的频率差异,使医生能够便捷、高效地诊断心音相关心脏疾病。

  20. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  1. Effects of sound-field frequency modulation amplification on reducing teachers' sound pressure level in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, C M; Crandell, C C; Curtis, B

    1999-09-01

    Voice problems are a frequent difficulty that teachers experience. Common complaints by teachers include vocal fatigue and hoarseness. One possible explanation for these symptoms is prolonged elevations in vocal loudness within the classroom. This investigation examined the effectiveness of sound-field frequency modulation (FM) amplification on reducing the sound pressure level (SPL) of the teacher's voice during classroom instruction. Specifically, SPL was examined during speech produced in a classroom lecture by 10 teachers with and without the use of sound-field amplification. Results indicated a significant 2.42-dB decrease in SPL with the use of sound-field FM amplification. These data support the use of sound-field amplification in the vocal hygiene regimen recommended to teachers by speech-language pathologists.

  2. Ethnographic Voice Memo Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mette Apollo; Conradsen, Maria Bosse

    1800-01-01

    -based technique which actively involves actors in producing ethnography-based data concerning their everyday practice. With the help from smartphone technology it is possible to complement ethnography-based research methods when involving the actors and having them create small voice memo narratives. The voice...... memos create insights of actors‟ everyday practice, without the direct presence of a researcher and could be considered a step towards meeting the dilemmas of research in complex fieldwork settings....

  3. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  4. Sound intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1998-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  5. Secure digital voice communications in the Defense Data Network (DDN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, M.; Gan, D.; Oesterreicher, C.

    1985-03-01

    This final report has investigated and validated one of the fourteen key features of the future, all-digital World-wide Digital Systems Architecture (WWDSA), namely the enhanced 2.4 Kbps secure voice survivability through the use of packetized voice and the use of packetized voice and the interconnection between the voice survivability through the use of packetized voice and the interconnection between the voice (DSN) phase implementation plan in the report, Secure Voice, as provided by the STU-IIs, can be implemented in the DDN in the late 1980s time-frame with no technical and minimum schedule risk. VIUs are proposed to interconnect, the family of secure voice terminals, called STU-IIs, to the DDN. VIUs contain modan, signalling and supervision (S/S), and processor modules and are supported by the implementation model of the protocol architecture that (with the TAC as processor module) was proposed in the report. An optimum system-level architecture employing the VIUs and the proposed in the implementation plan based on an extensive evaluation.

  6. Increase in voice level and speaker comfort in lecture rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Gade, Anders Christian; Bellester, Gaspar Payá

    2009-01-01

    Teachers often suffer from health problems related to their voice. These problems are related to their working environment, including the acoustics of the lecture rooms. However, there is a lack of studies linking the room acoustic parameters to the voice produced by the speaker. In this pilot......, and other physical attributes, the sound power level produced by six speakers was measured. Objective room acoustic parameters were measured in the same rooms, including reverberation time and room gain, and questionnaires were handed out to people who had experience talking in the rooms. It is found...

  7. Toward a trustworthy voice: increasing the effectiveness of automated outreach calls to promote colorectal cancer screening among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Karen; Richardson, Terri; Kempe, Karin L; Wallace, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening rates are lower among African-American members of Kaiser Permanente Colorado (KPCO) than among members of other races and ethnicities. This study evaluated use of a linguistically congruent voice in interactive voice response outreach calls about colorectal cancer screening as a strategy to increase call completion and response. After an initial discussion group to assess cultural acceptability of the project, 6 focus groups were conducted with 33 KPCO African-American members. Participants heard and discussed recordings of 5 female voices reading the same segment of the standard-practice colorectal cancer message using interactive voice response. The linguistic palette included the voices of a white woman, a lightly accented Latina, and 3 African-American women. Participants strongly preferred the African-American voices, particularly two voices. Participants considered these voices the most trustworthy and reported that they would be the most effective at increasing motivation to complete an automated call. Participants supported the use of African-American voices when designing outgoing automated calls for African Americans because the sense of familiarity engendered trust among listeners. Participants also indicated that effective automated messages should provide immediate clarity of purpose; explain why the issue is relevant to African Americans; avoid sounding scripted; emphasize that the call is for the listener's benefit only; sound personable, warm, and positive; and not create fear among listeners. Establishing linguistic congruence between African Americans and the voices used in automated calls designed to reach them may increase the effectiveness of outreach efforts.

  8. Voice over IP in Wireless Heterogeneous Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fathi, Hanane; Chakraborty, Shyam; Prasad, Ramjee

    The convergence of different types of traffic has preceded the convergence of systems and services in a wireless heterogeneous network. Voice and data traffic are usually treated separate in both 2G and 2.5G wireless networks. With advances in packet switching technology and especially with the d...... and to the discruption caused by the user mobility during the session. Voice over IP in Wireless Hetetrogeneous Networks thus investigates and proposes cross-layer techniques for realizing time-efficient control mechanisms for VoIP: signaling, mobility and security.......The convergence of different types of traffic has preceded the convergence of systems and services in a wireless heterogeneous network. Voice and data traffic are usually treated separate in both 2G and 2.5G wireless networks. With advances in packet switching technology and especially....... The focus of Voice over IP in Wierless Heterogeneous Networks is on mechanisms that affect the VoIP user satisfaction  while not explicitly involved in the media session. This relates to the extra delays introduced by the security and the signaling protocols used to set up an authorized VoIP session...

  9. Characterization of Yellow Seahorse Hippocampus kuda feeding click sound signals in a laboratory environment: an application of probability density function and power spectral density analyses

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Saran, A.K.; Kuncolienker, D.S.; Sreepada, R.A.; Haris, K.; Fernandes, W.A

    Do the sounds generated by different-sized fish of different sexes differ from each other in temporal, spectral or intensity patterns? Such differences would enable the development of passive acoustic techniques to locate seahorses in open water...

  10. Frequency response of the skin on the head and neck during production of selected speech sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Jacob B; Thomson, Scott L

    2008-12-01

    Vibrations within the vocal tract during speech are transmitted through tissue to the skin surface and can be used to transmit speech. Achieving quality speech signals using skin vibration is desirable but problematic, primarily due to the several sound production locations along the vocal tract. The objective of this study was to characterize the frequency content of speech signals on various locations of the head and neck. Signals were recorded using a microphone and accelerometers attached to 15 locations on the heads and necks of 14 males and 10 females. The subjects voiced various phonemes and one phrase. The power spectral densities (PSD) of the phonemes were used to determine a quality ranking for each location and sound. Spectrograms were used to examine signal frequency content for selected locations. A perceptual listening test was conducted and compared to the PSD rankings. The signal-to-noise ratio was found for each location with and without background noise. These results are presented and discussed. Notably, while high-frequency content is attenuated at the throat, it is shown to be detectable at some other locations. The best locations for speech transmission were found to be generally common to males and females.

  11. Experience with speech sounds is not necessary for cue trading by budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Mary; Dent, Micheal L; Sawusch, James R

    2017-01-01

    The influence of experience with human speech sounds on speech perception in budgerigars, vocal mimics whose speech exposure can be tightly controlled in a laboratory setting, was measured. Budgerigars were divided into groups that differed in auditory exposure and then tested on a cue-trading identification paradigm with synthetic speech. Phonetic cue trading is a perceptual phenomenon observed when changes on one cue dimension are offset by changes in another cue dimension while still maintaining the same phonetic percept. The current study examined whether budgerigars would trade the cues of voice onset time (VOT) and the first formant onset frequency when identifying syllable initial stop consonants and if this would be influenced by exposure to speech sounds. There were a total of four different exposure groups: No speech exposure (completely isolated), Passive speech exposure (regular exposure to human speech), and two Speech-trained groups. After the exposure period, all budgerigars were tested for phonetic cue trading using operant conditioning procedures. Birds were trained to peck keys in response to different synthetic speech sounds that began with "d" or "t" and varied in VOT and frequency of the first formant at voicing onset. Once training performance criteria were met, budgerigars were presented with the entire intermediate series, including ambiguous sounds. Responses on these trials were used to determine which speech cues were used, if a trading relation between VOT and the onset frequency of the first formant was present, and whether speech exposure had an influence on perception. Cue trading was found in all birds and these results were largely similar to those of a group of humans. Results indicated that prior speech experience was not a requirement for cue trading by budgerigars. The results are consistent with theories that explain phonetic cue trading in terms of a rich auditory encoding of the speech signal.

  12. Matching novel face and voice identity using static and dynamic facial images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Harriet M J; Dunn, Andrew K; Baguley, Thom; Stacey, Paula C

    2016-04-01

    Research investigating whether faces and voices share common source identity information has offered contradictory results. Accurate face-voice matching is consistently above chance when the facial stimuli are dynamic, but not when the facial stimuli are static. We tested whether procedural differences might help to account for the previous inconsistencies. In Experiment 1, participants completed a sequential two-alternative forced choice matching task. They either heard a voice and then saw two faces or saw a face and then heard two voices. Face-voice matching was above chance when the facial stimuli were dynamic and articulating, but not when they were static. In Experiment 2, we tested whether matching was more accurate when faces and voices were presented simultaneously. The participants saw two face-voice combinations, presented one after the other. They had to decide which combination was the same identity. As in Experiment 1, only dynamic face-voice matching was above chance. In Experiment 3, participants heard a voice and then saw two static faces presented simultaneously. With this procedure, static face-voice matching was above chance. The overall results, analyzed using multilevel modeling, showed that voices and dynamic articulating faces, as well as voices and static faces, share concordant source identity information. It seems, therefore, that above-chance static face-voice matching is sensitive to the experimental procedure employed. In addition, the inconsistencies in previous research might depend on the specific stimulus sets used; our multilevel modeling analyses show that some people look and sound more similar than others.

  13. Unidentified Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates how urban spaces and its noises are approached by radio reporters in the first decades of public radio production in Denmark. Focussing on the period before reel tape was incorporated in production by late 1940es, I ask how urban space and urban sounds are heard...... in Danish radio until early post-war years. Yet I trace early attempts at managing noisy urban conditions and demonstrate how reporters experimented with available technological repositories and developed techniques in order to make sense in and through urban environments. Inspired by Michel Serres idea...... of the parasite I analyse such techniques as ways of distinguishing between noise and meaningful sounds, and ultimately show how such ventures constituted auditory responses to modernity and let organised sound enter the public sphere....

  14. Biosignal data preprocessing: a voice pathology detection application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genaro Daza Santacoloma

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A methodology for biosignal data preprocessing is presented. Experiments were mainly carried out with voice signals for automa- tically detecting pathologies. The proposed methodology was structured on 3 elements: outlier detection, normality verification and distribution transformation. It improved classification performance if basic assumptions about data structure were met. This entailed a more accurate detection of voice pathologies and it reduced the computational complexity of classification algorithms. Classification performance improved by 15%.

  15. Simultaneous F 0-F 1 modifications of Arabic for the improvement of natural-sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ykhlef, F.; Bensebti, M.

    2013-03-01

    Pitch (F 0) modification is one of the most important problems in the area of speech synthesis. Several techniques have been developed in the literature to achieve this goal. The main restrictions of these techniques are in the modification range and the synthesised speech quality, intelligibility and naturalness. The control of formants in a spoken language can significantly improve the naturalness of the synthesised speech. This improvement is mainly dependent on the control of the first formant (F 1). Inspired by this observation, this article proposes a new approach that modifies both F 0 and F 1 of Arabic voiced sounds in order to improve the naturalness of the pitch shifted speech. The developed strategy takes a parallel processing approach, in which the analysis segments are decomposed into sub-bands in the wavelet domain, modified in the desired sub-band by using a resampling technique and reconstructed without affecting the remained sub-bands. Pitch marking and voicing detection are performed in the frequency decomposition step based on the comparison of the multi-level approximation and detail signals. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by listening tests and compared to the pitch synchronous overlap and add (PSOLA) technique in the third approximation level. Experimental results have shown that the manipulation in the wavelet domain of F 0 in conjunction with F 1 guarantees natural-sounding of the synthesised speech compared to the classical pitch modification technique. This improvement was appropriate for high pitch modifications.

  16. Voice Therapy Practices and Techniques: A Survey of Voice Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Peter B.; Larson, George W.

    1992-01-01

    Eighty-three voice disorder therapists' ratings of statements regarding voice therapy practices indicated that vocal nodules are the most frequent disorder treated; vocal abuse and hard glottal attack elimination, counseling, and relaxation were preferred treatment approaches; and voice therapy is more effective with adults than with children.…

  17. Voice in early glottic cancer compared to benign voice pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gogh, C. D. L.; Mahieu, H. F.; Kuik, D. J.; Rinkel, R. N. P. M.; Langendijk, J. A.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I. M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare (Dutch) Voice Handicap Index (VHIvumc) scores from a selected group of patients with voice problems after treatment for early glottic cancer with patients with benign voice disorders and subjects from the normal population. The study included a group of 35 pat

  18. The inner voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony James Ridgway

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The inner voice- we all know what it is because we all have it and use it when we are thinking or reading, for example. Little work has been done on it in our field, with the notable exception of Brian Tomlinson, but presumably it must be a cognitive phenomenon which is of great importance in thinking, language learning, and reading in a foreign language. The inner voice will be discussed as a cognitive psychological phenomenon associated with short-term memory, and distinguished from the inner ear. The process of speech recoding will be examined (the process of converting written language into the inner voice and the importance of developing the inner voice, as a means of both facilitating the production of a new language and enhancing the comprehension of a text in a foreign language, will be emphasized. Finally, ways of developing the inner voice in beginning and intermediate readers of a foreign language will be explored and recommended.

  19. Application of translation invariant wavelet in heart sound signal de-noising%平移不变小波在心音信号去噪中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭兴明; 何彦青; 卢德林; 袁志会

    2014-01-01

    The wavelet threshold de-noising method can eliminate the noise existing in heart sound signals, but the lack of translation invariance, may produce artificial oscillation phenomenon near the singularity of the signal, namely Pesudo-Gibbs phenomenon influencing the de-noising result. Therefore, the wavelet threshold de-noising method based on transla-tion invariance(Translation Invariance, TI)is adopted to process the heart sound signals, which changes the position of singular points through translating the signal sequence, to reduce or eliminate the oscillation. Before processing heart sounds with this way, firstly it needs to eliminate the interference introduced during the acquisition process by reducing trend terms. The experimental results show that this method eliminates artificial oscillation phenomenon, and that the Signal-to-Noise Ratio(SNR)and Root Mean Square Error(RMSE)are obviously improved under the precondition of keeping the main characters of the heart sound signals.%小波阈值去噪方法可以消除心音信号中的噪声,但其缺乏平移不变性,可能在信号的奇异点附近产生人为的振荡现象,即Pesudo-Gibbs现象,影响去噪效果。采用平移不变(Translation Invariance,TI)小波阈值去噪的方法对心音信号进行去噪,通过对信号序列平移来改变奇异点在整段信号的位置,以降低或消除振荡。对信号采用平移不变小波去噪之前,先通过消除趋势项来降低信号采集过程中引入的干扰。实验结果表明,该方法消除了人为振荡现象,在保留心音信号主要特征的前提下,信号的信噪比(Signal-to-Noise Ratio,SNR)和根均方误差(Root Mean Square Error,RMSE)均得到明显改善。

  20. VOICE OVER INTERNET PROTOCOL (VOIP: FUTURE POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Kumari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available VoIP (voice over IP delivers standard voice over telephone services over Internet Protocol (IP. VoIP is the technology of digitizing sound, compressing it, breaking it up into data packets, and sending it over an IP (internet protocol network where it is reassembled, decompressed, and converted back into an analog wave form. Gateways are the key component required to facilitate IP Telephony. A gateway is used to bridge the traditional circuit switched PSTN with the packet switched Internet. The paper covers software, hardware and protocol requirements followed by weighing the VoIP advantages such as low cost, portability, free and advanced features, bandwidth efficiency, call recording and monitoring against the VoIP disadvantages such as power dependency, quality of voice and service, security, and reliability. With ever increasing internet penetration and better broadband connectivity, VoIP is going to expand further with businesses already using VoIP standalone or in a hybrid format, although our focus and scope here remains VoIP. Mobile VoIP, an infant with less than 4% market share, has so far been focusing on increasing active subscriptions without a sustainable revenue model, but has the potential and is going to see tussle with static VoIP for space in days ahead.

  1. Voice over Internet Protocol (VOIP: Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Deepti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available VoIP (voice over IP delivers standard voice over telephone services over Internet Protocol (IP. VoIP is the technology of digitizing sound, compressing it, breaking it up into data packets, and sending it over an IP (internet protocol network where it is reassembled, decompressed, and converted back into an analog wave form. Gateways are the key component required to facilitate IP Telephony. A gateway is used to bridge the traditional circuit switched PSTN with the packet switched Internet. The paper covers software, hardware and protocol requirements followed by weighing the VoIP advantages such as low cost, portability, free and advanced features, bandwidth efficiency, call recording and monitoring against the VoIP disadvantages such as power dependency, quality of voice and service, security, and reliability. With ever increasing internet penetration and better broadband connectivity, VoIP is going to expand further with businesses already using VoIP standalone or in a hybrid format, although our focus and scope here remains VoIP. Mobile VoIP, an infant with less than 4% market share, has so far been focusing on increasing active subscriptions without a sustainable revenue model, but has the potential and is going to see tussle with static VoIP for space in days ahead.

  2. Smartphone App for Voice Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. Feature: Taste, Smell, Hearing, Language, Voice, Balance Smartphone App for Voice Disorders Past Issues / Fall 2013 ... developed a mobile monitoring device that relies on smartphone technology to gather a week's worth of talking, ...

  3. Sound Settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peder Duelund; Hornyanszky, Elisabeth Dalholm; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    2013-01-01

    Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice......Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice...

  4. Right hemisphere specialization for intensity discrimination of musical and speech sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancucci, Alfredo; Babiloni, Claudio; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Romani, Gian Luca

    2005-01-01

    Sound intensity is the primary and most elementary feature of auditory signals. Its discrimination plays a fundamental role in different behaviours related to auditory perception such as sound source localization, motion detection, and recognition of speech sounds. This study was aimed at investigating hemispheric asymmetries for processing intensity of complex tones and consonant-vowel syllables. Forty-four right-handed non-musicians were presented with two dichotic matching-to-sample tests with focused attention: one with complex tones of different intensities (musical test) and the other with consonant-vowel syllables of different intensities (speech test). Intensity differences (60, 70, and 80 dBA) were obtained by altering the gain of a synthesized harmonic tone (260 Hz fundamental frequency) and of a consonant-vowel syllable (/ba/) recorded from a natural voice. Dependent variables were accuracy and reaction time. Results showed a significant clear-cut left ear advantage in both tests for both dependent variables. A monaural control experiment ruled out possible attentional biases. This study provides behavioural evidence of a right hemisphere specialization for the perception of the intensity of musical and speech sounds in healthy subjects.

  5. Non-organic dysphonia. II. A comparison of subglottal pressures in normal and pathological voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramming, P

    1989-01-01

    In previous investigations, typical phonetogram differences have been revealed between healthy and pathological voices: the average maximum and minimum sound pressure levels that a patient suffering from non-organic dysphonia can produce at different fundamental frequencies deviate significantly from the corresponding values for a healthy voice. The subglottal pressure, being the primary tool for regulating the sound pressure level of voice, was estimated from the oral pressure during the voiceless stop/p/in 10 female and 10 male subjects with normal voices and in 10 female and 10 male non-organic dysphonic patients. In loud phonation, the female patients had significantly lower values than the female healthy subjects, while no corresponding significant difference was seen between the male subjects. In soft phonation, the male patients had significantly higher values than the normal healthy subjects, while the females showed no significant difference.

  6. Pitch Based Sound Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai; Kjems, U

    2006-01-01

    A sound classification model is presented that can classify signals into music, noise and speech. The model extracts the pitch of the signal using the harmonic product spectrum. Based on the pitch estimate and a pitch error measure, features are created and used in a probabilistic model with soft......-max output function. Both linear and quadratic inputs are used. The model is trained on 2 hours of sound and tested on publicly available data. A test classification error below 0.05 with 1 s classification windows is achieved. Further more it is shown that linear input performs as well as a quadratic......, and that even though classification gets marginally better, not much is achieved by increasing the window size beyond 1 s....

  7. Voice Source Variation Between Vowels in Male Opera Singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Johan; Lã, Filipa M B; Gill, Brian P

    2016-09-01

    The theory of nonlinear source-filter interaction predicts that the glottal voice source should be affected by the frequency relationship between formants and partials. An attempt to experimentally verify this theory is presented. Glottal voice source and electrolaryngograph (ELG) signal differences between vowels were analyzed in vowel sequences, sung at four pitches with the same degree of vocal loudness by professional opera singers. In addition, the relationships between such differences and the frequency distance between the first formant (F1) and its closest partial were examined. A digital laryngograph microprocessor was used to simultaneously record audio and ELG signals. The former was inverse filtered, and voice source parameters and formant frequencies were extracted. The amplitude quotient of the derivative of the ELG signal (AQdELG) and the contact quotient were also compared. A one-way repeated-measures ANOVA revealed significant differences between vowels, for contact quotient at four pitches and for maximum flow declination rate (MFDR) at three pitches. For other voice source parameters, differences were found at one or two pitches only. No consistent correlation was found between MFDR and the distance between F1 and its closest partial. The glottal voice source tends to vary between vowels, presumably because of source-filter interaction, but the variation does not seem to be dependent on the frequency distance between F1 and its closest partial. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Speech enhancement on smartphone voice recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tris Atmaja, Bagus; Nur Farid, Mifta; Arifianto, Dhany

    2016-11-01

    Speech enhancement is challenging task in audio signal processing to enhance the quality of targeted speech signal while suppress other noises. In the beginning, the speech enhancement algorithm growth rapidly from spectral subtraction, Wiener filtering, spectral amplitude MMSE estimator to Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF). Smartphone as revolutionary device now is being used in all aspect of life including journalism; personally and professionally. Although many smartphones have two microphones (main and rear) the only main microphone is widely used for voice recording. This is why the NMF algorithm widely used for this purpose of speech enhancement. This paper evaluate speech enhancement on smartphone voice recording by using some algorithms mentioned previously. We also extend the NMF algorithm to Kulback-Leibler NMF with supervised separation. The last algorithm shows improved result compared to others by spectrogram and PESQ score evaluation.

  9. Analyzing the Pattern of L1 Sounds on L2 Sounds Produced by Javanese Students of Stkip PGRI Jombang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daning Hentasmaka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The studyconcerns on an analysis on the tendency of first language (L1 sound patterning on second language (L2 sounds done by Javanese students.Focusing on the consonant sounds, the data were collected by recording students’ pronunciationof English words during the pronunciation test. The data then analysed through three activities: data reduction, data display, and conclusion drawing/ verification. Theresult showedthatthe patterning of L1 sounds happened on L2 sounds especially on eleven consonant sounds: the fricatives [v, θ, ð, ʃ, ʒ], the voiceless stops [p, t, k], and the voiced stops [b, d, g].Thosepatterning case emergedmostlyduetothe difference in the existence of consonant sounds and rules of consonant distribution. Besides, one of the cases was caused by the difference in consonant clusters between L1 and L2

  10. Semi-continuous ultrasonic sounding and changes of ultrasonic signal characteristics as a sensitive tool for the evaluation of ongoing microstructural changes of experimental mortar bars tested for their ASR potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokajíček, T; Kuchařová, A; Petružálek, M; Šachlová, Š; Svitek, T; Přikryl, R

    2016-09-01

    Semi-continuous ultrasonic sounding of experimental mortar bars used in the accelerated alkali silica reactivity laboratory test (ASTM C1260) is proposed as a supplementary measurement technique providing data that are highly sensitive to minor changes in the microstructure of hardening/deteriorating concrete mixture. A newly designed, patent pending, heating chamber was constructed allowing ultrasonic sounding of mortar bars, stored in accelerating solution without necessity to remove the test specimens from the bath during the measurement. Subsequent automatic data analysis of recorded ultrasonic signals proved their high correlation to the measured length changes (expansion) and their high sensitivity to microstructural changes. The changes of P-wave velocity, and of the energy, amplitude, and frequency of ultrasonic signal, were in the range of 10-80%, compared to 0.51% change of the length. Results presented in this study thus show that ultrasonic sounding seems to be more sensitive to microstructural changes due to ongoing deterioration of concrete microstructure by alkali-silica reaction than the dimensional changes.

  11. Sound Settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peder Duelund; Hornyanszky, Elisabeth Dalholm; Larsen, Jacob Norvig;

    2013-01-01

    Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice...

  12. Effects of melody and technique on acoustical and musical features of western operatic singing voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrouy-Maestri, Pauline; Magis, David; Morsomme, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    The operatic singing technique is frequently used in classical music. Several acoustical parameters of this specific technique have been studied but how these parameters combine remains unclear. This study aims to further characterize the Western operatic singing technique by observing the effects of melody and technique on acoustical and musical parameters of the singing voice. Fifty professional singers performed two contrasting melodies (popular song and romantic melody) with two vocal techniques (with and without operatic singing technique). The common quality parameters (energy distribution, vibrato rate, and extent), perturbation parameters (standard deviation of the fundamental frequency, signal-to-noise ratio, jitter, and shimmer), and musical features (fundamental frequency of the starting note, average tempo, and sound pressure level) of the 200 sung performances were analyzed. The results regarding the effect of melody and technique on the acoustical and musical parameters show that the choice of melody had a limited impact on the parameters observed, whereas a particular vocal profile appeared depending on the vocal technique used. This study confirms that vocal technique affects most of the parameters examined. In addition, the observation of quality, perturbation, and musical parameters contributes to a better understanding of the Western operatic singing technique. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Moth hearing and sound communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Active echolocation enables bats to orient and hunt the night sky for insects. As a counter-measure against the severe predation pressure many nocturnal insects have evolved ears sensitive to ultrasonic bat calls. In moths bat-detection was the principal purpose of hearing, as evidenced...... by comparable hearing physiology with best sensitivity in the bat echolocation range, 20–60 kHz, across moths in spite of diverse ear morphology. Some eared moths subsequently developed sound-producing organs to warn/startle/jam attacking bats and/or to communicate intraspecifically with sound. Not only...... the sounds for interaction with bats, but also mating signals are within the frequency range where bats echolocate, indicating that sound communication developed after hearing by “sensory exploitation”. Recent findings on moth sound communication reveal that close-range (~ a few cm) communication with low...

  14. Moth hearing and sound communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Active echolocation enables bats to orient and hunt the night sky for insects. As a counter-measure against the severe predation pressure many nocturnal insects have evolved ears sensitive to ultrasonic bat calls. In moths bat-detection was the principal purpose of hearing, as evidenced by compar......, revealing a bias towards what humans can sense, when studying (acoustic) communication in animals....... by comparable hearing physiology with best sensitivity in the bat echolocation range, 20–60 kHz, across moths in spite of diverse ear morphology. Some eared moths subsequently developed sound-producing organs to warn/startle/jam attacking bats and/or to communicate intraspecifically with sound. Not only...... the sounds for interaction with bats, but also mating signals are within the frequency range where bats echolocate, indicating that sound communication developed after hearing by “sensory exploitation”. Recent findings on moth sound communication reveal that close-range (~ a few cm) communication with low...

  15. Effects of Consensus Training on the Reliability of Auditory Perceptual Ratings of Voice Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwarsson, Jenny; Petersen, Niels Reinholt

    2012-01-01

    a multidimensional protocol with four-point equal-appearing interval scales. The stimuli consisted of text reading by authentic dysphonic patients. The consensus training for each perceptual voice parameter included (1) definition, (2) underlying physiology, (3) presentation of carefully selected sound examples...... training, including use of a reference voice sample material, to calibrate, equalize, and stabilize the internal standards held in memory by the listeners....

  16. Sustainable Consumer Voices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitmøller, Anders; Rask, Morten; Jensen, Nevena

    2011-01-01

    Aiming to explore how user driven innovation can inform high level design strategies, an in-depth empirical study was carried out, based on data from 50 observations of private vehicle users. This paper reports the resulting 5 consumer voices: Technology Enthusiast, Environmentalist, Design Lover......, Pragmatist and Status Seeker. Expedient use of the voices in creating design strategies is discussed, thus contributing directly to the practice of high level design managers. The main academic contribution of this paper is demonstrating how applied anthropology can be used to generate insights...... into disruptive emergence of product service systems, where quantitative user analyses rely on historical continuation....

  17. 读书机器人变声系统的研制%A Voice Modification System for Book Reading Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓杰; 房宁; 赵群飞

    2012-01-01

    为了增加读书机器人(JoyTon)朗读声音的多样性,设计了一种基于单一语音库的声音变换系统.将读书机嚣TTS(textto speech)合成出的初始声音分解成声音激励信号和声道滤波嚣信号,并转换到频域进行修改.利用短时傅立叶幅度谱重构激励信号的方法以及通过修改声道滤波器参数的方法来变换音速、音调和音色.修改后的声音激励信号和声道滤波嚣信号被重新合成产生新的声音信号.该变声系统能在不增加语音库容量的情况下使读书机嚣人用丰富多彩的感情和声调朗读.%Voice modification based on single speech database is proposed in order to increase the voice diversity of the book reading robot (JoyTon). The original sounds synthesized by book reading robot's TTS engine are broken down into excitation and vocal tract filter. Both excitation and vocal tract filter are modified in the frequency domain. Excitation reconstruction through short-time Fourier transform magnitude and parameters modification of vocal tract filter are used to achieve tempo, pitch and timbre modification. Modified excitation and modified vocal tract filter are synthesized back to generate new voice signals. This voice modification system makes book reading robot a text with a variety of emotions and tones without extra memory for speech library.

  18. VoiceRelay: voice key operation using visual basic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Lise; Jennings, David T

    2004-11-01

    Using a voice key is a popular method for recording vocal response times in a variety of language production tasks. This article describes a class module called VoiceRelay that can be easily utilized in Visual Basic programs for voice key operation. This software-based voice key offers the precision of traditional voice keys (although accuracy is system dependent), as well as the flexibility of volume and sensitivity control. However, VoiceRelay is a considerably less expensive alternative for recording vocal response times because it operates with existing PC hardware and does not require the purchase of external response boxes or additional experiment-generation software. A sample project demonstrating implementation of the VoiceRelay class module may be downloaded from the Psychonomic Society Web archive, www.psychonomic.org/archive.

  19. Acoustic feedback system with digital signal processor to alert the subject and quantitative visualization of arousal reaction induced by the sound using dynamic characteristics of saccadic eye movement: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, A; Manabe, S; Uchikawa, Y

    2005-01-01

    A new system has been developed to assess human alertness and to alert the subject with acoustic stimulation in accordance with the assessed level of alertness. Dynamic characteristics of saccadic eye movement (saccade: SC) were used to calculate an alertness index. Digital signal processor was adopted for the calculation. The system was tested through eye tracking tasks. The results indicated that the developed system could awaken the subject by feeding sound back to the subject. Also, arousal reaction induced by the sound was visualized quantitatively by analyzing values of the alertness index after the stimulation. These results indicate applicability of the system not only to awakening device for accident prevention, but also to a tool for investigating effects of the stimulation.

  20. Inspiratory Phonation in Baby Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermke, Kathleen; Haschemi, Asin Ahmad; Hesse, Volker; Robb, Michael P

    2017-05-18

    This study aimed to evaluate the developmental occurrence of inspiratory phonations (IPs) in the spontaneous cries of healthy infants across the first 10 weeks of life. This is a populational retrospective study. The spontaneous crying of 17 healthy infants (10 were male) was retrospectively investigated. Sound files of spontaneously uttered cries that were repeatedly recorded once per week for across the first 10 weeks of life were retrospectively analyzed. Frequency spectra and waveforms were used to identify the occurrence of IPs and to measure the duration and fundamental frequency (fo) of each instance of IP. A consistent number of IPs were identified across the 10-week period. All infants were observed to produce IPs in their spontaneous cries, although the frequency of occurrence was not consistent across infants. A marked sex difference was observed with female infants producing a higher number of IPs compared to males. The duration and fo of IPs did not differ significantly across the 10 weeks or between sexes. The production of IPs is a regularly occurring phenomenon in healthy, normally developing infants' spontaneous crying. The proportional difference in the production of IPs between female and male infants, observed for the first time here, is postulated to be linked to sex-based differences (including steroidal hormones) in respiratory anatomy and physiology. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Flow-Structure-Acoustic Interaction Computational Modeling of Voice Production inside an Entire Airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2015-11-01

    Human voice quality is directly determined by the interplay of dynamic behavior of glottal flow, vibratory characteristics of VFs and acoustic characteristics of upper airway. These multiphysics constituents are tightly coupled together and precisely coordinate to produce understandable sound. Despite many years' research effort, the direct relationships among the detailed flow features, VF vibration and aeroacoustics still remains elusive. This study utilizes a first-principle based, flow-structure-acoustics interaction computational modeling approach to study the process of voice production inside an entire human airway. In the current approach, a sharp interface immersed boundary method based incompressible flow solver is utilized to model the glottal flow; A finite element based solid mechanics solver is utilized to model the vocal vibration; A high-order immersed boundary method based acoustics solver is utilized to directly compute sound. These three solvers are fully coupled to mimic the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. The geometry of airway is reconstructed based on the in-vivo MRI measurement reported by Story et al. (1995) and a three-layer continuum based vocal fold model is taken from Titze and Talkin (1979). Results from these simulations will be presented and further analyzed to get new insight into the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. This study is expected to improve the understanding of fundamental physical mechanism of voice production and to help to build direct cause-effect relationship between biomechanics and voice sound.

  2. Voice application development for Android

    CERN Document Server

    McTear, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book will give beginners an introduction to building voice-based applications on Android. It will begin by covering the basic concepts and will build up to creating a voice-based personal assistant. By the end of this book, you should be in a position to create your own voice-based applications on Android from scratch in next to no time.Voice Application Development for Android is for all those who are interested in speech technology and for those who, as owners of Android devices, are keen to experiment with developing voice apps for their devices. It will also be useful as a starting po

  3. Modulation of voice related to tremor and vibrato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Rosemary Anne

    Modulation of voice is a result of physiologic oscillation within one or more components of the vocal system including the breathing apparatus (i.e., pressure supply), the larynx (i.e. sound source), and the vocal tract (i.e., sound filter). These oscillations may be caused by pathological tremor associated with neurological disorders like essential tremor or by volitional production of vibrato in singers. Because the acoustical characteristics of voice modulation specific to each component of the vocal system and the effect of these characteristics on perception are not well-understood, it is difficult to assess individuals with vocal tremor and to determine the most effective interventions for reducing the perceptual severity of the disorder. The purpose of the present studies was to determine how the acoustical characteristics associated with laryngeal-based vocal tremor affect the perception of the magnitude of voice modulation, and to determine if adjustments could be made to the voice source and vocal tract filter to alter the acoustic output and reduce the perception of modulation. This research was carried out using both a computational model of speech production and trained singers producing vibrato to simulate laryngeal-based vocal tremor with different voice source characteristics (i.e., vocal fold length and degree of vocal fold adduction) and different vocal tract filter characteristics (i.e., vowel shapes). It was expected that, by making adjustments to the voice source and vocal tract filter that reduce the amplitude of the higher harmonics, the perception of magnitude of voice modulation would be reduced. The results of this study revealed that listeners' perception of the magnitude of modulation of voice was affected by the degree of vocal fold adduction and the vocal tract shape with the computational model, but only by the vocal quality (corresponding to the degree of vocal fold adduction) with the female singer. Based on regression analyses

  4. Electrolarynx Voice Recognition Utilizing Pulse Coupled Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatchul Arifin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The laryngectomies patient has no ability to speak normally because their vocal chords have been removed. The easiest option for the patient to speak again is by using electrolarynx speech. This tool is placed on the lower chin. Vibration of the neck while speaking is used to produce sound. Meanwhile, the technology of "voice recognition" has been growing very rapidly. It is expected that the technology of "voice recognition" can also be used by laryngectomies patients who use electrolarynx.This paper describes a system for electrolarynx speech recognition. Two main parts of the system are feature extraction and pattern recognition. The Pulse Coupled Neural Network – PCNN is used to extract the feature and characteristic of electrolarynx speech. Varying of β (one of PCNN parameter also was conducted. Multi layer perceptron is used to recognize the sound patterns. There are two kinds of recognition conducted in this paper: speech recognition and speaker recognition. The speech recognition recognizes specific speech from every people. Meanwhile, speaker recognition recognizes specific speech from specific person. The system ran well. The "electrolarynx speech recognition" has been tested by recognizing of “A” and "not A" voice. The results showed that the system had 94.4% validation. Meanwhile, the electrolarynx speaker recognition has been tested by recognizing of “saya” voice from some different speakers. The results showed that the system had 92.2% validation. Meanwhile, the best β parameter of PCNN for electrolarynx recognition is 3.

  5. Strategies to decrease biofilm formation on voice prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Laryngectomized patients lose their natural ability to speak as a result of rigorous anatomical changes after surgery. Due to the surgical resection of a laryngeal tumour, the larynx or voice box is taken out and the trachea is sutured in the neck. As a consequence the airflow through the oropharynx, and so the ability to articulate and speak is lost (Fig. 1A). Luckily however, we do not necessarily need our vocal cords to produce sound, since sound is nothing more than a series of alternate ...

  6. Sustainable Consumer Voices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitmøller, Anders; Rask, Morten; Jensen, Nevena

    2011-01-01

    Aiming to explore how user driven innovation can inform high level design strategies, an in-depth empirical study was carried out, based on data from 50 observations of private vehicle users. This paper reports the resulting 5 consumer voices: Technology Enthusiast, Environmentalist, Design Lover...

  7. Voices of courage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noraida Abdullah Karim

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In May 2007 the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children1 presented its annual Voices of Courage awards to three displaced people who have dedicated their lives to promoting economic opportunities for refugee and displaced women and youth. These are their (edited testimonies.

  8. Listen to a voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2001-01-01

    Listen to the voice of a young girl Lonnie, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 16. Imagine that she is deeply involved in the social security system. She lives with her mother and two siblings in a working class part of a small town. She is at a special school for problematic youth, and he...

  9. Political animal voices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.R.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, I develop a theory of political animal voices. The first part of the thesis focuses on non-human animal languages and forming interspecies worlds. I first investigate the relation between viewing language as exclusively human and seeing humans as categorically different from other

  10. Finding a Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Schools have struggled for decades to provide expensive augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) resources for autistic students with communication challenges. Clunky voice output devices, often included in students' individualized education plans, cost about $8,000, a difficult expense to cover in hard times. However, mobile technology is…

  11. the Voice of Tomorrow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AlanBurdick

    2003-01-01

    Have you heard Mide? Coule be.Mike is a professional reader,and he's everywhere these days. On MapQuest, the Web-based map service,he'll read aloud whatever directions you ask for. If you like to have AOL or Yahoo! e-mail read aloud to you over the phone, that's Mike's voice you 're hearing. Soon

  12. What the voice reveals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ko, Sei Jin

    2007-01-01

    Given that the voice is our main form of communication, we know surprisingly little about how it impacts judgment and behavior. Furthermore, the modern advancement in telecommunication systems, such as cellular phones, has meant that a large proportion of our everyday interactions are conducted voca

  13. The Inner Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Anthony James

    2009-01-01

    The inner voice- we all know what it is because we all have it and use it when we are thinking or reading, for example. Little work has been done on it in our field, with the notable exception of Brian Tomlinson, but presumably it must be a cognitive phenomenon which is of great importance in thinking, language learning, and reading in a foreign…

  14. Moving beyond Youth Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serido, Joyce; Borden, Lynne M.; Perkins, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    This study combines research documenting the benefits of positive relationships between youth and caring adults on a young person's positive development with studies on youth voice to examine the mechanisms through which participation in youth programs contributes to positive developmental outcomes. Specifically, the study explores whether youth's…

  15. Bodies and Voices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A wide-ranging collection of essays centred on readings of the body in contemporary literary and socio-anthropological discourse, from slavery and rape to female genital mutilation, from clothing, ocular pornography, voice, deformation and transmutation to the imprisoned, dismembered, remembered...

  16. Voices for Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Edwin G.; Kapadia, Madhu

    Listed in this annotated bibliography are 502 cassette tapes of value to career exploration for Grade 7 through the adult level, whether as individualized instruction, small group study, or total class activity. Available to New Jersey educators at no charge, this Voices for Careers System is also available for duplication on request from the New…

  17. What the voice reveals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ko, Sei Jin

    2007-01-01

    Given that the voice is our main form of communication, we know surprisingly little about how it impacts judgment and behavior. Furthermore, the modern advancement in telecommunication systems, such as cellular phones, has meant that a large proportion of our everyday interactions are conducted voca

  18. Bodies and Voices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A wide-ranging collection of essays centred on readings of the body in contemporary literary and socio-anthropological discourse, from slavery and rape to female genital mutilation, from clothing, ocular pornography, voice, deformation and transmutation to the imprisoned, dismembered, remembered...

  19. When males whistle at females: complex FM acoustic signals in cockroaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Jérôme; Aubin, Thierry

    2006-10-01

    Male cockroaches of the species Elliptorhina chopardi expel air through a pair of modified abdominal spiracles during courtship. This air expulsion simultaneously produces air and substrate-borne vibrations. We described and compared in details these two types of vibrations. Our analysis of the air-borne signals shows that males can produce three categories of signals with distinct temporal and frequency parameters. “Pure whistles” consist of two independent harmonic series fast frequency modulated with independent harmonics that can cross each other. “Noisy whistles” also possess two independent voices but include a noisy broad-band frequency part in the middle. Hiss sounds are more noise-like, being made of a broad-band frequency spectrum. All three call types are unusually high in dominant frequency (>5 kHz) for cockroaches. The substrate-borne signals are categorised similarly. Some harmonics of the substrate-borne signals were filtered out, however, making the acoustic energy centered on fewer frequency bands. Our analysis shows that cockroach signals are complex, with fast frequency modulations and two distinct voices. These results also readdress the question of what system could potentially receive and decode the information contained within such complex sounds.

  20. Mapping emotions into acoustic space: the role of voice production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sona; Scherer, Klaus R; Björkner, Eva; Sundberg, Johan

    2011-04-01

    Research on the vocal expression of emotion has long since used a "fishing expedition" approach to find acoustic markers for emotion categories and dimensions. Although partially successful, the underlying mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. To illustrate that this research can profit from considering the underlying voice production mechanism, we specifically analyzed short affect bursts (sustained/a/vowels produced by 10 professional actors for five emotions) according to physiological variations in phonation (using acoustic parameters derived from the acoustic signal and the inverse filter estimated voice source waveform). Results show significant emotion main effects for 11 of 12 parameters. Subsequent principal components analysis revealed three components that explain acoustic variations due to emotion, including "tension," "perturbation," and "voicing frequency." These results suggest that future work may benefit from theory-guided development of parameters to assess differences in physiological voice production mechanisms in the vocal expression of different emotions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploring expressivity and emotion with artificial voice and speech technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauletto, Sandra; Balentine, Bruce; Pidcock, Chris; Jones, Kevin; Bottaci, Leonardo; Aretoulaki, Maria; Wells, Jez; Mundy, Darren P; Balentine, James

    2013-10-01

    Emotion in audio-voice signals, as synthesized by text-to-speech (TTS) technologies, was investigated to formulate a theory of expression for user interface design. Emotional parameters were specified with markup tags, and the resulting audio was further modulated with post-processing techniques. Software was then developed to link a selected TTS synthesizer with an automatic speech recognition (ASR) engine, producing a chatbot that could speak and listen. Using these two artificial voice subsystems, investigators explored both artistic and psychological implications of artificial speech emotion. Goals of the investigation were interdisciplinary, with interest in musical composition, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), commercial voice announcement applications, human-computer interaction (HCI), and artificial intelligence (AI). The work-in-progress points towards an emerging interdisciplinary ontology for artificial voices. As one study output, HCI tools are proposed for future collaboration.

  2. Rainforests as concert halls for birds: Are reverberations improving sound transmission of long song elements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemeth, Erwin; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pedersen, Simon Boel

    2006-01-01

    In forests reverberations have probably detrimental and beneficial effects on avian communication. They constrain signal discrimination by masking fast repetitive sounds and they improve signal detection by elongating sounds. This ambivalence of reflections for animal signals in forests is simila...

  3. Effects of hearing loss on the voice in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolfan-Stosic, Natalija; Simunjak, Boris

    2007-04-01

    The object of this paper is to report on preliminary acoustic characteristics obtained from a group of 10 to 12 year old males from special institution from Zagreb with more than mild sensorineural hearing losses. The study was structured as an investigation of voice and resonance characteristics of Croatian children with and without sensorineural hearing loss, using sustained phonation of the vowel /a/ which was recorded using a high-quality tape recorder carried out by two voice clinicians. The samples were digitized and analyzed for frequency and spectral characteristics by EZVoice and Bruel & Kjaer Real-time Frequency Analyzer and high quality sound level meter (mouth-to-microphone distance = 30 cm). Differences were observed in perturbation measures; F0 variability; vocal intensity. Spectral deviations were also observed. Discussion focuses on application of these findings by Croatian speech and hearing specialists with the hearing impaired population. Results indicated the following: measures of jitter were significantly elevated in the hearing loss group as compared to the normal controls. A similar result was observed for measures of shimmer. Lack of voice professional's awareness of importance for making pleasant voice quality of hearing-impaired individuals was the initial idea of this study. Patients with hearing losses have been reported to show a wide variety of voice disturbances.

  4. Tonotopic cortical representation of periodic complex sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansino, Selene; Ducorps, Antoine; Ragot, Richard

    2003-10-01

    Most of the sounds that are biologically relevant are complex periodic sounds, i.e., they are made up of harmonics, whose frequencies are integer multiples of a fundamental frequency (Fo). The Fo of a complex sound can be varied by modifying its periodicity frequency; these variations are perceived as the pitch of the voice or as the note of a musical instrument. The center frequency (CF) of peaks occurring in the audio spectrum also carries information, which is essential, for instance, in vowel recognition. The aim of the present study was to establish whether the generators underlying the 100 m are tonotopically organized based on the Fo or CF of complex sounds. Auditory evoked neuromagnetic fields were recorded with a whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system while 14 subjects listened to 9 different sounds (3 Fo x 3 CF) presented in random order. Equivalent current dipole (ECD) sources for the 100 m component show an orderly progression along the y-axis for both hemispheres, with higher CFs represented more medially. In the right hemisphere, sources for higher CFs were more posterior, while in the left hemisphere they were more inferior. ECD orientation also varied as a function of the sound CF. These results show that the spectral content CF of the complex sounds employed here predominates, at the latency of the 100 m component, over a concurrent mapping of their periodic frequency Fo. The effect was observed both on dipole placement and dipole orientation.

  5. Revisiting vocal perception in non-human animals: a review of vowel discrimination, speaker voice recognition, and speaker normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhamas eKriengwatana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which human speech perception evolved by taking advantage of predispositions and pre-existing features of vertebrate auditory and cognitive systems remains a central question in the evolution of speech. This paper reviews asymmetries in vowel perception, speaker voice recognition, and speaker normalization in non-human animals – topics that have not been thoroughly discussed in relation to the abilities of non-human animals, but are nonetheless important aspects of vocal perception. Throughout this paper we demonstrate that addressing these issues in non-human animals is relevant and worthwhile because many non-human animals must deal with similar issues in their natural environment. That is, they must also discriminate between similar-sounding vocalizations, determine signaler identity from vocalizations, and resolve signaler-dependent variation in vocalizations from conspecifics. Overall, we find that, although plausible, the current evidence is insufficiently strong to conclude that directional asymmetries in vowel perception are specific to humans, or that non-human animals can use voice characteristics to recognize human individuals. However, we do find some indication that non-human animals can normalize speaker differences. Accordingly, we identify avenues for future research that would greatly improve and advance our understanding of these topics.

  6. Prevalence of Voice Disorders in Iranian Primary School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Ali; Sandoughdar, Nazila

    2017-03-01

    The voice is the sound produced by vibration of our vocal cords and has an important role in verbal communication. A child's voice disorder may significantly impair his or her ability to be heard and understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of voice disorders in primary school students. In this descriptive-analytical study, a total of 501 fourth through fifth grade primary school students (boys = 51.6%, girls = 48.4%) with the age range of 10-12 years were selected from nine public school systems in Tehran that were assessed in October 2013 through March 2014. Presence of a voice disorder characterized by hoarseness was identified by a dual approach including investigator screening and parent identification. We used the grade of overall dysphonia, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain scale for perceptual evaluation of voice. All children were assessed with video laryngoscopy examination by an otorhinolaryngologist. The recordings were made during spontaneous speech, counting numbers, sustained utterance of the (/a/) vowel, reading a standard passage in Farsi, and the ratio of /s/ and /z/. Statistical analysis was done via chi-square test and t test. Results indicated that the prevalence of voice disorders in primary school students is 53.2%. The results indicated significant differences between gender and subjects with lesions (P = 0.00000), gender and vocal disorders (P = 0.04), and s/z ratio and type of lesion (P = 0.0002). Phonotrauma seems to play an important role in child dysphonia, with nodules as main diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 医用电气设备听觉报警信号声压级的风险分析与控制%Risk Analysis and Control of Auditory Alarming Signal Sound Pressure Level for Medical Equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴少海; 邓沙

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzed the risk triggered by the sound pressure level of medical electrical equipment associated with auditory alarming signal, background noise, adjustable and inactive status and provided the corresponding control measures.%本文主要对与医用电气设备听觉报警信号的声压级相关的背景噪音、听觉报警信号可调性以及非激活状况等可能引发的风险进行了分析,并提供了相应的控制措施。

  8. MegaSound: Sound in Irish megalithic buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijs, Victor

    2002-11-01

    Stimulated by the studies done by Paul Deveraux and Robert Jahn, research has been conducted on the sound properties of two megalithic chambers is Ireland: Dowth South and Fourknocks I. As reference measurements two normal rooms (bed- and bathroom) have been studied. The following aspects will be covered in the presentation: some theoretical background on acoustical modes (within a passage, a chamber, and a combination of them: Helmholtz resonator); tips for doing sound experiments inside megalithic chambers (like: equipment, measurement software, power provisioning and calibrating); frequency response measurements (between 20 and 200 Hz) for the surveyed chambers/rooms; comparison of the results with other researchers' results; background on the pitch of the human (male, female, and child) voices in neolithic times and recommendations for future research. The presentation also provides insight in the aeralization (simulation) of sound in a megalithic chamber, covering: software that can do these simulations; issues in finding the basic information, e.g., acoustic absorption coefficients and provide examples of the results. I would like to thank all the people who have provided constructive feedback on my work (http://www.iol.ie/approxgeniet/eng/megasound.htm).

  9. April 16th : The World Voice Day

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svec, Jan G.; Behlau, Mara

    2007-01-01

    Although the voice is used as an everyday basis of speech, most people realize its importance only when a voice problem arises. Increasing public awareness of the importance of the voice and alertness to voice problems are the main goals of the World Voice Day, which is celebrated yearly on April 16

  10. Risk factors for voice problems in teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, P. G. C.; de Jong, F. I. C. R. S.; Thomas, G.; Huinck, W.; Donders, R.; Graamans, K.; Schutte, H. K.

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify factors that are associated with voice problems and voice-related absenteeism in teachers, 1,878 questionnaires were analysed. The questionnaires inquired about personal data, voice complaints, voice-related absenteeism from work and conditions that may lead to voice complaints

  11. Risk factors for voice problems in teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, P. G. C.; de Jong, F. I. C. R. S.; Thomas, G.; Huinck, W.; Donders, R.; Graamans, K.; Schutte, H. K.

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify factors that are associated with voice problems and voice-related absenteeism in teachers, 1,878 questionnaires were analysed. The questionnaires inquired about personal data, voice complaints, voice-related absenteeism from work and conditions that may lead to voice complaints

  12. Risk factors for voice problems in teachers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, P.G.C.; Jong, F.I.C.R.S. de; Thomas, G.; Huinck, W.J.; Donders, A.R.T.; Graamans, K.; Schutte, H.K.

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify factors that are associated with voice problems and voice-related absenteeism in teachers, 1,878 questionnaires were analysed. The questionnaires inquired about personal data, voice complaints, voice-related absenteeism from work and conditions that may lead to voice complaints

  13. Exploring the anatomical encoding of voice with a mathematical model of the vocal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaneo, M Florencia; Sitt, Jacobo; Varoquaux, Gael; Sigman, Mariano; Cohen, Laurent; Trevisan, Marcos A

    2016-11-01

    The faculty of language depends on the interplay between the production and perception of speech sounds. A relevant open question is whether the dimensions that organize voice perception in the brain are acoustical or depend on properties of the vocal system that produced it. One of the main empirical difficulties in answering this question is to generate sounds that vary along a continuum according to the anatomical properties the vocal apparatus that produced them. Here we use a mathematical model that offers the unique possibility of synthesizing vocal sounds by controlling a small set of anatomically based parameters. In a first stage the quality of the synthetic voice was evaluated. Using specific time traces for sub-glottal pressure and tension of the vocal folds, the synthetic voices generated perceptual responses, which are indistinguishable from those of real speech. The synthesizer was then used to investigate how the auditory cortex responds to the perception of voice depending on the anatomy of the vocal apparatus. Our fMRI results show that sounds are perceived as human vocalizations when produced by a vocal system that follows a simple relationship between the size of the vocal folds and the vocal tract. We found that these anatomical parameters encode the perceptual vocal identity (male, female, child) and show that the brain areas that respond to human speech also encode vocal identity. On the basis of these results, we propose that this low-dimensional model of the vocal system is capable of generating realistic voices and represents a novel tool to explore the voice perception with a precise control of the anatomical variables that generate speech. Furthermore, the model provides an explanation of how auditory cortices encode voices in terms of the anatomical parameters of the vocal system.

  14. Vocal responses to perturbations in voice auditory feedback in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanjun Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the most common symptoms of speech deficits in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD is significantly reduced vocal loudness and pitch range. The present study investigated whether abnormal vocalizations in individuals with PD are related to sensory processing of voice auditory feedback. Perturbations in loudness or pitch of voice auditory feedback are known to elicit short latency, compensatory responses in voice amplitude or fundamental frequency. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twelve individuals with Parkinson's disease and 13 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects sustained a vowel sound (/α/ and received unexpected, brief (200 ms perturbations in voice loudness (±3 or 6 dB or pitch (±100 cents auditory feedback. Results showed that, while all subjects produced compensatory responses in their voice amplitude or fundamental frequency, individuals with PD exhibited larger response magnitudes than the control subjects. Furthermore, for loudness-shifted feedback, upward stimuli resulted in shorter response latencies than downward stimuli in the control subjects but not in individuals with PD. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The larger response magnitudes in individuals with PD compared with the control subjects suggest that processing of voice auditory feedback is abnormal in PD. Although the precise mechanisms of the voice feedback processing are unknown, results of this study suggest that abnormal voice control in individuals with PD may be related to dysfunctional mechanisms of error detection or correction in sensory feedback processing.

  15. Evaluation of Voice Parameters in People with Head and Neck Cancers: An Investigational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Zacharia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Head and neck cancer severely affects the voice and compromises a patient’s vocal independence. In the present study we have investigated the difference in three vital components of the voice - pitch, jitter, and shimmer in head and neck cancer patients and compared the findings with age matched healthy volunteers. Methods: Voice parameters were ascertained in newly diagnosed head and neck cancer patients and controls using voice analysis software (PRAAT and a Dynamic Unidirectional AUD-59 XLR microphone in a sound proof voice recording laboratory. Results: We observed considerable changes in the three voice indices of pitch, jitter and shimmer. According to gender, there were significant changes in all three indices for men (P<0.015 to 0.0001, whereas only pitch significantly changed in women (P=0.0001. Conclusion: The results have suggested that individuals with any form of head and neck cancer will have a degree of voice problems even before the initiation of cancer treatments. Voice assessment is a vital aspect to be considered before initiation of treatment.

  16. Stable Voice Clusters Identified When Using the Maximum versus Minimum Intensity Curve in the Phonetogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarrone, Flavio; Ivanova, Anna; Decoster, Wivine; de Jong, Felix; van Hulle, Marc M

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether the minimum as well as the maximum voice intensity (i.e. sound pressure level, SPL) curves of a voice range profile (VRP) are required when discovering different voice groups based on a clustering analysis. In this approach, no a priori labeling of voice types is used. VRPs of 194 (84 male and 110 female) professional singers were registered and processed. Cluster analysis was performed with the use of features related to (1) both the maximum and minimum SPL curves and (2) the maximum SPL curve only. Features related to the maximum as well as the minimum SPL curves showed three clusters in both male and female voices. These clusters, or voice groups, are based on voice types with similar VRP features. However, when using features related only to the maximum SPL curve, the clusters became less obvious. Features related to the maximum and minimum SPL curves of a VRP are both needed in order to identify the three voice clusters. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. 基于混沌理论的心音信号非线性动力学分析%Nonlinear dynamic analysis of heart sound signals based on chaos theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁晓蓉; 郭兴明; 钟丽莎

    2012-01-01

    In order to get more valuable information from the perspective of nonlinear dynamics, a method based on chaos theory was proposed to analyze the heart sound signals. The correlation dimension and largest Lyapunov exponent were calculated, besides, the recurrence plot and its quantification analysis parameters were obtained and used to study the heart sounds of 13 cases of normal people and 13 cases of patients with mitral stenosis. The results show that the difference between the chaotic features of the normal heart sounds and of the sounds with mitral stenosis is significant. Thus, the method can be applied to assist the diagnosis of mitral stenosis.%为了从非线性动力学的角度对心音进行分析,提出一种基于混沌理论的心音信号的分析方法.首先,计算心音信号的关联维数及最大Lyapunov指数,获取了心音信号递归图和递归定量分析参数;然后,通过13例健康人和13例二尖瓣狭窄病人的心音对其进行分析验证.结果表明:正常及二尖瓣狭窄心音信号的混沌特征具有显著差异,该方法为实现二尖瓣狭窄的早期辅助诊断提供了依据.

  18. Stop consonant voicing in young children's speech: Evidence from a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganser, Emily

    There are intuitive reasons to believe that speech-sound acquisition and language acquisition should be related in development. Surprisingly, only recently has research begun to parse just how the two might be related. This study investigated possible correlations between speech-sound acquisition and language acquisition, as part of a large-scale, longitudinal study of the relationship between different types of phonological development and vocabulary growth in the preschool years. Productions of voiced and voiceless stop-initial words were recorded from 96 children aged 28-39 months. Voice Onset Time (VOT, in ms) for each token context was calculated. A mixed-model logistic regression was calculated which predicted whether the sound was intended to be voiced or voiceless based on its VOT. This model estimated the slopes of the logistic function for each child. This slope was referred to as Robustness of Contrast (based on Holliday, Reidy, Beckman, and Edwards, 2015), defined as being the degree of categorical differentiation between the production of two speech sounds or classes of sounds, in this case, voiced and voiceless stops. Results showed a wide range of slopes for individual children, suggesting that slope-derived Robustness of Contrast could be a viable means of measuring a child's acquisition of the voicing contrast. Robustness of Contrast was then compared to traditional measures of speech and language skills to investigate whether there was any correlation between the production of stop voicing and broader measures of speech and language development. The Robustness of Contrast measure was found to correlate with all individual measures of speech and language, suggesting that it might indeed be predictive of later language skills.

  19. Keyboard With Voice Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Voice synthesizer tells what key is about to be depressed. Verbal feedback useful for blind operators or where dim light prevents sighted operator from seeing keyboard. Also used where operator is busy observing other things while keying data into control system. Used as training aid for touch typing, and to train blind operators to use both standard and braille keyboards. Concept adapted to such equipment as typewriters, computers, calculators, telephones, cash registers, and on/off controls.

  20. مخارج الأصوات الصامتة عند الدكتور غانم قدوري حمد في ضوء الدراسات القديمة والحديثة Exits silent voices For Dr. Ghanem Kaddouri Hamad In The Light Of Ancient and Modern Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jwad Kazim علي جواد كاظم --- Dr. Haider Fakery Miran أ.م.د.حيدر فخري ميران

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Acoustics one of the cornerstones in the science of the Arabic language, and the fact that science extends to the roots of the spoken language accompanying the hand by hand with the date of birth of humanity, but what keeps the prevailing concept of sound then is merely only releases audio speech aid reflect a certain signal dubbed (language. as did not mean residents of those time immemorial what this voice, and his relationship with approximating the director or capacity, and its role in building vocabulary, and then its impact on the system based on relationships semantic between the structure and the other. All of that gave us Abu Bishr ibn Qanbar nicknamed (Sebojh while introducing us fully linguistically system in Arabic linguistics, and this clever system that the body (the book introducing the concepts of sound depends on the taste vitae of each letter of the Arabic This was a taste of those characters highly controversial when the sons of the modern era. It is those who stirred controversy over efforts veterans of our teacher Dr. Ghanem Kaddouri Praise who gave us effort acoustically great through his studies vocal public and the efforts of scientists intonation private, reasoned and directed and interpretive voices single and fittings in the light of the language, and presented Almousotat Arab speaking, a system and all that befalls him from changes speech aid developed by human nature. Is our teacher, Dr. Hamad note of the flags of thought voice Arab at the international level and country but to praise counting approach path exhibits from researchers in the lesson voice, there is almost pursuant What in field studies voice only Agterv of praise and his library voice lesson and investigation and research, as well as calculated for Hamad also said he provided specialized cadres in this field فشاع Iraq Arab voice lesson then one part of the sections, but the lesson voice was present and be Menhalh Praise and writings. So here we

  1. On the definition and interpretation of voice selective activation in the temporal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja eBethmann

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Regions along the superior temporal sulci and in the anterior temporal lobes have been found to be involved in voice processing. It has even been argued that parts of the temporal cortices serve as voice-selective areas. Yet, evidence for voice-selective activation in the strict sense is still missing. The current fMRI study aimed at assessing the degree of voice-specific processing in different parts of the superior and middle temporal cortices. To this end, voices of famous persons were contrasted with widely different categories, which were sounds of animals and musical instruments. The argumentation was that only brain regions with statistically proven absence of activation by the control stimuli may be considered as candidates for voice-selective areas. Neural activity was found to be stronger in response to human voices in all analyzed parts of the temporal lobes except for the middle and posterior STG. More importantly, the activation differences between voices and the other environmental sounds increased continuously from the mid-posterior STG to the anterior MTG. Here, only voices but not the control stimuli excited an increase of the BOLD response above a resting baseline level. The findings are discussed with reference to the function of the anterior temporal lobes in person recognition and the general question on how to define selectivity of brain regions for a specific class of stimuli or tasks. In addition, our results corroborate recent assumptions about the hierarchical organization of auditory processing building on a processing stream from the primary auditory cortices to anterior portions of the temporal lobes.

  2. Sound quality and subjective hearing perception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛东兴

    2006-01-01

    @@ Increasing attention is being paid on sound quality and subjective hearing perception properties of sound/noise signals. While lots of efforts had been done and is being continually done on describing sound character physically, subjective sensation found to be more suitable way reflecting sound character in human related products and environments, demonstrating that human-being is the central object. A wide range of work is being carried out, including subjective evaluation methodology, general sound quality metrics and metrics for special type of noise or products, acoustic comfort and soundscape in living and work spaces and applications in product sound design and product quality evaluation. The aim of this special issue is to reflect the state-of-the-art in sound quality study of Chinese researchers.

  3. Voicing the Technological Body. Some Musicological Reflections on Combinations of Voice and Technology in Popular Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Heesch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with interrelations of voice, body and technology in popular music from a musicological perspective. It is an attempt to outline a systematic approach to the history of music technology with regard to aesthetic aspects, taking the identity of the singing subject as a main point of departure for a hermeneutic reading of popular song. Although the argumentation is based largely on musicological research, it is also inspired by the notion of presentness as developed by theologian and media scholar Walter Ong. The variety of the relationships between voice, body, and technology with regard to musical representations of identity, in particular gender and race, is systematized alongside the following cagories: (1 the “absence of the body,” that starts with the establishment of phonography; (2 “amplified presence,” as a signifier for uses of the microphone to enhance low sounds in certain manners; and (3 “hybridity,” including vocal identities that blend human body sounds and technological processing, whereby special focus is laid on uses of the vocoder and similar technologies.

  4. Why Is My Voice Changing? (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Why Is My Voice Changing? KidsHealth > For Teens > Why Is My Voice ... deeper than a girl's, though. What Causes My Voice to Change? At puberty, guys' bodies begin producing ...

  5. Common Problems That Can Affect Your Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... near you Common Problems That Can Affect Your Voice Common Problems That Can Affect Your Voice Patient ... that traditionally accompany gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Voice Misuse and Overuse Speaking is a physical task ...

  6. Cross-Modal Correspondence between Brightness and Chinese Speech Sound with Aspiration

    OpenAIRE

    Sachiko Hirata; Shinichi Kita

    2011-01-01

    Phonetic symbolism is the phenomenon of speech sounds evoking images based on sensory experiences; it is often discussed with cross-modal correspondence. By using Garner's task, Hirata, Kita, and Ukita (2009) showed the cross-modal congruence between brightness and voiced/voiceless consonants in Japanese speech sound, which is known as phonetic symbolism. In the present study, we examined the effect of the meaning of mimetics (lexical words whose sound reflects its meaning, like “ding-dong”) ...

  7. Voice and silence in organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moaşa, H.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike previous research on voice and silence, this article breaksthe distance between the two and declines to treat them as opposites. Voice and silence are interrelated and intertwined strategic forms ofcommunication which presuppose each other in such a way that the absence of one would minimize completely the other’s presence. Social actors are not voice, or silence. Social actors can have voice or silence, they can do both because they operate at multiple levels and deal with multiple issues at different moments in time.

  8. VOICE REHABILITATION FOLLOWING TOTAL LARYNGECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite continuing advances in surgical management of laryngeal malignancy, total laryngectomy is still the treatment of choice in advanced laryngeal malignancies. Considering the longevity of the patient following total laryngectomy, various measures have been adopted in order to provide voice function to the patient. Significant advancements have taken place in voice rehabilitation of post laryngectomy patients. Advancements in oncological surgical techniques and irradiation techniques have literally cured laryngeal malignancies. Among the various voice rehabilitation techniques available TEP (Tracheo oesophageal puncture is considered to be the gold standard. This article attempts to explore the various voice rehabilitation technique available with primary focus on TEP.

  9. Voice(-)Over(,) Sound Track and Silent Movie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Søren Hattesen

    2010-01-01

    In his book Deliberate Speed cultural historian W.T. Lhamon puts forth the claim that ‘50s American art was characterized by a common need to compete with all the forms and expressions which the many new media of a constantly growing popular culture offered the contemporary artist, but with which...... acknowledging the intermedial link between Kerouac’s literary play and the more popular cultural home movie genre. In this paper I shall focus on how Frank and Leslie exploit the media-specific characteristics of the home movie in order to explore the authority of the Beat philosophy and its aesthetics. Here I...

  10. A note on measurement of sound pressure with intensity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter; Jacobsen, Finn

    2004-01-01

    be improved under a variety of realistic sound field conditions by applying a different weighting of the two pressure signals from the probe. The improved intensity probe can measure the sound pressure more accurately at high frequencies than an ordinary sound intensity probe or an ordinary sound level meter......The effect of scattering and diffraction on measurement of sound pressure with "two-microphone" sound intensity probes is examined using an axisymmetric boundary element model of the probe. Whereas it has been shown a few years ago that the sound intensity estimated with a two-microphone probe...

  11. "Ring" in the solo child singing voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David M; Williams, Jenevora; Herbst, Christian T

    2014-03-01

    Listeners often describe the voices of solo child singers as being "pure" or "clear"; these terms would suggest that the voice is not only pleasant but also clearly audible. The audibility or clarity could be attributed to the presence of high-frequency partials in the sound: a "brightness" or "ring." This article aims to investigate spectrally the acoustic nature of this ring phenomenon in children's solo voices, and in particular, relating it to their "nonring" production. Additionally, this is set in the context of establishing to what extent, if any, the spectral characteristics of ring are shared with those of the singer's formant cluster associated with professional adult opera singers in the 2.5-3.5kHz region. A group of child solo singers, acknowledged as outstanding by a singing teacher who specializes in teaching professional child singers, were recorded in a major UK concert hall performing Come unto him, all ye that labour, from the aria He shall feed his flock from The Messiah by GF Handel. Their singing was accompanied by a recording of a piano played through in-ear headphones. Sound pressure recordings were made from well within the critical distance in the hall. The singers were observed to produce notes with and without ring, and these recordings were analyzed in the frequency domain to investigate their spectra. The results indicate that there is evidence to suggest that ring in child solo singers is carried in two areas of the output spectrum: first in the singer's formant cluster region, centered around 4kHz, which is more than 1000Hz higher than what is observed in adults; and second in the region around 7.5-11kHz where a significant strengthening of harmonic presence is observed. A perceptual test has been carried out demonstrating that 94% of 62 listeners label a synthesized version of the calculated overall average ring spectrum for all subjects as having ring when compared with a synthesized version of the calculated overall average nonring

  12. Voice low tone to high tone ratio--a new index for nasal airway assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guoshe; Yang, Cheryl C H; Kuo, Terry B J

    2003-09-30

    There are several methodology based on voice analysis to evaluate nasal airway. Here we introduce a new quantitative index based on voice spectrum analysis to evaluate nasal obstruction. Ten subjects of nasal blockage were instructed to produced the sustained consonant-vowel syllable /m partial partial differential/ at comfortable levels of speech for at least 5 seconds. After nasal decongestant treatment, the second voice sample was collected. Sound spectrum was obtained by the algorithm of fast Fourier transform and the fundamental frequency (F0) was calculated by the method of autocorrelation. Voice low tone to high tone ratio (VLHR) was defined as the division of low frequency power (LFP) into high frequency power (HFP) of the sound power spectrum and was finally expressed in decibels. The cut-off frequency was the product of F0 and square root of (4 x 5). The VLHR after nasal decongestant treatment increased significantly as compared with that before treatment (P < 0.01). VLHR is a new index derived from sound spectral analysis and that may detect the changes in frequency characteristics of voice during treatment for nasal obstruction. The index is quantitative, non-invasive, and potentially useful for basic researches and clinical applications.

  13. Explaining the high voice superiority effect in polyphonic music: evidence from cortical evoked potentials and peripheral auditory models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Laurel J; Marie, Céline; Bruce, Ian C; Bidelman, Gavin M

    2014-02-01

    Natural auditory environments contain multiple simultaneously-sounding objects and the auditory system must parse the incoming complex sound wave they collectively create into parts that represent each of these individual objects. Music often similarly requires processing of more than one voice or stream at the same time, and behavioral studies demonstrate that human listeners show a systematic perceptual bias in processing the highest voice in multi-voiced music. Here, we review studies utilizing event-related brain potentials (ERPs), which support the notions that (1) separate memory traces are formed for two simultaneous voices (even without conscious awareness) in auditory cortex and (2) adults show more robust encoding (i.e., larger ERP responses) to deviant pitches in the higher than in the lower voice, indicating better encoding of the former. Furthermore, infants also show this high-voice superiority effect, suggesting that the perceptual dominance observed across studies might result from neurophysiological characteristics of the peripheral auditory system. Although musically untrained adults show smaller responses in general than musically trained adults, both groups similarly show a more robust cortical representation of the higher than of the lower voice. Finally, years of experience playing a bass-range instrument reduces but does not reverse the high voice superiority effect, indicating that although it can be modified, it is not highly neuroplastic. Results of new modeling experiments examined the possibility that characteristics of middle-ear filtering and cochlear dynamics (e.g., suppression) reflected in auditory nerve firing patterns might account for the higher-voice superiority effect. Simulations show that both place and temporal AN coding schemes well-predict a high-voice superiority across a wide range of interval spacings and registers. Collectively, we infer an innate, peripheral origin for the higher-voice superiority observed in human

  14. Voice identity recognition: functional division of the right STS and its behavioral relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Sonja; Kiebel, Stefan J; Maess, Burkhard; von Kriegstein, Katharina

    2015-02-01

    The human voice is the primary carrier of speech but also a fingerprint for person identity. Previous neuroimaging studies have revealed that speech and identity recognition is accomplished by partially different neural pathways, despite the perceptual unity of the vocal sound. Importantly, the right STS has been implicated in voice processing, with different contributions of its posterior and anterior parts. However, the time point at which vocal and speech processing diverge is currently unknown. Also, the exact role of the right STS during voice processing is so far unclear because its behavioral relevance has not yet been established. Here, we used the high temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography and a speech task control to pinpoint transient behavioral correlates: we found, at 200 msec after stimulus onset, that activity in right anterior STS predicted behavioral voice recognition performance. At the same time point, the posterior right STS showed increased activity during voice identity recognition in contrast to speech recognition whereas the left mid STS showed the reverse pattern. In contrast to the highly speech-sensitive left STS, the current results highlight the right STS as a key area for voice identity recognition and show that its anatomical-functional division emerges around 200 msec after stimulus onset. We suggest that this time point marks the speech-independent processing of vocal sounds in the posterior STS and their successful mapping to vocal identities in the anterior STS.

  15. The Voice Handicap Index with Post-Laryngectomy Male Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Eryl; Carding, Paul; Drinnan, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment for advanced laryngeal cancer involves complete removal of the larynx ("laryngectomy") and initial total loss of voice. Post-laryngectomy rehabilitation involves implementation of different means of "voicing" for these patients wherever possible. There is little information about laryngectomees'…

  16. Pedagogic Voice: Student Voice in Teaching and Engagement Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutsis, Aspa; McGregor, Glenda; Mills, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with the notion of "pedagogic voice" as it relates to the presence of student "voice" in teaching, learning and curriculum matters at an alternative, or second chance, school in Australia. This school draws upon many of the principles of democratic schooling via its utilisation of student voice…

  17. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  18. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  19. Does a pneumotach accurately characterize voice function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Gage; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A study is presented which addresses how a pneumotach might adversely affect clinical measurements of voice function. A pneumotach is a device, typically a mask, worn over the mouth, in order to measure time-varying glottal volume flow. By measuring the time-varying difference in pressure across a known aerodynamic resistance element in the mask, the glottal volume flow waveform is estimated. Because it adds aerodynamic resistance to the vocal system, there is some concern that using a pneumotach may not accurately portray the behavior of the voice. To test this hypothesis, experiments were performed in a simplified airway model with the principal dimensions of an adult human upper airway. A compliant constriction, fabricated from silicone rubber, modeled the vocal folds. Variations of transglottal pressure, time-averaged volume flow, model vocal fold vibration amplitude, and radiated sound with subglottal pressure were performed, with and without the pneumotach in place, and differences noted. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  20. The maximum intelligible range of the human voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boren, Braxton

    This dissertation examines the acoustics of the spoken voice at high levels and the maximum number of people that could hear such a voice unamplified in the open air. In particular, it examines an early auditory experiment by Benjamin Franklin which sought to determine the maximum intelligible crowd for the Anglican preacher George Whitefield in the eighteenth century. Using Franklin's description of the experiment and a noise source on Front Street, the geometry and diffraction effects of such a noise source are examined to more precisely pinpoint Franklin's position when Whitefield's voice ceased to be intelligible. Based on historical maps, drawings, and prints, the geometry and material of Market Street is constructed as a computer model which is then used to construct an acoustic cone tracing model. Based on minimal values of the Speech Transmission Index (STI) at Franklin's position, Whitefield's on-axis Sound Pressure Level (SPL) at 1 m is determined, leading to estimates centering around 90 dBA. Recordings are carried out on trained actors and singers to determine their maximum time-averaged SPL at 1 m. This suggests that the greatest average SPL achievable by the human voice is 90-91 dBA, similar to the median estimates for Whitefield's voice. The sites of Whitefield's largest crowds are acoustically modeled based on historical evidence and maps. Based on Whitefield's SPL, the minimal STI value, and the crowd's background noise, this allows a prediction of the minimally intelligible area for each site. These yield maximum crowd estimates of 50,000 under ideal conditions, while crowds of 20,000 to 30,000 seem more reasonable when the crowd was reasonably quiet and Whitefield's voice was near 90 dBA.

  1. Absence of cue-recruitment for extrinsic signals: sounds, spots, and swirling dots fail to influence perceived 3D rotation direction after training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshul Jain

    Full Text Available The visual system can learn to use information in new ways to construct appearance. Thus, signals such as the location or translation direction of an ambiguously rotating wire frame cube, which are normally uninformative, can be learned as cues to determine the rotation direction. This perceptual learning occurs when the formerly uninformative signal is statistically associated with long-trusted visual cues (such as binocular disparity that disambiguate appearance during training. In previous demonstrations, the newly learned cue was intrinsic to the perceived object, in that the signal was conveyed by the same image elements as the object itself. Here we used extrinsic new signals and observed no learning. We correlated three new signals with long-trusted cues in the rotating cube paradigm: one crossmodal (an auditory signal and two within modality (visual. Cue recruitment did not occur in any of these conditions, either in single sessions or in ten sessions across as many days. These results suggest that the intrinsic/extrinsic distinction is important for the perceptual system in determining whether it can learn and use new information from the environment to construct appearance. Extrinsic cues do have perceptual effects (e.g. the "bounce-pass" illusion and McGurk effect, so we speculate that extrinsic signals must be recruited for perception, but only if certain conditions are met. These conditions might specify the age of the observer, the strength of the long-trusted cues, or the amount of exposure to the correlation.

  2. An acoustical study of the voicing distinction in Dutch plosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Alphen, Petra M.

    2002-05-01

    Dutch has two voiced plosives, namely /b/ and /d/. They are said to have a negative VOT (i.e., are prevoiced), while the voiceless plosives /p/ and /t/ have a small, positive VOT. A production study was designed to investigate two questions. First, how does prevoicing vary in spoken Dutch? Second, what other cues in the acoustic signal might contribute to the perceptual distinction between voiced and voiceless plosives? Ten subjects were asked to produce a list of monosyllabic words which were chosen to study the following factors: place of articulation (labial versus alveolar), following phoneme (vowel versus consonant), lexical status of the carrier stimulus (word versus nonword), and lexical competitor environment of the carrier stimulus. Results will be reported on the relative contribution of various durational, spectral, and energy measures to the voiced-voiceless distinction. The data showed that 25% of all tokens were produced without prevoicing. The prevoicing of the voiced plosive was omitted more often when the plosive was followed by a consonant than when it was followed by a vowel. Although both spectral and energy cues signal the voicing distinction, and although prevoicing is often omitted, VOT appears to be the primary cue to this distinction.

  3. Voice Quality and Gender Stereotypes: A Study of Lebanese Women with Reinke's Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Nayla; Portes, Cristel; Lancia, Leonardo; Legou, Thierry; Baider, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Women with Reinke's edema (RW) report being mistaken for men during telephone conversations. For this reason, their masculine-sounding voices are interesting for the study of gender stereotypes. The study's objective is to verify their complaint and to understand the cues used in gender identification. Method Using a self-evaluation study,…

  4. Voice Quality and Gender Stereotypes: A Study of Lebanese Women with Reinke's Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Nayla; Portes, Cristel; Lancia, Leonardo; Legou, Thierry; Baider, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Women with Reinke's edema (RW) report being mistaken for men during telephone conversations. For this reason, their masculine-sounding voices are interesting for the study of gender stereotypes. The study's objective is to verify their complaint and to understand the cues used in gender identification. Method Using a self-evaluation study,…

  5. Voice Quality of Psychological Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Antonio; Nunes, Ana; Coimbra, Rosa Lidia; Lima, Rosa; Moutinho, Lurdes

    2008-01-01

    Variations in voice quality are essentially related to modifications of the glottal source parameters, such as: F[subscript 0], jitter, and shimmer. Voice quality is affected by prosody, emotional state, and vocal pathologies. Psychogenic vocal pathology is particularly interesting. In the present case study, the speaker naturally presented a…

  6. Voice handicap index in Swedish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Ann-Christine; Dotevall, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a Swedish version of the voice handicap index questionnaire (Sw-VHI). A total of 57 adult, dysphonic patients and 15 healthy controls completed the Sw-VHI and rated the degree of vocal fatigue and hoarseness on visual analogue scales. A perceptual voice evaluation was also performed. Test-retest reliability was analyzed in 38 subjects without voice complaints. Sw-VHI distinguished between dysphonic subjects and controls (P 0.84) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.75) were good. Only moderate or weak correlations were found between Sw-VHI and the subjective and perceptual voice ratings. The data indicate that a difference above 13 points for the total Sw-VHI score and above 6 points for the Sw-VHI subscales is significant for an individual when comparing two different occasions. In conclusion, the Sw-VHI appears to be a robust instrument for assessment of the psycho-social impact of a voice disorder. However, Sw-VHI seems to, at least partly, capture different aspects of voice function to the subjective voice ratings and the perceptual voice evaluation.

  7. Enhancing Author's Voice through Scripting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Chase J.; Rasinski, Timothy V.

    2011-01-01

    The authors suggest using scripting as a strategy to mentor and enhance author's voice in writing. Through gradual release, students use authentic literature as a model for writing with voice. The authors also propose possible extensions for independent practice, integration across content areas, and tips for evaluation.

  8. Voice, Schooling, Inequality, and Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, James

    2013-01-01

    The rich studies in this collection show that the investigation of voice requires analysis of "recognition" across layered spatial-temporal and sociolinguistic scales. I argue that the concepts of voice, recognition, and scale provide insight into contemporary educational inequality and that their study benefits, in turn, from paying attention to…

  9. Voices in History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Leudar

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of “hearing voices” nowadays usually count as verbal hallucinations and they indicate serious mental illness. Some are first rank symptoms of schizophrenia, and the mass media, at least in Britain, tend to present them as antecedents of impulsive violence. They are, however, also found in other psychiatric conditions and epidemiological surveys reveal that even individuals with no need of psychiatric help can hear voices, sometimes following bereavement or abuse, but sometimes for no discernible reason. So do these experiences necessarily mean insanity and violence, and must they be thought of as pathogenic hallucinations; or are there other ways to understand them and live with them, and with what consequences?One way to make our thinking more flexible is to turn to history. We find that hearing voices was always an enigmatic experience, and the people who had it were rare. The gallery of voice hearers is, though, distinguished and it includes Galilei, Bunyan and St Teresa. Socrates heard a daemon who guided his actions, but in his time this did not signify madness, nor was it described as a hallucination. Yet in 19th century French psychological medicine the daemon became a hallucination and Socrates was retrospectively diagnosed as mentally ill. This paper examines the controversies which surrounded the experience at different points in history as well as the practice of retrospective psychiatry. The conclusion reached on the basis of the historical materials is that the experience and the ontological status it is ascribed are not trans-cultural or trans-historic but situated both in history and in the contemporary conflicts.

  10. NASA Space Sounds API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has released a series of space sounds via sound cloud. We have abstracted away some of the hassle in accessing these sounds, so that developers can play with...

  11. Voice over IP Security

    CERN Document Server

    Keromytis, Angelos D

    2011-01-01

    Voice over IP (VoIP) and Internet Multimedia Subsystem technologies (IMS) are rapidly being adopted by consumers, enterprises, governments and militaries. These technologies offer higher flexibility and more features than traditional telephony (PSTN) infrastructures, as well as the potential for lower cost through equipment consolidation and, for the consumer market, new business models. However, VoIP systems also represent a higher complexity in terms of architecture, protocols and implementation, with a corresponding increase in the potential for misuse. In this book, the authors examine the

  12. Modulation of the motor cortex during singing-voice perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, Yohana; Schön, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Several studies on action observation have shown that the biological dimension of movement modulates sensorimotor interactions in perception. In the present fMRI study, we tested the hypothesis that the biological dimension of sound modulates the involvement of the motor system in human auditory perception, using musical tasks. We first localized the vocal motor cortex in each participant. Then we compared the BOLD response to vocal, semi-vocal and non-vocal melody perception, and found greater activity for voice perception in the right sensorimotor cortex. We additionally ran a psychophysiological interaction analysis with the right sensorimotor as a seed, showing that the vocal dimension of the stimuli enhanced the connectivity between the seed region and other important nodes of the auditory dorsal stream. Finally, the participants' vocal ability was negatively correlated to the voice effect in the Inferior Parietal Lobule. These results suggest that the biological dimension of singing-voice impacts the activity within the auditory dorsal stream, probably via a facilitated matching between the perceived sound and the participant motor representations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Questioning Photovoice Research: Whose Voice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Agnew, Robin A; Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S

    2016-07-01

    Photovoice is an important participatory research tool for advancing health equity. Our purpose is to critically review how participant voice is promoted through the photovoice process of taking and discussing photos and adding text/captions. PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, and Web of Science databases were searched from the years 2008 to 2014 using the keywords photovoice, photonovella, photovoice and social justice, and photovoice and participatory action research. Research articles were reviewed for how participant voice was (a) analyzed, (b) exhibited in community forums, and (c) disseminated through published manuscripts. Of 21 studies, 13 described participant voice in the data analysis, 14 described participants' control over exhibiting photo-texts, seven manuscripts included a comprehensive set of photo-texts, and none described participant input on choice of manuscript photo-texts. Photovoice designs vary in the advancement of participant voice, with the least advancement occurring in manuscript publication. Future photovoice researchers should expand approaches to advancing participant voice.

  14. Voice quality of psychological origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Antonio; Nunes, Ana; Coimbra, Rosa Lídia; Lima, Rosa; Moutinho, Lurdes

    2008-01-01

    Variations in voice quality are essentially related to modifications of the glottal source parameters, such as: F0, jitter, and shimmer. Voice quality is affected by prosody, emotional state, and vocal pathologies. Psychogenic vocal pathology is particularly interesting. In the present case study, the speaker naturally presented a ventricular band voice whereas in a controlled production he was able to use a more normal phonation process. A small corpus was recorded which included sustained vowels and short sentences in both registers. A normal speaker was also recorded in similar tasks. Annotation and extraction of parameters were made using Praat's voice report function. Application of the Hoarseness Diagram to sustained productions situates this case in the pseudo-glottic phonation region. Analysis of several different parameters related to F0, jitter, shimmer, and harmonicity revealed that the speaker with psychogenic voice was capable of controlling certain parameters (e.g. F0 maximum) but was unable to correct others such as shimmer.

  15. Moving sound source localization based on triangulation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Feng; Yang, Diange; Wen, Junjie; Lian, Xiaomin

    2016-12-01

    This study develops a sound source localization method that extends traditional triangulation to moving sources. First, the possible sound source locating plane is scanned. Secondly, for each hypothetical source location in this possible plane, the Doppler effect is removed through the integration of sound pressure. Taking advantage of the de-Dopplerized signals, the moving time difference of arrival (MTDOA) is calculated, and the sound source is located based on triangulation. Thirdly, the estimated sound source location is compared to the original hypothetical location and the deviations are recorded. Because the real sound source location leads to zero deviation, the sound source can be finally located by minimizing the deviation matrix. Simulations have shown the superiority of MTDOA method over traditional triangulation in case of moving sound sources. The MTDOA method can be used to locate moving sound sources with as high resolution as DAMAS beamforming, as shown in the experiments, offering thus a new method for locating moving sound sources.

  16. Timing sight and sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Derek H; Johnston, Alan; Nishida, Shinya

    2005-05-01

    It has been proposed that there is a perceptual compensation for the difference between the speeds of light and sound. We examined this possibility using a range of auditory-visual tasks, in which performance depends on the relative timing of auditory and visual information, and manipulated viewing distance to test for perceptual compensation. We explored auditory-visual integration, cross modal causal attributions, and auditory-visual temporal order judgments. We observed timing shifts with viewing distance following loudspeaker, but not headphone, presentations. We were unable to find reliable evidence of perceptual compensation. Our findings suggest that auditory and visual signals of an event that reach an observer at the same point in time tend to become perceptually bound, even when the sources of those signals could not have occurred together.

  17. Voice Initiation and Termination Times in Stuttering and Nonstuttering Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, Walter L.; Springer, Mark T.

    1980-01-01

    The times needed to initiate and terminate voicing in response to series of short segments of auditory signal were studied for 20 stuttering and 20 nonstuttering children (ages for both groups 5 to 12). The effects of random reward and nonreward on the phonatory response times also were studied. (Author/PHR)

  18. Voice pitch alters mate-choice-relevant perception in hunter-gatherers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apicella, Coren L; Feinberg, David R

    2009-03-22

    In humans, voice pitch is thought to be a cue of underlying quality and an important criterion for mate choice, but data from non-Western cultures have not been provided. Here we test attributions to and preferences for voices with raised and lowered pitch in hunter-gatherers. Using a forced-choice playback experiment, we found that both men and women viewed lower pitched voices in the opposite sex as being better at acquiring resources (e.g. hunting and gathering). While men preferred higher pitched women's voices as marriage partners, women showed no overall preference for voice pitch in men. However, women who were currently breastfeeding had stronger preferences for higher pitched male voices whereas women not currently breastfeeding preferred lower pitched voices. As testosterone is considered a costly signal associated with dominance, heritable immunity to infection and low paternal investment, women's preferences potentially reflect a trade-off between securing good genes and paternal investment. Men's preferences for higher pitched female voices are probably due to an evolved preference for markers of fecundity, reflected in voice pitch.

  19. Voice pitch alters mate-choice-relevant perception in hunter–gatherers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apicella, Coren L.; Feinberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    In humans, voice pitch is thought to be a cue of underlying quality and an important criterion for mate choice, but data from non-Western cultures have not been provided. Here we test attributions to and preferences for voices with raised and lowered pitch in hunter–gatherers. Using a forced-choice playback experiment, we found that both men and women viewed lower pitched voices in the opposite sex as being better at acquiring resources (e.g. hunting and gathering). While men preferred higher pitched women's voices as marriage partners, women showed no overall preference for voice pitch in men. However, women who were currently breastfeeding had stronger preferences for higher pitched male voices whereas women not currently breastfeeding preferred lower pitched voices. As testosterone is considered a costly signal associated with dominance, heritable immunity to infection and low paternal investment, women's preferences potentially reflect a trade-off between securing good genes and paternal investment. Men's preferences for higher pitched female voices are probably due to an evolved preference for markers of fecundity, reflected in voice pitch. PMID:19129125

  20. Evaluating signals of oil spill impacts, climate, and species interactions in Pacific herring and Pacific salmon populations in Prince William Sound and Copper River, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Eric J; Adkison, Milo; Couture, Jessica; Dressel, Sherri C; Litzow, Michael A; Moffitt, Steve; Hoem Neher, Tammy; Trochta, John; Brenner, Rich

    2017-01-01

    The Exxon Valdez oil spill occurred in March 1989 in Prince William Sound, Alaska, and was one of the worst environmental disasters on record in the United States. Despite long-term data collection over the nearly three decades since the spill, tremendous uncertainty remains as to how significantly the spill affected fishery resources. Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and some wild Pacific salmon populations (Oncorhynchus spp.) in Prince William Sound declined in the early 1990s, and have not returned to the population sizes observed in the 1980s. Discerning if, or how much of, this decline resulted from the oil spill has been difficult because a number of other physical and ecological drivers are confounded temporally with the spill; some of these drivers include environmental variability or changing climate regimes, increased production of hatchery salmon in the region, and increases in populations of potential predators. Using data pre- and post-spill, we applied time-series methods to evaluate support for whether and how herring and salmon productivity has been affected by each of five drivers: (1) density dependence, (2) the EVOS event, (3) changing environmental conditions, (4) interspecific competition on juvenile fish, and (5) predation and competition from adult fish or, in the case of herring, humpback whales. Our results showed support for intraspecific density-dependent effects in herring, sockeye, and Chinook salmon, with little overall support for an oil spill effect. Of the salmon species, the largest driver was the negative impact of adult pink salmon returns on sockeye salmon productivity. Herring productivity was most strongly affected by changing environmental conditions; specifically, freshwater discharge into the Gulf of Alaska was linked to a series of recruitment failures-before, during, and after EVOS. These results highlight the need to better understand long terms impacts of pink salmon on food webs, as well as the interactions between

  1. Prediction of Fluid Responsiveness by a Non-invasive Respiratory Systolic Time Interval Variation Using Heart Sound Signals in Recipients Undergoing Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S-H; Moon, Y-J; Kim, J-W; Song, J-G; Hwang, G-S

    2017-06-01

    The fluid management of cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) is challenging. Phonocardiography, a graphic recording of heart sounds, provides valuable information concerning heart function and hemodynamic condition. We assessed whether the systolic time interval (STI) and its respiratory variation could predict fluid responsiveness in cirrhotic patients undergoing LT. Thirty LT recipients who needed volume expansion were included. The fluid challenge consisted of 500 mL 5% albumin administered over a period of 10 minutes. STI was measured as the time interval between the maximal amplitude of each heart sound corrected with the corresponding RR interval (cSTI). The respiratory variation in STI (STV) induced by mechanical ventilation was calculated. Responders were defined as those showing a ≥10% increase in stroke volume index after volume expansion. In all, 14 of the 30 patients were responders. Significant increases in cSTI were observed after volume expansion in both responders (P fluid loading, whereas STV in non-responders remained unchanged (6.4% ± 2.6% vs 6.4% ± 4.2%, P = .86). A cut-off value of ≥7.5% STV from baseline could predict fluid responsiveness with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.804 (95% confidence interval, 0.618-0.925). Intra-operative STV can predict fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing LT. Beat-to-beat monitoring of STI and STV may be useful as a non-invasive hemodynamic index and for fluid management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Muscular tension and body posture in relation to voice handicap and voice quality in teachers with persistent voice complaints.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, P.G.C.; Jong, F.I.C.R.S. de; Oudes, M.J.; Huinck, W.J.; Acht, H. van; Graamans, K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between extrinsic laryngeal muscular hypertonicity and deviant body posture on the one hand and voice handicap and voice quality on the other hand in teachers with persistent voice complaints and a history of voice-related absenteeism. The st

  3. Tuning the cognitive environment: Sound masking with 'natural' sounds in open-plan offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoach, Alana

    With the gain in popularity of open-plan office design and the engineering efforts to achieve acoustical comfort for building occupants, a majority of workers still report dissatisfaction in their workplace environment. Office acoustics influence organizational effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction through meeting appropriate requirements for speech privacy and ambient sound levels. Implementing a sound masking system is one tried-and-true method of achieving privacy goals. Although each sound masking system is tuned for its specific environment, the signal -- random steady state electronic noise, has remained the same for decades. This research work explores how `natural' sounds may be used as an alternative to this standard masking signal employed so ubiquitously in sound masking systems in the contemporary office environment. As an unobtrusive background sound, possessing the appropriate spectral characteristics, this proposed use of `natural' sounds for masking challenges the convention that masking sounds should be as meaningless as possible. Through the pilot study presented in this work, we hypothesize that `natural' sounds as sound maskers will be as effective at masking distracting background noise as the conventional masking sound, will enhance cognitive functioning, and increase participant (worker) satisfaction.

  4. Effect of Vocal Fry on Voice and on Velopharyngeal Sphincter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias, Vanessa Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction It is known that the basal sound promotes shortening and adduction of the vocal folds and leaves the mucosa looser. However there are few studies that address the supralaryngeal physiological findings obtained using the technique. Objective To check the effectiveness of using vocal fry on the voice and velopharingeal port closure of five adult subjects, whose cleft palate has been corrected with surgery. Methods Case study with five subjects who underwent otolaryngology examination by means of nasopharyngoscopy for imaging and measurement of the region of velopharyngeal port closure before and after using the vocal fry technique for three minutes. During the exam, the subjects sustained the isolated vowel /a:/ in their usual pitch and loudness. The emission of the vowel /a:/ was also used for perceptual analysis and spectrographic evaluation of their voices. Results Four subjects had an improvement in the region of velopharyngeal port closure; the results of the spectrographic evaluation were indicative of decreased hypernasality, and the results of the auditory-perceptual analysis suggested improved overall vocal quality, adequacy of loudness, decreased hypernasality, improvement of type of voice and decreased hoarseness. Conclusion This study showed a positive effect of vocal fry on voice and greater velopharyngeal port closure.

  5. Sound Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Duffy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about what constitutes ‘the rural’ invariably focus on notions of spatial location – of inhabiting spaces apart from that of the metropolitan. Deeply embedded in our images of what it means to be Australian, nonetheless our intellectual framing of ‘the rural’ as something outback and beyond has significant implications for our relations with these spaces. The relatively recent phenomenon of sea- and tree-changes has struck many unawares, and not simply because a good latté is so hard to find. Although a frivolous remark, such an apparent lack does shift our focus to a bodily scale of the rural; how is rural place re/made through our experiences of it? This article originates out of on-going research that explores the practice of listening and sound and the ways in which the body can draw attention to the intuitive, emotional, and psychoanalytical processes of subjectivity and place-making. Drawing on Nigel Thrift’s concept of an ecology of place, I suggest that contemporary heightened concerns with regards to loss and lack in rural Australia has led to a nascent emotional economy – one in which individual and intimate connections to the rural require a rethinking of how we live community and belonging. In such a terrain, what does it mean to be rural?

  6. Sound ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about what constitutes ‘the rural’ invariably focus on notions of spatial location – of inhabiting spaces apart from that of the metropolitan. Deeply embedded in our images of what it means to be Australian, nonetheless our intellectual framing of ‘the rural’ as something outback and beyond has significant implications for our relations with these spaces. The relatively recent phenomenon of sea- and tree-changes has struck many unawares, and not simply because a good latté is so hard to find. Although a frivolous remark, such an apparent lack does shift our focus to a bodily scale of the rural; how is rural place re/made through our experiences of it? This article originates out of on-going research that explores the practice of listening and sound and the ways in which the body can draw attention to the intuitive, emotional, and psychoanalytical processes of subjectivity and place-making. Drawing on Nigel Thrift’s concept of an ecology of place, I suggest that contemporary heightened concerns with regards to loss and lack in rural Australia has led to a nascent emotional economy – one in which individual and intimate connections to the rural require a rethinking of how we live community and belonging. In such a terrain, what does it mean to be rural?

  7. Sound Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Duffy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about what constitutes ‘the rural’ invariably focus on notions of spatial location – of inhabiting spaces apart from that of the metropolitan. Deeply embedded in our images of what it means to be Australian, nonetheless our intellectual framing of ‘the rural’ as something outback and beyond has significant implications for our relations with these spaces. The relatively recent phenomenon of sea- and tree-changes has struck many unawares, and not simply because a good latté is so hard to find. Although a frivolous remark, such an apparent lack does shift our focus to a bodily scale of the rural; how is rural place re/made through our experiences of it? This article originates out of on-going research that explores the practice of listening and sound and the ways in which the body can draw attention to the intuitive, emotional, and psychoanalytical processes of subjectivity and place-making. Drawing on Nigel Thrift’s concept of an ecology of place, I suggest that contemporary heightened concerns with regards to loss and lack in rural Australia has led to a nascent emotional economy – one in which individual and intimate connections to the rural require a rethinking of how we live community and belonging. In such a terrain, what does it mean to be rural?

  8. RF Sounding: A System for Generating Sounds from Spectral Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziosi, Fabio; Rinaldi, Claudia; Tarquini, Francesco

    In this paper we present RF Sounding, an open space installation which comprises both artistic and technological innovations. The aim of this project is to provide the user entering a specifically defined area, with awareness of radio frequency signals characterizing the cellular networks band. Indeed, radio signals are shifted, with proper elaboration, to the audible band and the result is spread all over the specific area through a certain number of loudspeakers. The system produces different reactions depending on the communication phase (e.g. initial handshake procedure, reception or initiation of a call, etc.). Moreover, the sound produced after translation of signals to the audible band, is assumed to be spatialized as a function of user movement; localization is indeed achieved through a wireless sensor network that is installed in the defined area.

  9. Chaos tool implementation for non-singer and singer voice comparison (preliminary study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajer, Me; Pereira, Jc; Maciel, Cd

    2007-11-01

    Voice waveform is linked to the stretch, shorten, widen or constrict vocal tract. The articulation effects of the singer's vocal tract modify the voice acoustical characteristics and differ from the non-singer voices. In the last decades, Chaos Theory has shown the possibility to explore the dynamic nature of voice signals from a different point of view. The purpose of this paper is to apply the chaos technique of phase space reconstruction to analyze non- singers and singer voices in order to explore the signal nonlinear dynamic, and correlate them with traditional acoustic parameters. Eight voice samples of sustained vowel /i/ from non-singers and eight from singers were analyzed with "ANL" software. The samples were also acoustically analyzed with "Analise de Voz 5.0" in order to extract acoustic perturbation measures jitter and shimmer, and the coefficient of excess - (EX). The results showed different visual patterns for the two groups correlated with different jitter, shimmer, and coefficient of excess values. We conclude that these results clearly indicate the potential of phase space reconstruction technique for analysis and comparison of non-singers and singer voices. They also show a promising tool for training voices application.

  10. Chaos tool implementation for non-singer and singer voice comparison (preliminary study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dajer, Me; Pereira, Jc; Maciel, Cd [Department of Electric Engineering, School of Engineering of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil); Av. Trabalhador Sao-Carlesnse, 400. CEP 13566-590. Sao Carlos. SP (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    Voice waveform is linked to the stretch, shorten, widen or constrict vocal tract. The articulation effects of the singer's vocal tract modify the voice acoustical characteristics and differ from the non-singer voices. In the last decades, Chaos Theory has shown the possibility to explore the dynamic nature of voice signals from a different point of view. The purpose of this paper is to apply the chaos technique of phase space reconstruction to analyze non- singers and singer voices in order to explore the signal nonlinear dynamic, and correlate them with traditional acoustic parameters. Eight voice samples of sustained vowel /i/ from non-singers and eight from singers were analyzed with 'ANL' software. The samples were also acoustically analyzed with 'Analise de Voz 5.0' in order to extract acoustic perturbation measures jitter and shimmer, and the coefficient of excess - (EX). The results showed different visual patterns for the two groups correlated with different jitter, shimmer, and coefficient of excess values. We conclude that these results clearly indicate the potential of phase space reconstruction technique for analysis and comparison of non-singers and singer voices. They also show a promising tool for training voices application.

  11. Emergence of linguistic laws in human voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Iván González; Luque, Bartolo; Lacasa, Lucas; Luque, Jordi; Hernández-Fernández, Antoni

    2017-03-01

    Linguistic laws constitute one of the quantitative cornerstones of modern cognitive sciences and have been routinely investigated in written corpora, or in the equivalent transcription of oral corpora. This means that inferences of statistical patterns of language in acoustics are biased by the arbitrary, language-dependent segmentation of the signal, and virtually precludes the possibility of making comparative studies between human voice and other animal communication systems. Here we bridge this gap by proposing a method that allows to measure such patterns in acoustic signals of arbitrary origin, without needs to have access to the language corpus underneath. The method has been applied to sixteen different human languages, recovering successfully some well-known laws of human communication at timescales even below the phoneme and finding yet another link between complexity and criticality in a biological system. These methods further pave the way for new comparative studies in animal communication or the analysis of signals of unknown code.

  12. Audiovisual integration of emotional signals from music improvisation does not depend on temporal correspondence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Karin; McAleer, Phil; Pollick, Frank

    2010-04-06

    In the present study we applied a paradigm often used in face-voice affect perception to solo music improvisation to examine how the emotional valence of sound and gesture are integrated when perceiving an emotion. Three brief excerpts expressing emotion produced by a drummer and three by a saxophonist were selected. From these bimodal congruent displays the audio-only, visual-only, and audiovisually incongruent conditions (obtained by combining the two signals both within and between instruments) were derived. In Experiment 1 twenty musical novices judged the perceived emotion and rated the strength of each emotion. The results indicate that sound dominated the visual signal in the perception of affective expression, though this was more evident for the saxophone. In Experiment 2 a further sixteen musical novices were asked to either pay attention to the musicians' movements or to the sound when judging the perceived emotions. The results showed no effect of visual information when judging the sound. On the contrary, when judging the emotional content of the visual information, a worsening in performance was obtained for the incongruent condition that combined different emotional auditory and visual information for the same instrument. The effect of emotionally discordant information thus became evident only when the auditory and visual signals belonged to the same categorical event despite their temporal mismatch. This suggests that the integration of emotional information may be reinforced by its semantic attributes but might be independent from temporal features.

  13. Crossing Cultures with Multi-Voiced Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styslinger, Mary E.; Whisenant, Alison

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the benefits of using multi-voiced journals as a teaching strategy in reading instruction. Multi-voiced journals, an adaptation of dual-voiced journals, encourage responses to reading in varied, cultured voices of characters. It is similar to reading journals in that they prod students to connect to the lives…

  14. Estimating the intended sound direction of the user: toward an auditory brain-computer interface using out-of-head sound localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Nambu

    Full Text Available The auditory Brain-Computer Interface (BCI using electroencephalograms (EEG is a subject of intensive study. As a cue, auditory BCIs can deal with many of the characteristics of stimuli such as tone, pitch, and voices. Spatial information on auditory stimuli also provides useful information for a BCI. However, in a portable system, virtual auditory stimuli have to be presented spatially through earphones or headphones, instead of loudspeakers. We investigated the possibility of an auditory BCI using the out-of-head sound localization technique, which enables us to present virtual auditory stimuli to users from any direction, through earphones. The feasibility of a BCI using this technique was evaluated in an EEG oddball experiment and offline analysis. A virtual auditory stimulus was presented to the subject from one of six directions. Using a support vector machine, we were able to classify whether the subject attended the direction of a presented stimulus from EEG signals. The mean accuracy across subjects was 70.0% in the single-trial classification. When we used trial-averaged EEG signals as inputs to the classifier, the mean accuracy across seven subjects reached 89.5% (for 10-trial averaging. Further analysis showed that the P300 event-related potential responses from 200 to 500 ms in central and posterior regions of the brain contributed to the classification. In comparison with the results obtained from a loudspeaker experiment, we confirmed that stimulus presentation by out-of-head sound localization achieved similar event-related potential responses and classification performances. These results suggest that out-of-head sound localization enables us to provide a high-performance and loudspeaker-less portable BCI system.

  15. Calculating Speed of Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Shalabh

    2017-01-01

    Sound is an emerging source of renewable energy but it has some limitations. The main limitation is, the amount of energy that can be extracted from sound is very less and that is because of the velocity of the sound. The velocity of sound changes as per medium. If we could increase the velocity of the sound in a medium we would be probably able to extract more amount of energy from sound and will be able to transfer it at a higher rate. To increase the velocity of sound we should know the speed of sound. If we go by the theory of classic mechanics speed is the distance travelled by a particle divided by time whereas velocity is the displacement of particle divided by time. The speed of sound in dry air at 20 °C (68 °F) is considered to be 343.2 meters per second and it won't be wrong in saying that 342.2 meters is the velocity of sound not the speed as it's the displacement of the sound not the total distance sound wave covered. Sound travels in the form of mechanical wave, so while calculating the speed of sound the whole path of wave should be considered not just the distance traveled by sound. In this paper I would like to focus on calculating the actual speed of sound wave which can help us to extract more energy and make sound travel with faster velocity.

  16. A new VOX technique for reducing noise in voice communication systems. [voice operated keying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. F.; Morgan, W. C.; Shack, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    A VOX technique for reducing noise in voice communication systems is described which is based on the separation of voice signals into contiguous frequency-band components with the aid of an adaptive VOX in each band. It is shown that this processing scheme can effectively reduce both wideband and narrowband quasi-periodic noise since the threshold levels readjust themselves to suppress noise that exceeds speech components in each band. Results are reported for tests of the adaptive VOX, and it is noted that improvements can still be made in such areas as the elimination of noise pulses, phoneme reproduction at high-noise levels, and the elimination of distortion introduced by phase delay.

  17. Sounds of Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anette Boye

    2017-01-01

    in ways that are often ignored in early childhood classroom research. When teachers take different roles in relation to children, they use their voice with different pitch, melody, and loudness. This research examined how various acoustic elements in teachers’ voices are associated with different teaching...

  18. Particle Filter with Integrated Voice Activity Detection for Acoustic Source Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders M. Johansson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In noisy and reverberant environments, the problem of acoustic source localisation and tracking (ASLT using an array of microphones presents a number of challenging difficulties. One of the main issues when considering real-world situations involving human speakers is the temporally discontinuous nature of speech signals: the presence of silence gaps in the speech can easily misguide the tracking algorithm, even in practical environments with low to moderate noise and reverberation levels. A natural extension of currently available sound source tracking algorithms is the integration of a voice activity detection (VAD scheme. We describe a new ASLT algorithm based on a particle filtering (PF approach, where VAD measurements are fused within the statistical framework of the PF implementation. Tracking accuracy results for the proposed method is presented on the basis of synthetic audio samples generated with the image method, whereas performance results obtained with a real-time implementation of the algorithm, and using real audio data recorded in a reverberant room, are published elsewhere. Compared to a previously proposed PF algorithm, the experimental results demonstrate the improved robustness of the method described in this work when tracking sources emitting real-world speech signals, which typically involve significant silence gaps between utterances.

  19. Implicit phonetic symbolism in voicing of consonants and visual lightness using Garner's speeded classification task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Sachiko; Ukita, Jun; Kita, Shinichi

    2011-12-01

    The present study examines implicit phonetic symbolism which posits that arbitrary linguistic sound is related to certain aspects of characteristics of other modalities, such as color, touch, or emotion. In consonant discrimination and lightness discrimination using Garner's speeded classification paradigm, spoken sounds (voiced/voiceless consonants) and lightness of visual stimuli (black/white squares) were systematically varied to assess cross-modal interactions. Congruent audio-visual pairs (voiced consonants and black, and between voiceless consonants and white) facilitated consonant discrimination. In lightness discrimination, no congruent facilitation or congruence effect was observed. These results indicated that cross-modal interactions in implicit phonetic symbolism can be found in correlations between linguistic spoken sounds and visual lightness.

  20. The Sound of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  1. Sounds Exaggerate Visual Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Timothy D.; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    While perceiving speech, people see mouth shapes that are systematically associated with sounds. In particular, a vertically stretched mouth produces a /woo/ sound, whereas a horizontally stretched mouth produces a /wee/ sound. We demonstrate that hearing these speech sounds alters how we see aspect ratio, a basic visual feature that contributes…

  2. The Sound of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  3. Sound reproduction system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, M.M.; De Vries, D.; Horbach, U.

    2002-01-01

    Arrangement of a sound reproduction system (1), including at least one input (2), a sound field generator (4), a loudspeaker panel (10); the at least one input (2) connected to the sound filed generator (4), and the sound filed (4) connected to the loudspeaker panel (10); the at least one input (2)

  4. The Implementation of DirectSound Audio Capture Technique In The Virtual Spectrographic Analyzer%DirectSound音频采集技术在虚拟语谱仪中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐治

    2014-01-01

    In the signal analysis or algorithm studying of voice signal processing,the signal capture function must be realizedfirstly. In the development of a spectrographic analyzer,a hardware & software solution based on sound card and DirectSound programming interface is adopted,this solution has the advantages of convenience and high performance. This paper details the programming technique of the implementation of the DirectX’s audio component DirectSound to realize the voice capture function,including the basic principle of DirectSound,how to initialize the related hardware &software platform,the synchronization mechanism based on event notifications,the access management of stream buffer and the introduction of some key APIs.%在语音信号处理的信号特性分析或算法研究中,需要首先实现信号采集功能。在虚拟语谱仪的开发中采用了基于声卡和DirectSound编程接口的软硬件方案,它具有方便及高性能的优点。该文详尽地介绍了应用DirectX的音频组件DirectSound来实现语音采集功能的编程技术,包括DirectSound的基本原理、如何初始化相关的软硬件环境、基于事件通知的同步机制、流式缓冲区的访问管理以及部分关键API的介绍。

  5. Voice Habits and Behaviors: Voice Care Among Flamenco Singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón García, Marina; Muñoz López, Juana; Y Mendoza Lara, Elvira

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the vocal behavior of flamenco singers, as compared with classical music singers, to establish a differential vocal profile of voice habits and behaviors in flamenco music. Bibliographic review was conducted, and the Singer's Vocal Habits Questionnaire, an experimental tool designed by the authors to gather data regarding hygiene behavior, drinking and smoking habits, type of practice, voice care, and symptomatology perceived in both the singing and the speaking voice, was administered. We interviewed 94 singers, divided into two groups: the flamenco experimental group (FEG, n = 48) and the classical control group (CCG, n = 46). Frequency analysis, a Likert scale, and discriminant and exploratory factor analysis were used to obtain a differential profile for each group. The FEG scored higher than the CCG in speaking voice symptomatology. The FEG scored significantly higher than the CCG in use of "inadequate vocal technique" when singing. Regarding voice habits, the FEG scored higher in "lack of practice and warm-up" and "environmental habits." A total of 92.6% of the subjects classified themselves correctly in each group. The Singer's Vocal Habits Questionnaire has proven effective in differentiating flamenco and classical singers. Flamenco singers are exposed to numerous vocal risk factors that make them more prone to vocal fatigue, mucosa dehydration, phonotrauma, and muscle stiffness than classical singers. Further research is needed in voice training in flamenco music, as a means to strengthen the voice and enable it to meet the requirements of this musical genre. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Voices of the Unheard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Noomi Christine Linde

    2014-01-01

    . They were in two different classes at both schools, i.e. four classes in total. The families were followed for 18 months. Formal interviews were conducted with mothers and teachers, parent-teacher conferences were recorded, participant observations were conducted in classrooms and playgrounds, afterschool...... is that Somali diaspora parents (and with special focus on mothers as these where the parents who took most responsibility in the four cases of this research) have difficulty expressing their opinions as there are structural, historical and social dynamics that create conditions in which their voices...... are silenced, or at least restricted significantly, resulting in marginalizing consequences. The focus in each article is on here-and-now interactional dynamics but in order to understand these constitutive negotiations, it is argued that the analysis must be situated in a description of the constituted...

  7. Passing on power & voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Vibeke Røn; Nielsen, Cathrine Sand

    2014-01-01

    . The education lasts for 3,5 years and the landmark of the educational model is the continuously shifts between teaching in classroom and teaching in clinical practice. Clinical teaching takes place at approved clinical placement institutions in hospitals and in the social and health care services outside...... intention of gaining knowledge about other possible ways to perform the education. The class, named the E-class, followed what in the field was named ‘an experimental educational model based on experienced-based learning’ (Nielsen et al. 2011). The experiential educational model is argued as an experiment.......aspx Higher degree of student involvement in planning as well as teaching was in the field presented as a part of ‘the overall educational approach’. In the course ‘Acute, Critical Nursing & Terminal, Palliative Care’ this was transferred into an innovative pedagogy with intend to pass on power and voice...

  8. Voice stress analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Malcolm; Shipp, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    In a study of the validity of eight candidate voice measures (fundamental frequency, amplitude, speech rate, frequency jitter, amplitude shimmer, Psychological Stress Evaluator scores, energy distribution, and the derived measure of the above measures) for determining psychological stress, 17 males age 21 to 35 were subjected to a tracking task on a microcomputer CRT while parameters of vocal production as well as heart rate were measured. Findings confirm those of earlier studies that increases in fundamental frequency, amplitude, and speech rate are found in speakers involved in extreme levels of stress. In addition, it was found that the same changes appear to occur in a regular fashion within a more subtle level of stress that may be characteristic, for example, of routine flying situations. None of the individual speech measures performed as robustly as did heart rate.

  9. Voice over IP

    OpenAIRE

    Mantula, Juha

    2006-01-01

    Tämä opinnäytetyö käsittelee Voice over Internet Protocol -tekniikkaa ja sen tuomia mahdollisuuksia yrityselämässä. Teoriaosa käsittelee VoIP:n kannalta tärkeitä pro-tokollia ja standardeja, VoIP:n ominaisuuksia sekä esittelee erilaisia puheohjelmia, jotka käyttävät VoIP-tekniikkaa hyväkseen. Empiirinen osuus tutkii Viestintä Ky Pitkärannan Skype-ohjelman käyttöä. Työn tarkoituksena on selvittää VoIP:n hyviä ja huonoja puolia ja sitä kuinka tek-niikkaa voidaan käyttää hyväksi päivittäisessä ...

  10. AN ANALYSIS OF SOUND FOR FAULT ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphattharachai Chomphan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various types of faults of the gasoline engine may result in similar symptoms. Sound analysis of engine has been conducted to diagnose the engine faults. This study presents a study of sound analysis of the normal engine and the engine with three different fault conditions. The gasoline engine was our target of this study. The engine sound has been recorded by using a microphone at the engine room for three directions. Three conditions of engine faults including the engine that is not smooth while idling, the engine that goes missing while idling and the engine that has no power are simulated. In the signal processing of the sound, we use five signal features including fundamental frequency, long term spectrum, energy, long term cestrum and zero crossing rate. Thereafter, the important differences between normal engine and the fault engines are concluded. These proposed signal features can be used to discriminate all three conditions and the engine with normal condition effectively.

  11. A note on voice timing and the evolution of connected speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourcin, Adrian

    2010-07-01

    Voice is a dominant component of everyday speech in all languages. The possibility is examined that its use may have evolved so that its timing in connected speech is ideal from the point of view of information theory-with voicing taking up 50% of the total speaking time. Initial measurements have been made of voice timing proportions using Laryngograph (EGG) signals as the basis of timing analyses. The results of these analyses for data from two groups of speakers are reported: single native speakers of each of 8 different languages; and 56 speakers of British English. The average 51% and 52% voice timing proportions that were found closely approximate the ideal of 50%. Implications of this finding for voice evolution are briefly discussed.

  12. Raising voices: How sixth graders construct authority and knowledge in argumentative essays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Mary Elizabeth

    This qualitative classroom-based study documents one teacher-researcher's response to the "voice" debate in composition studies and to the opposing views expressed by Elbow and Bartholomae. The author uses Bakhtin's principle of dialogism, Hymes's theory of communicative competence, as well as Ivanic's discussion of discoursally constructed identities to reconceptualize voice and to redesign writing instruction in her sixth grade classroom. This study shows how students, by redefining and then acting on that voice pedagogy in terms that made sense to them, shaped the author's understanding of what counts as "voiced" writing in non-narrative discourse. Based on a grounded-theory analysis of the twenty-six sixth graders' argumentative essays in science, the author explains voice, not as a property of writers or of texts, but as a process of "knowing together"---a collaborative, but not entirely congenial, exercise of establishing one's authority by talking with, against, and through other voices on the issue. As the results of this study show, the students' "I-Ness" or authorial presence within their texts, was born in a nexus of relationships with "rivals," "allies" and "readers." Given their teacher's injunctions to project confidence and authority in argumentative writing, the students assumed fairly adversarial stances toward these conversational partners throughout their essays. Exaggerating the terms for voiced writing built into the curriculum, the sixth graders produced essays that read more like caricatures than examples of argumentation. Their displays of rhetorical bravado and intellectual aggressiveness, however offsetting to the reader, still enabled these sixth graders to composed voiced essays. This study raises doubts about the value of urging students to sound like their "true selves" or to adopt the formal registers of academe. Students, it seems clear, stand to gain by experimenting with a range of textual identities. The author suggests that voice

  13. Effect of extreme adaptive frequency compression in bimodal listeners on sound localization and speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veugen, Lidwien C E; Chalupper, Josef; Mens, Lucas H M; Snik, Ad F M; van Opstal, A John

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to improve access to high-frequency interaural level differences (ILD), by applying extreme frequency compression (FC) in the hearing aid (HA) of 13 bimodal listeners, using a cochlear implant (CI) and conventional HA in opposite ears. An experimental signal-adaptive frequency-lowering algorithm was tested, compressing frequencies above 160 Hz into the individual audible range of residual hearing, but only for consonants (adaptive FC), thus protecting vowel formants, with the aim to preserve speech perception. In a cross-over design with at least 5 weeks of acclimatization between sessions, bimodal performance with and without adaptive FC was compared for horizontal sound localization, speech understanding in quiet and in noise, and vowel, consonant and voice-pitch perception. On average, adaptive FC did not significantly affect any of the test results. Yet, two subjects who were fitted with a relatively weak frequency compression ratio, showed improved horizontal sound localization. After the study, four subjects preferred adaptive FC, four preferred standard frequency mapping, and four had no preference. Noteworthy, the subjects preferring adaptive FC were those with best performance on all tasks, both with and without adaptive FC. On a group level, extreme adaptive FC did not change sound localization and speech understanding in bimodal listeners. Possible reasons are too strong compression ratios, insufficient residual hearing or that the adaptive switching, although preserving vowel perception, may have been ineffective to produce consistent ILD cues. Individual results suggested that two subjects were able to integrate the frequency-compressed HA input with that of the CI, and benefitted from enhanced binaural cues for horizontal sound localization.

  14. Voice and choice by delegation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bovenkamp, Hester; Vollaard, Hans; Trappenburg, Margo; Grit, Kor

    2013-02-01

    In many Western countries, options for citizens to influence public services are increased to improve the quality of services and democratize decision making. Possibilities to influence are often cast into Albert Hirschman's taxonomy of exit (choice), voice, and loyalty. In this article we identify delegation as an important addition to this framework. Delegation gives individuals the chance to practice exit/choice or voice without all the hard work that is usually involved in these options. Empirical research shows that not many people use their individual options of exit and voice, which could lead to inequality between users and nonusers. We identify delegation as a possible solution to this problem, using Dutch health care as a case study to explore this option. Notwithstanding various advantages, we show that voice and choice by delegation also entail problems of inequality and representativeness.

  15. The Christian voice in philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Fowler

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the Rev. Stuart Fowler outlines a Christian voice in Philosophy and urges the Christian philosopher to investigate his position and his stance with integrity and honesty.

  16. Voice Force tulekul / Tõnu Ojala

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojala, Tõnu, 1969-

    2005-01-01

    60. sünnipäeva tähistava Tallinna Tehnikaülikooli Akadeemilise Meeskoori juubelihooaja üritusest - a capella pop-gruppide festivalist Voice Force (kontserdid 12. nov. klubis Parlament ja 3. dets. Vene Kultuurikeskuses)

  17. Voice Force tulekul / Tõnu Ojala

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojala, Tõnu, 1969-

    2005-01-01

    60. sünnipäeva tähistava Tallinna Tehnikaülikooli Akadeemilise Meeskoori juubelihooaja üritusest - a capella pop-gruppide festivalist Voice Force (kontserdid 12. nov. klubis Parlament ja 3. dets. Vene Kultuurikeskuses)

  18. 动态信噪比下舱音信号的降噪方法对比%Comparison of Denoising Methods for the Cockpit Voice Signal Under Dynamic SNR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周兆明; 王从庆; 李蕾; 胡朝军

    2014-01-01

    The noise of cockpit voice information has high loudness ,numerous types and wide frequency range,which has serious influence on performance of cockpit voice recognition .To solve the problem,an adaptive filter based on Least Mean Square algorithm was used for noise reduction,which could achieve the best noise reduction effect by adjusting the order and the step length of the filter .After that,the cockpit voice was pre-emphasized,framed,windowed and conducted Fourier transform ,followed by extracting Mel-Frequency Cepstrum Coefficients (MFCC) and first-order differential cepstrum parameters as feature vectors .Finally,a Support Vector Machine (SVM) was designed for training and identification.The problem that the performance of cockpit voice recognition is poor under a low SNR was solved .The simulation results show that this method is obviously superior to the wavelet packet de -noising,and the recognition accuracy rate reaches 96.9231%.%针对舱音信息中响度大、种类多和频率范围宽的噪声对舱音识别性能造成严重影响的问题,利用基于最小均方差算法的自适应滤波器对舱音进行降噪。通过调整滤波器的阶数和步长使降噪效果达到最佳,然后对降噪后的舱音进行预加重、分帧、加窗及傅里叶变换;依次提取每个舱音信号的梅尔倒谱系数和一阶差分倒谱参数作为特征向量;设计支持向量机,利用舱音进行训练和识别,解决了舱音样本在低信噪比下识别性能低的缺点。仿真结果表明,该方法明显优于小波包降噪,识别精确率达到96.9231%。

  19. Closed rhinoplasty:effects and changes on voice - a preliminary report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe Guarro; Romano Mafifa; Barbara Rasile; Carmine Alfano

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Effects of rhinoplasty were already studied from many points of view: otherwise poor is scientific production focused on changes of voice after rhinoplasty. This preliminary study analyzed objectively and subjectively these potential effects on 19 patients who underwent exclusively closed rhinoplasty.Methods: This preliminary evaluation was conducted from September 2012 to May 2013 and 19 patients have undergone primary rhinoplasty with exclusively closed approach (7 males, 12 females). All patients were evaluated before and 6 months after surgery. Each of them answered to a questionnaire (Voice Handicap Index Score) and the voice was recorded for spectrographic analysis: this system allowed to perform the measurement of the intensity and frequency of vowels (“A” and “E”) and nasal consonants (“N” and “M”) before and after surgery. Data were analysed with the Mann-Whitney test.Results: Sixteen patients showed statistically significant differences after surgery. It was detected in 69% of cases an increased frequency of emission of the consonant sounds (P = 0.046), while in 74% of cases the same phenomenon was noticed for vowel sounds (P = 0.048).Conclusion: Many patients who undergo rhinoplasty think that the intervention only leads to anatomical changes and improvement of respiratory function. The surgeon should instead accurately inform patients about the potential effects on the voice. This preliminary study reveals the significant effects of closed rhinoplasty on the human voice.

  20. Test-Retest Reliability of the Dual-Microphone Voice Range Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Printz, Trine; Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Godballe, Christian; Grøntved, Ågot Møller

    2017-05-16

    The voice range profile (VRP) measures vocal intensity and fundamental frequency. Phonosurgical and logopedic treatment outcome studies using the VRP report voice improvements of 3-6 semitones (ST) in ST range and 4-7 decibels (dB) in sound pressure level range after treatment. These small improvements stress the importance of reliable measurements. The aim was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the dual-microphone computerized VRP on participants with healthy voices. This is a prospective test-retest reliability study. Dual-microphone VRPs were repeated twice on healthy participants (n = 37) with an interval of 6-37 days. Voice frequency and intensity (minimum, maximum, and ranges) were assessed in combination with the area of the VRP. Correlations between VRP parameters were high (r > 0.60). However, in the retest, a statistically significant increase in voice frequency range (1.4 ST [95% confidence interval {CI}: 0.8-2.1 ST], P VRP (148 cells [95% CI: 87-210 cells], P VRP is well below the differences seen after surgical or logopedic intervention, even when measuring in non-sound-treated rooms. There is a need for studies regarding inter-examiner reliability with a longer interval between test and retest before the assessment is fully reliable for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Signal-to-background ratio preferences of normal-hearing listeners as a function of music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jillian Gallant

    The purpose of this study was to identify listeners' signal-to-background-ratio (SBR) preference levels for vocal music and to investigate whether or not SBR differences existed for different music genres. The ``signal'' was the singer's voice, and the ``background'' was the accompanying music. Three songs were each produced in two different genres (total of 6 genres represented). Each song was performed by three male and three female singers. Analyses addressed influences of musical genre, singing style, and singer timbre on listener's SBR choices. Fifty-three normal-hearing California State University of Northridge students ranging in age from 20-52 years participated as subjects. Subjects adjusted the overall music loudness to a comfortable listening level, and manipulated a second gain control which affected only the singer's voice. Subjects listened to 72 stimuli and adjusted the singer's voice to the level they felt sounded appropriate in comparison to the background music. Singer and Genre were the two primary contributors to significant differences in subject's SBR preferences, although the results clearly indicate Genre, Style and Singer interact in different combinations under different conditions. SBR differences for each song, each singer, and each subject did not occur in a predictable manner, and support the hypothesis that SBR preferences are neither fixed nor dependent merely upon music application or setting. Further investigations regarding psychoacoustical bases responsible for differences in SBR preferences are warranted.

  2. Feature Extraction of Voice Segments Using Cepstral Analysis for Voice Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, P. S.; Baisakhi Chakraborty; Jaya Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Even though a lot of work has been done on areas of speech to text and vice versa or voice detection or similarity analysis of two voice samples but very less emphasis has be given to voice regeneration. General algorithms for distinct voice checking for two voice sources paved way for our endeavor in reconstructing the voice from the source voice samples provided. By utilizing these algorithms and putting further stress on the feature extraction part we tried to fabricate the source voice wi...

  3. Voice Simulation in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, Britney B; Lee, Heeyoung; Kane, Irene; Mitchell, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to improve prelicensure nursing students' attitudes toward and self-efficacy related to delivering nursing care to patients with auditory hallucinations. Based on the Hearing Voices That Are Distressing curriculum, 87 participants were instructed to complete 3 tasks while wearing headphones delivering distressing voices. Comparing presimulation and postsimulation results, this study suggests that the simulation significantly improved attitudes toward patients with auditory hallucinations; however, self-efficacy related to caring for these patients remained largely unchanged.

  4. Work-related voice disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Eduardo Przysiezny; Luciana Tironi Sanson Przysiezny

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dysphonia is the main symptom of the disorders of oral communication. However, voice disorders also present with other symptoms such as difficulty in maintaining the voice (asthenia), vocal fatigue, variation in habitual vocal fundamental frequency, hoarseness, lack of vocal volume and projection, loss of vocal efficiency, and weakness when speaking. There are several proposals for the etiologic classification of dysphonia: functional, organofunctional, organic, and work-related...

  5. Tracheostomy cannulas and voice prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Burkhard; Dommerich, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Cannulas and voice prostheses are mechanical aids for patients who had to undergo tracheotomy or laryngectomy for different reasons. For better understanding of the function of those artificial devices, first the indications and particularities of the previous surgical intervention are described in the context of this review. Despite the established procedure of percutaneous dilatation tracheotomy e.g. in intensive care units, the application of epithelised tracheostomas has its own position, especially when airway obstruction is persistent (e.g. caused by traumata, inflammations, or tumors) and a longer artificial ventilation or special care of the patient are required. In order to keep the airways open after tracheotomy, tracheostomy cannulas of different materials with different functions are available. For each patient the most appropriate type of cannula must be found. Voice prostheses are meanwhile the device of choice for rapid and efficient voice rehabilitation after laryngectomy. Individual sizes and materials allow adaptation of the voice prostheses to the individual anatomical situation of the patients. The combined application of voice prostheses with HME (Head and Moisture Exchanger) allows a good vocal as well as pulmonary rehabilitation. Precondition for efficient voice prosthesis is the observation of certain surgical principles during laryngectomy. The duration of the prosthesis mainly depends on material properties and biofilms, mostly consisting of funguses and bacteries. The quality of voice with valve prosthesis is clearly superior to esophagus prosthesis or electro-laryngeal voice. Whenever possible, tracheostoma valves for free-hand speech should be applied. Physicians taking care of patients with speech prostheses after laryngectomy should know exactly what to do in case the device fails or gets lost.

  6. Regularity extraction from non-adjacent sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eBendixen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The regular behavior of sound sources helps us to make sense of the auditory environment. Regular patterns may, for instance, convey information on the identity of a sound source (such as the acoustic signature of a train moving on the rails. Yet typically, this signature overlaps in time with signals emitted from other sound sources. It is generally assumed that auditory regularity extraction cannot operate upon this mixture of signals because it only finds regularities between adjacent sounds. In this view, the auditory environment would be grouped into separate entities by means of readily available acoustic cues such as separation in frequency and location. Regularity extraction processes would then operate upon the resulting groups. Our new experimental evidence challenges this view. We presented two interleaved sound sequences which overlapped in frequency range and shared all acoustic parameters. The sequences only differed in their underlying regular patterns. We inserted deviants into one of the sequences to probe whether the regularity was extracted. In the first experiment, we found that these deviants elicited the mismatch negativity (MMN component. Thus the auditory system was able to find the regularity between the non-adjacent sounds. Regularity extraction was not influenced by sequence cohesiveness as manipulated by the relative duration of tones and silent inter-tone-intervals. In the second experiment, we showed that a regularity connecting non-adjacent sounds was discovered only when the intervening sequence also contained a regular pattern, but not when the intervening sounds were randomly varying. This suggests that separate regular patterns are available to the auditory system as a cue for identifying signals coming from distinct sound sources. Thus auditory regularity extraction is not necessarily confined to a processing stage after initial sound grouping, but may precede grouping when other acoustic cues are unavailable.

  7. Voice disorders in children, aged 5 to 7 years

    OpenAIRE

    Polutnik, Tjaša

    2013-01-01

    Dysphonia is a term for every unpleasant change which can be detected via hearing and the voice disorder is most frequently a consequence of recuperation after a respiratory infection and it can also occur due to an incorrect formation of sounds or throat disorders. The purpose of the research is to find out how often dysphonia occurs among children from the age of five to the age of seven and how illnesses or the individual way children talk influence the occurrence of dysphonia. The researc...

  8. Emergence of linguistic laws in human voice

    CERN Document Server

    Torre, Ivan Gonzalez; Lacasa, Lucas; Luque, Jordi; Hernandez-Fernandez, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Linguistic laws constitute one of the quantitative cornerstones of modern cognitive sciences and have been routinely investigated in written corpora, or in the equivalent transcription of oral corpora. This means that inferences of statistical patterns of language in acoustics are biased by the arbitrary, language-dependent segmentation of the signal, and virtually precludes the possibility of making comparative studies between human voice and other animal communication systems. Here we bridge this gap by proposing a method that allows to measure such patterns in acoustic signals of arbitrary origin, without needs to have access to the language corpus underneath. The method has been applied to six different human languages, recovering successfully some well-known laws of human communication at timescales even below the phoneme and finding yet another link between complexity and criticality in a biological system. These methods further pave the way for new comparative studies in animal communication or the ana...

  9. The Speaker Behind The Voice: Therapeutic Practice from the Perspective of Pragmatic Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity eDeamer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many attempts at understanding auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs have tried to explain why there is an auditory experience in the absence of an appropriate stimulus. We suggest that many instance of voice-hearing should be approached differently. More specifically, they could be viewed primarily as hallucinated acts of communication, rather than hallucinated sounds. We suggest that this change of perspective is reflected in, and helps to explain, the successes of two recent therapeutic techniques. These two techniques are: Relating Therapy for Voices and Avatar Therapy.

  10. What is sound energy ?

    CERN Document Server

    Loria, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Sounds are all around us, but what makes sound? How does it travel? What can it do? These questions and more will be answered as the science of sound energy is examined in depth. Readers will learn how the physical movement of objects creates sound, as well as the qualities of sound and how they vary, and are received. The uses of sound energy in various fields will be explored. Simple illustrations of sophisticated scientific concepts will enhance the young learner's understanding of the topic.

  11. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of voice: A normative study in the Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline B. Fernandes, Radish Kumar Balasubramanium, Arivudai Nambi Pitchaimuthu, Jayashree S. Bhat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to establish normative data for the Indian population using Nonlinear dynamic analysis. In this study, correlation dimension, a measure of nonlinear dynamic analysis was performed for normophonic young, middle aged and elderly voices. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, normophonic young, middle aged and elderly individuals were selected without a history of voice/respiratory problems and vocal abuse/ misuse. 60 participants were selected in each group. All of these individuals had a normal voice as evaluated through GRBAS scale. Sound Recorder, on a computer desktop was used for voice recording and “convert” code in MATLAB as well as D2.ini.writer software based on TISEAN package (Hegger, Kantz & Schreiber, 1999 was used for the calculation of Correlation dimension (D2. Correlation dimension measures were obtained for each participant, for both steady vowel phonations (/a/, /i/, /u/ as well as narration samples. Results: The correlation dimension measures across the group revealed a significant main effect of the groups indicating correlation dimension increases with increase in age. Conclusions: The application of nonlinear dynamic measures in the assessment of voice is a novel venture and thus this study provides normative data for correlation dimensions in the Indian population for future comparisons against the disordered voice samples. Further studies are warranted to investigate the same in the clinical population. Also other nonlinear dynamic analysis methods need to be investigated to obtain the normative data in the Indian population.

  12. Emotion and identification of environmental sounds and electroencephalographic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimai, S

    1992-06-01

    Eight environmental sounds, i.e., playing the harp, cuckoo's song, sound of the waves, cock's crow, noise of the subway, alarm of a clock, sound of a dentist's drill, scratching of the blackboard, and their temporally reverse sounds were presented for 20 sec to 16 college students in a sound-attenuated chamber. The subjects were requested to estimate the degree of pleasantness-unpleasantness and confidence in identifying each sound 10 sec after presentation. Electroencephalography was recorded at C3, C4, O1 and O2 (International 10-20 system), and the mean EEG powers of delta, theta, alpha-1, alpha-2, beta-1 and beta-2 bands during the sound presentations were computed by a signal processor. The results were as follows: 1) Even when the loudness and frequency component of the sounds were equivalent, there was big difference in pleasantness-unpleasantness estimation among the environmental sounds. 2) Inaccuracy in identifying the sounds presented backwards neutralized the pleasantness-unpleasantness estimation. 3) Powers of theta and low frequency alpha bands were higher during presentation of the pleasant sounds than during presentation of the unpleasant sounds. 4) Alpha activity was more closely related with subjective confidence in sound identification than with pleasantness-unpleasantness estimation of sound. These findings suggest that pleasantness-unpleasantness estimation of environmental sounds depends not only on their loudness level or frequency component but on the accuracy in sound identification and that modification of sound identification may be useful in alleviating the environment noise problem. Alpha activity seems to be closely related to the recognition of sound, but further research is needed on EEG activity in the relationship between the emotional state and sound identification.

  13. Synthesized size-sound sound symbolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lockwood, G.F.; Hagoort, P.; Dingemanse, M.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of sound symbolism have shown that people can associate sound and meaning in consistent ways when presented with maximally contrastive stimulus pairs of nonwords such as bouba/kiki (rounded/sharp) or mil/mal (small/big). Recent work has shown the effect extends to antonymic words from natura

  14. The Study of MSADQ/CDMA Protocol in Voice/Data Integration Packet Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new packet medium access protocol, namely, minislot signalingaccess based on distributed queues(MSADQ/CDMA), is proposed in voice and data intergration CDMA networks. The MSADQ protocol is based on distributed queues and collision resolution algorithm. Through proper management of the PN codes, the number of random competition collision reduces greatly, the multiple access interference (MAI) decreases. It has several special access signaling channels to carry the voice and data access request. Each slot is devided into several control minislots (CMSs), in which the Data Terminals (DT) or Voice Terminals (VT) transmit their request. According to the voice and data traffic character, the signaling access structure is proposed. The code assign rules and queue managing rules are also proposed to ensure the QoS requirement of each traffic. Comparisions with other three protocol are developed by simulation, which shows that MSADQ/CDMA protocol occupies less PN codes, but still has very good performance.

  15. Early sound symbolism for vowel sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Ferrinne; Maurer, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Children and adults consistently match some words (e.g., kiki) to jagged shapes and other words (e.g., bouba) to rounded shapes, providing evidence for non-arbitrary sound-shape mapping. In this study, we investigated the influence of vowels on sound-shape matching in toddlers, using four contrasting pairs of nonsense words differing in vowel sound (/i/ as in feet vs. /o/ as in boat) and four rounded-jagged shape pairs. Crucially, we used reduplicated syllables (e.g., kiki vs. koko) rather than confounding vowel sound with consonant context and syllable variability (e.g., kiki vs. bouba). Toddlers consistently matched words with /o/ to rounded shapes and words with /i/ to jagged shapes (p vowel sound and shape.

  16. Processing of voiced and unvoiced acoustic stimuli in musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrill Guy Martin Ott

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Past research has shown that musical training induces changes in the processing of supra-segmental aspects of speech, such as pitch and prosody. The aim of the present study was to determine whether musical expertise also leads to an altered neurophysiological processing of sub-segmental information available in the speech signal, in particular the voice onset time (VOT. Using high-density EEG recordings we analysed the neurophysiological responses to voiced and unvoiced CV syllables and noise analogues in 26 German speaking adult musicians and non-musicians. From the EEG the N1 amplitude of the event-related potential (ERP and two microstates from the topographical EEG analysis (one around the N1 amplitude and one immediately preceding the N1 microstate were calculated to the different stimuli. Similar to earlier studies the N1 amplitude was different to voiced and unvoiced stimuli in non-musicians with larger amplitudes to voiced stimuli. The more refined microstate analysis revealed that the microstate within the N1 time window was shorter to unvoiced stimuli in non-musicians. For musicians there was no difference for the N1 amplitudes and the corresponding microstates between voiced and unvoiced stimuli. In addition, there was a longer very early microstate preceding the microstate at the N1 time window to non-speech stimuli only in musicians. Taken together, our findings suggest that musicians process unvoiced stimuli (irrespective whether these stimuli are speech or non-speech stimuli differently. We propose that musicians utilise the same network to analyse unvoiced stimuli as for the analysis of voiced stimuli. As a further explanation it is also possible that musicians devote more neurophysiological resources into the analysis of unvoiced segments.

  17. Tracheal Sounds Acquisition Using Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bersain A. Reyes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds’ amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r2 = 0.9693, 0.11 (−1.41 to 1.63 breaths-per-minute (bpm for Galaxy S4, and r2 = 0.9672, 0.097 (–1.38 to 1.57 bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found.

  18. Differences in acoustic and perceptual parameters of the voice between elderly and young women at habitual and high intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetto de Menezes, Keyla S; Master, Suely; Guzman, Marco; Bortnem, Cori; Ramos, Luiz Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare elderly and young female voices in habitual and high intensity. The effect of increased intensity on the acoustic and perceptual parameters was assessed. Sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and harmonic to noise ratio were obtained at habitual and high intensity voice in a group of 30 elderly women and 30 young women. Perceptual assessment was also performed. Both groups demonstrated an increase in sound pressure level and fundamental frequency from habitual voice to high intensity voice. No differences were found between groups in any acoustic variables on samples recorded with habitual intensity level. No significant differences between groups were found in habitual intensity level for pitch, hoarseness, roughness, and breathiness. Asthenia and instability obtained significant higher values in elderly than young participants, whereas, the elderly demonstrated lower values for perceived tension and loudness than young subjects. Acoustic and perceptual measures do not demonstrate evident differences between elderly and young speakers in habitual intensity level. The parameters analyzed may lack the sensitivity necessary to detect differences in subjects with normal voices. Phonation with high intensity highlights differences between groups, especially in perceptual parameters. Therefore, high intensity should be included to compare elderly and young voice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Complex sound analysis in the lesser bulldog bat: evidence for a mechanism for processing frequency elements of frequency modulated signals over restricted time intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roverud, R C

    1994-05-01

    A stereotypical approach phase vocalization response of the lesser bulldog bat, Noctilio albiventris, to artificial echoes simulating a virtual approaching object was used to assess the ability of the bat to analyze and extract distance information from the artificial echoes. The performance of the bat was not significantly different when presented with naturally structured CF/FM echoes containing FM elements that sweep continuously from about 75-55 kHz in 4 ms or with CF/FM echoes containing FM components constructed from a series of 98 pure tone frequency steps, each with a duration of 0.04 ms. The performance of the bat remained unchanged when the duration of the tone steps was increased up to 0.08 ms but declined sharply to a level that was significantly below that seen with a naturally structured echo when the steps were 0.09 ms or longer. The performance of the bat depended on the duration of the individual tone steps, which could not exceed a specific upper limit of about 0.08 ms. The study suggests that the bats have adaptations for processing individual narrow band segments of FM signals over specific time intervals.

  20. Signal Processing of Random Physiological Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Lessard, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Signal Processing of Random Physiological Signals presents the most widely used techniques in signal and system analysis. Specifically, the book is concerned with methods of characterizing signals and systems. Author Charles Lessard provides students and researchers an understanding of the time and frequency domain processes which may be used to evaluate random physiological signals such as brainwave, sleep, respiratory sounds, heart valve sounds, electromyograms, and electro-oculograms.Another aim of the book is to have the students evaluate actual mammalian data without spending most or all

  1. Sound wave transmission (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  2. Making fictions sound real

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Birger

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role that sound plays in making fictions perceptually real to film audiences, whether these fictions are realist or non-realist in content and narrative form. I will argue that some aspects of film sound practices and the kind of experiences they trigger are related...... to basic rules of human perception, whereas others are more properly explained in relation to how aesthetic devices, including sound, are used to characterise the fiction and thereby make it perceptually real to its audience. Finally, I will argue that not all genres can be defined by a simple taxonomy...... of sounds. Apart from an account of the kinds of sounds that typically appear in a specific genre, a genre analysis of sound may also benefit from a functionalist approach that focuses on how sounds can make both realist and non-realist aspects of genres sound real to audiences....

  3. An Antropologist of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2015-01-01

    PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology....

  4. Modelling Hyperboloid Sound Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burry, Jane; Davis, Daniel; Peters, Brady;

    2011-01-01

    The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...

  5. The effects of noise on speech and warning signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Alice H.

    1989-06-01

    To assess the effects of noise on speech communication it is necessary to examine certain characteristics of the speech signal. Speech level can be measured by a variety of methods, none of which has yet been standardized, and it should be kept in mind that vocal effort increases with background noise level and with different types of activity. Noise and filtering commonly degrade the speech signal, especially as it is transmitted through communications systems. Intelligibility is also adversely affected by distance, reverberation, and monaural listening. Communication systems currently in use may cause strain and delays on the part of the listener, but there are many possibilities for improvement. Individuals who need to communicate in noise may be subject to voice disorders. Shouted speech becomes progressively less intelligible at high voice levels, but improvements can be realized when talkers use clear speech. Tolerable listening levels are lower for negative than for positive S/Ns, and comfortable listening levels should be at a S/N of at least 5 dB, and preferably above 10 dB. Popular methods to predict speech intelligibility in noise include the Articulation Index, Speech Interference Level, Speech Transmission Index, and the sound level meter's A-weighting network. This report describes these methods, discussing certain advantages and disadvantages of each, and shows their interrelations.

  6. Native voice, self-concept and the moral case for personalized voice technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Purpose (1) To explore the role of native voice and effects of voice loss on self-concept and identity, and survey the state of assistive voice technology; (2) to establish the moral case for developing personalized voice technology. Methods This narrative review examines published literature on the human significance of voice, the impact of voice loss on self-concept and identity, and the strengths and limitations of current voice technology. Based on the impact of voice loss on self and identity, and voice technology limitations, the moral case for personalized voice technology is developed. Results Given the richness of information conveyed by voice, loss of voice constrains expression of the self, but the full impact is poorly understood. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices facilitate communication but, despite advances in this field, voice output cannot yet express the unique nuances of individual voice. The ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence and equality of opportunity establish the moral responsibility to invest in accessible, cost-effective, personalized voice technology. Conclusions Although further research is needed to elucidate the full effects of voice loss on self-concept, identity and social functioning, current understanding of the profoundly negative impact of voice loss establishes the moral case for developing personalized voice technology. Implications for Rehabilitation Rehabilitation of voice-disordered patients should facilitate self-expression, interpersonal connectedness and social/occupational participation. Proactive questioning about the psychological and social experiences of patients with voice loss is a valuable entry point for rehabilitation planning. Personalized voice technology would enhance sense of self, communicative participation and autonomy and promote shared healthcare decision-making. Further research is needed to identify the best strategies to preserve and strengthen identity and sense of

  7. Children's Voice or Children's Voices? How Educational Research Can Be at the Heart of Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Julian

    2015-01-01

    There are problems with considering children and young people in schools as quite separate individuals, and with considering them as members of a single collectivity. The tension is represented in the use of "voice" and "voices" in educational debates. Voices in dialogue, in contrast to "children's voice", are…

  8. An Antropologist of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2015-01-01

    PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology.......PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology....

  9. Man & Sound Environment 2010.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Proceedings to the conference "Man and Sound Environment 2010" arranged by The sound Envirnment Center at Lund university. Ulf Landström, Swedish Noise Research Network & Frans Mossberg The Sound Environment Centre at Lund university. CONTENTS: Preface – Symposium “Man and Sound Environment 2010” The prevalence of noise problems. Gunn Marit Aasvang, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Department of Environmental Medicine, Nydalen, Oslo, Norway Effects of ...

  10. Voice complaints, risk factors for voice problems and history of voice problems in relation to puberty in female student teachers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, G.; Jong, F.I.C.R.S. de; Kooijman, P.G.C.; Donders, A.R.T.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate voice complaints, risk factors for voice complaints and history of voice problems in student teachers before they embarked on their professional teaching career. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed among female student teachers. The response rate

  11. Voice complaints, risk factors for voice problems and history of voice problems in relation to puberty in female student teachers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, G.; Jong, F.I.C.R.S. de; Kooijman, P.G.C.; Donders, A.R.T.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate voice complaints, risk factors for voice complaints and history of voice problems in student teachers before they embarked on their professional teaching career. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed among female student teachers. The response rate

  12. Three-dimensional Sound Source Localization Using Inter-channel Time Difference Trajectory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmoon Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sound source localization is one of the basic and essential techniques for intelligent robots in terms of human-robot interaction and has been utilized in various engineering fields. This paper suggests a new localization method using an inter-channel time difference trajectory, which is a new localization cue for efficient 3-D localization. As one of the ways to realize the proposed cue, a two-channel rotating array is employed. Two microphones are attached on the left and right sides of the spherical head. One microphone is in a circular motion on the right side, while the other is fixed on the left side. According to the rotating motion of the array, the (source direction-dependent characteristics of the trajectories are analysed using the Ray-Tracing formula extended for 3-D models. In simulation, the synthesized signals generated by the fixed and rotating microphone signal models were used as the output signals of the two microphones. The simulation showed that the localization performance is strongly dependent on the azimuthal position of a source, which is caused by the asymmetry of the trajectory amplitude. Additionally, the experimental results of the two experiments carried out in the room environment demonstrated that the proposed system can localize a Gaussian noise source and a voice source in 3-D space.

  13. Quick Statistics about Voice, Speech, and Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here Home » Health Info » Statistics and Epidemiology Quick Statistics About Voice, Speech, Language Voice, Speech, Language, and ... no 205. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2015. Hoffman HJ, Li C-M, Losonczy K, ...

  14. Introduction: Textual and contextual voices of translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Voices – marks of the tangle of subjectivities involved in textual processes – constitute the very fabric of texts in general and translations in particular. The title of this book, Textual and Contextual Voices of Translation, refers both to textual voices, that is, the voices found within...... the translated texts, and to contextual voices, that is, the voices of those involved in shaping, commenting, or otherwise influencing the textual voices. The latter appear in prefaces, reviews, and other texts that surround the translated texts and provide them with a context. Our main claim is that studying...... both the textual and contextual voices helps us better understand and explain the complexity of both the translation process and the translation product. The dovetailed approach to translation research that is advocated in this book aims at highlighting the diversity of participants, power positions...

  15. Audio-visual voice activity detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Peng; WANG Zuo-ying

    2006-01-01

    In speech signal processing systems,frame-energy based voice activity detection (VAD) method may be interfered with the background noise and non-stationary characteristic of the frame-energy in voice segment.The purpose of this paper is to improve the performance and robustness of VAD by introducing visual information.Meanwhile,data-driven linear transformation is adopted in visual feature extraction,and a general statistical VAD model is designed.Using the general model and a two-stage fusion strategy presented in this paper,a concrete multimodal VAD system is built.Experiments show that a 55.0% relative reduction in frame error rate and a 98.5% relative reduction in sentence-breaking error rate are obtained when using multimodal VAD,compared to frame-energy based audio VAD.The results show that using multimodal method,sentence-breaking errors are almost avoided,and flame-detection performance is clearly improved, which proves the effectiveness of the visual modal in VAD.

  16. Spatially extended sound equalization in rectangular rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco

    2001-01-01

    of broadband signals can be achieved by the simulation of a traveling plane wave using FIR filters. The optimal solution has been calculated following the traditional least-squares approximation, where a modeling delay has been applied to minimize reverberation. An advantage of the method is that the sound......The results of a theoretical study on global sound equalization in rectangular rooms at low frequencies are presented. The zone where sound equalization can be obtained is a continuous three-dimensional region that occupies almost the complete volume of the room. It is proved that the equalization...

  17. Spatially extended sound equalization in rectangular rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco

    2001-01-01

    The results of a theoretical study on global sound equalization in rectangular rooms at low frequencies are presented. The zone where sound equalization can be obtained is a continuous three-dimensional region that occupies almost the complete volume of the room. It is proved that the equalization...... of broadband signals can be achieved by the simulation of a traveling plane wave using FIR filters. The optimal solution has been calculated following the traditional least-squares approximation, where a modeling delay has been applied to minimize reverberation. An advantage of the method is that the sound...

  18. Active control of radiated sound using nearfield pressure sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ke'an; YIN Xuefei

    2004-01-01

    Based on nearfield sound pressure sensing to pick up error information, an approach for constructing active acoustic structure to effectively reduce radiated sound power at low frequency is proposed. The idea is that a nearfield pressure after active control is used as error signals and transformed into an objective function in adaptive active control process.Firstly sound power expression using near-field pressure radiated from a flexible structure is derived, and then three kind of nearfield pressure based active control strategies, I.e. Minimization of radiated sound power, minimization of sound power for dominant radiation modes and minimization of sound power for modified dominant radiation modes are respectively presented and applied to active control of radiated single and broadband noise. Finally computer simulations on sound power reduction under three strategies are conducted and it is shown that the proposed active control strategies are invalid and considerable reduction in radiated sound power can be achieved.

  19. Researching home through sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Ida Wentzel

    2014-01-01

    sounds via the sense of hearing; i.e., by listening. Furthermore, I examine some of the methodological challenges associated with listening to a space (as sound), interpreting what is heard and then representing the sounds in a text. I also discuss the types of knowledge that may be created through...... auditory and visual approaches....

  20. Effect of fundamental frequency at voice onset on vocal attack time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ben C; Baken, R J; Roark, Rick M; Reid, Stephanie; Ribeiro, Melissa; Tsai, Weilyn

    2013-05-01

    To examine vocal attack time (VAT) values associated with the production of low, mid, and high rates of vocal fold vibration in normal speakers. Sound pressure (SP) and electroglottographic (EGG) recordings were obtained for eight female and five male subjects while producing multiple tokens of the sustained vowels /ɑ/, /i/, and /u/ at comfortable loudness and at mid, low (-3 semitones), and high (+6 semitones) rates of vocal fold vibration. Generalized sinusoidal models of the SP and EGG signals were computed to compare rates of amplitude change. VAT was computed from the time lag of the cross-correlation function. Adjusted mean VAT for the high frequency condition was smaller than the adjusted mean VAT values for the low- and mid-frequency conditions. There was no significant difference between the mid and low frequency conditions. Findings reveal an association of the VAT measure with increases in vocal fold tension associated with the production of high rates of vocal fold vibration. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.