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Sample records for vogelius william rundell

  1. The Impact of Militancy and Cult Groups' Activities on Rundele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study adopted expectancy theory as its theoretical framework of analysis, emphasizing that the cult groups and militants were motivated in their activities due to the expected rewards from their actions. The findings showed that Rundele as one of the communities in the Niger Delta region had intensive militants' and cult ...

  2. An Analysis of The Oxford Guide to Practical Lexicography (Atkins and Rundell 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles-Maurice de Schryver

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: Since at least a decade ago, the lexicographic community at large has been demandingthat a modern textbook be designed — one that would place corpora at the centre of the lexicographicenterprise. Written by two of the most respected practising lexicographers, this book hasfinally arrived, and delivers on very many levels. This review article presents a critical analysis ofits features.

    Keywords: LEXICOGRAPHY, LEARNERS' DICTIONARY, MONOLINGUAL, BILINGUAL,CORPUS, FRAME SEMANTICS, ENGLISH, FRENCH, TEXTBOOK

    Samenvatting: Een analyse van The Oxford Guide to Practical Lexicography(Atkins en Rundell 2008. Al minstens tien jaar lang eist de volledige lexicografischegemeenschap dat een modern tekstboek zou worden ontworpen — één dat corpora in het centrumvan de lexicografische belangstelling zou plaatsen. Geschreven door twee van de meest gerespecteerdepraktiserende lexicografen, is dit boek er nu eindelijk, en het ontgoochelt niet. Dit recensieartikelanalyseert de kenmerken ervan kritisch.

    Sleutelwoorden: LEXICOGRAFIE, LEERWOORDENBOEK, VERKLAREND (MONOLINGUAAL,VERTALEND (BILINGUAAL, CORPUS, FRAME SEMANTICS, ENGELS, FRANS,TEKSTBOEK

  3. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do well on tasks that involve spoken language, music, and learning by repetition (rote memorization). Affected individuals ... Resources (5 links) Disease InfoSearch: Williams syndrome Genetic Science Learning Center, University of Utah MalaCards: williams-beuren ...

  5. William Wilde: Historian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, L

    2016-05-01

    This essay attempts to assess William Wilde as a social historian. It examines some of his contributions to the discipline of history and looks particularly at 'The food of the Irish', which was published in the Dublin University Magazine in February 1854.

  6. Anderson, Prof. Basil Williams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1964 Honorary. Anderson, Prof. Basil Williams. Date of birth: 3 July 1901. Date of death: 24 February 1984. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held ...

  7. Florence Jessie Mac Williams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CPMGIKAlBGE-340/2003-05. Resonance - January 2005. Licenced to post WPP No.6 RT Nagar Postoffice. Florence Jessie Mac Williams. (1917 - 1990). Registered with Registrar of Newspapers in India vide Regn. No. 66273/96. ISSN 0971-8044. Price per copy: Rs 40.

  8. Interaction with William Carnall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    A personal account is given of interaction with William T. Carnall during the period 1977-1988, when I made regular visits to the Argonne National Laboratory to discuss the theoretical background to the spectroscopic work he was carrying out on the lanthanides and actinides

  9. Series, Prof. George William

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1984 Honorary. Series, Prof. George William. Date of birth: 22 February 1920. Date of death: 2 January 1995. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held ...

  10. David Owen WILLIAMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Lidy Williams-Oonk and her children Mark & Marietta, being unable to thank everybody individually, would like to express their sincere thanks to friends and colleagues at CERN and abroad for their great help and support, their messages and flowers, as well as their donations to the Ligue Genevoise contre le Cancer, on the death of their beloved husband and father.

  11. Williams propylene upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappell, D. [Williams Energy Canada Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Edmonton-based Williams Energy Canada Inc. extracts petrochemicals from oil sands and operates a straddle plant business and an olefins business. This presentation provided an update of both businesses and reviewed the advantage of polypropylene production in Alberta, with reference to premium markets and to comparative rail costs to Chicago via Texas, and rail costs to Chicago from Alberta. Williams' straddle plant business includes the Cochrane Straddle Plant, the Empress 2 Straddle Plant, and the Empress 5 Straddle Plant. The Fort McMurray Extraction Plant was also described along with the Redwater Olefins Fractionator and its potential for salt cavern storage and distribution. It was noted that Alberta is well positioned for polypropylene production because it already has a secure supply and an excellent distribution network. tabs., figs.

  12. Williams propylene upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappell, D.

    2004-01-01

    Edmonton-based Williams Energy Canada Inc. extracts petrochemicals from oil sands and operates a straddle plant business and an olefins business. This presentation provided an update of both businesses and reviewed the advantage of polypropylene production in Alberta, with reference to premium markets and to comparative rail costs to Chicago via Texas, and rail costs to Chicago from Alberta. Williams' straddle plant business includes the Cochrane Straddle Plant, the Empress 2 Straddle Plant, and the Empress 5 Straddle Plant. The Fort McMurray Extraction Plant was also described along with the Redwater Olefins Fractionator and its potential for salt cavern storage and distribution. It was noted that Alberta is well positioned for polypropylene production because it already has a secure supply and an excellent distribution network. tabs., figs

  13. Raymond Williams and local cultures

    OpenAIRE

    B Longhurst

    1991-01-01

    In this paper it is maintained that Raymond Williams's writings on culture are of great importance to current developments in cultural geography. His work is periodised into three stages and its different subject matters identified. An interpretation of Williams's theory of culture is offered which places particular emphasis on his concepts of 'structure of feeling' and 'knowable community'. The creative tension between Williams's holistic treatment of culture and his stress on cultural strug...

  14. Whither Sir William?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Greenberg, MSLS, PhD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There are times when something is simply so familiar that we can no longer see it at all. It can be a story, or a concept, or even a flesh-and-blood person. Familiarity breeds not only contempt, but a kind of invisibility as well. For too many of us, such is the case with Sir William Osler. In his time (1849–1919, many considered him to be one of the greatest practitioners, teachers, and writers ever in the field of medicine. He was instrumental in the founding of the Medical Library Association (MLA and was elected its second president.

  15. First Calderón Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, William; Somersalo, Erkki

    2008-07-01

    The Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) awarded the first Calderón Prize to Matti Lassas for his outstanding contributions to the field of inverse problems, especially in geometric inverse problems. The Calderón Prize is given to a researcher under the age of 40 who has made distinguished contributions to the field of inverse problems broadly defined. The first Calderón Prize Committee consisted of Professors Adrian Nachman, Lassi Päivärinta, William Rundell (chair), and Michael Vogelius. William Rundell For the Calderón Prize Committee Prize ceremony The ceremony awarding the Calderón Prize. Matti Lassas is on the left. He and William Rundell are on the right. Photos by P Stefanov. Brief Biography of Matti Lassas Matti Lassas was born in 1969 in Helsinki, Finland, and studied at the University of Helsinki. He finished his Master's studies in 1992 in three years and earned his PhD in 1996. His PhD thesis, written under the supervision of Professor Erkki Somersalo was entitled `Non-selfadjoint inverse spectral problems and their applications to random bodies'. Already in his thesis, Matti demonstrated a remarkable command of different fields of mathematics, bringing together the spectral theory of operators, geometry of Riemannian surfaces, Maxwell's equations and stochastic analysis. He has continued to develop all of these branches in the framework of inverse problems, the most remarkable results perhaps being in the field of differential geometry and inverse problems. Matti has always been a very generous researcher, sharing his ideas with his numerous collaborators. He has authored over sixty scientific articles, among which a monograph on inverse boundary spectral problems with Alexander Kachalov and Yaroslav Kurylev and over forty articles in peer reviewed journals of the highest standards. To get an idea of the wide range of Matti's interests, it is enough to say that he also has three US patents on medical imaging applications. Matti is

  16. [William Harvey revisited ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Hubert

    2015-07-01

    William Harvey's discovery of the circulation of the blood is often described as a product of the Scientific Revolution of the Seventeenth Century. Modern research has, however, shown thatHarvey followed the Aristotelian research tradition and thus tried to reveal the purpose of the organs through examination of various animals. His publication of 1628 has to be read as an argument of natural philosophy, or, more precisely, as a series of linked observations, experiments and philosophical reasonings from which the existence of circulation has to be deduced as a logical consequence. Harvey did not consider experiments as superior to philosophical reasoning nor intended he to create a new system of medicine. He believed in the vitality of the heart and the blood and rejected Francis Bacon's empirism and the mechanistic rationalism of Descartes. Harvey's contribution and originality lied less in his single observations and experiments but in the manner how he linked them with critical reasoning and how he accepted, presented and defended the ensuing radical findings.

  17. William Rowan Hamilton: Mathematical genius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, D.R. [School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)]. E-mail: dwilkins@maths.tcd.ie

    2005-08-01

    This year Ireland celebrates the bicentenary of the mathematician William Rowan Hamilton, best remembered for 'quaternions' and for his pioneering work on optics and dynamics. Two centuries after his birth, the extent to which terms such as 'Hamiltonian' and 'Hamiltonian system' have entered the everyday language of mathematicians and physicists testifies to the continuing impact of the scientific work of William Rowan Hamilton. (U.K.)

  18. William Rowan Hamilton: Mathematical genius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    This year Ireland celebrates the bicentenary of the mathematician William Rowan Hamilton, best remembered for quaternions and for his pioneering work on optics and dynamics. Two centuries after his birth, the extent to which terms such as Hamiltonian and Hamiltonian system have entered the everyday language of mathematicians and physicists testifies to the continuing impact of the scientific work of William Rowan Hamilton. (U.K.)

  19. 33 CFR 167.1702 - In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. 167.1702 Section 167.1702 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST....1702 In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. The Prince William Sound...

  20. [Williams-Beuren syndrome (Williams syndrome). Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklós, Györgyi; Fekete, György; Haltrich, Irén; Tóth, Miklós; Reismann, Péter

    2017-11-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, that occurs equally in all ethnic groups and both sexes. The diagnosis might be missed during childhood in mild cases. However, establishing the diagnosis is important, not only to find the cause of intellectual disability but to look for cardiovascular, endocrine, psychiatry, urology and other conditions, which can occur at any age in the patients' lifetime. This case report presents the story of 47-year-old woman, who was admitted with haematemesis. During her stay on the ward, in the light of the distinctive facial features, mental retardation, and social behaviour patterns, the possibility of Williams syndrome emerged. Later, the diagnosis was confirmed by genetic analysis. This female is the oldest living patient with Williams syndrome in Hungary. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(47): 1883-1888.

  1. Interview: William and Barbara Christopher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaching Exceptional Children, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Asserting that the biggest mistake educators can make is to set themselves up as experts vis-a-vis parents as amateurs, Barbara and William Christopher emphasize the importance of continued education for the autistic individual and relate their experiences with the educational community as they sought help for their autistic son. (JC)

  2. Skin findings in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Beth A; Bayliss, Susan J; Berk, David R; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H; Danback, Joshua R; Pober, Barbara R

    2014-09-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the skin and vascular elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%), and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity), and E (Young's modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A human neurodevelopmental model for Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chailangkarn, Thanathom; Trujillo, Cleber A; Freitas, Beatriz C; Hrvoj-Mihic, Branka; Herai, Roberto H; Yu, Diana X; Brown, Timothy T; Marchetto, Maria C; Bardy, Cedric; McHenry, Lauren; Stefanacci, Lisa; Järvinen, Anna; Searcy, Yvonne M; DeWitt, Michelle; Wong, Wenny; Lai, Philip; Ard, M Colin; Hanson, Kari L; Romero, Sarah; Jacobs, Bob; Dale, Anders M; Dai, Li; Korenberg, Julie R; Gage, Fred H; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric; Semendeferi, Katerina; Muotri, Alysson R

    2016-08-18

    Williams syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an uncommon hypersociability and a mosaic of retained and compromised linguistic and cognitive abilities. Nearly all clinically diagnosed individuals with Williams syndrome lack precisely the same set of genes, with breakpoints in chromosome band 7q11.23 (refs 1-5). The contribution of specific genes to the neuroanatomical and functional alterations, leading to behavioural pathologies in humans, remains largely unexplored. Here we investigate neural progenitor cells and cortical neurons derived from Williams syndrome and typically developing induced pluripotent stem cells. Neural progenitor cells in Williams syndrome have an increased doubling time and apoptosis compared with typically developing neural progenitor cells. Using an individual with atypical Williams syndrome, we narrowed this cellular phenotype to a single gene candidate, frizzled 9 (FZD9). At the neuronal stage, layer V/VI cortical neurons derived from Williams syndrome were characterized by longer total dendrites, increased numbers of spines and synapses, aberrant calcium oscillation and altered network connectivity. Morphometric alterations observed in neurons from Williams syndrome were validated after Golgi staining of post-mortem layer V/VI cortical neurons. This model of human induced pluripotent stem cells fills the current knowledge gap in the cellular biology of Williams syndrome and could lead to further insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the disorder and the human social brain.

  4. Language and Communicative Development in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B.; Becerra, Angela M.

    2007-01-01

    Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder caused by a microdeletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, is associated with mild to moderate intellectual disability or learning difficulties. Most individuals with Williams syndrome evidence a cognitive profile including relative strengths in verbal short-term memory and language, and…

  5. Williams Syndrome with a “Twist”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despoina Maritsi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome is a rare genetic condition with multisystemic involvement, caused by a microscopic deletion in the chromosome band 7q11.23. We describe the first case of a toddler with Williams syndrome who developed Benign Paroxysmal Torticollis (BPT, a benign dystonic disorder of unknown aetiology.

  6. William Paley's lost "intelligent design".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam R

    2009-01-01

    William Paley's Natural Theology has experienced a resurgence in popularity in recent decades with the continuing controversies over the teaching of evolution and the emergence of a new "intelligent design" movement. But while both the movement's supporters and detractors agree that Paley is an intellectual forefather of the present-day movement, this agreement is forged at the expense of historical accuracy. Paley's intelligent design has almost nothing in common with the present day movement and, in fact, suggests theological arguments against the type of reasoning used by the modern movement. Paley wrote in reaction to Hume and in response to the evolutionary theories of Buffon and Erasmus Darwin. In this light, the Natural Theology suggests a different reading than it is usually given. Paley's narrowly-argued theology relies upon the ability to detect the presence of "purpose" in nature without relying upon knowing what those purposes are. His empirically-argued theology leads him to a God who operates through natural law, not in its contravention, and his concern goes far beyond proving the existence of a deity to undertaking the theological project of determining the attributes and characteristics of the deity. Though not himself an evolutionist, Paley put forth a theological worldview consistent with evolution. In fact, given his arguments that the observation of great contrivance increases the testimony of nature to God's power, Paley's philosophy might be more consistent with a theistic Darwinian evolution than with special creation.

  7. David Owen Williams (1944 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Many people, not only at CERN but also throughout the world, were saddened to learn that their friend and colleague David Williams had passed away in the early hours of Tuesday 24 October. His death came after a year of fighting cancer with all of his usual determination and optimism. Even days before the end he was still welcoming to visitors, and was alert and interested in all their news. Born in 1944, David came to CERN from the University of Cambridge in 1966, with a degree in Physics and Computer Science. Joining what at the time was called the Documents and Data (DD) Division, in the earlier part his career he worked first on software for analysis of bubble chamber photographs, subsequently leading the group that supported experiments with 'hybrids' of bubble chambers and electronic detectors and then the group supporting online computing in experiments. He thus witnessed all of the enormous changes that took place in particle physics as the era of bubble chambers came to an end and the availability ...

  8. William Harvey, Aristotle and astrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    In this paper I argue that William Harvey believed in a form of astrology. It has long been known that Harvey employed a macrocosm-microcosm analogy and used alchemical terminology in describing how the two types of blood change into one another. This paper then seeks to examine a further aspect of Harvey in relation to the magical tradition. There is an important corollary to this line of thought, however. This is that while Harvey does have a belief in astrology, it is strongly related to Aristotle's views in this area and is quite restricted and attenuated relative to some contemporary beliefs in astrology. This suggests a more general thesis. While Harvey was amenable to ideas which we associate with the natural magic tradition, those ideas had a very broad range of formulation and there was a limit to how far he would accept them. This limit was largely determined by Harvey's adherence to Aristotle's natural philosophy and his Christian beliefs. I argue that this is also the case in relation to Harvey's use of the macrocosm-microcosm analogy and of alchemical terminology, and, as far as we can rely on the evidence, this informs his attitudes towards witches as well. Understanding Harvey's influences and motives here is important in placing him properly in the context of early seventeenth-century thought.

  9. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: HYDRO (Hydrology)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  10. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: INVERT (Invertebrates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  11. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: INDEX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  12. 33 CFR 167.1700 - In Prince William Sound: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In Prince William Sound: General... Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1700 In Prince William Sound: General. The Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme consists of four parts: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation...

  13. Colour discrimination and categorisation in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Farran, E. K.; Cranwell, M. B.; Alvarez, J.; Franklin, A.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) present with impaired functioning of the dorsal visual stream relative to the ventral visual stream. As such, little attention has been given to ventral stream functions in WS. We investigated colour processing, a predominantly ventral stream function, for the first time in nineteen individuals with Williams syndrome. Colour discrimination was assessed using the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test. Colour categorisation was assessed using a match-to-sample ...

  14. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  15. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Zamani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD, skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6 in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2 (ELN X1 (7q22 X2 ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  16. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Marina A; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing.

  17. Investigating the ''social brain'' through Williams syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, Masanori; Mimura, Masaru; Reiss, A.L.; Hoeft, F.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in social cognitive neuroscience have led to the concept of the ''social brain''. The social brain includes neural processes specialized for processing social information necessary for the recognition of self and others, and interpersonal relationships. Because of its unique behavioral phenotypic features which includes 'hypersociability', Williams syndrome has gained popularity among social cognitive neuroscientists. Individuals with Williams syndrome share the same genetic risk factor for cognitive-behavioral dysfunction utilizing brain imaging to elucidate endophenotype provides us with an unprecendented opportunity to study gene, brain and behavior relationships especially those related to social cognition. In this review, we provide an overview of neuroimaging studies on social cognition in Williams syndrome and discuss the neural basis of the social brain. (author)

  18. William Carlos Williams’ cubism: The sensory dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-L Kruger

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article the cubism of the American poet William Carlos Williams is discussed as a product of sensory elements combined with techniques derived from the work of the visual artists associated with this style. Through the study o f a number of poems written in the period between 1917 and 1923 it is shown that Williams employs the cubist intersection of sensory planes in particular to create a sensory dimension that not only renews the traditions and mode of poetry, but also reveals the cubist concern with the defamiliarization and foregrounding of fragments of everyday experiences. Ultimately the article is an attempt to indicate Williams’ incorporation o f a sensual dimension in creating a style that achieves modernist presentation revealing an independence from both traditional literary and visual styles.

  19. [Association between Williams syndrome and adrenal insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rchachi, Meryem; Larwanou, Maazou Mahamane; El Ouahabi, Hanan; Ajdi, Farida

    2017-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a developmental disorder including dysmorphia, cardiovascular malformations and a specific neuropsychological profile together with other associated disorders. We report the case of a 17-year old girl, born of a non-inbred marriage, with Williams syndrome discovered during an assessment of degree of failure to thrive. Its association with primary adrenal insufficiency makes it unique. Diagnosis is confirmed by cytogenetic and molecular analysis. Its management consists of the implementation of treatment for adrenal insufficiency associated with a clinico-biological monitoring.

  20. The world in eighteen lessons: Christopher Williams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrebi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Conceptual photographer Christopher Williams is a real artist's artist. Ever since he moved to Germany, his measured work, which both reveres and examines the art of photography, has more and more easily found its way into European art institutes, such as this spring at Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens in

  1. De wereld in 18 lessen: Christopher Williams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrebi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Hij is een echte artist’s artist, de conceptuele fotograaf Christopher Williams. Sinds hij in Duitsland woont en werkt, vindt zijn afgewogen werk, dat de fotografie tegelijk eert en ondervraagt, steeds makkelijker onderdak in Europese kunstinstituten, zoals dit voorjaar bij Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens in

  2. March 1964 Prince William Sound, USA Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Prince William Sound magnitude 9.2 Mw earthquake on March 28, 1964 at 03:36 GMT (March 27 at 5:36 pm local time), was the largest U.S. earthquake ever recorded...

  3. Fears, Hyperacusis and Musicality in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Stefan; Rosander, Michael; Andersson, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    The study investigated the prevalence of fear and hyperacusis and the possible connections between fear, hyperacusis and musicality in a Swedish sample of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). The study included 38 individuals and a cross-sectional design, with no matched control group. Two persons, who knew the participant well, completed a…

  4. Psycholinguistic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natalia F.; Heinze, Elena Garayzabal; Giacheti, Celia M.; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Sampaio, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the psycholinguistic abilities of children with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing children using the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (ITPA). Performance on the ITPA was analysed in a group with WS (N=20, mean age=8.5 years, SD=1.62) and two typically developing groups,…

  5. Who Was the Real William Shakespeare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael Todd

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights a project that encourages students to connect reading and mathematics instruction by using a data analysis approach. Students analyze sonnets from statistical, literary, and historical points of view in an effort to uncover the true identity of William Shakespeare. (Contains 10 figures.)

  6. Florence Jessie Mac Williams (1917-1990)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Florence Jessie Mac Williams (1917-1990). Featured Scientist Volume 10 Issue 1 January 2005 pp 98-98. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/01/0098-0098. Resonance ...

  7. Denigrating Carl Rogers: William Coulson's Last Crusade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Howard

    1991-01-01

    Reviews William Coulson's assertions that Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, and he initiated the humanistic education field, that Rogers repudiated his philosophy late in life, and that they owe the nation's parents an apology. Argues that these charges are groundless and provides examples and quotations from Rogers' later writings to show how Rogers…

  8. Mr. William Shakespeare and the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Describes resources and links on a Web site entitled "Mr. William Shakespeare and the Internet," with suggestions for using them with students. Highlights include: historical context; impact of events/situations on works; motivational/preparatory lessons; reading and understanding Shakespeare; analysis of works; language; assessing other…

  9. MRI Amygdala Volume in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitao, Liliana; Sampaio, Adriana; Sampaio, Cassandra; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Fernandez, Montse; Garayzabal, Elena; Shenton, Martha E.; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most intriguing characteristics of Williams Syndrome individuals is their hypersociability. The amygdala has been consistently implicated in the etiology of this social profile, particularly given its role in emotional and social behavior. This study examined amygdala volume and symmetry in WS individuals and in age and sex matched…

  10. Analysis of Speech Fluency in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natalia Freitas; Sampaio, Adriana; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Giacheti, Celia Maria

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder, often referred as being characterized by dissociation between verbal and non-verbal abilities, although the number of studies disputing this proposal is emerging. Indeed, although they have been traditionally reported as displaying increased speech fluency, this topic has not been…

  11. Attention to Faces in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Jones, Nicola; Brown, Philippa H.; Robinson, Lucy J.; Langton, Stephen R. H.; Bruce, Vicki; Riby, Leigh M.

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with distinct social behaviours. One component of the WS social phenotype is atypically prolonged face fixation. This behaviour co-exists with attention difficulties. Attention is multi-faceted and may impact on gaze behaviour in several ways. Four experiments assessed (i) attention capture by faces, (ii)…

  12. Attentional Disengagement in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Key, Alexandra P.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a distinctive behavioral and cognitive profile, including widespread problems with attention. However, the specific nature of their attentional difficulties, such as inappropriate attentional allocation and/or poor attentional disengagement abilities, has yet to be…

  13. Stranger Danger Awareness in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, D. M.; Kirk, H.; Hanley, M.; Riby, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) is characterised by a distinctive cognitive profile and an intriguing social phenotype. Individuals with the disorder are often highly social engaging with familiar and unfamiliar people and once in an interaction they often show subtle abnormalities of social behaviour. Atypically…

  14. Fading-Figure Tracing in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Chiyoko; Inui, Toshio; Iwata, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe impairment of visuospatial abilities. Figure-drawing abilities, which are thought to reflect visuospatial abilities, have yet to be fully investigated in WS. The purpose of the present study was to clarify whether drawing abilities differ between WS individuals and…

  15. Attribution of Negative Intention in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, Kali; Porter, Melanie A.

    2013-01-01

    People with Williams syndrome (WS) are said to have sociable and extremely trusting personalities, approaching strangers without hesitation. This study investigated whether people with WS are less likely than controls to attribute negative intent to others when interpreting a series of ambiguous pictures. This may, at least partially, explain…

  16. Northern gas: Williams petrochemical feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappell, D. [Williams Energy Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    Williams Energy is a company that is involved in the following fields: gas pipelines, exploration and production, midstream, refining, petrochemical, power, and marketing and trading. The author provides an overview of the global and Canadian infrastructure before proceeding to discuss Arctic gas, which is viewed by Williams Energy as necessary. It favors the Alaska Highway route with a consortium for project development. Williams performed a petrochemical study to determine the feasibility of a petrochemical complex utilizing natural gas liquid from an Arctic gas pipeline. The scope of the study encompassed facilities (extraction plant, cracker, polyolefins plant), size (world scale, approximately 2 billion pounds per year), and location (Fairbanks or Alberta). The study led to the following findings: (1) review of several scenarios for both locations, (2) complex to produce two grades of polyethylene, (3) feedstock cost favors Alaska, (4) construction costs lower in Alberta, (5) and the primary market for the Alaska complex would be northeast Asia, while the primary market for the Alberta location would be the United States. It was determined that both options would be viable, however Alberta was favored due to the polyethylene forecast. The challenges still being faced by Williams include low frac spread, market inefficiencies, empress volumes, carbon dioxide, and fuel and electricity cost. Each of these challenges is discussed separately. The author concludes by indicating that incremental ethane is available, carbon dioxide issues need resolution, and Alberta and Alaska are attractive for Arctic ethane petrochemical production. figs.

  17. Executive Functions in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menghini, D.; Addona, F.; Costanzo, F.; Vicari, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The present study was aimed at investigating working memory (WM) and executive functions capacities in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) as compared with mental-age matched typically developing (TD) children. Method: In order to serve the study goal, a sizeable battery of tasks tapping WM as well as attention, memory, planning,…

  18. 76 FR 1130 - Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Prince William Sound Resource Advisory... conducted: The Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will be discussing and voting on...

  19. 76 FR 18715 - Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Prince William Sound Resource Advisory... meeting is open to the public. The following business will be conducted: The Prince William Sound Resource...

  20. 75 FR 39910 - Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Prince William Sound Resource..., Anchorage, Alaska 99503. Send written comments to Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee, c/o USDA...

  1. 77 FR 45331 - Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Prince William Sound Resource Advisory... Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will be discussing and voting on proposals that...

  2. 33 CFR 110.233 - Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prince William Sound, Alaska. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.233 Prince William Sound, Alaska. (a) The anchorage grounds. In Prince William Sound, Alaska, beginning at a point at latitude 60°40′00″ N., longitude 146°40...

  3. Rorty, Williams, and Davidson: Skepticism and Metaepistemology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ranalli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We revisit an important exchange on the problem of radical skepticism between Richard Rorty and Michael Williams. In his contribution to this exchange, Rorty defended the kind of transcendental approach to radical skepticism that is offered by Donald Davidson, in contrast to Williams’s Wittgenstein-inspired view. It is argued that the key to evaluating this debate is to understand the particular conception of the radical skeptical problem that is offered in influential work by Barry Stroud, a conception of the skeptical problem which generates metaepistemological ramifications for anti-skeptical theories. In particular, we argue that, contra Williams, Rorty’s view that Davidson was offering a theoretical diagnosis of radical skepticism can be consistently maintained with his transcendental approach.

  4. Ethical Life in Kierkegaard and Williams

    OpenAIRE

    Stocker, Barry

    2018-01-01

    A discussion of how the criticisms of ethical theory in Søren Kierkegaard and Bernard Williams both reinforce each other and also provide some challenges to each other. Despite Williams’ brief and dismissive encounter with Kierkegaard around the reading of a ancient tragedy, both oppose any tendency to see the characters in those tragedies as lacking in agency. Both are consistently concerned with how the individual struggles for some ethical agency and how no individual can be free of the in...

  5. Random Thoughts on William Shakespeare and Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    KV Sahasranam

    2017-01-01

    Medicine and literature have always been connected over the ages. William Shakespeare (1564-1616) is no exception. There are plenty of references to medicine and diseases in the works of Shakespeare. The knowledge which Shakespeare has of medical conditions is much more than is expected of a common man. This is attributed to his association with practitioners of his time and reading of contemporary texts in medicine. Also his son in law Dr. John Hall who married Susanna, Shakespeare's eldest ...

  6. Neural Correlates of Amusia in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dankner, Nathan; Pryweller, Jennifer R.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD) populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffus...

  7. Learning by observation: insights from Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Francesca; Menghini, Deny; Mandolesi, Laura; Federico, Francesca; Vicari, Stefano; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer's acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence) in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for acquiring competencies

  8. Learning by observation: insights from Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Foti

    Full Text Available Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer's acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for

  9. Congenital heart defects in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2017-01-01

    Yuan SM. Congenital heart defects in Williams syndrome. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 225-232. Williams syndrome (WS), also known as Williams-Beuren syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder involving multiple systems including the circulatory system. However, the etiologies of the associated congenital heart defects in WS patients have not been sufficiently elucidated and represent therapeutic challenges. The typical congenital heart defects in WS were supravalvar aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis (both valvular and peripheral), aortic coarctation and mitral valvar prolapse. The atypical cardiovascular anomalies include tetralogy of Fallot, atrial septal defects, aortic and mitral valvular insufficiencies, bicuspid aortic valves, ventricular septal defects, total anomalous pulmonary venous return, double chambered right ventricle, Ebstein anomaly and arterial anomalies. Deletion of the elastin gene on chromosome 7q11.23 leads to deficiency or abnormal deposition of elastin during cardiovascular development, thereby leading to widespread cardiovascular abnormalities in WS. In this article, the distribution, treatment and surgical outcomes of typical and atypical cardiac defects in WS are discussed.

  10. TENNESSEE WILLIAMS E O TEATRO MARGINAL GAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Falqueto Lemos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The work developed in this text aims to read the dramatist Tennnessee Williams in a play in two scenes “E Contar Tristes Histórias das Mortes das Bonecas” which was published in Brazil in the book “Mister Paradise e outras peças em um ato” (2011. The intention is to reflect upon one of his recurring themes, the marginalization. In order to perform the analysis, the theoretical support was grounded in “Literatura e Sociedade” by Antonio Candido (2006, concerning the participation of society and authorship in a piece of literature.

  11. TENNESSEE WILLIAMS E O TEATRO MARGINAL GAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Falqueto Lemos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The work developed in this text aims to read the dramatist Tennnessee Williams in a play in two scenes “E Contar Tristes Histórias das Mortes das Bonecas” which was published in Brazil in the book “Mister Paradise e outras peças em um ato” (2011. The intention is to reflect upon one of his recurring themes, the marginalization. In order to perform the analysis, the theoretical support was grounded in “Literatura e Sociedade” by Antonio Candido (2006, concerning the participation of society and authorship in a piece of literature.

  12. WILLIAM HAZLITT, OBSESSIVE LOVE, AND LIBER AMORIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosman, Harry

    2017-07-01

    William Hazlitt, a distinguished literary figure of the early nineteenth century and a forerunner of psychoanalytic insights, had a keen awareness of the impact of the imagination on assessing works of art. At forty-two, he became hopelessly involved in an obsessive love affair with a nineteen-year-old woman and could not extricate himself from the relationship. The affair followed the death of his father, a powerful influence on his life. Factors in his obsessive love included finding an object of idealization subject to his imaginative creation and narcissistically reexperiencing himself about to begin a new life. © 2017 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  13. Enough room for Williams and IMF? / Paul Beckman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Beckman, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Lõppesid Leedu ja USA energeetikakompanii Williams International läbirääkimised Leedu naftakompleksis osaluse omandamise asjus. IMF uurib Leedu majanduslikku arengut, mida tehing Williamsiga komplitseerib

  14. William Butler Yeats’s ‘The Symbolic System’ of William Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Antonielli

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The theosophical systems formulated by great poets, such as William Blake and William Butler Yeats, represent a personal idiosyncratic actualization of an ancient repertoire of magical symbols and occult visions. This study wants to focus the attention on the philosophical, mythical, and esoteric syncretism that W. B. Yeats drew from William Blake’s symbolical system. A fundamental step of Yeats’s deep investigation into the Blakean ‘vision’ was given by his monumental work, written together with Edwin John Ellis, on Blake’s poetic and pictorial production, completed in 1893 with a three-volume edition entitled The Works of William Blake, Poetic, Symbolic, and Critical. This work, published in London by Bernard Quaritch, deeply influenced Yeats’s symbolical and imaginary system, determining its subsequent development up to its codification in the volume of A Vision. With WWB, Yeats was able to systematize for the first time his own thought, giving unity to his Weltanschauung and his poetry. Following this hypothesis, I concentrated on Yeats’s and Ellis’s numerous analyses dedicated to Blake’s mythological and symbolical corpus and, in particular, I examined the last chapter of the first volume of the Quaritch edition. This chapter, entitled “The Symbolic System”, constitutes an unquestionable link between Yeats the reader and scholar of Blake, and Yeats the poet and follower of Blake.

  15. The scientific legacy of William Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This book presents a modern scholarly analysis of issues associated with England’s most famous astronomer, William Herschel. The world’s leading experts on Herschel, discoverer of the planet Uranus, here offer their combined wisdom on many aspects of his life and astronomical research. Solar system topics include comets, Earth’s Moon, and the spurious moons of Uranus, all objects whose observation was pioneered by Herschel.  The contributors examine his study of the structure of the Milky Way and an in-depth look at the development of the front view telescopes he built. The popular subject of extraterrestrial life is looked at from the point of view of both William Herschel and his son John, both of whom had an interest in the topic. William’s personal development through the educational system of the late eighteenth-century is also explored, and the wide range of verse and satire in various languages associated with his discoveries is collected here for the first time. Hershel worked at a time of i...

  16. Colour discrimination and categorisation in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Emily K; Cranwell, Matthew B; Alvarez, James; Franklin, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) present with impaired functioning of the dorsal visual stream relative to the ventral visual stream. As such, little attention has been given to ventral stream functions in WS. We investigated colour processing, a predominantly ventral stream function, for the first time in nineteen individuals with Williams syndrome. Colour discrimination was assessed using the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test. Colour categorisation was assessed using a match-to-sample test and a colour naming task. A visual search task was also included as a measure of sensitivity to the size of perceptual colour difference. Results showed that individuals with WS have reduced colour discrimination relative to typically developing participants matched for chronological age; performance was commensurate with a typically developing group matched for non-verbal ability. In contrast, categorisation was typical in WS, although there was some evidence that sensitivity to the size of perceptual colour differences was reduced in this group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 76 FR 44893 - Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Prince William Sound Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Prince William Sound Resource Advisory... District, 145 Forest Station Road, Girdwood, AK; Prince Willam Sound Community College, 303 Lowe Street...

  18. The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. http://www.hewlett.org/. Think Tank Initiative. This initiative is creating high-quality independent research and policy institutions throughout the developing world. View more. Think Tank Initiative. Growth and Economic Opportunities for ...

  19. 78 FR 28953 - William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    .... Ford Federal Direct Loan Program; Interim Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 95... [Docket ID ED-2013-OPE-0066] RIN 1840-AD13 William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program AGENCY: Office of... Secretary amends the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program (Direct Loan Program) regulations to...

  20. Handedness and corpus callosal morphology in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marilee A; Wilson, Sarah J; Chen, Jian; Wood, Amanda G; Reutens, David C

    2013-02-01

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder caused by a hemizygous deletion on chromosome 7q11.23, resulting in atypical brain structure and function, including abnormal morphology of the corpus callosum. An influence of handedness on the size of the corpus callosum has been observed in studies of typical individuals, but handedness has not been taken into account in studies of callosal morphology in Williams syndrome. We hypothesized that callosal area is smaller and the size of the splenium and isthmus is reduced in individuals with Williams syndrome compared to healthy controls, and examined age, sex, and handedness effects on corpus callosal area. Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained on 25 individuals with Williams syndrome (18 right-handed, 7 left-handed) and 25 matched controls. We found that callosal thickness was significantly reduced in the splenium of Williams syndrome individuals compared to controls. We also found novel evidence that the callosal area was smaller in left-handed participants with Williams syndrome than their right-handed counterparts, with opposite findings observed in the control group. This novel finding may be associated with LIM-kinase hemizygosity, a characteristic of Williams syndrome. The findings may have significant clinical implications in future explorations of the Williams syndrome cognitive phenotype.

  1. Mental Health Problems in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, Chris; Elison, Sarah; Howlin, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Although many researchers have investigated emotional and behavioral difficulties in individuals with Williams syndrome, few have used standardized diagnostic assessments. We examined mental health problems in 92 adults with Williams syndrome using the Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults with Developmental Disabilities--PAS-ADD (Moss,…

  2. Emotional Responsivity in Young Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Debbie J.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Most, David E.; Philofsky, Amy; Rogers, Sally J.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that young children with Williams syndrome show higher rates of emotional responsivity relative to other children with developmental disabilities was explored. Performance of 23 young children with Williams syndrome and 30 MA-matched children with developmental disabilities of nonspecific etiologies was compared on an adaptation of…

  3. Discovering Structure in Auditory Input: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabbagh, Mayada; Cohen, Henri; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2010-01-01

    We examined auditory perception in Williams syndrome by investigating strategies used in organizing sound patterns into coherent units. In Experiment 1, we investigated the streaming of sound sequences into perceptual units, on the basis of pitch cues, in a group of children and adults with Williams syndrome compared to typical controls. We showed…

  4. Mailability v. the Crusader: Williams v. O'Brien.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Charles E.

    The issues of prior restraint and press censorship are examined in this paper, which focuses on the 1970 Williams v. O'Brien court case. The paper discusses the litigation, in which Robert F. Williams, as an American citizen living in Peking, China, sued the United States Postmaster General over the banning of the May 1967 issue of "The…

  5. Malformations vasculaires au cours du syndrome de Williams ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le syndrome de Williams-Beuren est une maladie génétique rare, il associe classiquement une dysmorphie faciale assez spécifique, des malformations cardiovasculaires et un profil neuropsychologique particulier. Nous rapportons les observations de trois enfants atteints du syndrome de Williams-Beuren en insistant ...

  6. Pursuing the Panderer: An Analysis of "United States v. Williams"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrain, Patrick N.; Moore, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    In May 2008, the Supreme Court addressed whether the government can regulate the ownership and distribution of virtual child pornography. "U.S. v. Williams" marked the first time the Court directly addressed the concept of pandering virtual child pornography. This article examines the Court's decision in "U.S. v. Williams" and…

  7. Robert Williams Wood: pioneer of invisible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shruti; Sharma, Amit

    2016-03-01

    The Wood's lamp aids in the diagnosis of multiple infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic dermatologic conditions. Although the Wood's lamp has many applications, which have improved both the diagnosis and management of disease, the man credited for its invention is relatively unknown in medicine. Robert Williams Wood, a prominent physicist of the early 20th century, is credited for the invention of the Wood's lamp. Wood was the father of infrared and ultraviolet photography and made significant contributions to other areas in optics and spectroscopy. Wood's work encompassed the formative years of American Physics; he published over 200 original papers over his lifetime. A few years after the invention of the Wood's lamp for ultraviolet photography, physicians in Europe adopted the Wood's lamp for dermatologic applications. Wood's lamp remains popular in clinics globally, given its ease of use and ability to improve diagnostic precision. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A Mystic in English Literature: William Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fahri DOĞAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human beings have never been satisfied with this ephemeral world. Perhaps, yearning and desire of rejoining −stemming from the descent from the heaven to the earth− are the emotions felt by the members of both celestial and non-celestial religions. Mysticism, having started with the zeal of people who weren‘t satisfied with this ephemeral world towards the eternal world, aimed at the love of God in the religions where there is a belief of single God. In this article, glancing at the life of a Christian mystic William Blake, we will try to shed light into his mystic thoughts. While studying Blake‘s mystic thoughts, there will be common points with Sufism. Nevertheless, analysis of these common points has been assigned to other studies.

  9. Random Thoughts on William Shakespeare and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KV Sahasranam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Medicine and literature have always been connected over the ages. William Shakespeare (1564-1616 is no exception. There are plenty of references to medicine and diseases in the works of Shakespeare. The knowledge which Shakespeare has of medical conditions is much more than is expected of a common man. This is attributed to his association with practitioners of his time and reading of contemporary texts in medicine. Also his son in law Dr. John Hall who married Susanna, Shakespeare's eldest daughter would have contributed substantially to the knowledge of medicine in Shakespeare's compositions. Surgery at the Elizabethan times was well known and is reflected to a large extent in his plays.

  10. William Osler's "The Nervousness of American Women".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Richard L

    2008-02-01

    Almost a century ago, William Osler, the foremost physician of his time, was approached by a leading periodical to write a series of articles on the health of the American woman. Osler, then the Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford, wrote an essay dealing with the psychological stresses affecting the "new woman" of the early 20th century at varying stages of her development and the "nervousness" that ensued. The article was never published as a result of his belated reservations on the propriety of a professional writing for a lay journal. Osler's thinking frequently reflected the spirit of his Victorian-Edwardian era, although at times he demonstrated advanced and prescient ideas about sexuality, not often the subject of discussion, even in circumspect form, in contemporary nonprofessional literature.

  11. [William W. Cadbury and canton hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze-Sheng; Liu, Ze-En

    2004-01-01

    William W. Cadbury M.D. was born in Philadelphia, USA and graduated from the Medical College of Pennsylvania University. It was nearly 40 years since he arrived in Canton (Guangzhou) in 1909 and left at retirement age. He taught western medicine in Canton Christian College and worked as a medical doctor in Canton Hospital, the oldest western medical hospital in the Orient. He was regarded as a famous foreign doctor and an excellent professor in internal medicine in the Republic of China. He wrote At the point of Lancet: 100 years of Canton Hospital 1835 - 1935, which recorded the achievement made by American missionary doctors, particularly the pioneers such as Peter Parker M.D. and John G. Kerr. M.D. So far the book is still an important reference for the studies on history of western medicine in China and the history of modern medical exchange between China and other countries.

  12. William Crabtree and the date of Easter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, D.

    2014-04-01

    A previously unknown treatise by William Crabtree (c.1603-c.1644) has recently been unearthed in the Lancashire Record Office. The treatise, in manuscript form and written in 1640, deals with the controversy over the long-term impact of the Julian Calendar - then in use in England - upon the ecclesiastical dating of Easter. By Crabtree's time, the timing of the Easter celebration in England was often several weeks adrift of the intentions of the early Church Fathers. The Gregorian Calendar, which Roman Catholic countries had adopted as long ago as 1582 in order to resolve the problem, was still vehemently resisted by the English state. This is possibly the only surviving manuscript in Crabtree's own hand. In it, he displays noteworthy dispassionate objectivity as he outlines the astronomical basis for the Easter date and explains why it has gone awry.

  13. Discoverers of the universe William and Caroline Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Hoskin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Discoverers of the Universe tells the gripping story of William Herschel, the brilliant, fiercely ambitious, emotionally complex musician and composer who became court astronomer to Britain's King George III, and of William's sister, Caroline, who assisted him in his observations of the night sky and became an accomplished astronomer in her own right. Together, they transformed our view of the universe from the unchanging, mechanical creation of Newton's clockmaker god to the ever-evolving, incredibly dynamic cosmos that it truly is. William was in his forties when his amateur observations usi

  14. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hwang, Mi Soo; Kim, Sun Yong; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan

    1988-01-01

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures

  15. William L. Donn 1918-1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedzelman, Stanley David

    William L. Donn, Professor Emeritus of the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, City College of New York, and Special Research Scientist at Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory (LDGO) of Columbia University (Palisades, N.Y.), died at his home on June 30, 1987, at the age of 69. Bill demonstrated expertise in a wide range of fields, with a highly productive and creative research and writing career that included geology, oceanography, climatology, atmospheric physics, and meteorology.Donn was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., on March 2, 1918. At the tender age of 10 years, he demonstrated his love and talent for science by building a telescope with his brother, Bertram. During his undergraduate years at Brooklyn College, he switched his major from astronomy to geology. He was largely selftrained in both meteorology and oceanography, serving as head of the Meteorology Section, U.S. Merchant Marine Academy during World War II . One by-product of these years was the textbook Meteorology—With Marine Applications, first published in 1946. This widely adopted text became a standard for a generation of mariners and college students.

  16. Neurocranial morphology and growth in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Stefan; Kjaer, Inger; Heiberg, Arvid; Bjørnland, Tore; Storhaug, Kari

    2005-02-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare congenital neurodevelopmental disorder with distinctive facial features, cardiovascular abnormalities, short stature, mental retardation, and behaviour and cognitive characteristics. The aim of this study was to describe the neurocranial morphology and growth in a group of 62 individuals with WS. The neurocranium was analysed on lateral cephalograms and comparisons were made with neurocranial standards from longitudinal data derived from the Oslo University Craniofacial Growth Archive. The size and morphology of the neurocranium in WS subjects differed from controls. Females as a group showed greater differences than males. The posterior cranial base length was shorter in both WS males and females, and the anterior cranial base length was shorter in WS females whereas it was close to normal in the WS male group. The cranial base angle was, however, not different from the control groups. A flattening was seen in the superior aspect of the parietal bone in both WS males and females. In the posterior part of the neurocranium, the prominence of the occipital bone was larger than in the control groups, which was also reflected in a larger total length of the neurocranium. The thickness of the frontal and occipital bones was considerably greater than in the control group. The deviant size and morphology of the neurocranium in WS subjects was already established in the youngest age group and maintained throughout the observation period. The growth pattern of the neurocranium in WS subjects seemed to be similar to that of the control groups, except in a few individuals.

  17. Imaging of cardiovascular malformations in Williams syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shiguo; Zhao Shihua; Jiang Shiliang; Huang Lianjun; Xu Zhongying; Ling Jian; Zheng Hong; Yan Chaowu; Lu Jinguo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging methods for cardiovascular malformations in Williams syndrome(WS). Methods: Thirteen cases of WS (7 males and 6 females) aged 10 months to 13 years were involved in this study. All patients underwent chest X-ray radiography, electrocardiography, echocardiography and physical examination. 3 cases underwent electronic beam computed tomography (EBCT), cardiac catheterization and angiography were performed in 8 cases. Results: Twelve patients were referred to our hospital for cardiac murmur and 1 case for cyanosis after birth. 7 patients were found with 'elfin-like' facial features, 6 patients with pulmonary arterial stenosis, 2 cases with patent ductus arteriosus, 2 cases with severe pulmonary hypertension and 1 case with total endocardial cushion defect. Sudden death occurred in 2 patients during and after catheterization, respectively. Conclusions: Conventional angiography is the golden standard for the diagnosis of cardiovascular malformations in WS. Noninvasive methods such as MSCT and MRI should be suggested because of the risk of sudden death in conventional angiography. (authors)

  18. Sir William Mitchell (1925-2002)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Sir William (Bill) Mitchell, former President of the CERN Council, died on 30th October 2002 at the age of 77. Mitchell was professor of Physics at Oxford University from 1978 to 1989, having previously been Professor of Physics, Dean of Science and Deputy Vice-Chancellor at Reading University. From 1985 to 1990 he was Chairman of the UK's Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC), which at the time was the funding agency for the UK's participation in the CERN programme. As Chairman, Mitchell was one of the UK representatives on the CERN Council, and in 1991 he was elected President, a position he held for three years. This was a difficult period for CERN. Financial problems were being faced in many member states, notably in Germany as a result of unification. This led to calls for reductions in the CERN budget and, more significantly, to requests for delays in consderation of future programmes. On the other hand for the future of CERN and the progress of elementary particle physics, it was necessary...

  19. National uranium resource evaluation: Williams quadrangle, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, A.J.; Nystrom, R.J.; Thiede, D.S.

    1981-03-01

    Geologic environments of the Williams Quadrangle, Arizona, were evaluated for uranium favorability by means of literature research, uranium-occurrence investigation and other surface studies, subsurface studies, aerial radiometric data, hydrogeochemical data, and rock-sample analytic data. Favorability criteria are those of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Three geologic environments are favorable for uranium: the Tertiary fluvial rocks of the Colorado Plateau where they unconformably overlie impermeable bed rock (for channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits); collapse breccia pipes in Paleozoic strata of the Colorado Plateau (for vein-type deposits in sedimentary rocks); and Precambrian crystalline rocks of the Hualapai, Peacock, and Aquarius Mountains, and Cottonwood and Grand Wash Cliffs (for magmatic-hydrothermal deposits). Unfavorable geologic environments are: Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic rocks, Tertiary and Quaternary sedimentary rocks of the Colorado Plateau, nearly all Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, and the Precambrian-Cambrian unconformity of the Grand Wash Cliffs area. Tertiary rocks in Cenozoic basins and Precambrian crystalline rocks in the Grand Canyon region and in parts of the Aquarius Mountains and Cottonwood and Grand Wash Cliffs are unevaluated

  20. Neural correlates of amusia in williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D; Dankner, Nathan; Pryweller, Jennifer R; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2014-11-21

    Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD) populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine neural correlates of amusia in 17 individuals with WS (4 of whom met criteria for amusia). Consistent with findings from TD amusics, amusia in WS was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). The relationship between amusia and FA in the inferior component of the SLF was particularly robust, withstanding corrections for cognitive functioning, auditory sensitivities, or musical training. Though the number of individuals with amusia in the study is small, results add to evidence for the role of fronto-temporal disconnectivity in congenital amusia and suggest that novel populations with developmental differences can provide a window into understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships that underlie musical behaviors.

  1. Space perception and William James's metaphysical presuppositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Martin J

    2011-05-01

    William James's overtly philosophical work may be more continuous with his psychological work than is sometimes thought. His Essays in Radical Empiricism can be understood as an explicit statement of the absolute presupposition that formed the basis of Jamesian psychology: that direct experience is primary and has to be taken at face value. An examination of James's theory of space perception suggests that, even in his early work, he presupposed the primacy of direct experience, and that later changes in his account of space perception can be understood as making his view more consistent with this presupposition. In his earlier view of space perception, James argued that sensations were directly experienced as spatial, though he accepted that spatial relations between sensations may be constructed by higher order thought. In his later view, however, James argued that spatial relations were just as directly experienced as sensations. The work of T. H. Green may have prompted James to recognize the full consequence of his ideas and to realize that taking experience at face value required that spatial relations be thought of as intrinsic to experience rather than the result of intellectual construction.

  2. Neural Correlates of Amusia in Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam D. Lense

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS, a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine neural correlates of amusia in 17 individuals with WS (4 of whom met criteria for amusia. Consistent with findings from TD amusics, amusia in WS was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF. The relationship between amusia and FA in the inferior component of the SLF was particularly robust, withstanding corrections for cognitive functioning, auditory sensitivities, or musical training. Though the number of individuals with amusia in the study is small, results add to evidence for the role of fronto-temporal disconnectivity in congenital amusia and suggest that novel populations with developmental differences can provide a window into understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships that underlie musical behaviors.

  3. William James and the Heidelberg fiasco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Horst

    2018-02-01

    Urged on by his father to become a physician instead of a painter, William James pursued 3 evasion stratagems. First, to avoid becoming a practitioner, he declared that he wanted to specialize in physiology. Based upon this premise, he left for Germany in the spring of 1867. The second step was giving up general physiology and announcing that he would specialize in the nervous system and psychology. Based upon this premise, he declared that he would go to Heidelberg and study with Helmholtz and Wundt. However, he then deferred going there. When, at last, he was urged by an influential friend of his father's to accompany him to Heidelberg, he employed his default stratagem: He simply fled. He returned home after 3 terms in Europe without enrolling at a single university. There is no evidence that he had learned anything there about psychology or experimental psychology, except, possibly, by reading books. James's "Heidelberg fiasco" was the apogee of his evasion of his father's directive. A dense fog of misinformation surrounds his stay in Heidelberg to this day. By analyzing circumstances and context, this article examines the fiasco and places it in the pattern of his behavior during his stay in Europe. Nevertheless, experiencing this fiasco potentially shaped James's ambivalent attitude toward experimental psychology on a long-term basis. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Ending Caleb Williams: on storytelling influencing William Godwin’s politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Roberto da Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available William Godwin escreveu o romance gótico Things as They Are; or, the Adventures of Caleb Williams (“As Coisas como Elas São; ou, as Aventuras de Caleb Williams”, em tradução livre em 1794 para disseminar suas ideias filosóficas e políticas. Inicio o artigo revisando a literatura para demonstrar como sua teoria influenciou tanto sua decisão de escrever ficções quanto o tipo de ficção que ele escreveu, mostrando como o autor usou e inovou convenções do gênero gótico para transmitir suas ideias para um público mais amplo. Então comparo duas perspectivas divergentes na literatura quanto à maneira como suas narrativas influenciaram suas ideias políticas e filosóficas, em particular a partir de comentários acerca do significado e do impacto de mudanças de última hora ao desfecho de Caleb Williams. Argumento que essa relação ambígua entre narrativa e política na obra de Godwin é relevante para reflexões políticas contemporâneas sobre a relação entre representação e ação política, ou como narrativas sobre a condição humana e realidades políticas podem afetas as ideias, atitudes e relações sociais de seus narradores.

  5. Global and local music perception in children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deruelle, Christine; Schön, Daniele; Rondan, Cécilie; Mancini, Josette

    2005-04-25

    Musical processing can be decomposed into the appreciation of global and local elements. This global/local dissociation was investigated with the processing of contour-violated and interval-violated melodies. Performance of a group of 16 children with Williams syndrome and a group of 16 control children were compared in a same-different task. Control participants were more accurate in detecting differences in the contour-violated than in the interval-violated condition while Williams syndrome individuals performed equally well in both conditions. This finding suggests that global precedence may occur at an early perceptual stage in normally developing children. In contrast, no such global precedence is observed in the Williams syndrome population. These data are discussed in the context of atypical cognitive profiles of individuals with Williams syndrome.

  6. Comparison of the acute effects of Tulbaghia violacea William Henry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    William Henry Harvey (Alliaceae) on blood pressure and heart rate of ... (WKY), and compare the results obtained with those for adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Methods: T. ... have similar secondary metabolites and biological ...

  7. Herbert Hoover and William Shakespeare: Two Writers on Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Margaret L.

    1979-01-01

    Outlines the ways in which Herbert Hoover and William Shakespeare wrote about professional ethics (for engineers and kings, respectively) using the writing techniques of concreteness, audience awareness, and development by induction. (TJ)

  8. Dental management of patient with Williams Syndrome - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel; Ramachandra, Srinivas Sulugodu; Singh, Ashish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystemic rare genetic disorder caused by deletion of 26-28 genes in the long arm of chromosome 7. It is characterized by developmental and physical abnormalities including congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, mental retardation, neurological features, growth deficiency, genitourinary manifestations, gastrointestinal problems, musculoskeletal problems, unique behavioral characteristics, and dental problems. Dental abnormalities include malocclusion, hypodontia, malformed teeth, taurodontism, pulp stones, increased space between teeth, enamel hypoplasia, and high prevalence of dental caries. Authors report a 17-year-old female patient with underlying Williams syndrome. Oral features and problems seen in the patient are listed. Malocclusion and screwdriver shaped teeth were noticed. Generalized widening of the periodontal ligament space with vital teeth was seen. This finding has not been reported in cases of Williams syndrome earlier. Precautions taken during dental treatment in patients with Williams syndrome are also discussed.

  9. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: NESTS (Bird Nests)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  10. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  11. 34 CFR 685.100 - The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. 685...) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION WILLIAM D. FORD FEDERAL DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM Purpose and Scope § 685.100 The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. (a) Under the William D. Ford...

  12. Epistemologia pragmatyczna Michaela Williamsa (PRAGMATIST EPISTEMOLOGY BY MICHAEL WILLIAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Ziemińska

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents three main elements of Williams' epistemology: the concept of knowledge, the problem of skepticism and the concept of truth. Williams takes knowledge not as pure descriptive but partly normative concept (to know is to be engaged and entitled. He rejects the demonstrative conception of knowledge (knowledge is infallible and prefers the fallibilist conception of knowledge (knowledge is uncertain and fallible. Williams is good at bringing skeptical presuppositions to light: the demonstrative conception of knowledge and the conception of justification with Prior Grounding Requirement, epistemological realism and priority for internal knowledge. He rightly observes that when we change that presuppositions (skeptic's context, knowledge does exist. However, Williams-fallibilist is close to a skeptic: they both agree that our beliefs are uncertain. The difference is only whether some of our beliefs deserve to be called knowledge. The most important worries concern Williams' concept of truth (deflationary pragmatism. According to Williams truth has no nature and it is not a goal of inquiry. However, if truth is not a goal, we can hardly understand the previous discussion with skepticism and the defense of rationality.

  13. William James, Gustav Fechner, and Early Psychophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. Hawkins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available American psychologist and philosopher William James devoted the entirety of his career to exploring the nature of volition, as expressed by such phenomena as will, attention, and belief. As part of that endeavor, James's unorthodox scientific pursuits, from his experiments with nitrous oxide and hallucinogenic drugs to his investigation of spiritualist mediums, represent his attempt to address the "hard problems" of consciousness for which his training in brain physiology and experimental psychology could not entirely account. As a student, James's reading in chemistry and physics had sparked his interest in the concepts of energy and force, terms that he later deployed in his writing about consciousness and in his arguments against philosophical monism and scientific materialism, as he developed his radically empiricist ideas privileging discontinuity and plurality. Despite James's long campaign against scientific materialism, he was, however, convinced of the existence of a naturalistic explanation for the more "wayward and fitful" aspects of mind, including transcendent experiences associated with hysteria, genius, and religious ecstasy. In this paper, I examine aspects of James's thought that are still important for contemporary debates in psychology and neuroscience: his "transmission theory" of consciousness, his ideas on the "knowing of things together," and, finally, the related concept of "the compounding of consciousness," which postulates the theoretical possibility for individual entities within a conscious system of thought to "know" the thoughts of others within the system. Taken together, these ideas suggest that James, in spite of, or perhaps because of, his forays into metaphysics, was working toward a naturalistic understanding of consciousness, what I will term a "distributive model," based on his understanding of consciousness as an "awareness" that interacts dynamically within, and in relation to, its environment.

  14. Metabolic abnormalities in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Verdú, María Gabriela; Segura-Puimedon, Maria; Borralleras, Cristina; Flores, Raquel; Del Campo, Miguel; Campuzano, Victoria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS, OMIM-194050) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystemic manifestations caused by a 1.55-1.83 Mb deletion at 7q11.23 including 26-28 genes. Reported endocrine and metabolic abnormalities include transient hypercalcaemia of infancy, subclinical hypothyroidism in ∼ 30% of children and impaired glucose tolerance in ∼ 75% of adult individuals. The purpose of this study was to further study metabolic alterations in patients with WBS, as well as in several mouse models, to establish potential candidate genes. We analysed several metabolic parameters in a cohort of 154 individuals with WBS (data available from 69 to 151 cases per parameter), as well as in several mouse models with complete and partial deletions of the orthologous WBS locus, and searched for causative genes and potential modifiers. Triglyceride plasma levels were significantly decreased in individuals with WBS while cholesterol levels were slightly decreased compared with controls. Hyperbilirubinemia, mostly unconjugated, was found in 18.3% of WBS cases and correlated with subclinical hypothyroidism and hypotriglyceridemia, suggesting common pathogenic mechanisms. Haploinsufficiency at MLXIPL and increased penetrance for hypomorphic alleles at the UGT1A1 gene promoter might underlie the lipid and bilirubin alterations. Other disturbances included increased protein and iron levels, as well as the known subclinical hypothyroidism and glucose intolerance. Our results show that several unreported biochemical alterations, related to haploinsufficiency for specific genes at 7q11.23, are relatively common in WBS. The early diagnosis, follow-up and management of these metabolic disturbances could prevent long-term complications in this disorder. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. William Byrd: Political and Recusant Composer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Foshay Bacon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Amidst the pendulum of political and religious upheaval that pervaded England throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth century, William Byrd stands as one of the best loved and lauded composers. Byrd succeeded in the secular and sacred realms, contributing great works to the Anglican Church, popularizing the English madrigal and producing prolific amounts of sacred music. However, in a time where one’s religious beliefs were often linked with political loyalty, Byrd defied his monarch’s established and enforced Protestant religion, composing politically charged music for recusant use in clandestine Catholic Church services. His themes were aligned with the Jesuit mission and his texts were often drawn from the lips of martyred Catholics at the gallows; their last words forever immortalized by Byrd for the furthering of the Jesuit cause and the Counter-Reformation. The examination of sources by prominent Byrd scholars, an analyses of Byrd’s ‘political’ compositions and a study of the social and historical background are used to place Byrd within the appropriate context, prove his recusant and political leanings, and analyze his precarious relationship with the English monarch, Elizabeth I. It is shown that Byrd could not have proceeded with his recusant practices, personally or musically, had it not been for his status as a composer, as well as Byrd’s shrewdness in procuring diplomatic relationships with high persons at court and with Queen Elizabeth I through the Chapel Royal. Finally, Byrd’s success at writing for the Anglican Church service and popular secular music showcased his ability to take a moderate stance in situations that benefitted his status with the crown

  16. Obituary: William A. Rense (1914-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Glen

    2009-12-01

    On March 28, 2008, the space research community lost another of its pioneers. William A. Rense, professor emeritus of physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder, who died in Estes Park, Colorado, following complications from cancer. He was 94. Bill, as he was widely known, was born in 1914 in Massillon, Ohio, the son of German immigrants. His was a large family - five brothers and one sister. His father, Joseph Rense, worked for the city of Cleveland while his mother, Rosalia (Luther) Rense was a housewife. As a child, Bill developed a love of astronomy which led him to earn a bachelor's degree in physics and astronomy from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, followed by master's and PhD degrees in physics at Ohio State University. He held teaching positions at Rutgers, University of Miami (Florida), Texas A & M, and Louisiana State University before taking his final appointment at CU in 1949. While teaching at LSU, he met and in 1942 married Wanda (Childs) Rense. In addition to teaching physics at CU, Bill did research in CU's Upper Air Laboratory. His early work there included studies of polarized light and its implications for the analysis of zodiacal light. He and his co-workers also began developing instrumentation to be flown above the Earth's atmosphere in sounding rockets. In 1952 he obtained the first photographic spectrogram of the solar Lyman-alpha line of hydrogen (121.6nm). This work was followed in 1956 by the first full disk spectroheliogram in Lyman-alpha. These results could not have been possible without the use of pointing control systems for sounding rockets. These "sun trackers" kept the payloads pointed at the sun long enough for the measurements to be made, and CU was a pioneer in their development. The expanding research venue led the Upper Air Laboratory to be renamed the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), and Bill Rense was its first director. He continued his research into the properties of the solar

  17. Recent paleoseismicity record in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Steven A.; Miller, Eric J.; Marshall, Nicole R.; Dellapenna, Timothy M.

    2017-12-01

    Sedimentological and geochemical investigation of sediment cores collected in the deep (>400 m) central basin of Prince William Sound, along with geochemical fingerprinting of sediment source areas, are used to identify earthquake-generated sediment gravity flows. Prince William Sound receives sediment from two distinct sources: from offshore (primarily Copper River) through Hinchinbrook Inlet, and from sources within the Sound (primarily Columbia Glacier). These sources are found to have diagnostic elemental ratios indicative of provenance; Copper River Basin sediments were significantly higher in Sr/Pb and Cu/Pb, whereas Prince William Sound sediments were significantly higher in K/Ca and Rb/Sr. Within the past century, sediment gravity flows deposited within the deep central channel of Prince William Sound have robust geochemical (provenance) signatures that can be correlated with known moderate to large earthquakes in the region. Given the thick Holocene sequence in the Sound ( 200 m) and correspondingly high sedimentation rates (>1 cm year-1), this relationship suggests that sediments within the central basin of Prince William Sound may contain an extraordinary high-resolution record of paleoseismicity in the region.

  18. Celiac disease in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mıhçı, Ercan; Nur, Banu Güzel; Berker-Karaüzüm, Sibel; Yılmaz, Aygen; Artan, Reha

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune, gastrointestinal disorder characterized by intolerance to the dietary grain protein gluten. An increased prevalence of celiac disease has been reported in Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, but there has been only few previous reports with respect to the association of celiac disease in Williams-Beuren syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of celiac disease in our 24 Williams-Beuren syndrome patients. Gastrointestinal problems and celiac disease symptoms of patients were noted. All patients were analyzed by the titer of tissue transglutaminases IgA and IgG. HLA genotyping and intestinal biopsy was performed to the patients with positive serology. We also performed gluten free diet in the presence of compatible symptoms, serology, HLA genotyping and intestinal biopsy. In our study, two patients had positive tTG antibodies, but only one had positive biopsy finding for celiac disease. The frequency of celiac disease in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome was estimated as 1/24 (4.1%). Though the number of participants in this study was limited, the results show that the frequency of celiac disease is higher in Williams-Beuren syndrome compared to the general population. We suggest that a high suspicion and testing for celiac disease should be recommended at certain intervals in all cases with Williams-Beuren syndrome to detect the cause of growth retardation and gastrointestinal problems.

  19. Williams Syndrome and 15q Duplication: Coincidence versus Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Aditi; Agarwal, Swashti; Perez-Colon, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystem disorder caused by contiguous gene deletion in 7q11.23, commonly associated with distinctive facial features, supravalvular aortic stenosis, short stature, idiopathic hypercalcemia, developmental delay, joint laxity, and a friendly personality. The clinical features of 15q11q13 duplication syndrome include autism, mental retardation, ataxia, seizures, developmental delay, and behavioral problems. We report a rare case of a girl with genetically confirmed Williams syndrome and coexisting 15q duplication syndrome. The patient underwent treatment for central precocious puberty and later presented with primary amenorrhea. The karyotype revealed 47,XX,+mar. FISH analysis for the marker chromosome showed partial trisomy/tetrasomy for proximal chromosome 15q (15p13q13). FISH using an ELN -specific probe demonstrated a deletion in the Williams syndrome critical region in 7q11.23. To our knowledge, a coexistence of Williams syndrome and 15q duplication syndrome has not been reported in the literature. Our patient had early pubertal development, which has been described in some patients with Williams syndrome. However, years later after discontinuing gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue treatment, she developed primary amenorrhea.

  20. Obituary: William K. Rose (1935-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2011-12-01

    Stellar astrophysicist William Kenneth Rose died near his home in Potomac, Maryland, on September 30, 2010, after an extended illness. Rose was the son of pharmacist Kenneth William Rose and Shirley Near Rose and was born in Ossining, New York, on August 10, 1935. He received an AB from Columbia College in 1957 and a PhD in physics from Columbia University in 1963, with a thesis on "measurements of linear polarization in discrete radio sources using a 9.4 cm maser," under the direction of Charles H. Townes. Rose played a major role in designing and constructing the maser and used it at a radio telescope at Maryland Point that belonged to the Naval Research Lab. He observed Jupiter and Saturn and a number of extra-solar-system sources, and also diffuse centimeter emission (see appendix). The thesis was not published in an archival journal, but can be found under Library of Congress code QB 475.R67. While in graduate School, Bill married Sheila Tuchman, whose primary scientific interests were biological. None of their three children chose to be scientists, but two are CPAs. Bill moved successfully through the academic hurdles) from a research position at Princeton (1963-67), where a collaboration with Nick Woolf and Martin Schwarzchild on the infrared spectra of giant stars became one of his most-cited papers, to assistant and associate professorships at MIT (1967-71), and then associate and full professorships at the University of Maryland (1971 to retirement in 2005). His most innovative work was probably that on nova explosions arising from degenerate ignition of hydrogen accreted on white dwarfs in close binary systems, published in 1968. The same idea occurred to others at about the same time, and Bill did not, perhaps, get quite his fair share of the credit. I first met Sheila and Bill in summer 1969 at the Stony Brook summer school on stellar evolution (not published until 1972). He lectured on the nature of nova explosions and on nuclear burning in thin

  1. Coronary ostium occlusion by coronary cusp displacement in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiohama, Tadashi; Fujii, Katsunori; Ebata, Ryota; Funabashi, Nobusada; Matsumiya, Goro; Saito, Yuko Kazato; Takechi, Fumie; Yonemori, Yoko; Nakatani, Yukio; Shimojo, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    Williams syndrome is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome resulting from a heterozygous deletion on chromosome 7q11.23, and is characterized by distinctive facial features and supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). This syndrome rarely presents unpredictable cardiac death, and yet, as illustrated in the present case, it is still not possible to predict it, even on close monitoring. We herein describe the case of a 6-year-old Japanese girl with Williams syndrome, who had sudden cardiac collapse due to cardiac infarction after pharyngitis. Cardiac failure followed a critical course that did not respond to catecholamine support or heart rest with extracardiac mechanical support. Although marked coronary stenosis was not present, the left coronary cusp abnormally adhered to the aortic wall, which may synergistically cause coronary ostium occlusion with SVAS. Altered hemodynamic state, even that caused by the common cold, may lead to critical myocardial events in Williams syndrome with SVAS. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Obituary: William L. Kraushaar, 1920-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Professor William L. Kraushaar, a former MIT physics professor and a pioneer in the field of high-energy astronomy, died 21 March 2008 of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 87. Kraushaar received his bachelor's degree from Lafayette College in 1942. During World War II he worked at the National Bureau of Standards on projects that included development of the proximity fuse for artillery shells. After the war he earned his doctorate at Cornell University. In 1949 Kraushaar was appointed research associate at MIT, where he made the first measurements of the mean life of the pi meson at the MIT electron synchrotron. Over the next fifteen years he rose through the faculty ranks, becoming a full professor before leaving MIT for the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1965. In 1957 Kraushaar began a decade-long effort to map the sky in the "light" of cosmic gamma rays. Their detection promised to open new ways to investigate high-energy processes in the universe. Initial balloon-borne experiments failed due to background gamma rays generated in the residual atmosphere above the highest attainable altitudes. In 1958, Kraushaar seized a new opportunity for experiments above the atmosphere. Working with Professor George Clark, he directed the development in the MIT Laboratory for Nuclear Science of a gamma-ray detector for a satellite experiment that was launched in April 1961 as Explorer 11. It registered 31 events with the electronic signatures of cosmic gamma rays with energies greater than 50 MeV. Kraushaar then initiated a second and more refined experiment to be carried on OSO 3. In this project Kraushaar and Clark were joined by Gordon Garmire, a former student of Kraushaar. The OSO 3 experiment, launched in March of 1967, registered 621 cosmic gamma-ray events. It yielded the first all-sky map of high-energy cosmic gamma rays showing a concentration of gamma rays from directions in the Milky Way where gamma-ray producing interactions of charged cosmic

  3. William Barlow and the Determination of Atomic Arrangement in Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauskopf, Seymour H

    2015-04-01

    William Barlow (1845-1934) was an important if unconventional scientist, known for having developed the 'closest-packing' atomic models of crystal structure. He resumed an early nineteenth-century tradition of utilizing crystallographical and chemical data to determine atomic arrangements in crystals. This essay recounts Barlow's career and scientific activity in three parts: (a) His place in the tradition of determining atomic arrangement in context of this earlier tradition and of contemporaneous developments of crystallography and chemistry, (b) his unconventional career, and (c) the 'success' of his program to determine atomic arrangements in crystals and its influence on the work of William Lawrence Bragg.

  4. Adaptive Functioning in Williams Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawn, Gabrielle; Porter, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    Literature on the level of adaptive functioning and relative strengths and weaknesses in functioning of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) was reviewed. The electronic databases PsycINFO, PubMed, Expanded Academic, Web of Science, Scopus and ProQuest were searched electronically for relevant articles and dissertations using the search terms…

  5. Beyond Behaviour: Is Social Anxiety Low in Williams Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Helen F.; Schniering, Carolyn A.; Porter, Melanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) exhibit striking social behaviour that may be indicative of abnormally low social anxiety. The present research aimed to determine whether social anxiety is unusually low in WS and to replicate previous findings of increased generalised anxiety in WS using both parent and self report. Fifteen individuals…

  6. Climatic data for Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, A.M.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Winter, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    Research on the hydrology of Williams Lake, north-central Minnesota includes study of evaporation. Presented here are those climatic data needed for energy-budget and mass-transfer studies, including: water-surface temperature, dry-bulb and wet-bulb air temperatures, wind speed, precipitation, and solar and atmospheric radiation. Data are collected at raft and land stations.

  7. Climatic data for Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, A.M.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Scarborough, J.L.; Winter, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Research on the hydrology of Williams Lake, north-central Minnesota includes study of evaporation. Presented here are those climatic data needed for energy-budget and mass-transfer studies, including: water-surface temperature, dry-bulb and wet-bulb air temperatures, wind speed, precipitation, and solar and atmospheric radiation. Data are collected at raft and land stations.

  8. Climatic data for Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota, 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, A.M.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Engelbrecht, L.G.; Gothard, W.A.; Winter, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    Research on the hydrology of Williams Lake, north-central Minnesota includes study of evaporation. Presented here are those climatic data needed for energy-budget and mass-transfer studies,including: water-surface temperature, dry-bulb and wet-bulb air temperatures, wind speed, precipitation, and solar radiation. Data are collected at raft and land stations.

  9. Edward Christopher Williams and His Impact on Librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Carlos

    Edward Christopher Williams had a major impact on librarianship, not only as the first documented African American to graduate from a library school, but also as a developer of education for librarians and as an active member of the American Library Association (ALA) and the Ohio Library Association. This study used the historical methodology…

  10. Atypical Sleep Architecture and Altered EEG Spectra in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombos, F.; Bodizs, R.; Kovacs, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterised by physical abnormalities and a distinctive cognitive profile with intellectual disabilities (IDs) and learning difficulties. Methods: In our study, nine adolescents and young adults with WS and 9 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) participants…

  11. Astronaut William Fisher preparing to train in the WETF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Astronaut William Fisher is shown in his extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) preparing to train in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). He is wearing the communications carrier assembly but not the full helmet (32102); Reflections of the WETF can be seen on the closed visor of the EMU helmet Fiser is wearing (32103).

  12. I Know! It's Backwards Day! Gender Roles and William's Doll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Kleut, Geraldine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a case study of an exploration of gender roles in a second-grade classroom. The author discusses some of the discursive identities in which she and her students are positioned, and then uses the picture book William's Doll to introduce a discussion of discursive gender identities with her students. She then asks students to…

  13. Elicited Production of Relative Clauses in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Relative clauses have been implicated alternately as a strength and a weakness in the language of people with Williams Syndrome (WS). To clarify the facts, an elicited production test was administered to 10 people with WS (age 10-16 years), 10 typically developing children (age 4-7 years), and 12 typically developing adults. Nearly every WS…

  14. Shepard Award Winners, Part 2: Dr. Tracie Williams

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-29

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Tracie Williams, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/29/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/29/2009.

  15. Orientation Perception in Williams Syndrome: Discrimination and Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Melanie; Landau, Barbara; Egeth, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, which stems from a genetic deletion on chromosome 7 and causes a profound weakness in visuospatial cognition. Our current study explores how orientation perception may contribute to the visuospatial deficits in WS. In Experiment 1, we found that WS individuals and normal 3-4 year olds…

  16. How Executive Functions Are Related to Intelligence in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ana; Cruz, Raquel; Sampaio, Adriana; Garayzabal, Elena; Martinez-Regueiro, Rocio; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Carracedo, Angel; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse

    2012-01-01

    Williams syndrome is characterized by impairments in executive functions (EFs). However, it remains unknown how distinct types of EFs relate to intelligence in this syndrome. The present study analyzed performance on working memory, inhibiting and shifting, and its links to IQ in a sample of 17 individuals with WS, and compared them with a group…

  17. Biblionef SA: Bringing books to the bookless | Williams | Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biblionef SA: Bringing books to the bookless. Jean Williams. Abstract. No abstract available. Innovation (2003) No. 26, pp 43-47. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  18. William Shakespeare’s“Hamlet”and Oedipus Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迪丽努尔

    2014-01-01

    “Hamlet”is one of the great dramas of William Shakespeare. This paper by describing the relationship between Hamlet and his mother, the Ghost and his uncle, tries to approve that Oedipus complex is the main reason of Hamlet’s kil ing his uncle.

  19. Sir William Jenner (1815-1898) and Queen Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, David; Queen Victoria

    2004-08-01

    This biographical note outlines the work of Sir William Jenner (1815-1898), court physician 1861-93 and President of the Royal College of Physicians 1881-8. He was the first to distinguish between typhoid and typhus both clinically and pathologically.

  20. A Conversation with William A. Fowler Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, John

    2005-06-01

    Physicist William A.Fowler initiated an experimental program in nuclear astrophysics after World War II. He recalls here the Steady State versus Big Bang controversy and his celebrated collaboration with Fred Hoyle and Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge on nucleosynthesis in stars. He also comments on the shift away from nuclear physics in universities to large accelerators and national laboratories.

  1. Florence Jessie MacWilliams (1917-1990)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    famous mathematician Oscar Zariski, well known for his work in algebraic geometry, at. Johns Hopkins University, following him to Harvard University to study with him for a year. There was a break in her studies for many years following her marriage in 1941 to. W al ter Mac Williams, an engineer, and the birth and raising of ...

  2. La Fondation William et Flora Hewlett | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    La Fondation William et Flora Hewlett. http://www.hewlett.org/ · What we do · Funding · Resources · About IDRC. Knowledge. Innovation. Solutions. Careers · Contact Us · Site map. Sign up now for IDRC news and views sent directly to your inbox each month. Subscribe · Copyright · Open access policy · Privacy policy ...

  3. William Knocke receives 2008 Virginia Outstanding Civil Engineer Award

    OpenAIRE

    Daniilidi, Christina

    2008-01-01

    William R. Knocke, W.C. English Professor and head of the Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech, was awarded the 2008 Virginia Outstanding Civil Engineer Award at the Virginia Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers' (ASCE) banquet, held recently in Williamsburg, Va.

  4. 77 FR 76414 - William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Federal Direct Loan Program AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION: Final regulations; correction... Loan (Perkins Loan) Program; the Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program; and the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program, including the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program...

  5. 77 FR 72960 - William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... Federal Direct Loan Program AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION... document to establish the date for the early implementation of William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) program regulations that establish a new income-contingent repayment plan based on the President...

  6. Perceptual Speech and Paralinguistic Skills of Adolescents with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Patricia M.; Pittelko, Stephen; Fillingane, Evan; Rustman, Emily; Lund, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare selected speech and paralinguistic skills of speakers with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing peers and to demonstrate the feasibility of providing preexisting databases to students to facilitate graduate research. In a series of three studies, conversational samples of 12 adolescents with…

  7. Williams Syndrome: Daily Challenges and Positive Impact on the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallan, Susan; Senior, Joyce; Reilly, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the distinctive physical, cognitive, personality and behavioural characteristics associated with Williams syndrome, few studies to date have examined parental experiences of raising a child with this genetic syndrome. Methods: This explorative pilot study employed predominantly qualitative methodologies via face-to-face…

  8. Language and Literacy Development of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23. Children with the syndrome evidence large individual differences in both broad language and reading abilities. Nevertheless, as a group, children with this syndrome show a consistent pattern characterized by relative…

  9. Advocating for Inclusion of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and explore the experience of inclusion of students with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition of a microdeletion on chromosome 7 which has medical, behavior, and cognitive issues. The study was conducted by gaining an understanding from the parents' point of view. The study was twofold. First, the…

  10. Gender Attribution and Gender Agreement in French Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boloh, Yves; Ibernon, Laure; Royer, Stephanie; Escudier, Frederique; Danillon, Aurelia

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies on grammatical gender in French individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have led to conflicting findings and interpretations regarding keys abilities--gender attribution and gender agreement. New production data from a larger SW sample (N = 24) showed that gender attribution scores in SW participants exactly mirrored those of…

  11. Examining Reports of Mental Health in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, Chris; Tomlinson, Katie; Estes, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have a disposition towards anxiety. Information regarding this is typically derived from parents and carers. The perspectives of the individuals with WS are rarely included in research of this nature. We examined the mental health of 19 adults with WS using explicit (psychiatric…

  12. Electrophysiological Correlates of Semantic Processing in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Ana P.; Galdo-Alvarez, Santaigo; Sampaio, Adriana; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder due to microdeletion in chromosome 7, has been described as a syndrome with an intriguing socio-cognitive phenotype. Cognitively, the relative preservation of language and face processing abilities coexists with severe deficits in visual-spatial tasks, as well as in tasks involving…

  13. Comprehension of Metaphor and Metonymy in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Van Herwegen, Jo; Thomas, Michael; Fishman, Roza; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    Background: Figurative language, such as metaphor and metonymy, is very common in daily language use. Its underlying cognitive processes are sometimes viewed as lying at the interface of language and thought. Williams syndrome, which is a rare genetic developmental disorder, provides an opportunity to study this interface because individuals with…

  14. The Interplay between Anxiety and Social Functioning in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Hanley, Mary; Kirk, Hannah; Clark, Fiona; Little, Katie; Fleck, Ruth; Janes, Emily; Kelso, Linzi; O'Kane, Fionnuala; Cole-Fletcher, Rachel; Allday, Marianne Hvistendahl; Hocking, Darren; Cornish, Kim; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2014-01-01

    The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) has been associated with an atypical social profile of hyper-sociability and heightened social sensitivity across the developmental spectrum. In addition, previous research suggests that both children and adults with WS have a predisposition towards anxiety. The current research aimed to explore…

  15. Visually Guided Step Descent in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Dorothy; Braddick, Oliver; Atkinson, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have impairments in visuospatial tasks and in manual visuomotor control, consistent with parietal and cerebellar abnormalities. Here we examined whether individuals with WS also have difficulties in visually controlling whole-body movements. We investigated visual control of stepping down at a change of…

  16. Musicality Correlates with Sociability and Emotionality in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Lai, Philip; Levitin, Daniel J.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by peaks and valleys of cognitive abilities. One peak that has been understudied is the affinity that many individuals with WS have with music. It remains unknown whether their high levels of musical interest, skill, and expressivity are related to their sociable…

  17. Pulmonary arterial stent implantation in an adult with Williams syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink, Herre J.; Henneman, Onno D. F.; van Delden, Otto M.; Biervliet, Jules D.; Kloek, Jaap J.; Reekers, Jim A.; Bresser, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We report a 38-year-old patient who presented with pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular dysfunction due to pulmonary artery stenoses as a manifestation of Williams syndrome, mimicking chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The patient was treated with balloon angioplasty and stent

  18. The use of emotions in narratives in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Aznar, Ana; Tenenbaum, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Although individuals with Williams syndrome are very sociable, they tend to have limited contact and friendships with peers. In typically developing children the use of positive emotions (e.g., happy) has been argued to be related to peer relationships and popularity. The current study investigated the use and development of emotion words in Williams syndrome using cross-sectional developmental trajectories and examined children's use of different types of emotion words. Nineteen children with Williams syndrome (WS) and 20 typically developing (TD) children matched for chronological age told a story from a wordless picture book. Participants with WS produced a similar number of emotion words compared to the control group and the use of emotion words did not change when plotted against chronological age or vocabulary abilities in either group. However, participants with WS produced more emotion words about sadness. Links between emotion production and friendships as well as future studies are discussed. After reading this article, readers will be able to: explain the development of positive and negative emotions in Williams syndrome and recognize that emotion production is atypical in this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterisation of Sleep Problems in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Hill, Catherine M.; Ashworth, Anna; Holley, Simone; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is critical to optimal daytime functioning, learning and general health. In children with established developmental disorders sleep difficulties may compound existing learning difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and syndrome specificity of sleep problems in Williams syndrome (WS), a…

  20. Comparison of the acute effects of Tulbaghia violacea William Henry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the effect of the crude methanol leaf extracts of Tulbaghia violacea William Henry Harvey (Alliaceae) on blood pressure (BP) and heart rate in ageing normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY), and compare the results obtained with those for adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Methods: T.

  1. Potential Beneficial Effects of Tulbaghia violacea William Henry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tulbaghia violacea William Henry Harvey (Harv. Alliaceae) is a small bulbous herb belonging to the family Alliaceae. It is used in South Africa to treat fever, colds, asthma, paralysis, and hypertension. Meanwhile, cardiovascular disease accounts for about 30 % of total global death, with most of these deaths occurring in low ...

  2. Personal Space Regulation in Williams Syndrome: The Effect of Familiarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Emma; Flynn, Emma; Riby, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    Personal space refers to a protective barrier that we strive to maintain around our body. We examined personal space regulation in young people with Williams syndrome (WS) and their typically developing, chronological age-matched peers using a parent report questionnaire and a stop-distance paradigm. Individuals with WS were reported by their…

  3. ProRisk : risk analysis instrument : developed for William properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, W.H.W.; Egeberg, Ingrid; Hendrickx, Kristoff; Kahramaner, Y.; Masseur, B.; Waijers, Koen; Weglicka, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a Risk Analysis Instrument developed for William Properties. Based on the analysis, it appears that the practice of Risk Analysis exists within the organization, yet rather implicit. The Risk Analysis Instrument comes with a package of four components: an activity diagram, a

  4. Experiences of Bullying for Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Marisa H.; Lough, Emma; Griffin, Megan M.; Lane, Laurel A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Individuals with intellectual disability experience high rates of bullying, but it is not known how people with specific syndromes, such as Williams syndrome (WS), experience and respond to bullying. Given their behavioral profile, including hypersociability and heightened anxiety, and their risk for experiencing other forms of…

  5. Word-Preserving Arts: Material Inscription, Ekphrasis, and Spatial Form in the Later Work of William Wordsworth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Peter

    William Wordsworth, posterity, reading, material inscription, ekphrasis, description, sonnet, portraiture......William Wordsworth, posterity, reading, material inscription, ekphrasis, description, sonnet, portraiture...

  6. 33 CFR 161.60 - Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... William Sound. 161.60 Section 161.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.60 Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound... Cape Hinchinbrook Light to Schooner Rock Light, comprising that portion of Prince William Sound between...

  7. 75 FR 16159 - Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council (PWSRCAC) Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [USCG-2010-0121] Prince William Sound Regional... the Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council (PWSRCAC) as an alternative voluntary advisory group for Prince William Sound, Alaska. This certification allows the PWSRCAC to monitor the...

  8. 77 FR 19301 - Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [USCG-2012-0099] Prince William Sound Regional... Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council (PWSRCAC) as an alternative voluntary advisory group for Prince William Sound, Alaska. This certification allows the PWSRCAC to monitor the activities...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1704 - Prince William Sound, Alaska-regulated navigation area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prince William Sound, Alaska... District § 165.1704 Prince William Sound, Alaska-regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a... Hinchinbrook Light to Schooner Rock Light, comprising that portion of Prince William Sound between 146°30′ W...

  10. 76 FR 1187 - Application for Recertification of Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... on, the application for recertification submitted by the Prince William Sound Regional Citizen's... advisory group in lieu of a Regional Citizens' Advisory Council for Prince William Sound, Alaska. This...

  11. Probed Serial Recall in Williams Syndrome: Lexical Influences on Phonological Short-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Jan; McCormack, Teresa; Boucher, Jill

    2005-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a genetic disorder that, it has been claimed, results in an unusual pattern of linguistic strengths and weaknesses. The current study investigated the hypothesis that there is a reduced influence of lexical knowledge on phonological short-term memory in Williams syndrome. Fourteen children with Williams syndrome and 2…

  12. Outcome in Adult Life for People with Williams Syndrome Results from a Survey of 239 Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, P.; Udwin, O.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although there has been considerable research into the genotype and phenotype of Williams syndrome, there have been relatively few studies of long-term prognosis. As a preliminary to a more detailed investigation of adults with Williams syndrome, a parental questionnaire was distributed to members of the UK Williams Syndrome…

  13. 77 FR 47374 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ...; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program/ Federal Family Loan (FFEL) Program: Deferment... which borrowers in the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) and Federal Family Education... considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program...

  14. 78 FR 11857 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ...; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program (DL) Regulations AGENCY: Department of... in response to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford.... Abstract: The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program regulations cover areas of program administration...

  15. 77 FR 43276 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ...; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program General Forbearance Request SUMMARY: Borrowers who receive loans through the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program will use this form to request forbearance... considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program General...

  16. Seasonal distribution of Dall's porpoise in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, John R.; O'Dell, Matthew B.; Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Straley, Janice M.; Dickson, Danielle M. S.

    2018-01-01

    Dall's porpoise, Phocoenoides dalli, are a conspicuous predator in the Prince William Sound ecosystem, yet there has been little effort directed towards monitoring this species since the 1980s, prior to the Exxon Valdez oil spill. We used vessel-based surveys to examine the seasonal distribution of Dall's porpoise in the waters of Prince William Sound during eight years from 2007 to 2015. Over the course of 168 days and 15,653 km of survey effort, 921 Dall's porpoise were encountered in 210 groups. We estimate an encounter rate of 0.061 porpoise/km traveled or 1 porpoise encountered for every 16.5 km traveled. Dall's porpoise were found throughout the year in Prince William Sound, and used a wide range of habitats, including those not considered typical of the species, such as bays, shallow water, and nearshore waters. Dall's porpoise seasonally shifted their center of distribution from the western passages in fall to the bays of the eastern Sound in winter and spring. Dall's porpoises were widely dispersed throughout the Sound in summer. We identified potential Dall's porpoise habitat (depth, slope, and distance from shore) within Prince William Sound using generalized additive models (GAM). Dall's porpoise were found in deeper water during summer and in shallowest water during spring. We propose that their use of novel habitats is a function of reduced predation risk associated with the decline of their main predator, killer whales (Orcinus orca), following the Exxon Valdez oil spill, and the presence of overwintering and spawning Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii). While the size of the Dall's porpoise population within Prince William Sound remains unknown, our encounter rates were lower than those reported in the 1970s. Their high metabolic rate and ubiquitous presence makes them one of the more important, yet understudied, forage fish predators in the region.

  17. Ischemic Stroke in Williams-Beuren Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Der Lee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A 15-year-old girl was admitted because of an acute onset of facial palsy and right hemiparesis. The patient had a history of moderate mental retardation and developmental delay. On admission, her vital signs were stable, except for high blood pressure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an infarct involving the left internal capsule and putamen. Because of the patient's young age, an extensive stroke survey was performed. Williams-Beuren syndrome was finally confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Compared with the previously reported cases, no evidence of cerebral arterial stenosis or cardiac abnormalities was found by noninvasive imaging techniques. Because Williams-Beuren syndrome is a complex, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with prominent cardiovascular features, regular assessment and antihypertensive treatment are necessary to minimize the lifelong cardiovascular risk in patients with this syndrome.

  18. Williams syndrome and mature B-Leukemia: A random association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decimi, Valentina; Fazio, Grazia; Dell'Acqua, Fabiola; Maitz, Silvia; Galbiati, Marta; Rizzari, Carmelo; Biondi, Andrea; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-12-01

    Williams syndrome (WBS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder with specific phenotypic characteristics and cardiac abnormalities, but is not considered as a cancer predisposing condition. However, in rare cases, malignancies have been described in patients with WBS, with hematologic cancer (mainly Burkitt Lymphoma and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia) as the most represented. We report here the case of a boy with WS and B-NHL. This is the unique case within the large cohort of patients (n = 117) followed in our institution for long time (mean clinical follow-up, 13 years). We herewith propose that the BCL7B gene, located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in Williams syndrome, could potentially have a role in this particular association. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Climatic data for Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota, 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberry, D.O.; Sturrock, A.M.; Scarborough, J.L.; Winter, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    Research on the hydrology of Williams Lake, north-central Minnesota includes study of evaporation. Those climatic data needed for energy budget and mass transfer studies are presented , including: water surface temperature, dry-bulb and wet-bulb air temperatures, wind speed, precipitation, and solar and atmospheric radiation. Some calculated values necessary for these studies are also presented, such as vapor pressure and Bowen-ratio values. Data are collected at raft and land stations.

  20. Climatic data for Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberry, D.O.; Sturrock, A.M.; Winter, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    Research on the hydrology of Williams Lake, north-central Minnesota includes study of evaporation. Presented here are those climatic data needed for energy-budget and mass-transfer studies, including: water-surface temperature, dry-bulb and wet-bulb air temperatures, wind speed, precipitation, and solar and atmospheric radiation. Some calculated values necessary for these studies, such as vapor pressure and Bowen ratio numbers, also are presented. Data are collected at raft and land stations.

  1. William Gaddis’s Immortality: Celebration, Cartoon, or Corruption?

    OpenAIRE

    Alberts, Crystal

    2013-01-01

    Although ostensibly a review of 'The Letters of William Gaddis' edited by Steven Moore (Champaign: Dalkey Archive, 2013), this article evaluates Moore’s volume in light of generally accepted practices of scholarly editions and the handling of historical documents. In particular, Alberts compares some of Moore’s edited letters to the originals housed either at Washington University in St. Louis or the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin and reveals issues involving the repre...

  2. Morphological differences in the mirror neuron system in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Rowena; Brown, Timothy T.; Erhart, Matthew; Järvinen, Anna M.; Korenberg, Julie R.; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition characterized by an overly gregarious personality, including high empathetic concern for others. Although seemingly disparate from the profile of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), both are associated with deficits in social communication/cognition. Notably, the mirror neuron system (MNS) has been implicated in social dysfunction for ASD; yet, the integrity of this network and its association with social functioning in WS remains unknown. Magnetic re...

  3. William J. Donovan: Visionary, Strategic Leader, an Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-03

    War II years until his death . 1945 through 1959. Strategy, without Information on which It can rely, is helpless. Information Is useless unless It Is...was again emulating his Rough Rider hero, because like him, he was now a cavalryman.32 Donovan had never been a horseman or soldier before, but like...Intelligence officer and Chief of Combined Operatlrns during World War II, said of General William Donovan In 1966, seven years after his death , "This

  4. The development of perceptual grouping in infants with Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Farran, E. K.; Brown, J. H.; Cole, V. L.; Houston-Price, C.; Karmiloff-Smith, A.

    2007-01-01

    Perceptual grouping by luminance similarity and by proximity was investigated in infants with Williams syndrome (WS) aged between 6 and 36 months (visit 1, N=29). WS infants who were still under 36 months old, 8 months later, repeated the testing procedure (visit 2, N=15). Performance was compared to typically developing (TD) infants aged from 2 to 20 months (N=63). Consistent with the literature, TD participants showed grouping by luminance at the youngest testing age, 2 months. Grouping by ...

  5. William H. Sheldon and the culture of the somatotype

    OpenAIRE

    Gatlin, Stephen H.

    1997-01-01

    The burden of this dissertation is to show that William Sheldon's somatotype project should be seen as an integral aspect of modernist culture. Sheldon engaged the same problems with modernity and the "Second Industrial Revolution" (urbanization, overpopulation, industrialization, alienation) that confronted modernist poets, novelists, and philosophers. In this I am elaborating Dorothy Ross's recent metaphor, "modernist impulses in the human sciences" (1994). Both scientists and artists were ...

  6. La Fondation William et Flora Hewlett | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    La Fondation William et Flora Hewlett. http://www.hewlett.org/. Initiative Think tank. Cette initiative permet d'établir des organismes indépendants qui se consacrent à la recherche et à l'élaboration de politiques dans des pays en développement. Voir davantage. Initiative Think tank. Croissance de l'économie et débouchés ...

  7. Sleep-EEG in dizygotic twins discordant for Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bódizs, Róbert; Gombos, Ferenc; Szocs, Katalin; Réthelyi, János M; Gerván, Patrícia; Kovács, Ilona

    2014-01-30

    Reports on twin pairs concordant and discordant for Williams syndrome were published before, but no study unravelled sleep physiology in these cases yet. We aim to fill this gap by analyzing sleep records of a twin pair discordant for Williams syndrome extending our focus on presleep wakefulness and sleep spindling. We performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification of the 7q11.23 region of a 17 years old dizygotic opposite-sex twin pair discordant for Williams syndrome. Polysomnography of laboratory sleep at this age was analyzed and followed-up after 1.5 years by ambulatory polysomnography. Sleep stages scoring, EEG power spectra and sleep spindle analyses were carried out. The twin brother showed reduced levels of amplification for all of the probes in the 7q11.23 region indicating a typical deletion spanning at least 1.038 Mb between FKBP6 and CLIP2. The results of the twin sister showed normal copy numbers in the investigated region. Lower sleep times and efficiencies, as well as higher slow wave sleep percents of the twin brother were evident during both recordings. Roughly equal NREM, Stage 2 and REM sleep percents were found. EEG analyses revealed state and derivation-independent decreases in alpha power, lack of an alpha spectral peak in presleep wakefulness, as well as higher NREM sleep sigma peak frequency in the twin brother. Faster sleep spindles with lower amplitude and shorter duration characterized the records of the twin brother. Spectra show a striking reliability and correspondence between the two situations (laboratory vs. home records). Alterations in sleep and specific neural oscillations including the alpha/sigma waves are inherent aspects of Williams syndrome.

  8. Parents perceptions of social inclusion for children with Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gulliver, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    This thesis explores parents’ perceptions of social inclusion for children with Williams Syndrome; a rare intellectual disability with a distinct social cognitive profile. 5 interviews with parents give rich understanding to what parents’ value for their child’s education, and how this is achieved. Thematic analysis highlights key similarities and differences in experiences between parents of children attending mainstream schools and one special school. Severity of disability affects how pare...

  9. Generalized Bragg-Williams method for 'antiferromagnetic' lattice gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, R.

    1983-01-01

    The many-sublattice Bragg-Williams approximation of statistical mechanics is applied to the two-dimensional square and triangular lattice-gas models with nearest-neighbor repulsive interactions. Each problem is solved through both the canonical and grand-canonical methods. The present treatment emphasizes the duality between concentration and chemical potential and illustrates the appearance of first- and second -order transitions in each method. (Author) [pt

  10. Fissured and geographic tongue in Williams-Beuren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS is a rare, most often sporadic, genetic disease caused by a chromosomal microdeletion at locus 7q11.23 involving 28 genes. It is characterized by congenital heart defects, neonatal hypercalcemia, skeletal and renal abnormalities, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder, and dysmorphic facies. A number of clinical findings has been reported, but none of the studies evaluated this syndrome considering oral cavity. We here report a fissured and geographic tongue in association with WBS.

  11. OBITUARY: Sir William Mitchell Physicist and enthusiast for science

    CERN Multimedia

    Cowley, R

    2002-01-01

    "William Mitchell was successively head of Physics at Reading and Oxford universities, and Chairman of the Science and Engineering Research Council from 1985 to 1990. He is largely responsible for the excellent neutron and X-ray facilities that are available for research by scientists in the UK. He was one of the first to realise that these uniquely powerful facilities would be essential tools not only for physicists but also for chemists, biologists, materials scientists and engineers" (1 page).

  12. MacWilliams Identity for M-Spotty Weight Enumerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuyoshi; Fujiwara, Eiji

    M-spotty byte error control codes are very effective for correcting/detecting errors in semiconductor memory systems that employ recent high-density RAM chips with wide I/O data (e.g., 8, 16, or 32bits). In this case, the width of the I/O data is one byte. A spotty byte error is defined as random t-bit errors within a byte of length b bits, where 1 le t ≤ b. Then, an error is called an m-spotty byte error if at least one spotty byte error is present in a byte. M-spotty byte error control codes are characterized by the m-spotty distance, which includes the Hamming distance as a special case for t =1 or t = b. The MacWilliams identity provides the relationship between the weight distribution of a code and that of its dual code. The present paper presents the MacWilliams identity for the m-spotty weight enumerator of m-spotty byte error control codes. In addition, the present paper clarifies that the indicated identity includes the MacWilliams identity for the Hamming weight enumerator as a special case.

  13. Who Invented the Word Asteroid: William Herschel or Stephen Weston?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Clifford J.; Orchiston, Wayne

    2011-11-01

    William Herschel made the first serious study of 1 Ceres and 2 Pallas in the year 1802. He was moved by their dissimilarities to the other planets to coin a new term to distinguish them. For this purpose he enlisted the aid of his good friends William Watson and Sir Joseph Banks. Watson gave him a long list of possible names, which Herschel rejected. With a lifetime of experience classifying and naming newly found objects in nature, Banks became the man both Erasmus Darwin (in 1781) and William Herschel (in 1802) turned to for sage advice in developing a new descriptive language. In the case of Ceres and Pallas, Banks turned the task over to his friend, the noted philologist Stephen Weston, FRS. It has recently been stated by a noted British historian that it was Weston - not Herschel - who coined the term 'asteroid' to collectively describe Ceres and Pallas. This claim is investigated, and parallels are drawn in the use of neologism in astronomy and botany.

  14. Dreamers in dialogue: evolution, sex and gender in the utopian visions of William Morris and William Henry Hudson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Novák

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to explore the parallels between two late-nineteenth-century utopias,William Henry Hudsons A Crystal Age (1882 and William Morriss News from Nowhere (1891. Itaims to explore how these two works respond to the transition from a kinetic to a static conception ofutopia that under pressure from evolutionary and feminist discourses took place during the period.Particular focus lies on the way in which this is negotiated through the depiction of evolution, sexuality,and gender roles in the respective novels, and how the depiction of these disruptive elements may workas a means of ensuring the readers active engagement in political, intellectual and emotional terms.

  15. On Reading Poems: Visual & Verbal Icons in William Carlos Williams' «Landscape With The Fall Of Icarus»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene R. Fairley

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Williams' admiration for Brueghel's landscape is coded in structural and stylistic correspondences between the poem and the painting. Structures in the poem have effects analogous to the use of devices of color, line, foregrounding in the painting. The poem, like the painting, presents a «neutral» scene but subtly insures the reader's involvement. Further, Williams draws a visual statement so that graphic features suggest a global image isomorphic with the motif of descent. Features of the poem, such as line and clause length, syntactic construction, semantic coherence, are discussed as factors that contribute to rapid glancing and increase readability. A study of readers shows their sensitivity to graphic features including the poem's shape, and corroborates the importance of stylistic features.

  16. William Gaddis’s Immortality: Celebration, Cartoon, or Corruption?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal Alberts

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although ostensibly a review of 'The Letters of William Gaddis' edited by Steven Moore (Champaign: Dalkey Archive, 2013, this article evaluates Moore’s volume in light of generally accepted practices of scholarly editions and the handling of historical documents. In particular, Alberts compares some of Moore’s edited letters to the originals housed either at Washington University in St. Louis or the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin and reveals issues involving the representation of the archival material, inconsistencies in editorial principles, and a misattributed letter, among other things.

  17. Seguridad social, empleo y propiedad privada en William Beveridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Llanos Reyes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to approach the economic and political notions of William Beveridge, which proposed the construction of the British Welfare State immediately after WWII. A form of State which sought to overcome the crisis of capitalism by proposing control over the system. We attempt to demonstrate the relation that should exist, according to Beveridge, the "father" of this model of capitalist State, between the development of a social security system, employment, and the situation of private property, while simultaneously pointing out the specifics and complexity of his ideas in the relation observed between full occupation and private property as basic elements for the construction of a Social Security system.

  18. [Sir William Richard Gowers: author of the "bible of neurology"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Genjiro

    2014-11-01

    William Richard Gowers is one of the great pioneers in neurology and the author of the well-known neurology textbook, "A Manual of Diseases of the Nervous System." His concepts of neurology are based on meticulously and carefully accumulated knowledge of history, observations, and neurological examinations of patients with various neurological diseases. He is not only a great neurologist but also a great teacher who loves teaching students and physicians through well-prepared lectures. We can glean the essence of the field of neurology through his life story and numerous writings concerning neurological diseases.

  19. Categories are alive: interview with Brackette F. Williams

    OpenAIRE

    Durão, Susana; Bastos, Cristiana; Williams, Brackette F.

    2013-01-01

    Brackette F. Williams is an American anthropologist and a Senior Justice ­Advocate, currently an associate professor of Cultural Anthropology at the University of ­Arizona. She studied at the University of Cornell, the University of Arizona, and received her doctorate from Johns Hopkins University. Her work interweaves ­matters of race, gender, class, ideology and politics in a unique manner – as seen in the article “A class act: Anthropology and the race to nation across ethnic terrain” (Ann...

  20. The other Dr Hooker: William Dawson Hooker (1816-40).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Harold

    2011-11-01

    William Hooker and his son Joseph were famous as botanists and as the creators of the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew. Joseph was famous also as the friend and mentor of Charles Darwin. But there was another brother, a little older than Joseph, also a doctor and naturalist. He went to Jamaica in the interests of his health and soon died there of yellow fever. His life was short and tragic with a medical conundrum at its end but its story also illustrates many of the beliefs and concerns that preoccupied doctors in this early Victorian era. It also illustrates the close relationship between medicine and botany that prevailed then.

  1. Dr. William O. Coffee and his absorption cure for cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, A P

    1989-08-01

    Dr. William O. Coffee was an ophthalmologist who conducted an office and mail-order practice in the Midwest from the 1880s until 1927. His main stock in trade was a self-discovered absorption cure for a variety of ocular diseases, with particular emphasis on the medical cure of cataracts. Dr. Coffee's career was a checkered one, marked by dubious credentials, exuberant self-promotion, unlikely and exaggerated claims of medical successes, plagiarism, and rejection by the medical "establishment." Certain parallels may be drawn between his activities and some currently observed practices in ophthalmology.

  2. Pulmonary Arterial Stent Implantation in an Adult with Williams Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reesink, Herre J.; Henneman, Onno D. F.; Delden, Otto M. van; Biervliet, Jules D.; Kloek, Jaap J.; Reekers, Jim A.; Bresser, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We report a 38-year-old patient who presented with pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular dysfunction due to pulmonary artery stenoses as a manifestation of Williams syndrome, mimicking chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The patient was treated with balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. Short-term follow-up showed a good clinical result with excellent patency of the stents but early restenosis of the segments in which only balloon angioplasty was performed. These stenoses were subsequently also treated successfully by stent implantation. Stent patency was observed 3 years after the first procedure

  3. Unravelling starlight: William and Margaret Huggins and the rise of the new astronomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Becker, Barbara J

    2011-01-01

    ...). A pioneer in adapting the spectroscope to new astronomical purposes, William Huggins rose to scientific prominence in London and transformed professional astronomy to become a principal founder...

  4. Pre-spill shoreline mapping in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, E.H.; Lamarche, A.; Reimer, P.D.; Marchant, S.O.; O'Brien, D.K.

    2003-01-01

    A long-term shoreline mapping program has been initiated in Prince William Sound, Alaska, to generate pre-spill data to assist in the planning activities for oil spill response in the area. Low-altitude aerial videotape surveys and video images form the basis for the mapping effort. The coast was initially divided into alongshore segments. The physical shore-zone is relatively homogeneous within each segment. A pre-spill Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Team (SCAT) database, using the ShoreData software, was created based on this initial detailed mapping. The SCAT field teams are therefore equipped with a detailed analysis of the shore-zone character. The same information was also used to develop a separate database for use by planning and response operations groups. The data is entered into the Graphical Resource Database (GRD), and a Geographic Information System (GIS). A simplified characterization of the primary features of each segment is then made available through interpretation of the data. In the event of an oil spill, the SCAT data in the ShoreData files can be combined with field data on shoreline oiling conditions using a second software package called ShoreAccess R which provides summaries of the main parameters required by the planning group. It can also be used as a data storage and management tool. As part of this program, more than 1700 kilometres of shoreline in Prince William Sound have already been mapped. 24 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  5. Sir William Osler's speech at Troy: a Trojan horse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Troy, New York, is a city of 55,000 people in upstate New York located along the Hudson River. A city of surprisingly rich cultural heritage, it was the home of New York state's first hospital outside New York City. The 50th anniversary celebration of Troy's hospital brought William Osler to the city as the keynote speaker. This speech, delivered on November 28, 1900, is one of Sir William's less well known addresses. Osler began his comments with Sir Thomas More's Utopia and talked at length about the hospital, its obligations, the influences it has upon the community, and the role of physicians and surgeons. He broached one of his old saws, the salary of attending physicians and their needed role in hospital management. His words were published in the diamond jubilee's records, but the hospital did not outlive its prominent guest professor, and it closed its doors in 1914. Just like the great historical city of Troy, New York's own Troy was on the brink of decline, and its hospital would be the first fatality. Therefore, it is almost prescient that the words of Osler, taken into historical context juxtaposed against the socioeconomic forces at work, are akin to the Greek's offering of a wooden edifice to end the Trojan War.

  6. Inversion of the Williams syndrome region is a common polymorphism found more frequently in parents of children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobart, Holly H; Morris, Colleen A; Mervis, Carolyn B; Pani, Ariel M; Kistler, Doris J; Rios, Cecilia M; Kimberley, Kendra W; Gregg, Ronald G; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2010-05-15

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a multisystem disorder caused by deletion of about 1.55 Mb of DNA (including 26 genes) on chromosome 7q11.23, a region predisposed to recombination due to its genomic structure. Deletion of the Williams syndrome chromosome region (WSCR) occurs sporadically. To better define chance for familial recurrence and to investigate the prevalence of genomic rearrangements of the region, 257 children with WS and their parents were studied. We determined deletion size in probands by metaphase FISH, parent-of-origin of the deleted chromosome by molecular genetic methods, and inversion status of the WSCR in both parents by interphase FISH. The frequency of WSCR inversion in the transmitting parent group was 24.9%. In contrast, the rate of inversion in the non-transmitting parent group (a reasonable estimate of the rate in the general population) was 5.8%. There were no significant gender differences with respect to parent-of-origin for the deleted chromosome or the incidence of the inversion polymorphism. There was no difference in the rate of spontaneous abortion for mothers heterozygous for the WSCR inversion relative to mothers without the inversion. We calculate that for a parent heterozygous for a WSCR inversion, the chance to have a child with WS is about 1 in 1,750, in contrast to the 1 in 9,500 chance for a parent without an inversion.

  7. 76 FR 13667 - Commercial Furniture Group, Inc., Formerly Known as Falcon Products, Inc., Shelby Williams, Howe...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Furniture Group, Inc., Formerly Known as Falcon Products, Inc., Shelby Williams, Howe and Thonet, Including...., Formerly Known as Falcon Products, Inc., Shelby Williams, Howe and Thonet, Chicago, IL; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance In accordance with Section 223 of...

  8. 77 FR 63308 - J. William Foley Incorporated v. United Illuminating Company; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL12-106-000] J. William Foley Incorporated v. United Illuminating Company; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on October 5...) and 825(e), J. William Foley Incorporated (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against United...

  9. A MacWilliams Identity for Convolutional Codes: The General Case

    OpenAIRE

    Gluesing-Luerssen, Heide; Schneider, Gert

    2008-01-01

    A MacWilliams Identity for convolutional codes will be established. It makes use of the weight adjacency matrices of the code and its dual, based on state space realizations (the controller canonical form) of the codes in question. The MacWilliams Identity applies to various notions of duality appearing in the literature on convolutional coding theory.

  10. A MacWilliams Identity for Convolutional Codes : The General Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gluesing-Luerssen, Heide; Schneider, Gert

    A MacWilliams Identity for convolutional codes will be established. It makes use of the weight adjacency matrices of the code and its dual, based on state space realizations (the controller canonical form) of the codes in question. The MacWilliams Identity applies to various notions of duality

  11. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound. 164.43 Section 164.43 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004, each...

  12. Music and Anxiety in Williams Syndrome: A Harmonious or Discordant Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.; Rosner, Beth A.; Ly, Tran; Sagun, Jaclyn

    2005-01-01

    In this two-part study, we assessed musical involvements in two samples of persons with Williams syndrome compared to others with mental retardation and also related musicality to anxiety and fears in Study 2. Relative to others with mental retardation, those with Williams syndrome were more likely to take music lessons, play an instrument, and…

  13. 33 CFR 167.1701 - In Prince William Sound: Precautionary areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In Prince William Sound: Precautionary areas. 167.1701 Section 167.1701 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1701 In Prince William Sound...

  14. Repetition Priming in Adults with Williams Syndrome: Age-Related Dissociation between Implicit and Explicit Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Kittler, Phyllis; Brown, W. Ted; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Devenny, Darlynne A.

    2005-01-01

    We examined implicit and explicit memory in adults with Williams syndrome. An age-related dissociation was found; repetition priming (reflecting implicit memory) did not show change with age, but free recall (reflecting explicit memory) was markedly reduced. We also compared the performance of adults with Williams syndrome to adults with Down…

  15. Auditory Attraction: Activation of Visual Cortex by Music and Sound in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Anderson, Adam W.; Kim, Chai-Youn; Eapen, Mariam; Gore, John C.; Blake, Randolph; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder with a distinctive phenotype, including cognitive-linguistic features, nonsocial anxiety, and a strong attraction to music. We performed functional MRI studies examining brain responses to musical and other types of auditory stimuli in young adults with Williams syndrome and typically…

  16. Anxiety and Repetitive Behaviours in Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: A Cross-Syndrome Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jacqui; Riby, Deborah M.; Janes, Emily; Connolly, Brenda; McConachie, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Williams syndrome are vulnerable to anxiety. The factors that contribute to this risk remain unclear. This study compared anxiety in autism spectrum disorder and Williams Syndrome and examined the relationship between repetitive behaviours and anxiety. Thirty-four children with autism and twenty children…

  17. Intracranial arteries in individuals with the elastin gene hemideletion of Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wint, D P; Butman, J A; Masdeu, J C; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Mervis, C B; Sarpal, D; Morris, C A; Berman, K F

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome, a rare genetic disorder with a striking neurobehavioral profile characterized by extreme sociability and impaired visuospatial construction abilities, is caused by a hemideletion that includes the elastin gene, resulting in frequent supravavular aortic stenosis and other stenotic arterial lesions. Strokes have been reported in Williams syndrome. Although the extracranial carotid artery has been studied in a sample of patients with Williams syndrome, proximal intracranial arteries have not. Using MRA, we studied the intracranial vessels in 27 participants: 14 patients with Williams syndrome (age range, 18-44 years; mean age, 27.3 ± 9.1; 43% women) and 13 healthy control participants with similar age and sex distribution (age range, 22-52 years; mean age, 33.4 ± 7.6; 46% women). All participants with Williams syndrome had hemideletions of the elastin gene. Blinded to group allocation or to any other clinical data, a neuroradiologist determined the presence of intracranial vascular changes in the 2 groups. The Williams syndrome group and the healthy control group had similar patency of the proximal intracranial arteries, including the internal carotid and vertebral arteries; basilar artery; and stem and proximal branches of the anterior cerebral artery, MCA, and posterior cerebral arteries. The postcommunicating segment of the anterior cerebral artery was longer in the Williams syndrome group. Despite the elastin haploinsufficiency, the proximal intracranial arteries in Williams syndrome preserve normal patency.

  18. [Vascular malformations in the Williams-Beuren syndrome: report of three new cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sator, Hicham; Rhouni, Fatima Ezzahra; Benjouad, Ibitihale; Rhouni, Fatima Ezzahra; Benjouad, Ibitihale; Dafiri, Rachida; Chat, Latifa

    2016-01-01

    The Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare genetic disease. It combines classically specific facial dysmorphism, cardiovascular malformations and specific neuropsychological profile. We report three cases of Williams-Beuren syndrome in children with particular emphasis on vascular abnormalities observed on CT angiography and MR angiography.

  19. Brief Report: Developing Spatial Frequency Biases for Face Recognition in Autism and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Hayley C.; Annaz, Dagmara; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Johnson, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated whether contrasting face recognition abilities in autism and Williams syndrome could be explained by different spatial frequency biases over developmental time. Typically-developing children and groups with Williams syndrome and autism were asked to recognise faces in which low, middle and high spatial frequency…

  20. 78 FR 45515 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION [Docket No.: ED-2013-ICCD-0099] Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program Repayment Plan Selection Form AGENCY... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

  1. 77 FR 58818 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program Regulations-- Servicemembers Civil Relief Act SUMMARY: Upon a... in response to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford...

  2. 78 FR 52169 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

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    2013-08-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION [Docket No. ED-2013-ICCD-0109] Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program Federal Direct PLUS Loan Master... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct...

  3. A new case of keratoconus associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Melissa Machado; Frasson, Maria; Leão, Letícia Lima; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Cunha, Pricila da Silva; de Aguiar, Marcos José Burle

    2013-09-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a multisystemic genetic disorder caused by a contiguous gene deletion at 7q11.23. Keratoconus is a complex disease and it is suspected to have a genetic origin, although the specific gene responsible for keratoconus has not been identified. Although there are several ocular features in Williams-Beuren syndrome, keratoconus is not regularly described as part of this syndrome. To report a new patient with keratoconus and Williams-Beuren syndrome. This is the third case of an association between Williams-Beuren syndrome and keratoconus. The authors believe that the Williams-Beuren syndrome chromosome region can be a possible target for further investigation as the genetic basis of keratoconus.

  4. Infantile ictal apneas in a child with williams-beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kenneth A; McLeod, D Ross; Bello-Espinosa, Luis

    2013-02-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a genetic disorder rarely associated with seizures. The few described cases of Williams-Beuren syndrome and epilepsy have primarily involved infantile spasms and deletions extending beyond the common deletion region for this disorder. We present the case of a 5-week-old child with ictal apneas and typical Williams-Beuren syndrome deletion. Diagnosis was challenging, because the child had cardiac, respiratory, and gastrointestinal abnormalities typically associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome, which are also associated with cyanotic episodes. The results of interictal electroencephalography were normal, illustrating that prolonged electroencephalography is often essential in evaluation of suspected ictal apneas. Seizure freedom was achieved with carbamazepine. Sudden death is seen in Williams-Beuren syndrome, and this case raises the question whether some of these cases may be related to ictal apneas and could potentially be preventable with appropriate pharmaceutical intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Syntax in Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Burraco, Antonio; Garayzábal, Elena; Cuetos, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The syntactic skills of Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) were assessed in different areas (phrase structure, recursion, and bound anaphora). Children were compared to typically-developing peers matched either in chronological age (CA-TD) or in verbal age (VA-TD). In all tasks children with WS performed significantly worse than CA-TD children, but similarly to VA-TD children. However, significant differences were observed in specific domains, particularly regarding sentences with cross-serial dependencies. At the same time, children with WS were less sensitive to syntactic constraints and exhibited a poorer knowledge of some functional words (specifically, of nonreflexive pronouns). A processing bottleneck or a computational constraint may account for this outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Grammatical gender vs. natural gender in French Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibernon, Laure; Boloh, Yves

    2010-01-01

    This article reports grammatical gender attribution scores in French Williams participants (N=28, mean chronological age=15.1) in an experiment similar to the classic one from Karmiloff-Smith (1979) where grammatical gender was pitted against natural gender. WS participants massively opted for the masculine gender as the default one, just as MA-controls did. They differed from CA-controls, however, in that they provided fewer sex-based responses. Splitting the WS group into two subgroups did not reveal a shift to sex-based responses similar to the one found in controls. It is argued that this latter difference could plausibly be related to differences in cognitive, lexical or meta-linguistic abilities. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Values of Masculinity in William Shakespeare’s Macbeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafruha Ferdous

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The theme of gender plays a vital role in William Shakespeare’s famous political play Macbeth. From the very beginning of the play the dramatist focuses on the importance of masculinity in gaining power and authority. Lady Macbeth along with the three witches are as important characters as Macbeth. Because they influence Macbeth profoundly. And Shakespeare very carefully draws the character of Lady Macbeth who being a female sometimes exhibits more masculinity than Macbeth. Similarly is the case of the three witches. Though they look like women they are also bearded which prove the presence of masculinity in their nature. Throughout the play several times the exposition of masculinity is demanded from the character of Macbeth. So the value of masculinity plays an important part in the drama.

  8. What motion is: William Neile and the laws of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemeny, Max

    2017-07-01

    In 1668-1669 William Neile and John Wallis engaged in a protracted correspondence regarding the nature of motion. Neile was unhappy with the laws of motion that had been established by the Royal Society in three papers published in 1668, deeming them not explanations of motion at all, but mere descriptions. Neile insisted that science could not be informative without a discussion of causes, meaning that Wallis's purely kinematic account of collision could not be complete. Wallis, however, did not consider Neile's objections to his work to be serious. Rather than engage in a discussion of the proper place of natural philosophy in science, Wallis decided to show how Neile's preferred treatment of motion lead to absurd conclusions. This dispute is offered as a case study of dispute resolution within the early Royal Society.

  9. Charles William Lacaillade. Biologist, Parasitologist, Educator, and Mentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperato, Pascal James

    2017-02-01

    Charles William Lacaillade (1904-1978) was an eminent biologist in the middle decades of the twentieth century. He was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts of parents whose ancestors were French Canadians. His father, also named Charles William Lacaillade, was a dentist who graduated from Tufts University School of Dentistry in 1898. His mother, Elodia Eno, came from a family of very successful businessmen. Lacaillade was the third of six children. His two older brothers, Harold Carleton and Hector Eno, both graduated from the University of Louisville, School of Dentistry, while his younger brother, Lawrence, became a businessman. His sister, Luemma, married Dr. Henry Steadman, a veterinarian, while his youngest sister, Gloria, married a U.S. Army officer, Lieutenant Colonel Victor Anido. Lacaillade received his MS and PhD degrees in biology and zoology from Harvard University. He then became a fellow at The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. At both institutions, he studied under some of the most eminent biological scientists of the time. These included Rudolf W. Glaser, George Howard Parker, Theobald Smith, Carl TenBroeck, and William Morton Wheeler. At the Rockefeller Institute, he co-discovered the vector and mode of transmission of Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis. This discovery, and the research he conducted with Rudolf W. Glaser, quickly established him as an outstanding biological researcher. However, a change in leadership at the Rockefeller Institute resulted in research priorities being given to the disciplines of general physiology, physical chemistry, and nutrition. This shift in the research agenda away from the biological sciences precluded career advancement at the Rockefeller Institute for post-doctoral fellows like Lacaillade. It was the height of the Great Depression, and even biologists with terminal doctoral degrees found it difficult to find positions. In 1935, Lacaillade accepted a position as an assistant in biology at St. John

  10. William Whewell's philosophy of architecture and the historicization of biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Aleta

    2016-10-01

    William Whewell's work on historical science has received some attention from historians and philosophers of science. Whewell's own work on the history of German Gothic church architecture has been touched on within the context of the history of architecture. To a large extent these discussions have been conducted separately. I argue that Whewell intended his work on Gothic architecture as an attempt to (help) found a science of historical architecture, as an exemplar of historical science. I proceed by analyzing the key features of Whewell's philosophy of historical science. I then show how his architectural history exemplifies this philosophy. Finally, I show how Whewell's philosophy of historical science matches some developments in a science (biological systematics) that, in the mid-to late-nineteenth century, came to be reinterpreted as a historical science. I comment briefly on Whewell as a potential influence on nineteenth century biology and in particular on Darwin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 77 FR 58819 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

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    2012-09-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford... William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program will use this form to request forbearance on their loans when... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program General Forbearance Request. OMB Control...

  12. 77 FR 29988 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

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    2012-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford... borrowers in the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) and Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program Deferment Request Forms. OMB Control...

  13. Williams-Beuren syndrome associated with single kidney and nephrocalcinosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Kamel; Jellouli, Manel; Ben Rabeh, Rania; Hammi, Yousra; Gargah, Tahar

    2015-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by congenital heart defects, abnormal facial features, mental retardation with specific cognitive and behavioral profile, growth hormone deficiency, renal and skeletal anomalies, inguinal hernia, infantile hypercalcaemia. We report a case with Williams-Beuren syndrome associated with a single kidney and nephrocalcinosis complicated by hypercalcaemia. A male infant, aged 20 months presented growth retardation associated with a psychomotor impairment, dysmorphic features and nephrocalcinosis. He had also hypercalciuria and hypercalcemia. Echocardiography was normal. DMSA renal scintigraphy showed a single functioning kidney. The FISH generated one ELN signal in 20 metaphases read and found the presence of ELN deletion, with compatible Williams-Beuren syndrome.

  14. Neurosurgeon as innovator: William V. Cone (1897-1959).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preul, M C; Stratford, J; Bertrand, G; Feindel, W

    1993-10-01

    Neurosurgeons are well known for being productive researchers and innovators. Few, however, have possessed the prolific ingenuity of William Cone. In 1934, he and William Penfield were cofounders of the Montreal Neurological Institute where, until 1959, he filled the twin roles of neurosurgeon-in-chief and neuropathologist. Because he did not find writing easy, many of his technical inventions and refinements remained unpublished. His numerous innovations included the extensive use of twist-drill technique for biopsy, drainage for subdural hematoma and cerebral abscess, and ventriculography. In the mid-1940's, he developed power tools driven by nitrogen that led to the modern, universally used air-driven tool systems. He had a special interest in the treatment of spinal dysfunction, for which he invented the Cone-Barton skull-traction tongs along with the Cone spinal operating table. He also devised operative procedures for vertebral fracture-dislocation and craniospinal anomalies. For the maintenance of muscle tone in the paralyzed bladder, he constructed a tidal drainage system. He introduced and popularized ventriculoperitoneal shunting techniques and carried out some of the earliest experimental trails to treat brain infections with sulphonamide and antibiotic drugs. He designed his own set of surgical suction devices, bone rongeurs, and a personal suction "air-conditioning" system for each surgeon. He had a keen early interest in intracranial tumors, and also demonstrated on monkeys how subdural mass lesions caused pupillary dilation and mesial temporal lobe damage due to cerebral compression. His work for the military during World War II on effects of altitude on brain pressure remained classified for many years. The first clipping and excision of an intracranial aneurysm is attributed to Cone. Although Penfield was known as "the Chief," Cone was referred to as "the Boss." His fervent dedication to provide total care to his patients was expressed in round

  15. Early Science Results from the Williams College Eclipse Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Person, Michael J.; Dantowitz, Ron; Lockwood, Christian A.; Nagle-McNaughton, Tim; Meadors, Erin N.; Perez, Cielo C.; Marti, Connor J.; Yu, Ross; Rosseau, Brendan; Daly, Declan M.; Ide, Charles A.; Davis, Allen B.; Lu, Muzhou; Sliski, David; Seiradakis, John; Voulgaris, Aris; Rusin, Vojtech; Peñaloza-Murillo, Marcos A.; Roman, Michael; Seaton, Daniel B.; Steele, Amy; Lee, Duane M.; Freeman, Marcus J.

    2018-01-01

    We describe our first cut of data reduction on a wide variety of observations of the solar corona and of the effect of the penumbra and umbra on the terrestrial atmosphere, carried out from our eclipse site on the campus of Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. Our team of faculty, undergraduate students, graduate students, and other colleagues observed the eclipse, taking images and spectra with a variety of sensors and telescopes. Equipment included frame-transfer cameras observing at 3 Hz in 0.3 nm filters at the coronal green and red lines to measure the power spectrum of oscillations in coronal loops or elsewhere in the lower corona; 3 spectrographs; a variety of telescopes and telephotos for white-light imaging; a double Lyot system tuned at Fe XIV 530.3 nm (FWHM 0.4 nm) and Fe X 637.4 nm (FWHM 0.5 nm); and a weather station to record changes in the terrestrial atmosphere. We are comparing our observations with predictions based on the previous mapping of the photospheric magnetic field, and preparing wide-field complete coronal imaging incorporating NOAA/NASA GOES-16 SUVI and NRL/NASA/LASCO for the corona outside our own images (which extend, given the completely clear skies we had, at least 4 solar radii), and NASA SDO/AIA and NOAA/NASA GOES-16 SUVI for the solar disk. One of our early composites appeared as Astronomy Picture of the Day for September 27: https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap170927.htmlOur expedition was supported in large part by grants from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society and from the Solar Terrestrial Program of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation, with additional student support from the STP/AGS of NSF, the NASA Massachusetts Space Grant Consortium, the Sigma Xi honorary scientific society, the Clare Booth Luce Foundation studentship and the Freeman Foote Expeditionary Fund at Williams College, other Williams College funds, and U. Pennsylvania funds.

  16. William Basse’s Polyhymnia and the Poetry of Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Crabstick

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The career of the little-known seventeenth-century poet William Basse (c. 1583-1653? combined two distinctive elements. He served, in the first instance, as a ‘retainer’ to the Wenman family of Thame Park in Oxfordshire for a period of more than forty years. He was also, however, a published poet who produced a substantial body of verse which reflected and intertwined with his career in service. The article aims to stimulate interest in Basse by drawing attention to a manuscript collection of his poems which remains unpublished and has until now been considered ‘lost’ in scholarly accounts of the poet. The Polyhymnia, held at Chetham’s Library in Manchester, was prepared as a gift in the late 1640s or early 1650s for relations of the Wenmans who lived on the nearby Rycote estate. It brought together poems from across the course of Basse’s career, and displayed him writing in a wide variety of forms and genres. The article summarises current knowledge of Basse’s life in service, sets out the context of the Polyhymnia as a manuscript apparently designed to fortify the links between Thame Park and Rycote, and explores the importance of Basse’s perspective as a servant to some of the more intriguing poems in the collection. It concludes by suggesting some of the ways in which a renewed focus upon Basse might contribute to study of the links between service and literature in the future.

  17. William Nierenberg: blockbuster. [Recommendations as alternative or substitution fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    An interview with William Nierenberg, Univ. of California, Berkeley and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, elicits the physicist/environmentalist's determination to expedite the application of available technical solutions. His success in penetrating social and institutional barriers is evidenced by his efforts to have methanol accepted as a substitute fuel. Perceiving these barriers as more formidable than the task of finding technological answers to energy problems, he elaborates on the case for methanol, which is widely used in Europe and does not require large investments for research and development. As a clean-burning substitute for low-sulfur oil, methanol's only drawback as a utility fuel has been price. However, he estimates that large-scale production of methanol will make it competitive with other fuels. He also recommends pursuing solar and ocean thermal energy. As a member of EPRI's Advisory Council, his approach to legislation balances environmental concerns with an understanding of practical issues. (DCK)

  18. Social organization of sea otters in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garshelis, David L.; Johnson, Ancel M.; Garshelis, Judith A.

    1984-01-01

    Sea otters in Prince William Sound. Alaska, were spatially segregated into predominantly (97%) male areas at the front of the expanding population and breeding areas with fewer (up to 33%) males. From 1975 to 1984 we captured and marked 267 otters with tags and (or) radio transmitters and investigated their reproductive strategies, social relationships, and patterns of sexual segregation. Mating occurred year-round, but peaked in September and October. Females first bred at 4 years of age and were capable of pupping annually; they generally separated from their pup before mating. Males established breeding territories that enabled prolonged precopulatory interactions that may have prompted female–pup separation and post-copulatory interactions that precluded females from mating with other males. Male mating success was related to age, weight, territory quality, and the length of time they maintained their territory. After the breeding season, territorial males returned to male areas where food was more abundant. Young, dispersing males also entered male areas and remained there until attaining breeding age. In male areas, otters commonly rested in groups of >50 individuals. Gregariousness promoted social interactions and likely enhanced food finding and (historically) predator protection. As food diminished, males moved into adjacent, unoccupied regions; females then occupied former male areas.

  19. Introduction to William Stephenson's quest for a science of subjectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, James M M

    2010-01-01

    In this introduction to the life and work of William Stephenson my aim is to provide a general overview of the development of his thinking and, more specifically, to highlight the importance he attached to the study of single cases. I also attempt to provide a context for an understanding of the significance of his "Tribute to Melanie Klein." Some of the principal reasons for Stephenson's marginal status in the discipline of psychology will also emerge in the course of the article. I begin by outlining some of the central notions in Q-methodology. The early sections of the article trace his roots in the north of England - the setting for his schooling and university training in physics - and then outline his encounters with Charles Spearman and Cyril Burt at University College London. The subsequent section deals with his time at the University of Oxford Institute of Experimental Psychology and the wartime interruption to his career. The next few sections take us across the Atlantic and describe some of the most significant features of his work on Q-methodology. these sections also record the difficulties Stephenson experienced before he eventually secured a tenured position at the University of Missouri School of Journalism in Columbia. In the final section I attempt to situate Q-methodology in relation to some of the principal theoretical orientations in the human sciences.

  20. Sir William Petty: modern epidemiologist (1623-1687).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, J E

    1987-01-01

    William Petty, physician, epidemiologist, political economist, demographer, cartographer, and administrator was an intellectual product of the seventeenth century. Petty was born in the year 1623 in Romsey, England of lower middle class parents; however, by the time of his death in 1687 he had become a knight of the realm, founder of the Royal Society, and friend of kings. Petty's life reflected the northern renaissance which induced such dramatic changes in science, technology, politics, and entrepreneurship. His education was eclectic, nonetheless he took his Doctor of Physic degree from Oxford in 1649 and became an Oxford don, where he spent the next few years as an academic before undertaking a definitive survey of Ireland on behalf of the Cromwell government. Ireland changed Petty's destiny and he became a man of the world and entrepreneur which stimulated his interest in public policy formulation and economics. It was Petty's peculiar genius to be innovative in the application of measurement, statistics, and mathematics to socioeconomic and demographic phenomena. As a physician he related his knowledge of health and disease to these phenomena in what in the modern context would be called human ecology or social epidemiology. These relationships and their measurement were employed to establish an objective set of data which could be analyzed for the purpose of rational public policy planning by the state. This scientific approach to public policy places Petty squarely in the context of modern epidemiologic and public health practice and marks the initiation of a major use of the epidemiologic method.

  1. In Search of William Gascoigne Seventeenth Century Astronomer

    CERN Document Server

    Sellers, David

    2012-01-01

    William Gascoigne (c.1612-44), the first inventor of the telescopic sight and micrometer—instruments crucial to the advance of astronomy—was killed in the English Civil War. His name is now known to historians of science around the world, but for some considerable time after his tragic death at the age of 32, it seemed as if his achievements would be consigned to oblivion. Most of his papers were lost in the maelstrom of war and the few that seemed to have survived later disappeared. This is the story of how his work was rescued. Woven into that story is an account of the state of astronomy and optics during Gascoigne’s lifetime, so that the reader can appreciate the significance of his discoveries.   A substantial appendix presents selected extracts from Gascoigne's correspondence. This includes much new material that has not been previously published and illustrates his efforts to explain the basis of his pioneering techniques to the satisfaction of his contemporaries.   

  2. Capacity to improve fine motor skills in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berencsi, A; Gombos, F; Kovács, I

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are known to have difficulties in carrying out fine motor movements; however, a detailed behavioural profile of WS in this domain is still missing. It is also unknown how great the capacity to improve these skills with focused and extensive practice is. We studied initial performance and learning capacity in a sequential finger tapping (FT) task in WS and in typical development. Improvement in the FT task has been shown to be sleep dependent. WS subjects participating in the current study have also participated in earlier polysomnography studies, although not directly related to learning. WS participants presented with great individual variability. In addition to generally poor initial performance, learning capacity was also greatly limited in WS. We found indications that reduced sleep efficiency might contribute to this limitation. Estimating motor learning capacity and the depth of sleep disorder in a larger sample of WS individuals might reveal important relationships between sleep and learning, and contribute to efficient intervention methods improving skill acquisition in WS. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research published by MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Perceptual learning in Williams syndrome: looking beyond averages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Gervan

    Full Text Available Williams Syndrome is a genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an uneven cognitive profile and surprisingly large neurobehavioral differences among individuals. Previous studies have already shown different forms of memory deficiencies and learning difficulties in WS. Here we studied the capacity of WS subjects to improve their performance in a basic visual task. We employed a contour integration paradigm that addresses occipital visual function, and analyzed the initial (i.e. baseline and after-learning performance of WS individuals. Instead of pooling the very inhomogeneous results of WS subjects together, we evaluated individual performance by expressing it in terms of the deviation from the average performance of the group of typically developing subjects of similar age. This approach helped us to reveal information about the possible origins of poor performance of WS subjects in contour integration. Although the majority of WS individuals showed both reduced baseline and reduced learning performance, individual analysis also revealed a dissociation between baseline and learning capacity in several WS subjects. In spite of impaired initial contour integration performance, some WS individuals presented learning capacity comparable to learning in the typically developing population, and vice versa, poor learning was also observed in subjects with high initial performance levels. These data indicate a dissociation between factors determining initial performance and perceptual learning.

  4. Narrative competence in Spanish-speaking adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Itza, Eliseo; Martínez, Verónica; Antón, Aránzazu

    2016-08-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder associated with intellectual disability and characterised by displaying an atypical neuropsychological profile, with peaks and valleys, where language skills seem better preserved than non-verbal intelligence. This study researches the narrative competence of nine Spanish-speaking adults with WS. Oral narratives were elicited from a silent film, and narrative coherence was analysed as a function of sequential order of the events narrated at three structure levels, while narrative cohesion was assessed through the frequency of use and type of discourse markers. WS subjects were able to remember a significant proportion of the events from the film, but coherence of narratives, i.e., sequential order of events, was more impaired. Consistently with their linguistic abilities, cohesion of narratives was better preserved, as they used discourse markers to introduce a high proportion of events. Construction of mental models of the narratives may be constrained in WS by non-verbal cognitive abilities, but narrative competence is also determined by textual pragmatic abilities to organize discourse, which should be addressed by specific intervention in narrative competence.

  5. Auditory cortical volumes and musical ability in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marilee A; Reutens, David C; Wilson, Sarah J

    2010-07-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have been shown to have atypical morphology in the auditory cortex, an area associated with aspects of musicality. Some individuals with WS have demonstrated specific musical abilities, despite intellectual delays. Primary auditory cortex and planum temporale volumes were manually segmented in 25 individuals with WS and 25 control participants, and the participants also underwent testing of musical abilities. Left and right planum temporale volumes were significantly larger in the participants with WS than in controls, with no significant difference noted between groups in planum temporale asymmetry or primary auditory cortical volumes. Left planum temporale volume was significantly increased in a subgroup of the participants with WS who demonstrated specific musical strengths, as compared to the remaining WS participants, and was highly correlated with scores on a musical task. These findings suggest that differences in musical ability within WS may be in part associated with variability in the left auditory cortical region, providing further evidence of cognitive and neuroanatomical heterogeneity within this syndrome. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. THE SYNTACTICAL ABILITY OF A YOUNG GIRL WITH WILLIAMS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana ARAPOVIKJ

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out on a young girl with Williams syndrome, whose syntactical ability was tested longitudinally over a period of 22 months, from age 9 years and 3 months to 11 years and 1 month. The assumption was that the girl with Wil­liams syndrome would have poorer syntactical ability than children with regular development, but similar to children with specific language impair­ment (SLI and that in all tasks she would achieve better results in the final testing. Syntax was ana­lyzed on the basis of the fundamental variable of repeating sentences, which consisted of five sub-variables: literal repetition of sentences, sentences repeated with omissions, ungrammatical repetition of sentences, sentences with altered content, sen­tences not repeated. A statistical difference was found between the syntactical ability of the girl with Williams’ syndrome and children with normal development in all tested sub-variables, and her results were the same as in children with specific language impairment. Moreover, in the final test­ing the girl achieved better results than in the ini­tial test.

  7. Addressing social skills deficits in adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Marisa H; Morin, Lindsay

    2017-12-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are hypersocial; yet, they experience social difficulties and trouble with relationships. This report summarizes findings from three studies examining the social functioning of adults with WS and the feasibility of a social skills training program for adults with WS (SSTP-WS) through the examination of performance on initial lesson plans. Study 1: 114 parents of adults with WS completed the Social Responsiveness Scale-2. Study 2: 10 adults with WS and 12 of their parents participated in focus groups to further describe the deficits identified in Study 1 and to discuss a SSTP-WS. Study 3: 30 adults with WS were randomly assigned to 2 lessons on either conversations or relationships and pre-post change in social skills knowledge was assessed. Study 1 indicates adults with WS experience severe social impairments in social cognition, and mild-moderate impairments in social awareness and social communication. Qualitative results in Study 2 indicate a SSTP-WS should address conversation skills and relationships. In Study 3, participants showed gains in social skills knowledge following completion of lessons. A SSTP-WS may be beneficial for adults with WS. Future research should describe the social needs of individuals with WS at different ages and should further develop a SSTP-WS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hydrographic trends in Prince William Sound, Alaska, 1960-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert W.

    2018-01-01

    A five-decade time series of temperature and salinity profiles within Prince William Sound (PWS) and the immediately adjacent shelf was assembled from several archives and ongoing field programs, and augmented with archived SST observations. Observations matched with recent cool (2007-2013) and warm (2013-onward) periods in the region, and also showed an overall regional warming trend ( 0.1 to 0.2 °C decade-1) that matched long-term increases in heat transport to the surface ocean. A cooling and freshening trend ( - 0.2 °C decade-1 and 0.02 respectively) occurred in the near surface waters in some portions of PWS, particularly the northwestern margin, which is also the location of most of the ice mass in the region; discharge (estimated from other studies) has increased over time, suggesting that those patterns were due to increased meltwater inputs. Increases in salinity at depth were consistent with enhanced entrainment of deep water by estuarine circulations, and by enhanced deep water renewal caused by reductions in downwelling-favorable winds. As well as local-scale effects, temperature and salinity were positively cross correlated with large scale climate and lunar indexes at long lags (years to months), indicating the longer time scales of atmospheric and transport connections with the Gulf of Alaska. Estimates of mixed layer depths show a shoaling of the seasonal mixed layer over time by several meters, which may have implications for ecosystem productivity in the region.

  9. Edouard Glissant e o legado de William Faulkner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eurídice Figueiredo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo se propone analizar el intertexto que une al escritor Edouard Glissant con William Faulkner a través de dos obras: el ensayo Faulkner, Mississipi [1996] y la novela Sartorius [1999]. En el primer texto, el autor enfatiza cuestiones presentes en su propia obra novelesca: la genealogía, la relación con el espacio de la plantación, el mestizaje, la [i]legitimidad de derechos con respecto a la posesión de la tierra, la opacidad. En el segundo, traza una línea genealógica de un personaje perteneciente a una etnia africana imaginaria, haciéndolo llegar hasta las plantaciones del sur de los Estados Unidos; paralelamente, presenta la línea genealógica de los Sartoris. En esta dirección, busco mostrar cómo el proyecto literario de Glissant dialoga con la obra de Faulkner, indagando e inventariando las mismas problemáticas con respecto al transplante de poblaciones y su inserción en el espacio de las plantaciones, tanto en el sur de los Estados Unidos como en las islas del Caribe. En las obras de ambos escritores puede percibirse el mismo vértigo trágico que persigue a los personajes, conduciéndolos a la locura, el sufrimiento y la muerte

  10. Facilitating complex shape drawing in Williams syndrome and typical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Kerry D; Farran, Emily K

    2013-07-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) produce drawings that are disorganised, likely due to an inability to replicate numerous spatial relations between parts. This study attempted to circumvent these drawing deficits in WS when copying complex combinations of one, two and three shapes. Drawing decisions were reduced by introducing a number of facilitators, for example, by using distinct colours and including facilitatory cues on the response sheet. Overall, facilitation improved drawing in the WS group to a comparable level of accuracy as typically developing participants (matched for non-verbal ability). Drawing accuracy was greatest in both groups when planning demands (e.g. starting location, line lengths and changes in direction) were reduced by use of coloured figures and providing easily distinguished and clearly grouped facilitatory cues to form each shape. This study provides the first encouraging evidence to suggest that drawing of complex shapes in WS can be facilitated; individuals with WS might be receptive to remediation programmes for drawing and handwriting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. English Medieval Churches, 'Festival Orientation' and William Wordsworth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Peter G.; Ketel, Hans

    2015-05-01

    A church that is shown to be aligned with sunrise or sunset on the feast day of the saint to whom the building was dedicated is said to display 'festival orientation'. The earliest work to touch upon this practice in English dates from c. 1678. William Wordsworth gave impetus to the subject in two poems published in 1827; he also played a part in the design of St Mary's chapel (1823-4), Rydal, Cumbria in the English Lake District. The 14th-century St Catherine's chapel at Houghton St Giles, Norfolk, was constructed for the use of pilgrims on their way to nearby Walsingham. Careful measurement of the orientation and eastern horizon of these two buildings has shown that St Mary's is aligned with sunrise on the Marian festival of The Visitation (2 July), and St Catherine's is directed towards the rising Sun on the feast of St Catherine of Alexandria (25 November). It is only by taking into account the character of the horizon that meaningful tests for festival orientation may be carried out.

  12. William Henry Broadbent (1835-1907) as a neurologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    By the end of his career, Sir William Broadbent (1835-1907) had become an eminent London general physician who had been appointed Physician-in-Ordinary to King Edward VII and to the Prince of Wales. Previously he had been Physician-in-Extraordinary to Queen Victoria. At earlier stages in his professional life, he had played a significant role in the development of clinical neurology in Victorian-era Britain. In 1866, he had enunciated a principle (Broadbent's hypothesis) that for the first time satisfactorily accounted for the mechanisms by which the trunk and bulbar muscles and the upper face were spared in hemiplegia. He had also carried out original investigations into the distribution of fiber tracts in the human cerebral hemispheres. At intervals over the years, he published on aspects of aphasia and developed a rather complicated though logical conceptual schema of the presumed anatomical background to the process of speech, based on clinic-pathological correlations. His role in all this neurological research and his other contributions on subjects such as neurosyphilis have largely been forgotten by subsequent generations.

  13. Lord Byron's physician: John William Polidori on somnambulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Stanley; Stiles, Anne

    2013-01-01

    John William Polidori (1795-1821) was the Edinburgh-trained physician hired by Lord Byron to accompany him to Switzerland, where he participated in the story-telling event proposed by Byron that led, with Polidori's help, to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Although those interested in English literature might also remember Polidori as the author of The Vampyre, one of the first extended works of fiction about vampires, his earlier interest in somnambulism and trance states is only beginning to be appreciated. Even more than students of Romantic literature, historians of science and medicine seem little aware of what Polidori had written about oneirodynia, a synonym for somnambulism, and how his thoughts from 1815 about such activities reflected the changing medical zeitgeist at this time. This chapter examines Polidori's medical thesis in a neuroscience context and compares what he wrote to the writings of several other physicians who were fascinated by nocturnal wanderings, their causes, their manifestations, and their possible treatments. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Predictors of specific phobia in children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, C H; Klein-Tasman, B P; Osborne, J W; Mervis, C B

    2016-10-01

    Specific phobia (SP) is the most common anxiety disorder among children with Williams syndrome (WS); prevalence rates derived from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-based diagnostic interviews range from 37% to 56%. We evaluated the effects of gender, age, intellectual abilities and/or behaviour regulation difficulties on the likelihood that a child with WS would be diagnosed with SP. A total of 194 6-17 year-olds with WS were evaluated. To best characterise the relations between the predictors and the probability of a SP diagnosis, we explored not only possible linear effects but also curvilinear effects. No gender differences were detected. As age increased, the likelihood of receiving a SP diagnosis decreased. As IQ increased, the probability of receiving a SP diagnosis also decreased. Behaviour regulation difficulties were the strongest predictor of a positive diagnosis. A quadratic relation was detected: The probability of receiving a SP diagnosis gradually rose as behaviour regulation difficulties increased. However, once behaviour regulation difficulties approached the clinical range, the probability of receiving a SP diagnosis asymptoted at a high level. Children with behaviour regulation difficulties in or just below the clinical range were at the greatest risk of developing SP. These findings highlight the value of large samples and the importance of evaluating for nonlinear effects to provide accurate model specification when characterising relations among a dependent variable and possible predictors. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Morphological differences in the mirror neuron system in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Brown, Timothy T; Erhart, Matthew; Järvinen, Anna M; Korenberg, Julie R; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition characterized by an overly gregarious personality, including high empathetic concern for others. Although seemingly disparate from the profile of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), both are associated with deficits in social communication/cognition. Notably, the mirror neuron system (MNS) has been implicated in social dysfunction for ASD; yet, the integrity of this network and its association with social functioning in WS remains unknown. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods were used to examine the structural integrity of the MNS of adults with WS versus typically developing (TD) individuals. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), a tool typically used to screen for social features of ASD, was also employed to assess the relationships between social functioning with the MNS morphology in WS participants. WS individuals showed reduced cortical surface area of MNS substrates yet relatively preserved cortical thickness as compared to TD adults. Increased cortical thickness of the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) was associated with increased deficits in social communication, social awareness, social cognition, and autistic mannerisms. However, social motivation was not related to anatomical features of the MNS. Our findings indicate that social deficits typical to both ASD and WS may be attributed to an aberrant MNS, whereas the unusual social drive marked in WS is subserved by substrates distinct from this network.

  16. Musical learning in children and adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, M; Dykens, E

    2013-09-01

    There is recent interest in using music making as an empirically supported intervention for various neurodevelopmental disorders due to music's engagement of perceptual-motor mapping processes. However, little is known about music learning in populations with developmental disabilities. Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder whose characteristic auditory strengths and visual-spatial weaknesses map onto the processes used to learn to play a musical instrument. We identified correlates of novel musical instrument learning in WS by teaching 46 children and adults (7-49 years) with WS to play the Appalachian dulcimer. Obtained dulcimer skill was associated with prior musical abilities (r = 0.634, P learning strategies, but not visual or instructional strategies, predicted greater dulcimer skill beyond individual musical and visual-motor integration abilities (β = 0.285, sr(2) = 0.06, P = 0.019). These findings map onto behavioural and emerging neural evidence for greater auditory-motor mapping processes in WS. Results suggest that explicit awareness of task-specific learning approaches is important when learning a new skill. Implications for using music with populations with syndrome-specific strengths and weakness will be discussed. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  17. THE HISTORY OF DESIGN EDUCATION AND WILLIAM MORRIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguz DILMAC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Industrial revolution had an impact on art as well as other fields of society in the years 1760-1860. The machines came to the front in together with bringing out production line to supply growing demand, and so the importance the art had diminished. The machines having some features like standard production, scales based on rules and geometric form having unnatural appearance caused the artists such as William Morris and John Ruskin to believe that the machine harmed the art. The artists such as Morris and Ruskin took a leading role in development of design idea by resisting the form of machine production devoid of art in the light of this ideas. The problem of design keeps as a current issue nowadays. That’s why, we could create a solution by having different perspectives based on previous experience and problems encountered nowadays. The problem of design keeps on up-to-date issue with the technology developing very fast today. So, this study was made with the aim to help us present right approaches towards today’s problems. This research, review of the literature obtained from architecture, history of art and industrial design on books- magazines the subject of the dissertation thesis Higher Education Center was formed with descriptive narratives. Another aim of the research carried out in this context the handmade, machine design is to examine the emerging issues in the transition to production.

  18. Läbi legendide William Shakespeare'i poole / Maris Peters

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Peters, Maris

    2010-01-01

    Tutvustus: Wells, Stanley. Kas on tõsi, et Shakespeare ...? / tõlkinud Maris Peters. Tallinn : Argo, 2010. Raamat William Shakespeare kohta käivatest legendidest, kuuldustest ja teooriatest ning tema teoste autorsusest

  19. Case report of sudden death in a child with Williams syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two year old child, confirmed with Williams syndrome (WS) ... and no relevant cardiac history such as chest pain or episodes ... brain, abdominal and pelvic organ blocks. .... a fully functional operating theatre complex presents a number.

  20. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  1. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  2. Lähtugem ehitistest! / William J. R. Curtis ; interv. Andres Kurg, Karin Hallas, Triin Ojari

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Curtis, William J. R.

    1998-01-01

    24. apr. pidas Rotermanni soolalaos loengu arhitektuuriajaloolane William J. R. Curtis. Katkeid jutuajamisest W. Curtisega. Arhitektuurikriitikast, oma raamatust "Modern Architecture since 1900", millest W. Curtis praegu kriitikuna kirjutab, Lille'i projektist jm

  3. John Whitridge Williams, MD (1866–1931) of Baltimore: pioneer of academic obstetrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, P M

    2007-01-01

    Williams was the founder of academic obstetrics in the United States and with his textbook was the recognised leader of this discipline in America during the first 30 years of the 20th century. PMID:17185435

  4. Application of Choi—Williams Reduced Interference Time Frequency Distribution to Machinery Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard A. Gaberson

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses time frequency analysis of machinery diagnostic vibration signals. The short time Fourier transform, the Wigner, and the Choi–Williams distributions are explained and illustrated with test cases. Examples of Choi—Williams analyses of machinery vibration signals are presented. The analyses detect discontinuities in the signals and their timing, amplitude and frequency modulation, and the presence of different components in a vibration signal.

  5. Binding of Visual and Spatial Short-Term Memory in Williams Syndrome and Moderate Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrold, Christopher; Phillips, Caroline; Baddeley, Alan D

    2007-01-01

    A main aim of this study was to test the claim that individuals with Williams syndrome have selectively impaired memory for spatial as opposed to visual information. The performance of 16 individuals with Williams syndrome (six males, 10 females; mean age 18y 7mo [SD 7y 6mo], range 9y 1mo-30y 7mo) on tests of short-term memory for item and…

  6. White matter integrity deficits in prefrontal-amygdala pathways in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Suzanne N; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Anderson, Adam W; Blackford, Jennifer Urbano

    2012-01-16

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with significant non-social fears. Consistent with this elevated non-social fear, individuals with Williams syndrome have an abnormally elevated amygdala response when viewing threatening non-social stimuli. In typically-developing individuals, amygdala activity is inhibited through dense, reciprocal white matter connections with the prefrontal cortex. Neuroimaging studies suggest a functional uncoupling of normal prefrontal-amygdala inhibition in individuals with Williams syndrome, which might underlie both the extreme amygdala activity and non-social fears. This functional uncoupling might be caused by structural deficits in underlying white matter pathways; however, prefrontal-amygdala white matter deficits have yet to be explored in Williams syndrome. We used diffusion tensor imaging to investigate prefrontal-amygdala white matter integrity differences in individuals with Williams syndrome and typically-developing controls with high levels of non-social fear. White matter pathways between the amygdala and several prefrontal regions were isolated using probabilistic tractography. Within each pathway, we tested for between-group differences in three measures of white matter integrity: fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and parallel diffusivity (λ(1)). Individuals with Williams syndrome had lower FA, compared to controls, in several of the prefrontal-amygdala pathways investigated, indicating a reduction in white matter integrity. Lower FA in Williams syndrome was explained by significantly higher RD, with no differences in λ(1), suggestive of lower fiber density or axon myelination in prefrontal-amygdala pathways. These results suggest that deficits in the structural integrity of prefrontal-amygdala white matter pathways might underlie the increased amygdala activity and extreme non-social fears observed in Williams syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Using novel control groups to dissect the amygdala's role in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Avery, Suzanne N; Blackford, Jennifer Urbano

    2011-07-01

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder with an intriguing behavioral phenotype-hypersociability combined with significant non-social fears. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormalities in amygdala function in individuals with Williams syndrome compared to typically-developing controls. However, it remains unclear whether the findings are related to the atypical neurodevelopment of Williams syndrome, or are also associated with behavioral traits at the extreme end of a normal continuum. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare amygdala blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) responses to non-social and social images in individuals with Williams syndrome compared to either individuals with inhibited temperament (high non-social fear) or individuals with uninhibited temperament (high sociability). Individuals with Williams syndrome had larger amygdala BOLD responses when viewing the non-social fear images than the inhibited temperament control group. In contrast, when viewing both fear and neutral social images, individuals with Williams syndrome did not show smaller amygdala BOLD responses relative to the uninhibited temperament control group, but instead had amygdala responses proportionate to their sociability. These results suggest heightened amygdala response to non-social fear images is characteristic of WS, whereas, variability in amygdala response to social fear images is proportionate to, and might be explained by, levels of trait sociability.

  8. Autistic disorder in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome: a reconsideration of the Williams-Beuren syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordjman, Sylvie; Anderson, George M; Botbol, Michel; Toutain, Annick; Sarda, Pierre; Carlier, Michèle; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Baumann, Clarisse; Cohen, David; Lagneaux, Céline; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Verloes, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a rare developmental disorder caused by deletion of contiguous genes at 7q11.23, has been characterized by strengths in socialization (overfriendliness) and communication (excessive talkativeness). WBS has been often considered as the polar opposite behavioral phenotype to autism. Our objective was to better understand the range of phenotypic expression in WBS and the relationship between WBS and autistic disorder. The study was conducted on 9 French individuals aged from 4 to 37 years old with autistic disorder associated with WBS. Behavioral assessments were performed using Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) scales. Molecular characterization of the WBS critical region was performed by FISH. FISH analysis indicated that all 9 patients displayed the common WBS deletion. All 9 patients met ADI-R and ADOS diagnostic criteria for autism, displaying stereotypies and severe impairments in social interaction and communication (including the absence of expressive language). Additionally, patients showed improvement in social communication over time. The results indicate that comorbid autism and WBS is more frequent than expected and suggest that the common WBS deletion can result in a continuum of social communication impairment, ranging from excessive talkativeness and overfriendliness to absence of verbal language and poor social relationships. Appreciation of the possible co-occurrence of WBS and autism challenges the common view that WBS represents the opposite behavioral phenotype of autism, and might lead to improved recognition of WBS in individuals diagnosed with autism.

  9. The rhetorical strategy of William Paley's Natural theology (1802): part 1, William Paley's Natural theology in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Niall

    2010-03-01

    This article reconstructs the historical and philosophical contexts of William Paley's Natural theology (1802). In the wake of the French Revolution, widely believed to be the embodiment of an atheistic political credo, the refutation of the transmutational biological theories of Buffon and Erasmus Darwin was naturally high on Paley's agenda. But he was also responding to challenges arising from his own moral philosophy, principally the psychological quandary of how men were to be kept in mind of the Creator. It is argued here that Natural theology was the culmination of a complex rhetorical scheme for instilling religious impressions that would increase both the virtue and happiness of mankind. Philosophy formed an integral part of this strategy, but it did not comprise the whole of it. Equally vital were those purely rhetorical aspects of the discourse which, according to Paley, were more concerned with creating 'impression'. This facet of his writing is explored in part one of this two-part article. Turning to the argumentative side of the scheme, part two examines Paley's responses to David Hume and Erasmus Darwin in the light of the wider strategy of inculcation at work throughout all his writings.

  10. William Bradley Coley, MD, and the phenomenon of spontaneous regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon LF

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Leonard F Vernon Sherman College of Chiropractic, Spartanburg, SC, USA Abstract: The standard definition of spontaneous regression (SR of cancer is as follows, “…when a malignant tumor partially or completely disappears without treatment or in the presence of therapy which is considered inadequate to exert a significant influence on neoplastic disease.” SR is also known as Saint Peregrine tumor, the name taken from a young priest, Peregrine Laziosi (1260 [5]–1345, exact date is unknown, who had been diagnosed with a tumor of the tibia. The mass eventually grew so large that it broke through the skin and became severely infected. The available treatment for this condition was limited to amputation. Historical records report that on the day of surgery, physicians found that the tumor had disappeared and reportedly never returned. To date, the medical literature consists only of individual case studies and overviews of this phenomenon. The most cited work on the subject was done by surgeons Tilden Everson and Warren Cole who reviewed 176 published cases of SR from 1900 to 1960. While a percentage of these were found not to be cases of SR, there remained a number of unexplained cases. A frequent theme in many cases of SR is the co-occurrence of infection. Given the current interest in immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer, this article discusses one of the very early pioneers of this theory, William Bradley Coley, MD, a surgeon who was clearly ahead of his time. Ostracized by colleagues for his belief that stimulation of the immune system could in fact produce a regression of cancer, Coley remained convinced that his theory was right and, while he was not familiar with cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF, interferons, and streptokinase, he knew instinctively that an innate immune response was taking place. Keywords: autoimmunity, cancer, fever, infection, immunotherapy, tumor, cytokines

  11. Strain accumulation across the Prince William Sound asperity, Southcentral Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, J. C.; Svarc, J. L.; Lisowski, M.

    2015-03-01

    The surface velocities predicted by the conventional subduction model are compared to velocities measured in a GPS array (surveyed in 1993, 1995, 1997, 2000, and 2004) spanning the Prince William Sound asperity. The observed velocities in the comparison have been corrected to remove the contributions from postseismic (1964 Alaska earthquake) mantle relaxation. Except at the most seaward monument (located on Middleton Island at the seaward edge of the continental shelf, just 50 km landward of the deformation front in the Aleutian Trench), the corrected velocities qualitatively agree with those predicted by an improved, two-dimensional, back slip, subduction model in which the locked megathrust coincides with the plate interface identified by seismic refraction surveys, and the back slip rate is equal to the plate convergence rate. A better fit to the corrected velocities is furnished by either a back slip rate 20% greater than the plate convergence rate or a 30% shallower megathrust. The shallow megathrust in the latter fit may be an artifact of the uniform half-space Earth model used in the inversion. Backslip at the plate convergence rate on the megathrust mapped by refraction surveys would fit the data as well if the rigidity of the underthrust plate was twice that of the overlying plate, a rigidity contrast higher than expected. The anomalous motion at Middleton Island is attributed to continuous slip at near the plate convergence rate on a postulated, listric fault that splays off the megathrust at depth of about 12 km and outcrops on the continental slope south-southeast of Middleton Island.

  12. Strain accumulation across the Prince William Sound asperity, Southcentral Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, James C.; Svarc, Jerry L.; Lisowski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The surface velocities predicted by the conventional subduction model are compared to velocities measured in a GPS array (surveyed in 1993, 1995, 1997, 2000, and 2004) spanning the Prince William Sound asperity. The observed velocities in the comparison have been corrected to remove the contributions from postseismic (1964 Alaska earthquake) mantle relaxation. Except at the most seaward monument (located on Middleton Island at the seaward edge of the continental shelf, just 50 km landward of the deformation front in the Aleutian Trench), the corrected velocities qualitatively agree with those predicted by an improved, two-dimensional, back slip, subduction model in which the locked megathrust coincides with the plate interface identified by seismic refraction surveys, and the back slip rate is equal to the plate convergence rate. A better fit to the corrected velocities is furnished by either a back slip rate 20% greater than the plate convergence rate or a 30% shallower megathrust. The shallow megathrust in the latter fit may be an artifact of the uniform half-space Earth model used in the inversion. Backslip at the plate convergence rate on the megathrust mapped by refraction surveys would fit the data as well if the rigidity of the underthrust plate was twice that of the overlying plate, a rigidity contrast higher than expected. The anomalous motion at Middleton Island is attributed to continuous slip at near the plate convergence rate on a postulated, listric fault that splays off the megathrust at depth of about 12 km and outcrops on the continental slope south-southeast of Middleton Island.

  13. Incontinence in children, adolescents and adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gontard, Alexander; Niemczyk, Justine; Borggrefe-Moussavian, Sorina; Wagner, Catharina; Curfs, Leopold; Equit, Monika

    2016-11-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a microdeletion syndrome (chromosome 7q11.23) characterized by typical facial features, cardiovascular disease, behavioural symptoms, and mild intellectual disability (ID). The aim of this study was to assess the rates of incontinence and psychological problems in persons with WS. 231 individuals with WS were recruited through the German parent support group (52.0% male, mean age 19.4 years). Faecal incontinence (FI) was diagnosed from the age of 4 years and nocturnal enuresis (NE) and daytime urinary incontinence (DUI) of 5 years onwards. The Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence, the International-Consultation-on-Incontinence-Questionnaire-Pediatric LUTS (ICIQ-CLUTS), as well as the Developmental Behavior Checklist for parents (DBC-P) or for adults (DBC-A) were filled out by parents or caregivers. 17.8% of the sample had NE, 5.9% DUI and 7.6% FI. NE was present in 44.9% of children (4-12 years), 13.5% of teens (13-17y), 3.3% of young adults (18-30y) and in 3.6% of adults (> 30y). DUI (and FI) decreased from 17.9% (21.4%) in children to 0% in adults. 3.5% of the sample had an ICIQ-CLUTS score in the clinical range. 30.5% of children and 22.1% of adults had a clinical DBC score. Children and teens with clinically relevant DBC-P-scores had significantly higher DUI rates. Children with WS have high rates of incontinence and LUTS, which decrease with age. Most adults are continent. NE is the most common subtype. Except for DUI in children, incontinence is not associated with behavioural problems. Screening, assessment and treatment of incontinence in individuals with WS is recommended. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:1000-1005, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Longitudinal Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela E. John

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Although prior research has indicated that pragmatics is an area of particular weakness for individuals with Williams syndrome (WS, the relations among different pragmatic abilities and the relations between pragmatic ability and expressive vocabulary ability have yet to be addressed. In addition, analyses of the relations between the same type of pragmatic ability over time have not been reported. The present study was designed to address these questions. We considered the pragmatic language abilities of 14 children with WS at two time points: as 4-year-olds during a 30-minute play-session with their mothers (Time 1 and an average of 5.87 years later during a one-on-one conversation with a familiar researcher (Time 2. Children’s intellectual and expressive vocabulary abilities were assessed at both time points. Results indicated that the ability to verbally contribute information beyond what was required in response to a question was significantly related to the ability to verbally contribute new information in the absence of a question both at age 4 years and during primary school. At age 4, both the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact (intersubjectivity and expressive vocabulary ability were related to the ability to verbally contribute information beyond what was expected within a social interaction. Finally, the ability to verbally contribute new information to a social interaction beyond what was required to answer a question and the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact (intersubjectivity at age 4 years predicted the ability to verbally contribute new information beyond what was required to answer a question at age 9 – 12 years. The theoretical implications of our findings and the importance of early pragmatic language intervention for children who have WS are discussed.

  15. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Longitudinal Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Angela E.; Dobson, Lauren A.; Thomas, Lauren E.; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has indicated that pragmatics is an area of particular weakness for individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). To further address this aspect of the WS social phenotype, we used an individual differences approach to consider both cross-sectional and longitudinal relations among different pragmatic abilities for 14 children with WS, taking into account individual differences in non-verbal reasoning abilities. We also considered the relations between pragmatic abilities and expressive vocabulary ability. Participants were tested at two time points: as 4-year-olds during a 30-min play session with their mothers (Time 1) and an average of 5.87 years later during a one-on-one conversation with a familiar researcher (Time 2). Children’s intellectual and expressive vocabulary abilities were assessed at both time points. Results indicated that the ability to verbally contribute information beyond what was required in response to a question (ExtendQ) was significantly related to the ability to verbally contribute new information in the absence of a question (ExtendS) both at age 4 years and during primary school. At age 4, both the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact in triadic interactions (secondary intersubjectivity) and expressive vocabulary ability were related to both ExtendQ and ExtendS. Finally, both ExtendQ and the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact (intersubjectivity) at age 4 years predicted ExtendQ at age 9–12 years. The theoretical implications of our findings and the importance of early pragmatic language intervention for children who have WS are discussed. PMID:22719734

  16. Dissociation of spatial memory systems in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostelmann, Mathilde; Fragnière, Emilie; Costanzo, Floriana; Di Vara, Silvia; Menghini, Deny; Vicari, Stefano; Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta

    2017-11-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic deletion syndrome, is characterized by severe visuospatial deficits affecting performance on both tabletop spatial tasks and on tasks which assess orientation and navigation. Nevertheless, previous studies of WS spatial capacities have ignored the fact that two different spatial memory systems are believed to contribute parallel spatial representations supporting navigation. The place learning system depends on the hippocampal formation and creates flexible relational representations of the environment, also known as cognitive maps. The spatial response learning system depends on the striatum and creates fixed stimulus-response representations, also known as habits. Indeed, no study assessing WS spatial competence has used tasks which selectively target these two spatial memory systems. Here, we report that individuals with WS exhibit a dissociation in their spatial abilities subserved by these two memory systems. As compared to typically developing (TD) children in the same mental age range, place learning performance was impaired in individuals with WS. In contrast, their spatial response learning performance was facilitated. Our findings in individuals with WS and TD children suggest that place learning and response learning interact competitively to control the behavioral strategies normally used to support human spatial navigation. Our findings further suggest that the neural pathways supporting place learning may be affected by the genetic deletion that characterizes WS, whereas those supporting response learning may be relatively preserved. The dissociation observed between these two spatial memory systems provides a coherent theoretical framework to characterize the spatial abilities of individuals with WS, and may lead to the development of new learning strategies based on their facilitated response learning abilities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. WEAVE: the next generation wide-field spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope : The next generation wide-field spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, Gavin; Trager, Scott C.; Abrams, Don Carlos; Carter, David; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; MacIntosh, Mike; Evans, Chris; Lewis, Ian; Navarro, Ramon; Agocs, Tibor; Dee, Kevin; Rousset, Sophie; Tosh, Ian; Middleton, Kevin; Pragt, Johannes; Terrett, David; Brock, Matthew; Benn, Chris; Verheijen, Marc; Cano Infantes, Diego; Bevil, Craige; Steele, Iain; Mottram, Chris; Bates, Stuart; Gribbin, Francis J.; Rey, Jürg; Rodriguez, Luis Fernando; Delgado, Jose Miguel; Guinouard, Isabelle; Walton, Nic; Irwin, Michael J.; Jagourel, Pascal; Stuik, Remko; Gerlofsma, Gerrit; Roelfsma, Ronald; Skillen, Ian; Ridings, Andy; Balcells, Marc; Daban, Jean-Baptiste; Gouvret, Carole; Venema, Lars; Girard, Paul

    We present the preliminary design of the WEAVE next generation spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), principally targeting optical ground-based follow up of upcoming ground-based (LOFAR) and spacebased (Gaia) surveys. WEAVE is a multi-object and multi-IFU facility utilizing

  18. The contribution of CLIP2 haploinsufficiency to the clinical manifestations of the Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeweyer, Geert; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Reyniers, Edwin; Kooy, R Frank

    2012-06-08

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare contiguous gene syndrome, characterized by intellectual disability, facial dysmorphisms, connective-tissue abnormalities, cardiac defects, structural brain abnormalities, and transient infantile hypercalcemia. Genes lying telomeric to RFC2, including CLIP2, GTF2I and GTF2IRD1, are currently thought to be the most likely major contributors to the typical Williams syndrome cognitive profile, characterized by a better-than-expected auditory rote-memory ability, a relative sparing of language capabilities, and a severe visual-spatial constructive impairment. Atypical deletions in the region have helped to establish genotype-phenotype correlations. So far, however, hardly any deletions affecting only a single gene in the disease region have been described. We present here two healthy siblings with a pure, hemizygous deletion of CLIP2. A putative role in the cognitive and behavioral abnormalities seen in Williams-Beuren patients has been suggested for this gene on the basis of observations in a knock-out mouse model. The presented siblings did not show any of the clinical features associated with the syndrome. Cognitive testing showed an average IQ for both and no indication of the Williams syndrome cognitive profile. This shows that CLIP2 haploinsufficiency by itself does not lead to the physical or cognitive characteristics of the Williams-Beuren syndrome, nor does it lead to the Williams syndrome cognitive profile. Although contribution of CLIP2 to the phenotype cannot be excluded when it is deleted in combination with other genes, our results support the hypothesis that GTF2IRD1 and GTF2I are the main genes causing the cognitive defects associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Explicit Oral Narrative Intervention for Students with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Itza, Eliseo; Martínez, Verónica; Pérez, Vanesa; Fernández-Urquiza, Maite

    2018-01-01

    Narrative skills play a crucial role in organizing experience, facilitating social interaction and building academic discourse and literacy. They are at the interface of cognitive, social, and linguistic abilities related to school engagement. Despite their relative strengths in social and grammatical skills, students with Williams syndrome (WS) do not show parallel cognitive and pragmatic performance in narrative generation tasks. The aim of the present study was to assess retelling of a TV cartoon tale and the effect of an individualized explicit instruction of the narrative structure. Participants included eight students with WS who attended different special education levels. Narratives were elicited in two sessions (pre and post intervention), and were transcribed, coded and analyzed using the tools of the CHILDES Project. Narratives were coded for productivity and complexity at the microstructure and macrostructure levels. Microstructure productivity (i.e., length of narratives) included number of utterances, clauses, and tokens. Microstructure complexity included mean length of utterances, lexical diversity and use of discourse markers as cohesive devices. Narrative macrostructure was assessed for textual coherence through the Pragmatic Evaluation Protocol for Speech Corpora (PREP-CORP). Macrostructure productivity and complexity included, respectively, the recall and sequential order of scenarios, episodes, events and characters. A total of four intervention sessions, lasting approximately 20 min, were delivered individually once a week. This brief intervention addressed explicit instruction about the narrative structure and the use of specific discourse markers to improve cohesion of story retellings. Intervention strategies included verbal scaffolding and modeling, conversational context for retelling the story and visual support with pictures printed from the cartoon. Results showed significant changes in WS students’ retelling of the story, both at

  20. Explicit Oral Narrative Intervention for Students with Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseo Diez-Itza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Narrative skills play a crucial role in organizing experience, facilitating social interaction and building academic discourse and literacy. They are at the interface of cognitive, social, and linguistic abilities related to school engagement. Despite their relative strengths in social and grammatical skills, students with Williams syndrome (WS do not show parallel cognitive and pragmatic performance in narrative generation tasks. The aim of the present study was to assess retelling of a TV cartoon tale and the effect of an individualized explicit instruction of the narrative structure. Participants included eight students with WS who attended different special education levels. Narratives were elicited in two sessions (pre and post intervention, and were transcribed, coded and analyzed using the tools of the CHILDES Project. Narratives were coded for productivity and complexity at the microstructure and macrostructure levels. Microstructure productivity (i.e., length of narratives included number of utterances, clauses, and tokens. Microstructure complexity included mean length of utterances, lexical diversity and use of discourse markers as cohesive devices. Narrative macrostructure was assessed for textual coherence through the Pragmatic Evaluation Protocol for Speech Corpora (PREP-CORP. Macrostructure productivity and complexity included, respectively, the recall and sequential order of scenarios, episodes, events and characters. A total of four intervention sessions, lasting approximately 20 min, were delivered individually once a week. This brief intervention addressed explicit instruction about the narrative structure and the use of specific discourse markers to improve cohesion of story retellings. Intervention strategies included verbal scaffolding and modeling, conversational context for retelling the story and visual support with pictures printed from the cartoon. Results showed significant changes in WS students’ retelling of the

  1. Approach to downstream planning for nearshore response and sensitive areas protection outside Prince William Sound, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeCola, E.G.; Robertson, T.L.; Robertson, R.; Banta, J.

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the need for an oil spill response plan for downstream coastal communities that could be affected by oil spilled from tankers travelling in Prince William Sound, Alaska. For the purpose of oil spill contingency planning, the State of Alaska has been divided into the Kodiak and Cook Inlet sub-areas that are at risk for downstream impacts from a Prince William Sound oil spill. The 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill provided an example of a worst-case scenario oil spill from a tanker in Prince William Sound, but the oil spill planning system that has evolved in Alaska does not adequately plan for on oil spill that originates in one sub-area of the state, but impacts other sub-areas in the downstream spill path. This study analyzed the gaps that exist in the current response planning system in the Prince William Sound, Cook Inlet and Kodiak sub-areas. A method was proposed to improve the existing response plans so that emergency response teams are better prepared to manage cross-boundary oil spills originating in Prince William Sound. The proposed method focuses on nearshore response and sensitive areas protection for coastlines and communities that are at risk for oil spills from a tanker travelling the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS). 11 refs., 3 figs

  2. Conceptualizing neurodevelopmental disorders through a mechanistic understanding of fragile X syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Lawrence K; Quintin, Eve-Marie; Haas, Brian W; Reiss, Allan L

    2012-04-01

    The overarching goal of this review is to compare and contrast the cognitive-behavioral features of fragile X syndrome (FraX) and Williams syndrome and to review the putative neural and molecular underpinnings of these features. Information is presented in a framework that provides guiding principles for conceptualizing gene-brain-behavior associations in neurodevelopmental disorders. Abnormalities, in particular cognitive-behavioral domains with similarities in underlying neurodevelopmental correlates, occur in both FraX and Williams syndrome including aberrant frontostriatal pathways leading to executive function deficits, and magnocellular/dorsal visual stream, superior parietal lobe, inferior parietal lobe, and postcentral gyrus abnormalities contributing to deficits in visuospatial function. Compelling cognitive-behavioral and neurodevelopmental contrasts also exist in these two disorders, for example, aberrant amygdala and fusiform cortex structure and function occurring in the context of contrasting social behavioral phenotypes, and temporal cortical and cerebellar abnormalities potentially underlying differences in language function. Abnormal dendritic development is a shared neurodevelopmental morphologic feature between FraX and Williams syndrome. Commonalities in molecular machinery and processes across FraX and Williams syndrome occur as well - microRNAs involved in translational regulation of major synaptic proteins; scaffolding proteins in excitatory synapses; and proteins involved in axonal development. Although the genetic variations leading to FraX and Williams syndrome are different, important similarities and contrasts in the phenotype, neurocircuitry, molecular machinery, and cellular processes in these two disorders allow for a unique approach to conceptualizing gene-brain-behavior links occurring in neurodevelopmental disorders.

  3. Holocene deposition and megathrust splay fault geometries within Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, S.; Liberty, L. M.; Haeussler, P. J.; Pratt, T. L.

    2011-12-01

    New high resolution sparker seismic reflection data, in conjunction with reprocessed legacy seismic data, provide the basis for a new fault, fold, and Holocene sediment thickness database for Prince William Sound, Alaska. Additionally, legacy airgun seismic data in Prince William Sound and the Gulf of Alaska tie features on these new sparker data to deeper portions of megathrust splay faults. We correlate regionally extensive bathymetric lineaments within Prince William Sound to megathrust splay faults, such as the ones that ruptured in the 1964 M9.2 earthquake. Lastly, we estimate Holocene sediment thickness within Prince William Sound to better constrain the Holocene fault history throughout the region. We identify three seismic facies related to Holocene, Quaternary, and Tertiary strata that are crosscut by numerous high angle normal faults in the hanging wall of the megathrust splay faults. The crustal-scale seismic reflection profiles show splay faults emerging from 20 km depth between the Yakutat block and North American crust and surfacing as the Hanning Bay and Patton Bay faults. A change in exhumation rates, slip rates, and fault orientation appears near Hinchinbrook that we attribute to differences in subducted slab geometry. Based on our slip rate analysis, we calculate average Holocene displacements of 20 m and 100 m in eastern and western Prince William Sound, respectively. Landward of two splay faults exposed on Montague Island, we observe subsidence, faulting, and landslides that record deformation associated with the 1964 and older megathrust earthquakes.

  4. Report of Some Comets: The Discovery of Uranus and Comets by William, Caroline, and John Herschel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Olson, R. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the discovery and drawings of comets by William, Caroline, and John Herschel. The first discovery, by William Herschel, in 1781 from Bath, published in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society with the title "Report of a Comet," turned out to be Uranus, the first planet ever discovered, Mercury through Saturn having been known since antiquity. William's sister Caroline was given duties of sweeping the skies and turned out to be a discoverer of 8 comets in her own right, in addition to keeping William's notes. Caroline's comets were discovered from Slough between 1786 and 1797. In the process, we also discuss original documents from the archives of the Royal Society and of the Royal Astronomical Society. We conclude by showing comet drawings that we have recently attributed to John Herschel, including Halley's Comet from 1836, recently located in the Ransom Center of the University of Texas at Austin. Acknowledgments: Planetary astronomy at Williams College is supported in part by grant NNX08AO50G from NASA Planetary Astronomy. We thank Peter Hingley of the Royal Astronomical Society and Richard Oram of the Harry Ransom Center of The University of Texas at Austin for their assistance.

  5. Obituary: William F. M. Buscombe, 1918-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taam, Ronald Everett; Bahng, John D. R.

    2003-12-01

    William Buscombe, an emeritus professor at Northwestern University, died from a massive stroke on 13 March 2003. He was a stellar spectroscopist and was working on the 16th edition of his catalog, entitled ``MK Spectral Classifications" at the time of his death. Bill was born on 12 February 1918 in Hamilton, Canada to Ethel Minett Buscombe and William Henry Buscombe. His mother was a business woman prior to marriage and his father was an executive secretary to a fire insurance company. His interest in astronomy was stimulated by a mathematics teacher in grade school and this interest carried over to his undergraduate years at the University of Toronto where he worked as a research assistant measuring stellar spectra at the David Dunlop Observatory. He earned a BA degree in Mathematics and Physics in 1940. Upon graduation he entered the graduate program in meteorology under the Department of Transport of the Government of Canada and worked as a meteorologist for the Canadian government until 1945. His studies and service eventually led to a MA degree in Meteorology from the University of Toronto in 1948. From the period 1945 to 1948, Bill was an instructor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Saskatchewan. During the summer of 1947 Bill resumed his research in astronomy working with Andew McKellar in a study of the intensities of molecular bands in R-type stars at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory. Subsequently, Bill entered into the graduate program in the Department of Astronomy at Princeton University where he worked with Martin Schwarzschild and Lyman Spitzer, Jr. In 1950, he was awarded a PhD in Astronomy for his thesis entitled, ``Spectrophotometry of Early A-Type Stars." Bill joined the staff at the Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observatories as a Fellow of the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1950--1952. During this period he spent a significant amount of time observing at Mount Wilson studying the variations of atomic absorption lines

  6. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hwang, Mi Soo; Kim, Sun Yong; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan [College of Medicine, Yeungam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-06-15

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures.

  7. Anaesthesia-related haemodynamic complications in Williams syndrome patients: a review of one institution's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, M; Fahy, C J; Costi, D A; Kelly, A J; Burgoyne, L L

    2014-09-01

    Williams syndrome is a genetic disorder associated with cardiac pathology, including supravalvular aortic stenosis and coronary artery stenosis. Sudden cardiac death has been reported in the perioperative period and attributed to cardiovascular pathology. In this retrospective audit, case note and anaesthetic records were reviewed for all confirmed Williams syndrome patients who had received an anaesthetic in our institution between July 1974 and November 2009. There were a total of 108 anaesthetics administered in 29 patients. Twelve of the anaesthetics (11.1%) were associated with cardiac complications including cardiac arrest in two cases (1.85%). Of the two cardiac arrests, one patient died within the first 24 hours postanaesthetic and the other patient survived, giving an overall mortality of 0.9% (3.4%). We conclude that Williams syndrome confers a significant anaesthetic risk, which should be recognised and considered by clinicians planning procedures requiring general anaesthesia.

  8. N-acetylcysteine for neuropsychiatric symptoms in a woman with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineiro, Mildred Lopez; Roberts, Antoinette M; Waxler, Jessica L; Mullett, Jennifer E; Pober, Barbara R; McDougle, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Williams syndrome is a relatively rare genetic disorder caused by the hemizygous microdeletion of a region in chromosome 7q11.23. Individuals with Williams syndrome typically present with a highly social, overfriendly, and empathic personality. Comorbid medical and neuropsychiatric disorders are common. Reports of effective pharmacological treatment of associated neuropsychiatric disorders are limited. The authors describe the successful treatment of interfering anger, aggression, and hair-pulling with N-acetylcysteine in a 19-year-old woman with Williams syndrome. The neuropsychiatric symptoms emerged 1 week following an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, for which fentanyl, midazolam, and propofol were used as anesthetics. The patient's treatment course and hypothesized mechanisms underlying the clinical presentation and symptom resolution are described. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Clinical utility of an array comparative genomic hybridization analysis for Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagihashi, Tatsuhiko; Torii, Chiharu; Takahashi, Reiko; Omori, Mikimasa; Kosaki, Rika; Yoshihashi, Hiroshi; Ihara, Masahiro; Minagawa-Kawai, Yasuyo; Yamamoto, Junichi; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2014-11-01

    To reveal the relation between intellectual disability and the deleted intervals in Williams syndrome, we performed an array comparative genomic hybridization analysis and standardized developmental testing for 11 patients diagnosed as having Williams syndrome based on fluorescent in situ hybridization testing. One patient had a large 4.2-Mb deletion spanning distally beyond the common 1.5-Mb intervals observed in 10/11 patients. We formulated a linear equation describing the developmental age of the 10 patients with the common deletion; the developmental age of the patient with the 4.2-Mb deletion was significantly below the expectation (developmental age = 0.51 × chronological age). The large deletion may account for the severe intellectual disability; therefore, the use of array comparative genomic hybridization may provide practical information regarding individuals with Williams syndrome. © 2014 Japanese Teratology Society.

  10. Revolution and Exploration: the English Translations of Rousseau and Humboldt by Helen Maria Williams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Yurss Lasanta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available British author Helen Maria Williams (1759-1827 was a well-known figure in the eighteenth century literary circles, whose work was praised by Elizabeth Montagu, Samuel Johnson, Dorothy and William Wordsworth, Mary Wollstonecraft, Hester Piozzi or Alexander von Humboldt.  In her early poems  Edwin and Eltruda (1782, An Ode to the Peace (1783 and Peru (1784, Williams starts to reveal her political tendencies by appealing to strong empathic feelings as a key to social and political transformation. As a result of her interest in politics, she travelled to France in 1790 and published her most acclaimed work Letters from France (1790. However, the rest of her production has received little critical attention by modern scholars, who have overlooked her involvement in translation. Williams’ only extant novel, Julia (1790 is in fact a creative translation of Rousseau’s Julie ou La Nouvelle Héloïse (1761, in which Williams includes poems that evidence her interest in revolutionary politics. Four years later, she translated Bernardin de Saint Pierre’s Paul et Virginie, while she was imprisoned in Paris. While translating novels was regarded as a respectable exercise for women writers, Williams challenges gender assumptions by translating Researches (1814 and the seven volumes of Personal Narrative (1814-1829, which had been produced by one of the most influential eighteenth century scientists, Alexander von Humboldt. This article interrogates how Williams makes use of translation to access areas of knowledge traditionally restricted to men, such as philosophy, politics and science. For this purpose, I will focus on her translations of the work of two leading intellectual figures of the eighteenth century,  Rousseau and Von Humboldt.

  11. The Role of Spiral Multidetector Dynamic CT in the Study of Williams-Campbell Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scioscio, V. di; Zompatori, M.; Mistura, I.; Montanari, P.; Santilli, L.; Luccaroni, R.; Sverzellati, N.

    2006-01-01

    Williams-Campbell syndrome is a cystic bronchiectatic disease secondary to deficiency or defect of cartilaginous plates in the wall of the airways. In the literature, two main forms are suggested: congenital and acquired (post-infectious). The most frequent symptoms are represented by recurrent pulmonary infections from childhood. Multislice spiral dynamic CT has a major role in the study of cystic pulmonary disease and in differentiating Williams-Campbell syndrome from the other causes of cystic bronchiectasis, in which even lung function tests can give deceptive results

  12. Infrared astronomy seeing the heat : from William Herschel to the Herschel space observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Clements, David L

    2014-01-01

    Uncover the Secrets of the Universe Hidden at Wavelengths beyond Our Optical GazeWilliam Herschel's discovery of infrared light in 1800 led to the development of astronomy at wavelengths other than the optical. Infrared Astronomy - Seeing the Heat: from William Herschel to the Herschel Space Observatory explores the work in astronomy that relies on observations in the infrared. Author David L. Clements, a distinguished academic and science fiction writer, delves into how the universe works, from the planets in our own Solar System to the universe as a whole. The book first presents the major t

  13. William and Caroline Herschel pioneers in late 18th-century astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hoskin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This beautifully structured book presents the essentials of William and Caroline Herschel's pioneering achievements in late 18th-century astronomy. Michael Hoskin shows that William Herschel was the first observational cosmologist and one of the first observers to attack the sidereal universe beyond the solar system:Herschel built instruments far better than any being used at the royal observatory. Aided by his sister Caroline, he commenced a great systematic survey that led to his discovery of Uranus in 1781.Unlike observers before him, whose telescopes did not reveal them as astronomical obj

  14. William Butcher, Jules Verne inédit, les manuscrits déchiffrés

    OpenAIRE

    Merello, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Les textes de Jules Verne sont des palimpsestes. Ils le sont au sens figuré, nous le savions déjà. Mais ils le sont également au sens propre, comme le montre le bel ouvrage de William Butcher. Ce dernier s’est donné pour objectif d’analyser les manuscrits de Verne parvenus jusqu’à nous. La ressource semble inépuisable : des milliers et des milliers de pages autographes à déchiffrer, à défricher. William Butcher s’est plongé dans ce labeur avec enthousiasme et il en tire de nombreuses informat...

  15. Relationship of the Williams-Poulios and Manning-Rosen Potential Energy Models for Diatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chun-Sheng; Liang, Guang-Chuan; Peng, Xiao-Long; Tang, Hong-Ming; Zhang, Lie-Hui

    2014-06-01

    By employing the dissociation energy and the equilibrium bond length for a diatomic molecule as explicit parameters, we generate an improved form of the Williams-Poulios potential energy model. It is found that the negative Williams-Poulios potential model is equivalent to the Manning-Rosen potential model for diatomic molecules. We observe that the Manning-Rosen potential is superior to the Morse potential in reproducing the interaction potential energy curves for the {{a}3 Σu+} state of the 6Li2 molecule and the {{X}1 sum+} state of the SiF+ molecule.

  16. The Role of Spiral Multidetector Dynamic CT in the Study of Williams-Campbell Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scioscio, V. di; Zompatori, M.; Mistura, I.; Montanari, P.; Santilli, L.; Luccaroni, R.; Sverzellati, N. [Medical Univ. of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Policlinic (Italy). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-10-15

    Williams-Campbell syndrome is a cystic bronchiectatic disease secondary to deficiency or defect of cartilaginous plates in the wall of the airways. In the literature, two main forms are suggested: congenital and acquired (post-infectious). The most frequent symptoms are represented by recurrent pulmonary infections from childhood. Multislice spiral dynamic CT has a major role in the study of cystic pulmonary disease and in differentiating Williams-Campbell syndrome from the other causes of cystic bronchiectasis, in which even lung function tests can give deceptive results.

  17. 77 FR 32625 - William J. Stevenson, Estate of Lynn E. Stevenson, Black Canyon Bliss, LLC; Notice of Application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 8866-010] William J. Stevenson, Estate of Lynn E. Stevenson, Black Canyon Bliss, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On April 23, 2012, William J. Stevenson, Estate...

  18. 77 FR 17568 - Notice of Receipt of Petition for Decision That Nonconforming 2005 Ifor Williams LM85G Trailers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ...-0030, Notice 1] Notice of Receipt of Petition for Decision That Nonconforming 2005 Ifor Williams LM85G... Safety Administration (NHTSA) of a petition for a decision that 2005 Ifor Williams LM85G trailers that... capable of being altered to comply with, all applicable FMVSS based on destructive test data or such other...

  19. Brief Report: Repetitive Behaviour Profiles in Williams Syndrome: Cross Syndrome Comparisons with Prader-Willi and Down Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, R.; Oliver, C.; Moss, J.; Adams, D.; Berg, K.; Burbidge, C.; Howlin, P.; Nelson, L.; Stinton, C.; Waite, J.

    2018-01-01

    This study describes the profile of repetitive behaviour in individuals with Williams syndrome, utilising cross-syndrome comparisons with people with Prader-Willi and Down syndromes. The Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire was administered to caregivers of adults with Williams (n = 96), Prader-Willi (n = 103) and Down (n = 78) syndromes. There were…

  20. Dual-Task Processing as a Measure of Executive Function: A Comparison between Adults with Williams and Down Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Devenny, Darlynne A.

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral phenotypes of individuals with Williams syndrome and individuals with Down syndrome have been contrasted in relation to short-term memory. People with Down syndrome are stronger visuospatially and those with Williams syndrome are stronger verbally. We examined short-term memory, then explored whether dual-task processing further…

  1. Health and Social Outcomes in Adults with Williams Syndrome: Findings from Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elison, Sarah; Stinton, Chris; Howlin, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated trajectories of cognitive, language and adaptive functioning in Williams syndrome (WS) but little is known about how other aspects of the Williams syndrome behavioural phenotype change across the life-span. Therefore, the present study examined age associated changes in a number of different domains of…

  2. Behavioral Profiles of Children with Williams Syndrome from Spain and the United States: Cross-Cultural Similarities and Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-García, Débora; Brun-Gasca, Carme; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2017-01-01

    To identify similarities and differences in the behavioral profile of children with Williams syndrome from Spain (n = 53) and the United States (n = 145), we asked parents of 6- to 14-year-olds with Williams syndrome to complete the Child Behavior Checklist 6-18. The distribution of raw scores was significantly higher for the Spanish sample than…

  3. 77 FR 66087 - Federal Perkins Loan Program, Federal Family Education Loan Program, and William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    ..., and 685 Federal Perkins Loan Program, Federal Family Education Loan Program, and William D. Ford... 685 RIN 1840-AD05 [Docket ID ED-2012-OPE-0010] Federal Perkins Loan Program, Federal Family Education... (Perkins Loan) program, Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) program, and William D. Ford Federal Direct...

  4. 77 FR 30266 - Annual Updates to the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan Formula for 2012; William D. Ford...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Updates to the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan Formula for 2012; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program AGENCY: Federal Student Aid, Department of Education... announces the annual updates to the ICR plan formula for 2012. Under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

  5. 77 FR 20796 - Annual Updates to the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan Formula for 2011; William D. Ford...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Updates to the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan Formula for 2011; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program AGENCY: Federal Student Aid, Department of Education... announces the annual updates to the ICR plan formula for 2011. Under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

  6. 78 FR 33395 - Annual Updates to the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan Formula for 2013-William D. Ford...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Updates to the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan Formula for 2013--William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number... free, at 1- 800-877-8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

  7. 78 FR 63464 - William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program Repayment Plan Selection Form; Extension of Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program Repayment Plan Selection Form; Extension of Public Comment Period; Correction AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION: Correction notice... entitled, ``William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program Repayment Plan Selection Form''. ED is extending...

  8. Variability of the cranial and dental phenotype in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare congenital disorder involving the cardiovascular system, connective tissue, and the central nervous system, resulting in mild to moderate mental retardation, a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, distinctive facial features, and cardiovascular disease. The majority of individuals with a clinical diagnosis of WS have a contiguous gene deletion at chromosome 7 (7q11.23). Physical features include characteristic facial features with full prominent cheeks, wide mouth, long philtrum, small nose with depressed nasal bridge, heavy orbital ridges, medial eyebrow flare, dental abnormalities, hoarse voice, growth retardation, and cardiovascular abnormalities (most commonly supravalvular aortic stenosis and/or peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis). The cognitive profile is distinctive, consisting of strengths in auditory memory, language, and face-processing, but extreme weakness in visuospatial, numerical and problem-solving abilities. Neurological studies have identified a significantly decreased brain volume in adult individuals with WS with relatively normal development of the limbic, frontal and cerebellar structures. The aims were to analyse the neurocranium, the craniofacial region, and the dentition in a well defined Norwegian group of individuals with WS. In order to accomplish this, normative cephalometric standards for the neurocranium, including the cranial base and the sella turcica, were established for Norwegian males and females from 6 to 21 years of age, using lateral radiographic cephalograms from the Oslo University Craniofacial Growth Archive. The study material comprised radiographic lateral cephalograms, orthopantomograms and dental casts from 62 individuals with WS ranging from 4 to 44 years. The lateral cephalograms, orthopantomograms and dental casts were analysed using standard methods reported in the literature. Neurocranium: The results from the cephalometric analyses showed that the size

  9. In memoriam - William Toshio (Tosh) Yasutake, 1922-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Diane G.; Winton, James R.

    2017-01-01

    William Toshio (Tosh) Yasutake, 1922-2016 passed away peacefully at home on December 12, 2016, at the age of 94. He is survived by Fumi, his wife of 66 years, as well as four children and six grandchildren. With his death, the fish health community has lost an outstanding scientist as well as a kind, unassuming, and wonderful human being. Tosh was born on June 10, 1922, in Seattle, Washington, to Jack and Hide Yasutake. He was in his first year of studies at the University of Washington when Pearl Harbor was attacked by Imperial Japan on December 7, 1941. Following the attack, Tosh and his family (father, mother, sister, and two brothers) were among the 110,000–120,000 people of Japanese ancestry who were forced from their homes on the Pacific coast and incarcerated in internment camps in the interior. In June 1942, Tosh enlisted in the U.S. Army, serving as an unarmed combat medic in the famed 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the most decorated unit for its size and length of service in the history of American warfare. Wounded in October 1944 during the Vosges Mountains campaign near Bruyères, France, Tosh was evacuated and missed the ensuing battle to rescue the “Lost Battalion,” at which his replacement was killed. Tosh returned to action in Italy in February 1945 and served until the end of the war in Europe, earning both a Purple Heart and a Bronze Star for bravery. In October 2010, the Congressional Gold Medal was awarded to the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, and in 2012 the surviving members were made chevaliers of the French Légion d’Honneur for actions contributing to the liberation of France in World War II.After the war, Tosh returned to the University of Washington on the GI Bill and received a B.S. degree in zoology in 1951. In 1953 he began his research career at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Western Fish Nutrition Laboratory at Cook, Washington, where he conducted pioneering research on nutritional fish diseases with John Halver. Tosh

  10. William Graham Brooke (1835-1907): Advocate of Girls' Superior Schooling in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the role of William Graham Brooke as advocate of women's higher education and access to university. His work as advocate is considered against the religious, political, social and economic backdrop of late nineteenth century Ireland. A barrister, as Clerk in the Lord Chancellor's office, he was centrally involved in the…

  11. Cognitive, Linguistic and Adaptive Functioning in Williams Syndrome: Trajectories from Early to Middle Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, Patricia; Elison, Sarah; Udwin, Orlee; Stinton, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about trajectories of cognitive functioning as individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) move though adulthood. Method: The present study investigated cognitive, linguistic and adaptive functioning in adults with WS aged 19-55 years, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal approaches. Results: Data from the…

  12. Spatial-Sequential and Spatial-Simultaneous Working Memory in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Silvia; De Mori, Letizia; Mammarella, Irene C.; Carretti, Barbara; Vianello, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare visuospatial working memory performance in 18 individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and 18 typically developing (TD) children matched for nonverbal mental age. Two aspects were considered: task presentation format (i.e., spatial-sequential or spatial-simultaneous), and level of attentional control…

  13. Attention Bias to Emotional Faces Varies by IQ and Anxiety in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Lauren M.; Oates, Joyce M.; Dai, Yael G.; Dodd, Helen F.; Waxler, Jessica; Clements, Caitlin C.; Weill, Sydney; Hoffnagle, Alison; Anderson, Erin; MacRae, Rebecca; Mullett, Jennifer; McDougle, Christopher J.; Pober, Barbara R.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) often experience significant anxiety. A promising approach to anxiety intervention has emerged from cognitive studies of attention bias to threat. To investigate the utility of this intervention in WS, this study examined attention bias to happy and angry faces in individuals with WS (N = 46). Results showed…

  14. William Harvey & Capillaries: Can You "Discover" Circulation without Connections between Arteries & Veins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allchin, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    William Harvey's discovery of the presence of capillaries and the role played by them without actually seeing them highlights his power of observation and logic. However, his perspective could not be considered as new since he had adopted his disposition for ocular demonstration from Aristotle and Galen.

  15. Binding of visual and spatial short-term memory in Williams syndrome and moderate learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrold, Christopher; Phillips, Caroline; Baddeley, Alan D

    2007-04-01

    A main aim of this study was to test the claim that individuals with Williams syndrome have selectively impaired memory for spatial as opposed to visual information. The performance of 16 individuals with Williams syndrome (six males, 10 females; mean age 18y 7mo [SD 7y 6mo], range 9y 1mo-30y 7mo) on tests of short-term memory for item and location information was compared with that shown by individuals with moderate learning difficulties (12 males, four females; mean age 10y 3mo [SD 1y], range 8y 6mo-11y 7mo) and typically developing children (six males, 10 females; mean age 6y 8mo [SD 7mo], range 5y 10mo-7y 9mo) of an equivalent level of visuospatial ability. A second aim was to determine whether individuals had impaired ability to 'bind' visual spatial information when required to recall 'item in location' information. In contrast to previous findings, there was no evidence that individuals with Williams syndrome were more impaired in the spatial than the visual memory condition. However, individuals with both Williams syndrome and moderate learning difficulties showed impaired memory for item in location information, suggesting that problems of binding may be generally associated with learning disability.

  16. Address by William J. Bennett, United States Secretary of Education. (Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, William J.

    The extent to which U.S. colleges and universities contribute to the fulfillment of students' lives is discussed by Secretary of Education William Bennett in an address to Harvard University. Secretary Bennett's observations are based on his experiences as a law student, freshman proctor, and tutor at Harvard University, as well as his subsequent…

  17. Sleep EEG Fingerprints Reveal Accelerated Thalamocortical Oscillatory Dynamics in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodizs, Robert; Gombos, Ferenc; Kovacs, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Sleep EEG alterations are emerging features of several developmental disabilities, but detailed quantitative EEG data on the sleep phenotype of patients with Williams syndrome (WS, 7q11.23 microdeletion) is still lacking. Based on laboratory (Study I) and home sleep records (Study II) here we report WS-related features of the patterns of…

  18. 78 FR 50335 - Double Hull Tanker Escorts on the Waters of Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ...-AB96 Double Hull Tanker Escorts on the Waters of Prince William Sound, Alaska AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... mandates two tug escorts for double hull tankers over 5,000 gross tons transporting oil in bulk in PWS. The... tug escort requirements apply to certain double hull tankers. DATES: This interim rule is effective...

  19. Welcome Donald Trump, Baltics! The presidency to endure? / Mark Hertling, William E. Pomeranz ; intervjueeris Linas Jegelevicius

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hertling, Mark

    2017-01-01

    USA Euroopa vägede endine ülem kindralleitnant Mark Hertlingi ja Kennani Instituudi asedirektor William E. Pomeranz analüüsivad Ameerika Ühendriikide uue presidendi Tonald Trumpi ametisseasumise võimalikku mõju Balti riikide julgeolekule

  20. Ramparts of empire the fortifications of sir william jervois, royal engineer 1821 - 1897

    CERN Document Server

    Crick, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    William Jervois was a military engineer who rose to prominence as a result of Lord Palmerston's extensive programme of fortification against a feared French invasion in the middle years of the nineteenth century. Ramparts of Empire is a detailed and engaging study of his life and works.

  1. Longitudinal Trajectories of Intellectual and Adaptive Functioning in Adolescents and Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M. H.; Lense, M. D.; Dykens, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with a distinct cognitive-behavioural phenotype including mild to moderate intellectual disability, visual-spatial deficits, hypersociability, inattention and anxiety. Researchers typically characterise samples of individuals with WS by their intellectual functioning and adaptive behaviour. Because…

  2. William H. Taft High School Project HOLA, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    Project HOLA at William H. Taft High School (Bronx, New York) assists foreign-born and Puerto Rican-born students to quickly assists foreign- and Puerto Rican-born students to quickly acquire English language skills and an American cultural orientation; to maintain or improve their Spanish language skills and cultural knowledge; and to be…

  3. William H. Taft High School Project HOLA, 1986-1987. OEA Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ana L.; And Others

    In its fourth year of Title VII funding, Project HOLA at William H. Taft High School served 383 Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency from low-income families. The program's goals were to develop English language skills for mainstreaming, to develop an understanding and awareness of American culture and society, to develop…

  4. William H. Taft High School Project HOLA 1984-1985. O.E.A. Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    In 1984-85, Project HOLA was in its second year of funding at William H. Taft High School in the Bronx, New York. HOLA serves Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency (LEP). Project goals include speedy acquisition of English skills, orientation to life in America, maintenance and improvement of Spanish skills and cultural…

  5. Absolutism and Natural Law Argument: William O. Douglas on Freedom of Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Raymond S.

    Noting that United States Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas has often been characterized as an "absolutist" in terms of First Amendment policy, this paper argues that, in fact, Douglas's policy positions provided for less than absolute freedom to communicate. The paper then reveals, through an anlaysis of 18 of Douglas's opinions,…

  6. William Horsley: Music Master at Miss Black's Boarding-School for Young Ladies, 1828-1840

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Susan

    2009-01-01

    William Horsley (1775-1858) was active in London from the late 1790s. A founder member of the Philharmonic Society, Horsley was at the heart of the musical establishment, working as a composer, organist, commentator and teacher. His teaching career spanned over 50 years, during which time he took private pupils, trained choristers and organists…

  7. Using Picture Books to Provide Archetypes to Young Boys: Extending the Ideas of William Brozo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambo, Debby

    2007-01-01

    In his book "To Be a Boy, To Be a Reader: Engaging Teen and Preteen Boys in Active Literacy," William Brozo suggested that many adolescent boys have become mentally and academically detached from school. While Brozo acknowledges that a solution to these problems is multifaceted, he asserts that engaging boys in literature that makes use of…

  8. Recognition of Emotional and Nonemotional Facial Expressions: A Comparison between Williams Syndrome and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Agnes; Guidetti, Michele; Roge, Bernadette; Reilly, Judy

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to compare two neurodevelopmental disorders (Williams syndrome and autism) in terms of the ability to recognize emotional and nonemotional facial expressions. The comparison of these two disorders is particularly relevant to the investigation of face processing and should contribute to a better understanding of social…

  9. Item and Error Analysis on Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Farran, Emily; Annaz, Dagmara

    2011-01-01

    Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM) is a standardised test that is commonly used to obtain a non-verbal reasoning score for children. As the RCPM involves the matching of a target to a pattern it is also considered to be a visuo-spatial perception task. RCPM is therefore frequently used in studies in Williams Syndrome (WS), in order to…

  10. Performance on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-2 by Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, C. Holley; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the performance of 292 4- to 17-year-olds with Williams syndrome (WS) on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-2 (KBIT-2; Kaufman & Kaufman, 2004). Mean IQ Composite, Verbal standard score (SS), and Nonverbal SS were in the borderline range relative to the general population, with variability similar to the general population.…

  11. Lexical-Semantic Reading in a Shallow Orthography: Evidence from a Girl with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Laura; Bello, Arianna; Volterra, Virginia; Burani, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    The reading skills of a girl with Williams Syndrome are assessed by a timed word-naming task. To test the efficiency of lexical and nonlexical reading, we considered four marker effects: Lexicality (better reading of words than nonwords), frequency (better reading of high than low frequency words), length (better reading of short than long words),…

  12. Atypical Verbal Communication Pattern According to Others' Attention in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Kosuke; Tomiwa, Kiyotaka; Okada, Masako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    Children with Williams syndrome (WS) have been reported to often face problems in daily communication and to have deficits in their pragmatic language abilities. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether children with WS could modify their verbal communication according to others' attention in order to share what they did. The children with WS…

  13. Meteor Beliefs Project: some meteoric imagery in the works of William Shakespeare

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeath, A.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2003-08-01

    Passages from three of William Shakespeare's plays are presented, illustrating some of the beliefs in meteors in 16th-17th century England. They also reflect earlier beliefs and information which it is known Shakespeare drew on in constructing his works.

  14. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 425 - Modified Monier-Williams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified Monier-Williams Method B Appendix B to Part 425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Pt. 425, App. B Appendix B to...

  15. Case report of sudden death in a child with Williams syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by distinctive personality traits, facial features (so called “elfin face”) and cardiac abnormalities, of which supravalvular aortic stenosis is the most common lesion found. The cause is a deletion of a group of genes on chromosome 7q11.23. Administration of ...

  16. Significance of calculated cluster conformations of benzene: comment on a publication by D. E. Williams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Waal, B.W.

    1981-01-01

    Results of potential-energy minimization, applied to clusters of benzene molecules, have been reported recently by Williams [Acta Cryst. (1980), A36, 715-723]. Two stable tridecamer clusters were found and compared with a 13-molecule fragment from crystalline orthorhombic benzene. In this comment

  17. Patterns and Trajectories in Williams Syndrome: The Case of Visual Orientation Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Melanie; Englund, Julia A.; Ahlers, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder typified by deficits in visuospatial cognition. To understand the nature of this deficit, we characterized how people with WS perceive visual orientation, a fundamental ability related to object identification. We compared WS participants to typically developing children (3-6 years of age) and…

  18. Periodic Reactions: The Early Works of William C. Bray and Alfred J. Lotka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervellati, Rinaldo; Greco, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions in the homogeneous phase have been studied intensively only since the mid-1960s, but they were known since 1920, having as forerunners the chemist William C. Bray and an "atypical" chemist Alfred J. Lotka. This contribution is the result of a careful reading of their literature and patient research into…

  19. 33 CFR 167.1703 - In Prince William Sound: Valdez Arm Traffic Separation Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In Prince William Sound: Valdez Arm Traffic Separation Scheme. 167.1703 Section 167.1703 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Description of Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1703 In Prince...

  20. Forest resources of Prince William Sound and Afognak Island, Alaska: their character and ownership, 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlllem W.S. van Hees

    1989-01-01

    The 1978 inventory of the forest resources of Prince William Sound and Afognak Island was designed to produce estimates of timberland area, volumes of timber, and growth and mortality of timber. Estimates of timber resource quantities were also categorized by owner. Nearly 56 percent of the available timberland area is under Forest Service management, and almost 40...

  1. The Recurring Author: William Shakespeare, a Case Study through Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert L., Jr.

    The "recurring author" is one whose works appear many times at different levels in instructional units found in literature textbook series. A descriptive case study discussed the treatment of a recurring author, William Shakespeare, using units in a sample of six literature textbook series. Developed to describe, to code, and to analyze…

  2. John Dewey, William Wirt and the Gary Schools Plan: A Centennial Reappraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, Malcolm

    2017-01-01

    A century on from the height of John Dewey's educational writings and the reputation of the Gary Schools Plan as a model of progressive education, the paper reappraises two key matters: the relationship between John Dewey and William Wirt, the first superintendent of the Gary Schools in Gary Indiana, and the coherence between John Dewey's…

  3. "A Marriage on the Rocks": An Unknown Letter by William H. Kilpatrick about His Project Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Michael

    2010-01-01

    William H. Kilpatrick is worldwide known as "Mr. Project Method." But the origin of his celebrated paper of 1918 has never been explored. The discovery of a hitherto unknown letter reveals that Kilpatrick was an educational entrepreneur who, without regard for language and tradition, adopted the term "project" and used it in a provocative new way…

  4. "I Had Made a Mistake": William H. Kilpatrick and the Project Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: William H. Kilpatrick is known worldwide as "Mr. Project Method." Despite considerable scholarship by Lawrence A. Cremin, Herbert M. Kliebard, Milton A. Bleeke, John A. Beineke, and others, the origin of Kilpatrick's celebrated paper of 1918 has never been explored in depth and its historical context. Focus of Study:…

  5. Featural versus configural face processing in a rare genetic disorder: Williams syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isaac, L.; Lincoln, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Williams syndrome (WMS) is a rare genetic disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 20 000 live births. Among other characteristics, WMS has a distinctive cognitive profile with spared face processing and language skills that contrasts with impairment in the cognitive domains of

  6. William Healy, M.D., Father of the American Child Guidance Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    courts, was another important development, starting in 1899. Meyer, Sigmund Freud , and Healy all contributed to the next step, which coupled the...Dummer Papers lists 454 correspondents. The prominent psychiatrists include: Franz Alexander, Trigant Burrow, Havelock Ellis, Flanders Dunbar, Sigmund ... Freud , Roy Grinker, William Healy, Karen Homey, Marion E. Kenworthy, Lawson Lowrey, Julse Masserman, Karl Menninger, Adolf Meyer, Smith Ely Jelliffe

  7. Dr William Farr of Shropshire (1807-1883): obstetric mortality and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, P M

    2002-07-01

    William Farr, chief statistician to the General Register Office for more than 40 years, was the most significant medical epidemiologist and statistician of the Victorian era. Often working behind the scenes, he helped to bring about many advances in hygiene and public health as well as developing a modern approach to the classification of disease and the collection and analysis of medical information data.

  8. Brief Report: Major Depressive Disorder with Psychotic Features in Williams Syndrome--A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Francisca; Keary, Christopher J.; Mullett, Jennifer E.; Palumbo, Michelle L.; Waxler, Jessica L.; Pober, Barbara R.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2018-01-01

    Descriptions of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and co-morbid major depressive disorder (MDD) with psychotic features have not appeared in the literature. In addition to reviewing previous reports of psychotic symptoms in persons with WS, this paper introduces clinical histories and therapeutic management strategies for three previously…

  9. William Bagley versus Arthur Bestor: Why the Standard Story Is Not True

    Science.gov (United States)

    Null, J. Wesley

    2008-01-01

    This essay challenges the conventional understanding of William Bagley and Arthur Bestor, which suggests that they held similar views in curriculum and teacher education. The author thinks this view is completely wrong and provides a radical new interpretation of Bagley and Bestor that uncovers a lost tradition within the field of education.…

  10. Why bad Moods Matter. William James on Melancholy, Mystic Emotion, and the Meaning of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Pott (Heleen J.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWilliam James’s reputation in the field of emotion research is based on his early psychological writings where he defines emotions as ‘feelings of bodily changes’. In his later work, particularly in his study of mystic emotion (1902), James comes up with what looks like a completely

  11. Brookhaven Lab physicist William Willis wins the 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    William Willis, a senior physicist Brookhaven National Laboratory, has won the American Physical Society's 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics. He received the prize, which consists of $5,000 and a certificate citing his contributions to physics, at the APS meeting in Philadelphia on April 6 (1 page).

  12. Williams Syndrome Hypersociability: A Neuropsychological Study of the Amygdala and Prefrontal Cortex Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitao, Liliana; Sampaio, Adriana; Fernandez, Montse; Sousa, Nuno; Pinheiro, Ana; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome display indiscriminate approach towards strangers. Neuroimaging studies conducted so far have linked this social profile to structural and/or functional abnormalities in WS amygdala and prefrontal cortex. In this study, the neuropsychological hypotheses of amygdala and prefrontal cortex involvement in WS…

  13. The Impact of Personality on History: An Interview with William L. Shirer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    William L. Shirer, author of Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, discusses a wide variety of subjects, including the personalities of Roosevelt and Hitler, why the Germans succumbed to Nazism, McCarthyism in the United States, and the heroic resistance of the Russians to German invasion. (CS)

  14. Instruction, Curriculum and Society: Iterations Based on the Ideas of William Doll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varbelow, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between society and school from the point of view of chaos theory with the purpose to understand the deficiencies in teacher education programs and to offer suggestions for their improvement. Based on the ideas of the postmodern curriculum theorist William Doll, it examines the paradigm shifts of world views…

  15. William Blake’s Milton a Poem as a conversion narrative in the Behmenist tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Elisabeth Engell

    2014-01-01

    The term ‘conversion narrative’ lacks proper definition and can be understood more broadly than is often the case, underlining its fictive nature. I show this by reading William Blake’s Milton a Poem as a conversion narrative, exploring how Blake weaves a wider discourse of conversion around...

  16. Ronald William Hodges, 1934-2017: Eminent Lepidopterist and Great Mentor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Ronald William Hodges (1934-2017) was an eminent lepidopterist and former Research Leader of the Systematic Entomology Laboratory from 1976 to 1979. He published on 117 genera (21 new), 806 species (351 new), 36 subfamilies (7 new), and 16 families (7 new) about gelechioid micromoths. He was awa...

  17. Mental Health Concerns in Williams Syndrome: Intervention Considerations and Illustrations from Case Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kristin D.; Klein-Tasman, Bonita P.

    2009-01-01

    The refinement of the Williams syndrome phenotype has frequently included the study of behavioral and temperamental features common to individuals with this disorder. Within this line of research, the importance of evaluating incidence of psychopathology has been increasingly recognized, with studies consistently identifying an increased risk for…

  18. The Production of Figurative Language in Typically Developing Children and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Lauren; Van Herwegen, Jo

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigated the development of figurative language production, including different types of figurative expressions, during a fictional narrative in 20 typically developing (TD) children and 20 children with Williams syndrome (WS) aged 7-18 years old. In contrast to previous studies, developmental trajectories showed that (1) the…

  19. Williams syndrome deletions and duplications: Genetic windows to understanding anxiety, sociality, autism, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Bernard J; Procyshyn, Tanya L

    2017-08-01

    We describe and evaluate an integrative hypothesis for helping to explain the major neurocognitive features of individuals with Williams syndrome region deletions and duplications. First, we demonstrate how the cognitive differences between Williams syndrome individuals, individuals with duplications of this region, and healthy individuals parallel the differences between individuals subject to effects of increased or decreased oxytocin. Second, we synthesize evidence showing that variation in expression of the gene GTF2I (General Transcription Factor II-I) underlies the primary social phenotypes of Williams syndrome and that common genetic variation in GTF2I mediates oxytocin reactivity, and its correlates, in healthy populations. Third, we describe findings relevant to the hypothesis that the GTF2I gene is subject to parent of origin effects whose behavioral expression fits with predictions from the kinship theory of genomic imprinting. Fourth, we describe how Williams syndrome can be considered, in part, as an autistic syndrome of Lorna Wing's 'active-but-odd' autism subtype, in contrast to associations of duplications with both schizophrenia and autism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. False Belief Attribution in Children with Williams Syndrome: The Answer Is in The Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, R.; Martínez-Castilla, P.; Sotillo, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) show difficulties in attributing false beliefs, whereas they are better at attributing emotions. This study examines whether being asked about the emotion linked to a false belief, instead of explicitly about the belief, facilitates performance on theory of mind (ToM) tasks. Method: Thirty…

  1. Development of Novel Metaphor and Metonymy Comprehension in Typically Developing Children and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Dimitriou, Dagmara; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the development of novel metaphor and metonymy comprehension in both typically developing (TD) children and individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). Thirty-one TD children between the ages of 3;09 and 17;01 and thirty-four individuals with WS between the ages of 7;01 and 44 years old were administered a newly developed task…

  2. Developmental Trajectories of Structural and Pragmatic Language Skills in School-Aged Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Heuvel, E.; Manders, E.; Swillen, A.; Zink, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to compare developmental courses of structural and pragmatic language skills in school-aged children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with idiopathic intellectual disability (IID). Comparison of these language trajectories could highlight syndrome-specific developmental features. Method: Twelve monolingual…

  3. Brief Report: Exploring the Relationship between Sensory Processing and Repetitive Behaviours in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Janes, Emily; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between sensory processing abnormalities and repetitive behaviours in children with Williams Syndrome (WS; n = 21). This is a novel investigation bringing together two clinical phenomena for the first time in this neuro-developmental disorder. Parents completed the Sensory Profile (Short Form; Dunn in The…

  4. A Comparison between Linguistic Skills and Socio-Communicative Abilities in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, P.; Menghini, D.; Marotta, L.; De Peppo, L.; Ravà, L.; Salvaguardia, F.; Varuzza, C.; Vicari, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) show a disharmonic linguistic profile with a clear pattern of strengths and weaknesses. Despite their sociable nature, atypical socio-communicative abilities and deficits in communication and relationship with others have been found. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether…

  5. Cross Syndrome Comparison of Sleep Problems in Children with Down Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Anna; Hill, Catherine M.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Dimitriou, Dagmara

    2013-01-01

    Based on previous findings of frequent sleep problems in children with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS), the present study aimed to expand our knowledge by using parent report and actigraphy to define sleep problems more precisely in these groups. Twenty-two school-aged children with DS, 24 with WS and 52 typically developing (TD)…

  6. A Diagnosis to Consider in an Adult Patient with Facial Features and Intellectual Disability: Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Özlem Akgün; Şimşek Kiper, Pelin Özlem; Utine, Gülen Eda; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Boduroğlu, Koray

    2017-03-01

    Williams syndrome (OMIM #194050) is a rare, well-recognized, multisystemic genetic condition affecting approximately 1/7,500 individuals. There are no marked regional differences in the incidence of Williams syndrome. The syndrome is caused by a hemizygous deletion of approximately 28 genes, including ELN on chromosome 7q11.2. Prenatal-onset growth retardation, distinct facial appearance, cardiovascular abnormalities, and unique hypersocial behavior are among the most common clinical features. Here, we report the case of a patient referred to us with distinct facial features and intellectual disability, who was diagnosed with Williams syndrome at the age of 37 years. Our aim is to increase awareness regarding the diagnostic features and complications of this recognizable syndrome among adult health care providers. Williams syndrome is usually diagnosed during infancy or childhood, but in the absence of classical findings, such as cardiovascular anomalies, hypercalcemia, and cognitive impairment, the diagnosis could be delayed. Due to the multisystemic and progressive nature of the syndrome, accurate diagnosis is critical for appropriate care and screening for the associated morbidities that may affect the patient's health and well-being.

  7. Heterogeneity of Social Approach Behaviour in Williams Syndrome: The Role of Response Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Katie; Riby, Deborah M.; Janes, Emily; Clark, Fiona; Fleck, Ruth; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2013-01-01

    The developmental disorder of Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with an overfriendly personality type, including an increased tendency to approach strangers. This atypical social approach behaviour (SAB) has been linked to two potential theories: the amygdala hypothesis and the frontal lobe hypothesis. The current study aimed to investigate…

  8. The Interplay between Executive Control and Motor Functioning in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Darren R.; Thomas, Daniel; Menant, Jasmine C.; Porter, Melanie A.; Smith, Stuart; Lord, Stephen R.; Cornish, Kim M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a rare genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder, show specific weaknesses in visual attention and response inhibition within the visuospatial domain. Here we examine the extent to which impairments in attentional control extend to the visuomotor domain using a…

  9. Viewing Social Scenes: A Visual Scan-Path Study Comparing Fragile X Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tracey A.; Porter, Melanie A.; Langdon, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and Williams syndrome (WS) are both genetic disorders which present with similar cognitive-behavioral problems, but distinct social phenotypes. Despite these social differences both syndromes display poor social relations which may result from abnormal social processing. This study aimed to manipulate the location of…

  10. Factor Structure of the Children's Behavior Questionnaire in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyfer, Ovsanna; John, Angela E.; Woodruff-Borden, Janet; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2012-01-01

    To examine the factor structure of temperament in 5-10-year-olds with Williams syndrome, an exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the responses of parents of 192 children on the children's behavior questionnaire. Four factors were identified. Two corresponded to factors reported for typically developing children: effortful control and…

  11. Prosodic Abilities of Spanish-Speaking Adolescents and Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Castilla, Pastora; Sotillo, Maria; Campos, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the relevant role of prosody in communication, and in contrast with other linguistic components, there is paucity of research in this field for Williams syndrome (WS). Therefore, this study performed a systematic assessment of prosodic abilities in WS. The Spanish version of the Profiling Elements of Prosody in Speech-Communication…

  12. Interpretation of Ambiguous Situations: Evidence for a Dissociation between Social and Physical Threat in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Helen F.; Porter, Melanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with an unusual profile of anxiety, characterised by increased rates of non-social anxiety but not social anxiety (Dodd and Porter, J Ment Health Res Intellect Disabil 2(2):89-109, "2009"). The present research examines whether this profile of anxiety is associated with an interpretation bias for ambiguous…

  13. Problem Behaviour and Psychosocial Functioning in Young Children with Williams Syndrome: Parent and Teacher Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Tasman, B. P.; Lee, K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is sparse literature about problem behaviour in young children with Williams syndrome (WS) and little consideration of the perspectives of multiple respondents. Methods: Problem behaviour of 35 children with WS ages 2 to 6 was examined based on both parent and teacher report using the Achenbach preschool forms. Results: The most…

  14. Attention in Williams Syndrome and Down's Syndrome: Performance on the New Early Childhood Attention Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckenridge, Kate; Braddick, Oliver; Anker, Shirley; Woodhouse, Margaret; Atkinson, Janette

    2013-01-01

    Attentional problems are commonly reported as a feature of the behavioural profile in both Williams syndrome (WS) and Down's syndrome (DS). Recent studies have begun to investigate these impairments empirically, acknowledging the need for an approach that considers cross-syndrome comparisons and developmental changes across the different component…

  15. Parent and Teacher Perspectives about Problem Behavior in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Tasman, Bonita P.; Lira, Ernesto N.; Li-Barber, Kirsten T.; Gallo, Frank J.; Brei, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    Problem behavior of 52 children with Williams syndrome ages 6 to 17 years old was examined based on both parent and teacher report. Generally good inter-rater agreement was found. Common areas of problem behavior based both on parent and teacher report included attention problems, anxiety difficulties, repetitive behaviors (e.g., obsessions,…

  16. Association between Speech-Language, General Cognitive Functioning and Behaviour Problems in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, N. F.; Giacheti, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WS) phenotype is described as unique and intriguing. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between speech-language abilities, general cognitive functioning and behavioural problems in individuals with WS, considering age effects and speech-language characteristics of WS sub-groups. Methods: The…

  17. Severity of Hyperacusis Predicts Individual Differences in Speech Perception in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabbagh, M.; Cohen, H.; Cohen, M.; Rosen, S.; Karmiloff-Smith, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Williams Syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder of genetic origin, characterised by relative proficiency in language in the face of serious impairment in several other domains. Individuals with WS display an unusual sensitivity to noise, known as hyperacusis. Methods: In this study, we examined the extent to which hyperacusis…

  18. The Use of Cohesive Markers in Narratives by Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nancy Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how children and adolescents with Williams syndrome (WS; ages 8 years, 0 months [8;0]-14;5) used referential devices (determiners and pronouns), tense, and connectives to create cohesion in oral narratives based on a storybook compared to typically developing mentally and chronologically age-matched children. WS children used…

  19. Referential Communication Skills of Children with Williams Syndrome: Understanding when Messages Are Not Adequate

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Angela E.; Rowe, Melissa L.; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2009-01-01

    Although children with Williams syndrome have relatively good structural language and concrete vocabulary abilities, they have difficulty with pragmatic aspects of language. To investigate the impact of pragmatic difficulties on listener-role referential communication, we administered a picture placement task designed to measure ability to…

  20. An Investigation into Semantic and Phonological Processing in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheryl S.; Binder, Katherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The current study examined semantic and phonological processing in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). Previous research in language processing in individuals with WS suggests a complex linguistic system characterized by "deviant" semantic organization and differential phonological processing. Method: Two experiments…

  1. The Development of Metaphorical Language Comprehension in Typical Development and in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael S. C.; Van Duuren, Mike; Purser, Harry R. M.; Mareschal, Denis; Ansari, Daniel; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2010-01-01

    The domain of figurative language comprehension was used to probe the developmental relation between language and cognition in typically developing individuals and individuals with Williams syndrome. Extending the work of Vosniadou and Ortony, the emergence of nonliteral similarity and category knowledge was investigated in 117 typically…

  2. Perceiving Facial and Vocal Expressions of Emotion in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesa-Skwerer, Daniela; Faja, Susan; Schofield, Casey; Verbalis, Alyssa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2006-01-01

    People with Williams syndrome are extremely sociable, empathic, and expressive in communication. Some researchers suggest they may be especially sensitive to perceiving emotional expressions. We administered the Faces and Paralanguage subtests of the Diagnostic Analysis of Nonverbal Accuracy Scale (DANVA2), a standardized measure of emotion…

  3. Prosodic Abilities in Spanish and English Children with Williams Syndrome: A Cross-Linguistic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Castilla, Pastora; Stojanovik, Vesna; Setter, Jane; Sotillo, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prosodic profiles of English- and Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS), examining cross-linguistic differences. Two groups of children with WS, English and Spanish, of similar chronological and nonverbal mental age, were compared on performance in expressive and receptive prosodic tasks…

  4. Toddlers with Williams Syndrome Process Upright but Not Inverted Faces Holistically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashon, Cara H.; Ha, Oh-Ryeong; DeNicola, Christopher A.; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2013-01-01

    Holistic processing of upright, but not inverted, faces is a marker of perceptual expertise for faces. This pattern is shown by typically developing individuals beginning at age 7 months. Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by extreme interest in faces from a very young age. Research on the effects of…

  5. Evaluation of a Stranger Safety Training Programme for Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are reported to display increased sociability towards strangers, leading to increased social vulnerability. No research has examined real life interactions of adults with WS towards strangers and no interventions have been implemented to teach stranger safety skills to this population. Method:…

  6. Sleep Patterns and Daytime Sleepiness in Adolescents and Young Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. E.; Malow, B. A.; Newman, K. D.; Roof, E.; Dykens, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders are common in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders and may adversely affect daytime functioning. Children with Williams syndrome have been reported to have disturbed sleep; however, no studies have been performed to determine if these problems continue into adolescence and adulthood. Methods: This study…

  7. Gaze Aversion during Social Style Interactions in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth; Whittle, Lisa; Riby, Deborah M.

    2013-01-01

    During face-to-face interactions typically developing individuals use gaze aversion (GA), away from their questioner, when thinking. GA is also used when individuals with autism (ASD) and Williams syndrome (WS) are thinking during question-answer interactions. We investigated GA strategies during face-to-face social style interactions with…

  8. Caregiver Survey of Pharmacotherapy to Treat Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marilee A.; Seyfer, Daisha L.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Foster, Jessica E. A.; McClure, Kelsey E.; Coury, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition characterized by a unique neurocognitive and behavioral profile, including increased incidence of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The purpose of the present study was to examine the perceived helpfulness and side effects of medications used to treat ADHD (methylphenidate class,…

  9. Adaptive Behavior and Problem Behavior in Young Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Laura J.; Fidler, Deborah J.; Hepburn, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    The present study compares the adaptive behavior profile of 18 young children with Williams syndrome (WS) and a developmentally matched group of 19 children with developmental disabilities and examines the relationship between adaptive behavior and problem behaviors in WS. Parents completed the Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales--Interview…

  10. Pathways to Language: A Naturalistic Study of Children with Williams Syndrome and Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yonata; Eilam, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    This is a naturalistic study of the development of language in Hebrew-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with Down syndrome (DS), whose MLU extended from 1[multiplied by]0 to 4[multiplied by]4. Developmental curves over the entire span of data collection revealed minor differences between children with WS, children with DS,…

  11. Contrast-Marking Prosodic Emphasis in Williams Syndrome: Results of Detailed Phonetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kiwako; Martens, Marilee A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Past reports on the speech production of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) suggest that their prosody is anomalous and may lead to challenges in spoken communication. While existing prosodic assessments confirm that individuals with WS fail to use prosodic emphasis to express contrast, those reports typically lack detailed…

  12. David Cronenberg ja William S. Burroughs kutsuvad teid lantshile / Aare Ermel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ermel, Aare, 1957-2013

    1999-01-01

    Mängufilm "Alasti eine" ("Naked Lunch") William S. Burroughs' teose järgi : režissöör ja stsenarist David Cronenberg : Suurbritannia - Kanada 1991. Lähemalt režissööri kohta. Ka Nädal nr. 35, lk. 29

  13. William Golding's Iconoclastic Views about the Neanderthal Man in "The Inheritors"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Sayed Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    William Golding has been identified as a nonconformist whose opinions always go contrary to what is customarily accepted or established. This is shown in all his novels, more specifically "The Inheritors", in which he defies long established opinions held by anthropologists, historians, archaeologists as well as many others about the…

  14. Developments in fiber-positioning technology for the WEAVE instrument at the William Herschel Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schallig, Ellen; Lewis, Ian J.; Gilbert, James; Dalton, Gavin; Brock, Matthew; Abrams, Don Carlos; Middleton, Kevin; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Carrasco, Esperanza; Trager, Scott C.; Vallenari, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field optical spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) on La Palma in the Canary Islands, Spain. It is a multi-object "pick-and-place" fibre-fed spectrograph with a 1000 fibre multiplex behind a new dedicated 2° prime focus corrector. The WEAVE

  15. William Whewell, Galileo, and reconceptualizing the history of science and religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David B

    2011-12-20

    This paper advocates a reconceptualization of the history of science and religion. It is an approach to the subject that would aid research by historians of science as well as their message to others, both academic and non-academic. The approach is perfectly illustrated by the life and ideas of William Whewell and Galileo.

  16. Cortisol Reactivity and Performance Abilities in Social Situations in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with hypersociability and anxiety. However, little is known about how these salient aspects of the phenotype are related or their underlying physiology. We examined cortisol reactivity in WS because cortisol is responsive to psychosocial stress. Compared to typically developing…

  17. Diurnal Cortisol Profile in Williams Syndrome in Novel and Familiar Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam Diane; Tomarken, Andrew J.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder associated with high rates of anxiety and social issues. We examined diurnal cortisol, a biomarker of the stress response, in adults with WS in novel and familiar settings, and compared these profiles to typically developing (TD) adults. WS and TD participants had similar profiles in…

  18. Human versus Non-Human Face Processing: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Andreia; Rosset, Delphine; Deruelle, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Increased motivation towards social stimuli in Williams syndrome (WS) led us to hypothesize that a face's human status would have greater impact than face's orientation on WS' face processing abilities. Twenty-nine individuals with WS were asked to categorize facial emotion expressions in real, human cartoon and non-human cartoon faces presented…

  19. Errors of Measurement, Theory, and Public Policy. William H. Angoff Memorial Lecture Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The 12th annual William H. Angoff Memorial Lecture was presented by Dr. Michael T. Kane, ETS's (Educational Testing Service) Samuel J. Messick Chair in Test Validity and the former Director of Research at the National Conference of Bar Examiners. Dr. Kane argues that it is important for policymakers to recognize the impact of errors of measurement…

  20. Anxiety in Williams Syndrome: The Role of Social Behaviour, Executive Functions and Change over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng-Cordell, Elise; Hanley, Mary; Kelly, Alyssa; Riby, Deborah M.

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety is a prevalent mental health issue for individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). Relatively little is known about the developmental course of anxiety, or how it links with core features of WS, namely social and executive functioning (EF). In this study, parent-reports of anxiety were compared across a 4-year period (N = 17), and links…

  1. Readings on the Tragedies of William Shakespeare. The Greenhaven Press Literary Companion to British Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Clarice, Ed.

    Designed for young adults, this book on William Shakespeare's tragedies is one of an anthology series providing accessible resources for students researching great literary lives and works. Contributing writers' essays in the book are taken from a wide variety of sources and are edited to accommodate the reading and comprehension levels of young…

  2. Readings on the Sonnets of William Shakespeare. The Greenhaven Press Literary Companion to British Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Clarice, Ed.

    Intended as an accessible resource for students researching William Shakespeare's (1564-1616) poetry, this collection of essays about Shakespeare's sonnets contains an in-depth biography of Shakespeare and writings from a wide variety of sources. The essays are edited to accommodate the reading and comprehension levels of young adults; each essay…

  3. Readings on the Comedies (William Shakespeare). The Greenhaven Press Literary Companion to British Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Clarice, Ed.

    Intended as an accessible resource for students researching William Shakespeare's (1564-1616) "Comedies," this collection of essays about the great playwright contains an in-depth biography and writings taken from a wide variety of sources. The essays are edited to accommodate the reading and comprehension levels of young adults; each…

  4. 76 FR 69760 - Agency Information Collection Activities: The William T. Pecora Award Application and Nomination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... collection of nominations for the William T. Pecora Award. As part of our continuing efforts to reduce... individuals or groups working in the field of remote sensing of the earth. National and international... Burden Hours: 200 hours. We estimate the public reporting burden averages 10 hours per response...

  5. Increased overall cortical connectivity with syndrome specific local decreases suggested by atypical sleep-EEG synchronization in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombos, Ferenc; Bódizs, Róbert; Kovács, Ilona

    2017-07-21

    Williams syndrome (7q11.23 microdeletion) is characterized by specific alterations in neurocognitive architecture and functioning, as well as disordered sleep. Here we analyze the region, sleep state and frequency-specific EEG synchronization of whole night sleep recordings of 21 Williams syndrome and 21 typically developing age- and gender-matched subjects by calculating weighted phase lag indexes. We found broadband increases in inter- and intrahemispheric neural connectivity for both NREM and REM sleep EEG of Williams syndrome subjects. These effects consisted of increased theta, high sigma, and beta/low gamma synchronization, whereas alpha synchronization was characterized by a peculiar Williams syndrome-specific decrease during NREM states (intra- and interhemispheric centro-temporal) and REM phases of sleep (occipital intra-area synchronization). We also found a decrease in short range, occipital connectivity of NREM sleep EEG theta activity. The striking increased overall synchronization of sleep EEG in Williams syndrome subjects is consistent with the recently reported increase in synaptic and dendritic density in stem-cell based Williams syndrome models, whereas decreased alpha and occipital connectivity might reflect and underpin the altered microarchitecture of primary visual cortex and disordered visuospatial functioning of Williams syndrome subjects.

  6. Notas no percurso: linguagem musical e Síndrome de Williams/Notes on the way: musical language and Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio Souza Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo versa sobre uma síndrome em particular chamada Síndrome de Williams-Beuren. Esta síndrome possui uma relação específica com a música, relação esta que estará no fulcro de nossas preocupações durante as páginas que se seguem. Num primeiro momento faremos uma apresentação da síndrome e de suas singularidades; em seguida nos debruçaremos sobre a especificidade que aqui está em questão, ou seja, a relação da síndrome com o universo sonoro; por fim, traremos um caso com o qual tivemos contato envolvendo a educação musical em contexto da síndrome, e discutiremos a respeito dos elementos que esse contato nos trouxe para pensar essa curiosa e relevante relação entre arte-educação e o desenvolvimento neuropsicológico atípico. The present article is about a particular syndrome, called Williams-Beuren. This syndrome has a very specific relationship with music, which will be at the heart of our concerns over the following pages. Initially we will make a presentation of the syndrome and its singularities. Then we will focus on the uniqueness of the correlation between Williams-Beuren and the musical world. Finally, we will discuss a case which involves musical education in the context of this syndrome, and discuss about the elements, brought by that contact, that are useful to think about this curious and relevant relationship between art education and atypical neuropsychological development.

  7. La haine à l’œuvre dans Carpenter’s Gothic (1999 de William Gaddis Cultivating Hatred in Carpenter’s Gothic (1999 by William Gaddis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Sohier

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In Carpenter’s Gothic, hatred is given pride of place. William Gaddis delineates a society in which hatred proliferates. Characters are caught in the turmoils of their hatred whether it derives from the Vietnam War or from fundamentalist movements, from their individualistic quest for social recognition or from self-aggrandizement. We mean to develop a typology derived from psychoanalysis and anthropology so as to take into account all the different facets hate has in the novel. We shall devote analyses to jealousy caused by hatred, then describe the primary hate that underpins all types of relationships as a preliminary to questioning the excess that fuels Gaddis’s writing. Lastly, by referring to the author’s non-fictional work we shall put forward the thesis that the voluble protagonist is to a large extent the author’s mouthpiece. McCandless’s vindictive disquisitions on the course of the world will be seen as the equivalent of a tragic mask through which William Gaddis gives vent to his melancholia and intense detestation of the ways of the world.

  8. William Ospina y la búsqueda de la franja amarilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Valero Bernal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este artículo es el de analizar el ensayo «Lo que le falta a Colombia» del escritor William Ospina. En este ensayo Ospina profundiza en los principales problemas sociales y políticos que Colombia atravesaba a finales del s. XX así como en las posibles soluciones que podrían adoptarse. Los planteamientos que emplea el escritor colombiano pueden relacionarse con una gran variedad de conceptos propios del ámbito de la política y la sociología. A lo largo de este trabajo mostraremos las analogías existentes entre el análisis de William Ospina y las ideas de pensadores tan alejados en el tiempo como Thomas Hobbes, Rousseau, John Rawls o Charles Tilly.

  9. ABORDAGEM DIAGNÓSTICA DA SÍNDROME DE WILLIAMS - BEUREN.

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Marina Machado

    2016-01-01

    As anomalias cromossômicas causam fenótipos específicos e complexos resultantes de desequilíbrios na dose normal de genes localizados em um segmento cromossômico específico, sendo responsáveis por 60 % ou mais das síndromes genéticas identificáveis. A Síndrome de Williams-Beuren (SWB) caracteriza-se por anomalias múltiplas e deficiência intelectual, descrita independentemente por Williams et al. (1961) e por Beuren et al. (1962). A SWB consiste em uma doença genética causada pela microdeleção...

  10. Description of common musculoskeletal findings in Williams Syndrome and implications for therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copes, L E; Pober, B R; Terilli, C A

    2016-07-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), is a relatively rare genetic disorder affecting ∼1/10,000 persons. Since the disorder is caused by a micro-deletion of ∼1.5 Mb, it is not surprising that the manifestations of WS are extremely broad, involving most body systems. In this paper, we primarily focus on the musculoskeletal aspects of WS as these findings have not been the subject of a comprehensive review. We review the MSK features commonly seen in individuals with WS, along with related sensory and neurological issues interacting with and compounding underlying MSK abnormalities. We end by providing perspective, particularly from the vantage point of a physical therapist, on therapeutic interventions to address the most common MSK and related features seen in WS. Clin. Anat. 29:578-589, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A child of Williams-Beuren syndrome for inguinal hernia repair: Perioperative management concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Deka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome, commonly known as Williams syndrome (WS, is a multi-organ disorder. The principal anomalies of the syndrome are developmental delay, unusual craniofacial dysmorphic features, and cardiovascular anomalies such as valvular or supravalvular aortic stenosis, pulmonary artery stenosis, and coronary insufficiency. Sudden cardiac death during minor procedures even in the absence of gross cardiovascular pathology is the most dreaded complication in these patients. A 7-year-old child with WS was posted for left-sided inguinal hernia repair under general anesthesia. Our article describes the uneventful perioperative course of the patient and highlights the concerns and complications that may be an integral part with the syndrome.

  12. Mapping cultural resource sites for the Prince William Sound Graphical Resource Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooley, C. B.; O'Brien, D. K.; Hillman, S. O.

    1997-01-01

    A software package for mapping digital data 'layers' of environmentally and/or culturally sensitive areas such as seabird colonies, seal haulouts, and sea otter concentrations in Prince William Sound and adjoining areas of southern Alaska has been developed by the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company. The data is to be added to an environmental computer mapping database. More than 1,800 known and reported coastal cultural resource sites have been identified. The database is part of the Prince William Sound Tanker Oil Discharge Prevention and Contingency Plan. The mappable data layers can be used to plan and execute whatever site protection program may be necessary, thus enhancing effective cultural resource protection during an oil spill response. 22 refs., 4 figs

  13. A gestalt approach to the science fiction novels of William Gibson

    OpenAIRE

    McFarlane, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Gestalt psychologists Kurt Koffka and Wolfgang Köhler argue that human perception relies on a form, or gestalt, into which perceptions are assimilated. Gestalt theory has been applied to the visual arts by Rudolf Arnheim and to literature by Wolfgang Iser. My original contribution to knowledge is to use gestalt theory to perform literary criticism, an approach that highlights the importance of perception in William Gibson’s novels and the impact of this emphasis on posthumanism and science fi...

  14. Williams' paradox and the role of phenotypic plasticity in sexual systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Janet L

    2013-10-01

    As George Williams pointed out in 1975, although evolutionary explanations, based on selection acting on individuals, have been developed for the advantages of simultaneous hermaphroditism, sequential hermaphroditism and gonochorism, none of these evolutionary explanations adequately explains the current distribution of these sexual systems within the Metazoa (Williams' Paradox). As Williams further pointed out, the current distribution of sexual systems is explained largely by phylogeny. Since 1975, we have made a great deal of empirical and theoretical progress in understanding sexual systems. However, we still lack a theory that explains the current distribution of sexual systems in animals and we do not understand the evolutionary transitions between hermaphroditism and gonochorism. Empirical data, collected over the past 40 years, demonstrate that gender may have more phenotypic plasticity than was previously realized. We know that not only sequential hermaphrodites, but also simultaneous hermaphrodites have phenotypic plasticity that alters sex allocation in response to social and environmental conditions. A focus on phenotypic plasticity suggests that one sees a continuum in animals between genetically determined gonochorism on the one hand and simultaneous hermaphroditism on the other, with various types of sequential hermaphroditism and environmental sex determination as points along the spectrum. Here I suggest that perhaps the reason we have been unable to resolve Williams' Paradox is because the problem was not correctly framed. First, because, for example, simultaneous hermaphroditism provides reproductive assurance or dioecy ensures outcrossing does not mean that there are no other evolutionary paths that can provide adaptive responses to those selective pressures. Second, perhaps the question we need to ask is: What selective forces favor increased versus reduced phenotypic plasticity in gender expression? It is time to begin to look at the question

  15. A gentlemanly tour on the fringes of Europe: William Hartigan Barrington in Scandinavia and Russia, 1837

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Angela

    2013-01-01

    In 1837, 22-year-old William Hartigan Barrington (1815–72) made a five-month tour of northern Europe. His detailed diaries describe his encounters with the people and cultures of Scandinavia and Russia, and his interest in a range of topics considered suitable for an educated young gentleman, including systems of government, the arts, manufacturing and commerce, infrastructure, and the poor and poor relief. His tours were expected to provide certain educational and socio-cultural benefits, wh...

  16. The William Houston Medal of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, A M

    2004-06-01

    The William Houston medal is a prestigious prize awarded to the individual achieving the most outstanding examination performance at the Membership in Orthodontics examination for the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. Five clinical cases treated by the candidate are presented as part of the final examination; two of these cases are described below. The first a Class III malocclusion, and the second a Class II division 1 malocclusion, were both treated by orthodontic camouflage.

  17. 3D PATTERN OF BRAIN ABNORMALITIES IN WILLIAMS SYNDROME VISUALIZED USING TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Reiss, Allan L.; Lee, Agatha D.; Bellugi, Ursula; Galaburda, Albert M.; Korenberg, Julie R.; Mills, Debra L.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with deletion of ~20 contiguous genes in chromosome band 7q11.23. Individuals with WS exhibit mild to moderate mental retardation, but are relatively more proficient in specific language and musical abilities. We used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to visualize the complex pattern of gray/white matter reductions in WS, based on fluid registration of structural brain images.

  18. Estrutura e significado em "Uma rosa para Emily", de William Faulkner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Daghlian

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma análise do consagrado conto "Uma Rosa para Emily", de William Faulkner, voltada para alguns dos principais aspectos de sua estrutura. Após considerarmos o enredo, discutimos a construção das personagens, com destaque para a protagonista, fazendo um levantamento e comentários sobre possíveis fontes de inspiração, destacando, entre outras, aspectos da biografia da poeta Emily Dickinson, a ficção e a poesia de E. A. Poe, romances de Charles Dickens e Henry James, o conto de Sherwood Anderson e a poesia de William Blake, Emily Dickinson, Robert Browning e John Crowe Ransom, acrescentando paralelos com o conto "Bartleby, o escrivão", de Herman Melville. Analisamos, então, o foco narrativo, os símbolos e o significado, ressaltando aqui o desenvolvimento temático da narrativa.This is an analysis of the well-known short story "A Rose for Emily," by William Faulkner, concentrating on some of the main aspects of its structure. A consideration of the plot is followed by a discussion of characterization, with emphasis on the protagonist, by means of a survey and comments on possible sources of inspiration including, among others, aspects of Emily Dickinson's biography, E. A. Poe's fiction and poetry, novels by Charles Dickens and Henry James, Sherwood Anderson's short stories, and the poetry of William Blake, Emily Dickinson, Robert Browning, and John Crowe Ransom, in addition to Herman Melville's short story "Bartleby, the Scrivener." The narrative focus, symbolism and meaning, stressing the thematic development of the narrative, are then analyzed.

  19. Deeper processing is beneficial during episodic memory encoding for adults with Williams syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, J.; Hamilton, C.; Riby, D. M.; Riby, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research exploring declarative memory in Williams syndrome (WS) has revealed impairment in the processing of episodic information accompanied by a relative strength in semantic ability. The aim of the current study was to extend this literature by examining how relatively spared semantic memory may support episodic remembering. Using a level of processing paradigm, older adults with WS (aged 35–61 years) were compared to typical adults of the same chronological age and typically deve...

  20. The Dance of the Dead Rhino: William Kentridge’s Magic Flute

    OpenAIRE

    Guarracino, Serena

    2010-01-01

    The article offers a reading of the staging of The Magic Flute by visual artist William Kentridge, focusing on his introduction of the rhino in the visual landscape of the opera as symbol for the silenced subject of violence. Operatic tradition has always been concerned with the staging of death, in particular with the death of its female protagonists, and recent scholarship has highlighted the complicity of the genre with the ideology of Western patriarchy and colonial violence. In this ligh...

  1. Williams-Beuren syndrome: pitfalls for diagnosis in limited resources setting

    OpenAIRE

    Lumaka, Aimé; Lukoo, Rita; Mubungu, Gerrye; Lumbala, Paul; Mbayabo, Gloire; Mupuala, Aimée; Lukusa-Tshilobo, Prosper; Devriendt, Koenraad

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Patients with Williams?Beuren Syndrome can be recognized clinically, given the characteristic dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and behavior. We report on a Congolese boy with typical WBS facial characteristics. He suffered meningitis and coma at the age of 2 years then subsequently presented with profound intellectual disability and atypical behavior. The WBS was only made at age 8.2 years and confirmed with FISH testing and microarray?CGH. The present report aims to...

  2. Aortic anomalies in an adolescent with the Williams' elfin facies syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.L.; Azouz, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    An adolescent with classical Williams' syndrome who presented with hypertensive encephalopathy is described. He had the unusual combination of supravalvular aortic stenosis, long segment coarctation of the aorta, aortic hypoplasia and a high bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. Surgical resection of the coarctation was required; however, the patient has remained moderately hypertensive. The aortic anomalies in this syndrome are reviewed and their frequency and importance examined. (orig.)

  3. Sizeable acquired subglottic cyst in a baby with Williams-Beuren syndrome: association or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, Athanasios; Tsakalides, Christos; Chatziavramidis, Angelos; Karagianni, Paraskevi; Dimitriadou, Meropi; Konstantinidis, Iordanis

    2013-10-15

    We describe a case of an acquired subglottic cyst presented with persistent stridor and voice hoarsening in a baby diagnosed with Williams-Beuren syndrome that was born premature and required intubation during neonatal period. We also comment on whether this is a coincidence or there can be an association between impaired elastogenesis, a feature of patients with the syndrome and the formation of a subglottic cyst. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pamidronate Rescue Therapy for Hypercalcemia in a Child With Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami A. Sanjad

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A 15-month-old male infant diagnosed with Williams Syndrome (WS was admitted with severe hypercalcemia and nephrocalcinosis. Intravenous hydration and furosemide failed to yield an appreciable and sustainable fall in serum calcium, while the injection of pamidronate achieved a significant decrease in serum calcium in a short period of time. This bisphosphonate could be considered as a second-line treatment for refractory hypercalcemia in WS.

  5. STS-95 Payload Specialist Glenn greets baseball legend Williams following a parade in Cocoa Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr. (left) greets baseball legend Ted Williams at a reception at the Double Tree Oceanfront Hotel following a parade down State Road A1A in nearby Cocoa Beach. Organizers of the parade included the Cocoa Beach Area Chamber of Commerce, the Brevard County Tourist Development Council, and the cities of Cape Canaveral and Cocoa Beach. The parade is reminiscent of those held after missions during the Mercury Program.

  6. The Unrequited Love as Reflected in William Blake's “Love's Secret”

    OpenAIRE

    Risthania, Olivia Fergie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this final academic paper is to describe the love story which tells sadness in William Blake's “Love's Secret”. The writer adopts Erich Fromm's theory of unrequited love from The Art of Loving. This final academic paper concerns intrinsic and extrinsic side of the poem. In the intrinsic side, the writer discusses about the existing diction and figurative language such as denotation and connotation and imagery to understand the true meaning of the poem. The extrinsic side, the w...

  7. Wilsonian visions of a new world order in concrete terms : the case of William C. Bullitt / Alexander Sedlmaier

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sedlmaier, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    President Wilsoni internatsionalismi ideede pooldajast, vasakpoolse poliitika kriitikust pärast I maailmasõda Ameerika - Saksamaa suhete taustal, ajakirjanikust ja diplomaadist William C. Bullitt'ist (1891-1967)

  8. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Prince William Sound, Alaska, Volumes 1 and 2, geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0019218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  9. Genes, language, and the nature of scientific explanations: the case of Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, Julien; Landau, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss two experiments of nature and their implications for the sciences of the mind. The first, Williams syndrome, bears on one of cognitive science's holy grails: the possibility of unravelling the causal chain between genes and cognition. We sketch the outline of a general framework to study the relationship between genes and cognition, focusing as our case study on the development of language in individuals with Williams syndrome. Our approach emphasizes the role of three key ingredients: the need to specify a clear level of analysis, the need to provide a theoretical account of the relevant cognitive structure at that level, and the importance of the (typical) developmental process itself. The promise offered by the case of Williams syndrome has also given rise to two strongly conflicting theoretical approaches-modularity and neuroconstructivism-themselves offshoots of a perennial debate between nativism and empiricism. We apply our framework to explore the tension created by these two conflicting perspectives. To this end, we discuss a second experiment of nature, which allows us to compare the two competing perspectives in what comes close to a controlled experimental setting. From this comparison, we conclude that the "meaningful debate assumption", a widespread assumption suggesting that neuroconstructivism and modularity address the same questions and represent genuine theoretical alternatives, rests on a fallacy.

  10. Evaluation of sea otter capture after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodkin, James L.; Weltz, F.; Bayha, Keith; Kormendy, Jennifer

    1990-01-01

    After the T/V Exxon Valdez oil spill into Prince William Sound, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Exxon Company, U.S.A., began rescuing sea otters (Enhydra lutris). The primary objective of this operation was to capture live, oiled sea otters for cleaning and rehabilitation. Between 30 March and 29 May 1989, 139 live sea otters were captured in the sound and transported to rehabilitation centers in Valdez, Alaska. Within the first 15 days of capture operations, 122 (88%) otters were captured. Most sea otters were captured near Knight, Green, and Evans islands in the western sound. The primary capture method consisted of dipnetting otters out of water and off beaches. While capture rates declined over time, survival of captured otters increased as the interval from spill date to capture date increased. The relative degree of oiling observed for each otter captured declined over time. Declining capture rates led to the use of tangle nets. The evidence suggests the greatest threat to sea otters in Prince William Sound occurred within the first 3 weeks after the spill. Thus, in the future, the authors believe rescue efforts should begin as soon as possible after an oil spill in sea otter habitat. Further, preemptive capture and relocation of sea otters in Prince William Sound may have increased the number of otters that could have survived this event.

  11. Shoreline oiling conditions in Prince William Sound following the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, J.M.; Owens, E.H.; Stoker, S.W.; McCormick, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill of March 24, 1989, in Prince William Sound, Alaska, Exxon conducted comprehensive, systematic shoreline surveys in cooperation with federal and state authorities to obtain information on the distribution and magnitude of shoreline oiling and to identify natural and cultural resources requiring special protection. Similar joint surveys were performed during the springs of 1990, 1991, and 1992 on all Prince william Sound and Gulf of Alaska shorelines that were suspected of having remnants of weathered oil and that would benefit from further cleanup. In the springs of 1990, 1991, and 1992, isolated pockets of subsurface oil were found, chiefly in small scattered zones in coarse cobble/boulder sediments in the upper intertidal or supratidal zones. In 1991, about one-third of the subdivisions in Prince William Sound with surface oil also contained some subsurface oil. The areal extent of this subsurface oil declined by nearly 70% between 1991 and 1992, from about 37,000 m 2 to about 12,000 m 2 . Moreover, where subsurface oil remained in 1992, it was present in lesser amounts. Rates of oil removal were greatest on coastal sections treated early in the spring and summer of 1989. Where shoreline treatment was delayed, the subsequent rate of removal of oil from the shore by natural processes was slower. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Effectiveness of commercial microbial products in enhancing oil degradation in Prince William Sound field plots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venosa, A.D.; Haines, J.R.; Allen, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    In the spring of 1990, previously reported laboratory experiments were conducted on 10 commercial microbial products to test for enhanced biodegradation of weathered crude oil from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. The laboratory tests measured the rate and extent of oil degradation in closed flasks. Weathered oil from the beaches in Alaska and seawater from Prince William Sound were used in the tests. Two of the 10 products were found to provide significantly greater alkane degradation than flasks supplemented with mineral nutrients alone. These two products were selected for further testing on a beach in Prince William Sound. A randomized complete block experiment was designed to compare the effectiveness of these two products in enhancing oil degradation compared to simple fertilizer alone. Four small plots consisting of a no nutrient control, a mineral nutrient plot, and two plots receiving mineral nutrients plus the two products, were laid out on a contaminated beach. These four plots comprised a 'block' of treatments, and this block was replicated four times on the same beach. Triplicate samples of beach sediment were collected at four equally spaced time intervals and analyzed for oil residue weight and alkane hydrocarbon profile changes with time. The objective was to determine if either of the two commercial microbiological products was able to enhance bioremediation of an oil-contaminated beach in Prince William Sound to an extent greater than that achievable by simple fertilizer application. Results indicated no significant differences among the four treatments in the 27-day period of the experiment

  13. Simulasi Perdagangan Saham PT Tambang Batubara Bukit Asam, Tbk. dengan Macd dan Williams % Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Benny

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD is a momentum indicator to determine the indication of the trend reversal point. Williams% Range is also a momentum indicator that can provide when reversal trend will occur. This analysis will use the data movement of stock prices for PT Tambang Coal Bukit Asam Tbk. (PTBA. PTBA stock prices are influenced by fundamental conditions such as limited supply of fuel which is rumored and coal is the main alternative fuels other than oil. Study period was 241 trade days. Data are analyzed in several periods and then fitted with the MACD indicator and Williams % R, then simulate the trade during the period of research studies to determine the level of trading profits or losses based on the combination of both these technical indicators. The conclusion of this analysis, the MACD is an indicator that is considered slow (lagging in giving an indication of weakness, but in reverse the MACD is considered to provide an accurate indication of where the indication given is rarely wrong. Williams% R is an rapid indicator in anticipation of a reversal trend, but these indicators often give a false indication since this indicator is quite sensitive to the movement of stock prices goings go up or down. 

  14. Bayesian stock assessment of Pacific herring in Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradian, Melissa L; Branch, Trevor A; Moffitt, Steven D; Hulson, Peter-John F

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) population in Prince William Sound, Alaska crashed in 1993 and has yet to recover, affecting food web dynamics in the Sound and impacting Alaskan communities. To help researchers design and implement the most effective monitoring, management, and recovery programs, a Bayesian assessment of Prince William Sound herring was developed by reformulating the current model used by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. The Bayesian model estimated pre-fishery spawning biomass of herring age-3 and older in 2013 to be a median of 19,410 mt (95% credibility interval 12,150-31,740 mt), with a 54% probability that biomass in 2013 was below the management limit used to regulate fisheries in Prince William Sound. The main advantages of the Bayesian model are that it can more objectively weight different datasets and provide estimates of uncertainty for model parameters and outputs, unlike the weighted sum-of-squares used in the original model. In addition, the revised model could be used to manage herring stocks with a decision rule that considers both stock status and the uncertainty in stock status.

  15. Bayesian stock assessment of Pacific herring in Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L Muradian

    Full Text Available The Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii population in Prince William Sound, Alaska crashed in 1993 and has yet to recover, affecting food web dynamics in the Sound and impacting Alaskan communities. To help researchers design and implement the most effective monitoring, management, and recovery programs, a Bayesian assessment of Prince William Sound herring was developed by reformulating the current model used by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. The Bayesian model estimated pre-fishery spawning biomass of herring age-3 and older in 2013 to be a median of 19,410 mt (95% credibility interval 12,150-31,740 mt, with a 54% probability that biomass in 2013 was below the management limit used to regulate fisheries in Prince William Sound. The main advantages of the Bayesian model are that it can more objectively weight different datasets and provide estimates of uncertainty for model parameters and outputs, unlike the weighted sum-of-squares used in the original model. In addition, the revised model could be used to manage herring stocks with a decision rule that considers both stock status and the uncertainty in stock status.

  16. Arterial Hypertension in a Child with Williams-Beuren Syndrome (7q11.23 Chromosomal Deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina de Sylos

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 7-year-old male child diagnosed with Williams-Beuren syndrome and arterial hypertension refractory to clinical treatment. The diagnosis was confirmed by genetic study. Narrowing of the descending aorta and stenosis of the renal arteries were also diagnosed. Systemic vascular alterations caused by deletion of the elastin gene may occur early in individuals with Williams-Beuren syndrome, leading to the clinical manifestation of systemic arterial hypertension refractory to drug treatment.

  17. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Subpart E of... - Prince William Sound Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prince William Sound Rural and Non-Rural Areas 4 Figure 4 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL FISHING AND RELATED... to Subpart E of Part 300—Prince William Sound Rural and Non-Rural Areas ER04NO09.010 [74 FR 57110...

  18. Williams syndrome predisposes to vascular stiffness modified by antihypertensive use and copy number changes in NCF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Beth A; Danback, Joshua R; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H; de Las Fuentes, Lisa; Reusz, Gyorgy S; Kis, Eva; Bhatt, Ami B; Pober, Barbara R

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome is caused by the deletion of 26 to 28 genes, including elastin, on human chromosome 7. Elastin insufficiency leads to the cardiovascular hallmarks of this condition, namely focal stenosis and hypertension. Extrapolation from the Eln(+/-) mouse suggests that affected people may also have stiff vasculature, a risk factor for stroke, myocardial infarction, and cardiac death. NCF1, one of the variably deleted Williams genes, is a component of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex and is involved in the generation of oxidative stress, making it an interesting candidate modifier for vascular stiffness. Using a case-control design, vascular stiffness was evaluated by pulse wave velocity in 77 Williams cases and matched controls. Cases had stiffer conducting vessels than controls (PWilliams syndrome. Pulse wave velocity increased with age at comparable rates in cases and controls, and although the degree of vascular stiffness varied, it was seen in both hypertensive and normotensive Williams participants. Use of antihypertensive medication and extension of the Williams deletion to include NCF1 were associated with protection from vascular stiffness. These findings demonstrate that vascular stiffness is a primary vascular phenotype in Williams syndrome and that treatment with antihypertensives or agents inhibiting oxidative stress may be important in managing patients with this condition, potentially even those who are not overtly hypertensive.

  19. Performance on verbal and low-verbal false belief tasks: evidence from children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Dimitriou, Dagmara; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies that have investigated the relationship between performance on theory of mind (ToM) tasks and verbal abilities in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have reported contradictory findings with some showing that language abilities aid performance on ToM tasks while others have found that participants with WS fail these tasks because of their verbal demands. The current study investigated this relationship again comparing performance on a classical change-location task to two newly developed low-verbal tasks, one change-location task and one unexpected content task. Thirty children with WS (aged 5-17;01 years) and 30 typically developing (TD) children (aged between 2;10 years and 9;09 years), who were matched for vocabulary comprehension scores were included in the study. Although performance in the WS group was significantly poorer compared to the TD group on all three tasks, performance was not predicted by their receptive vocabulary or grammatical ability scores. In addition, ToM abilities in both groups depended on the cognitive demands of the task at hand. This finding shows that performance on ToM tasks in WS is not necessarily hindered by their delayed language abilities but rather by the task administered. This could potentially affect the diagnosis of developmental disorders, such as Autism Spectrum Disorders, and comparison of ToM abilities across developmental disorders. Readers of this article should be able to (1) describe the current state of theory of mind research in Williams syndrome, (2) identify which cognitive abilities might explain performance on theory of mind tasks in both typically developing children and in children with Williams syndrome, and (3) interpret the importance of task demands when assessing children's theory of mind abilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Diagnosis of a case with Williams-Beuren syndrome with nephrocalcinosis using chromosome microarray analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S J; Liu, M; Long, W J; Luo, X P

    2016-12-02

    Objective: To explore the clinical phenotypes and the genetic cause for a boy with unexplained growth retardation, nephrocalcinosis, auditory anomalies and multi-organ/system developmental disorders. Method: Routine G-banding and chromosome microarray analysis were applied to a child with unexplained growth retardation, nephrocalcinosis, auditory anomalies and multi-organ/system developmental disorders treated in the Department of Pediatrics of Tongji Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology in September 2015 and his parents to conduct the chromosomal karyotype analysis and the whole genome scanning. Deleted genes were searched in the Decipher and NCBI databases, and their relationships with the clinical phenotypes were analyzed. Result: A six-month-old boy was refered to us because of unexplained growth retardation and feeding intolerance.The affected child presented with abnormal manifestation such as special face, umbilical hernia, growth retardation, hypothyroidism, congenital heart disease, right ear sensorineural deafness, hypercalcemia and nephrocalcinosis. The child's karyotype was 46, XY, 16qh + , and his parents' karyotypes were normal. Chromosome microarray analysis revealed a 1 436 kb deletion on the 7q11.23(72701098_74136633) region of the child. This region included 23 protein-coding genes, which were reported to be corresponding to Williams-Beuren syndrome and its certain clinical phenotypes. His parents' results of chromosome microarray analysis were normal. Conclusion: A boy with characteristic manifestation of Williams-Beuren syndrome and rare nephrocalcinosis was diagnosed using chromosome microarray analysis. The deletion on the 7q11.23 might be related to the clinical phenotypes of Williams-Beuren syndrome, yet further studies are needed.

  1. Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the auditory nerve). For some people, hearing loss may begin as early as late childhood. WS also is associated with a characteristic “cognitive profile” of mental strengths and weaknesses composed of strengths in verbal short-term memory and language, combined with severe weakness in visuospatial ...

  2. William Shakespeare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    呼振璞

    2005-01-01

    威廉·莎士比亚(1564—1616)是欧洲文艺复共时期英国最伟大的剧作家。他共写有37部戏剧,154首十四行诗,2首长诗和其它诗歌。他以奇伟的笔触对英国封建制度走向衰落和资本主义原始积累的历史转折期的英国社会做了形象、深入的刻画。

  3. The book classification of William Torrey Harris: influences of Bacon and Hegel in library classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo de Sales

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The studies of library classification generally interact with the historical contextualization approach and with the classification ideas typical of Philosophy. In the 19th century, the North-American philosopher and educator William Torrey Harris developed a book classification at the St. Louis Public School, based on Francis Bacon and Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel. The objective of this essay is to analyze Harris’s classification, reflecting upon his theoretical and philosophical backgrounds. To achieve such objective, this essay adopts a critical-descriptive approach for analysis. Results show some influences of Bacon and Hegel in Harris’s classification.

  4. Improving the Weizsäcker-Williams approximation in electron-proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Frixione, Stefano; Nason, P; Ridolfi, G

    1993-01-01

    We critically examine the validity of the Weizs\\"acker-Williams approximation in electron-hadron collisions. We show that in its commonly used form it can lead to large errors, and we show how to improve it in order to get accurate results. In particular, we present an improved form that is valid beyond the leading logarithmic approximation in the case when a small-angle cut is applied to the scattered electron. Furthermore we include comparisons of the approximate expressions with the exact electroproduction calculation in the case of heavy-quark production.

  5. Paratextual Transactions: Text and Off Text in William Blake’s Milton and Jerusalem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Volpone

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Il saggio si concentra sulle dinamiche tra testo e paratesto negli ultimi due libri profetici di William Blake, Milton e Jerusalem. A partire dalle riflessioni di Genette in Soglie, si ragionerà su come parola e immagine interagiscono nelle tavole e concorrono a produrre significato. I libri profetici, in quanto opera d’arte “integrata”, implicano una partecipazione attiva da parte del lettore, che deve saper interpretare i molteplici livelli di interazione tra le componenti testuali e paratestuali, all’interno della complessa cornice rappresentata dalla letteratura apocalittica alla quale l’ultima produzione di Blake appartiene.

  6. Ian D. Copestake, The Ethics of William Carlos Williams’s Poetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotle University of Greece

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Ian D. Copestake’s monograph on William Carlos Williams’s poetry offers a well-informed and well-documented insight into the connection between Williams’s writing with Unitarianism and Emersonian thinking. In this very well-written and accessible book, the reader gets introduced to a number of poems in addition to excerpts from Williams’s essays, letters and autobiography which facilitate the understanding and appreciation of the poet’s attempt to promote “independent thought and action” (5....

  7. On the application of the Williams-Weizsaecker-method to higher order S-matrix-approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegelbecker, R.C.

    1983-05-01

    In this paper the method of quasireal processes is investigated using a special example - pair production in the stationary field of a nucleus by an incident electron. As a result, the semi-classical version of the Williams-Weizsaecker-method is confirmed on the basis of all 3sup(rd)-order Feynman-diagrams. The spectra of quasireal processes, derived from quantum field theory, can also be applied simultaneously in several vertex points on one diagram and are valid for higher photon energies than the semiclassical spectrum; the restriction #betta# [de

  8. Estrutura e significado em "Uma rosa para Emily", de William Faulkner

    OpenAIRE

    Daghlian,Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Trata-se de uma análise do consagrado conto "Uma Rosa para Emily", de William Faulkner, voltada para alguns dos principais aspectos de sua estrutura. Após considerarmos o enredo, discutimos a construção das personagens, com destaque para a protagonista, fazendo um levantamento e comentários sobre possíveis fontes de inspiração, destacando, entre outras, aspectos da biografia da poeta Emily Dickinson, a ficção e a poesia de E. A. Poe, romances de Charles Dickens e Henry James, o conto de Sherw...

  9. William Allen Miller (1817-70): a distinguished scientist re-discovered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley-Miller, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Dr William Allen Miller developed an early interest in science and astronomy at secondary school. Although qualifying in medicine, he pursued a career in Chemistry at King's College, London. A particular interest in spectrum analysis led to a collaboration with Dr Huggins in examining the spectra of stars. For this work they each received the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society. His subsequent work at King's College, the Royal Society, the Courts of Law and for various Government enterprises earned him an outstanding scientific and advisory reputation.

  10. Wir sind sowas von geliefert: William Binney, ex-NSA, erklärt Snowden Leaks

    OpenAIRE

    Schmetz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Die Snowden-Leaks an sich, insbesondere die von ihm an die Öffentlichkeit geleakten Powerpoint-Folien, haben es bereits in sich. Leicht zu verstehen sind sie aber nicht immer, es gibt schlicht zu viele Codenamen. Um so interessanter ist daher diese Mitschrift eines Vortrags von William Binney, einem ehemaligen technischen Direktor bei der NSA, der nach 37 Jahren Dienst ausschied und Whistleblower wurde. In diesem Vortrag erklärt Binney, was es mit der Überwachungsinfrastruktur der NSA auf sic...

  11. Efectividad de la microonda, masoterapia y ejercicios de Williams en pacientes con dolor lumbar

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio del Valle Torres; Nadia Rosa Hechavarría Almaguer; Carlos López Peña; Raúl Barceló Reyna

    2015-01-01

    Fundamento: el dolor lumbar constituye un problema de salud a nivel mundial, su tratamiento constituye un reto en la práctica médica asistencial. Objetivo: evaluar la efectividad de la microonda, masoterapia y ejercicios de Williams en pacientes con dolor lumbar. Método: se realizó un estudio prospectivo experimental en una muestra de 60 pacientes con lumbalgia subaguda y crónica. Se asignaron dos esquemas de tratamiento: uno con microonda combinada con masoterapia y ejercicios de Wil...

  12. Williams-Beuren syndrome: pitfalls for diagnosis in limited resources setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumaka, Aimé; Lukoo, Rita; Mubungu, Gerrye; Lumbala, Paul; Mbayabo, Gloire; Mupuala, Aimée; Tshilobo, Prosper Lukusa; Devriendt, Koenraad

    2016-03-01

    Patients with Williams-Beuren Syndrome can be recognized clinically, given the characteristic dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and behavior. We report on a Congolese boy with typical WBS facial characteristics. He suffered meningitis and coma at the age of 2 years then subsequently presented with profound intellectual disability and atypical behavior. The WBS was only made at age 8.2 years and confirmed with FISH testing and microarray-CGH. The present report aims to warn clinicians that infections may associate and/or modify a genetic disease as this may be observed in developing countries given the prevalence of infectious diseases.

  13. Memory profiles of Down, Williams, and fragile X syndromes: implications for reading development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Frances A; Moore, Marie S; Loveall, Susan J; Merrill, Edward C

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to understand the types of memory impairments that are associated with intellectual disability (ID, formerly called mental retardation) and the implications of these impairments for reading development. Specifically, studies on working memory, delayed memory and learning, and semantic/conceptual memory in Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, and fragile X syndrome were examined. A distinct memory profile emerged for each of the 3 etiologies of ID. Memory profiles are discussed in relation to strengths and weaknesses in reading skills in these three etiologies. We suggest that reading instruction be designed to capitalize on relatively stronger memory skills while providing extra support for especially challenging aspects of reading.

  14. Danish resonances and repercussions in the life and work of William H. Johnson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    William H. Johnson was an outstanding African-American artist, represented with hundreds of works in the Smithsonian Museum of American Art’s collection, but he was also a resident of Denmark for the better part of the 1930s, and again for a brief spell after WWII. While studying art in Paris...... and the rest of Scandinavia in that period. I shall take a look at the reception of his work (and that of Holcha Krake) in all three Scandinavian countries (they both spent considerable time in Norway and Sweden as well as in Holcha’s native Denmark) which routinely exoticizes Johnson and his art in language...

  15. Anesthesiological Management of a Patient with Williams Syndrome Undergoing Spine Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Boncagni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams Syndrome (WS is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder associated with a mutation on chromosome 7. Patients with WS usually display dysmorphic facial and musculoskeletal features, congenital heart diseases, metabolic disturbances and cognitive impairment. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are present in the majority of the children and may provide a substrate for perioperative Sudden Cardiac Death, as presented by several reports, something that creates a great challenge to the anesthetic conduct. We present the case of a 12-year old girl who required anesthetic care for surgical correction of an acquired kyphoscoliosis. Potential anesthesiological implications of WS are subsequently reviewed.

  16. Surgical repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis in children with williams syndrome: a 30-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Tyson A; d'Udekem, Yves; Brizard, Christian P; Wheaton, Gavin; Weintraub, Robert G; Konstantinov, Igor E

    2015-04-01

    Williams syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder associated with supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) in childhood. We reviewed outcomes of children with Williams syndrome who underwent repair of SVAS during a 30-year period at a single institution. Between 1982 and 2012, 28 patients with Williams syndrome were operated on for SVAS. Mean age at operation was 5.2 years (range, 3 months to 13 years), and mean weight at operation was 18.6 kg (range, 4.1 to 72.4 kg). Associated cardiac lesions in 11 patients (39.3%) were repaired at the time of the SVAS repair. The most common associated cardiac lesion was main pulmonary artery stenosis (8 of 28 [28%]). A 3-patch repair was performed in 10 patients, a Doty repair in 17, and a McGoon repair in 1 (3.6%). There were no early deaths. Follow-up was 96% complete (27 of 28). Overall mean follow-up was 11.2 years (range, 1 month to 27.3 years). Mean follow-up was 5 years (range, 1 month to 14.3 years) for the 3-patch repair patients and 14.7 years (range, 6 weeks to 27 years) for the Doty repair patients. Of the 17 Doty patients, there were 4 (24%) late deaths, occurring at 6 weeks, 3.5 years, 4 years, and 16 years after the initial operation. There were no late deaths in the 3-patch repair patients. Overall survival was 86% at 5, 10, and 15 years after repair. Survival was 82% at 5, 10 and 15 years for the Doty repair patients. Overall, 6 of 27 patients (22%) patients required late reoperation at a mean of 11.2 years (range, 3.6 to 23 years). No 3-patch repair patients required reoperation. Overall freedom from reoperation was 91% at 5 years and 73% at 10 and 15 years. Freedom from reoperation for the Doty repair patients was 93% at 5 years and 71% at 10 and 15 years. Surgical repair of SVAS in children Williams syndrome has excellent early results. However, significant late mortality and morbidity warrants close follow-up. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Business Solutions Case Study: Marketing Zero Energy Homes: Tommy Williams Homes, Gainesville, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    Building America research has shown that high-performance homes can potentially give builders an edge in the marketplace and can boost sales, but it doesn't happen automatically. It requires a tailored, easy-to-understand marketing campaign, and sometimes a little flair. This case study highlights the successful marketing approach of Tommy Williams Homes, which devotes resources to advertising, targeted social media outlets and blogs, realtor education seminars, and groundbreaking and open house celebrations. As a result, in one community, 2013 property sales records show that TWH outsells the only other builder in the development at a higher price, with fewer days on the market.

  18. Opposition in the Language of Representation and Undecidability of Pronouns in William Shakespeare’s Sonnets

    OpenAIRE

    Parisa Hamidizadeh; Yazdan Mahmoudi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to consider the undecidability of pronouns in William Shakespeare’s sonnet sequence. In sonnet 53 of Shakespeare’s sonnet sequence it is not clear that whether the beloved is male or female, because the beloved has affinity to both men and women: “And you, but one, can every shadow lend/Describe Adonis, and the counterfeit/Is poorly imitated after you/On Helen's cheek all art of beauty set” (53. 4-7). In fact, in sonnet 53 the beloved has been likened both to Adon...

  19. Early Manifestation of Supravalvular Aortic and Pulmonary Artery Stenosis in a Patient with Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Uk Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a developmental disorder characterized by vascular abnormalities such as thickening of the vascular media layer in medium- and large-sized arteries. Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS are common vascular abnormalities in WS. The natural course of SVAS and PPAS is variable, and the timing of surgery or intervention is determined according to the progression of vascular stenosis. In our patient, SVAS and PPAS showed rapid concurrent progression within two weeks after birth. We report the early manifestation of SVAS and PPAS in the neonatal period and describe the surgical treatment for stenosis relief.

  20. 'O' Rose Thou Art Sick': Floral Symbolism in William Blake's Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Malla

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of this paper is to analyse the symbolic implications of floral imagery in William Blake’s poetry. More specifically, this study explores the process of floral (resignification of William Blake’s Songs of Innocence (1789 and Songs of Experience (1794 as case studies. Since “Without contraries [there] is no progression” (Marriage of Heaven and Hell, plate 3, it can be argued that the Songs represent contrary aspects of the human condition that far from contradicting each other, establish a static contrast of shifting tensions and revaluation of the flower-image not only as a perfect symbol of the “vegetable” life rooted to the Earth but also as a figure longing to be free. In some sense at some level, the poetic-prophetic voice asserts in the Songs of Experience the state of corruption where man has fallen into. Ultimately, this study will explore how the failure to overcome the contrast that is suggested in the Songs will be deepened by the tragedy of Thel, which is symbolized by all unborn forces of life, all sterile seeds as an ultimate means of metaphorical regeneration throughout Poetry which constitutes in itself the Poet Prophet’s own means of transcending through art.

  1. William, a voxel model of child anatomy from tomographic images for Monte Carlo dosimetry calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Medical imaging provides two-dimensional pictures of the human internal anatomy from which may be constructed a three-dimensional model of organs and tissues suitable for calculation of dose from radiation. Diagnostic CT provides the greatest exposure to radiation per examination and the frequency of CT examination is high. Esti mates of dose from diagnostic radiography are still determined from data derived from geometric models (rather than anatomical models), models scaled from adult bodies (rather than bodies of children) and CT scanner hardware that is no longer used. The aim of anatomical modelling is to produce a mathematical representation of internal anatomy that has organs of realistic size, shape and positioning. The organs and tissues are represented by a great many cuboidal volumes (voxels). The conversion of medical images to voxels is called segmentation and on completion every pixel in an image is assigned to a tissue or organ. Segmentation is time consuming. An image processing pack age is used to identify organ boundaries in each image. Thirty to forty tomographic voxel models of anatomy have been reported in the literature. Each model is of an individual, or a composite from several individuals. Images of children are particularly scarce. So there remains a need for more paediatric anatomical models. I am working on segmenting ''William'' who is 368 PET-CT images from head to toe of a seven year old boy. William will be used for Monte Carlo dose calculations of dose from CT examination using a simulated modern CT scanner.

  2. ‘Wot larx!’: William Morris, Charles Dickens, and Fatherly Feelings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Parkins

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores the significance of William Morris’s reading of Dickens for Morris’s articulation of fatherly feelings. Recent scholarship on Victorian fatherhood has begun to overturn the stereotype of the dour, emotionally distant paterfamilias as providing only a partial understanding of forms of middle-class fatherhood and William Morris may serve as an example of a Victorian father whose parenting style eschewed detached authoritarianism, and instead combined nurture, play, and creativity. While Morris referred to Dickens’s works and characters in letters to a range of correspondents, his repeated usage of Joe Gargery’s catchphrase ‘Wot larx!’ (variously spelled occurs exclusively in letters to his wife and daughters, especially the latter. I will consider how the character of Joe Gargery, who combines nurturing tenderness with manly labour, was deployed by Morris to perform a playful and affectionate paternal persona. While Morris’s use of Joe’s catchphrase seems to express a spontaneous overflow of powerful feeling its status as a quotation also works to mark (and mask a disavowal of powerfully ambivalent feelings concerning his own emotional agency as husband and father.

  3. Duncan F. Gregory, William Walton and the development of British algebra: 'algebraical geometry', 'geometrical algebra', abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburgt, Lukas M

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed account of the period of the complex history of British algebra and geometry between the publication of George Peacock's Treatise on Algebra in 1830 and William Rowan Hamilton's paper on quaternions of 1843. During these years, Duncan Farquharson Gregory and William Walton published several contributions on 'algebraical geometry' and 'geometrical algebra' in the Cambridge Mathematical Journal. These contributions enabled them not only to generalize Peacock's symbolical algebra on the basis of geometrical considerations, but also to initiate the attempts to question the status of Euclidean space as the arbiter of valid geometrical interpretations. At the same time, Gregory and Walton were bound by the limits of symbolical algebra that they themselves made explicit; their work was not and could not be the 'abstract algebra' and 'abstract geometry' of figures such as Hamilton and Cayley. The central argument of the paper is that an understanding of the contributions to 'algebraical geometry' and 'geometrical algebra' of the second generation of 'scientific' symbolical algebraists is essential for a satisfactory explanation of the radical transition from symbolical to abstract algebra that took place in British mathematics in the 1830s-1840s.

  4. La portata etica della tragedia tra Bernard Williams e Martha Nussbaum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Testini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Questo breve scritto si propone di ripercorrere sinteticamente alcuni nodi fondamentali del dibattito filosofico tra Bernard Williams e Martha Nussbaum sul significato e sul valore etico della rappresentazione tragica non tanto all’interno del mondo greco quanto per la contemporaneità. Il campo su cui questa analisi intende muoversi è delimitato principalmente da due testi fondamentali come Vergogna e Necessità e l’introduzione alla nuova edizione del 2001, insieme alla prima parte, de La fragilità del bene. Si cercherà di mostrare lo scarto tra queste due diverse concezioni riconducendo ad ognuna il particolare atteggiamento etico che sostiene; di questi diversi punti di vista si cercherà di ricostruire il nesso con le differenti interpretazioni che i due autori forniscono dell’Agamennone di Eschilo e con le diverse reazioni che motivano nei confronti del protagonista e della sua vicenda. Gli obiettivi delle argomentazioni che seguono sono principalmente due: innanzitutto evidenziare come in alcune delle critiche mosse dalla filosofa americana al collega britannico siano rinvenibili spunti fondamentali per quella che si ritiene una più completa comprensione della tragedia come caso limite del conflitto tra soggetto etico e mondo e, in secondo luogo, produrre una giustificazione filosofica ulteriore della reazione motivata da Nussbaum davanti alla condotta di Agamennone che sia compatibile con l’approccio di Williams attraverso una riproposizione del conflitto di valori in termini di conflitto di ruoli.

  5. Megathrust splay faults at the focus of the Prince William Sound asperity, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberty, Lee M.; Finn, Shaun P.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Peterson, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    sparker and crustal-scale air gun seismic reflection data, coupled with repeat bathymetric surveys, document a region of repeated coseismic uplift on the portion of the Alaska subduction zone that ruptured in 1964. This area defines the western limit of Prince William Sound. Differencing of vintage and modern bathymetric surveys shows that the region of greatest uplift related to the 1964 Great Alaska earthquake was focused along a series of subparallel faults beneath Prince William Sound and the adjacent Gulf of Alaska shelf. Bathymetric differencing indicates that 12 m of coseismic uplift occurred along two faults that reached the seafloor as submarine terraces on the Cape Cleare bank southwest of Montague Island. Sparker seismic reflection data provide cumulative Holocene slip estimates as high as 9 mm/yr along a series of splay thrust faults within both the inner wedge and transition zone of the accretionary prism. Crustal seismic data show that these megathrust splay faults root separately into the subduction zone décollement. Splay fault divergence from this megathrust correlates with changes in midcrustal seismic velocity and magnetic susceptibility values, best explained by duplexing of the subducted Yakutat terrane rocks above Pacific plate rocks along the trailing edge of the Yakutat terrane. Although each splay fault is capable of independent motion, we conclude that the identified splay faults rupture in a similar pattern during successive megathrust earthquakes and that the region of greatest seismic coupling has remained consistent throughout the Holocene.

  6. 鲁迅心中的莎士比亚%William Shakespeare in Luxun' s Eyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯宏

    2012-01-01

    British has so much to say about William Shakespeare that British can' t get it all out, while in China Luxun is the great figure whom the Chinese have the untold subjects about. Luxun and Shakespeare have been meeting in China, for the sake of social and literary factors. But William Shakespeare mentioned and commented in Luxun' s works has been usually interpreted as the shortage of understanding or bias from Luxun. When all comments are carefully and conscientiously examined, the "great Shake- speare" is presented in Luxun's eyes.%英国有说不完的莎士比亚,而中国有道不尽的鲁迅。鲁迅与莎士比亚因为社会与文学的机缘相遇在中国。然而从鲁迅的著作中所提及或评论的莎士比亚,一直以来被解读为鲁迅对莎士比亚的批评,是对莎士比亚在文学方面的贡献认识不足或是一种偏见,但认真审视鲁迅著作中所提及的莎士比亚,却看到鲁迅眼中的“的确是伟大的”莎士比亚形象。

  7. Monitoring oiled shorelines in Prince William Sound Alaska, following the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilfillan, E.S.; Page, D.S.; Harner, E.J.; Boehm, P.D.; Stoker, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    Three types of shoreline monitoring programs were employed to evaluate the recovery of the ecological communities of Prince William Sound (PWS) shorelines after the oil spill: (a) Extensive shoreline surveys conducted (1989--1992) over much of the oiled shoreline to define extent of shoreline oiling and to assess biological conditions; (b) Detailed sampling in 1989 at nonrandomly chosen locations representing a range of oiling conditions (c) Comprehensive shoreline ecology program initiated in 1990 to assess shoreline recovery in Prince William Sound using (1) a rigorous stratified random sampling study design with 64 sites representing 4 shoreline habitats and 4 oiling levels (unoiled, light, moderate, heavy); (2) periodic sampling at 12 nonrandomly chosen sites of particular concern. Biological communities were analyzed to detect differences due to oiling in each of 16 habitat/tide zone combinations. Following the spill, populations of all major species survived as sources for recolonization. Recruitment to oiled shores began in summer 1989. By 1990, shoreline biota in PWS had largely recovered. Estimates of shoreline recovery (biological community indistinguishable from reference) ranged from 91% based on univariate analysis of standard community parameters to 73% based on multivariate correspondence analysis

  8. Histopathology of adult Pacific herring in Prince William Sound, Alaska, after the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marty, G. S.; Okihiro, M. S.; Hinton, D. E.; Brown, E. D.; Hanes, D.

    1999-01-01

    The histopathology of Pacific herring sampled from oiled sites in Prince William Sound, Alaska, three weeks after the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, is discussed. All samples showed multifocal hepatic necrosis and significantly increased tissue concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In contrast, Pacific herring from reference sites in 1989 and from all sites in 1990 and 1991 did not have hepatic necrosis or increase PAH concentrations. Naphthalenes were the predominant PAH in all tissue samples. The development of hepatic necrosis and the predominance of naphthalenes in samples from 1989 is considered consistent with results obtained from recent laboratory studies indicating that crude oil exposure resulted in dose-dependent expression of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). It was concluded that adult Pacific herring in Prince William Sound were likely exposed to Exxon Valdez oil in April 1989. Because Pacific herring near spawning condition in early spring are in a state of physiological stress, the added stress of oil exposure in 1989 could reasonably have led to expression of VHSV in these fish. The findings suggest that the immediate response to future large toxic spills should include consideration of the potential interaction of multiple stressors in exposed individuals. 29 refs., 7 tabs., 1 fig

  9. Efectividad de la microonda, masoterapia y ejercicios de Williams en pacientes con dolor lumbar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio del Valle Torres

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento: el dolor lumbar constituye un problema de salud a nivel mundial, su tratamiento constituye un reto en la práctica médica asistencial. Objetivo: evaluar la efectividad de la microonda, masoterapia y ejercicios de Williams en pacientes con dolor lumbar. Método: se realizó un estudio prospectivo experimental en una muestra de 60 pacientes con lumbalgia subaguda y crónica. Se asignaron dos esquemas de tratamiento: uno con microonda combinada con masoterapia y ejercicios de Williams (Grupo A, otro con medicamentos y reposo (Grupo B. Se aplicó la escala analógica visual y la escala de Oswestry en la consulta inicial y al culminar el tratamiento. Resultados: se obtuvo mejores resultados en el grupo A (estudio que en el grupo B (control en cuanto a reducción del dolor e independencia para las actividades de la vida diaria. Conclusiones: el protocolo de tratamiento fisioterapéutico resultó ser beneficioso, pues la recuperación y el alivio del dolor resultaron ser más rápidos y permitió la sustitución de fármacos.

  10. Attention to novelty versus repetition: Contrasting habituation profiles in Autism and Williams syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Vivanti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormalities in habituation have been documented in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD and Williams syndrome (WS. Such abnormalities have been proposed to underlie the distinctive social and non-social difficulties that define ASD, including sensory features and repetitive behaviours, and the distinctive social phenotype characterizing WS. Methods: We measured habituation in 39 preschoolers with ASD, 20 peers with WS and 19 typically developing (TD children using an eye-tracking protocol that measured participants’ duration of attention in response to a repeating stimulus and a novel stimulus presented side by side across multiple trials. Results: Participants in the TD group and the WS group decreased their attention toward the repeating stimulus and increased their attention to the novel stimulus over time. Conversely, the ASD group showed a similar attentional response to the novel and repeating stimuli. Habituation was correlated with social functioning in the WS but not in the ASD group. Contrary to predictions, slower habituation in ASD was associated with lower severity of repetitive behaviours. Conclusions: Habituation appears to be intact in WS and impaired in ASD. More research is needed to clarify the nature of the syndrome-specific patterns of correlations between habituation and social and non-social functioning in these neurodevelopmental disorders. Keywords: Habituation, Learning, Eye-tracking, Repetitive behaviours, Social cognition, Autism, Williams syndrome

  11. Williams syndrome and its cognitive profile: the importance of eye movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Herwegen J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jo Van Herwegen Department of Psychology, Kingston University London, Surrey, UK Abstract: People with Williams syndrome (WS, a rare neurodevelopmental disorder that is caused by a deletion on the long arm of chromosome 7, often show an uneven cognitive profile with participants performing better on language and face recognition tasks, in contrast to visuospatial and number tasks. Recent studies have shown that this specific cognitive profile in WS is a result of atypical developmental processes that interact with and affect brain development from infancy onward. Using examples from language, face processing, number, and visuospatial studies, this review evaluates current evidence from eye-tracking and developmental studies and argues that domain general processes, such as the ability to plan or execute saccades, influence the development of these domain-specific outcomes. Although more research on eye movements in WS is required, the importance of eye movements for cognitive development suggests a possible intervention pathway to improve cognitive abilities in this population. Keywords: Williams syndrome, eye movements, face processing, language, number, visuospatial abilities

  12. The plays of Lillian Hellman, Clifford Odets and William Inge on Slovene stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Slunjski

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available After the Second World War, Slovene theatres started to include in their repertoires more and more American authors and their plays. Their choice were varied, from serious dramas by Eugene O'Neill, Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller, to comedies by Norman Krasna and John Van Druten dependant mostly on the availability of the texts. In the immediate postwar years the theatres liked to present playwrights with progressive ideas in their plays, such as Lillian Hellman and her "The Little Foxes", which was successfully produced at three Slovene theatres, while her "The Children's Hour" received negative reviews. In the fifties, three theatres chose two plays by Clifford Odets, "Golden Boy" and "Country Girl", mainly because of his socially critical ideas and his admiration of humanity. His plays were rather well received; however, the critics doubted his literary genius. William Inge and his plays, "Come Back, Little Sheba", "Picnic" and "Bus Stop", chosen mainly because of the warmth with which the author depicted the tragedy and the beauty of life, were produced at three Slovene theatres. The author received rather wide-ranging opinions from the critics. Some thought him to be an unoriginal depicter of dull American life, while others praised his lyricism and new dramatic techniques.

  13. Ut Pictura Poesis : dialéctica entre palabras e imagen en Sir William Sterling Maxwell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Macartney

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente artículo se analiza la estrecha relación entre la historia del arte de Sir William Stirling Maxwell, su biblioteca y su colección artística. Este vínculo encierra la clave para la comprensión de su excepcional aportación a la historiografía del arte español. Sus diversas actividades, como historiador del arte, coleccionista de libros y cuadros, y director de ediciones privadas de libros raros, fueron todas manifestaciones de su gran fascinación por el paralelo entre la literatura y el arte, la palabra y la imagen. Tal relación se encuentra incluso en el esquema decorativo de su biblioteca.This article examines the remarkable unity between Sir William Stirling Maxwell's art history, his library and his art collection and argües that this relationship is the key to understanding his unique contribution to scholarship of Spanish art. In particular, it will be shown that his actlvities as an art historian, bibliophile, art collector and editor of prívate editions of rare books were all expressions of his fascination with the relationship between literature and art in general, and more specifically between word and image. Even the decorative scheme of his library emphasised this relationship.

  14. Religious Experience and its Essentialism in William James and Ghazzali’s Views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ebadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Religious experience is an approach to which Western thinkers are considered pioneers among whom Schleiermacher is the most prominent. "The essentialism of religious experience" is one of the several approaches that have been adopted in the case of religious experience. Accordingly, the religion that has sides and various dimensions has been reduced to a religious experience and the religious experience is introduced as the essence of religion. What is presented in this article is a comparative study of the essence of religious experience from the perspective of William James and Ghazzāli. Although mystical experience has a different structure form the religious experience and Ghazali as well as other Muslim philosophers and mystics paid more attention to the way of mystical experience, in the works of Ghazali there are also a traces of religious experience and hence, they are adaptable to some aspects of religious experience offered by William James. William James defines the religion “as the feelings, acts, and experiences that can occur for every individual in their solitudes and he believes that feeling is the essential pillar of religion and inherently reinforces it”. Religious experience is the essence of religion and it means that-the truth of the faith is the same as feelings and emotions that emerge from rational reflections on concrete reality as such, and other spiritual, transcendental, mystical and psychological actions are the consequences of these experiences. On the other hand, in the Muslim world, Al-Ghazzali believes that: The ultimate and holy aim of religion is the perception and experience of ultimate truth that can be achieved through good deeds, worship, asceticism and piety. This article tries to find similarities and differences in essence of religious experience of the two thinkers, because it is only in the theory of the essentialism of religious experience that the similarities and differences of

  15. William Henry Bragg, man and scientist, Nobel Laureate and First Professor of Physics, University of Adelaide 1886-1909.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, John; George, Robert

    2018-03-01

    In London, November 1915, a telegram was received at the home of William Henry Bragg from the secretary of the Academy of Science in Stockholm announcing the award of the Nobel Prize in Physics for "the analysis of crystal structures by means of X-rays". A second similar telegram was addressed to his 25 year old son William Lawrence Bragg (Jenkin, 2008). This article commemorates the centenary of that event and the unveiling of a bust of Sir William Bragg alongside that of his son, Sir Lawrence Bragg, on North Terrace in Adelaide where he spent 23 years of his early career. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Centennial ties: Harvey Cushing (1869-1939) and William Osler (1849-1919) on Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toodayan, Nadeem

    2017-08-01

    Andreas Vesalius is often regarded as the founding father of modern anatomical study. The quincentennial anniversary of his birth - 31 December 2014 - has been very widely commemorated, and it is the purpose of this article to contrast these celebrations with what happened during the Vesalius quatercentenary year of 1914. More specifically, we look at how Vesalius was perceived a century ago by examining his influence on two of western medicine's most iconic gentlemen - Harvey Williams Cushing (1869-1939) and his larger than life mentor, Sir William Osler (1849-1919).

  17. Théologie et ecclésiologie chez William Laud (1573-1645, archevêque de Cantorbéry Theology and Ecclesiology in the Thought of William Laud (1573-1645, Archbishop of Canterbury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Lurbe

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that William Laud’s theology and ecclesiology are strongly interrelated. A theologian who gave pride of place to sacramental life, and whose forceful rejection of predestination made him close to Arminianism, Laud followed in the footsteps of Saint Cyprian in upholding episcopacy as the proper form of government for the Church.

  18. Audiological follow-up of 24 patients affected by Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barozzi, Stefania; Soi, Daniela; Spreafico, Emanuela; Borghi, Anna; Comiotto, Elisabetta; Gagliardi, Chiara; Selicorni, Angelo; Forti, Stella; Cesarani, Antonio; Brambilla, Daniele

    2013-09-01

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with cardiovascular problems, facial abnormalities and several behavioural and neurological disabilities. It is also characterized by some typical audiological features including abnormal sensitivity to sounds, cochlear impairment related to the outer hair cells of the basal turn of the cochlea, and sensorineural or mixed hearing loss, predominantly in the high frequency range. The aim of this report is to describe a follow-up study of auditory function in a cohort of children affected by this syndrome. 24 patients, aged 5-14 years, were tested by means of air/bone conduction pure-tone audiometry, immittance test and transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. They were evaluated again 5 years after the first assessment, and 10 of them underwent a second follow-up examination after a further 5 years. The audiometric results showed hearing loss, defined by a pure tone average >15 dB HL, in 12.5% of the participants. The incidence of hearing loss did not change over the 5-year period and increased to 30% in the patients who underwent the 10-year follow-up. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss was detected in 20% of the patients. A remarkable finding of our study regarded sensorineural hearing impairment in the high frequency range, which increased significantly from 25% to 50% of the participants over the 5-year period. The increase became even more significant in the group of patients who underwent the 10-year follow-up, by which time the majority of them (80%) had developed sensorineural hearing loss. Otoacoustic emissions were found to be absent in a high percentage of patients, thus confirming the cochlear fragility of individuals with Williams syndrome. Our study verified that most of the young Williams syndrome patients had normal hearing sensitivity within the low-middle frequency range, but showed a weakness regarding the high frequencies, the threshold of which worsened significantly over time in

  19. WILLIAM GURNEE SINNIGEN - 20TH CENTURY CLASSICIST AND ROMAN HISTORIAN: BIOGRAPHY & BIBLIOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Gray Marsh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available William Gurnee Sinnigen was a Classicist and Roman historian, active in the mid-to-late 20th century. Trained at the University of Michigan by noted Roman administrative historian Arthur E. R. Boak, Sinnigen continued his mentor’s work in administrative history, producing several articles on different aspects of Roman and Byzantine administrative topics.  Sinnigen was also responsible for the revision and update of Boak’s acclaimed textbook on Roman history, as well as Charles Alexander Robinson’s textbook on Ancient history.  This article will provide a brief biography of Professor Sinnigen, along with a bibliography of his published works and reviews by other scholars of his work.

  20. The ties that bind: Soil surveyor William Edgar Tharp and oceanographic cartographer Marie Tharp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Edward R.

    The link between soil science and geology is personified in the American father and daughter: soil surveyor William Edgar Tharp (1870-1959) and oceanographic cartographer Marie Tharp (1920-2006). From 1904 to 1935, W.E. Tharp mapped soils in 14 states for the US Department of Agriculture, and campaigned during the late 1920s-early 1930s to raise awareness of the high rates of soil erosion from croplands. The lifestyle of the federal soil surveyor in the United States during the early 20th century involved frequent household moves, and it played a formative role in Marie Tharp’s childhood. Her path to a career in geology was molded by this family experience, by mentors encountered in the classroom, and by social barriers that faced women scientists of that era.

  1. El Concepto de Atención y Consciencia en la Obra de William James

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lorena Domínguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Situar un punto inicial en la historia de la psicología para rastrear el concepto de la atención no es tarea sencilla. Esta labor indudablemente nos lleva a enfrentar viejos problemas que surgieron con la filosofía y que, con el paso de los años y de los intereses intelectuales, fueron madurando y orientándose hacia múltiples direcciones. Con el ánimo de aportar en este mapa conceptual sobre el problema de la conciencia, abordaremos la obra de un autor fundamental en esta área de estudio. El objetivo del presente texto es reconstruir parte del pensamiento de William James, especialmente sus reflexiones alrededor del concepto de atención y del campo de conciencia.

  2. Addressing the Educational Needs of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Rather Neglected Area of Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palikara, Olympia; Ashworth, Maria; Van Herwegen, Jo

    2018-04-13

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder associated with physical health problems, limitations in cognitive abilities and increased risk of mental health difficulties. This profile of complex needs may make it challenging to support children with WS in schools. Surprisingly, in the current international move for inclusion, limited research exists on the educational provision and academic achievements of children with WS, including the non-existing literature on their voices and the perspectives of key stakeholders. This letter calls for additional research on the risk and protective factors associated with the educational outcomes of these children, the perspectives of the children themselves and the development of the evidence-base about the effectiveness of education intervention programs.

  3. Oil spill response planning, training and facilities for wildlife in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillman, S.O.

    1996-01-01

    The special provisions of the SERVS System of the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company concerning the treatment of wildlife in the event of an oil spill, were described. The Company is prepared to mobilize a rapid response for protection and treatment of wildlife in the event of an oil spill anywhere along the trans-Alaska pipeline or in Prince William Sound. Equipment for hazing, capture, and treatment is pre-assembled and staged at facilities at the Valdez Marine Terminal. Veterinarians and wildlife treatment specialists are under contract for treating oiled birds. This complex of wildlife response capabilities meets or exceeds the guidelines and response planning standards set by wildlife agencies. 7 refs., 6 figs

  4. An Account of ... William Cullen: John Thomson and the Making of a Medical Biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleton, David E

    2014-01-01

    John Thomson's An Account of the Life, Lectures and Writings of William Cullen (1832; 1859) remains a primary source for the career of the most influential academic physician in eighteenth-century Scotland and is also a significant work of medical history. But this multi-authored text, begun around 1810 by the academic surgeon, John Thomson, but only completed in 1859 by Dr David Craigie, has its own complex history. This chapter addresses what this history can reveal about the development of medical biography as a literary genre. It argues that the Account is a hybrid work shaped by a complex array of practical, domestic, intellectual, and professional pressures, as Thomson, in seeking to bolster his own career, was caught between the demands of Cullen's children for a traditional "Life" and his own more theoretical and socio-cultural interests.

  5. Finding revelation in anthropology: Alexander Winchell, William Robertson Smith and the heretical imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, David N

    2015-09-01

    Anthropological inquiry has often been considered an agent of intellectual secularization. Not least is this so in the sphere of religion, where anthropological accounts have often been taken to represent the triumph of naturalism. This metanarrative, however, fails to recognize that naturalistic explanations could sometimes be espoused for religious purposes and in defence of confessional creeds. This essay examines two late nineteenth-century figures--Alexander Winchell in the United States and William Robertson Smith in Britain--who found in anthropological analysis resources to bolster rather than undermine faith. In both cases these individuals found themselves on the receiving end of ecclesiastical censure and were dismissed from their positions at church-governed institutions. But their motivation was to vindicate divine revelation, in Winchell's case from the physical anthropology of human origins and in Smith's from the cultural anthropology of Semitic ritual.

  6. Bounds on absolutely maximally entangled states from shadow inequalities, and the quantum MacWilliams identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Felix; Eltschka, Christopher; Siewert, Jens; Gühne, Otfried

    2018-04-01

    A pure multipartite quantum state is called absolutely maximally entangled (AME), if all reductions obtained by tracing out at least half of its parties are maximally mixed. Maximal entanglement is then present across every bipartition. The existence of such states is in many cases unclear. With the help of the weight enumerator machinery known from quantum error correction and the shadow inequalities, we obtain new bounds on the existence of AME states in dimensions larger than two. To complete the treatment on the weight enumerator machinery, the quantum MacWilliams identity is derived in the Bloch representation. Finally, we consider AME states whose subsystems have different local dimensions, and present an example for a 2×3×3×3 system that shows maximal entanglement across every bipartition.

  7. Sir William Burnett (1779-1861), professional head of the Royal Naval Medical Department and entrepreneur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Christopher

    2004-08-01

    Sir William Burnett (1779-1861) had an active career as a Royal Navy surgeon in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, including service at the battles of St Vincent, the Nile and Trafalgar. From 1822 to 1855 he was professional head of the Royal Naval Medical Department, when he provided effective leadership in a time of great change. Although his official work earned him the reputation of a "hard-working, unimaginative, somewhat harsh man", his correspondence shows a very humane centre under the official carapace. His official performance and reputation were both eroded towards the end of his career by his determined promotion of zinc chloride, for which he held lucrative patents.

  8. William Gowers: the never completed third edition of the 'Bible of Neurology'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, Mervyn J; Scott, Ann E M; Lees, Andrew J; Woodward, Martin

    2012-10-01

    William Gowers' classic single-authored two-volume A manual of diseases of the nervous system appeared in a first edition in 1886 and 1888, and in a second edition in 1892 and 1893, with a third edition of Volume 1 in 1899. No third edition of Volume 2 ever appeared. However, in 1949 Critchley stated that he had seen part of a revision of this volume. Subsequent writers could not find this material, but it recently came to light at Gowers' old hospital at Queen Square, London. The present paper describes the rediscovered material, containing Gowers' handwritten alterations for a further edition of Volume 2, and substantial new material, at least in relation to nystagmus and myasthenia. Gowers' declining health, or a conflict between his planned new text and his contributions to the neurology segments (1899) of Allbutt's System of medicine, may explain why a third edition of Volume 2 of the Manual of diseases of the nervous system never appeared.

  9. What does Williams Syndrome Reveal about the Determinants of Social Behavior?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maaria Järvinen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence on autonomic nervous system (ANS function in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS has begun to highlight aberrancies that may have important implications for the social profile characterized by enhanced social motivation and approach. In parallel, neurobiological investigations have identified alterations in the structure, function, and connectivity of the amygdala, as well as prosocial neuropeptide dysregulation, as some of the key neurogenetic features of WS. A recent social approach/withdrawal hypothesis (Kemp and Guastella, 2011 suggests that autonomic cardiac control may play a key role in regulating the relationship between oxytocin and social behavior. This article discusses evidence from these critical, new strands of research into social behavior in WS, to consider the extent to which data on WS may provide novel insight into the determinants of social behavior. Future research directions are suggested.

  10. A Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings formulation for hydroacoustic analysis of propeller sheet cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, C.; Ianniello, S.; Salvatore, F.

    2018-01-01

    A novel hydroacoustic formulation for the prediction of tonal noise emitted by marine propellers in presence of unsteady sheet cavitation, is presented. The approach is based on the standard Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation and the use of transpiration (velocity and acceleration) terms, accounting for the time evolution of the vapour cavity attached on the blade surface. Drawbacks and potentialities of the method are tested on a marine propeller operating in a nonhomogeneous onset flow, by exploiting the hydrodynamic data from a potential-based panel method equipped with a sheet cavitation model and comparing the noise predictions with those carried out by an alternative numerical approach, documented in literature. It is shown that the proposed formulation yields a one-to-one correlation between emitted noise and sheet cavitation dynamics, carrying out accurate predictions in terms of noise magnitude and directivity.

  11. Non-Traditional Authorship Attribution Studies of William Shakespeare’s Canon: Some Caveats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Rudman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the problems in conducting non-traditional authorship attribution studies on the canon of William Shakespeare. After a short introduction, the case is put forth that these studies are ‘scientific’ and must adhere to the tenets of the scientific method. By showing that a complete and valid experimental plan is necessary and pointing out the many and varied pitfalls (e.g., the text, the control groups, the treatment of errors, it becomes clear what a valid study of Shakespearean non-traditional authorship attribution demands. I then come to the conclusion that such a valid study is not attainable with the limits of present-day knowledge.

  12. Elastins from patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome and healthy individuals differ on the molecular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinz, Andrea; Huertas, Angela C Mora; Schräder, Christoph U

    2016-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a congenital disorder, which involves the heterozygous deletion of the elastin gene and other genes on chromosome 7. Clinical symptoms that are associated with hemizygosity of the essential extracellular matrix protein elastin include premature aging of the skin...... and supravalvular aortic stenosis. However, only little is known about the molecular basis of structural abnormalities in the connective tissue of WBS patients. Therefore, for the first time this study aimed to systematically characterize and compare the structure and amount of elastin present in skin and aortic...... tissue from WBS patients and healthy individuals. Elastin fibers were isolated from tissue biopsies, and it was found that skin of WBS patients contains significantly less elastin compared to skin of healthy individuals. Scanning electron microscopy and mass spectrometric measurements combined...

  13. Developments in fiber-positioning technology for the WEAVE instrument at the William Herschel Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallig, Ellen; Lewis, Ian J.; Gilbert, James; Dalton, Gavin; Brock, Matthew; Abrams, Don Carlos; Middleton, Kevin; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Carrasco, Esperanza; Trager, Scott C.; Vallenari, Antonella

    2016-08-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field optical spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) on La Palma in the Canary Islands, Spain. It is a multi-object "pick-and-place" fibre-fed spectrograph with a 1000 fibre multiplex behind a new dedicated 2° prime focus corrector. The WEAVE positioner concept uses two robots working in tandem in order to reconfigure a fully populated field within the expected 1 hour dwell-time for the instrument (a good match between the required exposure times and the limit of validity for a given configuration due to the effects of differential refraction). In this paper we describe some of the final design decisions arising from the prototyping phase of the instrument design and provide an update on the current manufacturing status of the fibre positioner system.

  14. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data report for Williams NTMS quadrangle, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagoner, J.L.

    1979-02-01

    Wet and dry sediments were collected throughout the 18,500-km 2 arid-to-semiarid region and water samples at available streams, springs, and wells. Samples were collected between August 1977 and January 1978. Results of neutron activation analyses of uranium and trace elements and other field and laboratory analyses are presented in tabular hardcopy and microfiche format. The report includes six full-size overlays for use with the Williams NTMS 1:250,000 quadrangle. Sediment samples are divided into five general groups according to the source rock from which the sediment was derived. Background uranium concentrations for the quadrangle are relatively low, ranging from 1.91 to 2.40 ppM, with the highest associated with the Precambrian igneous and metamorphic complexes of the Basin and Range province. Uranium correlates best with the rare-earth elements and iron, scandium, titanium, and manganese. Known uranium occurrences are not readily identified by the stream sediment data

  15. Duke Power's William Lee says INPO's purpose is solving industry problems, not educating the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Former Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) head, William Lee thinks that nuclear critics could misuse institute reports on investigations of nuclear plant construction and operation. If so, that would outweigh any public relations benefits of using the reports to inform and educate the public. Lee thinks the best way to gain public confidence is for the industry to perform well. The four-year-old institute was originally formed to improve operations, but recent problems with unfinished plants led to a system of construction audits. By offering guidance to companies building nuclear plants, INPO is meeting competition from utilities such as Duke Power, which is now marketing its expertise in designing and building plants. Lee emphasizes the importance of asking the right questions that will lead to quality control

  16. Minor Characters in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night and A Midsummer Night's Dream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa Adnan Baqer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at discussing the role of the minor characters in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night and A Midsummer Night's Dream. The study assumes that without the first group of minor characters, associated with Olivia, the play Twelfth Night would lose much of its humor, and without the second group, associated with Sebastian, the play would fall apart. On the other hand, in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream minor characters play important roles, without them, the action dose not ran smoothly, or does not ran at all. The paper falls into three sections. Section one deals with the role of each minor character in Twelfth Night.  Section two focuses on the minor characters in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Section three is a conclusion which sums up the findings of the study.

  17. Parody and the gas station in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital G. Cykman

    2017-01-01

    Baz Luhrmann’s 1996 film, William Shakespeare'sRomeo and Juliet, is a pop-culture adaptation of the late sixteenth-century play. The cross-references and transgression of allusions and their postmodern subversive statement along with the extreme intensity with which these elements appear in act one, scene one, and especially in the scene placed at a gas station produce a self-directed irony, a cutting-edge, if playful combination of references that define it as parody in the postmodern sense. Hence, this article examines act one, scene one with a special attention to the gas station sequence, and analyzes it in the light of scholarly definitions of postmodern parody by Linda Hutcheon, John W. Duvall and Douglas Lanier, and of pastiche by Fredric Jameson. Once the hypothesis of parody is established, the article analyzes what the film parodies and in what ways, and what the objective and the impact of the applied humor are.

  18. ANALYSIS OF RAIN BY WILLIAM SOMERSET MAUGHAM IN TERMS OF POST-COLONIAL TERMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şaban KÖKTÜRK

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study dealt with the analysis of a short story, Rain by William Somerset Maugham in terms of post-colonial terms or elements. Before the analysis, the writer of the book was introduced and then the plot was explained so as to make readers familiar with the short story. In the analysis section, post-colonial elements or related terms such as missionary, colonial authority, the state of being subaltern, Manichean allegory, mimicry, ambivalence, surveillance, imperial hegemony, hybridity, essentialism, monolithic culture, alienation, dislocation, misuse of power, gender difference were analyzed from some of the excerpts whether to see how strong these concepts affect the course of the fiction. The study targeted at showing students of language & literature departments the application of the related terms or elements in such stories.

  19. Doctor William Gunn (1804-1890): From the South Pacific Islands to Chatham Royal Dockyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Richard

    2016-11-24

    Doctor William Gunn had a long and varied career in the Royal Navy. After spending time on anti-slavery patrols along the west coast of Africa, he was posted to the south Pacific. At Pitcairn Island, he treated the inhabitants during an influenza epidemic, proving himself to be a determined and dedicated practitioner. Subsequently, he was appointed head of the medical department at Chatham Royal Dockyard (1859-1865), an appointment that coincided with the final stages of the Royal Navy's transition from sail and wood to steam and iron. The impact of these changes on the health of dockworkers was quickly felt at Chatham, and Gunn found himself in charge during the building of the first iron warship in a royal dockyard. His story thus offers a window through which to observe a practitioner confronting the health issues and medical uncertainties thrown up by technological change in the Victorian era. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Sir William Turner (1832-1916) - Lancastrian, anatomist and champion of the Victorian era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Quenton; Correia, Janine Carla; Taylor, Adam M

    2016-11-01

    Sir William Turner, a Lancastrian, was renowned as a scientist, anatomist and a great reformer of medical education. His students became anatomists at various international institutions, which consequently shaped the future of anatomy as a subject matter both in the United Kingdom and in South Africa. Although Turner's accomplishments have been documented, little is known about the details that determined his career path and the individuals that shaped his future. Here the authors aim to highlight some aspects of Turner's academic achievements and his personal life as well as how he crossed paths with other great minds of the Victorian era including Richard Owen, Charles Darwin, James Paget and Joseph Lister. © The Author(s) 2015.