WorldWideScience

Sample records for voc mixtures poses

  1. Biodegradation of mixture of VOC's in a biofilter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Arulneyam; T. Swaminathan

    2004-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds(VOC' s) in air have become major concem in recent years. Biodegradation of a mixture of ethanol and methanol vapor was evaluated in a laboratory biofilter with a bed of compost and polystyrene particles using an acclimated mixed culture. The continuous performance of the biofilter was studied with different proportion of ethanol and methanol at different initial concentration and flow rates. The result showed significant removal for both ethanol and methanol, which were composition dependent.The presence of either compound in the mixture inhibited the biodegradation of the other.

  2. A comparative study of fungal and bacterial biofiltration treating a VOC mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, José M. [Departamento de Procesos y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Artificios 40, Col. Miguel Hidalgo, Delegación Álvaro Obregón (Mexico); Departamento de Ingeniería Química y Tecnología del Medio Ambiente – Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Hernández, Sergio [Departmento de Procesos e Hidráulica – Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana – Iztapalapa Mexico D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Muñoz, Raúl [Departamento de Ingeniería Química y Tecnología del Medio Ambiente – Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Revah, Sergio, E-mail: srevah@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Procesos y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Artificios 40, Col. Miguel Hidalgo, Delegación Álvaro Obregón (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Bacterial biofilter showed better EC and ΔP than fungal biofilter. ► The preferential biodegradation order was: propanal > hexanol > MIBK > toluene. ► Propanal partially inhibited the biodegradation of the rest of VOCs. ► The two-stage biofilter showed a higher stability than the individual units. -- Abstract: Bacterial biofilters usually exhibit a high microbial diversity and robustness, while fungal biofilters have been claimed to better withstand low moisture contents and pH values, and to be more efficient coping with hydrophobic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, there are only few systematic evaluations of both biofiltration technologies. The present study compared fungal and bacterial biofiltration for the treatment of a VOC mixture (propanal, methyl isobutyl ketone-MIBK, toluene and hexanol) under the same operating conditions. Overall, fungal biofiltration supported lower elimination capacities than its bacterial counterpart (27.7 ± 8.9 vs 40.2 ± 5.4 g C m{sup −3} reactor h{sup −1}), which exhibited a final pressure drop 60% higher than that of the bacterial biofilter due to mycelial growth. The VOC mineralization ratio was also higher in the bacterial bed (≈63% vs ≈43%). However, the substrate biodegradation preference order was similar for both biofilters (propanal > hexanol > MIBK > toluene) with propanal partially inhibiting the consumption of the rest of the VOCs. Both systems supported an excellent robustness versus 24 h VOC starvation episodes. The implementation of a fungal/bacterial coupled system did not significantly improve the VOC removal performance compared to the individual biofilter performances.

  3. A comparative study in treating two VOC mixtures in trickle bed air biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhangli; Kim, Daekeun; Sorial, George A

    2007-06-01

    Two independent parallel trickling bed air biofilters (TBABs) ("A" and "B") with two different typical VOC mixtures were investigated. Toluene, styrene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) were the target VOCs in the mixtures. Biofilter "A" was fed equal molar ratio of the VOCs and biofilter "B" was fed a mixture based on EPA 2003 emission report. Backwashing and substrate starvation operation were conducted as biomass control. Biofilter "A" and "B" maintained 99% overall removal efficiency for influent concentration up to 500 and 300 ppmv under backwashing operating condition, respectively. The starvation study indicated that it can be an effective biomass control for influent concentrations up to 250 ppmv for biofilter "A" and 300 ppmv for "B". Re-acclimation of biofilter performance was delayed with increase of influent concentration for both biofilters. Starvation operation helped the biofilter to recover at low concentrations and delayed re-acclimation at high concentrations. Furthermore, re-acclamation for biofilter "B" was delayed due to its high toluene content as compared to biofilter "A". The pseudo first-order removal rate constant decreased with increase of volumetric loading rate for both biofilters. MEK and MIBK were completely removed in the upper 3/8 media depth. While biofilter depth utilization for the removal of styrene and toluene increased with increase of influent concentrations for both biofilters. However, toluene removal utilized more biofilter depth for biofilter "B" as compared to biofilter "A".

  4. Performance evaluation of a biotrickling filter treating a mixture of oxygenated VOCs during intermittent loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempere, Feliu; Gabaldón, Carmen; Martínez-Soria, Vicente; Marzal, Paula; Penya-roja, Josep M; Javier Álvarez-Hornos, F

    2008-11-01

    Laboratory scale-studies on the biodegradation of a 1:1:1 weight mixture of three oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ethanol, ethyl acetate, and methyl-ethyl ketone (MEK) in a biotrickling filter (BTF) were carried out using two identically sized columns, filled with different polypropylene rings. The performance of the BTFs was examined for a period of 10 months applying several operational strategies. Similar performance was obtained for both supports. Intermittent flow rate of trickling liquid was shown beneficial to improve the removal efficiency (RE). Continuous feeding of VOC resulted in an excessive accumulation of biomass so high pressure drop was developed in less than 20-30 d of operation. Intermittent VOC loading with night and weekend feed cut-off periods passing dry air, but without addition of water, was shown as a successful operational mode to control the thickness of the biofilm. In this case, operation at high inlet loads (ILs) was extended for more than 75 d maintaining high REs and low pressure drops. Outlet emission concentrations lower than 100 mg Cm(-3) were obtained for ILs up to 100 g Cm(-3)h(-1) working at 15s of empty bed residence time. The most easily biodegradable compounds ethanol and ethyl acetate were used primarily than MEK. After a 3-wk-starvation period, the system performance was almost restored since the first d of operation, being the removal of the less biodegradable compound, MEK, partially deteriorated.

  5. Bio-filtering of a VOC mixture; Biofiltration d'un melange de COV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizpuru, A.

    2001-04-01

    The study is focused on the bio-filtration of a mixture of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC). Its primary interest is the complexity of the mixture treated which includes eleven components with different chemical structures (esters, ketones, alcohol, aromatic rings and chlorinated compounds). The first experiment, carried out with a natural material (peat), allowed the verification of the applicability of the process for treating such complex gas effluents. Even if global removal performance (120 g/m{sup 3} filter/h) is comparable to those attempted for less complex effluents, phenomena of competitions between substrates are observed. Therefore, the presence of many compounds reduces the elimination capacity for each pollutant, increases the microbial acclimatization time and Leads to a stratification of the degradation inside the reactor. On the other hand, a theoretical approach of the bio-filtration process based on Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSAR) exhibits three preponderant factors that determine pollutant treatability in a bio-filter:the Henry's law coefficient, octanol-water partition constant, and the first order connectivity index. These parameters can be correlated to the gas-liquid transfer, the solubility and the biodegradability of a molecule, respectively. Finally, the examination of a strong adsorption capacity material (active carbon) as a filter bed indicates the material used has a significant effect on system's removal. Therefore, in the present study, by modifying the respective retention times of pollutants, such a material increases the competition phenomena and thus reduces elimination capacities. (author)

  6. A Grasp-pose Generation Method Based on Gaussian Mixture Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjia Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM-based grasp-pose generation method is proposed in this paper. Through offline training, the GMM is set up and used to depict the distribution of the robot’s reachable orientations. By dividing the robot’s workspace into small 3D voxels and training the GMM for each voxel, a look-up table covering all the workspace is built with the x, y and z positions as the index and the GMM as the entry. Through the definition of Task Space Regions (TSR, an object’s feasible grasp poses are expressed as a continuous region. With the GMM, grasp poses can be preferentially sampled from regions with high reachability probabilities in the online grasp-planning stage. The GMM can also be used as a preliminary judgement of a grasp pose’s reachability. Experiments on both a simulated and a real robot show the superiority of our method over the existing method.

  7. Pose-Independent Face Recognition Using Biologically Inspired Feature Set and Mixture of Experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Azad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Automatic face recognition system has received significant attention during the last decades due to its wide range of applications, such as security, human-computer interaction, visual surveillance, and so on. In this paper, a new and efficient face recognition method, based on features inspired by the human’s visual cortex and applying mixture of experts’ architecture on the extracted feature set is proposed. A feature set is extracted by means of a feed-forward model, which contains a view and illumination invariant C2 features from all images in the data set. Then, these C2 feature vector which derived from a cortex-like mechanism passed to a mixture of multilayer perceptron neural networks. In the result part, the proposed approach is applied on ORL and Yale databases and the accuracy rate achieved 99.75% and 100% respectively. In addition, experimental results have demonstrated our method robust in successful recognition of human faces even with variant lighting and poses.

  8. Lean VOC-Air Mixtures Catalytic Treatment: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Competing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Baldissone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Various processing routes are available for the treatment of lean VOC-air mixtures, and a cost-benefit analysis is the tool we propose to identify the most suitable technology. Two systems have been compared in this paper, namely a “traditional” plant, with a catalytic fixed-bed reactor with a heat exchanger for heat recovery purposes, and a “non-traditional” plant, with a catalytic reverse-flow reactor, where regenerative heat recovery may be achieved thanks to the periodical reversal of the flow direction. To be useful for decisions-making, the cost-benefit analysis must be coupled to the reliability, or availability, analysis of the plant. Integrated Dynamic Decision Analysis is used for this purpose as it allows obtaining the full set of possible sequences of events that could result in plant unavailability, and, for each of them, the probability of occurrence is calculated. Benefits are thus expressed in terms of out-of-services times, that have to be minimized, while the costs are expressed in terms of extra-cost for maintenance activities and recovery actions. These variable costs must be considered together with the capital (fixed cost required for building the plant. Results evidenced the pros and cons of the two plants. The “traditional” plant ensures a higher continuity of services, but also higher operational costs. The reverse-flow reactor-based plant exhibits lower operational costs, but a higher number of protection levels are needed to obtain a similar level of out-of-service. The quantification of risks and benefits allows the stakeholders to deal with a complete picture of the behavior of the plants, fostering a more effective decision-making process. With reference to the case under study and the relevant operational conditions, the regenerative system was demonstrated to be more suitable to treat lean mixtures: in terms of time losses following potential failures the two technologies are comparable (Fixed bed

  9. Ozone and secondary organic aerosol production by interaction between and organophosphorous pesticide and biogenic VOCs mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás, Esther; Ródenas, Mila; Vera, Teresa; Muñoz, Amalia

    2017-04-01

    Pesticides are the chemical compounds most widely used worldwide, and their toxicological characteristics can have harmful effects on human health. The entry into the atmosphere of pesticides occurs during application or subsequent processes. Once they are emitted, they can be distributed in the gas phase or particulate phase. However, most of them are in both phases, since they are semi-volatile compounds. As with other organic compounds, pesticides' removal in the atmosphere can be mainly accomplished by wet or dry deposition, by photolysis or by reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH), nitrate radicals (NO3) and ozone (O3) [1]. All these processes give rise to the formation of other products, which could become more harmful than the starting compounds. It is therefore necessary to know all these processes to estimate the impact of pesticides in the atmosphere. In addition, it is important to study how the pesticides interact with organic compounds naturally emitted by crops and their possible impact on the formation of secondary organic aerosols, ozone and other compounds. In this work, the gas phase atmospheric degradation of an organothiophosphate insecticide has been investigated at the large outdoor European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) in the presence of a biogenic compound mixture typical from orange trees emissions. Its photolysis has been studied under sunlight conditions, in the presence of different concentration ratios of chlorpyrifos and biogenic VOCs mixture and in the absence of initial inorganic seeds. Reaction with ozone has also been studied. Gaseous phase compounds were determined by a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTRMS), Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) and NOx, O3 and SO2 monitors. Aerosol mass concentration was measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a tapered element oscillating monitor (TEOM). Chemical

  10. Co-formation of hydroperoxides and ultra-fine particles during the reactions of ozone with a complex VOC mixture under simulated indoor conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Z.H.; Weschler, Charles J.; Han, IK

    2005-01-01

    in the O-3/23 VOCs system. The present study confirmed the findings of a previous study carried out in a real-world office and generated new findings regarding co-formation of UFP. Through a comparative analysis of H2O2* yields under different reaction conditions, this study demonstrates that VOCs co......) under simulated indoor conditions. The VOC mixture contained 23 compounds, including two terpenes (d-limonene and alpha-pinene), two unsaturated alkenes (1-decene and 1-octene), and 19 other saturated organic compounds. These compounds are commonly found in indoor air but their concentrations were...

  11. Effects of permissible maximum-contamination levels of VOC mixture in water on total DNA, antioxidant gene expression, and sequences of ribosomal DNA of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doganlar, Oguzhan; Doganlar, Zeynep Banu; Tabakcioglu, Kiymet

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture with references to the response of D.melanogaster using selected antioxidant gene expressions, RAPD assay and base-pair change of ribosomal 18S, and the internal transcribed spacer, ITS2 rDNA gene sequences. For this purpose, Drosophila melanogaster Oregon R, reared under controlled conditions on artificial diets, were treated with the mixture of thirteen VOCs, which are commonly found in water in concentrations of 10, 20, 50, and 75 ppb for 1 and 5 days. In the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay, band changes were clearly detected, especially at the 50 and 75 ppb exposure levels, for both treatment periods, and the band profiles exhibited clear differences between the treated and untreated flies with changes in band intensity and the loss/appearance of bands. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-synthetase (GS) expressions demonstrated that these markers responded significantly to VOC-induced oxidative stress. Whilst CAT gene expressions increased linearly with increasing concentrations of VOCs and treatment times, the 50- and 75-ppb treatments caused decreases in GS expressions compared to the control at 5 days. Treatment with VOCs at both exposure times, especially in high doses, caused gene mutation of the 18S and the ITS2 ribosomal DNA. According to this research, we thought that the permissible maximum-contamination level of VOCs can cause genotoxic effect especially when mixed.

  12. Development, validation and application of a process for the generation of long-term stable VOC gas mixtures; Entwicklung, Validierung und Anwendung eines Verfahrens zur Erzeugung langzeitstabiler VOC-Gasgemische

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Matthias

    2010-07-01

    The development as well as the validation of a gas mixing system (GMS) that enables dynamic and traceable production of stable long-term VOC gas mixtures within the range between a few {mu}g/m{sup 3} and a few 100 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, is discussed. In this method pure liquid substances that are filled into stainless steel bottles are kept separately at a constant temperature, evaporated according to their vapour pressure and removed by a small inert gas flow. They are finally united in a gas mixing chamber. The carrier gas must be as small as possible so that the quasi-equilibrium between the gas space and the liquid phase in the substance bottles will not be disturbed. The carrier gas is assumed to be saturated with substance gas due to a long residence time in the bottles and a fast phase transition. Any concentration level of the gas mixture can be generated by a combination of vaporization temperature, carrier and dilution gas flows. With the GMS a mixture of 25 VOCs was prepared. For 16 compounds stable and reproducible gas concentrations were realized. Due to not completely removed leakage of some substance bottles and the tubing respectively, variation of the concentration of the remaining compounds was found. A sink effect as another reason for this variation could be expelled and the chemical stability of the vaporized substances proved with the exception of some aldehydes. The procedure was successfully applied in a round robin test and a material test. In the latter adsorption of VOCs on building products was scrutinized. In this way the applicability of the GMS could be shown. (orig.)

  13. A new portable generator to dynamically produce SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for VOCs and water vapour at atmospheric concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillevic, Myriam; Pascale, Céline; Ackermann, Andreas; Leuenberger, Daiana; Niederhauser, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the KEY-VOCs and AtmoChem-ECV projects, we are currently developing new facilities to dynamically generate reference gas mixtures for a variety of reactive compounds, at concentrations measured in the atmosphere and in a SI-traceable way (i.e. the amount of substance fraction in mole per mole is traceable to SI-units). Here we present the realisation of such standards for water vapour in the range 1-10 μmol/mol and for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as limonene, alpha-pinene, MVK, MEK, in the nmol/mol range. The matrix gas can be nitrogen or synthetic air. Further development in gas purification techniques could make possible to use purified atmospheric air as carrier gas. The method is based on permeation and dynamic dilution: one permeator containing a pure substance (either water, limonene, MVK, MEK or α-pinene) is kept into a permeation chamber with a constant gas flow. The mass loss is precisely calibrated using a magnetic suspension balance. The carrier gas is purified beforehand from the compounds of interest to the required level, using commercially available purification cartridges. This primary mixture is then diluted to reach the required amount of substance fraction. All flows are piloted by mass flow controllers which makes the production process flexible and easily adaptable to generate the required concentration. All parts in contact with the gas mixture are passivated using coated surfaces, to reduce adsorption/desorption processes as much as possible. Two setups are currently developed: one already built and fixed in our laboratory in Bern as well as a portable generator that is still under construction and that could be used anywhere in the field. The permeation chamber of the portable generator has multiple individual cells allowing the generation of mixtures up to 5 different components if needed. Moreover the presented technique can be adapted and applied to a large variety of molecules (e.g., NO2, BTEX, CFCs

  14. Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Aguilar Martín

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metals are ubiquitous pollutants present as mixtures. In particular, mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead is among the leading toxic agents detected in the environment. These metals have carcinogenic and cell-transforming potential. In this study, we used a two step cell transformation model, to determine the role of oxidative stress in transformation induced by a mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead. Oxidative damage and antioxidant response were determined. Metal mixture treatment induces the increase of damage markers and the antioxidant response. Loss of cell viability and increased transforming potential were observed during the promotion phase. This finding correlated significantly with generation of reactive oxygen species. Cotreatment with N-acetyl-cysteine induces effect on the transforming capacity; while a diminution was found in initiation, in promotion phase a total block of the transforming capacity was observed. Our results suggest that oxidative stress generated by metal mixture plays an important role only in promotion phase promoting transforming capacity.

  15. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Joan W.; Arati A. Inamdar

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpe...

  16. VOC emissions chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In order to support the development of test methods and reference materials for volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions from building materials and furnishings,...

  17. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan W; Inamdar, Arati A

    2015-09-22

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that "volatoxin" might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties.

  18. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs Mycotoxins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan W. Bennett

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that “volatoxin” might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties.

  19. Modeling unsteady-state VOC transport in simulated waste drums. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Hotz, N.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report is a revision of an EG&G Idaho informal report originally titled Modeling VOC Transport in Simulated Waste Drums. A volatile organic compound (VOC) transport model has been developed to describe unsteady-state VOC permeation and diffusion within a waste drum. Model equations account for three primary mechanisms for VOC transport from a void volume within the drum. These mechanisms are VOC permeation across a polymer boundary, VOC diffusion across an opening in a volume boundary, and VOC solubilization in a polymer boundary. A series of lab-scale experiments was performed in which the VOC concentration was measured in simulated waste drums under different conditions. A lab-scale simulated waste drum consisted of a sized-down 55-gal metal drum containing a modified rigid polyethylene drum liner. Four polyethylene bags were sealed inside a large polyethylene bag, supported by a wire cage, and placed inside the drum liner. The small bags were filled with VOC-air gas mixture and the VOC concentration was measured throughout the drum over a period of time. Test variables included the type of VOC-air gas mixtures introduced into the small bags, the small bag closure type, and the presence or absence of a variable external heat source. Model results were calculated for those trials where the permeability had been measured.

  20. VOCs and odors: key factors in selecting `green` building materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, C. [Steven Winter Associates Inc., Norwalk, CT and Washington DC (United States)

    1998-12-01

    The current state of knowledge available for selecting building materials on the basis of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and odors is reviewed. The significance of VOCs and odors in building materials is related to their role in influencing indoor air quality. As far as toxicity is concerned, many of the VOCs detected in indoor air are relatively inert when considered singly. They are not however, unimportant because in actual fact they are invariably found in mixtures some of which can be toxic. Although knowledge of VOCs is incomplete, it is important to specify ozone-resistant polymeric building products, i.e. those that are chemically stable and inert to oxidation. In addition to VOCs, attention should also be focused on semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) since they are even more persistent than VOCs and tend to offgas for prolonged periods of time. Similarly, it is reasonable to specify low-odor materials. Inclusion of issues related to complex indoor chemistry, less volatile emissions, in addition to VOCs and odor, should in time result in expanded choices of building materials that promote indoor air quality. 16 refs.,2 tabs.

  1. Dejima VOC dan rangaku

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Wibawarta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Japan and the Netherlands have maintained a special relationship for about 300years since the adoption of the National Seclusion policy, the so-called sakoku bythe Tokugawa shogunate (1603-1867. The Dutch began trading with Japan andengaging with Japanese society in 1600, when a Dutch ship, De Liefde, arrived inKyushu. The Tokugawa government measures regarding foreign policy includedregulations on foreign access to Japan and a prohibition on Japanese goingabroad. Between the middle of the seventeenth to the early nineteenth century,Japan was characterized by a stable political pattern in which representativesof the VOC (Dutch East India Company, were the only Europeans with a rightto trade in Japan. In the course of this period, the Japanese evaluation of theDutch changed from regarding them as commercial agents to seeing them asimporters of European knowledge. This paper is especially concerned with theinfluence of the so-called ‘Dutch Studies’ (rangaku on the early modernizationof Japan, especially with regard to medicine and the natural sciences. Thisresearch examines the development of rangaku and the trading between Japanand VOC at Dejima.

  2. Major reactive species of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their sources in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO; Min; FU; Linlin; LIU; Ying; LU; Sihua; ZHANG; Yuanhan

    2005-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important precursors of atmospheric chemical processes. As a whole mixture, the ambient VOCs show very strong chemical reactivity. Based on OH radical loss rates in the air, the chemical reactivity of VOCs in Beijing was calculated. The results revealed that alkenes, accounting for only about 15% in the mixing ratio of VOCs, provide nearly 75% of the reactivity of ambient VOCs and the C4 to C5 alkenes were the major reactive species among the alkenes. The study of emission characteristics of various VOCs sources indicated that these alkenes are mainly from vehicle exhaust and gasoline evaporation. The reduction of alkene species in these two sources will be effective in photochemical pollution control in Beijing.

  3. On speciation of VOC localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.; Chang, J.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Most of the gas-phase chemical mechanisms successfully used in gas-phase atmospheric chemical processes, such as CBM-Z, RADM2 or SAPRC-07, treat hundreds of VOC as lumped organic species by their chemical characteristics. Most of the model results are compared with total VOC observations, and it is not appropriate to compare lumped VOC simulations to observations even if there are separate VOC observations like Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). While the PAMS Air Quality Model (PAMS-AQM) is developed, separate organic species observed by PAMS without a doubt can be directly compared with model simulations. From the past case study (Chen et al., 2010), it shows a major and very significant finding in that detailed emissions of VOC in the existing emissions database are often in error in Taiwan or other countries due to the fact that the annual VOC emissions are classified into hundreds of species-specific emissions by using the speciation factors following the protocol of the U.S. EPA (AP-42). Based on all PAMS observations from 2006-2007, four base cases with well comparable meteorological simulations were selected for the unified correction for all sources in Taiwan. After the PAMS species emissions are modified, the diurnal patterns and simulation-observation correlation for most of the PAMS species are improved, and the concentration levels are more comparable with those of observations. More expanded case studies also revealed necessary corrections for the PAMS species emissions. Sensitivity analyses for lumped organic species with modified PAMS species emissions are also conducted. After modified PAMS emissions are added into lumped VOC emissions, there is an increase of only 10% of totally VOC emissions. While the sources of the lumped VOC emissions are changed, ozone formation shows no significant change with modified lumped VOC emissions. This helps to support the argument that for ozone simulation, the lumped VOC processes balance out

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana as Bioindicator of Fungal VOCs in Indoor Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Richard; Yin, Guohua; Klich, Maren A.; Grimm, Casey; Bennett, Joan W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to detect different mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by the common indoor fungus, Aspergillus versicolor, and demonstrate the potential usage of the plant as a bioindicator to monitor fungal VOCs in indoor air. We evaluated the volatile production of Aspergillus versicolor strains SRRC 108 (NRRL 3449) and SRRC 2559 (ATCC 32662) grown on nutrient rich fungal medium, and grown under conditions to mimic the substrate encountered in the built environment where fungi would typically grow indoors (moist wallboard and ceiling tiles). Using headspace solid phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we analyzed VOC profiles of the two strains. The most abundant compound produced by both strains on all three media was 1-octen-3-ol. Strain SRRC 2559 made several terpenes not detected from strain SRRC 108. Using a split-plate bioassay, we grew Arabidopsis thaliana in a shared atmosphere with VOCs from the two strains of Aspergillus versicolor grown on yeast extract sucrose medium. The VOCs emitted by SRRC 2559 had an adverse impact on seed germination and plant growth. Chemical standards of individual VOCs from the Aspergillus versicolor mixture (2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-octen-3-ol, limonene, and β-farnesene), and β-caryophyllene were tested one by one in seed germination and vegetative plant growth assays. The most inhibitory compound to both seed germination and plant growth was 1-octen-3-ol. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis is a useful model for monitoring indoor air quality as it is sensitive to naturally emitted fungal volatile mixtures as well as to chemical standards of individual compounds, and it exhibits relatively quick concentration- and duration-dependent responses.

  5. Gaddafi's Death Poses Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The death of Muammar Gaddafi marks a new era for Libya.It also poses a huge challenge for Libyan authorities dealing with tribal conflicts.He Wenping,a researcher with the Institute of West-Asian and African Studies at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences,believes that Libya is in danger of falling into a period of internal strife and tribal conflict.

  6. Student-Posed Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Kathleen A.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2002-10-01

    As part of weekly reports,1 structured journals in which students answer three standard questions each week, they respond to the prompt, If I were the instructor, what questions would I ask or problems assign to determine if my students understood the material? An initial analysis of the results shows that some student-generated problems indicate fundamental misunderstandings of basic physical concepts. A further investigation explores the relevance of the problems to the week's material, whether the problems are solvable, and the type of problems (conceptual or calculation-based) written. Also, possible links between various characteristics of the problems and conceptual achievement are being explored. The results of this study spark many more questions for further work. A summary of current findings will be presented, along with its relationship to previous work concerning problem posing.2 1Etkina, E. Weekly Reports;A Two-Way Feedback Tool, Science Education, 84, 594-605 (2000). 2Mestre, J.P., Probing Adults Conceptual Understanding and Transfer of Learning Via Problem Posing, Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 23, 9-50 (2002).

  7. Development of new VOC exposure metrics and their relationship to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ten Brinke, JoAnn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are suspected to contribute significantly to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' (SBS), a complex of subchronic symptoms that occurs during and in general decreases away from occupancy of the building in question. A new approach takes into account individual VOC potencies, as well as the highly correlated nature of the complex VOC mixtures found indoors. The new VOC metrics are statistically significant predictors of symptom outcomes from the California Healthy Buildings Study data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis that a summary measure of the VOC mixture, other risk factors, and covariates for each worker will lead to better prediction of symptom outcome. VOC metrics based on animal irritancy measures and principal component analysis had the most influence in the prediction of eye, dermal, and nasal symptoms. After adjustment, a water-based paints and solvents source was found to be associated with dermal and eye irritation. The more typical VOC exposure metrics used in prior analyses were not useful in symptom prediction in the adjusted model (total VOC (TVOC), or sum of individually identified VOCsVOCi)). Also not useful were three other VOC metrics that took into account potency, but did not adjust for the highly correlated nature of the data set, or the presence of VOCs that were not measured. High TVOC values (2--7 mg m-3) due to the presence of liquid-process photocopiers observed in several study spaces significantly influenced symptoms. Analyses without the high TVOC values reduced, but did not eliminate the ability of the VOC exposure metric based on irritancy and principal component analysis to explain symptom outcome.

  8. Development of new VOC exposure metrics and their relationship to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are suspected to contribute significantly to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' (SBS), a complex of subchronic symptoms that occurs during and in general decreases away from occupancy of the building in question. A new approach takes into account individual VOC potencies, as well as the highly correlated nature of the complex VOC mixtures found indoors. The new VOC metrics are statistically significant predictors of symptom outcomes from the California Healthy Buildings Study data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis that a summary measure of the VOC mixture, other risk factors, and covariates for each worker will lead to better prediction of symptom outcome. VOC metrics based on animal irritancy measures and principal component analysis had the most influence in the prediction of eye, dermal, and nasal symptoms. After adjustment, a water-based paints and solvents source was found to be associated with dermal and eye irritation. The more typical VOC exposure metrics used in prior analyses were not useful in symptom prediction in the adjusted model (total VOC (TVOC), or sum of individually identified VOCs ({Sigma}VOC{sub i})). Also not useful were three other VOC metrics that took into account potency, but did not adjust for the highly correlated nature of the data set, or the presence of VOCs that were not measured. High TVOC values (2--7 mg m{sup {minus}3}) due to the presence of liquid-process photocopiers observed in several study spaces significantly influenced symptoms. Analyses without the high TVOC values reduced, but did not eliminate the ability of the VOC exposure metric based on irritancy and principal component analysis to explain symptom outcome.

  9. Boneless Pose Editing and Animation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Hansen, Kristian Evers; Erleben, Kenny

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a pose editing and animation method for triangulated surfaces based on a user controlled partitioning of the model into deformable parts and rigid parts which are denoted handles. In our pose editing system, the user can sculpt a set of poses simply by transforming...... the handles for each pose. Using Laplacian editing, the deformable parts are deformed to match the handles. In our animation system the user can constrain one or several handles in order to define a new pose. New poses are interpolated from the examples poses, by solving a small non-linear optimization...... problem in order to obtain the interpolation weights. While the system can be used simply for building poses, it is also an animation system. The user can specify a path for a given constraint and the model is animated correspondingly....

  10. Assessment of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near major roads in urban Nanjing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Zhao, W.

    2008-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major component of atmospheric pollutants in Nanjing, a large city in the east of China. Accordingly, 12-h diurnal monitoring for ten consecutive days was performed adjacent to major roads in five districts, ca.1.5 m above ground level, in April, July and October 2006, and January 2007. The most numerous species of VOCs (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m/ p-xylene, o-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, tetrachloromethane, trichloroethane and tetrachloroethane) were selected as the target pollutants for this field study of atmospheric distribution. The eleven VOCs were mostly found in gas phase due to their high vapor pressures. Gas-phase concentrations ranged between 0.6 and 67.9 μg m - 3 . Simultaneously, the levels of those VOCs measured near major roads were associated slightly with their regional background level. For all these areas, as expected, the high traffic area was the highest in terms of concentration. A positive correlation was also found between the VOC levels and traffic density. Our studies also provided VOC distribution, and vertical/horizontal profiles. The results show that traffic-related exposure to VOCs in major road microenvironments is higher than elsewhere and poses a potential threat to pedestrians, commuters, and traffic-exposed workers.

  11. Problem posing reflections and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Stephen I

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the editors' collaborative teaching at Harvard in the late 1960s, they produced a ground-breaking work -- The Art Of Problem Posing -- which related problem posing strategies to the already popular activity of problem solving. It took the concept of problem posing and created strategies for engaging in that activity as a central theme in mathematics education. Based in part upon that work and also upon a number of articles by its authors, other members of the mathematics education community began to apply and expand upon their ideas. This collection of thirty readings is a tes

  12. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC Removal by Vapor Permeation at Low VOC Concentrations: Laboratory Scale Results and Modeling for Scale Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Moulin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum transformation industries have applied membrane processes for solvent and hydrocarbon recovery as an economic alternative to reduce their emissions and reuse evaporated components. Separation of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs (toluene-propylene-butadiene from air was performed using a poly dimethyl siloxane (PDMS/α-alumina membrane. The experimental set-up followed the constant pressure/variable flow set-up and was operated at ~21 °C. The membrane is held in a stainless steel module and has a separation area of 55 × 10−4 m². Feed stream was set to atmospheric pressure and permeate side to vacuum between 3 and 5 mbar. To determine the performance of the module, the removed fraction of VOC was analyzed by Gas Chromatography/Flame Ionization Detector (GC/FID. The separation of the binary, ternary and quaternary hydrocarbon mixtures from air was performed at different flow rates and more especially at low concentrations. The permeate flux, permeance, enrichment factor, separation efficiency and the recovery extent of the membrane were determined as a function of these operating conditions. The permeability coefficients and the permeate flux through the composite PDMS-alumina membrane follow the order given by the Hildebrand parameter: toluene > 1,3-butadiene > propylene. The simulated data for the binary VOC/air mixtures showed fairly good agreement with the experimental results in the case of 1,3-butadiene and propylene. The discrepancies observed for toluene permeation could be minimized by taking into account the effects of the porous support and an influence of the concentration polarization. Finally, the installation of a 0.02 m2 membrane module would reduce 95% of the VOC content introduced at real concentration conditions used in the oil industry.

  13. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Removal by Vapor Permeation at Low VOC Concentrations: Laboratory Scale Results and Modeling for Scale Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollar-Perez, Georgette; Carretier, Emilie; Lesage, Nicolas; Moulin, Philippe

    2011-03-03

    Petroleum transformation industries have applied membrane processes for solvent and hydrocarbon recovery as an economic alternative to reduce their emissions and reuse evaporated components. Separation of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (toluene-propylene-butadiene) from air was performed using a poly dimethyl siloxane (PDMS)/α-alumina membrane. The experimental set-up followed the constant pressure/variable flow set-up and was operated at ~21 °C. The membrane is held in a stainless steel module and has a separation area of 55 × 10-4 m². Feed stream was set to atmospheric pressure and permeate side to vacuum between 3 and 5 mbar. To determine the performance of the module, the removed fraction of VOC was analyzed by Gas Chromatography/Flame Ionization Detector (GC/FID). The separation of the binary, ternary and quaternary hydrocarbon mixtures from air was performed at different flow rates and more especially at low concentrations. The permeate flux, permeance, enrichment factor, separation efficiency and the recovery extent of the membrane were determined as a function of these operating conditions. The permeability coefficients and the permeate flux through the composite PDMS-alumina membrane follow the order given by the Hildebrand parameter: toluene > 1,3-butadiene > propylene. The simulated data for the binary VOC/air mixtures showed fairly good agreement with the experimental results in the case of 1,3-butadiene and propylene. The discrepancies observed for toluene permeation could be minimized by taking into account the effects of the porous support and an influence of the concentration polarization. Finally, the installation of a 0.02 m2 membrane module would reduce 95% of the VOC content introduced at real concentration conditions used in the oil industry.

  14. Biofiltration for control of volatile organic compounds (VOCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, D.F. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Govind, R. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Air biofiltration is a promising technology for control of air emissions of biodegradable volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In conjunction with vacuum extraction of soils or air stripping of ground water, it can be used to mineralize VOCs removed from contaminated soil or groundwater. The literature describes three major biological systems for treating contaminated air bioscrubbers, biotrickling filters and biofilters. Filter media can be classified as: bioactive fine or irregular particulates, such as soil, peat, compost or mixtures of these materials; pelletized, which are randomly packed in a bed; and structured, such as monoliths with defined or variable passage size and geometry. The media can be made of sorbing and non-absorbing materials. Non-bioactive pelletized and structured media require recycled solutions of nutrients and buffer for efficient microbial activity and are thus called biotrickling filters. Extensive work has been conducted to improve biofiltration by EPA`s Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory and the University of Cincinnati in biofilters using pelletized and structured media and improved operational approaches. Representative VOCs in these studies included compounds with a range of aqueous solubilities and octanol-water partition coefficients. The compounds include iso-pentane, toluene, methylene chloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), ethyl benzene, chlorobenzene and perchloroethylene (PCE) and alpha ({alpha}-) pinene. Comparative studies were conducted with peat/compost biofilters using isopentane and {alpha}-pinene. Control studies were also conducted to investigate adsorption/desorption of contaminants on various media using mercuric chloride solution to insure the absence of bioactivity.

  15. 688 AMBIENT VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    The VOCs were classified thus: aromatics 41%, halogenated 42%, esters 3%, ketones 8%, ... and Industrial emission were identified as sources of VOCs in the studied industrial area with ... canisters, or by dynamic or diffusive adsorption .... The GC/FID was standardized and ... with CS2 was prepared from stock standard in.

  16. DEVELOPING A NO-VOC WOOD TOPCOAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper reports an evaluation of a new low-VOC (volatile organic compound) wood coating technology, its performance characteristics, and its application and emissions testing. The low-VOC wood coating selected for the project was a two-component, water-based epoxy coating. Poly...

  17. 用修正的Polanyi-Dubinin方程描述有机蒸气-水蒸气在活性炭上的吸附平衡%MODIFIED POLANYI-DUBININ EQUATION TO ORRELATE ADSORPTION EQUILIBRIUM OF VOC-WATER VAPOR MIXTURES ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高华生; 汪大翚; 叶芸春; 谭天恩

    2001-01-01

    Long-column method was used to determine the adsorption isotherms of 4 VOCs (benzene, toluene, chloroform and acetone) in concentration range of 250~5000?mg*m-3 on a commercial activated-carbon under different humidity levels at 30?℃.A modified Polanyi-Dubinin equation was proposed to correlate the adsorption equilibrium of different VOC-water vapor systems. Among 3 methods of calculating the Relative Affinity Coefficient β used,the Molar Volume method and the Molecular Parachor method proved to be suitable for the calculation with better precision than the Electronic Polarization method. Calculation results were satisfactory for the benzene-, toluene-, and chloroform-water vapor/activated carbon systems, but poor for acetone possibly because of its strong polarity.The equation could be used to estimate the detaining effect of atmospheric humidity on the adsorption equilibrium of VOCs on activated carbon.

  18. T2VOC user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falta, R.W. [Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Pruess, K.; Finsterle, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Battistelli, A. [AQUATER S.p.A., San Lorenzo in Campo, (Italy)

    1995-03-01

    T2VOC is a numerical simulator for three-phase, three-component, non-isothermal flow of water, air, and a volatile organic compound (VOC) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. Developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, T2VOC is an extension of the TOUGH2 general-purpose simulation program. This report is a self-contained guide to application of T2VOC to subsurface contamination problems involving nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). It gives a technical description of the T2VOC code, including a discussion of the physical processes modeled, and the mathematical and numerical methods used. Detailed instructions for preparing input data are presented along with several illustrative sample problems.

  19. Refining Visually Detected Object poses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Preben; Petersen, Henrik Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Automated industrial assembly today require that the 3D position and orientation (hereafter ''pose`) of the objects to be assembled are known precisely. Today this precision is mostly established by a dedicated mechanical object alignment system. However, such systems are often dedicated...... that enables direct assembly. Conventional vision systems and laser triangulation systems can locate randomly placed known objects (with 3D CAD models available) with some accuracy, but not necessarily a good enough accuracy. In this paper, we present a novel method for refining the pose accuracy of an object...... that has been located based on the appearance as detected by a monocular camera. We illustrate the quality of our refinement method experimentally....

  20. Refining Visually Detected Object poses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Preben; Petersen, Henrik Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Automated industrial assembly today require that the 3D position and orientation (hereafter ''pose`) of the objects to be assembled are known precisely. Today this precision is mostly established by a dedicated mechanical object alignment system. However, such systems are often dedicated to the p......Automated industrial assembly today require that the 3D position and orientation (hereafter ''pose`) of the objects to be assembled are known precisely. Today this precision is mostly established by a dedicated mechanical object alignment system. However, such systems are often dedicated...... to the particular object and in order to handle the demand for flexibility, there is an increasing demand for avoiding such dedicated mechanical alignment systems. Rather, it would be desirable to automatically locate and grasp randomly placed objects from tables, conveyor belts or even bins with a high accuracy...

  1. Photoelectron Imaging of OXIDE.VOC Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patros, Kellyn M.; Mann, Jennifer; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Perturbations of the bare O2- and O4- electronic structure arising from VOC (VOC = hexane, isoprene, benzene and benzene.D6) interactions are investigated using anion photoelectron imaging at 2.33 and 3.49 eV photon energies. Trends observed from comparing features in the spectra include VOC-identity-dependent electron affinities of the VOC complexes relative to the bare oxide clusters, due to enhance stability in the anion complex relative to the neutral. Autodetachment is observed in all O4-.VOC spectra and only isoprene with O2-. In addition, the intensities of transitions to states correlated with the singlet states of O2 neutral via detachment from the O2-.VOC anion complexes show dramatic VOC-identity variations. Most notably, benzene as a complex partner significantly enhances these transitions relative to O2- and O2-.hexane. A less significant enhancement is also observed in the O2-.isoprene complex. This enhancement may be due to the presence of low-lying triplet states in the complex partners.

  2. EVALUATION OF LOW-VOC LATEX PAINTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of four commercially available low-VOC (volatile organic compound) latex paints as substitutes for conventional latex paints by assessing both their emission characteristics and their performance as coatings. Bulk analysis indicated that ...

  3. Locating industrial VOC sources with aircraft observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, P; Gioli, B; Dugheri, S; Salvini, A; Matese, A; Bonacchi, A; Zaldei, A; Cupelli, V; Miglietta, F

    2011-05-01

    Observation and characterization of environmental pollution, focussing on Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), in a high-risk industrial area, are particularly important in order to provide indications on a safe level of exposure, indicate eventual priorities and advise on policy interventions. The aim of this study is to use the Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) method to measure VOCs, directly coupled with atmospheric measurements taken on a small aircraft environmental platform, to evaluate and locate the presence of VOC emission sources in the Marghera industrial area. Lab analysis of collected SPME fibres and subsequent analysis of mass spectrum and chromatograms in Scan Mode allowed the detection of a wide range of VOCs. The combination of this information during the monitoring campaign allowed a model (Gaussian Plume) to be implemented that estimates the localization of emission sources on the ground.

  4. Low VOC Barrier Coating for Industrial Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Technology Certification Program HAP Hazardous Air Pollutant HW hazardous waste LVBC low VOC barrier coating MEK methyl ethyl ketone MIL-DTL...peeling, blistering , tape adhesion, pull-off adhesion, film thickness, and LVBC/ZVT patch test adhesion testing in an acceptable or better manner...significant reductions in the amount of hazardous waste generated by the Navy. The ZVT technology contains less than 5 g/l of VOC and the resulting

  5. Aircraft recognition and pose estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmam, Hatem; Kim, Jijoong

    2000-05-01

    This work presents a geometry based vision system for aircraft recognition and pose estimation using single images. Pose estimation improves the tracking performance of guided weapons with imaging seekers, and is useful in estimating target manoeuvres and aim-point selection required in the terminal phase of missile engagements. After edge detection and straight-line extraction, a hierarchy of geometric reasoning algorithms is applied to form line clusters (or groupings) for image interpretation. Assuming a scaled orthographic projection and coplanar wings, lateral symmetry inherent in the airframe provides additional constraints to further reject spurious line clusters. Clusters that accidentally pass all previous tests are checked against the original image and are discarded. Valid line clusters are then used to deduce aircraft viewing angles. By observing that the leading edges of wings of a number of aircraft of interest are within 45 to 65 degrees from the symmetry axis, a bounded range of aircraft viewing angles can be found. This generic property offers the advantage of not requiring the storage of complete aircraft models viewed from all aspects, and can handle aircraft with flexible wings (e.g. F111). Several aircraft images associated with various spectral bands (i.e. visible and infra-red) are finally used to evaluate the system's performance.

  6. POCP for individual VOC under European conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenstedt, J.; Pleijel, K.

    1998-09-01

    Ground level ozone has been recognised as one of the most important environmental threats on the regional scale in Europe. Ozone is today considered to be harmful to human health already at the relatively low concentrations present in southern Scandinavia. The fact that ozone has the potential to damage vegetation at these concentrations is already well known. Ozone also gives rise to degradation of materials and is one of the gases which adds to the greenhouse effect. Ground level ozone is formed from nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the presence of sunlight. The only way to reduce ozone is therefore to reduce the emissions of the precursors. Ranking individual VOC by their ozone formation potential can make emission reductions more environmentally efficient and save time and money. POCP values give a ranking of the ozone formation ability of an individual VOC relative to other VOC. A critical analysis of the POCP concept has been performed which shows that the background emissions of NO{sub x} and VOC affect the POCP values to a large extent. Based on the critical analysis, five scenarios with different background emissions of NO{sub x} and VOC were selected for calculation of POCP values. These scenarios were chosen because they reflect the variation in POCP values which arise in different environments within Europe. The range thus indicates POCP values which are intended to be applicable within Europe. POCP values for 83 different VOC are presented in the form of ranges in this report. 42 refs, 13 figs, 3 tabs

  7. VOCs in Arid soils: Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds In Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) focuses on technologies to clean up volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants in soil and groundwater at arid sites. The initial host site is the 200 West Area at DOE`s Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. The primary VOC contaminant is carbon tetrachloride, in association with heavy metals and radionuclides. An estimated 580--920 metric tons of carbon tetrachloride were disposed of between 1955 and 1973, resulting in extensive soil and groundwater contamination. The VOC-Arid ID schedule has been divided into three phases of implementation. The phased approach provides for: rapid transfer of technologies to the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) programs once demonstrated; logical progression in the complexity of demonstrations based on improved understanding of the VOC problem; and leveraging of the host site EM-40 activities to reduce the overall cost of the demonstrations. During FY92 and FY93, the primary technology demonstrations within the ID were leveraged with an ongoing expedited response action at the Hanford 200 West Area, which is directed at vapor extraction of VOCs from the vadose (unsaturated) zone. Demonstration efforts are underway in the areas of subsurface characterization including: drilling and access improvements, off-gas and borehole monitoring of vadose zone VOC concentrations to aid in soil vapor extraction performance evaluation, and treatment of VOC-contaminated off-gas. These current demonstration efforts constitute Phase 1 of the ID and, because of the ongoing vadose zone ERA, can result in immediate transfer of successful technologies to EM-40.

  8. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Jeffries

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC, particulate matter (PM, and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit virtually gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity. Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound to which we added PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells. We observed that, even if the gas-phase pollutants

  9. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Jeffries

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC, particulate matter (PM, and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity. Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound and PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and it exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells – even if the gas-phase pollutants are not

  10. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit virtually gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity). Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound to which we added PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA) was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells). We observed that, even if the gas-phase pollutants are not

  11. Statistical Model-Based Face Pose Estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Xinliang; YANG Jie; LI Feng; WANG Huahua

    2007-01-01

    A robust face pose estimation approach is proposed by using face shape statistical model approach and pose parameters are represented by trigonometric functions. The face shape statistical model is firstly built by analyzing the face shapes from different people under varying poses. The shape alignment is vital in the process of building the statistical model. Then, six trigonometric functions are employed to represent the face pose parameters. Lastly, the mapping function is constructed between face image and face pose by linearly relating different parameters. The proposed approach is able to estimate different face poses using a few face training samples. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate its efficiency and accuracy.

  12. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM. In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a), we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004) for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA). That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise) as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the target PM for "effect

  13. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ebersviller

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs, particulate matter (PM, and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM.

    In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a, we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004 for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA. That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the

  14. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Jeffries

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs, particulate matter (PM, and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM. In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a, we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004 for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA. That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the target PM

  15. Locating industrial VOC sources with aircraft observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toscano, P., E-mail: p.toscano@ibimet.cnr.it [Institute for Biometeorology (IBIMET - CNR), Via G. Caproni 8, 50145 Firenze (Italy); Gioli, B. [Institute for Biometeorology (IBIMET - CNR), Via G. Caproni 8, 50145 Firenze (Italy); Dugheri, S. [Careggi Hospital-University of Florence, Occupational Health Division, Largo Palagi 1, 50100 Florence (Italy); Salvini, A. [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 13, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Matese, A. [Institute for Biometeorology (IBIMET - CNR), Via G. Caproni 8, 50145 Firenze (Italy); Bonacchi, A. [Careggi Hospital-University of Florence, Occupational Health Division, Largo Palagi 1, 50100 Florence (Italy); Zaldei, A. [Institute for Biometeorology (IBIMET - CNR), Via G. Caproni 8, 50145 Firenze (Italy); Cupelli, V. [Careggi Hospital-University of Florence, Occupational Health Division, Largo Palagi 1, 50100 Florence (Italy); Miglietta, F. [Institute for Biometeorology (IBIMET - CNR), Via G. Caproni 8, 50145 Firenze (Italy); Fondazione Edmund Mach, Via Mach 1, San Michele all' Adige, Trento (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    Observation and characterization of environmental pollution, focussing on Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), in a high-risk industrial area, are particularly important in order to provide indications on a safe level of exposure, indicate eventual priorities and advise on policy interventions. The aim of this study is to use the Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) method to measure VOCs, directly coupled with atmospheric measurements taken on a small aircraft environmental platform, to evaluate and locate the presence of VOC emission sources in the Marghera industrial area. Lab analysis of collected SPME fibres and subsequent analysis of mass spectrum and chromatograms in Scan Mode allowed the detection of a wide range of VOCs. The combination of this information during the monitoring campaign allowed a model (Gaussian Plume) to be implemented that estimates the localization of emission sources on the ground. - Highlights: > Flight plan aimed at sampling industrial area at various altitudes and locations. > SPME sampling strategy was based on plume detection by means of CO{sub 2}. > Concentrations obtained were lower than the limit values or below the detection limit. > Scan mode highlighted presence of {gamma}-butyrolactone (GBL) compound. > Gaussian dispersion modelling was used to estimate GBL source location and strength. - An integrated strategy based on atmospheric aircraft observations and dispersion modelling was developed, aimed at estimating spatial location and strength of VOC point source emissions in industrial areas.

  16. Flameless Candle Batteries Pose Risk to Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162882.html Flameless Candle Batteries Pose Risk to Kids If swallowed, serious damage ... WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Tiny button batteries that light up flameless "tea candles" pose a ...

  17. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  18. VOC methods and levels in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomboi, M.T. [Area de Contaminacion Atmosferica, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Ozone precursors began to be studied in the eighties in Spain, in order to know their levels and composition in areas, which had high concentrations of other atmospheric polluting agents. At the end of the eighties, VOC were incorporated into the air quality networks in urban areas in order to anticipate at the derived amendments of the entrance into force on the Directive 92/72/CEE of 1992 on air pollution by ozone. At the same time, field campaigns for VOC toxics were started in specific industrial areas and the zones with high traffic. More recently, the air quality networks have been orientated to non-urban areas, to cover the knowledge of VOC in semi-urban and rural areas. On the other hand, the role of the biogenic emissions and the role that their chemical and photochemical products play in atmospheric chemistry was becoming important in the nineties. Therefore some research projects, e.g. 'Biogenic Emissions in the Mediterranean Area (BEMA)', were developed in order to understand the vegetation emissions in the Mediterranean area in relation to anthropogenic compounds and to get information on their participation in tropospheric ozone formation. VOC have been sampled at European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) sites since 1999, based on recommendations from the EMEP Workshop on Measurements of Hydrocarbons/VOC in Lindau 1989. Collection of light hydrocarbons started in 1999, whereas measurements of carbonyls have just started in 2003. In this work, the most important sampling and analysis techniques to determine ozone precursors and to control VOC are shown, as well as the main results obtained in projects, networks and measurement campaigns performed with these methods.

  19. Silica deactivation of bead VOC catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libanati, C.; Pereira, C.J. [Research Division, W. R. Grace and Co., Columbia, MD (United States); Ullenius, D.A. [Grace TEC Systems, De Pere, WI (United States)

    1998-01-15

    Catalytic oxidation is a key technology for controlling the emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from industrial plants. The present paper examines the deactivation by silica of bead VOC catalysts in a flexographic printing application. Post mortem analyses of field-aged catalysts suggest that organosilicon compounds contained in the printing ink diffuse into the catalyst and deposit as silica particles in the micropores. Laboratory activity evaluation of aged catalysts suggests that silica deposition is non-selective and that silica masks the noble metal active site

  20. Effects of VOCs on herbaceous plants in an open-top chamber experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cape, J.N.; Leith, I.D.; Binnie, J.; Content, J.; Donkin, M.; Skewes, M.; Price, D.N.; Brown, A.R.; Sharpe, A.D

    2003-07-01

    Birdsfoot trefoil and broad-leaved dock were affected by VOCs. - A selection of herbaceous plants representing the ground flora around a typical chemical installation in the UK was exposed continuously for 7 weeks to a mixture of six VOCs (acetone, acetonitrile, dichloromethane, ethanol, methyl t-butyl ether and toluene) in open-top chambers. Exposure concentrations were based on predictions of atmospheric dispersion from a single source, at a distance of approximately 2 km. The effects of continuous exposure, representing a worst-case, were measured in terms of uncontrolled water loss from leaves, leaf wettability, chlorophyll content and fluorescence, dry matter production and detailed observations of changes in plant growth and phenology. There were significant effects of VOC exposure on seed production, leaf water content and photosynthetic efficiency in some plant species. Such effects may be detectable in vegetation close to major industrial point sources of VOCs, or as a result of an accidental release of material during manufacture or transport. Some of the species tested e.g. birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.) seem to be promising as potential bioindicators for VOCs, but there may be other even more sensitive species waiting to be discovered. However, the most obvious and conveniently measured response to VOC exposure in the birdsfoot trefoil (premature senescence i.e. advanced timing of seed pod production) could easily be confused in the field with climatic influences. It is also uncertain at this stage whether any of the effects observed would lead to longer term ecological changes in natural plant communities, through biased competition between sensitive and more tolerant species.

  1. Influence of way of finishing furniture segments on amount emissions VOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Čech

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the influence of way of finishing furniture segments on amount emissions VOCs (volatile organic compounds. The so-called Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC are among the largest pollution sources of both the internal and external environments.VOC is defined as emission of any organic compound or a mixture thereof, with the exception of methane, whereby the compound exerts the pressure of 0.01 kPa or more at the temperature of 20 °C (293.15 K and reaches the corresponding volatility under the specific conditions of its use and can undergo photochemical reactions with nitrogen oxides when exposed to solar radiation. The effects of VOC upon environment can be described by equation: VOC + NOx + UV radiation + heat = tropospheric ozone (O3In this work there were tested MDF (medium density fibreboard coated by resin impregnated paper was used for the furniture components’ production. Next were tested compressed wood, which was used as a second material of furniture components. These both chosen materials was covered by resin impregnated paper and than sequentially finished by regular coat of finish.An attention of this study is especially put on mentioned factors and on quantity of instant and long-term VOCs emissions emitted from furniture components.The amount of emissions from furniture components, in different phases of the preparation including the resin impregnated paper coating finish, was monitored within the time intervals of 24 hours and 720 hours starting after the time of the finish preparation.The MDF (medium density fibreboard coated by resin impregnated paper was used for the furniture components´ production.A compressed wood was used as a second material of furniture components. This alternative material was covered by resin impregnated paper and than sequentially finished by regular coat of finish.

  2. Personal Exposure to Mixtures of Volatile Organic Compounds: Modeling and Further Analysis of the RIOPA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterman, Stuart; Su, Feng-Chiao; Li, Shi; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Jia, Chunrong

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Emission sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are numerous and widespread in both indoor and outdoor environments. Concentrations of VOCs indoors typically exceed outdoor levels, and most people spend nearly 90% of their time indoors. Thus, indoor sources generally contribute the majority of VOC exposures for most people. VOC exposure has been associated with a wide range of acute and chronic health effects; for example, asthma, respiratory diseases, liver and kidney dysfunction, neurologic impairment, and cancer. Although exposures to most VOCs for most persons fall below health-based guidelines, and long-term trends show decreases in ambient emissions and concentrations, a subset of individuals experience much higher exposures that exceed guidelines. Thus, exposure to VOCs remains an important environmental health concern. The present understanding of VOC exposures is incomplete. With the exception of a few compounds, concentration and especially exposure data are limited; and like other environmental data, VOC exposure data can show multiple modes, low and high extreme values, and sometimes a large portion of data below method detection limits (MDLs). Field data also show considerable spatial or interpersonal variability, and although evidence is limited, temporal variability seems high. These characteristics can complicate modeling and other analyses aimed at risk assessment, policy actions, and exposure management. In addition to these analytic and statistical issues, exposure typically occurs as a mixture, and mixture components may interact or jointly contribute to adverse effects. However most pollutant regulations, guidelines, and studies remain focused on single compounds, and thus may underestimate cumulative exposures and risks arising from coexposures. In addition, the composition of VOC mixtures has not been thoroughly investigated, and mixture components show varying and complex dependencies. Finally, although many factors are

  3. VOC transport in vented drums containing simulated waste sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Rae, C.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-02-01

    A model is developed to estimate the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement in a lab-scale vented waste drum containing simulated waste sludge. The VOC transport model estimates the concentration using the measured VOC concentration beneath the drum lid and model parameters defined or estimated from process knowledge of drum contents and waste drum configuration. Model parameters include the VOC diffusion characteristic across the filter vent, VOC diffusivity in air, size of opening in the drum liner lid, the type and number of layers of polymer bags surrounding the waste, VOC permeability across the polymer, and the permeable surface area of the polymer bags. Comparison of model and experimental results indicates that the model can accurately estimate VOC concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement. The model may be useful in estimating the VOC concentration in actual waste drums.

  4. World Calibration Center for VOC (WCC-VOC), a new Facility for the WMO-GAW-Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappenglueck, B.-

    2002-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are recognized to be important precursors of tropospheric ozone as well as other oxidants and organic aerosols. In order to design effective control measures for the reduction of photooxidants, photochemical processes have to be understood and the sources of the precursors known. Reliable and representative measurements of VOCs are necessary to describe the anthropogenic and biogenic sources, to follow the photochemical degradation of VOCs in the troposphere. Measurement of VOCs is of key importance for the understanding of tropospheric chemistry. Tropospheric VOCs have been one of the recommended measurements to be made within the GAW programme. The purpose will be to monitor their atmospheric abundance, to characterize the various compounds with regard to anthropogenic and biogenic sources and to evaluate their role in the tropospheric ozone formation process. An international WMO/GAW panel of experts for VOC measurements developed the rational and objectives for this GAW activity and recommended the configuration and required activities of the WCC-VOC. In reflection of the complexity of VOC measurements and the current status of measurement technology, a "staged" approach was adopted. Stage 1 measurements: C2-C9 hydrocarbons, including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, dienes and monocyclics. (The WCC-VOC operates currently under this mode). Stage 2 measurements: C10-C14 hydrocarbons, including higher homologs of the Stage 1 set as well as biogenic hydrocarbon compounds. Stage 3 measurements: Oxygenated VOCs, including alcohols, carbonyls, carboxylic acids. The Quality Assurance/Science Activity Centre (QA/SAC) Germany currently has established the World Calibration Centre for VOC (WCC-VOC). The WCC-VOC has operated in the research mode und has become operational recently. From now on, the WCC-VOC conducts one round-robin calibration audit per year at all global stations that measure VOCs and assists other stations in setting up VOC

  5. GEIGER BRICKEL BENEFITS FROM LOW -VOC COATINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midwest Research Institute, under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), conducted a study to identify wood furniture manufacturing facilities that had converted to low-volatile organic compound (VOC)/hazardous air pollutant (HAP) wood furnit...

  6. Some improperly posed problems of mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrentiev, M M

    1967-01-01

    This monograph deals with the problems of mathematical physics which are improperly posed in the sense of Hadamard. The first part covers various approaches to the formulation of improperly posed problems. These approaches are illustrated by the example of the classical improperly posed Cauchy problem for the Laplace equation. The second part deals with a number of problems of analytic continuations of analytic and harmonic functions. The third part is concerned with the investigation of the so-called inverse problems for differential equations in which it is required to determine a dif­ ferential equation from a certain family of its solutions. Novosibirsk June, 1967 M. M. LAVRENTIEV Table of Contents Chapter I Formu1ation of some Improperly Posed Problems of Mathematic:al Physics § 1 Improperly Posed Problems in Metric Spaces. . . . . . . . . § 2 A Probability Approach to Improperly Posed Problems. . . 8 Chapter II Analytic Continuation § 1 Analytic Continuation of a Function of One Complex Variable fro...

  7. Mixture Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.

    2007-12-01

    A mixture experiment involves combining two or more components in various proportions or amounts and then measuring one or more responses for the resulting end products. Other factors that affect the response(s), such as process variables and/or the total amount of the mixture, may also be studied in the experiment. A mixture experiment design specifies the combinations of mixture components and other experimental factors (if any) to be studied and the response variable(s) to be measured. Mixture experiment data analyses are then used to achieve the desired goals, which may include (i) understanding the effects of components and other factors on the response(s), (ii) identifying components and other factors with significant and nonsignificant effects on the response(s), (iii) developing models for predicting the response(s) as functions of the mixture components and any other factors, and (iv) developing end-products with desired values and uncertainties of the response(s). Given a mixture experiment problem, a practitioner must consider the possible approaches for designing the experiment and analyzing the data, and then select the approach best suited to the problem. Eight possible approaches include 1) component proportions, 2) mathematically independent variables, 3) slack variable, 4) mixture amount, 5) component amounts, 6) mixture process variable, 7) mixture of mixtures, and 8) multi-factor mixture. The article provides an overview of the mixture experiment designs, models, and data analyses for these approaches.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF LOW-VOC LATEX PAINTS: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND CONTENT, VOC AND ALDEHYDE EMISSIONS, AND PAINT PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of laboratory tests to evaluate commercially available latex paints advertised as "low-odor," "low-VOC (volatile organic compound)," or "no-VOC." Measurements were performed to quantify the total content of VOCs in the paints...

  9. Dismount Threat Recognition through Automatic Pose Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    camera and joint estimation software of the Kinect for Xbox 360. A threat determination is made based on the pose identified by the network. Ac- curacy...mapping produced by the Kinect sensor [3]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.5. Test subject and generated model. The subject is...16 3.2. Joint position estimates extracted from Kinect . Example of col- lecting orthogonal poses

  10. [VOCs tax policy on China's economy development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Xin; Wang, Yu-Fei; Wang, Hai-Lin; Hao, Zheng-Ping; Wang, Zheng

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, environmental tax was designed to control volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions. Computable general equilibrium (CGE) model was used to explore the impacts of environmental tax (in forms of indirect tax) on the macro-economy development at both national and sector levels. Different levels of tax were simulated to find out the proper tax rate. It is found out that imposing environmental tax on high emission sectors can cause the emission decreased immediately and can lead to negative impacts on macro-economy indicators, such as GDP (gross domestic products), total investment, total product and the whole consumption etc. However, only the government income increased. In addition, the higher the tax rate is, the more pollutants can be reduced and the worse economic effects can be caused. Consequently, it is suggested that, the main controlling policies of VOCs abatement should be mandatory orders, and low environmental tax can be implemented as a supplementary.

  11. Catalytic non-thermal plasma reactor for the decomposition of a mixture of volatile organic compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Rama Raju; E Linga Reddy; J Karuppiah; P Manoj Kumar Reddy; Ch Subrahmanyam

    2013-05-01

    The decomposition of mixture of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been studied in a catalytic non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The VOCs mixture consisting n-hexane, cyclo-hexane and -xylene was chosen for the present study. The decomposition characteristics of mixture of VOCs by the DBD reactor with inner electrode modified with metal oxides of Mn and Co was studied. The results indicated that the order of the removal efficiency of VOCs followed as -xylene > cyclo-hexane > -hexane. Among the catalytic study, MnOx/SMF (manganese oxide on sintered metal fibres electrode) shows better performance, probably due to the formation of active oxygen species by in situ decomposition of ozone on the catalyst surface. Water vapour further enhanced the performance due to the in situ formation of OH radicals.

  12. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  13. Media dan monopoli dagang Percetakan dan penerbitan di Indonesia pada masa VOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasijanto Kasijanto

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the research on media history in Indonesia. The VOC(Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie period of the seventeenth/eighteenthcentury, also known as the early modern period, is regarded as a starting pointin this study. It was during this time that printing machines were imported fromEurope by the VOC authorities. The availability of paper and printing ink alsomade it possible for the production of printed matter such as forms, books, andother material. The first known printed media was the Bataviasche Nouvelles,which served as a kind of newspaper. This period saw three types of publishinghouses: (1 urban publishing; (2 publishing houses working under contract; and(3 royal publishing houses. Basically however, all these different publishingactivities were aimed at supporting the existence of the VOC. Publishingcompanies were generally engaged in providing service to the Church andmeeting the VOC’s administrative requirements. Communication media, basedon enhancing freedom of opinion and disseminating information, would pose aproblem as it would come face to face with VOC’s power monopoly.

  14. Long-term stability measurements of low concentration Volatile Organic Compound gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nick; Amico di Meane, Elena; Brewer, Paul; Ferracci, Valerio; Corbel, Marivon; Worton, David

    2017-04-01

    VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) are a class of compounds with significant influence on the atmosphere due to their large anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources. VOC emissions have a significant impact on the atmospheric hydroxyl budget and nitrogen reservoir species, while also contributing indirectly to the production of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol. However, the global budget of many of these species are poorly constrained. Moreover, the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) have set challenging data quality objectives for atmospheric monitoring programmes for these classes of traceable VOCs, despite the lack of available stable gas standards. The Key-VOCs Joint Research Project is an ongoing three-year collaboration with the aim of improving the measurement infrastructure of important atmospheric VOCs by providing traceable and comparable reference gas standards and by validating new measurement systems in support of the air monitoring networks. It focuses on VOC compounds that are regulated by European legislation, that are relevant for indoor air monitoring and for air quality and climate monitoring programmes like the VOC programme established by the WMO GAW and the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP). These VOCs include formaldehyde, oxy[genated]-VOCs (acetone, ethanol and methanol) and terpenes (a-pinene, 1,8-cineole, δ-3-carene and R-limonene). Here we present the results of a novel long term stability study for low concentration formaldehyde, oxy-VOC and terpenes gas mixtures produced by the Key-VOCs consortium with discussion regarding the implementation of improved preparation techniques and the use of novel cylinder passivation chemistries to guarantee mixture stability.

  15. Ultraviolet and radical oxidation of airborne VOC`s. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinsohn, R.J.; Spaeder, T.A.; Albano, M.T.; Schmelzle, J.P.; Fetter, R.O.

    1994-03-18

    Airborne VOC`s reactions initiated by UV radiation at selected wavelengths from 185 to 308 nm have been studied. A simplified chemical kinetic mechanism is proposed incorporating photolysis and radical reactions. The concentration of HCHO and CH{sub 3}OH were predicted as a function of time, radiation wavelength, actinic flux and initial ozone concentration. The gas velocity and HCHO concentration were predicted in a gas stream flowing over a UV bulb. Experiments were conducted in which ethanol vapor and air were irradiated by low-pressure mercury bulbs. Ethanol disappeared in an overall first-order manner and an intermediate species, believed to be acetaldehyde, appeared and then disappeared.

  16. 'Button' Batteries Pose Serious Risk to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip navigation U.S. National Library of Medicine Menu ... Pose Serious Risk to Children Toddlers may swallow the tiny batteries used to power many common household objects To use the sharing features ...

  17. Robust pose determination for autonomous docking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, J.S.; Jatko, W.B.; Ferrell, R.K.; Gleason, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes current work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop a robotic vision system capable of recognizing designated objects by their intrinsic geometry. This method, based on single camera vision, combines point features and a model-based technique using geometric feature matching for the pose calculation. In this approach, 2-D point features are connected into higher-order shapes and then matched with corresponding features of the model. Pose estimates are made using a closed-form point solution based on model features of four coplanar points. Rotations are represented by quaternions that simplify the calculations in determining the least squares solution for the coordinate transformation. This pose determination method including image acquisition, feature extraction, feature correspondence, and pose calculation has been implemented on a real-time system using a standard camera and image processing hardware. Experimental results are given for relative error measurements.

  18. CHALLENGES POSED BY RETIRED RUSSIAN NUCLEAR SUBMARINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, Dieter; Kroken, Ingjerd; Latyshev, Eduard; Griffith, Andrew

    2003-02-27

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the challenges posed by retired Russian nuclear submarines, review current U.S. and International efforts and provide an assessment of the success of these efforts.

  19. Infant Sleep Positioners Pose Suffocation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Infant Sleep Positioners Pose Suffocation Risk Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Infant Sleep Positioner Example See more images of Infant Sleep ...

  20. Learning toward practical head pose estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Gaoli; He, Feixiang; Zhu, Rong; Xuan, Shibin

    2017-08-01

    Head pose is useful information for many face-related tasks, such as face recognition, behavior analysis, human-computer interfaces, etc. Existing head pose estimation methods usually assume that the face images have been well aligned or that sufficient and precise training data are available. In practical applications, however, these assumptions are very likely to be invalid. This paper first investigates the impact of the failure of these assumptions, i.e., misalignment of face images, uncertainty and undersampling of training data, on head pose estimation accuracy of state-of-the-art methods. A learning-based approach is then designed to enhance the robustness of head pose estimation to these factors. To cope with misalignment, instead of using hand-crafted features, it seeks suitable features by learning from a set of training data with a deep convolutional neural network (DCNN), such that the training data can be best classified into the correct head pose categories. To handle uncertainty and undersampling, it employs multivariate labeling distributions (MLDs) with dense sampling intervals to represent the head pose attributes of face images. The correlation between the features and the dense MLD representations of face images is approximated by a maximum entropy model, whose parameters are optimized on the given training data. To estimate the head pose of a face image, its MLD representation is first computed according to the model based on the features extracted from the image by the trained DCNN, and its head pose is then assumed to be the one corresponding to the peak in its MLD. Evaluation experiments on the Pointing'04, FacePix, Multi-PIE, and CASIA-PEAL databases prove the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  1. Pulsed Corona Discharges and Their Applications in Toxic VOCs Abatement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MuhammadArifMalik; SalmanAkbarMalik

    1999-01-01

    plasma processes are among the emerging technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sbatoment. Both thermal plasmas and non-equil[brimn plasmas (cold plasmas) are being developed for VOCs clesnup. Particularly, pulsed corona discharges offer several edvantages over conventional VOCs abatement tochniqvee, To optimize the existing technology and to developit further, there is need to understand the mechanlsms involved in plasma chemical reacticms, Furthermore, it is strongly desirable to be able to predict the behavior of new VOCs in non-equillbrlum plasma enviromuent from the data known for a few representative oompounds, Pulsed corona discharge technique is introduced here with dtafion of refevant literature, Fundamental principfes,useful for predicting the VOCs' decomposition behavior, have been worked out from the published literature. Latest developments in the area, targeted to minimize the enersy losses, improve the VOCs destruction efficiency and reduce the generation of unwanted organic and inorganic by-products, are presented.

  2. Outdoor, indoor, and personal exposure to VOCs in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adgate, John L; Church, Timothy R; Ryan, Andrew D; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Fredrickson, Ann L; Stock, Thomas H; Morandi, Maria T; Sexton, Ken

    2004-10-01

    We measured volatile organic compound (VOC) exposures in multiple locations for a diverse population of children who attended two inner-city schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Fifteen common VOCs were measured at four locations: outdoors (O), indoors at school (S), indoors at home (H), and in personal samples (P). Concentrations of most VOCs followed the general pattern O approximately equal to S long-term health risks from children's exposure to these compounds.

  3. Remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with membrane separation techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Membrane separation, a new technology for removing VOCs including pervaporation, vapor permeation, membrane contactor, and membrane bioreactor was presented. Comparing with traditional techniques, these special techniques are an efficient and energy-saving technology. Vapor permeation can be applied to recovery of organic solvents from exhaust streams. Membrane contactor could be used for removing or recovering VOCs from air or wastewater. Pervaporation and vapor permeation are viable methods for removing VOCs from wastewater to yield a VOC concentrate which could either be destroyed by conventional means, or be recycled for reuse.

  4. Use of mass spectrometric methods for field screening of VOC`s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    While mass spectrometric (MS) methods of chemical analysis, particularly gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), have been the mainstay of environmental organic analytical techniques in the laboratory through the use of EPA and other standard methods, field implementation is relatively rare. Instrumentation and methods now exist for utilizing MS and GC/MS techniques in the field for analysis of VOC`s in gas phase, aqueous, and soil media. Examples of field investigations utilizing HP 5971A and Viking SpectraTrak systems for analysis of VOC`s in all three media will be presented. Mass spectral methods were found to offer significant advantages in terms of speed of analysis and reliability of compound identification over field gas chromatography (GC) methods while preserving adequate levels of detection sensitivity. The soil method in particular provides a method for rapid in-field analysis of methanol preserved samples thus minimizing the problem of volatiles loss which typically occurs with routine use of the EPA methods and remote analysis. The high cost of MS instrumentation remains a major obstacle to more widespread use.

  5. Exemplar-based human action pose correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei; Deng, Ke; Bai, Xiang; Leyvand, Tommer; Guo, Baining; Tu, Zhuowen

    2014-07-01

    The launch of Xbox Kinect has built a very successful computer vision product and made a big impact on the gaming industry. This sheds lights onto a wide variety of potential applications related to action recognition. The accurate estimation of human poses from the depth image is universally a critical step. However, existing pose estimation systems exhibit failures when facing severe occlusion. In this paper, we propose an exemplar-based method to learn to correct the initially estimated poses. We learn an inhomogeneous systematic bias by leveraging the exemplar information within a specific human action domain. Furthermore, as an extension, we learn a conditional model by incorporation of pose tags to further increase the accuracy of pose correction. In the experiments, significant improvements on both joint-based skeleton correction and tag prediction are observed over the contemporary approaches, including what is delivered by the current Kinect system. Our experiments for the facial landmark correction also illustrate that our algorithm can improve the accuracy of other detection/estimation systems.

  6. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  7. HYDROGEN AND VOC RETENTION IN WASTE BOXES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PACE ME; MARUSICH RM

    2008-11-21

    The Hanford Waste Management Project Master Documented Safety Analysis (MDSA) (HNF-14741, 2003) identifies derived safety controls to prevent or mitigate the risks of a single-container deflagration during operations requiring moving, venting or opening transuranic (TRU)-waste containers. The issue is whether these safety controls are necessary for operations involving TRU-waste boxes that are being retrieved from burial at the Hanford Site. This paper investigates the potential for a deflagration hazard within these boxes and whether safety controls identified for drum deflagration hazards should be applied to operations involving these boxes. The study evaluates the accumulation of hydrogen and VOCs within the waste box and the transport of these gases and vapors out of the waste box. To perform the analysis, there were numerous and major assumptions made regarding the generation rate and the transport pathway dimensions and their number. Since there is little actual data with regards to these assumptions, analyses of three potential configurations were performed to obtain some indication of the bounds of the issue (the concentration of hydrogen or flammable VOCs within a waste box). A brief description of each of the three cases along with the results of the analysis is summarized.

  8. Analysis of Sidestream Smoke VOCs and Characterization of their Odor Profiles by VOC Preconcentrator-GC-O Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higashi N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques have been employed in the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs. However, these techniques are insufficient for the precise analysis of tobacco smoke VOCs because of the complexity of the operating system, system instability, or poor sensitivity. To overcome these problems, a combined system of VOC preconcentrator, gas chromatograph, and olfactometer has been developed. The performance of this new system was evaluated in the analysis of VOCs in tobacco smoke and applied to the odor profiling of sidestream smoke (SSS that has not been sufficiently investigated in the past.

  9. Factoring Algebraic Error for Relative Pose Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, P; Duchaineau, M

    2009-03-09

    We address the problem of estimating the relative pose, i.e. translation and rotation, of two calibrated cameras from image point correspondences. Our approach is to factor the nonlinear algebraic pose error functional into translational and rotational components, and to optimize translation and rotation independently. This factorization admits subproblems that can be solved using direct methods with practical guarantees on global optimality. That is, for a given translation, the corresponding optimal rotation can directly be determined, and vice versa. We show that these subproblems are equivalent to computing the least eigenvector of second- and fourth-order symmetric tensors. When neither translation or rotation is known, alternating translation and rotation optimization leads to a simple, efficient, and robust algorithm for pose estimation that improves on the well-known 5- and 8-point methods.

  10. Yoga Poses Increase Subjective Energy and State Self-Esteem in Comparison to 'Power Poses'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golec de Zavala, Agnieszka; Lantos, Dorottya; Bowden, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Research on beneficial consequences of yoga focuses on the effects of yogic breathing and meditation. Less is known about the psychological effects of performing yoga postures. The present study investigated the effects of yoga poses on subjective sense of energy and self-esteem. The effects of yoga postures were compared to the effects of 'power poses,' which arguably increase the sense of power and self-confidence due to their association with interpersonal dominance (Carney et al., 2010). The study tested the novel prediction that yoga poses, which are not associated with interpersonal dominance but increase bodily energy, would increase the subjective feeling of energy and therefore increase self-esteem compared to 'high power' and 'low power' poses. A two factorial, between participants design was employed. Participants performed either two standing yoga poses with open front of the body (n = 19), two standing yoga poses with covered front of the body (n = 22), two expansive, high power poses (n = 21), or two constrictive, low power poses (n = 20) for 1-min each. The results showed that yoga poses in comparison to 'power poses' increased self-esteem. This effect was mediated by an increased subjective sense of energy and was observed when baseline trait self-esteem was controlled for. These results suggest that the effects of performing open, expansive body postures may be driven by processes other than the poses' association with interpersonal power and dominance. This study demonstrates that positive effects of yoga practice can occur after performing yoga poses for only 2 min.

  11. An assessment of air quality reflecting the chemosensory irritation impact of mixtures of volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Michael H; Gola, Joelle M R; Cometto-Muñiz, J Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We present a method to assess the air quality of an environment based on the chemosensory irritation impact of mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in such environment. We begin by approximating the sigmoid function that characterizes psychometric plots of probability of irritation detection (Q) versus VOC vapor concentration to a linear function. First, we apply an established equation that correlates and predicts human sensory irritation thresholds (SIT) (i.e., nasal and eye irritation) based on the transfer of the VOC from the gas phase to biophases, e.g., nasal mucus and tear film. Second, we expand the equation to include other biological data (e.g., odor detection thresholds) and to include further VOCs that act mainly by "specific" effects rather than by transfer (i.e., "physical") effects as defined in the article. Then we show that, for 72 VOCs in common, Q values based on our calculated SITs are consistent with the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) listed for those same VOCs on the basis of sensory irritation by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). Third, we set two equations to calculate the probability (Qmix) that a given air sample containing a number of VOCs could elicit chemosensory irritation: one equation based on response addition (Qmix scale: 0.00 to 1.00) and the other based on dose addition (1000*Qmix scale: 0 to 2000). We further validate the applicability of our air quality assessment method by showing that both Qmix scales provide values consistent with the expected sensory irritation burden from VOC mixtures present in a wide variety of indoor and outdoor environments as reported on field studies in the literature. These scales take into account both the concentration of VOCs at a particular site and the propensity of the VOCs to evoke sensory irritation.

  12. Non-standard and improperly posed problems

    CERN Document Server

    Straughan, Brian; Ames, William F

    1997-01-01

    Written by two international experts in the field, this book is the first unified survey of the advances made in the last 15 years on key non-standard and improperly posed problems for partial differential equations.This reference for mathematicians, scientists, and engineers provides an overview of the methodology typically used to study improperly posed problems. It focuses on structural stability--the continuous dependence of solutions on the initial conditions and the modeling equations--and on problems for which data are only prescribed on part of the boundary.The book addresses continuou

  13. The nucleolus is well-posed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragnelli, Vito; Patrone, Fioravante; Torre, Anna

    2006-02-01

    The lexicographic order is not representable by a real-valued function, contrary to many other orders or preorders. So, standard tools and results for well-posed minimum problems cannot be used. We prove that under suitable hypotheses it is however possible to guarantee the well-posedness of a lexicographic minimum over a compact or convex set. This result allows us to prove that some game theoretical solution concepts, based on lexicographic order are well-posed: in particular, this is true for the nucleolus.

  14. Flexible Polyhedral Surfaces with Two Flat Poses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellmuth Stachel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present three types of polyhedral surfaces, which are continuously flexible and have not only an initial pose, where all faces are coplanar, but pass during their self-motion through another pose with coplanar faces (“flat pose”. These surfaces are examples of so-called rigid origami, since we only admit exact flexions, i.e., each face remains rigid during the motion; only the dihedral angles vary. We analyze the geometry behind Miura-ori and address Kokotsakis’ example of a flexible tessellation with the particular case of a cyclic quadrangle. Finally, we recall Bricard’s octahedra of Type 3 and their relation to strophoids.

  15. NEW SOIL VOC SAMPLERS: EN CORE AND ACCU CORE SAMPLING/STORAGE DEVICES FOR VOC ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

    2006-06-01

    Soil sampling and storage practices for volatile organic analysis must be designed to minimize loss of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from samples. The En Core{reg_sign} sampler is designed to collect and store soil samples in a manner that minimizes loss of contaminants due to volatilization and/or biodegradation. An ASTM International (ASTM) standard practice, D 6418, Standard Practice for Using the Disposable En Core Sampler for Sampling and Storing Soil for Volatile Organic Analysis, describes use of the En Core sampler to collect and store a soil sample of approximately 5 grams or 25 grams for volatile organic analysis and specifies sample storage in the En Core sampler at 4 {+-} 2 C for up to 48 hours; -7 to -21 C for up to 14 days; or 4 {+-} 2 C for up to 48 hours followed by storage at -7 to -21 C for up to five days. This report discusses activities performed during the past year to promote and continue acceptance of the En Core samplers based on their performance to store soil samples for VOC analysis. The En Core sampler is designed to collect soil samples for VOC analysis at the soil surface. To date, a sampling tool for collecting and storing subsurface soil samples for VOC analysis is not available. Development of a subsurface VOC sampling/storage device was initiated in 1999. This device, which is called the Accu Core{trademark} sampler, is designed so that a soil sample can be collected below the surface using a dual-tube penetrometer and transported to the laboratory for analysis in the same container. Laboratory testing of the current Accu Core design shows that the device holds low-level concentrations of VOCs in soil samples during 48-hour storage at 4 {+-} 2 C and that the device is ready for field evaluation to generate additional performance data. This report discusses a field validation exercise that was attempted in Pennsylvania in 2004 and activities being performed to plan and conduct a field validation study in 2006. A draft ASTM

  16. SUBSTRATE EFFECTS ON VOC EMISSIONS FROM A LATEX PAINT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of two substrates -- a stainless steel plate and a gypsum board -- on the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from a latex paint were evaluated by environmental chamber tests. It was found that the amount of VOCs emitted from the painted stainless steel was 2 to...

  17. FORMULATING ULTRA-LOW-VOC WOOD FURNITURE COATINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The article discusses the formulation of ultra-low volatile organic compound (VOC) wood furniture coatings. The annual U.S. market for wood coatings is about 240, 000 cu m (63 million gal). In this basis, between 57 and 91 million kg (125 and 200 million lb) of VOCs are emitted i...

  18. Direct measurement of VOC diffusivities in tree tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baduru, K.K.; Trapp, Stefan; Burken, Joel G.

    2008-01-01

    fundamental terminal fate processes for VOCs that have been translocated from contaminated soil or groundwater, and diffusion constitutes the mass transfer mechanism to the plant−atmosphere interface. Therefore, VOC diffusion through woody plant tissues, that is, xylem, has a direct impact on contaminant fate...

  19. Head Pose Estimation from Passive Stereo Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenstein, Michael D.; Jensen, Jeppe; Høilund, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    function. Our algorithm incorporates 2D and 3D cues to make the system robust to low-quality range images acquired by passive stereo systems. It handles large pose variations (of ±90 ° yaw and ±45 ° pitch rotation) and facial variations due to expressions or accessories. For a maximally allowed error of 30...

  20. On a Monotone Ill-posed Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nguyen BUONG

    2005-01-01

    A class of a posteriori parameter choice strategies for the operator version of Tikhonovregularization (including variants of Morozov's and Arcangeli's methods) is proposed and used in investigating the rate of convergence of the regularized solution for ill-posed nonlinear equation involving a monotone operator in Banach space.

  1. What question would Turing pose today?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grosz, Barbara J

    2012-01-01

    ... well" in a game he defines and calls "the imitation game," and which we know as the Turing test. The Turing test poses the challenge of constructing a computer system able to carry on a dialogue with a person, potentially ranging over any subject matter and many subject matters, well enough to be indistinguishable from a person. Turing conject...

  2. "Light" Tobacco Products Pose Heavy Health Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates "Light" Tobacco Products Pose Heavy Health Risks Share Tweet ... Feed A federal law is restricting the words “light,” “low,” and “mild” from tobacco products now on ...

  3. Nieuwsgaring in Batavia tijdens de VOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Zuiderweg

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available  The board members of the Dutch East India Company (1602-1795, the Heren Zeventien, promulgated various decrees in which they forbade to bring out information regarding their colonies in the Dutch East Indies and Batavia in letters, manuscripts and printed matter. But in Batavia some inventive Company servants and even staff members got around these regulations, as did some printers in Holland. They published newspapers like Bataviase Nouvelles and Vendu-Nieuws, and also the specialized journal Verhandelingen van het Bataviaasch Genootschap. The initiators of this journal joined hands with the Dutch world of learning and its journals. This article provides an overview of early journalism in the Dutch East Indies and thus contributes to the reconstruction of the literary and cultural climate in Batavia at the time of the VOC.

  4. Pose measurement method based on geometrical constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zimiao Zhang; Changku Sun; Pengfei Sun; Peng Wang

    2011-01-01

    @@ The pose estimation method based on geometric constraints is studied.The coordinates of the five feature points in the camera coordinate system are calculated to obtain the pose of an object on the basis of the geometric constraints formed by the connective lines of the feature points and the coordinates of the feature points on the CCD image plane; during the solution process,the scaling and orthography projection model is used to approximate the perspective projection model.%The pose estimation method based on geometric constraints is studied. The coordinates of the five feature points in the camera coordinate system are calculated to obtain the pose of an object on the basis of the geometric constraints formed by the connective lines of the feature points and the coordinates of the feature points on the CCD image plane; during the solution process, the scaling and orthography projection model is used to approximate the perspective projection model. The initial values of the coordinates of the five feature points in the camera coordinate system are obtained to ensure the accuracy and convergence rate of the non-linear algorithm. In accordance with the perspective projection characteristics of the circular feature landmarks, we propose an approach that enables the iterative acquisition of accurate target poses through the correction of the perspective projection coordinates of the circular feature landmark centers. Experimental results show that the translation positioning accuracy reaches ±0.05 mm in the measurement range of 0-40 mm, and the rotation positioning accuracy reaches ±0.06° in the measurement range of 4°-60°.

  5. Treatment by adsorption on zeolites of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Study of the absorption/adsorption coupling applied to air treatment; Traitement des composes organiques volatils (COV) par adsorption sur zeolithe. Etude du couplage absorption/adsorption applique au traitement de l'air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosillon, St.

    2000-11-01

    Absorption and adsorption are the most suitable techniques to treat strong flow rates of gaseous effluents with low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This works deals with the adsorption on zeolites of pure VOCs or VOC mixtures. The competitive adsorption phenomena, the adsorption equilibria and the adsorption kinetics are analyzed for the dimensioning of industrial facilities. The selectiveness of zeolites depends on 4 parameters: the polarity, the volatility and the composition of the gaseous mixture compounds, and the filling up ratio of zeolites. The modeling of adsorption isotherms has been done using the Langmuir model for pure compounds and using the ideal adsorbed solution theory for mixtures. The simulation results obtained are relatively different from the experimental ones. The adsorbed VOCs seem to form non-ideal adsorbates. The saturation curves obtained by simulation are in good agreement with experimental curves when the proper value of the internal transfer coefficient is used. The different values of this parameter have permitted to deduce the average value of the effective diffusion of the zeolite for the 4 VOCs studied. In the last part, it is shown that the coupling of absorption and adsorption can be efficient for the treatment of mixtures of water soluble and water insoluble VOCs. The poor efficiency of water curtains for the treatment of industrial solvents has been demonstrated and a VOC adsorption process that use two concentrator wheels is proposed. (J.S.)

  6. Personal exposure to mixtures of volatile organic compounds: modeling and further analysis of the RIOPA data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterman, Stuart; Su, Feng-Chiao; Li, Shi; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Jia, Chunrong

    2014-06-01

    Emission sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs*) are numerous and widespread in both indoor and outdoor environments. Concentrations of VOCs indoors typically exceed outdoor levels, and most people spend nearly 90% of their time indoors. Thus, indoor sources generally contribute the majority of VOC exposures for most people. VOC exposure has been associated with a wide range of acute and chronic health effects; for example, asthma, respiratory diseases, liver and kidney dysfunction, neurologic impairment, and cancer. Although exposures to most VOCs for most persons fall below health-based guidelines, and long-term trends show decreases in ambient emissions and concentrations, a subset of individuals experience much higher exposures that exceed guidelines. Thus, exposure to VOCs remains an important environmental health concern. The present understanding of VOC exposures is incomplete. With the exception of a few compounds, concentration and especially exposure data are limited; and like other environmental data, VOC exposure data can show multiple modes, low and high extreme values, and sometimes a large portion of data below method detection limits (MDLs). Field data also show considerable spatial or interpersonal variability, and although evidence is limited, temporal variability seems high. These characteristics can complicate modeling and other analyses aimed at risk assessment, policy actions, and exposure management. In addition to these analytic and statistical issues, exposure typically occurs as a mixture, and mixture components may interact or jointly contribute to adverse effects. However most pollutant regulations, guidelines, and studies remain focused on single compounds, and thus may underestimate cumulative exposures and risks arising from coexposures. In addition, the composition of VOC mixtures has not been thoroughly investigated, and mixture components show varying and complex dependencies. Finally, although many factors are known to

  7. Socrematic adapts its odors treatments to VOC. Bacteria avid for solvents; Socrematic adapte ses traitements des odeurs aux COV. Des bacteries friandes de solvants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit, V.

    2002-05-01

    Socrematic (Saint-Ouen-l'Aumone, France), a company specialized in air treatment processes, has developed a bio-filter system made of peat, bacteria and fungi for the cleansing of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of the gaseous effluents of the Rexam Cosmetic Closures company at Simandre (Saone-et-Loire, France). The bio-filter reduces the initial VOCs concentration of 200-250 mg/m{sup 3} (a mixture of butanones, ethyl-acetates and xylenes) to about 36 mg/m{sup 3}. Short note. (J.S.)

  8. Direct solution to the minimal generalized pose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraldo, Pedro; Araujo, Helder

    2015-03-01

    Pose estimation is a relevant problem for imaging systems whose applications range from augmented reality to robotics. In this paper we propose a novel solution for the minimal pose problem, within the framework of generalized camera models and using a planar homography. Within this framework and considering only the geometric elements of the generalized camera models, an imaging system can be modeled by a set of mappings associating image pixels to 3-D straight lines. This mapping is defined in a 3-D world coordinate system. Pose estimation performs the computation of the rigid transformation between the original 3-D world coordinate system and the one in which the camera was calibrated. Using synthetic data, we compare the proposed minimal-based method with the state-of-the-art methods in terms of numerical errors, number of solutions and processing time. From the experiments, we conclude that the proposed method performs better, especially because there is a smaller variation in numerical errors, while results are similar in terms of number of solutions and computation time. To further evaluate the proposed approach we tested our method with real data. One of the relevant contributions of this paper is theoretical. When compared to the state-of-the-art approaches, we propose a completely new parametrization of the problem that can be solved in four simple steps. In addition, our approach does not require any predefined transformation of the dataset, which yields a simpler solution for the problem.

  9. Driver head pose tracking with thermal camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, S.; Fournier, C.; Lavergne, C.; Druart, G.; Lépine, T.

    2016-09-01

    Head pose can be seen as a coarse estimation of gaze direction. In automotive industry, knowledge about gaze direction could optimize Human-Machine Interface (HMI) and Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS). Pose estimation systems are often based on camera when applications have to be contactless. In this paper, we explore uncooled thermal imagery (8-14μm) for its intrinsic night vision capabilities and for its invariance versus lighting variations. Two methods are implemented and compared, both are aided by a 3D model of the head. The 3D model, mapped with thermal texture, allows to synthesize a base of 2D projected models, differently oriented and labeled in yaw and pitch. The first method is based on keypoints. Keypoints of models are matched with those of the query image. These sets of matchings, aided with the 3D shape of the model, allow to estimate 3D pose. The second method is a global appearance approach. Among all 2D models of the base, algorithm searches the one which is the closest to the query image thanks to a weighted least squares difference.

  10. VOC and HAP recovery using ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael R. Milota : Kaichang Li

    2007-05-29

    During the manufacture of wood composites, paper, and to a lesser extent, lumber, large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as terpenes, formaldehyde, and methanol are emitted to air. Some of these compounds are hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The air pollutants produced in the forest products industry are difficult to manage because the concentrations are very low. Presently, regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs and RCOs) are commonly used for the destruction of VOCs and HAPs. RTOs consume large amounts of natural gas to heat air and moisture. The combustion of natural gas generates increased CO2 and NOx, which have negative implications for global warming and air quality. The aforementioned problems are addressed by an absorption system containing a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as an absorbent. RTILs are salts, but are in liquid states at room temperature. RTILs, an emerging technology, are receiving much attention as replacements for organic solvents in industrial processes with significant cost and environmental benefits. Some of these processes include organic synthesis, extraction, and metal deposition. RTILs would be excellent absorbents for exhausts from wood products facilities because of their unique properties: no measurable vapor pressure, high solubility of wide range of organic compounds, thermal stability to 200°C (almost 400°F), and immisciblity with water. Room temperature ionic liquids were tested as possible absorbents. Four were imidizolium-based and were eight phosphonium-based. The imidizolium-based ionic liquids proved to be unstable at the conditions tested and in the presence of water. The phosphonium-based ionic liquids were stable. Most were good absorbents; however, cleaning the contaminates from the ionic liquids was problematic. This was overcome with a higher temperature (120°C) than originally proposed and a very low pressure (1 kPa. Absorption trials were conducted with tetradecy

  11. Tabu search for human pose recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyce, W.; Rodriguez, N.; Lange, B.; Andary, S.; Seilles, A.

    2014-03-01

    The use of computer vision techniques to build hands-free input devices has long been a topic of interest to researchers in the field of natural interaction. In recent years Microsoft's Kinect has brought these technologies to the layman, but the most commonly used libraries for Kinect human pose recognition are closed-source. There is not yet an accepted, effective open-source alternative upon which highly specific applications can be based. We propose a novel technique for extracting the appendage configurations of users from the Kinect camera's depth feed, based on stochastic local search techniques rather than per-pixel classification.

  12. Assessing sanitary mixtures in East African cities

    OpenAIRE

    Letema, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    The urbanisation of poverty and informality in East African cities poses a threat to environmental health, perpetuates social exclusion and inequalities, and creates service gaps (UN-Habitat, 2008). This makes conventional sanitation provision untenable citywide, giving rise to the emergence of sanitation mixtures. Sanitation mixtures have different scales, institutional arrangements, user groups, and rationalities for their establishment, location, and management. For assessing the performan...

  13. Skill Levels of Prospective Physics Teachers on Problem Posing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cildir, Sema; Sezen, Nazan

    2011-01-01

    Problem posing is one of the topics which the educators thoroughly accentuate. Problem posing skill is defined as an introvert activity of a student's learning. In this study, skill levels of prospective physics teachers on problem posing were determined and their views on problem posing were evaluated. To this end, prospective teachers were given…

  14. Measurement of VOCs in vehicle exhaust by extractive FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Bernhard; Paar, H.; Sturm, Peter J.

    2001-02-01

    12 The detection of benzene and other organic compounds in vehicle exhaust by FT-IR-spectroscopy is seriously limited by the strong interference of carbon dioxide and the rather weak absorption coefficient of the gases. Therefore, a measurement device was developed which separates the components of interest (mostly VOCs) from carbon dioxide, water and nitric oxide. In addition the VOCs have to be pre- concentrated. To avoid condensation of VOCs the measurements have to take place at higher temperatures. The vehicle exhaust was led through an activated charcoal tube where the organic compounds were adsorbed. Afterwards, the charcoal tube was heated in a furnace, the VOCs were desorbed thermically and were carried by (heated) nitrogen into a gas cell with a path-length of 10 m where the concentration of the different species was measured. With the help of this measurement device a lot of VOC- components like benzene, toluene, and xylene were detected successfully. Measurements were performed on an engine test bed and a chassis dynamometer for heavy duty vehicles. The detection limit of most of the VOCs was about 2 to 3 ppb for a sampling time of 20 min. Calibration measurements showed an accuracy of 15%.

  15. A Novel Methodology to Evaluate Health Impacts Caused by VOC Exposures Using Real-Time VOC and Holter Monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Kumano

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available While various volatile organic compounds (VOCs are known to show neurotoxic effects, the detailed mechanisms of the action of VOCs on the autonomic nervous system are not fully understood, partially because objective and quantitative measures to indicate neural abnormalities are still under development. Nevertheless, heart rate variability (HRV has been recently proposed as an indicative measure of the autonomic effects. In this study, we used HRV as an indicative measure of the autonomic effrects to relate their values to the personal concentrations of VOCs measured by a real-time VOC monitor. The measurements were conducted for 24 hours on seven healthy subjects under usual daily life conditions. The results showed HF powers were significantly decreased for six subjects when the changes of total volatile organic compound (TVOC concentrations were large, indicating a suppression of parasympathetic nervous activity induced by the exposure to VOCs. The present study indicated these real-time monitoring was useful to characterize the trends of VOC exposures and their effects on autonomic nervous system.

  16. Relative Pose Estimation Algorithm with Gyroscope Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel vision and inertial fusion algorithm S2fM (Simplified Structure from Motion for camera relative pose estimation. Different from current existing algorithms, our algorithm estimates rotation parameter and translation parameter separately. S2fM employs gyroscopes to estimate camera rotation parameter, which is later fused with the image data to estimate camera translation parameter. Our contributions are in two aspects. (1 Under the circumstance that no inertial sensor can estimate accurately enough translation parameter, we propose a translation estimation algorithm by fusing gyroscope sensor and image data. (2 Our S2fM algorithm is efficient and suitable for smart devices. Experimental results validate efficiency of the proposed S2fM algorithm.

  17. Ethical quandaries posing as conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottow, Miguel

    2010-06-01

    Conflicts of interest are receiving increased attention in medical research, clinical practice and education. Criticism of, and penalties for, conflicts of interest have been insufficiently discussed and have been applied without adequate conceptual backing. Genuine conflicts of interest are situations in which alternative courses of action are ethically equivalent, decision-making being less a matter of moral deliberation than of personal weighing of interest. In contrast, situations usually thought of as conflicts of interest are mostly temptations to follow an attractive but undue option that causes harm by failing to uphold well-entrenched ethical standards. Examples of moral quandaries that pose as ethically neutral conflicts of interest are healthcare providers enticed to favour certain products; patients being referred to non-therapeutic trials entailing risks and non-optimal healthcare; industry-supported scientists failing to deliver unbiased research results and reports or participating in ghost-writing; and sponsored educators who praise their supporters beyond objective evidence. All these are moral blemishes, where integrity gives way to material incentives at the cost of provoking risky and harm-producing situations, thus constituting false conflicts of interest when they are in fact ethical misdemeanours. Disclosure has been the most widely recommended response to avoid the concealment of conflicting and ethically suspect interests. Regulations regarding disclosure reveal a utilitarian stance that shows more concern for the magnitude of support or sponsorship than for the underlying ethical transgression. Education and oversight should directly address and help correct the moral attitude towards undue influence of inducements and marketing strategies falsely posing as conflicts of interest.

  18. The Coffee-Milk Mixture Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of a problem that is frequently posed at professional development workshops, in print, and on the Web--the coffee-milk mixture riddle--illustrates the timeless advice of George Pólya's masterpiece on problem solving in mathematics, "How to Solve It." In his book, Pólya recommends that problems previously solved and put…

  19. The Coffee-Milk Mixture Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of a problem that is frequently posed at professional development workshops, in print, and on the Web--the coffee-milk mixture riddle--illustrates the timeless advice of George Pólya's masterpiece on problem solving in mathematics, "How to Solve It." In his book, Pólya recommends that problems previously solved and put…

  20. H2S and VOCs abatement robustness in biofilters and air diffusion bioreactors: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrero, Raquel; Rodríguez, Elisa; Martin, María; García-Encina, Pedro A; Muñoz, Raúl

    2010-07-01

    The robustness of a conventional biofilter and an air diffusion bioreactor (ADB) was comparatively evaluated in laboratory-scale plants treating a mixture of H2S, butanone, toluene and alpha-pinene at gas residence times of 50 s. Under steady state conditions, H2S, butanone and toluene were almost completely degraded, while alpha-pinene removal did not exhibit removal efficiencies (REs) higher than 11.0 +/- 2.3%. Fluctuations in temperature from 8 degrees C to 30 degrees C did not impact significantly process performance in any of the biotechnologies tested. However, while the ADB unit was able to cope with three and six fold step increases in pollutant loadings, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) REs noticeably decreased in the biofilter when subjected to a six fold step change (i.e. 90% reduction for butanone and 30% for toluene). A process shutdown of five days resulted in the temporary loss of butanone and toluene RE in the ADB system. A lack of irrigation during five days caused a slight decrease in the biofilter REs, while a failure in the pH control system drastically affected the ADB performance. Finally, process robustness was quantified. The calculated overall risks showed that both biotechnologies were reliable for H2S and VOCs treatment in wastewater treatment plants, ADB diffusion exhibiting a higher robustness towards fluctuations commonly found under routine operation. This robustness was further confirmed by the high stability of the DGGE profiles.

  1. Dissociation against oxidation kinetics for the conversion of VOCs in non-thermal plasmas of atmospheric gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquiers, Stéphane; Blin-Simiand, Nicole; Magne, Lionel

    2016-08-01

    The kinetics of four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (propene, propane, acetaldehyde, acetone) were studied in plasmas of atmospheric gases using a photo-triggered discharge (homogeneous plasma) or a dielectric barrier discharge (filamentary plasma). It was shown for the homogeneous plasma that quenchings of nitrogen metastable states, A3Ʃ+u and the group of singlets a' 1Ʃ-u, a 1Πg and w 1∆u, are important processes for the decomposition of such molecules. Recent measurements of the H2 concentration produced in the N2/C3H6 mixture emphasize that the hydrogen molecule can be an exit route for propene dissociation. It is also found that H2 and CO molecules are efficiently produced following the dissociation of CH3COCH3 and the subsequent chemical reactivity induced by radicals coming from acetone. Addition of oxygen to a N2/VOC mixture can change drastically the kinetics. However, the quenching processes of N2 metastables by the VOC are always present and compete with oxidation reactions for the conversion of the pollutant. At low temperature, oxidations by O or by OH are not always sufficiently effective to induce an increase of the molecule decomposition when oxygen is added to the mixture. In particular, the presence of O2 has a detrimental effect on the acetone removal. Also, as evidenced for acetaldehyde and propane, some kinetic analogies appear between filamentary and homogeneous plasmas. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  2. TO PURGE OR NOT TO PURGE? VOC CONCENTRATION ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil vapor surveys are commonly used as a screening technique to delineate volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminant plumes and provide information for soil sampling plans. Traditionally, three purge volumes of vapor are removed before a sample is collected. One facet of this study was to evaluate the VOC concentrations lost during purging and explore the potential implications of those losses. The vapor data was compared to collocated soil data to determine if any correlation existed between the VOC concentrations. Two different methods for soil vapor collection were compared: 1) active/micro-volume; and 2) active/macro-volume. The active/micro-volume vapor sample had total line purge volume of 1.25 mL and the active/macro-volume vapor sample had a total line purge volume of 15 mL. Six line purge volumes were collected for each vapor sampling technique, with the fourth purge volume representing the traditional sample used for site screening data. Each sample was collected by gas tight syringe and transferred to a thermal de sorption tube for sorption, transport, and analysis. Following the removal of the soil vapor samples, collocated soil samples were taken. For both active vapor sampling techniques, the VOC concentrations in the first three purge volumes exceeded the VOC concentrations in the last three purge volumes. This implies that the general rule of removal of three purge volumes prior to taking a sample for analysis could lead to underestimating the

  3. Human pose tracking by parametric annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Kaliamoorthi, Prabhu

    2012-01-01

    Model based methods to marker-free motion capture have a very high computational overhead that make them unattractive. In this paper we describe a method that improves on existing global optimization techniques to tracking articulated objects. Our method improves on the state-of-the-art Annealed Particle Filter (APF) by reusing samples across annealing layers and by using an adaptive parametric density for diffusion. We compare the proposed method with APF on a scalable problem and study how the two methods scale with the dimensionality, multi-modality and the range of search. Then we perform sensitivity analysis on the parameters of our algorithm and show that it tolerates a wide range of parameter settings. We also show results on tracking human pose from the widely-used Human Eva I dataset. Our results show that the proposed method reduces the tracking error despite using less than 50% of the computational resources as APF. The tracked output also shows a significant qualitative improvement over APF as dem...

  4. Logo Detection Using Pose Clustering and Momentums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Karimi Tafti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, logo and arm detection with growing variety and number of arms in companies and countries is one of the significant topics in image processing. For logo detection there are many image processing algorithms which can be used for this purpose regard to features of the logo. In the most of recent works, images are exactly the logos, but in general, the logo can be one portion of another image or even can transform (rotate, skew, shift, … and have more complexity. In this paper we will select Iran logo as a sample, because it has not any regular geometric form and has special complexity. In a bank of images we will try to find this logo and its position with its transformation. Images bank includes images that has not Iran logo or has Iran logo with affine transform within another pictures. Approaches that will be discussed here are pose clustering and momentum clustering. Simulation results show that this approach can be used as a suitable way for finding the existence and position of arm in this field.

  5. Optimal Control of Non-well-posed Heat Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geng Sheng WANG

    2005-01-01

    This work is concerned with Pontryagin's maximum principle of optimal control problems governed by some non-well-posed semilinear heat equations. A type of approach to the non-well-posed optimal control problem is given.

  6. High-molecular products analysis of VOC destruction in atmospheric pressure discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmannova, Hana; Ciganek, Miroslav; Krcma, Frantisek

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the issue of applicability of the solid phase microextraction (SPME) in the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) destruction products in the gliding arc discharge. Our research is focused on the measurements with the simple one stage gliding arc reactor, applied voltage was varied in the range of 3.5-4 kV. As a carrier gas, the dry air and its mixtures with nitrogen and oxygen, enriched by toluene, with flow rate of 1000-3500 ml/min was used. Total decomposition of toluene of 97 % was achieved at the oxygen content in carrier gas of 60 %. For measurements with air as a carrier gas, the highest efficiency was 95 %. We also tested the SPME technique suitability for the quantitative analysis of exhausts gases and if this technique can be used efficiently in the field to extract byproducts. Carbowax/divinylbenzene and Carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fibres were chosen for sampling. Tens of various high-molecular substances were observed, especially a large number of oxygenous compounds and further several nitrogenous and CxHy compounds. The concentrations of various generated compounds strongly depend on the oxygen content in gas mixture composition. The results showed that the fiber coated by Carbowax/divinylbenzene can extract more products independently on the used VOC compound. The Carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fiber is useful for the analysis of oxygenous compounds and its use will be recommended especially when the destruction is done in the oxygen rich atmosphere. With the higher ratio of oxygen in the carrier gas a distinctive decline of CxHy compounds amount have been observed. We also tried to describe the significant production of some compounds like benzyl alcohol, benzeneacetaldehyde, even in oxygen content is proximate 0 %. Experimental data demonstrated that it is necessary to use several SPME fibres for full-scale high-molecular products analysis.

  7. In vivo analysis of palm wine (Elaeis guineensis) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasekan, Ola; Otto, Sabine

    2009-04-01

    The in vivo volatile organic compounds (VOCs) release patterns in palm wine was carried out using the PTR-MS. In order to analyze the complex mixtures of VOCs in palm wine, the fragmentation patterns of 14 known aroma compounds of palm wine were also investigated. Results revealed masses m/z (43, 47, 61, 65, 75, 89 and 93) as the predominant ones measured in-breathe exhaled from the nose, during consumption of palm wine. Further studies of aroma's fragmentation patterns, showed that the m/z 43 is characteristic of fragment of various compounds, while m/z 47 is ethanol, m/z 61(acetic acid), m/z 65 (protonated ethanol cluster ions), m/z 75 (methyl acetate), m/z 89 (acetoin) and m/z 93 (2-phenylethanol) respectively. The dynamic release parameters (Imax and tmax) of the 7 masses revealed significant (P = 0.05) differences, between maximum intensity (Imax) and no significant (P = 0.05) differences between tmax among VOCs respectively.

  8. Distributions of personal VOC exposures: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chunrong; D'Souza, Jennifer; Batterman, Stuart

    2008-10-01

    Information regarding the distribution of volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations and exposures is scarce, and there have been few, if any, studies using population-based samples from which representative estimates can be derived. This study characterizes distributions of personal exposures to ten different VOCs in the U.S. measured in the 1999--2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Personal VOC exposures were collected for 669 individuals over 2-3 days, and measurements were weighted to derive national-level statistics. Four common exposure sources were identified using factor analyses: gasoline vapor and vehicle exhaust, methyl tert-butyl ether (MBTE) as a gasoline additive, tap water disinfection products, and household cleaning products. Benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylenes chloroform, and tetrachloroethene were fit to log-normal distributions with reasonably good agreement to observations. 1,4-Dichlorobenzene and trichloroethene were fit to Pareto distributions, and MTBE to Weibull distribution, but agreement was poor. However, distributions that attempt to match all of the VOC exposure data can lead to incorrect conclusions regarding the level and frequency of the higher exposures. Maximum Gumbel distributions gave generally good fits to extrema, however, they could not fully represent the highest exposures of the NHANES measurements. The analysis suggests that complete models for the distribution of VOC exposures require an approach that combines standard and extreme value distributions, and that carefully identifies outliers. This is the first study to provide national-level and representative statistics regarding the VOC exposures, and its results have important implications for risk assessment and probabilistic analyses.

  9. Effects of Dressing Poses on Clothing Thermal Insulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊; 刘岩; 张渭源

    2004-01-01

    With a thermal manikin, the effects of dressing poses on clothing thermal insulation are studied. It is found that the thermal insulation of still air layer over human body has not been influenced by the dressing poses, but the dressing poses have effects on the thermal insulation of clothing system.

  10. 2D Methods for pose invariant face recognition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mokoena, Ntabiseng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to recognise face images under random pose is a task that is done effortlessly by human beings. However, for a computer system, recognising face images under varying poses still remains an open research area. Face recognition across pose...

  11. Unseen head pose prediction using dense multivariate label distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao-li SANG; Hu CHEN; Ge HUANG; Qi-jun ZHAO

    2016-01-01

    Accurate head poses are useful for many face-related tasks such as face recognition, gaze estimation, and emotion analysis. Most existing methods estimate head poses that are included in the training data (i.e., previously seen head poses). To predict head poses that are not seen in the training data, some regression-based methods have been proposed. However, they focus on estimating continuous head pose angles, and thus do not systematically evaluate the performance on predicting unseen head poses. In this paper, we use a dense multivariate label distribution (MLD) to represent the pose angle of a face image. By incorporating both seen and unseen pose angles into MLD, the head pose predictor can estimate unseen head poses with an accuracy comparable to that of estimating seen head poses. On the Pointing’04 database, the mean absolute errors of results for yaw and pitch are 4.01◦ and 2.13◦, respectively. In addition, experiments on the CAS-PEAL and CMU Multi-PIE databases show that the proposed dense MLD-based head pose estimation method can obtain the state-of-the-art performance when compared to some existing methods.

  12. Transfer between Pose and Illumination Training in Face Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang Hong; Bhuiyan, Md. Al-Amin; Ward, James; Sui, Jie

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between pose and illumination learning in face recognition was examined in a yes-no recognition paradigm. The authors assessed whether pose training can transfer to a new illumination or vice versa. Results show that an extensive level of pose training through a face-name association task was able to generalize to a new…

  13. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during malting and beer manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Nigel B.; Costigan, Gavin T.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Woodfield, Michael J.

    Estimates have been made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released during different stages of beer manufacture. The estimates are based on recent measurements and plant specification data supplied by manufacturers. Data were obtained for three main manufacturing processes (malting, wort processing and fermentation) for three commercial beer types. Some data on the speciation of emitted compounds have been obtained. Based on these measurements, an estimate of the total unabated VOC emission. from the U.K. brewing industry was calculated as 3.5 kta -1, over 95% of which was generated during barley malting. This value does not include any correction for air pollution control.

  14. Matrix effect on the performance of headspace solid phase microextraction method for the analysis of target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashikawa, Fábio S; Cayuela, Maria Luz; Roig, Asunción; Silva, Carlos A; Sánchez-Monedero, Miguel A

    2013-11-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) is a fast, cheap and solvent free methodology widely used for environmental analysis. A SPME methodology has been optimized for the analysis of VOCs in a range of matrices covering different soils of varying textures, organic matrices from manures and composts from different origins, and biochars. The performance of the technique was compared for the different matrices spiked with a multicomponent VOC mixture, selected to cover different VOC groups of environmental relevance (ketone, terpene, alcohol, aliphatic hydrocarbons and alkylbenzenes). VOC recovery was dependent on the nature itself of the VOC and the matrix characteristics. The SPME analysis of non-polar compounds, such as alkylbenzenes, terpenes and aliphatic hydrocarbons, was markedly affected by the type of matrix as a consequence of the competition for the adsorption sites in the SPME fiber. These non-polar compounds were strongly retained in the biochar surfaces limiting the use of SPME for this type of matrices. However, this adsorption capacity was not evident when biochar had undergone a weathering/aging process through composting. Polar compounds (alcohol and ketone) showed a similar behavior in all matrices, as a consequence of the hydrophilic characteristics, affected by water content in the matrix. SPME showed a good performance for soils and organic matrices especially for non-polar compounds, achieving a limit of detection (LD) and limit of quantification (LQ) of 0.02 and 0.03 ng g(-1) for non-polar compounds and poor extraction for more hydrophilic and polar compounds (LD and LQ higher 310 and 490 ng g(-1)). The characteristics of the matrix, especially pH and organic matter, had a marked impact on SPME, due to the competition of the analytes for active sites in the fiber, but VOC biodegradation should not be discarded in matrices with active microbial biomass.

  15. Cancer risks posed by aflatoxin M1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, D P; Cullen, J M; Hsieh, L S; Shao, Y; Ruebner, B H

    1985-01-01

    The suspect milk-borne carcinogen, aflatoxin M1 (AFM), was produced and isolated from the rice culture of the fungus Aspergillus flavus NRRL3251 for confirmation and determination of the potency of its carcinogenicity in the male adult Fischer rat. The carcinogen was mixed into an agar-based, semisynthetic diet at 0, 0.5, 5, and 50 ppb (microgram/kg) and was fed to groups of animals continuously for 19-21 months. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB), of which AFM is a metabolite, at 50 ppb was used as a positive control. Hepatocarcinogenicity of AFM was detected at 50 ppb, but not at 5 or 0.5 ppb, with a potency of 2-10% that of AFB. A low incidence of intestinal adenocarcinomas was found in the AFM 50 ppb group, but not in any other groups. At 0.5 ppb, the action level enforced by the U.S.A. Food and Drug Administration, AFM induced no liver lesions in the rats but stimulated the animals' growth. On the average, the rats in the 0.5 ppb group weighed 11% (p less than 0.001) more than those in the control group. This increased growth was associated with increased feed intake. Based on the biological activity of AFM at the relevant low doses and the estimated level of human exposure to AFM through consumption of milk, the cancer risk posed by this contaminant for human adults is assessed to be very low. For infants, further studies are warranted because milk constitutes the major ingredient of the infant diet and because infant animals have been shown to be more sensitive to the carcinogenicity of AFB than adult animals.

  16. Modeling competitive adsorption of mixtures of volatile organic compounds in a fixed-bed of beaded activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefera, Dereje Tamiru; Hashisho, Zaher; Philips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2014-05-06

    A two-dimensional mathematical model was developed to study competitive adsorption of n-component mixtures in a fixed-bed adsorber. The model consists of an isotherm equation to predict adsorption equilibria of n-component volatile organic compounds (VOCs) mixture from single component isotherm data, and a dynamic adsorption model, the macroscopic mass, energy and momentum conservation equations, to simulate the competitive adsorption of the n-components onto a fixed-bed of adsorbent. The model was validated with experimentally measured data of competitive adsorption of binary and eight-component VOCs mixtures onto beaded activated carbon (BAC). The mean relative absolute error (MRAE) was used to compare the modeled and measured breakthrough profiles as well as the amounts of adsorbates adsorbed. For the binary and eight-component mixtures, the MRAE of the breakthrough profiles was 13 and 12%, respectively, whereas, the MRAE of the adsorbed amounts was 1 and 2%, respectively. These data show that the model provides accurate prediction of competitive adsorption of multicomponent VOCs mixtures and the competitive adsorption isotherm equation is able to accurately predict equilibrium adsorption of VOCs mixtures.

  17. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, W.; Yan, H.; Hooda, U.; Wild, M.P.; Banerjee, S. [Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shmulsky, R.; Thompson, A.; Ingram, L.; Conners, T. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This study was initiated by an Institute of Paper Science and Technology finding that heating softwood in a low-headspace environment removed much of the VOCs without removing the water. This offered the possibility of removing VOCs from wet wood, capturing them as a product, and then drying the VOC-depleted wood conventionally with little or no VOC controls. Two means of low-headspace heating were explored: steam and radiofrequency (RF). It was found in the previous year, that while both steam and RF were able to drive out VOCs, steam was impracticably slow for lumber. Hence the effect of RF or microwave on wood was the principal focus of the work reported here. Finally, in order to understand the mechanism of VOC release, the transport of the VOCs in wood was studied, together with the seasonal effects that influence VOC concentration in trees.

  18. VocVille - A Casual Social Game for Learning Vocabulary

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The document introduces VocVille, a causal online game for learning vocabularies. This application is created for the author's diploma thesis of his career as a Computervisualist (computer vision) for the University of Koblenz-Landau, which he terminated as an exchange student at the University of Cádiz, in which he developed this diploma thesis.

  19. Assessment of Industrial VOC Gas-Scrubber Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, H

    2004-02-13

    Gas scrubbers for air-pollution control of volatile organic compounds (VOC) cover a wide range of technologies. In this review, we have attempted to evaluate the single-pass scrubber destruction and removal efficiencies (DREs) for a range of gas-scrubber technologies. We have focused primarily on typical industrial DREs for the various technologies, typical problems, and any DRE-related experiential information available. The very limited literature citations found suggest significant differences between actual versus design performance in some technologies. The potentially significant role of maintenance in maintaining DREs was also investigated for those technologies. An in-depth portrayal of the entire gas scrubbing industry is elusive. Available literature sources suggest significant differences between actual versus design performance in some technologies. Lack of scrubber system maintenance can contribute to even larger variances. ''Typical'' industrial single-pass performance of commonly used VOC gas scrubbers generally ranged from {approx}80 to 99%. Imperfect solid and/or liquid particulates capture (possibly as low as 95% despite design for 99+% capture efficiency) can also lead to VOC releases. Changing the VOC composition in the gas stream without modifying scrubber equipment or operating conditions could also lead to significant deterioration in attainable destruction and removal efficiencies.

  20. EVALUATION OF SINK EFFECTS ON VOCS FROM A LATEX PAINT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sink strength of two common indoor materials, a carpet and a gypsum board, was evaluated by environmental chamber tests with four volatile organic compounds (VOCs): propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, 2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethanol (BEE), and texanol. These oxygenated compounds rep...

  1. CASE STUDIES: LOW-VOC/HAP WOOD FURNITURE COATINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a study in which wood furniture manufacturing facilities were identified that had converted at least one of their primary coating steps to low-volatile organic compound (VOC)/hazardous Air pollutant (HAP) wood furniture coatings: high-solids, water...

  2. RESEARCH AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-VOC WOOD COATINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses a project, cofunded by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and the U.S. EPA, to develop a new, low volatile organic compound (VOC) wood coating. Traditional wood furniture coating technologies contain organic solvents which become air pol...

  3. Solid-phase microextraction and the human fecal VOC metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Dixon

    Full Text Available The diagnostic potential and health implications of volatile organic compounds (VOCs present in human feces has begun to receive considerable attention. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME has greatly facilitated the isolation and analysis of VOCs from human feces. Pioneering human fecal VOC metabolomic investigations have utilized a single SPME fiber type for analyte extraction and analysis. However, we hypothesized that the multifarious nature of metabolites present in human feces dictates the use of several diverse SPME fiber coatings for more comprehensive metabolomic coverage. We report here an evaluation of eight different commercially available SPME fibers, in combination with both GC-MS and GC-FID, and identify the 50/30 µm CAR-DVB-PDMS, 85 µm CAR-PDMS, 65 µm DVB-PDMS, 7 µm PDMS, and 60 µm PEG SPME fibers as a minimal set of fibers appropriate for human fecal VOC metabolomics, collectively isolating approximately 90% of the total metabolites obtained when using all eight fibers. We also evaluate the effect of extraction duration on metabolite isolation and illustrate that ex vivo enteric microbial fermentation has no effect on metabolite composition during prolonged extractions if the SPME is performed as described herein.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF AEROBIC BIOFILTER DESIGN CRITERIA FOR TREATING VOCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reports preliminary results on the use of trickle bed biofilters with monolithic ceramic channelized microbial support structures for the treatment of VOCs typical of landfill leachate stripping. Toluene was used for the purpose of characterizing the trickle bed biofi...

  5. Accuracy of seven vapour intrusion algorithms for VOC in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provoost, Jeroen; Bronders, Jan; Seuntjens, Piet [Flemish Inst. for Technological Research (VITO), Mol (Belgium); Reijnders, Lucas [Dept. of Science, Open Univ. Netherlands (OU NL), Heerlen (Netherlands); Swartjes, Frank; Lijzen, Johannes [National Inst. for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2009-02-15

    During the last decade, soil contamination with volatile organic contaminants (VOC) received special attention because of their potential to cause indoor air problems. Moreover, research has shown that people spend 64% to 94% of there time indoors; therefore, the indoor air quality is of a primary importance for exposure to VOC. Human health risks to VOC-in cases of soil contamination-are often dominated by the exposure route 'inhalation of indoor air'. Exposure is often a result of vapour transport from the soil or groundwater to the indoor air of the building. Within human health risk assessments, a variety of algorithms are available that calculate transfer of soil gas to the indoor air. These algorithms suffer from a relatively high uncertainty due to a lack of representation of spatial and temporal variability. For such an application, these algorithms need to be further verified empirically against field observations so that they can be sufficiently reliable for regulatory purposes. This paper presents the accuracy for seven algorithms by using observed and predicted soil and indoor air concentrations from three sites, where the groundwater had been contaminated with aromatic and chlorinated VOC. (orig.)

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF AEROBIC BIOFILTER DESIGN CRITERIA FOR TREATING VOCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reports preliminary results on the use of trickle bed biofilters with monolithic ceramic channelized microbial support structures for the treatment of VOCs typical of landfill leachate stripping. Toluene was used for the purpose of characterizing the trickle bed biofi...

  7. Accuracy of seven vapour intrusion algorithms for VOC in groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Provoost, J.; Reijnders, L.; Swartjes, F.; Bronders, J.; Seuntjens, P.; Lijzen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background, aim and scope: During the last decade, soil contamination with volatile organic contaminants (VOC) received special attention because of their potential to cause indoor air problems. Moreover, research has shown that people spend 64% to 94% of there time indoors; therefore, the indoor ai

  8. VOC signatures from North American oil and gas sources (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, I. J.; Marrero, J.; Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Hartt, G.; Meinardi, S.; Schroeder, J.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Between 2008 and 2013 UC Irvine has used its whole air sampling (WAS) technique to investigate VOC source signatures from a range of oil and gas sources in North America, including five separate field campaigns at the Alberta oil sands (1 airborne, 4 ground-based); the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill (airborne and ship-based); the 2012 airborne Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) mission over oil and gas wells in Colorado, Texas and Oklahoma; and the 2013 ground-based Barnett Shale Campaign in Texas. Each campaign has characterized more than 80 individual C1-C10 VOCs including alkanes, alkenes and aromatics. For example, oil sands are an extra-heavy, unconventional crude oil that is blended with diluent in order to flow, and upgraded into synthetic crude oil. The VOC signature at the oil sands mining and upgrading facilities is alkane-rich, and the fuel gas associated with these operations has an i-butane/n-butane ratio similar to that of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). In addition to light alkanes, enhanced levels of benzene were observed over US oil and natural gas wells during DC3, likely because of its use in hydrofracking fluid. A series of VOC emission ratios from North American petrochemical sources will be presented and compared, including oil sands, conventional oil and hydrofracking operations.

  9. Bubble-facilitated VOC transport from LNAPL smear zones and its potential effect on vapor intrusion: Laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy, N. C.; Mumford, K. G.

    2016-12-01

    Light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) sources can pose a significant threat to indoor air through the volatilization of hydrocarbons from the source and the subsequent transport of vapor through the soil. If subjected to the rise and fall of a water table, an LNAPL source can become a smear zone that consists of trapped discontinuous LNAPL blobs (residual) and has a higher aqueous permeability and higher surface area-to-volume ratio than pool sources. The rise and fall of a water table can also trap atmospheric air bubbles alongside the LNAPL. If these bubbles expand and become mobile, either through partitioning of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or the production of biogenic gases, bubble-facilitated vertical vapor transport can occur. It is important to understand the bubble-facilitated transport of VOCs as it is a mechanism that could lead to faster transport. The transport of VOCs from smear zones was investigated using laboratory column and visualization experiments. In the column experiments, pentane LNAPL was emplaced in a 5 cm sand-packed source zone and the water level was raised and lowered to trap residual LNAPL and air bubbles. Each column also contained a 10 cm-high zone of clean saturated sand, and a 10 cm vadose zone of 4 mm-diameter glass beads. Water was pumped through the source and occlusion zones, and air flowed across the top of the column, where vapor samples were collected and analyzed immediately by gas chromatography. In the visualization experiments, pentane LNAPL was emplaced in a two-dimensional cell designed to allow visualization of mobilized LNAPL and gas through glass walls. Results of the column experiments showed VOC mass fluxes in test columns were 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than in the control columns. In addition, the flux signal was intermittent, consistent with expectations of bubble-facilitated transport. The results from the visualization experiments showed gas fingers growing and mobilizing over time, and supports

  10. Conversion Characteristics and Production Evaluation of Styrene/o-Xylene Mixtures Removed by DBD Pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of chemical oxidation methods with biotechnology to removal recalcitrant VOCs is a promising technology. In this paper, the aim was to identify the role of key process parameters and biodegradability of the degradation products using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD reactor, which provided the fundamental data to evaluate the possibilities of the combined system. Effects of various technologic parameters like initial concentration of mixtures, residence time and relative humidity on the decomposition and the degradation products were examined and discussed. It was found that the removal efficiency of mixed VOCs decreased with increasing initial concentration. The removal efficiency reached the maximum value as relative humidity was approximately 40%–60%. Increasing the residence time resulted in increasing the removal efficiency and the order of destruction efficiency of VOCs followed the order styrene > o-xylene. Compared with the single compounds, the removal efficiency of styrene and o-xylene in the mixtures of VOCs decreased significantly and o-xylene decreased more rapidly. The degradation products were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the main compounds detected were O3, COx and benzene ring derivatives. The biodegradability of mixed VOCs was improved and the products had positive effect on biomass during plasma application, and furthermore typical results indicated that the biodegradability and biotoxicity of gaseous pollutant were quite depending on the specific input energy (SIE.

  11. Conversion characteristics and production evaluation of styrene/o-xylene mixtures removed by DBD pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liying; Zhu, Runye; Mao, Yubo; Chen, Jianmeng; Zhang, Liang

    2015-01-26

    The combination of chemical oxidation methods with biotechnology to removal recalcitrant VOCs is a promising technology. In this paper, the aim was to identify the role of key process parameters and biodegradability of the degradation products using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor, which provided the fundamental data to evaluate the possibilities of the combined system. Effects of various technologic parameters like initial concentration of mixtures, residence time and relative humidity on the decomposition and the degradation products were examined and discussed. It was found that the removal efficiency of mixed VOCs decreased with increasing initial concentration. The removal efficiency reached the maximum value as relative humidity was approximately 40%-60%. Increasing the residence time resulted in increasing the removal efficiency and the order of destruction efficiency of VOCs followed the order styrene > o-xylene. Compared with the single compounds, the removal efficiency of styrene and o-xylene in the mixtures of VOCs decreased significantly and o-xylene decreased more rapidly. The degradation products were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the main compounds detected were O3, COx and benzene ring derivatives. The biodegradability of mixed VOCs was improved and the products had positive effect on biomass during plasma application, and furthermore typical results indicated that the biodegradability and biotoxicity of gaseous pollutant were quite depending on the specific input energy (SIE).

  12. Increasing competitiveness of wine producers in strategic alliances VOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Prokeš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the main reasons for the formation of new regional association of wineries, based on a different origin for wines in the wine region of Moravia in the southeast part of the Czech Republic. This research aim is to create a plan for new development of such strategic alliances on the basis of results of localization factors. There coefficient of localization is used for identification of cluster. Results are compared with already operating on associations for the appellation in Austria DAC. They were traced changes in consumer preferences in the Czech wine market. Consumers are placing more emphasis on the selection of wine on its descent from a particular area, growing community and the individual grower. This paper specifically introduces new associations for appellation system VOC. This alliance is described in the context of the establishment, operation, development and expansion, respectively the possibility of involvement of additional organizations suppliers and research institutions. The application of the results of research was a plan for the establishment of new alliance VOC Modré Hory, where are associated 30 wine producers of wine in 5 villages around the center Velké Pavlovice. Based on the experience of newly emerging VOC system of appellations was setting up a plan of formation association with the proposed methodological approach. Open cooperation between associations VOC appellation and other entities involving suppliers, customers, research institutions and universities has the possibility of creating an institutionalized wine cluster. The plan to create a wine cluster was proposed to establish cooperation between the newly emerging associations of VOC at three sub-regions of South Moravia, in order to achieve competitive advantage.

  13. Biofiltration of wastewater lift station emissions: evaluation of VOC removal in the presence of H{sub 2}S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Rathibandla, Snehasheela; Jones, Kim; Cabezas, Jose [Texas A and M University-Kingsville, Department of Environmental Engineering, Kingsville, TX (United States)

    2008-02-15

    The capacity of biofilter systems to remove volatile organic compounds in the presence of high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide was investigated for applications in wastewater lift stations. The treatment system was an enclosed unit composed of a biotrickling filter coupled with a biofilter. The biofilter media were plastic hollow spherical balls filled with a compost mixture; and the biotrickling filter media was a structured plastic packing. The gases from the pumping station wet well were a mixture of H{sub 2}S and low concentration aliphatic and aromatic VOCs, toluene being the most significant in concentrations of 41 ppb. The H{sub 2}S concentration was 314 ppm with fluctuations of 100 ppm resulting from pumping cycles at the station. No inhibition effect was detected from the simultaneous biological removal of VOCs and H{sub 2}S: toluene removal efficiency was 91% with the two sections contributing approximately equally to the pollutant removal; and the average removal of H{sub 2}S was 74%. A traditional open-in-ground biofilter filled with wood chips and compost, existing in the site, attained similar removal efficiencies for toluene, but the elimination capacity of the biotrickling/biofilter system was 3.3-times higher than the open biofilter. (orig.)

  14. Mixture Density Mercer Kernels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We present a method of generating Mercer Kernels from an ensemble of probabilistic mixture models, where each mixture model is generated from a Bayesian mixture...

  15. To Strike a Pose: No Stereotype Backlash for Power Posing Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Rennung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Power posing, the adoption of open and powerful postures, has effects that parallel those of actual social power. This study explored the social evaluation of adopting powerful versus powerless body postures in men and women regarding perceived warmth, competence, and the likelihood of eliciting admiration, envy, pity, and contempt. Previous findings suggest that the display of power by women may have side effects due to gender stereotyping, namely reduced warmth ratings and negative emotional reactions. An experiment (N = 2,473 asked participants to rate pictures of men and women who adopted high-power or low-power body postures. High-power posers were rated higher on competence, admiration, envy, and contempt compared to low-power posers, whereas the opposite was true for pity. There was no impact of power posing on perceived warmth. Contrary to expectations, the poser’s gender did not moderate any of the effects. These findings suggest that nonverbal displays of power do influence fundamental dimensions of social perception and their accompanying emotional reactions but result in comparably positive and negative evaluations for both genders.

  16. To Strike a Pose: No Stereotype Backlash for Power Posing Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennung, Miriam; Blum, Johannes; Göritz, Anja S

    2016-01-01

    Power posing, the adoption of open and powerful postures, has effects that parallel those of actual social power. This study explored the social evaluation of adopting powerful vs. powerless body postures in men and women regarding perceived warmth, competence, and the likelihood of eliciting admiration, envy, pity, and contempt. Previous findings suggest that the display of power by women may have side effects due to gender stereotyping, namely reduced warmth ratings and negative emotional reactions. An experiment (N = 2,473) asked participants to rate pictures of men and women who adopted high-power or low-power body postures. High-power posers were rated higher on competence, admiration, envy, and contempt compared to low-power posers, whereas the opposite was true for pity. There was no impact of power posing on perceived warmth. Contrary to expectations, the poser's gender did not moderate any of the effects. These findings suggest that non-verbal displays of power do influence fundamental dimensions of social perception and their accompanying emotional reactions but result in comparably positive and negative evaluations for both genders.

  17. To Strike a Pose: No Stereotype Backlash for Power Posing Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennung, Miriam; Blum, Johannes; Göritz, Anja S.

    2016-01-01

    Power posing, the adoption of open and powerful postures, has effects that parallel those of actual social power. This study explored the social evaluation of adopting powerful vs. powerless body postures in men and women regarding perceived warmth, competence, and the likelihood of eliciting admiration, envy, pity, and contempt. Previous findings suggest that the display of power by women may have side effects due to gender stereotyping, namely reduced warmth ratings and negative emotional reactions. An experiment (N = 2,473) asked participants to rate pictures of men and women who adopted high-power or low-power body postures. High-power posers were rated higher on competence, admiration, envy, and contempt compared to low-power posers, whereas the opposite was true for pity. There was no impact of power posing on perceived warmth. Contrary to expectations, the poser’s gender did not moderate any of the effects. These findings suggest that non-verbal displays of power do influence fundamental dimensions of social perception and their accompanying emotional reactions but result in comparably positive and negative evaluations for both genders. PMID:27729887

  18. Local Feature Learning for Face Recognition under Varying Poses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Xiaodong; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a local feature learning method for face recognition to deal with varying poses. As opposed to the commonly used approaches of recovering frontal face images from profile views, the proposed method extracts the subject related part from a local feature by removing the pose...... related part in it on the basis of a pose feature. The method has a closed-form solution, hence being time efficient. For performance evaluation, cross pose face recognition experiments are conducted on two public face recognition databases FERET and FEI. The proposed method shows a significant...... recognition improvement under varying poses over general local feature approaches and outperforms or is comparable with related state-of-the-art pose invariant face recognition approaches. Copyright ©2015 by IEEE....

  19. PARAMETRIC EVALUATION OF VOC CONVERSION VIA CATALYTIC INCINERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaskantzis Neto G.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - A pilot-scale catalytic incineration system was used to investigate the effectiveness of catalytic incineration as a means of reducing volatile organic compound (VOC air pollutants. The objectives of the study were: 1 to investigate the effects of operating and design variables on the reduction efficiency of VOCs; and 2 to evaluate reduction efficiencies for specific compounds in different chemical classes. The study results verified that the following factors affect the catalyst performance: inlet temperature, space velocity, compound type, and compound inlet concentration. Tests showed that reduction efficiencies exceeding 98% were possible, given sufficiently high inlet gas temperatures for the following classes of compounds: alcohols, acetates, ketones, hydrocarbons, and aromatics

  20. Factors associated with sources, transport, and fate of volatile organic compounds and their mixtures in aquifers of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillace, P.J.; Moran, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Factors associated with sources, transport, and fate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater from aquifers throughout the United States were evaluated using statistical methods. Samples were collected from 1631 wells throughout the conterminous United States between 1996 and 2002 as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. Water samples from wells completed in aquifers used to supply drinking water were analyzed for more than 50 VOCs. Wells were primarily rural domestic water supplies (1184), followed by public water supplies (216); the remaining wells (231) supplied a variety of uses. The median well depth was 50 meters. Age-date information shows that about 60% of the samples had a fraction of water recharged after 1953. Chloroform, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and perchloroethene were some of the frequently detected VOCs. Concentrations generally were less than 1 ??g/L. Source factors include, in order of importance, general land-use activity, septic/sewer density, and sites where large concentrations of VOCs are potentially released, such as leaking underground storage tanks. About 10% of all samples had VOC mixtures that were associated with concentrated sources; 20% were associated with dispersed sources. Important transport factors included well/screen depth, precipitation/groundwater recharge, air temperature, and various soil characteristics. Dissolved oxygen was strongly associated with VOCs and represents the fate of many VOCs in groundwater. Well type (domestic or public water supply) was also an important explanatory factor. Results of multiple analyses show the importance of (1) accounting for both dispersed and concentrated sources of VOCs, (2) measuring dissolved oxygen when sampling wells to help explain the fate of VOCs, and (3) limiting the type of wells sampled in monitoring networks to avoid unnecessary variance in the data, or controlling for this variance during data analysis.

  1. Modeling the uncertainty of several VOC and its impact on simulated VOC and ozone in Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuai; Choi, Yunsoo; Roy, Anirban; Li, Xiangshang; Jeon, Wonbae; Souri, Amir Hossein

    2015-11-01

    A WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ modeling system was used to study Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions and their impact on surface VOC and ozone concentrations in southeast Texas during September 2013. The model was evaluated against the ground-level Automated Gas Chromatograph (Auto-GC) measurement data from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). The comparisons indicated that the model over-predicted benzene, ethylene, toluene and xylene, while under-predicting isoprene and ethane. The mean biases between simulated and observed values of each VOC species showed clear daytime, nighttime, weekday and weekend variations. Adjusting the VOC emissions using simulated/observed ratios improved model performance of each VOC species, especially mitigating the mean bias substantially. Simulated monthly mean ozone showed a minor change: a 0.4 ppb or 1.2% increase; while a change of more than 5 ppb was seen in hourly ozone data on high ozone days, this change moved model predictions closer to observations. The CMAQ model run with the adjusted emissions better reproduced the variability in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) formaldehyde (HCHO) columns. The adjusted model scenario also slightly better reproduced the aircraft HCHO concentrations from NASA's DISCOVER-AQ campaign conducted during the simulation episode period; Correlation, Mean Bias and RMSE improved from 0.34, 1.38 ppb and 2.15 ppb to 0.38, 1.33 ppb and 2.08 ppb respectively. A process analysis conducted for both industrial/urban and rural areas suggested that chemistry was the main process contributing to ozone production in both areas, while the impact of chemistry was smaller in rural areas than in industrial and urban areas. For both areas, the positive chemistry contribution increased in the sensitivity simulation largely due to the increase in emissions. Nudging VOC emissions to match the observed concentrations shifted the ozone hotspots

  2. Combining head pose and eye location information for gaze estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valenti, R.; Sebe, N.; Gevers, T.

    2012-01-01

    Head pose and eye location for gaze estimation have been separately studied in numerous works in the literature. Previous research shows that satisfactory accuracy in head pose and eye location estimation can be achieved in constrained settings. However, in the presence of nonfrontal faces, eye

  3. Motor biases do not influence posing orientation in selfies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindell, Annukka K

    2017-01-01

    When posing for portraits people tend to offer their left cheek. This bias is also evident in selfies: informal photographic self-portraits taken with a smartphone. Mechanical biases have been argued to influence selfie posing orientation (predicting that using the left hand favours a stronger left cheek bias), however this hypothesis has not been directly tested. The present study was thus designed to determine whether motor biases influence selfie pose orientation. Three hundred and twenty participants (F = 159, M = 161) were asked to pose for a selfie "as you really are," and completed a handedness measure; hand used to take the selfie and selfie pose orientation were recorded. Ordinal logistic regression confirmed that neither participant handedness nor hand used to capture the selfie predicted selfie pose orientation. Regardless of sex, handedness, or hand used, participants were more likely to present a midline (49.75%) than a left (26.53%) or right (26.72%) cheek pose. Though handedness was a strong predictor of hand used to capture the selfie (left handers favour the left, and right handers the right, hand), it did not predict posing orientation. These results confirm that selfie cheek biases are not simply a residual effect of the mechanics of taking selfies.

  4. Eyes Do Not Lie: Spontaneous Versus Posed Smiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibeklioğlu, H.; Valenti, R.; Salah, A.A.; Gevers, T.

    2010-01-01

    Automatic detection of spontaneous versus posed facial expressions received a lot of attention in recent years. However, almost all published work in this area use complex facial features or multiple modalities, such as head pose and body movements with facial features. Besides, the results of these

  5. Aromatic VOCs global influence in the ozone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Perez, David; Pozzer, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are a subgroup of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) of special interest in the atmosphere of urban and semi-urban areas. Aromatics form a high fraction of VOCs, are highly reactive and upon oxidation they are an important source of ozone. These group of VOCs are released to the atmosphere by processes related to biomass burning and fossil fuel consumption, while they are removed from the atmosphere primarily by OH reaction and by dry deposition. In addition, a branch of aromatics (ortho-nitrophenols) produce HONO upon photolysis, which is responsible of certain amount of the OH recycling. Despite their importance in the atmosphere in anthropogenic polluted areas, the influence of aromatics in the ozone production remains largely unknown. This is of particular relevance, being ozone a pollutant with severe side effects on air quality, health and climate. In this work the atmospheric impacts at global scale of the most emitted aromatic VOCs in the gas phase (benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene, phenol, benzaldehyde and trimethylbenzenes) are analysed and assessed. Specifically, the impact on ozone due to aromatic oxidation is estimated, as this is of great interest in large urban areas and can be helpful for developing air pollution control strategies. Further targets are the quantification of the NOx loss and the OH recycling due to aromatic oxidation. In order to investigate these processes, two simulations were performed with the numerical chemistry and climate simulation ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model. The simulations compare two cases, one with ozone concentrations when aromatics are present or the second one when they are missing. Finally, model simulated ozone is compared against a global set of observations in order to better constrain the model accuracy.

  6. Ensurdecimento vocálico em Zo’é

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Suelly Arruda Câmara Cabral

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho apresentamos uma descrição do fenômeno deensurdecimento vocálico na língua Zo’é (Tupi-Guarani. Sãoapresentadas ainda hipóteses acerca das restrições sincrônicas ativasno condicionamento deste fenômeno, além de uma hipótese acercada origem histórica do mesmo.

  7. Determination of VOC emission rates and compositions for offset printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadden, R A; Scheff, P A; Franke, J E; Conroy, L M; Keil, C B

    1995-07-01

    The release rates of volatile organic compounds (VOC) as fugitive emissions from offset printing are difficult to quantify, and the compositions are usually not known. Tests were conducted at three offset printing shops that varied in size and by process. In each case, the building shell served as the test "enclosure," and air flow and concentration measurements were made at each air entry and exit point. Emission rates and VOC composition were determined during production for (1) a small shop containing three sheetfed presses and two spirit duplicators (36,700 sheets, 47,240 envelopes and letterheads), (2) a medium-size industrial in-house shop with two webfed and three sheetfed presses, and one spirit duplicator (315,130 total sheets), and (3) one print room of a large commercial concern containing three webfed, heatset operations (1.16 x 10(6) ft) served by catalytic air pollution control devices. Each test consisted of 12 one-hour periods over two days. Air samples were collected simultaneously during each period at 7-14 specified locations within each space. The samples were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) for total VOC and for 13-19 individual organics. Samples of solvents used at each shop were also analyzed by GC. Average VOC emission rates were 4.7-6.1 kg/day for the small sheetfed printing shop, 0.4-0.9 kg/day for the industrial shop, and 79-82 kg/day for the commercial print room. Emission compositions were similar and included benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, and hexane. Comparison of the emission rates with mass balance estimates based on solvent usage and composition were quite consistent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Face pose tracking using the four-point algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Ho Yin; Wong, Kin Hong; Yu, Ying Kin; Tsui, Kwan Pang; Kam, Ho Chuen

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we have developed an algorithm to track the pose of a human face robustly and efficiently. Face pose estimation is very useful in many applications such as building virtual reality systems and creating an alternative input method for the disabled. Firstly, we have modified a face detection toolbox called DLib for the detection of a face in front of a camera. The detected face features are passed to a pose estimation method, known as the four-point algorithm, for pose computation. The theory applied and the technical problems encountered during system development are discussed in the paper. It is demonstrated that the system is able to track the pose of a face in real time using a consumer grade laptop computer.

  9. Pose estimation for mobile robots working on turbine blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, X.D.; Chen, Q.; Liu, J.J.; Sun, Z.G.; Zhang, W.Z. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-03-11

    This paper discussed a features point detection and matching task technique for mobile robots used in wind turbine blade applications. The vision-based scheme used visual information from the robot's surrounding environment to match successive image frames. An improved pose estimation algorithm based on a scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) was developed to consider the characteristics of local images of turbine blades, pose estimation problems, and conditions. The method included a pre-subsampling technique for reducing computation and bidirectional matching for improving precision. A random sample consensus (RANSAC) method was used to estimate the robot's pose. Pose estimation conditions included a wide pose range; the distance between neighbouring blades; and mechanical, electromagnetic, and optical disturbances. An experimental platform was used to demonstrate the validity of the proposed algorithm. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Light dependency of VOC emissions from selected Mediterranean plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Harley, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.

    The light, temperature and stomatal conductance dependencies of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from ten plant species commonly found in the Mediterranean region were studied using a fully controlled leaf cuvette in the laboratory. At standard conditions of temperature and light (30°C and 1000 μmol m -2 s -1 PAR), low emitting species ( Arbutus unedo, Pinus halepensis, Cistus incanus, Cistus salvifolius, Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris) emitted between 0.1 and 5.0 μg (C) (total VOCs) g -1 dw h -1, a medium emitter ( Pinus pinea) emitted between 5 and 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1 and high emitters ( Cistus monspeliensis, Lavendula stoechas and Quercus sp.) emitted more than 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1. VOC emissions from all of the plant species investigated showed some degree of light dependency, which was distinguishable from temperature dependency. Emissions of all compounds from Quercus sp. were light dependent. Ocimene was one of several monoterpene compounds emitted by P. pinea and was strongly correlated to light. Only a fraction of monoterpene emissions from C. incanus exhibited apparent weak light dependency but emissions from this plant species were strongly correlated to temperature. Data presented here are consistent with past studies, which show that emissions are independent of stomatal conductance. These results may allow more accurate predictions of monoterpene emission fluxes from the Mediterranean region to be made.

  11. A demonstration of biofiltration for VOC removal in petrochemical industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lan; Huang, Shaobin; Wei, Zongmin

    2014-05-01

    A biotrickling filter demo has been set up in a petrochemical factory in Sinopec Group for about 10 months with a maximum inlet gas flow rate of 3000 m3 h(-1). The purpose of this project is to assess the ability of the biotrickling filter to remove hardly biodegradable VOCs such as benzene, toluene and xylene which are recalcitrant and poorly water soluble and commonly found in petrochemical factories. Light-weight hollow ceramic balls (Φ 5-8 cm) were used as the packing media treated with large amounts of circulating water (2.4 m3 m(-2) h(-1)) added with bacterial species. The controlled empty bed retention time (EBRT) of 240 s is a key parameter for reaching a removal efficiency of 95% for benzene, toluene, xylene, and 90% for total hydrocarbons. The demo has been successfully adopted and practically applied in waste air treatments in many petrochemical industries for about two years. The net inlet concentrations of benzene, toluene and xylene were varied from 0.5 to 3 g m(-3). The biofiltration process is highly efficient for the removal of hydrophobic and recalcitrant VOCs with various concentrations from the petrochemical factories. The SEM analysis of the bacterial community in the BTF during VOC removal showed that Pseudomonas putida and Klebsiella sp. phylum were dominant and shutdown periods could play a role in forming the community structural differences and leading to the changes of removal efficiencies.

  12. A mass transfer model for VOC emission from silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Montes, Felipe; Rotz, C. Alan

    2012-07-01

    Silage has been shown to be an important source of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone. Measurements have shown that environmental conditions and silage properties strongly influence emission rates, making it difficult to assess the contribution of silage in VOC emission inventories. In this work, we present an analytical convection-diffusion-dispersion model for predicting emission of VOCs from silage. It was necessary to incorporate empirical relationships from wind tunnel trials for the response of mass transfer parameters to surface air velocity and silage porosity. The resulting model was able to accurately predict the effect of temperature on ethanol emission in wind tunnel trials, but it over-predicted alcohol and aldehyde emission measured using a mass balance approach from corn silage samples outdoors and within barns. Mass balance results confirmed that emission is related to gas-phase porosity, but the response to air speed was not clear, which was contrary to wind tunnel results. Mass balance results indicate that alcohol emission from loose silage on farms may approach 50% of the initial mass over six hours, while relative losses of acetaldehyde will be greater.

  13. Person-Independent Head Pose Estimation Using Biased Manifold Embedding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethuraman Panchanathan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Head pose estimation has been an integral problem in the study of face recognition systems and human-computer interfaces, as part of biometric applications. A fine estimate of the head pose angle is necessary and useful for several face analysis applications. To determine the head pose, face images with varying pose angles can be considered to be lying on a smooth low-dimensional manifold in high-dimensional image feature space. However, when there are face images of multiple individuals with varying pose angles, manifold learning techniques often do not give accurate results. In this work, we propose a framework for a supervised form of manifold learning called Biased Manifold Embedding to obtain improved performance in head pose angle estimation. This framework goes beyond pose estimation, and can be applied to all regression applications. This framework, although formulated for a regression scenario, unifies other supervised approaches to manifold learning that have been proposed so far. Detailed studies of the proposed method are carried out on the FacePix database, which contains 181 face images each of 30 individuals with pose angle variations at a granularity of 1∘. Since biometric applications in the real world may not contain this level of granularity in training data, an analysis of the methodology is performed on sparsely sampled data to validate its effectiveness. We obtained up to 2∘ average pose angle estimation error in the results from our experiments, which matched the best results obtained for head pose estimation using related approaches.

  14. Experiments in the EMRP project KEY-VOCs: Adsorption/desorption effects of VOCs in different tubing materials and preparation and analysis of a zero gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Jennifer; Claude, Anja; Kubistin, Dagmar; Tensing, Erasmus; Michl, Katja; Plass-Duelmer, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric chemistry and composition are influenced by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from natural and anthropogenic sources. Due to their toxicity and their crucial role in ozone and aerosol formation VOCs impact air quality and climate change and high quality observations are demanded. The European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) project KEY-VOCs has targeted the improvement of VOC measurement capabilities with the focus on VOCs relevant for indoor air as well as for air quality and climate monitoring programmes. One major uncertainty is the influence of surface effects of the measurement devices. By developing a test system the adsorption/desorption effects of certain VOCs can be systematically examined. Different tubing materials e.g. stainless steel and PFA were analysed with the oxygenated VOC methanol and results of these experiments will be presented. In air quality monitoring very low levels of VOCs have to be measured. Purified air or nitrogen is widely used as a zero gas to characterize measurement systems and procedures as well as for instrument calibration. A high quality zero gas is an important contributor to the quality of the measurements and generally achieved by using state-of-the-art purification technologies. The efficiency of several air purifiers was assessed and the results have been analysed.

  15. Barometric pumping with a twist: VOC containment and remediation without boreholes. Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The majority of the planned remediation sites within the DOE complex are contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In many instances the contamination has not reached the water table, does not pose an immediate threat, and is not considered a high priority problem. These sites will ultimately require remediation of some type, either by active vapor extraction, bioremediation, or excavation and ex-situ soil treatment. The cost of remediating these sites can range from $50 K to more than $150 K, depending on site characteristics, contaminants, and remediation method. Additionally, for many remediated sites, residual contamination exists which could not practically be removed by the applied remediation technology. These circumstances result in modest sites with contamination of limited risk, but by regulation they must still be controlled. A remediation solution being developed by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA) for the Department of Energy serves as an in-situ containment and extraction methodology for sites where most or all of the contamination resides in the vadose zone soil. The approach capitalizes on the advective soil gas movement resulting from barometric pressure oscillations.

  16. Human health risk evaluation of selected VOC, SVOC and particulate emissions from scented candles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Thomas; Vitale, Danielle; Joachim, Fred J; Smith, Ben; Cruse, Lynn; Mascarenhas, Reuben; Schneider, Scott; Singal, Madhuri

    2014-06-01

    Airborne compounds in the indoor environment arise from a wide variety of sources such as environmental tobacco smoke, heating and cooking, construction materials as well as outdoor sources. To understand the contribution of scented candles to the indoor load of airborne substances and particulate matter, candle emission testing was undertaken in environmentally controlled small and large emission chambers. Candle emission rates, calculated on the basis of measured chamber concentrations of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC, SVOC) and particulate matter (PM), were used to predict their respective indoor air concentrations in a standard EU-based dwelling using 2 models: the widely accepted ConsExpo 1-box inhalation model and the recently developed RIFM 2-box indoor air dispersion model. The output from both models has been used to estimate more realistic consumer exposure concentrations of specific chemicals and PM in candle emissions. Potential consumer health risks associated with the candle emissions were characterized by comparing the exposure concentrations with existing indoor or ambient air quality guidelines or, where not existent, to established toxicity thresholds. On the basis of this investigation it was concluded that under normal conditions of use scented candles do not pose known health risks to the consumer.

  17. Primary VOC emissions from Commercial Aircraft Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Dogushan; Huang, Rujin; Slowik, Jay; Brem, Benjamin; Durdina, Lukas; Rindlisbacher, Theo; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre

    2014-05-01

    Air traffic is growing continuously [1]. The increasing number of airplanes leads to an increase of aviation emissions giving rise to environmental concerns globally by high altitude emissions and, locally on air quality at the ground level [2]. The overall impact of aviation emissions on the environment is likely to increase when the growing air transportation trend [2] is considered. The Aviation Particle Regulatory Instrumentation Demonstration Experiment (APRIDE)-5 campaign took place at Zurich Airport in 2013. In this campaign, aircraft exhaust is sampled during engine acceptance tests after engine overhaul at the facilities of SR Technics. Direct sampling from the engine core is made possible due to the unique fixed installation of a retractable sampling probe and the use of a standardized sampling system designed for the new particulate matter regulation in development for aircraft engines. Many of the gas-phase aircraft emissions, e.g. CO2, NOX, CO, SO2, hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were detected by the instruments in use. This study, part of the APRIDE-5 campaign, focuses on the primary VOC emissions in order to produce emission factors of VOC species for varying engine operating conditions which are the surrogates for the flight cycles. Previously, aircraft plumes were sampled in order to quantify VOCs by a proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) [3]. This earlier study provided a preliminary knowledge on the emission of species such as methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, benzene and toluene by varying engine thrust levels. The new setup was (i) designed to sample from the diluted engine exhaust and the new tool and (ii) used a high resolution time of flight PTR-MS with higher accuracy for many new species, therefore providing a more detailed and accurate inventory. We will present the emission factors for species that were quantified previously, as well as for many additional VOCs detected during the campaign

  18. Volatile organic compound (VOC) determination in working atmospheres; Determinacion de compuestos organicos volatiles (VOC) en ambiente laboral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blass A, Georgina; Panama T, Luz A; Corrales C, Deyanira [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The present work describes, in a synthesized way, the implementation and application of procedures based on the normativity related to the subject of the volatile organic compounds (Volatile Organic Compounds VOC), that allow to sample, quantify and evaluate the present contamination in the working atmosphere of a refinery due to the fugitive emissions of VOC and other substances. In accordance with the corresponding normativity, more than 189 organic compounds denominated dangerous air polluting agents (Hazardous Air Pollutants, HAP) can be found in a working atmosphere, but they are the 11 main HAP that can be found in a refinery. In the present article the work made for the sampling and quantification of 5 of the 11 dangerous polluting agents of the air: benzene, toluene, xylene, iso-octane and naphthalene. [Spanish] El presente trabajo describe, de manera sintetizada, la implementacion y aplicacion de procedimientos basados en la normatividad relacionada al tema de los compuestos organicos volatiles (Volatil Organic Compounds, VOC), que permiten muestrear, cuantificar y evaluar la contaminacion presente en el ambiente laboral de una refineria debido a las emisiones fugitivas de VOC y otras sustancias. De acuerdo con la normatividad correspondiente, mas de 189 compuestos organicos denominados contaminantes peligrosos del aire (Hazardous Air Pollutants, HAP), pueden ser encontrados en un ambiente laboral, pero son 11 los principales HAP que pueden ser hallados en una refineria. En el presente articulo se informa el trabajo realizado para el muestreo y cuantificacion de 5 de los 11 contaminantes peligrosos del aire: benceno, tolueno, xileno, iso-octano y naftaleno.

  19. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC measurements in the Pearl River Delta (PRD region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-chung Chang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We measured levels of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs at seven sites in the Pearl River Delta (PRD region of China during the Air Quality Monitoring Campaign spanning 4 October to 3 November 2004. Two of the sites, Guangzhou (GZ and Xinken (XK, were intensive sites at which we collected multiple daily canister samples. The observations reported here provide a look at the VOC distribution, speciation, and photochemical implications in the PRD region. Alkanes constituted the largest percentage (>40% in mixing ratios of the quantified VOCs at six sites; the exception was one major industrial site that was dominated by aromatics (about 52%. Highly elevated VOC levels occurred at GZ during two pollution episodes; however, the chemical composition of VOCs did not exhibit noticeable changes during these episodes. We calculated the OH loss rate to estimate the chemical reactivity of all VOCs. Of the anthropogenic VOCs, alkenes played a predominant role in VOC reactivity at GZ, whereas the contributions of reactive aromatics were more important at XK. Our preliminary analysis of the VOC correlations suggests that the ambient VOCs at GZ came directly from local sources (i.e., automobiles; those at XK were influenced by both local emissions and transportation of air mass from upwind areas.

  20. [Study on control and management for industrial volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Ning; Nei, Lei; Wang, Yu-Fei; Hao, Zheng-Ping

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from industrial sources account for a large percent of total anthropogenic VOCs. In this paper, VOCs emission characterization, control technologies and management were discussed. VOCs from industrial emissions were characterized by high intensity, wide range and uneven distribution, which focused on Bejing-Tianjin Joint Belt, Shangdong Peninsula, Yangtze River Delta and the Pearl River Delta. The current technologies for VOCs treatment include adsorption, catalytic combustion, bio-degradation and others, which were applied in petrochemical, oil vapor recovery, shipbuilding, printing, pharmaceutical, feather manufacturing and so on. The scarcity of related regulations/standards plus ineffective supervision make the VOCs management difficult. Therefore, it is suggested that VOCs treatment be firstly performed from key areas and industries, and then carried out step by step. By establishing of actual reducing amount control system and more detailed VOCs emission standards and regulations, applying practical technologies together with demonstration projects, and setting up VOCs emission registration and classification-related-charge system, VOCs could be reduced effectively.

  1. Optimal mixture experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, B K; Pal, Manisha; Das, P

    2014-01-01

    The book dwells mainly on the optimality aspects of mixture designs. As mixture models are a special case of regression models, a general discussion on regression designs has been presented, which includes topics like continuous designs, de la Garza phenomenon, Loewner order domination, Equivalence theorems for different optimality criteria and standard optimality results for single variable polynomial regression and multivariate linear and quadratic regression models. This is followed by a review of the available literature on estimation of parameters in mixture models. Based on recent research findings, the volume also introduces optimal mixture designs for estimation of optimum mixing proportions in different mixture models, which include Scheffé’s quadratic model, Darroch-Waller model, log- contrast model, mixture-amount models, random coefficient models and multi-response model.  Robust mixture designs and mixture designs in blocks have been also reviewed. Moreover, some applications of mixture desig...

  2. Methods of RVD object pose estimation and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yang; He, Yan; Wang, Weihua; Yu, Qifeng

    2007-11-01

    Methods of measuring a RVD (rendezvous and docking) cooperative object's pose from monocular and binocular images respectively are presented. The methods solve the initial values first and optimize the object pose parameters by bundle adjustment. In the disturbance-rejecting binocular method, chosen measurement system parameters of one camera's exterior parameters are modified simultaneously. The methods need three or more cooperative target points to measure the object's pose accurately. Experimental data show that the methods converge quickly and stably, provide accurate results and do not need accurate initial values. Even when the chosen measurement system parameters are subjected to some amount of disturbance, the binocular method manages to provide fairly accurate results.

  3. Pose estimation based on human detection and segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qiang; ZHENG EnLiang; LIU YunCai

    2009-01-01

    We address the problem of 3D human pose estimation in a single real scene image. Normally, 3D pose estimation from real Image needs background subtraction to extract the appropriate features. We do not make such assumption. In this paper, a two-step approach is proposed, first, Instead of applying background subtraction to get the segmentation of human, we combine the segmentation with human detection using an ISM-based detector. Then, silhouette feature can be extracted and 3D pose estimation Is solved as a regression problem. RVMs and ridge regression method are applied to solve this problem. The results show the robustness and accuracy of our method.

  4. Quaternion epipolar decomposition for camera pose identification and animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarbek, W.; Tomaszewski, M.

    2013-03-01

    In the literature of computer vision, computer graphics and robotics, the use of quaternions is exclusively related to 3D rotation representation and interpolation. In this research we found how epipoles in multi-camera systems can be used to represent camera poses in the quaternion domain. The rotational quaternion is decomposed in two epipole rotational quaternions and one z axis rotational quaternion. Quadratic form of the essential matrix is also related to quaternion factors. Thus, five pose parameters are distributed into three independent rotational quaternions resulting in measurement error separation at camera pose identification and greater flexibility at virtual camera animation. The experimental results refer to the design of free viewpoint television.

  5. Space vehicle pose estimation via optical correlation and nonlinear estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoczy, John M.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2008-03-01

    A technique for 6-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) pose estimation of space vehicles is being developed. This technique draws upon recent developments in implementing optical correlation measurements in a nonlinear estimator, which relates the optical correlation measurements to the pose states (orientation and position). For the optical correlator, the use of both conjugate filters and binary, phase-only filters in the design of synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filters is explored. A static neural network is trained a priori and used as the nonlinear estimator. New commercial animation and image rendering software is exploited to design the SDF filters and to generate a large filter set with which to train the neural network. The technique is applied to pose estimation for rendezvous and docking of free-flying spacecraft and to terrestrial surface mobility systems for NASA's Vision for Space Exploration. Quantitative pose estimation performance will be reported. Advantages and disadvantages of the implementation of this technique are discussed.

  6. Health Issues: Do Cell Phones Pose a Health Hazard?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Home, Business, and Entertainment Products Cell Phones Health Issues Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... it Email Print Do cell phones pose a health hazard? Many people are concerned that cell phone ...

  7. Hold That Pose: Yoga May Ease Tough Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Hold That Pose: Yoga May Ease Tough Depression Study finds weekly sessions, plus deep breathing, helped ... the doctor ordered when it comes to beating depression, new research suggests. Researchers found that weekly sessions ...

  8. Fringe inverse videogrammetry based on global pose estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yong-Liang; Su, Xianyu; Chen, Wenjing

    2011-10-10

    Fringe inverse videogrammetry based on global pose estimation is presented to measure a three-dimensional (3D) coordinate. The main components involve an LCD screen, a tactile probe equipped with a microcamera, and a portable personal computer. The LCD is utilized to display fringes, a microcamera is installed on the tactile probe, and the 3D coordinate of the center of the probe tip can be calculated through the microcamera's pose. Fourier fringe analysis is exploited to complete subpixel location of reference points. A convex-relaxation optimization algorithm is employed to estimate the global camera pose, which guarantees global convergence compared with bundle adjustment, a local pose estimation algorithm. The experiments demonstrate that fringe inverse videogrammetry can measure the 3D coordinate precisely. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  9. MULTILEVEL ITERATION METHODS FOR SOLVING LINEAR ILL-POSED PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we develop multilevel iteration methods for solving linear systems resulting from the Galerkin method and Tikhonov regularization for ill-posed problems. The algorithm and its convergence analysis are presented in an abstract framework.

  10. RELATIVE CAMERA POSE ESTIMATION METHOD USING OPTIMIZATION ON THE MANIFOLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of relative camera pose estimation, a method using optimization with respect to the manifold is proposed. Firstly from maximum-a-posteriori (MAP model to nonlinear least squares (NLS model, the general state estimation model using optimization is derived. Then the camera pose estimation model is applied to the general state estimation model, while the parameterization of rigid body transformation is represented by Lie group/algebra. The jacobian of point-pose model with respect to Lie group/algebra is derived in detail and thus the optimization model of rigid body transformation is established. Experimental results show that compared with the original algorithms, the approaches with optimization can obtain higher accuracy both in rotation and translation, while avoiding the singularity of Euler angle parameterization of rotation. Thus the proposed method can estimate relative camera pose with high accuracy and robustness.

  11. A Restarted Conjugate Gradient Method for Ill-posed Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-fei Wang

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a restarted conjugate gradient iterative algorithm for solving ill-posed problems.The damped Morozov's discrepancy principle is used as a stopping rule. Numerical experiments are given to illustrate the efficiency of the method.

  12. ESPRIT: Exercise Sensing and Pose Recovery Inference Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop ESPRIT: an Exercise Sensing and Pose Recovery Inference Tool, in support of NASA's effort in developing crew exercise technologies for...

  13. Mathematical Thinking and Creativity through Mathematical Problem Posing and Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F. Ayllón

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the relationship between the development of mathematical thinking and creativity with mathematical problem posing and solving. Creativity and mathematics are disciplines that do not usually appear together. Both concepts constitute complex processes sharing elements, such as fluency (number of ideas, flexibility (range of ideas, novelty (unique idea and elaboration (idea development. These factors contribute, among others, to the fact that schoolchildren are competent in mathematics. The problem solving and posing are a very powerful evaluation tool that shows the mathematical reasoning and creative level of a person. Creativity is part of the mathematics education and is a necessary ingredient to perform mathematical assignments. This contribution presents some important research works about problem posing and solving related to the development of mathematical knowledge and creativity. To that end, it is based on various beliefs reflected in the literature with respect to notions of creativity, problem solving and posing.

  14. Theoretical study of simultaneous water and VOCs adsorption and desorption in a silica gel rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, G.; Zhang, Y.F.; Fang, Lei

    2008-01-01

    One-dimensional partial differential equations were used to model the simultaneous water and VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) adsorption and desorption in a silica gel rotor which was recommended for indoor air cleaning. The interaction among VOCs and moisture in the adsorption and desorption...... by the temperatures of the rotor and the air stream. The VOC transfer equations were solved by discretizing them into explicit up-wind finite differential equations. The model was validated with experimental data. The calculated results suggested that the regeneration time designed for dehumidification may...... process was neglected in the model as the concentrations of VOC pollutants in typical indoor environment were much lower than that of moisture and the adsorbed VOCs occupied only a minor portion of adsorption capacity of the rotor. Consequently VOC transfer was coupled with heat and moisture transfer only...

  15. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in surface coating materials: Their compositions and potential as an alternative fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Trieu-Vuong; Choi, In-Young; Son, Youn-Suk; Song, Kyu-Yong; Sunwoo, Young; Kim, Jo-Chun

    2016-03-01

    A sampling system was designed to determine the composition ratios of VOCs emitted from 31 surface coating materials (SCMs). Representative architectural, automotive, and marine SCMs in Korea were investigated. Toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were the predominant VOCs. The VOC levels (wt%) from automotive SCMs were significantly higher than those from architectural and marine paints. It was found that target SCMs comprised mainly VOCs with 6-10 carbon atoms in molecules, which could be adsorbed by activated carbon. The saturated activated carbon which had already adsorbed toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene was combusted. The saturated activated carbon was more combustible than new activated carbon because it comprised inflammable VOCs. Therefore, it could be an alternative fuel when using in a "fuelization system". To use the activated carbon as a fuel, a control technology of VOCs from a coating process was also designed and introduced.

  16. Purge and trap method to determine alpha factors of VOC liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A theoretical approach and laboratory practice of determining the alpha factors of volatile organic compound (VOC) liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients are present in this study.Using Purge Trap Concentrator, VOC spiked water samples are purged by high-purity nitrogen in the laboratory, the VOC liquid-phase mass transfer rate constants under the laboratory conditions are then obtained by observing the variation of VOCs purged out of the water with the purge time.The alpha factors of VOC liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients are calculated as the ratios of the liquid-phase mass transfer rate constants in real water samples to their counterparts in pure water under the same experimental conditions. This direct and fast approach is easy to control in the laboratory, and would benefit mutual comparison among researchers, so might be useful for thestudy of VOC mass transfer across the liquid-gas interface.

  17. [Study on the chemical compositions of VOCs emitted by cooking oils based on GC-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wan-Qing; Nie, Lei; Tian, Gang; Li, Jing; Shao, Xia; Wang, Min-Yan

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are key precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in air, and the differences in the compositions of VOCs lead to their different contribution to atmospheric reaction. Cooking oil fume is one of the important sources of atmospheric VOCs, and its chemical compositions are distinct under different conditions of oil types, food types, cooking methods and heating temperatures etc. In this study, the production of cooking oil fume was simulated by heating typical pure vegetable oils (peanut oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, olive oil and blend oil) at different temperatures in beakers to investigate the chemical compositions of VOCs. The emitted VOCs were sampled with a Tenax adsorption tube and analyzed using GC-MS after thermal desorption. According to spectral library search and map analysis, using area normalized semi-quantitative method, preliminary qualitative and quantitative tests were conducted for the specific components of VOCs under different conditions.

  18. Robust head pose estimation via supervised manifold learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Song, Xubo

    2014-05-01

    Head poses can be automatically estimated using manifold learning algorithms, with the assumption that with the pose being the only variable, the face images should lie in a smooth and low-dimensional manifold. However, this estimation approach is challenging due to other appearance variations related to identity, head location in image, background clutter, facial expression, and illumination. To address the problem, we propose to incorporate supervised information (pose angles of training samples) into the process of manifold learning. The process has three stages: neighborhood construction, graph weight computation and projection learning. For the first two stages, we redefine inter-point distance for neighborhood construction as well as graph weight by constraining them with the pose angle information. For Stage 3, we present a supervised neighborhood-based linear feature transformation algorithm to keep the data points with similar pose angles close together but the data points with dissimilar pose angles far apart. The experimental results show that our method has higher estimation accuracy than the other state-of-art algorithms and is robust to identity and illumination variations.

  19. Perspective projection for variance pose face recognition from camera calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhir, M. M.; Woo, W. L.; Chambers, J. A.; Dlay, S. S.

    2016-04-01

    Variance pose is an important research topic in face recognition. The alteration of distance parameters across variance pose face features is a challenging. We provide a solution for this problem using perspective projection for variance pose face recognition. Our method infers intrinsic camera parameters of the image which enable the projection of the image plane into 3D. After this, face box tracking and centre of eyes detection can be identified using our novel technique to verify the virtual face feature measurements. The coordinate system of the perspective projection for face tracking allows the holistic dimensions for the face to be fixed in different orientations. The training of frontal images and the rest of the poses on FERET database determine the distance from the centre of eyes to the corner of box face. The recognition system compares the gallery of images against different poses. The system initially utilises information on position of both eyes then focuses principally on closest eye in order to gather data with greater reliability. Differentiation between the distances and position of the right and left eyes is a unique feature of our work with our algorithm outperforming other state of the art algorithms thus enabling stable measurement in variance pose for each individual.

  20. Characteristics of Ambient Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs Measured in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Qiang Zhou

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the characteristics of ambient abundance of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in Shanghai, one of the biggest metropolis of China, VOCs were measured with a gas chromatography system equipped with a mass-selective detector (GC/MSD from July 2006 to February 2010. An intensive measurement campaign was conducted (eight samples per day with a 3 hour interval during May 2009. The comparison of ambient VOCs collected in different regions of Shanghai shows that the concentrations are slightly higher in the busy commercial area (28.9 ppbv at Xujiaui than in the urban administrative area (24.3 ppbv at Pudong. However, during the intensive measurement period, the concentrations in the large steel industrial area (28.7 ppbv at Baoshan were much higher than in the urban administrative area (18 ppbv at Pudong, especially for alkanes, alkenes, and toluene. The seasonal variations of ambient VOC concentrations measured at the Xujiahui sampling site indicate that the VOC concentrations are significantly affected by meteorological conditions (such as wind direction and precipitation. In addition, although alkanes are the most abundant VOCs at the Xujiahui measurement site, the most important VOCs contributing to ozone formation potential (OFP are aromatics, accounting for 57% of the total OFP. The diurnal variations of VOC concentrations show that VOC concentrations are higher on weekdays than in weekends at the Xujiahui sampling site, suggesting that traffic condition and human activities have important impacts on VOC emissions in Shanghai. The evidence also shows that the major sources of isoprene are mainly resulted from gasoline evaporation at a particular time (06:00–09:00 in the busy commercial area. The results gained from this study provide useful information for better understanding the characteristics of ambient VOCs and the sources of VOCs in Shanghai.

  1. Low temperature asphalt mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Modrijan, Damjan

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents the problem of manufacturing and building in the asphalt mixtures produced by the classical hot procedure and the possibility of manufacturing low temperature asphalt mixtures.We will see the main advantages of low temperature asphalt mixtures prepared with bitumen with organic addition Sasobit and compare it to the classical asphalt mixtures. The advantages and disadvantages of that are valued in the practical example in the conclusion.

  2. Time-activity relationships to VOC personal exposure factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Rufus D.; Schweizer, Christian; Llacqua, Vito; Lai, Hak Kan; Jantunen, Matti; Bayer-Oglesby, Lucy; Künzli, Nino

    Social and demographic factors have been found to play a significant role in differences between time-activity patterns of population subgroups. Since time-activity patterns largely influence personal exposure to compounds as individuals move across microenvironments, exposure subgroups within the population may be defined by factors that influence daily activity patterns. Socio-demographic and environmental factors that define time-activity subgroups also define quantifiable differences in VOC personal exposures to different sources and individual compounds in the Expolis study. Significant differences in exposures to traffic-related compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were observed in relation to gender, number of children and living alone. Categorization of exposures further indicated time exposed to traffic at work and time in a car as important determinants. Increased exposures to decane, nonane and undecane were observed for males, housewives and self-employed. Categorization of exposures indicated exposure subgroups related to workshop use and living downtown. Higher exposures to 3-carene and α-pinene commonly found in household cleaning products and fragrances were associated with more children, while exposures to traffic compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were reduced with more children. Considerable unexplained variation remained in categorization of exposures associated with home product use and fragrances, due to individual behavior and product choice. More targeted data collection methods in VOC exposure studies for these sources should be used. Living alone was associated with decreased exposures to 2-methyl-1-propanol and 1-butanol, and traffic-related compounds. Identification of these subgroups may help to reduce the large amount of unexplained variation in VOC exposure studies. Further they may help in assessing impacts of urban planning that result in changes in behavior of individuals, resulting in shifts in

  3. Low HAP/VOC Compliant Resins for Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    on lauric acid FAVE-O fatty acid vinyl ester resin system based on octanoic acid FTIR Fourier transform infrared GIC Mode 1 fracture energy...temperature and could potentially produce smog-promoting ozone as well as long-term and acute health effects. VOC/HAPs are emitted during all phases of...Viscosity ា cP at 25 °C (MOct) Unreacted epoxy FTIR *, NMR* No epoxy present None detected Correct reactant ratios NMR Methacrylate to FA ratio of 1:1

  4. DESORPTION OF VOCs FROM POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS UNDER MICROWAVE FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Desorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)from polymeric adsorbents by microwave was investigated experimentally. Two kinds of organic compounds, benzene and toluene,were separately used as adsorbates in this work. Results showed that the application of microwave to regenerate the polymeric adsorbents not only can get higher regeneration efficiency in comparison with the use of heat regeneration, but also make the temperatures of the fixed beds much lower than that when using the heat regeneratton The weaker the polarity of a polymeric adsorbent, the easier its regeneration was.

  5. DESORPTION OF VOCs FROM POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS UNDER MICROWAVE FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIXiang; LIZhong; 等

    2001-01-01

    Desorption of volatile organic compounds(VOCs) from polymeric adsorbents by microwave was investigated experimentally.Two kinds of organic compounds.benzene and toluene.were separately used as adsorbates in this work Results showed that the application of microwave to regenerate the polymeric adsorbents not only can get higher regeneration efficiency in comparison with the use of heat regeneration,but also make the temperatures of the fixed beds much lower than that when using the heat regeneration the weaker the polarity of a polymericadsorbent,the easier its regeneration was.

  6. VoCS : Sistema de almacenamiento voluntario en la nube

    OpenAIRE

    Schiavón Raineri, Ignacio Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    La computación en la nube responde a las necesidades del aumento de dispositivos conectados a Internet y el creciente volumen de datos manejados, ofreciendo acceso ubicuo y transparente a la información de forma segura. Esto ha tenido como consecuencia la apertura del mercado, ofreciendo muchas aplicaciones basadas en la nube como SkyDrive, Google Drive o Dropbox. VoCS (Volunteer Cloud Storage) es un sistema de almacenamiento voluntario en la nube de código abierto y seguro, que pretende ofre...

  7. Plant leaves as indoor air passive samplers for volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Todd A; Doucette, William J

    2015-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) enter indoor environments through internal and external sources. Indoor air concentrations of VOCs vary greatly but are generally higher than outdoors. Plants have been promoted as indoor air purifiers for decades, but reports of their effectiveness differ. However, while air-purifying applications may be questionable, the waxy cuticle coating on leaves may provide a simple, cost-effective approach to sampling indoor air for VOCs. To investigate the potential use of plants as indoor air VOC samplers, a static headspace approach was used to examine the relationship between leaf and air concentrations, leaf lipid contents and octanol-air partition coefficients (Koa) for six VOCs and four plant species. The relationship between leaf and air concentrations was further examined in an actual residence after the introduction of several chlorinated VOC emission sources. Leaf-air concentration factors (LACFs), calculated from linear regressions of the laboratory headspace data, were found to increase as the solvent extractable leaf lipid content and Koa value of the VOC increased. In the studies conducted in the residence, leaf concentrations paralleled the changing air concentrations, indicating a relatively rapid air to leaf VOC exchange. Overall, the data from the laboratory and residential studies illustrate the potential for plant leaves to be used as cost effective, real-time indoor air VOC samplers.

  8. FEV manoeuvre induced changes in breath VOC compositions: an unconventional view on lung function tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukul, Pritam; Schubert, Jochen K.; Oertel, Peter; Kamysek, Svend; Taunk, Khushman; Trefz, Phillip; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2016-06-01

    Breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis can open a non-invasive window onto pathological and metabolic processes in the body. Decades of clinical breath-gas analysis have revealed that changes in exhaled VOC concentrations are important rather than disease specific biomarkers. As physiological parameters, such as respiratory rate or cardiac output, have profound effects on exhaled VOCs, here we investigated VOC exhalation under respiratory manoeuvres. Breath VOCs were monitored by means of real-time mass-spectrometry during conventional FEV manoeuvres in 50 healthy humans. Simultaneously, we measured respiratory and hemodynamic parameters noninvasively. Tidal volume and minute ventilation increased by 292 and 171% during the manoeuvre. FEV manoeuvre induced substance specific changes in VOC concentrations. pET-CO2 and alveolar isoprene increased by 6 and 21% during maximum exhalation. Then they decreased by 18 and 37% at forced expiration mirroring cardiac output. Acetone concentrations rose by 4.5% despite increasing minute ventilation. Blood-borne furan and dimethyl-sulphide mimicked isoprene profile. Exogenous acetonitrile, sulphides, and most aliphatic and aromatic VOCs changed minimally. Reliable breath tests must avoid forced breathing. As isoprene exhalations mirrored FEV performances, endogenous VOCs might assure quality of lung function tests. Analysis of exhaled VOC concentrations can provide additional information on physiology of respiration and gas exchange.

  9. VOCs and OVOCs distribution and control policy implications in Pearl River Delta region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Peter K. K.; Ho, Josephine W. K.; Tsang, Roy C. W.; Blake, Donald R.; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Yu, Jian Zhen; Yuan, Zibing; Wang, Xinming; Shao, Min; Zhong, Liuju

    2013-09-01

    Ambient air measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) were conducted and characterised during a two-year grid study in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of southern China. The present grid study pioneered the systematic investigation of the nature and characteristics of complex VOC and OVOC sources at a regional scale. The largest contributing VOCs, accounting over 80% of the total VOCs mixing ratio, were toluene, ethane, ethyne, propane, ethene, butane, benzene, pentane, ethylbenzene, and xylenes. Sub-regional VOC spatial characteristics were identified, namely: i) relatively fresh pollutants, consistent with elevated vehicular and industrial activities, around the PRD estuary; and ii) a concentration gradient with higher mixing ratios of VOCs in the west as compared with the eastern part of PRD. Based on alkyl nitrate aging determination, a high hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration favoured fast hydrocarbon reactions and formation of locally produced ozone. The photochemical reactivity analysis showed aromatic hydrocarbons and alkenes together consisted of around 80% of the ozone formation potential (OFP) among the key VOCs. We also found that the OFP from OVOCs should not be neglected since their OFP contribution was more than one-third of that from VOCs alone. These findings support the choice of current air pollution control policy which focuses on vehicular sources but warrants further controls. Industrial emissions and VOCs emitted by solvents should be the next targets for ground-level ozone abatement.

  10. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, P.; Yan, Hui; Banerjee, S. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This progress report summarizes three accomplishments in a study of low volatile organic compound (VOC) drying of lumber and wood panel products. A mathematical model for predicting moisture emissions from particle was constructed and is being extended to VOCs. VOCs emissions from drying boards show that VOCs appear to be evenly released from all surfaces. Preliminary results from monthly analyses of loblolly pines indicate that resin acids appear to decrease between March to August, and that no consistent trends are apparent for terpenes. 3 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Implementation of VOC source reduction practices in a manufactured house and in school classrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, A.T.; Apte, M.G.; Shendell, D.G.; Beal, D.; McIlvaine, J.E.R.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed studies of a new manufactured house and four new industrialized relocatable school classrooms were conducted to determine the emission sources of formaldehyde and other VOCs and to identify and implement source reduction practices. Procedures were developed to generate VOC emission factors that allowed reasonably accurate predictions of indoor air VOC concentrations. Based on the identified sources of formaldehyde and other aldehydes, practices were developed to reduce the concentrations of these compounds in new house construction. An alternate ceiling panel reduced formaldehyde concentrations in the classrooms. Overall, the classrooms had relatively low VOC concentrations.

  12. Release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs from the lung cancer cell line CALU-1 in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schubert Jochen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this work was to confirm the existence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs specifically released or consumed by lung cancer cells. Methods 50 million cells of the human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell line CALU-1 were incubated in a sealed fermenter for 4 h or over night (18 hours. Then air samples from the headspace of the culture vessel were collected and preconcentrated by adsorption on solid sorbents with subsequent thermodesorption and analysis by means of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Identification of altogether 60 compounds in GCMS measurement was done not only by spectral library match, but also by determination of retention times established with calibration mixtures of the respective pure compounds. Results The results showed a significant increase in the concentrations of 2,3,3-trimethylpentane, 2,3,5-trimethylhexane, 2,4-dimethylheptane and 4-methyloctane in the headspace of CALU-1 cell culture as compared to medium controls after 18 h. Decreased concentrations after 18 h of incubation were found for acetaldehyde, 3-methylbutanal, butyl acetate, acetonitrile, acrolein, methacrolein, 2-methylpropanal, 2-butanone, 2-methoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-ethoxy-2-methylpropane, and hexanal. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that certain volatile compounds can be cancer-cell derived and thus indicative of the presence of a tumor, whereas other compounds are not released but seem to be consumed by CALU-1 cells.

  13. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the food and drink industries of the European community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passant, Neil R.; Richardson, Stephen J.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Gibson, N.; Woodfield, M. J.; van der Lugt, Jan Pieter; Wolsink, Johan H.; Hesselink, Paul G. M.

    Estimates were made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released into the atmosphere as a result of the industrial manufacture and processing of food and drink in the European Community. The estimates were based on a review of literature sources, industrial and government contacts and recent measurements. Data were found on seven food manufacturing sectors (baking, vegetable oil extraction, solid fat processing, animal rendering, fish meal processing, coffee production and sugar beet processing) and three drink manufacturing sectors (brewing, spirit production and wine making). The principle of a data quality label is advocated to illustrate the authors' confidence in the data, and to highlight areas for further research. Emissions of ethanol from bread baking and spirit maturation were found to be the principle sources. However, significant losses of hexane and large quantities of an ill-defined mixture of partially oxidized hydrocarbons were noted principally from seed oil extraction and the drying of plant material, respectively. This latter mixture included low molecular weight aldehydes, carboxylic acids, ketones, amines and esters. However, the precise composition of many emissions were found to be poorly understood. The total emission from the food and drink industry in the EC was calculated as 260 kt yr -1. However, many processes within the target industry were found to be completely uncharacterized and therefore not included in the overall estimate (e.g. soft drink manufacture, production of animal food, flavourings, vinegar, tea, crisps and other fried snacks). Moreover, the use of data quality labels illustrated the fact that many of our estimates were based on limited data. Hence, further emissions monitoring is recommended from identified sources (e.g. processing of sugar beet, solid fat and fish meal) and from uncharacterized sources.

  14. Optimal accelerometer placement on a robot arm for pose estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayasinghe, Indika B.; Sanford, Joseph D.; Abubakar, Shamsudeen; Saadatzi, Mohammad Nasser; Das, Sumit K.; Popa, Dan O.

    2017-05-01

    The performance of robots to carry out tasks depends in part on the sensor information they can utilize. Usually, robots are fitted with angle joint encoders that are used to estimate the position and orientation (or the pose) of its end-effector. However, there are numerous situations, such as in legged locomotion, mobile manipulation, or prosthetics, where such joint sensors may not be present at every, or any joint. In this paper we study the use of inertial sensors, in particular accelerometers, placed on the robot that can be used to estimate the robot pose. Studying accelerometer placement on a robot involves many parameters that affect the performance of the intended positioning task. Parameters such as the number of accelerometers, their size, geometric placement and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) are included in our study of their effects for robot pose estimation. Due to the ubiquitous availability of inexpensive accelerometers, we investigated pose estimation gains resulting from using increasingly large numbers of sensors. Monte-Carlo simulations are performed with a two-link robot arm to obtain the expected value of an estimation error metric for different accelerometer configurations, which are then compared for optimization. Results show that, with a fixed SNR model, the pose estimation error decreases with increasing number of accelerometers, whereas for a SNR model that scales inversely to the accelerometer footprint, the pose estimation error increases with the number of accelerometers. It is also shown that the optimal placement of the accelerometers depends on the method used for pose estimation. The findings suggest that an integration-based method favors placement of accelerometers at the extremities of the robot links, whereas a kinematic-constraints-based method favors a more uniformly distributed placement along the robot links.

  15. Liquids and liquid mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Rowlinson, J S; Baldwin, J E; Buckingham, A D; Danishefsky, S

    2013-01-01

    Liquids and Liquid Mixtures, Third Edition explores the equilibrium properties of liquids and liquid mixtures and relates them to the properties of the constituent molecules using the methods of statistical thermodynamics. Topics covered include the critical state, fluid mixtures at high pressures, and the statistical thermodynamics of fluids and mixtures. This book consists of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the liquid state and the thermodynamic properties of liquids and liquid mixtures, including vapor pressure and heat capacities. The discussion then turns to the thermodynami

  16. Alcohol induced alterations to the human fecal VOC metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin D Couch

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that excessive alcohol consumption impacts the intestinal microbiota composition, causing disruption of homeostasis (dysbiosis. However, this observed change is not indicative of the dysbiotic intestinal microbiota function that could result in the production of injurious and toxic products. Thus, knowledge of the effects of alcohol on the intestinal microbiota function and their metabolites is warranted, in order to better understand the role of the intestinal microbiota in alcohol associated organ failure. Here, we report the results of a differential metabolomic analysis comparing volatile organic compounds (VOC detected in the stool of alcoholics and non-alcoholic healthy controls. We performed the analysis with fecal samples collected after passage as well as with samples collected directly from the sigmoid lumen. Regardless of the approach to fecal collection, we found a stool VOC metabolomic signature in alcoholics that is different from healthy controls. The most notable metabolite alterations in the alcoholic samples include: (1 an elevation in the oxidative stress biomarker tetradecane; (2 a decrease in five fatty alcohols with anti-oxidant property; (3 a decrease in the short chain fatty acids propionate and isobutyrate, important in maintaining intestinal epithelial cell health and barrier integrity; (4 a decrease in alcohol consumption natural suppressant caryophyllene; (5 a decrease in natural product and hepatic steatosis attenuator camphene; and (6 decreased dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, microbial products of decomposition. Our results showed that intestinal microbiota function is altered in alcoholics which might promote alcohol associated pathologies.

  17. Oxygenated VOC and monoterpene emissions from a boreal coniferous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, R.; Rantala, P.; Kajos, M. K.; Patokoski, J.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Aalto, J.; Kolari, P.; Bäck, J.; Hari, P.; Kulmala, M.; Rinne, J.

    2012-04-01

    Compared with terpenoids, emissions of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from boreal ecosystems have been poorly characterized. We measured ecosystem scale emissions of three oxygenated compounds (methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) and monoterpenes from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland during the summers 2006-2008. The measurements were conducted using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. The contribution of the three oxygenated compounds to the measured total emissions was 40-60 %. The highest oxygenated VOC emissions were those of methanol, comprising 20-30 % of the total, followed by acetone with a share of 10-20 %. The acetaldehyde emissions were 5-10 % of the total. This emission composition will be compared with that obtained from shoot enclosure measurements. Methanol showed deposition during some periods although its overall flux was towards the atmosphere. The monoterpene emissions had a light dependent component, suggesting that part of the emissions originated directly from monoterpene biosynthesis. Diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variations in the emissions, along with temperature and light dependencies, will be discussed.

  18. O sistema vocálico alemão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Haupt

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available 0 presente trabalho explica, de forma simplificada, o sistema vocálico alemão através dos traços de duração, abertura e recuo. Na discussão sobre o assunto, é feita uma abordagem sobre a relação de dependência entre a duração e os traços de abertura, além de discutir a relevância de manter a duração em todo o sistema. Através do modelo de Fonologia Autossegmental, é possível verificar que a estrutura silábica das vogais longas e breves é diferente, além de verificar em que contextos silábicos elas podem ocorrer (especificamente em posição tônica. Já em posição átona, ocorre o schwa, uma variante da vogal lei, que fará parte do sistema vocálico alemão, constituído, então, de 15 vogais em posição tônica e uma variante átona.

  19. Preparatory power posing affects nonverbal presence and job interview performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Amy J C; Wilmuth, Caroline A; Yap, Andy J; Carney, Dana R

    2015-07-01

    The authors tested whether engaging in expansive (vs. contractive) "power poses" before a stressful job interview--preparatory power posing--would enhance performance during the interview. Participants adopted high-power (i.e., expansive, open) poses or low-power (i.e., contractive, closed) poses, and then prepared and delivered a speech to 2 evaluators as part of a mock job interview. All interview speeches were videotaped and coded for overall performance and hireability and for 2 potential mediators: verbal content (e.g., structure, content) and nonverbal presence (e.g., captivating, enthusiastic). As predicted, those who prepared for the job interview with high- (vs. low-) power poses performed better and were more likely to be chosen for hire; this relation was mediated by nonverbal presence, but not by verbal content. Although previous research has focused on how a nonverbal behavior that is enacted during interactions and observed by perceivers affects how those perceivers evaluate and respond to the actor, this experiment focused on how a nonverbal behavior that is enacted before the interaction and unobserved by perceivers affects the actor's performance, which, in turn, affects how perceivers evaluate and respond to the actor. This experiment reveals a theoretically novel and practically informative result that demonstrates the causal relation between preparatory nonverbal behavior and subsequent performance and outcomes.

  20. Human Pose Estimation from Monocular Images: A Comprehensive Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Gong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human pose estimation refers to the estimation of the location of body parts and how they are connected in an image. Human pose estimation from monocular images has wide applications (e.g., image indexing. Several surveys on human pose estimation can be found in the literature, but they focus on a certain category; for example, model-based approaches or human motion analysis, etc. As far as we know, an overall review of this problem domain has yet to be provided. Furthermore, recent advancements based on deep learning have brought novel algorithms for this problem. In this paper, a comprehensive survey of human pose estimation from monocular images is carried out including milestone works and recent advancements. Based on one standard pipeline for the solution of computer vision problems, this survey splits the problem into several modules: feature extraction and description, human body models, and modeling methods. Problem modeling methods are approached based on two means of categorization in this survey. One way to categorize includes top-down and bottom-up methods, and another way includes generative and discriminative methods. Considering the fact that one direct application of human pose estimation is to provide initialization for automatic video surveillance, there are additional sections for motion-related methods in all modules: motion features, motion models, and motion-based methods. Finally, the paper also collects 26 publicly available data sets for validation and provides error measurement methods that are frequently used.

  1. Development of biogenic VOC emission inventories for the boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, V.

    2008-07-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by vegetation, especially forests, can affect local and regional atmospheric photochemistry through their reactions with atmospheric oxidants. Their reaction products may also participate in the formation and growth of new particles which affect the radiation balance of the atmosphere, and thus climate, by scattering and absorbing shortwave and longwave radiation and by modifying the radiative properties, amount and lifetime of clouds. Globally, anthropogenic VOC emissions are far surpassed by the biogenic ones, making biogenic emission inventories an integral element in the development of efficient air quality and climate strategies. The inventories are typically constructed based on landcover information, measured emissions of different plants or vegetation types, and empirical dependencies of the emissions on environmental variables such as temperature and light. This thesis is focused on the VOC emissions from the boreal forest, the largest terrestrial biome with characteristic vegetation patterns and strong seasonality. The isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions of the most prevalent boreal tree species in Finland, Scots pine, have been measured and their seasonal variation and dependence on temperature and light have been studied. The measured emission data and other available observations of the emissions of the principal boreal trees have been used in a biogenic emission model developed for the boreal forests in Finland. The model utilizes satellite landcover information, Finnish forest classification and hourly meteorological data to calculate isoprene, monoterpene, sesquiterpene and other VOC emissions over the growing season. The principal compounds emitted by Scots pine are DELTA3-carene and alpha-pinene in the south boreal zone and alpha- and beta-pinene in the north boreal zone. The monoterpene emissions are dependent on temperature and have a clear seasonal cycle with high emissions in spring

  2. Robust Head Pose Estimation Using a 3D Morphable Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Head pose estimation from single 2D images has been considered as an important and challenging research task in computer vision. This paper presents a novel head pose estimation method which utilizes the shape model of the Basel face model and five fiducial points in faces. It adjusts shape deformation according to Laplace distribution to afford the shape variation across different persons. A new matching method based on PSO (particle swarm optimization algorithm is applied both to reduce the time cost of shape reconstruction and to achieve higher accuracy than traditional optimization methods. In order to objectively evaluate accuracy, we proposed a new way to compute the pose estimation errors. Experiments on the BFM-synthetic database, the BU-3DFE database, the CUbiC FacePix database, the CMU PIE face database, and the CAS-PEAL-R1 database show that the proposed method is robust, accurate, and computationally efficient.

  3. Vision based object pose estimation for mobile robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Annie; Bidlack, Clint; Katkere, Arun; Feague, Roy; Weymouth, Terry

    1994-01-01

    Mobile robot navigation using visual sensors requires that a robot be able to detect landmarks and obtain pose information from a camera image. This paper presents a vision system for finding man-made markers of known size and calculating the pose of these markers. The algorithm detects and identifies the markers using a weighted pattern matching template. Geometric constraints are then used to calculate the position of the markers relative to the robot. The selection of geometric constraints comes from the typical pose of most man-made signs, such as the sign standing vertical and the dimensions of known size. This system has been tested successfully on a wide range of real images. Marker detection is reliable, even in cluttered environments, and under certain marker orientations, estimation of the orientation has proven accurate to within 2 degrees, and distance estimation to within 0.3 meters.

  4. Pose-Invariant Face Recognition via RGB-D Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoli Sang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D face models can intrinsically handle large pose face recognition problem. In this paper, we propose a novel pose-invariant face recognition method via RGB-D images. By employing depth, our method is able to handle self-occlusion and deformation, both of which are challenging problems in two-dimensional (2D face recognition. Texture images in the gallery can be rendered to the same view as the probe via depth. Meanwhile, depth is also used for similarity measure via frontalization and symmetric filling. Finally, both texture and depth contribute to the final identity estimation. Experiments on Bosphorus, CurtinFaces, Eurecom, and Kiwi databases demonstrate that the additional depth information has improved the performance of face recognition with large pose variations and under even more challenging conditions.

  5. Viewpoint and pose in body-form adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekunova, Alla; Black, Michael; Parkinson, Laura; Barton, Jason J S

    2013-01-01

    Faces and bodies are complex structures, perception of which can play important roles in person identification and inference of emotional state. Face representations have been explored using behavioural adaptation: in particular, studies have shown that face aftereffects show relatively broad tuning for viewpoint, consistent with origin in a high-level structural descriptor far removed from the retinal image. Our goals were to determine first, if body aftereffects also showed a degree of viewpoint invariance, and second if they also showed pose invariance, given that changes in pose create even more dramatic changes in the 2-D retinal image. We used a 3-D model of the human body to generate headless body images, whose parameters could be varied to generate different body forms, viewpoints, and poses. In the first experiment, subjects adapted to varying viewpoints of either slim or heavy bodies in a neutral stance, followed by test stimuli that were all front-facing. In the second experiment, we used the same front-facing bodies in neutral stance as test stimuli, but compared adaptation from bodies in the same neutral stance to adaptation with the same bodies in different poses. We found that body aftereffects were obtained over substantial viewpoint changes, with no significant decline in aftereffect magnitude with increasing viewpoint difference between adapting and test images. Aftereffects also showed transfer across one change in pose but not across another. We conclude that body representations may have more viewpoint invariance than faces, and demonstrate at least some transfer across pose, consistent with a high-level structural description.

  6. Molecular Probes: A Tool for Studying Toxicity of VOCs to P.Putida F1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Olson, M. S.

    2007-12-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are of great concern in ground water remediation, and are generally present in the form of NAPLs in subsurface environments. Among the various treatment technologies, in situ bioremediation is one of the most effective and low-cost treatment options. Many soil bacteria are reported to degrade these organic contaminants via metabolism (using them as a source of carbon to derive energy) or co- metabolism up to certain concentrations. However, larger concentrations of these contaminants are toxic to bacteria. Thus, in order to achieve successful bioremediation, it is important to determine the optimal concentrations of various contaminants that is beneficial for the activity and survival of degrading bacteria. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel method for toxicity analyses of VOC contaminants to the soil bacteria that degrade them. The present study is based on a two-color fluorescence assay of bacterial viability which facilitates actual counting of live and dead bacteria. Pseudomonas putida F1 cells were labeled with a LIVE/DEAD® BacLightTM bacterial viability kit (Invitrogen), which consists of a mixture of two dyes, SYTO 9 and propidium iodide, each with a different ability to penetrate healthy bacterial cells. Live cells stain green whereas propidium iodide (red dye) only penetrates cells with compromised membranes that are considered dead or dying. Stained cells were exposed to different concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) and toluene in sealed vials. Change in the concentrations of green and red cells were monitored over the time using fluorescence microscopy. UTHSCSA ImageTool software was used to count the live and dead cells in the images. It was observed that live (green) cell concentrations decreased and dead/damaged (red) cell concentrations increased over time when cells were exposed to TCE. No significant changes were observed in control experiments. Death rate constants calculated based on live cell

  7. Present and potential security threats posed to civil aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav SZABO

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft presents ideal object for terrorist attack. Apart from the risks posed by possible terrorist attacks on airborne aircraft, air terrorism includes the threats to general aviation on the ground, including airports and surrounding infrastructure. Air oriented terrorism in all of its forms can undermine public confidence in the safety of air travel, which could result in negative effects for certain airlines and other firms in aviation industry due to decline in passenger travel and cargo shipment. This article is giving an overview about the redoubtable present and potential future threats posed to in-flight security, and possibilities and solutions how to mitigate the risks on acceptable level.

  8. Pose Estimation of Interacting People using Pictorial Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Pose estimation of people have had great progress in recent years but so far research has dealt with single persons. In this paper we address some of the challenges that arise when doing pose estimation of interacting people. We build on the pictorial structures framework and make important...... contributions by combining color-based appearance and edge information using a measure of the local quality of the appearance feature. In this way we not only combine the two types of features but dynamically find the optimal weighting of them. We further enable the method to handle occlusions by searching...

  9. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60.502 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires a...

  10. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  11. Evaluation of the Snap Sampler for Sampling Ground Water Monitoring Wells for VOCs and Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    23 Table 4. Results from the holding- time study with...the opposite order. First Holding- Time Study for VOCs The purpose of this study was to determine whether analyte concentra- tions of samples... Study for VOCs The procedure for this study was the same as for the previous holding- time study except that that the Snap Samplers were equilibrated

  12. POLLUTION PREVENTION CASE STUDIES: LOW-VOC/HAP WOOD FURNITURE COATINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article provides a brief profile of the wood furniture industry, discusses pollution prevention activities typically implemented, describes the four low-VOC/HAP coating technologies studied. and summarizes one case study for each of the low-VOC/HAP coating yechnologies inves...

  13. Removal of dissolved VOCs from water with an air stripper/membrane vapor separation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijmans, J.G.; Kamaruddin, H.D.; Segelke, S.V.; Wessling, Matthias; Baker, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Treatment of water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a major problem for the United States chemical industry. Currently, VOCs are removed from moderately contaminated wastewater streams by processes such as steam stripping and from dilute wastewaters by air stripping combined wi

  14. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 4, annual summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, J.; Su, Wei; Yan, Hui [and others

    1997-07-01

    Heating softwood in a low-headspace environment draws out the VOCs from the wood, without removing the water. The VOCs can be collected from the headspace, and represent a valuable product. The VOC-depleted wood can then be dried conventionally with much reduced emissions. Heating can be accomplished through radiofrequency (RF) or steam. For lumber, steam is inefficient, but brief RF treatment under low-headspace conditions draws out 80% of the VOCs. The power used is quite low, since the RF energy is not used to remove water, but only to maintain the wood at a set temperature. The technology is now at the pre-pilot stage. Either steam or RF can be used for particle, OSB, and veneer, again under low-headspace conditions. Increasing steam temperature facilitates VOC removal. In order to understand the mechanism of VOC release in lumber, the transport of water and VOCs to the surface is being studied as a function of sample size and orientation. Characterization of the terpenes and resin/fatty acids from a control set of trees is underway in order to define the seasonal influence on VOCs.

  15. Smartphone-based sensing system using ZnO and graphene modified electrodes for VOCs detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Diming; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Xing; Xu, Gang; Lu, Yanli; Liu, Qingjun

    2017-07-15

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) detection is in high demand for clinic treatment, environment monitoring, and food quality control. Especially, VOCs from human exhaled breath can serve as significant biomarkers of some diseases, such as lung cancer and diabetes. In this study, a smartphone-based sensing system was developed for real-time VOCs monitoring using alternative current (AC) impedance measurement. The interdigital electrodes modified with zinc oxide (ZnO), graphene, and nitrocellulose were used as sensors to produce impedance responses to VOCs. The responses could be detected by a hand-held device, sent out to a smartphone by Bluetooth, and reported with concentration on an android program of the smartphone. The smartphone-based system was demonstrated to detect acetone at concentrations as low as 1.56ppm, while AC impedance spectroscopy was used to distinguish acetone from other VOCs. Finally, measurements of the exhalations from human being were carried out to obtain the concentration of acetone in exhaled breath before and after exercise. The results proved that the smartphone-based system could be applied on the detection of VOCs in real settings for healthcare diagnosis. Thus, the smartphone-based system for VOCs detection provided a convenient, portable and efficient approach to monitor VOCs in exhaled breath and possibly allowed for early diagnosis of some diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Total OH reactivity study from VOC photochemical oxidation in the SAPHIR chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Hohaus, T.; Fuchs, H.; Novelli, A.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Schmitt, S. H.; Wahner, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that hydroxyl radicals (OH) act as a dominant reactive species in the degradation of VOCs in the atmosphere. In recent field studies, directly measured total OH reactivity often showed poor agreement with OH reactivity calculated from VOC measurements (e.g. Nölscher et al., 2013; Lu et al., 2012a). This "missing OH reactivity" is attributed to unaccounted biogenic VOC emissions and/or oxidation products. The comparison of total OH reactivity being directly measured and calculated from single component measurements of VOCs and their oxidation products gives us a further understanding on the source of unmeasured reactive species in the atmosphere. This allows also the determination of the magnitude of the contribution of primary VOC emissions and their oxidation products to the missing OH reactivity. A series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, to explore in detail the photochemical degradation of VOCs (isoprene, ß-pinene, limonene, and D6-benzene) by OH. The total OH reactivity was determined from the measurement of VOCs and their oxidation products by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) with a GC/MS/FID system, and directly measured by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) at the same time. The comparison between these two total OH reactivity measurements showed an increase of missing OH reactivity in the presence of oxidation products of VOCs, indicating a strong contribution to missing OH reactivity from uncharacterized oxidation products.

  17. Concentrations and flux measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in boreal forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki, Mari; Aaltonen, Hermanni; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Hellén, Heidi; Pumpanen, Jukka; Bäck, Jaana

    2017-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) impact soil processes as VOCs transmit signals between roots and rhizosphere (Ditengou et al., 2015), VOCs can regulate microbial activity (Asensio et al., 2012), and VOCs can also promote root growth (Hung et al., 2012). Belowground concentrations of VOCs have not been measured in situ and for this reason, knowledge of how different soil organisms such as roots, rhizosphere and decomposers contribute to VOC production is limited. The aim of this study was to determine and quantify VOC fluxes and concentrations of different horizons from boreal forest soil. The VOC concentrations and fluxes were measured from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest soil at the SMEAR II station in southern Finland from 21th of April to 2nd of December in 2016. VOC fluxes were measured using dynamic (flow-through) chambers from five soil collars placed on five different locations. VOC concentrations were also measured in each location from four different soil horizons with the measurement depth 1-107 cm. VOCs were collected from underground gas collectors into the Tenax-Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes using portable pumps ( 100 ml min-1). The VOC concentrations and fluxes of isoprene, 11 monoterpenes, 13 sesquiterpenes and different oxygenated VOCs were measured. Sample tubes were analyzed using thermal desorption-gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). Soil temperature and soil water content were continuously monitored for each soil horizon. Our preliminary results show that the primary source of VOCs is organic soil layer and the contribution of mineral soil to the VOC formation is minor. VOC fluxes and concentrations were dominated by monoterpenes such as α-pinene, camphene, β-pinene, and Δ3-carene. Monoterpene concentration is almost 10-fold in organic soil compared to the deeper soil layers. However, the highest VOC fluxes on the soil surface were measured in October, whereas the monoterpene concentrations in organic soil were highest in July

  18. Efficient control of odors and VOC emissions via activated carbon technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Farhana; Kim, James; Huang, Ruey; Nu, Huong Ton; Lorenzo, Vlad

    2014-07-01

    This research study was undertaken to enhance the efficiency and economy of carbon scrubbers in controlling odors and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the wastewater collection and treatment facilities of the Bureau of Sanitation, City of Los Angeles. The butane activity and hydrogen sulfide breakthrough capacity of activated carbon were assessed. Air streams were measured for odorous gases and VOCs and removal efficiency (RE) determined. Carbon towers showed average to excellent removal of odorous compounds, VOCs, and siloxanes; whereas, wet scrubbers demonstrated good removal of odorous compounds but low to negative removal of VOCs. It was observed that the relative humidity and empty bed contact time are one of the most important operating parameters of carbon towers impacting the pollutant RE. Regular monitoring of activated carbon and VOCs has resulted in useful information on carbon change-out frequency, packing recommendations, and means to improve performance of carbon towers.

  19. Non-labeling multiplex surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U. S.; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report multiplex SERS based VOCs detection with a leaning nano-pillar substrate. The VOCs analyte molecules adsorbed at the tips of the nano-pillars produced SERS signal due to the field enhancement occurring at the localized surface plasmon hot spots between adjacent leaning nano...... chemical sensing layer for the enrichment of gas molecules on sensor surface. The leaning nano-pillar substrate also showed highly reproducible SERS signal in cyclic VOCs detection, which can reduce the detection cost in practical applications. Further, multiplex SERS detection on different combination...... of acetone and ethanol vapor was also successfully demonstrated. The vibrational fingerprints of molecular structures provide specific Raman peaks for different VOCs contents. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multiplex VOCs detection using SERS. We believe that this work may lead to a portable...

  20. Pollution characteristic of VOCs of ambient air in winter and spring in Shijiazhuang City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing CHANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to further explore the pollution characteristics of volatile organic compounds in ambient air in winter and spring in Shijiazhuang City, the pollution characteristics of 62 volatile organic compounds (VOCs, monthly and quarterly variation, the correlation between VOCs and PM2.5, and the main sources of VOCs are investigated by using EPA TO-15 method. It shows that 40 organic compounds of the 64 VOCs have been quantitatively determined in winter and spring in the city, which are mainly acetone, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, dichloromethane, toluene, ethyl acetate, etc.. In the no-quantitatively determined components, higher ethanol, butyl acetate, butane etc. are detected. The VOCs concentration has positive correlation with the PM2.5 concentration during haze days.

  1. Effects of pose and image resolution on automatic face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmood, Zahid; Ali, Tauseef; Khan, Samee U.

    The popularity of face recognition systems have increased due to their use in widespread applications. Driven by the enormous number of potential application domains, several algorithms have been proposed for face recognition. Face pose and image resolutions are among the two important factors that

  2. Full Body Pose Estimation During Occlusion using Multiple Cameras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Cosar, Serhan

    people is a very challenging problem for methods based on pictorials structure as for any other monocular pose estimation method. In this report we present work on a multi-view approach based on pictorial structures that integrate low level information from multiple calibrated cameras to improve the 2D...

  3. Robustifying eye center localization by head pose cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valenti, R.; Yücel, Z.; Gevers, T.

    2009-01-01

    Head pose and eye location estimation are two closely related issues which refer to similar application areas. In recent years, these problems have been studied individually in numerous works in the literature. Previous research shows that cylindrical head models and isophote based schemes provide

  4. Example-Based Human Pose Recovery under Predicted Partial Occlusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, Ronald; Babuska, Robert; Groen, Frans C A.

    2010-01-01

    For human pose recovery, the presence of occlusions due to objects or other persons in the scene remains a difficult problem to cope with. However, recent advances in the area of human detection allow for simultaneous segmentation of humans and the prediction of occluded regions. In this chapter, we

  5. Hidden information in ill-posed inverse problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahrobaei, S.; Mansoori, M.; Joosten, G.J.P.; Van den Hof, P.M.J.; Jansen, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that parameter updating of large-scale numerical reservoir flow models (a.k.a. ‘computer assisted history matching’) is an ill-posed inverse problem. Typically the number of uncertain parameters in a reservoir flow model is very large whereas the available information for estimating

  6. New Riccati equations for well-posed linear systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opmeer, MR; Curtain, RF

    2004-01-01

    We consider the classic problem of minimizing a quadratic cost functional for well-posed linear systems over the class of inputs that are square integrable and that produce a square integrable output. As is well-known, the minimum cost can be expressed in terms of a bounded nonnegative self-adjoint

  7. Fast Multilevel Methods for Solving Ill-posed Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈仲英; 宋丽红; 马富明

    2005-01-01

    Many industrial and engineering applications require numerically solving ill-posed problems. Regularization methods are employed to find approximate solutions of these problems. The choice of regularization parameters by numerical algorithms is one of the most important issues for the success of regularization methods. When we use some discrepancy principles to determine the regularization parameter,

  8. Hidden information in ill-posed inverse problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahrobaei, S.; Mansoori, M.; Joosten, G.J.P.; Van den Hof, P.M.J.; Jansen, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that parameter updating of large-scale numerical reservoir flow models (a.k.a. ‘computer assisted history matching’) is an ill-posed inverse problem. Typically the number of uncertain parameters in a reservoir flow model is very large whereas the available information for estimating

  9. Pose Reconstruction of Flexible Instruments from Endoscopic Images using Markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reilink, Rob; Stramigioli, Stefano; Misra, Sarthak

    2012-01-01

    A system is developed that can reconstruct the pose of flexible endoscopic instruments that are used in ad- vanced flexible endoscopes using solely the endoscopic images. Four markers are placed on the instrument, whose positions are measured in the image. These measurements are compared to a

  10. Dynamical System Method for Solving Ill-Posed Operator Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingjun Luo; Suhua Yang

    2007-01-01

    Two dynamical system methods are studied for solving linear ill-posed problems with both operator and right-hand nonexact. The methods solve a Cauchy problem for a linear operator equation which possesses a global solution. The limit of the global solution at infinity solves the original linear equation. Moreover,we also present a convergent iterativeprocess for solving the Cauchy problem.

  11. Fiducial Marker Detection and Pose Estimation From LIDAR Range Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Markers .................................................26 E. APPLICATIONS OF 3D POINT CLOUDS ................................................27 F...in the environment and produces 3D coordinates or range and bearing values. The raw data can be easily represented by point clouds , with each point...registration and pose estimation include cylinders, spheres, and orthogonal planes (Gao, 2007; Haas, 2005). E. APPLICATIONS OF LIDAR 3D POINT CLOUDS Robotics

  12. Mathematical Thinking and Creativity through Mathematical Problem Posing and Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayllón, María F.; Gómez, Isabel A.; Ballesta-Claver, Julio

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the relationship between the development of mathematical thinking and creativity with mathematical problem posing and solving. Creativity and mathematics are disciplines that do not usually appear together. Both concepts constitute complex processes sharing elements, such as fluency (number of ideas), flexibility (range of ideas),…

  13. Enhancing Students' Communication Skills through Problem Posing and Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugito; E. S., Sri Mulyani; Hartono; Supartono

    2017-01-01

    This study was to explore how enhance communication skill through problem posing and presentation method. The subjects of this research were the seven grade students Junior High School, including 20 male and 14 female. This research was conducted in two cycles and each cycle consisted of four steps, they were: planning, action, observation, and…

  14. Effects of pose and image resolution on automatic face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmood, Zahid; Ali, Tauseef; Khan, Samee U.

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of face recognition systems have increased due to their use in widespread applications. Driven by the enormous number of potential application domains, several algorithms have been proposed for face recognition. Face pose and image resolutions are among the two important factors that

  15. Anthropogenic VOC speciation in emission inventories: a method for improvement and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schneidemesser, E.; D'angiola, A.; Granier, C.; Monks, P. S.; Law, K.

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important precursor compounds for the formation of ozone and other secondary organic aerosols. Anthropogenic sources of VOCs are dominated by industrial usage and transportation sources, the latter being extremely important in urban areas. Megacities and large urban conglomerations are emission hot spots that exert disproportionately large adverse health effects on the population and surrounding environment, owing to their high population density and concentrated emission sources. Exceedances of ozone air quality standards are a problem in many urban areas. Improvements in the modelling of ozone precursors would benefit our understanding of the impact of changes in emissions and the effect of future legislation on air quality. As many VOCs are extremely reactive in the atmosphere and have high ozone forming potential, improved speciation of VOCs in models could lead to better predictions of ozone levels and secondary organic aerosol formation. Previously, VOC and carbon monoxide (CO) data from urban areas around the world were compared. Significant differences in VOC concentrations were observed, however, when normalized to CO, the VOC-CO ratios were similar for many locations and over time, even as emission reductions were implemented. The largest variation was found in the lighter alkanes due to the use of alternative transportation fuels in various world regions. These ratios were grouped by region and used to develop a new speciation for surface emissions of VOCs, by applying the regional observed VOC-CO ratios to the CO emissions for the urban areas. Urban areas were defined as 150 inhabitants per km2 or greater. Model simulations were performed using the MOZART-4 chemistry transport model to assess the improved speciation of the VOC emissions. The model outputs were compared to urban observational data where available. The impact of the new speciation of the distribution of CO, OH and ozone at the global scale will be

  16. Assessment of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in indooor parking facilities at Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanto, Gabriel Andari

    This dissertation identified the types, magnitudes, sources, and assessed risk exposure of VOCs in different types of indoor parking facilities. VOCs are ones of major pollutants emitted from automobiles. The indoor parking facilities included were attached garages, grounds, and underground parking. Modification of method TO15 by EPA had been applied for identifying types and magnitudes of VOCs. Results of these identifications are presented. Eight most abundant VOCs could be identified in every sampling location with toluene as the most abundant compound followed by m,p-xylene, ethylbenzene and benzene. Compare to ground and underground parking, attached garages have the highest concentration of TVOCs. For sources identification, BTEX, m,p-xylene and benzene, and toluene and benzene ratios are calculated. BTEX ratios for ground and underground parking are similar compare to attached garage due to the similar pattern of driving speed and the content of gasoline fuel. On the other hand the ratios of m,p-xylene and benzene and toluene and benzene in attached garage are higher compare to the same ratios for ground and underground parking due to other significant contributor of VOCs such as solvent, household cleanings stored. Cancer and noncancer risk assessment were also calculated. Results showed that cancer and noncancer risk due human exposures to VOC in indoor parking facilities were relatively low. However the risk of the human exposure to VOCs from indoor parking facilities has to be considered as a part of total risks of VOC exposures on human during their daily activities. When people in Houston have already exposed to high VOC concentrations from outdoor environment activities such as traffic and refineries and petrochemical facilities, additional activities causing VOC exposures will add the risk significantly.

  17. Raman scattering investigation of VOCs in interaction with ice particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facq, Sébastien; Oancea, Adriana; Focsa, Cristian; Chazallon, Bertrand

    2010-05-01

    Cirrus clouds that form in the Earth's upper troposphere (UT) are known to play a significant role in the radiation budget and climate [1]. These clouds that cover about 35% of the Earth's surface [2] are mainly composed of small ice particles that can provide surfaces for trace gas interactions [3]. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are present in relative high abundance in the UT [4][5]. They promote substantial sources of free OH radicals that are responsible for driving photochemical cycles in the atmosphere. Their presence can both influence the oxidizing capacity and the ozone budget of the atmosphere. VOCs can interact with ice particles via different trapping processes (adsorption, diffusion, freezing, and co-deposition, i.e., incorporation of trace gases during growing ice conditions) which can result in the perturbation of the chemistry and photochemistry of the UT. Knowledge of the incorporation processes of VOCs in ice particles is important in order to understand and predict their impact on the ice particles structure and reactivity and more generally on the cirrus cloud formation. This proceeds via the in-situ characterization of the ice condensed phase in a pressure and temperature range of the UT. An important mechanism of UT cirrus cloud formation is the heterogeneous ice freezing process. In this study, we examine and characterize the interaction of a VOC, i.e., ethanol (EtOH) with ice particles during freezing. Vibrational spectra of water O-H and EtOH C-H spectral regions are analysed using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. Information at the molecular level on the surface structure can be derived from accompanying changes observed in band shapes and vibrational mode frequencies. Depending of the EtOH content, different crystalline phases have been identified and compared to hydrates previously reported for the EtOH-water system. Particular attention is paid on the effect of EtOH aqueous solutions cooling rate and droplet sizes on the phases

  18. Surface acoustic wave sensing of VOCs in harsh chemical environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1993-06-01

    The measurement of VOC concentrations in harsh chemical and physical environments is a formidable task. A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor has been designed for this purpose and its construction and testing are described in this paper. Included is a detailed description of the design elements specific to operation in 300{degree}C steam and HCl environments including temperature control, gas handling, and signal processing component descriptions. In addition, laboratory temperature stability was studied and a minimum detection limit was defined for operation in industrial environments. Finally, a description of field tests performed on steam reforming equipment at Synthetica Technologies Inc. of Richmond, CA is given including a report on destruction efficiency of CCl{sub 4} in the Synthetica moving bed evaporator. Design improvements based on the field tests are proposed.

  19. Detection of new VOC compounds with iCRDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Leen, J. B.; Gardner, A.; Gupta, M.; Baer, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    The instrument at Los Gatos Research (a member of ABB Inc.) which is based on incoherent cavity ringdown spectroscopy (iCRDS) that operates in the mid-infrared (bands from 860-1060 cm-1 or 970-1280 cm-1) is capable of detecting a broad range of VOCs, in situ, continuously and autonomously, for example, BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), including differentiation of xylene isomers. Previously, we have demonstrated the measurement of trichloroethylene (TCE) in zero air with a precision of 0.17 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes), and the measurement of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with a precision of 0.15 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes). Both of these measured precisions exceed the EPA's commercial building action limit, which for TCE is 0.92 ppb (5 µg/m3) and for PCE is 0.29 ppb (2 µg/m3). This ability has been fully demonstrated by the deployment of the instrument to the Superfund site at Moffett Naval Air Station in Mountain View, California where contaminated ground water results in vapor intrusion of TCE and PCE. For two weeks, the instrument operated continuously and autonomously, successfully measuring TCE and PCE concentrations in both the breathing zone and steam tunnel air, in excellent agreement with previous TO-15 data. In this poster, we present laboratory performance data targeting new toxic molecules with the same instrument. We have demonstrated the measurement of trichlorofluolomethane (Freon 11) in zero air with a precision of 1 ppb (3σ at 1075cm-1), and hexafluoropropene in zero air with a precision of about 0.3 ppb (3σ per spectrum). The iCRDS instrument has shown the ability to continuously and autonomously measure sub-ppb levels of toxic VOCs in the lab/field, offering an unprecedented picture of the short term dynamics associated with vapor intrusion and ground water pollution.

  20. Multi—pose Color Face Recognition in a Complex Background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUChangren; WANGRunsheng

    2003-01-01

    Face recognition has wider application fields. In recurrent references, most of the algorithms that deal with the face recognition in the static images are with simple background, and only used for ID picture recogni-tion. It is necessary to study the whole process of multi-pose face recognition in a clutter background. In this pa-per an automatic multi-pose face recognition system with multi-feature is proposed. It consists of several steps: face detection, detection and location of the face organs, feature extraction for recognition, recognition decision. In face de-tection the combination of skin-color and multi-verification which consists of the analysis of the shape, local organ fea-tures and head model is applied to improve the perfor-mance. In detection and location of the face organ feature points, with the analysis of multiple features and their pro-jections, the combination of an iterative search with a con-fidence function and template matching at the candidate points is adopted to improve the performance of accuracy and speed. In feature extraction for recognition, geome-try normalization based on three-point afflne transform is adopted to conserve the information to a maximum con-tent before the feature extraction of principal component analysis (PCA). In recognition decision, a hierarchical face model with the division of the face poses is introduced to reduce its retrieval space and thus to cut its time consump-tion. In addition, a fusion decision is applied to improve the face recognition performance. Also, pose recognition result can be got simultaneously. The new approach is ap-plied to 420 color images which consist of multi-pose faces with two visible eyes in a complex background, and the results are satisfactory.

  1. Thermal response and recyclability of poly(stearylacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) gel as a VOCs absorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of absorbent materials for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is in demand for a variety of environmental applications including protective barriers for VOCs point sources. One of the challenges for the currently available VOCs absorbents is their recyclability. In this study, we syn...

  2. Characterisation and treatment of VOCs in process water from upgrading facilities for compressed biogas (CBG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson Påledal, S; Arrhenius, K; Moestedt, J; Engelbrektsson, J; Stensen, K

    2016-02-01

    Compression and upgrading of biogas to vehicle fuel generates process water, which to varying degrees contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originating from the biogas. The compostion of this process water has not yet been studied and scientifically published and there is currently an uncertainty regarding content of VOCs and how the process water should be managed to minimise the impact on health and the environment. The aim of the study was to give an overview about general levels of VOCs in the process water. Characterisation of process water from amine and water scrubbers at plants digesting waste, sewage sludge or agricultural residues showed that both the average concentration and composition of particular VOCs varied depending on the substrate used at the biogas plant, but the divergence was high and the differences for total concentrations from the different substrate groups were only significant for samples from plants using waste compared to residues from agriculture. The characterisation also showed that the content of VOCs varied greatly between different sampling points for same main substrate and between sampling occasions at the same sampling point, indicating that site-specific conditions are important for the results which also indicates that a number of analyses at different times are required in order to make an more exact characterisation with low uncertainty. Inhibition of VOCs in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process was studied in biomethane potential tests, but no inhibition was observed during addition of synthetic process water at concentrations of 11.6 mg and 238 mg VOC/L.

  3. CAN SORBENT-BASED GAS PHASE AIR CLEANING FOR VOCS SUBSTITUTE FOR VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Fisk, William J.

    2007-08-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge about the suitability of sorbent-based air cleaning for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the air in commercial buildings, as needed to enable reductions in ventilation rates and associated energy savings. The principles of sorbent air cleaning are introduced, criteria are suggested for sorbent systems that can counteract indoor VOC concentration increases from reduced ventilation, major findings from research on sorbent performance for this application are summarized, and related priority research needs are identified. Major conclusions include: sorbent systems can remove a broad range of VOCs with moderate to high efficiency, sorbent technologies perform effectively when challenged with VOCs at the low concentrations present indoors, and there is a large uncertainty about the lifetime and associated costs of sorbent air cleaning systems when used in commercial buildings for indoor VOC control. Suggested priority research includes: experiments to determine sorbent system VOC removal efficiencies and lifetimes considering the broad range and low concentration of VOCs indoors; evaluations of in-situ regeneration of sorbents; and an updated analysis of the cost of sorbent air cleaning relative to the cost of ventilation.

  4. Comparison of VOC and ammonia emissions from individual PVC materials, adhesives and from complete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järnström, H; Saarela, K; Kalliokoski, P; Pasanen, A-L

    2008-04-01

    Emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and ammonia measured from six PVC materials and four adhesives in the laboratory were compared to the emission rates measured on site from complete structures. Significantly higher specific emission rates (SERs) were generally measured from the complete structures than from individual materials. There were large differences between different PVC materials in their permeability for VOCs originating from the underlying structure. Glycol ethers and esters from adhesives used in the installation contributed to the emissions from the PVC covered structure. Emissions of 2-ethylhexanol and TXIB (2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate) were common. High ammonia SERs were measured from single adhesives but their contribution to the emissions from the complete structure did not appear as obvious as for VOCs. The results indicate that three factors affected the VOC emissions from the PVC flooring on a structure: 1) the permeability of the PVC product for VOCs, 2) the VOC emission from the adhesive used, and 3) the VOC emission from the backside of the PVC product.

  5. Indoor contaminants from Hardcopy Devices: Characteristics of VOCs in photocopy centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhosh, Maryam; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Zare, Mohammad Reza; Fakhri, Yadolah; Shamsolahi, Hamid Reza

    2012-12-01

    Indoor air pollution in working places is widely recognized as one of the most serious potential environment risks to human health. Mean volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations of 144 samples from four copy centers in Tehran, Iran in two seasons were monitored for the purpose of quantifying the various VOCs in these areas. Area samples were collected in thermal desorption tubes and were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass selective detector. Real-time personal total volatile organic compounds were measured using a data-logging photo-ionization detector. Simultaneously, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes) outdoor measurements were performed in the same manner as were the indoor measurements. Nineteen different VOCs were detected in the area samples. The results show that in all photocopy centers, the indoor levels of toluene were much higher than the outdoor levels. During business hours, the VOC levels increased, especially toluene indoor concentration. The ventilation decreased the indoor VOC concentrations. The background and indoor VOC concentrations were higher in winter than in spring. The minimum ratio of the indoor to outdoor concentration of BTEX was estimated to be more than 42. This value proved that buildings with photocopiers can be a site of VOC accumulation.

  6. VOC reactivity and its effect on ozone production during the HaChi summer campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ran

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of ozone and its precursors conducted within the HaChi (Haze in China project in summer 2009 were analyzed to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs and their effects on ozone photochemical production at a suburban site in the North China Plain (NCP. Ozone episodes, during which running 8-h average ozone concentrations exceeding 80 ppbv lasted for more than 4 h, occurred on about two thirds of the observational days during the 5-week field campaign. This suggests continuous ozone exposure risks in this region in the summer. Average concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx and VOCs are about 20 ppbv and 650 ppbC, respectively. On average, total VOC reactivity is dominated by anthropogenic VOCs. The contribution of biogenic VOCs to total ozone-forming potential, however, is also considerable in the daytime. Key species associated with ozone photochemical production are 2-butenes (18 %, isoprene (15 %, trimethylbenzenes (11 %, xylenes (8.5 %, 3-methylhexane (6 %, n-hexane (5 % and toluene (4.5 %. Formation of ozone is found to be NOx-limited as indicated by measured VOCs/NOx ratios and further confirmed by a sensitivity study using a photochemical box model NCAR_MM. The Model simulation suggests that ozone production is also sensitive to changes in VOC reactivity under the NOx-limited regime, although this sensitivity depends strongly on how much NOx is present.

  7. Temporal variability and sources of VOCs in urban areas of the eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltsonoudis, Christos; Kostenidou, Evangelia; Florou, Kalliopi; Psichoudaki, Magda; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2016-11-01

    During the summer of 2012 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) in urban sites, in Athens and Patras, two of the largest cities in Greece. Also, during the winter of 2013, PTR-MS measurements were conducted in the center of the city of Athens. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the VOC measurements to gain insights about their sources. In summer most of the measured VOCs were due to biogenic and traffic emissions. Isoprene, monoterpenes, and several oxygenated VOCs (oVOCs) originated mainly from vegetation either directly or as oxidation products. Isoprene average concentrations in Patras and Athens were 1 and 0.7 ppb respectively, while the monoterpene concentrations were 0.3 and 0.9 ppb respectively. Traffic was the main source of aromatic compounds during summer. For Patras and Athens the average concentrations of benzene were 0.1 and 0.2 ppb, of toluene 0.3 and 0.8 ppb, and of the xylenes 0.3 and 0.7 ppb respectively. Winter measurements in Athens revealed that biomass burning used for residential heating was a major VOC source contributing both aromatic VOCs and biogenic compounds such as monoterpenes. Several episodes related to biomass burning were identified and emission ratios (ERs) and emission factors (EFs) were estimated.

  8. VOCs in industrial, urban and suburban neighborhoods—Part 2: Factors affecting indoor and outdoor concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chunrong; Batterman, Stuart; Godwin, Christopher

    Many microenvironmental and behavioral factors can affect concentrations of and exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Identifying these determinants is important to understand exposures and risks, and also to design policies and strategies that minimize concentrations. This study is aimed at determining factors associated with VOC concentrations found indoors in residences and outdoors in ambient air. It utilizes results from a comprehensive field study in which 98 VOCs were measured both inside and outside of 159 residences in three communities in southeast Michigan, USA. Additional measurements included indoor CO 2 concentrations, temperature, relative humidity, building and neighborhood characteristics, and occupant activities, assessed using a questionnaire and comprehensive walkthrough investigation. Factors potentially affecting concentrations were identified using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Outdoors, seasonal and community effects were observed. Indoors, seasonal effects were limited to the urban and industrial communities, largely due to changes in ambient levels. Elevated indoor VOC concentrations were associated with eight sources or activities: the presence of an attached garage; recent renovations; older residences; indoor smoking; less frequent window or door opening; higher CO 2 concentrations; and lower ventilation rates. VOC levels were uninfluenced by building materials (wood vs. brick), flooring type (carpeting vs. wood), stove type (gas or electric), number of occupants, air freshener use, and hobbies involving arts and crafts. Factor analyses identified up to five factors for the ambient VOC measurements, and up to 10 factors for the indoor measurements, which further helped to explain the variability of concentrations and associations between VOCs.

  9. Development of metal organic fromwork-199 immobilized zeolite foam for adsorption of common indoor VOCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Vipin K; Pires, João

    2017-05-01

    Reticulated foam shaped adsorbents are more efficient for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particularly from low VOC-concentration indoor air streams. In this study composite structure of zeolite and metal organic frameworks (MOFs), referred as ZMF, has been fabricated by immobilization of fine MOF-199 powder on foam shaped Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) Zeolitic structure, referred as ZF. The ZMF possess a uniform and well-dispersed coating of MOF-199 on the porous framework of ZF. It shows higher surface area, pore volume, and VOCs adsorption capacity, as compared to ZF-structure. Post-fabrication changes in selective adsorption properties of ZMF were studied with three common indoor VOCs (benzene, n-hexane, and cyclohexane), using gravimetric adsorption technique. The adsorption capacity of ZMF with different VOCs follow the order of benzene>n-hexane>cyclohexane. In comparison with MOF-199 and ZF, the composite structure ZMF shows improvement in selectivity for benzene from other two VOCs. Further, improvement in efficiency and stability of prepared ZMF was found to be associated with its high MOF loading capacity and unique morphological and structural properties. The developed composite structure with improved VOCs removal and recyclability could be a promising material for small to limited scale air pollution treatment units. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs in Conventional and High Performance School Buildings in the U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lexuan Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs has been an indoor environmental quality (IEQ concern in schools and other buildings for many years. Newer designs, construction practices and building materials for “green” buildings and the use of “environmentally friendly” products have the promise of lowering chemical exposure. This study examines VOCs and IEQ parameters in 144 classrooms in 37 conventional and high performance elementary schools in the U.S. with the objectives of providing a comprehensive analysis and updating the literature. Tested schools were built or renovated in the past 15 years, and included comparable numbers of conventional, Energy Star, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED-certified buildings. Indoor and outdoor VOC samples were collected and analyzed by thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy for 94 compounds. Aromatics, alkanes and terpenes were the major compound groups detected. Most VOCs had mean concentrations below 5 µg/m3, and most indoor/outdoor concentration ratios ranged from one to 10. For 16 VOCs, the within-school variance of concentrations exceeded that between schools and, overall, no major differences in VOC concentrations were found between conventional and high performance buildings. While VOC concentrations have declined from levels measured in earlier decades, opportunities remain to improve indoor air quality (IAQ by limiting emissions from building-related sources and by increasing ventilation rates.

  11. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Conventional and High Performance School Buildings in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lexuan; Su, Feng-Chiao; Batterman, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been an indoor environmental quality (IEQ) concern in schools and other buildings for many years. Newer designs, construction practices and building materials for “green” buildings and the use of “environmentally friendly” products have the promise of lowering chemical exposure. This study examines VOCs and IEQ parameters in 144 classrooms in 37 conventional and high performance elementary schools in the U.S. with the objectives of providing a comprehensive analysis and updating the literature. Tested schools were built or renovated in the past 15 years, and included comparable numbers of conventional, Energy Star, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified buildings. Indoor and outdoor VOC samples were collected and analyzed by thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy for 94 compounds. Aromatics, alkanes and terpenes were the major compound groups detected. Most VOCs had mean concentrations below 5 µg/m3, and most indoor/outdoor concentration ratios ranged from one to 10. For 16 VOCs, the within-school variance of concentrations exceeded that between schools and, overall, no major differences in VOC concentrations were found between conventional and high performance buildings. While VOC concentrations have declined from levels measured in earlier decades, opportunities remain to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) by limiting emissions from building-related sources and by increasing ventilation rates. PMID:28117727

  12. A New Full Pose Measurement Method for Robot Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jun Kang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of robot kinematic errors during the calibration process often requires accurate full pose measurements (position and orientation of robot end-effectors in Cartesian space. This paper proposes a new method of full pose measurement of robot end-effectors for calibration. This method is based on an analysis of the features of a set of target points (placed on a rotating end-effector on a circular trajectory. The accurate measurement is validated by computational simulation results from the Puma robot. Moreover, experimental calibration and validation results for the Hyundai HA-06 robot prove the effectiveness, correctness, and reliability of the proposed method. This method can be applied to robots that have entirely revolute joints or to robots for which only the last joint is revolute.

  13. Pose Estimation of Interacting People using Pictorial Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Pose estimation of people have had great progress in recent years but so far research has dealt with single persons. In this paper we address some of the challenges that arise when doing pose estimation of interacting people. We build on the pictorial structures framework and make important...... contributions by combining color-based appearance and edge information using a measure of the local quality of the appearance feature. In this way we not only combine the two types of features but dynamically find the optimal weighting of them. We further enable the method to handle occlusions by searching...... a foreground mask for possible occluded body parts and then applying extra strong kinematic constraints to find the true occluded body parts. The effect of applying our two contributions are show through both qualitative and quantitative tests and show a clear improvement on the ability to correctly localize...

  14. Pose tracking for augmented reality applications in outdoor archaeological sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Georges; Asmar, Daniel; Elhajj, Imad; Al-Harithy, Howayda

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, agencies around the world have invested huge amounts of effort toward digitizing many aspects of the world's cultural heritage. Of particular importance is the digitization of outdoor archaeological sites. In the spirit of valorization of this digital information, many groups have developed virtual or augmented reality (AR) computer applications themed around a particular archaeological object. The problem of pose tracking in outdoor AR applications is addressed. Different positional systems are analyzed, resulting in the selection of a monocular camera-based user tracker. The limitations that challenge this technique from map generation, scale, anchoring, to lighting conditions are analyzed and systematically addressed. Finally, as a case study, our pose tracking system is implemented within an AR experience in the Byblos Roman theater in Lebanon.

  15. Pose estimation using time-resolved inversion of diffuse light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviv, Dan; Barsi, Christopher; Naik, Nikhil; Feigin, Micha; Raskar, Ramesh

    2014-08-25

    We present a novel approach for evaluation of position and orientation of geometric shapes from scattered time-resolved data. Traditionally, imaging systems treat scattering as unwanted and are designed to mitigate the effects. Instead, we show here that scattering can be exploited by implementing a system based on a femtosecond laser and a streak camera. The result is accurate estimation of object pose, which is a fundamental tool in analysis of complex scenarios and plays an important role in our understanding of physical phenomena. Here, we experimentally show that for a given geometry, a single incident illumination point yields enough information for pose estimation and tracking after multiple scattering events. Our technique can be used for single-shot imaging behind walls or through turbid media.

  16. Wheel pose measurement based on cross structure light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Ding, Xun; Wang, Xian; Zhao, Yafeng

    2016-01-01

    It's necessary for automobile to detect and adjust four-wheel alignment parameters regularly, due to the significant effect on improving stability, enhancing security and reducing tire wear of automobiles. In order to measure the parameters that determined by relative position and posture of four wheels to the automobile cab, this paper proposes a method which applies monocular vision of linear structure light to wheel pose measurement. Firstly, space coordinates of feature point cloud are calculated out from the principle of structured light. Then, an algorithm is designed to determine the normal vector of wheel tangent plane and measure the wheel pose. Finally, actual experiments that by evaluation of adjusted wheel angle measurement are carried out to verify the system accuracy. The corresponding studies can be applied in designing and developing 3D four-wheel alignment system that based on structured light.

  17. Robust feature tracking for endoscopic pose estimation and structure recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, S.; Krappe, S.; Röhl, S.; Bodenstedt, S.; Müller-Stich, B.; Dillmann, R.

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is a highly complex medical discipline with several difficulties for the surgeon. To alleviate these difficulties, augmented reality can be used for intraoperative assistance. For visualization, the endoscope pose must be known which can be acquired with a SLAM (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) approach using the endoscopic images. In this paper we focus on feature tracking for SLAM in minimally invasive surgery. Robust feature tracking and minimization of false correspondences is crucial for localizing the endoscope. As sensory input we use a stereo endoscope and evaluate different feature types in a developed SLAM framework. The accuracy of the endoscope pose estimation is validated with synthetic and ex vivo data. Furthermore we test the approach with in vivo image sequences from da Vinci interventions.

  18. Well posed reduced systems for the Einstein equations

    CERN Document Server

    Choquet-Bruhat, Y

    1996-01-01

    We review some well posed formulations of the evolution part of the Cauchy problem of General Relativity that we have recently obtained. We include also a new first order symmetric hyperbolic system based directly on the Riemann tensor and the full Bianchi identities. It has only physical characteristics and matter sources can be included. It is completely equivalent to our other system with these properties.

  19. Pose Estimation for Augmented Reality: A Hands-On Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Marchand, Éric; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Spindler, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Augmented reality (AR) allows to seamlessly insert virtual objects in an image sequence. In order to accomplish this goal, it is important that synthetic elements are rendered and aligned in the scene in an accurate and visually acceptable way. The solution of this problem can be related to a pose estimation or, equivalently, a camera localization process. This paper aims at presenting a brief but almost self-contented introduction to the most important approaches dedi...

  20. Temporally Scalable Visual SLAM using a Reduced Pose Graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    generated from Kinect data for illustration purposes. II. RELATED WORK The pose graph optimization approach to SLAM was first introduced by Lu and Milios [19...such as the Microsoft Kinect ) and results for both camera types are presented in Section V. Additionally, our approach can incorporate IMU (roll and...camera, a Kinect sensor and a Microstrain IMU among other sensors. The data was collected in a large building over a period of six months. There were

  1. Frozen Landweber Iteration for Nonlinear Ill-Posed Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Xu; B.Han; L.Li

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we propose a modification of the Landweber iteration termed frozen Landweber iteration for nonlinear ill-posed problems.A convergence analysis for this iteration is presented.The numerical performance of this frozen Landweber iteration for a nonlinear Hammerstein integral equation is compared with that of the Landweber iteration.We obtain a shorter running time of the frozen Landweber iteration based on the same convergence accuracy.

  2. Highly Specific Pose Estimation with a Catadioptric Omnidirectional Camera

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    International audience; This article presents a new method for estimating the pose of para-catadioptric vision systems. It is based on the estimation of vanishing points associated with vertical edges of the environment. However, unlike classical approaches no feature (line, circle) extraction and/or identification is needed. A sampled domain of possible vanishing points is tested and histograms are build to characterize the soundness of these points. A specificity index allows to find the mo...

  3. Sensing Strategies for Disambiguating among Multiple Objects in Known Poses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    ELEMENT. PROIECT. TASK Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AE OKUI UBR 545 Technology Square Cambridge, MA 021.39 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12...AD-Ali65 912 SENSING STRATEGIES FOR DISAMBIGURTING MONG MULTIPLE 1/1 OBJECTS IN KNOWN POSES(U) MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE ARTIFICIAL ...or Dist Special 1 ’ MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A. I. Memo 855 August, 1985 Sensing Strategies for

  4. Iterative regularization methods for nonlinear ill-posed problems

    CERN Document Server

    Scherzer, Otmar; Kaltenbacher, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Nonlinear inverse problems appear in many applications, and typically they lead to mathematical models that are ill-posed, i.e., they are unstable under data perturbations. Those problems require a regularization, i.e., a special numerical treatment. This book presents regularization schemes which are based on iteration methods, e.g., nonlinear Landweber iteration, level set methods, multilevel methods and Newton type methods.

  5. Activity Recognition Using Biomechanical Model Based Pose Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Reiss, Attila; Hendeby, Gustaf; Bleser, Gabriele; Stricker, Didier

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a novel activity recognition method based on signal-oriented and model-based features is presented. The model-based features are calculated from shoulder and elbow joint angles and torso orientation, provided by upper-body pose estimation based on a biomechanical body model. The recognition performance of signal-oriented and model-based features is compared within this paper, and the potential of improving recognition accuracy by combining the two approaches is proved: the accu...

  6. Pose Estimation and Segmentation of Multiple People in Stereoscopic Movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Guillaume; Alahari, Karteek; Sivic, Josef; Laptev, Ivan

    2015-08-01

    We describe a method to obtain a pixel-wise segmentation and pose estimation of multiple people in stereoscopic videos. This task involves challenges such as dealing with unconstrained stereoscopic video, non-stationary cameras, and complex indoor and outdoor dynamic scenes with multiple people. We cast the problem as a discrete labelling task involving multiple person labels, devise a suitable cost function, and optimize it efficiently. The contributions of our work are two-fold: First, we develop a segmentation model incorporating person detections and learnt articulated pose segmentation masks, as well as colour, motion, and stereo disparity cues. The model also explicitly represents depth ordering and occlusion. Second, we introduce a stereoscopic dataset with frames extracted from feature-length movies "StreetDance 3D" and "Pina". The dataset contains 587 annotated human poses, 1,158 bounding box annotations and 686 pixel-wise segmentations of people. The dataset is composed of indoor and outdoor scenes depicting multiple people with frequent occlusions. We demonstrate results on our new challenging dataset, as well as on the H2view dataset from (Sheasby et al. ACCV 2012).

  7. Teaching Human Poses Interactively to a Social Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Salichs

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The main activity of social robots is to interact with people. In order to do that, the robot must be able to understand what the user is saying or doing. Typically, this capability consists of pre-programmed behaviors or is acquired through controlled learning processes, which are executed before the social interaction begins. This paper presents a software architecture that enables a robot to learn poses in a similar way as people do. That is, hearing its teacher’s explanations and acquiring new knowledge in real time. The architecture leans on two main components: an RGB-D (Red-, Green-, Blue- Depth -based visual system, which gathers the user examples, and an Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR system, which processes the speech describing those examples. The robot is able to naturally learn the poses the teacher is showing to it by maintaining a natural interaction with the teacher. We evaluate our system with 24 users who teach the robot a predetermined set of poses. The experimental results show that, with a few training examples, the system reaches high accuracy and robustness. This method shows how to combine data from the visual and auditory systems for the acquisition of new knowledge in a natural manner. Such a natural way of training enables robots to learn from users, even if they are not experts in robotics.

  8. Synergy-based Hand Pose Sensing: Reconstruction Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Matteo; Bicchi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Low-cost sensing gloves for reconstruction posture provide measurements which are limited under several regards. They are generated through an imperfectly known model, are subject to noise, and may be less than the number of Degrees of Freedom (DoFs) of the hand. Under these conditions, direct reconstruction of the hand posture is an ill-posed problem, and performance can be very poor. This paper examines the problem of estimating the posture of a human hand using(low-cost) sensing gloves, and how to improve their performance by exploiting the knowledge on how humans most frequently use their hands. To increase the accuracy of pose reconstruction without modifying the glove hardware - hence basically at no extra cost - we propose to collect, organize, and exploit information on the probabilistic distribution of human hand poses in common tasks. We discuss how a database of such an a priori information can be built, represented in a hierarchy of correlation patterns or postural synergies, and fused with glove ...

  9. Teaching Human Poses Interactively to a Social Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Pacheco, Victor; Malfaz, Maria; Fernandez, Fernando; Salichs, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The main activity of social robots is to interact with people. In order to do that, the robot must be able to understand what the user is saying or doing. Typically, this capability consists of pre-programmed behaviors or is acquired through controlled learning processes, which are executed before the social interaction begins. This paper presents a software architecture that enables a robot to learn poses in a similar way as people do. That is, hearing its teacher's explanations and acquiring new knowledge in real time. The architecture leans on two main components: an RGB-D (Red-, Green-, Blue- Depth) -based visual system, which gathers the user examples, and an Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) system, which processes the speech describing those examples. The robot is able to naturally learn the poses the teacher is showing to it by maintaining a natural interaction with the teacher. We evaluate our system with 24 users who teach the robot a predetermined set of poses. The experimental results show that, with a few training examples, the system reaches high accuracy and robustness. This method shows how to combine data from the visual and auditory systems for the acquisition of new knowledge in a natural manner. Such a natural way of training enables robots to learn from users, even if they are not experts in robotics. PMID:24048336

  10. Shape recognition and pose estimation for mobile Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagbi, Nate; Bergig, Oriel; El-Sana, Jihad; Billinghurst, Mark

    2011-10-01

    Nestor is a real-time recognition and camera pose estimation system for planar shapes. The system allows shapes that carry contextual meanings for humans to be used as Augmented Reality (AR) tracking targets. The user can teach the system new shapes in real time. New shapes can be shown to the system frontally, or they can be automatically rectified according to previously learned shapes. Shapes can be automatically assigned virtual content by classification according to a shape class library. Nestor performs shape recognition by analyzing contour structures and generating projective-invariant signatures from their concavities. The concavities are further used to extract features for pose estimation and tracking. Pose refinement is carried out by minimizing the reprojection error between sample points on each image contour and its library counterpart. Sample points are matched by evolving an active contour in real time. Our experiments show that the system provides stable and accurate registration, and runs at interactive frame rates on a Nokia N95 mobile phone. © 2011 IEEE

  11. LEVELING STUDENTS’ CREATIVE THINKING IN SOLVING AND POSING MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatag Yuli Eko Siswono

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers assume that people are creative, but their degree ofcreativity is different. The notion of creative thinking level has beendiscussed .by experts. The perspective of mathematics creative thinkingrefers to a combination of logical and divergent thinking which is basedon intuition but has a conscious aim. The divergent thinking is focusedon flexibility, fluency, and novelty in mathematical problem solving andproblem posing. As students have various backgrounds and differentabilities, they possess different potential in thinking patterns,imagination, fantasy and performance; therefore, students have differentlevels of creative thinking. A research study was conducted in order todevelop a framework for students’ levels of creative thinking inmathematics. This research used a qualitative approach to describe thecharacteristics of the levels of creative thinking. Task-based interviewswere conducted to collect data with ten 8thgrade junior secondary schoolstudents. The results distinguished five levels of creative thinking,namely level 0 to level 4 with different characteristics in each level.These differences are based on fluency, flexibility, and novelty inmathematical problem solving and problem posing.Keywords: student’s creative thinking, problem posing, flexibility,fluency, novelty DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.1.1.794.17-40

  12. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels.

  13. 国内外 VOCs 排放标准体系研究%Study of Emission Standards System of VOCs at Home and Abroad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗斌; 蒋燕; 王斌

    2014-01-01

    It had important significance to develop VOCs emission standards for controlling VOCs emissions, improving air quality, and protecting human health and ecological environment. The characteristics of emission standards system of VOCs at home and abroad were analyzed, and some suggestions on the development of VOCs emission standards were proposed that toxicity and emissions of pollutants, particular pollutants of key industries should be considered when developing standards, and establishing emission standards system of VOCs giving priority to industry standards.%制定VOCs排放标准对于控制VOCs排放量,改善环境空气质量,保护人体健康和生态环境有重要意义。分析了国内外VOCs排放标准体系的特点,提出我国制定VOCs排放标准的几点建议,即标准制定过程中应考虑污染物毒性和排放量大小,考虑控制重点行业的特征污染物,并建立以行业排放标准为主的VOCs排放标准体系。

  14. Extended Research on Detection of Deception Using Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2006-06-01

    A system that captures and analyzes volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from skin surfaces may offer a viable alternative method to the polygraph instrument currently in use for detecting deception in U.S. government settings. Like the involuntary autonomic central nervous system response data gathered during polygraph testing, VOC emissions from the skin may provide data that can be used to detect stress caused by deception. Detecting VOCs, then, may present a noninvasive, non-intrusive method for observing, recording, and quantifying evidence of stress or emotional change.

  15. Study on characteristics of double surface VOC emissions from dry flat-plate building materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinke; ZHANG Yinping; ZHAO Rongyi

    2006-01-01

    This paper sets up an analytic model of double surface emission of volatile organic compound (VOC) from dry, flat-plate building materials. Based on it, the influence of factors including air change rate, loading factor of materials in the room, mass diffusion coefficient, partition coefficient, convective mass transfer coefficient, thickness of materials, asymmetric convective flow and initial VOC concentration distribution in the building material on emission is discussed. The conditions for simplifying double surface emission into single surface emission are also discussed. The model is helpful to assess the double surface VOC emission from flat-plate building materials used in indoor furniture and space partition.

  16. Predicting the lifetime of organic vapor cartridges exposed to volatile organic compound mixtures using a partial differential equations model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, François; Chauveau, Romain; Grevillot, Georges; Marsteau, Stéphanie; Silvente, Eric; Vallieres, Cécile

    2016-09-01

    In this study, equilibria, breakthrough curves, and breakthrough times were predicted for three binary mixtures of four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a model based on partial differential equations of dynamic adsorption coupling a mass balance, a simple Linear Driving Force (LDF) hypothesis to describe the kinetics, and the well-known Extended-Langmuir (EL) equilibrium model. The model aims to predict with a limited complexity, the BTCs of respirator cartridges exposed to binary vapor mixtures from equilibria and kinetics data obtained from single component. In the model, multicomponent mass transfer was simplified to use only single dynamic adsorption data. The EL expression used in this study predicted equilibria with relatively good accuracy for acetone/ethanol and ethanol/cyclohexane mixtures, but the prediction of cyclohexane uptake when mixed with heptane is less satisfactory. The BTCs given by the model were compared to experimental BTCs to determine the accuracy of the model and the impact of the approximation on mass transfer coefficients. From BTCs, breakthrough times at 10% of the exposure concentration t10% were determined. All t10% were predicted within 20% of the experimental values, and 63% of the breakthrough times were predicted within a 10% error. This study demonstrated that a simple mass balance combined with kinetic approximations is sufficient to predict lifetime for respirator cartridges exposed to VOC mixtures. It also showed that a commonly adopted approach to describe multicomponent adsorption based on volatility of VOC rather than adsorption equilibrium greatly overestimated the breakthrough times.

  17. A sealing mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khayrullin, S.R.; Firsov, I.A.; Ongoyev, V.M.; Shekhtman, E.N.; Taskarin, B.T.

    1983-01-01

    A plugging mixture is proposed which contains triethanolamine, caustic soda, water and an additive. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to reduce the cost of the mixture while preserving its operational qualities, it additionally contains clay powder and as the additive, ground limestone with the following component ratio in percent by mass: ground limestone, 50 to 60; triethanolamine, 0.1 to 0.15; caustic soda, 2 to 3; clay powder, 8 to 10 and water the remainder. The mixture is distinguished by the fact that the ground limestone has a specific surface of 2,000 to 3,000 square centimeters per gram.

  18. An unheated permeation device for calibrating atmospheric VOC measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of an unpowered permeation device for continuous calibration of in-situ instruments measuring atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs is described. Being lightweight and compact, and containing only negligible amounts of chemicals, the device is especially suited for field use such as onboard aircraft. Its speciality is to maintain the permeation process in thermal equilibrium, i.e. the instantaneous permeation rate can be ascribed via a simple temperature measurement. This equilibrium state is maintained by a combination of three features: (i a thin PTFE membrane as permeation medium which guarantees short stabilization times, (ii a water bath as heat buffer, and (iii a vacuum-panel based insulation, in which features (ii and (iii minimize temperature drifts. The uncertainty of the permeation rate due to thermal non-equilibrium is kept below 1 %. An extensive theory part details the major permeation processes of gases through porous polymers, being Fick's diffusion, Knudsen flow, and viscous flow. Both the measured stabilization time and the measured temperature dependence of the permeation rate independently indicate that the permeation can be described by a viscous flow model, where diffusion of the gas molecules in large pores (having a diameter of >0.05 μm dominates.

  19. [Comparison Analysis of Economic and Engineering Control of Industrial VOCs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-fei; Liu, Chang-xin; Cheng, Jie; Hao, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollutant has become China's major air pollutant in key urban areas like sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. It is mainly produced from industry sectors, and engineering control is one of the most important reduction measures. During the 12th Five-Year Plan, China decides to invest 40 billion RMB to build pollution control projects in key industry sectors with annual emission reduction of 605 000 t x a(-1). It shows that China attaches a great importance to emission reduction by engineering projects and highlights the awareness of engineering reduction technologies. In this paper, a macroeconomic model, namely computable general equilibrium model, (CGE model) was employed to simulate engineering control and economic control (imposing environmental tax). We aim to compare the pros and cons of the two reduction policies. Considering the economic loss of the whole country, the environmental tax has more impacts on the economy system than engineering reduction measures. We suggest that the central government provides 7 500 RMB x t(-1) as subsidy for enterprises in industry sectors to encourage engineering reduction.

  20. An unheated permeation device for calibrating atmospheric VOC measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of an unpowered permeation device for continuous calibration of in-situ instruments measuring atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs is described. Being lightweight and compact, and containing only negligible amounts of chemicals, the device is especially suited for field use such as on board aircraft. Its speciality is to maintain the permeation process in thermal equilibrium, so that the instantaneous permeation rate can be ascribed to a simple temperature measurement. This equilibrium state is maintained by a combination of three features: (i a thin PTFE membrane as permeation medium which guarantees short stabilization times, (ii a water bath as heat buffer, and (iii a vacuum-panel based insulation, in which features (ii and (iii minimize temperature drifts to ~30 mK h−1 per Kelvin temperature difference to the environment. The respective uncertainty of the permeation rate due to thermal non-equilibrium is kept below 1%. An extensive theory part details the major permeation processes of gases through porous polymers, being Fick's diffusion, Knudsen flow, and viscous flow. Both the measured stabilization time and the measured temperature dependence of the permeation rate independently indicate that the permeation can be described by a viscous flow model, where diffusion of the gas molecules in large pores (having a diameter of >0.05 μm dominates.

  1. Measurements of VOCs in Mexico City during the MILAGRO Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. K.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, N. J.; Meinardi, S.; Atlas, E.; Rowland, F.; Blake, D. R.

    2006-12-01

    During March of 2006 we participated in MILAGRO (Megacities Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations), a multi-platform campaign to measure pollutants in and in outflow from the Mexico City metropolitan area. As part of MILAGRO we collected whole air canister samples at two Mexico City ground sites: the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, located in the city, northeast of the center, and the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac, a suburban site approximately 50 km northeast of the city center. Samples were also collected in various other locations throughout Mexico City. Over 300 whole air samples were collected and analyzed for a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including methane, carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and halocarbons. Propane was the most abundant NMHC at both the urban and suburban locations, with mixing ratios frequently in excess of 10 parts per billion at both locations. This is likely the result of the widespread use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) of which propane is the major component. For most species, median mixing ratios at the urban sites were significantly greater than at the suburban site. Here we compare results from both urban and suburban locations and also examine the influence of transport on the composition of outflow from Mexico City.

  2. Reactivity of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in summer of 2004 in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Huang; Min Shao; Sihua Lu; Ying Liu

    2008-01-01

    Ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled at six sites in Beijing in the summer of 2004 and analyzed byGCMS. The chemical reactivities of 73 quantified VOCs species were evaluated by OH loss rates (L<,OH) and ozone formationpotentials (OFPs). Top 15 reactive species, mainly alkenes and aromatics, were identified by these two methods, and accounted formore than 70% of total reactivity of VOCs. In urban areas, isoprene was the most reactive species in term of OH loss rate,contributing 11.4% to the Loft of VOCs. While toluene, accounting for 9.4% of OFPs, appeared to have a long-time role in thephotochemical processes. Tongzhou site is obviously influenced by local chemical industry, but the other five sites showed typicalurban features influenced mainly by vehicular emissions.2008 Min Shao. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  3. An analytical solution for VOCs emission from multiple sources/sinks in buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG BaoQing; YU Bo; Chang Nyung KIM

    2008-01-01

    An analytical solution is presented to describe the emission/sorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from/on multiple single-layer materials coexisting in buildings. The diffusion of VOCs within each material is described by a transient diffusion equation. All diffusion equations are coupled with each other through the equation of mass conservation in the air. The analytical solution is validated by the experimental data in literature, Compared to the one-material case, the coexistence of multiple materials may decrease the emission rate of VOCs from each material. The smaller the diffusion coef-ficient is, the more the emission rate decreases. Whether a material is a source or a sink in the case of multiple materials coexisting is not affected by the diffusion coefficient. For the case of multiple mate-rials with different partition coefficients, a material with a high partition coefficient may become a sink. This may promote the emission of VOCs from other materials.

  4. EVALUATION AND PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF INNOVATIVE LOW-VOC CONTACT ADHESIVES IN WOOD LAMINATING OPERATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an evaluation and assessment of the perfor-mance, economics, and emission reduction potential upon application of low-volatile organic compound (VOC) waterborne contact adhesive formulations specifically ina manual laminating operation for assembling s...

  5. VocMat projekt - uudsed e-õppe võimalused turismiasjalistele / Heli Tooman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooman, Heli, 1949-

    2008-01-01

    Turismivaldkonna spetsialistidele mõeldud koolitusprojektist VocMat (Vocational Management Training for the Tourism Industry). Projekti partneriteks Eestis on Ettevõtluse Arendamise Sihtasutuse Turismiarenduskeskus ja Tartu Ülikooli Pärnu kolledzh. Lisa: Kokkuvõte

  6. VocMat projekt - uudsed e-õppe võimalused turismiasjalistele / Heli Tooman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooman, Heli, 1949-

    2008-01-01

    Turismivaldkonna spetsialistidele mõeldud koolitusprojektist VocMat (Vocational Management Training for the Tourism Industry). Projekti partneriteks Eestis on Ettevõtluse Arendamise Sihtasutuse Turismiarenduskeskus ja Tartu Ülikooli Pärnu kolledzh. Lisa: Kokkuvõte

  7. ONKALO POSE experiment. Phase 3: execution and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valli, J. [Poeyry Finland Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Hakala, M. [KMS-Hakala Oy, Nokia (Finland); Wanne, T. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Kantia, P. [Geofcon Oy, Rovaniemi (Finland); Siren, T.

    2014-01-15

    In-depth knowledge of the in situ stress state at the Olkiluoto site is critical for stability assessment both prior to and after deposition of spent nuclear fuel in order to understand and avoid potential damage to the rock at the site. Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment (POSE) was designed specifically for this purpose with three primary goals: establish the in situ spalling/damage strength of Olkiluoto migmatitic gneiss, establish the state of in situ stress at the -345 m depth level and act as a Prediction-Outcome (P-O) exercise. Phases 1 and 2 of POSE are outlined in WR 2012-60. The objectives of the third phase of the POSE experiment are the same as the original objectives outlined above. This report outlines the execution and results of the third phase of the POSE experiment. The third phase of the experiment involved internally heating the third experimental hole (ONK-EH3) of the POSE niche in order to cause a symmetrical thermal stress increase around the hole due to the thermal expansion of rock. This thermomechanically induced stress increase, coupled with the estimated existing in situ stress state, should cause the maximum principal stress around the hole to exceed the predicted spalling strength of the rock around the hole. ONK-EH3 is located almost completely in pegmatitic granite. Four fractures near the top of the hole were mapped after boring ONK-EH3, and a tensile failure located at the contact between mica-rich gneiss and pegmatitic granite was observed 18 months after boring, prior to the experiment. Based on predictive calculations and the estimated in situ state of stress, the maximum principal stress magnitude should reach ca. 100 MPa when the temperature was just below 100 deg C after 12 weeks of heating. There were problems with the heater control unit at the beginning of the experiment, after which heating proceeded according to plan. The crack damage threshold of pegmatitic granite has been determined to be 85 ±17 MPa at

  8. Leaf level VOC emissions of single plants from Amazonian and Mediterranean ecosystems: Ontogeny and flooding as stress factor for VOC emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Bracho Nunez, Araceli

    2010-01-01

    Die Vegetation ist die wichtigste Quelle von organischen flüchtigen Verbindungen (auf Englisch volatile organic compounds,VOCs), die einen bemerkenswerten Einfluss auf der Chemie und Physik der Atmosphäre haben. VOCs beeinflussen die oxidative Kapazität der Atmosphäre und tragen zu der Bildung und zum Wachstum von sekundären organischen Aerosolen bei, welche einerseits eine Streuung und Reflektierung der Energie verursachen und andererseits sich an der Bildung und Entwicklung von Wolken betei...

  9. Macrobend optical sensing for pose measurement in soft robot arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareh, Sina; Noh, Yohan; Li, Min; Ranzani, Tommaso; Liu, Hongbin; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a pose-sensing system for soft robot arms integrating a set of macrobend stretch sensors. The macrobend sensory design in this study consists of optical fibres and is based on the notion that bending an optical fibre modulates the intensity of the light transmitted through the fibre. This sensing method is capable of measuring bending, elongation and compression in soft continuum robots and is also applicable to wearable sensing technologies, e.g. pose sensing in the wrist joint of a human hand. In our arrangement, applied to a cylindrical soft robot arm, the optical fibres for macrobend sensing originate from the base, extend to the tip of the arm, and then loop back to the base. The connectors that link the fibres to the necessary opto-electronics are all placed at the base of the arm, resulting in a simplified overall design. The ability of this custom macrobend stretch sensor to flexibly adapt its configuration allows preserving the inherent softness and compliance of the robot which it is installed on. The macrobend sensing system is immune to electrical noise and magnetic fields, is safe (because no electricity is needed at the sensing site), and is suitable for modular implementation in multi-link soft continuum robotic arms. The measurable light outputs of the proposed stretch sensor vary due to bend-induced light attenuation (macrobend loss), which is a function of the fibre bend radius as well as the number of repeated turns. The experimental study conducted as part of this research revealed that the chosen bend radius has a far greater impact on the measured light intensity values than the number of turns (if greater than five). Taking into account that the bend radius is the only significantly influencing design parameter, the macrobend stretch sensors were developed to create a practical solution to the pose sensing in soft continuum robot arms. Henceforward, the proposed sensing design was benchmarked against an electromagnetic

  10. Regularization theory for ill-posed problems selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    Thismonograph is a valuable contribution to thehighly topical and extremly productive field ofregularisationmethods for inverse and ill-posed problems. The author is an internationally outstanding and acceptedmathematicianin this field. In his book he offers a well-balanced mixtureof basic and innovative aspects.He demonstrates new,differentiatedviewpoints, and important examples for applications. The bookdemontrates thecurrent developments inthe field of regularization theory,such as multiparameter regularization and regularization in learning theory. The book is written for graduate and PhDs

  11. Compensating Pose Uncertainties Through Appropriate Gripper Finger Cutouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolniakowski, Adam; Gams, Andrej; Kiforenko, Lilita

    The gripper finger design is a recurring problem in many robotic grasping platforms used in industry. The task of switching the gripper configuration to accommodate for a new batch of objects typically requires engineering expertise, and is a lengthy and costly iterative trial-and-error process....... One of the open challenges is the need for the gripper to compensate for uncertainties inherent to the workcell, e.g. due to errors in calibration, inaccurate pose estimation from the vision system, or object deformation. In this paper, we present an analysis of gripper uncertainty compensating...

  12. Compensating Pose Uncertainties Through Appropriate Gripper Finger Cutouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolniakowski, Adam; Gams, Andrej; Kiforenko, Lilita

    2017-01-01

    The gripper finger design is a recurring problem in many robotic grasping platforms used in industry. The task of switching the gripper configuration to accommodate for a new batch of objects typically requires engineering expertise, and is a lengthy and costly iterative trial-and-error process....... One of the open challenges is the need for the gripper to compensate for uncertainties inherent to the workcell, e.g. due to errors in calibration, inaccurate pose estimation from the vision system, or object deformation. In this paper, we present an analysis of gripper uncertainty compensating...

  13. Iterative Methods for Ill-Posed Problems An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Bakushinsky, Anatoly B; Smirnova, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Ill-posed problems are encountered in countless areas of real world science and technology. A variety of processes in science and engineering is commonly modeled by algebraic, differential, integral and other equations. In a more difficult case, it can be systems of equations combined with the associated initial and boundary conditions. Frequently, the study of applied optimization problems is also reduced to solving the corresponding equations. These equations, encountered both in theoretical and applied areas, may naturally be classified as operator equations. The current tex

  14. Quantitative assessment of industrial VOC emissions in China: Historical trend, spatial distribution, uncertainties, and projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chenghang; Shen, Jiali; Zhang, Yongxin; Huang, Weiwei; Zhu, Xinbo; Wu, Xuecheng; Chen, Linghong; Gao, Xiang; Cen, Kefa

    2017-02-01

    The temporal trends of industrial volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions was comprehensively summarized for the 2011 to 2013 period, and the projections for 2020 to 2050 for China were set. The results demonstrate that industrial VOC emissions in China increased from 15.3 Tg in 2011 to 29.4 Tg in 2013 at an annual average growth rate of 38.3%. Guangdong (3.45 Tg), Shandong (2.85 Tg), and Jiangsu (2.62 Tg) were the three largest contributors collectively accounting for 30.4% of the national total emissions in 2013. The top three average industrial VOC emissions per square kilometer were Shanghai (247.2 ton/km2), Tianjin (62.8 ton/km2), and Beijing (38.4 ton/km2), which were 12-80 times of the average level in China. The data from the inventory indicate that the use of VOC-containing products, as well as the production and use of VOCs as raw materials, as well as for storage and transportation contributed 75.4%, 10.3%, 9.1%, and 5.2% of the total emissions, respectively. ArcGIS was used to display the remarkable spatial distribution variation by allocating the emission into 1 km × 1 km grid cells with a population as surrogate indexes. Combined with future economic development and population change, as well as implementation of policy and upgrade of control technologies, three scenarios (scenarios A, B, and C) were set to project industrial VOC emissions for the years 2020, 2030, and 2050, which present the industrial VOC emissions in different scenarios and the potential of reducing emissions. Finally, the result shows that the collaborative control policies considerably influenced industrial VOC emissions.

  15. VOC emissions during outdoor ship painting and health-risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malherbe, Laure; Mandin, Corinne

    Painting of ship external surfaces in building or repair shipyards generates significant emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) to the atmosphere. Such emissions have not been specifically regulated so far. The purpose of our study is therefore to evaluate the quantities and as far as possible the nature of the emitted VOC, to characterize the dispersion of these chemicals in the atmosphere and to assess the exposure and resulting health risks for surrounding populations. This study is focused on VOC emitted during outdoor work involving use of paints and solvents. VOC emissions are diffuse, since they come from the whole painted surfaces. A methodology for quantifying them is developed and tested, using information provided by ALSTOM—Chantiers de l'Atlantique and data found in paint technical sheets. Its reliability is checked against emission values established by ALSTOM or found in literature. Then, for two particular situations, construction on one hand, repair on the other hand, atmospheric dispersion of total VOC is simulated to assess the long-term impact (characterized by the plume extension and the annual mean concentrations) of these compounds. Finally, a health-risk assessment based on the estimates is carried out to evaluate the risks by inhalation for people living near the site. Considering the presumed composition of paints and the available reference toxicological values, total VOC are entirely assimilated to toluene. In both examples (construction and repair) and in the current state of knowledge, the calculated risk is not of health concern. Several ways for taking this study further are proposed: a more exhaustive collection of data relative to VOC and other substances contained in paints, on-site measurement of VOC in the ambient air, characterization of diffuse emissions related to other activities, such as purging or welding, and other pollutants, like particles.

  16. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Testing at Building 348, Kelly AFB, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    At the request of HQ AFLC/ SGB , the USAFOEHL conducted a stack sampling survey to determine total volatile organic compounds (VOC) being emitted from...Occupational and Environmental Health Laboratory (USAFOEHL/ECQ). The survey was requested by HQ AFLC/ SGB .to estimate VOC emissions through each of...stardards. 2. Range and Sensitivity 2.1 This method was validated over the range of 1417-5940 mg/M at an atmospheric temperature and pressure of 24 0C

  17. Investigation on Using SBS and Active Carbon Filler to Reduce the VOC Emission from Bituminous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiqiang Cui

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bituminous materials are playing a vital role in pavement design and the roofing industry because of outstanding properties. Unfortunately, bituminous materials will release volatile organic compounds (VOC, making them non-environmentally friendly. Therefore, technologies that can be used to decrease the VOC emission are urgently required. In this research, the VOC emission and material behaviors were analyzed and compared to investigate the possibility of adding styrene butadiene styrene (SBS and active carbon filler into bituminous materials to develop environmentally-friendly materials. Thermal gravimetric analysis-mass spectrometry (TG-MS and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy testing (UV-Vis were employed to characterize the VOC emission process. Temperature sweep testing and frequency sweep testing were conducted to evaluate the rheological properties of bituminous materials. Research results indicated that the combined introduction of 4 wt% styrene butadiene styrene (SBS and 4 wt% active carbon filler cannot only significantly lower the VOC emission speed and amount, but also improve the deformation resistance behavior at a higher temperature. SBS and active carbon filler can be used to reduce the VOC emission form bituminous materials.

  18. Plant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ozone (O3) polluted atmospheres: the ecological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Delia M; Blande, James D; Souza, Silvia R; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2010-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is an important secondary air pollutant formed as a result of photochemical reactions between primary pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). O3 concentrations in the lower atmosphere (troposphere) are predicted to continue increasing as a result of anthropogenic activity, which will impact strongly on wild and cultivated plants. O3 affects photosynthesis and induces the development of visible foliar injuries, which are the result of genetically controlled programmed cell death. It also activates many plant defense responses, including the emission of phytogenic VOCs. Plant emitted VOCs play a role in many eco-physiological functions. Besides protecting the plant from abiotic stresses (high temperatures and oxidative stress) and biotic stressors (competing plants, micro- and macroorganisms), they drive multitrophic interactions between plants, herbivores and their natural enemies e.g., predators and parasitoids as well as interactions between plants (plant-to-plant communication). In addition, VOCs have an important role in atmospheric chemistry. They are O3 precursors, but at the same time are readily oxidized by O3, thus resulting in a series of new compounds that include secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Here, we review the effects of O3 on plants and their VOC emissions. We also review the state of current knowledge on the effects of ozone on ecological interactions based on VOC signaling, and propose further research directions.

  19. 基于微气体传感器阵列和神经网络的VOCs的辨别%Recognizing VOCs with Micro-GAS Sensor Array and Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕品; 唐祯安; 魏广芬

    2007-01-01

    A micro-gas sensor array was composed of the six tin oxide thin film gas sensors with Au, Cu, or Pt metal catalyst. The sensing properties of sensors to the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were evaluated. VOCs mean VOCsmixture and formaldehyde (HCHO) in the paper, while the VOCsmixture is the mixtures of 10 ppm toluene, 1 ppm acetone, 5 ppm α-pinene and 10 ppm ethanol. And a multilayer neural network with an error backpropagation (BP) learning algorithm was implemented to recognize the low concentration VOCsmixture and HCHO. The results demonstrated that the micro-sensor array, plus multilayer neural network, was very effective to recognize not only low concentration single component VOCsmixture and HCHO, but also HCHO and VOCsmixture in binary mixture with small errors.%六个由贵金属Au,Cu,Pt做添加剂的SnO2气体传感器构成了微气体传感器阵列.首先研究了这六只传感器对挥发性有机化合物(VOCs)敏感特性,本文中的VOCs 指VOCsmixture和甲醛(HCHO)气体,其中VOCsmixture是10 ppm甲苯、1 ppm丙酮、5 ppm α-派烯和10 ppm乙醇的混合气.然后采用BP神经网络对所获得的传感器信号进行了分析、识别.结果显示微气体传感器阵列与BP神经网络相结合不仅能有效地识别低浓度的单成分VOCsmixture和甲醛气体,而且也能有效地识别两元气体中的VOCsmixture和甲醛气体.

  20. Gaussian particle filter based pose and motion estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Determination of relative three-dimensional (3D) position, orientation, and relative motion between two reference frames is an important problem in robotic guidance, manipulation, and assembly as well as in other fields such as photogrammetry.A solution to pose and motion estimation problem that uses two-dimensional (2D) intensity images from a single camera is desirable for real-time applications. The difficulty in performing this measurement is that the process of projecting 3D object features to 2D images is a nonlinear transformation. In this paper, the 3D transformation is modeled as a nonlinear stochastic system with the state estimation providing six degrees-of-freedom motion and position values, using line features in image plane as measuring inputs and dual quaternion to represent both rotation and translation in a unified notation. A filtering method called the Gaussian particle filter (GPF) based on the particle filtering concept is presented for 3D pose and motion estimation of a moving target from monocular image sequences. The method has been implemented with simulated data, and simulation results are provided along with comparisons to the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) to show the relative advantages of the GPF. Simulation results showed that GPF is a superior alternative to EKF and UKF.

  1. SIFT algorithm-based 3D pose estimation of femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuehe; Zhu, Yanhe; Li, Changle; Zhao, Jie; Li, Ge

    2014-01-01

    To address the lack of 3D space information in the digital radiography of a patient femur, a pose estimation method based on 2D-3D rigid registration is proposed in this study. The method uses two digital radiography images to realize the preoperative 3D visualization of a fractured femur. Compared with the pure Digital Radiography or Computed Tomography imaging diagnostic methods, the proposed method has the advantages of low cost, high precision, and minimal harmful radiation. First, stable matching point pairs in the frontal and lateral images of the patient femur and the universal femur are obtained by using the Scale Invariant Feature Transform method. Then, the 3D pose estimation registration parameters of the femur are calculated by using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. Finally, based on the deviation between the six degrees freedom parameter calculated by the proposed method, preset posture parameters are calculated to evaluate registration accuracy. After registration, the rotation error is less than l.5°, and the translation error is less than 1.2 mm, which indicate that the proposed method has high precision and robustness. The proposed method provides 3D image information for effective preoperative orthopedic diagnosis and surgery planning.

  2. Multilevel Mixture Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Wang

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The mixture Kalman filter is a general sequential Monte Carlo technique for conditional linear dynamic systems. It generates samples of some indicator variables recursively based on sequential importance sampling (SIS and integrates out the linear and Gaussian state variables conditioned on these indicators. Due to the marginalization process, the complexity of the mixture Kalman filter is quite high if the dimension of the indicator sampling space is high. In this paper, we address this difficulty by developing a new Monte Carlo sampling scheme, namely, the multilevel mixture Kalman filter. The basic idea is to make use of the multilevel or hierarchical structure of the space from which the indicator variables take values. That is, we draw samples in a multilevel fashion, beginning with sampling from the highest-level sampling space and then draw samples from the associate subspace of the newly drawn samples in a lower-level sampling space, until reaching the desired sampling space. Such a multilevel sampling scheme can be used in conjunction with the delayed estimation method, such as the delayed-sample method, resulting in delayed multilevel mixture Kalman filter. Examples in wireless communication, specifically the coherent and noncoherent 16-QAM over flat-fading channels, are provided to demonstrate the performance of the proposed multilevel mixture Kalman filter.

  3. Quantification of Methane and VOC Emissions from Natural Gas Production in Two Basins with High Ozone Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edie, R.; Robertson, A.; Snare, D.; Soltis, J.; Field, R. A.; Murphy, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2005, the Uintah Basin of Utah and the Upper Green River Basin of Wyoming frequently exceeded the EPA 8-hour allowable ozone level of 75 ppb, spurring interest in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during oil and gas production. Debate continues over which stage of production (drilling, flowback, normal production, transmission, etc.) is the most prevalent VOC source. In this study, we quantify emissions from normal production on well pads by using the EPA-developed Other Test Method 33a. This methodology combines ground-based measurements of fugitive emissions with 3-D wind data to calculate the methane and VOC emission fluxes from a point source. VOC fluxes are traditionally estimated by gathering a canister of air during a methane flux measurement. The methane:VOC ratio of this canister is determined at a later time in the laboratory, and applied to the known methane flux. The University of Wyoming Mobile Laboratory platform is equipped with a Picarro methane analyzer and an Ionicon Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer, which provide real-time methane and VOC data for each well pad. This independent measurement of methane and VOCs in situ reveals multiple emission sources on one well pad, with varying methane:VOC ratios. Well pad emission estimates of methane, benzene, toluene and xylene for the two basins will be presented. The different emission source VOC profiles and the limitations of real-time and traditional VOC measurement methods will also be discussed.

  4. Belowground communication: impacts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil fungi on other soil-inhabiting organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Stephanie; Polle, Andrea; Brinkmann, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    We reviewed the impact of fungal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on soil-inhabiting organisms and their physiological and molecular consequences for their targets. Because fungi can only move by growth to distinct directions, a main mechanism to protect themselves from enemies or to manipulate their surroundings is the secretion of exudates or VOCs. The importance of VOCs in this regard has been significantly underestimated. VOCs not only can be means of communication, but also signals that are able to specifically manipulate the recipient. VOCs can reprogram root architecture of symbiotic partner plants or increase plant growth leading to enlarged colonization surfaces. VOCs are also able to enhance plant resistance against pathogens by activating phytohormone-dependent signaling pathways. In some cases, they were phytotoxic. Because the response was specific to distinct species, fungal VOCs may contribute to regulate the competition of plant communities. Additionally, VOCs are used by the producing fungus to attack rivaling fungi or bacteria, thereby protecting the emitter or its nutrient sources. In addition, animals, like springtails, nematodes, and earthworms, which are important components of the soil food web, respond to fungal VOCs. Some VOCs are effective repellents for nematodes and, therefore, have applications as biocontrol agents. In conclusion, this review shows that fungal VOCs have a huge impact on soil fauna and flora, but the underlying mechanisms, how VOCs are perceived by the recipients, how they manipulate their targets and the resulting ecological consequences of VOCs in inter-kingdom signaling is only partly understood. These knowledge gaps are left to be filled by future studies.

  5. A High Performance Biofilter for VOC Emission Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G; Conti, B; Leroux, A; Brzezinski, R; Viel, G; Heitz, M

    1999-02-01

    Biofiltration is a cleaning technique for waste air contaminated with some organic compounds. The advantages of the conventional biofilter over other biological systems are a high-superficial area best suited for the treatment of some compounds with poor water solubility, ease of operation, and low operating costs. It has crucial disadvantages, however; for example, it is not suitable to treat waste gases with high VOC concentrations and it has poor control of reaction conditions. To improve on these problems and to build a high-performance biofilter, three structured peat media and two trickling systems have been introduced in this study. The influences of media size and composition have been investigated experimentally. Peat bead blended with 30% (w/w) certain mineral material with a good binding capacity has advantages over other packing materials, for example, suitable size to prevent blockage due to microbial growth, strong buffering capacity to neutralize acidic substances in the system, and a pH range of 7.0-7.2 suitable for the growth of bacteria. Dropwise trickling system offers an effective measure to easily control the moisture content of the bed and the reaction conditions (pH, nutrient) and to partially remove excess biomass produced during the metabolic processes of microorganisms. The influence of nutrient supplementation has also been investigated in this study, which has revealed that the biological system was in a condition of nutrient limitation instead of carbon limitation. The biofilters built in our laboratory were used to treat waste gas contaminated with toluene in a concentration range of 1 to 3.2 g/m(3) and at the specific gas flow rate of 24 to120 m(3)/m(2).hr. Under the conditions employed, a high elimination capacity (135 g/m(3).hr) was obtained in the biofilter packed with peat beads (blended with 30% of the mineral material), and no blockage problem was observed in an experimental period of 2-3 months.

  6. ONKALO POSE experiment. Phase 1 and 2: execution and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, E. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Siren, T. [Posiva Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Hakala, M. [KMS-Hakala Oy, Nokia (Finland); Kantia, P. [Geofcon Oy, Rovaniemi (Finland)

    2014-02-15

    Posiva has conducted in the ONKALO rock characterisation facility during 2010 - 2011 an in situ experiment named POSE (Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment). The POSE experiment had three objectives: to establish the in situ spalling/damage strength of Olkiluoto migmatitic gneiss, to establish the state of in situ stress at the -345 m depth level, and to act as a Prediction-Outcome (P-O) exercise. The POSE experiment consisted of drilling with full-face boring machine two near fullscale deposition holes, diameter 1.52 m (compared to 1.75 m for the actual deposition holes), to a depth of 7.2 m, leaving a 0.9 m pillar between the holes. The holes were planned to be located in such way that maximum excavation-induced stresses could act in the pillar and damage could then take place. Boring of the two holes in 2010 was called Phase 1 (Pillar test). This was followed in 2011 by Phase 2 (Pillar heating test) where four heaters with a length of 7.5 m heated the test area to increase the stresses around the experimental holes. In the heating phase the other hole was back-filled with sand. The test was extensively monitored during the execution using temperature monitoring, strain gauge monitoring, video monitoring, microseismic monitoring and pressure monitoring. In addition, the holes were after the test measured using ground penetration radar (GPR) and 3D photogrammetry for detailed modelling. The outcomes from the test showed that no damage, except for three opened/sheared fractures, was noticed during the boring of the holes (Phase 1). Surface damage was, though, induced by heating (Phase 2). The damage was well localized around the holes and controlled by the foliation (mica rich layers) and rock type contacts which were known to be relatively weak. Surface type failures were not observed in the gneiss, but it was noticed in limited areas in the pegmatite-granite. The depths of the damaged areas due to heating were less than 100 mm. The depths and sizes of the

  7. Mixtures Estimation and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mengersen, Kerrie; Titterington, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This book uses the EM (expectation maximization) algorithm to simultaneously estimate the missing data and unknown parameter(s) associated with a data set. The parameters describe the component distributions of the mixture; the distributions may be continuous or discrete. The editors provide a complete account of the applications, mathematical structure and statistical analysis of finite mixture distributions along with MCMC computational methods, together with a range of detailed discussions covering the applications of the methods and features chapters from the leading experts on the subject

  8. Key participants in codeveloped technology pose for group picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Following the presentation of the Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), a new piece of technology developed through a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partnership with industry, to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Director Roy Bridges, Jr., key participants in the partnership pose for a group portrait. They are (from left) Bill Larson, NASA; Dr. Pedro Medelius, INET; Roy Bridges, Jr., KSC Director; Ed Gladney and William Saputo, L-3 Communications; Pam Gillespi, representing Congressman Dave Weldon; and Frank Kinney, Technological Research and Development Authority. The USCA is a key component of the codeveloped Automated Data Acquisition System (ADAS) that measures temperature, pressure and vibration at KSC's launch pads. The breakthrough technology is expected to reduce sensor setup and configuration times from hours to seconds. KSC teamed up with Florida's Technological Research and Development Authority and manufacturer L-3 Communications to produce a system that would benefit the aerospace industry and other commercial markets.

  9. Multi-Pose Face Detection and Tracking Using Condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chieh Chiang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Automatically locating face areas can advance applications either in images or videos. This paper proposes a video-based approach for face detection and tracking in an indoor environment to determine where face areas appear in video sequences. Our approach involves four main modules: an initialization module for setting all configurations, a Condensation module for face tracking, a template module for measuring the observation process in Condensation, and a correction module for correcting the tracking if the tracked face has been lost. We adapted the Condensation algorithm for dealing with the face tracking problem, and designed a checklist scheme for the template module that can record the most significant templates of the tracked face poses. We also performed experiments to demonstrate the performance and the robustness of our proposed approach for face detection and tracking.

  10. Lavrentiev regularization method for nonlinear ill-posed problems

    CERN Document Server

    Kinh, N V

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we shall be concerned with Lavientiev regularization method to reconstruct solutions x sub 0 of non ill-posed problems F(x)=y sub o , where instead of y sub 0 noisy data y subdelta is an element of X with absolut(y subdelta-y sub 0) X is an accretive nonlinear operator from a real reflexive Banach space X into itself. In this regularization method solutions x subalpha supdelta are obtained by solving the singularly perturbed nonlinear operator equation F(x)+alpha(x-x*)=y subdelta with some initial guess x*. Assuming certain conditions concerning the operator F and the smoothness of the element x*-x sub 0 we derive stability estimates which show that the accuracy of the regularized solutions is order optimal provided that the regularization parameter alpha has been chosen properly.

  11. Intrinsic feature-based pose measurement for imaging motion compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Justin S.; Goddard, Jr., James Samuel

    2014-08-19

    Systems and methods for generating motion corrected tomographic images are provided. A method includes obtaining first images of a region of interest (ROI) to be imaged and associated with a first time, where the first images are associated with different positions and orientations with respect to the ROI. The method also includes defining an active region in the each of the first images and selecting intrinsic features in each of the first images based on the active region. Second, identifying a portion of the intrinsic features temporally and spatially matching intrinsic features in corresponding ones of second images of the ROI associated with a second time prior to the first time and computing three-dimensional (3D) coordinates for the portion of the intrinsic features. Finally, the method includes computing a relative pose for the first images based on the 3D coordinates.

  12. Pose Estimation for Augmented Reality: A Hands-On Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Eric; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Spindler, Fabien

    2016-12-01

    Augmented reality (AR) allows to seamlessly insert virtual objects in an image sequence. In order to accomplish this goal, it is important that synthetic elements are rendered and aligned in the scene in an accurate and visually acceptable way. The solution of this problem can be related to a pose estimation or, equivalently, a camera localization process. This paper aims at presenting a brief but almost self-contented introduction to the most important approaches dedicated to vision-based camera localization along with a survey of several extension proposed in the recent years. For most of the presented approaches, we also provide links to code of short examples. This should allow readers to easily bridge the gap between theoretical aspects and practical implementations.

  13. Challenges Posed by Novel Psychoactive Substances – Middle East Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej J. Bogusz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available New psychoactive substances (NPS are defined as substances of abuse, either in a pure form or a preparation, that are not controlled by the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs or the 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances, but which may pose a public health threat. In this context, the term “new” does not necessarily refer to new inventions but to substances that have recently become available or popular in a given society or country. This definition indicates that the problem of NPS is not new; however, the availability of any information via new communication technologies in the 21st century has enabled the spread of unwanted and socially harmful information, like information on the commercial availability of various NPS, offered in rising amounts and brands.

  14. Investigation of MM-PBSA rescoring of docking poses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David C; Humblet, Christine; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane

    2008-05-01

    Target-based virtual screening is increasingly used to generate leads for targets for which high quality three-dimensional (3D) structures are available. To allow large molecular databases to be screened rapidly, a tiered scoring scheme is often employed whereby a simple scoring function is used as a fast filter of the entire database and a more rigorous and time-consuming scoring function is used to rescore the top hits to produce the final list of ranked compounds. Molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) approaches are currently thought to be quite effective at incorporating implicit solvation into the estimation of ligand binding free energies. In this paper, the ability of a high-throughput MM-PBSA rescoring function to discriminate between correct and incorrect docking poses is investigated in detail. Various initial scoring functions are used to generate docked poses for a subset of the CCDC/Astex test set and to dock one set of actives/inactives from the DUD data set. The effectiveness of each of these initial scoring functions is discussed. Overall, the ability of the MM-PBSA rescoring function to (i) regenerate the set of X-ray complexes when docking the bound conformation of the ligand, (ii) regenerate the X-ray complexes when docking conformationally expanded databases for each ligand which include "conformation decoys" of the ligand, and (iii) enrich known actives in a virtual screen for the mineralocorticoid receptor in the presence of "ligand decoys" is assessed. While a pharmacophore-based molecular docking approach, PhDock, is used to carry out the docking, the results are expected to be general to use with any docking method.

  15. Level of environmental threat posed by horticultural trade in Cactaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Ana; Le Roux, Johannes J; Richardson, David M; Wilson, John R U

    2017-01-11

    Ornamental horticulture has been identified as an important threat to plant biodiversity and the major pathway for plant invasions worldwide. In this context, the family Cactaceae is particularly interesting and challenging for three main reasons-it is considered the fifth most threatened major taxonomic group in the world; several cactus species are amongst the most widespread and damaging invasive species; and Cactaceae is one of the most popular horticultural plant groups. Based on CITES trade data and the eleven main auction sites selling cacti on the internet we document a substantial global trade from and to almost all continents. While less than 20 % of this trade involves threatened species, and less than 3% involves known invasive species, many species are sold without a valid scientific name. Importantly, however, hardly any of the globally traded cacti are collected from wild populations. In order to provide an in-depth look at the dynamics of the industry, we surveyed the businesses involved in the cactus trade in South Africa (one of the main hotspots of cactus trade and invasions). Despite a large commercial network, all South African imports (of which only 15 % and 1.5 % were of species listed as threatened and invasive, respectively) came from the same source. We purchased seeds of every available species and, based on DNA-barcoding techniques, could only identify 24 % of the species to genus level. If trade restrictions are placed on the small proportion of cacti that are invasive and there is no major increase in harvesting of native populations, the commercial cactus horticultural trade will pose a negligible environmental threat. However, there are currently no effective methods for easily identifying which cacti are traded, and both the illicit harvesting of cacti from the wild and the informal trade in invasive taxa pose on-going conservation challenges. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of Exposure to VOCs among Pregnant Women in the National Children’s Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Barksdale Boyle

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies can measure exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs using environmental samples, biomarkers, questionnaires, or observations. These different exposure assessment approaches each have advantages and disadvantages; thus, evaluating relationships is an important consideration. In the National Children’s Vanguard Study from 2009 to 2010, participants completed questionnaires and data collectors observed VOC exposure sources and collected urine samples from 488 third trimester pregnant women at in-person study visits. From urine, we simultaneously quantified 28 VOC metabolites of exposure to acrolein, acrylamide, acrylonitrile, benzene, 1-bromopropane, 1,3-butadiene, carbon disulfide, crotonaldehyde, cyanide, N,N-dimethylformamide, ethylbenzene, ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, styrene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, trichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and xylene exposures using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/MSMS method. Urinary thiocyanate was measured using an ion chromatography coupled with an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method (IC-ESI/MSMS. We modeled the relationship between urinary VOC metabolite concentrations and sources of VOC exposure. Sources of exposure were assessed by participant report via questionnaire (use of air fresheners, aerosols, paint or varnish, organic solvents, and passive/active smoking and by observations by a trained data collector (presence of scented products in homes. We found several significant (p < 0.01 relationships between the urinary metabolites of VOCs and sources of VOC exposure. Smoking was positively associated with metabolites of the tobacco constituents acrolein, acrylamide, acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, crotonaldehyde, cyanide, ethylene oxide, N,N-dimethylformamide, propylene oxide, styrene, and xylene. Study location was negatively associated with the toluene metabolite

  17. Optimizing the emission inventory of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) based on network observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng-Po; Liu, Wen-Tzu; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Chang, Julius S.; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2014-02-01

    Hourly observations of 56 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) performed by a network of photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS) at 11 locations across Taiwan were used to evaluate 56 speciated emissions and the resulting simulations of an air quality model. Based on the PAMS observations at two urban sites, emission modification was made for the 56 PAMS species in the model. To further test the applicability of this emission correction approach, the same modified emissions were subject to seven different meteorological conditions and comparison with observations of all the 11 PAMS sites. Originally there was a minimum of only 8 of 56 species showed agreement with observations for the worst of the 11 PAMS sites and 28 of 56 species for the best site. With modified emissions, the number increased to 13-52 species across the 11 PAMS sites, demonstrating that the simple urban based correction procedure has broad applicability. When applying this modification of PAMS emissions to the simulations of other air quality gases, SO2 and NOx showed small changes compared with observations (-0.27% and -2.51%, respectively), while total VOC concentrations showed significant changes (+15.28%) as a result of the adjustment in VOC emissions (+26.7%). Although VOCs are the precursor of ozone, the relatively large changes in VOC did not seem to affect ozone formation to the similar extent, only resulting in the changes of average O3 by 2.9 ppb (+9.41%). It shows that although the emission modification improves individual VOC simulations, the performance in oxidant simulation is still largely unaltered. Although the original U.S. VOC emission profiles can capture the general features of ambient VOCs, further optimization of emissions may still be needed by referencing extensive observations, so that emissions can better fit domestic conditions and accuracy in model simulations can be improved.

  18. Assessment of Exposure to VOCs among Pregnant Women in the National Children’s Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Elizabeth Barksdale; Viet, Susan M.; Wright, David J.; Merrill, Lori S.; Alwis, K. Udeni; Blount, Benjamin C.; Mortensen, Mary E.; Moye, John; Dellarco, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies can measure exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using environmental samples, biomarkers, questionnaires, or observations. These different exposure assessment approaches each have advantages and disadvantages; thus, evaluating relationships is an important consideration. In the National Children’s Vanguard Study from 2009 to 2010, participants completed questionnaires and data collectors observed VOC exposure sources and collected urine samples from 488 third trimester pregnant women at in-person study visits. From urine, we simultaneously quantified 28 VOC metabolites of exposure to acrolein, acrylamide, acrylonitrile, benzene, 1-bromopropane, 1,3-butadiene, carbon disulfide, crotonaldehyde, cyanide, N,N-dimethylformamide, ethylbenzene, ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, styrene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, trichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and xylene exposures using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/MSMS) method. Urinary thiocyanate was measured using an ion chromatography coupled with an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method (IC-ESI/MSMS). We modeled the relationship between urinary VOC metabolite concentrations and sources of VOC exposure. Sources of exposure were assessed by participant report via questionnaire (use of air fresheners, aerosols, paint or varnish, organic solvents, and passive/active smoking) and by observations by a trained data collector (presence of scented products in homes). We found several significant (p < 0.01) relationships between the urinary metabolites of VOCs and sources of VOC exposure. Smoking was positively associated with metabolites of the tobacco constituents acrolein, acrylamide, acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, crotonaldehyde, cyanide, ethylene oxide, N,N-dimethylformamide, propylene oxide, styrene, and xylene. Study location was negatively associated with the toluene metabolite N

  19. Modeling and interpreting biological effects of mixtures in the environment: introduction to the metal mixture modeling evaluation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Genderen, Eric; Adams, William; Dwyer, Robert; Garman, Emily; Gorsuch, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    The fate and biological effects of chemical mixtures in the environment are receiving increased attention from the scientific and regulatory communities. Understanding the behavior and toxicity of metal mixtures poses unique challenges for incorporating metal-specific concepts and approaches, such as bioavailability and metal speciation, in multiple-metal exposures. To avoid the use of oversimplified approaches to assess the toxicity of metal mixtures, a collaborative 2-yr research project and multistakeholder group workshop were conducted to examine and evaluate available higher-tiered chemical speciation-based metal mixtures modeling approaches. The Metal Mixture Modeling Evaluation project and workshop achieved 3 important objectives related to modeling and interpretation of biological effects of metal mixtures: 1) bioavailability models calibrated for single-metal exposures can be integrated to assess mixture scenarios; 2) the available modeling approaches perform consistently well for various metal combinations, organisms, and endpoints; and 3) several technical advancements have been identified that should be incorporated into speciation models and environmental risk assessments for metals.

  20. Mixtures and interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groten, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    Drinking water can be considered as a complex mixture that consists of tens, hundreds or thousands of chemicals of which the composition is qualitatively and quantitatively not fully known. From a public health point of view it is most relevant to answer the question of whether chemicals in drinking

  1. VOC emission into the atmosphere by trees and leaf litter in Polish forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidorov, V.; Smolewska, M.; Tyszkiewicz, Z.

    2009-04-01

    It is generally recognized at present that the vegetation of continents is the principal source of reactive volatile organic compounds (VOC) of the atmosphere. The upper limit of the evaluation of global phytogenic VOC is 1100-1500 Tg/yr (Isidorov, 1990; Guenther et al., 1995). Although these global evaluations showing the place of phytogenic emission among of other VOC sources are important, evaluations for individual countries are also very important. This poster represents the results of the estimation of VOC emission from Polish forests. Calculations took into account the composition and age of forests. According to our estimation, the total VOC emission by the arboreal vegetation differs from 190 to 750 kt/yr, depending of weather conditions in different years. There are only few studies conducted on decaying plant material as a source of atmospheric VOCs, but still they are able to give evidence of the importance of this source. For Polish forests, the litter mass is estimated to be (16-19)106 t/yr. These organic materials undergo decomposition by mesofauna and microorganisms. In these processes volatile organic compounds (VOC) stored in the litter and secondary metabolites of litter-destroying fungi are emitted into the atmosphere. The scale of the phenomenon makes leaf litter an important VOC source in the atmosphere. The filling of numerous gaps in researches of VOC emissions from decomposing leaf litter demands carrying out of long term field experiments in various climatic conditions. In this communication we report also the results of 3.5-year experiment on qualitative and quantitative GC-MS investigations of VOC emitted into the gas phase from leaves litter of some species of deciduous and coniferous trees of Polish forests. Apart from terpenes and their oxygenated derivatives, which are usual in plant tissues, leaf litter intensively emits vast amounts of lower alcohols and carbonyl compounds. We suppose that these volatile substances are products

  2. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Dairy Cows and Their Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, S.; Holzinger, R.; Mitloehner, F.; Goldstein, A.

    2005-12-01

    Biogenic VOCs are typically defined as those directly emitted from plants, but approximately 6% of global net primary production is consumed by cattle that carry out enteric fermentation and then emit VOCs that could also be considered biogenic. Current regulatory estimates suggest that dairy cattle in central California emit VOCs at rates comparable to those from passenger vehicles in the region, and thus contribute significantly to the extreme non-attainment of ozone standards there. We report PTR-MS measurements of ammonia and VOCs, and cavity-enhanced-absorption gas analyzer (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measurements of CH4, emitted from dairy cattle in various stages of pregnancy/lactation and their waste. Experiments were conducted in chambers at UC Davis that simulate freestall cow housing conditions. CH4 fluxes ranged from 125-374 lb/cow/year. The compounds with the highest fluxes from '3 cows+waste' treatments were: ammonia (1-18), methanol (0-2.3), acetone+propanal (0.2-0.7), dimethylsulfide (0-0.4), and mass 109 (likely ID = p-cresol; 0-0.3) in lb/cow/year. Mass 60 (likely ID = trimethylamine) and acetic acid were also abundant. There were 10s of additional compounds with detectable, but small, emissions. A few compounds that were likely emitted (i.e. ethanol, formaldehyde, and dimethylamine) were not quantified by the PTR-MS. The total flux for all measured organic gases (TOG = CH4 + PTR-MS VOCs(including acetone+propanal)) averaged 246±45 lb/cow/year for '3 cows+waste' treatments, and was dominated by methane (>98%). TOG flux for 'waste only' treatments averaged 1.1±0.1 lb/cow/year, and was instead dominated by VOC (>84%). The PTR-MS VOCs as a percent of TOG (0.6±0.2%) emitted from '3 cows+waste' treatments in chamber conditions was a factor of 10 smaller than that currently estimated by the California Air Resources Board. In addition, the ozone forming potentials of the most abundant VOCs are only about 10% those of typical combustion or plant

  3. An extended baseline examination of indoor VOCs in a city of low ambient pollution: Perth, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisey, S. J.; Saunders, S. M.; West, N.; Franklin, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    This study of indoor air quality reports VOC concentrations in 386 suburban homes located in Perth Western Australia, a city of low ambient pollution and temperate climate. Details of indoor VOC concentrations, temperature, relative humidity, and information on house characteristics and occupant activities were collected during the sampling periods. The concentration of VOCs observed in typical homes was low and individual compounds rarely exceeded 5 μg m-3. Median individual VOC concentrations ranged from 0.06 μg m-3 for 1,1,1 trichloroethane and butyl ether to 26.6 μg m-3 for cis/trans 2-butene. Recently renovated homes had higher concentrations of VOCs than non renovated homes, including ∑VOCs (p = 0.026), ∑BTEX (p = 0.03), ∑xylene (p = 0.013), toluene (p = 0.05), cyclohexane (p = 0.039), and propyl benzene (p = 0.039). Statistical analyses showed house age and attached garages were not significant factors for any of the VOCs tested. The concentrations of indoor VOCs in Perth were lower than overseas observations and those reported in recent Australian studies, with inferences made to differences in the climate and the occupant behaviour. The results are a baseline profile of indoor VOCs over the period 2006-2011, in an Australian city of low population density and of generally low ambient pollution.

  4. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in urban air: How chemistry affects the interpretation of positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bin; Shao, Min; de Gouw, Joost; Parrish, David D.; Lu, Sihua; Wang, Ming; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Qian; Song, Yu; Zhang, Jianbo; Hu, Min

    2012-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured online at an urban site in Beijing in August-September 2010. Diurnal variations of various VOC species indicate that VOCs concentrations were influenced by photochemical removal with OH radicals for reactive species and secondary formation for oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs). A photochemical age-based parameterization method was applied to characterize VOCs chemistry. A large part of the variability in concentrations of both hydrocarbons and OVOCs was explained by this method. The determined emission ratios of hydrocarbons to acetylene agreed within a factor of two between 2005 and 2010 measurements. However, large differences were found for emission ratios of some alkanes and C8 aromatics between Beijing and northeastern United States secondary formation from anthropogenic VOCs generally contributed higher percentages to concentrations of reactive aldehydes than those of inert ketones and alcohols. Anthropogenic primary emissions accounted for the majority of ketones and alcohols concentrations. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was also used to identify emission sources from this VOCs data set. The four resolved factors were three anthropogenic factors and a biogenic factor. However, the anthropogenic factors are attributed here to a common source at different stages of photochemical processing rather than three independent sources. Anthropogenic and biogenic sources of VOCs concentrations were not separated completely in PMF. This study indicates that photochemistry of VOCs in the atmosphere complicates the information about separated sources that can be extracted from PMF and the influence of photochemical processing must be carefully considered in the interpretation of source apportionment studies based upon PMF.

  5. Development of a portable instrument for the continuous analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its application to environmental monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Etsu; Matsushita, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Mitsuaki; Fuse, Yasuro; Miki, Sadao; Fujimoto, Kiyoomi; Morita, Hiroyoshi; Shimada, Osamu

    2006-01-01

    A small, time efficient and sensitive instrument for the continuous analysis of very volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a boiling point lower than 100 degrees C in addition to the analysis of VOCs with a boiling point in the range of 100-150 degrees C was developed and applied to the measurement of VOCs in the course of university research and environmental monitoring. VOCs, such as n-hexane, acetone, ethyl acetate, alcohols, benzene, toluene and xylene, were continuously measured once every 30 min. The detection limits of hexane, ethyl acetate, benzene and toluene at a preconcentration time of 10 min were 0.41 microg/m(3) (0.12 ppb), 0.67 microg/m(3) (0.19 ppb), 0.22 microg/m(3) (0.07 ppb) and 0.22 microg/m(3) (0.06 ppb), respectively. The relative standard deviations of VOCs were less than 5%. The sensitivities of the present method VOCs were higher than those of the conventional method. The temporal changes in VOC concentrations in several laboratories and at a plant for the disposal of organic liquid wastes were measured, and the behavior of VOCs was analyzed. All the VOC concentrations, except that of ethyl acetate, determined using the portable instrument were slightly lower than those determined using a passive sampler. The portable instrument developed in the course of this study can be used for the risk assessment and management of chemicals.

  6. A High Sensitivity and Wide Dynamic Range Fiber-Optic Sensor for Low-Concentration VOC Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rajibur Rahaman Khan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a volatile organic compound (VOC gas sensing system with high sensitivity and a wide dynamic range that is based on the principle of the heterodyne frequency modulation method. According to this method, the time period of the sensing signal shift when Nile Red containing a VOC-sensitive membrane of a fiber-optic sensing element comes into contact with a VOC. This sensing membrane produces strong, fast and reversible signals when exposed to VOC gases. The response and recovery times of the proposed sensing system were less than 35 s, and good reproducibility and accuracy were obtained.

  7. A High Sensitivity and Wide Dynamic Range Fiber-Optic Sensor for Low-Concentration VOC Gas Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md. Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a volatile organic compound (VOC) gas sensing system with high sensitivity and a wide dynamic range that is based on the principle of the heterodyne frequency modulation method. According to this method, the time period of the sensing signal shift when Nile Red containing a VOC-sensitive membrane of a fiber-optic sensing element comes into contact with a VOC. This sensing membrane produces strong, fast and reversible signals when exposed to VOC gases. The response and recovery times of the proposed sensing system were less than 35 s, and good reproducibility and accuracy were obtained. PMID:25490592

  8. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report number 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, H.; Wild, M.P.; Hooda, U.; Banerjee, S. [Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Shmulsky, R.; Thompson, A.; Ingram, L.; Conners, T. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Twenty five Southern pine boards were machined into 2 x 4 inch pieces. Next, the 8 foot boards were cut in half into matched pairs. One of the two was irradiated with RF, while the other served as a control. Both sets were dried under a conventional temperature-time based schedule. Results and conclusions are: RF pretreatment of lumber does not affect strength; the amount of pinene lost into the headspace during low-VOC RF-treatment of wood approximately corresponds to the amount of material lost from the wood; virtually all the pinene can be removed from the low-VOC reactor with steam, suggesting that pinene can be collected when the small amount of steam released during low-headspace treatment is condensed; temperature and moisture loss profiles for particle at 105 C has been modeled using experimental data at 130 C and 160 C; the VOC-temperature curve from dried particle shows a break at about 156 C, the boiling point of {alpha}-pinene, demonstrating that pinene boil-off occurs beyond this threshold; VOC release from dry particle has been successfully modeled; the transport of VOC from sapwood to the atmosphere for pine is faster than the corresponding movement from heartwood to sapwood; and seasonal variations in pine extractives are small.

  9. Comparing the VOC emissions between air-dried and heat-treated Scots pine wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Anne-Marja; Pasanen, Pertti; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    The emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from air-dried Scots pine wood and from heat-treated Scots pine wood were compared with GC-MS analysis. Air-dried wood blocks released about 8 times more total VOCs than heat-treated (24 h at 230°C) ones. Terpenes were clearly the main compound group in the air-dried wood samples, whereas aldehydes and carboxylic acids and their esters dominated in the heat-treated wood samples. Only 14 compounds out of 41 identified individual compounds were found in both wood samples indicating considerable changes in VOC emission profile during heat-treatment process. Of individual compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and hexanal were the most abundant ones in the air-dried wood. By contrast, in the heat-treated wood 2-furancarboxaldehyde, acetic acid and 2-propanone were the major compounds of VOC emission. Current emission results reveal that significant chemical changes have occurred, and volatile monoterpenes and other low-molecular-weight compounds have evaporated from the wood during the heat-treatment process when compared to air-dried wood. Major chemical changes detected in VOC emissions are explained by the thermal degradation and oxidation of main constituents in wood. The results suggest that if heat-treated wood is used in interior carpentry, emissions of monoterpenes are reduced compared to air-dried wood, but some irritating compounds might be released into indoor air.

  10. VOC emission rates and emission factors for a sheetfed offset printing shop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadden, R A; Scheff, P A; Franke, J E; Conroy, L M; Javor, M; Keil, C B; Milz, S A

    1995-04-01

    Emission rates were determined during production for a sheetfed offset printing shop by combining the measured concentrations and ventilation rates with mass balance models that characterized the printing space. Air samples were collected simultaneously on charcoal tubes for 12 separate 1-hour periods at 6 locations. Air samples and cleaning solvents were analyzed by gas chromatography for total volatile organic compounds (VOC) and 13 hydrocarbons. The average VOC emission rate was 470 g/hr with a range of 160-1100 g/hr. These values were in good agreement with the amounts of VOC, hexane, toluene, and aromatic C9s determined from estimated solvent usage and measured solvent compositions. Comparison of the emission rates with source activities indicated an emission factor of 30-51 g VOC/press cleaning. Based on the test observations it was estimated that this typical small printing facility was likely to release 1-2 T VOC/year. The methodology also may be useful for the surface coating industry, as emission rates in this study were determined without recourse to a temporary total enclosure and without interfering with worker activities, increasing worker exposure, or increasing safety and explosion hazards.

  11. Release of VOCs and particles during use of nanofilm spray products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgaard, Asger W; Jensen, Keld A; Janfelt, Christian; Lauritsen, Frants R; Clausen, Per A; Wolkoff, Peder

    2009-10-15

    Here, we present emission data on VOCs and particles emitted during simulated use of four commercial nanofilm spray products (NFPs) used for making easy-to-clean or self-cleaning surfaces on floors, ceramic tiles, and windows. The aim was to characterize the emitted VOCs and to provide specific source strength data for VOCs and particles released to the airduring use of the products. Containers with NFP were mounted on a spray-stand inside a closed stainless steel chamber with no air exchange. NFPs were sprayed in amounts corresponding to 1 m2 surface toward a target plate at a distance of 35 cm. Released VOCs were measured by a combination of air sampling on Tenax TA adsorbent followed by thermal desorption GC/MS and GC/FID analysis and real time measurements using a miniature membrane inlet mass spectrometer. Particles were measured using a fast mobility particle sizer and an aerosol particle sizer. A number of VOCs were identified, including small alcohols, ketones and ethers, chlorinated acetones, a perfluorinated silane, limonene, and cyclic siloxanes. The number of generated particles was on the order of 3 x 10(8) to 2 x 10(10) particles/m3 per g sprayed NFP and were dominated by nanosize particles.

  12. Hazard to man and the environment posed by the use of urban waste compost: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deportes, Isabelle; Benoit-Guyod, Jean-Louis [Gedexe, Meylan (France); Zmirou, Denis [Public Health Laboratory, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Joseph Fourier University, La Tronche (France)

    1995-09-29

    This review presents the current state of knowledge on the relationship between the environment and the use of municipal waste compost in terms of health risk assessment. The hazards stem from chemical and microbiological agents whose nature and magnitude depend heavily on the degree of sorting and on the composting methods. Three main routes of exposure can be determined and are quantified in the literature: (1) The ingestion of soil/compost mixtures by children, mostly in cases of pica, can be a threat because of the amount of lead, chromium, cadmium, PCDD/F and fecal streptococci that can be absorbed; (2) Though concern about contamination through the food chain is weak when compost is used in agriculture, some authors anticipate accumulation of pollutants after several years of disposal, which might lead to future hazards; (3) Exposure is also associated with atmospheric dispersion of compost organic dust that convey microorganisms and toxicants. Data on hazard posed by organic dust from municipal composts to the farmer or the private user is scarce. To date, microorganisms are only measured at composting plants, thus raising the issue of extrapolation to environmental situations. Lung damage and allergies may occur because of organic dust, Gram negative bacteria, actinomycetes and fungi. Further research is needed on the risk related to inhalation of chemical compounds

  13. Hazard assessment for a pharmaceutical mixture detected in the upper Tennessee River using Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wolfe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Widespread use of pharmaceuticals has resulted in mixture concentrations ranging from mg/L in effluent to µg/L concentrations in surface water. In a 2008 study, 13 pharmaceuticals, ranging in amounts from 0.0028 to 0.1757 µg/l, were identified in the Tennessee River, USA and its tributaries. In order to address the need for risk assessment of environmentally relevant pharmaceutical mixtures, Daphnia magna 21-d life cycle tests were performed on a mixture of 11 of the 13 pharmaceuticals as well as on the individual components of the mixture. Mixture exposures were based on the same initial ratios of individual compounds, up to 1000x the initial mixture concentrations.  The endpoints of mortality, time to first brood, size, and fecundity were the assessed.  The LOEC of the 11- pharmaceutical mixture was determined to be 100x greater than the measured mixture concentration detected in the Tennessee River, with the NOEC being 75x that of the measured mixture.  Single concentrations of pharmaceuticals within the mixture up to the 100x LOEC were not statistically different from control for any of the assessed endpoints.  Thus, no single pharmaceutical was deemed predominately responsible for the mixture toxicity at the concentrations tested. While mixtures of pharmaceuticals are common in many systems, based on the findings of the present study, they may not pose a significant acute or chronic hazard to aquatic invertebrates at current concentrations.

  14. Invasive Lionfish (Pterosis volitans) Pose Public Health Threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H

    2015-01-01

    The lionfish, Pterosis volitans, a native of Indo-Pacific oceans, is a popular saltwater aquarium fish despite venomous spines on its fins. Lionfish were inadvertently introduced into the western Atlantic from Florida in the early 1990s and have overpopulated and dispersed widely into the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. Initiatives to control lionfish populations were launched, including the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-sponsored "Lionfish as Food Campaign".2 Recently, scientists from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reported that lionfish caught off the US Virgin Islands contained ciguatoxins and could cause ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP); a seafood-borne poisoning without an antidote or any specific treatment, and a potential for prolonged neurotoxicity. Lionfish pose several public health threats. New strategies to control the lionfish population explosion in coastal waters and offshore fisheries are needed now to ensure seafood safety and public health. The lionfish, Pterosis volitans, is native to the reefs of the western Indian and Pacific Oceans (Figure 1). Brightly colored with red, white, and black stripes and adorned with feathery fins, the lionfish is a popular saltwater aquarium fish despite venomous spines on its fins (Figure 2). Lionfish were introduced into the western North Atlantic from Florida in the early 1990s after some specimens were discarded by dissatisfied amateur aquarists and others escaped from hurricane-flooded public aquariums.1 Since lionfish are voracious carnivores, have few natural predators, and reproduce prolifically, they have overpopulated and dispersed widely from Cape Hatteras to Florida, throughout the Caribbean Sea, and into the Gulf of Mexico.1 The population density of lionfish in its new, invaded territory now exceeds that of its native habitat.1 As a result, campaigns to control lionfish populations were launched in Florida and the Caribbean. Lionfish now pose several public

  15. Assessing the risk posed by natural hazards to infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidsvig, Unni Marie K.; Kristensen, Krister; Vidar Vangelsten, Bjørn

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposes a model for assessing the risk posed by natural hazards to infrastructures, with a focus on the indirect losses and loss of stability for the population relying on the infrastructure. The model prescribes a three-level analysis with increasing level of detail, moving from qualitative to quantitative analysis. The focus is on a methodology for semi-quantitative analyses to be performed at the second level. The purpose of this type of analysis is to perform a screening of the scenarios of natural hazards threatening the infrastructures, identifying the most critical scenarios and investigating the need for further analyses (third level). The proposed semi-quantitative methodology considers the frequency of the natural hazard, different aspects of vulnerability, including the physical vulnerability of the infrastructure itself, and the societal dependency on the infrastructure. An indicator-based approach is applied, ranking the indicators on a relative scale according to pre-defined ranking criteria. The proposed indicators, which characterise conditions that influence the probability of an infrastructure malfunctioning caused by a natural event, are defined as (1) robustness and buffer capacity, (2) level of protection, (3) quality/level of maintenance and renewal, (4) adaptability and quality of operational procedures and (5) transparency/complexity/degree of coupling. Further indicators describe conditions influencing the socio-economic consequences of the infrastructure malfunctioning, such as (1) redundancy and/or substitution, (2) cascading effects and dependencies, (3) preparedness and (4) early warning, emergency response and measures. The aggregated risk estimate is a combination of the semi-quantitative vulnerability indicators, as well as quantitative estimates of the frequency of the natural hazard, the potential duration of the infrastructure malfunctioning (e.g. depending on the required restoration effort) and the number of users of

  16. Effect of void structure of photocatalyst paper on VOC decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahori, Shuji; Iguchi, Yumi; Ichiura, Hideaki; Kitaoka, Takuya; Tanaka, Hiroo; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2007-02-01

    TiO2 powder-containing paper composites, called TiO2 paper, were prepared by a papermaking technique, and their photocatalytic efficiency was investigated. The TiO2 paper has a porous structure originating from the layered pulp fiber network, with TiO2 powders scattered on the fiber matrix. Under UV irradiation, the TiO2 paper decomposed gaseous acetaldehyde more effectively than powdery TiO2 and a pulp/TiO2 mixture not in paper form. Scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion analysis revealed that the TiO2 paper had characteristic unique voids ca. 10 microm in diameter, which might have contributed to the improved photocatalytic performance. TiO2 paper composites having different void structures were prepared by using beaten pulp fibers with different degrees of freeness and/or ceramic fibers. The photodecomposition efficiency was affected by the void structure of the photocatalyst paper, and the initial degradation rate of acetaldehyde increased with an increase in the total pore volume of TiO2 paper. The paper voids presumably provided suitable conditions for TiO2 catalysis, resulting in higher photocatalytic performance by TiO2 paper than by TiO2 powder and a pulp/TiO2 mixture not in paper form.

  17. Does ketoprofen or diclofenac pose the lowest risk to fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuklev, Filip; Fick, Jerker; Cvijovic, Marija; Kristiansson, Erik; Förlin, Lars; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2012-08-30

    Ketoprofen and diclofenac are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often used for similar indications, and both are frequently found in surface waters. Diclofenac affects organ histology and gene expression in fish at around 1 μg/L. Here, we exposed rainbow trout to ketoprofen (1, 10 and 100 μg/L) to investigate if this alternative causes less risk for pharmacological responses in fish. The bioconcentration factor from water to fish blood plasma was Ketoprofen only reached up to 0.6 ‰ of the human therapeutic plasma concentration, thus the probability of target-related effects was estimated to be fairly low. Accordingly, a comprehensive analysis of hepatic gene expression revealed no consistent responses. In some contrast, trout exposed to undiluted, treated sewage effluents bioconcentrated ketoprofen and other NSAIDs much more efficiently, according to a meta-analysis of recent studies. Neither of the setups is however an ideal representation of the field situation. If a controlled exposure system with a single chemical in pure water is a reasonable representation of the environment, then the use of ketoprofen is likely to pose a lower risk for wild fish than diclofenac, but if bioconcentration factors from effluent-exposed fish are applied, the risks may be more similar.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Matching for Human Pose Estimation in Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Torre, Fernando De la

    2016-08-01

    Detection and tracking humans in videos have been long-standing problems in computer vision. Most successful approaches (e.g., deformable parts models) heavily rely on discriminative models to build appearance detectors for body joints and generative models to constrain possible body configurations (e.g., trees). While these 2D models have been successfully applied to images (and with less success to videos), a major challenge is to generalize these models to cope with camera views. In order to achieve view-invariance, these 2D models typically require a large amount of training data across views that is difficult to gather and time-consuming to label. Unlike existing 2D models, this paper formulates the problem of human detection in videos as spatio-temporal matching (STM) between a 3D motion capture model and trajectories in videos. Our algorithm estimates the camera view and selects a subset of tracked trajectories that matches the motion of the 3D model. The STM is efficiently solved with linear programming, and it is robust to tracking mismatches, occlusions and outliers. To the best of our knowledge this is the first paper that solves the correspondence between video and 3D motion capture data for human pose detection. Experiments on the CMU motion capture, Human3.6M, Berkeley MHAD and CMU MAD databases illustrate the benefits of our method over state-of-the-art approaches.

  19. Pose invariant face recognition: 3D model from single photo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoléon, Thibault; Alfalou, Ayman

    2017-02-01

    Face recognition is widely studied in the literature for its possibilities in surveillance and security. In this paper, we report a novel algorithm for the identification task. This technique is based on an optimized 3D modeling allowing to reconstruct faces in different poses from a limited number of references (i.e. one image by class/person). Particularly, we propose to use an active shape model to detect a set of keypoints on the face necessary to deform our synthetic model with our optimized finite element method. Indeed, in order to improve our deformation, we propose a regularization by distances on graph. To perform the identification we use the VanderLugt correlator well know to effectively address this task. On the other hand we add a difference of Gaussian filtering step to highlight the edges and a description step based on the local binary patterns. The experiments are performed on the PHPID database enhanced with our 3D reconstructed faces of each person with an azimuth and an elevation ranging from -30° to +30°. The obtained results prove the robustness of our new method with 88.76% of good identification when the classic 2D approach (based on the VLC) obtains just 44.97%.

  20. Real-time pose invariant logo and pattern detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidla, Oliver; Kottmann, Michal; Benesova, Wanda

    2011-01-01

    The detection of pose invariant planar patterns has many practical applications in computer vision and surveillance systems. The recognition of company logos is used in market studies to examine the visibility and frequency of logos in advertisement. Danger signs on vehicles could be detected to trigger warning systems in tunnels, or brand detection on transport vehicles can be used to count company-specific traffic. We present the results of a study on planar pattern detection which is based on keypoint detection and matching of distortion invariant 2d feature descriptors. Specifically we look at the keypoint detectors of type: i) Lowe's DoG approximation from the SURF algorithm, ii) the Harris Corner Detector, iii) the FAST Corner Detector and iv) Lepetit's keypoint detector. Our study then compares the feature descriptors SURF and compact signatures based on Random Ferns: we use 3 sets of sample images to detect and match 3 logos of different structure to find out which combinations of keypoint detector/feature descriptors work well. A real-world test tries to detect vehicles with a distinctive logo in an outdoor environment under realistic lighting and weather conditions: a camera was mounted on a suitable location for observing the entrance to a parking area so that incoming vehicles could be monitored. In this 2 hour long recording we can successfully detect a specific company logo without false positives.

  1. VOC contamination in hospital, from stationary sampling of a large panel of compounds, in view of healthcare workers and patients exposure assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Bessonneau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess, for the first time, the nature of the indoor air contamination of hospitals. METHODS AND FINDINGS: More than 40 volatile organic compounds (VOCs including aliphatic, aromatic and halogenated hydrocarbons, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, ethers and terpenes were measured in a teaching hospital in France, from sampling in six sampling sites--reception hall, patient room, nursing care, post-anesthesia care unit, parasitology-mycology laboratory and flexible endoscope disinfection unit--in the morning and in the afternoon, during three consecutive days. Our results showed that the main compounds found in indoor air were alcohols (arithmetic means ± SD: 928±958 µg/m³ and 47.9±52.2 µg/m³ for ethanol and isopropanol, respectively, ethers (75.6±157 µg/m³ for ether and ketones (22.6±20.6 µg/m³ for acetone. Concentrations levels of aromatic and halogenated hydrocarbons, ketones, aldehydes and limonene were widely variable between sampling sites, due to building age and type of products used according to health activities conducted in each site. A high temporal variability was observed in concentrations of alcohols, probably due to the intensive use of alcohol-based hand rubs in all sites. Qualitative analysis of air samples led to the identification of other compounds, including siloxanes (hexamethyldisiloxane, octamethyltrisiloxane, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane, anesthetic gases (sevoflurane, desflurane, aliphatic hydrocarbons (butane, esters (ethylacetate, terpenes (camphor, α-bisabolol, aldehydes (benzaldehyde and organic acids (benzoic acid depending on sites. CONCLUSION: For all compounds, concentrations measured were lower than concentrations known to be harmful in humans. However, results showed that indoor air of sampling locations contains a complex mixture of VOCs. Further multicenter studies are required to compare these results. A full understanding of the exposure of healthcare workers and patients

  2. Pointer Sentinel Mixture Models

    OpenAIRE

    Merity, Stephen; Xiong, Caiming; Bradbury, James; Socher, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Recent neural network sequence models with softmax classifiers have achieved their best language modeling performance only with very large hidden states and large vocabularies. Even then they struggle to predict rare or unseen words even if the context makes the prediction unambiguous. We introduce the pointer sentinel mixture architecture for neural sequence models which has the ability to either reproduce a word from the recent context or produce a word from a standard softmax classifier. O...

  3. Adaptive mixture observation models for multiple object tracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Peng; SUN LiFeng; YANG ShiQiang

    2009-01-01

    Multiple object tracking (MOT) poses many difficulties to conventional well-studied single object track-ing (SOT) algorithms, such as severe expansion of configuration space, high complexity of motion con-ditions, and visual ambiguities among nearby targets, among which the visual ambiguity problem is the central challenge. In this paper, we address this problem by embedding adaptive mixture observation models (AMOM) into a mixture tracker which is implemented in Particle Filter framework. In AMOM, the extracted multiple features for appearance description are combined according to their discriminative power between ambiguity prone objects, where the discriminability of features are evaluated by online entropy-based feature selection techniques. The induction of AMOM can help to surmount the Incapa-bility of conventional mixture tracker in handling object occlusions, and meanwhile retain its merits of flexibility and high efficiency. The final experiments show significant improvement in MOT scenarios compared with other methods.

  4. [Evaluation and selection of VOCs treatment technologies in packaging and printing industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Lin; Wang, Jun-Hui; Zhu, Chun-Lei; Nie, Lei; Hao, Zheng-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play an important role in urban air pollution. Activities of industries including the packaging and printing industries are regarded as the major sources. How to select the suitable treating techniques is the major problem for emission control. In this article, based on the VOCs emission characteristics of the packaging and printing industry and the existing treatment technologies, using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) model, an evaluation system for VOCs selection was established and all the technologies used for treatment were assessed. It showed that the priority selection was in the following order: Carbon Fiber Adsorption-Desorption > Granular Carbon Adsorption-Desorption > Thermal Combustion > Regenerative Combustion > Catalytic combustion > Rotary adsorption-concentration and combustion > Granular Carbon adsorption-concentration and combustion. Carbon Fiber Adsorption-Desorption was selected as the best available technology due to its highest weight among those technologies.

  5. Energy recovery efficiency and cost analysis of VOC thermal oxidation pollution control technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warahena, Aruna S K; Chuah, Yew Khoy

    2009-08-01

    Thermal oxidation of VOC is extremely energy intensive, and necessitates high efficiency heat recovery from the exhaust heat. In this paper, two independent parameters heat recovery factor (HRF) and equipment cost factor (ECF) are introduced. HRF and ECF can be used to evaluate separately the merits of energy efficiency and cost effectiveness of VOC oxidation systems. Another parameter equipment cost against heat recovery (ECHR) which is a function of HRF and ECF is introduced to evaluate the merit of different systems for the thermal oxidation of VOC. Respective cost models were derived for recuperative thermal oxidizer (TO) and regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO). Application examples are presented to show the use and the importance of these parameters. An application examples show that TO has a lower ECF while RTO has a higher HRF. However when analyzed using ECHR, RTO would be of advantage economically in longer periods of use. The analytical models presented can be applied in similar environmental protection systems.

  6. VOC removal by plasma-photocatalyst combination : comparison between a low and an atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Antoine; Guaitella, Olivier; Gatilova, Lina; Thevenet, Frederic; Guillard, Chantal; Hannemann, Mario; Roepcke, Jurgen

    2004-09-01

    The combination of a non thermal plasma with a photo-catalyst is promising for VOC and odour abatement at room temperature and at a very low energy cost. In classical photocatalysis, UV photons generate an electron hole pair on the surface of the photo-catalyst (TiO2), which generates primary radicals responsible of VOC oxidation. In plasma-photocatalysis combination, activation mechanisms of the photocatalytic surface are not clearly identified to the day. Our strategy is to compare a pulsed DBD at atmospheric pressure containing TiO2 pellets, with a pulsed low pressure DC discharge in contact with a porous TiO2 surface. These two discharge are characterized electrically and the efficiency of VOC removal is performed using infrared laser absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography.

  7. Control of VOC emissions from a flexographic printing facility using an industrial biotrickling filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempere, F; Martínez-Soria, V; Penya-Roja, J M; Waalkens, A; Gabaldón, C

    2012-01-01

    The study of an industrial unit of biotrickling filter for the treatment of the exhaust gases of a flexographic facility was investigated over a 2-year period with the objective to meet the volatile organic compound (VOC) regulatory emission limits. Increasing the water flow rate from 2 to 40 m(3) h(-1) improved the performance of the process, meeting the VOC regulation when 40 m(3) h(-1) were used. An empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 36 s was used when the inlet air temperature was 18.7 °C, and an EBRT as low as 26 s was set when the inlet temperature was 26.8 °C. During this long-term operation, the pressure drop over the column of the bioreactor was completely controlled avoiding clogging problems and the system could perfectly handle the non-working periods without VOC emission, demonstrating its robustness and feasibility to treat the emission of the flexographic sector.

  8. A Review of Photocatalysts Prepared by Sol-Gel Method for VOCs Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ke Tseng

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The sol-gel process is a wet-chemical technique (chemical solution deposition, which has been widely used in the fields of materials science, ceramic engineering, and especially in the preparation of photocatalysts. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs are prevalent components of indoor air pollution. Among the approaches to remove VOCs from indoor air, photocatalytic oxidation (PCO is regarded as a promising method. This paper is a review of the status of research on the sol-gel method for photocatalyst preparation and for the PCO purification of VOCs. The review and discussion will focus on the preparation and coating of various photocatalysts, operational parameters, and will provide an overview of general PCO models described in the literature.

  9. Bubble-Facilitated VOC Transport from LNAPL Smear Zones and Its Potential Effect on Vapor Intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy, Nicole C; Mumford, Kevin G

    2017-02-10

    Most conceptual and mathematical models of soil vapor intrusion assume that the transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a source toward a building is limited by diffusion through the soil gas. Under conditions where advection occurs, transport rates are higher and can lead to higher indoor air concentrations. Advection-dominated conditions can be created by gas bubble flow in the saturated zone. A series of laboratory column experiments were conducted to measure mass flux due to bubble-facilitated VOC transport from light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) smear zones. Smear zones that contained both LNAPL residual and trapped gas, as well as those that contained only LNAPL residual, were investigated. Results showed that the VOC mass flux due to bubble-facilitated transport was orders-of-magnitude higher than under diffusion-limited conditions. Results also showed that the mass flux due to bubble-facilitated transport was intermittent, and increased with an increased supply of dissolved gases.

  10. Electronic nose system combined with membrane interface probe for detection of VOCs in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghwan; Howard, Zachary; Kurup, Pradeep

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a novel electronic nose system combined with a membrane interface probe (MIP) for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water. The MIP is an in situ tool that allows the detection of certain VOCs in the soil via a pushed or driven probe. The MIP was combined with a sensor array consisting of four different tin-oxide gas sensors known as an electronic nose (e-nose). The designed e-nose system was calibrated in aqueous media spiked with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-xylene (BTEX) at concentrations of 100, 250, and 500 ppm. Since the experiment was conducted utilizing five repetitions for each analyte, a data set of 60 measurements was prepared for principal components analysis (PCA). The results of the PCA showed that two principal components contain more than 99% variance information and each VOC is separable and detectable by the e-nose.

  11. Comparison of the Decomposition VOC Profile during Winter and Summer in a Moist, Mid-Latitude (Cfb) Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Shari L.; Perrault, Katelynn A.; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues; Nizio, Katie D.; Focant, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with decomposition is an emerging field in forensic taphonomy due to their importance in locating human remains using biological detectors such as insects and canines. A consistent decomposition VOC profile has not yet been elucidated due to the intrinsic impact of the environment on the decomposition process in different climatic zones. The study of decomposition VOCs has typically occurred during the warmer months to enable chemical profiling of all decomposition stages. The present study investigated the decomposition VOC profile in air during both warmer and cooler months in a moist, mid-latitude (Cfb) climate as decomposition occurs year-round in this environment. Pig carcasses (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) were placed on a soil surface to decompose naturally and their VOC profile was monitored during the winter and summer months. Corresponding control sites were also monitored to determine the natural VOC profile of the surrounding soil and vegetation. VOC samples were collected onto sorbent tubes and analyzed using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography – time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). The summer months were characterized by higher temperatures and solar radiation, greater rainfall accumulation, and comparable humidity when compared to the winter months. The rate of decomposition was faster and the number and abundance of VOCs was proportionally higher in summer. However, a similar trend was observed in winter and summer demonstrating a rapid increase in VOC abundance during active decay with a second increase in abundance occurring later in the decomposition process. Sulfur-containing compounds, alcohols and ketones represented the most abundant classes of compounds in both seasons, although almost all 10 compound classes identified contributed to discriminating the stages of decomposition throughout both seasons. The advantages of GC×GC-TOFMS were demonstrated for

  12. Productions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Surface Waters from Reactions with Atmospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Frances; Bell, Thomas; Yang, Mingxi

    2017-04-01

    Ozone (O3) is a key atmospheric oxidant, greenhouse gas and air pollutant. In marine environments, some atmospheric ozone is lost by reactions with aqueous compounds (e.g. dissolved organic material, DOM, dimethyl sulfide, DMS, and iodide) near the sea surface. These reactions also lead to formations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Removal of O3 by the ocean remains a large uncertainty in global and regional chemical transport models, hampering coastal air quality forecasts. To better understand the role of the ocean in controlling O3 concentrations in the coastal marine atmosphere, we designed and implemented a series of laboratory experiments whereby ambient surface seawater was bubbled with O3-enriched, VOC-free air in a custom-made glass bubble equilibration system. Gas phase concentrations of a range of VOCs were monitored continuously over the mass range m/z 33 - 137 at the outflow of the bubble equilibrator by a proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Gas phase O3 was also measured at the input and output of the equilibrator to monitor the uptake due to reactions with dissolved compounds in seawater. We observed consistent productions of a variety of VOCs upon reaction with O3, notably isoprene, aldehydes, and ketones. Aqueous DMS is rapidly removed from the reactions with O3. To test the importance of dissolved organic matter precursors, we added increasing (milliliter) volumes of Emiliania huxleyi culture to the equilibrator filled with aged seawater, and observed significant linear increases in gas phase concentrations of a number of VOCs. Reactions between DOM and O3 at the sea-air interface represent a potentially significant source of VOCs in marine air and a sink of atmospheric O3.

  13. Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R. [and others

    1995-05-01

    Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

  14. Catalyst screening for the VOC decomposition using adsorption and oxygen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.H.; Ogata, A. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are directly related to the formation of photochemical smog and the secondary aerosol formation, particularly in urban areas. As such, VOC pollution control is a high priority in air quality management. Non-thermal plasmas (NTPs) have been considered for the abatement of VOCs, but 3 key factors must be addressed, notably improve the energy efficiency, have less NOx formation and acceptable material balance. A recent trend in the use of NTP for air pollution control is the combination of NTP with a catalyst. This combined process is subdivided into single-stage and two-stage depending on the position of the catalyst. Ozone-assisted catalysis is the two-stage system. This study focused on the decomposition of VOCs using a single-stage plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) system, and demonstrated the effectiveness of the PDC in terms of energy efficiency, product selectivity and carbon balance. The PDC reactor has a strong dependence on the oxygen content in the oxidation of VOCs. The potentials of various catalysts for cycled system were evaluated in terms of adsorption capability of VOC and enhancement factor (EF). The study focused on zeolites with a large surface area. Nanometer-sized active metals were also loaded on the zeolite surfaces, and their catalytic activity was tested. The metal nanoparticles supported on zeolites enhanced the catalytic activities considerably. ICCD camera observation of the discharge plasma on the surface of catalyst provided an important insight into the understanding of discharge plasma and catalyst. The area of discharge plasma expanded over a wide range by the metal nanoparticles. This physical influence was found to be closely related to the enhanced performance of the plasma-driven catalyst process. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Embedding Game-Based Problem-Solving Phase into Problem-Posing System for Mathematics Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuo-En; Wu, Lin-Jung; Weng, Sheng-En; Sung, Yao-Ting

    2012-01-01

    A problem-posing system is developed with four phases including posing problem, planning, solving problem, and looking back, in which the "solving problem" phase is implemented by game-scenarios. The system supports elementary students in the process of problem-posing, allowing them to fully engage in mathematical activities. In total, 92 fifth…

  16. Viewpoint Invariant Gesture Recognition and 3D Hand Pose Estimation Using RGB-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doliotis, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The broad application domain of the work presented in this thesis is pattern classification with a focus on gesture recognition and 3D hand pose estimation. One of the main contributions of the proposed thesis is a novel method for 3D hand pose estimation using RGB-D. Hand pose estimation is formulated as a database retrieval problem. The proposed…

  17. Investigation of Problem-Solving and Problem-Posing Abilities of Seventh-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Elif Esra; Ünal, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of multiple problem-solving skills on the problem-posing abilities of gifted and non-gifted students and to assess whether the possession of such skills can predict giftedness or affect problem-posing abilities. Participants' metaphorical images of problem posing were also explored. Participants were 20 gifted…

  18. Single-frame 3D human pose recovery from multiple views

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hofmann; D.M. Gavrila

    2009-01-01

    We present a system for the estimation of unconstrained 3D human upper body pose from multi-camera single-frame views. Pose recovery starts with a shape detection stage where candidate poses are generated based on hierarchical exemplar matching in the individual camera views. The hierarchy used in t

  19. Multi-view 3D human pose estimation in complex environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hofmann; D.M. Gavrila

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a framework for unconstrained 3D human upper body pose estimation from multiple camera views in complex environment. Its main novelty lies in the integration of three components: single-frame pose recovery, temporal integration and model texture adaptation. Single-frame pose recovery co

  20. Multi-view 3D Human Pose Estimation in Complex Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, K.M.; Gavrila, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a framework for unconstrained 3D human upper body pose estimation from multiple camera views in complex environment. Its main novelty lies in the integration of three components: single-frame pose recovery, temporal integration and model texture adaptation. Single-frame pose recovery co

  1. Comparison of different real time VOC measurement techniques in a ponderosa pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser, L.; Karl, T.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Graus, M.; Herdlinger-Blatt, I. S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Sive, B.; Turnipseed, A.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Zheng, W.; Flocke, F. M.; Guenther, A.; Keutsch, F. N.; Apel, E.; Hansel, A.

    2013-03-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios measured by five independent instruments are compared at a forested site dominated by ponderosa pine (Pinus Ponderosa) during the BEACHON-ROCS field study in summer 2010. The instruments included a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS), a Proton Transfer Reaction Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), a Fast Online Gas-Chromatograph coupled to a Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS; TOGA), a Thermal Dissociation Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PAN-CIMS) and a Fiber Laser-Induced Fluorescence Instrument (FILIF). The species discussed in this comparison include the most important biogenic VOCs and a selected suite of oxygenated VOCs that are thought to dominate the VOC reactivity at this particular site as well as typical anthropogenic VOCs that showed low mixing ratios at this site. Good agreement was observed for methanol, the sum of the oxygenated hemiterpene 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and the hemiterpene isoprene, acetaldehyde, the sum of acetone and propanal, benzene and the sum of methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and butanal. Measurements of the above VOCs conducted by different instruments agree within 20%. The ability to differentiate the presence of toluene and cymene by PTR-TOF-MS is tested based on a comparison with GC-MS measurements, suggesting a study-average relative contribution of 74% for toluene and 26% for cymene. Similarly, 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanal (HMPR) is found to interfere with the sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein (MVK + MAC) using PTR-(TOF)-MS at this site. A study-average relative contribution of 85% for MVK + MAC and 15% for HMPR was determined. The sum of monoterpenes measured by PTR-MS and PTR-TOF-MS was generally 20-25% higher than the sum of speciated monoterpenes measured by TOGA, which included α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene, carene, myrcene, limonene, cineole as well as other terpenes. However, this difference is consistent throughout the study, and

  2. On-road emission characteristics of VOCs from light-duty gasoline vehicles in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinyue; Yao, Zhiliang; Shen, Xianbao; Ye, Yu; Jiang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    This study is the third in a series of three papers aimed at characterizing the VOC emissions of vehicles in Beijing. In this study, 30 light-duty vehicles fueled with gasoline were evaluated using a portable emission measurement system (PEMS) as they were driven on a predesigned, fixed test route. All of the tested vehicles were rented from private vehicle owners and spanned regulatory compliance guidelines ranging from Pre-China I to China IV. Alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and some additional species in the exhaust were collected in Tedlar bags and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Carbonyls were collected on 2,4-dinitrophenyhydrazine (DNPH) cartridges and analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Overall, 74 VOC species were detected from the tested vehicles, including 22 alkanes, 6 alkenes, 1 alkyne, 16 aromatics, 3 cyclanes, 10 halohydrocarbons, 12 carbonyls and 4 other compounds. Alkanes, aromatics and carbonyls were the dominant VOCs with weight percentages of approximately 36.4%, 33.1% and 17.4%, respectively. The average VOC emission factors and standard deviations of the Pre-China I, China I, China II, China III and China IV vehicles were 469.3 ± 200.1, 80.7 ± 46.1, 56.8 ± 37.4, 25.6 ± 11.7 and 14.9 ± 8.2 mg/km, respectively, which indicated that the VOC emissions significantly decreased under stricter vehicular emission standards. Driving cycles also influenced the VOC emissions from the tested vehicles. The average VOC emission factors based on the travel distances of the tested vehicles under urban driving cycles were greater than those under highway driving cycles. In addition, we calculated the ozone formation potential (OFP) using the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) method. The results of this study will be helpful for understanding the true emission levels of light-duty gasoline vehicles and will provide information for controlling VOC emissions from vehicles in Beijing, China.

  3. VOC emissions, evolutions and contributions to SOA formation at a receptor site in Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs were measured by two online instruments (GC-FID/MS and PTR-MS at a receptor site on Changdao Island (37.99° N, 120.70° E in eastern China. Reaction with OH radical dominated the chemical loss of most VOC species during the Changdao campaign. A photochemical age based parameterization method is used to calculate VOC emission ratios and to quantify the evolution of ambient VOCs. The calculated emission ratios of most hydrocarbons agree well with those obtained from emission inventory, but the emission ratios of oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs are significantly lower than those from emission inventory. The photochemical age based parameterization method is also used to investigate primary emissions and secondary formation of organic aerosol. The primary emission ratio of OA to CO are determined to be 14.9 μg m−3 ppm−1 and SOA are produced at an enhancement ratio of 18.8 μg m−3 ppm−1 to CO after 50 h of photochemical processing in the atmosphere. SOA formation is significantly higher than the level determined from VOC oxidation under both high-NOx (2.0 μg m−3 ppm−1 CO and low-NOx condition (6.5 μg m−3 ppm−1 CO. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and higher alkanes (>C10 account for as high as 17.4% of SOA formation, which suggests semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs may be a large contributor to SOA formation during the Changdao campaign. SOA formation potential of primary VOC emissions determined from both field campaigns and emission inventory in China are lower than the measured SOA levels reported in Beijing and Pearl River Delta (PRD, indicating SOA formation cannot be explained by VOC oxidation in this regions. SOA budget in China is estimated to be 5.0–13.7 Tg yr−1, with a fraction of at least 2.7 Tg yr−1 from anthropogenic emissions, which are much higher than the previous estimates from regional models.

  4. Comparison of the substrate effect on VOC emissions from water based varnish and latex paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gabriela V; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D; Santos, Armando M; Fernandes, Eduardo O

    2003-01-01

    The building materials are recognised to be major contributors to indoor air contamination by volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The improvement of the quality of the environment within buildings is a topic of increasing research and public interest. Legislation in preparation by the European Commission may induce, in the near future, European Union Member States to solicit the industries of paints, varnishes and flooring materials for taking measures, in order to reduce the VOC emissions resulting from the use of their products. Therefore, product characterisation and information about the influence of environmental parameters on the VOC emissions are fundamental for providing the basic scientific information required to allow architects, engineers, builders, and building owners to provide a healthy environment for building occupants. On the other hand, the producers of coating building materials require this information to introduce technological alterations, when necessary, in order to improve the ecological quality of their products, and to make them more competitive. Studies of VOC emissions from wet materials, like paints and varnishes, have usually been conducted after applying the material on inert substrates, due to its non-adsorption and non-porosity properties. However, in real indoor environments, these materials are applied on substrates of a different nature. One aim of this work was to study, for the first time, the VOC emissions from a latex paint applied on concrete. The influence of the substrate (uncoated cork parquet, eucalyptus parquet without finishing and pine parquet with finishing) on the emissions of VOC from a water-based varnish was also studied. For comparison purposes, polyester film (an inert substrate) was used for both wet materials. The specific emission rates of the major VOCs were monitored for the first 72 h of material exposure in the atmosphere of a standardized test chamber. The air samples were collected on Tenax TA and

  5. [Pollution characteristics and health risk assessment of atmospheric VOCs in the downtown area of Guangzhou, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Li, Hong; Wang, Xue-Zhong; Zhang, Xin-Min; Wen, Chong

    2013-12-01

    The measurements of 31 kinds of VOCs in the ambient air of a site were carried out in the downtown of Guangzhou by online method from November 5, 2009 to November 9, 2009. The ambient level and composition characteristics, temporal variation characteristics, sources identification, and chemical reactivity of VOCs were studied, and the health risk of VOCs in the ambient air in the study area was assessed by using the international recognized health risk assessment method. Results showed that the mean and the range of the mass concentrations of 31 VOCs were 114.51 microg x m(-3) and 29.42-546.06 microg x m(-3), respectively. The mass concentrations of 31 VOCs, and those of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics all showed a changing trend of higher in the morning and in the evening, and lower at noontime. Vehicular exhaust, gasoline and liquefied petroleum gas evaporates were the main sources of VOCs with the volatilization of paints and solvents being important emission sources. Toluene, trans-2-butene, m/p-xylene, i-butane, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene were the key reactive species among the 31 VOCs. Vehicular exhaust and gasoline evaporation were the main sources of VOCs leading to the formation of ozone. Health risk assessment showed that n-hexane, 1,3-butadiene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m/p-xylene and o-xylene had no appreciable risk of adverse non-cancer health effect on the exposed population, but 1, 3-butadiene and benzene had potential cancer risk. By comparing the corresponding data about health risk assessment of benzene compounds in some cities in China, it is concluded that benzene can impose relatively high cancer risk to the exposed populations in the ambient air of some cities in China. Therefore, strict countermeasures should be taken to further control the pollution of benzene in the ambient air of cities, and it is imperative to start the related studies and develop the atmospheric environmental health criteria and national ambient air quality

  6. Comparison of different real time VOC measurement techniques in a ponderosa pine forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kaser

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compound (VOC mixing ratios measured by five independent instruments are compared at a forested site dominated by ponderosa pine (Pinus Ponderosa during the BEACHON-ROCS field study in summer 2010. The instruments included a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS, a Proton Transfer Reaction Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS, a Fast Online Gas-Chromatograph coupled to a Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS; TOGA, a Thermal Dissociation Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PAN-CIMS and a Fiber Laser-Induced Fluorescence Instrument (FILIF. The species discussed in this comparison include the most important biogenic VOCs and a selected suite of oxygenated VOCs that are thought to dominate the VOC reactivity at this particular site as well as typical anthropogenic VOCs that showed low mixing ratios at this site. Good agreement was observed for methanol, the sum of the oxygenated hemiterpene 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO and the hemiterpene isoprene, acetaldehyde, the sum of acetone and propanal, benzene and the sum of methyl ethyl ketone (MEK and butanal. Measurements of the above VOCs conducted by different instruments agree within 20%. The ability to differentiate the presence of toluene and cymene by PTR-TOF-MS is tested based on a comparison with GC-MS measurements, suggesting a study-average relative contribution of 74% for toluene and 26% for cymene. Similarly, 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanal (HMPR is found to interfere with the sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein (MVK+MAC using PTR-(TOF-MS at this site. A study-average relative contribution of 85% for MVK+MAC and 15% for HMPR was determined. The sum of monoterpenes measured by PTR-MS and PTR-TOF-MS was generally 20–25% higher than the sum of speciated monoterpenes measured by TOGA, which included α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene, carene, myrcene, limonene, cineole as well as other terpenes. However, this difference is consistent throughout the

  7. Comparison of different real time VOC measurement techniques in a ponderosa pine forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kaser

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compound (VOC mixing ratios measured by five independent instruments are compared at a forested site dominated by ponderosa pine (Pinus Ponderosa during the BEACHON-ROCS field study in summer 2010. The instruments included a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS, a Proton Transfer Reaction Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS, a Fast Online Gas-Chromatograph coupled to a Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS; TOGA, a Thermal Dissociation Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PAN-CIMS and a Fiber Laser-Induced Fluorescence Instrument (FILIF. The species discussed in this comparison include the most important biogenic VOCs and a selected suite of oxygenated VOCs that are thought to dominate the VOC reactivity at this particular site as well as typical anthropogenic VOCs that showed low mixing ratios at this site. Good agreement was observed for methanol, the sum of the oxygenated hemiterpene 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO and the hemiterpene isoprene, acetaldehyde, the sum of acetone and propanal, benzene and the sum of methyl ethyl ketone (MEK and butanal. Measurements of the above VOCs conducted by different instruments agree within 20%. The ability to differentiate the presence of toluene and cymene by PTR-TOF-MS is tested based on a comparison with GC-MS measurements, suggesting a study-average relative contribution of 74% for toluene and 26% for cymene. Similarly, 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanal (HMPR is found to interfere with the sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein (MVK + MAC using PTR-(TOF-MS at this site. A study-average relative contribution of 85% for MVK + MAC and 15% for HMPR was determined. The sum of monoterpenes measured by PTR-MS and PTR-TOF-MS was generally 20–25% higher than the sum of speciated monoterpenes measured by TOGA, which included α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene, carene, myrcene, limonene, cineole as well as other terpenes. However, this difference is consistent throughout the study

  8. VOCs Speciation From Steam Boiler Stacks of Industries Located in Naucalpan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, G. M.; Tejeda, D. D.; Bremauntz, M. P.; Valdez, A.; Montufar, P. C.; Martinez, M. A.; Sierra, M. J.; Gonzalez, C. A.

    2007-05-01

    Results of VOCs speciation from industrial steam boiler stacks located in Naucalpan are presented and discussed. This municipality is located north of the Metropolitan Zone of the Valley of Mexico (MZVM). Speciation of VOCs is important to generate information about sources of pollution, to update emission inventories, to study the dynamics of pollutants in the atmosphere, and to estimate possible risks of population exposure. This information is valuable for decision making on air pollution control strategies. Samples from 35 steam boilers form industries burning Diesel, LPG, or CNG were taken using the US-EPA Method 18. Selected samples from the use of different fuels were analyzed using gas chromatography and flame ionization detection (GC-FID) according to US-EPA protocol TO-14. The VOCs analyzed included alkanes of 9 carbons or less, alkenes of 7 carbons or less and aromatics (families of benzene). The results show consistency on the VOCs detected on Diesel samples. The main compounds found were 1- Butene+iButylene, m/p-Xylene, Ethane, Propene, Propane, Acetylene, 2Me-1Butene, and Toluene. The average concentrations of these compounds were in the range of 130 to 385 ppbC. The results of LPG samples did not show a definite pattern of VOCs, although light components predominate and, in some samples, Toluene and Xylene. These last components were not expected for industries reporting the use of LPG, perhaps due to the use of a combination of fuels and mistakes in the reports of fuel used at the time of sampling. The analysis of CNG samples show predominance of light VOCs, in the range of 90 to 300 ppbC. As in the case of LPG, some aromatics showed high concentrations in some samples analyzed perhaps due to the use of different fuels in the boiler. The results of this study are the first results of VOCs speciation obtained form exhaust gases from stacks of Mexican industries. The data reported are valuable to analyze emission inventories of VOCs and to better

  9. ONKALO POSE experiment. Phase 3: acoustic and ultrasonic monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Montes, J.; Flynn, W.; Huang, J. [Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    The objectives of the third phase of the POSE experiment are to determine the in situ state of stress at Olkiluoto and the spalling strength of Olkiluoto rock, by internal heating of the experimental hole (ONK-EH3) using 8 vertically installed heaters. This report presents the results from the Acoustic and ultrasonic monitoring carried out around the third experimental hole of the POSE niche between November 2012 and May 2013. The experiment was monitored using an array of 24 transducers installed along 4 monitoring drillholes and data was automatically acquired and processed using the system installed at the niche by Applied Seismology Consultants in May 2012. Daily ultrasonic surveys were carried out between 14{sup th} November 2012 and 21{sup st} May 2013, monitoring the changes in transmission velocities of P and S-waves with an estimated error of ±2 m x s{sup -1} (ASC, 2013). Changes in transmission velocities closely follow the evolution of the temperature profile in the hole wall. An increase in both P-and S-wave transmission velocities is observed at all depth levels and surveyed raypaths during the heating phase, with the highest changes observed in raypaths skimming the hole surface and depths between 2.33 m and 3.7 m. This observation indicates the closure of in situ and excavation-induced microcracks due to thermal stress. After the heaters were switched off, P-wave velocities show a marked decrease, in all raypaths reaching values below those measured at the start of the monitoring approximately 4 weeks after the heaters were switched off. The highest decrease was observed along raypaths surveying the region skimming the hole wall. This decrease below original background values indicates the induction of rock degradation as microcracking induced through the heating-cooling cycle. Changes in P- and S-wave transmission velocity were used to calculate changes in Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio along the different raypaths and depth levels

  10. Internet poses multiple risks to children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColgan, Maria D; Giardino, Angelo P

    2005-05-01

    Computers and Internet usage, whether by children at home or at public places such as schools and libraries, are here to stay. Tremendous benefits in terms of educational opportunities, communication, and recreation can be expected. With all the benefits that such information technology provides, however, there is an element of risk that should not inhibit its use but must be attended to and managed. The methods child sexual offenders use to pursue their criminal interests will continue to evolve as technology evolves. The first and most important line of defense calls for parents and other caregivers to remain directly responsible for the safety of the children in their care. Parents, teachers, healthcare providers, and other caregivers need to learn continually about the Internet and remain aware of how best to protect children who use the computer and the Internet. Law enforcement agencies must also continue to prepare for advances in computer technology, to better anticipate the behavior of child sexual offenders, and to investigate and prosecute offenders. All law enforcement, medical, and social services personnel who have contact with children on a regular basis must continue to educate children and their parents or guardians about the dangers posed by the Internet. After a child is victimized, law enforcement, medical, and social services personnel also must remain cognizant that the victim's computer may contain evidence that may help identify and prosecute the offender. In short, all those charged with the protection of children and the prosecution of child sexual offenders must continue to adapt to our ever-evolving computer technology.

  11. Crisis planning to manage risks posed by animal rights extremists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Matthew R; Rich, Barbara A; Bennett, B Taylor

    2010-01-01

    Among the multitude of crises that US research institutions may face are those caused by animal rights activists. While most activists opposed to animal research use peaceful and lawful means of expressing their opinions, some extremists resort to illegal methods. Arson, break-ins, and theft with significant property damage at US animal research facilities began in the 1980s. The most troubling trend to develop in the past decade is the targeting of individuals associated with animal research, whether directly or indirectly, and the use of violent scare tactics to intimidate researchers and their families. The National Association for Biomedical Research has a 30-year history of monitoring the animal rights movement and assisting member institutions with crisis situations. In this article we discuss attacks on researchers at their homes, cyber crimes, exploitation of new media formats, infiltration of research facilities, and the targeting of external research stakeholders and business partners. We describe the need for a well-conceived crisis management plan and strong leadership to mitigate crisis situations. Institutions with well-informed leaders and crisis management teams ready to take timely action are best equipped to protect staff, laboratory animals, and research programs. They act on early warnings, provide support for targeted staff, seek legal remedies, thoughtfully control access to research facilities, and identify and enlist new research supporters. We underscore the importance of up-to-date crisis planning so that institutions are not only aware of ongoing risks posed by animal rights extremists but also better prepared to take preemptive action and able to manage those risks successfully.

  12. STS-103 crew pose in front of Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    During Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TDCT) activities at Launch Pad 39B, the STS-103 crew pose in front of the flame trench, which is situated underneath the Mobile Launcher Platform holding Space Shuttle Discovery. Standing left to right are Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., and Mission Specialists Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, also with ESA, and Steven L. Smith. One of the solid rocket boosters and the external tank that are attached to Discovery can be seen in the photo. The flame trench is made of concrete and refractory brick, and contains an orbiter flame deflector on one side and solid rocket booster flame deflector on the other. The deflectors protect the flame trench floor and pad surface from the intense heat of launch. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  13. Essays on Finite Mixture Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Dijk (Bram)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractFinite mixture distributions are a weighted average of a ¯nite number of distributions. The latter are usually called the mixture components. The weights are usually described by a multinomial distribution and are sometimes called mixing proportions. The mixture components may be the

  14. Essays on Finite Mixture Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Dijk (Bram)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractFinite mixture distributions are a weighted average of a ¯nite number of distributions. The latter are usually called the mixture components. The weights are usually described by a multinomial distribution and are sometimes called mixing proportions. The mixture components may be the sam

  15. Mixtures of truncated basis functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langseth, Helge; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre; Rumí, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a framework, called mixtures of truncated basis functions (MoTBFs), for representing general hybrid Bayesian networks. The proposed framework generalizes both the mixture of truncated exponentials (MTEs) framework and the mixture of polynomials (MoPs) framework. Similar...

  16. Separating Underdetermined Convolutive Speech Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Wang, DeLiang; Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    a method for underdetermined blind source separation of convolutive mixtures. The proposed framework is applicable for separation of instantaneous as well as convolutive speech mixtures. It is possible to iteratively extract each speech signal from the mixture by combining blind source separation...

  17. Toxicological evaluation of chemical mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feron, V.J.; Groten, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses major developments in the safety evaluation of chemical mixtures during the past 15 years, reviews today's state of the art of mixture toxicology, and discusses challenges ahead. Well-thought-out tailor-made mechanistic and empirical designs for studying the toxicity of mixtures

  18. [Abuse of energy drinks: does it pose a risk?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Aymeric; Karila, Laurent; Lejoyeux, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Energy drinks designate "any product in the form of a drink or concentrated liquid containing a mixture of ingredients having the property to raise the level of energy and liveliness". Their introduction has raised many reluctance and reserves after numerous cardiovascular and neurological injuries among regular consumers. This article attempts to synthesize the existing literature on energy drinks. The review focuses to show that excessive energy drinks consumption cause many complications. The literature review was conducted from 2001 to 2014, using PubMed, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and PsycInfo, using the following keywords alone or combined: energy drinks, caffeine, taurine, toxicity, dependence, complications. Occasional or moderate consumption of these cans seem to present little risk to healthy adults. However, their repeated consumption in proportions that far exceed the recommendations for recommended use by the manufacturers, combined with the use of alcohol or illicit drugs consumption increases the risk of occurrence of somatic and psychiatric complications, especially among underage, and subjects with cardiovascular and neurological history. Repeated consumption of energy drinks increases the risk of somatic and psychiatric complications. Further studies must be controlled to improve our understanding of other possible negative consequences on health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission characteristics and control strategies for a petrochemical industrial area in middle Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chia-Hsien; Horng, Jao-Jia

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated VOC emissions from the largest petrochemical industrial district in Taiwan and recommended some control measures to reduce VOC emissions. In addition to the petrochemical industry, the district encompasses a chemical and fiber industry, a plastics industry and a harbor, which together produce more than 95% of the VOC emissions in the area. The sequence of VOC emission was as follows: components (e.g., valves, flanges, and pumps) (47%) > tanks (29%) > stacks (15%) > wastewater treatment facility (6%) > loading (2%) > flares (1%). Other plants producing high-density polyethylene (HDPE), styrene, ethylene glycol (EG), gas oil, and iso-nonyl-alchol (INA) were measured to determine the VOC leaching in the district. The VOC emissions of these 35 plants (90% of all plants) were less than 100 tons/year. About 74% of the tanks were fixed-roof tanks that leached more VOCs than the other types of tanks. To reduce leaching, the components should be checked periodically, and companies should be required to follow the Taiwan EPA regulations. A VOC emission management system was developed in state implementation plans (SIPs) to inspect and reduce emissions in the industrial district.

  20. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart B of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings 1 Table 1 to Subpart B of Part 59 Protection of Environment... Automobile Refinish Coatings Pt. 59, Subpt. B, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart B of Part 59—Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings Coating category Grams VOC per liter...

  1. CAPSTONE REPORT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF A STANDARD TEST METHOD FOR VOC EMISSIONS FROM INTERIOR LATEX PAINT AND ALKYD PAINTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives details of a small-chamber test method developed by the EPA for characterizing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from interior latex and alkyd paints. Current knowledge about VOC, including hazardous air pollutant, emissions from interior paints generated...

  2. VOC identification and inter-comparison from laboratory biomass burning using PTR-MS and PIT-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Warneke; J. M. Roberts; P. Veres; J. Gilman; W. C. Kuster; I. Burling; R. Yokelson; J. A. de Gouw

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from fires of biomass commonly found in the southeast and southwest U.S. were investigated with PTR-MS and PIT-MS, which are capable of fast measurements of a large number of VOCs. Both instruments were calibrated with gas standards and mass dependent calibration curves are determined. The sensitivity of the PIT-MS linearly...

  3. Reduction of odorous VOC in phenolics solutions and swine manure slurry using soybean peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    A research project was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of low-activity soybean peroxidase (SBP; 0.75 U/mg) and H2O2 for reducing emissions of odorous volatile organic compounds (VOC) from standard solutions (phenol and 4-methylphenol; 1 mM each) and swine manure slurry. VOC emissions were measu...

  4. An Admiralty for Asia: Isaac le Maire and conflicting conceptions about the corporate governance of the VOC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Gelderblom (Oscar); A. de Jong (Abe); J. Jonker (Joost)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe Dutch East India Company or VOC in 1602 showed many characteristics of modern corporations, including limited liability, freely transferable shares, and well-defined managerial functions. However, we challenge the notion of the VOC as the precursor of modern corporations to argue tha

  5. Accuracy and robustness of Kinect pose estimation in the context of coaching of elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdrzálek, Stepán; Kurillo, Gregorij; Ofli, Ferda; Bajcsy, Ruzena; Seto, Edmund; Jimison, Holly; Pavel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Microsoft Kinect camera is becoming increasingly popular in many areas aside from entertainment, including human activity monitoring and rehabilitation. Many people, however, fail to consider the reliability and accuracy of the Kinect human pose estimation when they depend on it as a measuring system. In this paper we compare the Kinect pose estimation (skeletonization) with more established techniques for pose estimation from motion capture data, examining the accuracy of joint localization and robustness of pose estimation with respect to the orientation and occlusions. We have evaluated six physical exercises aimed at coaching of elderly population. Experimental results present pose estimation accuracy rates and corresponding error bounds for the Kinect system.

  6. ErrorCheck: A New Method for Controlling the Accuracy of Pose Estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Preben Hagh Strunge; Petersen, Henrik Gordon

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present ErrorCheck, which is a new method for controlling the accuracy of a computer vision based pose refinement method. ErrorCheck consists of a way for validating robustness of a pose refinement method towards false correspondences and a way of controlling the accuracy...... of a validated pose refinement method. ErrorCheck uses a theoretical estimate of the pose error covariance both for validating robustness and controlling the accuracy.We illustrate the first usage of ErrorCheck by applying it to state-of-the-art methods for pose refinement and some variations of these methods...

  7. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) on Board of the Zeppelin NT during the PEGASOS Campaign in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Julia; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Beck, Harry; Rohrer, Franz; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Gomm, Sebastian; Holland, Frank; Lu, Keding; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rose, Bernhard; Wegener, Robert; Wahner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are mostly emitted at the ground and are degraded by the reactions with OH, NO3 or O3 as they rise upwards in the atmosphere. VOCs play an important role as sources and sinks for radicals in the troposphere. Up to date, most of the VOC measurements were performed from ground based platforms; the profile measurements across the whole planetary boundary layer (PBL) are still quite limited which restrained the exploring of the VOCs chemistry of the entire PBL. This although these measurements are particularly interesting, as most of the chemistry of the VOC degradation in the troposphere takes place in the PBL. Moreover, fast VOCs measurements utilizing Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) are a challenge due to the great chemical variability of VOC species. Therefore accurate in-situ measurements of VOCs together with other species as CO, NOx, O3 and the OH reactivity, encompassing different levels of altitude and fast time resolution, would essentially improve the understanding of the VOC distribution in the lower troposphere. Here we present the setup and the modifications of the fast GC-MS system and the results of the PEGASOS Zeppelin campaigns in summer 2012. First, we present our developments and modifications of an in-flight GC-MS system to detect volatile non methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) with a time resolution of 3 minutes and a detection limit in the order of 2 pptv. The modified setup enabled us to analyze 70 different VOC species, ranging from alkanes (C4 to C11), aromatics and terpenes to oxygenated hydrocarbons (OVOC) such as alcohols and aldehydes. Second, in contrast to previous airplane studies also utilizing a GC-MS system, the Zeppelin NT as a measuring platform during the PEGASOS campaign enabled us to measure vertical profiles up to 1500m at low travelling speeds which means a high spatial resolution. We will present results for selected VOC that offer new insights on height profiles

  8. TECHNICAL JUSTIFICATION FOR CHOOSING PROPANE AS A CALIBRATION AGENT FOR TOTAL FLAMMABLE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) DETERMINATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOUGLAS, J.G.

    2006-07-06

    This document presents the technical justification for choosing and using propane as a calibration standard for estimating total flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an air matrix. A propane-in-nitrogen standard was selected based on a number of criteria: (1) has an analytical response similar to the VOCs of interest, (2) can be made with known accuracy and traceability, (3) is available with good purity, (4) has a matrix similar to the sample matrix, (5) is stable during storage and use, (6) is relatively non-hazardous, and (7) is a recognized standard for similar analytical applications. The Waste Retrieval Project (WRP) desires a fast, reliable, and inexpensive method for screening the flammable VOC content in the vapor-phase headspace of waste containers. Table 1 lists the flammable VOCs of interest to the WRP. The current method used to determine the VOC content of a container is to sample the container's headspace and submit the sample for gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The driver for the VOC measurement requirement is safety: potentially flammable atmospheres in the waste containers must be allowed to diffuse prior to processing the container. The proposed flammable VOC screening method is to inject an aliquot of the headspace sample into an argon-doped pulsed-discharge helium ionization detector (Ar-PDHID) contained within a gas chromatograph. No actual chromatography is performed; the sample is transferred directly from a sample loop to the detector through a short, inert transfer line. The peak area resulting from the injected sample is proportional to the flammable VOC content of the sample. However, because the Ar-PDHID has different response factors for different flammable VOCs, a fundamental assumption must be made that the agent used to calibrate the detector is representative of the flammable VOCs of interest that may be in the headspace samples. At worst, we desire that calibration with the selected

  9. Application of the Electronic Nose Technique to Differentiation between Model Mixtures with COPD Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Namieśnik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the potential of an electronic nose technique in the field of fast diagnostics of patients suspected of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. The investigations were performed using a simple electronic nose prototype equipped with a set of six semiconductor sensors manufactured by FIGARO Co. They were aimed at verification of a possibility of differentiation between model reference mixtures with potential COPD markers (N,N-dimethylformamide and N,N-dimethylacetamide. These mixtures contained volatile organic compounds (VOCs such as acetone, isoprene, carbon disulphide, propan-2-ol, formamide, benzene, toluene, acetonitrile, acetic acid, dimethyl ether, dimethyl sulphide, acrolein, furan, propanol and pyridine, recognized as the components of exhaled air. The model reference mixtures were prepared at three concentration levels—10 ppb, 25 ppb, 50 ppb v/v—of each component, except for the COPD markers. Concentration of the COPD markers in the mixtures was from 0 ppb to 100 ppb v/v. Interpretation of the obtained data employed principal component analysis (PCA. The investigations revealed the usefulness of the electronic device only in the case when the concentration of the COPD markers was twice as high as the concentration of the remaining components of the mixture and for a limited number of basic mixture components.

  10. Spatial/temporal variations and source apportionment of VOCs monitored at community scale in an urban area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang Ho; Zhu, Xianlei; Fan, Zhi-hua

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize spatial/temporal variations of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a community-scale monitoring approach and identify the main sources of concern in Paterson, NJ, an urban area with mixed sources of VOCs. VOC samples were simultaneously collected from three local source-dominated (i.e., commercial, industrial, and mobile) sites in Paterson and one background site in Chester, NJ (located ∼58 km southwest of Paterson). Samples were collected using the EPA TO-15 method from midnight to midnight, one in every sixth day over one year. Among the 60 analyzed VOCs, ten VOCs (acetylene, benzene, dichloromethane, ethylbenzene, methyl ethyl ketone, styrene, toluene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, and p-dichlorobenzene) were selected to examine their spatial/temporal variations. All of the 10 VOCs in Paterson were significantly higher than the background site (pp-xylene, o-xylene, and p-dichlorobenzene measured at the commercial site were significantly higher than the industrial/mobile sites (pp-dichlorobenzene) were significantly different by season (pp<0.05). These results are consistent with literature data, indicating the impact of anthropogenic VOC sources on air pollution in Paterson. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis was applied for 24-hour integrated VOC measurements in Paterson over one year and identified six contributing factors, including motor vehicle exhausts (20%), solvents uses (19%), industrial emissions (16%), mobile+stationery sources (12%), small shop emissions (11%), and others (22%). Additional locational analysis confirmed the identified sources were well matched with point sources located upwind in Paterson. The study demonstrated the community-scale monitoring approach can capture spatial variation of VOCs in an urban community with mixed VOC sources. It also provided robust data to identify major sources of concern in the community.

  11. Mixture Based Outlier Filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pecherková

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Success/failure of adaptive control algorithms – especially those designed using the Linear Quadratic Gaussian criterion – depends on the quality of the process data used for model identification. One of the most harmful types of process data corruptions are outliers, i.e. ‘wrong data’ lying far away from the range of real data. The presence of outliers in the data negatively affects an estimation of the dynamics of the system. This effect is magnified when the outliers are grouped into blocks. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for outlier detection and removal. It is based on modelling the corrupted data by a two-component probabilistic mixture. The first component of the mixture models uncorrupted process data, while the second models outliers. When the outlier component is detected to be active, a prediction from the uncorrupted data component is computed and used as a reconstruction of the observed data. The resulting reconstruction filter is compared to standard methods on simulated and real data. The filter exhibits excellent properties, especially in the case of blocks of outliers. 

  12. Investigation of key parameters influencing the efficient photocatalytic oxidation of indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quici, Natalia; Kibanova, Daria; Vera, Maria Laura; Choi, Hyeok; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Litter, Marta I.; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Destaillats, Hugo

    2008-06-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation of indoor VOCs has the potential to eliminate pollutants from indoor environments, thus effectively improving and/or maintaining indoor air quality while reducing ventilation energy costs. Design and operation of UV photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners requires optimization of various parameters to achieve highest pollutant removal efficiencies while avoiding the formation of harmful secondary byproducts and maximizing catalyst lifetime.

  13. Schipperen op de Aziatische vaart: de financiering van de VOC kamer Enkhuizen, 1602-1622

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Schalk; O. Gelderblom; J. Jonker

    2012-01-01

    Negotiating the Asiatic Route: Financing the Dutch East India Company, Enkhuizen Chamber, 1602-1622 During its first twenty years the Dutch East India Company, or voc, struggled with the disadvantages of operations being spread over six local chambers, as imposed by its 1602 charter. Mirroring the D

  14. Effects of cold temperature and ethanol content on VOC emissions from light-duty gasoline vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions of speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including mobile source air toxics (MSATs), were measured in vehicle exhaust from three light-duty spark ignition vehicles operating on summer and winter grade gasoline (E0) and ethanol blended (E10 and E85) fuels. Vehicle...

  15. Voc Degradation in TF-VLS Grown InP Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yubo; Sun, Xingshu; Johnston, Steve; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Hettick, Mark; Javey, Ali; Bermel, Peter

    2016-11-21

    Here we consider two hypotheses to explain the open-circuit voltage (VOC) degradation observed in thin-film vapor-liquid-solid (TF-VLS) grown p-type InP photovoltaic cells: bandgap narrowing and local shunting. First, a bandgap (Eg) narrowing effect is hypothesized, based on the surface inhomogeneity of VLS InP captured by the photoluminescence (PL) image. The PL data was used to estimate a spatially-resolved active VOC across surface of the InP sample. Combining this data with the effective Jsc allowed an assessment of the I-V characteristics of individual unit cells. Next, an H-SPICE diode compact model was utilized to reproduce the I-V characteristics of the whole sample. We find a good fit to the I-V performance of TF-VLS grown InP solar cell. Second, a local shunting effect was also considered as an alternative explanation of the VOC degradation effect. Again, PL image data was used, and small local shunt resistance was added in arbitrary elementary unit cells to represent certain dark spots seen in the PL image and dictate the VOC degradation occurred in the sample.

  16. ECOS E-MATRIX Methane and Volatile Organic Carbon (VOC) Emissions Best Practices Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisien, Lia [The Environmental Council Of The States, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-01-31

    This final scientific/technical report on the ECOS e-MATRIX Methane and Volatile Organic Carbon (VOC) Emissions Best Practices Database provides a disclaimer and acknowledgement, table of contents, executive summary, description of project activities, and briefing/technical presentation link.

  17. Principled pragmatism : VOC Interaction with Makassar 1637-68, and the nature of company diplomacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feddersen, C.F.

    2016-01-01

    The thesis explores the nature of VOC diplomacy using the seventeenth century interaction between the Company and the sultanate of Makassar on the western coast of South Sulawesi as its case. I analyse the Directors’ reflections on diplomacy in the general and approach towards Makassar in particular

  18. Comparison of storage stability of odorous VOCs in polyester aluminum and polyvinyl fluoride tedlar bags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole air sampling using containers such as flexible bags or rigid canisters is commonly used to collect samples of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in air. The objective of this study was to compare the stability of polyester aluminum (PEA) and polyvinyl fluoride (PVF, brand name Tedlar®) bags for ...

  19. Feasibility Analysis of Sustainability-Based Measures to Reduce VOC Emissions in Office Partition Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Rosen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A feasibility analysis is reported of reduction opportunities for volatile organic compound (VOC emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions, aimed at contributing to efforts to improve the sustainability of the process. A pollution prevention methodology is utilized. The purpose is to provide practical options for VOC emissions reductions during the manufacturing of office furniture partitions, but the concepts can be generally applied to the wood furniture industry. Baseline VOC emissions for a typical plant are estimated using a mass balance approach. The feasibility analysis expands on a preliminary screening to identify viable pollution prevention options using realistic criteria and weightings, and is based on technical, environmental and economic considerations. The measures deemed feasible include the implementation of several best management practices, ceasing the painting of non-visible parts, switching to hot melt backwrapping glue, application of solvent recycling and modification of the mechanical clip attachment. Implementation, measurement and control plans are discussed for the measures considered feasible, which can enhance the sustainability of the manufacturing of office furniture partitions. Reducing VOC emissions using the measures identified can, in conjunction with other measures, improve the sustainability of the manufacturing process.

  20. Improvement of health risk factors after reduction of VOC concentrations in industrial and urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Jorge Esteban Colman; Kohajda, Tibor; Aguilar, Myriam Elisabeth; Massolo, Laura Andrea; Sánchez, Erica Yanina; Porta, Atilio Andrés; Opitz, Philipp; Wichmann, Gunnar; Herbarth, Olf; Mueller, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    After reductions of fugitive and diffuse emissions by an industrial complex, a follow-up study was performed to determine the time variability of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the lifetime cancer risk (LCR). Passive samplers (3 M monitors) were placed outdoors (n = 179) and indoors (n = 75) in industrial, urban, and control areas for 4 weeks. Twenty-five compounds including n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, aromatics, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and terpenes were determined by GC/MS. The results show a significant decrease of all VOCs, especially in the industrial area and to a lesser extent in the urban area. The median outdoor concentration of benzene in the industrial area declined compared to the former study, around 85% and about 50% in the urban area, which in the past was strongly influenced by industrial emissions. Other carcinogenic compounds like styrene and tetrachloroethylene were reduced to approximately 60%. VOC concentrations in control areas remained nearly unchanged. According to the determined BTEX ratios and interspecies correlations, in contrast to the previous study, traffic was identified as the main emission source in the urban and control areas and showed an increased influence in the industrial area. The LCR, calculated for benzene, styrene, and tetrachloroethylene, shows a decrease of one order of magnitude in accordance to the decreased total VOC concentrations and is now acceptable according to values proposed by the World Health Organization.

  1. Environmental aspects of VOCs evolved in the early stages of human decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statheropoulos, M; Agapiou, A; Spiliopoulou, C; Pallis, G C; Sianos, E

    2007-10-15

    In the present study, the time profile, measured as "accumulation", of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during the early stages of human decomposition was investigated. A human cadaver was placed in a sealed bag at approximately the 4th day after death. Evolved VOCs were monitored for 24 h by sampling at different time intervals. VOCs produced were analyzed by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS). Over 30 substances were identified in total. These included mainly aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, oxygenated compounds (alcohols, aldehydes, ketones) and organic sulfides. The last were the most prominent class of compounds identified. Eleven compounds were present in all the sampling cycles and constitute a "common core": ethanol, 2-propanone, dimethyl disulfide, methyl benzene, octane, 2-butanone, methyl ethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide and o-, m- and p-xylenes. The last sampling cycle yielded the most abundant compounds in number and quantities. Inorganic gases such as CO2, CO, NH3 and H2S were also determined. The fundamental physicochemical properties of the evolved VOCs were used for evaluating their environmental impacts. It appears that the decay process, which is a dynamic procedure, can provide chemical signals that might be detected and properly evaluated by experts in the fields of forensic sciences, search and rescue units and environmental scientists.

  2. Principled pragmatism : VOC Interaction with Makassar 1637-68, and the nature of company diplomacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feddersen, C.F.

    2016-01-01

    The thesis explores the nature of VOC diplomacy using the seventeenth century interaction between the Company and the sultanate of Makassar on the western coast of South Sulawesi as its case. I analyse the Directors’ reflections on diplomacy in the general and approach towards Makassar in particular

  3. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic...

  4. 40 CFR 60.112b - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds... organic compounds (VOC). (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel either with a design capacity... for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for...

  5. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  6. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air from Nisyros Island (Dodecanese Archipelago, Greece): Natural versus anthropogenic sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, F; Capecchiacci, F; Giannini, L; Vougioukalakis, G E; Vaselli, O

    2013-09-01

    This study presents the chemical composition of VOCs in air and gas discharges collected at Nisyros Island (Dodecanese Archipelago, Greece). The main goals are i) to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic VOC sources and ii) to evaluate their impact on local air quality. Up to 63 different VOCs were recognized and quantitatively determined in 6 fumaroles and 19 air samples collected in the Lakki caldera, where fumarolic emissions are located, and the outer ring of the island, including the Mandraki village and the main harbor. Air samples from the crater area show significant concentrations of alkanes, alkenes, cyclic, aromatics, and S- and O-bearing heterocycles directly deriving from the hydrothermal system, as well as secondary O-bearing compounds from oxidation of primary VOCs. At Mandraki village, C6H6/Σ(methylated aromatics) and Σ(linear)/Σ(branched) alkanes ratios <1 allow to distinguish an anthropogenic source related to emissions from outlet pipes of touristic and private boats and buses.

  7. ‘Vervloekte goudzugt’. De VOC, slavenhandel en slavernij in Azië

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The Dutch history of slavery is often perceived from an Atlantic perspective. The study of slavery and slave trade in Asia, especially also in and around the territories controlled by the Dutch East India Company (VOC) has increasingly received attention, indicating the widespread nature of slavery

  8. CHARACTERIZATION AND REDUCTION OF FORMALDEHYDE EMISSIONS FROM A LOW-VOC LATEX PAINT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses the measurment and analysis of the patterns of formaldehyde emission from a low volatile organic compound (VOC) latex paint applied to gypsum board, using small environmental chamber tests. The formaldehyde emissions resulted in sharp increase of chamber air...

  9. Mechanisms of Increased Particle and VOC Emissions during DPF Active Regeneration and Practical Emissions Considering Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2017-02-27

    Mechanisms involved in increased particle and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during active and parked active regenerations of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) were investigated using heavy-duty trucks equipped with both a urea selective catalytic reduction system and a DPF (SCR + DPF) and a DPF-only. Particle emissions increased in the later part of the regeneration period but the mechanisms were different above and below 23 nm. Particles above 23 nm were emitted due to the lower filtering efficiency of the DPF because of the decreasing amount of soot trapped during regeneration. Small particles below 23 nm were thought to be mainly sulfuric acid particles produced from SO2 trapped by the catalyst, being released and oxidized during regeneration. Contrary to the particle emissions, VOCs increased in the earlier part of the regeneration period. The mean molecular weights of the VOCs increased gradually as the regeneration proceeded. To evaluate "practical emissions" in which increased emissions during the regeneration were considered, a Regeneration Correction Factor (RCF), which is the average emission during one cycle of regeneration/emission in normal operation, was adopted. The RCFs of PM and VOCs were 1.1-1.5, and those of PNs were as high as 3-140, although they were estimated from a limited number of observations.

  10. Optimization of an Innovative Biofiltration System as a VOC Control Technology for Aircraft Painting Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-20

    Cladosporium resinae (ATCC 34066), Cladosporium sphaerospermum (ATCC 200384), Exophiala lecanii-corni (CBS 102400), Mucor rouxii (ATCC 44260), and...degrade all VOCs tested except for styrene under the conditions imposed. Cladosporium resinae was able to degrade both organic acids, all of the ketones...2002). Cladosporium Cladosporium Exophiala Mucor Phanerochaete resinae sphaerospermum lecanii-corni rouxii chrysosporium No carbon source Glucose

  11. Schipperen op de Aziatische vaart. De financiering van de VOC kamer Enkhuizen, 1602-1622

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/35509391X; Gelderblom, O.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/19265473X; Jonker, J.P.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075034638

    2012-01-01

    Negotiating the Asiatic Route: Financing the Dutch East India Company, Enkhuizen Chamber, 1602-1622 During its first twenty years the Dutch East India Company, or voc, struggled with the disadvantages of operations being spread over six local chambers, as imposed by its 1602 charter. Mirroring the

  12. CASE STUDIES: LOW-VOC/HAP WOOD FURNITURE COATINGS (PROJECT SUMMARY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a study in which wood furniture manufacturing fa-cilities were identified that had converted at least one of their primary coating steps to low-volatile organic compound (VOC)/hazardous air pollut-ant (HAP) wood furniture coatings [high-solids, waterbo...

  13. POLLUTION PREVENTION AND THE USE OF LOW-VOC/HAP COATINGS AT WOOD FURNITURE MANUFACTURING FACILITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses a study of pollution prevention and the use of low-VOC/HAP (volatile organic compound/hazardous air pollutant) coatings at wood furniture manufacturing facilities. The study is to identify wood furniture and cabinet manufacturing facilities that have converted...

  14. DEMONSTRATION OF NO-VOC/NO-HAP WOOD FURNITURE COATING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency has contracted with AeroVironment Environmental Services, Inc. and its subcontractor, Adhesives Coating Co., to develop and demonstrate a no-VOC (volatile organic compound)/no-HAP (hazardous air pollutant) wood furniture coating s...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A NO-VOC/NO-HAP WOOD FURNITURE COATINGS SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of the development and demonstration of a no-VOC (volatile organic compound)/no-HAP (hazardous air pollutant) wood furniture coating system. The performance characteristics of the new coating system are excellent in terms of adhesion, drying time, gloss, ...

  16. CASE STUDY PROJECT: THE USE OF LOW-VOC/HAP COATINGS AT WOOD FURNITURE MANUFACTURING FACILITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses a study of pollution prevention and the use of low-VOC/HAP (volatile organic compound/hazardous air pollutant) coatings at wood furniture manufacturing facilities. The study is to identify wood furniture and cabinet manufacturing facilities that have converted...

  17. Personal volatile organic compound (VOC) exposure of children attending elementary schools adjacent to industrial complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kun-Ho; Jo, Wan-Kuen

    The major deficiency in linking the effects of environmental exposure to children's health is the lack of data on the exposure of children to hazardous environmental pollutants. Accordingly, the present study compared the personal volatile organic compound (VOC) exposure of children from four elementary schools at different proximities to the Daegu Dyeing Industrial Complex (DDIC) and adjacent to different traffic densities. The personal air concentrations of four VOCs (toluene, m, p-xylenes, and o-xylene) were significantly higher for the children attending the school (S1) closest to the boundary of the DDIC compared to the children attending the school (S2) further away. The DDIC was the likely primary cause for the elevated personal air concentrations of the four VOCs in the children attending the school nearest the DDIC. The personal exposure to toluene and methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) for the children attending the school near a major roadway with a high traffic density was significantly higher than that for the children attending the school near a roadway with a low traffic density. The difference in the breath concentrations was generally similar to the difference in the personal air concentrations among the children from the four schools. In contrast to the children attending schools in low-income areas, the children attending schools in high-income areas exhibited no significant difference in the concentrations of any of the target VOCs in the personal air and breath samples between the children living with and without a smoker in the home.

  18. Evaluation of Hydrogen/Oxygen Release Compounds for the Remediation of VOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fiore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs are widespread in groundwater of industrialized areas and in situ remediation intervents characterized by a high environmental compatibility are of main interest. The scope of this study is the evaluation of the potential of two innovative reagents (HRC and ORC from Regenesis for the remediation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs. The reagents respectively perform reduction and oxidation mechanisms, both effective in the degradation of VOCs. Approach: Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC and Oxygen Release Compound (ORC were tested about the degradation of Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene and Xylene (BTEX and some chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CAHs. Five series of batch tests were performed with an artificial polluted aqueous phase and some soil coming from a polluted site in which natural attenuation of VOCs occurs. Results: ORC exhibited a good efficiency in the degradation of BTEX and the zero order model was found as a reliable approximation of experimental data (with the exceptions of benzene and toluene, for which a first order kinetic model was trustworthy, while HRC showed a good efficiency in the degradation of CAHs and a first order model consistently estimated almost all experimental data. The experimental data were modeled by means of different mathematical equations, considering zero and first order kinetics and the results were discussed and compared. Conclusions: On the grounds of the performed tests, Oxygen Release Compound (ORC is effective in BTEX degradation and Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC in CAHs removal.

  19. PROCEEDINGS: LOW- AND NO-VOC COATING TECHNOLOGIES - 2ND BIENNIAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report documents an international conference that provided a forum for the exchange of technical information on coating technologies. It focused on improved and emerging technologies that result in fewer volatile organic compound (VOC) and toxic air emissions that those from ...

  20. VOC emissions of smouldering combustion from Mediterranean wildfires in central Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtyugina, Margarita; Calvo, Ana Isabel; Nunes, Teresa; Alves, Célia; Fernandes, Ana Patrícia; Tarelho, Luís; Vicente, Ana; Pio, Casimiro

    2013-01-01

    Emissions of trace gases and C5-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from Mediterranean wildfires occurring in Portugal in summer 2010 were studied. Fire smoke was collected in Tedlar bags and analysed for CO, CO2, total hydrocarbons (THC) and VOCs. The CO, CO2 and THC emission factors (EFs) were 206 ± 79, 1377 ± 142 and 8.1 ± 9 g kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. VOC emissions from Mediterranean wildfires were reported for the first time. Aromatic hydrocarbons were major components of the identified VOC emissions. Among them, benzene and toluene were dominant compounds with EFs averaging 0.747 ± 0.303 and 0.567 ± 0.422 g kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. Considerable amounts of oxygenated organic volatile compounds (OVOCs) and isoprenoids were detected. 2-Furaldehyde and hexanal were the most abundant measured OVOCs with EFs of 0.337 ± 0.259 and 0.088 ± 0.039 g kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. The isoprenoid emissions were dominated by isoprene (EF = 0.207 ± 0.195 g kg-1 dry biomass burned) and α-pinene (EF = 0.112 ± 0.093 g kg-1 dry biomass burned). Emission data obtained in this work are useful for validating and improving emission inventories, as well for carrying out modelling studies to assess the effects of vegetation fires on air pollution and tropospheric chemistry.

  1. Contaminated land clean-up using composted wastes and impacts of VOCs on land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J C; Akinola, M; Nason, M A; Tandy, S; Healey, J R; Jones, D L

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes experiments that demonstrate the effects and potential for remediation of a former steelworks site in Wales polluted with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Under field conditions, PAH-contaminated soil was composted in-vessel, with or without organic feedstocks, receiving forced aeration for 80 days followed by 4 months maturation. Treatments compared PAH removal in contaminated soil to contaminated soil mixed with three different organic waste mixes after composting and after composts were spread to land. After composting, PAH concentrations declined in all treatments, by up to 38%. Sixteen months after the composts were landspread and vegetation was established, only those containing contaminated soil with organic additions exhibited further PAH removal, by up to 29%. Composting resulted in a decline in the relative concentration of small PAHs, whereas the landspreading-vegetation phase saw a decline in the relative concentration of medium PAHs in two of the three composts exhibiting PAH removal. Under controlled glasshouse conditions, vegetated soil columns of differing depths were exposed to VOCs from beneath. VOC vapour affected both shoot and root growth and soil microbial activity; effects varied with distance from the VOC source. This work demonstrated that on-site remediation of aged PAH-contaminated land can be successfully initiated by in-vessel co-composting followed by land spreading and vegetation, within a practical timeframe.

  2. Numerical modeling analysis of VOC removal processes in different aerobic vertical flow systems for groundwater remediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Biase, C.; Carminati, A.; Oswald, S.E.; Thullner, M.

    2013-01-01

    Vertical flow systems filled with porous medium have been shown to efficiently remove volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater. To apply this semi-natural remediation strategy it is however necessary to distinguish between removal due to biodegradation and due to volatile l

  3. Effects of cold temperature and ethanol content on VOC emissions from light-duty gasoline vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions of speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including mobile source air toxics (MSATs), were measured in vehicle exhaust from three light-duty spark ignition vehicles operating on summer and winter grade gasoline (E0) and ethanol blended (E10 and E85) fuels. Vehicle...

  4. Schipperen op de Aziatische vaart. De financiering van de VOC kamer Enkhuizen, 1602-1622

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, R.; Gelderblom, O.C.; Jonker, J.P.B.

    2012-01-01

    Negotiating the Asiatic Route: Financing the Dutch East India Company, Enkhuizen Chamber, 1602-1622 During its first twenty years the Dutch East India Company, or voc, struggled with the disadvantages of operations being spread over six local chambers, as imposed by its 1602 charter. Mirroring the D

  5. Antonio van Diemen : de opkomst van de VOC in Azië

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Willem Menno

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch East India Company, the VOC (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie ) was founded in 1602 and was the first company with permanent capital, tradable shares and limited liability. Its aim was to monopolise the trade in valuable spices as nutmeg, mace and cloves found only in a remote part of the

  6. Exposure of jeepney drivers in Manila, Philippines, to selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the occupational exposure of jeepney drivers to selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Manila, Philippines. Personal sampling was conducted on 15 jeepney drivers. Area sampling was conducted to determine the background VOC concentration in Manila as compared to that in a rural area. Both personal and area samples were collected for 5 working days. Samples were obtained using diffusive samplers and were analyzed for 6 VOCs (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene and o-xylene) using gas chromatography. Results showed that the average personal exposure concentration of jeepney drivers was 55.6 (+/-9.3), 196.6 (+/-75.0), 17.9 (+/-9.0), 72.5 (+/-21.1) and 88.5 (+/-26.5) microg/m(3) for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene and o-xylene, respectively. The urban ambient concentration was 11.8 (+/-2.2), 83.7 (+/-40.5) and 38.0 (+/-12.1) microg/m(3) for benzene, toluene and o-xylene, respectively. The rural ambient concentration was 14.0 (+/-6.0) and 24.7 (+/-11.9) microg/m(3) for toluene and o-xylene, respectively. The personal samples had significantly higher (pp<0.05) than the rural concentrations. The personal exposures for all the target VOCs were not significantly different among the jeepney drivers.

  7. Methanol and other VOC fluxes from a Danish beech forest during late springtime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schade, Gunnar W.; Solomon, Sheena J.; Dellwik, Ebba;

    2011-01-01

    In-canopy mixing ratio gradients and above-canopy fluxes of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using a commercial proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest in Denmark. Fluxes of methanol were bidirectional: Emission...

  8. Navigating through technology: technology and the Dutch East India Company VOC in the eighteenth century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Johannes Dirk

    2016-01-01

    For almost two centuries, the ships and the crews of the VOC navigated their way between the Dutch Republic and Asia. This could not have been achieved without the technology of ship design and ship building, the technology involved with keeping the crew healthy, and the technology of charting a rou

  9. Indium Corporation Introduces New Pb-Free VOC-Free Wave Solder Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The Indium Corporation of America has introduced WF-7742 Wave Solder Flux specifically designed to meet the process demands of Pb-Free manufacturing. WF-7742 is a VOC-Free material formulated for Pb-Free wave soldering of surface-mount, mixed-technology and through-holeelectronics assemblies.

  10. Emission inventory of evaporative emissions of VOCs in four metro cities in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anjali; née Som Majumdar, Dipanjali

    2010-01-01

    High concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air of urban areas stress the need for the control of VOC emissions due to the toxic and carcinogenic nature of many VOCs commonly encountered in urban air. Emission inventories are an essential tool in the management of local air quality, which provide a listing of sources of air pollutant emissions within a specific area over a specified period of time. This study intended to provide a level IV emission inventory as par the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) definition for evaporative VOC emissions in the metro cities of India namely Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, and Kolkata. The vehicular evaporative emissions are found to be the largest contributor to the total evaporative emissions of hydrocarbons followed by evaporative losses related to petrol loading and unloading activities. Besides vehicle-related activities, other major sources contributing to evaporative emissions of hydrocarbons are surface coating, dry cleaning, graphical art applications, printing (newspaper and computer), and the use of consumer products. Various specific preventive measures are also recommended for reducing the emissions.

  11. Numerical modeling analysis of VOC removal processes in different aerobic vertical flow systems for groundwater remediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Biase, C.; Carminati, A.; Oswald, S.E.; Thullner, M.

    Vertical flow systems filled with porous medium have been shown to efficiently remove volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater. To apply this semi-natural remediation strategy it is however necessary to distinguish between removal due to biodegradation and due to volatile

  12. The Formative Years of the Modern Corporation: The Dutch East India Company VOC, 1602-1623

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Gelderblom (Oscar); A. de Jong (Abe); J. Jonker (Joost)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWith their legal personhood, permanent capital with transferable shares, separation of ownership and management, and limited liability for both shareholders and managers, the Dutch East India Company (VOC) and subsequently the English East India Company (EIC) are generally considered a m

  13. DEMONSTRATION OF A NO-VOC/NO-HAP WOOD KITCHEN CABINET COATING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of the development and demonstration of a no-VOC (volatile organic compound)/no-HAP (hazardous air pollutant) wood furniture coating system at two cabinet manufacturing plants: one in Portland, OR, and the other in Redwood City, CA. Technology transfer ef...

  14. CORONA DESTRUCTION: AN INNOVATIVE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR VOCS AND AIR TOXICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the work and results to date leading to the demonstration of the corona destruction process at pilot scale. The research effort in corona destruction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and air toxics has shown significant promise for providing a valuable co...

  15. Effect of heat waves on VOC emissions from vegetation and urban air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churkina, G.; Kuik, F.; Lauer, A.; Bonn, B.; Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Programs to plant millions of trees in cities around the world aim at the reduction of summer temperatures, increase carbon storage, storm water control, provision of space for recreation, as well as poverty alleviation. Although these multiple benefits speak positively for urban greening programs, the programs do not take into account how close human and natural systems are coupled in urban areas. Elevated temperatures together with anthropogenic emissions of air and water pollutants distinguish the urban system. Urban and sub-urban vegetation responds to ambient changes and reacts with pollutants. Neglecting this coupling may lead to unforeseen drawbacks of urban greening programs. The potential for emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vegetation combined with anthropogenic emissions to produce ozone has long been recognized. This potential increases under rising temperatures. Here we investigate how heat waves affect emissions of VOC from urban vegetation and corresponding ground-level ozone. In this study we use Weather Research and Forecasting Model with coupled atmospheric chemistry (WRF-CHEM) to quantify these feedbacks in Berlin, Germany during the 2006 heat wave. VOC emissions from vegetation are simulated with MEGAN 2.0 coupled with WRF-CHEM. Our preliminary results indicate that contribution of VOCs from vegetation to ozone formation may increase by more than twofold during the heat wave period. We highlight the importance of the vegetation for urban areas under changing climate and discuss associated tradeoffs.

  16. Preliminary insights into the chemical composition and emissions of urban VOCs in the East Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, S.; Borbon, A.; Afif, C.; Bechara, J.; Leonardis, T.; Fronval, I.; Waked, A.; Brioude, J.; Locoge, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Mediterranean region is an area where polluted air masses coming from Eastern and Central Europe increase air pollution, particularly during stagnation periods, together with intense solar radiation. It was demonstrated that the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea suffers from this kind of phenomena. Favorable weather conditions, remote sources, high urban and biogenic emissions lead to the formation of secondary pollutants (ozone and secondary organic aerosols, SOA), which may have significant impacts on health and climate. However, data are sparse in this region. The ECOCEM (Emission and Chemistry of Organic Carbon in the East Mediterranean - Beirut) project aims to improve our understanding of air pollution in this area by studying the composition of the gaseous and particulate phases in Beirut (Lebanon). Beirut is located on the eastern border of the Mediterranean basin. The goal of the project, which is taking place over two intensive field campaigns (July 2011 and February 2012), is to provide valuable observations on the composition and the temporal evolution of organics (summer versus winter),to identify and quantify the relative importance of sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aerosols (SOA) and to study the role of VOCs in the first oxidation steps of SOA formation. For that purpose, a large suite of primary and secondary VOCs (>60) were measured during the summertime campaign (July 2nd to July 17th 2011) at one suburban site in Beirut. Techniques encompass off-line sampling on carbonaceous sorbent tubes (2-hour time resolution) and liquid coil scrubbing (1-hour time resolution), an on-line GCFID (1-hour time resolution) and a PTR-MS (4-min time resolution). We will discuss here the atmospheric composition of VOCs in relation with their emissions. In particular, these data provide useful constraints to evaluate the first temporally and spatially resolved national emission inventory that was built for the year 2010. Preliminary results

  17. VOC characteristics, emissions and contributions to SOA formation during hazy episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Wu, Fangkun; Hu, Bo; Tang, Guiqian; Zhang, Junke; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are important precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The pollution processes in Beijing were investigated from 18th October to 6th November 2013 to study the characteristics, SOA formation potential and contributing factors of VOC during hazy episodes. The mean concentrations of VOC were 67.4 ± 33.3 μg m-3 on clear days and have 5-7-fold increase in polluted periods. VOC concentrations rapidly increased at a visibility range of 4-5 km with the rate of 25%/km in alkanes, alkenes and halocarbons and the rate of 45%/km in aromatics. Analysis of the mixing layer height (MLH); wind speed and ratios of benzene/toluene (B/T), ethylbenzene/m,p-xylene (E/X), and isopentane/n-pentane (i/n) under different visibility conditions revealed that the MLH and wind speed were the 2 major factors affecting the variability of VOC during clear days and that local emissions and photochemical reactions were main causes of VOC variation on polluted days. Combined with the fractional aerosol coefficient (FAC) method, the SOA formation potentials of alkanes, alkenes and aromatics were 0.3 ± 0.2 μg m-3, 1.1 ± 1.0 μg m-3 and 6.5 ± 6.4 μg m-3, respectively. As the visibility deteriorated, the SOA formation potential increased from 2.1 μg m-3 to 13.2 μg m-3, and the fraction of SOA-forming aromatics rapidly increased from 56.3% to 90.1%. Initial sources were resolved by a positive matrix factorization (PMF) model. Vehicle-related emissions were an important source of VOC at all visibility ranges, accounting for 23%-32%. As visibility declined, emissions from solvents and the chemical industry increased from 13.2% and 6.3% to 34.2% and 23.0%, respectively. Solvents had the greatest SOA formation ability, accounting for 52.5% on average on hazy days, followed by vehicle-related emissions (20.7%).

  18. Determination of Summertime VOC Emission Rates from Produced Water Ponds in the Uintah Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R. S.; Woods, C.; Lyman, S.

    2013-12-01

    The observance of excess ozone concentrations in Utah's Uintah Basin over past several years has prompted several investigations into the extent and causes of the elevated ozone. Among these is the assessment of potential emissions of reactive VOCs. Evaporation ponds, used a remediation technique for treatment of contaminated production and other waters, are one potential source of significant VOC emissions and is estimated that there are around 160 such ponds within the Uintah Basin's oil and gas production areas. In June 2012 VOC emission rates for several reactive VOCs were derived for an evaporation facility consisting of a small inlet pond (≈0.03 acres) and two larger, serial ponds (≈4.3 acres each). The emission rates were determined over three sampling periods using an inverse modeling approach. Under this methodology, ambient VOC concentrations are determined at several downwind locations through whole-air collection into SUMMA canisters, followed by GC/MS quantification and compared with predicted concentrations using an EPA-approved dispersion model, AERMOD. The presumed emission rates used within the model were then adjusted until the modeled concentrations approach the observed concentrations. The derived emission rates for the individual VOCs were on the order of 10-3 g/s/m2 from the inlet pond and 10-6 g/s/m2 from the larger ponds. The emissions from the 1st pond in series after the inlet pond were about 3-4x the emissions from the 2nd pond. These combined emission rates are about an order of magnitude those reported for a single study in Colorado (Thoma, 2009). It should be noted, however, that the variability about each of the VOC emission rates was significant (often ×100% at the 95% confidence interval). Extrapolating these emission rates to the estimated total areas of all the evaporation ponds within Basin resulted in calculated Basin-wide VOC emissions 292,835 tons/yr. However, Bar-Ilan et al. (2009) estimated 2012 VOC oil and gas related

  19. Characterizing relationships between personal exposures to VOCs and socioeconomic, demographic, behavioral variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Wei; Majeed, Mohammed A.; Chu, Pei-Ling; Lin, Hui-Chih

    Socioeconomic and demographic factors have been found to significantly affect time-activity patterns in population cohorts that can subsequently influence personal exposures to air pollutants. This study investigates relationships between personal exposures to eight VOCs (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, m-,p-xylene, chloroform, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and tetrachloroethene) and socioeconomic, demographic, time-activity pattern factors using data collected from the 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) VOC study. Socio-demographic factors (such as race/ethnicity and family income) were generally found to significantly influence personal exposures to the three chlorinated compounds. This was mainly due to the associations paired by race/ethnicity and urban residence, race/ethnicity and use of air freshener in car, family income and use of dry-cleaner, which can in turn affect exposures to chloroform, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and tetrachloroethene, respectively. For BTEX, the traffic-related compounds, housing characteristics (leaving home windows open and having an attached garage) and personal activities related to the uses of fuels or solvent-related products played more significant roles in influencing exposures. Significant differences in BTEX exposures were also commonly found in relation to gender, due to associated significant differences in time spent at work/school and outdoors. The coupling of Classification and Regression Tree (CART) and Bootstrap Aggregating (Bagging) techniques were used as effective tools for characterizing robust sets of significant VOC exposure factors presented above, which conventional statistical approaches could not accomplish. Identification of these significant VOC exposure factors can be used to generate hypotheses for future investigations about possible significant VOC exposure sources and pathways in the general U.S. population.

  20. Off-flavours in wines through indirect transfer of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumi, M D; Lambri, M; De Faveri, D M

    2009-05-01

    This paper assesses the impact of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the drying of coatings on the sensory characters of corks and wines. According to Italian National Standard Method 11021:2002, a small-scale chamber was used (1) to expose wines to the drying of coatings with both low and high VOCs, and (2) to expose corks to the same coatings. After exposure to the coatings, the corks were then placed in direct contact with wine. Different styles of white, red and rose wines were tested. In both directly exposed wines and in wines after contact with the exposed cork, the taste and smell off-flavour perception and intensity were assessed by a panel of eight experienced wine tasters using a five-point numerical scale according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard methods. The results showed that the sensory characters of wines, especially taste, were influenced by the VOC content of the coatings. The taste off-flavour perception was found to be higher than the smell in wines exposed to coatings with either high or low VOCs contents. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan analysis prove that: (1) panellist's answers were significantly different, (2) it was difficult to differentiate the off-flavour perception on the high-level scale, and (3) the panellist off-flavour perceptions versus wine style discriminated the wines into two groups (red and white/rose). For all the wine styles, Pearson's test showed no significant correlation between off-flavour perception levels and the main chemical characters of the wines. For the wines that were in direct contact with the exposed corks, the panellists detect the off-flavours according to the levels of VOCs in the coating and wine styles and they assessed the highest levels of alteration were to the taste.

  1. Eddy covariance VOC emission and deposition fluxes above grassland using PTR-TOF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Ruuskanen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Eddy covariance (EC is the preferable technique for flux measurements since it is the only direct flux determination method. It requires a continuum of high time resolution measurements (e.g. 5–20 Hz. For volatile organic compounds (VOC soft ionization via proton transfer reaction has proven to be a quantitative method for real time mass spectrometry; here we use a proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF for 10 Hz EC measurements of full mass spectra up to m/z 315. The mass resolution of the PTR-TOF enabled the identification of chemical formulas and separation of oxygenated and hydrocarbon species exhibiting the same nominal mass. We determined 481 ion mass peaks from ambient air concentration above a managed, temperate mountain grassland in Neustift, Stubai Valley, Austria. During harvesting we found significant fluxes of 18 compounds distributed over 43 ions, including protonated parent compounds, as well as their isotopes and fragments and VOC-H+-water clusters. The dominant BVOC fluxes were methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, hexenal and other C6 leaf wound compounds, acetone, acetic acid, monoterpenes and sequiterpenes.

    The smallest reliable fluxes we determined were less than 0.1 nmol m−2 s−1, as in the case of sesquiterpene emissions from freshly cut grass. Terpenoids, including mono- and sesquiterpenes, were also deposited to the grassland before and after the harvesting. During cutting, total VOC emission fluxes up to 200 nmol C m−2 s−1 were measured. Methanol emissions accounted for half of the emissions of oxygenated VOCs and a third of the carbon of all measured VOC emissions during harvesting.

  2. Relative vulnerability of public supply wells to VOC contamination in hydrologically distinct regional aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, L.J.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2010-01-01

    A process-based methodology was used to compare the vulnerability of public supply wells tapping seven study areas in four hydrologically distinct regional aquifers to volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination. This method considers (1) contributing areas and travel times of groundwater flowpaths converging at individual supply wells, (2) the oxic and/or anoxic conditions encountered along each flowpath, and (3) the combined effects of hydrodynamic dispersion and contaminant- and oxic/anoxic-specific biodegradation. Contributing areas and travel times were assessed using particle tracks generated from calibrated regional groundwater flow models. These results were then used to estimate VOC concentrations relative to an unspecified initial concentration (C/C0) at individual public supply wells. The results show that the vulnerability of public supply wells to VOC contamination varies widely between different regional aquifers. Low-recharge rates, long travel times, and the predominantly oxic conditions characteristic of Basin and Range aquifers in the western United States leads to lower vulnerability to VOCs, particularly to petroleum hydrocarbons such as benzene and toluene. On the other hand, high recharge rates and short residence times characteristic of the glacial aquifers of the eastern United States leads to greater vulnerability to VOCs. These differences lead to distinct patterns of C/C0 values estimated for public supply wells characteristic of each aquifer, information that can be used by resource managers to develop monitoring plans based on relative vulnerability, to locate new public supply wells, or to make land-use management decisions. Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  3. Electrical and VOC sensing properties of anatase and rutile TiO{sub 2} nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sennik, Erdem [Gebze Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Kocaeli (Turkey); Kilinc, Necmettin, E-mail: nkilinc@gyte.edu.tr [Gebze Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Kocaeli (Turkey); Nigde University, Mechatronics Engineering Department, 51245 Nigde (Turkey); Ozturk, Zafer Ziya [Gebze Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Kocaeli (Turkey); TÜBITAK-Marmara Research Center, Materials Institute, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanotubes fabricated by anodizing of Ti thin films in aqueous HF electrolytes. • TiO{sub 2} nanotubes annealed at 300 °C and 700 °C to obtain anatase and rutile phases. • Electrical, optical and VOC gas sensing properties of the nanotubes investigated. • Dc conduction mechanism can be explained with the thermally activated conduction. • The sensor response of anatase was higher than that of rutile for almost all VOC gases. - Abstract: The dc electrical and volatile organic compound (VOC) sensing properties of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes in both anatase and rutile phases were investigated. TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were obtained in aqueous HF (0.5 wt.%) electrolytes by anodizing of Ti thin films that deposited on quartz substrates using thermal evaporation. Anodization was performed at 10 V in aqueous HF at 0 °C. Then the fabricated TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were annealed at 300 °C and at 700 °C under dry air for 5 h to obtain anatase and rutile phases, respectively. The TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) as structural, and UV–vis spectrophotometer as optical. The current voltage characteristics of the nanotubes under dry air flow revealed that the conductivity of the sample with anatase phase was higher than that of the sample with rutile phase. The VOCs sensing properties of the nanotubes were investigated at 200 °C. It was found that the sensor response of anatase was higher than that of rutile for almost all VOC gases. On the other hand, the sensitivities of two sensors are the highest for isopropyl alcohol.

  4. Catalytic oxidation of VOCs over CNT-supported platinum nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Hea-Jung; Kim, Jae-Ha [Bioneer Corporation, Munyueong-dong 49-4, Daedeok-gu, Daejeon 306-220 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jun-Sik; You, Dong-Wook [Department of Chemistry and Nanoscience and Technology Institute, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Han-Oh [Bioneer Corporation, Munyueong-dong 49-4, Daedeok-gu, Daejeon 306-220 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kwang-Woo, E-mail: kwjung@wku.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Nanoscience and Technology Institute, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-30

    The catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene (BTEX) over novel Pt/carbon nanotube (CNT) catalysts fabricated by a molecular-level mixing method was investigated at temperatures ranging from 40 to 150 °C. The Pt/CNT interface was probed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to elucidate the binding nature of the Pt nanoparticle-CNT surface. The breakthrough curves for multi-component mixtures show displacement effects, in which adsorbates exhibit interaction forces that are sufficiently to displace weakly bounded substances during adsorption. Catalytic oxidation was conducted using a BTEX concentration ranging from 100 to 500 ppmv in air at volume hour space velocities (VHSVs) of approximately 7.5 × 10{sup 4} h{sup −1}–3.4 × 10{sup 5} h{sup −1}. The light-off curves were very steep, and complete oxidation was realized at temperatures as low as 115 °C with 30 wt% Pt/CNT, well below the temperatures required using previously studied Pt-based catalysts. The oxidation activity was presumably promoted because of the higher surface BTEX concentration afforded by the adsorption capability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The catalyst was characterized by its unique hydrophobic property, which facilitated the conversion of BTEX with high activity at relatively low temperatures and was unaffected by moisture in the system.

  5. Concomitant variables in finite mixture models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedel, M

    The standard mixture model, the concomitant variable mixture model, the mixture regression model and the concomitant variable mixture regression model all enable simultaneous identification and description of groups of observations. This study reviews the different ways in which dependencies among

  6. Source apportionment of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs)and their characteristics in Chengdu, southwest of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuanyuan; Xie, Shaodong; Li, Jing; Li, Yaqi

    2017-04-01

    Chengdu, located in the largest basin region in the world, suffers from increasing ground-level ozone and aerosol pollutions. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one of the prominent precursors of ground-level ozone and aerosols. Ambient VOCs were measured continuously using an online gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detector (GC-MS/FID) with a time resolution of 1 hour from 28 August 2016 to 7 October 2016 at Pixian in Chengdu. 99 measurements of VOCs were conducted including 28 alkanes, 11 alkenes, 16 aromatics, 13 oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and 29 halocarbons, acetylene, and acetonitrile. Based on the hourly average data, positive matrix factorization (PMF) was used to better understand the emission sources of VOCs in Chengdu. The average mixing ratios of alkanes, alkenes, aromatics, OVOCs, halocarbons, acetylene, and acetonitrile were respectively 14.49 ppbv, 4.92 ppbv, 5.14 ppbv, 9.74 ppbv, 7.77 ppbv, 3.56 ppbv, and 0.43 ppbv. Six sources were extracted by using PMF model. Liquefied petroleum gas, background and petrochemical industries contributed 28%, 19%, 18% to the total ambient VOCs, respectively. Biogenic emission (14%), Gasoline vehicles (13%), Solvent use (8%) were also identified as major sources of ambient VOCs at Pixian.

  7. Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Animal Husbandry: Chemical Compositions, Separation of Sources and Animal Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, B.; Coggon, M.; Koss, A.; Warneke, C.; Eilerman, S. J.; Neuman, J. A.; Peischl, J.; Aikin, K. C.; Ryerson, T. B.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are important sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere. We used a hydronium ion time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (H3O+ ToF-CIMS) to measure VOC emissions from CAFOs in the Northern Front Range of Colorado during an aircraft campaign (SONGNEX) for regional contributions and from a mobile laboratory sampling for chemical characterizations of individual animal feedlots. The main VOCs emitted from CAFOs include carboxylic acids, alcohols, carbonyls, phenolic species, sulfur- and nitrogen-containing species. Alcohols and carboxylic acids dominate VOC concentrations. Sulfur-containing and phenolic species become more important in terms of odor activity values and NO3 reactivity, respectively. The high time-resolution mobile measurements allow the separation of the sources of VOCs from different parts of the operations occurring within the facilities. We show that the increase of ethanol concentrations were primarily associated with feed storage and handling. We apply a multivariate regression analysis using NH3 and ethanol as tracers to attribute the relative importance of animal-related emissions (animal exhalation and waste) and feed-related emissions (feed storage and handling) for different VOC species. Feed storage and handling contribute significantly to emissions of alcohols, carbonyls and carboxylic acids. Phenolic species and nitrogen-containing species are predominantly associated with animals and their waste. VOC ratios can be potentially used as indicators for the separation of emissions from dairy and beef cattle from the regional aircraft measurements.

  8. Biogenic VOCs emission inventory development of temperate grassland vegetation in Xilin River Basin,Inner Mongolia,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Nian-peng; HAN Xing-guo; SUN Wei; Pan Qing-min

    2004-01-01

    Given the key role of biogenic volatile organic compounds(VOCs) to tropospheric chemistry and regional air quality, it is important to generate accurate VOCs emission inventories. However, only a less fraction of plant species, in temperate grassland of Inner Mongolia, has been characterized by quantitative measurements. A taxonomic methodology, which assigns VOCs measurements to unmeasured species, is an applicable and inexpensive alternation for extensive VOCs emission survey, although data are needed for additional plant families and genera to further validate the taxonomic approach in grassland vegetation. In this experiment, VOCs emission rates of 178 plant species were measured with a portable photoionization detector(PID). The results showed the most of genera and some families have consistent feature of their VOCs emission, especially for isoprene, and provide the basic premise of taxonomic methodology to develop VOCs emission inventories for temperate grassland. Then, the taxonomic methodology was introduced into assigning emission rate to other 96 species, which no measured emission rates available here. A systematical emission inventory of temperate grassland vegetation in Inner Mongolia was provided and further evidence that taxonomy relationship can serve as a useful guide for generalizing the emissions behavior of many, but not all, plant families and genera to grassland vegetation.

  9. Protein mixtures: interactions and gelation

    OpenAIRE

    Ersch, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gelation is a ubiquitous process in the preparation of foods. As most foods are multi constituent mixtures, understanding gelation in mixtures is an important goal in food science. Here we presented a systematic investigation on the influence of molecular interactions on the gelation in protein mixtures. Gelatin gels with added globular protein and globular protein gels with added gelatin were analyzed for their gel microstructure and rheological properties. Mixed gels with altered microstruc...

  10. Oxygen Storage Capacity and Oxygen Mobility of Co-Mn-Mg-Al Mixed Oxides and Their Relation in the VOC Oxidation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Haidy Castaño

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Co-Mn-Mg-Al oxides were synthesized using auto-combustion and co-precipitation techniques. Constant ratios were maintained with (Co + Mn + Mg/Al equal to 3.0, (Co + Mn/Mg equal to 1.0 and Co/Mn equal to 0.5. The chemical and structural composition, redox properties, oxygen storage capacity and oxygen mobility were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, temperature-programmed reduction of hydrogen (H2-TPR, oxygen storage capacity (OSC, oxygen storage complete capacity (OSCC and isotopic exchange, respectively. The catalytic behavior of the oxides was evaluated in the total oxidation of a mixture of 250 ppm toluene and 250 ppm 2-propanol. The synthesis methodology affected the crystallite size, redox properties, OSC and oxide oxygen mobility, which determined the catalytic behavior. The co-precipitation method got the most active oxide in the oxidation of the volatile organic compound (VOC mixture because of the improved mobility of oxygen and ability to favor redox processes in the material structure.

  11. Pollution profiles and health risk assessment of VOCs emitted during e-waste dismantling processes associated with different dismantling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Taicheng; Huang, Yong; Li, Guiying; He, Zhigui; Chen, Jiangyao; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2014-12-01

    Pollution profiles of typical volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during dismantling of various printed circuit board assemblies (PCBAs) of e-wastes using different methods were comparatively investigated in the real e-waste dismantling workshops in South China in April 2013. Similar pollution profiles and concentrations of VOCs were observed between dismantling mobile phone and hard disk PCBAs by using electric blowers and between dismantling television and power supplier PCBAs using electric heating furnaces. Aromatic hydrocarbons (accounting for >60% of the sum of VOCs) were the dominant group during using electric blowers, while aromatic (accounting for >44% of the sum of VOCs) and halogenated hydrocarbons (accounting for >48% of the sum of VOCs) were the two dominant groups which contributed equally using electric heating furnaces. However, the distribution profiles of VOCs emitted during dismantling of televisions, hard disks and micro motors using rotary incinerators varied greatly, though aromatic hydrocarbons were still the dominant group. The combustion of e-wastes led to the most severe contamination of VOCs, with total VOCs (3.3×10(4) μg m(-3)) using rotary incinerators about 190, 180, 139, and 40 times higher than those using mechanical cutting, electric soldering iron, electric blower, and electric heating furnace, respectively. Both cancer and non-cancer risks existed for workers due to exposure to on-site emitted VOCs in all workshops especially in those using rotary incinerators according to the USEPA methodology, whereas only cancer risks existed in rotary incinerator workshops according to the American Conference of Industrial Hygienists methodology.

  12. Chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl-VOCs) in environment - sources, potential human health impacts, and current remediation technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Binbin; Lei, Chao; Wei, Chaohai; Zeng, Guangming

    2014-10-01

    Chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl-VOCs), including polychloromethanes, polychloroethanes and polychloroethylenes, are widely used as solvents, degreasing agents and a variety of commercial products. These compounds belong to a group of ubiquitous contaminants that can be found in contaminated soil, air and any kind of fluvial mediums such as groundwater, rivers and lakes. This review presents a summary of the research concerning the production levels and sources of Cl-VOCs, their potential impacts on human health as well as state-of-the-art remediation technologies. Important sources of Cl-VOCs principally include the emissions from industrial processes, the consumption of Cl-VOC-containing products, the disinfection process, as well as improper storage and disposal methods. Human exposure to Cl-VOCs can occur through different routes, including ingestion, inhalation and dermal contact. The toxicological impacts of these compounds have been carefully assessed, and the results demonstrate the potential associations of cancer incidence with exposure to Cl-VOCs. Most Cl-VOCs thus have been listed as priority pollutants by the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) of China, Environmental Protection Agency of the U.S. (U.S. EPA) and European Commission (EC), and are under close monitor and strict control. Yet, more efforts will be put into the epidemiological studies for the risk of human exposure to Cl-VOCs and the exposure level measurements in contaminated sites in the future. State-of-the-art remediation technologies for Cl-VOCs employ non-destructive methods and destructive methods (e.g. thermal incineration, phytoremediation, biodegradation, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) and reductive dechlorination), whose advantages, drawbacks and future developments are thoroughly discussed in the later sections.

  13. The impact from emitted NO{sub x} and VOC in an aircraft plume. Model results for the free troposphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pleijel, K.

    1998-04-01

    The chemical fate of gaseous species in a specific aircraft plume is investigated using an expanding box model. The model treats the gas phase chemical reactions in detail, while other parameters are subject to a high degree of simplification. Model simulations were carried out in a plume up to an age of three days. The role of emitted VOC, NO{sub x} and CO as well as of background concentrations of VOC, NO{sub x} and ozone on aircraft plume chemistry was investigated. Background concentrations were varied in a span of measured values in the free troposphere. High background concentrations of VOC were found to double the average plume production of ozone and organic nitrates. In a high NO{sub x} environment the plume production of ozone and organic nitrates decreased by around 50%. The production of nitric acid was found to be less sensitive to background concentrations of VOC, and increased by up to 50% in a high NO{sub x} environment. Mainly, emitted NO{sub x} caused the plume production of ozone, nitric acid and organic nitrates. The ozone production during the first hours is determined by the relative amount of NO{sub 2} in the NO{sub x} emissions. The impact from emitted VOC was in relative values up to 20% of the ozone production and 65% of the production of organic nitrates. The strongest relative influence from VOC was found in an environment characterized by low VOC and high NO{sub x} background concentrations, where the absolute peak production was lower than in the other scenarios. The effect from emitting VOC and NO{sub x} at the same time added around 5% for ozone, 15% for nitric acid and 10% for organic nitrates to the plume production caused by NO{sub x} and VOC when emitted separately 47 refs, 15 figs, 4 tabs

  14. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs): chemical compositions and separation of sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bin; Coggon, Matthew M.; Koss, Abigail R.; Warneke, Carsten; Eilerman, Scott; Peischl, Jeff; Aikin, Kenneth C.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2017-04-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) emit a large number of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. In this study, we conducted mobile laboratory measurements of VOCs, methane (CH4) and ammonia (NH3) downwind of dairy cattle, beef cattle, sheep and chicken CAFO facilities in northeastern Colorado using a hydronium ion time-of-flight chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (H3O+ ToF-CIMS), which can detect numerous VOCs. Regional measurements of CAFO emissions in northeastern Colorado were also performed using the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) campaign. Alcohols and carboxylic acids dominate VOC concentrations and the reactivity of the VOCs with hydroxyl (OH) radicals. Sulfur-containing and phenolic species provide the largest contributions to the odor activity values and the nitrate radical (NO3) reactivity of VOC emissions, respectively. VOC compositions determined from mobile laboratory and aircraft measurements generally agree well with each other. The high time-resolution mobile measurements allow for the separation of the sources of VOCs from different parts of the operations occurring within the facilities. We show that the emissions of ethanol are primarily associated with feed storage and handling. Based on mobile laboratory measurements, we apply a multivariate regression analysis using NH3 and ethanol as tracers to determine the relative importance of animal-related emissions (animal exhalation and waste) and feed-related emissions (feed storage and handling) for different VOC species. Feed storage and handling contribute significantly to emissions of alcohols, carbonyls, carboxylic acids and sulfur-containing species. Emissions of phenolic species and nitrogen-containing species are predominantly associated with animals and their waste.

  15. Prospective evaluation of shape similarity based pose prediction method in D3R Grand Challenge 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Zhang, Kam Y. J.

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of ligand three-dimensional (3D) shape similarity is one of the commonly used approaches to identify ligands similar to one or more known active compounds from a library of small molecules. Apart from using ligand shape similarity as a virtual screening tool, its role in pose prediction and pose scoring has also been reported. We have recently developed a method that utilizes ligand 3D shape similarity with known crystallographic ligands to predict binding poses of query ligands. Here, we report the prospective evaluation of our pose prediction method through the participation in drug design data resource (D3R) Grand Challenge 2015. Our pose prediction method was used to predict binding poses of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase (MAP4K4) ligands and it was able to predict the pose within 2 Å root mean square deviation (RMSD) either as the top pose or among the best of five poses in a majority of cases. Specifically for HSP90 protein, a median RMSD of 0.73 and 0.68 Å was obtained for the top and the best of five predictions respectively. For MAP4K4 target, although the median RMSD for our top prediction was only 2.87 Å but the median RMSD of 1.67 Å for the best of five predictions was well within the limit for successful prediction. Furthermore, the performance of our pose prediction method for HSP90 and MAP4K4 ligands was always among the top five groups. Particularly, for MAP4K4 protein our pose prediction method was ranked number one both in terms of mean and median RMSD when the best of five predictions were considered. Overall, our D3R Grand Challenge 2015 results demonstrated that ligand 3D shape similarity with the crystal ligand is sufficient to predict binding poses of new ligands with acceptable accuracy.

  16. Synchronized submanifold embedding for person-independent pose estimation and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shuicheng; Wang, Huan; Fu, Yun; Yan, Xiaoou; Huang, Thomas S

    2009-01-01

    Precise 3-D head pose estimation plays a significant role in developing human-computer interfaces and practical face recognition systems. This task is challenging due to the particular appearance variations caused by pose changes for a certain subject. In this paper, the pose data space is considered as a union of submanifolds which characterize different subjects, instead of a single continuous manifold as conventionally regarded. A novel manifold embedding algorithm dually supervised by both identity and pose information, called synchronized submanifold embedding (SSE), is proposed for person-independent precise 3-D pose estimation, which means that the testing subject may not appear in the model training stage. First, the submanifold of a certain subject is approximated as a set of simplexes constructed using neighboring samples. Then, these simplexized submanifolds from different subjects are embedded by synchronizing the locally propagated poses within the simplexes and at the same time maximizing the intrasubmanifold variances. Finally, the pose of a new datum is estimated as the propagated pose of the nearest point within the simplex constructed by its nearest neighbors in the dimensionality reduced feature space. The experiments on the 3-D pose estimation database, CHIL data for CLEAR07 evaluation, and the extended application for age estimation on FG-NET aging database, demonstrate the superiority of SSE over conventional regression algorithms as well as unsupervised manifold learning algorithms.

  17. Neurotoxicity of Metal Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, V M; Aschner, M; Marreilha Dos Santos, A P

    2017-01-01

    Metals are the oldest toxins known to humans. Metals differ from other toxic substances in that they are neither created nor destroyed by humans (Casarett and Doull's, Toxicology: the basic science of poisons, 8th edn. McGraw-Hill, London, 2013). Metals are of great importance in our daily life and their frequent use makes their omnipresence and a constant source of human exposure. Metals such as arsenic [As], lead [Pb], mercury [Hg], aluminum [Al] and cadmium [Cd] do not have any specific role in an organism and can be toxic even at low levels. The Substance Priority List of Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) ranked substances based on a combination of their frequency, toxicity, and potential for human exposure. In this list, As, Pb, Hg, and Cd occupy the first, second, third, and seventh positions, respectively (ATSDR, Priority list of hazardous substances. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Atlanta, 2016). Besides existing individually, these metals are also (or mainly) found as mixtures in various parts of the ecosystem (Cobbina SJ, Chen Y, Zhou Z, Wub X, Feng W, Wang W, Mao G, Xu H, Zhang Z, Wua X, Yang L, Chemosphere 132:79-86, 2015). Interactions among components of a mixture may change toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics (Spurgeon DJ, Jones OAH, Dorne J-L, Svendsen C, Swain S, Stürzenbaum SR, Sci Total Environ 408:3725-3734, 2010) and may result in greater (synergistic) toxicity (Lister LJ, Svendsen C, Wright J, Hooper HL, Spurgeon DJ, Environ Int 37:663-670, 2011). This is particularly worrisome when the components of the mixture individually attack the same organs. On the other hand, metals such as manganese [Mn], iron [Fe], copper [Cu], and zinc [Zn] are essential metals, and their presence in the body below or above homeostatic levels can also lead to disease states (Annangi B, Bonassi S, Marcos R, Hernández A, Mutat Res 770(Pt A):140-161, 2016). Pb, As, Cd, and Hg can induce Fe, Cu, and Zn

  18. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the evaporative emissions of modern passenger cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Tingting; Yue, Xin; Chai, Fahe; Hu, Jingnan; Lai, Yitu; He, Liqang; Zhu, Rencheng

    2017-02-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from vehicle evaporative emissions contribute substantially to photochemical air pollution. Yet, few studies of the characteristics of VOCs emitted from vehicle evaporative emissions have been published. We investigate the characteristics of 57 VOCs in hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions by applying the Sealed Housing Evaporative Determination unit (SHED) test to three modern passenger cars (one US Tier 2 and two China IV vehicles) using two different types of gasoline. The characteristics of the VOCs from the hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions were different due to their different emission mechanisms. In the hot soak emissions, toluene, isopentane/n-pentane, and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane were dominant species. In the 24 h and 48 h diurnal emissions, isopentane and n-pentane were dominant species. Toluene was the third most dominant component in the 24 h diurnal emissions but decreased by a mass of 42%-80% in the 48 h diurnal emissions. In the hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions, alkanes were generally the dominant hydrocarbons, followed by aromatics and olefins. However, owing to different evaporative emission mechanisms, the weight percentages of the aromatic hydrocarbons decreased and the weight percentages of the alkanes increased from the hot soak test to the 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal tests for each vehicle. The dominant contributors to the ozone formation potentials (OFPs) were also different in the hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions. The OFPs (g O3/g VOC) of the hot soak emissions were higher than those of the 24 h and 48 h diurnal emissions. In addition, the combined effect of decreasing the olefin and aromatic contents of gasoline on vehicle evaporative emissions was investigated. The aromatics all decreased substantially in the hot soak, 24 h and 48 h diurnal emissions, and the total masses of the VOCs and OFPs decreased, with the greatest reduction occurring in

  19. Performance of the JULES land surface model for UK Biogenic VOC emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Garry; Comyn-Platt, Edward; Vieno, Massimo; Langford, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Emissions of biogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) are important for air quality and tropospheric composition. Through their contribution to the production of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), biogenic VOCs indirectly contribute to climate forcing and climate feedbacks [1]. Biogenic VOCs encompass a wide range of compounds and are produced by plants for growth, development, reproduction, defence and communication [2]. There are both biological and physico-chemical controls on emissions [3]. Only a few of the many biogenic VOCs are of wider interest and only two or three (isoprene and the monoterpenes, α- and β-pinene) are represented in chemical transport models. We use the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), the UK community land surface model, to estimate biogenic VOC emission fluxes. JULES is a process-based model that describes the water, energy and carbon balances and includes temperature, moisture and carbon stores [4, 5]. JULES currently provides emission fluxes of the 4 largest groups of biogenic VOCs: isoprene, terpenes, methanol and acetone. The JULES isoprene scheme uses gross primary productivity (GPP), leaf internal carbon and the leaf temperature as a proxy for the electron requirement for isoprene synthesis [6]. In this study, we compare JULES biogenic VOC emission estimates of isoprene and terepenes with (a) flux measurements made at selected sites in the UK and Europe and (b) gridded estimates for the UK from the EMEP/EMEP4UK atmospheric chemical transport model [7, 8], using site-specific or EMEP4UK driving meteorological data, respectively. We compare the UK-scale emission estimates with literature estimates. We generally find good agreement in the comparisons but the estimates are sensitive to the choice of the base or reference emission potentials. References (1) Unger, 2014: Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 8563, doi:10.1002/2014GL061616; (2) Laothawornkitkul et al., 2009: New Phytol., 183, 27, doi

  20. New observations of VOC emissions and concentrations in, above, and around the Central Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, A. H.; Fares, S.; Gentner, D. R.; Park, J.; Weber, R.; Ormeno, E.; Holzinger, R.; Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T. R.; Guenther, A. B.; Fischer, M. L.; Harley, R. A.; Karlik, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    Large portions of the Central Valley of California are out of compliance with current state and federal air quality standards for ozone and particulate matter, and the relative importance of biogenic and anthropogenic VOC emissions to their photochemical production in this region remains uncertain. In 2009-2011 multiple measurement campaigns were completed investigating the VOC emission inventory and concentration distributions. In 2009 BVOC emissions from more than 20 species of major agricultural crops in California were measured in a greenhouse using branch enclosures by both PTRMS and in-situ GC. Overall, crops were found to emit low amounts of BVOC compared to the natural forests surrounding the valley. Crops mainly emitted methanol and terpenes, with a broad array of other species emitted at lower levels, and all the measured crops showed negligible emissions of isoprene. Navel oranges were the largest crop BVOC emitters measured so a full year of flux measurements were made in an orange grove near Visalia in 2010 by eddy covariance(EC)-PTRMS with two multi-week periods of concentration measurements by hourly in-situ GC, and one month of high mass resolution flux measurements by EC-PTR-TOF-MS. The dominant BVOC emissions from the orange grove were methanol and terpenes, followed by acetone, acetaldehyde, and a low level of emissions for many other species. In 2011 aircraft eddy covariance measurements of BVOC fluxes were made by EC-PTRMS covering a large area of California as part of the California Airborne Bvoc Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign aimed at improving BVOC emission models on regional scales, mainly profiling BVOC emissions from oak woodlands surrounding the Central Valley. In 2010, hourly in-situ VOC measurements were made via in-situ GC in Bakersfield, CA as part of the CalNex experiment. Additionally, in-situ measurements of fresh motor vehicle exhaust were made in Oakland's Caldecott tunnel. Measurements by

  1. Approaches to improve the Voc of CDTE devices: Device modeling and thinner devices, alternative back contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkons, Curtis J.

    An existing commercial process to develop thin film CdTe superstrate cells with a lifetime tau=1-3 ns results in Voc= 810-850 mV which is 350 mV lower than expected for CdTe with a bandgap EG = 1.5 eV. Voc is limited by 1.) SRH recombination in the space charge region; and 2.) the Cu2Te back contact to CdTe, which, assuming a 0.3 eV CdTe/Cu2Te barrier, exhibits a work function of phi Cu2Te= 5.5 eV compared to the CdTe valence band of Ev,CdTe=5.8 eV. Proposed solutions to develop CdTe devices with increased Voc are: 1.) reduce SRH recombination by thinning the CdTe layer to ≤ 1 mum; and 2.) develop an ohmic contact back contact using a material with phi BC≥5.8 eV. This is consistent with simulations using 1DSCAPS modeling of CdTe/CdS superstrate cells under AM 1.5 conditions. Two types of CdTe devices are presented. The first type of CdTe device utilizes a window/CdTe stack device with an initial 3-9 mum CdTe layer which is then chemically thinned resulting in regions of the CdTe film with thickness less than 1 mum. The CdTe surface was contacted with a liquid junction quinhydrone-Pt (QH-Pt) probe which enables rapid repeatable Voc measurements on CdTe before and after thinning. In four separate experiments, the window/CdTe stack devices with thinned CdTe exhibited a Voc increase of 30-170 mV, which if implemented using a solid state contact could cut the Voc deficit in half. The second type of CdTe device utilizes C61 PCBM as a back contact to the CdTe, selected since PCBM has a valence band maximum energy (VBM) of 5.8 eV. The PCBM films were grown by two different chemistries and the characterization of the film properties and device results are discussed. The device results show that PCBM exhibits a blocking contact with a 0.6 eV Schottky barrier and possible work function of phiPCBM = 5.2 eV.

  2. Seasonal variability and source apportionment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Paris megacity (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudic, Alexia; Gros, Valérie; Sauvage, Stéphane; Locoge, Nadine; Sanchez, Olivier; Sarda-Estève, Roland; Kalogridis, Cerise; Petit, Jean-Eudes; Bonnaire, Nicolas; Baisnée, Dominique; Favez, Olivier; Albinet, Alexandre; Sciare, Jean; Bonsang, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of air quality studies at the megacity scale, highly time-resolved volatile organic compound (C2-C8) measurements were performed in downtown Paris (urban background sites) from January to November 2010. This unique dataset included non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and aromatic/oxygenated species (OVOCs) measured by a GC-FID (gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector) and a PTR-MS (proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometer), respectively. This study presents the seasonal variability of atmospheric VOCs being monitored in the French megacity and their various associated emission sources. Clear seasonal and diurnal patterns differed from one VOC to another as the result of their different origins and the influence of environmental parameters (solar radiation, temperature). Source apportionment (SA) was comprehensively conducted using a multivariate mathematical receptor modeling. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's positive matrix factorization tool (US EPA, PMF) was used to apportion and quantify ambient VOC concentrations into six different sources. The modeled source profiles were identified from near-field observations (measurements from three distinct emission sources: inside a highway tunnel, at a fireplace and from a domestic gas flue, hence with a specific focus on road traffic, wood-burning activities and natural gas emissions) and hydrocarbon profiles reported in the literature. The reconstructed VOC sources were cross validated using independent tracers such as inorganic gases (NO, NO2, CO), black carbon (BC) and meteorological data (temperature). The largest contributors to the predicted VOC concentrations were traffic-related activities (including motor vehicle exhaust, 15 % of the total mass on the annual average, and evaporative sources, 10 %), with the remaining emissions from natural gas and background (23 %), solvent use (20 %), wood-burning (18 %) and a biogenic source (15 %). An important finding of

  3. A MCM modeling study of the effects of nitryl chloride on oxidant budgets, ozone production, VOC lifetimes, and halogen recycling in polluted regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, T. P.; Thornton, J. A.; Wolfe, G. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Bon, D.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Li, S.; Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Nitryl chloride (ClNO2) is produced at night by reactions of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) on chloride containing particles. Nitryl chloride is photolyzed during the day to liberate highly reactive chlorine atoms. This chemistry takes place primarily in urban environments where the concentrations of N2O5 precursors (NOx and ozone) are high, though it can likely occur in remote regions at lower intensity. Recent field measurements have illustrated the potential importance of ClNO2 as a chlorine atom source and a NOx reservoir. However, the fate of these chlorine atoms and the overall impact of ClNO2 remain unclear. To this end we have incorporated ClNO2 production, photolysis, and subsequent Cl-atom reactions into an existing Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM version 3.2) based model framework. Cl-atom reactions with alkenes and alcohols not presently part of the MCM have also been added. Using observational constraints from the CalNex 2010 field study, we assess the dominant reactive sinks and sources of chlorine atoms over the course of a model day. Relative to model runs excluding ClNO2 formation, the presence of ClNO2 produces marked changes on a variety of species important to tropospheric chemistry and air quality (e.g. O3, RO2, OH, HO2, ClOx). For example a 50% yield of ClNO2 (max ClNO2 of 1.5 ppb) from nighttime N2O5 reactions leads to a ~10% enhancement in integrated ozone production. VOC and NOx lifetimes are shorter due primarily to enhanced OH from propagation of RO2 produced by Cl-atom chemistry under high NOx. The impact of ClNO2 on daytime halogen atom recycling is substantial, with order of magnitude higher daytime Cl2 production predicted with ClNO2 chemistry than without. In fact, incorporation of ClNO2 could help explain daytime levels of Cl2 observed in polluted coastal regions. Additionally, we highlight a set of chlorinated VOC oxidation products that are predicted to form at small, but potentially detectable levels in regions with similar VOC

  4. VOCs-Mediated Location of Olive Fly Larvae by the Braconid Parasitoid Psyttalia concolor: A Multivariate Comparison among VOC Bouquets from Three Olive Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunti, Giulia; Benelli, Giovanni; Conte, Giuseppe; Mele, Marcello; Caruso, Giovanni; Gucci, Riccardo; Flamini, Guido; Canale, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Herbivorous activity induces plant indirect defenses, as the emission of herbivorous-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs), which could be used by parasitoids for host location. Psyttalia concolor is a larval pupal endoparasitoid, attacking a number of tephritid flies including B. oleae. In this research, we investigated the olfactory cues routing host location behavior of P. concolor towards B. oleae larvae infesting three different olive cultivars. VOCs from infested and healthy fruits were identified using GC-MS analyses. In two-choice behavioral assays, P. concolor females preferred infested olive cues, which also evoked ovipositional probing by female wasps. GC-MS analysis showed qualitative and quantitative differences among volatiles emitted by infested and healthy olives. Volatile emissions were peculiar for each cultivar analyzed. Two putative HIPVs were detected in infested fruits, regardless of the cultivar, the monoterpene (E)-β-ocimene, and the sesquiterpene (E-E)-α-farnesene. Our study adds basic knowledge to the behavioral ecology of P. concolor. From an applied point of view, the field application of the above-mentioned VOCs may help to enhance effectiveness of biological control programs and parasitoid mass-rearing techniques.

  5. VOCs-Mediated Location of Olive Fly Larvae by the Braconid Parasitoid Psyttalia concolor: A Multivariate Comparison among VOC Bouquets from Three Olive Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Giunti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbivorous activity induces plant indirect defenses, as the emission of herbivorous-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs, which could be used by parasitoids for host location. Psyttalia concolor is a larval pupal endoparasitoid, attacking a number of tephritid flies including B. oleae. In this research, we investigated the olfactory cues routing host location behavior of P. concolor towards B. oleae larvae infesting three different olive cultivars. VOCs from infested and healthy fruits were identified using GC-MS analyses. In two-choice behavioral assays, P. concolor females preferred infested olive cues, which also evoked ovipositional probing by female wasps. GC-MS analysis showed qualitative and quantitative differences among volatiles emitted by infested and healthy olives. Volatile emissions were peculiar for each cultivar analyzed. Two putative HIPVs were detected in infested fruits, regardless of the cultivar, the monoterpene (E-β-ocimene, and the sesquiterpene (E-E-α-farnesene. Our study adds basic knowledge to the behavioral ecology of P. concolor. From an applied point of view, the field application of the above-mentioned VOCs may help to enhance effectiveness of biological control programs and parasitoid mass-rearing techniques.

  6. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  7. Evaporating Drops of Alkane Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Guéna, Geoffroy; Poulard, Christophe; Cazabat, Anne-Marie

    2005-01-01

    22 pages 9 figures; Alkane mixtures are model systems where the influence of surface tension gradients during the spreading and the evaporation of wetting drops can be easily studied. The surface tension gradients are mainly induced by concentration gradients, mass diffusion being a stabilising process. Depending on the relative concentration of the mixture, a rich pattern of behaviours is obtained.

  8. Protein mixtures: interactions and gelation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersch, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gelation is a ubiquitous process in the preparation of foods. As most foods are multi constituent mixtures, understanding gelation in mixtures is an important goal in food science. Here we presented a systematic investigation on the influence of molecular interactions on the gelation in protein mixt

  9. Evaporating Drops of Alkane Mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu'ena, G; Poulard, C; Cazabat, Anne-Marie; Gu\\'{e}na, Geoffroy; Poulard, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Alkane mixtures are model systems where the influence of surface tension gradients during the spreading and the evaporation of wetting drops can be easily studied. The surface tension gradients are mainly induced by concentration gradients, mass diffusion being a stabilising process. Depending on the relative concentration of the mixture, a rich pattern of behaviours is obtained.

  10. Protein mixtures: interactions and gelation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersch, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gelation is a ubiquitous process in the preparation of foods. As most foods are multi constituent mixtures, understanding gelation in mixtures is an important goal in food science. Here we presented a systematic investigation on the influence of molecular interactions on the gelation in protein mixt

  11. Easy and flexible mixture distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Mabit, Stefan L.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method to generate flexible mixture distributions that are useful for estimating models such as the mixed logit model using simulation. The method is easy to implement, yet it can approximate essentially any mixture distribution. We test it with good results in a simulation study...

  12. Potential theory of adsorption for associating mixtures: possibilities and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Martin Gamel; Shapiro, Alexander; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    The applicability of the Multicomponent Potential Theory of Adsorption (MPTA) for prediction of the adsorption equilibrium of several associating binary mixtures on different industrial adsorbents is investigated. In the MPTA the adsorbates are considered to be distributed fluids subject...... to describe the solid-fluid interactions. The potential is extended to include adsorbate-absorbent specific capacities rather than an adsorbent specific capacity. Correlations of pure component isotherms are generally excellent with individual capacities, although adsorption on silicas at different...... temperatures still poses a challenge. The quality of the correlations is usually independent on the applied EoS. Predictions for binary mixtures indicate that the MPTA+SRK is superior when adsorption occurs on non-polar or slightly polar adsorbents, while MPTA+CPA performs better for polar adsorbents, or when...

  13. Technology projects for characterization--monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junk, G.A.; Haas, W.J. Jr.

    1992-07-01

    One hundred thirty technology project titles related to the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at an arid site are listed alphabetically by first contact person in a master compilation that includes phone numbers, addresses, keywords, and short descriptions. Separate tables are presented for 62 field-demonstrated, 36 laboratory-demonstrated, and 35 developing technology projects. The technology projects in each of these three categories are also prioritized in separate summary tables. Additional tables are presented for a number of other categorizations of the technology projects: In Situ; Fiberoptic; Mass Spectrometer; Optical Spectroscopy; Raman or SERS; Ion Mobility or Acoustic; Associated; and Commercial. Four lists of contact person names are provided so details concerning the projects that deal with sampling, and VOCs in gases, waters, and soils (sediments) can be obtained. Finally, seven wide-ranging conclusions based on observations and experiences during this work are presented.

  14. Photocatalytic Solar Tower Reactor for the Elimination of a Low Concentration of VOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Negishi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We developed a photocatalytic solar tower reactor for the elimination of low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs typically emitted from small industrial establishments. The photocatalytic system can be installed in a narrow space, as the reactor is cylindrical-shaped. The photocatalytic reactor was placed vertically in the center of a cylindrical scattering mirror, and this vertical reactor was irradiated with scattered sunlight generated by the scattering mirror. About 5 ppm toluene vapor, used as representative VOC, was continuously photodegraded and converted to CO2 almost stoichiometrically under sunny conditions. Toluene removal depended only on the intensity of sunlight. The performance of the solar tower reactor did not decrease with half a year of operation, and the average toluene removal was 36% within this period.

  15. Bioremediation of PAHs and VOCs: Advances in clay mineral-microbial interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Rusmin, Ruhaida; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advanced bioremediation implies that biotic agents are more efficient in degrading the contaminants completely. Bioremediation by microbial degradation is often employed and to make this process efficient, natural and cost-effective materials can serve as supportive matrices. Clay/modified clay minerals are effective adsorbents of PAHs/VOCs, and readily available substrate and habitat for microorganisms in the natural soil and sediment. However, the mechanism underpinning clay-mediated biodegradation of organic compounds is often unclear, and this requires critical investigation. This review describes the role of clay/modified clay minerals in hydrocarbon bioremediation through interaction with microbial agents in specific scenarios. The vision is on a faster, more efficient and cost-effective bioremediation technique using clay-based products. This review also proposes future research directions in the field of clay modulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbons.

  16. A Novel Wireless Wearable Volatile Organic Compound (VOC Monitoring Device with Disposable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Deng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel portable wireless volatile organic compound (VOC monitoring device with disposable sensors is presented. The device is miniaturized, light, easy-to-use, and cost-effective. Different field tests have been carried out to identify the operational, analytical, and functional performance of the device and its sensors. The device was compared to a commercial photo-ionization detector, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and carbon monoxide detector. In addition, environmental operational conditions, such as barometric change, temperature change and wind conditions were also tested to evaluate the device performance. The multiple comparisons and tests indicate that the proposed VOC device is adequate to characterize personal exposure in many real-world scenarios and is applicable for personal daily use.

  17. Analysis and evaluation of VOC removal technologies demonstrated at Savannah River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesnut, D.A.; Wagoner, J.; Nitao, J.J.; Boyd, S.; Shaffer, R.J.; Kansa, E.J.; Buscheck, T.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Falta, R.W. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds, or VOCs, are ubiquitous subsurface contaminants at industrial as well as DOE sites. At the Savannah River Plant, the principles VOCs contaminating the subsurface below A-Area and M-Area are Trichloroethylene (C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3}, or TCE) and Tetrachloroethylene (C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}, or PCE). These compounds were used extensively as degreasing solvents from 1952 until 1979, and the waste solvent which did not evaporate (on the order of 2{times}10{sup 6} pounds) was discharged to a process sewer line leading to the M-Area Seepage Basin (Figure I.2). These compounds infiltrated into the soil and underlying sediments from leaks in the sewer line and elsewhere thereby contaminating the vadose zone between the surface and the water table as well as the aquifer.

  18. Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOC) in public buses of Pamplona, Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, M A; Elustondo, D; Bermejo, R; Santamaría, J M

    2008-10-01

    This study examines the exposure level of passengers and drivers to VOC in public buses in a medium-size metropolitan area (Northern Spain). In-vehicle monitoring was performed on different routes, on peak and non-peak hours, during January and February 2007. A total of 112 air samples were collected onto adsorbent tubes and analysed by thermal desorption (TD) and gas chromatography/mass selective detector (GC/MSD) technique. Statistical differences were found among route to route concentrations, with those routes with major prevalence in the commercial area of the city displaying higher values; differences between peak and non-peak hours were also observed. A decrease in VOC concentrations was also registered during the weekend. BTEX ratios were estimated and found to be related to traffic emissions and similar for all the surveyed routes. Correlations confirmed traffic as the main emission source for BTEX and trimethylbenzene, their concentrations being highly associated to changes in meteorological conditions.

  19. Determination of radon exhalation from construction materials using VOC emission test chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Jann, O; Kemski, J; Schneider, U; Krocker, C; Hoffmann, B

    2013-10-01

    The inhalation of (222) Rn (radon) decay products is one of the most important reasons for lung cancer after smoking. Stony building materials are an important source of indoor radon. This article describes the determination of the exhalation rate of stony construction materials by the use of commercially available measuring devices in combination with VOC emission test chambers. Five materials - two types of clay brick, clinker brick, light-weight concrete brick, and honeycomb brick - generally used for wall constructions were used for the experiments. Their contribution to real room concentrations was estimated by applying room model parameters given in ISO 16000-9, RP 112, and AgBB. This knowledge can be relevant, if for instance indoor radon concentration is limited by law. The test set-up used here is well suited for application in test laboratories dealing with VOC emission testing.

  20. Photocatalytic solar tower reactor for the elimination of a low concentration of VOCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Nobuaki; Sano, Taizo

    2014-01-01

    We developed a photocatalytic solar tower reactor for the elimination of low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) typically emitted from small industrial establishments. The photocatalytic system can be installed in a narrow space, as the reactor is cylindrical-shaped. The photocatalytic reactor was placed vertically in the center of a cylindrical scattering mirror, and this vertical reactor was irradiated with scattered sunlight generated by the scattering mirror. About 5 ppm toluene vapor, used as representative VOC, was continuously photodegraded and converted to CO2 almost stoichiometrically under sunny conditions. Toluene removal depended only on the intensity of sunlight. The performance of the solar tower reactor did not decrease with half a year of operation, and the average toluene removal was 36% within this period.