WorldWideScience

Sample records for voc decomposition rates

  1. Comparison of the Decomposition VOC Profile during Winter and Summer in a Moist, Mid-Latitude (Cfb) Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Shari L.; Perrault, Katelynn A.; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues; Nizio, Katie D.; Focant, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with decomposition is an emerging field in forensic taphonomy due to their importance in locating human remains using biological detectors such as insects and canines. A consistent decomposition VOC profile has not yet been elucidated due to the intrinsic impact of the environment on the decomposition process in different climatic zones. The study of decomposition VOCs has typically occurred during the warmer months to enable chemical profiling of all decomposition stages. The present study investigated the decomposition VOC profile in air during both warmer and cooler months in a moist, mid-latitude (Cfb) climate as decomposition occurs year-round in this environment. Pig carcasses (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) were placed on a soil surface to decompose naturally and their VOC profile was monitored during the winter and summer months. Corresponding control sites were also monitored to determine the natural VOC profile of the surrounding soil and vegetation. VOC samples were collected onto sorbent tubes and analyzed using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography – time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). The summer months were characterized by higher temperatures and solar radiation, greater rainfall accumulation, and comparable humidity when compared to the winter months. The rate of decomposition was faster and the number and abundance of VOCs was proportionally higher in summer. However, a similar trend was observed in winter and summer demonstrating a rapid increase in VOC abundance during active decay with a second increase in abundance occurring later in the decomposition process. Sulfur-containing compounds, alcohols and ketones represented the most abundant classes of compounds in both seasons, although almost all 10 compound classes identified contributed to discriminating the stages of decomposition throughout both seasons. The advantages of GC×GC-TOFMS were demonstrated for

  2. Litter Decomposition Rates, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains decomposition rates for litter of Salicornia pacifica, Distichlis spicata, and Deschampsia cespitosa buried at 7 tidal marsh sites in 2015....

  3. Catalyst screening for the VOC decomposition using adsorption and oxygen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.H.; Ogata, A. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are directly related to the formation of photochemical smog and the secondary aerosol formation, particularly in urban areas. As such, VOC pollution control is a high priority in air quality management. Non-thermal plasmas (NTPs) have been considered for the abatement of VOCs, but 3 key factors must be addressed, notably improve the energy efficiency, have less NOx formation and acceptable material balance. A recent trend in the use of NTP for air pollution control is the combination of NTP with a catalyst. This combined process is subdivided into single-stage and two-stage depending on the position of the catalyst. Ozone-assisted catalysis is the two-stage system. This study focused on the decomposition of VOCs using a single-stage plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) system, and demonstrated the effectiveness of the PDC in terms of energy efficiency, product selectivity and carbon balance. The PDC reactor has a strong dependence on the oxygen content in the oxidation of VOCs. The potentials of various catalysts for cycled system were evaluated in terms of adsorption capability of VOC and enhancement factor (EF). The study focused on zeolites with a large surface area. Nanometer-sized active metals were also loaded on the zeolite surfaces, and their catalytic activity was tested. The metal nanoparticles supported on zeolites enhanced the catalytic activities considerably. ICCD camera observation of the discharge plasma on the surface of catalyst provided an important insight into the understanding of discharge plasma and catalyst. The area of discharge plasma expanded over a wide range by the metal nanoparticles. This physical influence was found to be closely related to the enhanced performance of the plasma-driven catalyst process. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Environmental aspects of VOCs evolved in the early stages of human decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statheropoulos, M; Agapiou, A; Spiliopoulou, C; Pallis, G C; Sianos, E

    2007-10-15

    In the present study, the time profile, measured as "accumulation", of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during the early stages of human decomposition was investigated. A human cadaver was placed in a sealed bag at approximately the 4th day after death. Evolved VOCs were monitored for 24 h by sampling at different time intervals. VOCs produced were analyzed by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS). Over 30 substances were identified in total. These included mainly aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, oxygenated compounds (alcohols, aldehydes, ketones) and organic sulfides. The last were the most prominent class of compounds identified. Eleven compounds were present in all the sampling cycles and constitute a "common core": ethanol, 2-propanone, dimethyl disulfide, methyl benzene, octane, 2-butanone, methyl ethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide and o-, m- and p-xylenes. The last sampling cycle yielded the most abundant compounds in number and quantities. Inorganic gases such as CO2, CO, NH3 and H2S were also determined. The fundamental physicochemical properties of the evolved VOCs were used for evaluating their environmental impacts. It appears that the decay process, which is a dynamic procedure, can provide chemical signals that might be detected and properly evaluated by experts in the fields of forensic sciences, search and rescue units and environmental scientists.

  5. Effect of void structure of photocatalyst paper on VOC decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahori, Shuji; Iguchi, Yumi; Ichiura, Hideaki; Kitaoka, Takuya; Tanaka, Hiroo; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2007-02-01

    TiO2 powder-containing paper composites, called TiO2 paper, were prepared by a papermaking technique, and their photocatalytic efficiency was investigated. The TiO2 paper has a porous structure originating from the layered pulp fiber network, with TiO2 powders scattered on the fiber matrix. Under UV irradiation, the TiO2 paper decomposed gaseous acetaldehyde more effectively than powdery TiO2 and a pulp/TiO2 mixture not in paper form. Scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion analysis revealed that the TiO2 paper had characteristic unique voids ca. 10 microm in diameter, which might have contributed to the improved photocatalytic performance. TiO2 paper composites having different void structures were prepared by using beaten pulp fibers with different degrees of freeness and/or ceramic fibers. The photodecomposition efficiency was affected by the void structure of the photocatalyst paper, and the initial degradation rate of acetaldehyde increased with an increase in the total pore volume of TiO2 paper. The paper voids presumably provided suitable conditions for TiO2 catalysis, resulting in higher photocatalytic performance by TiO2 paper than by TiO2 powder and a pulp/TiO2 mixture not in paper form.

  6. Determination of VOC emission rates and compositions for offset printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadden, R A; Scheff, P A; Franke, J E; Conroy, L M; Keil, C B

    1995-07-01

    The release rates of volatile organic compounds (VOC) as fugitive emissions from offset printing are difficult to quantify, and the compositions are usually not known. Tests were conducted at three offset printing shops that varied in size and by process. In each case, the building shell served as the test "enclosure," and air flow and concentration measurements were made at each air entry and exit point. Emission rates and VOC composition were determined during production for (1) a small shop containing three sheetfed presses and two spirit duplicators (36,700 sheets, 47,240 envelopes and letterheads), (2) a medium-size industrial in-house shop with two webfed and three sheetfed presses, and one spirit duplicator (315,130 total sheets), and (3) one print room of a large commercial concern containing three webfed, heatset operations (1.16 x 10(6) ft) served by catalytic air pollution control devices. Each test consisted of 12 one-hour periods over two days. Air samples were collected simultaneously during each period at 7-14 specified locations within each space. The samples were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) for total VOC and for 13-19 individual organics. Samples of solvents used at each shop were also analyzed by GC. Average VOC emission rates were 4.7-6.1 kg/day for the small sheetfed printing shop, 0.4-0.9 kg/day for the industrial shop, and 79-82 kg/day for the commercial print room. Emission compositions were similar and included benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, and hexane. Comparison of the emission rates with mass balance estimates based on solvent usage and composition were quite consistent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. VOC emission rates and emission factors for a sheetfed offset printing shop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadden, R A; Scheff, P A; Franke, J E; Conroy, L M; Javor, M; Keil, C B; Milz, S A

    1995-04-01

    Emission rates were determined during production for a sheetfed offset printing shop by combining the measured concentrations and ventilation rates with mass balance models that characterized the printing space. Air samples were collected simultaneously on charcoal tubes for 12 separate 1-hour periods at 6 locations. Air samples and cleaning solvents were analyzed by gas chromatography for total volatile organic compounds (VOC) and 13 hydrocarbons. The average VOC emission rate was 470 g/hr with a range of 160-1100 g/hr. These values were in good agreement with the amounts of VOC, hexane, toluene, and aromatic C9s determined from estimated solvent usage and measured solvent compositions. Comparison of the emission rates with source activities indicated an emission factor of 30-51 g VOC/press cleaning. Based on the test observations it was estimated that this typical small printing facility was likely to release 1-2 T VOC/year. The methodology also may be useful for the surface coating industry, as emission rates in this study were determined without recourse to a temporary total enclosure and without interfering with worker activities, increasing worker exposure, or increasing safety and explosion hazards.

  8. Determination of Summertime VOC Emission Rates from Produced Water Ponds in the Uintah Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R. S.; Woods, C.; Lyman, S.

    2013-12-01

    The observance of excess ozone concentrations in Utah's Uintah Basin over past several years has prompted several investigations into the extent and causes of the elevated ozone. Among these is the assessment of potential emissions of reactive VOCs. Evaporation ponds, used a remediation technique for treatment of contaminated production and other waters, are one potential source of significant VOC emissions and is estimated that there are around 160 such ponds within the Uintah Basin's oil and gas production areas. In June 2012 VOC emission rates for several reactive VOCs were derived for an evaporation facility consisting of a small inlet pond (≈0.03 acres) and two larger, serial ponds (≈4.3 acres each). The emission rates were determined over three sampling periods using an inverse modeling approach. Under this methodology, ambient VOC concentrations are determined at several downwind locations through whole-air collection into SUMMA canisters, followed by GC/MS quantification and compared with predicted concentrations using an EPA-approved dispersion model, AERMOD. The presumed emission rates used within the model were then adjusted until the modeled concentrations approach the observed concentrations. The derived emission rates for the individual VOCs were on the order of 10-3 g/s/m2 from the inlet pond and 10-6 g/s/m2 from the larger ponds. The emissions from the 1st pond in series after the inlet pond were about 3-4x the emissions from the 2nd pond. These combined emission rates are about an order of magnitude those reported for a single study in Colorado (Thoma, 2009). It should be noted, however, that the variability about each of the VOC emission rates was significant (often ×100% at the 95% confidence interval). Extrapolating these emission rates to the estimated total areas of all the evaporation ponds within Basin resulted in calculated Basin-wide VOC emissions 292,835 tons/yr. However, Bar-Ilan et al. (2009) estimated 2012 VOC oil and gas related

  9. Improved performance of parallel surface/packed-bed discharge reactor for indoor VOCs decomposition: optimization of the reactor structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Hui, Chun-Xue; Li, Jie; Lu, Na; Shang, Ke-Feng; Wu, Yan; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a high-efficiency air-cleaning system for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) existing in the workshop of a chemical factory. A novel parallel surface/packed-bed discharge (PSPBD) reactor, which utilized a combination of surface discharge (SD) plasma with packed-bed discharge (PBD) plasma, was designed and employed for VOCs removal in a closed vessel. In order to optimize the structure of the PSPBD reactor, the discharge characteristic, benzene removal efficiency, and energy yield were compared for different discharge lengths, quartz tube diameters, shapes of external high-voltage electrode, packed-bed discharge gaps, and packing pellet sizes, respectively. In the circulation test, 52.8% of benzene was removed and the energy yield achieved 0.79 mg kJ-1 after a 210 min discharge treatment in the PSPBD reactor, which was 10.3% and 0.18 mg kJ-1 higher, respectively, than in the SD reactor, 21.8% and 0.34 mg kJ-1 higher, respectively, than in the PBD reactor at 53 J l-1. The improved performance in benzene removal and energy yield can be attributed to the plasma chemistry effect of the sequential processing in the PSPBD reactor. The VOCs mineralization and organic intermediates generated during discharge treatment were followed by CO x selectivity and FT-IR analyses. The experimental results indicate that the PSPBD plasma process is an effective and energy-efficient approach for VOCs removal in an indoor environment.

  10. Decomposition of sugar cane crop residues under different nitrogen rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Costa Potrich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The deposition of organic residues through mechanical harvesting of cane sugar is a growing practice in sugarcane production system. The maintenance of these residues on the soil surface depends mainly on environmental conditions. Nitrogen fertilization on dry residues tend to retard decomposition of these, providing benefits such as increased SOM. Thus, the object of this research was to evaluate the effect of different doses of nitrogen on sugar cane crop residues, as its decomposition and contribution to carbon sequestration in soil. The experiment was conducted in Dourados-MS and consisted of a randomized complete block design. Dried residues were placed in litter bags and the treatments were arranged in a split plot, being the four nitrogen rates (0, 50, 100 and 150 kg ha-1 N the plots, and the seven sampling times (0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 the spit plots. Decomposition rates of residues, total organic carbon and labile carbon on soil were analysed. The application of increasing N doses resulted in an increase in their decomposition rates. Despite this, note also the mineral N application as a strategy to get higher levels of labile carbon in soil.

  11. [Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from wood furniture--estimation of emission rate by passive flux sampler].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Hideto; Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Furuta, Mitsuko; Shibatsuji, Masayoshi; Nishimura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate aldehydes and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission from furniture, which may cause hazardous influence on human being such as sick building/sick house syndrome. In this study, VOCs emitted from six kinds of wood furniture, including three set of dining tables and three beds, were analyzed by large chamber test method (JIS A 1911). Based on the emission rates of total VOCs (TVOC), the impacts on the indoor TVOC was estimated by the simulation model with volume of 20 m3 and ventilation frequency of 0.5 times/h. The estimated increment of formaldehyde were exceeded the guideline value (100 microg/m3) in one set of dining table and one bed. The estimated TVOC increment values were exceeded the provisional target value for indoor air (400 microg/m3) in two sets of dining tables and two beds. These results revealed that VOC emissions from wood furniture may influence significantly indoor air quality. Also, in this study, to establish the alternative method for large chamber test methods, emission rates from representative five areas of furniture unit were evaluated by passive sampling method using flux sampler and emission rate from full-sized furniture was predicted. Emission rates predicted by flux passive sampler were 10-106% (formaldehyde) and 8-141% (TVOC) of the data measured using large chamber test, respectively.

  12. VOCs emission rate estimate for complicated industrial area source using an inverse-dispersion calculation method: A case study on a petroleum refinery in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Lv, Zhaofeng; Yang, Gan; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Li, Yue; Wang, Litao

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to apply an inverse-dispersion calculation method (IDM) to estimate the emission rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for the complicated industrial area sources, through a case study on a petroleum refinery in Northern China. The IDM was composed of on-site monitoring of ambient VOCs concentrations and meteorological parameters around the source, calculation of the relationship coefficient γ between the source's emission rate and the ambient VOCs concentration by the ISC3 model, and estimation of the actual VOCs emission rate from the source. Targeting the studied refinery, 10 tests and 8 tests were respectively conducted in March and in June of 2014. The monitoring showed large differences in VOCs concentrations between background and downwind receptors, reaching 59.7 ppbv in March and 248.6 ppbv in June, on average. The VOCs increases at receptors mainly consisted of ethane (3.1%-22.6%), propane (3.8%-11.3%), isobutane (8.5%-10.2%), n-butane (9.9%-13.2%), isopentane (6.1%-12.9%), n-pentane (5.1%-9.7%), propylene (6.1-11.1%) and 1-butylene (1.6%-5.4%). The chemical composition of the VOCs increases in this field monitoring was similar to that of VOCs emissions from China's refineries reported, which revealed that the ambient VOCs increases were predominantly contributed by this refinery. So, we used the ISC3 model to create the relationship coefficient γ for each receptor of each test. In result, the monthly VOCs emissions from this refinery were calculated to be 183.5 ± 89.0 ton in March and 538.3 ± 281.0 ton in June. The estimate in June was greatly higher than in March, chiefly because the higher environmental temperature in summer produced more VOCs emissions from evaporation and fugitive process of the refinery. Finally, the VOCs emission factors (g VOCs/kg crude oil refined) of 0.73 ± 0.34 (in March) and 2.15 ± 1.12 (in June) were deduced for this refinery, being in the same order with previous direct

  13. Do time-averaged, whole-building, effective volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions depend on the air exchange rate? A statistical analysis of trends for 46 VOCs in U.S. offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackes, A; Waring, M S

    2016-08-01

    We used existing data to develop distributions of time-averaged air exchange rates (AER), whole-building 'effective' emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOC), and other variables for use in Monte Carlo analyses of U.S. offices. With these, we explored whether long-term VOC emission rates were related to the AER over the sector, as has been observed in the short term for some VOCs in single buildings. We fit and compared two statistical models to the data. In the independent emissions model (IEM), emissions were unaffected by other variables, while in the dependent emissions model (DEM), emissions responded to the AER via coupling through a conceptual boundary layer between the air and a lumped emission source. For 20 of 46 VOCs, the DEM was preferable to the IEM and emission rates, though variable, were higher in buildings with higher AERs. Most oxygenated VOCs and some alkanes were well fit by the DEM, while nearly all aromatics and halocarbons were independent. Trends by vapor pressure suggested multiple mechanisms could be involved. The factors of temperature, relative humidity, and building age were almost never associated with effective emission rates. Our findings suggest that effective emissions in real commercial buildings will be difficult to predict from deterministic experiments or models.

  14. Factors affecting decomposition rates of chironomid (Diptera pupal exuviae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathi G. Kavanaugh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Collections of floating chironomid pupal exuviae are used to monitor water quality and assess ecological conditions. Factors controlling exuviae sinking rates are not well known, although they should have an effect on conclusions that can be drawn from collections. The current study was conducted to determine the rate of sinking under controlled laboratory conditions using water from three streams with different nutrient levels. Sinking rates ranged from less than a day to seven days, depending on microbial activity, nutrient concentrations, temperature and turbulence. Results also varied by genus, with pupal exuviae of Chironomus riparius, Diamesa nivoriunda, Orthocladius (Euorthocladius thienemanni and Eukiefferiella sp. used in experiments. Four species of bacteria and eight genera of fungi colonized and metabolized exuviae, with bacteria dominant early and fungi dominant later in the decomposition process. Decomposition was faster in lightly chitinized abdominal conjunctive areas, which resulted in exuviae breaking apart and sinking. Examination of untreated, dewaxed and dewaxed-deproteinized exuviae indicated that untreated exuviae sank faster. Waxes appeared important for colonization and initial microbial metabolization was delayed when waxes were removed. Results confirm the importance of biological degradation of exuviae in determining floatation times. We predict that streams and other waterbodies with high dissolved nutrients will result in rapidly sinking exuviae, while exuviae in low nutrient waterbodies will float longer.Article submitted 1. October 2014, accepted 18. November 2014, published 22. December 2014.

  15. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMINING AMALGAM DECOMPOSITION RATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R.W.; Wright, C.C.

    1962-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring the rate at which an amalgam decomposes in contact with aqueous solutions are described. The amalgam and an aqueous hydroxide solution are disposed in an electrolytic cell. The amalgam is used as the cathode of the cell, and an electrode and anode are disposed in the aqueous solution. A variable source of plating potential is connected across the cell. The difference in voltage between the amalgam cathode and a calibrated source of reference potential is used to control the variable source to null the difference in voltage and at the same time to maintain the concentration of the amalgam at some predetermined constant value. The value of the current required to maintain this concentration constant is indicative of the decomposition rate of the amalgam. (AEC)

  16. Hybrid empirical mode decomposition- ARIMA for forecasting exchange rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadan, Siti Sarah; Shabri, Ani; Ismail, Shuhaida

    2015-02-01

    This paper studied the forecasting of monthly Malaysian Ringgit (MYR)/ United State Dollar (USD) exchange rates using the hybrid of two methods which are the empirical model decomposition (EMD) and the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA). MYR is pegged to USD during the Asian financial crisis causing the exchange rates are fixed to 3.800 from 2nd of September 1998 until 21st of July 2005. Thus, the chosen data in this paper is the post-July 2005 data, starting from August 2005 to July 2010. The comparative study using root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) showed that the EMD-ARIMA outperformed the single-ARIMA and the random walk benchmark model.

  17. The trait contribution to wood decomposition rates of 15 Neotropical tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, Koert G; Poorter, Lourens; Sass-Klaassen, Ute; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2010-12-01

    The decomposition of dead wood is a critical uncertainty in models of the global carbon cycle. Despite this, relatively few studies have focused on dead wood decomposition, with a strong bias to higher latitudes. Especially the effect of interspecific variation in species traits on differences in wood decomposition rates remains unknown. In order to fill these gaps, we applied a novel method to study long-term wood decomposition of 15 tree species in a Bolivian semi-evergreen tropical moist forest. We hypothesized that interspecific differences in species traits are important drivers of variation in wood decomposition rates. Wood decomposition rates (fractional mass loss) varied between 0.01 and 0.31 yr(-1). We measured 10 different chemical, anatomical, and morphological traits for all species. The species' average traits were useful predictors of wood decomposition rates, particularly the average diameter (dbh) of the tree species (R2 = 0.41). Lignin concentration further increased the proportion of explained inter-specific variation in wood decomposition (both negative relations, cumulative R2 = 0.55), although it did not significantly explain variation in wood decomposition rates if considered alone. When dbh values of the actual dead trees sampled for decomposition rate determination were used as a predictor variable, the final model (including dead tree dbh and lignin concentration) explained even more variation in wood decomposition rates (R2 = 0.71), underlining the importance of dbh in wood decomposition. Other traits, including wood density, wood anatomical traits, macronutrient concentrations, and the amount of phenolic extractives could not significantly explain the variation in wood decomposition rates. The surprising results of this multi-species study, in which for the first time a large set of traits is explicitly linked to wood decomposition rates, merits further testing in other forest ecosystems.

  18. Effect of Palladium Form on Tetraphenylborate Decomposition Rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1998-04-28

    Palladium catalyzes the decomposition of tetraphenylborate in alkaline solutions. Researchers postulate several decomposition mechanisms that differ in the form of the palladium catalyst. Potential forms include solid and soluble, different soluble species (such as aqueous or organic soluble), and different oxidation states (i.e., 0, II, and IV). Initial tests measured the reactivity and distribution of four Pd forms in tetraphenylborate slurries.

  19. Interactions among temperature, moisture, and oxygen concentrations in controlling decomposition rates in a boreal forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos A.; Malghani, Saadatullah; Loescher, Henry W.

    2017-02-01

    Determining environmental controls on soil organic matter decomposition is of importance for developing models that predict the effects of environmental change on global soil carbon stocks. There is uncertainty about the environmental controls on decomposition rates at temperature and moisture extremes, particularly at high water content levels and high temperatures. It is uncertain whether observed declines in decomposition rates at high temperatures are due to declines in the heat capacity of extracellular enzymes as predicted by thermodynamic theory, or due to simultaneous declines in soil moisture. It is also uncertain whether oxygen limits decomposition rates at high water contents. Here we present the results of a full factorial experiment using organic soils from a boreal forest incubated at high temperatures (25 and 35 °C), a wide range of water-filled pore space (WFPS; 15, 30, 60, 90 %), and contrasting oxygen concentrations (1 and 20 %). We found support for the hypothesis that decomposition rates are high at high temperatures, provided that enough moisture and oxygen are available for decomposition. Furthermore, we found that decomposition rates are mostly limited by oxygen concentrations at high moisture levels; even at 90 % WFPS, decomposition proceeded at high rates in the presence of oxygen. Our results suggest an important degree of interaction among temperature, moisture, and oxygen in determining decomposition rates at the soil core scale.

  20. The Effect of Clothing on the Rate of Decomposition and Diptera Colonization on Sus scrofa Carcasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Allison; Cross, Peter; Moffatt, Colin; Simmons, Tal

    2015-07-01

    Twenty Sus scrofa carcasses were used to study the effect the presence of clothing had on decomposition rate and colonization locations of Diptera species; 10 unclothed control carcasses were compared to 10 clothed experimental carcasses over 58 days. Data collection occurred at regular accumulated degree day intervals; the level of decomposition as Total Body Score (TBSsurf ), pattern of decomposition, and Diptera present was documented. Results indicated a statistically significant difference in the rate of decomposition, (t427  = 2.59, p = 0.010), with unclothed carcasses decomposing faster than clothed carcasses. However, the overall decomposition rates from each carcass group are too similar to separate when applying a 95% CI, which means that, although statistically significant, from a practical forensic point of view they are not sufficiently dissimilar as to warrant the application of different formulae to estimate the postmortem interval. Further results demonstrated clothing provided blow flies with additional colonization locations.

  1. Comparison of decomposition rates between autopsied and non-autopsied human remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Lennon N; Wescott, Daniel J

    2016-04-01

    Penetrating trauma has been cited as a significant factor in the rate of decomposition. Therefore, penetrating trauma may have an effect on estimations of time-since-death in medicolegal investigations and on research examining decomposition rates and processes when autopsied human bodies are used. The goal of this study was to determine if there are differences in the rate of decomposition between autopsied and non-autopsied human remains in the same environment. The purpose is to shed light on how large incisions, such as those from a thorocoabdominal autopsy, effect time-since-death estimations and research on the rate of decomposition that use both autopsied and non-autopsied human remains. In this study, 59 non-autopsied and 24 autopsied bodies were studied. The number of accumulated degree days required to reach each decomposition stage was then compared between autopsied and non-autopsied remains. Additionally, both types of bodies were examined for seasonal differences in decomposition rates. As temperature affects the rate of decomposition, this study also compared the internal body temperatures of autopsied and non-autopsied remains to see if differences between the two may be leading to differential decomposition. For this portion of this study, eight non-autopsied and five autopsied bodies were investigated. Internal temperature was collected once a day for two weeks. The results showed that differences in the decomposition rate between autopsied and non-autopsied remains was not statistically significant, though the average ADD needed to reach each stage of decomposition was slightly lower for autopsied bodies than non-autopsied bodies. There was also no significant difference between autopsied and non-autopsied bodies in the rate of decomposition by season or in internal temperature. Therefore, this study suggests that it is unnecessary to separate autopsied and non-autopsied remains when studying gross stages of human decomposition in Central Texas

  2. Decomposition rates and carbon:nitrogen ratios for different litter types, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data table contains mean decomposition rates and mean carbon:nitrogen ratios for different litter types buried in 7 marshes during 2015. Note that C:N data are...

  3. Demand specifying variables and current ventilation rate requirements with respect to the future use of voc sensing for dcv control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Jakub

    Demand Controlled Ventilation (DCV) is a well established principle to provide a certain indoor environmental quality, defined both in the terms of air quality and thermal comfort. This is accomplished by adjusting the supplied airflow rate according to a certain demand indicator, which conventio......Demand Controlled Ventilation (DCV) is a well established principle to provide a certain indoor environmental quality, defined both in the terms of air quality and thermal comfort. This is accomplished by adjusting the supplied airflow rate according to a certain demand indicator, which...... conventionally has been the temperature or the CO2-concentration. When compared to schedule driven ventilation, application of DCV can lead to substantial energy savings. However, CO2 is the pollutant related to human occupancy and it does not provide any indication of so called building-related pollution...... be also taken into account in the ventilation control. Recent development in gas sensing technology resulted in a new generation of relatively cheap and practically applicable sensors that can offer measurements of some of the pollutants mentioned above – mainly Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC...

  4. Legume presence reduces the decomposition rate of non-legume roots, role of plant traits?

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    De Deyn, Gerlinde B.; Saar, Sirgi; Barel, Janna; Semchenko, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Plant litter traits are known to play an important role in the rate of litter decomposition and mineralization, both for aboveground and belowground litter. However also the biotic and abiotic environment in which the litter decomposes plays a significant role in the rate of decomposition. The presence of living plants may accelerate litter decomposition rates via a priming effects. The size of this effect is expected to be related to the traits of the litter. In this study we focus on root litter, given that roots and their link to ecosystem processes have received relatively little attention in trait-based research. To test the effect of a growing legume plant on root decomposition and the role of root traits in this we used dead roots of 7 different grassland species (comprising grasses, a forb and legumes), determined their C, N, P content and quantified litter mass loss after eight weeks of incubation in soil with and without white clover. We expected faster root decomposition with white clover, especially for root litter with low N content. In contrast we found slower decomposition of grass and forb roots which were poor in N (negative priming) in presence of white clover, while decomposition rates of legume roots were not affected by the presence of white clover. Overall we found that root decomposition can be slowed down in the presence of a living plant and that this effect depends on the traits of the decomposing roots, with a pronounced reduction in root litter poor in N and P, but not in the relatively nutrient-rich legume root litters. The negative priming effect of legume plants on non-legume litter decomposition may have resulted from preferential substrate utilisation by soil microbes.

  5. On-site passive flux sampler measurement of emission rates of carbonyls and VOCs from multiple indoor sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, Naohide [Research Institute of Science for Safety and Sustainability (RISS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Kai, Yuya; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Kumagai, Kazukiyo; Okuizumi, Yumiko; Jona, Miki; Yanagisawa, Yukio [Department of Environment Systems, Institute of Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8563 (Japan); Fujii, Minoru [Research Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    In indoor environments with high levels of air pollution, it is desirable to remove major sources of emissions to improve air quality. In order to identify the emission sources that contribute most to the concentrations of indoor air pollutants, we used passive flux samplers (PFSs) to measure emission rates of carbonyl compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from many of the building materials and furnishings present in a room in a reinforced concrete building in Tokyo, Japan. The emission flux of formaldehyde from a desk was high (125 {mu}g/m{sup 2}/h), whereas fluxes from a door and flooring were low (21.5 and 16.5 {mu}g/m{sup 2}/h, respectively). The emission fluxes of toluene from the ceiling and the carpet were high (80.0 and 72.3 {mu}g/m{sup 2}/h, respectively), whereas that from the flooring was low (9.09 {mu}g/m{sup 2}/h). The indoor and outdoor concentrations of formaldehyde were 61.5 and 8.64 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, respectively, and those of toluene were 43.2 and 17.5 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, respectively. The air exchange rate of the room as measured by the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) method was 1.84/h. Taking into consideration the area of the emission sources, the carpet, ceiling, and walls were identified as the principal emission sources, contributing 24%, 20%, and 22% of the formaldehyde, respectively, and 22%, 27%, and 14% of the toluene, respectively, assuming that the emission rate from every major emission sources could be measured. In contrast, the door, the flooring, and the desk contributed little to the indoor levels of formaldehyde (1.0%, 0.54%, and 4.1%, respectively) and toluene (2.2%, 0.31%, and 0.85%, respectively). (author)

  6. Let's Break it Down: A Study of Organic Decomposition Rates in Clay Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, E.

    2016-12-01

    In this experiment I will be testing if temperature affects the organic decomposition rates in clay soil. I will need to be able to clean and weigh each filter paper without disrupting my data damaging or brushing off additional paper material. From there I need to be able to analyze and interpret my data to factor anything else that may affect the decomposition rates in the soil. Soil decomposers include bacteria and fungi. They obtain energy from plant and animal detritus through aerobic decomposition, which is similar to how humans break down sugar. The formula is: C6H12O6 + O2 → CO2 + H2O + energy. Besides oxygen and sugar the organisms need nutrients such as water and sustainable temperatures. Decomposition is important to us because it helps regulate soil structure, moisture, temperature, and provides nutrients to soil organisms. This matters on a global scale since decomposers release a large amount of carbon when breaking down matter, which contributes to greenhouse gasses such as carbon dioxide and methane. These greenhouse gasses affect the earth's climate. People who care about decomposition are farmers and those in agriculture, as well as environmental scientists. Even national parks might care because decomposition may affect park safety, how the park looks, and the amount of plants and wildlife. Things that can affect decomposition are the decomposers in the soil, temperature, and water or moisture. My secondary research also showed that PH and chemical composition of the soil affect the rate of decomposition.Cold or freezing temperatures can help preserve organic material in soil because it freezes the soil and moisture, making it too dense for the organic decomposers to break down the organic matter. Soil also can be preserved by drying out and being stored at 4º Celsius (or 39º Fahrenheit) for 28 days. However, soil can degrade slowly in these conditions because it is not frozen and can be oxidized.

  7. Improvement in 8h-sampling rate assessment considering meteorological parameters variability for biogas VOC passive measurements in the surroundings of a French landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verriele, Marie; Allam, Nadine; Depelchin, Laurence; Le Coq, Laurence; Locoge, Nadine

    2015-11-01

    Passive sampling technology has been extensively used for long-term VOC atmospheric concentrations' monitoring. Its performances regarding the short-term measurements and related to VOC from biogas were evaluated in this work: laboratory scale experiments have been conducted in order to check the suitability of Radiello® diffusive samplers for the assessment of 8 h-VOC levels in highly changeable meteorological conditions; in a second step a short pilot field campaign was implemented in the vicinity of a West-French landfill. First of all, it was assessed that amongst a diversified list of 16 characteristic compounds from biogas, mercaptans, some halogenated, oxygenated compounds and terpenes could not be measured accurately by this passive technique either because they are not captured by the sorbent or they are not quantitatively desorbed in the chosen mediated analytical conditions. Moreover, it has been confirmed that sampling rates (SR) related to isopentane, THF, cyclohexane, toluene, p-xylene and n-decane are influenced by environmental factors: the main influence concerns the wind speed. From 2 m s(-1), when the velocity increases by 1 m s(-1), the SR increases from 12 to 32% depending on the COV (considering a linear dependence between 2 and 7 m s(-1)). Humidity has no effect on SR, and temperature influence is rather limited to less than 3% per degree. A comprehensive uncertainty estimation, including uncertainties linked to meteorological changes, has led to global relative uncertainties comprising between 18% and 54% from one VOC to another: a quite high value comparatively to those obtained without considering meteorological condition influences. To illustrate our results, targeted VOC were quantified in the field, on a single day: concentrations range between LD to 3 µg m(-3): relatively very low concentrations compared to those usually reported by literature.

  8. Decomposition rate of carrion is dependent on composition not abundance of the assemblages of insect scavengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farwig, Nina; Brandl, Roland; Siemann, Stefen; Wiener, Franziska; Müller, Jörg

    2014-08-01

    Environmental factors and biodiversity affect ecosystem processes. As environmental change modifies also biodiversity it is unclear whether direct effects of environmental factors on ecosystem processes are more important than indirect effects mediated by changes in biodiversity. High-quality resources like carrion occur as heterogeneous pulses of energy and nutrients. Consequently, the distribution of scavenging insects is related to resource availability. Therefore, carrion decomposition represents a suitable process from which to unravel direct effects of environmental change from indirect biodiversity-related effects on ecosystem processes. During three field seasons in 2010 we exposed traps baited with small-mammal carrion at 21 sites along a temperature gradient to explore the insect carrion fauna and decomposition rate in the Bohemian Forest, Germany. The abundance component of beetle and fly assemblages decreased with decreasing temperature. Independently, the composition component of both taxa changed with temperature and season. The change in the composition component of beetles depicted a loss of larger species at higher temperatures. Decomposition rate did not change directly along the temperature gradient but was directly influenced by season. The composition component of beetles, and to a small extent of flies, but not their abundance component, directly affected carrion decomposition. Consequently, lower decomposition rates at lower temperatures can be explained by the absence of larger beetle species. Thus, we predict that future environmental change will modify carrion fauna composition and thereby indirectly decomposition rate. Moreover, reorganizations of the insect carrion composition will directly translate into modified decomposition rates, with potential consequences for nutrient availability and carbon storage.

  9. Rate of litter decomposition and microbial activity in an area of Caatinga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Carneiro Souto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the decomposition of litter and microbial activity in an area of preserved Caatinga, an experiment was conducted in the Natural Heritage Private Reserve Tamanduá Farm in Santa Terezinha county, State of Paraiba. The decomposition rate was determined by using litter bags containing 30 g of litter, which were arranged on the soil surface in September 2003 and 20 bags were taken each month until September 2005. The collected material was oven dried and weighed to assess weight loss compared to initial weight. Microbial activity was estimated monthly by the quantification of carbon dioxide (CO2 released into the edaphic breathing process from the soil surface, and captured by KOH solution. Weight loss of litter after one year was 41.19% and, after two years, was 48.37%, indicating a faster decomposition in the first year. Data analysis showed the influence of season on litter decomposition and temperature on microbial activity.

  10. Effect of Oxidizer Particle Size on Burning Rate and Thermal Decomposition of Composite Solid Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore

    1982-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies on Thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorarte(AP- polystyrene(PS propellant and burning rate of PS/AP propellant have been carried out as a function of oxidizer particle size. Thermal decomposition of AP and AP/PS propellant as function of AP particle size shows a maximum rate around 100 micro particle size which has been explained on the basis of Mample's theory. No such maximum is observed in the case of PS/AP propellant burning rate.

  11. Litter quality and decomposition rates of foliar litter produced under CO{sub 2} enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neill, E.G.; Norby, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Decomposition of senesced plant material is one of two critical processes linking above- and below-ground components of nutrient cycles. As such, it is a key area of concern in understanding and predicting ecosystem responses to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Just as root acquisition of nutrients from soils represents the major pathway for nutrient movement from the soil to vegetation, decomposition serves as the major path of return to the soil. For any given ecosystem, a long-term shift in decomposition rates could alter nutrient cycling rates and potentially change the structure, function, and even the persistence of that ecosystem type within a given region. There is wide-spread concern that decomposition processes would be altered in an enriched-CO{sub 2} world. What is lacking presently is sufficient experimental data at the ecosystem level to determine whether these concerns have merit. Two issues are discussed in this article: effects of carbon dioxide enrichement on foliar litter quality and subsequent effects on decomposition rates. The focus is primarily on nitrogen because in many terrestrial ecosystems, nitrogen is the major nutrient limiting plant growth and experimental results from diverse ecosystem types have demonstrated that nitrogen concentrations are consistently reduced in green foliage produced at elevated carbon dioxide. Methodological questions are also discussed.

  12. Leaf litter decomposition rates increase with rising mean annual temperature in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori D. Bothwell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Decomposing litter in forest ecosystems supplies nutrients to plants, carbon to heterotrophic soil microorganisms and is a large source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Despite its essential role in carbon and nutrient cycling, the temperature sensitivity of leaf litter decay in tropical forest ecosystems remains poorly resolved, especially in tropical montane wet forests where the warming trend may be amplified compared to tropical wet forests at lower elevations. We quantified leaf litter decomposition rates along a highly constrained 5.2 °C mean annual temperature (MAT gradient in tropical montane wet forests on the Island of Hawaii. Dominant vegetation, substrate type and age, soil moisture, and disturbance history are all nearly constant across this gradient, allowing us to isolate the effect of rising MAT on leaf litter decomposition and nutrient release. Leaf litter decomposition rates were a positive linear function of MAT, causing the residence time of leaf litter on the forest floor to decline by ∼31 days for each 1 °C increase in MAT. Our estimate of the Q10 temperature coefficient for leaf litter decomposition was 2.17, within the commonly reported range for heterotrophic organic matter decomposition (1.5–2.5 across a broad range of ecosystems. The percentage of leaf litter nitrogen (N remaining after six months declined linearly with increasing MAT from ∼88% of initial N at the coolest site to ∼74% at the warmest site. The lack of net N immobilization during all three litter collection periods at all MAT plots indicates that N was not limiting to leaf litter decomposition, regardless of temperature. These results suggest that leaf litter decay in tropical montane wet forests may be more sensitive to rising MAT than in tropical lowland wet forests, and that increased rates of N release from decomposing litter could delay or prevent progressive N limitation to net primary productivity with climate warming.

  13. Unimolecular Rate Expression for Cyclohexene Decomposition and Its Use in Chemical Thermometry under Shock Tube Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Wing; Rosado-Reyes, Claudette M

    2015-07-16

    The methods used in deriving the rate expressions from comparative rate single-pulse shock tube studies, recent direct shock tube studies, and high-pressure flow experiments bearing on the data for the reverse Diels-Alder decomposition of cyclohexene to form ethylene and 1,3-butadiene are reviewed. This current interest is due to the increasing need for accurate kinetics and physical data (particularly the temperature) for realistic simulations in practical areas such as combustion. The rate constants derived from the direct shock tube studies and high-pressure flow experiments are somewhat larger than those used in comparative rate single-pulse shock tube experiments. For the latter, it is shown that they have been derived from a variety of independent experiments that include rate constants for unimolecular decomposition and isomerization processes that are considered to be well understood. The possibility of non-Arrhenius behavior in the unimolecular rate constants as a consequence of the large range covered in rate constants (as much as 12 orders of magnitude) for the comparative rate experiments has been examined and ruled out as a source of the discrepancy. Our analysis shows that there is the need to consider the possibility of radical-induced decompositions for verifying the correctness of the reaction mechanisms in studying unimolecular reactions. In the case of cyclohexene decomposition, recent experiments demonstrating the presence of residual amounts of H atoms in shock tube experiments suggest that addition to the double bond can also lead to the formation of ethylene and 1,3-butadiene and hence to rate constants larger than the true values. This possibility is even more likely to occur in high-pressure flow experiments. As a result, the internal standard method must be used with care and a radical inhibitor should always be present in sufficiently large quantities to suppress possible chain reactions. The present analysis results have important

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhiza enhance the rate of litter decomposition while inhibiting soil microbial community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Heng; Hyde, Kevin; Xu, Jianchu; Mortimer, Peter

    2017-02-08

    Although there is a growing amount of evidence that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) influence the decomposition process, the extent of their involvement remains unclear. Therefore, given this knowledge gap, our aim was to test how AMF influence the soil decomposer communities. Dual compartment microcosms, where AMF (Glomus mosseae) were either allowed access (AM+) to or excluded (AM-) from forest soil compartments containing litterbags (leaf litter from Calophyllum polyanthum) were used. The experiment ran for six months, with destructive harvests at 0, 90, 120, 150, and 180 days. For each harvest we measured AMF colonization, soil nutrients, litter mass loss, and microbial biomass (using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA)). AMF significantly enhanced litter decomposition in the first 5 months, whilst delaying the development of total microbial biomass (represented by total PLFA) from T150 to T180. A significant decline in soil available N was observed through the course of the experiment for both treatments. This study shows that AMF have the capacity to interact with soil microbial communities and inhibit the development of fungal and bacterial groups in the soil at the later stage of the litter decomposition (180 days), whilst enhancing the rates of decomposition.

  15. Global negative vegetation feedback to climate warming responses of leaf litter decomposition rates in cold biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Johannes H C; van Bodegom, Peter M; Aerts, Rien; Callaghan, Terry V; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Alatalo, Juha; Chapin, F Stuart; Gerdol, Renato; Gudmundsson, Jon; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan; Hartley, Anne E; Hik, David S; Hofgaard, Annika; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg S; Karlsson, Staffan; Klein, Julia A; Laundre, Jim; Magnusson, Borgthor; Michelsen, Anders; Molau, Ulf; Onipchenko, Vladimir G; Quested, Helen M; Sandvik, Sylvi M; Schmidt, Inger K; Shaver, Gus R; Solheim, Bjørn; Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A; Stenström, Anna; Tolvanen, Anne; Totland, Ørjan; Wada, Naoya; Welker, Jeffrey M; Zhao, Xinquan

    2007-07-01

    Whether climate change will turn cold biomes from large long-term carbon sinks into sources is hotly debated because of the great potential for ecosystem-mediated feedbacks to global climate. Critical are the direction, magnitude and generality of climate responses of plant litter decomposition. Here, we present the first quantitative analysis of the major climate-change-related drivers of litter decomposition rates in cold northern biomes worldwide. Leaf litters collected from the predominant species in 33 global change manipulation experiments in circum-arctic-alpine ecosystems were incubated simultaneously in two contrasting arctic life zones. We demonstrate that longer-term, large-scale changes to leaf litter decomposition will be driven primarily by both direct warming effects and concomitant shifts in plant growth form composition, with a much smaller role for changes in litter quality within species. Specifically, the ongoing warming-induced expansion of shrubs with recalcitrant leaf litter across cold biomes would constitute a negative feedback to global warming. Depending on the strength of other (previously reported) positive feedbacks of shrub expansion on soil carbon turnover, this may partly counteract direct warming enhancement of litter decomposition.

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhiza enhance the rate of litter decomposition while inhibiting soil microbial community development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Heng; Hyde, Kevin; Xu, Jianchu; Mortimer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Although there is a growing amount of evidence that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) influence the decomposition process, the extent of their involvement remains unclear. Therefore, given this knowledge gap, our aim was to test how AMF influence the soil decomposer communities. Dual compartment microcosms, where AMF (Glomus mosseae) were either allowed access (AM+) to or excluded (AM−) from forest soil compartments containing litterbags (leaf litter from Calophyllum polyanthum) were used. The experiment ran for six months, with destructive harvests at 0, 90, 120, 150, and 180 days. For each harvest we measured AMF colonization, soil nutrients, litter mass loss, and microbial biomass (using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA)). AMF significantly enhanced litter decomposition in the first 5 months, whilst delaying the development of total microbial biomass (represented by total PLFA) from T150 to T180. A significant decline in soil available N was observed through the course of the experiment for both treatments. This study shows that AMF have the capacity to interact with soil microbial communities and inhibit the development of fungal and bacterial groups in the soil at the later stage of the litter decomposition (180 days), whilst enhancing the rates of decomposition. PMID:28176855

  17. Litter dynamics in two Sierran mixed conifer forests. I. Litterfall and decomposition rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Litterfall was measured for 4 years and leaf litter decomposition rates were studied for 3.6 years in two mixed conifer forest (giant sequoia-fir and fir-pine) in the southern Sierra Nevada of California. The giant sequoia-fir forest (GS site) was dominated by giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindl.) Buchh.), white fir (Abies concolor Lindl. & Gord.), and sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana Dougl.). The fir-pine forest (FP site) was dominated by white fir, sugar pine, and incense cedar (Calocedrus decurrens (Torr.) Florin). Litterfall, including large woody debris -1•year-1 compared with 4355 kg•ha-1•year-1 at the FP site (3.4:1). In the GS site, leaf litter decomposition after 3.6 years was slowest for giant sequoia (28.2% mass loss), followed by sugar pine (34.3%) and white fie (45.1%). In the FP site, mass loss was slowest for sugar pine (40.0%), followed by white fir (45.1%), while incense cedar showed the greatest mass loss (56.9%) after 3.6 years. High litterfall rates of large woody debris (i.e., 2.5-15.2 cm diameter) and slow rates of leaf litter decomposition in the giant sequoia-fir forest type may result in higher litter accumulation rates than in the fir-pine type. Leaf litter times to 95% decay for the GS and FP sites were 30 and 27 years, respectively, if the initial 0.7-year period (a short period of rapid mass decay) was ignored in the calculation. A mass balance approach for total litterfall (<15.2 cm diameter) decomposition yielded lower decay constants than did the litterbag study and therefore longer times to 95% decay (57 years for the GS site and 62 years for the FP site).

  18. Determination of Kinetic Parameters for Thermal Decomposition of Phenolic Ablative Materials by Multiple Heating Rate Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    the ratio method to analyze thermogravimetric data obtained for a urethane polymer. Baer, Hedges, Seader , Jayakar, and Wojcik6 heated samples of...reinforced polymers at heating rates up to 4200°C/min. The data were correlated by a numerical technique developed by Burningham and Seader .7 Friedman...Decomposition Through Thermogravimetric Analysis," Thermochimica Acta, No, 1, (1970), pp. 147-158. 6. A. D. Baer, J. H. Hedges, J. D. Seader , K. M. Jayakar

  19. Optimized FPGA Implementation of Multi-Rate FIR Filters Through Thread Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kayla N.; He, Yutao; Zheng, Jason X.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-rate finite impulse response (MRFIR) filters are among the essential signal-processing components in spaceborne instruments where finite impulse response filters are often used to minimize nonlinear group delay and finite precision effects. Cascaded (multistage) designs of MRFIR filters are further used for large rate change ratio in order to lower the required throughput, while simultaneously achieving comparable or better performance than single-stage designs. Traditional representation and implementation of MRFIR employ polyphase decomposition of the original filter structure, whose main purpose is to compute only the needed output at the lowest possible sampling rate. In this innovation, an alternative representation and implementation technique called TD-MRFIR (Thread Decomposition MRFIR) is presented. The basic idea is to decompose MRFIR into output computational threads, in contrast to a structural decomposition of the original filter as done in the polyphase decomposition. A naive implementation of a decimation filter consisting of a full FIR followed by a downsampling stage is very inefficient, as most of the computations performed by the FIR state are discarded through downsampling. In fact, only 1/M of the total computations are useful (M being the decimation factor). Polyphase decomposition provides an alternative view of decimation filters, where the downsampling occurs before the FIR stage, and the outputs are viewed as the sum of M sub-filters with length of N/M taps. Although this approach leads to more efficient filter designs, in general the implementation is not straightforward if the numbers of multipliers need to be minimized. In TD-MRFIR, each thread represents an instance of the finite convolution required to produce a single output of the MRFIR. The filter is thus viewed as a finite collection of concurrent threads. Each of the threads completes when a convolution result (filter output value) is computed, and activated when the first

  20. Decomposition rate comparisons between frequently burned and unburned areas of uneven-aged loblolly pine stands in southeastern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclele Renschin; Hal O. Leichty; Michael G. Shelton

    2001-01-01

    Although fire has been used extensively over long periods of time in loblolly pine (Pinis taeda L.) ecosystems, little is known concerning the effects of frequent fire use on nutrient cycling and decomposition. To better understand the long-term effects of fire on these processes, foliar litter decomposition rates were quantified in a study...

  1. Primal Decomposition-Based Method for Weighted Sum-Rate Maximization in Downlink OFDMA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weeraddana Chathuranga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the weighted sum-rate maximization problem in downlink Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA systems. Motivated by the increasing popularity of OFDMA in future wireless technologies, a low complexity suboptimal resource allocation algorithm is obtained for joint optimization of multiuser subcarrier assignment and power allocation. The algorithm is based on an approximated primal decomposition-based method, which is inspired from exact primal decomposition techniques. The original nonconvex optimization problem is divided into two subproblems which can be solved independently. Numerical results are provided to compare the performance of the proposed algorithm to Lagrange relaxation based suboptimal methods as well as to optimal exhaustive search-based method. Despite its reduced computational complexity, the proposed algorithm provides close-to-optimal performance.

  2. Hydrothermal decomposition of industrial jarosite in alkaline media: The rate determining step of the process kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Ibarra A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the role of NaOH and Ca(OH2 on the hydrothermal decomposition of industrial jarosite deposited by a Mexican company in a tailings dam. The industrial jarosite is mainly composed by natrojarosite and contains 150 g Ag/t, showing a narrow particle size distribution, as revealed by XRD, fire assay, SEM-EDS and laser-diffraction analysis. The effect of the pH, when using NaOH or Ca(OH2 as alkalinizing agent was studied by carrying out decomposition experiments at different pH values and 60°C in a homogeneous size particle system (pH = 8, 9, 10 and 11 and in a heterogeneous size particle system (pH = 11. Also, the kinetic study of the process and the controlling step of the decomposition reaction when NaOH and Ca(OH2 are used was determined by fitting the data obtained to the shrinking core model for spherical particles of constant size. These results, supported by chemical (EDS, morphological (SEM and mapping of elements (EDS analysis of a partially reacted jarosite particle allowed to conclude that when NaOH is used, the process kinetics is controlled by the chemical reaction and when Ca(OH2 is used, the rate determining step is changed to a diffusion control through a layer of solid products.

  3. A high success rate full-waveform lidar echo decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijun; Li, Duan; Li, Xiaolu

    2016-01-01

    A full-waveform Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) echo decomposition method is proposed in this paper. In this method, the peak points are used to detect the separated echo components, while the inflection points are combined with corresponding peak points to detect the overlapping echo components. The detected echo components are then sorted according to their energies in a descending order. The sorted echo components are one by one added into the decomposition model according to their orders. For each addition, the parameters of all echo components already added into the decomposition model are iteratively renewed. After renewing, the amplitudes and full width at half maximums of the echo components are compared with pre-set thresholds to determine and remove the false echo components. Both simulation and experiment were carried out to evaluate the proposed method. In simulation, 4000 full-waveform echoes with different numbers and parameters of echo components were generated and decomposed using the proposed and three other commonly used methods. Results show that the proposed method is of the highest success rate, 91.43%. In experiment, 9549 Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) echoes for Shennongjia forest district in south China were employed as test echoes. The test echoes were first decomposed using the four methods and the decomposition results were also compared with those provided by the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Comparison results show that the determination coefficient ({{R}2} ) of the proposed method is of the largest mean, 0.6838, and the smallest standard deviation, 0.3588, and the distribution of the number of the echo components decomposed from the GLAS echoes is the most satisfied with the situation of full-waveform echoes from the forest area, implying that the superposition of the echo components decomposed from a full-waveform echo by using the proposed method can best approximate the full-waveform echo.

  4. Rate coefficients for photoinitiated NO 2 unimolecular decomposition: energy dependence in the threshold regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyarov, D.; Polyakova, E.; Bezel, I.; Wittig, C.

    2002-05-01

    Rate coefficients k( E) for photoinitiated NO 2 unimolecular decomposition have been obtained by recording the product NO laser-induced fluorescence signal intensity versus the delay between the pump and probe pulses. A 10 ps pump-probe cross-correlation temporal width provides a useful compromise between time and frequency resolution (3 cm-1) . k( E) increases rapidly: from ˜2×10 10 to ⩾1.3×10 11 s-1 within 25 cm-1 of reaction threshold. In this regime, long-range interfragment interactions play an important role. A high level of theory will be needed to reconcile these results.

  5. Progressivity of personal income tax in Croatia: decomposition of tax base and rate effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Urban

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents progressivity breakdowns for Croatian personal income tax (henceforth PIT in 1997 and 2004. The decompositions reveal how the elements of the system – tax schedule, allowances, deductions and credits – contribute to the achievement of progressivity, over the quantiles of pre-tax income distribution. Through the use of ‘single parameter’ Gini indices, the social decision maker’s (henceforth SDM relatively more or less favorable inclination toward taxpayers in the lower tails of pre-tax income distribution is accounted for. Simulations are undertaken to show how the introduction of a flat-rate system would affect progressivity.

  6. Measurements of VOC/SVOC emission factors from burning incenses in an environmental test chamber: influence of temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoukian, A; Buiron, D; Temime-Roussel, B; Wortham, H; Quivet, E

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the influence of three environmental indoor parameters (i.e., temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate) on the emission of 13 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) during incense burning. Experiments have been carried out using an environmental test chamber. Statistical results from a classical two-level full factorial design highlight the predominant effect of ventilation on emission factors. The higher the ventilation, the higher the emission factor. Moreover, thanks to these results, an estimation of the concentration range for the compounds under study can be calculated and allows a quick look of indoor pollution induced by incense combustion. Carcinogenic substances (i.e., benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, and formaldehyde) produced from the incense combustion would be predicted in typical living indoors conditions to reach instantaneous concentration levels close to or higher than air quality exposure threshold values.

  7. Decomposition characteristics of toluene by a corona radical shower system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zu-liang; GAO Xiang; LUO Zhong-yang; NI Ming-jiang; CEN Ke-fa

    2004-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma technologies offer an innovative approach to decomposing various volatile organic compounds(VOCs). The decomposition of toluene from simulated flue gas was investigated using a pipe electrode with nozzles for the generation of free radicals. Corona characteristics and decomposition of toluene were investigated experimentally. In addition, the decomposition mechanism of toluene was explored in view of reaction rate. The experimental results showed that the humidity of additional gas has an important effect on corona characteristics and modes and stable streamer corona can be generated through optimizing flow rate and humidity of additional gas. Applied voltage, concentration of toluene, humidity of toluene and resident time are some important factors affecting decomposition efficiency. Under optimizing conditions, the decomposition efficiency of toluene can reach 80%. These results can give a conclusion that the corona radical shower technology is feasible and effective on the removal of toluene in the flue gas.

  8. Thermal decomposition rate of MgCO3 as an inorganic astrobiological matrix in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisceglia, E.; Longo, G. Micca; Longo, S.

    2017-04-01

    Carbonate minerals, likely of hydrothermal origins and included into orthopyroxenite, have been extensively studied in the ALH84001 meteorite. In this meteorite, nanocrystals comparable with those produced by magnetotactic bacteria have been found into a carbonate matrix. This leads naturally to a discussion of the role of such carbonates in panspermia theories. In this context, the present work sets the basis of a criterion to evaluate whether a carbonate matrix in a meteor entering a planetary atmosphere would be able to reach the surface. As a preliminary step, the composition of carbonate minerals in the ALH84001 meteorite is reviewed; in view of the predominance of Mg in these carbonates, pure magnesite (MgCO3) is proposed as a mineral model. This mineral is much more sensitive to high temperatures reached during an entry process, compared with silicates, due to facile decomposition into MgO and gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2). A most important quantity for further studies is therefore the decomposition rate expressed as CO2 evaporation rate J (molecules/m2 s). An analytical expression for J(T) is given using the Langmuir law, based on CO2 pressure in equilibrium with MgCO3 and MgO at the surface temperature T. Results suggest that carbonate minerals rich in magnesium may offer much better thermal protection to embedded biological matter than silicates and significantly better than limestone, which was considered in previous studies, in view of the heat absorbed by their decomposition even at moderate temperatures. This first study can be extended in the future to account for more complex compositions, including Fe and Ca.

  9. Thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates of BTATz-CMDB propellant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Wang, Bo-Zhou; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Cheng; Hu, Rong-Zu; Ren, Ying-Hui; Xu, Si-Yu; Xu, Kang-Zhen; Ren, Xiao-Ning

    2010-09-15

    The composite modified double base (CMDB) propellants (nos. RB0601 and RB0602) containing 3,6-bis (1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-yl-amino)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (BTATz) without and with the ballistic modifier were prepared and their thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates were investigated. The results show that there are three mass-loss stages in TG curve and two exothermic peaks in DSC curve for the BTATz-CMDB propellant. The first two mass-loss stages occur in succession and the temperature ranges are near apart, and the decomposition peaks of the two stages overlap each other, inducing only one visible exothermic peak appear in DSC curve during 350-550 K. The reaction mechanisms of the main exothermal decomposition processes of RB0601 and RB0602 are all classified as chemical reaction, the mechanism functions are f(alpha)=(1-alpha)(2), and the kinetic equations are dalpha/dt = 10(19.24)(1-alpha)(2)e(-2.32x10(4)/T) and dalpha/dt = 10(20.32)(1-alpha)(2)e(-2.32x10(4)/T). The thermal safety evaluation on the BTATz-CMDB propellants was obtained. With the substitution of 26% RDX by BTATz and with the help of the ballistic modifier in the CMDB propellant formulation, the burning rate can be improved by 89.0% at 8 MPa and 47.1% at 22 MPa, the pressure exponent can be reduced to 0.353 at 14-20 MPa.

  10. Thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates of BTATz-CMDB propellant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Jianhua [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China); Zhao Fengqi, E-mail: yiren@nwu.edu.cn [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China); Wang Bozhou; Liu Qian; Zhou Cheng; Hu Rongzu [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China); Ren Yinghui [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Xu Siyu [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China); Xu, Kang-Zhen [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Ren Xiaoning [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China)

    2010-09-15

    The composite modified double base (CMDB) propellants (nos. RB0601 and RB0602) containing 3,6-bis (1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-yl-amino)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (BTATz) without and with the ballistic modifier were prepared and their thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates were investigated. The results show that there are three mass-loss stages in TG curve and two exothermic peaks in DSC curve for the BTATz-CMDB propellant. The first two mass-loss stages occur in succession and the temperature ranges are near apart, and the decomposition peaks of the two stages overlap each other, inducing only one visible exothermic peak appear in DSC curve during 350-550 K. The reaction mechanisms of the main exothermal decomposition processes of RB0601 and RB0602 are all classified as chemical reaction, the mechanism functions are f({alpha}) = (1 - {alpha}){sup 2}, and the kinetic equations are d{alpha}/dt=10{sup 19.24}(1-{alpha}){sup 2}e{sup -2.32x10{sup 4/T}} and d{alpha}/dt=10{sup 20.32}(1-{alpha}){sup 2}e{sup -2.43x10{sup 4/T}}. The thermal safety evaluation on the BTATz-CMDB propellants was obtained. With the substitution of 26% RDX by BTATz and with the help of the ballistic modifier in the CMDB propellant formulation, the burning rate can be improved by 89.0% at 8 MPa and 47.1% at 22 MPa, the pressure exponent can be reduced to 0.353 at 14-20 MPa.

  11. On the convergence rate of a parallel nonoverlapping domain decomposition method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In recent years,a nonoverlapping domain decomposition iterative procedure,which is based on using Robin-type boundary conditions as information transmission conditions on the subdomain interfaces,has been developed and analyzed.It is known that the convergence rate of this method is 1-O(h),where h is mesh size.In this paper,the convergence rate is improved to be 1-O(h1/2 H-1/2)sometime by choosing suitable parameter,where H is the subdomain size.Counter examples are constructed to show that our convergence estimates are sharp,which means that the convergence rate cannot be better than 1-O(h1/2H-1/2)in a certain case no matter how parameter is chosen.

  12. On the convergence rate of a parallel nonoverlapping domain decomposition method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN LiZhen; SHI ZhongCi; XU XueJun

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, a nonoverlapping domain decomposition iterative procedure, which is based on using Robin-type boundary conditions as information transmission conditions on the subdomain interfaces, has been developed and analyzed. It is known that the convergence rate of this method is 1 - O(h), where h is mesh size. In this paper, the convergence rate is improved to be 1 - O(h1/2H-1/2) sometime by choosing suitable parameter, where H is the subdomain size. Counter examples are constructed to show that our convergence estimates are sharp, which means that the convergence rate cannot be better than 1 - O(h1/2H-1/2) in a certain case no matter how parameter is chosen.

  13. Pulsed Corona Discharges and Their Applications in Toxic VOCs Abatement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MuhammadArifMalik; SalmanAkbarMalik

    1999-01-01

    plasma processes are among the emerging technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sbatoment. Both thermal plasmas and non-equil[brimn plasmas (cold plasmas) are being developed for VOCs clesnup. Particularly, pulsed corona discharges offer several edvantages over conventional VOCs abatement tochniqvee, To optimize the existing technology and to developit further, there is need to understand the mechanlsms involved in plasma chemical reacticms, Furthermore, it is strongly desirable to be able to predict the behavior of new VOCs in non-equillbrlum plasma enviromuent from the data known for a few representative oompounds, Pulsed corona discharge technique is introduced here with dtafion of refevant literature, Fundamental principfes,useful for predicting the VOCs' decomposition behavior, have been worked out from the published literature. Latest developments in the area, targeted to minimize the enersy losses, improve the VOCs destruction efficiency and reduce the generation of unwanted organic and inorganic by-products, are presented.

  14. VOC emission into the atmosphere by trees and leaf litter in Polish forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidorov, V.; Smolewska, M.; Tyszkiewicz, Z.

    2009-04-01

    of vital activity of fungi which decompose leaf litter. Verification of the hypothesis was carried out in the frames of a long-term experiment on decomposition of Scots pine and common spruce litter. The experiment was conducted in natural conditions by placing litter bags on undisturbed topsoil in a forest area where pine and spruce trees prevailed. Part of the needles placed were taken out of the litter bags on the 30th, 282nd, 490th, 630th and 920th day of the experiment for subsequent isolation of fungi which colonize the litter (overall there were identified 98 species which belong to 48 genera of fungi). The experiment revealed that species composition of the fungi colonizing pine and spruce litter varies considerably. At the early stages of decomposition, dematiceous hypnomycetes, which belongs to Cladosporum, Alternaria genera as well as Hormonem genus, capable of utilizing pectin, were dominant species. At the later stages they were substituted with phycomycetes (Mucor sp.), ascomycetes (Penicillium sp.) and basidiomycetes (Trichderma sp.), the most significant group of "secondary saprophytes" able to carry out biodegradation of polysaccharides and lignin. In volatile emissions of all the 15 species of fungi there were identified 80 VOCs of different classes: terpene hydrocarbons and their oxygenated derivatives, C6-C14 aliphatic and C6-C10 aromatic hydrocarbons, C1-C8 alcohols, C2-C9 carbonyls, esters, furans, and halocarbons. VOC composition was specific for each fungi species and depended on the litter of a particular tree species from which it had been isolated. For instance, the emission rate of terpenes, alcohols and carbonyl compounds by Trichoderma polysporum isolated from pine and spruce litter was 3-5 times different. Differences in composition of VOCs emitted into the gas phase by "primary" and "secondary" fungi species which colonize pine and spruce litter are also discussed. This work was supported by Grant MNiSW N305 067 32/2411.

  15. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  16. Macrophyte decomposition in a surface-flow ammonia-dominated constructed wetland: Rates associated with environmental and biotic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thullen, J.S.; Nelson, S.M.; Cade, B.S.; Sartoris, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Decomposition of senesced culm material of two bulrush species was studied in a surface-flow ammonia-dominated treatment wetland in southern California. Decomposition of the submerged culm material during summer months was relatively rapid (k = 0.037 day-1), but slowed under extended submergence (up to 245 days) and during fall and spring sampling periods (k = 0.009-0.014 day-1). Stepwise regression of seasonal data indicated that final water temperature and abundance of the culm-mining midge, Glyptotendipes, were significantly associated with culm decomposition. Glyptotendipes abundance, in turn, was correlated with water quality parameters such as conductivity and dissolved oxygen and ammonia concentrations. No differences were detected in decomposition rates between the bulrush species, Schoenoplectus californicus and Schoenoplectus acutus.

  17. Decrease in the rate of thermal decomposition of lead and barium styphnates in a radiation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabykh, S.M.; Kholodkovskaya, N.V.; Zhulanova, V.P. [Kemerovo State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The effect of radiation on the thermolysis of lead and barium styphnates C{sub 6}H(NO{sub 2}){sub 3}O{sub 2}Pb{center_dot}H{sub 2}O and C{sub 6}H(NO{sub 2}){sub 3}O{sub 2}Ba{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, which are priming explosives, was studied. Decomposition of the substances was evaluated by measuring a decrease in the concentration of styphnate ions, as determined by chemical analysis. Irradiation was carried out on an RkhM-{gamma}-20 {sup 60}Co {gamma}-radiation source at a dose rate of D {approx} 10 kGy/h. Thermostating was performed in the temperature range 120-190{degrees}C to within {plus_minus}0.5{degrees}/C.

  18. PRINCIPAL COMPONENT DECOMPOSITION BASED FINITE ELEMENT MODEL UPDATING FOR STRAIN-RATE-DEPENDENCE NONLINEAR DYNAMIC PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qintao; ZHANG Lingmi; TAO Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Thin wall component is utilized to absorb impact energy of a structure. However, the dynamic behavior of such thin-walled structure is highly non-linear with material, geometry and boundary non-linearity. A model updating and validation procedure is proposed to build accurate finite element model of a frame structure with a non-linear thin-walled component for dynamic analysis. Design of experiments (DOE) and principal component decomposition (PCD) approach are applied to extract dynamic feature from nonlinear impact response for correlation of impact test result and FE model of the non-linear structure. A strain-rate-dependent non-linear model updating method is then developed to build accurate FE model of the structure. Computer simulation and a real frame structure with a highly non-linear thin-walled component are employed to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  19. VOC emissions chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In order to support the development of test methods and reference materials for volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions from building materials and furnishings,...

  20. Edge effects on moisture reduce wood decomposition rate in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockatt, Martha E; Bebber, Daniel P

    2015-02-01

    Forests around the world are increasingly fragmented, and edge effects on forest microclimates have the potential to affect ecosystem functions such as carbon and nutrient cycling. Edges tend to be drier and warmer due to the effects of insolation, wind, and evapotranspiration and these gradients can penetrate hundreds of metres into the forest. Litter decomposition is a key component of the carbon cycle, which is largely controlled by saprotrophic fungi that respond to variation in temperature and moisture. However, the impact of forest fragmentation on litter decay is poorly understood. Here, we investigate edge effects on the decay of wood in a temperate forest using an experimental approach, whereby mass loss in wood blocks placed along 100 m transects from the forest edge to core was monitored over 2 years. Decomposition rate increased with distance from the edge, and was correlated with increasing humidity and moisture content of the decaying wood, such that the decay constant at 100 m was nearly twice that at the edge. Mean air temperature decreased slightly with distance from the edge. The variation in decay constant due to edge effects was larger than that expected from any reasonable estimates of climatic variation, based on a published regional model. We modelled the influence of edge effects on the decay constant at the landscape scale using functions for forest area within different distances from edge across the UK. We found that taking edge effects into account would decrease the decay rate by nearly one quarter, compared with estimates that assumed no edge effect. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Photoinitiated unimolecular decomposition of NO2: Rotational dependence of the dissociation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezel, I.; Ionov, P.; Wittig, C.

    1999-11-01

    Photoinitiated unimolecular decomposition rate constants of rotationally excited NO2 molecules have been measured near dissociation threshold (D0) by employing a double resonance technique. Rotational selectivity has been achieved by using narrow-linewidth (0.015 cm-1) infrared excitation to prepare specific rotational levels (N'=1,3,…,15, Ka'=0) of the (1,0,1) vibrational level. The picosecond-resolution pump-probe technique has then been used to photodissociate the molecules thus tagged and to monitor the appearance of the NO product. Data have been obtained for two progressions of average excess energies, -D0: (i) 10 cm-1+E101rot and (ii) 75 cm-1+E101rot, where denotes an average over the pump laser linewidth and E101rot is the rotational energy of the (1,0,1) X˜ 2A1 intermediate vibrational level. The measured rate constants do not display any noticeable dependence on N', which is a reflection of significant rovibronic interaction. Spin-rotation interaction, which has been implicated as the main source of rovibronic coupling for small values of N', is not likely to yield such a result. A model is proposed to describe the influence of rotation on the dissociation rate. The experimental data are consistent with a Coriolis coupling mechanism causing transitions to occur between Ka levels.

  2. Potential rates of anaerobic decomposition and experimental priming effects in thawed peats from discontinuous permafrost in western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estop Aragones, C.; Heffernan, L.; Olefeldt, D.

    2016-12-01

    Recent climate change has led to increased rates of warming and wildfire in the circumpolar region. It is predicted that this will promote the widespread thawing of permafrost and the development of thermokarst bogs in the peatlands of western Canada. Previously frozen deep organic matter becomes available to microbial activity with thermokarst with the potential loss of C stocks while liberating greenhouse gases to the atmosphere and creating a positive feedback to climate change. Although anoxic conditions in these waterlogged systems may reduce peat decomposition, fresh plant derived C inputs associated with high vegetation productivity post-thaw could increase peat decomposition. The effect of this potential mechanism on enhanced peat decomposition is poorly investigated though. We are measuring anaerobic CO2 and CH4 production rates from a peat plateau, an adjacent young and an old thermokarst feature in the discontinuous permafrost. Samples were selected from depths where peat has been exposed to seasonal thaw (active layer) and from deeper, previously frozen organic matter along 5 m profiles. Preliminary results indicate that most CO2 production is driven by the top meter of peat, especially in the recent thermokarst where the highest rates of CH4 production are also measured due to high vegetation productivity post-thaw. Data suggests that the decomposition of deeper peat is more temperature sensitive. We are considering a 13C labelling experiment to investigate the priming effects on heterotrophic respiration of organic matter heterotrophic respiration once the labile C pool has been depleted and production rates have become stable over time. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy will be used to determine how peat quality is related to anaerobic decomposition rates, its temperature dependency, and priming effects. These measurements aim to constrain the fate of C through anaerobic decomposition upon permafrost thaw.

  3. Dramatic Decomposition Weakening of Simulated Faults in Carrara Marble at Seismic Slip-rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, R.; Shimamoto, T.; Hirose, T.; Ree, J.

    2005-12-01

    Evolution of fault-zone strength and its weakening mechanisms during an earthquake are critical for understanding of earthquake rupture process. We report dramatic weakening of dry simulated faults in Carrara marble at seismic slip-rates, with frictional coefficient as low as 0.04 (probably the lowest record as rock friction). Calcite decomposition was confirmed by in-situ CO2 detection and other methods and the weakening may require new weakening mechanisms other than currently suggested ones such as frictional melting, thermal pressurization and silica gel formation. We conducted rotary-shear friction experiments on Carrara marble at slip-rates (V) of 0.09-1.24 m/s and normal stresses (σn) of 2.5-13.4 MPa. For preventing a thermal fracturing and applying a high normal load, we used solid cylindrical specimens jacketed with aluminum tubes. Narrow gap was left between the two aluminum tubes to avoid metal-to-metal contact. Our main results can be summarized as follows: (1) Slip weakening occurs in all experiments except for the runs at the lowest V (0.09 m/s); (2) Steady-state friction coefficient (μss) decreases as slip-rate and normal load increase; (3) At the highest V (1.13-1.24 m/s) and σn = 7.3 MPa, the average friction coefficient of initial peak friction (μp) is 0.61 (± 0.02), but the average μss is 0.04! (± 0.01) which is much lower than μp; (4) Decrease in average temperature of sliding surfaces corresponds to increase in friction, and strength recovery occurs very rapidly and completely upon cooling of specimens; (5) XRD and EPMA data show that the gouge for the specimens at V > 0.09 m/s is composed of calcite, lime (CaO) and/or hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2); (6) CO2 gas was detected with sensors during the weakening; (7) Decomposed calcite forms a fault zone consisting of ultrafine-grained gouge, but no melt or amorphous material was identified by optical microscopy or XRD analysis. Calcite decomposition clearly indicates that temperature in the fault

  4. The trait contribution to wood decomposition rates of 15 neotropical tree species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, van K.G.; Poorter, L.; Sass-Klaassen, U.; Logtestijn, R.S.P.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.

    2010-01-01

    The decomposition of dead wood is a critical uncertainty in models of the global carbon cycle. Despite this, relatively few studies have focused on dead wood decomposition, with a strong bias to higher latitudes. Especially the effect of inter-specific variation in species traits on differences wood

  5. Climate change effects on organic matter decomposition rates in ecosystems from the Maritime Antarctic and Falkland Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst, S.F.; Huiskes, A.H.L.; Convey, P.; Aerts, R.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems have poorly developed soils and currently experience one of the greatest rates of climate warming on the globe. We investigated the responsiveness of organic matter decomposition in Maritime Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems to climate change, using two study sites in

  6. Climate change effects on organic matter decomposition rates in ecosystems from the Maritime Antarctic and Falkland Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst, S.F.; Huiskes, A.H.L.; Convey, P.; Aerts, R.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems have poorly developed soils and currently experience one of the greatest rates of climate warming on the globe. We investigated the responsiveness of organic matter decomposition in Maritime Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems to climate change, using two study sites in

  7. Effects of different land use on soil chemical properties, decomposition rate and earthworm communities in tropical Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geissen, V.; Peña-Peña, K.; Huerta, E.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of land use on soil chemical properties were evaluated, and earthworm communities and the decomposition rate of three typical land use systems in tropical Mexico, namely banana plantations (B), agroforestry systems (AF) and a successional forest (S) were compared. The study was carried o

  8. The Stone Cold Truth: The Effect of Concrete Encasement on the Rate and Pattern of Soft Tissue Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D C; Dabbs, Gretchen R; Roberts, Lindsey G; Cleary, Megan K

    2016-03-01

    This study provides a descriptive analysis of taphonomic changes observed in the soft tissue of ten pigs (Sus scrofa) after being encased in Quickrete (®) concrete and excavated at monthly or bimonthly intervals over the course of 2 years. The best method of subject excavation was investigated. Rate and pattern of decomposition were compared to a nonencased control subject. Results demonstrate subjects interred in concrete decomposed significantly slower than the control subject (p < 0.01), the difference being observable after 1 month. After 1 year, the encased subject was in the early stage of decomposition with purging fluids and intact organs present, versus complete skeletonization of the control subject. Concrete subjects also display a unique decomposition pattern, exhibiting a chemically burned outer layer of skin and a common separation of the dermal and epidermal layers. Results suggest using traditional methods to estimate postmortem interval on concrete subjects may result in underestimation.

  9. Rates of Decomposition of Ribose and other Sugars: Implications for Chemical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, Rosa; Robertson, Michael P.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1995-01-01

    The existence of the RNA world, in which RNA acted as a catalyst as well as an informational macromolecule, assumes a large prebiotic source of ribose or the existence of pre-RNA molecules with backbones different from ribose-phosphate. The generally accepted prebiotic synthesis of ribose, the formose reaction, yields numerous sugars without any selectivity. Even if there were a selective synthesis of ribose, there is still the problem of stability. Sugars are known to be unstable in strong acid or base, but there are few data for neutral solutions. Therefore, we have measured the rate of decomposition of ribose between pH 4 and pH 8 from 40 C to 120 C. The ribose half-lives are very short (73 min at pH 7.0 and 100 C and 44 years at pH 7.0 and 0 C). The other aldopentoses and aldohexoses have half-lives within an order of magnitude of these values, as do 2-deoxyribose, ribose 5-phosphate, and ribose 2,4bisphosphate. These results suggest that the backbone of the first genetic material could not have contained ribose or other sugars because of their instability.

  10. Intercropping affects the rate of decomposition of soil organic matter and root litter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cong, W.; Hoffland, E.; Li, L.; Janssen, B.H.; Werf, van der W.

    2015-01-01

    Aims - Intercropping increases aboveground and belowground crop productivity, suggesting potential for carbon sequestration. Here we determined whether intercropping affects decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and root litter. Methods - We measured in the laboratory and the field the

  11. Intercropping affects the rate of decomposition of soil organic matter and root litter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cong, W.; Hoffland, E.; Li, L.; Janssen, B.H.; Werf, van der W.

    2015-01-01

    Aims - Intercropping increases aboveground and belowground crop productivity, suggesting potential for carbon sequestration. Here we determined whether intercropping affects decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and root litter. Methods - We measured in the laboratory and the field the breakdow

  12. Estimation of Critical Rate of Temperature Rise for Thermal Explosion of First Order Autocatalytic Decomposition Reaction Systems by Using Non-isothermal DSC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Peng-jiang; LU Gui-e; JIANG Ji-you; HU Rong-zu; ZHANG Hai; XIA Zhi-ming; SONG Ji-rong; GAO Sheng-li; NING Bin-ke; SHI Qi-zhen; LIU Rong

    2004-01-01

    A method of estimating the critical rate of temperature rise for the thermal explosion of first order autocatalytic decomposition reaction systems by using non-isothermal DSC is presented. The information was obtained on the increasing rate of temperature for the first order autocatalytic decomposition of nitrocellulose containing 13.86% nitrogen converting into the thermal explosion.

  13. An experimental investigation of the effect of rotation on the rate of unimolecular decomposition of NO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, P. I.; Bezel, I.; Ionov, S. I.; Wittig, C.

    1997-06-01

    The effect of rotational excitation on the rate of unimolecular decomposition has been examined for a benchmark system. NO 2 molecules having specific excitations were selected by pumping rotational components of the (1,0,1) ← (0,0,0) combination band with the output from a 0.02 cm -1 resolution parametric oscillator, and reaction rates were obtained by applying the picosecond-resolution pump-probe technique to these tagged species. The addition of up to 100 cm -1 of rotational energy ( N ⩽ 15, Ka = 0), with other parameters held fixed, left the rate unaffected. Implications are discussed within the framework of statistical rate theories.

  14. Quantification of the effects of management factors on maize(Zea mays L. ) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. ) residues decomposition rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Efforts to quantify management effects on decomposition rate of added substrates to the soil is important especially where such information is to be used for prediction in mathematical or simulation models. Using data from a short-term (60 days) greenhouse simulation study, a procedure for quantdying effects of management on SOM and substrate decomposition is presented. Using microbial growth rate u ( q ),microbial efficiency in substrate utilization e (q), specific decomposition rates for added plant residues to two contrasting soils, red earth (Ferrasol) and black earth (Acrisol) were estimated. The treatments included straw addition + buried, (T1); straw addition + mineral N (T2); and straw addition + tillage, (T3). Sampling was done every 15 days. Straw decomposition rate was affected by external mineral N sources (Urea 46% N). Addition of an external N source significantly increased decomposition rates. The study could not, however, fully account for the effect of tillage on residues because of the limited effect of the tillage method due to the artificial barrier to mechanical interference supplied by the mesh bags. It is concluded that using few decomposer parameters, decomposition rates and consequently SOM trends in a soil system can be monitored and quantification of the influence of perturbations on decomposition rate of added substrates possible.

  15. Drivers of CO2 Emission Rates from Dead Wood Logs of 13 Tree Species in the Initial Decomposition Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiemo Kahl

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Large dead wood is an important structural component of forest ecosystems and a main component of forest carbon cycles. CO2 emissions from dead wood can be used as a proxy for actual decomposition rates. The main drivers of CO2 emission rates for dead wood of temperate European tree species are largely unknown. We applied a novel, closed chamber measurement technique to 360 dead wood logs of 13 important tree species in three regions in Germany. We found that tree species identity was with 71% independent contribution to the model (R2 = 0.62 the most important driver of volume-based CO2 emission rates, with angiosperms having on average higher rates than conifers. Wood temperature and fungal species richness had a positive effect on CO2 emission rates, whereas wood density had a negative effect. This is the first time that positive fungal species richness—wood decomposition relationship in temperate forests was shown. Certain fungal species were associated with high or low CO2 emission rates. In addition, as indicated by separate models for each tree species, forest management intensity, study region, and the water content as well as C and N concentration of dead wood influenced CO2 emission rates.

  16. Ecosystem function in oil sands wetlands : rates of detrital decomposition, moss growth, and microbial respiration in oilsands wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wytrykush, C. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada); Hornung, J. [Petro-Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    A study was conducted in which leaf litter breakdown and biomass accrual in 31 reference and oilsands affected (OSPM) wetlands in Northeastern Alberta was examined. The purpose was to determine how the decomposition of dead plant matter controls the primary productivity in wetlands. The data collected from this study will provide information about carbon flow and dynamics in oilsands affected wetlands. The study involved the investigation of wetlands that contrasted in water origin (OSPM vs. reference), sediment origin (OSPM vs. natural), sediment organic content and age. Mesh bags containing 5 g of dried Typha (cattail) or 20 g of damp moss were placed into 31 wetlands in order to monitor the rate at which biomass was lost to decomposition, as measured by changes in dry mass. After 1 year, moss growth was found to be greatest in younger wetlands with natural sediments. Cattail decomposition was found to be slower in wetlands containing OSPM water than that in reference wetlands. Preliminary analysis of respiration rates of biota associated with decomposing cattail indicate that the amount of oxygen consumed is not affected by wetland water source, sediment source, level of initial sediment organic content, or age.

  17. A Taphonomic Study Exploring the Differences in Decomposition Rate and Manner between Frozen and Never Frozen Domestic Pigs (Sus scrofa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lindsey G; Dabbs, Gretchen R

    2015-05-01

    This research examined differences in decomposition rate and manner of domestic pig subjects (Sus scrofa) in never frozen (control) and previously frozen (experimental) research conditions. Eight control and experimental subjects were placed in an identical outdoor research environment. Daily quantitative and qualitative measurements were collected: abdominal circumference, total body score (TBS), temperature, photographs, descriptive decomposition stages, and visual observations. Field necropsies were performed at accumulated degree days (ADD) between 50 and 300 (Celsius). Paired samples t-tests of ADD to TBS >3.0, TBS >9.5, and TBS >16.0 indicate the rate of decomposition of experimental subjects was significantly slower than controls at both TBS >3 and >9.5 (p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). A suite of qualitative indicators of predecomposition freezing is also reported. The differences between experimental and control subjects suggest previously frozen subjects should not be used in taphonomic research, as results do not accurately reflect the "normal" taphonomic condition.

  18. Introducing a decomposition rate modifier in the Rothamsted Carbon Model to predict soil organic carbon stocks in saline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Raj; Smith, Pete; Marschner, Petra; Baldock, Jeff; Chittleborough, David; Smith, Jo

    2011-08-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) models such as the Rothamsted Carbon Model (RothC) have been used to estimate SOC dynamics in soils over different time scales but, until recently, their ability to accurately predict SOC stocks/carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions from salt-affected soils has not been assessed. Given the large extent of salt-affected soils (19% of the 20.8 billion ha of arable land on Earth), this may lead to miss-estimation of CO(2) release. Using soils from two salt-affected regions (one in Punjab, India and one in South Australia), an incubation study was carried out measuring CO(2) release over 120 days. The soils varied both in salinity (measured as electrical conductivity (EC) and calculated as osmotic potential using EC and water content) and sodicity (measured as sodium adsorption ratio, SAR). For soils from both regions, the osmotic potential had a significant positive relationship with CO(2)-C release, but no significant relationship was found between SAR and CO(2)-C release. The monthly cumulative CO(2)-C was simulated using RothC. RothC was modified to take into account reductions in plant inputs due to salinity. A subset of non-salt-affected soils was used to derive an equation for a "lab-effect" modifier to account for changes in decomposition under lab conditions and this modifier was significantly related with pH. Using a subset of salt-affected soils, a decomposition rate modifier (as a function of osmotic potential) was developed to match measured and modelled CO(2)-C release after correcting for the lab effect. Using this decomposition rate modifier, we found an agreement (R(2) = 0.92) between modelled and independently measured data for a set of soils from the incubation experiment. RothC, modified by including reduced plant inputs due to salinity and the salinity decomposition rate modifier, was used to predict SOC stocks of soils in a field in South Australia. The predictions clearly showed that SOC stocks are reduced in saline soils

  19. Theoretical study of the pressure dependent rate constants of the thermal decomposition of β-propiolactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Shiroudi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical study of the thermal decomposition of β-propiolactone is carried out using ab initio molecular orbital (MO methods at the MP2/6-311+G∗∗ level and Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus (RRKM theory. The reported experimental results showed that decomposition of β-propiolactone occurred by three competing homogeneous and first order reactions. For the three reactions, the calculation was also performed at the MP2/6-311+G∗∗ level of theory, as well as by single-point calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G∗∗//MP2/6-311+G∗∗, and MP4/6-311+G∗∗//MP2/6-311+G∗∗ levels of theory. The fall-off pressures for the decomposition in these reactions are found to be 2.415, 9.423 × 10−2 and 3.676 × 10−3 mmHg, respectively.

  20. Does tree species richness attenuate the effect of experimental irrigation and drought on decomposition rate in young plantation forests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masudur Rahman, Md; Verheyen, Kris; Castagneyrol, Bastien; Jactel, Hervé; Carnol, Monique

    2017-04-01

    Expected changes in precipitation in Europe due to climate change are likely to affect soil organic matter (OM) transformation. In forests, increasing tree species diversity might modulate the effect of changed precipitation. We evaluated the effect of tree species richness on the decomposition and stabilization rate in combination with reduced precipitation (FORBIO, Belgium) and irrigation treatment (ORPHEE, southern France) in young (6-8 yr.) experimental plantations. The species richness were one to four in FORBIO and one to five in ORPHEE. Twenty four rainout shelters of 3 m × 3 m were built around oak and beech trees in FORBIO plantation to impose a reduced precipitation treatment, whereas four of the eight blocks (175 m×100 m) in ORPHEE plantation was subjected to irrigation treatment. These treatments resulted in about 4% less soil moisture in FORBIO and about 7% higher soil moisture in ORPHEE compared to control. Commercially available green and rooibos tea bags were buried in the soil at 5-7 cm depth to measure two decomposition indices, known as 'tea bag index' (TBI). These TBI are (i) decomposition rate (k) and (ii) stabilization rate (S). The results showed no species richness effect on TBI indices in both reduced precipitation and irrigation treatment. In FORBIO, reduced precipitation resulted in decreased k and increased S compared to control around the beech trees only. In ORPHEE, both k and S were higher in the irrigation treatment compared to control. Overall, TBI indices were higher in FORBIO than ORPHEE and this might be explained by the sandy soils and poor nutrient content at the ORPHEE site. These results suggest that OM decomposition rate may be slower in drier condition and OM stabilization rate may be slower or faster in drier condition, depending on the site quality. The absence of tree species effects on OM transformation indicates that tree species richness would not be able to modulate the effects of changed precipitation patterns in

  1. Effects of different tree species on soil organic matter composition, decomposition rates and temperature sensitivities in boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Javier; Nilsson, Mats B.; Erhagen, Björn; Sparrman, Tobias; Ilstedt, Ulrik; Schleucher, Jürgen; Öquist, Mats

    2017-04-01

    High-latitude ecosystems store a large proportion of the global soil organic matter (SOM) and its mineralization constitutes a major carbon flux to the atmosphere. It has been suggested that different tree species can significantly influence organo-chemical composition of SOM, and rate and temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition. In this study we used surface soil samples (top 5 cm) from a field experiment where five different tree species (Pinus silvestrys L, Picea abies (L.) H. Karst., Larix decidua Mill., Betula pendula Roth, and Pinus contorta Douglas) were planted on a grass meadow in a randomized block design (n=3) ca. 40 years ago. The samples were incubated at 4, 9, 14, and 19 °C at a soil water potential of -25 kPa (previously determined as optimal water content for decomposition). CO2 production rates were measured hourly for 13 days. CO2 production rates were consequently lowest in the control plots and increased in the order Meadow< Contorta < Betula < Larix < Pinus < Picea. The values ranged between 0.03-0.1, 0.06-0.154, 0.1-0.24 and 0.13-0.36 mg CO2 g-1 OM (dw) h-1 at 4, 9, 14 and 19°C respectively. The temperature response of CO2 production corresponded to Q10s of 2.22 (±0.11), 2.22(±0.15), 2.66 (±0.18), 2.09 (±0.33), 2.38 (±0.31) and 2.31 (±0.09) for meadow, contorta, betula, larix, pinus and picea respectively. Only betula resulted in significantly higher Q10s as compared to the control plots, picea, contorta and larix treatments. These differences in tree species effects on SOM decomposition and its temperature sensitivity will be further discussed in relation to the organo-chemical composition of SOM as determined by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) techniques. We conclude that the temperature response of SOM decomposition rates is likely coupled to tree species composition and may have important implications for soil C dynamics. This finding can have

  2. Influence of different forest system management practices on leaf litter decomposition rates, nutrient dynamics and the activity of ligninolytic enzymes: a case study from central European forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purahong, Witoon; Kapturska, Danuta; Pecyna, Marek J; Schulz, Elke; Schloter, Michael; Buscot, François; Hofrichter, Martin; Krüger, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Leaf litter decomposition is the key ecological process that determines the sustainability of managed forest ecosystems, however very few studies hitherto have investigated this process with respect to silvicultural management practices. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of forest management practices on leaf litter decomposition rates, nutrient dynamics (C, N, Mg, K, Ca, P) and the activity of ligninolytic enzymes. We approached these questions using a 473 day long litterbag experiment. We found that age-class beech and spruce forests (high forest management intensity) had significantly higher decomposition rates and nutrient release (most nutrients) than unmanaged deciduous forest reserves (Pforest management (low forest management intensity) exhibited no significant differences in litter decomposition rate, C release, lignin decomposition, and C/N, lignin/N and ligninolytic enzyme patterns compared to the unmanaged deciduous forest reserves, but most nutrient dynamics examined in this study were significantly faster under such near-to-nature forest management practices. Analyzing the activities of ligninolytic enzymes provided evidence that different forest system management practices affect litter decomposition by changing microbial enzyme activities, at least over the investigated time frame of 473 days (laccase, Pforest system management practices can significantly affect important ecological processes and services such as decomposition and nutrient cycling.

  3. Influence of different forest system management practices on leaf litter decomposition rates, nutrient dynamics and the activity of ligninolytic enzymes: a case study from central European forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witoon Purahong

    Full Text Available Leaf litter decomposition is the key ecological process that determines the sustainability of managed forest ecosystems, however very few studies hitherto have investigated this process with respect to silvicultural management practices. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of forest management practices on leaf litter decomposition rates, nutrient dynamics (C, N, Mg, K, Ca, P and the activity of ligninolytic enzymes. We approached these questions using a 473 day long litterbag experiment. We found that age-class beech and spruce forests (high forest management intensity had significantly higher decomposition rates and nutrient release (most nutrients than unmanaged deciduous forest reserves (P<0.05. The site with near-to-nature forest management (low forest management intensity exhibited no significant differences in litter decomposition rate, C release, lignin decomposition, and C/N, lignin/N and ligninolytic enzyme patterns compared to the unmanaged deciduous forest reserves, but most nutrient dynamics examined in this study were significantly faster under such near-to-nature forest management practices. Analyzing the activities of ligninolytic enzymes provided evidence that different forest system management practices affect litter decomposition by changing microbial enzyme activities, at least over the investigated time frame of 473 days (laccase, P<0.0001; manganese peroxidase (MnP, P = 0.0260. Our results also indicate that lignin decomposition is the rate limiting step in leaf litter decomposition and that MnP is one of the key oxidative enzymes of litter degradation. We demonstrate here that forest system management practices can significantly affect important ecological processes and services such as decomposition and nutrient cycling.

  4. Okun's Law, Creation of Money and the Decomposition of the Rate of Unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane Mussard; Bernard Philippe

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we show that the rate of unemployment in period t depends on GDP and inflation rate in period t-1. We then show that GDP is related to money creation, and subsequently that the rate of unemployment is a decreasing function of this creation.

  5. Dejima VOC dan rangaku

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Wibawarta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Japan and the Netherlands have maintained a special relationship for about 300years since the adoption of the National Seclusion policy, the so-called sakoku bythe Tokugawa shogunate (1603-1867. The Dutch began trading with Japan andengaging with Japanese society in 1600, when a Dutch ship, De Liefde, arrived inKyushu. The Tokugawa government measures regarding foreign policy includedregulations on foreign access to Japan and a prohibition on Japanese goingabroad. Between the middle of the seventeenth to the early nineteenth century,Japan was characterized by a stable political pattern in which representativesof the VOC (Dutch East India Company, were the only Europeans with a rightto trade in Japan. In the course of this period, the Japanese evaluation of theDutch changed from regarding them as commercial agents to seeing them asimporters of European knowledge. This paper is especially concerned with theinfluence of the so-called ‘Dutch Studies’ (rangaku on the early modernizationof Japan, especially with regard to medicine and the natural sciences. Thisresearch examines the development of rangaku and the trading between Japanand VOC at Dejima.

  6. Enstrophy-based proper orthogonal decomposition of flow past rotating cylinder at super-critical rotating rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Gullapalli, Atchyut

    2016-11-01

    Spinning cylinder rotating about its axis experiences a transverse force/lift, an account of this basic aerodynamic phenomenon is known as the Robins-Magnus effect in text books. Prandtl studied this flow by an inviscid irrotational model and postulated an upper limit of the lift experienced by the cylinder for a critical rotation rate. This non-dimensional rate is the ratio of oncoming free stream speed and the surface speed due to rotation. Prandtl predicted a maximum lift coefficient as CLmax = 4π for the critical rotation rate of two. In recent times, evidences show the violation of this upper limit, as in the experiments of Tokumaru and Dimotakis ["The lift of a cylinder executing rotary motions in a uniform flow," J. Fluid Mech. 255, 1-10 (1993)] and in the computed solution in Sengupta et al. ["Temporal flow instability for Magnus-robins effect at high rotation rates," J. Fluids Struct. 17, 941-953 (2003)]. In the latter reference, this was explained as the temporal instability affecting the flow at higher Reynolds number and rotation rates (>2). Here, we analyze the flow past a rotating cylinder at a super-critical rotation rate (=2.5) by the enstrophy-based proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of direct simulation results. POD identifies the most energetic modes and helps flow field reconstruction by reduced number of modes. One of the motivations for the present study is to explain the shedding of puffs of vortices at low Reynolds number (Re = 60), for the high rotation rate, due to an instability originating in the vicinity of the cylinder, using the computed Navier-Stokes equation (NSE) from t = 0 to t = 300 following an impulsive start. This instability is also explained through the disturbance mechanical energy equation, which has been established earlier in Sengupta et al. ["Temporal flow instability for Magnus-robins effect at high rotation rates," J. Fluids Struct. 17, 941-953 (2003)].

  7. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of titanium hydride (TiH2) powder in air

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Rasooli; M A Boutorabi; M Divandari; A Azarniya

    2013-04-01

    DTA and TGA curves of titanium hydride powder were determined in air at different heating rates. Also the thermal decomposition behaviour of the aforementioned powder at high heating rates was taken into consideration. A great breakthrough of the practical interest in the research was the depiction of the H2-time curves of TiH2 powder at various temperatures in air. In accordance with the results, an increase in heating rate to higher degrees does not change the process of releasing hydrogen from titanium hydride powder, while switching it from internal diffusion to chemical reaction. At temperatures lower than 600 °C, following the diffusion of hydrogen and oxygen atoms in titanium lattice, thin layers TiH phase and oxides form on the powder surface, controlling the process. On the contrary, from 700 °C later on, the process is controlled by oxidation of titanium hydride powder. In fact, the powder oxidation starts around 650 °C and may escalate following an increase in the heating rate too.

  8. Organic carbon decomposition rates controlled by water retention time across inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Núria; Marcé, Rafael; Kothawala, Dolly N.; Tranvik, Lars. J.

    2016-07-01

    The loss of organic carbon during passage through the continuum of inland waters from soils to the sea is a critical component of the global carbon cycle. Yet, the amount of organic carbon mineralized and released to the atmosphere during its transport remains an open question, hampered by the absence of a common predictor of organic carbon decay rates. Here we analyse a compilation of existing field and laboratory measurements of organic carbon decay rates and water residence times across a wide range of aquatic ecosystems and climates. We find a negative relationship between the rate of organic carbon decay and water retention time across systems, entailing a decrease in organic carbon reactivity along the continuum of inland waters. We find that the half-life of organic carbon is short in inland waters (2.5 +/- 4.7 yr) compared to terrestrial soils and marine ecosystems, highlighting that freshwaters are hotspots of organic carbon degradation. Finally, we evaluate the response of organic carbon decay rates to projected changes in runoff. We calculate that regions projected to become drier or wetter as the global climate warms will experience changes in organic carbon decay rates of up to about 10%, which illustrates the influence of hydrological variability on the inland waters carbon cycle.

  9. On speciation of VOC localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.; Chang, J.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Most of the gas-phase chemical mechanisms successfully used in gas-phase atmospheric chemical processes, such as CBM-Z, RADM2 or SAPRC-07, treat hundreds of VOC as lumped organic species by their chemical characteristics. Most of the model results are compared with total VOC observations, and it is not appropriate to compare lumped VOC simulations to observations even if there are separate VOC observations like Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). While the PAMS Air Quality Model (PAMS-AQM) is developed, separate organic species observed by PAMS without a doubt can be directly compared with model simulations. From the past case study (Chen et al., 2010), it shows a major and very significant finding in that detailed emissions of VOC in the existing emissions database are often in error in Taiwan or other countries due to the fact that the annual VOC emissions are classified into hundreds of species-specific emissions by using the speciation factors following the protocol of the U.S. EPA (AP-42). Based on all PAMS observations from 2006-2007, four base cases with well comparable meteorological simulations were selected for the unified correction for all sources in Taiwan. After the PAMS species emissions are modified, the diurnal patterns and simulation-observation correlation for most of the PAMS species are improved, and the concentration levels are more comparable with those of observations. More expanded case studies also revealed necessary corrections for the PAMS species emissions. Sensitivity analyses for lumped organic species with modified PAMS species emissions are also conducted. After modified PAMS emissions are added into lumped VOC emissions, there is an increase of only 10% of totally VOC emissions. While the sources of the lumped VOC emissions are changed, ozone formation shows no significant change with modified lumped VOC emissions. This helps to support the argument that for ozone simulation, the lumped VOC processes balance out

  10. Decomposition into Tradables and Nontradables and the Purchasing Power Parity (PPP Hypothesis of the Real Won-dollar Exchange Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deockhyun Ryu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to test the purchasing power parity (PPP hypothesis using the won-dollar real exchange rate and analyze the effect of the decomposition into tradables and non-tradables on the change of the won-dollar real exchange rate. This paper decomposes the CPI-based real exchange rate into two parts according to Engel (1999; one is the relative price of traded goods between the countries, the other is a component that is a weighted difference of the relative price of nontraded-to traded-goods prices in each country. We construct this by comparing the component subsection weights in CPI. The empirical analysis of this paper consists of two parts as follows. First, we conducted a traditional time series analyses of the real exchange rate, tradable and non-tradable parts respectively, thereby testing the PPP hypothesis and other important hypotheses. Secondly, this paper conducted a Mean Squared Error (MSE analysis to evaluate the relative contribution of tradable and non-tradable parts to the change of real exchange rate. From the time series analysis, it is not guaranteed that the PPP hyThe purpose of this paper is to test the purchasing power parity (PPP hypothesis using the won-dollar real exchange rate and analyze the effect of the decomposition into tradables and non-tradables on the change of the won-dollar real exchange rate. This paper decomposes the CPI-based real exchange rate into two parts according to Engel (1999; one is the relative price of traded goods between the countries, the other is a component that is a weighted difference of the relative price of nontraded-to traded-goods prices in each country. We construct this by comparing the component subsection weights in CPI. The empirical analysis of this paper consists of two parts as follows. First, we conducted a traditional time series analyses of the real exchange rate, tradable and non-tradable parts respectively, thereby testing the PPP hypothesis and other

  11. [VOCs tax policy on China's economy development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Xin; Wang, Yu-Fei; Wang, Hai-Lin; Hao, Zheng-Ping; Wang, Zheng

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, environmental tax was designed to control volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions. Computable general equilibrium (CGE) model was used to explore the impacts of environmental tax (in forms of indirect tax) on the macro-economy development at both national and sector levels. Different levels of tax were simulated to find out the proper tax rate. It is found out that imposing environmental tax on high emission sectors can cause the emission decreased immediately and can lead to negative impacts on macro-economy indicators, such as GDP (gross domestic products), total investment, total product and the whole consumption etc. However, only the government income increased. In addition, the higher the tax rate is, the more pollutants can be reduced and the worse economic effects can be caused. Consequently, it is suggested that, the main controlling policies of VOCs abatement should be mandatory orders, and low environmental tax can be implemented as a supplementary.

  12. Rate of Decomposition of Organic Matter in Soil as Influenced by Repeated Air Drying-Rewetting and Repeated Additions of Organic Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1974-01-01

    Repeated air drying and rewetting of three soils followed by incubation at 20°C resulted in an increase in the rate of decomposition of a fraction of 14C labeled organic matter in the soils. The labeled organic matter originated from labeled glucose, cellulose and straw, respectively, metabolized...... of the treatment was least in the soil which had been incubated with the labeled material for the longest time. Additions of unlabeled, decomposable organic material also increased the rate of decomposition of the labeled organic matter. The evolution of labeled CO2 during the 1st month of incubation after...... addition was in some cases 4–10 times larger than the evolution from the controls. During the continued incubation the evolution decreased almost to the level of the controls, indicating that the effect was related to the increased biological activity in the soils during decomposition of the added material...

  13. Home-field advantages of litter decomposition increase with increasing N deposition rates: a litter and soil perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Li, Q.; Yang, J.; Xiaotao, L.; Liang, W.; Han, X.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2017-01-01

    1.Differences in litter quality and in soil microbial community composition can influence the litter decomposition and “home-field advantage” (HFA). However, our knowledge about the relative role of litter and soil characteristics on litter decomposition and HFA effects is still limited, especially

  14. Temporal dynamics of abiotic and biotic factors on leaf litter of three plant species in relation to decomposition rate along a subalpine elevation gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxiao Zhu

    Full Text Available Relationships between abiotic (soil temperature and number of freeze-thaw cycles or biotic factors (chemical elements, microbial biomass, extracellular enzymes, and decomposer communities in litter and litter decomposition rates were investigated over two years in subalpine forests close to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in China. Litterbags with senescent birch, fir, and spruce leaves were placed on the forest floor at 2,704 m, 3,023 m, 3,298 m, and 3,582 m elevation. Results showed that the decomposition rate positively correlated with soil mean temperature during the plant growing season, and with the number of soil freeze-thaw cycles during the winter. Concentrations of soluble nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P and potassium (K had positive effects but C:N and lignin:N ratios had negative effects on the decomposition rate (k, especially during the winter. Meanwhile, microbial biomass carbon (MBC, N (MBN, and P (MBP were positively correlated with k values during the first growing season. These biotic factors accounted for 60.0% and 56.4% of the variation in decomposition rate during the winter and the growing season in the first year, respectively. Specifically, litter chemistry (C, N, P, K, lignin, C:N and lignin:N ratio independently explained 29.6% and 13.3%, and the microbe-related factors (MBC, MBN, MBP, bacterial and fungal biomass, sucrase and ACP activity explained 22.9% and 34.9% during the first winter and the first growing season, respectively. We conclude that frequent freeze-thaw cycles and litter chemical properties determine the winter decomposition while microbe-related factors play more important roles in determining decomposition in the subsequent growing season.

  15. Effects of magnesium-based hydrogen storage materials on the thermal decomposition, burning rate, and explosive heat of ammonium perchlorate-based composite solid propellant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Leili; Li, Jie; Zhang, Lingyao; Tian, Siyu

    2017-08-24

    MgH2, Mg2NiH4, and Mg2CuH3 were prepared, and their structure and hydrogen storage properties were determined through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal analyzer. The effects of MgH2, Mg2NiH4, and Mg2CuH3 on the thermal decomposition, burning rate, and explosive heat of ammonium perchlorate-based composite solid propellant were subsequently studied. Results indicated that MgH2, Mg2NiH4, and Mg2CuH3 can decrease the thermal decomposition peak temperature and increase the total released heat of decomposition. These compounds can improve the effect of thermal decomposition of the propellant. The burning rates of the propellant increased using Mg-based hydrogen storage materials as promoter. The burning rates of the propellant also increased using MgH2 instead of Al in the propellant, but its explosive heat was not enlarged. Nonetheless, the combustion heat of MgH2 was higher than that of Al. A possible mechanism was thus proposed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Gas Pressure Monitored Iodide-Catalyzed Decomposition Kinetics of H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2]: Initial-Rate and Integrated-Rate Methods in the General Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyasulu, Frazier; Barlag, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    The reaction kinetics of the iodide-catalyzed decomposition of [subscript 2]O[subscript 2] using the integrated-rate method is described. The method is based on the measurement of the total gas pressure using a datalogger and pressure sensor. This is a modification of a previously reported experiment based on the initial-rate approach. (Contains 2…

  17. Analysis of acoustic cardiac signals for heart rate variability and murmur detection using nonnegative matrix factorization-based hierarchical decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Ghafoor; Koch, Peter; Papadias, Constantinos B.

    2014-01-01

    . A novel method based on hierarchical decomposition of the single channel mixture using various nonnegative matrix factorization techniques is proposed, which provides unsupervised clustering of the underlying component signals. HRV is determined over the recovered normal cardiac acoustic signals....... This novel decomposition technique is compared against the state-of-the-art techniques; experiments are performed using real-world clinical data, which show the potential significance of the proposed technique....

  18. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate: a shock tube study using tunable laser absorption of H(2)O near 2.5 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zekai; Farooq, Aamir; Barbour, Ethan A; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2009-11-19

    The thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was measured behind reflected shock waves in hydrogen peroxide/inert gas mixtures using a sensitive laser diagnostic for water vapor. In these mixtures, the formation rate of water is predominantly controlled by the decomposition rate of hydrogen peroxide. Rate determinations were made over a temperature range of 1000-1200 K and a pressure range of 0.9-3.2 atm for both argon and nitrogen carrier gases. Good detection sensitivity for water was achieved using tunable diode laser absorption of water at 2550.96 nm within its v(3) fundamental band. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition rates were found to be independent of pressure at 0.9 and 1.7 atm and showed only slight influence of pressure at 3.2 atm. The best fit of the current data to the low-pressure-limit rate for H(2)O(2) dissociation in argon bath gas is k(1,0) = 10(15.97+/-0.10) exp(-21 220 +/- 250 K/T) [cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)] (1000-1200 K). Experiments conducted in a nitrogen bath gas show a relative collision efficiency of argon to nitrogen of 0.67.

  19. Measurement of the rate of hydrogen peroxide thermal decomposition in a shock tube using quantum cascade laser absorption near 7.7 μm

    KAUST Repository

    Sajid, Muhammad Bilal

    2013-10-24

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is formed during hydrocarbon combustion and controls the system reactivity under intermediate temperature conditions. Here, we measured the rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition behind reflected shock waves using midinfrared absorption of H2O 2 near 7.7 μm. We performed the experiments in diluted H 2O2/Ar mixtures between 930 and 1235 K and at three different pressures (1, 2, and 10 atm). Under these conditions, the decay of hydrogen peroxide is sensitive only to the decomposition reaction rate, H 2O2 + M → 2OH + M (k1). The second-order rate coefficient at low pressures (1 and 2 atm) did not exhibit any pressure dependence, suggesting that the reaction was in the low-pressure limit. The rate data measured at 10 atm exhibited falloff behavior. The measured decomposition rates can be expressed in Arrhenius forms as follows: k1(1 and 2 atm)=10(16.29±0.12)× exp (-21993±301/T)(cm 3 mol -1s-1) k1(10 atm)=10(15.24±0.10)× exp (-19955±247/T)(cm 3 mol -1s-1) © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Purge and trap method to determine alpha factors of VOC liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A theoretical approach and laboratory practice of determining the alpha factors of volatile organic compound (VOC) liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients are present in this study.Using Purge Trap Concentrator, VOC spiked water samples are purged by high-purity nitrogen in the laboratory, the VOC liquid-phase mass transfer rate constants under the laboratory conditions are then obtained by observing the variation of VOCs purged out of the water with the purge time.The alpha factors of VOC liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients are calculated as the ratios of the liquid-phase mass transfer rate constants in real water samples to their counterparts in pure water under the same experimental conditions. This direct and fast approach is easy to control in the laboratory, and would benefit mutual comparison among researchers, so might be useful for thestudy of VOC mass transfer across the liquid-gas interface.

  1. A Novel Methodology to Evaluate Health Impacts Caused by VOC Exposures Using Real-Time VOC and Holter Monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Kumano

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available While various volatile organic compounds (VOCs are known to show neurotoxic effects, the detailed mechanisms of the action of VOCs on the autonomic nervous system are not fully understood, partially because objective and quantitative measures to indicate neural abnormalities are still under development. Nevertheless, heart rate variability (HRV has been recently proposed as an indicative measure of the autonomic effects. In this study, we used HRV as an indicative measure of the autonomic effrects to relate their values to the personal concentrations of VOCs measured by a real-time VOC monitor. The measurements were conducted for 24 hours on seven healthy subjects under usual daily life conditions. The results showed HF powers were significantly decreased for six subjects when the changes of total volatile organic compound (TVOC concentrations were large, indicating a suppression of parasympathetic nervous activity induced by the exposure to VOCs. The present study indicated these real-time monitoring was useful to characterize the trends of VOC exposures and their effects on autonomic nervous system.

  2. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC measurements in the Pearl River Delta (PRD region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-chung Chang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We measured levels of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs at seven sites in the Pearl River Delta (PRD region of China during the Air Quality Monitoring Campaign spanning 4 October to 3 November 2004. Two of the sites, Guangzhou (GZ and Xinken (XK, were intensive sites at which we collected multiple daily canister samples. The observations reported here provide a look at the VOC distribution, speciation, and photochemical implications in the PRD region. Alkanes constituted the largest percentage (>40% in mixing ratios of the quantified VOCs at six sites; the exception was one major industrial site that was dominated by aromatics (about 52%. Highly elevated VOC levels occurred at GZ during two pollution episodes; however, the chemical composition of VOCs did not exhibit noticeable changes during these episodes. We calculated the OH loss rate to estimate the chemical reactivity of all VOCs. Of the anthropogenic VOCs, alkenes played a predominant role in VOC reactivity at GZ, whereas the contributions of reactive aromatics were more important at XK. Our preliminary analysis of the VOC correlations suggests that the ambient VOCs at GZ came directly from local sources (i.e., automobiles; those at XK were influenced by both local emissions and transportation of air mass from upwind areas.

  3. A Longitudinal Study of Decomposition Odour in Soil Using Sorbent Tubes and Solid Phase Microextraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katelynn A. Perrault

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Odour profiling of decomposed remains is important for understanding the mechanisms that cadaver dogs and forensically-relevant insects use to locate decomposed remains. The decomposition odour profile is complex and has been documented in outdoor terrestrial environments. The purpose of this study was to perform longitudinal analysis of the volatile organic compound (VOC profile in soils associated with decomposed remains across all stages of decomposition. Two VOC collection techniques (sorbent tubes and solid phase microextraction were used to collect a wider analyte range and to investigate differences in collection techniques. Pig carcasses were placed in an outdoor research facility in Australia to model the decomposition process and VOCs were collected intermittently over two months. VOCs of interest were identified over the duration of the trial, showing distinct trends in compound evolution and disappearance. The collection techniques were complementary, representing different subsets of VOCs from the overall profile. Sorbent tubes collected more decomposition-specific VOCs and these compounds were more effective at characterising the matrix over an extended period. Using both collection techniques improves the likelihood of identifying the complete VOC profile of decomposition odour. Such information is important for the search and recovery of victim remains in various stages of decomposition.

  4. Increased site fertility and litter decomposition rate in high-pollution sites in the San Bernardino Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark E. Fenn

    1991-01-01

    Some possible factors causing enhanced litter decomposition in high-pollution sites in the San Bernardino Mountains of southern California were investigated. Nitrogen concentration of soil, as well as foliage and litter of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) and Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi Grev. & Balf.) were greater in...

  5. Effect of an Invasive Grass on Ambient Rates of Decomposition and Microbial Community Structure: A Search for Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    In sutu decomposition of above and below ground plant biomass of the native grass species Andropogon glmoeratus (Walt.) B.S.P and exotic Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv. (cogongrass) was investigated using litter bags over the course of a 12 month period. The above and below ground biomass of the inv...

  6. Major reactive species of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their sources in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO; Min; FU; Linlin; LIU; Ying; LU; Sihua; ZHANG; Yuanhan

    2005-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important precursors of atmospheric chemical processes. As a whole mixture, the ambient VOCs show very strong chemical reactivity. Based on OH radical loss rates in the air, the chemical reactivity of VOCs in Beijing was calculated. The results revealed that alkenes, accounting for only about 15% in the mixing ratio of VOCs, provide nearly 75% of the reactivity of ambient VOCs and the C4 to C5 alkenes were the major reactive species among the alkenes. The study of emission characteristics of various VOCs sources indicated that these alkenes are mainly from vehicle exhaust and gasoline evaporation. The reduction of alkene species in these two sources will be effective in photochemical pollution control in Beijing.

  7. Biomass,litterfall and decomposition rates for the fringed Rhizophora mangle forest lining the Bon Accord Lagoon,Tobago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahanna A Juman

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The mangrove forest that fringes the Bon Accord Lagoon measures 0.8 km² and is dominated by red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle .This forest forms the landward boundary of the Buccoo Reef Marine Park in Southwest Tobago,and is part of a mangrove-seagrass-coral reef continuum.Biomass and productivity,as indicated by litterfall rates,were measured in seven 0.01 ha monospecific plots from February 1998 to February 1999,and decomposition rates were determined. Red mangrove above-ground biomass ranged between 2.0 and 25.9 kg (dry wt.m-2 .Mean biomass was 14.1 ±8.1 kg (dry wt.m-2 yielding a standing crop of 11 318 ±6 488 t. Litterfall rate varied spatially and seasonally.It peaked from May to August (4.2-4.3 g dry wt.m-2 d-1 and was lowest from October to December (2.3-2.8 g dry wt.m-2 d-1 .Mean annual litterfall rate was 3.4 ±0.9 g dry wt.m-2 d-1 .Leaf degradation rates ranged from 0.3%loss d-1 in the upper intertidal zone to 1%loss d-1 at a lower intertidal site flooded by sewage effluent.Mean degradation rate was 0.4 ±1%loss d-1 .The swamp produces 2.8 t dry wt.of litterfall and 12 kg dry wt.of decomposed leaf material daily.Biomass and litterfall rates in Bon Accord Lagoon were compared to five similar sites that also participate in the Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity Programme (CARICOMP.The Bon Accord Lagoon mangrove swamp is a highly productive fringed-forest that contributes to the overall productivity of the mangrove-seagrass-reef complex.El manglar que bordea la laguna de Bon Accord mide 0.8 km² y predomina el mangle rojo (Rhizophora mangle .Este manglar es el límite terrestre del Parque Nacional Buccoo Reef en el suroeste de Tobago,y es parte de un continuo de mangles-pastos-arrecifes.En este trabajo se midió la biomasa y productividad,mediante la caída de hojas,y las tasas de descomposición en siete parcelas monoespecíficas de 0.01 ha,de febrero 1998 a febrero 1999.La biomasa sobre el suelo del mangle rojo se registró entre 2

  8. Concentrations and flux measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in boreal forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki, Mari; Aaltonen, Hermanni; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Hellén, Heidi; Pumpanen, Jukka; Bäck, Jaana

    2017-04-01

    and August. Organic soil is formed by organic matter which contains energy rich compounds for microbial decomposition and fine root biomass is also highest in soil surface (Helmisaari et al., 2007). With these analyses, we aim at distinguishing the VOC sinks and sources in the soil layers and quantifying the potential role of VOC uptake by soil microbiota. Asensio, D., Yuste, J. C., Mattana, S., Ribas, À., Llusià, J., and Peñuelas, J.: Litter VOCs induce changes in soil microbial biomass C and N and largely increase soil CO2 efflux. Plant and soil, 360(1-2), 163-174, doi:10.1007/s11104-012-1220-9, 2012. Ditengou, F. A., Müller, A., Rosenkranz, M., Felten, J., Lasok, H., van Doorn, M. M., Legue, V., Palme, K., Schnitzler, J.-P., and Polle, A. Volatile signalling by sesquiterpenes from ectomycorrhizal fungi reprogrammes root architecture. Nature communications, 6:6279, doi:10.1038/ncomms7279, 2015. Helmisaari, H. S., Derome, J., Nöjd, P., & Kukkola, M.: Fine root biomass in relation to site and stand characteristics in Norway spruce and Scots pine stands. Tree Physiology, 27(10), 1493-1504, 2007. Hung, R., Lee, S., and Bennett, J. W.: Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system for testing the effect of Trichoderma volatile organic compounds. Fungal Ecology, 6(1), 19-26, doi:10.1016/j.funeco.2012.09.005, 2013.

  9. FEV manoeuvre induced changes in breath VOC compositions: an unconventional view on lung function tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukul, Pritam; Schubert, Jochen K.; Oertel, Peter; Kamysek, Svend; Taunk, Khushman; Trefz, Phillip; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2016-06-01

    Breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis can open a non-invasive window onto pathological and metabolic processes in the body. Decades of clinical breath-gas analysis have revealed that changes in exhaled VOC concentrations are important rather than disease specific biomarkers. As physiological parameters, such as respiratory rate or cardiac output, have profound effects on exhaled VOCs, here we investigated VOC exhalation under respiratory manoeuvres. Breath VOCs were monitored by means of real-time mass-spectrometry during conventional FEV manoeuvres in 50 healthy humans. Simultaneously, we measured respiratory and hemodynamic parameters noninvasively. Tidal volume and minute ventilation increased by 292 and 171% during the manoeuvre. FEV manoeuvre induced substance specific changes in VOC concentrations. pET-CO2 and alveolar isoprene increased by 6 and 21% during maximum exhalation. Then they decreased by 18 and 37% at forced expiration mirroring cardiac output. Acetone concentrations rose by 4.5% despite increasing minute ventilation. Blood-borne furan and dimethyl-sulphide mimicked isoprene profile. Exogenous acetonitrile, sulphides, and most aliphatic and aromatic VOCs changed minimally. Reliable breath tests must avoid forced breathing. As isoprene exhalations mirrored FEV performances, endogenous VOCs might assure quality of lung function tests. Analysis of exhaled VOC concentrations can provide additional information on physiology of respiration and gas exchange.

  10. HYDROGEN AND VOC RETENTION IN WASTE BOXES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PACE ME; MARUSICH RM

    2008-11-21

    The Hanford Waste Management Project Master Documented Safety Analysis (MDSA) (HNF-14741, 2003) identifies derived safety controls to prevent or mitigate the risks of a single-container deflagration during operations requiring moving, venting or opening transuranic (TRU)-waste containers. The issue is whether these safety controls are necessary for operations involving TRU-waste boxes that are being retrieved from burial at the Hanford Site. This paper investigates the potential for a deflagration hazard within these boxes and whether safety controls identified for drum deflagration hazards should be applied to operations involving these boxes. The study evaluates the accumulation of hydrogen and VOCs within the waste box and the transport of these gases and vapors out of the waste box. To perform the analysis, there were numerous and major assumptions made regarding the generation rate and the transport pathway dimensions and their number. Since there is little actual data with regards to these assumptions, analyses of three potential configurations were performed to obtain some indication of the bounds of the issue (the concentration of hydrogen or flammable VOCs within a waste box). A brief description of each of the three cases along with the results of the analysis is summarized.

  11. Calculated rate constants of the chemical reactions involving the main byproducts SO2F, SOF2, SO2F2 of SF6 decomposition in power equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuwei; Rong, Mingzhe; Yang, Kang; Yang, Aijun; Wang, Xiaohua; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Dingxin; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-04-01

    SF6 is widely used in electrical equipment as an insulating gas. In the presence of an electric arc, partial discharge (PD) or spark, SF6 dissociation products (such as SF2, SF3 and SF4) react with the unavoidable gas impurities (such as water vapor and oxygen), electrodes and surrounding solid insulation materials, forming several toxic and corrosive byproducts. The main stable decomposition products are SO2F, SO2F2 and SOF2, which have been confirmed experimentally to have a direct relationship with discharge faults, and are thus expected to be useful in the fault diagnosis of power equipment. Various studies have been performed of the main SF6 decomposition species and their concentrations under different types of faults. However, most of the experiments focused on the qualitative analysis of the relationship between the stable products and discharge faults. Although some theoretical research on the formation of main SF6 derivatives have been carried out using chemical kinetics models, the basic data (chemical reactions and their rate constants) adopted in the model are inaccurate and incomplete. The complex chemical reactions of SF6 with the impurities are ignored in most cases. The rate constants of some reactions obtained at ambient temperature or in a narrow temperature range are adopted in the models over a far greater range, for example up to 12 000 K, due to the difficulty in the experimental measurement and theoretical estimation of rate coefficients, particularly at high temperatures. Therefore, improved theoretical models require not only the consideration of additional SF6 decomposition reactions in the presence of impurities but also on improved values of rate constants. This paper is devoted to determining the rate constants of the chemical reactions relating to the main byproducts of SF6 decomposition in SF6 gas-insulated power equipment: SO2F, SOF2 and SO2F2. Quantum chemistry calculations with density functional theory, conventional

  12. Rate constants for the thermal decomposition of ethanol and its bimolecular reactions with OH and D: reflected shock tube and theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, R; Su, M-C; Michael, J V; Klippenstein, S J; Harding, L B; Ruscic, B

    2010-09-09

    The thermal decomposition of ethanol and its reactions with OH and D have been studied with both shock tube experiments and ab initio transition state theory-based master equation calculations. Dissociation rate constants for ethanol have been measured at high T in reflected shock waves using OH optical absorption and high-sensitivity H-atom ARAS detection. The three dissociation processes that are dominant at high T are C2H5OH--> C2H4+H2O (A) -->CH3+CH2OH (B) -->C2H5+OH (C).The rate coefficient for reaction C was measured directly with high sensitivity at 308 nm using a multipass optical White cell. Meanwhile, H-atom ARAS measurements yield the overall rate coefficient and that for the sum of reactions B and C , since H-atoms are instantaneously formed from the decompositions of CH(2)OH and C(2)H(5) into CH(2)O + H and C(2)H(4) + H, respectively. By difference, rate constants for reaction 1 could be obtained. One potential complication is the scavenging of OH by unreacted ethanol in the OH experiments, and therefore, rate constants for OH+C2H5OH-->products (D)were measured using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBH) as the thermal source for OH. The present experiments can be represented by the Arrhenius expression k=(2.5+/-0.43) x 10(-11) exp(-911+/-191 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) over the T range 857-1297 K. For completeness, we have also measured the rate coefficient for the reaction of D atoms with ethanol D+C2H5OH-->products (E) whose H analogue is another key reaction in the combustion of ethanol. Over the T range 1054-1359 K, the rate constants from the present experiments can be represented by the Arrhenius expression, k=(3.98+/-0.76) x10(-10) exp(-4494+/-235 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). The high-pressure rate coefficients for reactions B and C were studied with variable reaction coordinate transition state theory employing directly determined CASPT2/cc-pvdz interaction energies. Reactions A , D , and E were studied with conventional transition state theory

  13. Effects of fluorescent light and vacuum packaging on the rate of decomposition of pigments in paprika (Capsicum annuum) powder determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, H; Ramos, A C; Tibor, C; Forgács, E

    2001-11-30

    The effect of storage time, the presence of light and oxygen on the decomposition rate of carotenoid pigments in paprika (Capsicum annuum) powders was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The similarities and dissimilarities of pigment composition of samples under various storage conditions was elucidated by principal component analysis (PCA) and stepwise regression analysis (SRA). Calculations proved that the overall decomposition rate of pigment sections equally depended on the storage time and on the presence of light and oxygen, the effect of storage time being the most decisive factor while the impact of oxygen was the lowest. The selectivity of decomposition also depended on the storage time and on the presence of oxygen the influence of storage time being the most important. RP-HPLC followed by PCA and SRA can be successfully used for the study of the impact of environmental conditions on the decomposition of carotenoid pigments of paprika powders.

  14. Ozone decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batakliev Todor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers. Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates

  15. Catalytic non-thermal plasma reactor for the decomposition of a mixture of volatile organic compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Rama Raju; E Linga Reddy; J Karuppiah; P Manoj Kumar Reddy; Ch Subrahmanyam

    2013-05-01

    The decomposition of mixture of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been studied in a catalytic non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The VOCs mixture consisting n-hexane, cyclo-hexane and -xylene was chosen for the present study. The decomposition characteristics of mixture of VOCs by the DBD reactor with inner electrode modified with metal oxides of Mn and Co was studied. The results indicated that the order of the removal efficiency of VOCs followed as -xylene > cyclo-hexane > -hexane. Among the catalytic study, MnOx/SMF (manganese oxide on sintered metal fibres electrode) shows better performance, probably due to the formation of active oxygen species by in situ decomposition of ozone on the catalyst surface. Water vapour further enhanced the performance due to the in situ formation of OH radicals.

  16. Effect of variable rates of daily sampling of fly larvae on decomposition and carrion insect community assembly: implications for forensic entomology field study protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Jean-Philippe; Moreau, Gaétan

    2013-07-01

    Experimental protocols in forensic entomology successional field studies generally involve daily sampling of insects to document temporal changes in species composition on animal carcasses. One challenge with that method has been to adjust the sampling intensity to obtain the best representation of the community present without affecting the said community. To this date, little is known about how such investigator perturbations affect decomposition-related processes. Here, we investigated how different levels of daily sampling of fly eggs and fly larvae affected, over time, carcass decomposition rate and the carrion insect community. Results indicated that a daily sampling of carrion insects, and caused an increase in the volume of eggs laid by dipterans. This study suggests that the carrion insect community not only has a limited resilience to recurrent perturbations but that a daily sampling intensity equal to or <5% of the egg and larvae volumes appears adequate to ensure that the system is representative of unsampled conditions. Hence we propose that this threshold be accepted as best practice in future forensic entomology successional field studies.

  17. High-molecular products analysis of VOC destruction in atmospheric pressure discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmannova, Hana; Ciganek, Miroslav; Krcma, Frantisek

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the issue of applicability of the solid phase microextraction (SPME) in the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) destruction products in the gliding arc discharge. Our research is focused on the measurements with the simple one stage gliding arc reactor, applied voltage was varied in the range of 3.5-4 kV. As a carrier gas, the dry air and its mixtures with nitrogen and oxygen, enriched by toluene, with flow rate of 1000-3500 ml/min was used. Total decomposition of toluene of 97 % was achieved at the oxygen content in carrier gas of 60 %. For measurements with air as a carrier gas, the highest efficiency was 95 %. We also tested the SPME technique suitability for the quantitative analysis of exhausts gases and if this technique can be used efficiently in the field to extract byproducts. Carbowax/divinylbenzene and Carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fibres were chosen for sampling. Tens of various high-molecular substances were observed, especially a large number of oxygenous compounds and further several nitrogenous and CxHy compounds. The concentrations of various generated compounds strongly depend on the oxygen content in gas mixture composition. The results showed that the fiber coated by Carbowax/divinylbenzene can extract more products independently on the used VOC compound. The Carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fiber is useful for the analysis of oxygenous compounds and its use will be recommended especially when the destruction is done in the oxygen rich atmosphere. With the higher ratio of oxygen in the carrier gas a distinctive decline of CxHy compounds amount have been observed. We also tried to describe the significant production of some compounds like benzyl alcohol, benzeneacetaldehyde, even in oxygen content is proximate 0 %. Experimental data demonstrated that it is necessary to use several SPME fibres for full-scale high-molecular products analysis.

  18. Comparison of VOC and ammonia emissions from individual PVC materials, adhesives and from complete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järnström, H; Saarela, K; Kalliokoski, P; Pasanen, A-L

    2008-04-01

    Emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and ammonia measured from six PVC materials and four adhesives in the laboratory were compared to the emission rates measured on site from complete structures. Significantly higher specific emission rates (SERs) were generally measured from the complete structures than from individual materials. There were large differences between different PVC materials in their permeability for VOCs originating from the underlying structure. Glycol ethers and esters from adhesives used in the installation contributed to the emissions from the PVC covered structure. Emissions of 2-ethylhexanol and TXIB (2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate) were common. High ammonia SERs were measured from single adhesives but their contribution to the emissions from the complete structure did not appear as obvious as for VOCs. The results indicate that three factors affected the VOC emissions from the PVC flooring on a structure: 1) the permeability of the PVC product for VOCs, 2) the VOC emission from the adhesive used, and 3) the VOC emission from the backside of the PVC product.

  19. Employing ensemble empirical mode decomposition for artifact removal: extracting accurate respiration rates from ECG data during ambulatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Kevin T; Kearney, Damien; Ward, Tomás E; Coyle, Shirley; Diamond, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Observation of a patient's respiration signal can provide a clinician with the required information necessary to analyse a subject's wellbeing. Due to an increase in population number and the aging population demographic there is an increasing stress being placed on current healthcare systems. There is therefore a requirement for more of the rudimentary patient testing to be performed outside of the hospital environment. However due to the ambulatory nature of these recordings there is also a desire for a reduction in the number of sensors required to perform the required recording in order to be unobtrusive to the wearer, and also to use textile based systems for comfort. The extraction of a proxy for the respiration signal from a recorded electrocardiogram (ECG) signal has therefore received considerable interest from previous researchers. To allow for accurate measurements, currently employed methods rely on the availability of a clean artifact free ECG signal from which to extract the desired respiration signal. However, ambulatory recordings, made outside of the hospital-centric environment, are often corrupted with contaminating artifacts, the most degrading of which are due to subject motion. This paper presents the use of the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) algorithm to aid in the extraction of the desired respiration signal. Two separate techniques are examined; 1) Extraction of the respiration signal directly from the noisy ECG 2) Removal of the artifact components relating to the subject movement allowing for the use of currently available respiration signal detection techniques. Results presented illustrate that the two proposed techniques provide significant improvements in the accuracy of the breaths per minute (BPM) metric when compared to the available true respiration signal. The error reduced from ± 5.9 BPM prior to the use of the two techniques to ± 2.9 and ± 3.3 BPM post processing using the EEMD algorithm techniques.

  20. 688 AMBIENT VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    The VOCs were classified thus: aromatics 41%, halogenated 42%, esters 3%, ketones 8%, ... and Industrial emission were identified as sources of VOCs in the studied industrial area with ... canisters, or by dynamic or diffusive adsorption .... The GC/FID was standardized and ... with CS2 was prepared from stock standard in.

  1. DEVELOPING A NO-VOC WOOD TOPCOAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper reports an evaluation of a new low-VOC (volatile organic compound) wood coating technology, its performance characteristics, and its application and emissions testing. The low-VOC wood coating selected for the project was a two-component, water-based epoxy coating. Poly...

  2. T2VOC user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falta, R.W. [Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Pruess, K.; Finsterle, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Battistelli, A. [AQUATER S.p.A., San Lorenzo in Campo, (Italy)

    1995-03-01

    T2VOC is a numerical simulator for three-phase, three-component, non-isothermal flow of water, air, and a volatile organic compound (VOC) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. Developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, T2VOC is an extension of the TOUGH2 general-purpose simulation program. This report is a self-contained guide to application of T2VOC to subsurface contamination problems involving nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). It gives a technical description of the T2VOC code, including a discussion of the physical processes modeled, and the mathematical and numerical methods used. Detailed instructions for preparing input data are presented along with several illustrative sample problems.

  3. Fabrication of boron-doped carbon fibers by the decomposition of B4C and its excellent rate performance as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiqi; Ma, Canliang; Yang, Xueteng; Han, Tao; Tao, Zechao; Song, Yan; Liu, Zhanjun; Guo, Quangui; Liu, Lang

    2015-03-01

    A facile route, for the first time, was developed to fabricate boron-doped carbon fibers (BDCFs). Boron was doped into mesosphere pitch-based carbon fibers (CFs) by exposing the CFs in a vapor of boron by the decomposition of boron carbide. The microstructure of BDCFs was characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. When used as anode materials for the lithium-ion batteries, BDCFs electrode exhibits an improved performance. Concretely, the specific capacity of BDCFs still had a value of over 400 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. Moreover, BDCFs exhibits better rate capability and less hysteresis in comparison to the pristine CFs. Such enhanced lithium storage capability can be attributed to the improvement of graphitization properties and the high amount of defects induced by boron.

  4. Decomposition rates and residue-colonizing microbial communities of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal protein Cry3Bb-expressing (Bt) and non-Bt corn hybrids in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kai; Serohijos, Raquel C; Devare, Medha; Thies, Janice E

    2011-02-01

    Despite the rapid adoption of crops expressing the insecticidal Cry protein(s) from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), public concern continues to mount over the potential environmental impacts. Reduced residue decomposition rates and increased tissue lignin concentrations reported for some Bt corn hybrids have been highlighted recently as they may influence soil carbon dynamics. We assessed the effects of MON863 Bt corn, producing the Cry3Bb protein against the corn rootworm complex, on these aspects and associated decomposer communities by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. Litterbags containing cobs, roots, or stalks plus leaves from Bt and unmodified corn with (non-Bt+I) or without (non-Bt) insecticide applied were placed on the soil surface and at a 10-cm depth in field plots planted with these crop treatments. The litterbags were recovered and analyzed after 3.5, 15.5, and 25 months. No significant effect of treatment (Bt, non-Bt, and non-Bt+I) was observed on initial tissue lignin concentrations, litter decomposition rate, or bacterial decomposer communities. The effect of treatment on fungal decomposer communities was minor, with only 1 of 16 comparisons yielding separation by treatment. Environmental factors (litterbag recovery year, litterbag placement, and plot history) led to significant differences for most measured variables. Combined, these results indicate that the differences detected were driven primarily by environmental factors rather than by any differences between the corn hybrids or the use of tefluthrin. We conclude that the Cry3Bb corn tested in this study is unlikely to affect carbon residence time or turnover in soils receiving these crop residues.

  5. Spectral Tensor-Train Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2016-01-01

    The accurate approximation of high-dimensional functions is an essential task in uncertainty quantification and many other fields. We propose a new function approximation scheme based on a spectral extension of the tensor-train (TT) decomposition. We first define a functional version of the TT.......e., the “cores”) comprising the functional TT decomposition. This result motivates an approximation scheme employing polynomial approximations of the cores. For functions with appropriate regularity, the resulting spectral tensor-train decomposition combines the favorable dimension-scaling of the TT...... decomposition with the spectral convergence rate of polynomial approximations, yielding efficient and accurate surrogates for high-dimensional functions. To construct these decompositions, we use the sampling algorithm \\tt TT-DMRG-cross to obtain the TT decomposition of tensors resulting from suitable...

  6. Study on characteristics of double surface VOC emissions from dry flat-plate building materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinke; ZHANG Yinping; ZHAO Rongyi

    2006-01-01

    This paper sets up an analytic model of double surface emission of volatile organic compound (VOC) from dry, flat-plate building materials. Based on it, the influence of factors including air change rate, loading factor of materials in the room, mass diffusion coefficient, partition coefficient, convective mass transfer coefficient, thickness of materials, asymmetric convective flow and initial VOC concentration distribution in the building material on emission is discussed. The conditions for simplifying double surface emission into single surface emission are also discussed. The model is helpful to assess the double surface VOC emission from flat-plate building materials used in indoor furniture and space partition.

  7. Photoelectron Imaging of OXIDE.VOC Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patros, Kellyn M.; Mann, Jennifer; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Perturbations of the bare O2- and O4- electronic structure arising from VOC (VOC = hexane, isoprene, benzene and benzene.D6) interactions are investigated using anion photoelectron imaging at 2.33 and 3.49 eV photon energies. Trends observed from comparing features in the spectra include VOC-identity-dependent electron affinities of the VOC complexes relative to the bare oxide clusters, due to enhance stability in the anion complex relative to the neutral. Autodetachment is observed in all O4-.VOC spectra and only isoprene with O2-. In addition, the intensities of transitions to states correlated with the singlet states of O2 neutral via detachment from the O2-.VOC anion complexes show dramatic VOC-identity variations. Most notably, benzene as a complex partner significantly enhances these transitions relative to O2- and O2-.hexane. A less significant enhancement is also observed in the O2-.isoprene complex. This enhancement may be due to the presence of low-lying triplet states in the complex partners.

  8. Alcohol induced alterations to the human fecal VOC metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin D Couch

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that excessive alcohol consumption impacts the intestinal microbiota composition, causing disruption of homeostasis (dysbiosis. However, this observed change is not indicative of the dysbiotic intestinal microbiota function that could result in the production of injurious and toxic products. Thus, knowledge of the effects of alcohol on the intestinal microbiota function and their metabolites is warranted, in order to better understand the role of the intestinal microbiota in alcohol associated organ failure. Here, we report the results of a differential metabolomic analysis comparing volatile organic compounds (VOC detected in the stool of alcoholics and non-alcoholic healthy controls. We performed the analysis with fecal samples collected after passage as well as with samples collected directly from the sigmoid lumen. Regardless of the approach to fecal collection, we found a stool VOC metabolomic signature in alcoholics that is different from healthy controls. The most notable metabolite alterations in the alcoholic samples include: (1 an elevation in the oxidative stress biomarker tetradecane; (2 a decrease in five fatty alcohols with anti-oxidant property; (3 a decrease in the short chain fatty acids propionate and isobutyrate, important in maintaining intestinal epithelial cell health and barrier integrity; (4 a decrease in alcohol consumption natural suppressant caryophyllene; (5 a decrease in natural product and hepatic steatosis attenuator camphene; and (6 decreased dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, microbial products of decomposition. Our results showed that intestinal microbiota function is altered in alcoholics which might promote alcohol associated pathologies.

  9. CAN SORBENT-BASED GAS PHASE AIR CLEANING FOR VOCS SUBSTITUTE FOR VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Fisk, William J.

    2007-08-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge about the suitability of sorbent-based air cleaning for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the air in commercial buildings, as needed to enable reductions in ventilation rates and associated energy savings. The principles of sorbent air cleaning are introduced, criteria are suggested for sorbent systems that can counteract indoor VOC concentration increases from reduced ventilation, major findings from research on sorbent performance for this application are summarized, and related priority research needs are identified. Major conclusions include: sorbent systems can remove a broad range of VOCs with moderate to high efficiency, sorbent technologies perform effectively when challenged with VOCs at the low concentrations present indoors, and there is a large uncertainty about the lifetime and associated costs of sorbent air cleaning systems when used in commercial buildings for indoor VOC control. Suggested priority research includes: experiments to determine sorbent system VOC removal efficiencies and lifetimes considering the broad range and low concentration of VOCs indoors; evaluations of in-situ regeneration of sorbents; and an updated analysis of the cost of sorbent air cleaning relative to the cost of ventilation.

  10. VOCs in industrial, urban and suburban neighborhoods—Part 2: Factors affecting indoor and outdoor concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chunrong; Batterman, Stuart; Godwin, Christopher

    Many microenvironmental and behavioral factors can affect concentrations of and exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Identifying these determinants is important to understand exposures and risks, and also to design policies and strategies that minimize concentrations. This study is aimed at determining factors associated with VOC concentrations found indoors in residences and outdoors in ambient air. It utilizes results from a comprehensive field study in which 98 VOCs were measured both inside and outside of 159 residences in three communities in southeast Michigan, USA. Additional measurements included indoor CO 2 concentrations, temperature, relative humidity, building and neighborhood characteristics, and occupant activities, assessed using a questionnaire and comprehensive walkthrough investigation. Factors potentially affecting concentrations were identified using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Outdoors, seasonal and community effects were observed. Indoors, seasonal effects were limited to the urban and industrial communities, largely due to changes in ambient levels. Elevated indoor VOC concentrations were associated with eight sources or activities: the presence of an attached garage; recent renovations; older residences; indoor smoking; less frequent window or door opening; higher CO 2 concentrations; and lower ventilation rates. VOC levels were uninfluenced by building materials (wood vs. brick), flooring type (carpeting vs. wood), stove type (gas or electric), number of occupants, air freshener use, and hobbies involving arts and crafts. Factor analyses identified up to five factors for the ambient VOC measurements, and up to 10 factors for the indoor measurements, which further helped to explain the variability of concentrations and associations between VOCs.

  11. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs in Conventional and High Performance School Buildings in the U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lexuan Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs has been an indoor environmental quality (IEQ concern in schools and other buildings for many years. Newer designs, construction practices and building materials for “green” buildings and the use of “environmentally friendly” products have the promise of lowering chemical exposure. This study examines VOCs and IEQ parameters in 144 classrooms in 37 conventional and high performance elementary schools in the U.S. with the objectives of providing a comprehensive analysis and updating the literature. Tested schools were built or renovated in the past 15 years, and included comparable numbers of conventional, Energy Star, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED-certified buildings. Indoor and outdoor VOC samples were collected and analyzed by thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy for 94 compounds. Aromatics, alkanes and terpenes were the major compound groups detected. Most VOCs had mean concentrations below 5 µg/m3, and most indoor/outdoor concentration ratios ranged from one to 10. For 16 VOCs, the within-school variance of concentrations exceeded that between schools and, overall, no major differences in VOC concentrations were found between conventional and high performance buildings. While VOC concentrations have declined from levels measured in earlier decades, opportunities remain to improve indoor air quality (IAQ by limiting emissions from building-related sources and by increasing ventilation rates.

  12. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Conventional and High Performance School Buildings in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lexuan; Su, Feng-Chiao; Batterman, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been an indoor environmental quality (IEQ) concern in schools and other buildings for many years. Newer designs, construction practices and building materials for “green” buildings and the use of “environmentally friendly” products have the promise of lowering chemical exposure. This study examines VOCs and IEQ parameters in 144 classrooms in 37 conventional and high performance elementary schools in the U.S. with the objectives of providing a comprehensive analysis and updating the literature. Tested schools were built or renovated in the past 15 years, and included comparable numbers of conventional, Energy Star, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified buildings. Indoor and outdoor VOC samples were collected and analyzed by thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy for 94 compounds. Aromatics, alkanes and terpenes were the major compound groups detected. Most VOCs had mean concentrations below 5 µg/m3, and most indoor/outdoor concentration ratios ranged from one to 10. For 16 VOCs, the within-school variance of concentrations exceeded that between schools and, overall, no major differences in VOC concentrations were found between conventional and high performance buildings. While VOC concentrations have declined from levels measured in earlier decades, opportunities remain to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) by limiting emissions from building-related sources and by increasing ventilation rates. PMID:28117727

  13. Study of insect succession and rate of decomposition on a partially burned pig carcass in an oil palm plantation in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Chong Chin; Mohamad, Abdullah Marwi; Ahmad, Firdaus Mohd Salleh; Jeffery, John; Kurahashi, Hiromu; Omar, Baharudin

    2008-12-01

    Insects found associated with corpse can be used as one of the indicators in estimating postmortem interval (PMI). The objective of this study was to compare the stages of decomposition and faunal succession between a partially burnt pig (Sus scrofa Linnaeus) and natural pig (as control). The burning simulated a real crime whereby the victim was burnt by murderer. Two young pigs weighed approximately 10 kg were used in this study. Both pigs died from pneumonia and immediately placed in an oil palm plantation near a pig farm in Tanjung Sepat, Selangor, Malaysia. One pig was partially burnt by 1-liter petrol while the other served as control. Both carcasses were visited twice per day for the first week and once thereafter. Adult flies and larvae on the carcasses were collected and later processed in a forensic entomology laboratory. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the rate of decomposition and sequence of faunal succession on both pig carcasses. Both carcasses were completely decomposed to remain stage after nine days. The species of flies visiting the pig carcasses consisted of blow flies (Chrysomya megacephala, Chrysomya rufifacies, Hemipyrellia ligurriens), flesh fly (Sarcophagidae.), muscid fly (Ophyra spinigera), soldier fly (Hermetia illucens), coffin fly (Phoridae) and scavenger fly (Sepsidae). The only difference noted was in the number of adult flies, whereby more flies were seen in the control carcass. Faunal succession on both pig carcasses was in the following sequence: Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Muscidae, Phoridae and lastly Stratiomyidae. However, there was overlap in the appearance of members of these families. Blowflies continued to oviposit on both carcasses. Hence postmortem interval (PMI) can still be estimated from the partially burnt pig carcass.

  14. Reactivity of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in summer of 2004 in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Huang; Min Shao; Sihua Lu; Ying Liu

    2008-01-01

    Ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled at six sites in Beijing in the summer of 2004 and analyzed byGCMS. The chemical reactivities of 73 quantified VOCs species were evaluated by OH loss rates (L<,OH) and ozone formationpotentials (OFPs). Top 15 reactive species, mainly alkenes and aromatics, were identified by these two methods, and accounted formore than 70% of total reactivity of VOCs. In urban areas, isoprene was the most reactive species in term of OH loss rate,contributing 11.4% to the Loft of VOCs. While toluene, accounting for 9.4% of OFPs, appeared to have a long-time role in thephotochemical processes. Tongzhou site is obviously influenced by local chemical industry, but the other five sites showed typicalurban features influenced mainly by vehicular emissions.2008 Min Shao. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  15. An analytical solution for VOCs emission from multiple sources/sinks in buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG BaoQing; YU Bo; Chang Nyung KIM

    2008-01-01

    An analytical solution is presented to describe the emission/sorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from/on multiple single-layer materials coexisting in buildings. The diffusion of VOCs within each material is described by a transient diffusion equation. All diffusion equations are coupled with each other through the equation of mass conservation in the air. The analytical solution is validated by the experimental data in literature, Compared to the one-material case, the coexistence of multiple materials may decrease the emission rate of VOCs from each material. The smaller the diffusion coef-ficient is, the more the emission rate decreases. Whether a material is a source or a sink in the case of multiple materials coexisting is not affected by the diffusion coefficient. For the case of multiple mate-rials with different partition coefficients, a material with a high partition coefficient may become a sink. This may promote the emission of VOCs from other materials.

  16. Estimation of the Kinetic Parameters and the Critical Rate of Temperature Rise in the Thermal Explosion from the Exothermic Autocatalytic Decomposition of 3,4-Bis(4′-nitrofurazan-3′-yl)-2-oxofurazan (BNFOF) Using Non-isothermal Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Feng-Qi; ZHOU Yan-Shui; ZHAO Hong-An; GAO Sheng-Li; SHI Qi-Zhen; LU Gui-E; JIANG Jin-Yong; GUO Peng-Jiang; HU Rong-Zu; ZHANG Hai; XIA Zhi-Ming; GAO Hong-Xu; CHEN Pei; LUO Yang; ZHANG Zhi-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    A method of estimating the kinetic parameters and the critical rate of temperature rise in the thermal explosion for the autocatalytic decomposition of 3,4-bis(4′-nitrofurazan-3′-yl)-2-oxofurazan (BNFOF) with non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was presented. The rate equation for the decomposition of BNFOF was established, and information was obtained on the rate of temperature increase in BNFOF when the empiric-order autocatalytic decomposition was converted into thermal explosion.

  17. Analysis of heart rate variability based on singular value decomposition entropy%基于奇异值分解熵的心率变异性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世阳; 杨明; 李存岑; 蔡萍

    2008-01-01

    Assessing the dynamics of heart rate fluctuations can provide valuable information about heart status. In this study, regularity of heart rate variability (HRV) of heart failure patients and healthy persons using the concept of singular value decomposition entropy (SvdEn) is analyzed. SvdEn is calculated from the time series using normalized singular values. The advantage of this method is its simplicity and fast computation. It enables analysis of very short and non-stationary data sets. The results show that SvdEn of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) shows a low value (SvdEn: 0.056 5= 0.006, p < 0.01) which can be completely separated from healthy subjects. In addition, differences of SvdEn values between day and night are found for the healthy groups. SvdEn decreases with age. The lower the SvdEn values, the higher the risk of heart disease. Moreover, SvdEn is associated with the energy of heart rhythm. The results show that using SvdEn for discriminating HRV in different physiological states for clinical applications is feasible and simple.

  18. High rate capability of a BaTiO3-decorated LiCoO2 cathode prepared via metal organic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teranishi, Takashi; Katsuji, Naoto; Yoshikawa, Yumi; Yoneda, Mika; Hayashi, Hidetaka; Kishimoto, Akira; Yoda, Koji; Motobayashi, Hidefumi; Tasaki, Yuzo

    2016-10-01

    Metal organic decomposition (MOD) using octylic acid salts was applied to synthesize a BaTiO3-LiCoO2 (BT-LC) composite powder. The Ba and Ti octylates were utilized as metal precursors, in an attempt to synthesize homogeneous BT nanoparticles on the LC matrix. The BT-LC composite, having a phase-separated composite structure without any impurity phase, was successfully obtained by optimizing the MOD procedure. The composite prepared using octylate precursors exhibited a sharper distribution and better dispersibility of decorated BT particles. Additionally, the average particle size of the decorated BTs using metal octylate was reduced to 23.3 nm, compared to 44.4 nm from conventional processes using Ba acetate as well as Ti alkoxide as precursors. The composite cathode displayed better cell performance than its conventional counterpart; the discharge capacity of the metal octylate-derived specimen was 55.6 mAh/g at a 50C rate, corresponding to 173% of the capacity of the conventional specimen (32.2 mAh/g). The notable improvement in high rate capability obtained in this study, compared with the conventional route, was attributed to the higher density of the triple junction formed by the BT-LC-electrolyte interface.

  19. EVALUATION OF LOW-VOC LATEX PAINTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of four commercially available low-VOC (volatile organic compound) latex paints as substitutes for conventional latex paints by assessing both their emission characteristics and their performance as coatings. Bulk analysis indicated that ...

  20. Locating industrial VOC sources with aircraft observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, P; Gioli, B; Dugheri, S; Salvini, A; Matese, A; Bonacchi, A; Zaldei, A; Cupelli, V; Miglietta, F

    2011-05-01

    Observation and characterization of environmental pollution, focussing on Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), in a high-risk industrial area, are particularly important in order to provide indications on a safe level of exposure, indicate eventual priorities and advise on policy interventions. The aim of this study is to use the Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) method to measure VOCs, directly coupled with atmospheric measurements taken on a small aircraft environmental platform, to evaluate and locate the presence of VOC emission sources in the Marghera industrial area. Lab analysis of collected SPME fibres and subsequent analysis of mass spectrum and chromatograms in Scan Mode allowed the detection of a wide range of VOCs. The combination of this information during the monitoring campaign allowed a model (Gaussian Plume) to be implemented that estimates the localization of emission sources on the ground.

  1. Low VOC Barrier Coating for Industrial Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Technology Certification Program HAP Hazardous Air Pollutant HW hazardous waste LVBC low VOC barrier coating MEK methyl ethyl ketone MIL-DTL...peeling, blistering , tape adhesion, pull-off adhesion, film thickness, and LVBC/ZVT patch test adhesion testing in an acceptable or better manner...significant reductions in the amount of hazardous waste generated by the Navy. The ZVT technology contains less than 5 g/l of VOC and the resulting

  2. A demonstration of biofiltration for VOC removal in petrochemical industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lan; Huang, Shaobin; Wei, Zongmin

    2014-05-01

    A biotrickling filter demo has been set up in a petrochemical factory in Sinopec Group for about 10 months with a maximum inlet gas flow rate of 3000 m3 h(-1). The purpose of this project is to assess the ability of the biotrickling filter to remove hardly biodegradable VOCs such as benzene, toluene and xylene which are recalcitrant and poorly water soluble and commonly found in petrochemical factories. Light-weight hollow ceramic balls (Φ 5-8 cm) were used as the packing media treated with large amounts of circulating water (2.4 m3 m(-2) h(-1)) added with bacterial species. The controlled empty bed retention time (EBRT) of 240 s is a key parameter for reaching a removal efficiency of 95% for benzene, toluene, xylene, and 90% for total hydrocarbons. The demo has been successfully adopted and practically applied in waste air treatments in many petrochemical industries for about two years. The net inlet concentrations of benzene, toluene and xylene were varied from 0.5 to 3 g m(-3). The biofiltration process is highly efficient for the removal of hydrophobic and recalcitrant VOCs with various concentrations from the petrochemical factories. The SEM analysis of the bacterial community in the BTF during VOC removal showed that Pseudomonas putida and Klebsiella sp. phylum were dominant and shutdown periods could play a role in forming the community structural differences and leading to the changes of removal efficiencies.

  3. A mass transfer model for VOC emission from silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Montes, Felipe; Rotz, C. Alan

    2012-07-01

    Silage has been shown to be an important source of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone. Measurements have shown that environmental conditions and silage properties strongly influence emission rates, making it difficult to assess the contribution of silage in VOC emission inventories. In this work, we present an analytical convection-diffusion-dispersion model for predicting emission of VOCs from silage. It was necessary to incorporate empirical relationships from wind tunnel trials for the response of mass transfer parameters to surface air velocity and silage porosity. The resulting model was able to accurately predict the effect of temperature on ethanol emission in wind tunnel trials, but it over-predicted alcohol and aldehyde emission measured using a mass balance approach from corn silage samples outdoors and within barns. Mass balance results confirmed that emission is related to gas-phase porosity, but the response to air speed was not clear, which was contrary to wind tunnel results. Mass balance results indicate that alcohol emission from loose silage on farms may approach 50% of the initial mass over six hours, while relative losses of acetaldehyde will be greater.

  4. POCP for individual VOC under European conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenstedt, J.; Pleijel, K.

    1998-09-01

    Ground level ozone has been recognised as one of the most important environmental threats on the regional scale in Europe. Ozone is today considered to be harmful to human health already at the relatively low concentrations present in southern Scandinavia. The fact that ozone has the potential to damage vegetation at these concentrations is already well known. Ozone also gives rise to degradation of materials and is one of the gases which adds to the greenhouse effect. Ground level ozone is formed from nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the presence of sunlight. The only way to reduce ozone is therefore to reduce the emissions of the precursors. Ranking individual VOC by their ozone formation potential can make emission reductions more environmentally efficient and save time and money. POCP values give a ranking of the ozone formation ability of an individual VOC relative to other VOC. A critical analysis of the POCP concept has been performed which shows that the background emissions of NO{sub x} and VOC affect the POCP values to a large extent. Based on the critical analysis, five scenarios with different background emissions of NO{sub x} and VOC were selected for calculation of POCP values. These scenarios were chosen because they reflect the variation in POCP values which arise in different environments within Europe. The range thus indicates POCP values which are intended to be applicable within Europe. POCP values for 83 different VOC are presented in the form of ranges in this report. 42 refs, 13 figs, 3 tabs

  5. VOCs in Arid soils: Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds In Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) focuses on technologies to clean up volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants in soil and groundwater at arid sites. The initial host site is the 200 West Area at DOE`s Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. The primary VOC contaminant is carbon tetrachloride, in association with heavy metals and radionuclides. An estimated 580--920 metric tons of carbon tetrachloride were disposed of between 1955 and 1973, resulting in extensive soil and groundwater contamination. The VOC-Arid ID schedule has been divided into three phases of implementation. The phased approach provides for: rapid transfer of technologies to the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) programs once demonstrated; logical progression in the complexity of demonstrations based on improved understanding of the VOC problem; and leveraging of the host site EM-40 activities to reduce the overall cost of the demonstrations. During FY92 and FY93, the primary technology demonstrations within the ID were leveraged with an ongoing expedited response action at the Hanford 200 West Area, which is directed at vapor extraction of VOCs from the vadose (unsaturated) zone. Demonstration efforts are underway in the areas of subsurface characterization including: drilling and access improvements, off-gas and borehole monitoring of vadose zone VOC concentrations to aid in soil vapor extraction performance evaluation, and treatment of VOC-contaminated off-gas. These current demonstration efforts constitute Phase 1 of the ID and, because of the ongoing vadose zone ERA, can result in immediate transfer of successful technologies to EM-40.

  6. Quantitative assessment of industrial VOC emissions in China: Historical trend, spatial distribution, uncertainties, and projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chenghang; Shen, Jiali; Zhang, Yongxin; Huang, Weiwei; Zhu, Xinbo; Wu, Xuecheng; Chen, Linghong; Gao, Xiang; Cen, Kefa

    2017-02-01

    The temporal trends of industrial volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions was comprehensively summarized for the 2011 to 2013 period, and the projections for 2020 to 2050 for China were set. The results demonstrate that industrial VOC emissions in China increased from 15.3 Tg in 2011 to 29.4 Tg in 2013 at an annual average growth rate of 38.3%. Guangdong (3.45 Tg), Shandong (2.85 Tg), and Jiangsu (2.62 Tg) were the three largest contributors collectively accounting for 30.4% of the national total emissions in 2013. The top three average industrial VOC emissions per square kilometer were Shanghai (247.2 ton/km2), Tianjin (62.8 ton/km2), and Beijing (38.4 ton/km2), which were 12-80 times of the average level in China. The data from the inventory indicate that the use of VOC-containing products, as well as the production and use of VOCs as raw materials, as well as for storage and transportation contributed 75.4%, 10.3%, 9.1%, and 5.2% of the total emissions, respectively. ArcGIS was used to display the remarkable spatial distribution variation by allocating the emission into 1 km × 1 km grid cells with a population as surrogate indexes. Combined with future economic development and population change, as well as implementation of policy and upgrade of control technologies, three scenarios (scenarios A, B, and C) were set to project industrial VOC emissions for the years 2020, 2030, and 2050, which present the industrial VOC emissions in different scenarios and the potential of reducing emissions. Finally, the result shows that the collaborative control policies considerably influenced industrial VOC emissions.

  7. Locating industrial VOC sources with aircraft observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toscano, P., E-mail: p.toscano@ibimet.cnr.it [Institute for Biometeorology (IBIMET - CNR), Via G. Caproni 8, 50145 Firenze (Italy); Gioli, B. [Institute for Biometeorology (IBIMET - CNR), Via G. Caproni 8, 50145 Firenze (Italy); Dugheri, S. [Careggi Hospital-University of Florence, Occupational Health Division, Largo Palagi 1, 50100 Florence (Italy); Salvini, A. [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 13, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Matese, A. [Institute for Biometeorology (IBIMET - CNR), Via G. Caproni 8, 50145 Firenze (Italy); Bonacchi, A. [Careggi Hospital-University of Florence, Occupational Health Division, Largo Palagi 1, 50100 Florence (Italy); Zaldei, A. [Institute for Biometeorology (IBIMET - CNR), Via G. Caproni 8, 50145 Firenze (Italy); Cupelli, V. [Careggi Hospital-University of Florence, Occupational Health Division, Largo Palagi 1, 50100 Florence (Italy); Miglietta, F. [Institute for Biometeorology (IBIMET - CNR), Via G. Caproni 8, 50145 Firenze (Italy); Fondazione Edmund Mach, Via Mach 1, San Michele all' Adige, Trento (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    Observation and characterization of environmental pollution, focussing on Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), in a high-risk industrial area, are particularly important in order to provide indications on a safe level of exposure, indicate eventual priorities and advise on policy interventions. The aim of this study is to use the Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) method to measure VOCs, directly coupled with atmospheric measurements taken on a small aircraft environmental platform, to evaluate and locate the presence of VOC emission sources in the Marghera industrial area. Lab analysis of collected SPME fibres and subsequent analysis of mass spectrum and chromatograms in Scan Mode allowed the detection of a wide range of VOCs. The combination of this information during the monitoring campaign allowed a model (Gaussian Plume) to be implemented that estimates the localization of emission sources on the ground. - Highlights: > Flight plan aimed at sampling industrial area at various altitudes and locations. > SPME sampling strategy was based on plume detection by means of CO{sub 2}. > Concentrations obtained were lower than the limit values or below the detection limit. > Scan mode highlighted presence of {gamma}-butyrolactone (GBL) compound. > Gaussian dispersion modelling was used to estimate GBL source location and strength. - An integrated strategy based on atmospheric aircraft observations and dispersion modelling was developed, aimed at estimating spatial location and strength of VOC point source emissions in industrial areas.

  8. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC Removal by Vapor Permeation at Low VOC Concentrations: Laboratory Scale Results and Modeling for Scale Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Moulin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum transformation industries have applied membrane processes for solvent and hydrocarbon recovery as an economic alternative to reduce their emissions and reuse evaporated components. Separation of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs (toluene-propylene-butadiene from air was performed using a poly dimethyl siloxane (PDMS/α-alumina membrane. The experimental set-up followed the constant pressure/variable flow set-up and was operated at ~21 °C. The membrane is held in a stainless steel module and has a separation area of 55 × 10−4 m². Feed stream was set to atmospheric pressure and permeate side to vacuum between 3 and 5 mbar. To determine the performance of the module, the removed fraction of VOC was analyzed by Gas Chromatography/Flame Ionization Detector (GC/FID. The separation of the binary, ternary and quaternary hydrocarbon mixtures from air was performed at different flow rates and more especially at low concentrations. The permeate flux, permeance, enrichment factor, separation efficiency and the recovery extent of the membrane were determined as a function of these operating conditions. The permeability coefficients and the permeate flux through the composite PDMS-alumina membrane follow the order given by the Hildebrand parameter: toluene > 1,3-butadiene > propylene. The simulated data for the binary VOC/air mixtures showed fairly good agreement with the experimental results in the case of 1,3-butadiene and propylene. The discrepancies observed for toluene permeation could be minimized by taking into account the effects of the porous support and an influence of the concentration polarization. Finally, the installation of a 0.02 m2 membrane module would reduce 95% of the VOC content introduced at real concentration conditions used in the oil industry.

  9. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Removal by Vapor Permeation at Low VOC Concentrations: Laboratory Scale Results and Modeling for Scale Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollar-Perez, Georgette; Carretier, Emilie; Lesage, Nicolas; Moulin, Philippe

    2011-03-03

    Petroleum transformation industries have applied membrane processes for solvent and hydrocarbon recovery as an economic alternative to reduce their emissions and reuse evaporated components. Separation of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (toluene-propylene-butadiene) from air was performed using a poly dimethyl siloxane (PDMS)/α-alumina membrane. The experimental set-up followed the constant pressure/variable flow set-up and was operated at ~21 °C. The membrane is held in a stainless steel module and has a separation area of 55 × 10-4 m². Feed stream was set to atmospheric pressure and permeate side to vacuum between 3 and 5 mbar. To determine the performance of the module, the removed fraction of VOC was analyzed by Gas Chromatography/Flame Ionization Detector (GC/FID). The separation of the binary, ternary and quaternary hydrocarbon mixtures from air was performed at different flow rates and more especially at low concentrations. The permeate flux, permeance, enrichment factor, separation efficiency and the recovery extent of the membrane were determined as a function of these operating conditions. The permeability coefficients and the permeate flux through the composite PDMS-alumina membrane follow the order given by the Hildebrand parameter: toluene > 1,3-butadiene > propylene. The simulated data for the binary VOC/air mixtures showed fairly good agreement with the experimental results in the case of 1,3-butadiene and propylene. The discrepancies observed for toluene permeation could be minimized by taking into account the effects of the porous support and an influence of the concentration polarization. Finally, the installation of a 0.02 m2 membrane module would reduce 95% of the VOC content introduced at real concentration conditions used in the oil industry.

  10. 碳硫比对磷石膏分解率的影响研究%The Effect of C/S Ratio on the Decomposition Rate of Phosphogypsum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘大东; 陈前林; 李文飞; 罗焕虎

    2012-01-01

    In nitrogen,decomposition of phosphogypsum was not exactly the same at different temperatures.Raising the temperature of calcination and prolong the time of heat preservation can effectively improve the decomposition rate of phosphogypsum.At 1100 ℃ and 1150 ℃,C/S=0.7,the decomposition can reach above 99% for 20 min.The decomposition of phosphogypsum rate can reach more than 99% under the constant temperature 1200 ℃ for 5 min.%在氮气条件下,磷石膏在不同温度、碳硫比和保温时间下的分解情况不尽相同,提高煅烧温度和延长保温时间可有效的提高磷石膏的分解率。在1100℃和1150℃、碳硫比0.7、保温20 min时,磷石膏分解的分解率可达在99%以上;而在1200℃、保温5 min后,磷石膏的分解率可以达到99%以上。

  11. Composition decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyson, Mark

    2003-01-01

    This PhD is based on constructing and resolving a set of modular problems. Each problem exists as a separate entity. Each has its own characteristics, yet when combined with other, related problems, provides a dimension to a story. The relationships and order between problems has priority over....... Not only have design tools changed character, but also the processes associated with them. Today, the composition of problems and their decomposition into parcels of information, calls for a new paradigm. This paradigm builds on the networking of agents and specialisations, and the paths of communication...... that are necessary to make sense out of any design situation. The hypothesis of this project, is that Design organisation, communication and CAD-information processes must be jointly reengineered to create the dynamic structures needed for the forward projection of design knowledge into this expanding Design network....

  12. Three potential pathways influencin/contrastin/decomposition rates of fine roots%细根异速分解的3个可能影响途径

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王存国; 陈正侠; 马承恩; 林贵刚; 韩士杰

    2016-01-01

    Plant root decomposition is one of the critical processes of carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Plant roots less than 2 mm in diameter constitute a heterogeneous branching system. Within the system, lower order roots (e. g. 1st -3rd order) or fine roots in smaller diameter (e. g. less than 0. 5 mm in diameter) which mainly serve for water and nutrient uptake have fast turnover rates (0. 5 -2. 5 times per year) , and contribute greatly to soil carbon and nutrients pools. Recently, increasing number of studies have shown that lower order roots decompose more slowly than higher order roots ( e. g. more than 3rd order) or fine roots in larger diameter (e. g. more than 0. 5 mm in diameter) which mainly serve for water﹣nutrient transport and carbon storage. Here, we review three main factors explaining the contrasting decomposition rates across different root orders or diameter classes: mycorrhizal, carbon quality and nitrogen content. Overall, we intend to provide insights into the important roles of functional traits ( e. g. diameter ) of fine roots that play in ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycling in a changing world.%植物根系分解是驱动陆地生态系统碳和养分循环的关键过程之一。直径小于2 mm的根是一个复杂的异质性细根系统。位于细根系统末端的低级根(如1~3级根)或直径较小的细根(如直径小于0.5 mm的细根),执行水分和养分吸收功能,其周转迅速(0.5~2.5次/a),是植物根系向土壤输入碳和养分的主要途径。近年来对细根分解的研究表明,在细根系统中,低级根的分解速率显著慢于高级根(如3级以上的根)或直径较大的细根(如直径大于0.5 mm的细根),执行输导和储藏功能。本文综述了影响细根异速分解的3个可能途径:菌根、碳质量和氮含量,旨在增强研究者对全球变化下细根功能属性(如细根直径)如何影响生态系统碳和养分循环的理解。

  13. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  14. Biogenic VOCs emission inventory development of temperate grassland vegetation in Xilin River Basin,Inner Mongolia,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Nian-peng; HAN Xing-guo; SUN Wei; Pan Qing-min

    2004-01-01

    Given the key role of biogenic volatile organic compounds(VOCs) to tropospheric chemistry and regional air quality, it is important to generate accurate VOCs emission inventories. However, only a less fraction of plant species, in temperate grassland of Inner Mongolia, has been characterized by quantitative measurements. A taxonomic methodology, which assigns VOCs measurements to unmeasured species, is an applicable and inexpensive alternation for extensive VOCs emission survey, although data are needed for additional plant families and genera to further validate the taxonomic approach in grassland vegetation. In this experiment, VOCs emission rates of 178 plant species were measured with a portable photoionization detector(PID). The results showed the most of genera and some families have consistent feature of their VOCs emission, especially for isoprene, and provide the basic premise of taxonomic methodology to develop VOCs emission inventories for temperate grassland. Then, the taxonomic methodology was introduced into assigning emission rate to other 96 species, which no measured emission rates available here. A systematical emission inventory of temperate grassland vegetation in Inner Mongolia was provided and further evidence that taxonomy relationship can serve as a useful guide for generalizing the emissions behavior of many, but not all, plant families and genera to grassland vegetation.

  15. VOC methods and levels in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomboi, M.T. [Area de Contaminacion Atmosferica, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Ozone precursors began to be studied in the eighties in Spain, in order to know their levels and composition in areas, which had high concentrations of other atmospheric polluting agents. At the end of the eighties, VOC were incorporated into the air quality networks in urban areas in order to anticipate at the derived amendments of the entrance into force on the Directive 92/72/CEE of 1992 on air pollution by ozone. At the same time, field campaigns for VOC toxics were started in specific industrial areas and the zones with high traffic. More recently, the air quality networks have been orientated to non-urban areas, to cover the knowledge of VOC in semi-urban and rural areas. On the other hand, the role of the biogenic emissions and the role that their chemical and photochemical products play in atmospheric chemistry was becoming important in the nineties. Therefore some research projects, e.g. 'Biogenic Emissions in the Mediterranean Area (BEMA)', were developed in order to understand the vegetation emissions in the Mediterranean area in relation to anthropogenic compounds and to get information on their participation in tropospheric ozone formation. VOC have been sampled at European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) sites since 1999, based on recommendations from the EMEP Workshop on Measurements of Hydrocarbons/VOC in Lindau 1989. Collection of light hydrocarbons started in 1999, whereas measurements of carbonyls have just started in 2003. In this work, the most important sampling and analysis techniques to determine ozone precursors and to control VOC are shown, as well as the main results obtained in projects, networks and measurement campaigns performed with these methods.

  16. Silica deactivation of bead VOC catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libanati, C.; Pereira, C.J. [Research Division, W. R. Grace and Co., Columbia, MD (United States); Ullenius, D.A. [Grace TEC Systems, De Pere, WI (United States)

    1998-01-15

    Catalytic oxidation is a key technology for controlling the emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from industrial plants. The present paper examines the deactivation by silica of bead VOC catalysts in a flexographic printing application. Post mortem analyses of field-aged catalysts suggest that organosilicon compounds contained in the printing ink diffuse into the catalyst and deposit as silica particles in the micropores. Laboratory activity evaluation of aged catalysts suggests that silica deposition is non-selective and that silica masks the noble metal active site

  17. Biodegradation of mixture of VOC's in a biofilter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Arulneyam; T. Swaminathan

    2004-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds(VOC' s) in air have become major concem in recent years. Biodegradation of a mixture of ethanol and methanol vapor was evaluated in a laboratory biofilter with a bed of compost and polystyrene particles using an acclimated mixed culture. The continuous performance of the biofilter was studied with different proportion of ethanol and methanol at different initial concentration and flow rates. The result showed significant removal for both ethanol and methanol, which were composition dependent.The presence of either compound in the mixture inhibited the biodegradation of the other.

  18. VOC transport in vented drums containing simulated waste sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Rae, C.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-02-01

    A model is developed to estimate the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement in a lab-scale vented waste drum containing simulated waste sludge. The VOC transport model estimates the concentration using the measured VOC concentration beneath the drum lid and model parameters defined or estimated from process knowledge of drum contents and waste drum configuration. Model parameters include the VOC diffusion characteristic across the filter vent, VOC diffusivity in air, size of opening in the drum liner lid, the type and number of layers of polymer bags surrounding the waste, VOC permeability across the polymer, and the permeable surface area of the polymer bags. Comparison of model and experimental results indicates that the model can accurately estimate VOC concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement. The model may be useful in estimating the VOC concentration in actual waste drums.

  19. World Calibration Center for VOC (WCC-VOC), a new Facility for the WMO-GAW-Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappenglueck, B.-

    2002-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are recognized to be important precursors of tropospheric ozone as well as other oxidants and organic aerosols. In order to design effective control measures for the reduction of photooxidants, photochemical processes have to be understood and the sources of the precursors known. Reliable and representative measurements of VOCs are necessary to describe the anthropogenic and biogenic sources, to follow the photochemical degradation of VOCs in the troposphere. Measurement of VOCs is of key importance for the understanding of tropospheric chemistry. Tropospheric VOCs have been one of the recommended measurements to be made within the GAW programme. The purpose will be to monitor their atmospheric abundance, to characterize the various compounds with regard to anthropogenic and biogenic sources and to evaluate their role in the tropospheric ozone formation process. An international WMO/GAW panel of experts for VOC measurements developed the rational and objectives for this GAW activity and recommended the configuration and required activities of the WCC-VOC. In reflection of the complexity of VOC measurements and the current status of measurement technology, a "staged" approach was adopted. Stage 1 measurements: C2-C9 hydrocarbons, including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, dienes and monocyclics. (The WCC-VOC operates currently under this mode). Stage 2 measurements: C10-C14 hydrocarbons, including higher homologs of the Stage 1 set as well as biogenic hydrocarbon compounds. Stage 3 measurements: Oxygenated VOCs, including alcohols, carbonyls, carboxylic acids. The Quality Assurance/Science Activity Centre (QA/SAC) Germany currently has established the World Calibration Centre for VOC (WCC-VOC). The WCC-VOC has operated in the research mode und has become operational recently. From now on, the WCC-VOC conducts one round-robin calibration audit per year at all global stations that measure VOCs and assists other stations in setting up VOC

  20. GEIGER BRICKEL BENEFITS FROM LOW -VOC COATINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midwest Research Institute, under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), conducted a study to identify wood furniture manufacturing facilities that had converted to low-volatile organic compound (VOC)/hazardous air pollutant (HAP) wood furnit...

  1. Automatic sleep staging using empirical mode decomposition, discrete wavelet transform, time-domain, and nonlinear dynamics features of heart rate variability signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Farideh; Setarehdan, Seyed-Kamaledin; Ayala-Moyeda, Jose; Nazeran, Homer

    2013-10-01

    The conventional method for sleep staging is to analyze polysomnograms (PSGs) recorded in a sleep lab. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is one of the most important signals in PSGs but recording and analysis of this signal presents a number of technical challenges, especially at home. Instead, electrocardiograms (ECGs) are much easier to record and may offer an attractive alternative for home sleep monitoring. The heart rate variability (HRV) signal proves suitable for automatic sleep staging. Thirty PSGs from the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS) database were used. Three feature sets were extracted from 5- and 0.5-min HRV segments: time-domain features, nonlinear-dynamics features and time-frequency features. The latter was achieved by using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) methods. Normalized energies in important frequency bands of HRV signals were computed using time-frequency methods. ANOVA and t-test were used for statistical evaluations. Automatic sleep staging was based on HRV signal features. The ANOVA followed by a post hoc Bonferroni was used for individual feature assessment. Most features were beneficial for sleep staging. A t-test was used to compare the means of extracted features in 5- and 0.5-min HRV segments. The results showed that the extracted features means were statistically similar for a small number of features. A separability measure showed that time-frequency features, especially EMD features, had larger separation than others. There was not a sizable difference in separability of linear features between 5- and 0.5-min HRV segments but separability of nonlinear features, especially EMD features, decreased in 0.5-min HRV segments. HRV signal features were classified by linear discriminant (LD) and quadratic discriminant (QD) methods. Classification results based on features from 5-min segments surpassed those obtained from 0.5-min segments. The best result was obtained from features using 5-min HRV

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF LOW-VOC LATEX PAINTS: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND CONTENT, VOC AND ALDEHYDE EMISSIONS, AND PAINT PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of laboratory tests to evaluate commercially available latex paints advertised as "low-odor," "low-VOC (volatile organic compound)," or "no-VOC." Measurements were performed to quantify the total content of VOCs in the paints...

  3. 阳离子明胶蛋白助剂对双氧水分解率的影响%Effect of cationic gelatin protein on hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐俊玲; 王雪燕

    2016-01-01

    For the purpose of improving the control of the hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate, the prediction of the bleaching results, and the optimization of cotton fabric bleaching process, a self-made cationic gelatin protein agent was used in cotton hydrogen peroxide bleaching and hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate was calculated. The influence of self-made cationic gelatin protein agent, stabilizing agent sodium silicate and activator TAED on the hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate was compared. The results showed that cationic gelatin protein could promote the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide effectively and the decomposition rate was closed to TAED under low temperature and low alkali. The cationic gelatin protein acted as an activator in bleaching process. It provided a theoretical basis for the cationic gelatin protein agent application in hydrogen peroxide bleaching with low temperature and low alkali.%为提高对棉织物漂白过程中双氧水分解速率的控制、漂白效果的预测及漂白工艺优化的理论指导作用,将自制的阳离子明胶蛋白助剂应用于棉织物双氧水漂白工艺中,计算双氧水分解速率,并与传统稳定剂硅酸钠及活化剂TAED对双氧水分解速率的影响对比。结果表明,在低温低碱条件下,阳离子明胶蛋白能有效促进双氧水的分解,分解率与TAED相近,说明阳离子明胶蛋白助剂在双氧水漂白过程中起到活化剂的作用,从而为阳离子明胶蛋白助剂在双氧水低温低碱漂白中的应用提供理论依据。

  4. Control of VOC emissions from a flexographic printing facility using an industrial biotrickling filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempere, F; Martínez-Soria, V; Penya-Roja, J M; Waalkens, A; Gabaldón, C

    2012-01-01

    The study of an industrial unit of biotrickling filter for the treatment of the exhaust gases of a flexographic facility was investigated over a 2-year period with the objective to meet the volatile organic compound (VOC) regulatory emission limits. Increasing the water flow rate from 2 to 40 m(3) h(-1) improved the performance of the process, meeting the VOC regulation when 40 m(3) h(-1) were used. An empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 36 s was used when the inlet air temperature was 18.7 °C, and an EBRT as low as 26 s was set when the inlet temperature was 26.8 °C. During this long-term operation, the pressure drop over the column of the bioreactor was completely controlled avoiding clogging problems and the system could perfectly handle the non-working periods without VOC emission, demonstrating its robustness and feasibility to treat the emission of the flexographic sector.

  5. Bubble-Facilitated VOC Transport from LNAPL Smear Zones and Its Potential Effect on Vapor Intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy, Nicole C; Mumford, Kevin G

    2017-02-10

    Most conceptual and mathematical models of soil vapor intrusion assume that the transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a source toward a building is limited by diffusion through the soil gas. Under conditions where advection occurs, transport rates are higher and can lead to higher indoor air concentrations. Advection-dominated conditions can be created by gas bubble flow in the saturated zone. A series of laboratory column experiments were conducted to measure mass flux due to bubble-facilitated VOC transport from light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) smear zones. Smear zones that contained both LNAPL residual and trapped gas, as well as those that contained only LNAPL residual, were investigated. Results showed that the VOC mass flux due to bubble-facilitated transport was orders-of-magnitude higher than under diffusion-limited conditions. Results also showed that the mass flux due to bubble-facilitated transport was intermittent, and increased with an increased supply of dissolved gases.

  6. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Dairy Cows and Their Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, S.; Holzinger, R.; Mitloehner, F.; Goldstein, A.

    2005-12-01

    Biogenic VOCs are typically defined as those directly emitted from plants, but approximately 6% of global net primary production is consumed by cattle that carry out enteric fermentation and then emit VOCs that could also be considered biogenic. Current regulatory estimates suggest that dairy cattle in central California emit VOCs at rates comparable to those from passenger vehicles in the region, and thus contribute significantly to the extreme non-attainment of ozone standards there. We report PTR-MS measurements of ammonia and VOCs, and cavity-enhanced-absorption gas analyzer (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measurements of CH4, emitted from dairy cattle in various stages of pregnancy/lactation and their waste. Experiments were conducted in chambers at UC Davis that simulate freestall cow housing conditions. CH4 fluxes ranged from 125-374 lb/cow/year. The compounds with the highest fluxes from '3 cows+waste' treatments were: ammonia (1-18), methanol (0-2.3), acetone+propanal (0.2-0.7), dimethylsulfide (0-0.4), and mass 109 (likely ID = p-cresol; 0-0.3) in lb/cow/year. Mass 60 (likely ID = trimethylamine) and acetic acid were also abundant. There were 10s of additional compounds with detectable, but small, emissions. A few compounds that were likely emitted (i.e. ethanol, formaldehyde, and dimethylamine) were not quantified by the PTR-MS. The total flux for all measured organic gases (TOG = CH4 + PTR-MS VOCs(including acetone+propanal)) averaged 246±45 lb/cow/year for '3 cows+waste' treatments, and was dominated by methane (>98%). TOG flux for 'waste only' treatments averaged 1.1±0.1 lb/cow/year, and was instead dominated by VOC (>84%). The PTR-MS VOCs as a percent of TOG (0.6±0.2%) emitted from '3 cows+waste' treatments in chamber conditions was a factor of 10 smaller than that currently estimated by the California Air Resources Board. In addition, the ozone forming potentials of the most abundant VOCs are only about 10% those of typical combustion or plant

  7. Climate history shapes contemporary leaf litter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael S. Strickland; Ashley D. Keiser; Mark A. Bradford

    2015-01-01

    Litter decomposition is mediated by multiple variables, of which climate is expected to be a dominant factor at global scales. However, like other organisms, traits of decomposers and their communities are shaped not just by the contemporary climate but also their climate history. Whether or not this affects decomposition rates is underexplored. Here we source...

  8. RESEARCH ON THE VOLATILE RATES OF VOCs FROM AERATION TANK IN WWTP IN COLD REGION%寒地污水厂曝气池VOCs逸散速率研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王源; 杨俊晨; 白秀梅

    2011-01-01

    In order to research the volatile rate of BTEX and chlorinated hydrocarbon coming from aeration tank in municipal WWTP in cold region, a mathematical model were applied to calculate volatile rates of BTEX ( benzene, toluene, xylene) and chlorinated hydrocarbon ( chloroform, carbon tetrachlo-ride, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene). The results showed that the volatile raters of benzene, toluene, xylene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene were highest in winter, whose values were 5. 22, 0. 37, 0.46, 1.46, 1. 18, 18. 92 and 2. 22g/s respectively. The discharge of BTEX and chlorinated hydrocarbon coming from aeration tank in municipal WWTP meet the needs of .%本文以寒冷地区某城市污水处理厂曝气池作为研究对象,应用数学模型计算曝气池中苯系物(苯,甲苯,二甲苯)和氯代烃(三氯甲烷,四氯化碳,三氯乙烯,四氯乙烯)的逸散速率.计算结果表明寒冷地区污水处理厂苯系物和氯代烃在冬季的逸散速率最高.苯、甲苯、二甲苯、三氯甲烷、四氯化碳、三氯乙烯和四氯乙烯在冬季的逸散速率分别为5.22、0.37、0.46、1.46、1.18、18.92和2.22g/s.污水处理厂曝气池苯系物和氯代烃的排放标准满足《大气污染物综合排放标准( GB16297 - 1996)》.

  9. Ultraviolet and radical oxidation of airborne VOC`s. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinsohn, R.J.; Spaeder, T.A.; Albano, M.T.; Schmelzle, J.P.; Fetter, R.O.

    1994-03-18

    Airborne VOC`s reactions initiated by UV radiation at selected wavelengths from 185 to 308 nm have been studied. A simplified chemical kinetic mechanism is proposed incorporating photolysis and radical reactions. The concentration of HCHO and CH{sub 3}OH were predicted as a function of time, radiation wavelength, actinic flux and initial ozone concentration. The gas velocity and HCHO concentration were predicted in a gas stream flowing over a UV bulb. Experiments were conducted in which ethanol vapor and air were irradiated by low-pressure mercury bulbs. Ethanol disappeared in an overall first-order manner and an intermediate species, believed to be acetaldehyde, appeared and then disappeared.

  10. Factors controlling bark decomposition and its role in wood decomposition in five tropical tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossa, Gbadamassi G. O.; Paudel, Ekananda; Cao, Kunfang; Schaefer, Douglas; Harrison, Rhett D.

    2016-01-01

    Organic matter decomposition represents a vital ecosystem process by which nutrients are made available for plant uptake and is a major flux in the global carbon cycle. Previous studies have investigated decomposition of different plant parts, but few considered bark decomposition or its role in decomposition of wood. However, bark can comprise a large fraction of tree biomass. We used a common litter-bed approach to investigate factors affecting bark decomposition and its role in wood decomposition for five tree species in a secondary seasonal tropical rain forest in SW China. For bark, we implemented a litter bag experiment over 12 mo, using different mesh sizes to investigate effects of litter meso- and macro-fauna. For wood, we compared the decomposition of branches with and without bark over 24 mo. Bark in coarse mesh bags decomposed 1.11–1.76 times faster than bark in fine mesh bags. For wood decomposition, responses to bark removal were species dependent. Three species with slow wood decomposition rates showed significant negative effects of bark-removal, but there was no significant effect in the other two species. Future research should also separately examine bark and wood decomposition, and consider bark-removal experiments to better understand roles of bark in wood decomposition. PMID:27698461

  11. An investigation on thermal decomposition of DNTF-CMDB propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Jiangning; Ren, Xiaoning; Zhang, Laying; Zhou, Yanshui [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China)

    2007-12-15

    The thermal decomposition of DNTF-CMDB propellants was investigated by pressure differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). The results show that there is only one decomposition peak on DSC curves, because the decomposition peak of DNTF cannot be separated from that of the NC/NG binder. The decomposition of DNTF can be obviously accelerated by the decomposition products of the NC/NG binder. The kinetic parameters of thermal decompositions for four DNTF-CMDB propellants at 6 MPa were obtained by the Kissinger method. It is found that the reaction rate decreases with increasing content of DNTF. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Comparison of the substrate effect on VOC emissions from water based varnish and latex paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gabriela V; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D; Santos, Armando M; Fernandes, Eduardo O

    2003-01-01

    The building materials are recognised to be major contributors to indoor air contamination by volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The improvement of the quality of the environment within buildings is a topic of increasing research and public interest. Legislation in preparation by the European Commission may induce, in the near future, European Union Member States to solicit the industries of paints, varnishes and flooring materials for taking measures, in order to reduce the VOC emissions resulting from the use of their products. Therefore, product characterisation and information about the influence of environmental parameters on the VOC emissions are fundamental for providing the basic scientific information required to allow architects, engineers, builders, and building owners to provide a healthy environment for building occupants. On the other hand, the producers of coating building materials require this information to introduce technological alterations, when necessary, in order to improve the ecological quality of their products, and to make them more competitive. Studies of VOC emissions from wet materials, like paints and varnishes, have usually been conducted after applying the material on inert substrates, due to its non-adsorption and non-porosity properties. However, in real indoor environments, these materials are applied on substrates of a different nature. One aim of this work was to study, for the first time, the VOC emissions from a latex paint applied on concrete. The influence of the substrate (uncoated cork parquet, eucalyptus parquet without finishing and pine parquet with finishing) on the emissions of VOC from a water-based varnish was also studied. For comparison purposes, polyester film (an inert substrate) was used for both wet materials. The specific emission rates of the major VOCs were monitored for the first 72 h of material exposure in the atmosphere of a standardized test chamber. The air samples were collected on Tenax TA and

  13. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Joan W.; Arati A. Inamdar

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpe...

  14. Outdoor, indoor, and personal exposure to VOCs in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adgate, John L; Church, Timothy R; Ryan, Andrew D; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Fredrickson, Ann L; Stock, Thomas H; Morandi, Maria T; Sexton, Ken

    2004-10-01

    We measured volatile organic compound (VOC) exposures in multiple locations for a diverse population of children who attended two inner-city schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Fifteen common VOCs were measured at four locations: outdoors (O), indoors at school (S), indoors at home (H), and in personal samples (P). Concentrations of most VOCs followed the general pattern O approximately equal to S long-term health risks from children's exposure to these compounds.

  15. Remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with membrane separation techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Membrane separation, a new technology for removing VOCs including pervaporation, vapor permeation, membrane contactor, and membrane bioreactor was presented. Comparing with traditional techniques, these special techniques are an efficient and energy-saving technology. Vapor permeation can be applied to recovery of organic solvents from exhaust streams. Membrane contactor could be used for removing or recovering VOCs from air or wastewater. Pervaporation and vapor permeation are viable methods for removing VOCs from wastewater to yield a VOC concentrate which could either be destroyed by conventional means, or be recycled for reuse.

  16. Rapid leaf development drives the seasonal pattern of volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes in a 'coppiced' bioenergy poplar plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilli, Federico; Gioli, Beniamino; Fares, Silvano; Terenzio, Zenone; Zona, Donatella; Gielen, Bert; Loreto, Francesco; Janssens, Ivan A; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2016-03-01

    Leaves of fast-growing, woody bioenergy crops often emit volatile organic compounds (VOC). Some reactive VOC (especially isoprene) play a key role in climate forcing and may negatively affect local air quality. We monitored the seasonal exchange of VOC using the eddy covariance technique in a 'coppiced' poplar plantation. The complex interactions of VOC fluxes with climatic and physiological variables were also explored by using an artificial neural network (Self Organizing Map). Isoprene and methanol were the most abundant VOC emitted by the plantation. Rapid development of the canopy (and thus of the leaf area index, LAI) was associated with high methanol emissions and high rates of gross primary production (GPP) since the beginning of the growing season, while the onset of isoprene emission was delayed. The highest emissions of isoprene, and of isoprene photo-oxidation products (Methyl Vinyl Ketone and Methacrolein, iox ), occurred on the hottest and sunniest days, when GPP and evapotranspiration were highest, and formaldehyde was significantly deposited. Canopy senescence enhanced the exchange of oxygenated VOC. The accuracy of methanol and isoprene emission simulations with the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature increased by applying a function to modify their basal emission factors, accounting for seasonality of GPP or LAI. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Use of mass spectrometric methods for field screening of VOC`s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    While mass spectrometric (MS) methods of chemical analysis, particularly gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), have been the mainstay of environmental organic analytical techniques in the laboratory through the use of EPA and other standard methods, field implementation is relatively rare. Instrumentation and methods now exist for utilizing MS and GC/MS techniques in the field for analysis of VOC`s in gas phase, aqueous, and soil media. Examples of field investigations utilizing HP 5971A and Viking SpectraTrak systems for analysis of VOC`s in all three media will be presented. Mass spectral methods were found to offer significant advantages in terms of speed of analysis and reliability of compound identification over field gas chromatography (GC) methods while preserving adequate levels of detection sensitivity. The soil method in particular provides a method for rapid in-field analysis of methanol preserved samples thus minimizing the problem of volatiles loss which typically occurs with routine use of the EPA methods and remote analysis. The high cost of MS instrumentation remains a major obstacle to more widespread use.

  18. Climate fails to predict wood decomposition at regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Bradford; Robert J. Warren; Petr Baldrian; Thomas W. Crowther; Daniel S. Maynard; Emily E. Oldfield; William R. Wieder; Stephen A. Wood; Joshua R. King

    2014-01-01

    Decomposition of organic matter strongly influences ecosystem carbon storage1. In Earth-system models, climate is a predominant control on the decomposition rates of organic matter2, 3, 4, 5. This assumption is based on the mean response of decomposition to climate, yet there is a growing appreciation in other areas of global change science that projections based on...

  19. Electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Gerard Anthony

    1993-01-01

    This work involves the characterisation of the electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A variety of methods were employed involving the use of catalytic reagents to enhance the rate at which chlorinated organic compounds are reduced. The first reagent used was oxygen which was electrochemically reduced to superoxide in nonaqueous solvents. Superoxide is a reactive intermediate and decomposes chlorinated hydrocarbons. However it was found that since the rate of reaction betw...

  20. The indoor volatile organic compound (VOC) characteristics and source identification in a new university campus in Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian; Liu, Junjie; Pei, Jingjing

    2017-06-01

    This study investigates the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) constituents and concentration levels on a new university campus, where all of the buildings including classrooms and student dormitories were newly built and decorated within 1 year. Investigated indoor environments include dormitories, classrooms, and the library. About 30 dormitory buildings with different furniture loading ratios were measured. The characteristics of the indoor VOCs species are analyzed and possible sources are identified. The VOCs were analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). It was found that the average total VOC (TVOC) concentration can reach 2.44 mg/m(3). Alkenes were the most abundant VOCs in dormitory rooms, contributing up to 86.5% of the total VOCs concentration. The concentration of α-pinene is the highest among the alkenes. Unlike the dormitory rooms, there is almost no room with TVOC concentration above 0.6 mg/m(3) in classroom and library buildings. Formaldehyde concentration in the dormitory rooms increased about 23.7% after the installation of furniture, and the highest level reached 0.068 mg/m(3). Ammonia released from the building antifreeze material results in an average indoor concentration of 0.28 mg/m(3), which is 100% over the threshold and should be seriously considered. Further experiments were conducted to analyze the source of the α-pinene and some alkanes in dormitory rooms. The results showed that the α-pinene mainly comes from the bed boards, while the wardrobes are the main sources of alkanes. The contribution of the pinewood bed boards to the α-pinene and TVOC concentration can reach up to above 90%. The same type rooms were sampled 1 year later and the decay rate of α-pinene is quite high, close to 100%, so that it almost cannot be detected in the sampled rooms. Analysis of indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in newly built campus buildings in China identified the specific constituents of indoor VOCs contaminants exposed to

  1. Chemical composition and decomposition rate of plants used as green manure Composição química e velocidade de decomposição de plantas visando a adubação verde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Tavares Arantes Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Productive systems in which green manure is the source of nutrients must develop more efficient ways to improve soil nutrient dynamics. A well-synchronized balance must be established between specific crop demands and supply of nutrients from decomposition. However, scientific data and information to help improve green manure management in Brazil is still insufficient. For that reason, a number of arboreal species was first chemically characterized and then subjected to decomposition analysis in order to establish a correlation between some parameters. Species were grouped together based on the similarity of chemical composition and decomposition rate. The lignin:N and (lignin+polyphenol:N ratios were found to have the greatest correlation coefficient with the dry matter decomposition rate and nitrogen release.Sistemas produtivos que utilizam a adubação verde prezam por uma dinâmica mais eficiente de nutrientes no solo. Nesse sentido, é importante buscar a sincronia entre a demanda nutricional da cultura e a disponibilidade de nutrientes provenientes da decomposição. Esse estudo objetivou estabelecer uma correlação entre a composição química e a velocidade de decomposição de espécies em um sistema agroflorestal. Para tanto, realizou-se a caracterização química de espécies arbóreas, seguida de estudos de decomposição e busca de correlação entre os parâmetros analisados. De posse dos resultados, foi possível agrupar espécies com composição química e taxas de decomposição semelhantes. As relações lignina:N e (lignina+polifenol:N apresentaram os maiores coeficientes de correlação com a velocidade de decomposição de massa seca e liberação de nitrogênio.

  2. Analysis of Sidestream Smoke VOCs and Characterization of their Odor Profiles by VOC Preconcentrator-GC-O Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higashi N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques have been employed in the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs. However, these techniques are insufficient for the precise analysis of tobacco smoke VOCs because of the complexity of the operating system, system instability, or poor sensitivity. To overcome these problems, a combined system of VOC preconcentrator, gas chromatograph, and olfactometer has been developed. The performance of this new system was evaluated in the analysis of VOCs in tobacco smoke and applied to the odor profiling of sidestream smoke (SSS that has not been sufficiently investigated in the past.

  3. Contrasting winter and summer VOC mixing ratios at a forest site in the Western Mediterranean Basin: the effect of local biogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco, R.; Peñuelas, J.; Filella, I.; Llusià, J.; Molowny-Horas, R.; Schallhart, S.; Metzger, A.; Müller, M.; Hansel, A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are involved in ozone and aerosol generation, thus having implications for air quality and climate. VOCs and their emissions by vegetation also have important ecological roles as they can protect plants from stresses and act as communication cues between plants and between plants and animals. In spite of these key environmental and biological roles, the reports on seasonal and daily VOC mixing ratios in the literature for Mediterranean natural environments are scarce. We conducted seasonal (winter and summer) measurements of VOC mixing ratios in an elevated (720 m a.s.l.) holm oak Mediterranean forest site near the metropolitan area of Barcelona (NE Iberian Peninsula). Methanol was the most abundant compound among all the VOCs measured in both seasons. While aromatic VOCs showed almost no seasonal variability, short-chain oxygenated VOCs presented higher mixing ratios in summer, presumably due to greater emission by vegetation and increased photochemistry, both enhanced by the high temperatures and solar radiation in summer. Isoprenoid VOCs showed the biggest seasonal change in mixing ratios: they increased by one order of magnitude in summer, as a result of the vegetation's greater physiological activity and emission rates. The maximum diurnal concentrations of ozone increased in summer too, most likely due to more intense photochemical activity and the higher levels of VOCs in the air. The daily variation of VOC mixing ratios was mainly governed by the wind regime of the mountain, as the majority of the VOC species analyzed followed a very similar diel cycle. Mountain and sea breezes that develop after sunrise advect polluted air masses to the mountain. These polluted air masses had previously passed over the urban and industrial areas surrounding the Barcelona metropolitan area, where they were enriched in NOx and in VOCs of biotic and abiotic origin. Moreover, these polluted air masses receive additional biogenic

  4. Contrasting winter and summer VOC mixing ratios at a forest site in the Western Mediterranean Basin: the effect of local biogenic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Seco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs are involved in ozone and aerosol generation, thus having implications for air quality and climate. VOCs and their emissions by vegetation also have important ecological roles as they can protect plants from stresses and act as communication cues between plants and between plants and animals. In spite of these key environmental and biological roles, the reports on seasonal and daily VOC mixing ratios in the literature for Mediterranean natural environments are scarce.

    We conducted seasonal (winter and summer measurements of VOC mixing ratios in an elevated (720 m a.s.l. holm oak Mediterranean forest site near the metropolitan area of Barcelona (NE Iberian Peninsula. Methanol was the most abundant compound among all the VOCs measured in both seasons. While aromatic VOCs showed almost no seasonal variability, short-chain oxygenated VOCs presented higher mixing ratios in summer, presumably due to greater emission by vegetation and increased photochemistry, both enhanced by the high temperatures and solar radiation in summer. Isoprenoid VOCs showed the biggest seasonal change in mixing ratios: they increased by one order of magnitude in summer, as a result of the vegetation's greater physiological activity and emission rates. The maximum diurnal concentrations of ozone increased in summer too, most likely due to more intense photochemical activity and the higher levels of VOCs in the air.

    The daily variation of VOC mixing ratios was mainly governed by the wind regime of the mountain, as the majority of the VOC species analyzed followed a very similar diel cycle. Mountain and sea breezes that develop after sunrise advect polluted air masses to the mountain. These polluted air masses had previously passed over the urban and industrial areas surrounding the Barcelona metropolitan area, where they were enriched in NOx and in VOCs of biotic and abiotic origin. Moreover, these

  5. Relative vulnerability of public supply wells to VOC contamination in hydrologically distinct regional aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, L.J.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2010-01-01

    A process-based methodology was used to compare the vulnerability of public supply wells tapping seven study areas in four hydrologically distinct regional aquifers to volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination. This method considers (1) contributing areas and travel times of groundwater flowpaths converging at individual supply wells, (2) the oxic and/or anoxic conditions encountered along each flowpath, and (3) the combined effects of hydrodynamic dispersion and contaminant- and oxic/anoxic-specific biodegradation. Contributing areas and travel times were assessed using particle tracks generated from calibrated regional groundwater flow models. These results were then used to estimate VOC concentrations relative to an unspecified initial concentration (C/C0) at individual public supply wells. The results show that the vulnerability of public supply wells to VOC contamination varies widely between different regional aquifers. Low-recharge rates, long travel times, and the predominantly oxic conditions characteristic of Basin and Range aquifers in the western United States leads to lower vulnerability to VOCs, particularly to petroleum hydrocarbons such as benzene and toluene. On the other hand, high recharge rates and short residence times characteristic of the glacial aquifers of the eastern United States leads to greater vulnerability to VOCs. These differences lead to distinct patterns of C/C0 values estimated for public supply wells characteristic of each aquifer, information that can be used by resource managers to develop monitoring plans based on relative vulnerability, to locate new public supply wells, or to make land-use management decisions. Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  6. VOC characteristics, emissions and contributions to SOA formation during hazy episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Wu, Fangkun; Hu, Bo; Tang, Guiqian; Zhang, Junke; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are important precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The pollution processes in Beijing were investigated from 18th October to 6th November 2013 to study the characteristics, SOA formation potential and contributing factors of VOC during hazy episodes. The mean concentrations of VOC were 67.4 ± 33.3 μg m-3 on clear days and have 5-7-fold increase in polluted periods. VOC concentrations rapidly increased at a visibility range of 4-5 km with the rate of 25%/km in alkanes, alkenes and halocarbons and the rate of 45%/km in aromatics. Analysis of the mixing layer height (MLH); wind speed and ratios of benzene/toluene (B/T), ethylbenzene/m,p-xylene (E/X), and isopentane/n-pentane (i/n) under different visibility conditions revealed that the MLH and wind speed were the 2 major factors affecting the variability of VOC during clear days and that local emissions and photochemical reactions were main causes of VOC variation on polluted days. Combined with the fractional aerosol coefficient (FAC) method, the SOA formation potentials of alkanes, alkenes and aromatics were 0.3 ± 0.2 μg m-3, 1.1 ± 1.0 μg m-3 and 6.5 ± 6.4 μg m-3, respectively. As the visibility deteriorated, the SOA formation potential increased from 2.1 μg m-3 to 13.2 μg m-3, and the fraction of SOA-forming aromatics rapidly increased from 56.3% to 90.1%. Initial sources were resolved by a positive matrix factorization (PMF) model. Vehicle-related emissions were an important source of VOC at all visibility ranges, accounting for 23%-32%. As visibility declined, emissions from solvents and the chemical industry increased from 13.2% and 6.3% to 34.2% and 23.0%, respectively. Solvents had the greatest SOA formation ability, accounting for 52.5% on average on hazy days, followed by vehicle-related emissions (20.7%).

  7. NEW SOIL VOC SAMPLERS: EN CORE AND ACCU CORE SAMPLING/STORAGE DEVICES FOR VOC ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

    2006-06-01

    Soil sampling and storage practices for volatile organic analysis must be designed to minimize loss of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from samples. The En Core{reg_sign} sampler is designed to collect and store soil samples in a manner that minimizes loss of contaminants due to volatilization and/or biodegradation. An ASTM International (ASTM) standard practice, D 6418, Standard Practice for Using the Disposable En Core Sampler for Sampling and Storing Soil for Volatile Organic Analysis, describes use of the En Core sampler to collect and store a soil sample of approximately 5 grams or 25 grams for volatile organic analysis and specifies sample storage in the En Core sampler at 4 {+-} 2 C for up to 48 hours; -7 to -21 C for up to 14 days; or 4 {+-} 2 C for up to 48 hours followed by storage at -7 to -21 C for up to five days. This report discusses activities performed during the past year to promote and continue acceptance of the En Core samplers based on their performance to store soil samples for VOC analysis. The En Core sampler is designed to collect soil samples for VOC analysis at the soil surface. To date, a sampling tool for collecting and storing subsurface soil samples for VOC analysis is not available. Development of a subsurface VOC sampling/storage device was initiated in 1999. This device, which is called the Accu Core{trademark} sampler, is designed so that a soil sample can be collected below the surface using a dual-tube penetrometer and transported to the laboratory for analysis in the same container. Laboratory testing of the current Accu Core design shows that the device holds low-level concentrations of VOCs in soil samples during 48-hour storage at 4 {+-} 2 C and that the device is ready for field evaluation to generate additional performance data. This report discusses a field validation exercise that was attempted in Pennsylvania in 2004 and activities being performed to plan and conduct a field validation study in 2006. A draft ASTM

  8. SUBSTRATE EFFECTS ON VOC EMISSIONS FROM A LATEX PAINT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of two substrates -- a stainless steel plate and a gypsum board -- on the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from a latex paint were evaluated by environmental chamber tests. It was found that the amount of VOCs emitted from the painted stainless steel was 2 to...

  9. FORMULATING ULTRA-LOW-VOC WOOD FURNITURE COATINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The article discusses the formulation of ultra-low volatile organic compound (VOC) wood furniture coatings. The annual U.S. market for wood coatings is about 240, 000 cu m (63 million gal). In this basis, between 57 and 91 million kg (125 and 200 million lb) of VOCs are emitted i...

  10. Direct measurement of VOC diffusivities in tree tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baduru, K.K.; Trapp, Stefan; Burken, Joel G.

    2008-01-01

    fundamental terminal fate processes for VOCs that have been translocated from contaminated soil or groundwater, and diffusion constitutes the mass transfer mechanism to the plant−atmosphere interface. Therefore, VOC diffusion through woody plant tissues, that is, xylem, has a direct impact on contaminant fate...

  11. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan W; Inamdar, Arati A

    2015-09-22

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that "volatoxin" might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties.

  12. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs Mycotoxins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan W. Bennett

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that “volatoxin” might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties.

  13. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  14. Nieuwsgaring in Batavia tijdens de VOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Zuiderweg

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available  The board members of the Dutch East India Company (1602-1795, the Heren Zeventien, promulgated various decrees in which they forbade to bring out information regarding their colonies in the Dutch East Indies and Batavia in letters, manuscripts and printed matter. But in Batavia some inventive Company servants and even staff members got around these regulations, as did some printers in Holland. They published newspapers like Bataviase Nouvelles and Vendu-Nieuws, and also the specialized journal Verhandelingen van het Bataviaasch Genootschap. The initiators of this journal joined hands with the Dutch world of learning and its journals. This article provides an overview of early journalism in the Dutch East Indies and thus contributes to the reconstruction of the literary and cultural climate in Batavia at the time of the VOC.

  15. Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations and Emission Rates in New Manufactured and Site-Built Houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armin Rudd

    2008-10-30

    This study was conducted with the primary objective of characterizing and comparing the airborne concentrations and the emission rates of total VOCs and selected individual VOCs, including formaldehyde, among a limited number of new manufactured and site-built houses.

  16. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES FROM MIXED DECIDUOUS AND CONIFEROUS FORESTS IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regio...

  17. Raman scattering investigation of VOCs in interaction with ice particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facq, Sébastien; Oancea, Adriana; Focsa, Cristian; Chazallon, Bertrand

    2010-05-01

    Cirrus clouds that form in the Earth's upper troposphere (UT) are known to play a significant role in the radiation budget and climate [1]. These clouds that cover about 35% of the Earth's surface [2] are mainly composed of small ice particles that can provide surfaces for trace gas interactions [3]. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are present in relative high abundance in the UT [4][5]. They promote substantial sources of free OH radicals that are responsible for driving photochemical cycles in the atmosphere. Their presence can both influence the oxidizing capacity and the ozone budget of the atmosphere. VOCs can interact with ice particles via different trapping processes (adsorption, diffusion, freezing, and co-deposition, i.e., incorporation of trace gases during growing ice conditions) which can result in the perturbation of the chemistry and photochemistry of the UT. Knowledge of the incorporation processes of VOCs in ice particles is important in order to understand and predict their impact on the ice particles structure and reactivity and more generally on the cirrus cloud formation. This proceeds via the in-situ characterization of the ice condensed phase in a pressure and temperature range of the UT. An important mechanism of UT cirrus cloud formation is the heterogeneous ice freezing process. In this study, we examine and characterize the interaction of a VOC, i.e., ethanol (EtOH) with ice particles during freezing. Vibrational spectra of water O-H and EtOH C-H spectral regions are analysed using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. Information at the molecular level on the surface structure can be derived from accompanying changes observed in band shapes and vibrational mode frequencies. Depending of the EtOH content, different crystalline phases have been identified and compared to hydrates previously reported for the EtOH-water system. Particular attention is paid on the effect of EtOH aqueous solutions cooling rate and droplet sizes on the phases

  18. A DECOMPOSITION METHOD OF STRUCTURAL DECOMPOSITION ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jinghua

    2005-01-01

    Over the past two decades,structural decomposition analysis(SDA)has developed into a major analytical tool in the field of input-output(IO)techniques,but the method was found to suffer from one or more of the following problems.The decomposition forms,which are used to measure the contribution of a specific determinant,are not unique due to the existence of a multitude of equivalent forms,irrational due to the weights of different determinants not matching,inexact due to the existence of large interaction terms.In this paper,a decomposition method is derived to overcome these deficiencies,and we prove that the result of this approach is equal to the Shapley value in cooperative games,and so some properties of the method are obtained.Beyond that,the two approaches that have been used predominantly in the literature have been proved to be the approximate solutions of the method.

  19. Experiments on decomposition rate and release forms of nitrogen and phosphorus from the decomposing cyanobacterial detritus%蓝藻碎屑分解速率及氮磷释放形态的实验分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李柯; 关保华; 刘正文

    2011-01-01

    The decomposition rate of cyanobacterial detritus and the release forms of nitrogen and phosphorus from the decomposing cyanobacterial detritus were investigated experimentally in this paper. Results showed that the content of total nitrogen of cyanobacterial detritus was 88.56 ±4. 10 mg/g; the decomposition rate of cyanobacterial detritus was high and there was 41.9% dry mass lost in two days. The release rate of total phosphorus of cyanobacterial detritus was faster than total nitrogen, but the increase in concentration of total dissolved nitrogen (TON) in the water column lasted longer than total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) during the decomposing of cyanobacteria. After the increase in the first four days, the concentration of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) was kept constant but the concentration of dissolved organic nitrogen ( DON) continued to increase. The ammonia was the main form of DIN in the water column, while the concentration of nitrate and nitrite was low during the decomposition. The Urea-N was not the main form of DON released by cyanobacterial detritus because the average percentage of Urea-N was low (3% of DON). The concentration of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) and dissolved organic phosphorus ( DOP) increased in the first four days, and then DOP was transformed into DIP progressively. The present study demonstrated that the decomposition rate of cyanobacterial detritus is high, with releasing of organic and inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus. The result of present study shed light on understanding of the impact of cyanobacterial blooms on nitrogen and phosphorus cycling of lakes.%在试验条件下研究了水华蓝藻堆积使叶绿素浓度达到1600μg/L时,水体所含蓝藻形成的碎眉在水中的分解速率及其营养盐释放情况.结果表明:蓝藻碎屑的总氮含量为88.56±4.10mg/g,其在水体中有较高的分解速率,2d内即分解掉41.9%的生物量;蓝藻碎屑磷释放速率要高于氮,但其导致的水

  20. Contribution of low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) from consumer products to ozone formation in urban atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E.; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2015-05-01

    Because recent laboratory testing indicates that some low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOC) solvents readily evaporate at ambient conditions, LVP-VOCs used in some consumer product formulations may contribute to ozone formation. The goal of this study is to determine the fraction of LVP-VOCs available for ozone formation from the use of consumer products for two hypothetical emissions. This study calculates and compares the fraction of consumed product available for ozone formation as a result of (a) volatilization to air during use and (b) down-the-drain disposal. The study also investigates the impact of different modes of releases on the overall fraction available in ambient air for ozone formation. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs volatilized to air during use, we applied a multi-compartment mass-balance model to track the fate of emitted LVP-VOCs in a multimedia urban environment. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain, we used a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) fate model to predict the emission rates of LVP-VOCs to ambient air at WWTPs or at the discharge zone of the facilities and then used these results as emissions in the multimedia urban environment model. In a WWTP, the LVP-VOCs selected in this study are primarily either biodegraded or removed via sorption to sludge depending on the magnitude of the biodegradation half-life and the octanol-water partition coefficient. Less than 0.2% of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain are available for ozone formation. In contrast, when the LVP-VOC in a consumer product is volatilized from the surface to which it has been applied, greater than 90% is available for photochemical reactions either at the source location or in the downwind areas. Comparing results from these two modes of releases allows us to understand the importance of determining the fraction of LVP-VOCs volatilized versus disposed down the drain when the product is used by consumers. The results from this study

  1. Multiresolution signal decomposition schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Goutsias (John); H.J.A.M. Heijmans (Henk)

    1998-01-01

    textabstract[PNA-R9810] Interest in multiresolution techniques for signal processing and analysis is increasing steadily. An important instance of such a technique is the so-called pyramid decomposition scheme. This report proposes a general axiomatic pyramid decomposition scheme for signal analysis

  2. Multiresolution signal decomposition schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goutsias, J.; Heijmans, H.J.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    [PNA-R9810] Interest in multiresolution techniques for signal processing and analysis is increasing steadily. An important instance of such a technique is the so-called pyramid decomposition scheme. This report proposes a general axiomatic pyramid decomposition scheme for signal analysis and synthes

  3. VOCs and odors: key factors in selecting `green` building materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, C. [Steven Winter Associates Inc., Norwalk, CT and Washington DC (United States)

    1998-12-01

    The current state of knowledge available for selecting building materials on the basis of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and odors is reviewed. The significance of VOCs and odors in building materials is related to their role in influencing indoor air quality. As far as toxicity is concerned, many of the VOCs detected in indoor air are relatively inert when considered singly. They are not however, unimportant because in actual fact they are invariably found in mixtures some of which can be toxic. Although knowledge of VOCs is incomplete, it is important to specify ozone-resistant polymeric building products, i.e. those that are chemically stable and inert to oxidation. In addition to VOCs, attention should also be focused on semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) since they are even more persistent than VOCs and tend to offgas for prolonged periods of time. Similarly, it is reasonable to specify low-odor materials. Inclusion of issues related to complex indoor chemistry, less volatile emissions, in addition to VOCs and odor, should in time result in expanded choices of building materials that promote indoor air quality. 16 refs.,2 tabs.

  4. An unheated permeation device for calibrating atmospheric VOC measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of an unpowered permeation device for continuous calibration of in-situ instruments measuring atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs is described. Being lightweight and compact, and containing only negligible amounts of chemicals, the device is especially suited for field use such as onboard aircraft. Its speciality is to maintain the permeation process in thermal equilibrium, i.e. the instantaneous permeation rate can be ascribed via a simple temperature measurement. This equilibrium state is maintained by a combination of three features: (i a thin PTFE membrane as permeation medium which guarantees short stabilization times, (ii a water bath as heat buffer, and (iii a vacuum-panel based insulation, in which features (ii and (iii minimize temperature drifts. The uncertainty of the permeation rate due to thermal non-equilibrium is kept below 1 %. An extensive theory part details the major permeation processes of gases through porous polymers, being Fick's diffusion, Knudsen flow, and viscous flow. Both the measured stabilization time and the measured temperature dependence of the permeation rate independently indicate that the permeation can be described by a viscous flow model, where diffusion of the gas molecules in large pores (having a diameter of >0.05 μm dominates.

  5. An unheated permeation device for calibrating atmospheric VOC measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of an unpowered permeation device for continuous calibration of in-situ instruments measuring atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs is described. Being lightweight and compact, and containing only negligible amounts of chemicals, the device is especially suited for field use such as on board aircraft. Its speciality is to maintain the permeation process in thermal equilibrium, so that the instantaneous permeation rate can be ascribed to a simple temperature measurement. This equilibrium state is maintained by a combination of three features: (i a thin PTFE membrane as permeation medium which guarantees short stabilization times, (ii a water bath as heat buffer, and (iii a vacuum-panel based insulation, in which features (ii and (iii minimize temperature drifts to ~30 mK h−1 per Kelvin temperature difference to the environment. The respective uncertainty of the permeation rate due to thermal non-equilibrium is kept below 1%. An extensive theory part details the major permeation processes of gases through porous polymers, being Fick's diffusion, Knudsen flow, and viscous flow. Both the measured stabilization time and the measured temperature dependence of the permeation rate independently indicate that the permeation can be described by a viscous flow model, where diffusion of the gas molecules in large pores (having a diameter of >0.05 μm dominates.

  6. VOC and HAP recovery using ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael R. Milota : Kaichang Li

    2007-05-29

    During the manufacture of wood composites, paper, and to a lesser extent, lumber, large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as terpenes, formaldehyde, and methanol are emitted to air. Some of these compounds are hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The air pollutants produced in the forest products industry are difficult to manage because the concentrations are very low. Presently, regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs and RCOs) are commonly used for the destruction of VOCs and HAPs. RTOs consume large amounts of natural gas to heat air and moisture. The combustion of natural gas generates increased CO2 and NOx, which have negative implications for global warming and air quality. The aforementioned problems are addressed by an absorption system containing a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as an absorbent. RTILs are salts, but are in liquid states at room temperature. RTILs, an emerging technology, are receiving much attention as replacements for organic solvents in industrial processes with significant cost and environmental benefits. Some of these processes include organic synthesis, extraction, and metal deposition. RTILs would be excellent absorbents for exhausts from wood products facilities because of their unique properties: no measurable vapor pressure, high solubility of wide range of organic compounds, thermal stability to 200°C (almost 400°F), and immisciblity with water. Room temperature ionic liquids were tested as possible absorbents. Four were imidizolium-based and were eight phosphonium-based. The imidizolium-based ionic liquids proved to be unstable at the conditions tested and in the presence of water. The phosphonium-based ionic liquids were stable. Most were good absorbents; however, cleaning the contaminates from the ionic liquids was problematic. This was overcome with a higher temperature (120°C) than originally proposed and a very low pressure (1 kPa. Absorption trials were conducted with tetradecy

  7. Seasonal and species-specific response of VOC emissions by Mediterranean woody plant to elevated ozone concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llusià, J.; Peñuelas, J.; Gimeno, B. S.

    Although certain factors controlling plant emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are reasonably well understood, the influence of elevated ozone concentrations as abiotic stress is mostly unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of ozone concentrations on seasonal biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions by different Mediterranean plant species in open top chambers (OTC). Three ozone treatments were established: filtered air (F), non-filtered air (NF), and fumigated air (NF+) adding 40 nl l -1 of ozone over NF. We studied the response of VOC emission in saplings of four Mediterranean woody plant species and subspecies: Ceratonia siliqua L., Olea europaea L., Quercus ilex spp. ilex L., and Quercus ilex spp. rotundifolia L. as representative of natural Mediterranean vegetation. No visible symptoms were detected on the leaves. No significant effect was found on net photosynthetic rates or stomatal conductance except for an increase in net photosynthetic rates in Quercus ilex ilex in spring and summer and an overall slight increase in Quercus ilex rotundifolia. Emissions of the total VOCs from Ceratonia siliqua in summer, and from Olea europaea and Quercus ilex rotundifolia in spring increased in ozone fumigated OTC in comparison with F or NF OTC. Decreased emissions were found in Quercus ilex rotundifolia in summer. There were no significant differences between ozone fumigation treatments for the other plant species and seasons. When considering particular VOCs, the results were also variable among species and time of the year. While α-pinene emissions decreased with ozone fumigation in Olea europaea, α-pinene and limonene emissions increased in Quercus ilex ilex. The responses of these particular VOCs did not always match the responses of total VOCs. In spite of this strong variability, when considering overall annual data for all species and seasons, there were increased net photosynthetic rates (37%) and limonene (95%) and total VOC (45

  8. Seasonal and species-specific response of VOC emissions by Mediterranean woody plant to elevated ozone concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llusia, J.; Penuelas, J. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Unitat Ecofisiologia CSIC-CEAB-CREAF; Gimeno, R.S. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain). Ecotoxicologia de la Contaminacion Atmosferica

    2002-08-01

    Although certain factors controlling plant emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are reasonably well understood, the influence of elevated ozone concentrations as abiotic stress is mostly unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of ozone concentrations on seasonal biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions by different Mediterranean plant species in open top chambers (OTC). Three ozone treatments were established: filtered air (F), non-filtered air (NF), and fumigated air (NF+) adding 40 nl l{sup -1} of ozone over NF. We studied the response of VOC emission in saplings of four Mediterranean woody plant species and subspecies: Ceratonia siliqua L., Olea europaea L., Quercus ilex spp. ilex L., and Quercus ilex spp. rotundifolia L. as representative of natural Mediterranean vegetation. No visible symptoms were detected on the leaves. No significant effect was found on net photosynthetic rates or stomatal conductance except for an increase in net photosynthetic rates in Quercus ilex ilex in spring and summer and an overall slight increase in Quercus ilex rotundifolia. Emissions of the total VOCs from Ceratonia siliqua in summer, and from Olea europaea and Quercus ilex rotundifolia in spring increased in ozone fumigated OTC in comparison with F or NF OTC. Decreased emissions were found in Quercus ilex rotundifolia in summer. There were no significant differences between ozone fumigation treatments for the other plant species and seasons. When considering particular VOCs, the results were also variable among species and time of the year. While {alpha}-pinene emissions decreased with ozone fumigation in Olea europaea, {alpha}-pinene and limonene emissions increased in Quercus ilex ilex. The responses of these particular VOCs did not always match the responses of total VOCs. In spite of this strong variability, when considering overall annual data for all species and seasons, there were increased net photosynthetic rates (37%) and limonene (95

  9. NMR analysis, protonation equilibria and decomposition kinetics of tolperisone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgován, Gábor; Tihanyi, Károly; Noszál, Béla

    2009-12-05

    The rate constants of spontaneous and hydroxide-catalyzed decomposition and the tautomer-specific protonation constants of tolperisone, a classical muscle relaxant were determined. A solution NMR method without any separation techniques was elaborated to quantitate the progress of decomposition. All the rate and equilibrium constants were determined at four different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The molecular mechanism of decomposition is proposed.

  10. The thermal decomposition of nitrocellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. E. G.; Turcotte, R.; Acheson, B.; Kwok, Q. S. M.; Vachon, M. [Natural Resources Canada, CANMET Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2003-03-01

    In the past, the thermal decomposition of nitrocellulose, the main high-energy component of explosives and solid rocket propellant compositions, was studied using DSC, thermogravimetry and accelerating rate calorimetry. This paper discusses new results obtained by accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), heat flux calorimetry (HFC), simultaneous thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) coupled to FTIR and mass spectrometry (MS). Experiments with ARC showed that both the onset temperature and the activation energy for the thermal decomposition depend on sample mass. Evaluating the thermal decomposition of nitrocellulose using HFC at various pressures of argon between ambient and 27 MPa showed that the true onset temperature and the width of the corresponding exotherms are a strong function of the initial pressure. Also presented are the results of investigations conducted using TG-DTA-FTIR-MS in air and in helium. Corresponding to the sharp exotherm observed in helium, many gaseous product species were detected in a narrow band in FTIR and MS spectra. The main species observed by FTIR were carbon dioxide, formic acid, carbon monoxide and trace amounts of formaldehyde, nitrous oxide and water. In comparison, the products detected in air were found to occur in a much wider temperature range. Absorbances of carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and water were observed to have been strongly enhanced in air, while organic species such as formic acid and formaldehyde were significantly depressed. 13 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  11. Effect of cooling rate on evolution of superconducting phases during decomposition and recrystallization of (Bi,Pb)-2223 core in Ag-sheathed tape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jingyong; LI Jianguo; ZHENG Huiling; LI Chengshan; LU Yafeng; ZHOU Lian

    2006-01-01

    The reformation of (Bi,Pb)-2223 from the liquid or melt is very important for a melting process of (Bi,Pb)-2223 tape. By combination of quenching experiment with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, the effect of cooling rate on the evolution of three superconducting phases in the (Bi,Pb)-2223 core of Ag-sheathed tape was investigated. The results show that (Bi,Pb)-2223 reformation from the melt seems to experience different routes during slowly cooling at different rates. One is that (Bi,Pb)-2223 phase reformed directly from the melt, and no Bi-2212 participate in this process. The other is that (Bi,Pb)-2223 is converted from the intermediate product, Bi-2212, which formed from the melt during the first cooling stage. Due to the inherent sluggish formation kinetics of (Bi,Pb)-2223 from Bi-2212, only partial (Bi,Pb)-2223 can finally be reformed with the second route.

  12. Decompositions of manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Daverman, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Decomposition theory studies decompositions, or partitions, of manifolds into simple pieces, usually cell-like sets. Since its inception in 1929, the subject has become an important tool in geometric topology. The main goal of the book is to help students interested in geometric topology to bridge the gap between entry-level graduate courses and research at the frontier as well as to demonstrate interrelations of decomposition theory with other parts of geometric topology. With numerous exercises and problems, many of them quite challenging, the book continues to be strongly recommended to eve

  13. Determination of radon exhalation from construction materials using VOC emission test chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Jann, O; Kemski, J; Schneider, U; Krocker, C; Hoffmann, B

    2013-10-01

    The inhalation of (222) Rn (radon) decay products is one of the most important reasons for lung cancer after smoking. Stony building materials are an important source of indoor radon. This article describes the determination of the exhalation rate of stony construction materials by the use of commercially available measuring devices in combination with VOC emission test chambers. Five materials - two types of clay brick, clinker brick, light-weight concrete brick, and honeycomb brick - generally used for wall constructions were used for the experiments. Their contribution to real room concentrations was estimated by applying room model parameters given in ISO 16000-9, RP 112, and AgBB. This knowledge can be relevant, if for instance indoor radon concentration is limited by law. The test set-up used here is well suited for application in test laboratories dealing with VOC emission testing.

  14. A comparative study in treating two VOC mixtures in trickle bed air biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhangli; Kim, Daekeun; Sorial, George A

    2007-06-01

    Two independent parallel trickling bed air biofilters (TBABs) ("A" and "B") with two different typical VOC mixtures were investigated. Toluene, styrene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) were the target VOCs in the mixtures. Biofilter "A" was fed equal molar ratio of the VOCs and biofilter "B" was fed a mixture based on EPA 2003 emission report. Backwashing and substrate starvation operation were conducted as biomass control. Biofilter "A" and "B" maintained 99% overall removal efficiency for influent concentration up to 500 and 300 ppmv under backwashing operating condition, respectively. The starvation study indicated that it can be an effective biomass control for influent concentrations up to 250 ppmv for biofilter "A" and 300 ppmv for "B". Re-acclimation of biofilter performance was delayed with increase of influent concentration for both biofilters. Starvation operation helped the biofilter to recover at low concentrations and delayed re-acclimation at high concentrations. Furthermore, re-acclamation for biofilter "B" was delayed due to its high toluene content as compared to biofilter "A". The pseudo first-order removal rate constant decreased with increase of volumetric loading rate for both biofilters. MEK and MIBK were completely removed in the upper 3/8 media depth. While biofilter depth utilization for the removal of styrene and toluene increased with increase of influent concentrations for both biofilters. However, toluene removal utilized more biofilter depth for biofilter "B" as compared to biofilter "A".

  15. Numerical Study on the Contribution of Convective Mass Transfer Inside High-Porosity Adsorbents in the VOC Adsorption Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ge; He, Wenna; Fang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    and cavity would form, approximately, a consecutive parabola. The convective mass transfer inside the adsorbents would have little impact on the axial VOC transfer but could affect the average adsorption rate significantly at high porosities. The Peclet number Pe which is based on the inlet velocity...

  16. Directional Filters for Cartoon + Texture Image Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Buades

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present in this article a detailed analysis and implementation of the cartoon+texture decomposition algorithm proposed in [A. Buades, J.L. Lisani, 'Directional filters for color cartoon + texture image and video decomposition', Journal of Mathematical Imaging and Vision, 2015]. This method follows the approach proposed by [A. Buades, T. Le, J-M. Morel, L. Vese, 'Cartoon+Texture Image Decomposition', IPOL 2011], based on low/high-pass filtering, but replaces the isotropic filters by a bank of low-pass directional filters. The cartoon image is obtained by filtering in the direction that leads to the largest local total variation rate reduction. This permits to improve the performance of the decomposition near image discontinuities, where an halo effect was produced by the previous method.

  17. Decomposition rate of four dominant tree species leaf litters in Qingling Huoditang forests%秦岭火地塘林区四种主要树种凋落叶分解速率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何帆; 王得祥; 雷瑞德

    2011-01-01

    利用野外分解袋法对秦岭火地塘林区油松、华山松、华北落叶松、锐齿栎凋落叶的分解速率和养分释放趋势进行研究.结果表明,分解2年后,4种树种凋落叶的干物质残留率在35.6%~58.6%,残留率大小顺序为油松>华山松>华北落叶松>锐齿栎.除油松与华山松凋落叶之间残留率差异不显著外,各树种之间凋落叶分解后的残留率差异显著.在2个试验年度中,4-9月凋落叶分解最快,在其他月份保持较平稳的分解速度,分解前12个月凋落叶失重速度明显大干后12个月,呈明显的季节和阶段性差异.利用Olson模型对凋落叶分解50%和95%所需时间进行估测,结果显示,不同树种所需时间差异显著,其中锐齿栎凋落叶95%被分解所需时间最短,为5.43年,油松最长,为9.87年.凋落叶中N、P元素在分解第1年均表现出富集现象,直至1年后达到一个最高值后,开始释放,C含量则呈现出逐步下降的趋势.导致不同树种凋落叶分解速率及养分释放速率差异主要与不同凋落叶的初始质量和性质有关.%By using field litter bag technique, this paper studied the decomposition rate and nutrient release of the leaf litters from Pinus tabulaeformis, P.armandii, Larix principis-rupprechtii, and Quercus aliena var.acuteserrata in Qingling Huoditang forest area.After two years decomposition, the remaining percentage of the leaf litters was 35.6% -58.6% , and ranked as P.tabulaeformis > P.armandii > L.principis-rupprechtii > Q.aliena var.acuteserrata.Except that P.tabulaeformis and P.armandii had no significant difference in their leaf litters remaining percentage, there existed significant differences in the remaining percentage among the test tree species.During the two-year experiment, the leaf litters decomposed fastest during the period from April to September, and kept a stable decomposition rate in other months.Compared the second year, the mass loss rate of the

  18. Measurement of VOCs in vehicle exhaust by extractive FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Bernhard; Paar, H.; Sturm, Peter J.

    2001-02-01

    12 The detection of benzene and other organic compounds in vehicle exhaust by FT-IR-spectroscopy is seriously limited by the strong interference of carbon dioxide and the rather weak absorption coefficient of the gases. Therefore, a measurement device was developed which separates the components of interest (mostly VOCs) from carbon dioxide, water and nitric oxide. In addition the VOCs have to be pre- concentrated. To avoid condensation of VOCs the measurements have to take place at higher temperatures. The vehicle exhaust was led through an activated charcoal tube where the organic compounds were adsorbed. Afterwards, the charcoal tube was heated in a furnace, the VOCs were desorbed thermically and were carried by (heated) nitrogen into a gas cell with a path-length of 10 m where the concentration of the different species was measured. With the help of this measurement device a lot of VOC- components like benzene, toluene, and xylene were detected successfully. Measurements were performed on an engine test bed and a chassis dynamometer for heavy duty vehicles. The detection limit of most of the VOCs was about 2 to 3 ppb for a sampling time of 20 min. Calibration measurements showed an accuracy of 15%.

  19. Dominant modal decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombovari, Zoltan

    2017-03-01

    The paper deals with the automatic decomposition of experimental frequency response functions (FRF's) of mechanical structures. The decomposition of FRF's is based on the Green function representation of free vibratory systems. After the determination of the impulse dynamic subspace, the system matrix is formulated and the poles are calculated directly. By means of the corresponding eigenvectors, the contribution of each element of the impulse dynamic subspace is determined and the sufficient decomposition of the corresponding FRF is carried out. With the presented dominant modal decomposition (DMD) method, the mode shapes, the modal participation vectors and the modal scaling factors are identified using the decomposed FRF's. Analytical example is presented along with experimental case studies taken from machine tool industry.

  20. Spectral proper orthogonal decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Sieber, Moritz; Paschereit, Christian Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The identification of coherent structures from experimental or numerical data is an essential task when conducting research in fluid dynamics. This typically involves the construction of an empirical mode base that appropriately captures the dominant flow structures. The most prominent candidates are the energy-ranked proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and the frequency ranked Fourier decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD). However, these methods fail when the relevant coherent structures occur at low energies or at multiple frequencies, which is often the case. To overcome the deficit of these "rigid" approaches, we propose a new method termed Spectral Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (SPOD). It is based on classical POD and it can be applied to spatially and temporally resolved data. The new method involves an additional temporal constraint that enables a clear separation of phenomena that occur at multiple frequencies and energies. SPOD allows for a continuous shifting from the energetically ...

  1. Decomposition of Polynomials

    CERN Document Server

    Blankertz, Raoul

    2011-01-01

    This diploma thesis is concerned with functional decomposition $f = g \\circ h$ of polynomials. First an algorithm is described which computes decompositions in polynomial time. This algorithm was originally proposed by Zippel (1991). A bound for the number of minimal collisions is derived. Finally a proof of a conjecture in von zur Gathen, Giesbrecht & Ziegler (2010) is given, which states a classification for a special class of decomposable polynomials.

  2. Exploring Patterns of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition with Students through the Global Decomposition Project (GDP) and the Interactive Model of Leaf Decomposition (IMOLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, S. M.; Wood, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    As decomposition rates are affected by climate change, understanding crucial soil interactions that affect plant growth and decomposition becomes a vital part of contributing to the students' knowledge base. The Global Decomposition Project (GDP) is designed to introduce and educate students about soil organic matter and decomposition through a standardized protocol for collecting, reporting, and sharing data. The Interactive Model of Leaf Decomposition (IMOLD) utilizes animations and modeling to learn about the carbon cycle, leaf anatomy, and the role of microbes in decomposition. Paired together, IMOLD teaches the background information and allows simulation of numerous scenarios, and the GDP is a data collection protocol that allows students to gather usable measurements of decomposition in the field. Our presentation will detail how the GDP protocol works, how to obtain or make the materials needed, and how results will be shared. We will also highlight learning objectives from the three animations of IMOLD, and demonstrate how students can experiment with different climates and litter types using the interactive model to explore a variety of decomposition scenarios. The GDP demonstrates how scientific methods can be extended to educate broader audiences, and data collected by students can provide new insight into global patterns of soil decomposition. Using IMOLD, students will gain a better understanding of carbon cycling in the context of litter decomposition, as well as learn to pose questions they can answer with an authentic computer model. Using the GDP protocols and IMOLD provide a pathway for scientists and educators to interact and reach meaningful education and research goals.

  3. Effect of processing parameters on the deposition rate of Si3N4/Si2N2O by chemical vapor infiltration and the in situ thermal decomposition of Na2SiF6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech-Canul, M. I.; de La Peña, J. L.; Leal-Cruz, A. L.

    2007-11-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) and oxynitride (Si2N2O) were deposited by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) through a novel route involving the in-situ thermal decomposition of Na2SiF6 in commercial nitrogen precursors containing impurity oxygen. In addition, the quantitative effect of processing time (30, 60, 90, 120 min), temperature (1000, 1100, 1200 and 1300 °C), nitrogen precursor (N2 or N2-5%NH3) and gas flow rate (46.5, 93, 120 and 240 cm3/min) on phase percentage and deposition rate of Si3N4 and Si2N2O was investigated. Analysis of variance shows that the parameter that most significantly impacts the total amount of deposited phase is the processing temperature, followed by processing time and nitrogen precursor. Regardless of the nitrogen precursor, at 1300 °C, Si3N4 and Si2N2O depositions follow an S-like and parabolic behavior, respectively. The incubation period shown by Si3N4 in N2-5%NH3 is associated to a decrease in the O2 partial pressure during Si2N2O formation while the rapid increase at long processing times is attributed to the enhanced effect of hydrogen.

  4. Numerical modeling analysis of VOC removal processes in different aerobic vertical flow systems for groundwater remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Biase, Cecilia; Carminati, Andrea; Oswald, Sascha E; Thullner, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Vertical flow systems filled with porous medium have been shown to efficiently remove volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater. To apply this semi-natural remediation strategy it is however necessary to distinguish between removal due to biodegradation and due to volatile losses to the atmosphere. Especially for (potentially) toxic VOCs, the latter needs to be minimized to limit atmospheric emissions. In this study, numerical simulation was used to investigate quantitatively the removal of volatile organic compounds in two pilot-scale water treatment systems: an unplanted vertical flow filter and a planted one, which could also be called a vertical flow constructed wetland, both used for the treatment of contaminated groundwater. These systems were intermittently loaded with contaminated water containing benzene and MTBE as main VOCs. The highly dynamic but permanently unsaturated conditions in the porous medium facilitated aerobic biodegradation but could lead to volatile emissions of the contaminants. Experimental data from porous material analyses, flow rate measurements, solute tracer and gas tracer test, as well as contaminant concentration measurements at the boundaries of the systems were used to constrain a numerical reactive transport modeling approach. Numerical simulations considered unsaturated water flow, transport of species in the aqueous and the gas phase as well as aerobic degradation processes, which made it possible to quantify the rates of biodegradation and volatile emissions and calculating their contribution to total contaminant removal. A range of degradation rates was determined using experimental results of both systems under two operation modes and validated by field data obtained at different operation modes applied to the filters. For both filters, simulations and experimental data point to high biodegradation rates, if the flow filters have had time to build up their removal capacity. For this case volatile

  5. Dissociation against oxidation kinetics for the conversion of VOCs in non-thermal plasmas of atmospheric gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquiers, Stéphane; Blin-Simiand, Nicole; Magne, Lionel

    2016-08-01

    The kinetics of four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (propene, propane, acetaldehyde, acetone) were studied in plasmas of atmospheric gases using a photo-triggered discharge (homogeneous plasma) or a dielectric barrier discharge (filamentary plasma). It was shown for the homogeneous plasma that quenchings of nitrogen metastable states, A3Ʃ+u and the group of singlets a' 1Ʃ-u, a 1Πg and w 1∆u, are important processes for the decomposition of such molecules. Recent measurements of the H2 concentration produced in the N2/C3H6 mixture emphasize that the hydrogen molecule can be an exit route for propene dissociation. It is also found that H2 and CO molecules are efficiently produced following the dissociation of CH3COCH3 and the subsequent chemical reactivity induced by radicals coming from acetone. Addition of oxygen to a N2/VOC mixture can change drastically the kinetics. However, the quenching processes of N2 metastables by the VOC are always present and compete with oxidation reactions for the conversion of the pollutant. At low temperature, oxidations by O or by OH are not always sufficiently effective to induce an increase of the molecule decomposition when oxygen is added to the mixture. In particular, the presence of O2 has a detrimental effect on the acetone removal. Also, as evidenced for acetaldehyde and propane, some kinetic analogies appear between filamentary and homogeneous plasmas. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  6. Thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leckey, J.H.; Nulf, L.E.

    1994-10-28

    The rate of thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide (HgS) has been measured at temperatures from 265 to 345 C. These data have been analyzed using a first-order chemical reaction model for the time dependence of the reaction and the Arrhenius equation for the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Using this information, the activation energy for the reaction was found to be 55 kcal/mol. Significant reaction vessel surface effects obscured the functional form of the time dependence of the initial portion of the reaction. The data and the resulting time-temperature reaction-rate model were used to predict the decomposition rate of HgS as a function of time and temperature in thermal treatment systems. Data from large-scale thermal treatment studies already completed were interpreted in terms of the results of this study. While the data from the large-scale thermal treatment studies were consistent with the data from this report, mass transport effects may have contributed to the residual amount of mercury which remained in the soil after most of the large-scale runs.

  7. Evaluation of the ability of mice to detect VOCs, using a positive operant reinforcement procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Rieko

    2015-08-01

    To examine the validity of a newly established "three-odor detection (TOD)" procedure using one of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), limonene, food-restricted male mice were used. Five animals each were assigned to either TOD or single-odor detection (SOD). TOD was composed of two trainings and one test (TEST) session. Mice were trained to discriminate an odor of coffee from no odor and odors of coffee and cheese from no odor in trainings 1 and 2, respectively. In TEST, mice were required to discriminate odors of coffee, cheese, and limonene from no odor. In SOD, mice were required to discriminate an odor of limonene from no odor. Each training or test was conducted once a day until animals achieved a learning criterion (75% correct response rate for 2 consecutive days), or until a maximum number of sessions (20 sessions) was completed. The number of sessions for reaching the learning criterion of animals in TEST (8.2 ± 0.8) was smaller than that of animals in SOD (19.2 ± 0.8). Results indicated that mice in TOD detected low levels of VOCs more rapidly than animals in SOD. I concluded that TOD is a useful procedure for detecting low levels of VOCs.

  8. Performance evaluation of a biotrickling filter treating a mixture of oxygenated VOCs during intermittent loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempere, Feliu; Gabaldón, Carmen; Martínez-Soria, Vicente; Marzal, Paula; Penya-roja, Josep M; Javier Álvarez-Hornos, F

    2008-11-01

    Laboratory scale-studies on the biodegradation of a 1:1:1 weight mixture of three oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ethanol, ethyl acetate, and methyl-ethyl ketone (MEK) in a biotrickling filter (BTF) were carried out using two identically sized columns, filled with different polypropylene rings. The performance of the BTFs was examined for a period of 10 months applying several operational strategies. Similar performance was obtained for both supports. Intermittent flow rate of trickling liquid was shown beneficial to improve the removal efficiency (RE). Continuous feeding of VOC resulted in an excessive accumulation of biomass so high pressure drop was developed in less than 20-30 d of operation. Intermittent VOC loading with night and weekend feed cut-off periods passing dry air, but without addition of water, was shown as a successful operational mode to control the thickness of the biofilm. In this case, operation at high inlet loads (ILs) was extended for more than 75 d maintaining high REs and low pressure drops. Outlet emission concentrations lower than 100 mg Cm(-3) were obtained for ILs up to 100 g Cm(-3)h(-1) working at 15s of empty bed residence time. The most easily biodegradable compounds ethanol and ethyl acetate were used primarily than MEK. After a 3-wk-starvation period, the system performance was almost restored since the first d of operation, being the removal of the less biodegradable compound, MEK, partially deteriorated.

  9. Aridity and decomposition processes in complex landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossola, Alessandro; Nyman, Petter

    2015-04-01

    Decomposition of organic matter is a key biogeochemical process contributing to nutrient cycles, carbon fluxes and soil development. The activity of decomposers depends on microclimate, with temperature and rainfall being major drivers. In complex terrain the fine-scale variation in microclimate (and hence water availability) as a result of slope orientation is caused by differences in incoming radiation and surface temperature. Aridity, measured as the long-term balance between net radiation and rainfall, is a metric that can be used to represent variations in water availability within the landscape. Since aridity metrics can be obtained at fine spatial scales, they could theoretically be used to investigate how decomposition processes vary across complex landscapes. In this study, four research sites were selected in tall open sclerophyll forest along a aridity gradient (Budyko dryness index ranging from 1.56 -2.22) where microclimate, litter moisture and soil moisture were monitored continuously for one year. Litter bags were packed to estimate decomposition rates (k) using leaves of a tree species not present in the study area (Eucalyptus globulus) in order to avoid home-field advantage effects. Litter mass loss was measured to assess the activity of macro-decomposers (6mm litter bag mesh size), meso-decomposers (1 mm mesh), microbes above-ground (0.2 mm mesh) and microbes below-ground (2 cm depth, 0.2 mm mesh). Four replicates for each set of bags were installed at each site and bags were collected at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 12 months since installation. We first tested whether differences in microclimate due to slope orientation have significant effects on decomposition processes. Then the dryness index was related to decomposition rates to evaluate if small-scale variation in decomposition can be predicted using readily available information on rainfall and radiation. Decomposition rates (k), calculated fitting single pool negative exponential models, generally

  10. Modelling volatility by variance decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amado, Cristina; Teräsvirta, Timo

    on the multiplicative decomposition of the variance is developed. It is heavily dependent on Lagrange multiplier type misspecification tests. Finite-sample properties of the strategy and tests are examined by simulation. An empirical application to daily stock returns and another one to daily exchange rate returns...... illustrate the functioning and properties of our modelling strategy in practice. The results show that the long memory type behaviour of the sample autocorrelation functions of the absolute returns can also be explained by deterministic changes in the unconditional variance....

  11. Real interest parity decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Luiz Ferreira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the general causes of real interest rate differentials (rids for a sample of emerging markets for the period of January 1996 to August 2007. To this end, two methods are applied. The first consists of breaking the variance of rids down into relative purchasing power pariety and uncovered interest rate parity and shows that inflation differentials are the main source of rids variation; while the second method breaks down the rids and nominal interest rate differentials (nids into nominal and real shocks. Bivariate autoregressive models are estimated under particular identification conditions, having been adequately treated for the identified structural breaks. Impulse response functions and error variance decomposition result in real shocks as being the likely cause of rids.O objetivo deste artigo é investigar as causas gerais dos diferenciais da taxa de juros real (rids para um conjunto de países emergentes, para o período de janeiro de 1996 a agosto de 2007. Para tanto, duas metodologias são aplicadas. A primeira consiste em decompor a variância dos rids entre a paridade do poder de compra relativa e a paridade de juros a descoberto e mostra que os diferenciais de inflação são a fonte predominante da variabilidade dos rids; a segunda decompõe os rids e os diferenciais de juros nominais (nids em choques nominais e reais. Sob certas condições de identificação, modelos autorregressivos bivariados são estimados com tratamento adequado para as quebras estruturais identificadas e as funções de resposta ao impulso e a decomposição da variância dos erros de previsão são obtidas, resultando em evidências favoráveis a que os choques reais são a causa mais provável dos rids.

  12. Study on Decomposition Rate and Nutrition Release of Submerged Macrophytes(Vallisneria spiralis) in Winter%冬季苦草分解速率及营养盐释放规律研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈见; 谢从新; 何绪刚; 胡雄; 李佩; 陆诗敏

    2011-01-01

    采用分解网袋法研究了冬季苦草腐败分解速率及其氮、磷损失规律。结果表明:苦草腐败释放的磷大部分被底泥吸附,少量进入水体;释放到水体中的氨氮(NH4+-N)、亚硝态氮(NO2--N)和硝态氮(NO3--N)数量也较少;底泥减缓了苦草干重损失速度,而加快了TN和TP损失速率;苦草分解过程中磷的释放速率比氮快;苦草腐败分解具有阶段性,前36d分解迅速,以后分解速率显著下降。%This paper studied on the rate of decomposition of tape grass(Vallisneria spiralis) as well as the law of the release of nitrogen and phosphorus in the decomposed tape grass in winter using a litter-bag method.The results showed the majority of phosphorus

  13. TO PURGE OR NOT TO PURGE? VOC CONCENTRATION ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil vapor surveys are commonly used as a screening technique to delineate volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminant plumes and provide information for soil sampling plans. Traditionally, three purge volumes of vapor are removed before a sample is collected. One facet of this study was to evaluate the VOC concentrations lost during purging and explore the potential implications of those losses. The vapor data was compared to collocated soil data to determine if any correlation existed between the VOC concentrations. Two different methods for soil vapor collection were compared: 1) active/micro-volume; and 2) active/macro-volume. The active/micro-volume vapor sample had total line purge volume of 1.25 mL and the active/macro-volume vapor sample had a total line purge volume of 15 mL. Six line purge volumes were collected for each vapor sampling technique, with the fourth purge volume representing the traditional sample used for site screening data. Each sample was collected by gas tight syringe and transferred to a thermal de sorption tube for sorption, transport, and analysis. Following the removal of the soil vapor samples, collocated soil samples were taken. For both active vapor sampling techniques, the VOC concentrations in the first three purge volumes exceeded the VOC concentrations in the last three purge volumes. This implies that the general rule of removal of three purge volumes prior to taking a sample for analysis could lead to underestimating the

  14. Decomposing Nekrasov Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Morozov, A

    2015-01-01

    AGT relations imply that the four-point conformal block admits a decomposition into a sum over pairs of Young diagrams of essentially rational Nekrasov functions - this is immediately seen when conformal block is represented in the form of a matrix model. However, the q-deformation of the same block has a deeper decomposition - into a sum over a quadruple of Young diagrams of a product of four topological vertices. We analyze the interplay between these two decompositions, their properties and their generalization to multi-point conformal blocks. In the latter case we explain how Dotsenko-Fateev all-with-all (star) pair "interaction" is reduced to the quiver model nearest-neighbor (chain) one. We give new identities for q-Selberg averages of pairs of generalized Macdonald polynomials. We also translate the slicing invariance of refined topological strings into the language of conformal blocks and interpret it as abelianization of generalized Macdonald polynomials.

  15. Decomposing Nekrasov decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A.; Zenkevich, Y.

    2016-02-01

    AGT relations imply that the four-point conformal block admits a decomposition into a sum over pairs of Young diagrams of essentially rational Nekrasov functions — this is immediately seen when conformal block is represented in the form of a matrix model. However, the q-deformation of the same block has a deeper decomposition — into a sum over a quadruple of Young diagrams of a product of four topological vertices. We analyze the interplay between these two decompositions, their properties and their generalization to multi-point conformal blocks. In the latter case we explain how Dotsenko-Fateev all-with-all (star) pair "interaction" is reduced to the quiver model nearest-neighbor (chain) one. We give new identities for q-Selberg averages of pairs of generalized Macdonald polynomials. We also translate the slicing invariance of refined topological strings into the language of conformal blocks and interpret it as abelianization of generalized Macdonald polynomials.

  16. Symmetric tensor decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Brachat, Jerome; Mourrain, Bernard; Tsigaridas, Elias

    2009-01-01

    We present an algorithm for decomposing a symmetric tensor, of dimension n and order d as a sum of rank-1 symmetric tensors, extending the algorithm of Sylvester devised in 1886 for binary forms. We recall the correspondence between the decomposition of a homogeneous polynomial in n variables of total degree d as a sum of powers of linear forms (Waring's problem), incidence properties on secant varieties of the Veronese Variety and the representation of linear forms as a linear combination of evaluations at distinct points. Then we reformulate Sylvester's approach from the dual point of view. Exploiting this duality, we propose necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of such a decomposition of a given rank, using the properties of Hankel (and quasi-Hankel) matrices, derived from multivariate polynomials and normal form computations. This leads to the resolution of polynomial equations of small degree in non-generic cases. We propose a new algorithm for symmetric tensor decomposition, based on th...

  17. Mueller matrix differential decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-05-15

    We present a Mueller matrix decomposition based on the differential formulation of the Mueller calculus. The differential Mueller matrix is obtained from the macroscopic matrix through an eigenanalysis. It is subsequently resolved into the complete set of 16 differential matrices that correspond to the basic types of optical behavior for depolarizing anisotropic media. The method is successfully applied to the polarimetric analysis of several samples. The differential parameters enable one to perform an exhaustive characterization of anisotropy and depolarization. This decomposition is particularly appropriate for studying media in which several polarization effects take place simultaneously. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. Decomposition of residue currents

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Mats; Wulcan, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Given a submodule $J\\subset \\mathcal O_0^{\\oplus r}$ and a free resolution of $J$ one can define a certain vector valued residue current whose annihilator is $J$. We make a decomposition of the current with respect to Ass$(J)$ that correspond to a primary decomposition of $J$. As a tool we introduce a class of currents that includes usual residue and principal value currents; in particular these currents admit a certain type of restriction to analytic varieties and more generally to construct...

  19. Diffusion-controlled toluene reference material for VOC emissions testing: international interlaboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Reed, Cynthia; Liu, Zhe; Cox, Steven; Leber, Dennis; Samarov, Dan; Little, John C

    2014-04-01

    The measurement of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from building products and materials by manufacturers and testing laboratories, and the use of the test results for labeling programs, continue to expand. One issue that hinders wide acceptance for chamber product testing is the lack of a reference material to validate test chamber performance. To meet this need, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Virginia Tech (VT) have developed a prototype reference material that emits a single VOC similar to the emissions of a diffusion-controlled building product source with a dynamic emissions profile. The prototype material has undergone extensive testing at NIST and a pilot interlaboratory study (ILS) with four laboratories. The next development step is an evaluation of the prototype source in multiple-sized chambers of 14 laboratories in seven countries. Each laboratory was provided duplicate specimens and a test protocol. Study results identified significant issues related to the need to store the source at a subzero Celsius temperature until tested and possible inconsistencies in large chambers. For laboratories using a small chamber and meeting all the test method criteria, the results were very encouraging with relative standard deviations ranging from 5% to 10% across the laboratories. Currently, the chamber performance of laboratories conducting product VOC emissions testing is assessed through interlaboratory studies (ILS) using a source with an unknown emission rate. As a result, laboratory proficiency can only be based on the mean and standard deviation of emission rates measured by the participating ILS laboratories. A reference material with a known emission rate has the potential to provide an independent assessment of laboratory performance as well as improve the quality of interlaboratory studies. Several international laboratories with different chamber testing systems demonstrated the ability to measure the emission rate

  20. Climate fails to predict wood decomposition at regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Mark A.; Warren, Robert J., II; Baldrian, Petr; Crowther, Thomas W.; Maynard, Daniel S.; Oldfield, Emily E.; Wieder, William R.; Wood, Stephen A.; King, Joshua R.

    2014-07-01

    Decomposition of organic matter strongly influences ecosystem carbon storage. In Earth-system models, climate is a predominant control on the decomposition rates of organic matter. This assumption is based on the mean response of decomposition to climate, yet there is a growing appreciation in other areas of global change science that projections based on mean responses can be irrelevant and misleading. We test whether climate controls on the decomposition rate of dead wood--a carbon stock estimated to represent 73 +/- 6 Pg carbon globally--are sensitive to the spatial scale from which they are inferred. We show that the common assumption that climate is a predominant control on decomposition is supported only when local-scale variation is aggregated into mean values. Disaggregated data instead reveal that local-scale factors explain 73% of the variation in wood decomposition, and climate only 28%. Further, the temperature sensitivity of decomposition estimated from local versus mean analyses is 1.3-times greater. Fundamental issues with mean correlations were highlighted decades ago, yet mean climate-decomposition relationships are used to generate simulations that inform management and adaptation under environmental change. Our results suggest that to predict accurately how decomposition will respond to climate change, models must account for local-scale factors that control regional dynamics.

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana as Bioindicator of Fungal VOCs in Indoor Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Richard; Yin, Guohua; Klich, Maren A.; Grimm, Casey; Bennett, Joan W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to detect different mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by the common indoor fungus, Aspergillus versicolor, and demonstrate the potential usage of the plant as a bioindicator to monitor fungal VOCs in indoor air. We evaluated the volatile production of Aspergillus versicolor strains SRRC 108 (NRRL 3449) and SRRC 2559 (ATCC 32662) grown on nutrient rich fungal medium, and grown under conditions to mimic the substrate encountered in the built environment where fungi would typically grow indoors (moist wallboard and ceiling tiles). Using headspace solid phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we analyzed VOC profiles of the two strains. The most abundant compound produced by both strains on all three media was 1-octen-3-ol. Strain SRRC 2559 made several terpenes not detected from strain SRRC 108. Using a split-plate bioassay, we grew Arabidopsis thaliana in a shared atmosphere with VOCs from the two strains of Aspergillus versicolor grown on yeast extract sucrose medium. The VOCs emitted by SRRC 2559 had an adverse impact on seed germination and plant growth. Chemical standards of individual VOCs from the Aspergillus versicolor mixture (2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-octen-3-ol, limonene, and β-farnesene), and β-caryophyllene were tested one by one in seed germination and vegetative plant growth assays. The most inhibitory compound to both seed germination and plant growth was 1-octen-3-ol. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis is a useful model for monitoring indoor air quality as it is sensitive to naturally emitted fungal volatile mixtures as well as to chemical standards of individual compounds, and it exhibits relatively quick concentration- and duration-dependent responses.

  2. Distributions of personal VOC exposures: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chunrong; D'Souza, Jennifer; Batterman, Stuart

    2008-10-01

    Information regarding the distribution of volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations and exposures is scarce, and there have been few, if any, studies using population-based samples from which representative estimates can be derived. This study characterizes distributions of personal exposures to ten different VOCs in the U.S. measured in the 1999--2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Personal VOC exposures were collected for 669 individuals over 2-3 days, and measurements were weighted to derive national-level statistics. Four common exposure sources were identified using factor analyses: gasoline vapor and vehicle exhaust, methyl tert-butyl ether (MBTE) as a gasoline additive, tap water disinfection products, and household cleaning products. Benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylenes chloroform, and tetrachloroethene were fit to log-normal distributions with reasonably good agreement to observations. 1,4-Dichlorobenzene and trichloroethene were fit to Pareto distributions, and MTBE to Weibull distribution, but agreement was poor. However, distributions that attempt to match all of the VOC exposure data can lead to incorrect conclusions regarding the level and frequency of the higher exposures. Maximum Gumbel distributions gave generally good fits to extrema, however, they could not fully represent the highest exposures of the NHANES measurements. The analysis suggests that complete models for the distribution of VOC exposures require an approach that combines standard and extreme value distributions, and that carefully identifies outliers. This is the first study to provide national-level and representative statistics regarding the VOC exposures, and its results have important implications for risk assessment and probabilistic analyses.

  3. Decomposition of Diethylstilboestrol in Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregers-Hansen, Birte

    1964-01-01

    The rate of decomposition of DES-monoethyl-1-C14 in soil was followed by measurement of C14O2 released. From 1.6 to 16% of the added C14 was recovered as C14O2 during 3 months. After six months as much as 12 to 28 per cent was released as C14O2.Determination of C14 in the soil samples after the e...... not inhibit the CO2 production from the soil.Experiments with γ-sterilized soil indicated that enzymes present in the soil are able to attack DES.......The rate of decomposition of DES-monoethyl-1-C14 in soil was followed by measurement of C14O2 released. From 1.6 to 16% of the added C14 was recovered as C14O2 during 3 months. After six months as much as 12 to 28 per cent was released as C14O2.Determination of C14 in the soil samples after...

  4. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during malting and beer manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Nigel B.; Costigan, Gavin T.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Woodfield, Michael J.

    Estimates have been made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released during different stages of beer manufacture. The estimates are based on recent measurements and plant specification data supplied by manufacturers. Data were obtained for three main manufacturing processes (malting, wort processing and fermentation) for three commercial beer types. Some data on the speciation of emitted compounds have been obtained. Based on these measurements, an estimate of the total unabated VOC emission. from the U.K. brewing industry was calculated as 3.5 kta -1, over 95% of which was generated during barley malting. This value does not include any correction for air pollution control.

  5. The Thermal Decomposition of Calcium Carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The thermogravimetry(TG) and derivative thermogravimetry(DTG) curves of the thermal decomposition reaction of calcium carbonate have been measured at five different heating rates. The kinetic parameters and the reaction mechanism of the reaction were evaluated from analysis of the TG and DTG curves by using the Ozawa method, the combined integral and differential methods and the reduced equations derived by us.

  6. Theoretical model for removal of volatile organic compound (VOC) air pollutant in trickling biofilter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO; Qiang; (廖; 强); CHEN; Rong; (陈; 蓉); ZHU; Xun; (朱; 恂)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model for predicting VOC waste gas degradation in a trickling biofilter. To facilitate the analysis, the packed bed is simplified into a series of straight capillary tubes covered by the biofilm. The gas-liquid flow field through the tube is divided into the liquid film flow on the biofilm and the gas core flow in the center. The biofilm consists of a reaction free zone close to solid wall and a reaction zone beneath the liquid film. The capillary tube model accounts for the effect of mass transport resistance in the liquid film and the biofilm, the gas-liquid interfacial mass transport resistance, the biochemical reaction, and the limitation of oxygen to biochemical reaction. The liquid film thickness in the capillary tube is obtained by simultaneously solving a set of hydrodynamic equations representing the momentum transport behaviors of the gas-liquid two-phase flow. The mass transport equations are established for gas core, liquid film, and biofilm combined with biochemical kinetics equations. An iterative computation process is employed to solve the discrete equations. The predicted purification efficiencies of VOC waste gas in trickling biofilter are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. It has been revealed that for a fixed inlet concentration of toluene, the purification efficiency of trickling biofilter decreases with the increase in gas flow rate and liquid flow rate. The purification efficiency of VOC waste gas is dominated by mass transport resistance in liquid film and biofilm. The highest biodegradation rate occurs at the inlet of waste gas in trickling biofilter.

  7. A High Performance Biofilter for VOC Emission Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G; Conti, B; Leroux, A; Brzezinski, R; Viel, G; Heitz, M

    1999-02-01

    Biofiltration is a cleaning technique for waste air contaminated with some organic compounds. The advantages of the conventional biofilter over other biological systems are a high-superficial area best suited for the treatment of some compounds with poor water solubility, ease of operation, and low operating costs. It has crucial disadvantages, however; for example, it is not suitable to treat waste gases with high VOC concentrations and it has poor control of reaction conditions. To improve on these problems and to build a high-performance biofilter, three structured peat media and two trickling systems have been introduced in this study. The influences of media size and composition have been investigated experimentally. Peat bead blended with 30% (w/w) certain mineral material with a good binding capacity has advantages over other packing materials, for example, suitable size to prevent blockage due to microbial growth, strong buffering capacity to neutralize acidic substances in the system, and a pH range of 7.0-7.2 suitable for the growth of bacteria. Dropwise trickling system offers an effective measure to easily control the moisture content of the bed and the reaction conditions (pH, nutrient) and to partially remove excess biomass produced during the metabolic processes of microorganisms. The influence of nutrient supplementation has also been investigated in this study, which has revealed that the biological system was in a condition of nutrient limitation instead of carbon limitation. The biofilters built in our laboratory were used to treat waste gas contaminated with toluene in a concentration range of 1 to 3.2 g/m(3) and at the specific gas flow rate of 24 to120 m(3)/m(2).hr. Under the conditions employed, a high elimination capacity (135 g/m(3).hr) was obtained in the biofilter packed with peat beads (blended with 30% of the mineral material), and no blockage problem was observed in an experimental period of 2-3 months.

  8. The thermal decomposition of methane in a tubular reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Steinberg, M.

    1992-01-01

    The reaction rate of methane decomposition using a tubular reactor having a 1 inch inside diameter with an 8 foot long heated zone was investigated in the temperature range of 700 to 900 C with pressures ranging from 28.2 to 56.1 atm. Representing the rate by a conventional model, {minus}dC{sub CH4}/dt= k1 C{sub CH4} {minus}k2 C{sub H2}{sup 2}, the rate constant k1 for methane decomposition was determined. The activation energy, 31.3 kcal/mol, calculated by an Arrhenius Plot was lower than for previously published results for methane decomposition. This result indicates that submicron particles found in the reactor adhere to the inside of the reactor and these submicron high surface area carbon particles tend to catalyze the methane decomposition. The rate constant has been found to be approximately constant at 900 C with pressure range cited above. The rate of methane decomposition increases with methane partial pressure in first-order. The rate of the methane decomposition is favored by higher temperatures and pressures while the thermochemical equilibrium of methane decomposition is favored by lower pressures. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Convergence Analysis of a Domain Decomposition Paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bank, R E; Vassilevski, P S

    2006-06-12

    We describe a domain decomposition algorithm for use in several variants of the parallel adaptive meshing paradigm of Bank and Holst. This algorithm has low communication, makes extensive use of existing sequential solvers, and exploits in several important ways data generated as part of the adaptive meshing paradigm. We show that for an idealized version of the algorithm, the rate of convergence is independent of both the global problem size N and the number of subdomains p used in the domain decomposition partition. Numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness of the procedure.

  10. Eigenvalue Decomposition-Based Modified Newton Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When the Hessian matrix is not positive, the Newton direction may not be the descending direction. A new method named eigenvalue decomposition-based modified Newton algorithm is presented, which first takes the eigenvalue decomposition of the Hessian matrix, then replaces the negative eigenvalues with their absolute values, and finally reconstructs the Hessian matrix and modifies the searching direction. The new searching direction is always the descending direction. The convergence of the algorithm is proven and the conclusion on convergence rate is presented qualitatively. Finally, a numerical experiment is given for comparing the convergence domains of the modified algorithm and the classical algorithm.

  11. Effect of incubation starting time on litter decomposition rate in a subtropical forest in China%起始时间对亚热带森林凋落物分解速率的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李荣华; 邓琦; 周国逸; 张德强

    2011-01-01

    运用分解袋法研究了不同布置时间的凋落物在亚热带森林分解的初期过程,探讨了不同布置时间的凋落物经过相同时间分解的差异及环境因子对其分解速率特别是分解速率常数k的影响。结果表明:在凋落物分解较快的鼎湖山季风常绿阔叶林,不同时间布置的凋落物经过12个月的分解,其残留率及k均存在较大的差异。不同布置时间的凋落物的分解率在前期(0-6个月)与其相应阶段的环境因子呈显著相关关系,但与后期的环境因子相关性并不显著。不同布置时间的k值的变化范围为0.78-1.30,起始于雨季的k值较大,起始于旱季的较小(p<0.001),其大小与分解前期的环境因子相关性较高,与整个分解过程中的环境因子相关性较低。因此,凋落物的凋落时间可能影响其分解速率,由于布置时间不同而导致k值估算的不准确将对森林生态系统的养分循环及其碳平衡的评估产生很大影响。%Aims Estimation of ecosystem carbon balance may be affected by timing of sampling. Our objective was to determine the effect of different incubation starting times on litter decomposition rate (k) in a tropical and subtropical forest.Methods We used litter bags and incubated them in the field at the same site beginning on eight different starting times over a year, beginning January 13 and at 45-day intervals. Each of the eight sets of litter bags was sampled four times over a period of 12 months, remaining litter mass was determined and k values were estimated. Temperature, precipitation, photosynthetically available radiation, soil water content and relative humidity were measured throughout the experiment.Important findings The remaining litter mass and k values were significantly different (p < 0.05) among the eight starting times. Rate of litter decomposition was significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to temperature and precipitation during the early phase

  12. Taxas de decomposição e de liberação de macronutrientes da palhada de aveia preta em plantio direto Decomposition rate and nutrient release of oat straw used as mulching in no-till system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A palhada das plantas de cobertura mantida sobre o solo em plantio direto é uma reserva importante de nutrientes a ser liberada para as culturas subseqüentes, principalmente em regiões de clima tropical, devido às altas taxas de decomposição dos resíduos. O trabalho foi desenvolvido em condições de campo, durante 1998, no Município de Marechal Cândido Rondon, na Região Oeste do Estado do Paraná. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a taxa de decomposição e a velocidade de liberação de macronutrientes da palhada de aveia preta, na Região Oeste do Estado do Paraná. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições. As plantas foram manejadas aos trinta dias após a emergência. A persistência de palhada e a liberação de nutrientes do resíduo de aveia preta foram avaliadas 0, 13, 35 e 53 dias após a rolagem e dessecação. A taxa de decomposição da aveia foi constante (restando 34% do teor inicial e inversamente proporcional à relação C/N com valor inicial de 34 e final de 50. A maior parte do K é liberada logo após o manejo da aveia preta, restando na última coleta apenas 2% do teor inicial. N, P, Ca e S são liberados de forma gradual, restando na última avaliação, respectivamente, 55%, 42%, 48% e 47% da quantidade acumulada. O K seguido do N são os nutrientes disponibilizados em maior quantidade no solo, atingindo máxima velocidade de liberação entre 10 e 20 dias após o manejo da fitomassa de aveia preta.Plant residues left on soil surface in no-tillage systems are an important source of nutrients for the following crops, particularly under tropical climate, in which high residue decomposition rates shorten their persistence. The objective of this research work was to evaluate black oat decomposition and release of nutrients. The experiment was carried out during the 1998 cropping season in an experimental area located in Marechal Cândido Rondon, Paraná State, Brazil. A

  13. Trust Model for Social Network using Singular Value Decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Davis Bundi Ntwiga; Patrick Weke; Michael Kiura Kirumbu

    2016-01-01

    For effective interactions to take place in a social network, trust is important. We model trust of agents using the peer to peer reputation ratings in the network that forms a real valued matrix. Singular value decomposition discounts the reputation ratings to estimate the trust levels as trust is the subjective probability of future expectations based on current reputation ratings. Reputation and trust are closely related and singular value decomposition can estimate trust using the...

  14. Tree decompositions with small cost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodlaender, H.L.; Fomin, F.V.

    2002-01-01

    The f-cost of a tree decomposition ({Xi | i e I}, T = (I;F)) for a function f : N -> R+ is defined as EieI f(|Xi|). This measure associates with the running time or memory use of some algorithms that use the tree decomposition. In this paper we investigate the problem to find tree decompositions

  15. Variation trends in decomposition rate of corn straw and in temperature and relative humidity of straw returned layer when returning straw to blank strips above plastic film%带膜还田时玉米秸秆的腐解率和还田层的温湿度变化趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢秉林; 包兴国; 车宗贤; 张久东; 杨新强; 王平

    2016-01-01

    To provide a theoretical basis and technical support for returning corn straw to field in local areas ,varia-tion trends in decomposition rate of corn straw ,and temperature and relative humidity of straw returned layer when return-ing straw to blank strips above plastic film were studied by using nylon net bags in Hexi oasis irrigation .The results showed that straw returning could increase topsoil temperature at around 8 am but alleviate the soil temperature decline at around 8 pm .Daily average relative humidity ,maximum relative humidity and minimum relative humidity at the straw re-turned layer under straw-buried to blank strips above the plastic film were higher than those with the straw-mulching treat-ment ,but the diurnal relative humidity was lower .Meanwhile ,daily minimum temperature at the straw returned layer by the straw-buried treatment was higher than that by straw-mulching ,but the average daily temperature ,maximum tempera-ture and diurnal temperature were lower than those by straw-mulching to blank strips above cover plastic film .The tem-perature ,relative humidity and decomposition time of straw returning layer were the main influencing factors for corn straw decomposition .Temperature at the straw returned layer had the greatest effect on the decomposition of corn straw , followed by relative humidity and decomposition time .The temperature and relative humidity at the straw returned layer played major roles in the decomposition of straw and the decomposition time played a secondary role under straw-mulcheing to blank strips above plastic film .The temperature ,relative humidity and decomposition time played major roles in the decomposition rate of corn straw under straw-buried to blank strips above cover plastic film model .Straw-buried treatment entered the peak stage of straw decomposition after 30 days ,while the monthly decomposition rate of corn straw reached to 15% ~16% . Straw-mulched treatment entered the peak stage of straw

  16. The Influence of Grain Size on Decomposition Reaction of Limestone in Dispersing State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU De-long; WEI Hon-gen; LUO Yong-qin

    2004-01-01

    The thermal behavior and kinetic parameters of decomposition reaction of limestone in a temperature-programmed mode were investigated by means of TG. The experimental results show that the kinetic model functions in different forms for the thermal decomposition reactions of different limestone grain sizes in dispersing state under the atmosphere of static air are 4(1-α)3/4 for small size limestone and (1-α) for large size limestone. Information was obtained on the relationship among the decomposition temperature, decomposition time, decomposition fraction, decomposition reaction rate constant and grain size of limestone.

  17. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, W.; Yan, H.; Hooda, U.; Wild, M.P.; Banerjee, S. [Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shmulsky, R.; Thompson, A.; Ingram, L.; Conners, T. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This study was initiated by an Institute of Paper Science and Technology finding that heating softwood in a low-headspace environment removed much of the VOCs without removing the water. This offered the possibility of removing VOCs from wet wood, capturing them as a product, and then drying the VOC-depleted wood conventionally with little or no VOC controls. Two means of low-headspace heating were explored: steam and radiofrequency (RF). It was found in the previous year, that while both steam and RF were able to drive out VOCs, steam was impracticably slow for lumber. Hence the effect of RF or microwave on wood was the principal focus of the work reported here. Finally, in order to understand the mechanism of VOC release, the transport of the VOCs in wood was studied, together with the seasonal effects that influence VOC concentration in trees.

  18. Temperature and light dependence of the VOC emissions of Scots pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tarvainen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The volatile organic compound (VOC emission rates of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. were measured from trees growing in a natural forest environment at two locations in Finland. The emission rate measurements were carried out using a dynamic flow through technique with samples collected on adsorbent tubes and analyzed using thermodesorption followed by a gas chromatograph with a mass-selective detector (GC-MS. The standard emission potentials (at 303.15 K and 1000 µmol photons m−2 s−1 were calculated for the measured compounds using nonlinear regression to fit the experimental data to temperature and light dependent emission algorithms.

    The observed total VOC emission rates varied between 21 and 874 ng/g(dw*h and 268 and 1670 ng/g(dw*h in southern and northern Finland, respectively. A clear seasonal cycle was detected with high emission rates in early spring, a decrease of the emissions in late spring and early summer, high emissions again in late summer, and a gradual decrease in autumn.

    The main emitted compounds were Δ3-carene (southern Finland and α- and β-pinene (northern Finland, with approximate relative contributions of 60–70% and 60–85% of the total observed monoterpene emission rates, respectively. Sesquiterpene (β-caryophyllene and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO emissions were initiated in early summer at both sites. The observed MBO emission rates were between 1 and 3.5% of the total monoterpene emission rates. The sesquiterpene emission rates varied between 2 and 5% of the total monoterpene emission rates in southern Finland, but were high (40% in northern Finland in spring.

    Most of the measured emission rates were found to be well described by the temperature dependent emission algorithm. The calculated standard emission potentials were high in spring and early summer, decreased somewhat in late summer, and were high again towards autumn. The experimental

  19. VocVille - A Casual Social Game for Learning Vocabulary

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The document introduces VocVille, a causal online game for learning vocabularies. This application is created for the author's diploma thesis of his career as a Computervisualist (computer vision) for the University of Koblenz-Landau, which he terminated as an exchange student at the University of Cádiz, in which he developed this diploma thesis.

  20. Assessment of Industrial VOC Gas-Scrubber Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, H

    2004-02-13

    Gas scrubbers for air-pollution control of volatile organic compounds (VOC) cover a wide range of technologies. In this review, we have attempted to evaluate the single-pass scrubber destruction and removal efficiencies (DREs) for a range of gas-scrubber technologies. We have focused primarily on typical industrial DREs for the various technologies, typical problems, and any DRE-related experiential information available. The very limited literature citations found suggest significant differences between actual versus design performance in some technologies. The potentially significant role of maintenance in maintaining DREs was also investigated for those technologies. An in-depth portrayal of the entire gas scrubbing industry is elusive. Available literature sources suggest significant differences between actual versus design performance in some technologies. Lack of scrubber system maintenance can contribute to even larger variances. ''Typical'' industrial single-pass performance of commonly used VOC gas scrubbers generally ranged from {approx}80 to 99%. Imperfect solid and/or liquid particulates capture (possibly as low as 95% despite design for 99+% capture efficiency) can also lead to VOC releases. Changing the VOC composition in the gas stream without modifying scrubber equipment or operating conditions could also lead to significant deterioration in attainable destruction and removal efficiencies.

  1. EVALUATION OF SINK EFFECTS ON VOCS FROM A LATEX PAINT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sink strength of two common indoor materials, a carpet and a gypsum board, was evaluated by environmental chamber tests with four volatile organic compounds (VOCs): propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, 2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethanol (BEE), and texanol. These oxygenated compounds rep...

  2. CASE STUDIES: LOW-VOC/HAP WOOD FURNITURE COATINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a study in which wood furniture manufacturing facilities were identified that had converted at least one of their primary coating steps to low-volatile organic compound (VOC)/hazardous Air pollutant (HAP) wood furniture coatings: high-solids, water...

  3. RESEARCH AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-VOC WOOD COATINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses a project, cofunded by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and the U.S. EPA, to develop a new, low volatile organic compound (VOC) wood coating. Traditional wood furniture coating technologies contain organic solvents which become air pol...

  4. Solid-phase microextraction and the human fecal VOC metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Dixon

    Full Text Available The diagnostic potential and health implications of volatile organic compounds (VOCs present in human feces has begun to receive considerable attention. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME has greatly facilitated the isolation and analysis of VOCs from human feces. Pioneering human fecal VOC metabolomic investigations have utilized a single SPME fiber type for analyte extraction and analysis. However, we hypothesized that the multifarious nature of metabolites present in human feces dictates the use of several diverse SPME fiber coatings for more comprehensive metabolomic coverage. We report here an evaluation of eight different commercially available SPME fibers, in combination with both GC-MS and GC-FID, and identify the 50/30 µm CAR-DVB-PDMS, 85 µm CAR-PDMS, 65 µm DVB-PDMS, 7 µm PDMS, and 60 µm PEG SPME fibers as a minimal set of fibers appropriate for human fecal VOC metabolomics, collectively isolating approximately 90% of the total metabolites obtained when using all eight fibers. We also evaluate the effect of extraction duration on metabolite isolation and illustrate that ex vivo enteric microbial fermentation has no effect on metabolite composition during prolonged extractions if the SPME is performed as described herein.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF AEROBIC BIOFILTER DESIGN CRITERIA FOR TREATING VOCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reports preliminary results on the use of trickle bed biofilters with monolithic ceramic channelized microbial support structures for the treatment of VOCs typical of landfill leachate stripping. Toluene was used for the purpose of characterizing the trickle bed biofi...

  6. Accuracy of seven vapour intrusion algorithms for VOC in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provoost, Jeroen; Bronders, Jan; Seuntjens, Piet [Flemish Inst. for Technological Research (VITO), Mol (Belgium); Reijnders, Lucas [Dept. of Science, Open Univ. Netherlands (OU NL), Heerlen (Netherlands); Swartjes, Frank; Lijzen, Johannes [National Inst. for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2009-02-15

    During the last decade, soil contamination with volatile organic contaminants (VOC) received special attention because of their potential to cause indoor air problems. Moreover, research has shown that people spend 64% to 94% of there time indoors; therefore, the indoor air quality is of a primary importance for exposure to VOC. Human health risks to VOC-in cases of soil contamination-are often dominated by the exposure route 'inhalation of indoor air'. Exposure is often a result of vapour transport from the soil or groundwater to the indoor air of the building. Within human health risk assessments, a variety of algorithms are available that calculate transfer of soil gas to the indoor air. These algorithms suffer from a relatively high uncertainty due to a lack of representation of spatial and temporal variability. For such an application, these algorithms need to be further verified empirically against field observations so that they can be sufficiently reliable for regulatory purposes. This paper presents the accuracy for seven algorithms by using observed and predicted soil and indoor air concentrations from three sites, where the groundwater had been contaminated with aromatic and chlorinated VOC. (orig.)

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF AEROBIC BIOFILTER DESIGN CRITERIA FOR TREATING VOCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reports preliminary results on the use of trickle bed biofilters with monolithic ceramic channelized microbial support structures for the treatment of VOCs typical of landfill leachate stripping. Toluene was used for the purpose of characterizing the trickle bed biofi...

  8. Accuracy of seven vapour intrusion algorithms for VOC in groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Provoost, J.; Reijnders, L.; Swartjes, F.; Bronders, J.; Seuntjens, P.; Lijzen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background, aim and scope: During the last decade, soil contamination with volatile organic contaminants (VOC) received special attention because of their potential to cause indoor air problems. Moreover, research has shown that people spend 64% to 94% of there time indoors; therefore, the indoor ai

  9. VOC signatures from North American oil and gas sources (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, I. J.; Marrero, J.; Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Hartt, G.; Meinardi, S.; Schroeder, J.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Between 2008 and 2013 UC Irvine has used its whole air sampling (WAS) technique to investigate VOC source signatures from a range of oil and gas sources in North America, including five separate field campaigns at the Alberta oil sands (1 airborne, 4 ground-based); the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill (airborne and ship-based); the 2012 airborne Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) mission over oil and gas wells in Colorado, Texas and Oklahoma; and the 2013 ground-based Barnett Shale Campaign in Texas. Each campaign has characterized more than 80 individual C1-C10 VOCs including alkanes, alkenes and aromatics. For example, oil sands are an extra-heavy, unconventional crude oil that is blended with diluent in order to flow, and upgraded into synthetic crude oil. The VOC signature at the oil sands mining and upgrading facilities is alkane-rich, and the fuel gas associated with these operations has an i-butane/n-butane ratio similar to that of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). In addition to light alkanes, enhanced levels of benzene were observed over US oil and natural gas wells during DC3, likely because of its use in hydrofracking fluid. A series of VOC emission ratios from North American petrochemical sources will be presented and compared, including oil sands, conventional oil and hydrofracking operations.

  10. Plant identity influences decomposition through more than one mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie R McLaren

    Full Text Available Plant litter decomposition is a critical ecosystem process representing a major pathway for carbon flux, but little is known about how it is affected by changes in plant composition and diversity. Single plant functional groups (graminoids, legumes, non-leguminous forbs were removed from a grassland in northern Canada to examine the impacts of functional group identity on decomposition. Removals were conducted within two different environmental contexts (fertilization and fungicide application to examine the context-dependency of these identity effects. We examined two different mechanisms by which the loss of plant functional groups may impact decomposition: effects of the living plant community on the decomposition microenvironment, and changes in the species composition of the decomposing litter, as well as the interaction between these mechanisms. We show that the identity of the plant functional group removed affects decomposition through both mechanisms. Removal of both graminoids and forbs slowed decomposition through changes in the decomposition microenvironment. We found non-additive effects of litter mixing, with both the direction and identity of the functional group responsible depending on year; in 2004 graminoids positively influenced decomposition whereas in 2006 forbs negatively influenced decomposition rate. Although these two mechanisms act independently, their effects may be additive if both mechanisms are considered simultaneously. It is essential to understand the variety of mechanisms through which even a single ecosystem property is affected if we are to predict the future consequences of biodiversity loss.

  11. Temperature and light dependence of the VOC emissions of Scots pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tarvainen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The volatile organic compound (VOC emission rates of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. were measured from trees growing in a natural forest environment at two locations in Finland. The observed total VOC emission rates varied between 21 and 874 ngg-1 h-1 and 268 and 1670 ngg-1 h-1 in southern and northern Finland, respectively. A clear seasonal cycle was detected with high emission rates in early spring, a decrease of the emissions in late spring and early summer, high emissions again in late summer, and a gradual decrease in autumn. The main emitted compounds were Δ3-carene (southern Finland and α- and β-pinene (northern Finland, with approximate relative contributions of 60–70% and 60–85% of the total observed monoterpene emission rates, respectively. Sesquiterpene (β-caryophyllene and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO emissions were initiated in early summer at both sites. The observed MBO emission rates were between 1 and 3.5% of the total monoterpene emission rates. The sesquiterpene emission rates varied between 2 and 5% of the total monoterpene emission rates in southern Finland, but were high (40% in northern Finland in spring. Most of the measured emission rates were found to be well described by the temperature dependent emission algorithm. The calculated standard emission potentials were high in spring and early summer, decreased somewhat in late summer, and were high again towards autumn. The experimental coefficient β ranged from 0.025 to 0.19 (average 0.10 in southern Finland, with strongest temperature dependence in spring and weakest in late summer. Only the emission rates of 1,8-cineole were found to be both light and temperature dependent.

  12. Degradation Pathways for Geogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Soil Gases from the Solfatara Crater (Campi Flegrei, Southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, F.; Venturi, S.; Cabassi, J.; Capecchiacci, F.; Nisi, B., Sr.; Vaselli, O.

    2014-12-01

    The chemical composition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil gases from the Solfatara crater (Campi Flegrei, Southern Italy) was analyzed to investigate the effects of biogeochemical processes occurring within the crater soil on gases discharged from the hydrothermal reservoir and released into the atmosphere through diffuse degassing. In this system, two fumarolic vents (namely Bocca Grande and Bocca Nuova) are the preferential pathways for hydrothermal fluid uprising. For our goal, the chemistry of VOCs discharged from these sites were compared to that of soil gases. Our results highlighted that C4-C9 alkanes, alkenes, S-bearing compounds and alkylated aromatics produced at depth were the most prone to degradation processes, such as oxidation-reduction and hydration-dehydration reactions, as well as to microbial activity. Secondary products, which were enriched in sites characterized by low soil gas fluxes, mostly consisted of aldheydes, ketons, esters, ethers, organic acids and, subordinately, alcohols. Benzene, phenol and hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs) produced at depth were able to transit through the soil almost undisturbed, independently on the emission rate of diffuse degassing. The presence of cyclics was possibly related to an independent low-temperature VOC source, likely within sedimentary formations overlying the hydrothermal reservoir. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were possibly due to air contamination. This study demonstrated the strict control of biogeochemical processes on the behaviour of hydrothermal VOCs that, at least at a local scale, may have a significant impact on air quality. Laboratory experiments conducted at specific chemical-physical conditions and in presence of different microbial populations may provide useful information for the reconstruction of the degradation pathways controlling fate and behaviour of VOCs in the soil.

  13. Increasing competitiveness of wine producers in strategic alliances VOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Prokeš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the main reasons for the formation of new regional association of wineries, based on a different origin for wines in the wine region of Moravia in the southeast part of the Czech Republic. This research aim is to create a plan for new development of such strategic alliances on the basis of results of localization factors. There coefficient of localization is used for identification of cluster. Results are compared with already operating on associations for the appellation in Austria DAC. They were traced changes in consumer preferences in the Czech wine market. Consumers are placing more emphasis on the selection of wine on its descent from a particular area, growing community and the individual grower. This paper specifically introduces new associations for appellation system VOC. This alliance is described in the context of the establishment, operation, development and expansion, respectively the possibility of involvement of additional organizations suppliers and research institutions. The application of the results of research was a plan for the establishment of new alliance VOC Modré Hory, where are associated 30 wine producers of wine in 5 villages around the center Velké Pavlovice. Based on the experience of newly emerging VOC system of appellations was setting up a plan of formation association with the proposed methodological approach. Open cooperation between associations VOC appellation and other entities involving suppliers, customers, research institutions and universities has the possibility of creating an institutionalized wine cluster. The plan to create a wine cluster was proposed to establish cooperation between the newly emerging associations of VOC at three sub-regions of South Moravia, in order to achieve competitive advantage.

  14. Decomposition of semigroup algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Boehm, Janko; Nitsche, Max Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Let A \\subseteq B be cancellative abelian semigroups, and let R be an integral domain. We show that the semigroup ring R[B] can be decomposed, as an R[A]-module, into a direct sum of R[A]-submodules of the quotient ring of R[A]. In the case of a finite extension of positive affine semigroup rings we obtain an algorithm computing the decomposition. When R[A] is a polynomial ring over a field we explain how to compute many ring-theoretic properties of R[B] in terms of this decomposition. In particular we obtain a fast algorithm to compute the Castelnuovo-Mumford regularity of homogeneous semigroup rings. As an application we confirm the Eisenbud-Goto conjecture in a range of new cases. Our algorithms are implemented in the Macaulay2 package MonomialAlgebras.

  15. The photochemical decomposition of Indol in an aqueous solution; Descomposicion fotoquimica de Indol en solucion acuosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarz, A.; Tejero, J.M.; Panades, R.

    1998-06-01

    The photo decomposition of Indol at different pH has been studied. The Indol photo decomposition rate in aqueous solution a maximum at pH 10. By means of a simple mechanism in three steps, it is possible to explain the kinetics behavior of the Indol photo decomposition in aqueous solution. (Author) 6 refs.

  16. The decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane: Studies in a high-temperature flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, M.D.; Osterheld, T.H.; Melius, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane (MTS), a common silicon carbide precursor, in a high-temperature flow reactor are presented. The results indicate that methane and hydrogen chloride are major products of the decomposition. No chlorinated silane products were observed. Hydrogen carrier gas was found to increase the rate of MTS decomposition. The observations suggest a radical-chain mechanism for the decomposition. The implications for silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition are discussed.

  17. Ozone production and its sensitivity to NOx and VOCs: results from the DISCOVER-AQ field experiment, Houston 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, Gina M.; Ren, Xinrong; Loughner, Christopher P.; Estes, Mark; Crawford, James H.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2016-11-01

    An observation-constrained box model based on the Carbon Bond mechanism, version 5 (CB05), was used to study photochemical processes along the NASA P-3B flight track and spirals over eight surface sites during the September 2013 Houston, Texas deployment of the NASA Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) campaign. Data from this campaign provided an opportunity to examine and improve our understanding of atmospheric photochemical oxidation processes related to the formation of secondary air pollutants such as ozone (O3). O3 production and its sensitivity to NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were calculated at different locations and times of day. Ozone production efficiency (OPE), defined as the ratio of the ozone production rate to the NOx oxidation rate, was calculated using the observations and the simulation results of the box and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) models. Correlations of these results with other parameters, such as radical sources and NOx mixing ratio, were also evaluated. It was generally found that O3 production tends to be more VOC-sensitive in the morning along with high ozone production rates, suggesting that control of VOCs may be an effective way to control O3 in Houston. In the afternoon, O3 production was found to be mainly NOx-sensitive with some exceptions. O3 production near major emissions sources such as Deer Park was mostly VOC-sensitive for the entire day, other urban areas near Moody Tower and Channelview were VOC-sensitive or in the transition regime, and areas farther from downtown Houston such as Smith Point and Conroe were mostly NOx-sensitive for the entire day. It was also found that the control of NOx emissions has reduced O3 concentrations over Houston but has led to larger OPE values. The results from this work strengthen our understanding of O3 production; they indicate that controlling NOx emissions will provide

  18. Preparation of hierarchical layer-stacking Mn-Ce composite oxide for catalytic total oxidation of VOCs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐文翔; 武晓峰; 刘刚; 李双德; 李东艳; 李文辉; 陈运法

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical layer-stacking Mn-Ce composite oxide with mesoporous structure was firstly prepared by a simple precipita-tion/decomposition procedure with oxalate precursor and the complete catalytic oxidation of VOCs (benzene, toluene and ethyl ace-tate) were examined. The Mn-Ce oxalate precursor was obtained from metal salt and oxalic acid without any additives. The resulting materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), en-ergy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), hydrogen temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and X-ray photoelectron spec-troscopy (XPS). Compared with Mn-Ce composite oxide synthesized through a traditional method (Na2CO3 route), the hierarchical layer-stacking Mn-Ce composite oxide exhibited higher catalytic activity in the complete oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). By means of testing, the data revealed that the hierarchical layer-stacking Mn-Ce composite oxide possessed superior physiochemical properties such as good low-temperature reducibility, high manganese oxidation state and rich adsorbed surface oxy-gen species which resulted in the enhancement of catalytic abilities.

  19. Modeling decomposition of rigid polyurethane foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    Rigid polyurethane foams are used as encapsulants to isolate and support thermally sensitive components within weapon systems. When exposed to abnormal thermal environments, such as fire, the polyurethane foam decomposes to form products having a wide distribution of molecular weights and can dominate the overall thermal response of the system. Decomposing foams have either been ignored by assuming the foam is not present, or have been empirically modeled by changing physical properties, such as thermal conductivity or emissivity, based on a prescribed decomposition temperature. The hypothesis addressed in the current work is that improved predictions of polyurethane foam degradation can be realized by using a more fundamental decomposition model based on chemical structure and vapor-liquid equilibrium, rather than merely fitting the data by changing physical properties at a prescribed decomposition temperature. The polyurethane decomposition model is founded on bond breaking of the primary polymer and formation of a secondary polymer which subsequently decomposes at high temperature. The bond breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) from a single nonisothermal experiment with a heating rate of 20 C/min. Model predictions compare reasonably well with a separate nonisothermal TGA weight loss experiment with a heating rate of 200 C/min.

  20. The role of VOC oxidation products in continental new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Laaksonen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol physical and chemical properties and trace gas concentrations were measured during the QUEST field campaign in March–April, 2003, in Hyytiälä, Finland. Our aim was to understand the role of oxidation products of VOC's such as mono- and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric nucleation events. Particle chemical compositions were measured using the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, and chemical compositions of aerosol samples collected with low-pressure impactors and a high volume sampler were analysed using a number of techniques. The results indicate that during and after new particle formation, all particles larger than 50 nm in diameter contained similar organic substances that are likely to be mono- and sesquiterpene oxidation products. The oxidation products identified in the high volume samples were shown to be mostly aldehydes. In order to study the composition of particles in the 10–50 nm range, we made use of Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer results. We found that during nucleation events, both 10 and 50 nm particle growth factors due to uptake of ethanol vapour correlate strongly with gas-phase monoterpene oxidation product (MTOP concentrations, indicating that the organic constituents of particles smaller than 50 nm in diameter are at least partly similar to those of larger particles. We furthermore showed that particle growth rates during the nucleation events are correlated with the gas-phase MTOP concentrations. This indicates that VOC oxidation products may have a key role in determining the spatial and temporal features of the nucleation events. This conclusion was supported by our aircraft measurements of new 3–10 nm particle concentrations, which showed that the nucleation event on 28 March 2003, started at the ground layer, i.e. near the VOC source, and evolved together with the mixed layer. Furthermore, no new particle formation was detected upwind away from the forest, above the frozen Gulf of Bothnia.

  1. The role of VOC oxidation products in continental new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Laaksonen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol physical and chemical properties and trace gas concentrations were measured during the QUEST field campaign in March–April 2003, in Hyytiälä, Finland. Our aim was to understand the role of oxidation products of VOC's such as mono- and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric nucleation events. Particle chemical compositions were measured using the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, and chemical compositions of aerosol samples collected with low-pressure impactors and a high volume sampler were analysed using a number of techniques. The results indicate that during and after new particle formation, all particles larger than 50 nm in diameter contained similar organic substances that are likely to be mono- and sesquiterpene oxidation products. The oxidation products identified in the high volume samples were shown to be mostly aldehydes. In order to study the composition of particles in the 10–50 nm range, we made use of Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer results. We found that during nucleation events, both 10 and 50 nm particle growth factors due to uptake of ethanol vapour correlate strongly with gas-phase monoterpene oxidation product (MTOP concentrations, indicating that the organic constituents of particles smaller than 50 nm in diameter are at least partly similar to those of larger particles. We furthermore showed that particle growth rates during the nucleation events are correlated with the gas-phase MTOP concentrations. This indicates that VOC oxidation products may have a key role in determining the spatial and temporal features of the nucleation events. This conclusion was supported by our aircraft measurements of new 3–10 nm particle concentrations, which showed that the nucleation event on 28 March 2003, started at the ground layer, i.e. near the VOC source, and evolved together with the mixed layer. Furthermore, no new particle formation was detected upwind away from the forest, above the frozen Gulf of Bothnia.

  2. Increase of ambient formaldehyde in Beijing and its implication for VOC reactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Zhang; Min Shao; Yang Li; Si Hua Lu; Bin Yuan; Wen Tai Chen

    2012-01-01

    Influencing atmospheric OH radical budget and tropospheric ozone production,ambient formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the key oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs).We present the variations on formaldehyde column densities in summertime in Beijing retrieved from ozone monitoring instrument (OMI) between 2005 and 2011.Satellite columns of HCHO correlated well with available ground-based measurements despite some noticeable differences.The orthogonal distance regression (ODR) method was used to estimate the ratio between satellite columns and ground-level concentrations,whereas ordinary least squares (OLS)method was used to fit the trend of ambient formaldehyde.The formaldehyde concentrations derived from HCHO columns were in the range of 7-12 ppbv and steadily increased at an approximate rate of 0.64 ppbv/yr (7.8% at 2005 level) with an uncertainty of 51%.VOC reactivity quantified by means of OH loss rates showed increasing contribution from formaldehyde and acetaldehyde,rising from 35% in 2005 to 40% in 2010,and decreasing contribution from anthropogenic VOCs,dropping from 49% in 2005 to 40% in 2010.More attention should be paid to understanding the net feedback of increasing formaldehyde to ozone formation potential.

  3. Measurements and modeling to quantify emissions of methane and VOCs from shale gas operations: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presto, Albert A [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    The objectives of the project were to determine the leakage rates of methane and ozone-forming Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and the emission rates of air toxics from Marcellus shale gas activities. Methane emissions in the Marcellus Shale region were differentiated between “newer” sources associated with shale gas development and “older” sources associated with coal or conventional natural gas exploration. This project conducted measurements of methane and VOC emissions from both shale and non-shale natural gas resources. The initial scope of the project was the Marcellus Shale basin, and measurements were conducted in both the western wet gas regions (southwest PA and WV) and eastern dry gas region (northeast PA) of the basin. During this project, we obtained additional funding from other agencies to expand the scope of measurements to include additional basins. The data from both the Marcellus and other basins were combined to construct a national analysis of methane emissions from oil & gas production activities.

  4. A global HMX decomposition model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1996-12-01

    HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) decomposes by competing reaction pathways to form various condensed and gas-phase intermediate and final products. Gas formation is related to the development of nonuniform porosity and high specific surface areas prior to ignition in cookoff events. Such thermal damage enhances shock sensitivity and favors self-supported accelerated burning. The extent of HMX decomposition in highly confined cookoff experiments remains a major unsolved experimental and modeling problem. The present work is directed at determination of global HMX kinetics useful for predicting the elapsed time to thermal runaway (ignition) and the extent of decomposition at ignition. Kinetic rate constants for a six step engineering based global mechanism were obtained using gas formation rates measured by Behrens at Sandia National Laboratories with his Simultaneous Modulated Beam Mass Spectrometer (STMBMS) experimental apparatus. The six step global mechanism includes competition between light gas (H[sub 2]Awe, HCN, CO, H[sub 2]CO, NO, N[sub 2]Awe) and heavy gas (C[sub 2]H[sub 6]N[sub 2]Awe and C[sub 4]H[sub 10]N0[sub 2]) formation with zero order sublimation of HMX and the mononitroso analog of HMX (mn-HMX), C[sub 4]H[sub 8]N[sub 8]Awe[sub 7]. The global mechanism was applied to the highly confined, One Dimensional Time to eXplosion (ODTX) experiment and hot cell experiments by suppressing the sublimation of HMX and mn-HMX. An additional gas-phase reaction was also included to account for the gas-phase reaction of N[sub 2]Awe with H[sub 2]CO. Predictions compare adequately to the STMBMS data, ODTX data, and hot cell data. Deficiencies in the model and future directions are discussed.

  5. Pitfalls in VAR based return decompositions: A clarification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard; Tanggaard, Carsten

    Based on Chen and Zhao's (2009) criticism of VAR based return de- compositions, we explain in detail the various limitations and pitfalls involved in such decompositions. First, we show that Chen and Zhao's interpretation of their excess bond return decomposition is wrong: the residual component...... in their analysis is not "cashflow news" but "inter- est rate news" which should not be zero. Consequently, in contrast to what Chen and Zhao claim, their decomposition does not serve as a valid caution against VAR based decompositions. Second, we point out that in order for VAR based decompositions to be valid....... In a properly specified VAR, it makes no difference whether return news and dividend news are both computed directly or one of them is backed out as a residual....

  6. Feature Extraction by Wavelet Decomposition of Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Singh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new approach to surface acoustic wave (SAW chemical sensor array design and data processing for recognition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs based on transient responses. The array is constructed of variable thickness single polymer-coated SAW oscillator sensors. The thickness of polymer coatings are selected such that during the sensing period, different sensors are loaded with varied levels of diffusive inflow of vapour species due to different stages of termination of equilibration process. Using a single polymer for coating the individual sensors with different thickness introduces vapour-specific kinetics variability in transient responses. The transient shapes are analysed by wavelet decomposition based on Daubechies mother wavelets. The set of discrete wavelet transform (DWT approximation coefficients across the array transients is taken to represent the vapour sample in two alternate ways. In one, the sets generated by all the transients are combined into a single set to give a single representation to the vapour. In the other, the set of approximation coefficients at each data point generated by all transients is taken to represent the vapour. The latter results in as many alternate representations as there are approximation coefficients. The alternate representations of a vapour sample are treated as different instances or realisations for further processing. The wavelet analysis is then followed by the principal component analysis (PCA to create new feature space. A comparative analysis of the feature spaces created by both the methods leads to the conclusion that both methods yield complimentary information: the one reveals intrinsic data variables, and the other enhances class separability. The present approach is validated by generating synthetic transient response data based on a prototype polyisobutylene (PIB coated 3-element SAW sensor array exposed to 7 VOC vapours: chloroform, chlorobenzene o

  7. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of HMX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K

    2004-11-18

    Nucleation-growth kinetic expressions are derived for thermal decomposition of HMX from a variety of thermal analysis data types, including mass loss for isothermal and constant rate heating in an open pan and heat flow for isothermal and constant rate heating in open and closed pans. Conditions are identified in which thermal runaway is small to nonexistent, which typically means temperatures less than 255 C and heating rates less than 1 C/min. Activation energies are typically in the 140 to 165 kJ/mol range for open pan experiments and about 150 to 165 kJ/mol for sealed pan experiments. Our activation energies tend to be slightly lower than those derived from data supplied by the University of Utah, which we consider the best previous thermal analysis work. The reaction clearly displays more than one process, and most likely three processes, which are most clearly evident in open pan experiments. The reaction is accelerated in closed pan experiments, and one global reaction appears to fit the data well. Comparison of our rate measurements with additional literature sources for open and closed low temperature pyrolysis from Sandia gives a likely activation energy of 165 kJ/mol at 10% conversion.

  8. Modeling unsteady-state VOC transport in simulated waste drums. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Hotz, N.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report is a revision of an EG&G Idaho informal report originally titled Modeling VOC Transport in Simulated Waste Drums. A volatile organic compound (VOC) transport model has been developed to describe unsteady-state VOC permeation and diffusion within a waste drum. Model equations account for three primary mechanisms for VOC transport from a void volume within the drum. These mechanisms are VOC permeation across a polymer boundary, VOC diffusion across an opening in a volume boundary, and VOC solubilization in a polymer boundary. A series of lab-scale experiments was performed in which the VOC concentration was measured in simulated waste drums under different conditions. A lab-scale simulated waste drum consisted of a sized-down 55-gal metal drum containing a modified rigid polyethylene drum liner. Four polyethylene bags were sealed inside a large polyethylene bag, supported by a wire cage, and placed inside the drum liner. The small bags were filled with VOC-air gas mixture and the VOC concentration was measured throughout the drum over a period of time. Test variables included the type of VOC-air gas mixtures introduced into the small bags, the small bag closure type, and the presence or absence of a variable external heat source. Model results were calculated for those trials where the permeability had been measured.

  9. Estimation of VOC emissions from produced-water treatment ponds in Uintah Basin oil and gas field using modeling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, H.; Mansfield, M. L.; Lyman, S. N.; O'Neil, T.; Jones, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Emissions from produced-water treatment ponds are poorly characterized sources in oil and gas emission inventories that play a critical role in studying elevated winter ozone events in the Uintah Basin, Utah, U.S. Information gaps include un-quantified amounts and compositions of gases emitted from these facilities. The emitted gases are often known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which, beside nitrogen oxides (NOX), are major precursors for ozone formation in the near-surface layer. Field measurement campaigns using the flux-chamber technique have been performed to measure VOC emissions from a limited number of produced water ponds in the Uintah Basin of eastern Utah. Although the flux chamber provides accurate measurements at the point of sampling, it covers just a limited area of the ponds and is prone to altering environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure). This fact raises the need to validate flux chamber measurements. In this study, we apply an inverse-dispersion modeling technique with evacuated canister sampling to validate the flux-chamber measurements. This modeling technique applies an initial and arbitrary emission rate to estimate pollutant concentrations at pre-defined receptors, and adjusts the emission rate until the estimated pollutant concentrations approximates measured concentrations at the receptors. The derived emission rates are then compared with flux-chamber measurements and differences are analyzed. Additionally, we investigate the applicability of the WATER9 wastewater emission model for the estimation of VOC emissions from produced-water ponds in the Uintah Basin. WATER9 estimates the emission of each gas based on properties of the gas, its concentration in the waste water, and the characteristics of the influent and treatment units. Results of VOC emission estimations using inverse-dispersion and WATER9 modeling techniques will be reported.

  10. [Leaf litter decomposition in six Cloud Forest streams of the upper La Antigua watershed, Veracruz, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astudillo, Manuel R; Ramírez, Alonso; Novelo-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Vázquez, Gabriela

    2014-04-01

    Leaf litter decomposition is an important stream ecosystem process. To understand factors controlling leaf decomposition in cloud forest in Mexico, we incubated leaf packs in different streams along a land use cover gradient for 35 days during the dry and wet seasons. We assessed relations between leaf decomposition rates (k), stream physicochemistry, and macroinvertebrates colonizing leaf packs. Physicochemical parameters showed a clear seasonal difference at all study streams. Leaves were colonized by collector-gatherer insects, followed by shredders. Assessment of factors related to k indicated that only forest cover was negatively related to leaf decomposition rates. Thus stream physicochemistry and seasonality had no impact on decomposition rates. We concluded that leaf litter decomposition at our study streams is a stable process over the year. However, it is possible that this stability is the result of factors regulating decomposition during the different seasons and streams.

  11. 小波包分解提取高采样率GPS地震波信号%Extraction of High-Rate GPS Seismic Wave Signals with Wavelet Packets Decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    敖敏思; 胡友健; 赵斌; 叶险峰; 丁开华

    2012-01-01

    With the development of high-rate GPS receivers, precise orbit and processing technology of GPS data, it is possible to observe the high frequency, transient dynamic displacement by GPS. However, it remains a problem as how to mitigate the error such as multipath errors, and random noise aliasing in geophysical signals so as to extract seismic signals, which in turn limits the high-rate GPS and its geophysical applications. In this paper, an approach based on wavelet packets decomposition (WPD) is presented to extract seismic signals through mitigating the multipath error and random noise of dynamic displacement series from high-rate GPS. With the 1 Hz observation data from 19 stations in Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) during the Mexico M7. 2 earthquake in 2010, the ground displacement is calculated. Meanwhile, the approach based on WPD is introduced for seismic signal extraction and spectrum analysis. As is shown in results, the approach is accurate and effective in seismic signal extraction to reflect the characteristics of seismic wave propagations and it enjoys an advantage that it does not necessarily involve multiple-day observation.%随着高采样率GPS接收机的出现、高精度的定轨以及数据处理技术的发展,利用GPS观测高频率、瞬态的地震波信号成为可能.但如何消除混叠在地震波信号中的多路径、随机噪声等误差,有效地提取地震波信号,仍然是制约高采样率GPS及其地球物理应用的重要因素.提出一种基于小波包分解的方法,对动态位移序列中的多路径误差进行消除,同时去除高频率随机噪声,提取地震波信号.通过结合SCIGN的19个GPS测站的1Hz采样GPS观测数据,对2010年墨西哥M7.2地震的地震波引起的地表动态位移进行解算,采用小波包分解有效地提取地震波信号并对其进行谱分析.结果表明,该方法提取的地震波信号能较好地反映出地震波的传播及其特性,具有无

  12. Adaptive Integrand Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Mastrolia, Pierpaolo; Primo, Amedeo; Bobadilla, William J Torres

    2016-01-01

    We present a simplified variant of the integrand reduction algorithm for multiloop scattering amplitudes in $d = 4 - 2\\epsilon$ dimensions, which exploits the decomposition of the integration momenta in parallel and orthogonal subspaces, $d=d_\\parallel+d_\\perp$, where $d_\\parallel$ is the dimension of the space spanned by the legs of the diagrams. We discuss the advantages of a lighter polynomial division algorithm and how the orthogonality relations for Gegenbauer polynomilas can be suitably used for carrying out the integration of the irreducible monomials, which eliminates spurious integrals. Applications to one- and two-loop integrals, for arbitrary kinematics, are discussed.

  13. Clustering via Kernel Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Girolami, Mark A.; Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Methods for spectral clustering have been proposed recently which rely on the eigenvalue decomposition of an affinity matrix. In this work it is proposed that the affinity matrix is created based on the elements of a non-parametric density estimator. This matrix is then decomposed to obtain...... posterior probabilities of class membership using an appropriate form of nonnegative matrix factorization. The troublesome selection of hyperparameters such as kernel width and number of clusters can be obtained using standard cross-validation methods as is demonstrated on a number of diverse data sets....

  14. Symmetric Tensor Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brachat, Jerome; Comon, Pierre; Mourrain, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    of polynomial equations of small degree in non-generic cases. We propose a new algorithm for symmetric tensor decomposition, based on this characterization and on linear algebra computations with Hankel matrices. The impact of this contribution is two-fold. First it permits an efficient computation...... of total degree d as a sum of powers of linear forms (Waring’s problem), incidence properties on secant varieties of the Veronese variety and the representation of linear forms as a linear combination of evaluations at distinct points. Then we reformulate Sylvester’s approach from the dual point of view...

  15. Mode decomposition evolution equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2012-03-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be

  16. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  17. PARAMETRIC EVALUATION OF VOC CONVERSION VIA CATALYTIC INCINERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaskantzis Neto G.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - A pilot-scale catalytic incineration system was used to investigate the effectiveness of catalytic incineration as a means of reducing volatile organic compound (VOC air pollutants. The objectives of the study were: 1 to investigate the effects of operating and design variables on the reduction efficiency of VOCs; and 2 to evaluate reduction efficiencies for specific compounds in different chemical classes. The study results verified that the following factors affect the catalyst performance: inlet temperature, space velocity, compound type, and compound inlet concentration. Tests showed that reduction efficiencies exceeding 98% were possible, given sufficiently high inlet gas temperatures for the following classes of compounds: alcohols, acetates, ketones, hydrocarbons, and aromatics

  18. Subtask 1.15-Passive Diffusion Sample Bags Made from Expanded Polytetrafluorethylene (ePTFE) to Measure VOC Concentrations in Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry W. Botnen

    2006-08-01

    With laboratory testing of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membranes complete, collected data support that volatile organic compound (VOC) molecules will readily diffuse across ePTFE membranes. Membrane samples, supplied by BHA Technologies (GE Osmonics), were tested to determine diffusion rates for VOCs in groundwater. Tests were conducted using membranes with two different pore sizes, with and without thermally laminated spun bond backing, and multiple concentrations of contaminated groundwater. Results suggest that typical residence times associated with traditional samplers constructed of polyethylene (2 weeks) can be reduced by 1 week using ePTFE membranes (reducing project costs) and that VOCs will diffuse more readily at lower temperatures (2.2-3.3 C) across ePTFE materials.

  19. MACH: Fast Randomized Tensor Decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Tsourakakis, Charalampos E

    2009-01-01

    Tensors naturally model many real world processes which generate multi-aspect data. Such processes appear in many different research disciplines, e.g, chemometrics, computer vision, psychometrics and neuroimaging analysis. Tensor decompositions such as the Tucker decomposition are used to analyze multi-aspect data and extract latent factors, which capture the multilinear data structure. Such decompositions are powerful mining tools, for extracting patterns from large data volumes. However, most frequently used algorithms for such decompositions involve the computationally expensive Singular Value Decomposition. In this paper we propose MACH, a new sampling algorithm to compute such decompositions. Our method is of significant practical value for tensor streams, such as environmental monitoring systems, IP traffic matrices over time, where large amounts of data are accumulated and the analysis is computationally intensive but also in "post-mortem" data analysis cases where the tensor does not fit in the availa...

  20. High temperature phase decomposition in TixZryAlzN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Lind

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Through a combination of theoretical and experimental observations we study the high temperature decomposition behavior of c-(TixZryAlzN alloys. We show that for most concentrations the high formation energy of (ZrAlN causes a strong tendency for spinodal decomposition between ZrN and AlN while other decompositions tendencies are suppressed. In addition we observe that entropic effects due to configurational disorder favor a formation of a stable Zr-rich (TiZrN phase with increasing temperature. Our calculations also predict that at high temperatures a Zr rich (TiZrAlN disordered phase should become more resistant against the spinodal decomposition despite its high and positive formation energy due to the specific topology of the free energy surface at the relevant concentrations. Our experimental observations confirm this prediction by showing strong tendency towards decomposition in a Zr-poor sample while a Zr-rich alloy shows a greatly reduced decomposition rate, which is mostly attributable to binodal decomposition processes. This result highlights the importance of considering the second derivative of the free energy, in addition to its absolute value in predicting decomposition trends of thermodynamically unstable alloys.

  1. The scent fingerprint of hepatocarcinoma: in-vitro metastasis prediction with volatile organic compounds (VOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haick H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Haitham Amal,1,‡ Lu Ding,2,‡ Bin-bin Liu,3,‡ Ulrike Tisch,1 Zhen-qin Xu,2 Da-you Shi,2 Yan Zhao,3 Jie Chen,3 Rui-xia Sun,3 Hu Liu,2 Sheng-Long Ye,3 Zhao-you Tang,3 Hossam Haick1 1Department of Chemical Engineering and Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; 2Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China; 3Liver Cancer Institute and Zhong-shan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China ‡These authors have equal contribution to the manuscriptBackground: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a common and aggressive form of cancer. Due to a high rate of postoperative recurrence, the prognosis for HCC is poor. Subclinical metastasis is the major cause of tumor recurrence and patient mortality. Currently, there is no reliable prognostic method of invasion.Aim: To investigate the feasibility of fingerprints of volatile organic compounds (VOCs for the in-vitro prediction of metastasis.Methods: Headspace gases were collected from 36 cell cultures (HCC with high and low metastatic potential and normal cells and analyzed using nanomaterial-based sensors. Predictive models were built by employing discriminant factor analysis pattern recognition, and the classification success was determined using leave-one-out cross-validation. The chemical composition of each headspace sample was studied using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS.Results: Excellent discrimination was achieved using the nanomaterial-based sensors between (i all HCC and normal controls; (ii low metastatic HCC and normal controls; (iii high metastatic HCC and normal controls; and (iv high and low HCC. Several HCC-related VOCs that could be associated with biochemical cellular processes were identified through GC-MS analysis.Conclusion: The presented results constitute a proof-of-concept for the in-vitro prediction of the metastatic potential of HCC from VOC

  2. Modeling the uncertainty of several VOC and its impact on simulated VOC and ozone in Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuai; Choi, Yunsoo; Roy, Anirban; Li, Xiangshang; Jeon, Wonbae; Souri, Amir Hossein

    2015-11-01

    A WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ modeling system was used to study Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions and their impact on surface VOC and ozone concentrations in southeast Texas during September 2013. The model was evaluated against the ground-level Automated Gas Chromatograph (Auto-GC) measurement data from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). The comparisons indicated that the model over-predicted benzene, ethylene, toluene and xylene, while under-predicting isoprene and ethane. The mean biases between simulated and observed values of each VOC species showed clear daytime, nighttime, weekday and weekend variations. Adjusting the VOC emissions using simulated/observed ratios improved model performance of each VOC species, especially mitigating the mean bias substantially. Simulated monthly mean ozone showed a minor change: a 0.4 ppb or 1.2% increase; while a change of more than 5 ppb was seen in hourly ozone data on high ozone days, this change moved model predictions closer to observations. The CMAQ model run with the adjusted emissions better reproduced the variability in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) formaldehyde (HCHO) columns. The adjusted model scenario also slightly better reproduced the aircraft HCHO concentrations from NASA's DISCOVER-AQ campaign conducted during the simulation episode period; Correlation, Mean Bias and RMSE improved from 0.34, 1.38 ppb and 2.15 ppb to 0.38, 1.33 ppb and 2.08 ppb respectively. A process analysis conducted for both industrial/urban and rural areas suggested that chemistry was the main process contributing to ozone production in both areas, while the impact of chemistry was smaller in rural areas than in industrial and urban areas. For both areas, the positive chemistry contribution increased in the sensitivity simulation largely due to the increase in emissions. Nudging VOC emissions to match the observed concentrations shifted the ozone hotspots

  3. Aromatic VOCs global influence in the ozone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Perez, David; Pozzer, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are a subgroup of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) of special interest in the atmosphere of urban and semi-urban areas. Aromatics form a high fraction of VOCs, are highly reactive and upon oxidation they are an important source of ozone. These group of VOCs are released to the atmosphere by processes related to biomass burning and fossil fuel consumption, while they are removed from the atmosphere primarily by OH reaction and by dry deposition. In addition, a branch of aromatics (ortho-nitrophenols) produce HONO upon photolysis, which is responsible of certain amount of the OH recycling. Despite their importance in the atmosphere in anthropogenic polluted areas, the influence of aromatics in the ozone production remains largely unknown. This is of particular relevance, being ozone a pollutant with severe side effects on air quality, health and climate. In this work the atmospheric impacts at global scale of the most emitted aromatic VOCs in the gas phase (benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene, phenol, benzaldehyde and trimethylbenzenes) are analysed and assessed. Specifically, the impact on ozone due to aromatic oxidation is estimated, as this is of great interest in large urban areas and can be helpful for developing air pollution control strategies. Further targets are the quantification of the NOx loss and the OH recycling due to aromatic oxidation. In order to investigate these processes, two simulations were performed with the numerical chemistry and climate simulation ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model. The simulations compare two cases, one with ozone concentrations when aromatics are present or the second one when they are missing. Finally, model simulated ozone is compared against a global set of observations in order to better constrain the model accuracy.

  4. Ensurdecimento vocálico em Zo’é

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Suelly Arruda Câmara Cabral

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho apresentamos uma descrição do fenômeno deensurdecimento vocálico na língua Zo’é (Tupi-Guarani. Sãoapresentadas ainda hipóteses acerca das restrições sincrônicas ativasno condicionamento deste fenômeno, além de uma hipótese acercada origem histórica do mesmo.

  5. Direct and indirect effects of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xinzhang; Peng, Changhui; Jiang, Hong; Zhu, Qiuan; Wang, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure in the course of litter decomposition may have a direct effect on decomposition rates via changing states of photodegradation or decomposer constitution in litter while UV-B exposure during growth periods may alter chemical compositions and physical properties of plants. Consequently, these changes will indirectly affect subsequent litter decomposition processes in soil. Although studies are available on both the positive and negative effects (including no observable effects) of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition, a comprehensive analysis leading to an adequate understanding remains unresolved. Using data from 93 studies across six biomes, this introductory meta-analysis found that elevated UV-B directly increased litter decomposition rates by 7% and indirectly by 12% while attenuated UV-B directly decreased litter decomposition rates by 23% and indirectly increased litter decomposition rates by 7%. However, neither positive nor negative effects were statistically significant. Woody plant litter decomposition seemed more sensitive to UV-B than herbaceous plant litter except under conditions of indirect effects of elevated UV-B. Furthermore, levels of UV-B intensity significantly affected litter decomposition response to UV-B (PUV-B effects on litter decomposition were to a large degree compounded by climatic factors (e.g., MAP and MAT) (PUV-B on litter decomposition. No significant differences in UV-B effects on litter decomposition were found between study types (field experiment vs. laboratory incubation), litter forms (leaf vs. needle), and decay duration. Indirect effects of elevated UV-B on litter decomposition significantly increased with decay duration (PUV-B exposure intensity (30%) had significant direct effects on litter decomposition (PUV-B on litter decomposition.

  6. Biofiltration for control of volatile organic compounds (VOCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, D.F. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Govind, R. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Air biofiltration is a promising technology for control of air emissions of biodegradable volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In conjunction with vacuum extraction of soils or air stripping of ground water, it can be used to mineralize VOCs removed from contaminated soil or groundwater. The literature describes three major biological systems for treating contaminated air bioscrubbers, biotrickling filters and biofilters. Filter media can be classified as: bioactive fine or irregular particulates, such as soil, peat, compost or mixtures of these materials; pelletized, which are randomly packed in a bed; and structured, such as monoliths with defined or variable passage size and geometry. The media can be made of sorbing and non-absorbing materials. Non-bioactive pelletized and structured media require recycled solutions of nutrients and buffer for efficient microbial activity and are thus called biotrickling filters. Extensive work has been conducted to improve biofiltration by EPA`s Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory and the University of Cincinnati in biofilters using pelletized and structured media and improved operational approaches. Representative VOCs in these studies included compounds with a range of aqueous solubilities and octanol-water partition coefficients. The compounds include iso-pentane, toluene, methylene chloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), ethyl benzene, chlorobenzene and perchloroethylene (PCE) and alpha ({alpha}-) pinene. Comparative studies were conducted with peat/compost biofilters using isopentane and {alpha}-pinene. Control studies were also conducted to investigate adsorption/desorption of contaminants on various media using mercuric chloride solution to insure the absence of bioactivity.

  7. Light dependency of VOC emissions from selected Mediterranean plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Harley, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.

    The light, temperature and stomatal conductance dependencies of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from ten plant species commonly found in the Mediterranean region were studied using a fully controlled leaf cuvette in the laboratory. At standard conditions of temperature and light (30°C and 1000 μmol m -2 s -1 PAR), low emitting species ( Arbutus unedo, Pinus halepensis, Cistus incanus, Cistus salvifolius, Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris) emitted between 0.1 and 5.0 μg (C) (total VOCs) g -1 dw h -1, a medium emitter ( Pinus pinea) emitted between 5 and 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1 and high emitters ( Cistus monspeliensis, Lavendula stoechas and Quercus sp.) emitted more than 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1. VOC emissions from all of the plant species investigated showed some degree of light dependency, which was distinguishable from temperature dependency. Emissions of all compounds from Quercus sp. were light dependent. Ocimene was one of several monoterpene compounds emitted by P. pinea and was strongly correlated to light. Only a fraction of monoterpene emissions from C. incanus exhibited apparent weak light dependency but emissions from this plant species were strongly correlated to temperature. Data presented here are consistent with past studies, which show that emissions are independent of stomatal conductance. These results may allow more accurate predictions of monoterpene emission fluxes from the Mediterranean region to be made.

  8. VOC removal from contaminated groundwater through membrane pervaporation. (Ⅱ): 1,1,1-trichloroethane- SDS surfactant solution system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Ming; Sean LIU

    2003-01-01

    The conventional "pump-and-treat" technology for subsurface remediation of groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds(VOCs) such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane(TCA), a common chlorinated organic solvent, has limitation of prohibitively long treatment time due to extremely low water solubility of the VOCs. Surfactant-based soil remediation has emerged as the effective technology that substantially reduces the treatment time. In order to make the whole process economical, the surfactant used in soil washing has to be recovered and reused. This study examined the recovery of anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), from soil remediation fluids containing TCA, using a bench-scale membrane pervaporation unit. The effects of high TCA concentration, surfactant dosage, and flow rate on permeation flux and selectivity( α value) of the process were evaluated. In general, higher surfactant concentration yielded lower TCA flux and constant water flux, resulting in declining α values; higher flow rate of TCA feed stream results in higher VOC flux and selectivity, an indication of the effect of concentration polarization; higher TCA feed concentration produces higher TCA permeation across the membrane, however, the selectivity was virtually unchanged unless the total TCA concentration exceeded 2000 ppm.

  9. Study on Heart Rate Variability During Sleep Basing on Wavelet Decomposition and Zero Crossing Analysis%基于小波分解和过零点分析的睡眠期间心率变异性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖蒙; 严洪; 李延军

    2013-01-01

    Objective To propose a simple method for analyzing heart rate variability (HRV) and apply it in HRV feature study during sleep.Methods The low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) component of RR sequence were extracted through wavelet decomposition at first.Then the zero crossing features,which involved mean and normalized standard deviation of zero crossing intervals,of RR,LF and HF component were calculated.At the same time,the spectral features i.e.LFn,HFn,LF/HF and sample entropy were also determined.The significance levels of different features in different sleep stages were evaluated and the correlationship between zero crossing features and other measures were determined.Results The zero crossing features during wake,rapid eye movement(REM) and non-REM(NREM) sleep revealed significant difference.Three in 6 zero crossing features showed fairly strong correlation with spectral features and sample entropy.Conclusion The proposed method can be calculated easily and conveniently,and shows the capability of reflecting spectral and complexity features of HRV at the same time.It provides new index for investigating the activity of automatic nervous system and developing sleep monitoring method based on electrocardiogram.%目的 提出一种简便的心率变异性(heart rate variability,HRV)分析方法,并将其用于研究睡眠期间的HRV特征.方法 利用小波分解提取RR序列的低频(low frequency,LF)和高频(high frequency,HF)成分后,采用过零点分析法分别计算睡眠各阶段RR序列及其LF,HF分量的过零点特征(过零点间隔均值和归一化过零点间隔标准差),同时计算RR序列的频谱特征(LFn,HFn,LF/HF)和样本熵.分析各特征在不同睡眠阶段的差异性,以及过零点特征与其它特征的相关性.结果 RR过零点特征在觉醒、快速眼动(rapid eye movement,REM)和非快速眼动(non-REM,NREM)睡眠期间具有显著差异;三个过零点特征与频谱特征和样本熵

  10. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of HMX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K

    2004-05-05

    Nucleation-growth kinetic expressions are derived for thermal decomposition of HMX from a variety of types of data, including mass loss for isothermal and constant rate heating in an open pan, and heat flow for isothermal and constant rate heating in open and closed pans. Conditions are identified in which thermal runaway is small to nonexistent, which typically means temperatures less than 255 C and heating rates less than 1 C/min. Activation energies are typically in the 140 to 150 kJ/mol regime for open pan experiments and about 160 kJ/mol for sealed pan experiments. Our activation energies are about 10% lower than those derived from data supplied by the University of Utah, which we consider the best previous work. The reaction clearly displays more than one process, and most likely three processes, which are most clearly evident in open pan experiments. The reaction is accelerated for closed pan experiments, and one global reaction appears to fit the data well.

  11. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of HMX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K

    2005-03-17

    Nucleation-growth kinetic expressions are derived for thermal decomposition of HMX from a variety of types of data, including mass loss for isothermal and constant rate heating in an open pan, and heat flow for isothermal and constant rate heating in open and closed pans. Conditions are identified in which thermal runaway is small to nonexistent, which typically means temperatures less than 255 C and heating rates less than 1 C/min. Activation energies are typically in the 140 to 165 kJ/mol regime for open pan experiments and about 150-165 kJ/mol for sealed-pan experiments. The reaction clearly displays more than one process, and most likely three processes, which are most clearly evident in open pan experiments. The reaction is accelerated for closed pan experiments, and one global reaction fits the data fairly well. Our A-E values lie in the middle of the values given in a compensation-law plot by Brill et al. (1994). Comparison with additional open and closed low temperature pyrolysis experiments support an activation energy of 165 kJ/mol at 10% conversion.

  12. Externally validated QSPR modelling of VOC tropospheric oxidation by NO3 radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, E; Gramatica, P

    2008-01-01

    The troposphere is the principal recipient of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) of both anthropogenic and biogenic origin. The persistence of these compounds in the troposphere is an important factor for the evaluation of their fate, and the possible negative effects to the environment and human health. In this study, the tropospheric lifetime of 166 VOCs, in terms of night-time degradation rates with nitrate radical (NO(3)), was modelled by the quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR) approach. The multiple linear regression method was applied, in combination with the genetic algorithm-variable subset selection procedure, to a variety of theoretical molecular descriptors, calculated by the DRAGON software. The models were developed according to the OECD principles for regulatory acceptance of QSARs, with particular attention to external validation and applicability domain (AD). The external validation was performed on an unbiased external test set or by splitting the available data using self-organized maps or the random by response approach. The best QSPR models presented in this study showed good internal (range of Q(loo)(2): 89-92%) as well as external predictivity (range of Q(ext)(2): 75-89%). The AD of the models was analysed by the leverage approach, and was represented graphically in the Williams graph.

  13. Experiments in the EMRP project KEY-VOCs: Adsorption/desorption effects of VOCs in different tubing materials and preparation and analysis of a zero gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Jennifer; Claude, Anja; Kubistin, Dagmar; Tensing, Erasmus; Michl, Katja; Plass-Duelmer, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric chemistry and composition are influenced by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from natural and anthropogenic sources. Due to their toxicity and their crucial role in ozone and aerosol formation VOCs impact air quality and climate change and high quality observations are demanded. The European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) project KEY-VOCs has targeted the improvement of VOC measurement capabilities with the focus on VOCs relevant for indoor air as well as for air quality and climate monitoring programmes. One major uncertainty is the influence of surface effects of the measurement devices. By developing a test system the adsorption/desorption effects of certain VOCs can be systematically examined. Different tubing materials e.g. stainless steel and PFA were analysed with the oxygenated VOC methanol and results of these experiments will be presented. In air quality monitoring very low levels of VOCs have to be measured. Purified air or nitrogen is widely used as a zero gas to characterize measurement systems and procedures as well as for instrument calibration. A high quality zero gas is an important contributor to the quality of the measurements and generally achieved by using state-of-the-art purification technologies. The efficiency of several air purifiers was assessed and the results have been analysed.

  14. Primary VOC emissions from Commercial Aircraft Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Dogushan; Huang, Rujin; Slowik, Jay; Brem, Benjamin; Durdina, Lukas; Rindlisbacher, Theo; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre

    2014-05-01

    Air traffic is growing continuously [1]. The increasing number of airplanes leads to an increase of aviation emissions giving rise to environmental concerns globally by high altitude emissions and, locally on air quality at the ground level [2]. The overall impact of aviation emissions on the environment is likely to increase when the growing air transportation trend [2] is considered. The Aviation Particle Regulatory Instrumentation Demonstration Experiment (APRIDE)-5 campaign took place at Zurich Airport in 2013. In this campaign, aircraft exhaust is sampled during engine acceptance tests after engine overhaul at the facilities of SR Technics. Direct sampling from the engine core is made possible due to the unique fixed installation of a retractable sampling probe and the use of a standardized sampling system designed for the new particulate matter regulation in development for aircraft engines. Many of the gas-phase aircraft emissions, e.g. CO2, NOX, CO, SO2, hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were detected by the instruments in use. This study, part of the APRIDE-5 campaign, focuses on the primary VOC emissions in order to produce emission factors of VOC species for varying engine operating conditions which are the surrogates for the flight cycles. Previously, aircraft plumes were sampled in order to quantify VOCs by a proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) [3]. This earlier study provided a preliminary knowledge on the emission of species such as methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, benzene and toluene by varying engine thrust levels. The new setup was (i) designed to sample from the diluted engine exhaust and the new tool and (ii) used a high resolution time of flight PTR-MS with higher accuracy for many new species, therefore providing a more detailed and accurate inventory. We will present the emission factors for species that were quantified previously, as well as for many additional VOCs detected during the campaign

  15. Volatile organic compound (VOC) determination in working atmospheres; Determinacion de compuestos organicos volatiles (VOC) en ambiente laboral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blass A, Georgina; Panama T, Luz A; Corrales C, Deyanira [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The present work describes, in a synthesized way, the implementation and application of procedures based on the normativity related to the subject of the volatile organic compounds (Volatile Organic Compounds VOC), that allow to sample, quantify and evaluate the present contamination in the working atmosphere of a refinery due to the fugitive emissions of VOC and other substances. In accordance with the corresponding normativity, more than 189 organic compounds denominated dangerous air polluting agents (Hazardous Air Pollutants, HAP) can be found in a working atmosphere, but they are the 11 main HAP that can be found in a refinery. In the present article the work made for the sampling and quantification of 5 of the 11 dangerous polluting agents of the air: benzene, toluene, xylene, iso-octane and naphthalene. [Spanish] El presente trabajo describe, de manera sintetizada, la implementacion y aplicacion de procedimientos basados en la normatividad relacionada al tema de los compuestos organicos volatiles (Volatil Organic Compounds, VOC), que permiten muestrear, cuantificar y evaluar la contaminacion presente en el ambiente laboral de una refineria debido a las emisiones fugitivas de VOC y otras sustancias. De acuerdo con la normatividad correspondiente, mas de 189 compuestos organicos denominados contaminantes peligrosos del aire (Hazardous Air Pollutants, HAP), pueden ser encontrados en un ambiente laboral, pero son 11 los principales HAP que pueden ser hallados en una refineria. En el presente articulo se informa el trabajo realizado para el muestreo y cuantificacion de 5 de los 11 contaminantes peligrosos del aire: benceno, tolueno, xileno, iso-octano y naftaleno.

  16. Organic Carbon Storage and Decomposition Rate of Three Subcategories of Calcareous Soil in Karst Area%桂林毛村岩溶区三种亚类石灰土有机碳矿化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严毅萍; 曹建华; 梁毅; 王培; 玉宏

    2012-01-01

    应用土壤培养法,比较分析了桂林毛村典型岩溶区黑色石灰土、棕色石灰土、红色石灰土三种亚类石灰土在25℃和70%田间饱和含水量条件下培养90d有机碳矿化速率的差异。结果显示:各亚类土壤有机碳矿化速率和累积释放CO2-C量总体上都随土层加深而递减。0~20cm至20~40cm层递减幅度最大。各亚类石灰土有机碳矿化速率和累计释放量的大小顺序为:黑色石灰土〉棕色石灰土〉红色石灰土,黑色石灰土的矿化速率远远大于棕色石灰土和红色石灰土,其中0~20cm土层差异最大。土壤有机碳矿化速率和有机碳含量呈正相关。黑色石灰土土壤有机碳矿化释放的CO2-C分配比例最高,达到3.33%,其次是红色石灰土,比例为2.92%,旱地棕色石灰土矿化比例最低,为1.90%,说明桂林毛村典型岩溶区黑色石灰土和红色石灰土有机碳稳定性较弱,旱地棕色石灰土具有较强的固定有机碳能力。%Soil organic carbon(SOC) is an important component involved in the global carbon cycle and the influence of different sub-categories on SOC pools can significantly affect atomspheric CO2 concentrations.The response of soil carbon mineralization rates to different sub-categories is the crux for understanding the influence of different sub-categories on SOC.To determine the rate of SOC mineralization,each sub-category soil was collected and incubated in the laboratory at 25℃ with a constant moisture of 70% field water capacity over 90 days and the amount of cumulative CO2-C released over 90 days was compared among the different sub-categories of soil.It was found that there were no significant differences in the change of the fraction of cumulative CO2-C released by SOC mineralization with soil depth among the different sub-categories of soil.Decreasing rate between 0~20 cm and 20~40 cm soil layer was greatest.The decomposition rate and release cumulative amount of CO2 of

  17. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration

  18. [Study on control and management for industrial volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Ning; Nei, Lei; Wang, Yu-Fei; Hao, Zheng-Ping

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from industrial sources account for a large percent of total anthropogenic VOCs. In this paper, VOCs emission characterization, control technologies and management were discussed. VOCs from industrial emissions were characterized by high intensity, wide range and uneven distribution, which focused on Bejing-Tianjin Joint Belt, Shangdong Peninsula, Yangtze River Delta and the Pearl River Delta. The current technologies for VOCs treatment include adsorption, catalytic combustion, bio-degradation and others, which were applied in petrochemical, oil vapor recovery, shipbuilding, printing, pharmaceutical, feather manufacturing and so on. The scarcity of related regulations/standards plus ineffective supervision make the VOCs management difficult. Therefore, it is suggested that VOCs treatment be firstly performed from key areas and industries, and then carried out step by step. By establishing of actual reducing amount control system and more detailed VOCs emission standards and regulations, applying practical technologies together with demonstration projects, and setting up VOCs emission registration and classification-related-charge system, VOCs could be reduced effectively.

  19. Thermal Decomposition of Copper (II) Calcium (II) Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, A. G.; Polla, G.; de Perazzo, P. K.; Lanza, H.; de Benyacar, M. A. R.

    1996-05-01

    The presence of different stages in the thermal decomposition process of CuCa(HCOO) 4has been established by means of TGA at different heating rates, X-ray powder diffraction of quenched samples, and DSC methods. During the first stage, decomposition of one of the two copper formate structural units contained in the unit cell takes place. The presence of CuCa 2(HCOO) 6has been detected. Calcium formate structural units break down at higher temperatures; the last decomposition peak corresponds to the appearance of different calcium-copper oxides.

  20. Solid-state decomposition kinetics of pentaerythritol tetranitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickard, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Decomposition of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) was monitored at constant volume under variable pressures of NO{sub 2} using differential scanning calorimetry(DSC). Decomposition involved a slow initial reaction followed by an autocatalytic transition at longer times. The apparent induction time(time-to-maximum rate) for autocatalysis was found to be dependent upon sample mass and the initial pressure of NO{sub 2}. A global kinetic model consistent with observed product distributions and the free radical chain decomposition mechanisms proposed for simpler alkyl nitrates was found to yield calculated induction times in accord with experiment. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Ozone Decomposition on the Surface of Metal Oxide Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batakliev Todor Todorov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic decomposition of ozone to molecular oxygen over catalytic mixture containing manganese, copper and nickel oxides was investigated in the present work. The catalytic activity was evaluated on the basis of the decomposition coefficient which is proportional to ozone decomposition rate, and it has been already used in other studies for catalytic activity estimation. The reaction was studied in the presence of thermally modified catalytic samples operating at different temperatures and ozone flow rates. The catalyst changes were followed by kinetic methods, surface measurements, temperature programmed reduction and IR-spectroscopy. The phase composition of the metal oxide catalyst was determined by X-ray diffraction. The catalyst mixture has shown high activity in ozone decomposition at wet and dry O3/O2 gas mixtures. The mechanism of catalytic ozone degradation was suggested.

  2. Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Lindner, Robert R; Murray, Claire E; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian L; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W M; Dickey, John

    2014-01-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21cm absorption spectra from the 21cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the HI line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the up...

  3. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  4. Differentially Private Spatial Decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Cormode, Graham; Shen, Entong; Srivastava, Divesh; Yu, Ting

    2011-01-01

    Differential privacy has recently emerged as the de facto standard for private data release. This makes it possible to provide strong theoretical guarantees on the privacy and utility of released data. While it is well-known how to release data based on counts and simple functions under this guarantee, it remains to provide general purpose techniques to release different kinds of data. In this paper, we focus on spatial data such as locations and more generally any data that can be indexed by a tree structure. Directly applying existing differential privacy methods to this type of data simply generates noise. Instead, we introduce a new class of "private spatial decompositions": these adapt standard spatial indexing methods such as quadtrees and kd-trees to provide a private description of the data distribution. Equipping such structures with differential privacy requires several steps to ensure that they provide meaningful privacy guarantees. Various primitives, such as choosing splitting points and describi...

  5. Modeling N2O Reduction and Decomposition in a Circulating Fluidized bed Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Åmand, Lars-Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1996-01-01

    in the combustion chamber and the cyclone was calculated taking three mechanisms into account: Reduction by char, catalytic decomposition over bed material and thermal decomposition. The calculated destruction rate was in good agreement with the measured destruction of N2O injected at different levels in the boiler...... decomposition over bed material, and homogeneous thermal decomposition was negligible. However, at higher levels in the combustor the solids concentration is lower: at the top 60% of the N2O destruction was due to thermal decomposition and in the cyclone heterogeneous destruction of N2O was insignificant...

  6. Amplitude Modulated Sinusoidal Signal Decomposition for Audio Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M. G.; Jacobson, A.; Andersen, S. V.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a decomposition for sinusoidal coding of audio, based on an amplitude modulation of sinusoids via a linear combination of arbitrary basis vectors. The proposed method, which incorporates a perceptual distortion measure, is based on a relaxation of a nonlinear least......-squares minimization. Rate-distortion curves and listening tests show that, compared to a constant-amplitude sinusoidal coder, the proposed decomposition offers perceptually significant improvements in critical transient signals....

  7. Biological anoxic treatment of O{sub 2}-free VOC emissions from the petrochemical industry: A proof of concept study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Raúl; Souza, Theo S.O. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University of Valladolid, Dr Mergelina s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Glittmann, Lina [Ostfalia University of Applied Sciences, Department of Supply Engineering, Wolfenbüttel (Germany); Pérez, Rebeca [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University of Valladolid, Dr Mergelina s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Quijano, Guillermo, E-mail: gquijano@iq.uva.es [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University of Valladolid, Dr Mergelina s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • The treatment of O{sub 2}-free VOC emissions can be done by means of denitrifying processes. •Toluene vapors were successfully removed under anoxic denitrifying conditions. • A high bacterial diversity was observed. • Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were the predominant phyla. • The nature and number of metabolites accumulated varied with the toluene load -- Abstract: An innovative biofiltration technology based on anoxic biodegradation was proposed in this work for the treatment of inert VOC-laden emissions from the petrochemical industry. Anoxic biofiltration does not require conventional O{sub 2} supply to mineralize VOCs, which increases process safety and allows for the reuse of the residual gas for inertization purposes in plant. The potential of this technology was evaluated in a biotrickling filter using toluene as a model VOC at loads of 3, 5, 12 and 34 g m{sup −3} h{sup −1} (corresponding to empty bed residence times of 16, 8, 4 and 1.3 min) with a maximum elimination capacity of ∼3 g m{sup −3} h{sup −1}. However, significant differences in the nature and number of metabolites accumulated at each toluene load tested were observed, o- and p-cresol being detected only at 34 g m{sup −3} h{sup −1}, while benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde and phenol were detected at lower loads. A complete toluene removal was maintained after increasing the inlet toluene concentration from 0.5 to 1 g m{sup −3} (which entailed a loading rate increase from 3 to 6 g m{sup −3} h{sup −1}), indicating that the system was limited by mass transfer rather than by biological activity. A high bacterial diversity was observed, the predominant phyla being Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria.

  8. Theoretical study of simultaneous water and VOCs adsorption and desorption in a silica gel rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, G.; Zhang, Y.F.; Fang, Lei

    2008-01-01

    One-dimensional partial differential equations were used to model the simultaneous water and VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) adsorption and desorption in a silica gel rotor which was recommended for indoor air cleaning. The interaction among VOCs and moisture in the adsorption and desorption...... by the temperatures of the rotor and the air stream. The VOC transfer equations were solved by discretizing them into explicit up-wind finite differential equations. The model was validated with experimental data. The calculated results suggested that the regeneration time designed for dehumidification may...... process was neglected in the model as the concentrations of VOC pollutants in typical indoor environment were much lower than that of moisture and the adsorbed VOCs occupied only a minor portion of adsorption capacity of the rotor. Consequently VOC transfer was coupled with heat and moisture transfer only...

  9. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in surface coating materials: Their compositions and potential as an alternative fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Trieu-Vuong; Choi, In-Young; Son, Youn-Suk; Song, Kyu-Yong; Sunwoo, Young; Kim, Jo-Chun

    2016-03-01

    A sampling system was designed to determine the composition ratios of VOCs emitted from 31 surface coating materials (SCMs). Representative architectural, automotive, and marine SCMs in Korea were investigated. Toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were the predominant VOCs. The VOC levels (wt%) from automotive SCMs were significantly higher than those from architectural and marine paints. It was found that target SCMs comprised mainly VOCs with 6-10 carbon atoms in molecules, which could be adsorbed by activated carbon. The saturated activated carbon which had already adsorbed toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene was combusted. The saturated activated carbon was more combustible than new activated carbon because it comprised inflammable VOCs. Therefore, it could be an alternative fuel when using in a "fuelization system". To use the activated carbon as a fuel, a control technology of VOCs from a coating process was also designed and introduced.

  10. [Study on the chemical compositions of VOCs emitted by cooking oils based on GC-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wan-Qing; Nie, Lei; Tian, Gang; Li, Jing; Shao, Xia; Wang, Min-Yan

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are key precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in air, and the differences in the compositions of VOCs lead to their different contribution to atmospheric reaction. Cooking oil fume is one of the important sources of atmospheric VOCs, and its chemical compositions are distinct under different conditions of oil types, food types, cooking methods and heating temperatures etc. In this study, the production of cooking oil fume was simulated by heating typical pure vegetable oils (peanut oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, olive oil and blend oil) at different temperatures in beakers to investigate the chemical compositions of VOCs. The emitted VOCs were sampled with a Tenax adsorption tube and analyzed using GC-MS after thermal desorption. According to spectral library search and map analysis, using area normalized semi-quantitative method, preliminary qualitative and quantitative tests were conducted for the specific components of VOCs under different conditions.

  11. Nonequilibrium adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of methane clathrate hydrate decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    Nonequilibrium, constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the decomposition of methane clathrate hydrate in contact with water. Under adiabatic conditions, the rate of methane clathrate decomposition is affected by heat and mass transfer arising from the breakup of the clathrate hydrate framework and release of the methane gas at the solid-liquid interface and diffusion of methane through water. We observe that temperature gradients are established between the clathrate and solution phases as a result of the endothermic clathrate decomposition process and this factor must be considered when modeling the decomposition process. Additionally we observe that clathrate decomposition does not occur gradually with breakup of individual cages, but rather in a concerted fashion with rows of structure I cages parallel to the interface decomposing simultaneously. Due to the concerted breakup of layers of the hydrate, large amounts of methane gas are released near the surface which can form bubbles that will greatly affect the rate of mass transfer near the surface of the clathrate phase. The effects of these phenomena on the rate of methane hydrate decomposition are determined and implications on hydrate dissociation in natural methane hydrate reservoirs are discussed.

  12. Silica-Titania Composite (STC)'s Performance in the Photocatalytic Oxidation of Polar VOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lanfang H.; Coutts, Janelle; Richards, Jeffrey; Mazyck, David; Mazyck, David

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to determine the performance of a Silica-Titania Composite (STC) in the photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of polar VOCs for potential applications in trace contaminant control within space habitats such as the ISS and CEV Orion. Tests were carried out in a bench scale STC-packed annular reactor under continuous illumination by either a UV-C germicidal lamp(lambda (sub max) = 254 nm) or UV-A fluorescent BLB (lambda(sub max) = 365 nm) for the removal of ethanol (a predominant polar VOC in the ISS cabin). The STC's performance was evaluated in terms of the ethanol mineralization rate, mineralization efficiency, and the extent of its oxidation intermediate (acetaldehyde) formation in response to the type of light source (photon energy and photon flux) and relative humidity (RH) implemented. Results demonstrated that acetaldehyde was the only quantifiable intermediate in the effluent under UV illumination, but was not found in the dark adsorption experiments. The mineralization rate increased with an increase in photon energy (UV-C greater than UV-A), even though both lamps were adjusted to emit the same incident photon flux, and also increased with increasing photon flux. However, photonic efficiency decreased as the photon flux increased. More importantly, a higher photon flux gave rise to a lower effluent acetaldehyde concentration. The effect of RH on PCO was complex and intriguing because it affected both physical adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation. In general, increasing RH caused a decrease in adsorption capacity for ethanol and reduced the mineralization efficiency with a concomitant higher acetaldehyde evolution rate. The effect of RH was less profound than that of photon flux.

  13. Characteristics of Ambient Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs Measured in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Qiang Zhou

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the characteristics of ambient abundance of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in Shanghai, one of the biggest metropolis of China, VOCs were measured with a gas chromatography system equipped with a mass-selective detector (GC/MSD from July 2006 to February 2010. An intensive measurement campaign was conducted (eight samples per day with a 3 hour interval during May 2009. The comparison of ambient VOCs collected in different regions of Shanghai shows that the concentrations are slightly higher in the busy commercial area (28.9 ppbv at Xujiaui than in the urban administrative area (24.3 ppbv at Pudong. However, during the intensive measurement period, the concentrations in the large steel industrial area (28.7 ppbv at Baoshan were much higher than in the urban administrative area (18 ppbv at Pudong, especially for alkanes, alkenes, and toluene. The seasonal variations of ambient VOC concentrations measured at the Xujiahui sampling site indicate that the VOC concentrations are significantly affected by meteorological conditions (such as wind direction and precipitation. In addition, although alkanes are the most abundant VOCs at the Xujiahui measurement site, the most important VOCs contributing to ozone formation potential (OFP are aromatics, accounting for 57% of the total OFP. The diurnal variations of VOC concentrations show that VOC concentrations are higher on weekdays than in weekends at the Xujiahui sampling site, suggesting that traffic condition and human activities have important impacts on VOC emissions in Shanghai. The evidence also shows that the major sources of isoprene are mainly resulted from gasoline evaporation at a particular time (06:00–09:00 in the busy commercial area. The results gained from this study provide useful information for better understanding the characteristics of ambient VOCs and the sources of VOCs in Shanghai.

  14. Time-activity relationships to VOC personal exposure factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Rufus D.; Schweizer, Christian; Llacqua, Vito; Lai, Hak Kan; Jantunen, Matti; Bayer-Oglesby, Lucy; Künzli, Nino

    Social and demographic factors have been found to play a significant role in differences between time-activity patterns of population subgroups. Since time-activity patterns largely influence personal exposure to compounds as individuals move across microenvironments, exposure subgroups within the population may be defined by factors that influence daily activity patterns. Socio-demographic and environmental factors that define time-activity subgroups also define quantifiable differences in VOC personal exposures to different sources and individual compounds in the Expolis study. Significant differences in exposures to traffic-related compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were observed in relation to gender, number of children and living alone. Categorization of exposures further indicated time exposed to traffic at work and time in a car as important determinants. Increased exposures to decane, nonane and undecane were observed for males, housewives and self-employed. Categorization of exposures indicated exposure subgroups related to workshop use and living downtown. Higher exposures to 3-carene and α-pinene commonly found in household cleaning products and fragrances were associated with more children, while exposures to traffic compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were reduced with more children. Considerable unexplained variation remained in categorization of exposures associated with home product use and fragrances, due to individual behavior and product choice. More targeted data collection methods in VOC exposure studies for these sources should be used. Living alone was associated with decreased exposures to 2-methyl-1-propanol and 1-butanol, and traffic-related compounds. Identification of these subgroups may help to reduce the large amount of unexplained variation in VOC exposure studies. Further they may help in assessing impacts of urban planning that result in changes in behavior of individuals, resulting in shifts in

  15. Shrub encroachment in Arctic tundra: Betula nana effects on above- and below-ground litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Jennie R; Buckeridge, Kate M; van de Weg, Martine J; Shaver, Gaius R; Schimel, Joshua P; Gough, Laura

    2017-03-06

    Rapid arctic vegetation change as a result of global warming includes an increase in the cover and biomass of deciduous shrubs. Increases in shrub abundance will result in a proportional increase of shrub litter in the litter community, potentially affecting carbon turnover rates in arctic ecosystems. We investigated the effects of leaf and root litter of a deciduous shrub, Betula nana, on decomposition, by examining species-specific decomposition patterns, as well as effects of Betula litter on the decomposition of other species. We conducted a two-year decomposition experiment in moist acidic tundra in northern Alaska, where we decomposed three tundra species (Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Rhododendron palustre, and Eriophorum vaginatum) alone and in combination with Betula litter. Decomposition patterns for leaf and root litter were determined using three different measures of decomposition (mass loss, respiration, extracellular enzyme activity). We report faster decomposition of Betula leaf litter compared to other species, with support for species differences coming from all three measures of decomposition. Mixing effects were less consistent among the measures, with negative mixing effects shown only for mass loss. In contrast, there were few species differences or mixing effects for root decomposition. Overall, we attribute longer-term litter mass loss patterns in to patterns created by early decomposition processes in the first winter. We note numerous differences for species patterns between leaf and root decomposition, indicating that conclusions from leaf litter experiments should not be extrapolated to below-ground decomposition. The high decomposition rates of Betula leaf litter aboveground, and relatively similar decomposition rates of multiple species below, suggest a potential for increases in turnover in the fast-decomposing carbon pool of leaves and fine roots as the dominance of deciduous shrubs in the Arctic increases, but this outcome may be tempered

  16. Low HAP/VOC Compliant Resins for Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    on lauric acid FAVE-O fatty acid vinyl ester resin system based on octanoic acid FTIR Fourier transform infrared GIC Mode 1 fracture energy...temperature and could potentially produce smog-promoting ozone as well as long-term and acute health effects. VOC/HAPs are emitted during all phases of...Viscosity ា cP at 25 °C (MOct) Unreacted epoxy FTIR *, NMR* No epoxy present None detected Correct reactant ratios NMR Methacrylate to FA ratio of 1:1

  17. DESORPTION OF VOCs FROM POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS UNDER MICROWAVE FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Desorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)from polymeric adsorbents by microwave was investigated experimentally. Two kinds of organic compounds, benzene and toluene,were separately used as adsorbates in this work. Results showed that the application of microwave to regenerate the polymeric adsorbents not only can get higher regeneration efficiency in comparison with the use of heat regeneration, but also make the temperatures of the fixed beds much lower than that when using the heat regeneratton The weaker the polarity of a polymeric adsorbent, the easier its regeneration was.

  18. DESORPTION OF VOCs FROM POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS UNDER MICROWAVE FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIXiang; LIZhong; 等

    2001-01-01

    Desorption of volatile organic compounds(VOCs) from polymeric adsorbents by microwave was investigated experimentally.Two kinds of organic compounds.benzene and toluene.were separately used as adsorbates in this work Results showed that the application of microwave to regenerate the polymeric adsorbents not only can get higher regeneration efficiency in comparison with the use of heat regeneration,but also make the temperatures of the fixed beds much lower than that when using the heat regeneration the weaker the polarity of a polymericadsorbent,the easier its regeneration was.

  19. VoCS : Sistema de almacenamiento voluntario en la nube

    OpenAIRE

    Schiavón Raineri, Ignacio Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    La computación en la nube responde a las necesidades del aumento de dispositivos conectados a Internet y el creciente volumen de datos manejados, ofreciendo acceso ubicuo y transparente a la información de forma segura. Esto ha tenido como consecuencia la apertura del mercado, ofreciendo muchas aplicaciones basadas en la nube como SkyDrive, Google Drive o Dropbox. VoCS (Volunteer Cloud Storage) es un sistema de almacenamiento voluntario en la nube de código abierto y seguro, que pretende ofre...

  20. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of Triethylene Glycol Dinitrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN,Pei(陈沛); ZHAO,Feng-Qi(赵凤起); LUO,Yang(罗阳); HU,Rong-Zu(胡荣祖); LI,Shang-Wen(李上文); GAO,Yin(高茵)

    2004-01-01

    The thermal behavior and kinetic parameters of the decomposition reaction of triethylene glycol dinitrate (TEGDN) in a temperature-programmed mode at different pressures (0.1, 2, 4 and 6 MPa) have been investigated by means of DSC and TG-DTG. The results show that the properties of the thermal decomposition of TEGDN are affected by the change of pressure, and the kinetic model function, the apparent activation energy Ea and TEGDN obtained by the values Teo and Tpo of the onset temperature Te and the peak temperature TP when the heating rate tends to zero are 191.05,209.86 ℃ at 0.1 MPa, 207.59 and 221.65 ℃ at 2 MPa, respectively.

  1. Domain decomposition for implicit solvation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancès, Eric; Maday, Yvon; Stamm, Benjamin

    2013-08-07

    This article is the first of a series of papers dealing with domain decomposition algorithms for implicit solvent models. We show that, in the framework of the COSMO model, with van der Waals molecular cavities and classical charge distributions, the electrostatic energy contribution to the solvation energy, usually computed by solving an integral equation on the whole surface of the molecular cavity, can be computed more efficiently by using an integral equation formulation of Schwarz's domain decomposition method for boundary value problems. In addition, the so-obtained potential energy surface is smooth, which is a critical property to perform geometry optimization and molecular dynamics simulations. The purpose of this first article is to detail the methodology, set up the theoretical foundations of the approach, and study the accuracies and convergence rates of the resulting algorithms. The full efficiency of the method and its applicability to large molecular systems of biological interest is demonstrated elsewhere.

  2. Decomposition methods for unsupervised learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents the application and development of decomposition methods for Unsupervised Learning. It covers topics from classical factor analysis based decomposition and its variants such as Independent Component Analysis, Non-negative Matrix Factorization and Sparse Coding to their genera......This thesis presents the application and development of decomposition methods for Unsupervised Learning. It covers topics from classical factor analysis based decomposition and its variants such as Independent Component Analysis, Non-negative Matrix Factorization and Sparse Coding...... methods and clustering problems is derived both in terms of classical point clustering but also in terms of community detection in complex networks. A guiding principle throughout this thesis is the principle of parsimony. Hence, the goal of Unsupervised Learning is here posed as striving for simplicity...... in the decompositions. Thus, it is demonstrated how a wide range of decomposition methods explicitly or implicitly strive to attain this goal. Applications of the derived decompositions are given ranging from multi-media analysis of image and sound data, analysis of biomedical data such as electroencephalography...

  3. Plant leaves as indoor air passive samplers for volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Todd A; Doucette, William J

    2015-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) enter indoor environments through internal and external sources. Indoor air concentrations of VOCs vary greatly but are generally higher than outdoors. Plants have been promoted as indoor air purifiers for decades, but reports of their effectiveness differ. However, while air-purifying applications may be questionable, the waxy cuticle coating on leaves may provide a simple, cost-effective approach to sampling indoor air for VOCs. To investigate the potential use of plants as indoor air VOC samplers, a static headspace approach was used to examine the relationship between leaf and air concentrations, leaf lipid contents and octanol-air partition coefficients (Koa) for six VOCs and four plant species. The relationship between leaf and air concentrations was further examined in an actual residence after the introduction of several chlorinated VOC emission sources. Leaf-air concentration factors (LACFs), calculated from linear regressions of the laboratory headspace data, were found to increase as the solvent extractable leaf lipid content and Koa value of the VOC increased. In the studies conducted in the residence, leaf concentrations paralleled the changing air concentrations, indicating a relatively rapid air to leaf VOC exchange. Overall, the data from the laboratory and residential studies illustrate the potential for plant leaves to be used as cost effective, real-time indoor air VOC samplers.

  4. VOCs and OVOCs distribution and control policy implications in Pearl River Delta region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Peter K. K.; Ho, Josephine W. K.; Tsang, Roy C. W.; Blake, Donald R.; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Yu, Jian Zhen; Yuan, Zibing; Wang, Xinming; Shao, Min; Zhong, Liuju

    2013-09-01

    Ambient air measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) were conducted and characterised during a two-year grid study in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of southern China. The present grid study pioneered the systematic investigation of the nature and characteristics of complex VOC and OVOC sources at a regional scale. The largest contributing VOCs, accounting over 80% of the total VOCs mixing ratio, were toluene, ethane, ethyne, propane, ethene, butane, benzene, pentane, ethylbenzene, and xylenes. Sub-regional VOC spatial characteristics were identified, namely: i) relatively fresh pollutants, consistent with elevated vehicular and industrial activities, around the PRD estuary; and ii) a concentration gradient with higher mixing ratios of VOCs in the west as compared with the eastern part of PRD. Based on alkyl nitrate aging determination, a high hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration favoured fast hydrocarbon reactions and formation of locally produced ozone. The photochemical reactivity analysis showed aromatic hydrocarbons and alkenes together consisted of around 80% of the ozone formation potential (OFP) among the key VOCs. We also found that the OFP from OVOCs should not be neglected since their OFP contribution was more than one-third of that from VOCs alone. These findings support the choice of current air pollution control policy which focuses on vehicular sources but warrants further controls. Industrial emissions and VOCs emitted by solvents should be the next targets for ground-level ozone abatement.

  5. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, P.; Yan, Hui; Banerjee, S. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This progress report summarizes three accomplishments in a study of low volatile organic compound (VOC) drying of lumber and wood panel products. A mathematical model for predicting moisture emissions from particle was constructed and is being extended to VOCs. VOCs emissions from drying boards show that VOCs appear to be evenly released from all surfaces. Preliminary results from monthly analyses of loblolly pines indicate that resin acids appear to decrease between March to August, and that no consistent trends are apparent for terpenes. 3 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Implementation of VOC source reduction practices in a manufactured house and in school classrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, A.T.; Apte, M.G.; Shendell, D.G.; Beal, D.; McIlvaine, J.E.R.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed studies of a new manufactured house and four new industrialized relocatable school classrooms were conducted to determine the emission sources of formaldehyde and other VOCs and to identify and implement source reduction practices. Procedures were developed to generate VOC emission factors that allowed reasonably accurate predictions of indoor air VOC concentrations. Based on the identified sources of formaldehyde and other aldehydes, practices were developed to reduce the concentrations of these compounds in new house construction. An alternate ceiling panel reduced formaldehyde concentrations in the classrooms. Overall, the classrooms had relatively low VOC concentrations.

  7. Climate and litter quality differently modulate the effects of soil fauna on litter decomposition across biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Maestre, Fernando T; Kattge, Jens; Wall, Diana H

    2013-08-01

    Climate and litter quality have been identified as major drivers of litter decomposition at large spatial scales. However, the role played by soil fauna remains largely unknown, despite its importance for litter fragmentation and microbial activity. We synthesised litterbag studies to quantify the effect sizes of soil fauna on litter decomposition rates at the global and biome scales, and to assess how climate, litter quality and soil fauna interact to determine such rates. Soil fauna consistently enhanced litter decomposition at both global and biome scales (average increment ~ 37%). [corrected]. However, climate and litter quality differently modulated the effects of soil fauna on decomposition rates between biomes, from climate-driven biomes to those where climate effects were mediated by changes in litter quality. Our results advocate for the inclusion of biome-specific soil fauna effects on litter decomposition as a mean to reduce the unexplained variation in large-scale decomposition models. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  8. Pressure Dependent Decomposition Kinetics of the Energetic Material HMX up to 3.6 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, E A; Zaug, J M; Burnham, A K

    2009-05-29

    The effect of pressure on the thermal decomposition rate of the energetic material HMX was studied. HMX was precompressed in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) and heated at various rates. The parent species population was monitored as a function of time and temperature using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Decomposition rates were determined by fitting the fraction reacted to the extended-Prout-Tompkins nucleation-growth model and the Friedman isoconversional method. The results of these experiments and analysis indicate that pressure accelerates the decomposition at low to moderate pressures (i.e. between ambient pressure and 1 GPa) and decelerates the decomposition at higher pressures. The decomposition acceleration is attributed to pressure enhanced autocatalysis whereas the deceleration at high pressures is attributed pressure inhibiting bond homolysis step(s), which would result in an increase in volume. These results indicate that both {beta} and {delta} phase HMX are sensitive to pressure in the thermally induced decomposition kinetics.

  9. Thermal decomposition of lutetium propionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of lutetium(III) propionate monohydrate (Lu(C2H5CO2)3·H2O) in argon was studied by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Dehydration takes place around 90 °C. It is followed by the decomposition of the anhydrous ...... of the oxycarbonate to the rare-earth oxide proceeds in a different way, which is here reminiscent of the thermal decomposition path of Lu(C3H5O2)·2CO(NH2)2·2H2O...

  10. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur Yvette Cedex (France); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dickey, John, E-mail: rlindner@astro.wisc.edu [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  11. Photocatalytic decomposition of cortisone acetate in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romão, Joana Sobral; Hamdy, Mohamed S; Mul, Guido; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2015-01-23

    The photocatalytic decomposition of cortisone 21-acetate (CA), a model compound for the commonly used steroid, cortisone, was studied. CA was photocatalytically decomposed in a slurry reactor with the initial rates between 0.11 and 0.46 mg L(-1)min(-1) at 10 mg L(-1) concentration, using the following heterogeneous photocatalysts in decreasing order of their catalytic activity: ZnO>Evonik TiO2 P25>Hombikat TiO2>WO3. Due to the lack of ZnO stability in aqueous solutions, TiO2 P25 was chosen for further experiments. The decomposition reaction was found to be pseudo-first order and the rate constant decreased as a function of increasing initial CA concentration. Changing the initial pH of the CA solution did not affect the reaction rate significantly. The decomposition reaction in the presence of the oxidizing sacrificial agent sodium persulfate showed an observed decomposition rate constant of 0.004 min(-1), lower than that obtained for TiO2 P25 (0.040 min(-1)). The highest photocatalytic degradation rate constant was obtained combining both TiO2 P25 and S2O8(2-) (0.071 min(-1)) showing a synergistic effect. No reactive intermediates were detected using LC-MS showing fast photocatalytic decomposition kinetics of CA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Carbon material formation on SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 and residue constituents during acetylene decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hung-Lung; Wu, Trong-Neng; Ho, Yung-Shou; Zeng, Li-Xuan

    2014-07-15

    Carbon materials including carbon spheres and nanotubes were formed from acetylene decomposition on hydrogen-reduced SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 at 650-850°C. The physicochemical characteristics of SBA-15, Ni-SBA-15 and carbon materials were analyzed by field emission scanning electronic microscopy (FE-SEM), Raman spectrometry, and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). In addition, the contents of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the tar and residue and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the exhaust were determined during acetylene decomposition on SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15. Spherical carbon materials were observed on SBA-15 during acetylene decomposition at 750 and 850°C. Carbon filaments and ball spheres were formed on Ni-SBA-15 at 650-850°C. Raman spectroscopy revealed peaks at 1290 (D-band, disorder mode, amorphous carbon) and 1590 (G-band, graphite sp(2) structure)cm(-1). Naphthalene (2 rings), pyrene (4 rings), phenanthrene (3 rings), and fluoranthene (4 rings) were major PAHs in tar and residues. Exhaust constituents of hydrocarbon (as propane), H2, and C2H2 were 3.9-2.6/2.7-1.5, 1.4-2.8/2.6-4.3, 4.2-2.4/3.2-1.7% when acetylene was decomposed on SBA-15/Ni-SBA-15, respectively, corresponding to temperatures ranging from 650 to 850°C. The concentrations of 52 VOCs ranged from 9359 to 5658 and 2488 to 1104ppm for SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 respectively, at acetylene decomposition temperatures from 650 to 850°C, and the aromatics contributed more than 87% fraction of VOC concentrations.

  13. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM. In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a), we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004) for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA). That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise) as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the target PM for "effect

  14. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ebersviller

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs, particulate matter (PM, and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM.

    In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a, we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004 for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA. That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the

  15. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Jeffries

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs, particulate matter (PM, and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM. In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a, we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004 for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA. That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the target PM

  16. The Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of Polysiloxane/Polymethylacrylate IPNs Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhixiong; XIE Wenfeng; CHENG Dongcai

    2006-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane/polymethylacrylate(PDMS/PMA) interpenetratrating polymer networks(IPNs) was fabricated by simultaneous synthesis and characterized by thermogravimetry (TG). The kinetics of the thermal decomposition of polysiloxane/polymethylacrylate IPNs in N2 and air was studied at different heating rates. It was observed that there were two decomposition peaks both in N2 and air, which showed that thermal decomposition process obeyed two-step pyrolysis mechanism and accorded with the two compositions of IPN. Kinetic parameters were determined during simultaneous integration of the Doyle equation and the IPN/s kinetics equation was one-order equation in N2 and Air. The decomposition activation energy in N2 and air were 147.405 kJ·monl-1 and 192.656 kJ·monl-1 respectively.

  17. DECOMPOSITION OF TARS IN MICROWAVE PLASMA – PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Wnukowski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to the main problem connected with biomass gasification - a presence of tar in a product gas. This paper presents preliminary results of tar decomposition in a microwave plasma reactor. It gives a basic insight into the construction and work of the plasma reactor. During the experiment, researches were carried out on toluene as a tar surrogate. As a carrier gas for toluene and as a plasma agent, nitrogen was used. Flow rates of the gases and the microwave generator’s power were constant during the whole experiment. Results of the experiment showed that the decomposition process of toluene was effective because the decomposition efficiency attained above 95%. The main products of tar decomposition were light hydrocarbons and soot. The article also gives plans for further research in a matter of tar removal from the product gas.

  18. Mapping litter decomposition by remote-detected indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rossi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Leaf litter decomposition is a key process for the functioning of natural ecosystems. An important limiting factor for this process is detritus availability, which we have estimated by remote sensed indices of canopy green biomass (NDVI. Here, we describe the use of multivariate geostatistical analysis to couple in situ measures with hyper-spectral and multi-spectral remote-sensed data for producing maps of litter decomposition. A direct relationship between the decomposition rates in four different CORINE habitats and NDVI, calculated at different scales from Landsat ETM+ multi-spectral data and MIVIS hyper-spectral data was found. Variogram analysis was used to evaluate the spatial properties of each single variable and their common interaction. Co-variogram and co-kriging analysis of the two variables turned out to be an effective approach for decomposition mapping from remote-sensed spatial explicit data.

  19. MIMO Identical Eigenmode Transmission System (IETS) - A Channel Decomposition Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Shakir, M Zeeshan

    2010-01-01

    In the past few years considerable attention has been given to the design of Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Eigenmode Transmission Systems (EMTS). This paper presents an in-depth analysis of a new MIMO eigenmode transmission strategy. The non-linear decomposition technique called Geometric Mean Decomposition (GMD) is employed for the formation of eigenmodes over MIMO flatfading channel. Exploiting GMD technique, identical, parallel and independent transmission pipes are created for data transmission at higher rate. The system based on such decomposition technique is referred to as MIMO Identical Eigenmode Transmission System (IETS). The comparative analysis of the MIMO transceiver design exploiting nonlinear and linear decomposition techniques for variable constellation is presented in this paper. The new transmission strategy is tested in combination with the Vertical Bell Labs Layered Space Time (V-BLAST) decoding scheme using different number of antennas on both sides of the communication link. The ...

  20. Relationship between Decomposition Rates of Two Leaves and Colonization Benthic Macroinvertebrate in the Stream of Yabuli Mountain%亚布力山涧溪流2种树叶的分解速率与大型底栖动物定殖关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阚春梅; 刘曼红; 王令刚; 于洪贤

    2013-01-01

    利用分解网袋(孔径为1 mm)在亚布力山涧一级溪流中对水曲柳( Fraxinus mandshurica)和暴马丁香( Syringa reticulate var.mandshurica)进行了为期105 d的树叶分解研究。结果表明:水曲柳和暴马丁香树叶的分解速率分别为0.04、0.02,符合指数衰减模型,均属于快速分解组。定殖在水曲柳、暴马丁香树叶上的底栖动物种类分别为46、44种,二者均以双翅目摇蚊为主,分别占底栖动物类群数的60.9%和45.5%。从大型底栖动物摄食功能群的比例来看,定殖在水曲柳叶片上直接集食者比例最高,为52.3%;其次是撕食者(25.5%)和捕食者(19.9%);最少的为杂食者,占2.3%。而定殖在暴马丁香叶片上直接集食者为45.2%;其次为捕食者(30.9%)和撕食者(19.1%);收集者最少,占4.8%。说明夏秋两季在亚布力山涧溪流中直接集食的底栖动物丰富度与树叶分解速率有显著关系。%The experiment was conducted to study the leaves decomposition rates of Fraxinus mandshurica and Syringa reticulate with decomposition bags ( diameter of 1 mm) for 105 days in the stream of Yabuli Mountain.The leaves decomposition rates of Fraxinus mandshurica and Syringa reticulate are 0.04 and 0.02, and the decomposition rate accorded with expo-nential decay model.Leaves of two species belong to the rapid decomposition groups.In the whole experiment process, the species numbers colonization benthic macroinvertebrate of the leaf Fraxinus mandshurica (46) is higher than that of Syrin-ga reticulate leaves (44), and both belong to Diptera Chironomus, accounting for 60.9% and 45.5% of benthic animal groups.From functional feeding groups, the gatherers/collectors in Fraxinus mandshurica are dominant (52.3%), fol-lowed by the shredders (25.5%) and the predators (19.9%), respectively.The omnivores are rare (2.3%).There is significant relationship between

  1. The predicted impact of VOCs from Marijuana cultivation operations on ozone concentrations in great Denver, CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. T.; Vizuete, W.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Ashworth, K.

    2016-12-01

    Colorado is the first the marijuana legal states in the United States since 2014. As a result, thousands of legal Marijuana cultivation operations are at great Denver area now. Those Marijuana cultivation operations could be the potential to release a lot of biogenic VOCs, such as monoterpene(C10H16), alpha-pinene, and D-limonene. Those alkene species could rapidly increase the peroxy radicals and chemical reactions in the atmosphere, especially in the urban area which belong to VOC-limited ozone regime. These emissions will increase the ozone in Denver city, where is ozone non-attainment area. Some previous research explained the marijuana smoke and indoor air quality (Martyny, Serrano, Schaeffer, & Van Dyke, 2013) and the smell of marijuana chemical compounds(Rice & Koziel, 2015). However, there have been no studies discuss on identifying and assessing emission rate from marijuana and how those species impact on atmospheric chemistry and ozone concentration, and the marijuana emissions have been not considered in the national emission inventory, either. This research will use air quality model to identify the possibility of ozone impact by marijuana cultivation emission. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions, CAMx, are applied for this research to identify the impact of ozone concentration. This model is government regulatory model based on the Three-State Air Quality Modeling Study (3SAQS), which developed by UNC-Chapel Hill and ENVIRON in 2012. This model is used for evaluation and regulate the ozone impact in ozone non-attainment area, Denver city. The details of the 3SAQS model setup and protocol can be found in the 3SAQS report(UNC-IE, 2013). For the marijuana emission study scenarios, we assumed the monoterpene (C10H16) is the only emission species in air quality model and identify the ozone change in the model by the different quantity of emission rate from marijuana cultivation operations.

  2. Oxygenated VOC and monoterpene emissions from a boreal coniferous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, R.; Rantala, P.; Kajos, M. K.; Patokoski, J.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Aalto, J.; Kolari, P.; Bäck, J.; Hari, P.; Kulmala, M.; Rinne, J.

    2012-04-01

    Compared with terpenoids, emissions of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from boreal ecosystems have been poorly characterized. We measured ecosystem scale emissions of three oxygenated compounds (methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) and monoterpenes from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland during the summers 2006-2008. The measurements were conducted using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. The contribution of the three oxygenated compounds to the measured total emissions was 40-60 %. The highest oxygenated VOC emissions were those of methanol, comprising 20-30 % of the total, followed by acetone with a share of 10-20 %. The acetaldehyde emissions were 5-10 % of the total. This emission composition will be compared with that obtained from shoot enclosure measurements. Methanol showed deposition during some periods although its overall flux was towards the atmosphere. The monoterpene emissions had a light dependent component, suggesting that part of the emissions originated directly from monoterpene biosynthesis. Diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variations in the emissions, along with temperature and light dependencies, will be discussed.

  3. O sistema vocálico alemão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Haupt

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available 0 presente trabalho explica, de forma simplificada, o sistema vocálico alemão através dos traços de duração, abertura e recuo. Na discussão sobre o assunto, é feita uma abordagem sobre a relação de dependência entre a duração e os traços de abertura, além de discutir a relevância de manter a duração em todo o sistema. Através do modelo de Fonologia Autossegmental, é possível verificar que a estrutura silábica das vogais longas e breves é diferente, além de verificar em que contextos silábicos elas podem ocorrer (especificamente em posição tônica. Já em posição átona, ocorre o schwa, uma variante da vogal lei, que fará parte do sistema vocálico alemão, constituído, então, de 15 vogais em posição tônica e uma variante átona.

  4. The effect of increased temperature and nitrogen deposition on decomposition in bogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, A.J.G.; Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Robroek, B.J.M.; Limpens, J.; Berendse, F.

    2008-01-01

    Despite their low primary production, ombrotrophic peatlands have a considerable potential to store atmospheric carbon as a result of their extremely low litter decomposition rates. Projected changes in temperature and nitrogen (N) deposition may increase decomposition rates by their positive effect

  5. Development of biogenic VOC emission inventories for the boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, V.

    2008-07-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by vegetation, especially forests, can affect local and regional atmospheric photochemistry through their reactions with atmospheric oxidants. Their reaction products may also participate in the formation and growth of new particles which affect the radiation balance of the atmosphere, and thus climate, by scattering and absorbing shortwave and longwave radiation and by modifying the radiative properties, amount and lifetime of clouds. Globally, anthropogenic VOC emissions are far surpassed by the biogenic ones, making biogenic emission inventories an integral element in the development of efficient air quality and climate strategies. The inventories are typically constructed based on landcover information, measured emissions of different plants or vegetation types, and empirical dependencies of the emissions on environmental variables such as temperature and light. This thesis is focused on the VOC emissions from the boreal forest, the largest terrestrial biome with characteristic vegetation patterns and strong seasonality. The isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions of the most prevalent boreal tree species in Finland, Scots pine, have been measured and their seasonal variation and dependence on temperature and light have been studied. The measured emission data and other available observations of the emissions of the principal boreal trees have been used in a biogenic emission model developed for the boreal forests in Finland. The model utilizes satellite landcover information, Finnish forest classification and hourly meteorological data to calculate isoprene, monoterpene, sesquiterpene and other VOC emissions over the growing season. The principal compounds emitted by Scots pine are DELTA3-carene and alpha-pinene in the south boreal zone and alpha- and beta-pinene in the north boreal zone. The monoterpene emissions are dependent on temperature and have a clear seasonal cycle with high emissions in spring

  6. Some nonlinear space decomposition algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, Xue-Cheng; Espedal, M. [Univ. of Bergen (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    Convergence of a space decomposition method is proved for a general convex programming problem. The space decomposition refers to methods that decompose a space into sums of subspaces, which could be a domain decomposition or a multigrid method for partial differential equations. Two algorithms are proposed. Both can be used for linear as well as nonlinear elliptic problems and they reduce to the standard additive and multiplicative Schwarz methods for linear elliptic problems. Two {open_quotes}hybrid{close_quotes} algorithms are also presented. They converge faster than the additive one and have better parallelism than the multiplicative method. Numerical tests with a two level domain decomposition for linear, nonlinear and interface elliptic problems are presented for the proposed algorithms.

  7. Decomposition of indwelling EMG signals

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Decomposition of indwelling electromyographic (EMG) signals is challenging in view of the complex and often unpredictable behaviors and interactions of the action potential trains of different motor units that constitute the indwelling EMG signal. These phenomena create a myriad of problem situations that a decomposition technique needs to address to attain completeness and accuracy levels required for various scientific and clinical applications. Starting with the maximum a posteriori probab...

  8. A High Temperature Kinetic Study for the Thermal Unimolecular Decomposition of Diethyl Carbonate

    KAUST Repository

    AlAbbad, Mohammad

    2017-07-08

    Thermal unimolecular decomposition of diethyl carbonate (DEC) was investigated in a shock tube by measuring ethylene concentration with a CO2 gas laser over 900 - 1200 K and 1.2 – 2.8 bar. Rate coefficients were extracted using a simple kinetic scheme comprising of thermal decomposition of DEC as initial step followed by rapid thermal decomposition of the intermediate ethyl-hydrogen-carbonate. Our results were further analysed using ab initio and master equation calculations to obtain pressure- and temperature- dependence of rate coefficients. Similar to alkyl esters, unimolecular decomposition of DEC is found to undergo six-center retro-ene elimination of ethylene in a concerted manner.

  9. A high temperature kinetic study for the thermal unimolecular decomposition of diethyl carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlAbbad, Mohammed; Giri, Binod Raj; Szőri, Milan; Viskolcz, Béla; Farooq, Aamir

    2017-09-01

    Thermal unimolecular decomposition of diethyl carbonate (DEC) was investigated in a shock tube by measuring ethylene concentration with a CO2 gas laser over 900-1200 K and 1.2-2.8 bar. Rate coefficients were extracted using a simple kinetic scheme comprising of thermal decomposition of DEC as initial step followed by rapid thermal decomposition of the intermediate ethyl hydrogen carbonate. Our results were further analysed using ab initio and master equation calculations to obtain pressure- and temperature-dependence of rate coefficients. Similar to alkyl esters, unimolecular decomposition of DEC is found to undergo six-center retro-ene elimination of ethylene in a concerted manner.

  10. TREE DECOMPOSITIONS OF MULTIGRAPHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Minyong

    1999-01-01

    For a graph G, ifE(G) can be partitioned into several pairwise disjointsets as { E1, E2,……,El} such thatthe subgraph induced by Ei is a tree of orderki, (i=1,2, ……, l), then G is said to have a {k1,k2,……, kl}-tree-decomposition, denoted by {k1,k2,……, kl}∈G.For k≥1 and l≥0, a collection(G)(k,l) is the setof multigraphs such that G∈(G)(k,l) if and only if ε(G) = k(|G|-1)-l and ε(H)≤max{(k-1)(|H|-1), k(|H|-1)-l} for any subgraph H of G.We prove that (1) If k≥2, 0≤l≤3 and G∈(G)(k,l) of order n≥l+1, then {n,n,……, n-l}∈ G. (2) If k≥2 and G∈(G)(k,2) oforder n≥3, then {n,n,……, n,n-2}∈G and {n,n,……, n,n-1,n-1}∈G. (3) If k3 and G∈(G)(k,3) oforder n≥4, then {n,n,……, n,n-3}∈G ,{ n,n,……, n,n-1,n-2}∈ G and {n,n, ……, n,n-1,n-1,n-1}∈G.

  11. Concentrations and fluxes of isoprene and oxygenated VOCs at a French Mediterranean oak forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kalogridis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The CANOPEE project aims to better understand the biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC in the case of Mediterranean ecosystems and the impact of in-canopy processes on the atmospheric chemical composition above the canopy. Based on an intensive field campaign, the objective of our work was to determine the chemical composition of the air inside a canopy as well as the net fluxes of reactive species between the canopy and the boundary layer. Measurements were carried out during spring 2012 at the Oak Observatory of the Observatoire de Haute Provence (O3HP located in the southeast of France. The field site presents one dominant tree species, Quercus pubescens L., a typical Mediterranean species which features large isoprene emission rates. Mixing ratios of isoprene, its degradation products methylvinylketone (MVK and methacrolein (MACR and several other oxygenated VOC (OxVOC were measured above the canopy using an online proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, and fluxes were calculated by the disjunct eddy covariance approach. The O3HP site was found to be a very significant source of isoprene emissions, with daily maximum ambient concentrations ranging between 2–16 ppbv inside and 2–5 ppbv just above the top of the forest canopy. Significant isoprene fluxes were observed only during daytime, following diurnal cycles with midday net emission fluxes from the canopy ranging between 2–8 mg m−2 h1. Net isoprene normalised flux (at 30 °C, 1000 μmol m−2 s−1 was estimated at 6.6 mg m−2 h−1. The (MVK+MACR-to-isoprene ratio was used to assess the degree of isoprene oxidation. In-canopy chemical oxidation of isoprene was found to be weak, as indicated by the low (MVK+MACR-to-isoprene ratio (~ 0.13 and low MVK+MACR fluxes, and did not seem to have a significant impact on isoprene concentrations and fluxes above the canopy. Evidence of direct emission of methanol was also found exhibiting

  12. Decomposition of indwelling EMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawab, S Hamid; Wotiz, Robert P; De Luca, Carlo J

    2008-08-01

    Decomposition of indwelling electromyographic (EMG) signals is challenging in view of the complex and often unpredictable behaviors and interactions of the action potential trains of different motor units that constitute the indwelling EMG signal. These phenomena create a myriad of problem situations that a decomposition technique needs to address to attain completeness and accuracy levels required for various scientific and clinical applications. Starting with the maximum a posteriori probability classifier adapted from the original precision decomposition system (PD I) of LeFever and De Luca (25, 26), an artificial intelligence approach has been used to develop a multiclassifier system (PD II) for addressing some of the experimentally identified problem situations. On a database of indwelling EMG signals reflecting such conditions, the fully automatic PD II system is found to achieve a decomposition accuracy of 86.0% despite the fact that its results include low-amplitude action potential trains that are not decomposable at all via systems such as PD I. Accuracy was established by comparing the decompositions of indwelling EMG signals obtained from two sensors. At the end of the automatic PD II decomposition procedure, the accuracy may be enhanced to nearly 100% via an interactive editor, a particularly significant fact for the previously indecomposable trains.

  13. EFFECTS OF SOIL FAUNA ON LITTER DECOMPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Forest litter is the physical makeup part of forest ecosystem. The rate of decomposition of forest litter is low in temperate and cool temperate zones. There is important significance to search and utilize the function of soil animals, in order to probe the material circulation and energy flow in forest ecosystem. We selected three kinds of mesh bag with different mesh size, in which, large pore mesh bag is large enough to permit the activities of all kinds of soil animals, medium mesh bag is designed to exclude the function of soil macrofauna, while small mesh bag is small enough to exclude the effects of any kind of soil animals as far as possible. The decomposition time is three years. The studying results show that: the decomposing speed of the bags with big meshes, under functions of all kinds of soil animals, faster than the bags with medium meshes, under functions of medium and small soil animals, as well as the bags with small meshes that excluding all possibility of functions of soil animals; in the process of decomposition of litter, relationship of the litter lost weight with number of soil animals is not obvious clearly; the degree of functions of soil animals to soft litter higher than hard litter; according to the analysis of diversity index, no regular changes will happen to the diversity of soil animals as the time of decomposing samples lengthen.

  14. Biogeochemistry of Decomposition and Detrital Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderman, J.; Amundson, R.

    2003-12-01

    represented by three pools: labile SOM, slow SOM, and passive SOM. Inputs include aboveground litterfall and belowground root turnover and exudates, which will be distributed among the pools based on the biochemical nature of the material. Outputs from each pool include mineralization to CO2 (dashed lines), humification (labile→slow→passive), and downward transport due to leaching and physical mixing. Communition by soil fauna will accelerate the decomposition process and reveal previously inaccessible materials. Soil mixing and other disturbances can also make physically protected passive SOM available to microbial attack (passive→slow). There exists an amazing body of literature on the subject of decomposition that draws from many disciplines - including ecology, soil science, microbiology, plant physiology, biochemistry, and zoology. In this chapter, we have attempted to draw information from all of these fields to present an integrated analysis of decomposition in a biogeochemical context. We begin by reviewing the composition of detrital resources and SOM (Section 8.07.2), the organisms responsible for decomposition ( Section 8.07.3), and some methods for quantifying decomposition rates ( Section 8.07.4). This is followed by a discussion of the mechanisms behind decomposition ( Section 8.07.5), humification ( Section 8.07.6), and the controls on these processes ( Section 8.07.7). We conclude the chapter with a brief discussion on how current biogeochemical models incorporate this information ( Section 8.07.8).

  15. Volatilization of low vapor pressure--volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) during three cleaning products-associated activities: Potential contributions to ozone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E; Bennett, Deborah H

    2016-06-01

    There have been many studies to reduce ozone formation mostly from volatile organic compound (VOC) sources. However, the role of low vapor pressure (LVP)-VOCs from consumer products remains mostly unexplored and unaddressed. This study explores the impact of high production volume LVP-VOCs on ozone formation from three cleaning products-associated activities (dishwashing, clothes washing, and surface cleaning). We develop a model framework to account for the portion available for ozone formation during the use phase and from the down-the-drain disposal. We apply experimental studies that measured emission rates or models that were developed for estimating emission rates of organic compounds during the use phase. Then, the fraction volatilized (fvolatilized) and the fraction disposed down the drain (fdown-the-drain) are multiplied by the portion available for ozone formation for releases to the outdoor air (fO3|volatilized) and down-the-drain (fO3|down-the-drain), respectively. Overall, for chemicals used in three specific cleaning-product uses, fvolatilized is less than 0.6% for all studied LVP-VOCs. Because greater than 99.4% of compounds are disposed of down the drain during the use phase, when combined with fO3|volatilized and fO3|down-the-drain, the portion available for ozone formation from the direct releases to outdoor air and the down-the-drain disposal is less than 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. The results from this study indicate that the impact of the studied LVP-VOCs on ozone formation is very sensitive to what occurs during the use phase and suggest the need for future research on experimental work at the point of use.

  16. VOCs elimination and health risk reduction in e-waste dismantling workshop using integrated techniques of electrostatic precipitation with advanced oxidation technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangyao; Huang, Yong; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng; Hu, Yunkun; Li, Yunlu

    2016-01-25

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during the electronic waste dismantling process (EWDP) were treated at a pilot scale, using integrated electrostatic precipitation (EP)-advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs, subsequent photocatalysis (PC) and ozonation). Although no obvious alteration was seen in VOC concentration and composition, EP technology removed 47.2% of total suspended particles, greatly reducing the negative effect of particles on subsequent AOTs. After the AOT treatment, average removal efficiencies of 95.7%, 95.4%, 87.4%, and 97.5% were achieved for aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, as well as nitrogen- and oxygen-containing compounds, respectively, over 60-day treatment period. Furthermore, high elimination capacities were also seen using hybrid technique of PC with ozonation; this was due to the PC unit's high loading rates and excellent pre-treatment abilities, and the ozonation unit's high elimination capacity. In addition, the non-cancer and cancer risks, as well as the occupational exposure cancer risk, for workers exposed to emitted VOCs in workshop were reduced dramatically after the integrated technique treatment. Results demonstrated that the integrated technique led to highly efficient and stable VOC removal from EWDP emissions at a pilot scale. This study points to an efficient approach for atmospheric purification and improving human health in e-waste recycling regions.

  17. Theoretical models for NO decomposition in Cu-exchanged zeolites

    CERN Document Server

    Tsekov, R

    2015-01-01

    A unified description of the catalytic effect of Cu-exchanged zeolites is proposed for the decomposition of NO. A general expression for the rate constant of NO decomposition is obtained by assuming that the rate-determining step consists of the transferring of a single atom associated with breaking of the N-O bond. The analysis is performed on the base of the generalized Langevin equation and takes into account both the potential interactions in the system and the memory effects due to the zeolite vibrations. Two different mechanisms corresponding to monomolecular and bimolecular NO decomposition are discussed. The catalytic effect in the monomolecular mechanism is related to both the Cu+ ions and zeolite O-vacancies, while in the case of the bimolecular mechanism the zeolite contributes through dissipation only. The comparison of the theoretically calculated rate constants with experimental results reveals additional information about the geometric and energetic characteristics of the active centers and con...

  18. [Effects of aquatic plants during their decay and decomposition on water quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jin-Yan; Cao, Pei-Pei; Xu, Chi; Liu, Mao-Song

    2013-01-01

    Taking 6 aquatic plant species as test objects, a 64-day decomposition experiment was conducted to study the temporal variation patterns of nutrient concentration in water body during the process of the aquatic plant decomposition. There existed greater differences in the decomposition rates between the 6 species. Floating-leaved plants had the highest decomposition rate, followed by submerged plants, and emerged plants. The effects of the aquatic plant species during their decomposition on water quality differed, which was related to the plant biomass density. During the decomposition of Phragmites australis, water body had the lowest concentrations of chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus. In the late decomposition period of Zizania latifolia, the concentrations of water body chemical oxygen demand and total nitrogen increased, resulting in the deterioration of water quality. In the decomposition processes of Nymphoides peltatum and Nelumbo nucifera, the concentrations of water body chemical oxygen demand and total nitrogen were higher than those during the decomposition of other test plants. In contrast, during the decomposition of Potamogeton crispus and Myriophyllum verticillatum, water body had the highest concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, and total phosphorus. For a given plant species, the main water quality indices had the similar variation trends under different biomass densities. It was suggested that the existence of moderate plant residues could effectively promote the nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in water body, reduce its nitrate concentration to some extent, and decrease the water body nitrogen load.

  19. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60.502 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires a...

  20. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  1. Evaluation of the Snap Sampler for Sampling Ground Water Monitoring Wells for VOCs and Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    23 Table 4. Results from the holding- time study with...the opposite order. First Holding- Time Study for VOCs The purpose of this study was to determine whether analyte concentra- tions of samples... Study for VOCs The procedure for this study was the same as for the previous holding- time study except that that the Snap Samplers were equilibrated

  2. POLLUTION PREVENTION CASE STUDIES: LOW-VOC/HAP WOOD FURNITURE COATINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article provides a brief profile of the wood furniture industry, discusses pollution prevention activities typically implemented, describes the four low-VOC/HAP coating technologies studied. and summarizes one case study for each of the low-VOC/HAP coating yechnologies inves...

  3. Removal of dissolved VOCs from water with an air stripper/membrane vapor separation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijmans, J.G.; Kamaruddin, H.D.; Segelke, S.V.; Wessling, Matthias; Baker, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Treatment of water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a major problem for the United States chemical industry. Currently, VOCs are removed from moderately contaminated wastewater streams by processes such as steam stripping and from dilute wastewaters by air stripping combined wi

  4. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 4, annual summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, J.; Su, Wei; Yan, Hui [and others

    1997-07-01

    Heating softwood in a low-headspace environment draws out the VOCs from the wood, without removing the water. The VOCs can be collected from the headspace, and represent a valuable product. The VOC-depleted wood can then be dried conventionally with much reduced emissions. Heating can be accomplished through radiofrequency (RF) or steam. For lumber, steam is inefficient, but brief RF treatment under low-headspace conditions draws out 80% of the VOCs. The power used is quite low, since the RF energy is not used to remove water, but only to maintain the wood at a set temperature. The technology is now at the pre-pilot stage. Either steam or RF can be used for particle, OSB, and veneer, again under low-headspace conditions. Increasing steam temperature facilitates VOC removal. In order to understand the mechanism of VOC release in lumber, the transport of water and VOCs to the surface is being studied as a function of sample size and orientation. Characterization of the terpenes and resin/fatty acids from a control set of trees is underway in order to define the seasonal influence on VOCs.

  5. Smartphone-based sensing system using ZnO and graphene modified electrodes for VOCs detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Diming; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Xing; Xu, Gang; Lu, Yanli; Liu, Qingjun

    2017-07-15

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) detection is in high demand for clinic treatment, environment monitoring, and food quality control. Especially, VOCs from human exhaled breath can serve as significant biomarkers of some diseases, such as lung cancer and diabetes. In this study, a smartphone-based sensing system was developed for real-time VOCs monitoring using alternative current (AC) impedance measurement. The interdigital electrodes modified with zinc oxide (ZnO), graphene, and nitrocellulose were used as sensors to produce impedance responses to VOCs. The responses could be detected by a hand-held device, sent out to a smartphone by Bluetooth, and reported with concentration on an android program of the smartphone. The smartphone-based system was demonstrated to detect acetone at concentrations as low as 1.56ppm, while AC impedance spectroscopy was used to distinguish acetone from other VOCs. Finally, measurements of the exhalations from human being were carried out to obtain the concentration of acetone in exhaled breath before and after exercise. The results proved that the smartphone-based system could be applied on the detection of VOCs in real settings for healthcare diagnosis. Thus, the smartphone-based system for VOCs detection provided a convenient, portable and efficient approach to monitor VOCs in exhaled breath and possibly allowed for early diagnosis of some diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Total OH reactivity study from VOC photochemical oxidation in the SAPHIR chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Hohaus, T.; Fuchs, H.; Novelli, A.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Schmitt, S. H.; Wahner, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that hydroxyl radicals (OH) act as a dominant reactive species in the degradation of VOCs in the atmosphere. In recent field studies, directly measured total OH reactivity often showed poor agreement with OH reactivity calculated from VOC measurements (e.g. Nölscher et al., 2013; Lu et al., 2012a). This "missing OH reactivity" is attributed to unaccounted biogenic VOC emissions and/or oxidation products. The comparison of total OH reactivity being directly measured and calculated from single component measurements of VOCs and their oxidation products gives us a further understanding on the source of unmeasured reactive species in the atmosphere. This allows also the determination of the magnitude of the contribution of primary VOC emissions and their oxidation products to the missing OH reactivity. A series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, to explore in detail the photochemical degradation of VOCs (isoprene, ß-pinene, limonene, and D6-benzene) by OH. The total OH reactivity was determined from the measurement of VOCs and their oxidation products by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) with a GC/MS/FID system, and directly measured by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) at the same time. The comparison between these two total OH reactivity measurements showed an increase of missing OH reactivity in the presence of oxidation products of VOCs, indicating a strong contribution to missing OH reactivity from uncharacterized oxidation products.

  7. Mapping methane sources and emissions over California from direct airborne flux and VOC source tracer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, A.; Misztal, P. K.; Peischl, J.; Karl, T.; Jonsson, H. H.; Woods, R. K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the contributions of methane (CH4) emissions from anthropogenic sources in the Central Valley of California is important for validation of the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and subsequent AB32 law implementation. The state GHG inventory is largely based on activity data and emission factor based estimates. The 'bottom-up' emission factors for CH4 have large uncertainties and there is a lack of adequate 'top-down' measurements to characterize emission rates. Emissions from non-CO2 GHG sources display spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability, and are thus, often, poorly characterized. The Central Valley of California is an agricultural and industry intensive region with large concentration of dairies and livestock operations, active oil and gas fields and refining operations, as well as rice cultivation all of which are known CH4 sources. In order to gain a better perspective of the spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, airborne measurements were conducted aboard a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of low-altitude and mixed layer airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements alongside coincident VOC measurements. Transects during eight unique flights covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. We report direct quantification of CH4 fluxes using real-time airborne Eddy Covariance measurements. CH4 and CO2 were measured at 1-Hz data rate using an instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) along with specific VOCs (like isoprene, methanol, acetone etc.) measured at 10-Hz using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer - Eddy Covariance (PTRMS-EC) flux system. Spatially resolved eddy covariance

  8. The abiotic litter decomposition in the drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Throop, H.; Rahn, T. A.

    2009-12-01

    The decomposition of litter is an important ecosystem function that controls carbon and nutrient cycling, which is well understood from the relationship between temperature and moisture. However, the decomposition in the arid and semiarid environments (hereafter drylands) is relatively poorly predicted due to several abiotic factors such as the effect of ultraviolet radiation and physical mixing of fallen litter with soil. The relative magnitude of these abiotic factors to ecosystem scale litter decomposition is still in debate. Here, we examine the effect of two major abiotic factors in the drylands litter decomposition by conducting a controlled laboratory study using plant litter and soil collected from Sonoran and Chihuahuan desert areas. The first part of the experiment focused on the effect of soil-litter mixing. We established a complete block design of three levels of soil and litter mixing (no mixing, light soil-litter mixing, and complete soil-litter mixing) in combination with three levels of soil moisture (1%, 2%, and 6% volumetric water content) using 2g of two most dominant species litter, grass and mesquite, and 50g of air-dried soils in 500ml mason jar and incubated them under 25C. We measured CO2 fluxes from these soil-litter incubations and harvested the soil and litter at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks and analyzed them of carbon and nitrogen content as well as the actual mass loss in the litter. The second part of the experiment focused on the effect of ultraviolet radiation. We established short-term litter incubation on a quartz chamber and used different temperature, moisture, and minerals to find the mechanism of photodegradation of litter. We measured CO2 fluxes from the litter incubation under ultraviolet radiation and also measured 13CO2 from these emissions. We were able to detect changes in the rate of carbon mineralization as a result of our treatments in the first week of soil-litter mixing experiment. The carbon mineralization rate was

  9. Enzymes involved in vinyl acetate decomposition by Pseudomonas fluorescens PCM 2123 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczyrba, Elżbieta; Greń, Izabela; Bartelmus, Grażyna

    2014-03-01

    Esterases are widely used in food processing industry, but there is little information concerning enzymes involved in decompositions of esters contributing to pollution of environment. Vinyl acetate (an ester of vinyl alcohol and acetic acid) is a representative of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in decomposition, of which hydrolyses and oxidoreductases are mainly involved. Their activities under periodically changing conditions of environment are essential for the removal of dangerous VOCs. Esterase and alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were determined in crude cell extract from Pseudomonas fluorescens PMC 2123 after vinyl acetate induction. All examined enzymes exhibit their highest activity at 30-35 °C and pH 7.0-7.5. Esterase preferably hydrolyzed ester bonds with short fatty chains without plain differences for C2 or C4. Comparison of Km values for alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases for acetaldehyde suggested that this metabolite was preferentially oxidized than reduced. Activity of alcohol dehydrogenase reducing acetaldehyde to ethanol suggested that one mechanism of defense against the elevated concentration of toxic acetaldehyde could be its temporary reduction to ethanol. Esterase activity was inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, while β-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid had no inhibitor effect. From among metal ions, only Mg(2+) and Fe(2+) stimulated the cleavage of ester bond.

  10. Efficient control of odors and VOC emissions via activated carbon technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Farhana; Kim, James; Huang, Ruey; Nu, Huong Ton; Lorenzo, Vlad

    2014-07-01

    This research study was undertaken to enhance the efficiency and economy of carbon scrubbers in controlling odors and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the wastewater collection and treatment facilities of the Bureau of Sanitation, City of Los Angeles. The butane activity and hydrogen sulfide breakthrough capacity of activated carbon were assessed. Air streams were measured for odorous gases and VOCs and removal efficiency (RE) determined. Carbon towers showed average to excellent removal of odorous compounds, VOCs, and siloxanes; whereas, wet scrubbers demonstrated good removal of odorous compounds but low to negative removal of VOCs. It was observed that the relative humidity and empty bed contact time are one of the most important operating parameters of carbon towers impacting the pollutant RE. Regular monitoring of activated carbon and VOCs has resulted in useful information on carbon change-out frequency, packing recommendations, and means to improve performance of carbon towers.

  11. Non-labeling multiplex surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U. S.; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report multiplex SERS based VOCs detection with a leaning nano-pillar substrate. The VOCs analyte molecules adsorbed at the tips of the nano-pillars produced SERS signal due to the field enhancement occurring at the localized surface plasmon hot spots between adjacent leaning nano...... chemical sensing layer for the enrichment of gas molecules on sensor surface. The leaning nano-pillar substrate also showed highly reproducible SERS signal in cyclic VOCs detection, which can reduce the detection cost in practical applications. Further, multiplex SERS detection on different combination...... of acetone and ethanol vapor was also successfully demonstrated. The vibrational fingerprints of molecular structures provide specific Raman peaks for different VOCs contents. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multiplex VOCs detection using SERS. We believe that this work may lead to a portable...

  12. Pollution characteristic of VOCs of ambient air in winter and spring in Shijiazhuang City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing CHANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to further explore the pollution characteristics of volatile organic compounds in ambient air in winter and spring in Shijiazhuang City, the pollution characteristics of 62 volatile organic compounds (VOCs, monthly and quarterly variation, the correlation between VOCs and PM2.5, and the main sources of VOCs are investigated by using EPA TO-15 method. It shows that 40 organic compounds of the 64 VOCs have been quantitatively determined in winter and spring in the city, which are mainly acetone, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, dichloromethane, toluene, ethyl acetate, etc.. In the no-quantitatively determined components, higher ethanol, butyl acetate, butane etc. are detected. The VOCs concentration has positive correlation with the PM2.5 concentration during haze days.

  13. Insights into seasonal variation of litter decomposition and related soil degradative enzyme activities in subtropical forest in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cong-yan; LÜ Yan-na; WANG Lei; LIU Xue-yan; TIAN Xing-jun

    2013-01-01

    We used a litterbag method to investigate litter decomposition and related soil degradative enzyme activities across four seasons in a broad-leaved forest and a coniferous forest on Zijin Mountain in sub-tropical China. Across four seasons, we quantified litter mass losses, soil pH values, and related soil degradative enzyme activities. Litter decomposition rates differed significantly by season. Litter decomposi-tion rates of broadleaf forest leaves were higher than for coniferous for-ests needles across four seasons, and maximal differences in litter de-composition rates between the two litter types were found in spring. Obvious differences in litter decomposition rates of the two litter types were found in winter, which were similar to rates in spring. Litter de-composition rates of the two litter types in autumn were significantly higher than in spring. Soil degradative enzyme activities were lowest in winter and highest in summer in most cases across four seasons.

  14. A contribution to the knowledge of HMX decomposition and application of results. [at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutle, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    The decomposition of cyclotramethylenetetranitramine (HMX) in the solid and liquid phase was studied by isothermal and nonisothermal heating at atmospheric pressure. Decomposition rates of solid HMX changed with sample size and gaseous environment. Kinetic parameters were obtained from weight loss measurements in the temperature range 229 C - 269 C. These tests also yielded highly porous solid residues. Qualitative aspects of solid and liquid phase decomposition of HMX with additives were also investigated in isothermal and nonisothermal tests.

  15. A study of SiC decomposition under laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelmann, B.; Hellmann, R.

    2017-06-01

    In this experimental study we investigate the laser induced thermal decomposition of 4H-Sic under ambient conditions using fiber laser. Using a unique two-color pyrometer setup, we measure the temporal evolution of the temperature in the irradiated zone and determine the decomposition rate for various laser power levels. We find that the temporal evolution of the temperature in the irradiated area exhibits an initial heating phase up to about 1300 K, being characterized by an unaffected SiC surface. Upon an expeditious temperature increase, a decomposition phase follows with temperatures above 1700 K, being accompanied by carbonization of the SiC surface. The decomposed volume depends linearly on the duration of the decomposition phase and increases linearly with laser power. The temperature evaluation of the decomposition speed reveals an Arrhenius-type behavior allowing the calculation of the activation energy for the decomposition under ambient conditions to 613 kJ/mol in the temperature range between 2140 and 2420 K.

  16. Decomposition of recalcitrant carbon under experimental warming in boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Olivares, Adriana L; Allison, Steven D; Treseder, Kathleen K

    2017-01-01

    Over the long term, soil carbon (C) storage is partly determined by decomposition rate of carbon that is slow to decompose (i.e., recalcitrant C). According to thermodynamic theory, decomposition rates of recalcitrant C might differ from those of non-recalcitrant C in their sensitivities to global warming. We decomposed leaf litter in a warming experiment in Alaskan boreal forest, and measured mass loss of recalcitrant C (lignin) vs. non-recalcitrant C (cellulose, hemicellulose, and sugars) throughout 16 months. We found that these C fractions responded differently to warming. Specifically, after one year of decomposition, the ratio of recalcitrant C to non-recalcitrant C remaining in litter declined in the warmed plots compared to control. Consistent with this pattern, potential activities of enzymes targeting recalcitrant C increased with warming, relative to those targeting non-recalcitrant C. Even so, mass loss of individual C fractions showed that non-recalcitrant C is preferentially decomposed under control conditions whereas recalcitrant C losses remain unchanged between control and warmed plots. Moreover, overall mass loss was greater under control conditions. Our results imply that direct warming effects, as well as indirect warming effects (e.g. drying), may serve to maintain decomposition rates of recalcitrant C compared to non-recalcitrant C despite negative effects on overall decomposition.

  17. Anthropogenic VOC speciation in emission inventories: a method for improvement and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schneidemesser, E.; D'angiola, A.; Granier, C.; Monks, P. S.; Law, K.

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important precursor compounds for the formation of ozone and other secondary organic aerosols. Anthropogenic sources of VOCs are dominated by industrial usage and transportation sources, the latter being extremely important in urban areas. Megacities and large urban conglomerations are emission hot spots that exert disproportionately large adverse health effects on the population and surrounding environment, owing to their high population density and concentrated emission sources. Exceedances of ozone air quality standards are a problem in many urban areas. Improvements in the modelling of ozone precursors would benefit our understanding of the impact of changes in emissions and the effect of future legislation on air quality. As many VOCs are extremely reactive in the atmosphere and have high ozone forming potential, improved speciation of VOCs in models could lead to better predictions of ozone levels and secondary organic aerosol formation. Previously, VOC and carbon monoxide (CO) data from urban areas around the world were compared. Significant differences in VOC concentrations were observed, however, when normalized to CO, the VOC-CO ratios were similar for many locations and over time, even as emission reductions were implemented. The largest variation was found in the lighter alkanes due to the use of alternative transportation fuels in various world regions. These ratios were grouped by region and used to develop a new speciation for surface emissions of VOCs, by applying the regional observed VOC-CO ratios to the CO emissions for the urban areas. Urban areas were defined as 150 inhabitants per km2 or greater. Model simulations were performed using the MOZART-4 chemistry transport model to assess the improved speciation of the VOC emissions. The model outputs were compared to urban observational data where available. The impact of the new speciation of the distribution of CO, OH and ozone at the global scale will be

  18. Assessment of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in indooor parking facilities at Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanto, Gabriel Andari

    This dissertation identified the types, magnitudes, sources, and assessed risk exposure of VOCs in different types of indoor parking facilities. VOCs are ones of major pollutants emitted from automobiles. The indoor parking facilities included were attached garages, grounds, and underground parking. Modification of method TO15 by EPA had been applied for identifying types and magnitudes of VOCs. Results of these identifications are presented. Eight most abundant VOCs could be identified in every sampling location with toluene as the most abundant compound followed by m,p-xylene, ethylbenzene and benzene. Compare to ground and underground parking, attached garages have the highest concentration of TVOCs. For sources identification, BTEX, m,p-xylene and benzene, and toluene and benzene ratios are calculated. BTEX ratios for ground and underground parking are similar compare to attached garage due to the similar pattern of driving speed and the content of gasoline fuel. On the other hand the ratios of m,p-xylene and benzene and toluene and benzene in attached garage are higher compare to the same ratios for ground and underground parking due to other significant contributor of VOCs such as solvent, household cleanings stored. Cancer and noncancer risk assessment were also calculated. Results showed that cancer and noncancer risk due human exposures to VOC in indoor parking facilities were relatively low. However the risk of the human exposure to VOCs from indoor parking facilities has to be considered as a part of total risks of VOC exposures on human during their daily activities. When people in Houston have already exposed to high VOC concentrations from outdoor environment activities such as traffic and refineries and petrochemical facilities, additional activities causing VOC exposures will add the risk significantly.

  19. Surface acoustic wave sensing of VOCs in harsh chemical environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1993-06-01

    The measurement of VOC concentrations in harsh chemical and physical environments is a formidable task. A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor has been designed for this purpose and its construction and testing are described in this paper. Included is a detailed description of the design elements specific to operation in 300{degree}C steam and HCl environments including temperature control, gas handling, and signal processing component descriptions. In addition, laboratory temperature stability was studied and a minimum detection limit was defined for operation in industrial environments. Finally, a description of field tests performed on steam reforming equipment at Synthetica Technologies Inc. of Richmond, CA is given including a report on destruction efficiency of CCl{sub 4} in the Synthetica moving bed evaporator. Design improvements based on the field tests are proposed.

  20. 退化红壤丘陵区森林凋落物初始化学组成与分解速率的关系%Relationships between initial chemical composition of forest leaf litters and their decomposition rates in degraded red soil hilly region of Southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈法霖; 江波; 张凯; 郑华; 肖燚; 欧阳志云; 屠乃美

    2011-01-01

    通过小盆+凋落袋控制试验,研究了我国南方退化红壤丘陵区8种森林凋落物和4种混合凋落物初始化学组成与分解速率的关系.结果表明:阔叶凋落物中的氮、磷、钾、镁含量显著高于针叶凋落物,木质素、碳含量显著低于针叶凋落物;凋落物分解速率与凋落物初始氮、磷、钾、镁含量呈显著正相关,与凋落物初始碳、木质素含量以及木质素/氮、木质素/磷和碳/磷值呈显著负相关;木质素含量解释了凋落物分解速率变异的54.3%,是影响分解速率的最关键因子,凋落物碳、氮、磷含量也与分解速率密切相关,它们与木质素含量一起可解释分解速率变异的81.4%.在退化红壤丘陵区植被恢复过程中,低木质素含量、高氮磷含量的阔叶物种的引入有利于加速凋落物的分解速率和土壤肥力的恢复进程.%A pot experiment with litter bags was conducted to study the relationships between the initial chemical composition of 8 kind forest leaf litters and 4 kind mixed leaf litters and their decomposition rates in degraded red soil hilly region of Southern China. Comparing with needle-leaf litters. broad-leaf litters had significantly higher contents of N, P, K, and Mg, but significantly lower contents of lignin and C. The decomposition rates of test litters were significantly positively correlated with the litters initial contents of N, P, K, and Mg ( P<0.05 ) . and negatively correlated with the initial contents of lignin and C as well as the lignin/N, lignin/P, and C/P ratios (P<0.05 ) . The lignin content explained 54. 3% of the variation in litter decomposition rates, being the key affecting factor. Litters C. N. and P contents also had close correlations with the decomposition rates. and together with lignin content. contributed 81.4% of the variation. It was suggested that in the process of vegetation restoration in degraded red soil hilly region of Southern China, introducing

  1. Weak interactions and photoinitiated unimolecular decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylichenko, K.; Wittig, C.

    1998-04-01

    Numerical studies have been carried out to examine the applicability of the density of states measured just below dissociation threshold to transition state rate theory. The model system consists of two weakly interacting manifolds of levels, one of which is optically accessible. Both manifolds are coupled to dissociative continua. These studies demonstrate that immediately above reaction threshold, coupling to continua is relatively slow on the time scale of inter-manifold coupling, and it is the mixed manifolds which decay. At higher energies, couplings to continua exceed inter-manifold couplings, and it is the photoexcited bright states which undergo unimolecular decomposition.

  2. PARTITION PROPERTY OF DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION WITHOUT ELLIPTICITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mo Mu; Yun-qing Huang

    2001-01-01

    Partition property plays a central role in domain decomposition methods. Existing theory essentially assumes certain ellipticity. We prove the partition property for problems without ellipticity which are of practical importance. Example applications include implicit schemes applied to degenerate parabolic partial differential equations arising from superconductors, superfluids and liquid crystals. With this partition property, Schwarz algorithms can be applied to general non-elliptic problems with an h-independent optimal convergence rate. Application to the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model of superconductivity is illustrated and numerical results are presented.

  3. Detection of new VOC compounds with iCRDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Leen, J. B.; Gardner, A.; Gupta, M.; Baer, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    The instrument at Los Gatos Research (a member of ABB Inc.) which is based on incoherent cavity ringdown spectroscopy (iCRDS) that operates in the mid-infrared (bands from 860-1060 cm-1 or 970-1280 cm-1) is capable of detecting a broad range of VOCs, in situ, continuously and autonomously, for example, BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), including differentiation of xylene isomers. Previously, we have demonstrated the measurement of trichloroethylene (TCE) in zero air with a precision of 0.17 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes), and the measurement of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with a precision of 0.15 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes). Both of these measured precisions exceed the EPA's commercial building action limit, which for TCE is 0.92 ppb (5 µg/m3) and for PCE is 0.29 ppb (2 µg/m3). This ability has been fully demonstrated by the deployment of the instrument to the Superfund site at Moffett Naval Air Station in Mountain View, California where contaminated ground water results in vapor intrusion of TCE and PCE. For two weeks, the instrument operated continuously and autonomously, successfully measuring TCE and PCE concentrations in both the breathing zone and steam tunnel air, in excellent agreement with previous TO-15 data. In this poster, we present laboratory performance data targeting new toxic molecules with the same instrument. We have demonstrated the measurement of trichlorofluolomethane (Freon 11) in zero air with a precision of 1 ppb (3σ at 1075cm-1), and hexafluoropropene in zero air with a precision of about 0.3 ppb (3σ per spectrum). The iCRDS instrument has shown the ability to continuously and autonomously measure sub-ppb levels of toxic VOCs in the lab/field, offering an unprecedented picture of the short term dynamics associated with vapor intrusion and ground water pollution.

  4. Vadose Zone VOC Mass Transfer Testing At The SRS Miscellaneous Chemical Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riha, B

    2005-10-30

    Active remedial activities have been ongoing since 1996 to address low levels of solvent contamination at the Miscellaneous Chemical Basin at SRS. Contaminant levels in the subsurface may be approaching levels where mass transfer limitations are impacting the efficiency of the remedial action. Rate limited mass transfer effects have been observed at other sites in the vadose zone at the SRS, however, detailed measurements and evaluation has not been undertaken. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the mass transfer rates are very slow from the fine grain sediments. This conclusion is based on the observation that measured soil gas concentrations tend to be low in permeable zones relative to the higher concentrations found in fine grain zones. Decreasing soil gas concentration with depth below the ''upland unit'' at several areas at SRS is also evidence of slow diffusion rates. In addition, due to the length of time since disposal ceased at the MCB, we hypothesize that mobile solvents have migrated downward, and the solvent remaining in the upper fine grain zone (''upland unit'') are trapped in fine grain material and are primarily released by gas diffusion (Riha and Rossabi 2004). Natural weathering and other chemical solutions disposed with the solvents can further enhance this effect by increasing the micro-porosity in the clays (kaolinite). This microporosity can result in increased entrapment of water and solvents by capillary forces (Powers, et. al., 2003). Also supporting this conclusion is the observation that active SVE has proven ineffective on VOC removal from the fine grain zones at the SRS. Adsorption and the very slow release phenomenon have been documented similarly in the literature especially for old solvent spills such as at the SRS (Pavlostathis and Mathavan 1992; Oostrom and Lenhard 2003). Mass transfer relationships need to be developed in order to optimize remediation activities and to determine actual

  5. Establishing the volatile profile of pig carcasses as analogues for human decomposition during the early postmortem period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Armstrong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Following a mass disaster, it is important that victims are rapidly located as the chances of survival decrease greatly after approximately 48 h. Urban search and rescue (USAR teams may use a range of tools to assist their efforts but detector dogs still remain one of the most effective search tools to locate victims of mass disasters. USAR teams can choose to deploy human scent dogs (trained to locate living victims or human remains detection (HRD dogs (trained to locate deceased victims. However, little is known about the variation between live human scent and postmortem human remains scent and the timeframe during which one type of scent transitions to the other. The aim of the current study was to measure the change in the scent profile of human decomposition analogues during the first 72 h postmortem by measuring the volatile organic compounds (VOCs that comprise the odour. Three pig carcasses (Sus scrofa domesticus L. were placed on a soil surface and allowed to decompose under natural conditions. Decomposition odour was sampled frequently up to 75 h postmortem and analysed using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography – time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS. A total of 105 postmortem VOCs were identified during the early postmortem period. The VOC profile during the early postmortem period was highly dynamic, changing both hourly and daily. A transition period was observed after 43 h postmortem, where the VOC profile appeared to shift from a distinct antemortem odour to a more generalised postmortem odour. These findings are important in informing USAR teams and their use of detector dogs for disaster victim recovery.

  6. Piecewise-adaptive decomposition methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, J.I. [Room I-320-D, E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Malaga, Plaza El Ejido, s/n, 29013 Malaga (Spain)], E-mail: jirs@lcc.uma.es

    2009-05-30

    Piecewise-adaptive decomposition methods are developed for the solution of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. These methods are based on some theorems that show that Adomian's decomposition method is a homotopy perturbation technique and coincides with Taylor's series expansions for autonomous ordinary differential equations. Piecewise-decomposition methods provide series solutions in intervals which are subject to continuity conditions at the end points of each interval, and their adaption is based on the use of either a fixed number of approximants and a variable step size, a variable number of approximants and a fixed step size or a variable number of approximants and a variable step size. It is shown that the appearance of noise terms in the decomposition method is related to both the differential equation and the manner in which the homotopy parameter is introduced, especially for the Lane-Emden equation. It is also shown that, in order to avoid the use of numerical quadrature, there is a simple way of introducing the homotopy parameter in the two first-order ordinary differential equations that correspond to the second-order Thomas-Fermi equation. It is also shown that the piecewise homotopy perturbation methods presented here provide more accurate results than a modified Adomian decomposition technique which makes use of Pade approximants and the homotopy analysis method, for the Thomas-Fermi equation.

  7. Influence of the inlet air in efficiency of photocatalytic devices for mineralization of VOCs in air-conditioning installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Relinque, E; Castellote, M

    2014-10-01

    Nowadays, a large proportion of photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) devices are being implemented in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems. However, no systematic studies have been carried out regarding the influence of inlet air preconditioning. To analyse the impact of the inlet air-conditions into photocatalytic efficiency, a simulated air-conditioning duct with flowing gas through inside was designed. Isobutylene was chosen as the target VOCs. The concentration in the gas phase was monitored using a photoionization detector. The influence of flow rate, relative humidity and temperature on the VOC removal efficiency was analysed. Experimental results were presented in terms of gas-removal efficiency (η) and clean air delivery rate (CADR) and analysed on a kinetic basis. From them, the weight of each parameter in the global process has been determined, from bigger to smaller contribution, flow>temperature>relative humidity. Also, the relevance of the inlet air conditions has been illustrated in a model room in order to determinate the time necessary to obtain a threshold value accomplishing with enough air quality and the energy consumption of the device. Additionally, the photocatalytic decontamination has been assimilated to the "air exchange rate", a parameter commonly used in indoor air quality studies. The results show that preconditioning of air can improve the efficiency of photocatalytic devices and bring important energy savings.

  8. Thermal response and recyclability of poly(stearylacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) gel as a VOCs absorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of absorbent materials for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is in demand for a variety of environmental applications including protective barriers for VOCs point sources. One of the challenges for the currently available VOCs absorbents is their recyclability. In this study, we syn...

  9. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Jeffries

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC, particulate matter (PM, and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit virtually gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity. Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound to which we added PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells. We observed that, even if the gas-phase pollutants

  10. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects – Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Jeffries

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC, particulate matter (PM, and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity. Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound and PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and it exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells – even if the gas-phase pollutants are not

  11. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit virtually gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity). Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound to which we added PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA) was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells). We observed that, even if the gas-phase pollutants are not

  12. Leaf litter decomposition in temperate deciduous forest stands with a decreasing fraction of beech (Fagus sylvatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Mascha; Viedenz, Karin; Polle, Andrea; Thomas, Frank M

    2010-12-01

    We hypothesised that the decomposition rates of leaf litter will increase along a gradient of decreasing fraction of the European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and increasing tree species diversity in the generally beech-dominated Central European temperate deciduous forests due to an increase in litter quality. We studied the decomposition of leaf litter including its lignin fraction in monospecific (pure beech) stands and in stands with up to five tree genera (Acer spp., Carpinus betulus, Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus excelsior, Tilia spp.) using a litterbag approach. Litter and lignin decomposition was more rapid in stand-representative litter from multispecific stands than in litter from pure beech stands. Except for beech litter, the decomposition rates of species-specific tree litter did not differ significantly among the stand types, but were most rapid in Fraxinus excelsior and slowest in beech in an interspecific comparison. Pairwise comparisons of the decomposition of beech litter with litter of the other tree species (except for Acer platanoides) revealed a "home field advantage" of up to 20% (more rapid litter decomposition in stands with a high fraction of its own species than in stands with a different tree species composition). Decomposition of stand-representative litter mixtures displayed additive characteristics, not significantly more rapid than predicted by the decomposition of litter from the individual tree species. Leaf litter decomposition rates were positively correlated with the initial N and Ca concentrations of the litter, and negatively with the initial C:N, C:P and lignin:N ratios. The results support our hypothesis that the overall decomposition rates are mainly influenced by the chemical composition of the individual litter species. Thus, the fraction of individual tree species in the species composition seems to be more important for the litter decomposition rates than tree species diversity itself.

  13. Distributed k-Core Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Montresor, Alberto; Miorandi, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Among the novel metrics used to study the relative importance of nodes in complex networks, k-core decomposition has found a number of applications in areas as diverse as sociology, proteinomics, graph visualization, and distributed system analysis and design. This paper proposes new distributed algorithms for the computation of the k-core decomposition of a network, with the purpose of (i) enabling the run-time computation of k-cores in "live" distributed systems and (ii) allowing the decomposition, over a set of connected machines, of very large graphs, that cannot be hosted in a single machine. Lower bounds on the algorithms complexity are given, and an exhaustive experimental analysis on real-world graphs is provided.

  14. Thermal decomposition of ammonium hexachloroosmate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asanova, T I; Kantor, Innokenty; Asanov, I. P.

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes of (NH4)2[OsCl6] occurring during thermal decomposition in a reduction atmosphere have been studied in situ using combined energy-dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy (ED-XAFS) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). According to PXRD, (NH4)2[OsCl6] transforms directly...... to metallic Os without the formation of any crystalline intermediates but through a plateau where no reactions occur. XANES and EXAFS data by means of Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) analysis show that thermal decomposition occurs with the formation of an amorphous intermediate {OsCl4}x with a possible...... polymeric structure. Being revealed for the first time the intermediate was subjected to determine the local atomic structure around osmium. The thermal decomposition of hexachloroosmate is much more complex and occurs within a minimum two-step process, which has never been observed before....

  15. Volatile organic compound emmission rates from mixed deciduous and coniferous foest in Northern Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. G. Isebrands; A. B. Guenther; P. Harley; D. Helmig; L. Klinger; L. Vierling; P. Zimmerman; C. Geron

    1999-01-01

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds {VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regions of the world to understand regional and global impacts and to implement possible...

  16. Preparation of nanometer FeCuP alloy and its application in decomposition of PH3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new ternary Fe-based alloy catalyst FeCuP applied to decompose PH3 was prepared with low-cost material by chemical reduction deposition method. The properties of it were characterized by XRD, ICP and SEM. Its catalytic activity on the decomposition of PH3 and the decomposition conditions were studied. FeCuP alloy exhibits high thermal stabilities and high catalytic activity. Using it as catalyst, the decomposition temperature of phosphine decreases from over 800 ℃ to 400-500 ℃. The decomposition rate of phosphine achieved 100%.

  17. A MONOTONE DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION ALGORITHM FOR SOLVING WEIGHTED AVERAGE APPROXIMATIONS TO NONLINEAR SINGULARLY PERTURBED PARABOLIC PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Igor Boglaev; Matthew Hardy

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents and analyzes a monotone domain decomposition algorithm for solving nonlinear singularly perturbed reaction-diffusion problems of parabolic type.To solve the nonlinear weighted average finite difference scheme for the partial differential equation,we construct a monotone domain decomposition algorithm based on a Schwarz alternating method and a box-domain decomposition.This algorithm needs only to solve linear discrete systems at each iterative step and converges monotonically to the exact solution of the nonlinear discrete problem. The rate of convergence of the monotone domain decomposition algorithm is estimated.Numerical experiments are presented.

  18. Characterisation and treatment of VOCs in process water from upgrading facilities for compressed biogas (CBG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson Påledal, S; Arrhenius, K; Moestedt, J; Engelbrektsson, J; Stensen, K

    2016-02-01

    Compression and upgrading of biogas to vehicle fuel generates process water, which to varying degrees contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originating from the biogas. The compostion of this process water has not yet been studied and scientifically published and there is currently an uncertainty regarding content of VOCs and how the process water should be managed to minimise the impact on health and the environment. The aim of the study was to give an overview about general levels of VOCs in the process water. Characterisation of process water from amine and water scrubbers at plants digesting waste, sewage sludge or agricultural residues showed that both the average concentration and composition of particular VOCs varied depending on the substrate used at the biogas plant, but the divergence was high and the differences for total concentrations from the different substrate groups were only significant for samples from plants using waste compared to residues from agriculture. The characterisation also showed that the content of VOCs varied greatly between different sampling points for same main substrate and between sampling occasions at the same sampling point, indicating that site-specific conditions are important for the results which also indicates that a number of analyses at different times are required in order to make an more exact characterisation with low uncertainty. Inhibition of VOCs in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process was studied in biomethane potential tests, but no inhibition was observed during addition of synthetic process water at concentrations of 11.6 mg and 238 mg VOC/L.

  19. Assessment of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near major roads in urban Nanjing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Zhao, W.

    2008-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major component of atmospheric pollutants in Nanjing, a large city in the east of China. Accordingly, 12-h diurnal monitoring for ten consecutive days was performed adjacent to major roads in five districts, ca.1.5 m above ground level, in April, July and October 2006, and January 2007. The most numerous species of VOCs (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m/ p-xylene, o-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, tetrachloromethane, trichloroethane and tetrachloroethane) were selected as the target pollutants for this field study of atmospheric distribution. The eleven VOCs were mostly found in gas phase due to their high vapor pressures. Gas-phase concentrations ranged between 0.6 and 67.9 μg m - 3 . Simultaneously, the levels of those VOCs measured near major roads were associated slightly with their regional background level. For all these areas, as expected, the high traffic area was the highest in terms of concentration. A positive correlation was also found between the VOC levels and traffic density. Our studies also provided VOC distribution, and vertical/horizontal profiles. The results show that traffic-related exposure to VOCs in major road microenvironments is higher than elsewhere and poses a potential threat to pedestrians, commuters, and traffic-exposed workers.

  20. Indoor contaminants from Hardcopy Devices: Characteristics of VOCs in photocopy centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhosh, Maryam; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Zare, Mohammad Reza; Fakhri, Yadolah; Shamsolahi, Hamid Reza

    2012-12-01

    Indoor air pollution in working places is widely recognized as one of the most serious potential environment risks to human health. Mean volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations of 144 samples from four copy centers in Tehran, Iran in two seasons were monitored for the purpose of quantifying the various VOCs in these areas. Area samples were collected in thermal desorption tubes and were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass selective detector. Real-time personal total volatile organic compounds were measured using a data-logging photo-ionization detector. Simultaneously, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes) outdoor measurements were performed in the same manner as were the indoor measurements. Nineteen different VOCs were detected in the area samples. The results show that in all photocopy centers, the indoor levels of toluene were much higher than the outdoor levels. During business hours, the VOC levels increased, especially toluene indoor concentration. The ventilation decreased the indoor VOC concentrations. The background and indoor VOC concentrations were higher in winter than in spring. The minimum ratio of the indoor to outdoor concentration of BTEX was estimated to be more than 42. This value proved that buildings with photocopiers can be a site of VOC accumulation.

  1. VOC reactivity and its effect on ozone production during the HaChi summer campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ran

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of ozone and its precursors conducted within the HaChi (Haze in China project in summer 2009 were analyzed to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs and their effects on ozone photochemical production at a suburban site in the North China Plain (NCP. Ozone episodes, during which running 8-h average ozone concentrations exceeding 80 ppbv lasted for more than 4 h, occurred on about two thirds of the observational days during the 5-week field campaign. This suggests continuous ozone exposure risks in this region in the summer. Average concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx and VOCs are about 20 ppbv and 650 ppbC, respectively. On average, total VOC reactivity is dominated by anthropogenic VOCs. The contribution of biogenic VOCs to total ozone-forming potential, however, is also considerable in the daytime. Key species associated with ozone photochemical production are 2-butenes (18 %, isoprene (15 %, trimethylbenzenes (11 %, xylenes (8.5 %, 3-methylhexane (6 %, n-hexane (5 % and toluene (4.5 %. Formation of ozone is found to be NOx-limited as indicated by measured VOCs/NOx ratios and further confirmed by a sensitivity study using a photochemical box model NCAR_MM. The Model simulation suggests that ozone production is also sensitive to changes in VOC reactivity under the NOx-limited regime, although this sensitivity depends strongly on how much NOx is present.

  2. Temporal variability and sources of VOCs in urban areas of the eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltsonoudis, Christos; Kostenidou, Evangelia; Florou, Kalliopi; Psichoudaki, Magda; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2016-11-01

    During the summer of 2012 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) in urban sites, in Athens and Patras, two of the largest cities in Greece. Also, during the winter of 2013, PTR-MS measurements were conducted in the center of the city of Athens. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the VOC measurements to gain insights about their sources. In summer most of the measured VOCs were due to biogenic and traffic emissions. Isoprene, monoterpenes, and several oxygenated VOCs (oVOCs) originated mainly from vegetation either directly or as oxidation products. Isoprene average concentrations in Patras and Athens were 1 and 0.7 ppb respectively, while the monoterpene concentrations were 0.3 and 0.9 ppb respectively. Traffic was the main source of aromatic compounds during summer. For Patras and Athens the average concentrations of benzene were 0.1 and 0.2 ppb, of toluene 0.3 and 0.8 ppb, and of the xylenes 0.3 and 0.7 ppb respectively. Winter measurements in Athens revealed that biomass burning used for residential heating was a major VOC source contributing both aromatic VOCs and biogenic compounds such as monoterpenes. Several episodes related to biomass burning were identified and emission ratios (ERs) and emission factors (EFs) were estimated.

  3. Development of metal organic fromwork-199 immobilized zeolite foam for adsorption of common indoor VOCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Vipin K; Pires, João

    2017-05-01

    Reticulated foam shaped adsorbents are more efficient for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particularly from low VOC-concentration indoor air streams. In this study composite structure of zeolite and metal organic frameworks (MOFs), referred as ZMF, has been fabricated by immobilization of fine MOF-199 powder on foam shaped Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) Zeolitic structure, referred as ZF. The ZMF possess a uniform and well-dispersed coating of MOF-199 on the porous framework of ZF. It shows higher surface area, pore volume, and VOCs adsorption capacity, as compared to ZF-structure. Post-fabrication changes in selective adsorption properties of ZMF were studied with three common indoor VOCs (benzene, n-hexane, and cyclohexane), using gravimetric adsorption technique. The adsorption capacity of ZMF with different VOCs follow the order of benzene>n-hexane>cyclohexane. In comparison with MOF-199 and ZF, the composite structure ZMF shows improvement in selectivity for benzene from other two VOCs. Further, improvement in efficiency and stability of prepared ZMF was found to be associated with its high MOF loading capacity and unique morphological and structural properties. The developed composite structure with improved VOCs removal and recyclability could be a promising material for small to limited scale air pollution treatment units. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Rank-based decompositions of morphological templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussner, P; Ritter, G X

    2000-01-01

    Methods for matrix decomposition have found numerous applications in image processing, in particular for the problem of template decomposition. Since existing matrix decomposition techniques are mainly concerned with the linear domain, we consider it timely to investigate matrix decomposition techniques in the nonlinear domain with applications in image processing. The mathematical basis for these investigations is the new theory of rank within minimax algebra. Thus far, only minimax decompositions of rank 1 and rank 2 matrices into outer product expansions are known to the image processing community. We derive a heuristic algorithm for the decomposition of matrices having arbitrary rank.

  5. Cost and Performance Report: Low-Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP)/Volatile Organic Compound (VOC)-Compliant Resins for Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    VOCs evaporate at substantial rates at room temperature and could potentially produce smog-promoting ozone as well as long-term and acute health...spectroscopy ( FTIR ) testing was used to determine the presence of unreacted epoxy groups. Unreacted epoxy groups indicated incomplete conversion of...80 cP at 25 °C (MLau) Viscosity ា cP at 25 °C (MOct) Unreacted epoxy FTIR , NMR No epoxy present None detected Correct reactant ratios NMR

  6. Treatment by adsorption on zeolites of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Study of the absorption/adsorption coupling applied to air treatment; Traitement des composes organiques volatils (COV) par adsorption sur zeolithe. Etude du couplage absorption/adsorption applique au traitement de l'air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosillon, St.

    2000-11-01

    Absorption and adsorption are the most suitable techniques to treat strong flow rates of gaseous effluents with low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This works deals with the adsorption on zeolites of pure VOCs or VOC mixtures. The competitive adsorption phenomena, the adsorption equilibria and the adsorption kinetics are analyzed for the dimensioning of industrial facilities. The selectiveness of zeolites depends on 4 parameters: the polarity, the volatility and the composition of the gaseous mixture compounds, and the filling up ratio of zeolites. The modeling of adsorption isotherms has been done using the Langmuir model for pure compounds and using the ideal adsorbed solution theory for mixtures. The simulation results obtained are relatively different from the experimental ones. The adsorbed VOCs seem to form non-ideal adsorbates. The saturation curves obtained by simulation are in good agreement with experimental curves when the proper value of the internal transfer coefficient is used. The different values of this parameter have permitted to deduce the average value of the effective diffusion of the zeolite for the 4 VOCs studied. In the last part, it is shown that the coupling of absorption and adsorption can be efficient for the treatment of mixtures of water soluble and water insoluble VOCs. The poor efficiency of water curtains for the treatment of industrial solvents has been demonstrated and a VOC adsorption process that use two concentrator wheels is proposed. (J.S.)

  7. [Effects of benthic macro-invertebrate on decomposition of Acer buergerianum leaf litter in streams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Hong; Wang, Bei-Xin; Chen, Ai-Qing; Lan, Ce-Jie

    2009-05-01

    By using composite mesh bag method, the effects of benthic macro-invertebrate in an undisturbed stream and an ecologically restored stream on the decomposition process of Acer buergerianum leaf litter from the Purple Mountain of Nanjing in winter were studied. After 112 days of decomposition, the remaining rate of A. buergerianum leaf litter based on ash-free dry mass was 31-62%, and the decomposition rate followed a declined exponential equation (P Shredders (mainly Asellus sp.) had the highest abundance (70.4%) in the flowing water of undisturbed stream, while filterers (mainly Tanytarsus sp.) were dominant (37.8%) in the flowing water of ecologically restored stream. The decomposition rate of the leaf litter was significantly correlated with the richness and abundance of shredder species in flowing water (P shredders, suggesting that the decomposition of A. buergerianum leaf litter in streams in winter was more dependent on the richness and abundance of shredders.

  8. The influence of temperature on the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kunigk

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Peracetic acid is a powerful sanitizer that has only recently been introduced in the Brazilian food industry. The main disadvantage of this sanitizer is its decomposition rate. The main purpose of this paper is to present results obtained in experiments carried out to study the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in aqueous solutions at 25, 35, 40 and 45 °C. The decompositon of peracetic acid is a first-order reaction. The decomposition rate constants are between 1.71x10-3 h -1 for 25 °C and 9.64x10-3 h-1 for 45 °C. The decomposition rate constant is affected by temperature according to the Arrhenius equation, and the activation energy for the decomposition of peracetic acid in aqueous solutions prepared from the commercial formulation used in this work is 66.20 kJ/mol.

  9. Leaf economics traits predict litter decomposition of tropical plants and differ among land use types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.A.; Carreño Rocabado, G.; Poorter, L.

    2011-01-01

    1. Decomposition is a key ecosystem process that determines nutrient and carbon cycling. Individual leaf and litter characteristics are good predictors of decomposition rates within biomes worldwide, but knowledge of which traits are the best predictors for tropical species remains scarce. Also, the

  10. Decomposition and nutrient release from fresh and dried pine roots under two fertilizer regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim H. Ludovici; Lance W. Kress

    2006-01-01

    Root decomposition and nutrient release are typically estimated from dried root tissues; however, it is unlikely that roots dehydrate prior to decomposing. Soil fertility and root diameter may also affect the rate of decomposition. This study monitored mass loss and nutrient concentrations of dried and fresh roots of two size classes (

  11. Trade-Offs in Resource Allocation Among Moss Species Control Decomposition in Boreal Peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turetsky, M. R.; Crow, S. E.; Evans, R. J.; Vitt, D. H.; Wieder, R. K.

    2008-01-01

    We separated the effects of plant species controls on decomposition rates from environmental controls in northern peatlands using a full factorial, reciprocal transplant experiment of eight dominant bryophytes in four distinct peatland types in boreal Alberta, Canada. Standard fractionation techniques as well as compound-specific pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry were used to identify a biochemical mechanism underlying any interspecific differences in decomposition rates. We found that over a 3-year field incubation, individual moss species and not micro-environmental conditions controlled early stages of decomposition. Across species, Sphagnum mosses exhibited a trade-off in resource partitioning into metabolic and structural carbohydrates, a pattern that served as a strong predictor of litter decomposition. Decomposition rates showed a negative co-variation between species and their microtopographic position, as species that live in hummocks decomposed slowly but hummock microhabitats themselves corresponded to rapid decomposition rates. By forming litter that degrades slowly, hummock mosses appear to promote the maintenance of macropore structure in surface peat hummocks that aid in water retention. Many northern regions are experiencing rapid climate warming that is expected to accelerate the decomposition of large soil carbon pools stored within peatlands. However, our results suggest that some common peatland moss species form tissue that resists decomposition across a range of peatland environments, suggesting that moss resource allocation could stabilize peatland carbon losses under a changing climate.

  12. Molecular Probes: A Tool for Studying Toxicity of VOCs to P.Putida F1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Olson, M. S.

    2007-12-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are of great concern in ground water remediation, and are generally present in the form of NAPLs in subsurface environments. Among the various treatment technologies, in situ bioremediation is one of the most effective and low-cost treatment options. Many soil bacteria are reported to degrade these organic contaminants via metabolism (using them as a source of carbon to derive energy) or co- metabolism up to certain concentrations. However, larger concentrations of these contaminants are toxic to bacteria. Thus, in order to achieve successful bioremediation, it is important to determine the optimal concentrations of various contaminants that is beneficial for the activity and survival of degrading bacteria. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel method for toxicity analyses of VOC contaminants to the soil bacteria that degrade them. The present study is based on a two-color fluorescence assay of bacterial viability which facilitates actual counting of live and dead bacteria. Pseudomonas putida F1 cells were labeled with a LIVE/DEAD® BacLightTM bacterial viability kit (Invitrogen), which consists of a mixture of two dyes, SYTO 9 and propidium iodide, each with a different ability to penetrate healthy bacterial cells. Live cells stain green whereas propidium iodide (red dye) only penetrates cells with compromised membranes that are considered dead or dying. Stained cells were exposed to different concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) and toluene in sealed vials. Change in the concentrations of green and red cells were monitored over the time using fluorescence microscopy. UTHSCSA ImageTool software was used to count the live and dead cells in the images. It was observed that live (green) cell concentrations decreased and dead/damaged (red) cell concentrations increased over time when cells were exposed to TCE. No significant changes were observed in control experiments. Death rate constants calculated based on live cell

  13. 国内外 VOCs 排放标准体系研究%Study of Emission Standards System of VOCs at Home and Abroad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗斌; 蒋燕; 王斌

    2014-01-01

    It had important significance to develop VOCs emission standards for controlling VOCs emissions, improving air quality, and protecting human health and ecological environment. The characteristics of emission standards system of VOCs at home and abroad were analyzed, and some suggestions on the development of VOCs emission standards were proposed that toxicity and emissions of pollutants, particular pollutants of key industries should be considered when developing standards, and establishing emission standards system of VOCs giving priority to industry standards.%制定VOCs排放标准对于控制VOCs排放量,改善环境空气质量,保护人体健康和生态环境有重要意义。分析了国内外VOCs排放标准体系的特点,提出我国制定VOCs排放标准的几点建议,即标准制定过程中应考虑污染物毒性和排放量大小,考虑控制重点行业的特征污染物,并建立以行业排放标准为主的VOCs排放标准体系。

  14. A novel method to quantify the emission and conversion of VOCs in the smoking of electronic cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    An analytical technique was developed for the quantitation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in three different forms of electronic cigarette (EC): solution, vapor, and aerosol. Through the application of the mass change tracking (MCT) approach, the consumed amount of the solution was measured to track the conversion of targets between the different phases. The concentration of aerosol plus vapor (A&V) decreased exponentially (559 to 129 g m-3) with increasing puff velocity (0.05 to 1 L min-1). A strong correlation existed between sampling volume and consumed solution mass (R2 = 0.9972 ± 0.0021 (n = 4)). In the EC solution, acetic acid was considerably high (25.8 μg mL-1), along with trace quantities of some VOCs (methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, propionic acid, and i-butyric acid: 0.24 ± 0.15 μg mL-1 (n = 4)). In the aerosol samples, many VOCs (n-butyraldehyde, n-butyl acetate, benzene, xylene, styrene, n-valeric acid, and n-hexanoic acid) were newly produced (138 ± 250 μg m-3). In general, the solution-to-aerosol (S/A) conversion was significant: e.g., 1,540% for i-butyric acid. The emission rates of all targets computed based on their mass in aerosol/ consumed solution (ng mL-1) were from 30.1 (p-xylene) to 398 (methyl ethyl ketone), while those of carboxyls were much higher from 166 (acetic acid) to 5,850 (i-butyric acid).

  15. VOC flux measurements using a novel Relaxed Eddy Accumulation GC-FID system in urban Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.; Schade, G.; Boedeker, I.

    2008-12-01

    Houston experiences higher ozone production rates than most other major cities in the US, which is related to high anthropogenic VOC emissions from both area/mobile sources (car traffic) and a large number of petrochemical facilities. The EPA forecasts that Houston is likely to still violate the new 8-h NAAQS in 2020. To monitor neighborhood scale pollutant fluxes, we established a tall flux tower installation a few kilometers north of downtown Houston. We measure energy and trace gas fluxes, including VOCs from both anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in the urban surface layer using eddy covariance and related techniques. Here, we describe a Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) system combined with a dual-channel GC-FID used for VOC flux measurements, including first results. Ambient air is sampled at approximately 15 L min-1 through a 9.5 mm OD PFA line from 60 m above ground next to a sonic anemometer. Subsamples of this air stream are extracted through an ozone scrubber and pushed into two Teflon bag reservoirs, from which they are transferred to the GC pre-concentration units consisting of carbon-based adsorption traps encapsulated in heater blocks for thermal desorption. We discuss the performance of our system and selected measurement results from the 2008 spring and summer seasons in Houston. We present diurnal variations of the fluxes of the traffic tracers benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) during different study periods. Typical BTEX fluxes ranged from -0.36 to 3.10 mg m-2 h-1 for benzene, and -0.47 to 5.04 mg m-2 h-1 for toluene, and exhibited diurnal cycles with two dominant peaks related to rush-hour traffic. A footprint analysis overlaid onto a geographic information system (GIS) will be presented to reveal the dominant emission sources and patterns in the study area.

  16. Extended Research on Detection of Deception Using Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2006-06-01

    A system that captures and analyzes volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from skin surfaces may offer a viable alternative method to the polygraph instrument currently in use for detecting deception in U.S. government settings. Like the involuntary autonomic central nervous system response data gathered during polygraph testing, VOC emissions from the skin may provide data that can be used to detect stress caused by deception. Detecting VOCs, then, may present a noninvasive, non-intrusive method for observing, recording, and quantifying evidence of stress or emotional change.

  17. The ecology of carrion decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, or the remains of dead animals, is something that most people would like to avoid. It is visually unpleasant, emits foul odors, and may be the source of numerous pathogens. Decomposition of carrion, however, provides a unique opportunity for scientists to investigate how nutrients cycle t...

  18. Microbial interactions during carrion decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    This addresses the microbial ecology of carrion decomposition in the age of metagenomics. It describes what is known about the microbial communities on carrion, including a brief synopsis about the communities on other organic matter sources. It provides a description of studies using state-of-the...

  19. Wavefront reconstruction by modal decomposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method to determine the wavefront of a laser beam based on modal decomposition by computer-generated holograms. The hologram is encoded with a transmission function suitable for measuring the amplitudes and phases of the modes...

  20. Stepwise decomposition in controlpath synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, ten A.J.W.M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for the synthesis of the microarchitecture of controlpaths. This method is called stepwise decomposition. It focuses primarily on controlpaths of instruction set processors, however it is also applicable for more general Finite State Machine synthesis. Many of the current contr

  1. Stepwise decomposition in controlpath synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Berg, A.J.W.M.; ten Berg, A.J.W.M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for the synthesis of the microarchitecture of controlpaths. This method is called stepwise decomposition. It focuses primarily on controlpaths of instruction set processors, however it is also applicable for more general Finite State Machine synthesis. Many of the current contr

  2. Modular Decomposition of Boolean Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Bioch (Cor)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractModular decomposition is a thoroughly investigated topic in many areas such as switching theory, reliability theory, game theory and graph theory. Most appli- cations can be formulated in the framework of Boolean functions. In this paper we give a uni_ed treatment of modular decompositio

  3. Modular Decomposition of Boolean Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Bioch (Cor)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractModular decomposition is a thoroughly investigated topic in many areas such as switching theory, reliability theory, game theory and graph theory. Most appli- cations can be formulated in the framework of Boolean functions. In this paper we give a uni_ed treatment of modular

  4. Thermal Decomposition of Dicyclopentadienylarylvanadium Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, C.P.; Jelsma, A.; Teuben, J.H.; Liefde Meijer, H.J. de

    1977-01-01

    The thermolysis of compounds of the type Cp2VR (R = aryl) in the solid state has been studied. A distinct increase in thermal stability is observed upon substitution of the ortho-position of the aryl group. Thermal decomposition occurs with formation of RH, Cp2V, a vanadocene homologue with the

  5. Multiple Descriptions Using Sparse Decompositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Østergaard, Jan; Dahl, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the design of multiple descriptions (MDs) using sparse decompositions. In a description erasure channel only a subset of the transmitted descriptions is received. The MD problem concerns the design of the descriptions such that they individually approximate the source...

  6. Hydrogen peroxide deposition and decomposition in rain and dew waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Vicky; Angélica Rubio, M.; Lissi, Eduardo A.

    Peroxides and hydrogen peroxide were determined by a fluorometric method in dew and rain collected in the atmosphere of Santiago of Chile city. The measured peroxides comprise hydrogen peroxide (the main component) and peroxides not decomposed by catalase. The collected natural peroxides readily decompose in the natural matrix, rendering difficult an estimation of the values present in real-time. In order to establish the kinetics of the process and the factors that condition their decomposition, the kinetics of the decay at several pHs and/or the presence of metal chelators were followed. The kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the water matrix was evaluated employing the natural peroxides or hydrogen peroxide externally added. First-order kinetics was followed, with half decay times ranging from 80 to 2300 min. The addition of Fe(II) in the micromolar range increases the decomposition rate, while lowering the pH (<3) notably reduces the rate of the process. The contribution of metals to the decomposition of the peroxides in the natural waters was confirmed by the reduction in decomposition rate elicited by its treatment with Chelex-100. Dew and rain waters were collected in pre-acidified collectors, rendering values considerably higher than those measured in non-treated collectors. This indicates that acidification can be proposed as an easy procedure to stabilize the samples, reducing its decomposition during collection time and the time elapsed between collection and analysis. The weighted average concentration for total peroxides measured in pre-treated collectors was 5.4 μM in rains and 2.2 μM in dews.

  7. DECOMPOSITION STUDY OF CALCIUM CARBONATE IN COCKLE SHELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSTAKIMAH MOHAMED

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcium oxide (CaO is recognized as an efficient carbon dioxide (CO2 adsorbent and separation of CO2 from gas stream using CaO based adsorbent is widely applied in gas purification process especially at high temperature reaction. CaO is normally been produced via thermal decomposition of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 sources such as limestone which is obtained through mining and quarrying limestone hill. Yet, this study able to exploit the vast availability of waste resources in Malaysia which is cockle shell, as the potential biomass resources for CaCO3 and CaO. In addition, effect of particle size towards decomposition process is put under study using four particle sizes which are 0.125-0.25 mm, 0.25-0.5 mm, 1-2 mm, and 2-4 mm. Decomposition reactivity is conducted using Thermal Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA at heating rate of 20°C/minutes in inert (Nitrogen atmosphere. Chemical property analysis using x-ray fluorescence (XRF, shows cockle shell is made up of 97% Calcium (Ca element and CaO is produced after decomposition is conducted, as been analyzed by x-ray diffusivity (XRD analyzer. Besides, smallest particle size exhibits the highest decomposition rate and the process was observed to follow first order kinetics. Activation energy, E, of the process was found to vary from 179.38 to 232.67 kJ/mol. From Arrhenius plot, E increased when the particle size is larger. To conclude, cockle shell is a promising source for CaO and based on four different particles sizes used, sample at 0.125-0.25 mm offers the highest decomposition rate.

  8. Photocatalytic decomposition of cortisone acetate in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobral Romao, J.I.; Saad, M.H.; Mul, Guido; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The photocatalytic decomposition of cortisone 21-acetate (CA), a model compound for the commonly used steroid, cortisone, was studied. CA was photocatalytically decomposed in a slurry reactor with the initial rates between 0.11 and 0.46 mg L−1 min−1 at 10 mg L−1 concentration, using the following

  9. Quantitative and qualitative measures of decomposition: is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Eaton; Felipe G. Sanchez

    2009-01-01

    Decomposition rates of loblolly pine coarse woody debris (CWD) were determined by mass loss and wood density changes for trees that differed in source of mortality (natural, girdle-poison, and felling). Specifically, three treatments were examined: (1) control (CON): natural mortality; (2) CD: 5-fold increase in CWD compared with the CON; and (3) CS: 12-fold increase...

  10. Photocatalytic decomposition of cortisone acetate in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobral Romao, Joana; Hamdy, Mohamed S.; Mul, Guido; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The photocatalytic decomposition of cortisone 21-acetate (CA), a model compound for the commonly used steroid, cortisone, was studied. CA was photocatalytically decomposed in a slurry reactor with the initial rates between 0.11 and 0.46 mg L−1 min−1 at 10 mg L−1 concentration, using the following he

  11. Computer Data Processing of the Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余逸男; 胡良剑

    2003-01-01

    Two methods of computer data processing, linear fitting and nonlinear fitting, are applied to compute the rate constant for hydrogen peroxide decomposition reaction. The results indicate that not only the new methods work with no necessity to measure the final oxygen volume, but also the fitting errors decrease evidently.

  12. Seasonal necrophagous insect community assembly during vertebrate carrion decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbow, M E; Lewis, A J; Tomberlin, J K; Pechal, J L

    2013-03-01

    Necrophagous invertebrates have been documented to be a predominant driver of vertebrate carrion decomposition; however, very little is understood about the assembly of these communities both within and among seasons. The objective of this study was to evaluate the seasonal differences in insect taxa composition, richness, and diversity on carrion over decomposition with the intention that such data will be useful for refining error estimates in forensic entomology. Sus scrofa (L.) carcasses (n = 3-6, depending on season) were placed in a forested habitat near Xenia, OH, during spring, summer, autumn, and winter. Taxon richness varied substantially among seasons but was generally lower (1-2 taxa) during early decomposition and increased (3-8 taxa) through intermediate stages of decomposition. Autumn and winter showed the highest richness during late decomposition. Overall, taxon richness was higher during active decay for all seasons. While invertebrate community composition was generally consistent among seasons, the relative abundance of five taxa significantly differed across seasons, demonstrating different source communities for colonization depending on the time of year. There were significantly distinct necrophagous insect communities for each stage of decomposition, and between summer and autumn and summer and winter, but the communities were similar between autumn and winter. Calliphoridae represented significant indicator taxa for summer and autumn but replaced by Coleoptera during winter. Here we demonstrated substantial variability in necrophagous communities and assembly on carrion over decomposition and among seasons. Recognizing this variation has important consequences for forensic entomology and future efforts to provide error rates for estimates of the postmortem interval using arthropod succession data as evidence during criminal investigations.

  13. On-line field measurements of VOC emissions from a spruce tree at SMEAR Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Bonn, Boris; Noe, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    We have investigated VOC emissions from a Norway spruce tree (Picea abies) in a hemi-boreal mixed forest in September and October 2012, using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry techniques, applied in a dynamic branch enclosure system that was automatically operated with an electrical compressor. Parallel to BVOC measurements a vast amount of atmospheric (CO2, CH4, H2O, CO, particles) and meteorological (temperature, relative humidity, photosynthetic active radiation, wind speed and direction, precipitation) parameters were measured in the ambient atmosphere and inside the cuvette enclosure (temperature, relative humidity, O3). Prior to the measuring period, an innovatory experimental setup was built at Järvselja forest station, in order to accomplish the detection of BVOC and minimize sampling losses. Therefore, a new inlet line, consisting of 19.4m of heated and isolated glass tube was constructed. The new inlet system applied, allowed the on-line detection and calculation of sesquiterpene (SQT) emission rates for the first time in a hemi-boreal forest site. It total, 12 atmospheric relevant BVOCs were continuously monitored for a three week period and the emission rates were derived. Along with diurnal profiles and continuous timeless, some interesting observations showed the possibility of ozone effect on SQT emissions, the possibility of radiation effect on MT emissions, the higher induced emissions due to mechanical stress and the possibility for a valid intercomparison between different spruce trees located in mountain Kleiner Feldberg (Germany) and in Järvseja forest station (Estonia).

  14. Direct and indirect effects of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhang Song

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet-B (UV-B exposure in the course of litter decomposition may have a direct effect on decomposition rates via changing states of photodegradation or decomposer constitution in litter while UV-B exposure during growth periods may alter chemical compositions and physical properties of plants. Consequently, these changes will indirectly affect subsequent litter decomposition processes in soil. Although studies are available on both the positive and negative effects (including no observable effects of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition, a comprehensive analysis leading to an adequate understanding remains unresolved. Using data from 93 studies across six biomes, this introductory meta-analysis found that elevated UV-B directly increased litter decomposition rates by 7% and indirectly by 12% while attenuated UV-B directly decreased litter decomposition rates by 23% and indirectly increased litter decomposition rates by 7%. However, neither positive nor negative effects were statistically significant. Woody plant litter decomposition seemed more sensitive to UV-B than herbaceous plant litter except under conditions of indirect effects of elevated UV-B. Furthermore, levels of UV-B intensity significantly affected litter decomposition response to UV-B (P<0.05. UV-B effects on litter decomposition were to a large degree compounded by climatic factors (e.g., MAP and MAT (P<0.05 and litter chemistry (e.g., lignin content (P<0.01. Results suggest these factors likely have a bearing on masking the important role of UV-B on litter decomposition. No significant differences in UV-B effects on litter decomposition were found between study types (field experiment vs. laboratory incubation, litter forms (leaf vs. needle, and decay duration. Indirect effects of elevated UV-B on litter decomposition significantly increased with decay duration (P<0.001. Additionally, relatively small changes in UV-B exposure intensity (30% had significant direct effects

  15. Decomposition of childhood malnutrition in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, Thankam S; Sagna, Marguerite

    2015-10-01

    Childhood malnutrition is a major problem in developing countries, and in Cambodia, it is estimated that approximately 42% of the children are stunted, which is considered to be very high. In the present study, we examined the effects of proximate and socio-economic determinants on childhood malnutrition in Cambodia. In addition, we examined the effects of the changes in these proximate determinants on childhood malnutrition between 2000 and 2005. Our analytical approach included descriptive, logistic regression and decomposition analyses. Separate analyses are estimated for 2000 and 2005 survey. The primary component of the difference in stunting is attributable to the rates component, indicating that the decrease of stunting is due mainly to the decrease in stunting rates between 2000 and 2005. While majority of the differences in childhood malnutrition between 2000 and 2005 can be attributed to differences in the distribution of malnutrition determinants between 2000 and 2005, differences in their effects also showed some significance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Comparison Analysis of Economic and Engineering Control of Industrial VOCs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-fei; Liu, Chang-xin; Cheng, Jie; Hao, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollutant has become China's major air pollutant in key urban areas like sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. It is mainly produced from industry sectors, and engineering control is one of the most important reduction measures. During the 12th Five-Year Plan, China decides to invest 40 billion RMB to build pollution control projects in key industry sectors with annual emission reduction of 605 000 t x a(-1). It shows that China attaches a great importance to emission reduction by engineering projects and highlights the awareness of engineering reduction technologies. In this paper, a macroeconomic model, namely computable general equilibrium model, (CGE model) was employed to simulate engineering control and economic control (imposing environmental tax). We aim to compare the pros and cons of the two reduction policies. Considering the economic loss of the whole country, the environmental tax has more impacts on the economy system than engineering reduction measures. We suggest that the central government provides 7 500 RMB x t(-1) as subsidy for enterprises in industry sectors to encourage engineering reduction.

  17. Measurements of VOCs in Mexico City during the MILAGRO Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. K.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, N. J.; Meinardi, S.; Atlas, E.; Rowland, F.; Blake, D. R.

    2006-12-01

    During March of 2006 we participated in MILAGRO (Megacities Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations), a multi-platform campaign to measure pollutants in and in outflow from the Mexico City metropolitan area. As part of MILAGRO we collected whole air canister samples at two Mexico City ground sites: the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, located in the city, northeast of the center, and the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac, a suburban site approximately 50 km northeast of the city center. Samples were also collected in various other locations throughout Mexico City. Over 300 whole air samples were collected and analyzed for a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including methane, carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and halocarbons. Propane was the most abundant NMHC at both the urban and suburban locations, with mixing ratios frequently in excess of 10 parts per billion at both locations. This is likely the result of the widespread use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) of which propane is the major component. For most species, median mixing ratios at the urban sites were significantly greater than at the suburban site. Here we compare results from both urban and suburban locations and also examine the influence of transport on the composition of outflow from Mexico City.

  18. Characteristics of microbial volatile organic compound flux rates from soil and plant litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, C. M.; Fierer, N.

    2013-12-01

    Our knowledge of microbial production and consumption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil and litter, as well as which microorganisms are involved, is relatively limited compared to what we know about VOC emissions from terrestrial plants. With climate change expecting to alter plant community composition, nitrogen (N) deposition rates, mean annual temperatures, precipitation patterns, and atmospheric VOC concentrations, it is unknown how microbial production and consumption of VOCs from litter and soil will respond. We have spent the last 5 years quantifying VOC flux rates in decaying plant litter, mineral soils and from a subalpine field site using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Microbial production, relative to abiotic sources, accounted for 78% to 99% of the total VOC emissions from decomposing litter, highlighting the importance of microbial metabolisms in these systems. Litter chemistry correlated with the types of VOCs emitted, of which, methanol was emitted at the highest rates from all studies. The net emissions of carbon as VOCs was found to be up to 88% of that emitted as CO2 suggesting that VOCs likely represent an important component of the carbon cycle in many terrestrial systems. Nitrogen additions drastically reduced VOC emissions from litter to near zero, though it is still not understood whether this was due to an increase in consumption or a decrease in production. In the field, the root system contributed to 53% of the carbon that was emitted as VOCs from the soil with increasing air temperatures correlating to an increase in VOC flux rates from the soil system. Finally, we are currently utilizing next generation sequencing techniques (Illumina MiSeq) along with varying concentrations of isoprene, the third most abundant VOC in the atmosphere behind methane and methanol, above soils in a laboratory incubation to determine consumption rates and the microorganisms (bacteria, archaea and fungi) associated with the

  19. Gauss decomposition for quantum groups and duality

    CERN Document Server

    Damaskinsky, E V; Lyakhovsky, V D; Sokolov, M A

    1995-01-01

    The Gauss decomposition of quantum groups and supergroups are considered. The main attention is paid to the R-matrix formulation of the Gauss decomposition and its properties as well as its relation to the contraction procedure. Duality aspects of the Gauss decomposition are also touched. For clarity of exposition a few simple examples are considered in some details.

  20. Functionality Decomposition by Compositional Correctness Preserving Transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinksma, Hendrik; Langerak, Romanus

    1995-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the decomposition of processes in a process algebraic framework. Decomposition, or the refinement of process substructure, is an important design principle in the top-down development of concurrent systems. In the approach that we follow the decomposition is based on a

  1. EVALUATION AND PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF INNOVATIVE LOW-VOC CONTACT ADHESIVES IN WOOD LAMINATING OPERATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an evaluation and assessment of the perfor-mance, economics, and emission reduction potential upon application of low-volatile organic compound (VOC) waterborne contact adhesive formulations specifically ina manual laminating operation for assembling s...

  2. VocMat projekt - uudsed e-õppe võimalused turismiasjalistele / Heli Tooman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooman, Heli, 1949-

    2008-01-01

    Turismivaldkonna spetsialistidele mõeldud koolitusprojektist VocMat (Vocational Management Training for the Tourism Industry). Projekti partneriteks Eestis on Ettevõtluse Arendamise Sihtasutuse Turismiarenduskeskus ja Tartu Ülikooli Pärnu kolledzh. Lisa: Kokkuvõte

  3. VocMat projekt - uudsed e-õppe võimalused turismiasjalistele / Heli Tooman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooman, Heli, 1949-

    2008-01-01

    Turismivaldkonna spetsialistidele mõeldud koolitusprojektist VocMat (Vocational Management Training for the Tourism Industry). Projekti partneriteks Eestis on Ettevõtluse Arendamise Sihtasutuse Turismiarenduskeskus ja Tartu Ülikooli Pärnu kolledzh. Lisa: Kokkuvõte

  4. Crop residue decomposition in Minnesota biochar amended plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyers, S. L.; Spokas, K. A.

    2014-02-01

    Impacts of biochar application at laboratory scales are routinely studied, but impacts of biochar application on decomposition of crop residues at field scales have not been widely addressed. The priming or hindrance of crop residue decomposition could have a cascading impact on soil processes, particularly those influencing nutrient availability. Our objectives were to evaluate biochar effects on field decomposition of crop residue, using plots that were amended with biochars made from different feedstocks and pyrolysis platforms prior to the start of this study. Litterbags containing wheat straw material were buried below the soil surface in a continuous-corn cropped field in plots that had received one of seven different biochar amendments or a non-charred wood pellet amendment 2.5 yr prior to start of this study. Litterbags were collected over the course of 14 weeks. Microbial biomass was assessed in treatment plots the previous fall. Though first-order decomposition rate constants were positively correlated to microbial biomass, neither parameter was statistically affected by biochar or wood-pellet treatments. The findings indicated only a residual of potentially positive and negative initial impacts of biochars on residue decomposition, which fit in line with established feedstock and pyrolysis influences. Though no significant impacts were observed with field-weathered biochars, effective soil management may yet have to account for repeat applications of biochar.

  5. Functionally dissimilar neighbors accelerate litter decomposition in two grass species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, Lou; Jung, Vincent; Prinzing, Andreas; Bittebiere, Anne-Kristel; Butenschoen, Olaf; Mony, Cendrine

    2017-02-16

    Plant litter decomposition is a key regulator of nutrient recycling. In a given environment, decomposition of litter from a focal species depends on its litter quality and on the efficiency of local decomposers. Both may be strongly modified by functional traits of neighboring species, but the consequences for decomposition of litter from the focal species remain unknown. We tested whether decomposition of a focal plant's litter is influenced by the functional-trait dissimilarity to the neighboring plants. We cultivated two grass species (Brachypodium pinnatum and Elytrigia repens) in experimental mesocosms with functionally similar and dissimilar neighborhoods, and reciprocally transplanted litter. For both species, litter quality increased in functionally dissimilar neighborhoods, partly as a result of changes in functional traits involved in plant-plant interactions. Furthermore, functional dissimilarity increased overall decomposer efficiency in one species, probably via complementarity effects. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of biodiversity effects on ecosystem functioning in grasslands: interspecific functional diversity within plant communities can enhance intraspecific contributions to litter decomposition. Thus, plant species might better perform in diverse communities by benefiting from higher remineralization rates of their own litter.

  6. Radiation induced decomposition of a refractory cefathiamidine intermediate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiburi Bao; Lujun Chen; Jianlong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Diisopropylthiourea (DPT),an intermediate of a widely used cephalosporin,has been found to be one of the most refractory components in cephalosporin synthesis wastewater.This compound cannot be completely removed by conventional biological processes due to its antimicrobial property.Ionizing radiation has been applied in the decomposition of refractory pollutants in recent years and has proved effective.Therefore,the decomposition of DPT by γ-irradiation was studied.The compound was irradiated at the dose of 150-2000 Gy before a change of concentration and UV absorption of the solutions was detected.Furthermore,the decomposition kinetics and radiation yield (G-value) of DPT was investigated.The results of radiation experiments on DPT-containing aqueous showed that the DPT can be effectively degraded by γ-radiation.DPT concentration decreased with increasing absorbed doses.G-values of radiolytic decomposition for DPT (20 mg/L) were 1.04 and 0.47 for absorbed doses of 150 and 2000 Gy,respectively.The initial concentration and pH of the solutions affected the degradation.As the concentration of substrate increased,the decomposition was reduced.The decrease of removal rate and radiation efficacy under alkaline condition suggested that lower pH values benefit the γ-induced degradation.UV absorption from 190 to 250 nm decreased after radiation while that from 250 to 300 nm increased,indicating the formation of by-products.

  7. Kinetics of the decomposition reaction of phosphorite concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Run

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apatite is the raw material, which is mainly used in phosphate fertilizer, and part are used in yellow phosphorus, red phosphorus, and phosphoric acid in the industry. With the decrease of the high grade phosphorite lump, the agglomeration process is necessary for the phosphorite concentrate after beneficiation process. The decomposition behavior and the phase transformation are of vital importance for the agglomeration process of phosphorite. In this study, the thermal kinetic analysis method was used to study the kinetics of the decomposition of phosphorite concentrate. The phosphorite concentrate was heated under various heating rate, and the phases in the sample heated were examined by the X-ray diffraction method. It was found that the main phases in the phosphorite are fluorapatiteCa5(PO43F, quartz SiO2,and dolomite CaMg(CO32.The endothermic DSC peak corresponding to the mass loss caused by the decomposition of dolomite covers from 600°C to 850°C. The activation energy of the decomposition of dolomite, which increases with the increase in the extent of conversion, is about 71.6~123.6kJ/mol. The mechanism equation for the decomposition of dolomite agrees with the Valensi equation and G-B equation.

  8. Decomposition of forging die for high speed machining

    CERN Document Server

    Tapie, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Today's forging die manufacturing process must be adapted to several evolutions in machining process generation: CAD/CAM models, CAM software solutions and High Speed Machining (HSM). In this context, the adequacy between die shape and HSM process is in the core of machining preparation and process planning approaches. This paper deals with an original approach of machining preparation integrating this adequacy in the main tasks carried out. In this approach, the design of the machining process is based on two levels of decomposition of the geometrical model of a given die with respect to HSM cutting conditions (cutting speed and feed rate) and technological constrains (tool selection, features accessibility). This decomposition assists machining assistant to generate an HSM process. The result of this decomposition is the identification of machining features.

  9. Optimization and Assessment of Wavelet Packet Decompositions with Evolutionary Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schell Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In image compression, the wavelet transformation is a state-of-the-art component. Recently, wavelet packet decomposition has received quite an interest. A popular approach for wavelet packet decomposition is the near-best-basis algorithm using nonadditive cost functions. In contrast to additive cost functions, the wavelet packet decomposition of the near-best-basis algorithm is only suboptimal. We apply methods from the field of evolutionary computation (EC to test the quality of the near-best-basis results. We observe a phenomenon: the results of the near-best-basis algorithm are inferior in terms of cost-function optimization but are superior in terms of rate/distortion performance compared to EC methods.

  10. Naphthalene decomposition in a DC corona radical shower discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-jiang NI; Xu SHEN; Xiang GAO; Zu-liang WU; Hao LU; Zhong-shan LI; Zhong-yang LUO; Ke-fa CEN

    2011-01-01

    The naphthalene decomposition in a corona radical shower discharge (CRS) was investigated, with attention paid to the influences of voltage and initial naphthalene density. The OH emission spectra were investigated so as to know the naphthalene decomposing process. The by-products were analyzed and a decomposing theory in discharge was proposed. The results showed that higher voltage and relative humidity were effective on decomposition. The initial concentration affected the decomposing efficiency of naphthalene. When the mitial naphthalene density was 17 mg/m3, the decomposition rate was found to be 70% under 14 kV. The main by-products were carbon dioxide and water. However, a small amount of carbonic oxide, 1, 2-ethanediol and acetaldehyde were found due to the incomplete oxidization.

  11. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of Abietic Acid in Static Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NONG Weijian; CHEN Xiaopeng; WANG Linlin; LIANG Jiezhen; ZHONG Lingping; TONG Zhangfa

    2013-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of abietic acid in air was investigated under non-isothermal condition using thermograv,imetric analysis-differential thermal analysis (TGA-DTA) technique with heating rates of 5,10,15 and 25 K·min 1.The non-isothermal kinetic parameters were obtained via the analysis of the therrnogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric (TG-DTG) curves by using Flynn-Wall-Ozawa method and Kissinger method.The thermal decomposition mechanism of abietic acid was studied with four integral methods (Satava-Sesták,MacCallum-Tanner,ordinary integral and Agrawal).The results show that the thermal decomposition mechanism is nucleation and growth,and the mechanism function is Avrami-Erofeev equation with n equates 1/2.The activation energy and the pre-exponential factor are 64.04 kJ·mol-and 5.89×10 s-1,respectively.

  12. Leaf level VOC emissions of single plants from Amazonian and Mediterranean ecosystems: Ontogeny and flooding as stress factor for VOC emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Bracho Nunez, Araceli

    2010-01-01

    Die Vegetation ist die wichtigste Quelle von organischen flüchtigen Verbindungen (auf Englisch volatile organic compounds,VOCs), die einen bemerkenswerten Einfluss auf der Chemie und Physik der Atmosphäre haben. VOCs beeinflussen die oxidative Kapazität der Atmosphäre und tragen zu der Bildung und zum Wachstum von sekundären organischen Aerosolen bei, welche einerseits eine Streuung und Reflektierung der Energie verursachen und andererseits sich an der Bildung und Entwicklung von Wolken betei...

  13. Production of test gases in the ppb range for round-robin tests and quality assurance measures during the measurement of VOCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Andreas; Breuer, Dietmar

    2008-12-01

    Workers exposed to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) very often suffer damage to health, and VOC odours may also represent a serious nuisance. The compounds concerned may be numerous and highly diverse; the concentrations of the individual substances however are generally relatively low. Quality assurance measures such as round-robin tests for the measurement of VOCs in indoor areas or at workplaces have not so far been available. A particular reason for this is the challenge presented by the production of test gases in the necessary concentrations. The BGIA test gas facility has therefore been modified for the production of test gases in the microg/m(3) range. A two-stage primary gas purifier, a continuous test gas generator with multi-stage dilution, a capillary evaporator for low-volatility compounds and an online thermodesorber have been installed specifically for this purpose.Purification of the primary gas proved to be particularly difficult: the available pre-purified compressed air contained organic trace impurities which fluctuated over time. The essential requirement, i.e. the injection into the test gas stream of a primary gas which was constant over time and exhibited the lowest possible contamination, could be satisfied only by catalytic decomposition of the organic residual impurities and with a supplementary adsorber unit. Even with these measures in place, small quantities of organic substances remain present, and the blank readings must still be monitored continuously. Following completion of all modifications, it proved possible to produce test gases with a high degree of reproducibility with substance concentrations in the range of 1 to 500 microg/m(3).Since 2007, the BGIA has been offering round-robin tests for VOCs with local sampling in the range from 5 to 50 microg/m(3). The first round-robin tests show that good results are obtained at concentrations from 10 to 50 microg/m(3). At the lower concentration of round-robin tests also involved the

  14. VOC emissions during outdoor ship painting and health-risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malherbe, Laure; Mandin, Corinne

    Painting of ship external surfaces in building or repair shipyards generates significant emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) to the atmosphere. Such emissions have not been specifically regulated so far. The purpose of our study is therefore to evaluate the quantities and as far as possible the nature of the emitted VOC, to characterize the dispersion of these chemicals in the atmosphere and to assess the exposure and resulting health risks for surrounding populations. This study is focused on VOC emitted during outdoor work involving use of paints and solvents. VOC emissions are diffuse, since they come from the whole painted surfaces. A methodology for quantifying them is developed and tested, using information provided by ALSTOM—Chantiers de l'Atlantique and data found in paint technical sheets. Its reliability is checked against emission values established by ALSTOM or found in literature. Then, for two particular situations, construction on one hand, repair on the other hand, atmospheric dispersion of total VOC is simulated to assess the long-term impact (characterized by the plume extension and the annual mean concentrations) of these compounds. Finally, a health-risk assessment based on the estimates is carried out to evaluate the risks by inhalation for people living near the site. Considering the presumed composition of paints and the available reference toxicological values, total VOC are entirely assimilated to toluene. In both examples (construction and repair) and in the current state of knowledge, the calculated risk is not of health concern. Several ways for taking this study further are proposed: a more exhaustive collection of data relative to VOC and other substances contained in paints, on-site measurement of VOC in the ambient air, characterization of diffuse emissions related to other activities, such as purging or welding, and other pollutants, like particles.

  15. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Testing at Building 348, Kelly AFB, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    At the request of HQ AFLC/ SGB , the USAFOEHL conducted a stack sampling survey to determine total volatile organic compounds (VOC) being emitted from...Occupational and Environmental Health Laboratory (USAFOEHL/ECQ). The survey was requested by HQ AFLC/ SGB .to estimate VOC emissions through each of...stardards. 2. Range and Sensitivity 2.1 This method was validated over the range of 1417-5940 mg/M at an atmospheric temperature and pressure of 24 0C

  16. Nonlinear mode decomposition: A noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool—nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)—which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques—which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust—and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download.

  17. Nonlinear mode decomposition: a noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V E; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool-nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)-which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques-which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust-and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download.

  18. Quantitative and qualitative measures of decomposition: Is there a link?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, Robert, J.; Sanchez, Felipe, G.

    2009-03-01

    Decomposition rates of loblolly pine coarse woody debris (CWD) were determined by mass loss and wood density changes for trees that differed in source of mortality (natural, girdle-poison, and felling). Specifically, three treatments were examined: (1) control (CON): natural mortality; (2) CD: 5-fold increase in CWD compared with the CON; and (3) CS: 12-fold increase in snags compared with the CON. The additional CWD in the CD treatment plots and the additional snags in the CS plots were achieved by felling (for the CD plots) or girdling followed by herbicide injection (for the CS plots) select trees in these plots. Consequently,mortality on the CD plots is due to natural causes and felling. Likewise, mortality on the CS plots is due to natural causes and girdle-poison. In each treatment plot, mortality due to natural causes was inventoried since 1997, whereas mortality due to girdle-poison and felling were inventoried since 2001. No significant difference was detected between the rates of decomposition for the CWD on these treatment plots, indicating that source of the tree mortality did not influence rates of decomposition once the tree fell. These experimental measures of decomposition were compared with two decay classification systems (three- and five-unit classifications) to determine linkages. Changes in wood density did not correlate to any decay classification, whereas mass loss had a weak correlation with decay class. However, the large degree of variation limits the utility of decay classification systems in estimating mass loss.

  19. Vegetation exerts a greater control on litter decomposition than climate warming in peatlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Susan E; Orwin, Kate H; Ostle, Nicholas J; Briones, J I; Thomson, Bruce C; Griffiths, Robert I; Oakley, Simon; Quirk, Helen; Bardget, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Historically, slow decomposition rates have resulted in the accumulation of large amounts of carbon in northern peatlands. Both climate warming and vegetation change can alter rates of decomposition, and hence affect rates of atmospheric CO2 exchange, with consequences for climate change feedbacks. Although warming and vegetation change are happening concurrently, little is known about their relative and interactive effects on decomposition processes. To test the effects of warming and vegetation change on decomposition rates, we placed litter of three dominant species (Calluna vulgaris, Eriophorum vaginatum, Hypnum jutlandicum) into a peatland field experiment that combined warming.with plant functional group removals, and measured mass loss over two years. To identify potential mechanisms behind effects, we also measured nutrient cycling and soil biota. We found that plant functional group removals exerted a stronger control over short-term litter decomposition than did approximately 1 degrees C warming, and that the plant removal effect depended on litter species identity. Specifically, rates of litter decomposition were faster when shrubs were removed from the plant community, and these effects were strongest for graminoid and bryophyte litter. Plant functional group removals also had strong effects on soil biota and nutrient cycling associated with decomposition, whereby shrub removal had cascading effects on soil fungal community composition, increased enchytraeid abundance, and increased rates of N mineralization. Our findings demonstrate that, in addition to litter quality, changes in vegetation composition play a significant role in regulating short-term litter decomposition and belowground communities in peatland, and that these impacts can be greater than moderate warming effects. Our findings, albeit from a relatively short-term study, highlight the need to consider both vegetation change and its impacts below ground alongside climatic effects when

  20. Investigation on Using SBS and Active Carbon Filler to Reduce the VOC Emission from Bituminous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiqiang Cui

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bituminous materials are playing a vital role in pavement design and the roofing industry because of outstanding properties. Unfortunately, bituminous materials will release volatile organic compounds (VOC, making them non-environmentally friendly. Therefore, technologies that can be used to decrease the VOC emission are urgently required. In this research, the VOC emission and material behaviors were analyzed and compared to investigate the possibility of adding styrene butadiene styrene (SBS and active carbon filler into bituminous materials to develop environmentally-friendly materials. Thermal gravimetric analysis-mass spectrometry (TG-MS and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy testing (UV-Vis were employed to characterize the VOC emission process. Temperature sweep testing and frequency sweep testing were conducted to evaluate the rheological properties of bituminous materials. Research results indicated that the combined introduction of 4 wt% styrene butadiene styrene (SBS and 4 wt% active carbon filler cannot only significantly lower the VOC emission speed and amount, but also improve the deformation resistance behavior at a higher temperature. SBS and active carbon filler can be used to reduce the VOC emission form bituminous materials.

  1. Plant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ozone (O3) polluted atmospheres: the ecological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Delia M; Blande, James D; Souza, Silvia R; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2010-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is an important secondary air pollutant formed as a result of photochemical reactions between primary pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). O3 concentrations in the lower atmosphere (troposphere) are predicted to continue increasing as a result of anthropogenic activity, which will impact strongly on wild and cultivated plants. O3 affects photosynthesis and induces the development of visible foliar injuries, which are the result of genetically controlled programmed cell death. It also activates many plant defense responses, including the emission of phytogenic VOCs. Plant emitted VOCs play a role in many eco-physiological functions. Besides protecting the plant from abiotic stresses (high temperatures and oxidative stress) and biotic stressors (competing plants, micro- and macroorganisms), they drive multitrophic interactions between plants, herbivores and their natural enemies e.g., predators and parasitoids as well as interactions between plants (plant-to-plant communication). In addition, VOCs have an important role in atmospheric chemistry. They are O3 precursors, but at the same time are readily oxidized by O3, thus resulting in a series of new compounds that include secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Here, we review the effects of O3 on plants and their VOC emissions. We also review the state of current knowledge on the effects of ozone on ecological interactions based on VOC signaling, and propose further research directions.

  2. Research the Factor Affecting the Apparent Rate Constant in the Decomposition of Carbendazim by Oozone Oxidation%臭氧氧化多菌灵表观速率常数影响因素的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄曦; 张雁秋; 刘伟京; 涂勇; 徐军

    2011-01-01

    [目的]考察多菌灵初始浓度、臭氧投加量和温度对臭氧氧化降解多茼灵反应表观速率常数的影响.[方法]采用臭氧氧化降解水体中的多菌灵,考察多菌灵降解过程中表现反应速率常数与反应剂量因素的关系.[结果]在不同臭氧投加量和不同初始浓度条件下,多菌灵降解均符合假一级反应动力学.表现速率常数与臭氧投加量呈正相关性,与多菌灵初始浓度呈负相关性.表观速率常数随多菌灵初始浓度的增加而减小,但是反应物的绝对去除量增加,表明增加多菌灵初始浓度有利于提高臭氧的利用效率.表观速率常数随温度的升高而增加,与一般化学反应规律相符合.[结论]为安全有效地降解多菌灵提供了参考.%[ Objective] The effect of the initial concentration of carbenclazim, the adding amount of ozone and temperature on the apparent rate constant in the degradation of carbendazim was researched. [ Method ] The relationship between the apparent rate constant and reaction dose in the process of the carbendazim degradation in water was experimented. [ Results] The results indicated that under the condition of different doses of ozone-adding and initial concentrations the process of carbendazim degradation was matched with the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The apparent rate constants had the positive relativity with applied ozone dose and negative correlation with initial concentration. The apparent rate constant was decreased with increment of initial concentration. However, the absolute removal rate of the reactants was increased, which indicated that the increment of initial concentration would be beneficial to the improvement of the utilization rate of ozone. The apparent rate constant was increased with the increment of temperature, which was consistent with the general law of chemical reaction. [ Conclusion] The reference for the safety and efficiency degradation of carbendazim was provided

  3. 阿什河珍珠梅树叶的分解速率与大型底栖动物定殖关系1)%Relationship between Decomposition Rates of Sorbaria sorbifolia and Colonization Benthic Macroinvertebrate in the Stream of Ashihe River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董雪; 刘曼红; 于洪贤

    2015-01-01

    利用复合分解网袋(上半部为1.0 mm孔径,下半部为0.5 mm孔径)在阿什河上游森林段、中上游农田段和阿什河入松花江口城市段放入珍珠梅树叶,并对其进行了为期77 d的树叶分解研究。结果表明:森林段、农田段和城市段树叶分解速率都为0.02,符合指数衰减模型,均属于快速分解组。不同的河段定殖的底栖动物种类数明显不同,定殖在森林段和农田段大型底栖动物种类分别为25种和15种,二者均以双翅目摇蚊幼虫为主,分别占大型底栖动物类群数的83.6%和70.5%。城市段大型底栖动物种类为6种,全部为寡毛类。从大型底栖动物摄食功能群比例看,森林河段珍珠梅树叶上的大型底栖动物主要以直接集食者为主,占43.7%;其次是撕食者(39.3%)和捕食者(14.4%)。农田河段珍珠梅树叶上大型底栖动物直接集食者比例最高,为77.27%;其次是撕食者为(13.63%)和过滤收集者(4.54%)。城市河段珍珠梅树叶上大型底栖动物全部为直接集食者。结果表明,阿什河上游、中上游和下游中直接集食的底栖动物丰富度与树叶分解速率有显著关系。%The experiment was conducted to study the leaves decomposition rates of Sorbaria sorbifolia with decomposition bags (upper half’s diameter is 1 mm and another half’s diameter is 0.5 mm ) for 77 days in the forest section at the upper rea-ches of the Ashihe River , upstream farmland section and the city section of the River into the Songhua River .The leaf de-composition rates of the forest section , the farmland section and the city section were both 0.02, and the decomposition rate accorded with exponential decay model .Leaves of those sections belonged to the rapid decomposition groups .In the whole experiment process , the species numbers colonization benthic macroinvertebrate of the three sections was obviously

  4. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    KAUST Repository

    Le Maître, O. P.

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  5. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maître, O P; Knio, O M; Moraes, A

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  6. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maître, O. P.; Knio, O. M.; Moraes, A.

    2015-06-01

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  7. The coupled effects of carbon and nitrogen on soil decomposition: A theoretical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, B.; Finzi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) plays a crucial role in the carbon (C) cycle, holding 2.5 times more carbon than plant biomass. Ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate decomposition of soil carbon stocks, in turn leading to positive feedbacks on warming. Recent empirical studies and modeling work has revealed the importance of microbial physiology and exoenzyme kinetics in driving SOM decomposition. Existing mathematical models describe the microbial processes and biophysics involved in the decomposition. However, although decomposition by nitrogen-degrading enzymes is included in some models, nitrogen (N) does not drive model behavior and there are no reaction kinetics associated with the depolymerization or uptake of N. Additionally, very few empirically measured kinetic values exist for N-degrading enzymes or the uptake of N by microbes. This study proposes a theoretical model of SOM decomposition based on the principles of exoenzyme kinetics and microbial biophysics that explicitly links C and N through microbial uptake and SOM decomposition kinetics and by placing stoichiometric constraints on microbial growth and exoenzyme production. After constructing the model framework, the model was then used to test soil-carbon responses to warming, and to explore the importance of N uptake and depolymerization kinetics in driving decomposition. The model predictions suggest that the response of kinetics to temperature are more important than microbial responses in determining decomposition rates. Additionally, variations in the kinetics of N depolymerization affected decomposition rates, whereas N uptake kinetics and their effect on enzyme production had almost no effect. The model outputs were also compared to a C-only model framework in order to assess the effects of N on model behavior. The incorporation of N into a SOM decomposition model produced different, and in some cases, contradictory results as compared to a C-only model. Overall, these

  8. Carbon material formation on SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 and residue constituents during acetylene decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Hung-Lung, E-mail: hlchiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Risk Management, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Wu, Trong-Neng [Department of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Ho, Yung-Shou [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung 831, Taiwan (China); Zeng, Li-Xuan [Department of Risk Management, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Acetylene was decomposed on SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 at 650–850 °C. • Carbon spheres and filaments were formed after acetylene decomposition. • PAHs were determined in tar and residues. • Exhaust constituents include CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon species. - Abstract: Carbon materials including carbon spheres and nanotubes were formed from acetylene decomposition on hydrogen-reduced SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 at 650–850 °C. The physicochemical characteristics of SBA-15, Ni-SBA-15 and carbon materials were analyzed by field emission scanning electronic microscopy (FE-SEM), Raman spectrometry, and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). In addition, the contents of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the tar and residue and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the exhaust were determined during acetylene decomposition on SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15. Spherical carbon materials were observed on SBA-15 during acetylene decomposition at 750 and 850 °C. Carbon filaments and ball spheres were formed on Ni-SBA-15 at 650–850 °C. Raman spectroscopy revealed peaks at 1290 (D-band, disorder mode, amorphous carbon) and 1590 (G-band, graphite sp{sup 2} structure) cm{sup −1}. Naphthalene (2 rings), pyrene (4 rings), phenanthrene (3 rings), and fluoranthene (4 rings) were major PAHs in tar and residues. Exhaust constituents of hydrocarbon (as propane), H{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} were 3.9–2.6/2.7–1.5, 1.4–2.8/2.6–4.3, 4.2–2.4/3.2–1.7% when acetylene was decomposed on SBA-15/Ni-SBA-15, respectively, corresponding to temperatures ranging from 650 to 850 °C. The concentrations of 52 VOCs ranged from 9359 to 5658 and 2488 to 1104 ppm for SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 respectively, at acetylene decomposition temperatures from 650 to 850 °C, and the aromatics contributed more than 87% fraction of VOC concentrations.

  9. Quantification of Methane and VOC Emissions from Natural Gas Production in Two Basins with High Ozone Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edie, R.; Robertson, A.; Snare, D.; Soltis, J.; Field, R. A.; Murphy, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2005, the Uintah Basin of Utah and the Upper Green River Basin of Wyoming frequently exceeded the EPA 8-hour allowable ozone level of 75 ppb, spurring interest in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during oil and gas production. Debate continues over which stage of production (drilling, flowback, normal production, transmission, etc.) is the most prevalent VOC source. In this study, we quantify emissions from normal production on well pads by using the EPA-developed Other Test Method 33a. This methodology combines ground-based measurements of fugitive emissions with 3-D wind data to calculate the methane and VOC emission fluxes from a point source. VOC fluxes are traditionally estimated by gathering a canister of air during a methane flux measurement. The methane:VOC ratio of this canister is determined at a later time in the laboratory, and applied to the known methane flux. The University of Wyoming Mobile Laboratory platform is equipped with a Picarro methane analyzer and an Ionicon Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer, which provide real-time methane and VOC data for each well pad. This independent measurement of methane and VOCs in situ reveals multiple emission sources on one well pad, with varying methane:VOC ratios. Well pad emission estimates of methane, benzene, toluene and xylene for the two basins will be presented. The different emission source VOC profiles and the limitations of real-time and traditional VOC measurement methods will also be discussed.

  10. Thermal decomposition of natural dolomite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Gunasekaran; G Anbalagan

    2007-08-01

    Thermal decomposition behaviour of dolomite sample has been studied by thermogravimetric (TG) measurements. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) curve of dolomite shows two peaks at 777.8°C and 834°C. The two endothermic peaks observed in dolomite are essentially due to decarbonation of dolomite and calcite, respectively. The TG data of the decomposition steps have also been analysed using various differential, difference-differential and integral methods, viz. Freeman–Carroll, Horowitz–Metzger, Coats–Redfern methods. Values of activation entropy, Arrhenius factor, and order of reaction have been approximated and compared. Measured activation energies vary between 97 and 147 kJ mol-1. The large fluctuation in activation energy is attributed to the presence of impurities such as SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, Cl- etc in the samples. FTIR and XRD analyses confirm the decomposition reaction. SEM observation of the heat-treated samples at 950°C shows cluster of grains, indicating the structural transformation.

  11. A Lagrangian Dynamic Mode Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Sesterhenn, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Temporal or spatial structures are readily extracted from complex data by modal decompositions like POD or DMD. Subspaces of that decompositions serve as reduced order models and define spatial structures in time or temporal structures in space. Convecting phenomena pose a major problem to those decompositions. A structure travelling with a certain group velocity will be perceived as a plethora of modes in time or space respectively. This manifests itself for example in poorly decaying Singular Values when using a POD. The poor decay is very counter-intuitive, since we expect a single structure to be represented by a few modes. The intuition proves to be correct and we show that in a properly chosen reference frame along the characteristic defined by the group velocity, a POD or DMD reduces moving structures to a few modes, as expected. Beyond serving as a reduced model, the re- sulting entity can be used to define a constant or minimally changing structure in turbulent flows. This can be interpreted as an em...

  12. Development of new VOC exposure metrics and their relationship to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ten Brinke, JoAnn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are suspected to contribute significantly to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' (SBS), a complex of subchronic symptoms that occurs during and in general decreases away from occupancy of the building in question. A new approach takes into account individual VOC potencies, as well as the highly correlated nature of the complex VOC mixtures found indoors. The new VOC metrics are statistically significant predictors of symptom outcomes from the California Healthy Buildings Study data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis that a summary measure of the VOC mixture, other risk factors, and covariates for each worker will lead to better prediction of symptom outcome. VOC metrics based on animal irritancy measures and principal component analysis had the most influence in the prediction of eye, dermal, and nasal symptoms. After adjustment, a water-based paints and solvents source was found to be associated with dermal and eye irritation. The more typical VOC exposure metrics used in prior analyses were not useful in symptom prediction in the adjusted model (total VOC (TVOC), or sum of individually identified VOCsVOCi)). Also not useful were three other VOC metrics that took into account potency, but did not adjust for the highly correlated nature of the data set, or the presence of VOCs that were not measured. High TVOC values (2--7 mg m-3) due to the presence of liquid-process photocopiers observed in several study spaces significantly influenced symptoms. Analyses without the high TVOC values reduced, but did not eliminate the ability of the VOC exposure metric based on irritancy and principal component analysis to explain symptom outcome.

  13. Development of new VOC exposure metrics and their relationship to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are suspected to contribute significantly to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' (SBS), a complex of subchronic symptoms that occurs during and in general decreases away from occupancy of the building in question. A new approach takes into account individual VOC potencies, as well as the highly correlated nature of the complex VOC mixtures found indoors. The new VOC metrics are statistically significant predictors of symptom outcomes from the California Healthy Buildings Study data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis that a summary measure of the VOC mixture, other risk factors, and covariates for each worker will lead to better prediction of symptom outcome. VOC metrics based on animal irritancy measures and principal component analysis had the most influence in the prediction of eye, dermal, and nasal symptoms. After adjustment, a water-based paints and solvents source was found to be associated with dermal and eye irritation. The more typical VOC exposure metrics used in prior analyses were not useful in symptom prediction in the adjusted model (total VOC (TVOC), or sum of individually identified VOCs ({Sigma}VOC{sub i})). Also not useful were three other VOC metrics that took into account potency, but did not adjust for the highly correlated nature of the data set, or the presence of VOCs that were not measured. High TVOC values (2--7 mg m{sup {minus}3}) due to the presence of liquid-process photocopiers observed in several study spaces significantly influenced symptoms. Analyses without the high TVOC values reduced, but did not eliminate the ability of the VOC exposure metric based on irritancy and principal component analysis to explain symptom outcome.