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Sample records for vntr loci presented

  1. Polymorphism Identification of VNTR30 and VNTR36 Loci in Pathogenic Leptospira Serovares in Iran

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    Sama Reza Soltani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective: Leptospirosis, is the zoonotic disease which is characterized as an emerging infectious disease with large documented outbreaks. Epidemiological investigations are needed to distinguish outbreak situations or to trace reservoirs of the organisms. Today MLVA technique is used for segregating and identifying of Leptospira serovares. The method has potential application in furthering the understanding of Leptospiral molecular epidemiology. The propose of this study is rapid identification of pathogenic Leptospira serovares in Iran. Materials and methods: A total 12 pathogenic Leptospiral serovares and 1 saprophytic serovar that maintained from microbial bank of Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute, Karaj, Iran. The Genomic DNA of Leptospira was extracted .PCR was performed with primers for loci VNTR30, VNTR36. The amplified fragments were analyzed by gel electrophoresis . The sizes of the amplified products were estimated by comparison with a 100 -bp ladder. Results: All loci successfully amplified in all pathogenic leptospira serovars. The saprophytic serovar showed no amplified fragments. The results show VNTR30 has a wide range of polymorphism between Atumnalis, Hardjo St.Hardjo bovis, Pomona St. UT364, Icterohaemorrhagia St. RGA and VNTR36 shows variation between Canicola St. Hondutrecht IV , Hardjo St.Hardjo bovis, Pomona St. UT364 Conclusion: Most of the VNTR patterns were similar in different serovares while showed significant differences with same serovares of South America and Europe. On the other our serovares resemble Southeast Asia serovares because of the same geographical area. Among serovares Canicola St. Hondutrecht IV and Canicola St. Fiocruz LV133 identified by MLVA, PFGE was unable to differentiate them. In conclusion MLVA technique with wide range of polymorphism is known as good marker for identification serovares.

  2. Enterococcus faecium strains characterization through polymorphism study of VNTR loci

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    Belteghi, C.,

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are commensally bacteria of the gastrointestinal and female genital tract in humans and some mammals and birds, and one of the significant causes of hospital-acquired infections, especially in immuno-compromised patients. Genetic fingerprinting (DNA fingerprinting is a tool for identifying, marking and prevention of infectious agents dissemination. SSR (short sequence repeat are known to suffer frequent variations in the number of repetitive units.MLVA (multiple locus variable number tandem repeats analysis is a variant of genetic fingerprinting, in epidemiological studies on the pathogenetic Enterococcus faecium. Our study included laboratory Enterococcus faecium strains or isolated from clinical cases or from the environment (2003-2008. All analyzed strains of Enterococcus faecium were sensitive to vancomycin, except BM4147, and resistant to oxacilin. Strains isolated from the birds’ samples have shown a smaller resistance profile than those of human origin. 33 Enterococus faecium strains were analyzed by PCR amplification. 27 MT (VNTR profiles were obtained: six in the case of the strains isolated from birds, 15 in the case of the strains isolated form humans, 4 in the case of the collection strains and 2 in the case of the strains isolated from water samples. Among the strains isolated from humans and those isolated from animals, identical profiles were not recorded. Within the strains isolated from clinical cases, and those isolated from birds, circulating genotypes were noted, which can be considered as epidemical. The strains used as probiotics proved to be different from those circulating in birds. All MLVA profiles codes compared with those published on line in the UMC Utrecht database proved to be different. Results obtained in this study support the usefulness of the polymorphic VNTR analysis, as genetic marker, inepidemiological investigations.

  3. Allele distribution and genetic diversity of VNTR loci in Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates from different sources

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    Bartkus Joanne M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis is a zoonotic pathogen, which can be found in many sources including animals and the environment. However, little is known about the molecular relatedness among S. Enteritidis isolates from different sources. We have applied multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA to study the genetic diversity of S. Enteritidis isolates from human and non-human sources. Results We identified 38 unique MLVA types using nine VNTR loci markers for discrimination between 145 S. Enteritidis isolates from different sources including humans (n = 41, chickens (n = 45, and eggs (n = 40. There were 20 distinct MLVA types identified from human isolates, 17 distinct MLVA types from chicken isolates, and 5 from egg isolates. We compared allele distribution and frequency for each VNTR marker and measured allelic polymorphism within each VNTR locus of S. Enteritidis isolates from the sources using Nei's diversity index (D. Differences in allele distribution and frequency were detected in most loci of study isolates. Different genetic diversity for certain loci was identified in isolates from different sources. The average of genetic diversity (D was lower in egg isolates (0.16 compared to human (0.41 and chicken (0.30. However, for loci SE3, SE7, and SE9, human isolates showed significantly higher diversity than both chicken and egg isolates. Whereas for loci SE5 and SE10, chicken isolates had significantly higher diversity than both human and egg isolates. Minimum-spanning tree (MST comprised one major cluster, a minor cluster, and four clonal expansions. MLVA application enabled a cluster analysis by the MST of the S. Enteritidis isolates by sources, which allows a great insight into the genetic relatedness and the possible flow of these organisms between different reservoirs and humans. Conclusion Differences in allele distribution and genetic diversity of VNTR loci in S

  4. Genotyping of French Bacillus anthracis strains based on 31-loci multi locus VNTR analysis: epidemiology, marker evaluation, and update of the internet genotype database.

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    Simon Thierry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus anthracis is known to have low genetic variability. In spite of this lack of diversity, multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR analysis (MLVA and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs including the canonical SNPs assay (canSNP have proved to be highly effective to differentiate strains. Five different MLVA schemes based on a collection of 31 VNTR loci (MLVA8, MLVA15, MLVA20, MLVA25 and MLVA31 with increased resolving power have been described. RESULTS: MLVA31 was applied to characterize the French National Reference Laboratory collection. The total collection of 130 strains is resolved in 35 genotypes. The 119 veterinary and environmental strains collection in France were resolved into 26 genotypes belonging to three canSNP lineages and four MLVA clonal complexes (CCs with particular geographical clustering. A subset of seven loci (MLVA7 is proposed to constitute a first line assay. The loci are compatible with moderate resolution equipment such as agarose gel electrophoresis and show a good congruence value with MLVA31. The associated MLVA and SNP data was imported together with published genotyping data by taking advantage of major enhancements to the MLVAbank software and web site. CONCLUSIONS: The present report provides a wide coverage of the genetic diversity of naturally occurring B. anthracis strains in France as can be revealed by MLVA. The data obtained suggests that once such coverage is achieved, it becomes possible to devise optimized first-line MLVA assays comprising a sufficiently low number of loci to be typed either in one multiplex PCR or on agarose gels. Such a selection of seven loci is proposed here, and future similar investigations in additional countries will indicate to which extend the same selection can be used worldwide as a common minimum set. It is hoped that this approach will contribute to an efficient and low-cost routine surveillance of important pathogens for biosecurity such as

  5. Lab on a chip genotyping for Brucella spp. based on 15-loci multi locus VNTR analysis

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    Marianelli Cinzia

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis is an important zoonosis caused by the genus Brucella. In addition Brucella represents potential biological warfare agents due to the high contagious rates for humans and animals. Therefore, the strain typing epidemiological tool may be crucial for tracing back source of infection in outbreaks and discriminating naturally occurring outbreaks versus bioterroristic event. A Multiple Locus Variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR Analysis (MLVA assay based on 15 polymorphic markers was previously described. The obtained MLVA band profiles may be resolved by techniques ranging from low cost manual agarose gels to the more expensive capillary electrophoresis sequencing. In this paper a rapid, accurate and reproducible system, based on the Lab on a chip technology was set up for Brucella spp. genotyping. Results Seventeen DNA samples of Brucella strains isolated in Sicily, previously genotyped, and twelve DNA samples, provided by MLVA Brucella VNTR ring trial, were analyzed by MLVA-15 on Agilent 2100. The DNA fragment sizes produced by Agilent, compared with those expected, showed discrepancies; therefore, in order to assign the correct alleles to the Agilent DNA fragment sizes, a conversion table was produced. In order to validate the system twelve unknown DNA samples were analyzed by this method obtaining a full concordance with the VNTR ring trial results. Conclusion In this paper we described a rapid and specific detection method for the characterization of Brucella isolates. The comparison of the MLVA typing data produced by Agilent system with the data obtained by standard sequencing or ethidium bromide slab gel electrophoresis showed a general concordance of the results. Therefore this platform represents a fair compromise among costs, speed and specificity compared to any conventional molecular typing technique.

  6. Fieldable genotyping of Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis based on 25-loci Multi Locus VNTR Analysis

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    Carattoli Alessandra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthrax and plague are diseases caused by Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis respectively. These bacteria are etiological agents for worldwide zoonotic diseases and are considered among the most feared potential bioterror agents. Strain differentiation is difficult for these microorganisms because of their high intraspecies genome homogeneity. Moreover, fast strain identification and comparison with known genotypes may be crucial for naturally occurring outbreaks versus bioterrorist events discrimination. Results Thirty-nine B. anthracis and ten Y. pestis strains, representative of the species genetic diversity, were genotyped by Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer using previously described Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis assays (MLVA. Results were compared to previous data obtained by standard genotyping system (capillary electrophoresis on automatic sequencer and, when necessary, direct amplicon sequencing. A reference comparison table containing actual fragment sizes, sequencer sizes and Agilent sizes was produced. Conclusion In this report an automated DNA electrophoresis apparatus which provides a cheaper alternative compared to capillary electrophoresis approaches was applied for genotyping of B. anthracis and Y. pestis. This equipment, uses pre-cast gels and provides easy transportation, low maintenance and overall general logistic requirements and costs, is easy to set up and provides rapid analysis. This platform is a candidate for on-site MLVA genotyping of biothreat agents as well as other bacterial pathogens. It is an alternative to the more expensive and demanding capillary electrophoresis methods, and to the less expensive but more time-consuming classical gel electrophoresis approach.

  7. Determining the Risk of Intra-Community Transmission of Tuberculosis in the Northwest of Iran Through 15 Loci Miru-Vntr Typing

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    Afaghi-Gharamaleki, Ali; Moaddab, Seyyedreza; Darbouy, Mojtaba; Ansarin, Khalil; Hanifian, Shahram

    2017-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to investigating the effect of travelling on the transmission of tuberculosis from high- to low-burden TB countries. Mycobacteria samples isolated from patients of distinct and relatively co-related countries (Azerbaijan Republic and Tabriz [located in the northwest of Iran]) were analyzed through 15 loci MIRU-VNTR typing method. PCR was done using special primers for each of the loci; then the number of allele repeats for all loci were determined by the size of their fragments. Finally, the created numeric patterns for each isolate were analyzed and clustered, using MIRU-VNTRplus.org website. All 119 isolates dispersing at 106 distinct patterns were composed of 10 clusters with 23 members and 96 unique patterns. Nine and five loci had high and moderate discriminatory power, respectively, but only one of them was poor in clustering. The study showed that 89.08% of TB cases involved resulted from the reactivation pattern and 10.92% were related to ongoing transmission. Although Azerbaijan Republic is a higher-burden TB region than Tabriz and Azerbaijan people make frequent tours to Tabriz to receive low or free medical services, the findings showed no TB transmission from the regions at least during the year of the study.

  8. Development of new VNTR markers for pike and assessment of variability at di- and tetranucleotide repeat microsatellite loci

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    Hansen, Michael Møller; Taggart, J.B.; Meldrup, Dorte

    1999-01-01

    -0.57), though one highly variable microsatellite (13 alleles; expected heterozygosity 0.79) was identified. In combination with previously published microsatellites a set consisting of nine polymorphic loci appeared to be useful for discriminating populations, as determined by assignment tests. (C) 1999...

  9. Genotyping of Chlamydophila abortus strains by multilocus VNTR analysis.

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    Laroucau, Karine; Vorimore, Fabien; Bertin, Claire; Mohamad, Khalil Yousef; Thierry, Simon; Hermann, Willems; Maingourd, Cyril; Pourcel, Christine; Longbottom, David; Magnino, Simone; Sachse, Konrad; Vretou, Evangelia; Rodolakis, Annie

    2009-06-12

    Chlamydophila (C.) abortus is the causative agent of ovine enzootic abortion with zoonotic potential whose epidemiology has been held back because of the obligate intracellular habitat of the bacterium. In the present study, we report on a molecular typing method termed multiple loci variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) Analysis (MLVA) for exploring the diversity of C. abortus. An initial analysis performed with 34 selected genetic loci on 34 ruminant strains including the variant Greek strains LLG and POS resulted in the identification of five polymorphic loci, confirming the widely held notion that C. abortus is a very homogeneous species. Analysis of additional 111 samples with the selected five loci resulted in the classification of all strains into six genotypes with distinct molecular patterns termed genotypes [1] through [6]. Interestingly, the classification of the isolates in the six genotypes was partly related to their geographical origin. Direct examination of clinical samples proved the MLVA to be suitable for direct typing. Analysis of the genomic sequences in six C. abortus prototypes of amplicons generated with each of the five selected VNTR primers revealed that variation between genotypes was caused by the presence or absence of coding tandem repeats in three loci. Amplification of Chlamydophila psittaci reference strains with the five selected VNTR primers and of the six C. abortus prototype strains with the eight VNTR primers established for the typing of C. psittaci [Laroucau, K., Thierry, S., Vorimore, F., Blanco, K., Kaleta, E., Hoop, R., Magnino, S., Vanrompay, D., Sachse, K., Myers, G.S., Bavoil, P.M., Vergnaud, G., Pourcel, C., 2008. High resolution typing of Chlamydophila psittaci by multilocus VNTR analysis (MLVA). Infect. Genet. Evol. 8(2), 171-181] showed that both MLVA typing systems were species-specific when all respective VNTR primer sets were used. In conclusion, the newly developed MLVA system provides a highly sensitive

  10. [Evaluation of variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) isolates of Mycobacterium bovis in Algeria].

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    Sahraoui, Naima; Muller, Borna; Djamel, Yala; Fadéla, Boulahbal; Rachid, Ouzrout; Jakob, Zinsstag; Djamel, Guetarni

    2010-01-01

    The discriminatory potency of variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), based on 7 loci (MIRU 26, 27 and 5 ETRs A, B, C, D, E) was assayed on Mycobacterium bovis strains obtained from samples due to tuberculosis in two slaughterhouses in Algeria. The technique of MIRU-VNTR has been evaluated on 88 strains of M. bovis and one strain of M. caprea and shows 41 different profiles. Results showed that the VNTR were highly discriminatory with an allelic diversity of 0.930 when four loci (ETR A, B, C and MIRU 27) were highly discriminatory (h>0.25) and three loci (ETR D and E MIRU 26) moderately discriminatory (0.11VNTR loci were highly discriminatory be adequate for the first proper differentiation of strains of M. bovis in Algeria. The VNTR technique has proved a valuable tool for further development and application of epidemiological research for the of tuberculosis transmission in Algeria.

  11. A panel of VNTR markers in pigs.

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    Signer, E N; Gu, F; Jeffreys, A J

    1996-06-01

    By cloning tandemly repeated sequences from the pig genome by use of non-porcine minisatellite probes for library screening, five novel polymorphic VNTR loci were isolated: three minisatellites and two satellite-like loci. Four of them could be mapped onto chromosomes by linkage analysis and/or in situ hybridization. They were assigned to Chromosomes (Chrs) 5, 6, 14, and 16. Physical mapping on both presumed satellites and on one of the minisatellites revealed that the former resided near or at the centromere and the latter towards the chromosome ends. The location of the minisatellite is of particular interest since, together with data on three other minisatellites previously isolated, it supports the idea that, as in humans, minisatellites may preferentially be subtelomeric also in pigs.

  12. Genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing family based on SNP and VNTR typing profiles in Asian countries.

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    Yih-Yuan Chen

    Full Text Available The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB Beijing strain is highly virulent, drug resistant, and endemic over Asia. To explore the genetic diversity of this family in several different regions of eastern Asia, 338 Beijing strains collected in Taiwan (Republic of China were analyzed by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR typing and compared with published MIRU-VNTR profiles and by the Hunter-Gaston diversity index (HGDI of Beijing strains from Japan and South Korea. The results revealed that VNTR2163b (HGDI>0.6 and five other loci (VNTR424, VNTR4052, VNTR1955, VNTR4156 and VNTR 2996; HGDI>0.3 could be used to discriminate the Beijing strains in a given geographic region. Analysis based on the number of VNTR repeats showed three VNTRs (VNTR424, 3192, and 1955 to be phylogenetically informative loci. In addition, to determine the geographic variation of sequence types in MTB populations, we also compared sequence type (ST data of our strains with published ST profiles of Beijing strains from Japan and Thailand. ST10, ST22, and ST19 were found to be prevalent in Taiwan (82% and Thailand (92%. Furthermore, classification of Beijing sublineages as ancient or modern in Taiwan was found to depend on the repeat number of VNTR424. Finally, phylogenetic relationships of MTB isolates in Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan were revealed by a minimum spanning tree based on MIRU-VNTR genotyping. In this topology, the MIRU-VNTR genotypes of the respective clusters were tightly correlated to other genotypic characters. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that clonal evolution of these MTB lineages has occurred.

  13. [Discriminatory power of variable number on tandem repeats loci for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in China].

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    Chen, H X; Cai, C; Liu, J Y; Zhang, Z G; Yuan, M; Jia, J N; Sun, Z G; Huang, H R; Gao, J M; Li, W M

    2017-06-10

    Objective: Using the standard genotype method, variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), we constructed a VNTR database to cover all provinces and proposed a set of optimized VNTR loci combinations for each province, in order to improve the preventive and control programs on tuberculosis, in China. Methods: A total of 15 loci VNTR was used to analyze 4 116 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, isolated from national survey of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis, in 2007. Hunter-Gaston Index (HGI) was also used to analyze the discriminatory power of each VNTR site. A set combination of 12-VNTR, 10-VNTR, 8-VNTR and 5-VNTR was respectively constructed for each province, based on 1) epidemic characteristics of M. tuberculosis lineages in China, with high discriminatory power and genetic stability. Results: Through the completed 15 loci VNTR patterns of 3 966 strains under 96.36% (3 966/4 116) coverage, we found seven high HGI loci (including QUB11b and MIRU26) as well as low stable loci (including QUB26, MIRU16, Mtub21 and QUB11b) in several areas. In all the 31 provinces, we found an optimization VNTR combination as 10-VNTR loci in Inner Mongolia, Chongqing and Heilongjiang, but with 8-VNTR combination shared in other provinces. Conclusions: It is necessary to not only use the VNTR database for tracing the source of infection and cluster of M. tuberculosis in the nation but also using the set of optimized VNTR combinations in monitoring those local epidemics and M. tuberculosis (genetics in local) population.

  14. Genotypic characterization by spoligotyping and VNTR typing of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae isolates from cattle of Tunisia.

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    Lamine-Khemiri, Hela; Martínez, Remigio; García-Jiménez, Waldo Luis; Benítez-Medina, Jose Manuel; Cortés, Maria; Hurtado, Inés; Abassi, Mohammed Salah; Khazri, Imed; Benzarti, Mohammed; Hermoso-de-Mendoza, Javier

    2014-02-01

    This work is an approach to the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) bovine infections in Tunisia. A total of 35 MTBC isolates from both lateral retropharyngeal lymph node samples of cattle slaughtered in different Tunisian regions were genotyped by spoligotyping and variable number tandem repeat typing (VNTR)-typing. Spoligotyping allowed to identify two profiles not previously registered, namely SB2024, a Mycobacterium caprae isolate from Nabeul Region (North East Tunisia), the first description of this species in the country, and SB2025 (Mycobacterium bovis) from Sfax Region (Southern Tunisia). A second M. caprae isolate with a spoligotyping profile previously described in Europe mainland, SB0418, was also isolated from a bovine of Sfax region. Both isolates suggest the possibility of a widespread distribution of this species in the country. The predominant spoligotype was SB0120, present in all Tunisian regions selected for the study but Nabeul. Molecular typing also allowed to describe a mixed infection caused by two different M. bovis isolates (SB0120 and SB0848) in the same animal. VNTR typing was highly discriminant by testing a panel of six loci. Loci QUB3232 and QUB11b were the most discriminant, whereas ETR-D and QUB11a had the lower diversity index. The value of allelic diversity can significantly vary among countries; thus, it is important to standardize a panel of loci for future inter-laboratory comparisons. Although VNTR typing proved to be useful for an efficient discrimination among MTBC isolates, especially in combination with spoligotyping, further studies are needed in order to assess the genetic diversity of the MTBC in Tunisia.

  15. Diabetes susceptibility at IDDM2 cannot be positively mapped to the VNTR locus of the insulin gene.

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    Doria, A; Lee, J; Warram, J H; Krolewski, A S

    1996-05-01

    An inconsistency has come to light between the conclusion of Lucassen et al. that IDDM2 (11p15.5) must lie within a 4.1 kilobase (kb) segment at the insulin (INS) locus and their own data showing statistically significant associations between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and markers beyond the boundaries of that segment. We present data from an independent study of 201 IDDM patients and 107 non-diabetic control subjects that also show significant association with a marker 5' of the INS locus. Patients and control subjects were genotyped at INS/+ 1140 A/C (a surrogate for the variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the regulatory part of the INS gene) and a marker 5' of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, TH/pINS500-RsaI, making it 10 kb 5' of the VNTR. Homozygotes for INS/ + 1140 allele '+' were significantly more frequent among IDDM patients than among control subjects (73 vs 45%, p < 0.001) giving an odds ratio of 3.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.0-5.3). A very similar association was found for homozygotes for the TH/RsaI allele '+' (53 vs 31%, p < 0.001) giving an odds ratio of 2.6 (95%CI 1.6-4.2). By multilocus analysis, the TH/RsaI allele '+' identified a subset of INS/ + 1140 alleles '+' haplotypes that are more specifically associated with IDDM (odds ratio = 5.4, 95%CI 2.9-10.4) than allele + 1140 '+' as a whole. In conclusion, the segment of chromosome 11 that is associated with IDDM spans, at least, the INS and TH loci. No legitimate claim can be made that IDDM2 corresponds to the VNTR polymorphism at the INS locus until the correct boundaries for IDDM2 have been defined and other loci within them have been excluded as determinants of IDDM.

  16. First report of MIRU-VNTR genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates from Egypt.

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    Fawzy, A; Fayed, A; Youssef, H; El-Sayed, A; Zschöck, M

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease, an economically important disease in ruminants worldwide. It was first isolated in Egypt in 2005. Since then, the pathogen has been detected in different Egyptian provinces. In order to trace the source of infection, genotyping using simple methods of high discriminatory power such as mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) were carried out in different countries. Until now there is no published information about MIRU-VNTR genotyping of MAP isolates in Egypt. To address that point, 100 faecal samples were collected and cultivated from 3 different suspected dairy farms. Fourteen isolates belonging to one farm were identified as MAP and subjected to genotyping using 8 different MIRU-VNTR loci PCRs. Two different genotypes were recognized based on size polymorphism observed in one locus (VNTR-7) that was confirmed by sequencing. Our work provides a preliminary basis of constructing a MIRU-VNTR genotyping database of MAP in Egypt.

  17. Genetic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Assam, India: Dominance of Beijing Family and Discovery of Two New Clades Related to CAS1_Delhi and EAI Family Based on Spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR Typing.

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    Devi, Kangjam Rekha; Bhutia, Rinchenla; Bhowmick, Shovonlal; Mukherjee, Kaustab; Mahanta, Jagadish; Narain, Kanwar

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health concerns in Assam, a remote state located in the northeastern (NE) region of India. The present study was undertaken to explore the circulating genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in this region. A total of 189 MTBC strains were collected from smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases from different designated microscopy centres (DMC) from various localities of Assam. All MTBC isolates were cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) media and subsequently genotyped using spoligotyping and 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Spoligotyping of MTBC isolates revealed 89 distinct spoligo patterns. The most dominant MTBC strain belonged to Beijing lineage and was represented by 35.45% (n = 67) of total isolates, followed by MTBC strains belonging to Central Asian-Delhi (CAS/Delhi) lineage and East African Indian (EAI5) lineage. In addition, in the present study 43 unknown spoligo patterns were detected. The discriminatory power of spoligotyping was found to be 0.8637 based on Hunter Gaston Discriminatory Index (HGDI). On the other hand, 24-loci MIRU-VNTR typing revealed that out of total 189 MTBC isolates from Assam 185 (97.9%) isolates had unique MIRU-VNTR profiles and 4 isolates grouped into 2 clusters. Phylogenetic analysis of 67 Beijing isolates based on 24-loci MIRU-VNTR typing revealed that Beijing isolates from Assam represent two major groups, each comprising of several subgroups. Neighbour-Joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree analysis based on combined spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTR data of 78 Non-Beijing isolates was carried out for strain lineage identification as implemented by MIRU-VNTRplus database. The important lineages of MTBC identified were CAS/CAS1_Delhi (41.02%, n = 78) and East-African-Indian (EAI, 33.33%). Interestingly, phylogenetic analysis of orphan (23.28%) MTBC spoligotypes revealed that majority of these orphan

  18. Molecular strain typing of Brucella abortus isolates from Italy by two VNTR allele sizing technologies.

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    De Santis, Riccardo; Ancora, Massimo; De Massis, Fabrizio; Ciammaruconi, Andrea; Zilli, Katiuscia; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Pittiglio, Valentina; Fillo, Silvia; Lista, Florigio

    2013-10-01

    Brucellosis, one of the most important re-emerging zoonoses in many countries, is caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Brucella. Furthermore these bacteria represent potential biological warfare agents and the identification of species and biovars of field strains may be crucial for tracing back source of infection, allowing to discriminate naturally occurring outbreaks instead of bioterrorist events. In the last years, multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) has been proposed as complement of the classical biotyping methods and it has been applied for genotyping large collections of Brucella spp. At present, the MLVA band profiles may be resolved by automated or manual procedures. The Lab on a chip technology represents a valid alternative to standard genotyping techniques (as agarose gel electrophoresis) and it has been previously used for Brucella genotyping. Recently, a new high-throughput genotyping analysis system based on capillary gel electrophoresis, the QIAxcel, has been described. The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of two DNA sizing equipments, the QIAxcel System and the Lab chip GX, to correctly call alleles at the sixteen loci including one frequently used MLVA assay for Brucella genotyping. The results confirmed that these technologies represent a meaningful advancement in high-throughput Brucella genotyping. Considering the accuracy required to confidently resolve loci discrimination, QIAxcel shows a better ability to measure VNTR allele sizes compared to LabChip GX.

  19. Association between INS-VNTR polymorphism and polycystic ovary syndrome in a Korean population.

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    Yun, Ji-Hyun; Gu, Bon-Hee; Kang, Yu-Bin; Choi, Bum-Chae; Song, Sangjin; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common disorder in women of reproductive ages. But its etiology is not fully understood yet. Variability in the number of tandem repeats of the insulin gene (INS-VNTR) is known to associate with PCOS, and it is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and other cardiovascular diseases. The aim of our study was to analyze an association between the INS-VNTR polymorphism and PCOS in a Korean population. The -23/Hph I polymorphism was used as a surrogate marker for INS-VNTR polymorphism and a total of 218 PCOS patient and 141 control DNAs were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Statistical analysis of genotyping results were performed using HapAnalyzer. χ² test and logistic regression were used to analyze the association between two groups. A p value In conclusion, there was no association between PCOS and INS-VNTR polymorphism (p = 0.0544, odds ratio = 1.69). Our present data demonstrate that INS-VNTR polymorphism is not related with PCOS in Korean women. Thus, it is suggested that INS-VNTR polymorphism is not a key factor in the etiology and the pathogenesis of PCOS in a Korean population.

  20. MIRU-VNTR Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains Using QIAxcel Technology: A Multicentre Evaluation Study.

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    Vladyslav Nikolayevskyy

    Full Text Available Molecular genotyping of M.tuberculosis is an important laboratory tool in the context of emerging drug resistant TB. The standard 24-loci MIRU-VNTR typing includes PCR amplification followed by the detection and sizing of PCR fragments using capillary electrophoresis on automated sequencers or using agarose gels. The QIAxcel Advanced system might offer a cost-effective medium-throughput alternative.Performance characteristics of the QIAxcel Advanced platform for the standard 24 VNTR loci panel was evaluated at two centres on a total of 140 DNA specimens using automated capillary electrophoresis as a reference method. Additionally 4 hypervariable MIRU-VNTR loci were evaluated on 53 crude DNA extracts. The sizing accuracy, interlaboratory reproducibility and overall instrument's performance were assessed during the study.An overall concordance with the reference method was high reaching 98.5% and 97.6% for diluted genomic and crude DNA extracts respectively. 91.4% of all discrepancies were observed in fragments longer than 700bp. The concordance for hypervariable loci was lower except for locus 4120 (96.2%. The interlaboratory reproducibility agreement rates were 98.9% and 91.3% for standard and hypervariable loci, respectively. Overall performance of the QIAxcel platform for M.tuberculosis genotyping using a panel of standard loci is comparable to that of established methods for PCR fragments up to 700bp. Inaccuracies in sizing of longer fragments could be resolved through using in-house size markers or introduction of offset values. To conclude, the QiaXcel system could be considered an effective alternative to existing methods in smaller reference and regional laboratories offering good performance and shorter turnaround times.

  1. [Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its prospect based on variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) genotyping--a strategy in Osaka City, Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takayuki; Hase, Atsushi

    2010-12-01

    The methodological establishment of variable number of tandem repeat(s) (VNTR) genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has opened a new era of molecular epidemiology against tuberculosis (TB). The method can provide simple, rapid and accurate identification of clinical isolates from TB patients that makes it possible to compare the isolates among different laboratories. Such advantages of VNTR not only help us certify the identification of isolates in putative outbreaks easily but also promote the reasonable estimation of unidentified transmissions in surveillance studies. Recently, the Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association (JATA) (12)-VNTR has become a standard genotyping method of M. tuberculosis, and its spread has been expected in Japan. In Osaka City, located in the western part of the country, JATA (12)-VNTR has been applied to molecular epidemiological study of TB. Moreover, the additional 12 VNTR loci have been analyzed for various purposes, such as to enhance the discriminatory power (public health needs) or to further analyze the population genetic structure (research needs). As the nationwide findings of VNTR genotyping of M. tuberculosis are accumulated, this technology will be increasingly useful for detecting transmission of any specific strain in large geographic areas that could not be recognized by conventional epidemiological methods. The needs for the VNTR genotyping of M. tuberculosis and its practical uses are expected to expand drastically in the future.

  2. Identification of GATA2 and AP-1 activator elements within the enhancer VNTR occurring in intron 5 of the human SIRT3 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human SIRT3 gene contains an intronic VNTR enhancer. A T > C transition occurring in the second repeat of each VNTR allele implies the presence/absence of a putative GATA binding motif. A partially overlapping AP-1 site, not affected by the transition, was also identified. Aims of the present study ...

  3. Evolutionary history of the PER3 variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR: idiosyncratic aspect of primate molecular circadian clock.

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    Flávia Cal Sabino

    Full Text Available The PER3 gene is one of the clock genes, which function in the core mammalian molecular circadian system. A variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR locus in the 18th exon of this gene has been strongly associated to circadian rhythm phenotypes and sleep organization in humans, but it has not been identified in other mammals except primates. To better understand the evolution and the placement of the PER3 VNTR in a phylogenetical context, the present study enlarges the investigation about the presence and the structure of this variable region in a large sample of primate species and other mammals. The analysis of the results has revealed that the PER3 VNTR occurs exclusively in simiiforme primates and that the number of copies of the primitive unit ranges from 2 to 11 across different primate species. Two transposable elements surrounding the 18th exon of PER3 were found in primates with published genome sequences, including the tarsiiforme Tarsius syrichta, which lacks the VNTR. These results suggest that this VNTR may have evolved in a common ancestor of the simiiforme branch and that the evolutionary copy number differentiation of this VNTR may be associated with primate simiiformes sleep and circadian phenotype patterns.

  4. Implementation of a Consensus Set of Hypervariable Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Loci in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Molecular Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Alberto; Tafaj, Silva; Battaglia, Simone; Alagna, Riccardo; Bardhi, Donika; Kapisyzi, Perlat; Bala, Silvana; Haldeda, Migena; Borroni, Emanuele; Hafizi, Hasan; Cirillo, Daniela Maria

    2016-02-01

    This study shows that the addition of a consensus 4-locus set of hypervariable mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) loci to the spoligotyping-24-locus MIRU-VNTR typing strategy is a well-standardized approach that can contribute to an improvement of the true cluster definition while retaining high typeability in non-Beijing strains.

  5. Clinical characteristics and outcome of patients with neuroblastoma presenting genomic amplification of loci other than MYCN.

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    Anne Guimier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Somatically acquired genomic alterations with MYCN amplification (MNA are key features of neuroblastoma (NB, the most common extra-cranial malignant tumour of childhood. Little is known about the frequency, clinical characteristics and outcome of NBs harbouring genomic amplification(s distinct from MYCN. METHODS: Genomic profiles of 1100 NBs from French centres studied by array-CGH were re-examined specifically to identify regional amplifications. Patients were included if amplifications distinct from the MYCN locus were seen. A subset of NBs treated at Institut Curie and harbouring MNA as determined by array-CGH without other amplification was also studied. Clinical and histology data were retrospectively collected. RESULTS: In total, 56 patients were included and categorised into 3 groups. Group 1 (n = 8 presented regional amplification(s without MNA. Locus 12q13-14 was a recurrent amplified region (4/8 cases. This group was heterogeneous in terms of INSS stages, primary localisations and histology, with atypical clinical features. Group 2 (n = 26 had MNA as well as other regional amplifications. These patients shared clinical features of those of a group of NBs MYCN amplified (Group 3, n = 22. Overall survival for group 1 was better than that of groups 2 and 3 (5 year OS: 87.5%±11% vs 34.9%±7%, log-rank p<0.05. CONCLUSION: NBs harbouring regional amplification(s without MNA are rare and seem to show atypical features in clinical presentation and genomic profile. Further high resolution genetic explorations are justified in this heterogeneous group, especially when considering these alterations as predictive markers for targeted therapy.

  6. Paternity testing with VNTR DNA systems. I. Matching criteria and population frequencies of the VNTR systems D2S44, D5S43, D7S21, D7S22, and D12S11 in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Hansen, Hanna Elsebeth

    1993-01-01

    of the putative father as an exclusion in paternity testing. This matching criterion was used for the comparisons of 1,197 DNA fragment differences in 247 pairs of children and putative fathers who had not been excluded by conventional marker systems. In all of these cases, the migration differences between......Paternity testing using DNA polymorphism of variable numbers of tandem repeat (VNTR) regions with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was implemented. HinfI-digested DNA was separated by electrophoresis in agarose gels and hybridized with radiolabelled probes detecting the VNTR...... testing were established. The frequency distribution of HinfI digested DNA fragments of the 5 VNTR systems in 650 unrelated Danes is presented and the raw data is available....

  7. No association of the insulin gene VNTR polymorphism with polycystic ovary syndrome in a Han Chinese population

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    Gao Guihua

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a common endocrine disorder associated with an increased risk of type II diabetes mellitus. The results of previous research about the association of the VNTR polymorphism in 5-prime flanking region of the insulin (INS gene with PCOS have been inconsistent. The present study was to investigate the association of the INS-VNTR polymorphism with PCOS in a Han Chinese population. Methods The -23/HphI polymorphism as a surrogate marker of the INS-VNTR length polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP in 216 PCOS patients and 192 non-PCOS women as a control group. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were compared between patients and controls, and these results were analyzed in respect to clinical test data. Results No significant differences were observed between the cases and controls groups either in allele (P = 0.996 or genotype (P = 0.802 frequencies of INS-VNTR polymorphism; Regarding anthropometric data and hormone levels, there were no significant differences between INS-VNTR genotypes in the PCOS group, as well as in the non-PCOS group. Conclusion The present study demonstrated for the first time that the INS-VNTR polymorphism is not a key risk factor for sporadic PCOS in the Han Chinese women. Further studies are needed to give a global view of this polymorphism in pathogenesis of PCOS in a large-scale sample, family-based association design or well-defined subgroups of PCOS.

  8. PCR-based VNTR core sequence analysis for inferring genetic diversity in the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

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    Freitas Patrícia Domingues de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic variation in two farmed strains (F3-Panama and F17-Venezuela of the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei was examined based on DNA multiloci analyses. Eighteen adults of each strain were analyzed by PCR using a set of VNTR core sequence primers. Genetic similarity, mean allele frequency, mean heterozygosity and the frequency of polymorphic loci were determined for both strains. A dendrogram of genetic similarity was produced by UPGMA clustering. The results for three primers (INS, M13, YN73 revealed different levels of genetic variation within the strains. The higher genetic similarity seen within strain F17 was apparently related to inbreeding, although a bottleneck effect could not be discarded. The low level of genetic variability of this strain could account for the reduced adaptive advantage of these animals and their inability to adjust to breeding conditions in Brazil.

  9. Lack of association of DRD4 exon 3 VNTR genotype with reactivity to dynamic smoking cues in movies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lochbühler, K.C.; Verhagen, M.; Munafo, M.R.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objective of the present study was first to examine whether dynamic smoking cues in movies trigger craving, and second to explore whether the DRD4 48 bp variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) exon 3 genotype modifies this relationship. Using an experimental design, daily adult smoke

  10. Genotipificación por VNTR de aislados de Mycobacterium bovis de ganado sacrificado en Baja California, México

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    Carlos Martínez-Vidal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En México, la tuberculosis bovina (TBB es uno de los principales problemas que enfrenta la ganadería nacional. Las diferentes técnicas de genotipificación pueden ayudar a establecer la relación que existe entre las diferentes cepas presentes en una región y determinar algunos factores que incidan posteriormente en los programas de control y erradicación de la enfermedad. En el presente trabajo se aplicó la técnica de número variable de repeticiones en secuencia (VNTR a 11 aislados provenientes de ganado sacrificado en un rastro de Mexicali BC, y a 10 aislados de ganado sacrificado en un rastro de Tijuana. Se utilizaron oligonucleótidos específicos para amplificar los loci ETR-A, ETR-B, QUB-11a, QUB-11b, QUB-1895, QUB-26, QUB-3232 y QUB-3336, determinándose el parentesco relativo entre las cepas aisladas, así como el poder discriminatorio para cada locus en particular y para todos los loci en su conjunto. Se obtuvieron 14 perfiles alélicos al utilizar los ocho loci con un poder discriminatorio de 0.90 siendo el locus QUB 3336 el que mostró el mayor poder discriminatorio (h=0.72 en tanto el locus ETR-B mostró un nulo poder discriminatorio (h=0.00. En un dendrograma, se observaron seis grupos genéticos, en los cuales se encuentran indistintamente aislados de Tijuana y Mexicali Baja California; sin embargo, se encontraron genotipos específicos para cada una de las dos regiones. Los resultados sugieren que aunque el movimiento de ganado y la compra-venta en la región han provocado la dispersión de cepas en estas dos áreas, se puede discernir el origen de la mayoría de los aislados.

  11. VNTR-DAT1 and COMTVal158Met Genotypes Modulate Mental Flexibility and Adaptive Behavior Skills in Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hoyo, Laura; Xicota, Laura; Langohr, Klaus; Sánchez-Benavides, Gonzalo; de Sola, Susana; Cuenca-Royo, Aida; Rodriguez, Joan; Rodríguez-Morató, Jose; Farré, Magí; Dierssen, Mara; de la Torre, Rafael; Cuenca-Royo, Aida

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is an aneuploidy syndrome that is caused by trisomy for human chromosome 21 resulting in a characteristic cognitive and behavioral phenotype, which includes executive functioning and adaptive behavior difficulties possibly due to prefrontal cortex (PFC) deficits. DS also present a high risk for early onset of Alzheimer Disease-like dementia. The dopamine (DA) system plays a neuromodulatory role in the activity of the PFC. Several studies have implicated trait differences in DA signaling on executive functioning based on genetic polymorphisms in the genes encoding for the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMTVal158Met) and the dopamine transporter (VNTR-DAT1). Since it is known that the phenotypic consequences of genetic variants are modulated by the genetic background in which they occur, we here explore whether these polymorphisms variants interact with the trisomic genetic background to influence gene expression, and how this in turn mediates DS phenotype variability regarding PFC cognition. We genotyped 69 young adults of both genders with DS, and found that VNTR-DAT1 was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium but COMTVal158Met had a reduced frequency of Met allele homozygotes. In our population, genotypes conferring higher DA availability, such as Met allele carriers and VNTR-DAT1 10-repeat allele homozygotes, resulted in improved performance in executive function tasks that require mental flexibility. Met allele carriers showed worse adaptive social skills and self-direction, and increased scores in the social subscale of the Dementia Questionnaire for People with Intellectual Disabilities than Val allele homozygotes. The VNTR-DAT1 was not involved in adaptive behavior or early dementia symptoms. Our results suggest that genetic variants of COMTVal158Met and VNTR-DAT1 may contribute to PFC-dependent cognition, while only COMTVal158Met is involved in behavioral phenotypes of DS, similar to euploid population. PMID:27799900

  12. VNTR-DAT1 and COMTVal158Met genotypes modulate mental flexibility and adaptive behavior skills in Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Del Hoyo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is an aneuploidy syndrome that is caused by trisomy for human chromosome 21 resulting in a characteristic cognitive and behavioral phenotype, which includes executive functioning and adaptive behavior difficulties possibly due to prefrontal cortex (PFC deficits. DS also present a high risk for early onset of Alzheimer Disease (AD-like dementia. The dopamine (DA system plays a neuromodulatory role in the activity of the PFC. Several studies have implicated trait differences in DA signaling on executive functioning based on genetic polymorphisms in the genes encoding for the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMTVal158Met and the dopamine transporter (VNTR-DAT1. Since it is known that the phenotypic consequences of genetic variants are modulated by the genetic background in which they occur, we here explore whether these polymorphisms variants interact with the trisomic genetic background to influence gene expression, and how this in turn mediates DS phenotype variability regarding PFC cognition. We genotyped 69 young adults of both genders with DS, and found that VNTR-DAT1 was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium but COMTVal158Met had a reduced frequency of Met allele homozygotes. In our population, genotypes conferring higher DA availability, such as Met allele carriers and VNTR-DAT1 10-repeat allele homozygotes, resulted in improved performance in executive function tasks that require mental flexibility. Met allele carriers showed worse adaptive social skills and self-direction, and increased scores in the social subscale of the Dementia Questionnaire for People with Intellectual Disabilities than Val allele homozygotes. The VNTR-DAT1 was not involved in adaptive behavior or early dementia symptoms. Our results suggest that genetic variants of COMTVal158Met and VNTR-DAT1 may contribute to PFC-dependent cognition, while only COMTVal158Met is involved in behavioral phenotypes of DS, similar to euploid population.

  13. Suitability of IS6110-RFLP and MIRU-VNTR for Differentiating Spoligotyped Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates from Sichuan in China

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    Chao Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC vary with the geographic origin of the patients and can affect tuberculosis (TB transmission. This study was aimed to further differentiate spoligotype-defined clusters of drug-resistant MTBC clinical isolates split in Beijing (n=190 versus non-Beijing isolates (n=84 from Sichuan region, the second high-burden province in China, by IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP and 24-locus MIRU-VNTRs. Among 274 spoligotyped isolates, the clustering ratio of Beijing family was 5.3% by 24-locus MIRU-VNTRs versus 2.1% by IS6110-RFLP, while none of the non-Beijing isolates were clustered by 24-locus MIRU-VNTRs versus 9.5% by IS6110-RFLP. Hence, neither the 24-locus MIRU-VNTR was sufficient enough to fully discriminate the Beijing family, nor the IS6110-RFLP for the non-Beijing isolates. A region adjusted scheme combining 12 highly discriminatory VNTR loci with IS6110-RFLP was a better alternative for typing Beijing strains in Sichuan than 24-locus MIRU-VNTRs alone. IS6110-RFLP was for the first time introduced to systematically genotype MTBC in Sichuan and we conclude that the region-adjusted scheme of 12 highly discriminative VNTRs might be a suitable alternative to 24-locus MIRU-VNTR scheme for non-Beijing strains, while the clusters of the Beijing isolates should be further subtyped using IS6110-RFLP for optimal discrimination.

  14. VNTR analysis reveals unexpected genetic diversity within Mycoplasma agalactiae, the main causative agent of contagious agalactia

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    Ayling Roger D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma agalactiae is the main cause of contagious agalactia, a serious disease of sheep and goats, which has major clinical and economic impacts. Previous studies of M. agalactiae have shown it to be unusually homogeneous and there are currently no available epidemiological techniques which enable a high degree of strain differentiation. Results We have developed variable number tandem repeat (VNTR analysis using the sequenced genome of the M. agalactiae type strain PG2. The PG2 genome was found to be replete with tandem repeat sequences and 4 were chosen for further analysis. VNTR 5 was located within the hypothetical protein MAG6170 a predicted lipoprotein. VNTR 14 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG3350 and the hypothetical protein MAG3340. VNTR 17 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG4060 and the hypothetical protein MAG4070 and VNTR 19 spanned the 5' end of the pseudogene for a lipoprotein MAG4310 and the 3' end of the hypothetical lipoprotein MAG4320. We have investigated the genetic diversity of 88 M. agalactiae isolates of wide geographic origin using VNTR analysis and compared it with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis. Simpson's index of diversity was calculated to be 0.324 for PFGE and 0.574 for VNTR analysis. VNTR analysis revealed unexpected diversity within M. agalactiae with 9 different VNTR types discovered. Some correlation was found between geographical origin and the VNTR type of the isolates. Conclusion VNTR analysis represents a useful, rapid first-line test for use in molecular epidemiological analysis of M. agalactiae for outbreak tracing and control.

  15. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Complex by 24-Locus Based MIRU-VNTR Typing in Conjunction with Spoligotyping to Assess Genetic Diversity of Strains Circulating in Morocco.

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    Nada Bouklata

    Full Text Available Standard 24-locus Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit Variable Number Tandem Repeat (MIRU-VNTR typing allows to get an improved resolution power for tracing TB transmission and predicting different strain (sub lineages in a community.During 2010-2012, a total of 168 Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex (MTBC isolates were collected by cluster sampling from 10 different Moroccan cities, and centralized by the National Reference Laboratory of Tuberculosis over the study period. All isolates were genotyped using spoligotyping, and a subset of 75 was genotyped using 24-locus based MIRU-VNTR typing, followed by first line drug susceptibility testing. Corresponding strain lineages were predicted using MIRU-VNTRplus database.Spoligotyping resulted in 137 isolates in 18 clusters (2-50 isolates per cluster: clustering rate of 81.54% corresponding to a SIT number in the SITVIT database, while 31(18.45% patterns were unique of which 10 were labelled as "unknown" according to the same database. The most prevalent spoligotype family was LAM; (n = 81 or 48.24% of isolates, dominated by SIT42, n = 49, followed by Haarlem (23.80%, T superfamily (15.47%, >Beijing (2.97%, > U clade (2.38% and S clade (1.19%. Subsequent 24-Locus MIRU-VNTR typing identified 64 unique types and 11 isolates in 5 clusters (2 to 3isolates per cluster, substantially reducing clusters defined by spoligotyping only. The single cluster of three isolates corresponded to two previously treated MDR-TB cases and one new MDR-TB case known to be contact a same index case and belonging to a same family, albeit residing in 3 different administrative regions. MIRU-VNTR loci 4052, 802, 2996, 2163b, 3690, 1955, 424, 2531, 2401 and 960 were highly discriminative in our setting (HGDI >0.6.24-locus MIRU-VNTR typing can substantially improve the resolution of large clusters initially defined by spoligotyping alone and predominating in Morocco, and could therefore be used to better study tuberculosis

  16. Genetic polymorphism study at four minisatellite loci (D1S80, D17S5, D19S20, and APOB) among five Indian population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Birajalaxmi; Ghosh, Anu; Chauhan, P S; Seshadri, M

    2002-06-01

    The present study reports the genetic variation observed among five anthropologically distinct population groups of India, using four highly polymorphic minisatellite loci (D1S80, D17S5, D19S20, and APOB 3' VNTR) in order to examine the effect of geographical and linguistic affiliations on the genetic affinities among these groups. Random individuals from five ethnic groups were studied; the sample size ranged from 235 to 364. The population groups belong to two geographically separated regions of India, the state of Maharashtra (western India) and the state of Kerala (southern India). The two Maharashtrian groups (Konkanastha Brahmins and Marathas) speak "Marathi," an Indo-European language, whereas the three Kerala population groups (Nairs, Ezhavas, and Muslims) speak "Malayalam," an Indo-Dravidian language. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples and analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (Amp-FLP) technique. All four loci displayed high heterozygosity with average heterozygosity in the range of 0.82 to 0.84. The Polymorphic Information Content and Power of Discrimination were > or = 0.75 and > or = 0.80, respectively. The coefficient of gene differentiation was found to be low (average G(ST) = 1.2%; range between 0.6% at D1S80 locus to 1.6% at APOB 3' VNTR locus) across the loci, indicating close affinity among the population groups. The neighbor-joining tree revealed two clear clusters, one for the two Maharashtrian population groups and the other for the three Kerala population groups. The results obtained are in conformity with the geographical and linguistic backgrounds of the studied populations.

  17. Brain morphometric correlates of MAOA-uVNTR polymorphism in violent behavior

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    C. Romero-Rebollar

    2015-01-01

    Discussion: This findings suggests that grey matter integrity in superior temporal pole could be a neurobiological correlate of the allelic association between MAOA-uVNTR polymorphism and violent behavior due to its implication in socio-emotional processing.

  18. FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION OF INTRONIC POLYMORPHISMS OF IL1-raVNTR AND IL-4VNTR IN RHEUMATIC MITRAL VALVE DISEASE IN CAUCASIAN POPULATION OF SIBERIA

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    A. V. Ponasenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A search for associations between allelic variations of immune response genes, and mitral stenosis associated with rheumatic heart disease, represents an important task when studying the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders among inhabitants of large industrial regions in Western Siberia. Among multiple polymorphisms of interleukin-encoding genes, a particular attention should be paid to association studies of some intronic polymorphisms with variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTR. In this respect, genotyping of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist genes (IL-1ra86bp VNTR and interleukin 4 (IL-470bp VNTR has shown positive associations between the intron 2 IL-1ra*3R/3R microsatellite polymorphism, intron 3 IL-4*2R/2R variant, and the risk of mitral stenosis development in patients with rheumatic heart disease (OR = 12.71; p = 0.0001.  

  19. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Avis E.; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B.; Lan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity. PMID:27048654

  20. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Avis E; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-05-20

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity.

  1. DRD4-exonIII-VNTR moderates the effect of childhood adversities on emotional resilience in young-adults.

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    Debjani Das

    Full Text Available Most individuals successfully maintain psychological well-being even when exposed to trauma or adversity. Emotional resilience or the ability to thrive in the face of adversity is determined by complex interactions between genetic makeup, previous exposure to stress, personality, coping style, availability of social support, etc. Recent studies have demonstrated that childhood trauma diminishes resilience in adults and affects mental health. The Dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4 exon III variable number tandem repeat (VNTR polymorphism was reported to moderate the impact of adverse childhood environment on behaviour, mood and other health-related outcomes. In this study we investigated whether DRD4-exIII-VNTR genotype moderates the effect of childhood adversities (CA on resilience. In a representative population sample (n = 1148 aged 30-34 years, we observed an interactive effect of DRD4 genotype and CA (β = 0.132; p = 0.003 on resilience despite no main effect of the genotype when effects of age, gender and education were controlled for. The 7-repeat allele appears to protect against the adverse effect of CA since the decline in resilience associated with increased adversity was evident only in individuals without the 7-repeat allele. Resilience was also significantly associated with approach-/avoidance-related personality measures (behavioural inhibition/activation system; BIS/BAS measures and an interactive effect of DRD4-exIII-VNTR genotype and CA on BAS was observed. Hence it is possible that approach-related personality traits could be mediating the effect of the DRD4 gene and childhood environment interaction on resilience such that when stressors are present, the 7-repeat allele influences the development of personality in a way that provides protection against adverse outcomes.

  2. Mutations in the VNTR of the carboxyl-ester lipase gene (CEL) are a rare cause of monogenic diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torsvik, Janniche; Johansson, Stefan; Johansen, Anders;

    2009-01-01

    of the VNTR, and determined the VNTR-length of each allele. When blindly testing 56 members of the two families with known single-base deletions in the CEL VNTR, the method correctly assessed the mutation carriers. Screening of 241 probands from suspected maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) families...... negative for mutations in known MODY genes (95 individuals from Denmark and 146 individuals from UK) revealed no deletions in the proximal repeats of the CEL VNTR. However, we found one Danish patient with a short, novel CEL allele containing only three VNTR repeats (normal range 7-23 in healthy controls......). This allele co-segregated with diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance in the patient's family as six of seven mutation carriers were affected. We also identified individuals who had three copies of a complete CEL VNTR. In conclusion, the CEL gene is highly polymorphic, but mutations in CEL are likely...

  3. Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analysis reveals genetic diversity within Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides small colony isolates from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankpa, N D; Manso-silvan, L; Lorenzon, S; Yaya, A; Lombin, L H; Thiaucourt, F

    2010-12-15

    A Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analysis was conducted on thirteen (13) M. mycoides mycoides Small Colony isolates from Nigeria using Tandem Repeat (TR) 34 which is a predicted lipoprotein located within the hypothetical protein MAG6170. The analysis revealed diversity within the M. mycoides mycoides Small Colony isolates with five different VNTR types indicated. Some correlation was determined between the VNTR types and their geographical origin. VNTR analysis may represent a useful, rapid first-line test for use in molecular epidemiological analysis of M. mycoides mycoides Small Colony for possible outbreak tracing and disease control.

  4. CRISPR/cas loci of type II Propionibacterium acnes confer immunity against acquisition of mobile elements present in type I P. acnes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Brüggemann

    Full Text Available Propionibacterium acnes is a skin commensal that occasionally acts as an opportunistic pathogen. The population structure of this species shows three main lineages (I-III. While type I strains are mainly associated with sebaceous follicles of human skin and inflammatory acne, types II and III strains are more often associated with deep tissue infections. We investigated the occurrence and distribution of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR in P. acnes, assessed their immunological memory, and addressed the question if such a system could account for type-specific properties of the species. A collection of 108 clinical isolates covering all known phylotypes of P. acnes was screened for the existence of CRISPR/cas loci. We found that CRISPR loci are restricted to type II P. acnes strains. Sequence analyses of the CRISPR spacers revealed that the system confers immunity to P. acnes-specific phages and to two mobile genetic elements. These elements are found almost exclusively in type I P. acnes strains. Genome sequencing of a type I P. acnes isolate revealed that one element, 54 kb in size, encodes a putative secretion/tight adherence (TAD system. Thus, CRISPR/cas loci in P. acnes recorded the exposure of type II strains to mobile genetic elements of type I strains. The CRISPR/cas locus is deleted in type I strains, which conceivably accounts for their ability to horizontally acquire fitness or virulence traits and might indicate that type I strains constitute a younger subpopulation of P. acnes.

  5. VNTR molecular typing of salmonella enterica serovar typhi isolates in Kathmandu valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Acharya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Typhoid fever continues to be a worldwide health problem, especially in developing countries. Effective epidemiological surveillance is needed to monitor the presence and spread of disease. Materials and Methods: Variable number tandem repeats (VNTR was performed for Salmonella enterica serovar typhi by multiplex-PCR in 28 Nepalese isolates of sporadic typhoid fever. Results: From all 28 total isolates, we could identify 12 VNTR profiles among the isolates, signifying multiple variants in circulation within the region. Conclusion: The VNTR-based typing assay for serovar typhi isolates can be used during an outbreak of enteric fever. The typing could eventually form the basis of an effective epidemiological surveillance system for developing rational strategies to control typhoid fever. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v2i3.6026 JPN 2012; 2(3: 220-223

  6. A novel multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) method for Propionibacterium acnes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Yolande; Soler, Charles; Gérôme, Patrick; Vong, Rithy; Macnab, Christine; Appere, Géraldine; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2015-07-01

    Propionibacterium acnes plays a central role in the pathogenesis of acne and is responsible for severe opportunistic infections. Numerous typing schemes have been developed that allow the identification of phylotypes, but they are often insufficient to differentiate subtypes. To better understand the genetic diversity of this species and to perform epidemiological analyses, high throughput discriminant genotyping techniques are needed. Here we describe the development of a multiple locus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) method. Thirteen VNTRs were identified in the genome of P. acnes and were used to genotype a collection of clinical isolates. In addition, publically available sequencing data for 102 genomes were analyzed in silico, providing an MLVA genotype. The clustering of MLVA data was in perfect congruence with whole genome based clustering. Analysis of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) element uncovered new spacers, a supplementary source of genotypic information. The present MLVA13 scheme and associated internet database represents a first line genotyping assay to investigate large number of isolates. Particular strains may then be submitted to full genome sequencing in order to better analyze their pathogenic potential.

  7. Association of the NOS3 intron-4 VNTR polymorphism with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsø, Jonatan Myrup; Edsen, Troels; Kotinis, Alexandros;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECT: The nitric oxide system has been linked to the pathogenesis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The authors performed a case-control study to investigate the association between SAH and common genetic variants within the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3). METHODS: Three......-VNTR. Haplotype analysis revealed that no single haplotype containing the b-allele was responsible for the observed genotype effect. CONCLUSIONS: The authors' results suggest that the NOS3 27-bp-VNTR b/b genotype independent of other risk factors act in concert with male sex to substantially increase risk of SAH....... This effect is not mediated by any single NOS3 haplotype....

  8. Lack of Association Between IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Gene 86bp VNTR Polymorphism and Leiomyoma

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    Mohammadoo Khorasani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Uterine leiomyoma (ULs is the most common gynecological tumor and a significant health concern for many women .The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra is a naturally occurring cytokine inhibiting interleukin- 1 (IL-1 activity by binding to the IL-1 receptors without signal transduction. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association between interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR polymorphism and ULs in women of the South- East of Iran. Patients and Methods A total number of 99 patients with leiomyoma and 102 controls were studied. Genotyping of IL-1Ra (VNTR polymorphism was determined by gel electrophoresis after PCR amplification. Frequency of alleles and genotypes in patients and control group was statistically analyzed using χ2 test or fisher exact test. Results The frequency of alleles 1, 2 and 3 of IL-1Ra VNTR polymorphism were %71, %27 and %22 in control group and %74, %20 and %6 in the ULs patients, respectively and there were no significant differences between these two groups. No statistically significant differences were observed between the frequency of IL-1Ra genotypes in the study and control groups. Conclusions This study showed that 86bp VNTR polymorphism of IL-1Ra gene is not associated with leiomyoma in the studied population.

  9. Rapid clonal analysis of recurrent tuberculosis by direct MIRU-VNTR typing on stored isolates

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    de Viedma Darío

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of molecular tools to the analysis of tuberculosis has revealed examples of clonal complexity, such as exogenous reinfection, coinfection, microevolution or compartmentalization. The detection of clonal heterogeneity by standard genotyping approaches is laborious and often requires expertise. This restricts the rapid availability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB genotypes for clinical or therapeutic decision-making. A new PCR-based technique, MIRU-VNTR, has made it possible to genotype MTB in a time frame close to real-time fingerprinting. Our purpose was to evaluate the capacity of this technique to provide clinicians with a rapid discrimination between reactivation and exogenous reinfection and whether MIRU-VNTR makes it possible to obtain data directly from stored MTB isolates from recurrent episodes. Results We detected differences, between the MIRUtypes of recurrent isolates in 38.5% (5/13 of the cases studied. These included cases of i exogenous reinfection, often with more resistant strains, ii likely examples of microevolution, leading to the appearance of new clonal variants and iii a combination of microevolution, coinfection and competition. Conclusion MIRU-VNTR rapidly obtained clinically useful genotyping data in a challenging situation, directly from stored MTB isolates without subculturing them or purifying their DNA. Our results also mean that MIRU-VNTR could be applied for easy, rapid and affordable massive screening of collections of stored MTB isolates, which could establish the real dimension of clonal heterogeneity in MTB infection.

  10. Novel alleles of 31-bp VNTR polymorphism in the human cystathionine -synthase (CBS) gene were detected in healthy Asians

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yik-Yuen Gan; Chuan-Fei Chen

    2010-12-01

    A 31-bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism of the cystathionine -synthase (CBS) gene was earlier reported in Caucasians of predominantly European descent and Indo–Caucasoid populations.We report here for the first time, the detection of allele 20, which was absent in Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations, as a common allele present in Singaporean Chinese (6.25%), Indians (11.7%), and Malays (11.5%). Hence, allele 20 might be a specific allele for Asian populations. A relatively common allele 19 found in the Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations (10.4%–10.6%) was absent in the Asian samples of this study. Therefore, allele 19 might be a specific allele for the Caucasian populations. A novel and rare allele 13, which was not reported before in the Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations, was found in 0.5% of Singaporean Chinese as genotype 13/17 heterozygotes. The presence of alleles 13 and 20 were verified by DNA sequencing. There were five new genotypes (13/17, 16/20, 17/20, 18/20 and 20/20) not reported before in the Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations, detected in this study. Nine genotypes (15/18, 16/18, 16/21, 17/19, 18/19, 18/21, 19/19, 19/21 and 21/21) which were present in the Caucasian and/or Indo–Caucasoid populations were absent in this study. Our results showed that CBS 31-bp VNTR polymorphism has a distinct genetic difference in allele and genotype frequencies between the European Caucasians, Indo–Caucasoid and Asian populations.

  11. Associations between mutations and a VNTR in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goltsov, A.A.; Eisensmith, R.C.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Konecki, D.S.; Lichter-Konecki, U.

    1992-09-01

    The HindIII RFLP in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene is caused by the presence of an AT-rich (70%) minisatellite region. This region contains various multiples of 30-bp tandem repeats and is located 3 kb downstream of the final exon of the gene. PCR-mediated amplification of this region from haplotyped PAH chromosomes indicates that the previously reported 4.0-kb HindIII allele contains three of these repeats, while the 4.4-kb HindIII allele contains 12 of these repeats. The 4.2-kb HindIII fragment can contain six, seven, eight, or nine copies of this repeat. These variations permit more detailed analysis of mutant haplotypes 1, 5, 6, and, possibly, others. Kindred analysis in phenylketonuria families demonstrates Mendelian segregation of these VNTR alleles, as well as associations between theses alleles and certain PAH mutations. The R261Q mutation, associated with haplotype 1, is associated almost exclusively with an allele containing eight repeats; the R408W mutation, when occurring on a haplotype 1 background, may also be associated with the eight-repeat VNTR allele. Other PAH mutations associated with haplotype 1, R252W and P281L, do not appear to segregate with specific VNTR alleles. The IVS-10 mutation, when associated with haplotype 6, is associated exclusively with an allele containing seven repeats. The combined use of this VNTR system and the existing RFLP haplotype system will increase the performance of prenatal diagnostic tests based on haplotype analysis. In addition, this VNTR may prove useful in studies concerning the origins and distributions of PAH mutations in different human populations. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Development of a Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA to Unravel the Intra-Pathovar Structure of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Populations Worldwide.

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    Serena Ciarroni

    Full Text Available The bacterial canker of kiwifruit by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an emblematic example of a catastrophic disease of fruit crops. In 2008 a new, extremely virulent form of the pathogen emerged and rapidly devastated many Actinidia spp. orchards all over the world. In order to understand differences in populations within this pathovar and to elucidate their diffusion and movements on world scale, it is necessary to be able to quickly and on a routine basis compare new isolates with previous records. In this report a worldwide collection of 142 strains was analyzed by MLVA, chosen as investigative technique for its efficacy, reproducibility, simplicity and low cost. A panel of 13 Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR loci was identified and used to describe the pathogen population. The MLVA clustering is highly congruent with the population structure as previously established by other molecular approaches including whole genome sequencing and correlates with geographic origin, time of isolation and virulence. For convenience, we divided the VNTR loci in two panels. Panel 1 assay, using six loci, recognizes 23 different haplotypes, clustered into ten complexes with highest congruence with previous classifications. Panel 2, with seven VNTR loci, provides discriminatory power. Using the total set of 13 VNTR loci, 58 haplotypes can be distinguished. The recent hypervirulent type shows very limited diversity and includes, beside the strains from Europe, New Zealand and Chile, a few strains from Shaanxi, China. A broad genetic variability is observed in China, but different types are also retrievable in Japan and Korea. The low virulent strains cluster together and are very different from the other MLVA genotypes. Data were used to generate a public database in MLVAbank. MLVA represents a very promising first-line assay for large-scale routine genotyping, prior to whole genome sequencing of only the most relevant samples.

  13. Development of a Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) to Unravel the Intra-Pathovar Structure of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Populations Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarroni, Serena; Gallipoli, Lorenzo; Taratufolo, Maria C; Butler, Margi I; Poulter, Russell T M; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles; Balestra, Giorgio M; Mazzaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial canker of kiwifruit by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an emblematic example of a catastrophic disease of fruit crops. In 2008 a new, extremely virulent form of the pathogen emerged and rapidly devastated many Actinidia spp. orchards all over the world. In order to understand differences in populations within this pathovar and to elucidate their diffusion and movements on world scale, it is necessary to be able to quickly and on a routine basis compare new isolates with previous records. In this report a worldwide collection of 142 strains was analyzed by MLVA, chosen as investigative technique for its efficacy, reproducibility, simplicity and low cost. A panel of 13 Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR) loci was identified and used to describe the pathogen population. The MLVA clustering is highly congruent with the population structure as previously established by other molecular approaches including whole genome sequencing and correlates with geographic origin, time of isolation and virulence. For convenience, we divided the VNTR loci in two panels. Panel 1 assay, using six loci, recognizes 23 different haplotypes, clustered into ten complexes with highest congruence with previous classifications. Panel 2, with seven VNTR loci, provides discriminatory power. Using the total set of 13 VNTR loci, 58 haplotypes can be distinguished. The recent hypervirulent type shows very limited diversity and includes, beside the strains from Europe, New Zealand and Chile, a few strains from Shaanxi, China. A broad genetic variability is observed in China, but different types are also retrievable in Japan and Korea. The low virulent strains cluster together and are very different from the other MLVA genotypes. Data were used to generate a public database in MLVAbank. MLVA represents a very promising first-line assay for large-scale routine genotyping, prior to whole genome sequencing of only the most relevant samples.

  14. Lineage specific evolution of the VNTR composite retrotransposon central domain and its role in retrotransposition of gibbon LAVA elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupan, Iulia; Bulzu, Paul; Popescu, Octavian; Damert, Annette

    2015-05-16

    VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) composite retrotransposons - SVA (SINE-R-VNTR-Alu), LAVA (LINE-1-Alu-VNTR-Alu), PVA (PTGR2-VNTR-Alu) and FVA (FRAM-VNTR-Alu) - are specific to hominoid primates. Their assembly, the evolution of their 5' and 3' domains, and the functional significance of the shared 5' Alu-like region are well understood. The central VNTR domain, by contrast, has long been assumed to represent a more or less random collection of 30-50 bp GC-rich repeats. It is only recently that it attracted attention in the context of regulation of SVA expression. Here we provide evidence that the organization of the VNTR is non-random, with conserved repeat unit (RU) arrays at both the 5' and 3' ends of the VNTRs of human, chimpanzee and orangutan SVA and gibbon LAVA. The younger SVA subfamilies harbour highly organized internal RU arrays. The composition of these arrays is specific to the human/chimpanzee and orangutan lineages, respectively. Tracing the development of the VNTR through evolution we show for the first time how tandem repeats evolve within the constraints set by a functional, non-autonomous non-LTR retrotransposon in two different families - LAVA and SVA - in different hominoid lineages. Our analysis revealed that a microhomology-driven mechanism mediates expansion/contraction of the VNTR domain at the DNA level. Elements of all four VNTR composite families have been shown to be mobilized by the autonomous LINE1 retrotransposon in trans. In case of SVA, key determinants of mobilization are found in the 5' hexameric repeat/Alu-like region. We now demonstrate that in LAVA, by contrast, the VNTR domain determines mobilization efficiency in the context of domain swaps between active and inactive elements. The central domain of VNTR composites evolves in a lineage-specific manner which gives rise to distinct structures in gibbon LAVA, orangutan SVA, and human/chimpanzee SVA. The differences observed between the families and lineages are likely to

  15. Genomic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in Tuscany, Italy, based on large sequence deletions, SNPs in putative DNA repair genes and MIRU-VNTR polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzelli, Carlo; Lari, Nicoletta; Rindi, Laura

    2016-03-01

    The Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is cause of global concern as it is rapidly spreading worldwide, is considered hypervirulent, and is most often associated to massive spread of MDR/XDR TB, although these epidemiological or pathological properties have not been confirmed for all strains and in all geographic settings. In this paper, to gain new insights into the biogeographical heterogeneity of the Beijing family, we investigated a global sample of Beijing strains (22% from Italian-born, 78% from foreign-born patients) by determining large sequence polymorphism of regions RD105, RD181, RD150 and RD142, single nucleotide polymorphism of putative DNA repair genes mutT4 and mutT2 and MIRU-VNTR profiles based on 11 discriminative loci. We found that, although our sample of Beijing strains showed a considerable genomic heterogeneity, yielding both ancient and recent phylogenetic strains, the prevalent successful Beijing subsets were characterized by deletions of RD105 and RD181 and by one nucleotide substitution in one or both mutT genes. MIRU-VNTR analysis revealed 47 unique patterns and 9 clusters including a total of 33 isolates (41% of total isolates); the relatively high proportion of Italian-born Beijing TB patients, often occurring in mixed clusters, supports the possibility of an ongoing cross-transmission of the Beijing genotype to autochthonous population. High rates of extra-pulmonary localization and drug-resistance, particularly MDR, frequently reported for Beijing strains in other settings, were not observed in our survey.

  16. Paternity testing with VNTR DNA systems. II. Evaluation of 271 cases of disputed paternity with the VNTR systems D2S44, D5S43, D7S21, D7S22, and D12S11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanna Elsebeth; Morling, N

    1993-01-01

    Paternity testing was carried out in 271 cases of disputed paternity using the 5 VNTR systems D2S44 (YNH24), D5S43 (MS8), D7S21 (MS31), D7S22 (g3), and D12S11 (MS43a), and 10-15 conventional marker systems including the HLA-A,B system. By means of the matching criteria for the VNTR systems...

  17. Association of the MAOA promoter uVNTR polymorphism with suicide attempts in patients with major depressive disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lung, For-Wey; Tzeng, Dong-Sheng; Huang, Mei-Feng; Lee, Ming-Been

    2011-01-01

    The MAOA uVNTR polymorphism has been documented to affect the MAOA gene at the transcriptional level and is associated with aggressive impulsive behaviors, depression associated with suicide (depressed suicide...

  18. First report of MIRU-VNTR genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates from Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    A. Fawzy; Fayed, A.; Youssef, H; El-Sayed, A.; Zschöck, M.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, an economically important disease in ruminants worldwide. It was first isolated in Egypt in 2005. Since then, the pathogen has been detected in different Egyptian provinces. In order to trace the source of infection, genotyping using simple methods of high discriminatory power such as mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) were carried out in different co...

  19. Association of the NOS3 intron-4 VNTR polymorphism with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staalsø, Jonatan Myrup; Edsen, Troels; Kotinis, Alexandros; Romner, Bertil; Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2014-09-01

    The nitric oxide system has been linked to the pathogenesis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The authors performed a case-control study to investigate the association between SAH and common genetic variants within the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3). Three hundred thirty-three Caucasian SAH patients and 498 controls were genotyped for the -922A > G (rs 1800779), -786T > C (rs2070744), and 894G > T (rs1799983) single nucleotide polymorphisms and the intron-4 27-bp variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism (27-bp-VNTR). The b/b (5 repeats) genotype of the 27-bp-VNTR was overrepresented in cases (77%) versus controls (69%) (p = 0.02). In male patients the b/b genotype was found in 85% compared with 67% in male controls, whereas in women, the frequencies were 73% and 72%, respectively. This corresponds to an odds ratio of 2.8 (95% CI 1.5-5.6, p = 0.0005) for SAH in men with the b/b genotype versus men with a/b or a/a. In women, no such association was found (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.7-1.6, p = 0.76). Stepwise logistic regression including arterial hypertension, smoking, sex, and age with interactions yielded similar effect estimates of the 27-bp-VNTR. Haplotype analysis revealed that no single haplotype containing the b-allele was responsible for the observed genotype effect. The authors' results suggest that the NOS3 27-bp-VNTR b/b genotype independent of other risk factors act in concert with male sex to substantially increase risk of SAH. This effect is not mediated by any single NOS3 haplotype.

  20. IL-1RN VNTR Polymorphism in Adult Dermatomyositis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zornitsa Kamenarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in the cytokine genes and their natural antagonists are thought to influence the predisposition to dermatomyositis (DM and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. A variable number tandem repeat (VNTR polymorphism of 86 bp in intron 2 of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RN gene leads to the existence of five different alleles which cause differences in the production of both IL-1RA (interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and IL-1β. The aim of this case-control study was to investigate the association between the IL-1RN VNTR polymorphism and the susceptibility to DM and SLE in Bulgarian patients. Altogether 91 patients, 55 with SLE and 36 with DM, as well as 112 unrelated healthy controls, were included in this study. Only three alleles were identified in both patients and controls ((1 four repeats, (2 two repeats, and (3 five repeats. The IL-1RN*2 allele (P=0.02, OR 2.5, and 95% CI 1.2–5.4 and the 1/2+2/2 genotypes were found prevalent among the SLE patients (P=0.05, OR 2.6, and 95% CI 1–6.3. No association was found between this polymorphism and the ACR criteria for SLE as well as with the susceptibility to DM. Our results indicate that the IL-1RN VNTR polymorphism might play a role in the susceptibility of SLE but not DM.

  1. Association of VNTR polymorphisms in DRD4, 5-HTT and DAT1 genes with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Mustafa; Saglar, Emel; Kucukyildirim, Sibel; Erdem, Beril; Unlu, Hande; Mergen, Hatice

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the association between VNTR polymorphisms of DRD4, DAT1 and 5-HTT genes and obesity. Peripheral blood samples of 234 obese (BMI ≥ 30) and 148 healthy individuals (BMI ≤ 25) were objected to PCR to detect the VNTR of the 2nd intron of 5-HTT, 3rd exon of DRD4 and 3'UTR of DAT1 genes. The association between obesity and genotype distributions of 5-HTT, DAT1 and DRD4 genes and between obesity and distributions of allele frequencies were tested by Chi Square (χ(2)) test and were not found statistically significant. BMI values for genotype of obese and morbidly obese (BMI > 40) individuals were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and not found statistically significant differences between BMI values for the most frequent genotypes of 5-HTT, DAT1 and DRD4 genes. As a conclusion, there was no association between 5-HTT, DAT1 and DRD4 genes VNTR polymorphisms and obesity.

  2. Presentation

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    Paulo Henrique Freire Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This dossier focuses on one of the essential debate topics today about the territorial dimension of the new development strategies concerned with the worsening of the global socioecological crisis, that is: the challenges related to the activation and integration in networks of localized agri-food systems. For its composition, some contributions presented and debated during the VI International Conference on Localized Agri-food System - The LAFS facing the opportunities and challenges of the new global context have been gathered. The event took place in the city of Florianópolis, from May 21th to 25th of 2013. The event was promoted by the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC and by the Center for the International Cooperation on Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD. Besides UFSC and CIRAD, EPAGRI, State University of Santa Catarina (UDESC, as well as research institutes and universities from other states (UFMG, IEA/SP, UFS, UFRGS and Mexican and Argentinian partners from the RED SIAL Latino Americana also participated in the organization of lectures, discussion tables and workshops.

  3. Presentation

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    Eduardo Vicente

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present edition of Significação – Scientific Journal for Audiovisual Culture and in the others to follow something new is brought: the presence of thematic dossiers which are to be organized by invited scholars. The appointed subject for the very first one of them was Radio and the invited scholar, Eduardo Vicente, professor at the Graduate Course in Audiovisual and at the Postgraduate Program in Audiovisual Media and Processes of the School of Communication and Arts of the University of São Paulo (ECA-USP. Entitled Radio Beyond Borders the dossier gathers six articles and the intention of reuniting works on the perspectives of usage of such media as much as on the new possibilities of aesthetical experimenting being build up for it, especially considering the new digital technologies and technological convergences. It also intends to present works with original theoretical approach and original reflections able to reset the way we look at what is today already a centennial media. Having broadened the meaning of “beyond borders”, four foreign authors were invited to join the dossier. This is the first time they are being published in this country and so, in all cases, the articles where either written or translated into Portuguese.The dossier begins with “Radio is dead…Long live to the sound”, which is the transcription of a thought provoking lecture given by Armand Balsebre (Autonomous University of Barcelona – one of the most influential authors in the world on the Radio study field. It addresses the challenges such media is to face so that it can become “a new sound media, in the context of a new soundscape or sound-sphere, for the new listeners”. Andrew Dubber (Birmingham City University regarding the challenges posed by a Digital Era argues for a theoretical approach in radio studies which can consider a Media Ecology. The author understands the form and discourse of radio as a negotiation of affordances and

  4. Presentation

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    Helmut Renders

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We present to our esteemed readers the second edition of our journal for 2008. We have chosen the theme “The life and work of Prof. Dr. Jürgen Moltmann” as its special emphasis. It is our way to pay homage to J. Moltmann in the year the Universidade Metodista de São Paulo awards him an honorary Doctor Honoris Causa degree. Sincethe seventies, Moltmann and Latin America have been in dialog. In his emblematic work “A Theology of Liberation”, Gustavo Gutiérrez, the Catholic, discussed with Moltmann, the Reformed, the relationship between eschatology and history (GUTIÉRREZ, Gustavo.Teologia da Libertação. 5ª edição. Petrópolis, RJ: Vozes, 1985, p. 27, 137-139. A dialog held in the premises of IMS, which nowadays is called UMESP, has produced the little book “Passion for life” (MOLTMANN, Jürgen. Paixão pela vida. São Paulo, SP: ASTE - Associaçãode Seminários Teológicos Evangélicos, 1978.In the following years, the wide theological work of J. Moltmann went all the way from debates to congresses and has conquered the classrooms. Most probably, J. Moltmann is nowadays the most widely read European author in Brazilian theological seminaries. Thisrecognition can only be held in unison and the wide response to our request for articles confirms the huge repercussion that Moltmann’s work has been having up to today in Brazil. The ecumenical theologian J. Moltmann is ecumenically read. We believe that thisway we may be better equipped to answer to anyone who asks us for the reason there is hope in us. We have organized the articles on J. Moltmann’s theology according to the original publication date of the books dealt with in each essay. We also communicate that some articles which were originally requested for this edition of the journal will be published in the journal Estudos de Regilião in May 2009.As it is usual with the journal Caminhando, we have, besides this thematic emphasis, yet other contributions in the areas of

  5. Presentation

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    Nicanor Lopes

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Journal Caminhando debuts with a new editorial format: eachmagazine will have a Dossier.In 2010 Christianity celebrated the centenary of Edinburgh. TheWorld Missionary Conference in Edinburgh in 1910 is regarded by manyas missiological watershed in the missionary and ecumenical movement.So the Faculty of Theology of the Methodist Church (FATEO decidedto organize a Wesleyan Week discussing the issue of mission. For anevent of this magnitude FATEO invited the Rev. Dr. Wesley Ariarajah,Methodist pastor and teacher of Sri Lanka with extensive experience inpastoral ministry in local churches and professor of History of Religionsand the New Testament at the Theological College of Lanka, maintainedby the Protestant Churches in Sri Lanka. In 1981 he was invited to jointhe World Council of Churches, where he presided for over ten years theCouncil of Interreligious Dialogue. From 1992 he served as Deputy GeneralSecretary of the WCC.The following texts are not the speeches of the Rev. Dr. WesleyAriarajah, for they will be published separately. Nevertheless, the journaldialogs with the celebrations of the centenary of Edinburgh, parting formthe intriguing theme: "Mission in the 21st century in Brazil". After all, howis it that mission takes place among us in personal, church, and communityactivities?Within the Dossier, as common to the journal, the textos are organizedas follows: Bible, Theology / History and Pastoral Care. Other items thatdo not fit within the Dossier, but, do articulate mission, can be found inthe section Declarations and Documents and Book Reviews.The authors of the Dossier have important considerations in buildinga contemporary missiological concept considering Brazilian reality.Anderson de Oliveira, in the Bible-Section, presents a significantexegeses of Matthew 26.6-13. What does it mean when Jesus is quotedwith the words: "For the poor always ye have with you, but me ye havenot always." Is this declaration challenging the gospels

  6. Identification of Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat (VNTR) Sequences in Acinetobacter baumannii and Interlaboratory Validation of an Optimized Multiple-Locus VNTR Analysis Typing Scheme▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourcel, Christine; Minandri, Fabrizia; Hauck, Yolande; D'Arezzo, Silvia; Imperi, Francesco; Vergnaud, Gilles; Visca, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic pathogen responsible for nosocomial outbreaks, mostly occurring in intensive care units. Due to the multiplicity of infection sources, reliable molecular fingerprinting techniques are needed to establish epidemiological correlations among A. baumannii isolates. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) has proven to be a fast, reliable, and cost-effective typing method for several bacterial species. In this study, an MLVA assay compatible with simple PCR- and agarose gel-based electrophoresis steps as well as with high-throughput automated methods was developed for A. baumannii typing. Preliminarily, 10 potential polymorphic variable-number tandem repeats (VNTRs) were identified upon bioinformatic screening of six annotated genome sequences of A. baumannii. A collection of 7 reference strains plus 18 well-characterized isolates, including unique types and representatives of the three international A. baumannii lineages, was then evaluated in a two-center study aimed at validating the MLVA assay and comparing it with other genotyping assays, namely, macrorestriction analysis with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and PCR-based sequence group (SG) profiling. The results showed that MLVA can discriminate between isolates with identical PFGE types and SG profiles. A panel of eight VNTR markers was selected, all showing the ability to be amplified and good amounts of polymorphism in the majority of strains. Independently generated MLVA profiles, composed of an ordered string of allele numbers corresponding to the number of repeats at each VNTR locus, were concordant between centers. Typeability, reproducibility, stability, discriminatory power, and epidemiological concordance were excellent. A database containing information and MLVA profiles for several A. baumannii strains is available from http://mlva.u-psud.fr/. PMID:21147956

  7. Effect of ATRX and G-Quadruplex Formation by the VNTR Sequence on α-Globin Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Syed, Junetha; Suzuki, Yuki; Asamitsu, Sefan; Shioda, Norifumi; Wada, Takahito; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-05-17

    ATR-X (α-thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked) syndrome is caused by mutations in chromatin remodeler ATRX. ATRX can bind the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) sequence in the promoter region of the α-globin gene cluster. The VNTR sequence, which contains the potential G-quadruplex-forming sequence CGC(GGGGCGGGG)n , is involved in the downregulation of α-globin expression. We investigated G-quadruplex and i-motif formation in single-stranded DNA and long double-stranded DNA. The promoter region without the VNTR sequence showed approximately twofold higher luciferase activity than the promoter region harboring the VNTR sequence. G-quadruplex stabilizers hemin and TMPyP4 reduced the luciferase activity, whereas expression of ATRX led to a recovery in reporter activity. Our results demonstrate that stable G-quadruplex formation by the VNTR sequence downregulates the expression of α-globin genes and that ATRX might bind to and resolve the G-quadruplex.

  8. Dopamine transporter (DAT1) VNTR polymorphism and alcoholism in two culturally different populations of south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Lakkakula V K S; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Wasnik, Samiksha; Singh, Lalji; Raghavendra Rao, Vadlamudi

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that the central dopaminergic reward pathway is likely involved in alcohol intake and the progression of alcohol dependence. Dopamine transporter (DAT1) mediates the active re-uptake of DA from the synapse and is a principal regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission. The gene for the human DAT1 displays several polymorphisms, including a 40-bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) ranging from 3 to 16 copies in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the gene. To assess the role of this gene in alcoholism, we genotyped the VNTR of DAT1 gene in a sample of 206 subjects from the Kota population (111 alcohol dependence cases and 95 controls) and 142 subjects from Badaga population (81 alcohol dependence cases and 61 controls). Both populations inhabit a similar environmental zone, but have different ethnic histories. Phenotype was defined based on the DSM-IV criteria. Genotyping was performed using PCR and electrophoresis. The association of DAT1 with alcoholism was tested by using the Clump v1.9 program which uses the Monte Carlo method. In both Kota and Badaga populations, the allele A10 was the most frequent allele followed by allele A9. The genotypic distribution is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both cases and control groups of Kota and Badaga populations. The DAT1 VNTR was significantly associated with alcoholism in Badaga population but not in Kota population. Our results suggest that the A9 allele of the DAT gene is involved in vulnerability to alcoholism, but that these associations are population specific.

  9. Evaluation and selection of tandem repeat loci for Streptococcus pneumoniae MLVA strain typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valjevac Samina

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise identification of bacterial pathogens at the strain level is essential for epidemiological purposes. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the existence of 90 different serotypes makes the typing particularly difficult and requires the use of highly informative tools. Available methods are relatively expensive and cannot be used for large-scale or routine typing of any new isolate. We explore here the potential of MLVA (Multiple Loci VNTR Analysis; VNTR, Variable Number of Tandem Repeats, a method of growing importance in the field of molecular epidemiology, for genotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Results Available genome sequences were searched for polymorphic tandem repeats. The loci identified were typed across a collection of 56 diverse isolates and including a group of serotype 1 isolates from Africa. Eventually a set of 16 VNTRs was proposed for MLVA-typing of S. pneumoniae. These robust markers were sufficient to discriminate 49 genotypes and to aggregate strains on the basis of the serotype and geographical origin, although some exceptions were found. Such exceptions may reflect serotype switching or horizontal transfer of genetic material. Conclusion We describe a simple PCR-based MLVA genotyping scheme for S. pneumoniae which may prove to be a powerful complement to existing tools for epidemiological studies. Using this technique we uncovered a clonal population of strains, responsible for infections in Burkina Faso. We believe that the proposed MLVA typing scheme can become a standard for epidemiological studies of S. pneumoniae.

  10. Linkage of the VNTR/insulin-gene and type I diabetes mellitus: Increased gene sharing in affected sibling pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owerbach, D.; Gabbay, K.H. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Ninety-six multiplex type I diabetic families were typed at the 5' flanking region of the insulin gene by using a PCR assay that better resolves the VNTR into multiple alleles. Affected sibling pairs shared 2, 1, and 0 VNTR alleles - identical by descent - at a frequency of .47, .45, and .08, respectively, a ratio that deviated from the expected 1:2:1 ratio (P<.001). These results confirm linkage of the chromosome 11p15.5 region with type I diabetes mellitus susceptibility. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. 儿童结核病101例临床分离结核分枝杆菌多位点串联重复序列分型%Genotyping of 101 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from pediatrics tuberculosis in Chongqing by multiple locus VNTR analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王均; 黄延风; 张爱华; 许红梅

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the distribution of the variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) in clinically isolated strains Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis ) from pediatrics tuberculosis in Chongqing and explore the effective loci combination of them by multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA). Methods Twenty-four standardized MLVA loci was used to type the 101 clinically isolated M. tuberculosis strains, and the results were analyzed by BioNumerics 6.1 software, which including dendrogram and Hunter-Gaston index (HGI) of 24 loci. The HGI of different loci set (12 loci, 15 loci, and 24 loci) was evaluated. Results Twenty-four loci showed different polymorphism. All the 101 clinical isolates were typed into one group that displaying 83 genotypes, in which 69 strains (68.32%, 69/101 ) were typed 69 genotypes respectively, and 32 strains (31.68%) were typed 14 genotypes which showed cluster rate of 17.82%. The HGI of 24 loci was from 0. 168 to 0. 829, the number of VNTR loci with HGI higher than 0.5 was 16. Three loci set displayed different polymorphism. HGI of 12 loci, 15 loci, and 24 loci set were 0.995, 0.996, and 0.996 respectively. Conclusion The clinical strains of M. tuberculosis isolated from pediatrics tuberculosis in Chongqing show definite polymorphism and the standardization 15 loci VNTR set of MLVA can be used in the molecular epidemiological study of these strains in Chongqing.%目的 了解重庆地区儿童结核病中结核分枝杆菌临床分离株的数目可变串联重复序列(variable number tandem repeats,VNTR)的分布特征,寻找适合的VNTR位点组合.方法 采用多位点串联重复序列(multiple locus VNTR analysis,MLVA)分型方法,选择标化的24个VNTR位点,对101例结核分枝杆菌临床分离株DNA进行检测,结果采用BioNumerics 6.1数据库软件进行聚类分析和单位点Hunter-Gaston分辨率指数(Hunter-Gaston index,HGI)分析,并比较分析国际推荐的分组(12、15、24位点)的

  12. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Hormozgan Province of Iran Based on 15-Locus MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Samin; Haeili, Mehri

    2016-01-01

    Background. Considering that Hormozgan province in Iran (southern part of Iran on the Persian Gulf) is among the areas with high prevalence of MDR-MTB and attracts so many sailors and tourists, genetic diversity of MTB isolates circulating in this part of Iran was evaluated. Pattern of TB transmission was also examined. Methods and Material. A total of 38 isolates of MTB were cultured from TB patients from Hormozgan province of Iran and standard MIRU-VNTR typing and spoligotyping were applied to genotype these isolates. Drug susceptibility testing was performed using proportion method. Results. There were 28 VNTR profiles comprising 5 clusters and 23 unique isolates compared to 21 spoligotyping profiles, which contained 9 clusters and 12 unique isolates. Latin American-Mediterranean (n = 9, 23.6%) was found to be the most predominant lineage. MIRU-VNTR analysis, with an HGDI of 0.975, was more discriminating than spoligotyping, which had an HGDI of 0.955. The estimated proportion of TB cases due to recent transmission was 26.3% and 44.7% by MIRU-VNTR and spoligotyping, respectively. The rates of monodrug resistance and MDR were 15.8% and 7.9%, respectively. Two of 3 MDR strains were found to be related to MIRU-VNTR and belonged to the same spoligotyping cluster characterized with T1/SIT53 genotype. Conclusions. The high genetic diversity among MTB isolates suggests that transmission occurred from different sources to this area. Reactivation of a priori, latent MTB infection was found to contribute mainly to TB cases in this geographic region. PMID:27819023

  13. Association of the MAOA promoter uVNTR polymorphism with suicide attempts in patients with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzeng Dong-Sheng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MAOA uVNTR polymorphism has been documented to affect the MAOA gene at the transcriptional level and is associated with aggressive impulsive behaviors, depression associated with suicide (depressed suicide, and major depressive disorder (MDD. We hypothesized that the uVNTR polymorphism confers vulnerability to MDD, suicide or both. The aim of this study was to explore the association between the MAOA uVNTR and depressed suicide, using multiple controls. Methods Four different groups were included: 432 community controls, 385 patients with MDD who had not attempted suicide, 96 community subjects without mental disorders who had attempted suicide, and 109 patients with MDD who had attempted suicide. The MAOA uVNTR polymorphism was genotyped by a PCR technique. The symptom profiles and personal characteristics in each group were also compared. Results The MAOA 4R allele was more frequent in males with MDD than in male community controls (χ2 = 4.182, p = 0.041. Logistic regression analysis showed that, among the depressed subjects, those younger in age, more neurotic or who smoked had an increased risk of suicide (β = -0.04, p = 0.002; β = 0.15, p = 0.017; β = 0.79, p = 0.031, respectively. Moreover, among those who had attempted suicide, those younger in age, with more paternal overprotection, and more somatic symptoms were more likely to be in the MDD group than in the community group (β = -0.11, p Conclusion The MAOA 4R allele is associated with enhanced vulnerability to suicide in depressed males, but not in community subjects. The MAOA 4R allele affects vulnerability to suicide through the mediating factor of depressive symptoms. Further large-scale studies are needed to verify the psychopathology of the relationships among MAOA uVNTR polymorphism, symptom profiles, and suicidal behavior.

  14. Frequencies of VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms associated with factor VIII gene in Singapore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, I.; Lai, P.S.; Ouah, T.C. [National Univ. of Singapore (Malaysia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The allelic frequency of any polymorphism within a population determines its usefulness for genetic counselling. This is important in populations of non-Caucasian origin as RFLPs may significantly differ among ethnic groups. We report a study of five intragenic polymorphisms in factor VIII gene carried out in Singapore. The three PCR-based RFLP markers studied were Intron 18/Bcl I, Intron 19/Hind III and Intron 22/Xba I. In an analysis of 148 unrelated normal X chromosomes, the allele frequencies were found to be A1 = 0.18, A2 = 0.82 (Bcl I RFLP), A1 = 0.80, A2 = 0.20 (Hind III RFLP) and A1 = 0.58, and A2 = 0.42 (Xba I RFLP). The heterozygosity rates of 74 females analyzed separately were 31%, 32% and 84.2%, respectively. Linkage disequilibrium was also observed to some degree between Bcl I and Hind III polymorphism in our population. We have also analyzed a sequence polymorphism in Intron 7 using hybridization with radioactive-labelled {sup 32}P allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. This polymorphism was not very polymorphic in our population with only 2% of 117 individuals analyzed being informative. However, the use of a hypervariable dinucleotide repeat sequence (VNTR) in Intron 13 showed that 25 of our of 27 (93%) females were heterozygous. Allele frequencies ranged from 1 to 55 %. We conclude that a viable strategy for molecular analysis of Hemophilia A families in our population should include the use of Intron 18/Bcl I and Intron 22/Xba I RFLP markers and the Intron 13 VNTR marker.

  15. A revised nomenclature for transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayer Jens

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs and ERV-like sequences comprise 8% of the human genome. A hitherto unknown proportion of ERV loci are transcribed and thus contribute to the human transcriptome. A small proportion of these loci encode functional proteins. As the role of ERVs in normal and diseased biological processes is not yet established, transcribed ERV loci are of particular interest. As more transcribed ERV loci are likely to be identified in the near future, the development of a systematic nomenclature is important to ensure that all information on each locus can be easily retrieved. Results Here we present a revised nomenclature of transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci that sorts loci into groups based on Repbase classifications. Each symbol is of the format ERV + group symbol + unique number. Group symbols are based on a mixture of Repbase designations and well-supported symbols used in the literature. The presented guidelines will allow newly identified loci to be easily incorporated into the scheme. Conclusions The naming system will be employed by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee for naming transcribed human ERV loci. We hope that the system will contribute to clarifying a certain aspect of a sometimes confusing nomenclature for human endogenous retroviruses. The presented system may also be employed for naming transcribed loci of human non-ERV repeat loci.

  16. Genetic investigations in immigration cases and frequencies of DNA fragments of the VNTR systems D2S44, D5S43, D7S21, D7S22, and D12S11 in Turks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanna Elsebeth; Morling, N

    1993-01-01

    mainly Turks were investigated with DNA technique in parallel with investigations of 10-15 conventional systems. One man was excluded from paternity by both conventional and DNA investigations. Non-exclusion was observed with both conventional and DNA systems in 97 putative mother/child pairs and in 96...... putative father/child pairs. In a putative father/child combination with non-exclusion in 18 genetic systems, a single genetic inconsistency ('exclusion') in D7S21 (MS31) was observed. The frequency distributions of HinfI digested DNA fragments of the five VNTR systems in 105 Turks are presented....

  17. Multiple-Locus VNTR Analysis (MLVA) for Bacterial Strain Identification - Quarterly Progress Report for the period 7/1/00 to 10/30/00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Paul Keim

    2000-11-07

    Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) systems are being developed for B. anthracis, Y. pestis and F. tularensis. These are high resolution DNA fingerprinting systems that will allow for molecular epidemiology and forensic analysis of these pathogens.

  18. Multiple-Locus VNTR Analysis (MLVA) for Bacterial Strain Identification - Quarterly Progress Report for the Period 4/1/00 to 6/30/00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Paul Keim

    2000-11-07

    Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) systems are being developed for B. anthracis, Y. pestis and F. tularensis. These are high resolution DNA fingerprinting systems that will allow for molecular epidemiology and forensic analysis of these pathogens.

  19. Perpetual points and periodic perpetual loci in maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Prasad, Awadhesh; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    We introduce the concepts of perpetual points and periodic perpetual loci in discrete-time systems (maps). The occurrence and analysis of these points/loci are shown and basic examples are considered. We discuss the potential usage and properties of the introduced concepts. The comparison of perpetual points and loci in discrete-time and continuous-time systems is presented. The discussed methods can be widely applied in other dynamical systems.

  20. Regional cortical thinning of the orbitofrontal cortex in medication-naïve female patients with major depressive disorder is not associated with MAOA-uVNTR polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Won, Eunsoo; Choi, Sunyoung; Kang, June; Lee, Min-Soo; Ham, Byung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background Orbitofrontal cortex alterations have been suggested to underlie the impaired mood regulation in depression. MAOA-uVNTR (monoamine oxidase A-upstream variable number of tandem repeats) polymorphism has been reported to be associated with major depressive disorder by various studies. The influence of MAOA-uVNTR genotype on function and structure of the orbitofrontal cortex has previously been reported. In this study, we investigated the difference in orbitofrontal cortex thickness b...

  1. Lack of association between VNTR polymorphism of dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3 and schizophrenia in a Brazilian sample Ausência de associação entre o polimorfismo VNTR do gene do transportador de dopamina (SLC6A3 e esquizofrenia em uma população brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirino Cordeiro

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A role of dopaminergic dysfunction has been postulated in the aetiology of schizophrenia. We hypothesized that variations in the dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3 may be associated with schizophrenia. We conducted case-control and family based analysis on the polymorphic SLC6A3 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR in a sample of 220 schizophrenic patients, 226 gender and ethnic matched controls, and 49 additional case-parent trios. No differences were found in allelic or genotypic distributions between cases and controls and no significant transmission distortions from heterozygous parents to schizophrenic offspring were detected. Thus, our results do not support an association of the SLC6A3 VNTR with schizophrenia in our sample.Genes do sistema dopaminérgico são de escolha para a pesquisa de susceptibilidade para a esquizofrenia. Desse modo, possível contribuição do polimorfismo do gene do transportador de dopamina (SLC6A3 no aumento da vulnerabilidade para a esquizofrenia foi investigada no presente estudo. Analisou-se a distribuição do sítio polimórfico do gene do transportador de dopamina (VNTR em uma população de 220 pacientes com esquizofrenia (critério diagnóstico: DSM-IV e comparou-se com a distribuição em uma população controle de 226 indivíduos pareados para sexo e etnia. Nenhuma diferença foi observada na distribuição dos alelos entre casos e controles. O mesmo polimorfismo também foi investigado em uma segunda amostra composta por 49 trios (pais e probando. O resultado também foi negativo. Tais dados não dão suporte para a participação do polimorfismo do gene do transportador de dopamina no aumento de susceptibilidade para esquizofrenia na amostra estudada.

  2. Variation of DAT1 VNTR alleles and genotypes among old ethnic groups in Mesopotamia to the Oxus region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoei, Mohammad Mehdi; Chaleshtori, Morteza Hashemzadeh; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Shariati, Parvin; Houshmand, Massoud; Majidizadeh, Tayebeh; Soltani, Niloofar Jahangir; Golalipour, Massoud

    2008-02-01

    Variation of a VNTR in the DAT1 gene in seven ethnic groups of the Middle East was used to infer the history and affinities of these groups. The populations consisted of Assyrian, Jewish, Zoroastrian, Armenian, Turkmen, and Arab peoples of Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait. Three hundred forty subjects from these seven ethnic groups were screened for DAT1. DAT1 VNTR genotyping showed 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 alleles in the samples. Analysis of these data revealed differentiation and relationship among the populations. In this region, which covers an area of 2-2.5 million km2, the influence of geography and especially of linguistic characteristics has had potentially major effects on differentiation. Religion also has played a major role in imposing restrictions on some ethnic groups, who as a consequence have maintained their community. Overall, these ethnic groups showed greater heterogeneity compared to other populations.

  3. PCSK6 VNTR Polymorphism Is Associated with Degree of Handedness but Not Direction of Handedness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Arning

    Full Text Available Although the left and right human cerebral hemispheres differ both functionally and anatomically, the mechanisms that underlie the establishment of these hemispheric specializations, as well as their physiological and behavioral implications, remain largely unknown. Since cerebral asymmetry is strongly correlated with handedness, and handedness is assumed to be influenced by a number of genetic and environmental factors, we performed an association study of LRRTM1 rs6733871 and a number of polymorphisms in PCSK6 and different aspects of handedness assessed with the Edinburgh handedness inventory in a sample of unrelated healthy adults (n = 1113. An intronic 33bp variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR polymorphism in PCSK6 (rs10523972 shows a significant association (significance threshold: p<0.0025, adjusted for multiple comparisons with a handedness category comparison (P = 0.0005 and degree of handedness (P = 0.001. These results provide further evidence for the role of PCSK6 as candidate for involvement in the biological mechanisms that underlie the establishment of normal brain lateralization and thus handedness and support the assumption that the degree of handedness, instead the direction, may be the more appropriate indicator of cerebral organization.

  4. Polymorphisms of the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4 VNTR) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor gene (CNR1) are not strongly related to cue-reactivity after alcohol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wildenberg, Esther; Janssen, Rob G J H; Hutchison, Kent E; van Breukelen, Gerard J P; Wiers, Reinout W

    2007-06-01

    Polymorphisms in the D4 dopamine receptor gene (DRD4) and the CB1 cannabinoid receptor gene (CNR1) have been associated with a differential response to alcohol after consumption. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether heavy drinkers with these polymorphisms would respond with enhanced cue-reactivity after alcohol exposure. Eighty-eight male heavy drinkers were genotyped for the DRD4 variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) [either DRD4 long (L) or short (S)] and the CNR1 rs2023239 polymorphism (either CT/CC or TT). Participants were exposed to water and beer in 3-minute trials. Dependent variables of main interest were subjective craving for alcohol, subjective arousal and salivary reactivity. Overall, no strong evidence was found for stronger cue-reactivity (= outcome difference between beer and water trial) in the DRD4 L and CNR1 C allele groups. The DRD4 VNTR polymorphism tended to moderate salivary reactivity such that DRD4 L participants showed a larger beverage effect than the DRD4 S participants. Unexpectedly, the DRD4 L participants reported, on average, less craving for alcohol and more subjective arousal during cue exposure, compared with the DRD4 S participants. As weekly alcohol consumption increased, the CNR1 C allele group tended to report more craving for alcohol during the alcohol exposure than the T allele group. The DRD4 and CNR1 polymorphisms do not appear to strongly moderate cue-reactivity after alcohol cue exposure, in male heavy drinkers.

  5. 5-HTT VNTR多态性与偏头痛关系的系统评价%A systematic review with meta-analysis on the relationship of 5-HTT VNTR and migraine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王贤琦; 李光明; 柳华; 冯胜刚

    2011-01-01

    general poplation (Stin2. 12 alleles OR,95% CI:l.34, 1.09-1.64,P= 0.006; 12/12 genotype: OR,95% CI:1.55,1.17-2.05, P=0.002): Conclusion Existing evidence indicates that the 5-HTT VNTR polymorphism (mainly the STin2. 12 genotype) is associated with an increased risk of migraine in the general population. Future studies with larger sample sizes will be necessary to confirm the present results.

  6. Stability of VNTR loci in Mycobacterium leprae during MDT%MDT治疗期间麻风菌VNTR位点的稳定性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温艳; 邢燕; 刘健; RAMA MURTHY SAKAMURI; VARALAKSHMI VISSA; 翁小满

    2010-01-01

    目的: 评价MDT化疗前和皮肤组织液中麻风菌VNTR位点的稳定性.方法: 分别从12例MB新发患者的皮损组织、皮肤切刮组织液中提取麻风菌DNA.4例患者的DNA标本采用多重PCR扩增17个VNTR位点,8例患者扩增5个VNTR位点,同时常规PCR扩增2个VNTR位点.经直接测序确定VNTR位点重复拷贝数,用Genemapper软件进行片段长度分析.结果: 4例患者的皮损和组织液DNA标本的17个VNTR位点,不仅在MDT治疗前,等位基因型,即拷贝数没有差异,而且治疗期间每2个月连续取材的DNA标本的17个位点也高度相似.另8例患者,4例患者的麻风菌在这5个VNTR位点上无等位基因的变化.结论: 药物治疗对VNTR位点的稳定性无大影响,可能由于MDT后大部分麻风菌停止繁殖,DNA终止复制.

  7. Short alleles revealed by PCR demonstrate no heterozygote deficiency at minisatellite loci D1S7, D7S21, and D12S11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, S.; Castro, A.; Fernandez-Fernandez, I.; Pancorbo, M.M. de [Universidad del Pais Vasco, Vizcaya (Spain)

    1997-02-01

    Short VNTR alleles that go undetected after conventional Southern blot hybridization may constitute an alternative explanation for the heterozygosity deficiency observed at some minisatellite loci. To examine this hypothesis, we have employed a screening procedure based on PCR amplification of those individuals classified as homozygotes in our databases for the loci D1S7, D7S21, and D12S11. The results obtained indicate that the frequency of these short alleles is related to the heterozygosity deficiency observed. For the most polymorphic locus, D1S7, {approximately}60% of those individuals previously classified as homozygotes were in fact heterozygotes for a short allele. After the inclusion of these new alleles, the agreement between observed and expected heterozygosity, along with other statistical tests employed, provide additional evidence for lack of population substructuring. Comparisons of allele frequency distributions reveal greater differences between racial groups than between closely related populations. 45 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Schubert varieties and degeneracy loci

    CERN Document Server

    Fulton, William

    1998-01-01

    Schubert varieties and degeneracy loci have a long history in mathematics, starting from questions about loci of matrices with given ranks. These notes, from a summer school in Thurnau, aim to give an introduction to these topics, and to describe recent progress on these problems. There are interesting interactions with the algebra of symmetric functions and combinatorics, as well as the geometry of flag manifolds and intersection theory and algebraic geometry.

  9. Library Spirit and Genius Loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlkild, Nan

    2009-01-01

    The architecture and design of Nyborg Public Library in the light of the concepts "Library Spirit" and "Genius Loci", related to contemporary social and cultural movements, the development of the early welfare state and the "Scandinavian Style".......The architecture and design of Nyborg Public Library in the light of the concepts "Library Spirit" and "Genius Loci", related to contemporary social and cultural movements, the development of the early welfare state and the "Scandinavian Style"....

  10. Association analysis between a VNTR intron 8 polymorphism of the dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3 and obsessive- compulsive disorder in a Brazilian sample Análise de associação entre um polimorfismo VNTR no intron 8 do gene do transportador de dopamina (SLC6A3 e transtorno obsessivo-compulsivo em uma amostra brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Miguita

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Family, twin and segregation analysis have provided evidences that genetic factors are implicated in the susceptibility for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Several lines of research suggest that the dopaminergic system may be involved in the pathophysiology of OCD. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate a possible association between a polymorphism located in intron 8 of the dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3 and OCD in a Brazilian sample composed by 208 patients and 865 healthy controls. No statistically differences were observed in allelic and genotype distributions between cases and controls. No association was also observed when the sample was divided according to specific phenotypic features such as gender, presence of tic disorders co-morbidity and age at onset of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS. Our results suggest that the intron 8 VNTR of the SLC6A3 investigated in this study is not related to the susceptibility for OCD in our Brazilian sample.Estudos de família, gêmeos e de segregação têm demonstrado que fatores genéticos estão envolvidos na susceptibilidade para o desenvolvimento do transtorno obsessivo-compulsivo (TOC. Várias linhas de pesquisa sugerem que o sistema dopaminérgico possa estar envolvido na fisiopatologia do TOC. Assim, o objetivo do presente estudo foi investigar uma possível associação entre o polimorfismo localizado no intron 8 do gene do transportador da dopamina (SLC6A3 e o TOC em uma amostra brasileira composta por 208 pacientes e 865 controles sadios. Nenhuma diferença estatisticamente significante foi observada nas distribuições alélicas e genotípicas entre os grupos de pacientes e controles. Nenhuma associação também foi observada quando as amostras foram divididas de acordo com características fenotípicas específicas, tais como gênero, presença de co-morbidade com tiques e idade de início dos sintomas obsessivo-compulsivo (SOC. Nossos resultados sugerem que o VNTR

  11. Lack of Association between a 3'UTR VNTR Polymorphism of Dopamine Transporter Gene (SLC6A3) and ADHD in a Brazilian Sample of Adult Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aperecida da Silva, Maria; Cordeiro, Quirino; Louza, Mario; Vallada, Homero

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a possible association between a 3'UTR VNTR polymorphism of the dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3) and ADHD in a Brazilian sample of adult patients. Method: Study Case-control with 102 ADHD adult outpatients ("DSM-IV" criteria) and 479 healthy controls. The primers' sequence used were: 3'UTR-Forward: 5' TGT GGT…

  12. Lack of Association between a 3'UTR VNTR Polymorphism of Dopamine Transporter Gene (SLC6A3) and ADHD in a Brazilian Sample of Adult Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aperecida da Silva, Maria; Cordeiro, Quirino; Louza, Mario; Vallada, Homero

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a possible association between a 3'UTR VNTR polymorphism of the dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3) and ADHD in a Brazilian sample of adult patients. Method: Study Case-control with 102 ADHD adult outpatients ("DSM-IV" criteria) and 479 healthy controls. The primers' sequence used were: 3'UTR-Forward: 5' TGT GGT GAT GGG…

  13. Association of STin2 VNTR Polymorphism of Serotonin Transporter Gene with Lifelong Premature Ejaculation: A Case-Control Study in Han Chinese Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiansheng; Gao, Jingjing; Tang, Dongdong; Gao, Pan; Peng, Dangwei; Liang, Chaozhao

    2016-10-07

    BACKGROUND The STin2 VNTR polymorphism has a variable number of tandem repeats in intron 2 of the serotonin transporter gene. We aimed to explore the relationship between STin2 VNTR polymorphism and lifelong premature ejaculation (LPE). MATERIAL AND METHODS We recruited a total of 115 outpatients who complained of ejaculating prematurely and who were diagnosed as LPE, and 101 controls without PE complaint. Allelic variations of STin2 VNTR were genotyped using PCR-based technology. We evaluated the associations between STin2 VNTR allelic and genotypic frequencies and LPE, as well as the intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) of different STin2 VNTR genotypes among LPE patients. RESULTS The patients and controls did not differ significantly in terms of any characteristic except age. A significantly higher frequency of STin2.12/12 genotype was found among LPE patients versus controls (P=0.026). Frequency of patients carrying at least 1 copy of the 10-repeat allele was significantly lower compared to the control group (28.3% vs. 41.8%, OR=0.55; 95%CI=0.31-0.97, P=0.040). In the LPE group, the mean IELT showed significant difference in STin2.12/12 genotype when compared to those with STin2.12/10 and STin2.10/10 genotypes. The mean IELT in10-repeat allele carriers was 50% longer compared to homozygous carriers of the STin2.12 allele. CONCLUSIONS Our results indicate the presence of STin2.10 allele is a protective factor for LPE. Men carrying the higher expression genotype STin2. 12/12 have shorter IELT than 10-repeat allele carriers.

  14. Association of STin2 Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) Polymorphism of Serotonin Transporter Gene with Lifelong Premature Ejaculation: A Case-Control Study in Han Chinese Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiansheng; Gao, Jingjing; Tang, Dongdong; Gao, Pan; Peng, Dangwei; Liang, Chaozhao

    2016-01-01

    Background The STin2 VNTR polymorphism has a variable number of tandem repeats in intron 2 of the serotonin transporter gene. We aimed to explore the relationship between STin2 VNTR polymorphism and lifelong premature ejaculation (LPE). Material/Methods We recruited a total of 115 outpatients who complained of ejaculating prematurely and who were diagnosed as LPE, and 101 controls without PE complaint. Allelic variations of STin2 VNTR were genotyped using PCR-based technology. We evaluated the associations between STin2 VNTR allelic and genotypic frequencies and LPE, as well as the intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) of different STin2 VNTR genotypes among LPE patients. Results The patients and controls did not differ significantly in terms of any characteristic except age. A significantly higher frequency of STin2.12/12 genotype was found among LPE patients versus controls (P=0.026). Frequency of patients carrying at least 1 copy of the 10-repeat allele was significantly lower compared to the control group (28.3% vs. 41.8%, OR=0.55; 95%CI=0.31–0.97, P=0.040). In the LPE group, the mean IELT showed significant difference in STin2.12/12 genotype when compared to those with STin2.12/10 and STin2.10/10 genotypes. The mean IELT in10-repeat allele carriers was 50% longer compared to homozygous carriers of the STin2.12 allele. Conclusions Our results indicate the presence of STin2.10 allele is a protective factor for LPE. Men carrying the higher expression genotype STin2. 12/12 have shorter IELT than 10-repeat allele carriers. PMID:27713390

  15. GLANET: genomic loci annotation and enrichment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlu, Burçak; Firtina, Can; Keles, Sündüz; Tastan, Oznur

    2017-09-15

    Genomic studies identify genomic loci representing genetic variations, transcription factor (TF) occupancy, or histone modification through next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Interpreting these loci requires evaluating them with known genomic and epigenomic annotations. We present GLANET as a comprehensive annotation and enrichment analysis tool which implements a sampling-based enrichment test that accounts for GC content and/or mappability biases, jointly or separately. GLANET annotates and performs enrichment analysis on these loci with a rich library. We introduce and perform novel data-driven computational experiments for assessing the power and Type-I error of its enrichment procedure which show that GLANET has attained high statistical power and well-controlled Type-I error rate. As a key feature, users can easily extend its library with new gene sets and genomic intervals. Other key features include assessment of impact of single nucleotide variants (SNPs) on TF binding sites and regulation based pathway enrichment analysis. GLANET can be run using its GUI or on command line. GLANET's source code is available at https://github.com/burcakotlu/GLANET . Tutorials are provided at https://glanet.readthedocs.org . burcak@ceng.metu.edu.tr or oznur.tastan@cs.bilkent.edu.tr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. Poisson modules and degeneracy loci

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the interplay between modules and sub-objects in holomorphic Poisson geometry. In particular, we define a new notion of "residue" for a Poisson module, analogous to the Poincar\\'e residue of a meromorphic volume form. Of particular interest is the interaction between the residues of the canonical line bundle of a Poisson manifold and its degeneracy loci---where the rank of the Poisson structure drops. As an application, we provide new evidence in favour of Bondal's conjecture that the rank \\leq 2k locus of a Fano Poisson manifold always has dimension \\geq 2k+1. In particular, we show that the conjecture holds for Fano fourfolds. We also apply our techniques to a family of Poisson structures defined by Fe\\u{\\i}gin and Odesski\\u{\\i}, where the degeneracy loci are given by the secant varieties of elliptic normal curves.

  17. VNTR diversity in Yersinia pestis isolates from an animal challenge study reveals the potential for in vitro mutations during laboratory cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Amy J.; Nottingham, Roxanne; Busch, Joseph D.; Sahl, Jason W.; Shuey, Megan M.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Schupp, James M.; Smith, Susan; Rocke, Tonie E.; Klein, Paul; Wagner, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Underlying mutation rates and other evolutionary forces shape the population structure of bacteria in nature. Although easily overlooked, similar forces are at work in the laboratory and may influence observed mutations. Here, we investigated tissue samples and Yersinia pestis isolates from a rodent laboratory challenge with strain CO92 using whole genome sequencing and multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA). We identified six VNTR mutations that were found to have occurred in vitro during laboratory cultivation rather than in vivo during the rodent challenge. In contrast, no single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations were observed, either in vivo or in vitro. These results were consistent with previously published mutation rates and the calculated number of Y. pestis generations that occurred during the in vitro versus the in vivo portions of the experiment. When genotyping disease outbreaks, the potential for in vitro mutations should be considered, particularly when highly variable genetic markers such as VNTRs are used.

  18. MIRU-VNTR genotype diversity and indications of homoplasy in M. avium strains isolated from humans and slaughter pigs in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvisa, Adrija; Tsirogiannis, Constantinos; Silamikelis, Ivars; Skenders, Girts; Broka, Lonija; Zirnitis, Agris; Jansone, Inta; Ranka, Renate

    2016-09-01

    Diseases which are caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are an increasing problem in the developed countries. In Latvia, one of the most clinically important members of NTM is Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), an opportunistic pathogen which has been isolated from several lung disease patients and tissue samples of slaughter pigs. This study was designed to characterize the genetic diversity of the M. avium isolates in Latvia and to compare the distribution of genotypic patterns among humans and pigs. Eleven (Hall and Salipante, 2010) clinical M. avium samples, isolated from patients of Center of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (years 2003-2010), and 32 isolates from pig necrotic mesenterial lymph nodes in different regions (years 2003-2007) were analyzed. The majority (42 of 43) of samples were identified as M. avium subsp. hominissuis; one porcine isolate belonged to M. avium subsp. avium. MIRU-VNTR genotyping revealed 13 distinct genotypes, among which nine genotype patterns, including M. avium subsp. avium isolate, were newly identified. IS1245 RFLP fingerprinting of 25 M. avium subsp. hominissuis samples yielded 17 different IS1245 RFLP patterns, allowing an efficient discrimination of isolates. Clusters of identical RFLP profiles were observed within host species, geographical locations and time frame of several years. Additional in silico analysis on simulated MIRU-VNTR genotype population datasets showed that the MIRU-VNTR pattern similarity could partly arise due to probabilistic increase of acquiring homoplasy among subpopulations, thus the similar MIRU-VNTR profiles of M. avium strains even in close geographical proximity should be interpreted with caution.

  19. Meta-analysis argues for a female-specific role of MAOA-uVNTR in panic disorder in four European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andreas; Weber, Heike; Domschke, Katharina; Klauke, Benedikt; Baumann, Christian; Jacob, Christian P; Ströhle, Andreas; Gerlach, Alexander L; Alpers, Georg W; Pauli, Paul; Hamm, Alfons; Kircher, Tilo; Arolt, Volker; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Binder, Elisabeth B; Erhardt, Angelika; Deckert, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a common mental disorder, ranking highest among the anxiety disorders in terms of disease burden. The pathogenesis of PD is multifactorial with significant heritability, however only a few convincing risk genes have been reported thus far. One of the most promising candidates is the gene encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), due to its key role in monoaminergic neurotransmission, established validity of animal models, and the efficacy of MAO inhibitors in the treatment of PD. A promoter repeat polymorphism in MAOA (MAOA-uVNTR) impacts on gene expression; high-expression alleles have been reported to increase the risk for PD. To further scrutinize the role of this polymorphism, we performed a formal meta-analysis on MAOA-uVNTR and PD using original data from four published European (Estonian, German, Italian, and Polish) samples and genotypes from three hitherto unpublished German PD samples, resulting in the largest (n = 1,115 patients and n = 1,260 controls) genetic study on PD reported to date. In the unpublished samples, evidence for association of MAOA-uVNTR with PD was obtained in one of the three samples. Results of the meta-analysis revealed a significant and female-specific association when calculating an allelic model (OR = 1.23, P = 0.006). This sex-specific effect might be explained by a gene-dose effect causing higher MAOA expression in females. Taken together, our meta-analysis therefore argues that high-expression MAOA-uVNTR alleles significantly increase the risk towards PD in women. However, epigenetic mechanisms might obfuscate the genetic association, calling for ascertainment in larger samples as well as assessment of the MAOA promoter methylation status therein.

  20. Associação entre polimorfismo SLC6A3 3’UTR VNTR e a resposta ao tratamento da dependência de nicotina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Rubino de Azevedo Focchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar a associação entre a resposta ao tratamento da dependência de nicotina com bupropiona e a presença do polimorfismo SLC6A3 3’UTR VNTR, localizado no gene que codifica o transportador dopaminérgico. Método: Foram acompanhados no Ambulatório de Tabagismo do Instituto de Psiquiatria da Faculdade de Medicina da USP 100 pacientes do sexo masculino com diagnóstico de dependência de nicotina, sem outras patologias. Todos receberam bupropiona até 300 mg ao dia por 12 semanas, associada à terapia cognitivo-comportamental em grupo. A Escala de Fagerström foi aplicada no início e no final do tratamento, e avaliou-se a parada do uso de cigarros na última semana de tratamento e um mês após. Os pacientes tiveram 10 ml de sangue colhidos e genotipados para a existência do polimorfismo SLC6A3 3’UTR VNTR. Resultados: Não foi encontrada associação entre cessação do uso de cigarro e presença do polimorfismo. Conclusão: São necessários mais estudos para avaliar se a presença do polimorfismo SLC6A3 3’UTR VNTR estaria relacionada à melhor resposta ao tratamento da dependência de nicotina.

  1. High-throughput identification of informative nuclear loci for shallow-scale phylogenetics and phylogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Alan R; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty

    2012-10-01

    One of the major challenges for researchers studying phylogeography and shallow-scale phylogenetics is the identification of highly variable and informative nuclear loci for the question of interest. Previous approaches to locus identification have generally required extensive testing of anonymous nuclear loci developed from genomic libraries of the target taxon, testing of loci of unknown utility from other systems, or identification of loci from the nearest model organism with genomic resources. Here, we present a fast and economical approach to generating thousands of variable, single-copy nuclear loci for any system using next-generation sequencing. We performed Illumina paired-end sequencing of three reduced-representation libraries (RRLs) in chorus frogs (Pseudacris) to identify orthologous, single-copy loci across libraries and to estimate sequence divergence at multiple taxonomic levels. We also conducted PCR testing of these loci across the genus Pseudacris and outgroups to determine whether loci developed for phylogeography can be extended to deeper phylogenetic levels. Prior to sequencing, we conducted in silico digestion of the most closely related reference genome (Xenopus tropicalis) to generate expectations for the number of loci and degree of coverage for a particular experimental design. Using the RRL approach, we: (i) identified more than 100,000 single-copy nuclear loci, 6339 of which were obtained for divergent conspecifics and 904 of which were obtained for heterospecifics; (ii) estimated average nuclear sequence divergence at 0.1% between alleles within an individual, 1.1% between conspecific individuals that represent two different clades, and 1.8% between species; and (iii) determined from PCR testing that 53% of the loci successfully amplify within-species and also many amplify to the genus-level and deeper in the phylogeny (16%). Our study effectively identified nuclear loci present in the genome that have levels of sequence divergence on

  2. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, A.; Graziano, S.L.; Nielsen, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for the Arctic cisco, Coregonus autumnalis. Loci were evaluated in 21 samples from the Colville River subsistence fishery. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 18. Observed heterozygosity of loci varied from 0.10 to 1.00, and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.09 to 0.92. All eight microsatellite markers were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The loci presented here will be useful in describing population structure and exploring populations of origin for Arctic cisco. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. PERMANENT GENETIC RESOURCES: Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, A; Graziano, S L; Nielsen, J L

    2008-03-01

    Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for the Arctic cisco, Coregonus autumnalis. Loci were evaluated in 21 samples from the Colville River subsistence fishery. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 18. Observed heterozygosity of loci varied from 0.10 to 1.00, and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.09 to 0.92. All eight microsatellite markers were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The loci presented here will be useful in describing population structure and exploring populations of origin for Arctic cisco.

  4. Dopamine transporter 3'UTR VNTR genotype is a marker of performance on executive function tasks in children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polotskaia Anna

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a heterogeneous disorder from both clinical and pathogenic viewpoints. Executive function deficits are considered among the most important pathogenic pathways leading to ADHD and may index part of the heterogeneity in this disorder. Methods To investigate the relationship between the dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3 3'-UTR VNTR genotypes and executive function in children with ADHD, 196 children diagnosed with ADHD were sequentially recruited, genotyped, and tested using a battery of three neuropsychological tests aimed at assessing the different aspects of executive functioning. Results Taking into account a correction for multiple comparisons, the main finding of this study is a significant genotype effect on performances on the Tower of London (F = 6.902, p = 0.009 and on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Third Edition (WISC-III Freedom From Distractibility Index (F = 7.125, p = 0.008, as well as strong trends on Self Ordered Pointing Task error scores (F = 4,996 p = 0.026 and WISC-III Digit Span performance (F = 6.28, p = 0.023. Children with the 9/10 genotype exhibited, on average, a poorer performance on all four measures compared to children with the 10/10 genotype. No effect of genotype on Wisconsin Card Sorting Test measures of performance was detected. Conclusion Results are compatible with the view that SLC6A3 genotype may modulate components of executive function performance in children with ADHD.

  5. The nature and identification of quantitative trait loci : a community's view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abiola, O; Angel, JM; Avner, P; Bachmanov, AA; Belknap, JK; Bennett, B; Blankenhorn, EP; Blizard, DA; Bolivar, [No Value; Brockmann, GA; Buck, KJ; Bureau, JF; Casley, WL; Chesler, EJ; Cheverud, JM; Churchill, GA; Cook, M; Crabbe, JC; Crusio, WE; Darvasi, A; de Haan, G; Demant, P; Doerge, RW; Elliott, RW; Farber, CR; Flaherty, L; Flint, J; Gershenfeld, H; Gu, JPGJ; Gu, WK; Himmelbauer, H; Hitzemann, R; Hsu, HC; Hunter, K; Iraqi, FA; Jansen, RC; Johnson, TE; Jones, BC; Kempermann, G; Lammert, F; Lu, L; Manly, KF; Matthews, DB; Medrano, JF; Mehrabian, M; Mittleman, G; Mock, BA; Mogil, JS; Montagutelli, [No Value; Morahan, G; Mountz, JD; Nagase, H; Nowakowski, RS; O'Hara, BR; Osadchuk, AV; Paigen, B; Palmer, Abraham A.; Peirce, JL; Pomp, D; Rosemann, M; Rosen, GD; Schalkwyk, LC; Seltzer, Z; Settle, S; Shimomura, K; Shou, SM; Sikela, JM; Siracusa, LD; Spearow, JL; Teuscher, C; Threadgill, DW; Toth, LA; Toye, AA; Vadasz, C; Van Zant, G; Wakeland, E; Zhang, HG; Zou, F; Angel, Joe M.; Belknap, John K.; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P.; Bolivar, Valerie; Brockmann, Gudrun A.; Buck, Kari J.; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Casley, William L.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Cheverud, James M.; Crabbe, John C.; Crusio, Wim E.; Elliott, Rosemary W.; Farber, Charles R.; Gibson, John P.; Gu, Jing; Gu, Weikuan; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Iraqi, Fuad A.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Jones, Byron C.; Manly, Kenneth F.; Matthews, Douglas B.; Medrano, Juan F.; Mock, Beverly A.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Montagutelli, Xavier; Mountz, John D.; Nowakowski, Richard S.; O’Hara, Bruce F.; Osadchuk, Alexander V.; Peirce, Jeremy L.; Rosen, Glenn D.; Shou, Siming; Siracusa, Linda D.; Spearow, Jimmy L.; Threadgill, David W.; Toth, Linda A.; Williams, Robert W.; Zhang, Huang-Ge; Williams, O.

    2003-01-01

    This white paper by eighty members of the Complex Trait Consortium presents a community’s view on the approaches and statistical analyses that are needed for the identification of genetic loci that determine quantitative traits. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) can be identified in several ways, but i

  6. Finding Quantitative Trait Loci Genes with Collaborative Targeted Maximum Likelihood Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Rose, Sherri; van der Laan, Mark J

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative trait loci mapping is focused on identifying the positions and effect of genes underlying an an observed trait. We present a collaborative targeted maximum likelihood estimator in a semi-parametric model using a newly proposed 2-part super learning algorithm to find quantitative trait loci genes in listeria data. Results are compared to the parametric composite interval mapping approach.

  7. Functional G894T (rs1799983) polymorphism and intron-4 VNTR variant of nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene are susceptibility biomarkers of obesity among Tunisians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Hela Ben; Dimassi, Saloua; M'hadhbi, Refka; Debbabi, Haithem; Kortas, Mondher; Tabka, Zouhair; Chahed, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) has been shown to play a role in the modulation of lipolysis. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of the G894T (rs1799983) and a 27 bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR 4a/b) of NOS3 gene on obesity in a sample of the Tunisian population. The study included 211 normal weight subjects and 183 obese patients. NOS3 G894T and 4a/b variants were determined by PCR analysis and examined for association with obesity-related traits. The effect of obesity on forearm skin blood flow (FSBF) response to acetylcholine, an endothelium-dependent vasodilator was determined by laser Doppler iontophoresis. In case-control studies, both G894T and 4a/b variants were associated with obesity. A significantly increased risk of obesity was found with the NOS3(G894T) TT genotype (OR:2.62, P=0.04). This association remains significant after adjustments for age and gender (OR: 2.93, P=0.03). A higher risk was also observed for carriers of the G894T allele (OR: 1.72, P=0.001). Stratified analysis by gender revealed that obese men (but not women) had significantly higher frequency of TT genotypes compared to controls (9.9% vs. 2.9%, P=0.01). Carriers of the 4b allele presented a significantly higher risk of obesity than non-carriers even after adjustments for age and gender (OR (95%CI): 1.72 (1.16-2.56), P=0.004). Correlations with anthropometric parameters revealed that carriers of TT and bb genotypes had significantly higher body mass index compared to those homozygous for the G and a alleles (P=0.0004). This study provides the first evidence for the association of G894T and 4a/b variants with body mass index and the risk of obesity in Tunisians. These polymorphisms did not exhibit, however any significant association with both metabolic traits and vascular function. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A multigene phylogeny of the Dothideomycetes using four nuclear loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoch, C.; Shoemaker, R.A.; Seifert, K.; Hambleton, S.; Spatafora, J.W.; Crous, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    We present an expanded multigene phylogeny of the Dothideomycetes. The final data matrix consisted of four loci (nuc SSU rDNA, nuc LSU rDNA, TEF1, RPB2) for 96 taxa, representing five of the seven orders in the current classification of Dothideomycetes and several outgroup taxa representative of the

  9. A multigene phylogeny of the Dothideomycetes using four nuclear loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoch, C.L.; Shoemaker, R.A.; Seifert, K.A.; Hambleton, S.; Spatafora, J.W.; Crous, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    We present an expanded multigene phylogeny of the Dothideomycetes. The final data matrix consisted of four loci (nuc SSU rDNA, nuc LSU rDNA, TEF1, RPB2) for 96 taxa, representing five of the seven orders in the current classification of Dothideomycetes and several outgroup taxa representative of the

  10. MAOA-uVNTR and Early Physical Discipline Interact to Influence Delinquent Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Alexis C.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Latendresse, Shawn J.; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Bates, John E.; Pettit, Gregory S.; Budde, John P.; Goate, Alison M.; Dick, Danielle M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the monoamine oxidizing gene "monoamine oxidase A" ("MAOA") has been associated with behavioral sensitivity to adverse environmental conditions in multiple studies (e.g., Caspi et al. 2002; Kim-Cohen et al., 2006). The present study investigates the effects of genotype and early…

  11. Genomic variability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains of the Euro-American lineage based on large sequence deletions and 15-locus MIRU-VNTR polymorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Rindi

    Full Text Available A sample of 260 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains assigned to the Euro-American family was studied to identify phylogenetically informative genomic regions of difference (RD. Mutually exclusive deletions of regions RD115, RD122, RD174, RD182, RD183, RD193, RD219, RD726 and RD761 were found in 202 strains; the RD(Rio deletion was detected exclusively among the RD174-deleted strains. Although certain deletions were found more frequently in certain spoligotype families (i.e., deletion RD115 in T and LAM, RD174 in LAM, RD182 in Haarlem, RD219 in T and RD726 in the "Cameroon" family, the RD-defined sublineages did not specifically match with spoligotype-defined families, thus arguing against the use of spoligotyping for establishing exact phylogenetic relationships between strains. Notably, when tested for katG463/gyrA95 polymorphism, all the RD-defined sublineages belonged to Principal Genotypic Group (PGG 2, except sublineage RD219 exclusively belonging to PGG3; the 58 Euro-American strains with no deletion were of either PGG2 or 3. A representative sample of 197 isolates was then analyzed by standard 15-locus MIRU-VNTR typing, a suitable approach to independently assess genetic relationships among the strains. Analysis of the MIRU-VNTR typing results by using a minimum spanning tree (MST and a classical dendrogram showed groupings that were largely concordant with those obtained by RD-based analysis. Isolates of a given RD profile show, in addition to closely related MIRU-VNTR profiles, related spoligotype profiles that can serve as a basis for better spoligotype-based classification.

  12. No Direct Association of Serotonin Transporter (STin2 VNTR and Receptor (HT 102T>C Gene Variants in Genetic Susceptibility to Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Joshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to find out if the serotonin receptor (HT102T>C and serotonin transporter (STin 2 polymorphisms play any role in genetic susceptibility of migraine. For the study, 217 migraine patients and 217 healthy controls (HC were recruited and genotyping was carried out using the Polymerase Chain Reaction and Restriction Fragment Length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method. All results were Bonferroni corrected. We could not find any significant differences in the genotype or allele frequencies in case of HT 102 T>C polymorphism between migraine patients and healthy controls (P value=0.224. No significant association was seen at allele and carrier levels. Sub-grouping the patients on the basis of gender or on basis of migraine type i.e. with or without aura also did not show any association. Similarly, no difference in genotype (P value=0.236, allele (P value=0.550 or carrier frequency (P value=0.771 in STin 2 VNTR polymorphism was observed between migraine patients. However, HT 102 TC genotype was observed to interact significantly with the STin 2.10/10 genotype in enhancing risk of migraine, both with and without aura. In conclusion, the HT102 T>C receptor and the STin 2 VNTR transporter polymorphisms, did not individually confer any significant risk of migraine or its clinical subtypes but the two polymorphisms appear to synergistically influence susceptibility to migraine. Serotonin transporter (STin2 VNTR and receptor (HT 102T>C polymorphisms; Migraine with aura (MA; Migraine without aura (MO; Genetic susceptibility

  13. Examining impulsivity as an endophenotype using a behavioral approach: a DRD2 TaqI A and DRD4 48-bp VNTR association study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beauchemin Joshua

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on the genetic basis for impulsivity has revealed an array of ambiguous findings. This may be a result of limitations to self-report assessments of impulsivity. Behavioral measures that assess more narrowly defined aspects of impulsivity may clarify genetic influences. This study examined the relationship between possession of the DRD2 TaqI A and DRD4 48 bp VNTR genetic polymorphisms and performance on a behavioral measure of impulsivity, the delay discounting task (DDT, and three traditional self-report measures. Methods 195 individuals (42% male were recruited from a university campus and were assessed in small group sessions using personal computers. Genotyping was conducted using previously established protocols. For the DRD2 TaqI A locus, individuals were designated as possessing at least one copy of the A1 allele (A1+ or not (A1-, and for the DRD4 48-bp VNTR locus, individuals were designated as having at least one long allele (7 repeats or longer, L+ or not (L-. Principal analyses used multiple univariate factorial 2 (A1+/A1- × 2 (L+/L- analyses of variance. Results A significant main effect of A1+ status on DDT performance was evident (p = .006 as well as a significant interaction effect (p = .006 between both genes. No other significant effects were evident on the self-report measures, with the exception of a trend toward an interaction effect on the Sensation Seeking Scale. Exploratory analyses suggested that the significant effects were not a function of population stratification or gender. Discussion These data suggest that the DRD2 TaqI A and DRD4 VNTR polymorphisms influence impulsivity as measured with a delay discounting task. Specifically, these findings suggest that an interaction between the functional effects of the two unlinked genotypes results in significant difference in the balance of mesolimbic dopaminergic activation relative to frontal-parietal activation. However, these findings are also

  14. Genomic Characterization of the Vaccinal Strain of Mycobacterium Avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis (MAP 316F by MIRU-VNTR

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    Zahra Ebrahim (MSc

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Paratuberculosis is a chronic granulomatous enteritis of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP. this study aimed to characterize the genome of the MAP 316F strain. Methods: The MAP 316F strain was subjected to the PCR-F57 and PCR-IS900 experiments in order to ensure its identity as MAP. This was followed by application of the Thibault genotyping system consisting of eight loci including 292, x3, 25, 47, 3, 7, 10 and 32. Required genomic material for all experiments was prepared using the simple method of boiling. Gel electrophoresis findings related to the typing PCRs were backed by sequencing of amplification products. Results: In PCR amplification, eight products with the size of 300, 298, 350, 217, 208, 203, 803 and 649 bp were detected at 292, X3, 25, 47, 3, 7, 10 and 32 loci, holding 3, 2, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2 and 8 copies of TRs at these loci, respectively. Conclusion: This genomic pattern is matched with that of the MAP 316F vaccine strain from the French Merial company and also the MAP K10 fully-sequenced strain. Keywords: Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, Genomics, Genotyping techniques, Strain

  15. Interaction between insulin (VNTR) and hepatic lipase (LIPC-514C>T) variants on the response to an oral glucose tolerance test in the EARSII group of young healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterworth, Dawn M; Jansen, Hans; Nicaud, Viviane; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J

    2005-06-10

    Insulin resistance is polygenic in origin, and can be observed at an early age. We have shown that variations in APOC3-482T>C and hepatic lipase (LIPC)-514C>T), individually (APOC3 alone) and interactively, modulate insulin and glucose levels after an OGTT in young healthy men participating in the European Atherosclerosis Research Study II (EARSII). Variation in the insulin gene (INS) variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) has been found to predispose to type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We have evaluated the HphI site 23 bp upstream of the INS gene (a surrogate marker for the VNTR) in EARSII (n=822), to determine if variation in INS contributes to insulin resistance. Carriers of the INS VNTR class III (HphI-) allele (frequency=0.29 (95%CI 0.27, 0.31)) had significantly higher 60-min insulin concentrations after the OGTT (P=0.014) and a marginally higher AUC insulin (P=0.07), compared to class I (HphI+) homozygotes. However, this effect on AUC insulin was modified by the level of physical activity, displaying significant gene:environment interaction (P=0.03). We tested for gene:gene interaction between the INS VNTR and both the LIPC-514C>T and APOC3-482T>C. While there was a significant interaction between INS VNTR and LIPC-514C>T on AUC glucose (P=0.013) and on AUC insulin (P=0.015), there was no interaction with APOC3-482T>C. Thus, despite a modest effect of the INS VNTR alone, the influence of this variant on insulin sensitivity was modified by gene:environment and gene:gene interactions, illustrating the biological complexity of insulin resistance.

  16. VNTR fingerprinting of Kluyveromyces marxianus strains WT, 7-1, and 8-1 by using different primer types to give best results in PCR and on electrophorese gel in order to find differentiation of the DNA of the yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using mutagenized Kluyveromyces marxianus strains (WT, 7-1, 8-1) we wish to find out the variable numbered tandem repeats (VNTR) of each of the DNA strains from the different mutagenized K. marxianus strains. To do this we used Phusion HF Buffer Pack to try and give a clear picture of the VNTR by u...

  17. O polimorfismo VNTR no gene codificador do antagonista do receptor da interleucina-1 está associado com a doença arterial coronariana Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene VNTR polymorphism is associated with coronary artery disease

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    Ahmet Arman

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A Doença Arterial Coronariana (DAC é a aterosclerose das artérias coronárias que transportam o sangue para o coração. A aterosclerose é uma doença inflamatória. As variações gênicas das citocinas - como as associadas à família IL1 - fazem parte da patogênese da aterosclerose. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a relação entre os polimorfismos da família IL1 (VNTR do IL1RN, posições -511 e +3953 do IL1B e a DAC na população turca. MÉTODOS: Um total de 427 indivíduos foram submetidos à angiografia coronariana e em seguida divididos da seguinte forma: 170 no grupo controle e 257 no grupo de pacientes com DAC. Os sujeitos com DAC foram divididos em dois subgrupos: 91 no grupo de Doença Coronariana em um único vaso (Single Vessel Disease - SVD e 166 no grupo Doença Coronariana em múltiplos vasos (Multiple Vessel Disease - MVD. Os genótipos de IL1RN e IL1B (-511, +3953 foram determinados por reação em cadeia da polimerase (RCP, seguida de análise da digestão por enzima de restrição. RESULTADOS: Não foram observadas diferenças significantes nas distribuições de genótipos de IL1RN e IL1B (-511 e +3953 entre os sujeitos com DAC e os controles, ou entre sujeitos com MVD e controles. No entanto, observou-se uma relação significante no genótipo IL1RN 2/2 entre sujeitos portadores de SVD e controles (P= 0,016, x2: 10,289, OR: 2,94IC 95% 1,183 - 7,229. Tampouco foi observada diferença estatisticamente significante nas freqüências dos alelos de IL1RN e IL1B (-511 e +3953 entre os sujeitos com DAC e controles, os sujeitos com MVD e controles, ou ainda os sujeitos SVD e controles. CONCLUSÃO: Não foi observada nenhuma relação na freqüência alélica e nem na distribuição genotípica dos polimorfismos de IL1RN e IL1B entre sujeitos com DAC e grupos controle. No entanto, o genótipo IL1RN 2/2 pode representar um fator de risco para sujeitos com SVD na população turca

  18. Alelle number and heterozigosity for microsatellite loci in different stingless bee species (Hymenoptera: Apidae, Meliponini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Flávio de O; Brito, Rute M; Arias, Maria C

    2006-01-01

    In the present study we compare genetic characteristics (allele diversity and observed heterozygosity) of microsatellite loci, from three stingless bee species (Plebeia remota Holmberg, Partamona mulata Moure In Camargo and Partamona helleri Friese), amplified by using heterospecific primers originally designed for Melipona bicolor Lepeletier and Scaptotrigona postica Latreille. We analyzed 360 individuals of P. remota from 72 nests, 58 individuals of R. mulata from 58 nests, and 47 individuals of P. helleri from 47 nests. The three species studied showed low level of polymorphism for the loci amplified with primers derived from M. bicolor. However, for the loci amplified with primers derived from S. postica, only P. remota presented low level of polymorphism.

  19. [A case of environmental infection with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease from a residential bathroom of a patient suggested by variable-number tandem-repeat typing of Mycobacterium avium tandem repeat loci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taga, Shu; Niimi, Masaki; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Nakagawa, Taku; Ogawa, Kenji

    2012-05-01

    A 63-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of bilateral infiltrations and nodular opacities in her chest radiograph taken in the mass radiography screening in September 2010. The chest computed tomography showed patchy infiltrations with bronchiectasis in the lower lung fields on both sides. She was diagnosed with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease based on the bacteria recovered from the sputum and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. To elucidate an environmental MAC source, we investigated her home, and isolated M. avium and M. gordonae from the bathtub and shower tap, respectively, in her residential bathroom. Analysis of the hsp65-PRA variants digested with BamHI and some insertion sequences showed that the clinical strains recovered from sputum and strains from the bathtub were M. avium subsp. hominissuis. A dendrogram of the Mycobacterium avium tandem repeat loci variable-number tandem-repeat (MATR-VNTR) analysis of the MAC strains showed that the bathtub strains formed a polyclonal colonization, and that 1 of the 5 MATR-VNTR patterns was identical to the corresponding pattern of the sputum strain from the patient. In conclusion, we believe that the residential bathroom of the patient was the environmental source of her pulmonary MAC disease, as has been previously reported.

  20. Discrimination power evaluation for 45 loci of variable number tandem repeats in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from China%45个可变数目串联重复序列位点用于中国结核分枝杆菌基因型鉴定的分辨力评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕冰; 李兆娜; 刘梅; 刘志广; 赵秀芹; 万康林

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the discriminatory efficiency of multiple loci of variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTR) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome.Genotyping and identification on Chinese M.tuberculosis clinical strains were used to locate a series of high discriminated loci,so as to provide the basis for creating a standardized multiple loci VNTR analysis (MLVA) to distribute fast typing and identification on Chinese M.tuberculosis.Methods VNTR loci which were chosen from the website http://minisatellites.u-psud.fr/ and referenced to the genome sequence of M.tuberculosis standard strain H37Rv were tested in Chinese M.tuberculosis clinical strains and H37Rv by means of PCR.The primers were designed by DNAStar software.The repeat member of VNTR unit was estimated by the result of PCR.The discrimination power of single locus or multiple loci was confirmed by the Hunter-Gaston index.Results 45 VNTR loci were tested in 135 Chinese M.tuberculosis clinical strains and H37Rv.The discrimination power of these loci appeared different from each other,with the biggest Hunter-Gaston index as 0.814 (0.797-0.830),the smallest one as 0.015 (0.001-0.028),and there were 13 loci with which the Hunter-Gaston index was bigger than 0.5.Results showed that the discrimination power was increasing by different loci that associated with each other.The more loci that were combined,the bigger the Hunter-Gaston index was,For example,the Hunter-Gaston index of Qub11-b associated with Qub 18 was 0.936,by which 136 strains could be divided into 44 groups.With the combination of 9 loci including Qub11-b,Qub18,Mtub21,Rv2372,MIRU26,Qub26,Qub4156c,Qub11-a and Qub15,the HunterGaston index could have reached 1 and by which the 136 strains could be divided into 136 groups,also showing that the biggest discrimination power to strain identification,viz.strain level genotype were reached.Conclusion The discrimination power of different locus was different.The discrimination power of multiple loci was

  1. Population data on 10 non-CODIS STR loci in Japanese population using a newly developed multiplex PCR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamura, H; Ota, M; Fukushima, H

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes a newly devised autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems for 10 loci (D1S1656, D2S1353, D8S1132, D12S1090, D14S608, D18S535, D19S253, D20S480, D21S226, and D22S689) unlinked to the core STR loci (non-CODIS loci). Of 252 samples taken from the Japanese population, PCR products ranged in length from 107 bp to 319 bp. No significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed at any of the 10 loci. The accumulated power of discrimination and power of exclusion for the 10 loci were 0.999999999998 and 0.99991, respectively. We conclude that the present multiplex system for the 10 non-CODIS loci represents a powerful tool for forensic applications.

  2. Genomic Loci Modulating the Retinal Transcriptome in Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez-Chona, Félix R; Lu Lu; Robert W Williams; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The present study predicts and tests genetic networks that modulate gene expression during the retinal wound-healing response.Methods: Upstream modulators and target genes were defined using meta-analysis and bioinfor matic approaches. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for retinal acute phase genes (Vazquez-Chona et al. 2005) were defi ned using QTL analysis of CNS gene expression (Chesler et al. 2005). Candidate modulators were defi ned using computational analysis of gene and motif se...

  3. Comparing geographical genetic differentiation between candidate and noncandidate loci for adaptation strengthens support for parallel ecological divergence in the marine snail Littorina saxatilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, J; Morán, P; Rolán-Alvarez, E

    2009-03-01

    The Galician sympatric ecotypes of Littorina saxatilis have been proposed as a model system for studying parallel ecological speciation. Such a model system makes a clear prediction: candidate loci (for divergent adaptation) should present a higher level of geographical differentiation than noncandidate (neutral) loci. We used 2356 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and four microsatellite loci to identify candidate loci for ecological adaptation using the F(ST) outlier method. Three per cent of the studied AFLP loci were identified as candidate loci associated with adaptation, after multitest adjustments, thus contributing to ecotype differentiation (candidate loci were not detected within ecotypes). Candidate and noncandidate loci were analysed separately at four different F(ST) partitions: differences between ecotypes (overall and local), differences between localities and micro-geographical differences within ecotypes. The magnitude of F(ST) differed between candidate and noncandidate loci for all partitions except in the case of micro-geographical differentiation within ecotypes, and the microsatellites (putatively neutral) showed an identical pattern to noncandidate loci. Thus, variation in candidate loci is determined partially independent by divergent natural selection (in addition to stochastic forces) at each locality, while noncandidate loci are exclusively driven by stochastic forces. These results support the evolutionary history described for these particular populations, considered to be a clear example of incomplete sympatric ecological speciation.

  4. Distribution of α1 immunoglobulin gene VNTR polymorphisms in Chinese%我国汉族人群α1基因数目可变串联重复序列分布特征的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古宏标; 黄玮俊; 杜勇; 李彩霞; 李幼姬; 薛超; 陈素琴; 胡彬; 王一鸣

    2005-01-01

    目的:研究我国汉族人群免疫球蛋白α1基因中3个数目可变串联重复序列(VNTR)多态性分布特征,及其与已报道的高加索人群相比较的特点.方法:从现存数据库中寻找α1基因内的3个VNTR位点,即α1基因3'端的hs1,2增强子内的VNTR1、其上游6 Kb的VNTR2和位于α1基因第5外显子的E5VNTR.提取201例广东汉族人基因组DNA,PCR分别扩增含上述3个VNTR位点片段,2%-3%凝胶电泳分带鉴定基因型,并以测序证实.结果:与高加索人群比较我国汉族人群α1基因VNTR1多态性分布特征表现为:C(3次重复)等位基因频率明显升高(10.0% vs 1.0%),A(1次重复)等位基因频率偏低(30.3% vs 36.1%-39.4%),差异显著(x2=72.85,P<0.01).基因型BB占37.8%,AB占32.3%,AA占12%,BC占11.4%,AC占4.5%,CC占2.0%,BC、AC基因型分布频率显著高于高加索人群,而AB型分布频率显著低于高加索人群(x2=73.77,P<0.01).另外两个数据库中报道的VNTR位点(VNTR 2及E5VNTR)在我们所测人群中呈均一分布,PCR产物长度分别为136 bp(VNTR 2)和535bp(E5VNTR).结论:我国汉族人群α1基因VNTR多态性分布与基因组数据库中基于高加索人群的资料不尽相同,其中Iα1 hs1,2 VN-TR1多态性不同于高加索人群,突出表现为C等位基因频率及BC、AC基因型频率显著高于高加索人群.而VNTR2和E5VNTR在被检人群中未见多态性.本研究弥补了现存数据库中缺乏我国汉族人群相应数据的不足,同时为以α1基因为候选基因找寻疾病基因的研究提供了可靠的数据.

  5. Simultaneous mapping of multiple gene loci with pooled segregants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Claesen

    Full Text Available The analysis of polygenic, phenotypic characteristics such as quantitative traits or inheritable diseases remains an important challenge. It requires reliable scoring of many genetic markers covering the entire genome. The advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies provides a new way to evaluate large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs as genetic markers. Combining the technologies with pooling of segregants, as performed in bulked segregant analysis (BSA, should, in principle, allow the simultaneous mapping of multiple genetic loci present throughout the genome. The gene mapping process, applied here, consists of three steps: First, a controlled crossing of parents with and without a trait. Second, selection based on phenotypic screening of the offspring, followed by the mapping of short offspring sequences against the parental reference. The final step aims at detecting genetic markers such as SNPs, insertions and deletions with next generation sequencing (NGS. Markers in close proximity of genomic loci that are associated to the trait have a higher probability to be inherited together. Hence, these markers are very useful for discovering the loci and the genetic mechanism underlying the characteristic of interest. Within this context, NGS produces binomial counts along the genome, i.e., the number of sequenced reads that matches with the SNP of the parental reference strain, which is a proxy for the number of individuals in the offspring that share the SNP with the parent. Genomic loci associated with the trait can thus be discovered by analyzing trends in the counts along the genome. We exploit the link between smoothing splines and generalized mixed models for estimating the underlying structure present in the SNP scatterplots.

  6. Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium analysis of the 48 bp VNTR in the III exon of the DRD4 gene in a sample of parents of ADHD cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo, Salvador; Toscano-Flores, José J; Matute, Esmeralda; Ramírez-Dueñas, María de Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain the genotype and gene frequency from parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and then assess the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium of genotype frequency of the variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) III exon of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene. The genotypes of the III exon of 48 bp VNTR repeats of the DRD4 gene were determined by polymerase chain reaction in a sample of 30 parents of ADHD cases. In the 60 chromosomes analyzed, the following frequencies of DRD4 gene polymorphisms were observed: six chromosomes (c) with two repeat alleles (r) (10%); 1c with 3r (1.5%); 36c with 4r (60%); 1c with 5r (1.5%); and 16c with 7r (27%). The genotypic distribution of the 30 parents was two parents (p) with 2r/2r (6.67%); 1p with 2r/4r (3.33%); 1p with 2r/5r (3.33%); 1p with 3r/4r (3.33%); 15p with 4r/4r (50%); 4p with 4r/7r (13.33); and 6p with 7r/7r (20%). A Hardy–Weinberg disequilibrium (χ2=13.03, P<0.01) was found due to an over-representation of the 7r/7r genotype. These results suggest that the 7r polymorphism of the DRD4 gene is associated with the ADHD condition in a Mexican population. PMID:26082657

  7. Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium analysis of the 48 bp VNTR in the III exon of the DRD4 gene in a sample of parents of ADHD cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trejo S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Salvador Trejo, José J Toscano-Flores, Esmeralda Matute, María de Lourdes Ramírez-Dueñas Laboratorio de Neuropsicología y Neurolingüística, Instituto de Neurociencias CUCBA, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico Abstract: The aim of this study was to obtain the genotype and gene frequency from parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and then assess the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium of genotype frequency of the variable number tandem repeat (VNTR III exon of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4 gene. The genotypes of the III exon of 48 bp VNTR repeats of the DRD4 gene were determined by polymerase chain reaction in a sample of 30 parents of ADHD cases. In the 60 chromosomes analyzed, the following frequencies of DRD4 gene polymorphisms were observed: six chromosomes (c with two repeat alleles (r (10%; 1c with 3r (1.5%; 36c with 4r (60%; 1c with 5r (1.5%; and 16c with 7r (27%. The genotypic distribution of the 30 parents was two parents (p with 2r/2r (6.67%; 1p with 2r/4r (3.33%; 1p with 2r/5r (3.33%; 1p with 3r/4r (3.33%; 15p with 4r/4r (50%; 4p with 4r/7r (13.33; and 6p with 7r/7r (20%. A Hardy–Weinberg disequilibrium (χ2=13.03, P<0.01 was found due to an over-representation of the 7r/7r genotype. These results suggest that the 7r polymorphism of the DRD4 gene is associated with the ADHD condition in a Mexican population. Keywords: ADHD, parents, DRD4, HWE

  8. Evolution of V genes from the TRV loci of mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, David N; Gambón-Cerdá, Santiago; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Information concerning the evolution of T lymphocyte receptors (TCR) can be deciphered from that part of the molecule that recognizes antigen presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC), namely the variable (V) regions. The genes that code for these variable regions are found within the TCR loci. Here, we describe a study of the evolutionary origin of V genes that code for the α and β chains of the TCR loci of mammals. In particular, we demonstrate that most of the 35 TRAV and 25 TRBV conserved genes found in Primates are also found in other Eutheria, while in Marsupials, Monotremes, and Reptiles, these genes diversified in a different manner. We also show that in mammals, all TRAV genes are derived from five ancestral genes, while all TRBV genes originate from four such genes. In Reptiles, the five TRAV and three out of the four TRBV ancestral genes exist, as well as other V genes not found in mammals. We also studied the TRGV and TRDV loci from all mammals, and we show a relationship of the TRDV to the TRAV locus throughout evolutionary time.

  9. Genotype-dependent participation of coat color gene loci in the behavioral traits of laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Aya

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate if loci responsible for coat color phenotypes contribute to behavioral characteristics, we specified novel gene loci associated with social exploratory behavior and examined the effects of the frequency of each allele at distinct loci on behavioral expression. We used the F2 generation, which arose from the mating of F1 mice obtained by interbreeding DBA/2 and ICR mice. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the agouti and albino loci affect behavioral traits. A genotype-based analysis revealed that novel exploratory activity was suppressed in a manner dependent on the frequency of the dominant wild-type allele at the agouti, but not albino, locus. The allele-dependent suppression was restricted to colored mice and was not seen in albino mice. The present results suggest that the agouti locus contributes to a particular behavioral trait in the presence of a wild-type allele at the albino locus, which encodes a structural gene for tyrosinase.

  10. Improved haplotype analysis of human myelin basic protein short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, G; Umetsu, K; Yuasa, I; Suzuki, T

    2000-06-01

    We report an improved haplotype analysis of the human myelin basic protein gene (MBP) short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism. The polymorphic G-->A transition and 2 conventional STR polymorphisms, MBPA and MBPB, were simultaneously determined by an amplified product length polymorphism technique. After the MBPC fragments containing MBPA and MBPB were amplified, the linkage of these 2 STR loci was determined by a second amplification, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, of the isolated MBPC fragments. The present haplotype analysis dispensed with family studies for the haplotyping of MBPA and MBPB. Polymorphisms of the MBP loci studied in German and Japanese populations showed a high genomic variation. Haplotype analysis of the MBP loci showed distinct differences between the German and the Japanese populations. Consequently, haplotype analysis of the MBP loci promises to be useful in forensic identification and paternity testing.

  11. List of isozyme loci - RGP gmap98 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us RGP gmap98 List of isozyme loci Data detail Data name List of isozyme loci DOI 10.18908/lsdb...he present high-density linkage map, and that were putatively identified as isozyme genes. Data file File name: rgp_gmap98_iso...gmap98/LATEST/rgp_gmap98_isozyme_loci.zip File size: 611 B Simple search URL http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/...0001 were considered as functionally identical clones. And we have selected the ones that hit the isozyme ge...his Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us List of isozyme loci - RGP gmap98 | LSDB Archive ...

  12. Quantifying missing heritability at known GWAS loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gusev

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that much of the missing heritability of complex traits can be resolved by estimates of heritability explained by all genotyped SNPs. However, it is currently unknown how much heritability is missing due to poor tagging or additional causal variants at known GWAS loci. Here, we use variance components to quantify the heritability explained by all SNPs at known GWAS loci in nine diseases from WTCCC1 and WTCCC2. After accounting for expectation, we observed all SNPs at known GWAS loci to explain 1.29 x more heritability than GWAS-associated SNPs on average (P=3.3 x 10⁻⁵. For some diseases, this increase was individually significant: 2.07 x for Multiple Sclerosis (MS (P=6.5 x 10⁻⁹ and 1.48 x for Crohn's Disease (CD (P = 1.3 x 10⁻³; all analyses of autoimmune diseases excluded the well-studied MHC region. Additionally, we found that GWAS loci from other related traits also explained significant heritability. The union of all autoimmune disease loci explained 7.15 x more MS heritability than known MS SNPs (P 20,000 Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA samples typed on ImmunoChip, with 2.37 x more heritability from all SNPs at GWAS loci (P = 2.3 x 10⁻⁶ and 5.33 x more heritability from all autoimmune disease loci (P < 1 x 10⁻¹⁶ compared to known RA SNPs (including those identified in this cohort. Our methods adjust for LD between SNPs, which can bias standard estimates of heritability from SNPs even if all causal variants are typed. By comparing adjusted estimates, we hypothesize that the genome-wide distribution of causal variants is enriched for low-frequency alleles, but that causal variants at known GWAS loci are skewed towards common alleles. These findings have important ramifications for fine-mapping study design and our understanding of complex disease architecture.

  13. Characterization of copy number variation in genomic regions containing STR loci using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repnikova, Elena A; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bailes, Andrea; Weber, Cecilia; Erdman, Linda; McKinney, Aimee; Ramsey, Sarah; Hashimoto, Sayaka; Lamb Thrush, Devon; Astbury, Caroline; Reshmi, Shalini C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Pyatt, Robert E

    2013-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) loci are commonly used in forensic casework, familial analysis for human identification, and for monitoring hematopoietic cell engraftment after bone marrow transplant. Unexpected genetic variation leading to sequence and length differences in STR loci can complicate STR typing, and presents challenges in casework interpretation. Copy number variation (CNV) is a relatively recently identified form of genetic variation consisting of genomic regions present at variable copy numbers within an individual compared to a reference genome. Large scale population studies have demonstrated that likely all individuals carry multiple regions with CNV of 1kb in size or greater in their genome. To date, no study correlating genomic regions containing STR loci with CNV has been conducted. In this study, we analyzed results from 32,850 samples sent for clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis for the presence of CNV at regions containing the 13 CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) STR, and the Amelogenin X (AMELX) and Amelogenin Y (AMELY) loci. Thirty-two individuals with CNV involving STR loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 7, 11, 12, 13, 16, and 21, and twelve with CNV involving the AMELX/AMELY loci were identified. These results were correlated with data from publicly available databases housing information on CNV identified in normal populations and additional clinical cases. These collective results demonstrate the presence of CNV in regions containing 9 of the 13 CODIS STR and AMELX/Y loci. Further characterization of STR profiles within regions of CNV, additional cataloging of these variants in multiple populations, and contributing such examples to the public domain will provide valuable information for reliable use of these loci.

  14. 52 Genetic Loci Influencing Myocardial Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Harst, Pim; van Setten, Jessica; Verweij, Niek; Vogler, Georg; Franke, Lude; Maurano, Matthew T.; Wang, Xinchen; Leach, Irene Mateo; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Hayward, Caroline; Sorice, Rossella; Meirelles, Osorio; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Polašek, Ozren; Tanaka, Toshiko; Arking, Dan E.; Ulivi, Sheila; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V.; Dörr, Marcus; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Magnani, Jared W.; Fabiola Del Greco, M.; Zhang, Weihua; Nolte, Ilja M.; Silva, Claudia T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tragante, Vinicius; Esko, Tõnu; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Andersen, Karl; Barnett, Phil; Bis, Joshua C.; Bodmer, Rolf; Buckley, Brendan M.; Campbell, Harry; Cannon, Megan V.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Lin Y.; Delitala, Alessandro; Devereux, Richard B.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Haugen, Eric; Heinig, Matthias; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hillege, Hans L.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hubner, Norbert; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Iorio, Annamaria; Kähönen, Mika; Kellis, Manolis; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kors, Jan A.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Lage, Kasper; Launer, Lenore J.; Levy, Daniel; Lundby, Alicia; Macfarlane, Peter W.; May, Dalit; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Nappo, Stefania; Naitza, Silvia; Neph, Shane; Nord, Alex S.; Nutile, Teresa; Okin, Peter M.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Oostra, Ben A.; Penninger, Josef M.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pers, Tune H.; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pinto, Yigal M.; Pfeufer, Arne; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prins, Bram P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rice, Ken M.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schafer, Sebastian; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Sehmi, Jobanpreet; Silljé, Herman H.W.; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Sinner, Moritz F.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Spector, Timothy D.; Spiering, Wilko; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Strauch, Konstantin; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Trinh, Bosco; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van den Boogaard, Malou; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Visscher, Peter M.; Vitart, Veronique; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Weichenberger, Christian X.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.; Yang, Jian; Bezzina, Connie R.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Snieder, Harold; Wright, Alan F.; Rudan, Igor; Boyer, Laurie A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ciullo, Marina; Sanna, Serena; Lehtimäki, Terho; Wilson, James F.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Alonso, Alvaro; Gasparini, Paolo; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kääb, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Felix, Stephan B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Hicks, Andrew A.; Chambers, John C.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Visel, Axel; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Isaacs, Aaron; Samani, Nilesh J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to cardiac muscle contraction is reflected by the amplitude and duration of the QRS complex on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormal QRS amplitude or duration reflect changes in myocardial mass and conduction, and are associated with increased risk of heart failure and death. OBJECTIVES This meta-analysis sought to gain insights into the genetic determinants of myocardial mass. METHODS We carried out a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 4 QRS traits in up to 73,518 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. RESULTS We identified 52 genomic loci, of which 32 are novel, that are reliably associated with 1 or more QRS phenotypes at p < 1 × 10−8. These loci are enriched in regions of open chromatin, histone modifications, and transcription factor binding, suggesting that they represent regions of the genome that are actively transcribed in the human heart. Pathway analyses provided evidence that these loci play a role in cardiac hypertrophy. We further highlighted 67 candidate genes at the identified loci that are preferentially expressed in cardiac tissue and associated with cardiac abnormalities in Drosophila melanogaster and Mus musculus. We validated the regulatory function of a novel variant in the SCN5A/SCN10A locus in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, our findings provide new insights into genes and biological pathways controlling myocardial mass and may help identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27659466

  15. Interval Mapping of Multiple Quantitative Trait Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ritsert C.

    1993-01-01

    The interval mapping method is widely used for the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in segregating generations derived from crosses between inbred lines. The efficiency of detecting and the accuracy of mapping multiple QTLs by using genetic markers are much increased by employing multiple Q

  16. STELLAR LOCI. I. METALLICITY DEPENDENCE AND INTRINSIC WIDTHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Haibo; Liu, Xiaowei [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xiang, Maosheng; Huang, Yang; Chen, Bingqiu, E-mail: yuanhb4861@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: x.liu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-02-01

    Stellar loci are widely used for selection of interesting outliers, reddening determinations, and calibrations. However, until now, the dependence of stellar loci on metallicity has not been fully explored, and their intrinsic widths are unclear. In this paper, by combining the spectroscopic and recalibrated imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, we have built a large, clean sample of dwarf stars with accurate colors and well-determined metallicities to investigate the metallicity dependence and intrinsic widths of the SDSS stellar loci. Typically, 1 dex decrease in metallicity causes 0.20 and 0.02 mag decrease in colors u – g and g – r and 0.02 and 0.02 mag increase in colors r – i and i – z, respectively. The variations are larger for metal-rich stars than for metal-poor ones, and larger for F/G/K stars than for A/M ones. Using the sample, we have performed two-dimensional polynomial fitting to the u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z colors as a function of color g – i and metallicity [Fe/H]. The residuals, at the level of 0.029, 0.008, 0.008, and 0.011 mag for the u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z colors, respectively, can be fully accounted for by the photometric errors and metallicity uncertainties, suggesting that the intrinsic widths of the loci are at maximum a few millimagnitudes. The residual distributions are asymmetric, revealing that a significant fraction of stars are binaries. In a companion paper, we will present an unbiased estimate of the binary fraction for field stars. Other potential applications of the metallicity-dependent stellar loci are briefly discussed.

  17. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis-associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis-associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression.

  18. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis–associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis–associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression. PMID:23749187

  19. Characterization of microsatellite loci for the littorine snail Bembicium vittatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennington, W J; Lukehurst, S S; Johnson, M S

    2008-11-01

    We describe the isolation and development of 17 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the intertidal snail Bembicium vittatum (Gastropoda: Littorinidae). The loci were tested in 46 individuals from a single population situated near the centre of the species distribution. No evidence of linkage disequilibrium was detected between any pair of loci. However, two loci showed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg expectations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 15. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Genotyping of Bacillus anthracis strains based on automated capillary 25-loci Multiple Locus Variable-Number Tandem Repeats Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciervo Alessandra

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is highly monomorphic which makes differentiation between strains difficult. A Multiple Locus Variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR Analysis (MLVA assay based on 20 markers was previously described. It has considerable discrimination power, reproducibility, and low cost, especially since the markers proposed can be typed by agarose-gel electrophoresis. However in an emergency situation, faster genotyping and access to representative databases is necessary. Results Genotyping of B. anthracis reference strains and isolates from France and Italy was done using a 25 loci MLVA assay combining 21 previously described loci and 4 new ones. DNA was amplified in 4 multiplex PCR reactions and the length of the resulting 25 amplicons was estimated by automated capillary electrophoresis. The results were reproducible and the data were consistent with other gel based methods once differences in mobility patterns were taken into account. Some alleles previously unresolved by agarose gel electrophoresis could be resolved by capillary electrophoresis, thus further increasing the assay resolution. One particular locus, Bams30, is the result of a recombination between a 27 bp tandem repeat and a 9 bp tandem repeat. The analysis of the array illustrates the evolution process of tandem repeats. Conclusion In a crisis situation of suspected bioterrorism, standardization, speed and accuracy, together with the availability of reference typing data are important issues, as illustrated by the 2001 anthrax letters event. In this report we describe an upgrade of the previously published MLVA method for genotyping of B. anthracis and apply the method to the typing of French and Italian B. anthracis strain collections. The increased number of markers studied compared to reports using only 8 loci greatly improves the discrimination power of the technique. An Italian strain belonging to the

  1. Microsatellite loci for genetic mapping in the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, K M; Chaves, L D; Hall, M K; Knutson, T P; Rowe, J A; Torgerson, A J

    2003-11-01

    New microsatellite loci for the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) were developed from two small insert DNA libraries. Polymorphism at these new loci was examined in domestic birds and two resource populations designed for genetic linkage mapping. The majority of loci (152 of 168) was polymorphic in domestic turkeys and informative in two mapping resource populations and thus will be useful for genetic linkage mapping.

  2. Variations of 18S rDNA Loci Among Six Populations of Paeonia obovata Maxim. (Paeoniaceae) Revealed by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Luo; Chao Wang; Daming Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The localization of 18S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) had been performed for some species of Paeonia. However, the pattern of 18S rDNA loci among populations is indistinct. In the present study, we localized 18S rDNA loci on meiotic or mitotic chromosomes of six populations of Paeonia obovata Maxim. (Paeoniaceae). Different numbers of rDNA loci were found with different diploid (2n=10) populations, namely eight (Lushi and Mt. Jiuhua populations), 10 (Mt. Taibai population), and seven (Mt. Guandi population), whereas tetraploid (2n=20) populations were all found with 16 loci. All rDNA loci were mapped near telomeres of mitotic chromosomes and there was no chromosome with two loci. The present results show that molecular cytological polymorphism exists among P. obovata diploid populations, indicating that structural variations occurred frequently during the evolutionary history of this species, accompanied with differentiation among populations.

  3. Alterations at chromosome 17 loci in peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lothe, R.A.; Slettan, A.; Saeter, G. [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular genetic changes in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Inactivation of the TP53 gene in l7p has been reported in a few tumors. The MPNST is one of the manifestations of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), suggesting that the NF1 gene in 17q might be important. We present a study of 15 neurofibromas and MPNST from nine individuals. Seven patients had NF1 and six of these developed MPNST. Genetic alterations at nine polymorphic loci on chromosome 17 were examined. Allelic imbalance was detected only in the malignant tumors from NF1 patients (4/6). Complete loss of heterozygosity of 17q loci was found in three of these tumors, all including loci within the NF1 gene. Two of the malignant tumors also showed deletions on 17p. No mutations were detected within exon 5-8 of the TP53 in any of the MPNST, and none of them were TP53 protein-positive using immunostaining with mono- and polyclonal antibodies against TP53. The numbers of chromosome 17 present in each tumor were evaluated by use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on interphase nuclei with a centromere-specific probe. A deviation from the disomic status of chromosome 17 was observed in two of the MPNST from NF1 patients. These results support the hypothesis of inactivation of both NF1 gene alleles during development of MPNST in patients with NF1. In contrast to other reports, we did not find evidence for a homozygous mutated condition of the TP53 gene in the same tumors. Finally, FISH analysis was in accordance with the DNA analysis in the deduction of the numbers of chromosome 17 in these tumors. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Complex Loci in human and mouse genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Pär G; Suzuki, Harukazu; Ninomiya, Noriko; Akalin, Altuna; Sessa, Luca; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Brozzi, Alessandro; Luzi, Lucilla; Tan, Sin Lam; Yang, Liang; Kunarso, Galih; Ng, Edwin Lian-Chong; Batalov, Serge; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Wells, Christine; Bajic, Vladimir B; Orlando, Valerio; Reid, James F; Lenhard, Boris; Lipovich, Leonard

    2006-04-01

    Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis-antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis-antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse transcriptional units (TUs), along with 6,141 cis-antisense pairs, 2,113 bidirectional promoters, and 1,480 chains from 42,887 human TUs. In both human and mouse, 25% of TUs resided in cis-antisense pairs, only 17% of which were conserved between the two organisms, indicating frequent species specificity of antisense gene arrangements. A sampling approach indicated that over 40% of all TUs might actually be in cis-antisense pairs, and that only a minority of these arrangements are likely to be conserved between human and mouse. Bidirectional promoters were characterized by variable transcriptional start sites and an identifiable midpoint at which overall sequence composition changed strand and the direction of transcriptional initiation switched. In microarray data covering a wide range of mouse tissues, genes in cis-antisense and bidirectionally promoted arrangement showed a higher probability of being coordinately expressed than random pairs of genes. In a case study on homeotic loci, we observed extensive transcription of nonconserved sequences on the noncoding strand, implying that the presence rather than the sequence of these transcripts is of functional importance. Complex loci are ubiquitous, host numerous nonconserved gene structures and lineage-specific exonification events, and may have a cis-regulatory impact on the member genes.

  5. Complex Loci in human and mouse genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär G Engström

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis-antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis-antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse transcriptional units (TUs, along with 6,141 cis-antisense pairs, 2,113 bidirectional promoters, and 1,480 chains from 42,887 human TUs. In both human and mouse, 25% of TUs resided in cis-antisense pairs, only 17% of which were conserved between the two organisms, indicating frequent species specificity of antisense gene arrangements. A sampling approach indicated that over 40% of all TUs might actually be in cis-antisense pairs, and that only a minority of these arrangements are likely to be conserved between human and mouse. Bidirectional promoters were characterized by variable transcriptional start sites and an identifiable midpoint at which overall sequence composition changed strand and the direction of transcriptional initiation switched. In microarray data covering a wide range of mouse tissues, genes in cis-antisense and bidirectionally promoted arrangement showed a higher probability of being coordinately expressed than random pairs of genes. In a case study on homeotic loci, we observed extensive transcription of nonconserved sequences on the noncoding strand, implying that the presence rather than the sequence of these transcripts is of functional importance. Complex loci are ubiquitous, host numerous nonconserved gene structures and lineage-specific exonification events, and may have a cis-regulatory impact on the member genes.

  6. Positive Selection on Loci Associated with Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Sadler

    Full Text Available Much of the evolution of human behavior remains a mystery, including how certain disadvantageous behaviors are so prevalent. Nicotine addiction is one such phenotype. Several loci have been implicated in nicotine related phenotypes including the nicotinic receptor gene clusters (CHRNs on chromosomes 8 and 15. Here we use 1000 Genomes sequence data from 3 populations (Africans, Asians and Europeans to examine whether natural selection has occurred at these loci. We used Tajima's D and the integrated haplotype score (iHS to test for evidence of natural selection. Our results provide evidence for strong selection in the nicotinic receptor gene cluster on chromosome 8, previously found to be significantly associated with both nicotine and cocaine dependence, as well as evidence selection acting on the region containing the CHRNA5 nicotinic receptor gene on chromosome 15, that is genome wide significant for risk for nicotine dependence. To examine the possibility that this selection is related to memory and learning, we utilized genetic data from the Collaborative Studies on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA to test variants within these regions with three tests of memory and learning, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS Block Design, WAIS Digit Symbol and WAIS Information tests. Of the 17 SNPs genotyped in COGA in this region, we find one significantly associated with WAIS digit symbol test results. This test captures aspects of reaction time and memory, suggesting that a phenotype relating to memory and learning may have been the driving force behind selection at these loci. This study could begin to explain why these seemingly deleterious SNPs are present at their current frequencies.

  7. SLC6A4 STin2 VNTR genetic polymorphism is associated with tobacco use disorder, but not with successful smoking cessation or smoking characteristics: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo de Castro, Márcia Regina; Maes, Michael; Guembarovski, Roberta Losi; Ariza, Carolina Batista; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Vargas, Heber Odebrecht; Vargas, Mateus Medonça; de Melo, Luiz Gustavo Piccoli; Dodd, Seetal; Berk, Michael; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara; Nunes, Sandra Odebrecht Vargas

    2014-06-27

    The aim of this study was to determine if variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in the second intron (STin2) of the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) gene was associated with tobacco use disorder, successful smoking cessation, or smoking characteristics. In this case-control study, patients with current tobacco use disorder, diagnosed according to DSM IV criteria (n = 185), and never-smokers, diagnosed according to CDC criteria (n = 175), were recruited and received 52 weeks of combined pharmacotherapy and cognitive therapy. Successful smoking cessation was defined as exhaled carbon monoxide smoking cessation, smoking characteristics and increased alcohol or sedative use risk. Our results suggest that the STin2.10/10 genotype and STin2.12 allele are associated with tobacco use disorder or nicotine dependence, but not with treatment response or severity of dependence. It is hypothesized that the ST2in.12 allele by modulating the metabolism of serotonin may participate in the pathophysiology of tobacco use disorder or nicotine dependence.

  8. Dopamine DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A and DAT1 VNTR polymorphisms are associated with a cognitive flexibility profile in pathological gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundo, Ana B; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; de la Torre, Rafael; Verdejo-García, Antonio; Granero, Roser; Penelo, Eva; Gené, Manel; Barrot, Carme; Sánchez, Cristina; Alvarez-Moya, Eva; Ochoa, Cristian; Aymamí, Maria Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Menchón, Jose M; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana

    2014-12-01

    Like drug addiction, pathological gambling (PG) has been associated with impairments in executive functions and alterations in dopaminergic functioning; however, the role of dopamine (DA) in the executive profile of PG remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify whether the DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A-rs1800497 and the DAT1-40 bp VNTR polymorphisms are associated with cognitive flexibility (measured by Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and Trail Making Test (TMT)) and inhibition response (measured by Stroop Color and Word Test (SCWT)), in a clinical sample of 69 PG patients. Our results showed an association between DA functioning and cognitive flexibility performance. The Taq1A A1+ (A1A2/A1A1) genotype was associated with poorer TMT performance (p<0.05), while DAT1 9-repeat homozygotes displayed better WCST performance (p<0.05) than either 10-repeat homozygotes or heterozygotes. We did not find any association between the DRD2 or DAT1 polymorphisms and the inhibition response. These results suggested that pathological gamblers with genetic predispositions toward lower availability of DA and D2 receptor density are at a higher risk of cognitive flexibility difficulties. Future studies should aim to shed more light on the genetic mechanisms underlying the executive profile in PG. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. High-throughput sequencing of core STR loci for forensic genetic investigations using the Roche Genome Sequencer FLX platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fordyce, Sarah L; Avila-Arcos, Maria C; Rockenbauer, Eszter;

    2011-01-01

    The analysis and profiling of short tandem repeat (STR) loci is routinely used in forensic genetics. Current methods to investigate STR loci, including PCR-based standard fragment analyses and capillary electrophoresis, only provide amplicon lengths that are used to estimate the number of STR...... repeat units. These methods do not allow for the full resolution of STR base composition that sequencing approaches could provide. Here we present an STR profiling method based on the use of the Roche Genome Sequencer (GS) FLX to simultaneously sequence multiple core STR loci. Using this method...

  10. Genetic analysis of ecological relevant morphological variability in Plantago lanceolata L. : 2. Localisation and organisation of quantitative trait loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, K

    1987-04-01

    Morphological variability was analysed in an F2-generation derived from crosses between two ecotypes of Plantago lanceolata L. Six allozyme loci, localised in five linkage groups, were used as markers. For two marker loci, Got-2 and Gpi-1, segregations did not fit monogenic ratios. In the linkage groups to which these two loci belonged, male sterility genes appeared to be present. In these crosses, male sterility (type 3, as described by Van Damme 1983) may be determined by two recessive loci located in the linkage groups of Got-2 and of Gpi-1. Many correlations of morphological and life history characters with allozyme markers were observed. The quantitative trait loci did not appear to be concentrated in major gene complexes. Often many loci were involved, sometimes with effects opposite to those expected from the population values. Main effects of the linkage groups appeared to be more important than interaction effects in determining variability. It also appeared that there is a positive correlation between the number of heterozygous allozyme loci and generative growth.

  11. Evolution of Microsatellite Loci of Tropical and Temperate Anguilla Eels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chen Tseng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Anguilla eels are divided into temperate and tropical eels, based on their major distributions. The present study collected two temperate eels, Anguilla japonica and Anguilla anguilla, and two tropical eels, Anguilla marmorata and Anguilla bicolor pacifica, to examine two questions: do temperate and tropical Anguilla eels have different genetic polymorphic patterns?; and do temperate Anguilla japonica and Anguilla anguilla have a closer relationship to each other than to tropical eels? In total, 274 sequences were cloned and sequenced from six conserved microsatellite loci to examine polymorphic patterns of these four catadromous eels. Different mutational events, including substitutions, and repeat-unit deletions and insertions, appeared in major regions, while different point mutations were observed in flanking regions. The results implied that parallel patterns of microsatellite sequences occurred within both tropical and temperate freshwater eels. Consensus flanking sequences of six homologous loci from each of the four species were constructed. Genetic distances ranged from 0.044 (Anguilla bicolor pacifica vs. Anguilla marmorata to 0.061 (Anguilla marmorata vs. Anguilla anguilla. The tree topology suggests the hypothesis of Anguilla japonica and Anguilla anguilla being a sister group must be rejected.

  12. Interpretation of electrophoretograms of seven microsatellite loci to determine the genetic diversity of the Arabian Oryx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, I A; Khan, H A; Shobrak, M; Al Homaidan, A A; Al Sadoon, M; Al Farhan, A H; Bahkali, A H

    2010-02-09

    Microsatellite markers are commonly used for examining population structure, especially inbreeding, outbreeding and gene flow. An array of microsatellite loci, preferably with multiallelic presentation, is preferable for ensuring accurate results. However, artifact peaks or stutters in the electrophoretograms significantly hamper the reliable interpretation of genotypes. We interpreted electrophoretograms of seven microsatellite loci to determine the genetic diversity of the Arabian Oryx. All the alleles of different loci exhibited good peak resolutions and hence were clearly identified. Moreover, none of the stutter peaks impaired the recognition or differentiation between homozygote and heterozygote. Our findings suggest that correct identification of alleles in the presence of co-amplified nonspecific fragments is important for reliable interpretation of microsatellite data.

  13. Dynamic investigation of loci with surprising outcomes and their mathematical explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Ruti; Stupel, Moshe; Oxman, Victor

    2016-04-01

    The locus is a very important concept in Euclidean geometry since it serves as a tool for solving different problems, and allows geometric constructions to be carried out. The teaching of the subject of loci in various mathematics courses includes solution of different exercises in which the student is required to find the locus in accordance with the data of the question. The present paper offers a different view of the subject of loci, which brings about conceptual understanding of the subject with identification of conserved properties and suitable generalizations obtained through investigation that includes the use of dynamic geometric software (GeoGebra). General formulas were developed for the equation of the locus in two cases. In the article, there are links to geometric applets which allow one to demonstrate the loci formed in some cases.

  14. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API).

  15. Evaluation of two putative susceptibility loci for oral clefts in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, L E; Murray, J C; O'Brien, S;

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL+/-P) and isolated cleft palate (CP) is influenced by genetic variation at several loci and that the relation between specific genetic variants and disease risk may be modified by environmental factors....... The present study evaluated potential associations between CL+/-P and CP and two putative clefting susceptibility loci, MSX1 and TGFB3, using data from a nationwide case-control study conducted in Denmark from 1991 to 1994. The potential effects of interactions between these genes and two common environmental...

  16. Whole-exome SNP array identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Yin, Xianyong; Gao, Jinping; Sheng, Yujun; Xu, Jinhua; Zhang, Jianzhong; He, Chundi; Qiu, Ying; Wen, Guangdong; Tian, Hongqing; Zheng, Xiaodong; Liu, Shengxiu; Wang, WenJun; Li, Weiran

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have reproducibly associated ∼40 susceptibility loci with psoriasis. However, the missing heritability is evident and the contributions of coding variants have not yet been systematically evaluated. Here, we present a large-scale whole-exome array analysis for psoriasis consisting of 42,760 individuals. We discover 16 SNPs within 15 new genes/loci associated with psoriasis, including C1orf141, ZNF683, TMC6, AIM2, IL1RL1, CASR, SON, ZFYVE16, MTHFR, CCDC1...

  17. Genotype profiles for the Costa Rican population at 7 PCR-based loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernal Morera

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Complete electronic DNA profiles of 2006 randomly selected Costa Ricans, typed for 7 PCR-based loci, are presented. Such data may prove valuable for anthropological and forensic studies of the Costa Rican population. Rev. Biol. Trop. 52(3: 713-715. Epub 2004 Dic 15.Se presenta una versión electrónica de los perfiles genéticos completos de 2006 individuos de Costa Rica seleccionados al azar, quienes fueron caracterizados para loci 6 basados en PCR. Tales datos podrían ser valiosos para estudios antropológicos y forenses de la población costarricense.

  18. Fine mapping of quantitative trait loci using linkage disequilibria with closely linked marker loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwissen, T.H.E.; Goddard, M.E.

    2000-01-01

    A multimarker linkage disequilibrium mapping method was developed for the fine mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) using a dense marker map. The method compares the expected covariances between haplotype effects given a postulated QTL position to the covariances that are found in the data. The

  19. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L.; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E.; Bis, Joshua C.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M. Kamran; Desrivières, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W.; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beecham, Ashley H.; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Blanton, Susan H.; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M.; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Chouraki, Vincent; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Crivello, Fabrice; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E.; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gutman, Boris A.; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K.; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Jørgensen, Kjetil N.; Karbalai, Nazanin; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre F.; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; McKay, David R.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C.; Nyquist, Paul; Loohuis, Loes M. Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S.; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Ropele, Stefan; Rose, Emma J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G.; Saremi, Arvin; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V.; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trompet, Stella; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Lee, Sven J.; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; Van Eijk, Kristel R.; Van Erp, Theo G. M.; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Windham, Beverly G.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Yanek, Lisa R.; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Agartz, Ingrid; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A.; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, James T.; Bennett, David A.; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R.; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; De Craen, Anton J. M.; De Geus, Eco J. C.; De Jager, Philip L.; De Zubicaray, Greig I.; Deary, Ian J.; Debette, Stéphanie; DeCarli, Charles; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C.; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Enzinger, Christian; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fedko, Iryna O.; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E.; Fleischman, Debra A.; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Glahn, David C.; Gollub, Randy L.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Håberg, Asta K.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huentelman, Matthew; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack Jr, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kahn, René S.; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, Katie L.; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Derek W.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A.; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L.; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L.; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schmidt, Helena; Schofield, Peter R.; Sigursson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andrew; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soininen, Hilkka; Steen, Vidar M.; Stott, David J.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hernández, Maria C. Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vellas, Bruno; Veltman, Dick J.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y.; Wright, Clinton B.; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Longstreth, W. T.; Schumann, Gunter; Grabe, Hans J.; Franke, Barbara; Launer, Lenore J.; Medland, Sarah E.; Seshadri, Sudha; Thompson, Paul M.; Ikram, M. Arfan

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hippocampal structure here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 33,536 individuals and discover six independent loci significantly associated with hippocampal volume, four of them novel. Of the novel loci, three lie within genes (ASTN2, DPP4 and MAST4) and one is found 200 kb upstream of SHH. A hippocampal subfield analysis shows that a locus within the MSRB3 gene shows evidence of a localized effect along the dentate gyrus, subiculum, CA1 and fissure. Further, we show that genetic variants associated with decreased hippocampal volume are also associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (rg=−0.155). Our findings suggest novel biological pathways through which human genetic variation influences hippocampal volume and risk for neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:28098162

  20. Transient neonatal diabetes, ZFP57, and hypomethylation of multiple imprinted loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonen, Susanne E; Mackay, Deborah J G; Hahnemann, Johanne M D

    2013-01-01

    Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus 1 (TNDM1) is the most common cause of diabetes presenting at birth. Approximately 5% of the cases are due to recessive ZFP57 mutations, causing hypomethylation at the TNDM locus and other imprinted loci (HIL). This has consequences for patient care because...

  1. Analysis techniques for multivariate root loci. [a tool in linear control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.; Laub, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis and techniques are developed for the multivariable root locus and the multivariable optimal root locus. The generalized eigenvalue problem is used to compute angles and sensitivities for both types of loci, and an algorithm is presented that determines the asymptotic properties of the optimal root locus.

  2. Record: a novel method for ordering loci on a genetic linkage map

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van H.; Stam, P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Eck, van H.J.

    2005-01-01

    A new method, REcombination Counting and ORDering (RECORD) is presented for the ordering of loci on genetic linkage maps. The method minimizes the total number of recombination events. The search algorithm is a heuristic procedure, combining elements of branch-and-bound with local reshuffling. Since

  3. Are nuclear loci ideal for barcoding plants? A case study of genetic delimitation of two sister species using multiple loci and multiple intraspecific individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian WANG; Qiu-Shi YU; Jian-Quan LIU

    2011-01-01

    Considerable debate remains as to which DNA region should be used to barcode plants. Several different chloroplast (cp) DNA regions (rbcL, matK, and trnH-psbA) and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed regions (ITS) have been suggested as suitable barcodes in plants. Recently, low-copy nuclear loci were also suggested to be potentially ideal barcode regions. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of these proposed DNA fragments and five additional low-copy loci (CHS, DETl, COPl, PGICl, and RPS2; comprising both coding and non-coding regions) in barcoding closely related species. We examined the divergences within and between two species of Pugioniun (Brassicaceae). We failed to find any interspecific variation from three cpDNA fragments with which to discriminate the two species. However, a single base mutation in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) could discriminate between the two species consistently. We found more variations among all individuals of the two species using each of the other five low-copy nuclear loci. However, only alleles from one locus (DET1) of the five low-copy loci related to flowering regulations was able to distinguish the sampled individuals into two species. We failed to amplify the corresponding fragments out of Brassicaceae using the designed DETl primers. We further discussed the discrimination power of different loci due to incomplete lineage sorting, gene flow, and species-specific evolution. Our results highlight the possibility of using the nuclear ITS as a core or complementary fragment to barcode recent diverged species.

  4. Polymorphism analysis of 15 STR loci in a large sample of Guangdong (Southern China) Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Lu, Huijie; Qiu, Pingming; Yang, Xingyi; Liu, Chao

    2015-11-01

    AmpFℓSTR Sinofiler PCR Amplification Kit is specially developed for Chinese forensic laboratories, but there are little population-genetic data about this kit for Southern China. This kit contains 15 STR loci: D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, D18S51, D6S1043, D12S391, D5S818 and FGA. We have conducted genotyping experiments on the 15 STR loci in 5234 unrelated individuals from Guangdong (Southern China). We observed a total of 243 alleles in the group with the allelic frequency values ranging from less than 0.0001 to 0.3686. Our statistic analysis indicates that the 15 STR loci conform to the Hardy-Weinberg's equilibrium (p>0.05). The highest polymorphism was found at D6S1043 locus and the lowest was found at D3S1358. The combined power of discrimination reached 0.99999999999999999977431 and the combined probability of paternity exclusion reached 0.999999721 for 15 STR loci. Guangdong Han population had significant differences compared with Shaanxi, Shandong and Henan province of Northern China. A Neighbor-joining tree indicates that the Guangdong Han has a close genetic relationship with the Yunnan population. Significant differences were found between Guangdong Han population and other reported populations (Japanese, Philippine, African American, Caucasian, Hispanic and Western Romanian) at 2-11 STR loci. The results may provide useful information for forensic sciences and population genetics studies. The present findings indicate that all the 15 STR loci are highly genetically polymorphic in the Han population of Guangdong.

  5. lociNGS: a lightweight alternative for assessing suitability of next-generation loci for evolutionary analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Hird

    Full Text Available Genomic enrichment methods and next-generation sequencing produce uneven coverage for the portions of the genome (the loci they target; this information is essential for ascertaining the suitability of each locus for further analysis. lociNGS is a user-friendly accessory program that takes multi-FASTA formatted loci, next-generation sequence alignments and demographic data as input and collates, displays and outputs information about the data. Summary information includes the parameters coverage per locus, coverage per individual and number of polymorphic sites, among others. The program can output the raw sequences used to call loci from next-generation sequencing data. lociNGS also reformats subsets of loci in three commonly used formats for multi-locus phylogeographic and population genetics analyses - NEXUS, IMa2 and Migrate. lociNGS is available at https://github.com/SHird/lociNGS and is dependent on installation of MongoDB (freely available at http://www.mongodb.org/downloads. lociNGS is written in Python and is supported on MacOSX and Unix; it is distributed under a GNU General Public License.

  6. Association of MAOA-VNTR with alcoholism: meta analysis%单胺氧化酶A串联重复序列多态性与酒精依赖行为关系的Meta分析研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    禚振华; 姚树桥

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨酒精依赖行为与单胺氧化酶A串联重复序列多态性(MAOA-VNTR)的关系.方法 通过EMBASE、Sciencedirect、PubMed、Googlescholar、CNKI收集1990~2010年公开发表的关于酒精依赖行为与MAOA-VNTR相关性的病例对照研究,利用元分析软件(CMA)进行分析,通过计算合并优势比(OR值)进行比较.结果 通过筛选,共有10篇文献(共3831例受试,其中对照组2084例,酒精依赖组1747例)符合我们的纳入标准.结果 显示MAOA-VNTR多态性与酒精依赖行为之间关联不显著(OR=1.112,P=0.32),在亚组分析中MAOA-VNTR多态性与反社会酒精依赖亚型关联显著(OR=2.04,P<0.05).结论 MAOA-VNTR多态性可能是反社会酒精依赖亚型的危险因子,而非酒精依赖行为的危险因子.%Objective To explore the relationship between MAOA-VNTR and alcoholism. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of studies of the association between MAOA -VNTR and the alcoholism. The articles were identified from EMBASE , Sciencedirect, PubMed, Googlescholar and CNKI from 1990 to 2010. Results A random-effects model was used to combine results from ten case -control studies. The association is significant in antisocial alcoholics ( OR = 2.04,P <0. 05) ,not in alcoholics ( OR = 1. 112,P = 0. 32). Conclusions MAOA-VNTR might be a risk factor for antisocial alcoholics ,not for alcoholics.

  7. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liti, Gianni; Warringer, Jonas; Blomberg, Anders

    2017-08-01

    Natural Saccharomyces strains isolated from the wild differ quantitatively in molecular and organismal phenotypes. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping is a powerful approach for identifying sequence variants that alter gene function. In yeast, QTL mapping has been used in designed crosses to map functional polymorphisms. This approach, outlined here, is often the first step in understanding the molecular basis of quantitative traits. New large-scale sequencing surveys have the potential to directly associate genotypes with organismal phenotypes, providing a broader catalog of causative genetic variants. Additional analysis of intermediate phenotypes (e.g., RNA, protein, or metabolite levels) can produce a multilayered and integrated view of individual variation, producing a high-resolution view of the genotype-phenotype map. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae present on Ziehl-Neelsen-stained microscopic slides and in skin biopsy samples from leprosy patients in different geographic regions of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Amanda Nogueira Brum; Gomes, Harrison Magdinier; Araujo, Marcelo Ivens de; Albuquerque, Edson Cláudio Araripe de; Baptista, Ida Maria Foschiani Dias; Moura, Maria Manuela da Fonseca; Rezende, Denise Silva; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Lara, Flávio Alves; Pontes, Maria Araci de Andrade; Gonçalves, Heitor de Sá; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Vissa, Varalakshmi D; Brennan, Patrick J; Suffys, Philip Noel

    2012-12-01

    We analysed 16 variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) and three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in Mycobacterium leprae present on 115 Ziehl-Neelsen (Z-N)-stained slides and in 51 skin biopsy samples derived from leprosy patients from Ceará (n = 23), Pernambuco (n = 41), Rio de Janeiro (n = 22) and Rondônia (RO) (n = 78). All skin biopsies yielded SNP-based genotypes, while 48 of the samples (94.1%) yielded complete VNTR genotypes. We evaluated two procedures for extracting M. leprae DNA from Z-N-stained slides: the first including Chelex and the other combining proteinase and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Of the 76 samples processed using the first procedure, 30.2% were positive for 16 or 15 VNTRs, whereas of the 39 samples processed using the second procedure, 28.2% yielded genotypes defined by at least 10 VNTRs. Combined VNTR and SNP analysis revealed large variability in genotypes, but a high prevalence of SNP genotype 4 in the Northeast Region of Brazil. Our observation of two samples from RO with an identical genotype and seven groups with similar genotypes, including four derived from residents of the same state or region, suggest a tendency to form groups according to the origin of the isolates. This study demonstrates the existence of geographically related M. leprae genotypes and that Z-N-stained slides are an alternative source for M. leprae genotyping.

  9. Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae present on Ziehl-Neelsen-stained microscopic slides and in skin biopsy samples from leprosy patients in different geographic regions of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Nogueira Brum Fontes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We analysed 16 variable number tandem repeats (VNTR and three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in Mycobacterium leprae present on 115 Ziehl-Neelsen (Z-N-stained slides and in 51 skin biopsy samples derived from leprosy patients from Ceará (n = 23, Pernambuco (n = 41, Rio de Janeiro (n = 22 and Rondônia (RO (n = 78. All skin biopsies yielded SNP-based genotypes, while 48 of the samples (94.1% yielded complete VNTR genotypes. We evaluated two procedures for extracting M. leprae DNA from Z-N-stained slides: the first including Chelex and the other combining proteinase and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Of the 76 samples processed using the first procedure, 30.2% were positive for 16 or 15 VNTRs, whereas of the 39 samples processed using the second procedure, 28.2% yielded genotypes defined by at least 10 VNTRs. Combined VNTR and SNP analysis revealed large variability in genotypes, but a high prevalence of SNP genotype 4 in the Northeast Region of Brazil. Our observation of two samples from RO with an identical genotype and seven groups with similar genotypes, including four derived from residents of the same state or region, suggest a tendency to form groups according to the origin of the isolates. This study demonstrates the existence of geographically related M. leprae genotypes and that Z-N-stained slides are an alternative source for M. leprae genotyping.

  10. Characterisation of 12 microsatellite loci in the Vietnamese commercial clam Lutraria rhynchaena Jonas 1844 (Heterodonta: Bivalvia: Mactridae) through next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Binh Thanh; Tan, Mun Hua; Lee, Yin Peng; Gan, Han Ming; Tran, Trang Thi; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    The marine clam Lutraria rhynchaena is gaining popularity as an aquaculture species in Asia. Lutraria populations are present in the wild throughout Vietnam and several stocks have been established and translocated for breeding and aquaculture grow-out purposes. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of utilising Illumina next-generation sequencing technology to streamline the identification and genotyping of microsatellite loci from this clam species. Based on an initial partial genome scan, 48 microsatellite markers with similar melting temperatures were identified and characterised. The 12 most suitable polymorphic loci were then genotyped using 51 individuals from a population in Quang Ninh Province, North Vietnam. Genetic variation was low (mean number of alleles per locus = 2.6; mean expected heterozygosity = 0.41). Two loci showed significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and the presence of null alleles, but there was no evidence of linkage disequilibrium among loci. Three additional populations were screened (n = 7-36) to test the geographic utility of the 12 loci, which revealed 100 % successful genotyping in two populations from central Vietnam (Nha Trang). However, a second population from north Vietnam (Co To) could not be successfully genotyped and morphological evidence and mitochondrial variation suggests that this population represents a cryptic species of Lutraria. Comparisons of the Qang Ninh and Nha Trang populations, excluding the 2 loci out of HWE, revealed statistically significant allelic variation at 4 loci. We reported the first microsatellite loci set for the marine clam Lutraria rhynchaena and demonstrated its potential in differentiating clam populations. Additionally, a cryptic species population of Lutraria rhynchaena was identified during initial loci development, underscoring the overlooked diversity of marine clam species in Vietnam and the need to genetically characterise population representatives prior

  11. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stancáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Kathiresan, Sekar; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-01-01

    Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577 individual

  12. Subanalytic Bundles and Tubular Neighbourhoods of Zero-Loci

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vishwambhar Pati

    2003-08-01

    We introduce the natural and fairly general notion of a subanalytic bundle (with a finite dimensional vector space of sections) on a subanalytic subset of a real analytic manifold , and prove that when is compact, there is a Baire subset of sections in whose zero-loci in have tubular neighbourhoods, homeomorphic to the restriction of the given bundle to these zero-loci.

  13. Study design for the identification of loci affecting human longevity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, B.T.; Kluft, C.; Bots, M.L.; Lagaay, A.M.; Brand, A.; Grobbee, D.E.; Knook, D.L.; Slagboom, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    The genetic component of human longevity is estimated at 30%. Which genes are involved in determining human longevity, however, is largely unknown. Genes that may affect human survival are susceptibility loci for major age related pathologies. Many studies are being performed to identify such loci f

  14. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stancáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Kathiresan, Sekar; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-01-01

    Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577

  15. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, C. J.; Schmidt, E. M.; Sengupta, S.

    2013-01-01

    Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577 individ...

  16. Development of eighteen microsatellite loci in walleye (Sander vitreus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coykendall, Dolly K.; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Stott, Wendylee; Springmann, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    A suite of tri- and tetra-nucleotide microsatellite loci were developed for walleye (Sander vitreus) from 454 pyrosequencing data. Eighteen of the 50 primer sets tested amplified consistently in 35 walleye from two lakes on Isle Royale, Lake Superior: Chickenbone Lake and Whittlesey Lake. The loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (average 5.5 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (average 35.8 %). Levels of genetic diversity were sufficient to produce unique multi-locus genotypes and detect phylogeographic structuring as individuals assigned back to their population of origin. Cross-species amplification within S. canadensis(sauger) was successful for 15 loci, and 11 loci were diagnostic to species. The loci characterized here will be useful for detecting fine-scale spatial structuring, resolving the taxonomic status of Sander species and sub-species, and detecting walleye/sauger hybrids.

  17. Conserved piRNA Expression from a Distinct Set of piRNA Cluster Loci in Eutherian Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirn, Gung-Wei; Rahman, Reazur; Sytnikova, Yuliya A; Matts, Jessica A; Zeng, Mei; Gerlach, Daniel; Yu, Michael; Berger, Bonnie; Naramura, Mayumi; Kile, Benjamin T; Lau, Nelson C

    2015-11-01

    The Piwi pathway is deeply conserved amongst animals because one of its essential functions is to repress transposons. However, many Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) do not base-pair to transposons and remain mysterious in their targeting function. The sheer number of piRNA cluster (piC) loci in animal genomes and infrequent piRNA sequence conservation also present challenges in determining which piC loci are most important for development. To address this question, we determined the piRNA expression patterns of piC loci across a wide phylogenetic spectrum of animals, and reveal that most genic and intergenic piC loci evolve rapidly in their capacity to generate piRNAs, regardless of known transposon silencing function. Surprisingly, we also uncovered a distinct set of piC loci with piRNA expression conserved deeply in Eutherian mammals. We name these loci Eutherian-Conserved piRNA cluster (ECpiC) loci. Supporting the hypothesis that conservation of piRNA expression across ~100 million years of Eutherian evolution implies function, we determined that one ECpiC locus generates abundant piRNAs antisense to the STOX1 transcript, a gene clinically associated with preeclampsia. Furthermore, we confirmed reduced piRNAs in existing mouse mutations at ECpiC-Asb1 and -Cbl, which also display spermatogenic defects. The Asb1 mutant testes with strongly reduced Asb1 piRNAs also exhibit up-regulated gene expression profiles. These data indicate ECpiC loci may be specially adapted to support Eutherian reproduction.

  18. Genomic Loci Modulating the Retinal Transcriptome in Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix R. Vázquez-Chona

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study predicts and tests genetic networks that modulate gene expression during the retinal wound-healing response.Methods: Upstream modulators and target genes were defined using meta-analysis and bioinfor matic approaches. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs for retinal acute phase genes (Vazquez-Chona et al. 2005 were defi ned using QTL analysis of CNS gene expression (Chesler et al. 2005. Candidate modulators were defi ned using computational analysis of gene and motif sequences. The effect of candidate genes on wound healing was tested using animal models of gene expression.Results: A network of early wound-healing genes is modulated by a locus on chromosome 12. The genetic background of the locus altered the wound-healing response of the retina. The C57BL/6 allele conferred enhanced expression of neuronal marker Thy1 and heat-shock-like crystallins, whereas the DBA/2J allele correlated with greater levels of the classic marker of retinal stress, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Id2 and Lpin1 are candidate upstream modula tors as they strongly correlated with the segregation of DBA/2J and C57BL/6 alleles, and their dosage levels correlated with the enhanced expression of survival genes (Thy1 and crystallin genes.Conclusion: We defined a genetic network associated with the retinal acute injury response. Using genetic linkage analysis of natural transcript variation, we identified regulatory loci and candidate modulators that control transcript levels of acute phase genes. Our results support the convergence of gene expression profiling, QTL analysis, and bioinformatics as a rational approach to discover molecular pathways controlling retinal wound healing.

  19. The mating type-like loci of Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Robledo-Márquez, Karina A; Ramírez-Zavaleta, Candy Y; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a haploid and opportunistic fungal pathogen that has not known sexual cycle, has conserved the majority of the genes required for mating and cell type identity. The C. glabrata genome contains three mating-type-like loci called MTL1, MTL2 and MTL3. The three loci encode putative transcription factors, a1, α1 and α2 that regulate cell type identity and sexual reproduction in other fungi like the closely related Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MTL1 can contain either a or α information. MTL2, which contains a information and MTL3 with α information, are relatively close to two telomeres. MTL1 and MTL2 are transcriptionally active, while MTL3 is subject to an incomplete silencing nucleated at the telomere that depends on the silencing proteins Sir2, Sir3, Sir4, yKu70/80, Rif1, Rap1 and Sum1. C. glabrata does not seem to maintain cell type identity, as cell type-specific genes are expressed regardless of the type (or even absence) of mating information. These data highlight important differences in the control of mating and cell type identity between the non-pathogenic yeast S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata, which might explain the absence of a sexual cycle in C. glabrata. The fact that C. glabrata has conserved the vast majority of the genes involved in mating might suggest that some of these genes perhaps have been rewired to control other processes important for the survival inside the host as a commensal or as a human pathogen. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel Microsatellite Loci Variation and Population Genetics within Leafy Seadragons, Phycodurus eques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn Larson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel leafy seadragon (Phycodurus eques microsatellite loci were developed via standard cloning techniques and tested for use in population genetics studies. Six out of a total of twelve microsatellites tested were usable for population analysis. Seadragon samples from Western Australia (N = 6, Southern Australia (N = 11, and a captive group (N = 11 were analyzed. Here, we present leafy seadragon microsatellite primer sequences for all 12 loci and population genetics statistics for the six loci that amplified consistently and displayed adequate variability to estimate population parameters, such as diversity, population differences, and relatedness. Observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.225 to 0.926 and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.278 to 0.650. Pairwise differences among populations (FST estimates from samples collected off the southern coast of Western and South Australia, and captive animals ranged from a low of 0.188 between Southern Australia and captive animals, to a high of 0.212 between Western Australia and captive animals. Statistical assignment analyses suggested between one and three populations. Percent first order relatives among individuals was high and ranged from 40 within Western Australia to 55 within captive animals. These loci were tested on other species including weedy seadragons (Phyllopteryx taeniolatus, as well as assorted seahorses (Hippocampus reidi, H. erectus and pipefish (Doryrhamphus dactyliophorus, D. pessuliferus, Corythoichthys intestinalis, Syngnathus leptorhynchus with no success.

  1. Spare PRELI gene loci: failsafe chromosome insurance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: LEA (late embryogenesis abundant proteins encode conserved N-terminal mitochondrial signal domains and C-terminal (A/TAEKAK motif repeats, long-presumed to confer cell resistance to stress and death cues. This prompted the hypothesis that LEA proteins are central to mitochondria mechanisms that connect bioenergetics with cell responses to stress and death signaling. In support of this hypothesis, recent studies have demonstrated that mammalian LEA protein PRELI can act as a biochemical hub, which upholds mitochondria energy metabolism, while concomitantly promoting B cell resistance to stress and induced death. Hence, it is important to define in vivo the physiological relevance of PRELI expression. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Given the ubiquitous PRELI expression during mouse development, embryo lethality could be anticipated. Thus, conditional gene targeting was engineered by insertion of flanking loxP (flox/Cre recognition sites on PRELI chromosome 13 (Chr 13 locus to abort its expression in a tissue-specific manner. After obtaining mouse lines with homozygous PRELI floxed alleles (PRELI(f/f, the animals were crossed with CD19-driven Cre-recombinase transgenic mice to investigate whether PRELI inactivation could affect B-lymphocyte physiology and survival. Mice with homozygous B cell-specific PRELI deletion (CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI(-/- bred normally and did not show any signs of morbidity. Histopathology and flow cytometry analyses revealed that cell lineage identity, morphology, and viability were indistinguishable between wild type CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI(+/+ and CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI(-/- deficient mice. Furthermore, B cell PRELI gene expression seemed unaffected by Chr13 PRELI gene targeting. However, identification of additional PRELI loci in mouse Chr1 and Chr5 provided an explanation for the paradox between LEA-dependent cytoprotection and the seemingly futile consequences of Chr 13 PRELI gene inactivation. Importantly, PRELI expression

  2. Association mapping of partitioning loci in barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackay Ian J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping, initially developed in human disease genetics, is now being applied to plant species. The model species Arabidopsis provided some of the first examples of association mapping in plants, identifying previously cloned flowering time genes, despite high population sub-structure. More recently, association genetics has been applied to barley, where breeding activity has resulted in a high degree of population sub-structure. A major genotypic division within barley is that between winter- and spring-sown varieties, which differ in their requirement for vernalization to promote subsequent flowering. To date, all attempts to validate association genetics in barley by identifying major flowering time loci that control vernalization requirement (VRN-H1 and VRN-H2 have failed. Here, we validate the use of association genetics in barley by identifying VRN-H1 and VRN-H2, despite their prominent role in determining population sub-structure. Results By taking barley as a typical inbreeding crop, and seasonal growth habit as a major partitioning phenotype, we develop an association mapping approach which successfully identifies VRN-H1 and VRN-H2, the underlying loci largely responsible for this agronomic division. We find a combination of Structured Association followed by Genomic Control to correct for population structure and inflation of the test statistic, resolved significant associations only with VRN-H1 and the VRN-H2 candidate genes, as well as two genes closely linked to VRN-H1 (HvCSFs1 and HvPHYC. Conclusion We show that, after employing appropriate statistical methods to correct for population sub-structure, the genome-wide partitioning effect of allelic status at VRN-H1 and VRN-H2 does not result in the high levels of spurious association expected to occur in highly structured samples. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both VRN-H1 and the candidate VRN-H2 genes can be identified using association mapping

  3. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Xueling; Jensen, Richard A; Ikram, M Kamran; Cotch, Mary Frances; Li, Xiaohui; MacGregor, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Glazer, Nicole L; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Jonasson, Fridbert; Launer, Lenore J; Attia, John; Baird, Paul N; Harrap, Stephen; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Inouye, Michael; Rochtchina, Elena; Scott, Rodney J; Viswanathan, Ananth; Li, Guo; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Kuo, Jane Z; Taylor, Kent D; Hewitt, Alex W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Sun, Cong; Young, Terri L; Mackey, David A; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Doney, Alex S F; Palmer, Colin N A; Morris, Andrew D; Rotter, Jerome I; Tai, E Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Vingerling, Johannes R; Siscovick, David S; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8). This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12) in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  4. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueling Sim

    Full Text Available Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8. This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12 in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts. In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  5. Three new loci for determining x chromosome inactivation patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Tümer, Zeynep; Ravn, Kirstine

    2011-01-01

    on two differentially methylated restriction enzyme sites (HpaII) and a polymorphic repeat located within this locus. Although highly informative, this locus is not always sufficient to evaluate the X-inactivation status in X-linked disorders. We have identified three new loci that can be used...... to determine XCI patterns in a methylation-sensitive PCR-based assay. All three loci contain polymorphic repeats and a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme (HpaII) site, methylation of which was shown to correlate with XCI. DNA from 60 females was used to estimate the heterozygosity of these new loci...

  6. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for the crimson snapper (Lutjanus erythropterus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Lin, L; Li, C H; Xu, S N; Liu, Y; Zhou, Y B

    2014-07-24

    We isolated and characterized 22 polymorphic microsatellite loci in Lutjanus erythropterus using a (GT)13-enriched genomic library. We found between 2 and 8 alleles per locus, with a mean of 4.85. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.065 to 0.867 and from 0.085 to 0.832, respectively, with means of 0.461 and 0.529, respectively. Allele frequencies in three loci were found to deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Evidence for null alleles was found for three loci. These markers will be useful for distinguishing released captive-bred L. erythropterus individuals from wild individuals.

  7. Novel loci and pathways significantly associated with longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yi; Nie, Chao; Min, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Only two genome-wide significant loci associated with longevity have been identified so far, probably because of insufficient sample sizes of centenarians, whose genomes may harbor genetic variants associated with health and longevity. Here we report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of Han...... Chinese with a sample size 2.7 times the largest previously published GWAS on centenarians. We identified 11 independent loci associated with longevity replicated in Southern-Northern regions of China, including two novel loci (rs2069837-IL6; rs2440012-ANKRD20A9P) with genome-wide significance...

  8. Evidence for heterozygote instability in microsatellite loci in house wrens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Brian S; Johnson, L Scott; Johnson, Bonnie G P; Brubaker, Jessica L; Sakaluk, Scott K; Thompson, Charles F

    2011-02-23

    Microsatellite loci have high mutation rates and high levels of allelic variation, but the factors influencing their mutation rate are not well understood. The proposal that heterozygosity may increase mutation rates has profound implications for understanding the evolution of microsatellite loci, but currently has limited empirical support. We examined 20 microsatellite mutations identified in an analysis of 12 260 meiotic events across three loci in two populations of a songbird, the house wren (Troglodytes aedon). We found that for an allele of a given length, mutation was significantly more likely when there was a relatively large difference in size between the allele and its homologue (i.e. a large 'allele span'). Our results support the proposal of heterozygote instability at microsatellite loci.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROSATELLITE LOCI IN SCHOENOPLECTUS AMERICANUS (CYPERACEAE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenoplectus americanus is a model organism for studying ecological and ecosystem responses of salt marsh plant communities to global climate change. Here we characterize 16 microsatellite loci in S. americanus to facilitate studies on the genetic basis of phenotypic responses...

  10. Subsequent yield loci of 5754O aluminum alloy sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-bo; WAN Min; WU Xiang-dong; YAN Yu

    2009-01-01

    Complex loading paths were realized with cruciform specimens and biaxial loading testing machine. Experimental method for determining the subsequent yield locus of sheet metal was established. With this method, the subsequent yield loci of 5754O aluminum alloy sheet were obtained under complex loading paths. Theoretical subsequent yield loci based on Yld2000-2d yield criterion and three kinds of hardening modes were calculated and compared with the experimental results. The results show that the theoretical subsequent yield loci based on mixed hardening mode describe the experimental subsequent yield loci well, whereas isotropic hardening mode, which is widely used in sheet metal forming fields, predicts values larger than the experimental results. Kinematic hardening mode predicts values smaller than the experimental results and its errors are the largest.

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of 24 Y-STR loci in Hani ethnic minority from Yunnan Province, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liping; Gu, Tao; Fan, Xiaodong; Yuan, Xiaokun; Rao, Min; Pang, Jing Bo; Nie, Aiting; Du, Lei; Zhang, Xiufeng; Nie, Shengjie

    2017-01-27

    In the present study, 24 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) loci were analyzed in 250 unrelated Hani male individuals from Lvchun county, Honghe Hani and Yi Autonomous Prefecture, Yunnan Province, Southwest China. The gene diversity of the 24 Y-STR loci in the studied Hani group ranged from 0.2683 (DYS437) to 0.8837 (DYS447). According to haplotypic analysis of the 24 Y-STR loci, 204 different haplotypes were obtained, 174 of which were unique. The haplotype diversity and discrimination capacity in Hani group were 0.9977 and 0.8160 at 24 STR loci, respectively. Six single non-fraction off-ladder alleles were observed at DYS447 in 103 samples, in addition to the alleles 19 to 28 included in the allelic ladder, alleles 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18 were also observed at DYS447. One intermediate allele 20.2 was observed in one individual at DYS527a/b. We analyzed interpopulation differentiations by making comparisons between Yunnan Hani group and other 17 groups. The results of pairwise genetic distances, multidimensional scaling plot, and neighbor-joining tree at the same set of 17 Y-filer loci indicated that Yunnan Hani group had the closer genetic relationships with Yunnan Han group. The present results may provide useful information for paternal lineages in forensic cases and can also increase our understanding of the genetic relationships between Hani and other groups.

  12. Dynamics of CRISPR Loci in Microevolutionary Process of Yersinia pestis Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Maria Paloma S.; França, Camila T.; Lins, Rosanny Holanda F. B.; Santos, Milena Danda V.; Silva, Ednaldo J.; Oliveira, Maria Betânia M.; Silveira-Filho, Vladimir M.; Rezende, Antônio M.; Balbino, Valdir Q.; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The potential use of CRISPR loci genotyping to elucidate population dynamics and microevolution of 146 Yersinia pestis strains from different biovars and locations was investigated in this work. The majority of strains from the Orientalis biovar presented specific spacer arrays, allowing for the establishment of a CRISPR signature for their respective isolates. Twenty-one new spacers were found in the Y. pestis strains from plague foci in Brazil. Ninety-three (64%) strains were grouped in the G1 genotype, whereas the others were distributed in 35 genotypes. This study allowed observing a microevolutionary process in a group of Y. pestis isolated from Brazil. We also identified specific genotypes of Y. pestis that were important for the establishment of the bacteria in plague foci in Brazil. The data have provided supporting evidence for the diversity and dynamics of CRISPR loci present in the genome of Y. pestis strains from plague foci in Brazil. PMID:25265542

  13. Gene-based meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies implicates new loci involved in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Sara; Ganna, Andrea; Van Der Laan, Sander W.; Esko, Tonu; Pers, Tune H.; Locke, Adam E.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Justice, Anne E.; Kahali, Bratati; Siemelink, Marten A.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Strachan, David P.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; North, Kari E.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Pawitan, Yudi; Ingelsson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified >100 loci with single variants associated with body mass index (BMI). This approach may miss loci with high allelic heterogeneity; therefore, the aim of the present study was to use gene-based meta-analysis to identify regions with high allelic heterogeneity to discover additional obesity susceptibility loci. We included GWAS data from 123 865 individuals of European descent from 46 cohorts in Stage 1 and Metabochip data from additional 103 046 individuals from 43 cohorts in Stage 2, all within the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium. Each cohort was tested for association between ∼2.4 million (Stage 1) or ∼200 000 (Stage 2) imputed or genotyped single variants and BMI, and summary statistics were subsequently meta-analyzed in 17 941 genes. We used the ‘VErsatile Gene-based Association Study’ (VEGAS) approach to assign variants to genes and to calculate gene-based P-values based on simulations. The VEGAS method was applied to each cohort separately before a gene-based meta-analysis was performed. In Stage 1, two known (FTO and TMEM18) and six novel (PEX2, MTFR2, SSFA2, IARS2, CEP295 and TXNDC12) loci were associated with BMI (P gene tests). We confirmed all loci, and six of them were gene-wide significant in Stage 2 alone. We provide biological support for the loci by pathway, expression and methylation analyses. Our results indicate that gene-based meta-analysis of GWAS provides a useful strategy to find loci of interest that were not identified in standard single-marker analyses due to high allelic heterogeneity. PMID:26376864

  14. Discovery and Refinement of Loci Associated with Lipid Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloso, Gina M.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M.; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A.; Ehret, Georg B.; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U.; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian’an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K.; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F.; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S.; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S.F.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E.; Ingi Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V.M.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J.; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S.; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Whitfield, John B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Franks, Paul W.; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable, risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,578 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5×10−8, including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry, we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipids are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio, and body mass index. Our results illustrate the value of genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestries and provide insights into biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological, and therapeutic research. PMID:24097068

  15. Regulation of alternative splicing in human obesity loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, Dorota; Käkelä, Pirjo; Nikkola, Elina; Venesmaa, Sari; Ilves, Imre; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Karhunen, Leila; Kuusisto, Johanna; Gylling, Helena; Pajukanta, Päivi; Laakso, Markku; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Multiple obesity susceptibility loci have been identified by genome-wide association studies, yet the mechanisms by which these loci influence obesity remain unclear. Alternative splicing could contribute to obesity by regulating the transcriptomic and proteomic diversity of genes in these loci. Based on a database search, 72 of the 136 genes at the 13 obesity loci encoded multiple protein isoforms. Thus, alternative splicing of these genes in adipose tissue samples was analyzed from the Metabolic Syndrome in Men population-based study and from two weight loss intervention studies (surgical and very low calorie diet). Alternative splicing was confirmed in 11 genes with PCR capillary electrophoresis in human subcutaneous adipose tissue. Interestingly, differential splicing of TRA2B, BAG6, and MSH5 was observed between lean individuals with normoglycemia and overweight individuals with type 2 diabetes. Of these genes, we detected fat depot-dependent splicing of TRA2B and BAG6 and weight loss-induced regulation of MSH5 splicing in the intervention studies. Finally, body mass index was a major determinant of TRA2B, BAG6, and MSH5 splicing in the combined data. This study provides evidence for alternative splicing in obesity loci, suggesting that alternative splicing at least in part mediates the obesity-associated risk in these loci. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  16. Creation and maintenance of variation in allorecognition loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Louise Nydam

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Allorecognition is the ability of an organism to differentiate self or close relatives from unrelated individuals. Effective allorecognition systems are critical to the survival of organisms; they prevent inbreeding, protect against pathogens, and facilitate fusions between close relatives. Where the loci governing allorecognition outcomes have been identified, the corresponding proteins often exhibit exceptional polymorphism. Two important questions about this polymorphism remain unresolved: how is it created, and how is it maintained. Studies on the evolution of polymorphism in allorecognition loci have traditionally been restricted to the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC. But because the genetic bases of several allorecognition systems have now been identified, including alr2 in Hydractinia, FuHC in Botryllus, the het (vic loci in fungi, lagB1 and lagC1 in Dictyostelium, and self-incompatibility (SI loci in several plant families, we are now poised to achieve a clearer understanding of how these loci evolve. In this review, we summarize what is currently know about the evolution of allorecognition loci, highlight open questions, and suggest future directions.

  17. Physical Modeling of Dynamic Coupling between Chromosomal Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampo, Thomas J; Kennard, Andrew S; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2016-01-19

    The motion of chromosomal DNA is essential to many biological processes, including segregation, transcriptional regulation, recombination, and packaging. Physical understanding of these processes would be dramatically enhanced through predictive, quantitative modeling of chromosome dynamics of multiple loci. Using a polymer dynamics framework, we develop a prediction for the correlation in the velocities of two loci on a single chromosome or otherwise connected by chromatin. These predictions reveal that the signature of correlated motion between two loci can be identified by varying the lag time between locus position measurements. In general, this theory predicts that as the lag time interval increases, the dual-loci dynamic behavior transitions from being completely uncorrelated to behaving as an effective single locus. This transition corresponds to the timescale of the stress communication between loci through the intervening segment. This relatively simple framework makes quantitative predictions based on a single timescale fit parameter that can be directly compared to the in vivo motion of fluorescently labeled chromosome loci. Furthermore, this theoretical framework enables the detection of dynamically coupled chromosome regions from the signature of their correlated motion.

  18. Escherichia coli Chromosomal Loci Segregate from Midcell with Universal Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Julie A; Kuwada, Nathan J; Traxler, Beth; Wiggins, Paul A

    2016-06-21

    The structure of the Escherichia coli chromosome is inherently dynamic over the duration of the cell cycle. Genetic loci undergo both stochastic motion around their initial positions and directed motion to opposite poles of the rod-shaped cell during segregation. We developed a quantitative method to characterize cell-cycle dynamics of the E. coli chromosome to probe the chromosomal steady-state mobility and segregation process. By tracking fluorescently labeled chromosomal loci in thousands of cells throughout the entire cell cycle, our method allows for the statistical analysis of locus position and motion, the step-size distribution for movement during segregation, and the locus drift velocity. The robust statistics of our detailed analysis of the wild-type E. coli nucleoid allow us to observe loci moving toward midcell before segregation occurs, consistent with a replication factory model. Then, as segregation initiates, we perform a detailed characterization of the average segregation velocity of loci. Contrary to origin-centric models of segregation, which predict distinct dynamics for oriC-proximal versus oriC-distal loci, we find that the dynamics of loci were universal and independent of genetic position.

  19. Quantitative trait loci analysis for rice seed vigor during the germination stage*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhou-fei; Wang,Jian-fei; Bao, Yong-Mei; Wang, Fu-Hua; Zhang, Hong-sheng

    2010-01-01

    Seed vigor is an important characteristic of seed quality, and rice cultivars with strong seed vigor are desirable in direct-sowing rice production for optimum stand establishment. In the present study, the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of three traits for rice seed vigor during the germination stage, including germination rate, final germination percentage, and germination index, were investigated using one recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between japonica Dagua...

  20. Isolation of human minisatellite loci detected by synthetic tandem repeat probes: direct comparison with cloned DNA fingerprinting probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Vergnaud, G; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-08-01

    As a direct comparison with cloned 'DNA fingerprinting' probes, we present the results of screening an ordered array Charomid library for hypervariable human loci using synthetic tandem repeat (STR) probes. By recording the coordinates of positive hybridization signals, the subset of clones within the library detected by each STR probe can be defined, and directly compared with the set of clones detected by naturally occurring (cloned) DNA fingerprinting probes. The STR probes vary in the efficiency of detection of polymorphic minisatellite loci; among the more efficient probes, there is a strong overlap with the sets of clones detected by the DNA fingerprinting probes. Four new polymorphic loci were detected by one or more of the STR probes but not by any of the naturally occurring repeats. Sequence comparisons with the probe(s) used to detect the locus suggest that a relatively poor match, for example 10 out of 14 bases in a limited region of each repeat, is sufficient for the positive detection of tandem repeats in a clone in this type of library screening by hybridization. These results not only provide a detailed evaluation of the usefulness of STR probes in the isolation of highly variable loci, but also suggest strategies for the use of these multi-locus probes in screening libraries for clones from hypervariable loci.

  1. MiniSTR multiplex systems based on non-CODIS loci for analysis of degraded DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamura, H; Fujimori, S; Ota, M; Fukushima, H

    2007-11-15

    We describe two short amplicon autosomal short tandem repeat (miniSTR) quadruplex systems for eight loci D1S1171, D2S1242, D3S1545, D4S2366, D12S391, D16S3253, D20S161, and D21S1437, unlinked from the combined DNA index system (non-CODIS) loci, using newly designed primer sets. The results of an assay of 411 Japanese individuals showed that polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products within the eight loci were less than 150bp in size, without the seven additional bases for adenylation. The frequency distributions in the loci showed no deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations. The accumulated power of discrimination and power of exclusion for the eight loci were 0.9999999991 and 0.998, respectively. For assay of highly degraded DNA, including artificially degraded samples and the degraded forensic casework samples assessed with the present miniSTR quadruplex systems, the systems proved quite effective in analyzing degraded DNA.

  2. CRISPR loci reveal networks of gene exchange in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodt Avital

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CRISPR (Clustered, Regularly, Interspaced, Short, Palindromic Repeats loci provide prokaryotes with an adaptive immunity against viruses and other mobile genetic elements. CRISPR arrays can be transcribed and processed into small crRNA molecules, which are then used by the cell to target the foreign nucleic acid. Since spacers are accumulated by active CRISPR/Cas systems, the sequences of these spacers provide a record of the past "infection history" of the organism. Results Here we analyzed all currently known spacers present in archaeal genomes and identified their source by DNA similarity. While nearly 50% of archaeal spacers matched mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids or viruses, several others matched chromosomal genes of other organisms, primarily other archaea. Thus, networks of gene exchange between archaeal species were revealed by the spacer analysis, including many cases of inter-genus and inter-species gene transfer events. Spacers that recognize viral sequences tend to be located further away from the leader sequence, implying that there exists a selective pressure for their retention. Conclusions CRISPR spacers provide direct evidence for extensive gene exchange in archaea, especially within genera, and support the current dogma where the primary role of the CRISPR/Cas system is anti-viral and anti-plasmid defense. Open peer review This article was reviewed by: Profs. W. Ford Doolittle, John van der Oost, Christa Schleper (nominated by board member Prof. J Peter Gogarten

  3. Graphics processing unit-accelerated quantitative trait Loci detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Guillaume; Filangi, Olivier; Elsen, Jean-Michel; Lavenier, Dominique; Le Roy, Pascale

    2013-09-01

    Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) using genetic marker information is a time-consuming analysis that has interested the mapping community in recent decades. The increasing amount of genetic marker data allows one to consider ever more precise QTL analyses while increasing the demand for computation. Part of the difficulty of detecting QTLs resides in finding appropriate critical values or threshold values, above which a QTL effect is considered significant. Different approaches exist to determine these thresholds, using either empirical methods or algebraic approximations. In this article, we present a new implementation of existing software, QTLMap, which takes advantage of the data parallel nature of the problem by offsetting heavy computations to a graphics processing unit (GPU). Developments on the GPU were implemented using Cuda technology. This new implementation performs up to 75 times faster than the previous multicore implementation, while maintaining the same results and level of precision (Double Precision) and computing both QTL values and thresholds. This speedup allows one to perform more complex analyses, such as linkage disequilibrium linkage analyses (LDLA) and multiQTL analyses, in a reasonable time frame.

  4. Lightness dependence of achromatic loci in color-appearance coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro eKuriki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shifts in the appearance of color under different illuminant chromaticity are known to be incomplete, and fit nicely with a simple linear transformation of cone responses that aligns the achromatic points under two illuminants. Most chromaticity-transfer functions with von-Kries-like transformations use only one set of values to fit the color shifts from one illuminant to another. However, an achromatic point shifts its chromaticity depending on the lightness of the test stimulus. This lightness dependence of the achromatic-point locus is qualitatively similar to a phenomenon known as the Helson-Judd effect. The present study suggests that the lightness dependency of achromatic points appears to be a general trend, which is supported by the results from deriving the optimal von-Kries coefficients for different lightness levels that best fit the color shifts under different illuminant chromaticities. Further, we report that such a lightness dependence of the achromatic-point loci can be represented simply as a straight line in coordinates defined using color-appearance models such as CIECAM when normalized for daylight.

  5. Quantitative trait loci underlying udder morphology traits in dairy sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gil, B; El-Zarei, M F; Alvarez, L; Bayón, Y; de la Fuente, L F; San Primitivo, F; Arranz, J J

    2008-09-01

    A genome scan was conducted on the basis of the daughter design to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing udder morphology traits in Spanish Churra dairy sheep. A total of 739 ewes belonging to 11 half-sib families were genotyped for 182 microsatellite markers covering 3,248.2 cM (Kosambi) of the ovine autosomal genome. Phenotypic traits included scores for 5 linear udder traits: udder depth, udder attachment, teat placement, teat size, and udder shape. Quantitative measurements for the QTL analysis were calculated for each trait from evaluation scores using within-family yield deviations corrected for fixed environmental effects. Joint analysis of all families using Haley-Knott regression identified 5 regions that exceeded the 5% chromosome-wise significance threshold on chromosomes 7, 14, 15, 20, and 26. Based on the across-family results, a within-family analysis was carried out to identify families segregated according to the QTL and to estimate the QTL effect. The allelic substitution effect for individual families ranged from 0.47 to 1.7 phenotypic standard deviation units for udder shape on chromosome 15 and udder depth on chromosome 14, respectively. These QTL regions provide a starting point for further research aimed at the characterization of genetic variability involved in udder traits in Churra sheep. This paper presents the first report of a sheep genome scan for udder-related traits in a dairy sheep outbred population.

  6. Quantitative trait loci underlying milk production traits in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gil, B; El-Zarei, M F; Alvarez, L; Bayón, Y; de la Fuente, L F; San Primitivo, F; Arranz, J-J

    2009-08-01

    Improvement of milk production traits in dairy sheep is required to increase the competitiveness of the industry and to maintain the production of high quality cheese in regions of Mediterranean countries with less favourable conditions. Additional improvement over classical selection could be reached if genes with significant effects on the relevant traits were specifically targeted by selection. However, so far, few studies have been undertaken to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in dairy sheep. In this study, we present a complete genome scan performed in a commercial population of Spanish Churra sheep to identify chromosomal regions associated with phenotypic variation observed in milk production traits. Eleven half-sib families, including a total of 1213 ewes, were analysed following a daughter design. Genome-wise multi-marker regression analysis revealed a genome-wise significant QTL for milk protein percentage on chromosome 3. Eight other regions, localized on chromosomes 1, 2, 20, 23 and 25, showed suggestive significant linkage associations with some of the analysed traits. To our knowledge, this study represents the first complete genome scan for milk production traits reported in dairy sheep. The experiment described here shows that analysis of commercial dairy sheep populations has the potential to increase our understanding of the genetic determinants of complex production-related traits.

  7. Identification and characterization of variant alleles at CODIS STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allor, Catherine; Einum, David D; Scarpetta, Marco

    2005-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from 32,671 individuals generated by the ABI Profiler Plus and Cofiler systems were screened for variant alleles not represented within manufacturer-provided allelic ladders. A total of 85 distinct variants were identified at 12 of the 13 CODIS loci, most of which involve a truncated tetranucleotide repeat unit. Twelve novel alleles, identified at D3S1358, FGA, D18S51, D5S818, D7S820 and TPOX, were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis and include both insertions and deletions involving the repeat units themselves as well as DNA flanking the repeat regions. Population genetic data were collected for all variants and frequencies range from 0.0003 (many single observations) to 0.0042 (D7S820 '10.3' in North American Hispanics). In total, the variant alleles identified in this study are carried by 1.6% of the estimated 1 million individuals tested annually in the U.S. for the purposes of parentage resolution. A paternity case involving a recombination event of paternal origin is presented and demonstrates how variant alleles can significantly strengthen the genetic evidence in troublesome cases. In such instances, increased costs and turnaround time associated with additional testing may be eliminated.

  8. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Endosperm Traits with Molecular Marker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chen-wu; LI Tao; SUN Chang-sen; GU Shi-liang

    2002-01-01

    Based on the genetic models for triploid endosperm traits and on the methods for mapping diploid quantitative traits loci (QTLs), the genetic constitutions, components of means and genetic variances of QTL controlling endosperm traits under flanking marker genotypes of different generations were presented. From these results, a multiple linear regression method for mapping QTL underlying endosperm traits in cereals was proposed, which used the means of endosperm traits under flanking marker genotypes as a dependent variable, the coefficient of additive effect ( d ) and dominance effect ( h 1 and/or h2 ) of a putative QTL in a given interval as independent variables. This method can work at any position in a genome covered by markers and increase the estimation precision of QTL location and their effects by eliminating the interference of other relative QTLs. This method can also be easily used in other uneven data such as markers and quantitative traits detected or measured in plants and tissues different either in generations or at chromosomal ploidy levels, and in endosperm traits controlled by complicated genetic models considering the effects produced by genotypes of both maternal plants and seeds on them.

  9. Multiple loci associated with renal function in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Shriner

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic kidney disease varies by ethnic group in the USA, with African Americans displaying a two-fold higher rate than European Americans. One of the two defining variables underlying staging of chronic kidney disease is the glomerular filtration rate. Meta-analysis in individuals of European ancestry has identified 23 genetic loci associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. We conducted a follow-up study of these 23 genetic loci using a population-based sample of 1,018 unrelated admixed African Americans. We included in our follow-up study two variants in APOL1 associated with end-stage kidney disease discovered by admixture mapping in admixed African Americans. To address confounding due to admixture, we estimated local ancestry at each marker and global ancestry. We performed regression analysis stratified by local ancestry and combined the resulting regression estimates across ancestry strata using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effects model. We found that 11 of the 24 loci were significantly associated with eGFR in our sample. The effect size estimates were not significantly different between the subgroups of individuals with two copies of African ancestry vs. two copies of European ancestry for any of the 11 loci. In contrast, allele frequencies were significantly different at 10 of the 11 loci. Collectively, the 11 loci, including four secondary signals revealed by conditional analyses, explained 14.2% of the phenotypic variance in eGFR, in contrast to the 1.4% explained by the 24 loci in individuals of European ancestry. Our findings provide insight into the genetic basis of variation in renal function among admixed African Americans.

  10. Haplotype diversity of 17 Y-str loci in an admixed population from the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francez, Pablo Abdon da Costa; Ramos, Luiz Patrick Vidal; de Jesus Brabo Ferreira Palha, Teresinha; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2012-01-01

    The allelic and haplotype frequencies of 17 Y-STR loci most commonly used in forensic testing were estimated in a sample of 138 unrelated healthy males from Macapá, in the northern Amazon region of Brazil. The average gene diversity was 0.6554 ± 0.3315. 134 haplotypes of the 17 loci were observed, 130 of them unique and four present in two individuals each. The haplotype diversity index was 0.9996 + 0.0009, with the most frequent haplogroups being R1b (52.2%), E1b1b (11.6%), J2 (10.1%) and Q (7.2%). Most haplogroups of this population belonged to European male lineages (89.2%), followed by Amerindian (7.2%) and African (3.6%) lineages. PMID:22481873

  11. Reconstructing recent human phylogenies with forensic STR loci: A statistical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Faisal

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Forensic Short Tandem Repeat (STR loci are effective for the purpose of individual identification, and other forensic applications. Most of these markers have high allelic variability and mutation rate because of which they have limited use in the phylogenetic reconstruction. In the present study, we have carried out a meta-analysis to explore the possibility of using only five STR loci (TPOX, FES, vWA, F13A and Tho1 to carry out phylogenetic assessment based on the allele frequency profile of 20 world population and north Indian Hindus analyzed in the present study. Results Phylogenetic analysis based on two different approaches – genetic distance and maximum likelihood along with statistical bootstrapping procedure involving 1000 replicates was carried out. The ensuing tree topologies and PC plots were further compared with those obtained in earlier phylogenetic investigations. The compiled database of 21 populations got segregated and finely resolved into three basal clusters with very high bootstrap values corresponding to three geo-ethnic groups of African, Orientals, and Caucasians. Conclusion Based on this study we conclude that if appropriate and logistic statistical approaches are followed then even lesser number of forensic STR loci are powerful enough to reconstruct the recent human phylogenies despite of their relatively high mutation rates.

  12. Reconstructing recent human phylogenies with forensic STR loci: a statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Suraksha; Khan, Faisal

    2005-09-28

    Forensic Short Tandem Repeat (STR) loci are effective for the purpose of individual identification, and other forensic applications. Most of these markers have high allelic variability and mutation rate because of which they have limited use in the phylogenetic reconstruction. In the present study, we have carried out a meta-analysis to explore the possibility of using only five STR loci (TPOX, FES, vWA, F13A and Tho1) to carry out phylogenetic assessment based on the allele frequency profile of 20 world population and north Indian Hindus analyzed in the present study. Phylogenetic analysis based on two different approaches - genetic distance and maximum likelihood along with statistical bootstrapping procedure involving 1000 replicates was carried out. The ensuing tree topologies and PC plots were further compared with those obtained in earlier phylogenetic investigations. The compiled database of 21 populations got segregated and finely resolved into three basal clusters with very high bootstrap values corresponding to three geo-ethnic groups of African, Orientals, and Caucasians. Based on this study we conclude that if appropriate and logistic statistical approaches are followed then even lesser number of forensic STR loci are powerful enough to reconstruct the recent human phylogenies despite of their relatively high mutation rates.

  13. Gene-based meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies implicates new loci involved in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägg, Sara; Ganna, Andrea; Van Der Laan, Sander W

    2015-01-01

    To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified >100 loci with single variants associated with body mass index (BMI). This approach may miss loci with high allelic heterogeneity; therefore, the aim of the present study was to use gene-based meta-analysis to identify regions...... with high allelic heterogeneity to discover additional obesity susceptibility loci. We included GWAS data from 123 865 individuals of European descent from 46 cohorts in Stage 1 and Metabochip data from additional 103 046 individuals from 43 cohorts in Stage 2, all within the Genetic Investigation...... of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium. Each cohort was tested for association between ∼2.4 million (Stage 1) or ∼200 000 (Stage 2) imputed or genotyped single variants and BMI, and summary statistics were subsequently meta-analyzed in 17 941 genes. We used the ‘VErsatile Gene-based Association Study’ (VEGAS...

  14. Present time

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E

    2014-01-01

    The idea of a moving present or `now' seems to form part of our most basic beliefs about reality. Such a present, however, is not reflected in any of our theories of the physical world. I show in this article that presentism, the doctrine that only what is present exists, is in conflict with modern relativistic cosmology and recent advances in neurosciences. I argue for a tenseless view of time, where what we call `the present' is just an emergent secondary quality arising from the interaction of perceiving self-conscious individuals with their environment. I maintain that there is no flow of time, but just an ordered system of events.

  15. Genetic loci that regulate healing and regeneration in LG/J and SM/J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P; Bryan, Gregory; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Clark, Lise Desquenne; Zhang, Xiang-Ming; Chang, Celia; Horng, Wenhwai; Pletscher, L Susan; Cheverud, James M; Showe, Louise C; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    MRL mice display unusual healing properties. When MRL ear pinnae are hole punched, the holes close completely without scarring, with regrowth of cartilage and reappearance of both hair follicles and sebaceous glands. Studies using (MRL/lpr x C57BL/6)F(2) and backcross mice first showed that this phenomenon was genetically determined and that multiple loci contributed to this quantitative trait. The lpr mutation itself, however, was not one of them. In the present study we examined the genetic basis of healing in the Large (LG/J) mouse strain, a parent of the MRL mouse and a strain that shows the same healing phenotype. LG/J mice were crossed with Small (SM/J) mice and the F(2) population was scored for healing and their genotypes determined at more than 200 polymorphic markers. As we previously observed for MRL and (MRL x B6)F(2) mice, the wound-healing phenotype was sexually dimorphic, with female mice healing more quickly and more completely than male mice. We found quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on chromosomes (Chrs) 9, 10, 11, and 15. The heal QTLs on Chrs 11 and 15 were linked to differential healing primarily in male animals, whereas QTLs on Chrs 9 and 10 were not sexually dimorphic. A comparison of loci identified in previous crosses with those in the present report using LG/J x SM/J showed that loci on Chrs 9, 11, and 15 colocalized with those seen in previous MRL crosses, whereas the locus on Chr 10 was not seen before and is contributed by SM/J.

  16. Evaluation of the genetic parameters and mutation analysis of 22 STR loci in the central Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongdan, Wang; Bing, Kang; Ning, Su; Miao, He; Bo, Zhang; Yuxin, Guo; Bofeng, Zhu; Shixiu, Liao; Zhaoshu, Zeng

    2017-01-01

    At present, the Han nationality is China's main ethnic group and also the most populous nation in the world. This is a great resource to study microsatellite mutations and for the study of ethnogeny. The aim of this study is to investigate the genetic polymorphisms and mutations of 22 autosomal STR loci in 2475 individuals from Henan province, China. DNA is amplified and genotyped using PowerPlex™24 system. The gene frequencies, forensic parameters, and the mutation rate of the 22 STR loci are analyzed. A total of 295 alleles are observed in this Henan Han population, and the allelic frequencies ranged from 0.0003 to 0.5036. In order to investigate the genetic relationships between the Henan Han and the other 14 different populations, our present data were compared with previously published data for the same 15 STR loci. The results indicated that the Henan Han had closer genetic relationships the groups including Minnan Han, Maonan, Yi and Guangdong Han groups while the South morocco population, the Moroccan population, the Malay group, and the Uigur stand away from Henan Han. Except of D2S441, D13S317, PentaE, D2S1338, D5S818, TPOX and D19S433, the mutation events are found in the other 15 STR loci. A total of 40 mutation events are observed in the 15 STR loci. The mutation rates are ranged from 0 to 4.85 × 10(-3). In this study, 39 mutations are single-step mutations, and only one at FGA comprised two steps. STR mutation is commonly existed in paternity testing, while there are no STR mutation studies of the 22 STR loci in the Henan Han population. It is of great importance in forensic individual discrimination and paternal testing.

  17. Genetic polymorphism of milk protein loci in Argentinian Holstein cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonvillani Adriana Gloria

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Some alleles of milk protein loci are associated with superior cheese production characteristics. The genetic polymorphism of the milk protein loci alphas1-casein, beta-casein, k-casein and beta-lactoglobulin was examined in Argentinian Holstein cattle. Samples from 12 herds of four regions of Córdoba were analyzed by starch gel electrophoresis. The chi² test was used to assess whether the populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Genotypic diversity was analyzed by the Shannon-Weaver index. The observed genotypic frequencies were analyzed by Hedrick's genetic identity and the genetic distance of Balakrishnan and Sanghvi. The allelic and genotypic frequencies were similar to those of other Holstein populations. The genotypic frequencies of the alphas1-casein and beta-casein loci were in equilibrium, whereas in some populations the k-casein and beta-lactoglobulin loci were not. According to the Shannon-Weaver index the total genetic diversity within each herd was greater than 96%. The high values of identity agreed with the low genetic distances among populations. We conclude that there is extensive genetic homogeneity in Holstein cattle in Córdoba Province and that it would be feasible to select for B alleles at the k-casein and b-lactoglobulin loci in order to improve the quality of milk available for cheese manufacturing.

  18. Isolation and characterization of the bovine microsatellite loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H Y; Kim, T H; Choi, B H; Jang, G W; Lee, J W; Lee, K T; Ha, J M

    2006-12-01

    Microsatellite loci were isolated using five repetitive probes for Korean native cattle. Eleven microsatellite loci were developed based on a biotin hybrid capture method, and enrichment of the genomic libraries (AAAT, TG, AG, T, and TGC repeats) was performed using Sau3AI adapters. The isolated markers were tested in two half-sib Korean cattle families and four imported breeds (Angus, Limousine, Holstein, and Shorthorn). Nine informative microsatellite loci were observed, and two microsatellite loci were revealed as monomorphic in Korean cattle. In the imported breeds, however, all of the markers were informative. In total, 213 alleles were obtained at the 11 loci across five breeds, and the average number of alleles found per locus, considering all populations, was 4.26. Heterozygosity was 0.71 (expected) and 0.57 (observed). The range of the polymorphic information content for the markers in all cattle populations was 0.43-0.69. Eleven percent of genetic variation was attributed to differentiation between populations as determined by the mean F (ST) values. The remaining 89% corresponded to differences among individuals. The isolated markers may be used to identify and classify the local breeds on a molecular basis.

  19. Plasmodium genetic loci linked to host cytokine and chemokine responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaradilokrat, S; Li, J; Wu, J; Qi, Y; Eastman, R T; Zilversmit, M; Nair, S C; Huaman, M C; Quinones, M; Jiang, H; Li, N; Zhu, J; Zhao, K; Kaneko, O; Long, C A; Su, X-z

    2014-01-01

    Both host and parasite factors contribute to disease severity of malaria infection; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease and the host-parasite interactions involved remain largely unresolved. To investigate the effects of parasite factors on host immune responses and pathogenesis, we measured levels of plasma cytokines/chemokines (CCs) and growth rates in mice infected with two Plasmodium yoelii strains having different virulence phenotypes and in progeny from a genetic cross of the two parasites. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis linked levels of many CCs, particularly IL-1β, IP-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and MIG, and early parasite growth rate to loci on multiple parasite chromosomes, including chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 12 and 13. Comparison of the genome sequences spanning the mapped loci revealed various candidate genes. The loci on chromosomes 7 and 13 had significant (P<0.005) additive effects on IL-1β, IL-5 and IP-10 responses, and the chromosome 9 and 12 loci had significant (P=0.017) interaction. Infection of knockout mice showed critical roles of MCP-1 and IL-10 in parasitemia control and host mortality. These results provide important information for a better understanding of malaria pathogenesis and can be used to examine the role of these factors in human malaria infection.

  20. High-Density Genotyping of Immune Loci in Koreans and Europeans Identifies Eight New Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Kang, Young Mo; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Nath, Swapan K.; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Kremer, Joel M.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothée; Liao, Katherine P.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Plenge, Robert M.; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objective A highly polygenic etiology and high degree of allele-sharing between ancestries have been well-elucidated in genetic studies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the high-density genotyping array Immunochip for immune disease loci identified 14 new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci among individuals of European ancestry. Here, we aimed to identify new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci using Korean-specific Immunochip data. Methods We analyzed Korean rheumatoid arthritis case-control samples using the Immunochip and GWAS array to search for new risk alleles of rheumatoid arthritis with anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies. To increase power, we performed a meta-analysis of Korean data with previously published European Immunochip and GWAS data, for a total sample size of 9,299 Korean and 45,790 European case-control samples. Results We identified 8 new rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci (TNFSF4, LBH, EOMES, ETS1–FLI1, COG6, RAD51B, UBASH3A and SYNGR1) that passed a genome-wide significance threshold (p<5×10−8), with evidence for three independent risk alleles at 1q25/TNFSF4. The risk alleles from the 7 new loci except for the TNFSF4 locus (monomorphic in Koreans), together with risk alleles from previously established RA risk loci, exhibited a high correlation of effect sizes between ancestries. Further, we refined the number of SNPs that represent potentially causal variants through a trans-ethnic comparison of densely genotyped SNPs. Conclusion This study demonstrates the advantage of dense-mapping and trans-ancestral analysis for identification of potentially causal SNPs. In addition, our findings support the importance of T cells in the pathogenesis and the fact of frequent overlap of risk loci among diverse autoimmune diseases. PMID:24532676

  1. High-density genotyping of immune loci in Koreans and Europeans identifies eight new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Kang, Young Mo; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Nath, Swapan K; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Kremer, Joel M; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothée; Liao, Katherine P; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Plenge, Robert M; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-03-01

    A highly polygenic aetiology and high degree of allele-sharing between ancestries have been well elucidated in genetic studies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the high-density genotyping array Immunochip for immune disease loci identified 14 new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci among individuals of European ancestry. Here, we aimed to identify new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci using Korean-specific Immunochip data. We analysed Korean rheumatoid arthritis case-control samples using the Immunochip and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) array to search for new risk alleles of rheumatoid arthritis with anticitrullinated peptide antibodies. To increase power, we performed a meta-analysis of Korean data with previously published European Immunochip and GWAS data for a total sample size of 9299 Korean and 45,790 European case-control samples. We identified eight new rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci (TNFSF4, LBH, EOMES, ETS1-FLI1, COG6, RAD51B, UBASH3A and SYNGR1) that passed a genome-wide significance threshold (p<5×10(-8)), with evidence for three independent risk alleles at 1q25/TNFSF4. The risk alleles from the seven new loci except for the TNFSF4 locus (monomorphic in Koreans), together with risk alleles from previously established RA risk loci, exhibited a high correlation of effect sizes between ancestries. Further, we refined the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that represent potentially causal variants through a trans-ethnic comparison of densely genotyped SNPs. This study demonstrates the advantage of dense-mapping and trans-ancestral analysis for identification of potentially causal SNPs. In addition, our findings support the importance of T cells in the pathogenesis and the fact of frequent overlap of risk loci among diverse autoimmune diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Small RNAs Repress Expression of Polysaccharide Utilization Loci of Gut Bacteroides Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, Laurie E

    2016-09-15

    Bacteroides species can metabolize numerous plant polysaccharides and host glycans present in the mammalian gut. The regulatory systems governing the induction of particular polysaccharide utilization loci when the cognate glycan is present are known, but how expression is repressed when a higher-priority glycan is present is largely unknown. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Cao et al. (J. Bacteriol. 198:2410-2418, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00381-16) reveal a conserved mechanism in Bacteroides whereby antisense small RNAs (sRNA) repress expression of genes involved in utilization of host glycans. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Detection of quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 1,2,3,12,14,15, X in pigs: performance characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paixao, D.M.; Carneiro, P.L.S.; Paiva, S.R.; Sousa, K.R.S.; Verardo, L.L.; Braccini Neto, J.; Pinto, A.P.G.; Marubayashi Hidalgo, A.; Nascimento, C.; Périssé, I.V.; Lopes, P.S.; Guimaraes, S.E.F.

    2013-01-01

    The accomplishment of the present study had the objective of mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) related to performance traits in a F2 pig population developed by mating two Brazilian Piau breed sires with 18 dams from a commercial line (Landrace × Large White × Pietrain). The linkage map for this

  4. Duplications of the Y-chromosome specific loci P25 and 92R7 and forensic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Brión, Maria; Parson, Walther

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we demonstrate that two commonly used Y-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), P25 and 92R7, are paralogous sequence variants (PSVs) originating from segmental duplications and that at least one of the sequence variants in each group of loci is polymorphic. Sever...

  5. Detection of quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 1,2,3,12,14,15, X in pigs: performance characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paixao, D.M.; Carneiro, P.L.S.; Paiva, S.R.; Sousa, K.R.S.; Verardo, L.L.; Braccini Neto, J.; Pinto, A.P.G.; Marubayashi Hidalgo, A.; Nascimento, C.; Périssé, I.V.; Lopes, P.S.; Guimaraes, S.E.F.

    2013-01-01

    The accomplishment of the present study had the objective of mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) related to performance traits in a F2 pig population developed by mating two Brazilian Piau breed sires with 18 dams from a commercial line (Landrace × Large White × Pietrain). The linkage map for this

  6. Finer characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using spoligotyping and 15-loci MIRU-VNTRs reveals phylogeographical specificities of isolates circulating in Guyana and Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Elisabeth; Baboolal, Shirematee; Akpaka, Patrick E; Millet, Julie; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-03-01

    In this study we used spoligotyping and 15-loci MIRU-VNTRs for a finer characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from patients residing in Guyana (n=74) and Suriname (n=80). The mean age of the patients was 38.5years (36.5 and 40.2years for Guyana vs. Suriname), with a male-to-female sex-ratio of 2.25 for Guyana vs. 4.27 in Suriname. Spoligotyping and 15-loci MIRU-VNTRs led to a total of 41 and 65 different patterns respectively, with an overall clustering rate of 83.8% vs. 68.8%. Combined spoligotyping and VNTR analysis led to the detection of 18 clusters of 2-41 isolates, with an overall clustering of 67.5% and a recent "n-1" transmission rate of 55.8%. Importantly, Guyana was characterized by a significantly higher percentage of clustered isolates than Suriname (79.7% vs. 56.3%; p=0.0019). Three big spoligo/MIRU (SIT/MIT) clusters containing >10 isolates each were shared between the 2 countries, and concerned: T1 sublineage cluster 53/861 (n=41, 37 in Guyana vs. 4 in Suriname); EAI6-BGD1 sublineage cluster 1340/860 (n=16, 3 in Guyana vs. 13 in Suriname); and T1 sublineage cluster 131/146 (n=11, 6 in Guyana vs. 5 in Suriname); as well as 2 smaller clusters of 2 and 3 isolates respectively. However, the relative phylogeographical specificities of strains in circulation as well as a lack of drug-resistance observed among strains from Suriname suggested that trans-border transmission of drug-resistant isolates occurred less frequently than thought. Tracing and interrupting transmission channels of a specific clone (SIT53/15-MIT861) should become a priority in Guyana, not only because it is by far most abundant but also because it accounts for almost half of the drug resistant isolates (n=8/17, 47.1%) in our study, and clustered 5/12 (41.7%) MDR isolates.

  7. CATCHY PRESENTATIONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kaare; Tollestrup, Christian; Ovesen, Nis

    2011-01-01

    An important competence for designers is the ability to communicate and present ideas and proposals for customers, partners, investors and colleagues. The Pecha Kucha principle, developed by Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham, has become a widely used and easy format for the presentation of new concepts...

  8. Association between MAOA-u VNTR polymorphism and its interaction with stressful life events and major depressive disorder in adolescents%MAOA-u VNTR多态性单独及和应激性生活事件交互作用与青少年重性抑郁障碍的关联分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马静; 禹顺英; 梁珊; 丁军; 冯哲; 杨帆; 高维佳; 林佳妮; 黄春香

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨单胺氧化酶A基因相关多态区域(MAOA-u VNTR)基因多态性与青少年重性抑郁障碍(major depressive disorder,MDD)有无关联,以及其与应激性生活事件(stressful life events,SLEs)之间的交互作用与MDD之间有无关联.方法 394名研究对象(MDD患者187人,正常对照207人)采用SNaP-shot系统进行基因分型,评估受试者近1年内的SLEs,采用统计学软件比较各配对组别MAOA-u VNTR基因型及等位基因的分布;建立基因×环境(GXE)交互作用的二分类logistic回归模型,分析MAOA-u VNTR基因型与SLEs交互作用与青少年MDD患病的关联性.结果 MAOA-u VNTR基因型及等位基因分布与青少年MDD是否发生、抑郁严重程度、是否共病焦虑、是否出现自杀观念/行为/企图均无直接相关性;男性及女性MAOA-u VNTR基因型与SLEs均不存在和青少年MDD患病相关的交互作用.结论 尚不能认为MAOA-u VNTR与青少年MDD相关;MAOA-u VNTR与SLEs间不存在与青少年MDD相关联的基因-环境交互作用.%Objective To investigate whether the genetic polymorphism,upstream variable number of tandem repeats (uVNTR),in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene,is associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents and to test whether there is gene-environment interaction between MAOA-uVNTR polymorphism and stressful life events (SLEs).Methods A total of 394 Chinese Han subjects,including 187 adolescent patients with MDD and 207normal students as a control group,were included in the study.Genotyping was performed by SNaP-shot assay.SLEs in the previous 12 months were evaluated.The groups were compared in terms of the frequency distributions of MAOA-uVNTR genotypes and alleles using statistical software.The binary logistic regression model of gene-environment interaction was established to analyze the association of the gene-environment interaction between MAOA-u VNTR genotypes and SLEs with adolescent MDD.Results The distribution profiles

  9. Colocalization of Multiple DNA Loci: A Physical Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Valentino; Scialdone, Antonio; Nicodemi, Mario

    2012-01-01

    A variety of important cellular processes require, for functional purposes, the colocalization of multiple DNA loci at specific time points. In most cases, the physical mechanisms responsible for bringing them in close proximity are still elusive. Here we show that the interaction of DNA loci with a concentration of diffusing molecular factors can induce spontaneously their colocalization, through a mechanism based on a thermodynamic phase transition. We consider up to four DNA loci and different valencies for diffusing molecular factors. In particular, our analysis illustrates that a variety of nontrivial stable spatial configurations is allowed in the system, depending on the details of the molecular factor/DNA binding-sites interaction. Finally, we discuss as a case study an application of our model to the pairing of X chromosome at X inactivation, one of the best-known examples of DNA colocalization. We also speculate on the possible links between X colocalization and inactivation. PMID:23200056

  10. Genetic polymorphism at 15 STR loci among three important subpopulation of Bihar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashma, R; Kashyap, V K

    2002-11-05

    Genotype polymorphism studies at 15 highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) loci were carried out in three genetically important minor caste groups (Yadav, Kurmi and Baniya) of Bihar, a eastern state of India to evaluate their significance in human identification and population genetics study. The selected communities practice endogamy. Despite of same geographical area, the physical features of Yadavs and Baniyas resemble North Indian Indo-Caucasoids whereas Kurmis resemble more to Indo-Austroloids. Among the chosen 15 loci, two are penta-nucleotide repeat: Penta-D and Penta-E, and 13 are tetra-nucleotide repeat: vWA D8S1179, TPOX, FGA, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, D3S1358, THO1, CSF1PO, D21S11, D18S51 and are validated for other population of India and world for forensic testing and human population study. Thirteen of these STR loci are present in the combined DNA index system (CODIS) [J. Forensic Sci. 44 (1999) 1277] and world-wide data is available.

  11. Fourteen non-CODIS autosomal short tandem repeat loci multiplex data from Taiwanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Hsiao-Lin; Chang, Yih-Yuan; Lee, James Chun-I; Yin, Hsiang-Yi; Tseng, Li-Hui; Su, Yi-Ning; Ko, Tsang-Ming

    2011-03-01

    Interest in the development of polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) markers unlinked to the CODIS loci is growing among forensic practitioners. We developed a multiplex system in which14 autosomal STR (D3S1744, D4S2366, D8S1110, D12S1090, D13S765, D14S608, Penta E, D17S1294, D18S536, D18S1270, D20S470, D21S1437, Penta D, and D22S683) could be amplified in one single polymerase chain reaction. DNA samples from 572 unrelated Taiwanese Han subjects were analyzed using this 14 STR multiplex system. Thirty parent-child pairs of parentage testing cases with a combined paternity index (CPI) below 1,000 and 32 parent-child pairs with single-step mutations found in AmpFℓSTR Identifiler loci were also recruited for validation of the newly developed system. DNA sequencing was performed for novel STRs and novel alleles found in these subjects. The distributions of allelic frequencies for these autosomal STRs and sequence data, allele nomenclature for the STRs, and forensic parameters are presented. The discrimination power in our multiplex loci ranged from 0.6858 (D18S536) to 0.9168 (Penta E), with a combined discrimination power of 0.999999999. It provides additional power to distinguish the possible single-step mutations in parent-child pairs and improves the ability to prove parentage by increasing the CPI. The combined power of exclusion of these 14 loci in Taiwanese Han in this study was 0.9999995913. In conclusion, this 14-autosomal STRs multiplex system provides highly informative STR data and appears useful in forensic casework and parentage testing.

  12. Limited evidence for parent-of-origin effects in inflammatory bowel disease associated loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Fransen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies of two main forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, have identified 99 susceptibility loci, but these explain only 23% of the genetic risk. Part of the 'hidden heritability' could be in transmissible genetic effects in which mRNA expression in the offspring depends on the parental origin of the allele (genomic imprinting, since children whose mothers have CD are more often affected than children with affected fathers. We analyzed parent-of-origin (POO effects in Dutch and Indian cohorts of IBD patients. METHODS: We selected 28 genetic loci associated with both CD and UC, and tested them for POO effects in 181 Dutch IBD case-parent trios. Three susceptibility variants in NOD2 were tested in 111 CD trios and a significant finding was re-evaluated in 598 German trios. The UC-associated gene, BTNL2, reportedly imprinted, was tested in 70 Dutch UC trios. Finally, we used 62 independent Indian UC trios to test POO effects of five established Indian UC risk loci. RESULTS: We identified POO effects for NOD2 (L1007fs; OR = 21.0, P-value = 0.013 for CD; these results could not be replicated in an independent cohort (OR = 0.97, P-value = 0.95. A POO effect in IBD was observed for IL12B (OR = 3.2, P-value = 0.019 and PRDM1 (OR = 5.6, P-value = 0.04. In the Indian trios the IL10 locus showed a POO effect (OR = 0.2, P-value = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: Little is known about the effect of genomic imprinting in complex diseases such as IBD. We present limited evidence for POO effects for the tested IBD loci. POO effects explain part of the hidden heritability for complex genetic diseases but need to be investigated further.

  13. Information Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kritina L.; Thompson, Shelby G.; Sandor, Aniko; McCann, Robert S.; Kaiser, Mary K.; Adelstein, Barnard D.; Begault, Durand R.; Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.; Godfroy, Martine

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. In addition to addressing display design issues associated with information formatting, style, layout, and interaction, the Information Presentation DRP is also working toward understanding the effects of extreme environments encountered in space travel on information processing. Work is also in progress to refine human factors-based design tools, such as human performance modeling, that will supplement traditional design techniques and help ensure that optimal information design is accomplished in the most cost-efficient manner. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within the Information Presentation DRP for FY10 are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. The poster will highlight completed and planned work for each subtask.

  14. Information Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, K.L.; Boyer, J.L.; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S.G.; McCann, R.S.; Begault, D.R.; Adelstein, B.D.; Beutter, B.R.; Stone, L.S.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center.

  15. Clustering of Beijing genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the Mekong delta in Vietnam on the basis of variable number of tandem repeat versus restriction fragment length polymorphism typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huyen Mai NT

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparison to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP typing, variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR typing is easier to perform, faster and yields results in a simple, numerical format. Therefore, this technique has gained recognition as the new international gold standard in typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, some reports indicated that VNTR typing may be less suitable for Beijing genotype isolates. We therefore compared the performance of internationally standardized RFLP and 24 loci VNTR typing to discriminate among 100 Beijing genotype isolates from the Southern Vietnam. Methods Hundred Beijing genotype strains defined by spoligotyping were randomly selected and typed by RFLP and VNTR typing. The discriminatory power of VNTR and RFLP typing was compared using the Bionumerics software. Results Among 95 Beijing strains available for analysis, 14 clusters were identified comprising 34 strains and 61 unique profiles in 24 loci VNTR typing ((Hunter Gaston Discrimination Index (HGDI = 0.994. 13 clusters containing 31 strains and 64 unique patterns in RFLP typing (HGDI = 0.994 were found. Nine RFLP clusters were subdivided by VNTR typing and 12 VNTR clusters were split by RFLP. Five isolates (5% revealing double alleles or no signal in two or more loci in VNTR typing could not be analyzed. Conclusions Overall, 24 loci VNTR typing and RFLP typing had similar high-level of discrimination among 95 Beijing strains from Southern Vietnam. However, loci VNTR 154, VNTR 2461 and VNTR 3171 had hardly added any value to the level of discrimination.

  16. Physiologic characterization of type 2 diabetes-related loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grarup, Niels; Sparsø, Thomas; Hansen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    of these variants influence pancreatic ß-cell function. However, risk alleles in five loci seem to have a primary impact on insulin sensitivity. Investigations of more detailed physiologic phenotypes, such as the insulin response to intravenous glucose or the incretion hormones, are now emerging and give...... indications of more specific pathologic mechanisms for diabetes-related risk variants. Such studies have shed light on the function of some loci but also underlined the complex nature of disease mechanism. In the future, sequencing-based discovery of low-frequency variants with higher impact on intermediate...

  17. Genetic polymorphism of 15 STR loci in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Pablo; Pinto de Erazo, Eugenia Leticia; Baeza, Carlos; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; López-Parra, Ana Maria

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the allelic frequencies of the 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci included in AmpFlSTRIdentifiler PCR Amplification Kit. Biological samples were obtained from 109 unrelated individuals from El Salvador. Allelic frequencies and forensic parameters were calculated. All loci showed no departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction. The obtained frequencies were compared with other previously reported population data. The multidimensional scaling plot and the neighbor-joining phylogeny supported a high native Mesoamerican contribution.

  18. Strategie di spazializzazione dei contenuti nel GeniusLoci Digitale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Gasperi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available GeniusLoci Digitale is a software architecture of virtual tour that integrates various multimedia technologies (3D computer graphics, panoramas, dynamic maps, movies, pictures to represent the identity of places. The designer is interested in reproducing virtually complex aspects that define a context, which means the effect of meaning that distinguishes one place. GeniusLoci Digitale is in fact an architecture that evolves in search of a reproductive and communicative function which is recognizable to extend its development to the Open Source community.

  19. 52 Genetic Loci Influencing Myocardial Mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Harst, Pim; van Setten, Jessica; Verweij, Niek

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to cardiac muscle contraction is reflected by the amplitude and duration of the QRS complex on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormal QRS amplitude or duration reflect......, and transcription factor binding, suggesting that they represent regions of the genome that are actively transcribed in the human heart. Pathway analyses provided evidence that these loci play a role in cardiac hypertrophy. We further highlighted 67 candidate genes at the identified loci that are preferentially...

  20. Confirmation of novel type 1 diabetes risk loci in families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, J D; Howson, J M M; Smyth, D

    2012-01-01

    Over 50 regions of the genome have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, mainly using large case/control collections. In a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study, 18 novel susceptibility loci were identified and replicated, including replication evidence from 2,319 families. Here, we......, the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC), aimed to exclude the possibility that any of the 18 loci were false-positives due to population stratification by significantly increasing the statistical power of our family study....

  1. Voting Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During his time as a state senator in Illinois, Barack Obama voted “Present” 129 times, a deliberate act of nonvoting that subsequently became an important campaign issue during the 2008 presidential elections. In this article, I examine the use of Present votes in the Illinois state senate. I find evidence that Present votes can largely be characterized as protest votes used as a legislative tool by the minority party. Incorporating information from Present votes into a Bayesian polytomous item-response model, I find that this information increases the efficiency of ideal point estimates by approximately 35%. There is little evidence of significant moderation by Obama when Present votes are accounted for, though my results suggest that Obama’s voting record may have moderated significantly before his subsequent election to the U.S. Senate. My results also suggest that because legislative nonvoting may occur for a variety of reasons, naive inclusion of nonvoting behavior into vote choice models may lead to biased results.

  2. Nine Loci for Ocular Axial Length Identified through Genome-wide Association Studies, Including Shared Loci with Refractive Error

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M. Kamran; Young, Terri L.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George

    2013-01-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LA...

  3. Sexual dimorphisms in genetic loci linked to body fat distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulit, Sara L.; Karaderi, Tugce

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic condition associated with increased morbidity and mortality and is a risk factor for a number of other diseases including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Obesity confers an enormous, costly burden on both individuals and public health more broadly. Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes. Body fat distribution is distinct from overall obesity in measurement, but studies of body fat distribution can yield insights into the risk factors for and causes of overall obesity. Sexual dimorphism in body fat distribution is present throughout life. Though sexual dimorphism is subtle in early stages of life, it is attenuated in puberty and during menopause. This phenomenon could be, at least in part, due to the influence of sex hormones on the trait. Findings from recent large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for various measures of body fat distribution (including waist-to-hip ratio, hip or waist circumference, trunk fat percentage and the ratio of android and gynoid fat percentage) emphasize the strong sexual dimorphism in the genetic regulation of fat distribution traits. Importantly, sexual dimorphism is not observed for overall obesity (as assessed by body mass index or total fat percentage). Notably, the genetic loci associated with body fat distribution, which show sexual dimorphism, are located near genes that are expressed in adipose tissues and/or adipose cells. Considering the epidemiological and genetic evidence, sexual dimorphism is a prominent feature of body fat distribution. Research that specifically focuses on sexual dimorphism in fat distribution can provide novel insights into human physiology and into the development of obesity and its comorbidities, as well as yield biological clues that will aid in the improvement of disease prevention and treatment. PMID:28073971

  4. A Trio of Human Molecular Genetics PCR Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinking, Jeffrey L.; Waldo, Jennifer T.; Dinsmore, Jannett

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates three different analytical forms of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that allow students to genotype themselves at four different loci. Here, we present protocols to allow students to a) genotype a non-coding polymorphic Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) locus on human chromosome 5 using conventional…

  5. A Trio of Human Molecular Genetics PCR Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinking, Jeffrey L.; Waldo, Jennifer T.; Dinsmore, Jannett

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates three different analytical forms of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that allow students to genotype themselves at four different loci. Here, we present protocols to allow students to a) genotype a non-coding polymorphic Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) locus on human chromosome 5 using conventional…

  6. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    RADIOSPARES, the leading catalogue distributor of components (electronic, electrical, automation, etc.) and industrial supplies will be at CERN on Friday 3 October 2008 (Main Building, Room B, from 9.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m.) to introduce its new 2008/2009 catalogue. This will be the opportunity for us to present our complete range of products in more detail: 400 000 part numbers available on our web site (Radiospares France, RS International, extended range of components from other manufacturers); our new services: quotations, search for products not included in the catalogue, SBP products (Small Batch Production: packaging in quantities adapted to customers’ requirements); partnership with our focus manufacturers; demonstration of the on-line purchasing tool implemented on our web site in conjunction with CERN. RADIOSPARES will be accompanied by representatives of FLUKE and TYCO ELECTRONICS, who will make presentations, demonstrate materials and answer any technical questio...

  7. Overview Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, John

    2001-01-01

    This report provides an overview presentation of the 2000 NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) Review and Planning Meeting. Topics include: 1) a background of the program; 2) 1999 Industry Feedback; 3) FY00 Status, including resource distribution and major accomplishments; 4) FY01 Major Milestones; and 5) Future direction for the program. Specifically, simulation environment/production software and NPSS CORBA Security Development are discussed.

  8. Genetic analysis of 24 Y-STR loci in the Miao ethnic minority from Yunnan Province, southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiufeng; Gu, Tao; Yao, Jinyong; Yang, Canming; Du, Lei; Pang, Jing Bo; Rao, Min; Nie, Aiting; Hu, Liping; Nie, Shengjie

    2017-02-14

    In the present study, 24 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) loci were analyzed in 252 unrelated Miao male individuals from Pingbian county, Honghe Hani and Yi Autonomous Prefecture, Yunnan province, southwestern China. The gene diversity of the 24 Y-STR loci in the studied group ranged from 0.2683 (DYS391) to 0.9312 (DYS527a/b). According to haplotypic analysis of the 24 Y-STR loci, 214 different haplotypes were obtained, 186 of which were unique. The overall haplotype diversity and discrimination capacity were calculated to be 0.9983 and 0.8492, respectively. In addition, three different triplications were observed at the DYS527a/b marker, and 1 intermediate allele and six single off-ladder alleles were observed at four markers. We analyzed interpopulation differentiations by making comparisons between the Yunnan Miao ethnic minority and 18 other ethnic groups. The results obtained using pairwise genetic distances, multidimensional scaling plot, and neighbor-joining tree at the same set of 17 Y-filer loci indicated that Yunnan Miao had a closer genetic relationship with Yunnan Han and Hunan Miao individuals. The present results may provide useful information for paternal lineages in forensic cases and can also increase our understanding of the genetic relationship between Miao individuals and other groups.

  9. Microsatellite loci for the invasive colonial hydrozoan Cordylophora caspia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordylophora caspia, a colonial hydrozoan native to the Ponto-Caspian region, has become a common invader of both fresh and brackish water ecosystems of North America and Europe. Here we describe 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci for this species. Preliminary analyses indicate ...

  10. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with effects on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-05

    Feb 5, 2008 ... 2Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, ... identify genetic loci associated with the expression of resistance to FTh. ... indicated that resistance to FTh may be controlled by ... population or to pyramid resistance into new populations. .... environment and human health (Eigenbrode and.

  11. Combined effects of multiple linked loci on pairwise sibling tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Tomonori; Osawa, Motoki; Kakimoto, Yu; Ochiai, Eriko; Suzuki, Takanori; Nakamura, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The advanced multiplex STR system, PowerPlex Fusion, includes four linked locus pairs. The conventional Identifiler system has one pair of linked loci. Therefore, sibling tests conducted using the advanced system might be more affected by linkage than those conducted using the conventional system. This study simulated single and combined effects of the four linked locus pairs on pairwise sibling tests. Simulated genotypes of 100,000 pairs of full siblings and nonrelatives were constructed according to allele frequencies of the Japanese population. The single linkage effect was evaluated for simulated genotype data by calculating both the likelihood ratio accounting for the linkage between two loci and the likelihood ratio ignoring the linkage. The combined effect was obtained by multiplication of the respective single effects. Furthermore, we investigated the possibility that ignoring the linkage affects subject classification by introducing a scale of the likelihood ratio into sibling tests. The single effect in the Identifiler analysis was 0.645-1.746 times if the linkage was ignored. Overestimations and underestimations were predictable from the identical-by-state status at two linked loci. The combined effect in the PowerPlex Fusion analysis was 0.217-7.390 times. Ignoring the linkage rarely caused a false conclusive or inconclusive result, even from PowerPlex Fusion analysis. Application of the advanced system improved sibling tests considerably. The additional examined loci were more beneficial than the adverse effect of the linkage derived from the four linked locus pairs.

  12. Linkage relationships of 19 enzyme Loci in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M M; Stuber, C W; Newton, K; Weissinger, H H

    1980-11-01

    Linkage relationships of 19 enzyme loci have been examined. The chromosomal locations of eight of these loci are formally reported for the first time in this paper. These localizations should assist in the construction of additional useful chromosome marker stocks, especially since several of these enzyme loci lie in regions that were previously poorly mapped. Six loci are on the long arm of chromosome 1. The arrangement is (centromere)-Mdh4-mmm-Pgm1-Adh1-Phi-Gdh1, with about 46% recombination between Mdh4 and Gdh1.-Linkage studies with a2 and pr have resulted in the localization of four enzyme genes to chromosome 5 with arrangement Pgm2-Mdh5-Got3-a2-(centromere)-pr-Got2. Pgm2 lies approximately 35 map units distal to a2 in a previously unmapped region of the short arm of 5, beyond ameiotic.-Approximately 23% recombination was observed between Mdh4 and Pgm1 on chromosome 1, while 17% recombination occurred between Mdh5 and Pgm2 on chromosome 5. Similarly, linkages between Idh1 and Mdh1, about 22 map units apart on chromosome 8, and between Mdh2 and Idh2, less than 5 map units apart on chromosome 6, were observed. Thus, segments of chromosomes 1 and 5 and segments of 6 and 8 may represent duplications on nonhomologous chromosomes.

  13. Failure Loci of Suction Caisson Foundations Under Combined Loading Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong; JIN Xia

    2008-01-01

    Suction caissons are widely used to support offshore fixed platforms in coastal areas. The loadings transferred to suction caissons include the eccentric lateral force induced by waves and self weight of the platform structure. However, under this kind of combined loading conditions, the failure mechanism of caissons with shallow embedment depths is quite different from conventional deep foundations or onshore shallow footings. The behaviour of caissons subjected to combined loadings may be described with the "failure locus" in force resultant spaces. Here the failure loci of smooth caissons are studied by use of finite element approach, with the embedment ratio of caissons varying in the range of 0.25~1.0 and eccentricity ratio of horizontal loadings in 0~10. The platform settlement and tilt limits are involved into determination of failure loci, thus the platforms can avoid significant displacements for the combined loadings located inside the failure locus. Three families of loading paths are used to map out the locus. It is found that the shape of failure loci depends on 3 non-dimensional parameters, and the failure locus of a given caisson changes gradually from the elliptical curve to hooked curve with increasing shear strength of soil. The lateral capacity of short caissons may be enhanced by vertical forces, compared with the maximum lateral capacity of long caissons occurring at the vertical force being zero. The critical embedment ratios partitioning elliptical and hooked loci are proposed.

  14. Novel Associations of Nonstructural Loci with Paraoxonase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen E. Quillen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-density-lipoprotein-(HDL- associated esterase paraoxonase 1 (PON1 is a likely contributor to the antioxidant and antiatherosclerotic capabilities of HDL. Two nonsynonymous mutations in the structural gene, PON1, have been associated with variation in activity levels, but substantial interindividual differences remain unexplained and are greatest for substrates other than the eponymous paraoxon. PON1 activity levels were measured for three substrates—organophosphate paraoxon, arylester phenyl acetate, and lactone dihydrocoumarin—in 767 Mexican American individuals from San Antonio, Texas. Genetic influences on activity levels for each substrate were evaluated by association with approximately one million single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs while conditioning on PON1 genotypes. Significant associations were detected at five loci including regions on chromosomes 4 and 17 known to be associated with atherosclerosis and lipoprotein regulation and loci on chromosome 3 that regulate ubiquitous transcription factors. These loci explain 7.8% of variation in PON1 activity with lactone as a substrate, 5.6% with the arylester, and 3.0% with paraoxon. In light of the potential importance of PON1 in preventing cardiovascular disease/events, these novel loci merit further investigation.

  15. Geometry of Brill-Noether loci on Prym varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Hoering, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Given the Prym variety of an \\'etale double cover one can define analogues of the classical Brill-Noether loci on Jacobians of curves. Recent work by Lahoz and Naranjo shows that the Brill-Noether locus V^2 completely determines the covering. In this paper we describe the singular locus and the irreducible components of V^2.

  16. Hidden landscapes: the metropolitan garden and the genius loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De wit, S.I.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis aims at the landscape architecture of the enclosed garden as an expression of the genius loci: definition, analysis, typology and transformation. The process of metropolisation tends to eliminate, or at least hide, the underlying landscape. The research addresses the question of how the

  17. STR data for the 13 CODIS loci in Singapore Malays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, H C; Sornarajah, R; Lim, S E S; Syn, C K C; Tan-Siew, W F; Chow, S T; Budowle, Bruce

    2005-03-10

    Allele frequencies for the 13 CODIS (Combined DNA Index System, USA) STR loci included in the AmpFISTR Profiler Plus and AmpFISTR Cofiler kits (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, USA) were determined in a sample of 197 unrelated Malays in Singapore.

  18. Overdominant quantitative trait loci for yield and fitness in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semel, Yaniv; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Menda, Naama; Zinder, Michael; Krieger, Uri; Issman, Noa; Pleban, Tzili; Lippman, Zachary; Gur, Amit; Zamir, Dani

    2006-08-29

    Heterosis, or hybrid vigor, is a major genetic force that contributes to world food production. The genetic basis of heterosis is not clear, and the importance of loci with overdominant (ODO) effects is debated. One problem has been the use of whole-genome segregating populations, where interactions often mask the effects of individual loci. To assess the contribution of ODO to heterosis in the absence of epistasis, we carried out quantitative genetic and phenotypic analyses on a population of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) introgression lines (ILs), which carry single marker-defined chromosome segments from the distantly related wild species Solanum pennellii. The ILs revealed 841 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for 35 diverse traits measured in the field on homozygous and heterozygous plants. ILs showing greater reproductive fitness were characterized by the prevalence of ODO QTL, which were virtually absent for the nonreproductive traits. ODO can result from true ODO due to allelic interactions of a single gene or from pseudoODO that involves linked loci with dominant alleles in repulsion. The fact that we detected dominant and recessive QTL for all phenotypic categories but ODO only for the reproductive traits indicates that pseudoODO due to random linkage is unlikely to explain heterosis in the ILs. Thus, we favor the true ODO model involving a single functional Mendelian locus. We propose that the alliance of ODO QTL with higher reproductive fitness was selected for in evolution and was domesticated by man to improve yields of crop plants.

  19. Blood Pressure Loci Identified with a Gene-Centric Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T.; Poulter, Neil R.; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C.; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G.; Whincup, Peter H.; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Dobson, Richard J.; Howard, Philip J.; Mein, Charles A.; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Goodall, Alison H.; Fowkes, F. Gerald; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A.; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-Francois; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sober, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Hastie, Claire E.; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K.; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Bjoern; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Wells, George A.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G. M.; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F.; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V.; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J.; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Mans; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2011-01-01

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a

  20. Blood Pressure Loci Identified with a Gene-Centric Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T.; Poulter, Neil R.; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C.; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G.; Whincup, Peter H.; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Dobson, Richard J.; Howard, Philip J.; Mein, Charles A.; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Goodall, Alison H.; Fowkes, F. Gerald; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A.; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-Francois; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sober, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Hastie, Claire E.; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K.; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Bjoern; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Wells, George A.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G. M.; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F.; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V.; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J.; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Mans; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2011-01-01

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a besp

  1. Quantitative trait loci associated with anthracnose resistance in sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    With an aim to develop a durable resistance to the fungal disease anthracnose, two unique genetic sources of resistance were selected to create genetic mapping populations to identify regions of the sorghum genome that encode anthracnose resistance. A series of quantitative trait loci were identifi...

  2. Ancient conservation of trinucleotide microsatellite loci in polistine wasps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezenwa, V O; Peters, J M; Zhu, Y

    1998-01-01

    Microsatellites have proven to be very useful genetic markers for studies of kinship, parentage, and gene mapping. If microsatellites are conserved among species, then those developed for one species can be used on related species, which would save the time and effort of developing new loci. We e...

  3. Origins of amino acid transporter loci in trypanosomatid parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Andrew P

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large amino acid transporter gene families were identified from the genome sequences of three parasitic protists, Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania major. These genes encode molecular sensors of the external host environment for trypanosomatid cells and are crucial to modulation of gene expression as the parasite passes through different life stages. This study provides a comprehensive phylogenetic account of the origins of these genes, redefining each locus according to a positional criterion, through the integration of phyletic identity with comparative gene order information. Results Each locus was individually specified by its surrounding gene order and associated with homologs showing the same position ('homoeologs' in other species, where available. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenies were in general agreement on systematic relationships and confirmed several 'orthology sets' of genes retained since divergence from the common ancestor. Reconciliation analysis quantified the scale of duplication and gene loss, as well as identifying further apparent orthology sets, which lacked conservation of genomic position. These instances suggested substantial genomic restructuring or transposition. Other analyses identified clear instances of evolutionary rate changes post-duplication, the effects of concerted evolution within tandem gene arrays and gene conversion events between syntenic loci. Conclusion Despite their importance to cell function and parasite development, the repertoires of AAT loci in trypanosomatid parasites are relatively fluid in both complement and gene dosage. Some loci are ubiquitous and, after an ancient origin through transposition, originated through descent from the ancestral trypanosomatid. However, reconciliation analysis demonstrated that unilateral expansions of gene number through tandem gene duplication, transposition of gene duplicates to otherwise well conserved genomic

  4. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    07 April 2009 Technical presentation by Leuze Electronics: 14.00 – 15.00, Main Building, Room 61-1-017 (Room A) Photoelectric sensors, data identification and transmission systems, image processing systems. We at Leuze Electronics are "the sensor people": we have been specialising in optoelectronic sensors and safety technology for accident prevention for over 40 years. Our dedicated staff are all highly customer oriented. Customers of Leuze Electronics can always rely on one thing – on us! •\tFounded in 1963 •\t740 employees •\t115 MEUR turnover •\t20 subsidiaries •\t3 production facilities in southern Germany Product groups: •\tPhotoelectric sensors •\tIdentification and measurements •\tSafety devices

  5. Thousands of microsatellite loci from the venomous coralsnake (Micrurus fulvius) and variability of select loci across populations and related species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoe, Todd A.; Streicher, Jeffrey W.; Meik, Jesse M.; Ingrasci, Matthew J.; Poole, Alexander W.; de Koning, A.P. Jason; Campbell, Jonathan A.; Parkinson, Christopher L.; Smith, Eric N.; Pollock, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of population genetics increasingly use next-generation DNA sequencing to identify microsatellite loci in non-model organisms. There are, however, relatively few studies that validate the feasibility of transitioning from marker development to experimental application across populations and species. North American coralsnakes of the Micrurus fulvius species complex occur in the United States and Mexico, and little is known about their population structure and phylogenetic relationships. This absence of information and population genetics markers is particularly concerning because they are highly venomous and have important implications on human health. To alleviate this problem in coralsnakes, we investigated the feasibility of using 454 shotgun sequences for microsatellite marker development. First, a genomic shotgun library from a single individual was sequenced (~7.74 megabases; 26,831 reads) to identify potentially amplifiable microsatellite loci (PALs). We then hierarchically sampled 76 individuals from throughout the geographic distribution of the species complex and examined whether PALs were amplifiable and polymorphic. Approximately half of the loci tested were readily amplifiable from all individuals, and 80% of the loci tested for variation were variable and thus informative as population genetic markers. To evaluate the repetitive landscape characteristics across multiple snakes, we also compared microsatellite content between the coralsnake and two other previously sampled snakes, the venomous copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and Burmese python (Python molurus). PMID:22938699

  6. Thousands of microsatellite loci from the venomous coralsnake Micrurus fulvius and variability of select loci across populations and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoe, Todd A; Streicher, Jeffrey W; Meik, Jesse M; Ingrasci, Matthew J; Poole, Alexander W; de Koning, A P Jason; Campbell, Jonathan A; Parkinson, Christopher L; Smith, Eric N; Pollock, David D

    2012-11-01

    Studies of population genetics increasingly use next-generation DNA sequencing to identify microsatellite loci in nonmodel organisms. There are, however, relatively few studies that validate the feasibility of transitioning from marker development to experimental application across populations and species. North American coralsnakes of the Micrurus fulvius species complex occur in the United States and Mexico, and little is known about their population structure and phylogenetic relationships. This absence of information and population genetics markers is particularly concerning because they are highly venomous and have important implications on human health. To alleviate this problem in coralsnakes, we investigated the feasibility of using 454 shotgun sequences for microsatellite marker development. First, a genomic shotgun library from a single individual was sequenced (approximately 7.74 megabases; 26,831 reads) to identify potentially amplifiable microsatellite loci (PALs). We then hierarchically sampled 76 individuals from throughout the geographic distribution of the species complex and examined whether PALs were amplifiable and polymorphic. Approximately half of the loci tested were readily amplifiable from all individuals, and 80% of the loci tested for variation were variable and thus informative as population genetic markers. To evaluate the repetitive landscape characteristics across multiple snakes, we also compared microsatellite content between the coralsnake and two other previously sampled snakes, the venomous copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and Burmese python (Python molurus). © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Genetic association studies in complex disease : Disentangling additional predisposing loci from associated neutral loci using a constrained - permutation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, G T; Nolte, I.M.; Jansen, R.C.; te Meerman, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    In the process of genetically mapping a complex disease, the question may arise whether a certain polymorphism is the only causal variant in a region. A number of methods can answer this question, but unfortunately these methods are optimal for bi-allelic loci only. We wanted to develop a method tha

  8. Impacts of Instructor and Student Loci of Commitment on Biology Learning for Prospective Elementary School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovici, Hedy

    1998-01-01

    Explores the dynamics in the loci of commitment of several participants in a university-level biology course developed for elementary school teachers. Concentrates on two instructors with almost opposing loci of commitment. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  9. Impacts of Instructor and Student Loci of Commitment on Biology Learning for Prospective Elementary School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovici, Hedy

    1998-01-01

    Explores the dynamics in the loci of commitment of several participants in a university-level biology course developed for elementary school teachers. Concentrates on two instructors with almost opposing loci of commitment. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  10. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtype...

  11. Unmasking Novel Loci for Internal Phosphorus Utilization Efficiency in Rice Germplasm through Genome-Wide Association Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissuwa, Matthias; Kondo, Katsuhiko; Fukuda, Takuya; Mori, Asako; Rose, Michael T.; Pariasca-Tanaka, Juan; Kretzschmar, Tobias; Haefele, Stephan M.; Rose, Terry J.

    2015-01-01

    Depletion of non-renewable rock phosphate reserves and phosphorus (P) fertilizer price increases has renewed interest in breeding P-efficient varieties. Internal P utilization efficiency (PUE) is of prime interest because there has been no progress to date in breeding for high PUE. We characterized the genotypic variation for PUE present within the rice gene pool by using a hydroponic system that assured equal plant P uptake, followed by mapping of loci controlling PUE via Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Loci associated with PUE were mapped on chromosomes 1, 4, 11 and 12. The highest PUE was associated with a minor indica-specific haplotype on chromosome 1 and a rare aus-specific haplotype on chromosome 11. Comparative variant and expression analysis for genes contained within the chromosome 1 haplotype identified high priority candidate genes. Differences in coding regions and expression patterns between genotypes of contrasting haplotypes, suggested functional alterations for two predicted nucleic acid-interacting proteins that are likely causative for the observed differences in PUE. The loci reported here are the first identified for PUE in any crop that is not confounded by differential P uptake among genotypes. Importantly, modern rice varieties lacked haplotypes associated with superior PUE, and would thus benefit from targeted introgressions of these loci from traditional donors to improve plant growth in phosphorus-limited cropping systems. PMID:25923470

  12. Advancing genetic theory and application by metabolic quantitative trait loci analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliebenstein, Danielj

    2009-06-01

    This review describes recent advances in the analysis of metabolism using quantitative genetics. It focuses on how recent metabolic quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies enhance our understanding of the genetic architecture underlying naturally variable phenotypes and the impact of this fundamental research on agriculture, specifically crop breeding. In particular, the role of whole-genome duplications in generating quantitative genetic variation within a species is highlighted and the potential uses of this phenomenon presented. Additionally, the review describes how new observations from metabolic QTL mapping analyses are helping to shape and expand the concepts of genetic epistasis.

  13. A comparison of SNP and STR loci for delineating population structure and performing individual genetic assignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glover, Kevin A.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Lien, Sigbjørn

    2010-01-01

    between SNP and STR data sets and variants thereof. The best 15 SNPs (30 alleles) gave a similar level of self-assignment to the best 4 STR loci (83 alleles), however, addition of further STR loci did not lead to a notable increase assignment whereas addition of up to 100 SNP loci increased assignment...

  14. The expected performance of single nucleotide polymorphism loci in paternity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Karen L

    2005-11-25

    We discuss the utility of single nucleotide polymorphism loci for full trio and mother-unavailable paternity testing cases, in the presence of population substructure and relatedness of putative and actual fathers. We focus primarily on the expected number of loci required to gain specified probabilities of mismatches, and report the expected proportion of paternity indices greater than three threshold values for these loci.

  15. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, w

  16. Multi-ethnic fine-mapping of 14 central adiposity loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ching-Ti; Buchkovich, Martin L; Winkler, Thomas W;

    2014-01-01

    The Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium identified 14 loci in European Ancestry (EA) individuals associated with waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) adjusted for body mass index. These loci are wide and narrowing the signals remains necessary. Twelve of 14 loci identified in GI...

  17. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boessenkool, S; King, T M; Seddon, P J; Waters, J M

    2008-09-01

    Twelve microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized in the endangered yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) using enriched genomic libraries. Polymorphic loci revealed two to eight alleles per locus and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.21 to 0.77. These loci will be suitable for assessing current and historical patterns of genetic variability in yellow-eyed penguins.

  18. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci,

  19. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci...

  20. Influence analysis in quantitative trait loci detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaoling; Kuriki, Satoshi; Maeno, Akiteru; Takada, Toyoyuki; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents systematic methods for the detection of influential individuals that affect the log odds (LOD) score curve. We derive general formulas of influence functions for profile likelihoods and introduce them into two standard quantitative trait locus detection methods-the interval mapping method and single marker analysis. Besides influence analysis on specific LOD scores, we also develop influence analysis methods on the shape of the LOD score curves. A simulation-based method is proposed to assess the significance of the influence of the individuals. These methods are shown useful in the influence analysis of a real dataset of an experimental population from an F2 mouse cross. By receiver operating characteristic analysis, we confirm that the proposed methods show better performance than existing diagnostics.

  1. Phylogenetic assignment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing clinical isolates in Japan by maximum a posteriori estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Junji; Wada, Takayuki; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Tamaru, Aki; Maeda, Shinji; Yamamoto, Kaori; Hase, Atsushi; Murakami, Koichi; Maeda, Eriko; Oishi, Akira; Migita, Yuji; Yamamoto, Taro; Ahiko, Tadayuki

    2015-10-01

    Intra-species phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been regarded as a clue to estimate its potential risk to develop drug-resistance and various epidemiological tendencies. Genotypic characterization of variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), a standard tool to ascertain transmission routes, has been improving as a public health effort, but determining phylogenetic information from those efforts alone is difficult. We present a platform based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation to estimate phylogenetic information for M. tuberculosis clinical isolates from individual profiles of VNTR types. This study used 1245 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates obtained throughout Japan for construction of an MAP estimation formula. Two MAP estimation formulae, classification of Beijing family and other lineages, and classification of five Beijing sublineages (ST11/26, STK, ST3, and ST25/19 belonging to the ancient Beijing subfamily and modern Beijing subfamily), were created based on 24 loci VNTR (24Beijing-VNTR) profiles and phylogenetic information of the isolates. Recursive estimation based on the formulae showed high concordance with their authentic phylogeny by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) of the isolates. The formulae might further support phylogenetic estimation of the Beijing lineage M. tuberculosis from the VNTR genotype with various geographic backgrounds. These results suggest that MAP estimation can function as a reliable probabilistic process to append phylogenetic information to VNTR genotypes of M. tuberculosis independently, which might improve the usage of genotyping data for control, understanding, prevention, and treatment of TB.

  2. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases.

  3. Informativeness of the CODIS STR loci for admixture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Pfaff, Carrie L; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Long, Jeffrey C

    2005-11-01

    Population admixture (or ancestry) is used as an approach to gene discovery in complex diseases, particularly when the disease prevalence varies widely across geographic populations. Admixture analysis could be useful for forensics because an indication of a perpetrator's ancestry would narrow the pool of suspects for a particular crime. The purpose of this study was to use Fisher's information to identify informative sets of markers for admixture analysis. Using published founding population allele frequencies we test three marker sets for efficacy for estimating admixture: the FBI CODIS Core STR loci, the HGDP-CEPH Human Genome Diversity Cell Line Panel and the set of 39 ancestry informative SNPS from the Shriver lab at Pennsylvania State University. We conclude that the FBI CODIS Core STR set is valid for admixture analysis, but not the most precise. We recommend using a combination of the most informative markers from the HGDP-CEPH and Shriver loci sets.

  4. CODIS STR loci data from 41 sample populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budowle, B; Shea, B; Niezgoda, S; Chakraborty, R

    2001-05-01

    Allele distributions for 12 or 13 CODIS core tetrameric short tandem repeat (STR) loci CSFIPO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, TPOX, and vWA were determined in 41 population data sets. The major population groups comprise African Americans, U.S. Caucasians, Hispanics, Far East Asians, and Native Americans. There was little evidence for departures from Hardy-Weinberg expectations (HWE) in any of the populations. The FST estimates over all thirteen STR loci are 0.0006 for African Americans, -0.0005 for Caucasians, 0.0021 for Hispanics, 0.0039 for Asians, and 0.0282 for Native Americans.

  5. PROPERTY IDENTIFICATION OF SINGULARITY LOCI OF GOUGH-STEWART MANIPULATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The problem of identifying the property of singularity loci of Gough-Stewart manipulators is addressed. After constructing the Jacobian matrix of the Gough-Stewart manipulator, a cubic polynomial expression in the mobile platform position parameters, which represents the constantorientation singularity locus of the manipulator, is derived. Graphical representations of the singularity locus of the manipulator for different orientations are illustrated with examples. Further,the singularity locus of the manipulator in the principal-section, where the mobile platform lies, is analyzed. It shows that singularity loci of the manipulator in parallel pfincipal-sections are all quadratic expressions including a parabola, four pairs of intersecting straight lines and infinite hyperbolas. Their geometric and kinematic properties are also researched as well.

  6. 52 Genetic Loci Influencing Myocardial Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Harst, Pim; van Setten, Jessica; Verweij, Niek; Vogler, Georg; Franke, Lude; Maurano, Matthew T; Wang, Xinchen; Mateo Leach, Irene; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Hayward, Caroline; Sorice, Rossella; Meirelles, Osorio; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Polašek, Ozren; Tanaka, Toshiko; Arking, Dan E; Ulivi, Sheila; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V; Dörr, Marcus; Kerr, Kathleen F; Magnani, Jared W; Del Greco M, Fabiola; Zhang, Weihua; Nolte, Ilja M; Silva, Claudia T; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tragante, Vinicius; Esko, Tõnu; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Adriaens, Michiel E; Andersen, Karl; Barnett, Phil; Bis, Joshua C; Bodmer, Rolf; Buckley, Brendan M; Campbell, Harry; Cannon, Megan V; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Lin Y; Delitala, Alessandro; Devereux, Richard B; Doevendans, Pieter A; Dominiczak, Anna F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Haugen, Eric; Heinig, Matthias; Hernandez, Dena G; Hillege, Hans L; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hubner, Norbert; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Iorio, Annamaria; Kähönen, Mika; Kellis, Manolis; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kors, Jan A; Lakatta, Edward G; Lage, Kasper; Launer, Lenore J; Levy, Daniel; Lundby, Alicia; Macfarlane, Peter W; May, Dalit; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Nappo, Stefania; Naitza, Silvia; Neph, Shane; Nord, Alex S; Nutile, Teresa; Okin, Peter M; Olsen, Jesper V; Oostra, Ben A; Penninger, Josef M; Pennacchio, Len A; Pers, Tune H; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pinto, Yigal M; Pfeufer, Arne; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Pramstaller, Peter P; Prins, Bram P; Raitakari, Olli T; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rice, Ken M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rotter, Jerome I; Schafer, Sebastian; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O; Sehmi, Jobanpreet; Silljé, Herman H W; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Sinner, Moritz F; Slowikowski, Kamil; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Spector, Timothy D; Spiering, Wilko; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Stolk, Ronald P; Strauch, Konstantin; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Tarasov, Kirill V; Trinh, Bosco; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van den Boogaard, Malou; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van Gilst, Wiek H; Viikari, Jorma S; Visscher, Peter M; Vitart, Veronique; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Weichenberger, Christian X; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H; Yang, Jian; Bezzina, Connie R; Munroe, Patricia B; Snieder, Harold; Wright, Alan F; Rudan, Igor; Boyer, Laurie A; Asselbergs, Folkert W; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Stricker, Bruno H; Psaty, Bruce M; Ciullo, Marina; Sanna, Serena; Lehtimäki, Terho; Wilson, James F; Bandinelli, Stefania; Alonso, Alvaro; Gasparini, Paolo; Jukema, J Wouter; Kääb, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Felix, Stephan B; Heckbert, Susan R; de Boer, Rudolf A; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Hicks, Andrew A; Chambers, John C; Jamshidi, Yalda; Visel, Axel; Christoffels, Vincent M; Isaacs, Aaron; Samani, Nilesh J; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-09-27

    Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to cardiac muscle contraction is reflected by the amplitude and duration of the QRS complex on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormal QRS amplitude or duration reflect changes in myocardial mass and conduction, and are associated with increased risk of heart failure and death. This meta-analysis sought to gain insights into the genetic determinants of myocardial mass. We carried out a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 4 QRS traits in up to 73,518 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. We identified 52 genomic loci, of which 32 are novel, that are reliably associated with 1 or more QRS phenotypes at p < 1 × 10(-8). These loci are enriched in regions of open chromatin, histone modifications, and transcription factor binding, suggesting that they represent regions of the genome that are actively transcribed in the human heart. Pathway analyses provided evidence that these loci play a role in cardiac hypertrophy. We further highlighted 67 candidate genes at the identified loci that are preferentially expressed in cardiac tissue and associated with cardiac abnormalities in Drosophila melanogaster and Mus musculus. We validated the regulatory function of a novel variant in the SCN5A/SCN10A locus in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings provide new insights into genes and biological pathways controlling myocardial mass and may help identify novel therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Incomplete Lineage Sorting: Consistent Phylogeny Estimation From Multiple Loci

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a simple algorithm for reconstructing phylogenies from multiple gene trees in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting, that is, when the topology of the gene trees may differ from that of the species tree. We show that our technique is statistically consistent under standard stochastic assumptions, that is, it returns the correct tree given sufficiently many unlinked loci. We also show that it can tolerate moderate estimation errors.

  8. Balancing selection maintains polymorphisms at neurogenetic loci in field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonn, Eija; Koskela, Esa; Mappes, Tapio; Mokkonen, Mikael; Sims, Angela M; Watts, Phillip C

    2017-04-04

    Most variation in behavior has a genetic basis, but the processes determining the level of diversity at behavioral loci are largely unknown for natural populations. Expression of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (Avpr1a) and oxytocin receptor (Oxtr) in specific regions of the brain regulates diverse social and reproductive behaviors in mammals, including humans. That these genes have important fitness consequences and that natural populations contain extensive diversity at these loci implies the action of balancing selection. In Myodes glareolus, Avpr1a and Oxtr each contain a polymorphic microsatellite locus located in their 5' regulatory region (the regulatory region-associated microsatellite, RRAM) that likely regulates gene expression. To test the hypothesis that balancing selection maintains diversity at behavioral loci, we released artificially bred females and males with different RRAM allele lengths into field enclosures that differed in population density. The length of Avpr1a and Oxtr RRAMs was associated with reproductive success, but population density and the sex interacted to determine the optimal genotype. In general, longer Avpr1a RRAMs were more beneficial for males, and shorter RRAMs were more beneficial for females; the opposite was true for Oxtr RRAMs. Moreover, Avpr1a RRAM allele length is correlated with the reproductive success of the sexes during different phases of reproduction; for males, RRAM length correlated with the numbers of newborn offspring, but for females selection was evident on the number of weaned offspring. This report of density-dependence and sexual antagonism acting on loci within the arginine vasopressin-oxytocin pathway explains how genetic diversity at Avpr1a and Oxtr could be maintained in natural populations.

  9. The Isoconditioning Loci of Planar Three-DOF Parallel Manipulators

    CERN Document Server

    Chablat, Damien; Caro, Stéphane; Angeles, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a special class of three-degree-of-freedom parallel manipulators. The singular configurations of the two Jacobian matrices are first studied. The isotropic configurations are then found based on the characteristic length of this manipulator. The isoconditioning loci for the Jacobian matrices are plotted to define a global performance index allowing the comparison of the different working modes. The index thus resulting is compared with the Cartesian workspace surface and the average of the condition number.

  10. Adaptive Linkage Disequilibrium Between Two Esterase Loci of a Salamander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, T. Preston

    1973-01-01

    In some populations of the salamander Plethodon cinereus, two polymorphic esterase loci are in linkage disequilibrium. Short-term stability of the linkage disequilibrium is demonstrated by an age class analysis. Long, perhaps very long, term stability is suggested by its distribution. This stability and concordant geographic variation in allelic frequencies imply selective origin and maintenance. Data on the frequencies of two color morphs suggest that formation of the linkage disequilibrium is dependent on the genetic background. Images PMID:4515614

  11. rDNA Loci Evolution in the Genus Glechoma (Lamiaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Tae-Soo; McCann, Jamie; Parker, John S.; Takayama, Koji; Hong, Suk-Pyo; Schneeweiss, Gerald M.

    2016-01-01

    Glechoma L. (Lamiaceae) is distributed in eastern Asia and Europe. Understanding chromosome evolution in Glechoma has been strongly hampered by its small chromosomes, constant karyotype and polyploidy. Here phylogenetic patterns and chromosomal variation in Glechoma species are considered, using genome sizes, chromosome mapping of 5S and 35S rDNAs by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), and phylogenetic analyses of internal transcribed spacers (nrITS) of 35S rDNA and 5S rDNA NTS sequences. Species and populations of Glechoma are tetraploid (2n = 36) with base chromosome number of x = 9. Four chromosomes carry pericentric 5S rDNA sites in their short arms in all the species. Two to four of these chromosomes also carry 35S rDNA in subterminal regions of the same arms. Two to four other chromosomes have 35S rDNA sites, all located subterminally within short arms; one individual possessed additional weak pericentric 35S rDNA signals on three other chromosomes. Five types of rDNA locus distribution have been defined on the basis of 35S rDNA variation, but none is species-specific, and most species have more than one type. Glechoma hederacea has four types. Genome size in Glechoma ranges from 0.80 to 0.94 pg (1C), with low levels of intrapopulational variation in all species. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS and NTS sequences distinguish three main clades coinciding with geographical distribution: European (G. hederacea–G. hirsuta), Chinese and Korean (G. longituba), and Japanese (G. grandis). The paper presents the first comparative cytogenetic analyses of Glechoma species including karyotype structure, rDNA location and number, and genome size interpreted in a phylogenetic context. The observed variation suggests that the genus is still in genomic flux. Genome size, but not rDNA loci number and distribution, provides a character for species delimitation which allows better inferences of interspecific relationships to be made, in the absence of well

  12. The loci recommended as universal barcodes for plants on the basis of floristic studies may not work with congeneric species as exemplified by DNA barcoding of Dendrobium species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Hemant

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the testing of several loci, predominantly against floristic backgrounds, individual or different combinations of loci have been suggested as possible universal DNA barcodes for plants. The present investigation was undertaken to check the applicability of the recommended locus/loci for congeneric species with Dendrobium species as an illustrative example. Results Six loci, matK, rbcL, rpoB, rpoC1, trnH-psbA spacer from the chloroplast genome and ITS, from the nuclear genome, were compared for their amplification, sequencing and species discrimination success rates among multiple accessions of 36 Dendrobium species. The trnH-psbA spacer could not be considered for analysis as good quality sequences were not obtained with its forward primer. Among the tested loci, ITS, recommended by some as a possible barcode for plants, provided 100% species identification. Another locus, matK, also recommended as a universal barcode for plants, resolved 80.56% species. ITS remained the best even when sequences of investigated loci of additional Dendrobium species available on the NCBI GenBank (93, 33, 20, 18 and 17 of ITS, matK, rbcL, rpoB and rpoC1, respectively were also considered for calculating the percent species resolution capabilities. The species discrimination of various combinations of the loci was also compared based on the 36 investigated species and additional 16 for which sequences of all the five loci were available on GenBank. Two-locus combination of matK+rbcL recommended by the Plant Working Group of Consortium for Barcoding of Life (CBOL could discriminate 86.11% of 36 species. The species discriminating ability of this barcode was reduced to 80.77% when additional sequences available on NCBI were included in the analysis. Among the recommended combinations, the barcode based on three loci - matK, rpoB and rpoC1- resolved maximum number of species. Conclusions Any recommended barcode based on the loci tested so

  13. Four loci explain 83% of size variation in the horse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouh Makvandi-Nejad

    Full Text Available Horse body size varies greatly due to intense selection within each breed. American Miniatures are less than one meter tall at the withers while Shires and Percherons can exceed two meters. The genetic basis for this variation is not known. We hypothesize that the breed population structure of the horse should simplify efforts to identify genes controlling size. In support of this, here we show with genome-wide association scans (GWAS that genetic variation at just four loci can explain the great majority of horse size variation. Unlike humans, which are naturally reproducing and possess many genetic variants with weak effects on size, we show that horses, like other domestic mammals, carry just a small number of size loci with alleles of large effect. Furthermore, three of our horse size loci contain the LCORL, HMGA2 and ZFAT genes that have previously been found to control human height. The LCORL/NCAPG locus is also implicated in cattle growth and HMGA2 is associated with dog size. Extreme size diversification is a hallmark of domestication. Our results in the horse, complemented by the prior work in cattle and dog, serve to pinpoint those very few genes that have played major roles in the rapid evolution of size during domestication.

  14. Genome-wide search for strabismus susceptibility loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to search for chromosomal susceptibility loci for comitant strabismus. Genomic DNA was isolated from 10mL blood taken from each member of 30 nuclear families in which 2 or more siblings are affected by either esotropia or exotropia. A genome-wide search was performed with amplification by polymerase chain reaction of 400 markers in microsatellite regions with approximately 10 cM resolution. For each locus, non-parametric affected sib-pair analysis and non-parametric linkage analysis for multiple pedigrees (Genehunter software, http://linkage.rockefeller.edu/soft/ were used to calculate multipoint lod scores and non-parametric linkage (NPL scores, respectively. In sib-pair analysis, lod scores showed basically flat lines with several peaks of 0.25 on all chromosomes. In non-parametric linkage analysis for multiple pedigrees, NPL scores showed one peak as high as 1.34 on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 7, 10, 15, and 16, while 2 such peaks were found on chromosomes 3, 9, 11, 12, 18, and 20. Non-parametric linkage analysis for multiple pedigrees of 30 families with comitant strabismus suggested a number of chromosomal susceptibility loci. Our ongoing study involving a larger number of families will refine the accuracy of statistical analysis to pinpoint susceptibility loci for comitant strabismus.

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ripke, Stephan

    2011-10-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10(-11)) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10(-9)), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10(-8)) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10(-9)).

  16. A new phylogeny of tetraodontiform fishes (Tetraodontiformes, Acanthomorpha) based on 22 loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Francesco; Sorenson, Laurie; Alfaro, Michael E

    2013-10-01

    Tetraodontiform fishes represent one of the most peculiar radiations of teleost fishes. In spite of this, we do not currently have a consensus on the phylogenetic relationships among the major tetraodontiform lineages, with different morphological and molecular datasets all supporting contrasting relationships. In this paper we present the results of the analysis of tetraodontiform interrelationships based on two mitochondrial and 20 nuclear loci for 40 species of tetraodontiforms (representing all of the 10 currently recognized families), as well as three outgroups. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of the concatenated dataset (18,682 nucleotides) strongly support novel relationships among the major tetraodontiform lineages. Our results recover two large clades already found in mitogenomic analyses (although the position of triacanthids differ), while they strongly conflict with hypotheses of tetraodontiform relationships inferred by previous studies based on morphology, as well as studies of higher-level teleost relationships based on nuclear loci, which included multiple tetraodontiform lineages. A parsimony gene-tree, species-tree analysis recovers relationships that are mostly congruent with the analyses of the concatenated dataset, with the significant exception of the position of the pufferfishes+porcupine fishes clade. Our findings suggest that while the phylogenetic placement of some tetraodontiform lineages (triacanthids, molids) remains problematic even after sequencing 22 loci, an overall molecular consensus is beginning to emerge regarding the existence of several major clades. This new hypothesis will require a re-evaluation of the phylogenetic usefulness of several morphological features, such as the fusion of several jaw bones into a parrot-like beak, or the reduction and loss of some of the fins, which may have occurred independently more times than previously thought.

  17. Population genetic study of 10 short tandem repeat loci from 600 domestic dogs in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seo Hyun; Jang, Yoon-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have long shared close relationships with many humans. Due to the large number of dogs in human populations, they are often involved in crimes. Occasionally, canine biological evidence such as saliva, bloodstains and hairs can be found at crime scenes. Accordingly, canine DNA can be used as forensic evidence. The use of short tandem repeat (STR) loci from biological evidence is valuable for forensic investigations. In Korea, canine STR profiling-related crimes are being successfully analyzed, leading to diverse crimes such as animal cruelty, dog-attacks, murder, robbery, and missing and abandoned dogs being solved. However, the probability of random DNA profile matches cannot be analyzed because of a lack of canine STR data. Therefore, in this study, 10 STR loci were analyzed in 600 dogs in Korea (344 dogs belonging to 30 different purebreds and 256 crossbred dogs) to estimate canine forensic genetic parameters. Among purebred dogs, a separate statistical analysis was conducted for five major subgroups, 97 Maltese, 47 Poodles, 31 Shih Tzus, 32 Yorkshire Terriers, and 25 Pomeranians. Allele frequencies, expected (Hexp) and observed heterozygosity (Hobs), fixation index (F), probability of identity (P(ID)), probability of sibling identity (P(ID)sib) and probability of exclusion (PE) were then calculated. The Hexp values ranged from 0.901 (PEZ12) to 0.634 (FHC2079), while the P(ID)sib values were between 0.481 (FHC2079) and 0.304 (PEZ12) and the P(ID)sib was about 3.35 × 10−5 for the combination of all 10 loci. The results presented herein will strengthen the value of canine DNA to solving dog-related crimes. PMID:26645337

  18. Mapping Heterotic Loci for Yield and Agronomic Traits Using Chromosome Segment Introgression Lines in Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian Guo; Yuping Guo; Jun Ma; Fang Wang; Mizhen Sun; Lijuan Gui; Jiajia Zhou

    2013-01-01

    In the present study,a set of chromosome segment introgression lines (CSILs) using Gossypium hirsutum L.TM-1 as the recipient parent and G.barbadense Hai7124 as the donor parent were used to explore the genetic basis of heterosis for interspecific hybrids.Two sets of F1 populations individually derived from CSlLs crossing with both parents were configured to investigate heterotic loci (HL) and substitution effect loci (SL).A total of 58 HL and 39 SL were identified in 3 years.One stable HL,hLP-A4-3,could be detected in all 3 years.Three HLs,hBS-A8-1,hLP-D6-1,and hSI-D7-11,could be detected in 2 years.Four SLs,sBS-D7-1,sLP-A8-1,sLP-D7-1,and sLP-D12-1,could be detected in 2 years.HL and SL tended to be distributed in some HL-rich chromosome segments with close positions.Compared with QTL detected in a former study,HL showed little overlap with QTL,indicating that trait phenotype and heterosis might be controlled by different sets of loci.All three forms of genetic effects (partial-,full-,over-dominant) were identified,while the over-dominant effect made the main contribution to heterosis.These results may help lay the foundation for clarifying the heredity mechanism of heterosis in cotton.

  19. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to Map Two Novel Anthracnose Resistance Loci in Sorghum bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Felderhoff, Terry; M McIntyre, Lauren; Saballos, Ana; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2016-07-07

    Colletotrichum sublineola is an aggressive fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. The obvious symptoms of anthracnose are leaf blight and stem rot. Sorghum, the fifth most widely grown cereal crop in the world, can be highly susceptible to the disease, most notably in hot and humid environments. In the southeastern United States the acreage of sorghum has been increasing steadily in recent years, spurred by growing interest in producing biofuels, bio-based products, and animal feed. Resistance to anthracnose is, therefore, of paramount importance for successful sorghum production in this region. To identify anthracnose resistance loci present in the highly resistant cultivar 'Bk7', a biparental mapping population of F3:4 and F4:5 sorghum lines was generated by crossing 'Bk7' with the susceptible inbred 'Early Hegari-Sart'. Lines were phenotyped in three environments and in two different years following natural infection. The population was genotyped by sequencing. Following a stringent custom filtering protocol, totals of 5186 and 2759 informative SNP markers were identified in the two populations. Segregation data and association analysis identified resistance loci on chromosomes 7 and 9, with the resistance alleles derived from 'Bk7'. Both loci contain multiple classes of defense-related genes based on sequence similarity and gene ontologies. Genetic analysis following an independent selection experiment of lines derived from a cross between 'Bk7' and sweet sorghum 'Mer81-4' narrowed the resistance locus on chromosome 9 substantially, validating this QTL. As observed in other species, sorghum appears to have regions of clustered resistance genes. Further characterization of these regions will facilitate the development of novel germplasm with resistance to anthracnose and other diseases. Copyright © 2016 Felderhoff et al.

  20. Identification of novel pathogenicity loci in Clostridium perfringens strains that cause avian necrotic enteritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dion Lepp

    Full Text Available Type A Clostridium perfringens causes poultry necrotic enteritis (NE, an enteric disease of considerable economic importance, yet can also exist as a member of the normal intestinal microbiota. A recently discovered pore-forming toxin, NetB, is associated with pathogenesis in most, but not all, NE isolates. This finding suggested that NE-causing strains may possess other virulence gene(s not present in commensal type A isolates. We used high-throughput sequencing (HTS technologies to generate draft genome sequences of seven unrelated C. perfringens poultry NE isolates and one isolate from a healthy bird, and identified additional novel NE-associated genes by comparison with nine publicly available reference genomes. Thirty-one open reading frames (ORFs were unique to all NE strains and formed the basis for three highly conserved NE-associated loci that we designated NELoc-1 (42 kb, NELoc-2 (11.2 kb and NELoc-3 (5.6 kb. The largest locus, NELoc-1, consisted of netB and 36 additional genes, including those predicted to encode two leukocidins, an internalin-like protein and a ricin-domain protein. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and Southern blotting revealed that the NE strains each carried 2 to 5 large plasmids, and that NELoc-1 and -3 were localized on distinct plasmids of sizes approximately 85 and approximately 70 kb, respectively. Sequencing of the regions flanking these loci revealed similarity to previously characterized conjugative plasmids of C. perfringens. These results provide significant insight into the pathogenetic basis of poultry NE and are the first to demonstrate that netB resides in a large, plasmid-encoded locus. Our findings strongly suggest that poultry NE is caused by several novel virulence factors, whose genes are clustered on discrete pathogenicity loci, some of which are plasmid-borne.

  1. Detection of quantitative trait loci and heterotic loci for plant height using an immortalized F2 population in maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG JiHua; MA XiQing; TENG WenTao; YAN JianBing; WU WeiRen; DAI JingRui; LI JianSheng

    2007-01-01

    A set of recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from Yuyu22, an elite hybrid widespread in China, was used to construct an immortalized F2 (IF2) population comprising 441 different crosses. Genetic linkage maps were constructed containing 10 linkages groups with 263 simple sequence repeat (SSR) molecular markers. Twelve and ten quantitative trait loci (QTL) were detected for plant height in the IF2 and RIL populations respectively, using the composite interval mapping method, and six same QTL were identified in the two populations. In addition, ten unique heterotic loci (HL) located on seven different chromosomes were revealed for plant height using the mid-parent heterosis as the input data. These HL explained 1.26%-8.41% of the genotypic variance in plant height heterosis and most expressed overdominant effects. Only three QTL and HL were located in the same chromosomal region, it implied that plant height and its heterosis might be controlled by two types of genetic mechanisms.

  2. Characterization of new microsatellite loci for population genetic studies in the Smooth Cauliflower Coral (Stylophora sp.)

    KAUST Repository

    Banguera-Hinestroza, E.

    2013-01-09

    A total of one hundred microsatellites loci were selected from the draft genome of Stylophora pistillata and evaluated in previously characterized samples of Stylophora cf pistillata from the Red Sea. 17 loci were amplified successfully and tested in 24 individuals from samples belonging to a single population from the central region of the Red Sea. The number of alleles ranged from 3 to 15 alleles per locus, while observed heterozygosity ranged from 0. 292 to 0. 95. Six of these loci showed significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) expectations, and 4/136 paired loci comparisons suggested linkage disequilibrium after Bonferroni corrections. After excluding loci with significant HWE deviation and evidence of null alleles, average genetic diversity over loci in the population studied (N = 24, Nloci = 11) was 0. 701 ± 0. 380. This indicates that these loci can be used effectively to evaluate genetic diversity and undertake population genetics studies in Stylophora sp. populations. 2013 The Author(s).

  3. Evolutionary history of chloridoid grasses estimated from 122 nuclear loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Amanda E; Hasenstab, Kristen M; Bell, Hester L; Blaine, Ellen; Ingram, Amanda L; Columbus, J Travis

    2016-12-01

    Chloridoideae (chloridoid grasses) are a subfamily of ca. 1700 species with high diversity in arid habitats. Until now, their evolutionary relationships have primarily been studied with DNA sequences from the chloroplast, a maternally inherited organelle. Next-generation sequencing is able to efficiently recover large numbers of nuclear loci that can then be used to estimate the species phylogeny based upon bi-parentally inherited data. We sought to test our chloroplast-based hypotheses of relationships among chloridoid species with 122 nuclear loci generated through targeted-enrichment next-generation sequencing, sometimes referred to as hyb-seq. We targeted putative single-copy housekeeping genes, as well as genes that have been implicated in traits characteristic of, or particularly labile in, chloridoids: e.g., drought and salt tolerance. We recovered ca. 70% of the targeted loci (122 of 177 loci) in all 47 species sequenced using hyb-seq. We then analyzed the nuclear loci with Bayesian and coalescent methods and the resulting phylogeny resolves relationships between the four chloridoid tribes. Several novel findings with this data were: the sister lineage to Chloridoideae is unresolved; Centropodia+Ellisochloa are excluded from Chloridoideae in phylogenetic estimates using a coalescent model; Sporobolus subtilis is more closely related to Eragrostis than to other species of Sporobolus; and Tragus is more closely related to Chloris and relatives than to a lineage of mainly New World species. Relationships in Cynodonteae in the nuclear phylogeny are quite different from chloroplast estimates, but were not robust to changes in the method of phylogenetic analysis. We tested the data signal with several partition schemes, a concatenation analysis, and tests of alternative hypotheses to assess our confidence in this new, nuclear estimate of evolutionary relationships. Our work provides markers and a framework for additional phylogenetic studies that sample more

  4. Thousands of microsatellite loci from the venomous coralsnake (Micrurus fulvius) and variability of select loci across populations and related species

    OpenAIRE

    Castoe, Todd A.; Streicher, Jeffrey W.; Jesse M Meik; Ingrasci, Matthew J.; Poole, Alexander W.; de Koning, A. P. Jason; Campbell, Jonathan A.; Parkinson, Christopher L; Eric N. Smith; Pollock, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of population genetics increasingly use next-generation DNA sequencing to identify microsatellite loci in non-model organisms. There are, however, relatively few studies that validate the feasibility of transitioning from marker development to experimental application across populations and species. North American coralsnakes of the Micrurus fulvius species complex occur in the United States and Mexico, and little is known about their population structure and phylogenetic relationship...

  5. Accumulating mutations in series of haplotypes at the KIT and MITF loci are major determinants of white markings in Franches-Montagnes horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Bianca; Signer-Hasler, Heidi; Binns, Matthew M; Obexer-Ruff, Gabriela; Hauswirth, Regula; Bellone, Rebecca R; Burger, Dominik; Rieder, Stefan; Wade, Claire M; Leeb, Tosso

    2013-01-01

    Coat color and pattern variations in domestic animals are frequently inherited as simple monogenic traits, but a number are known to have a complex genetic basis. While the analysis of complex trait data remains a challenge in all species, we can use the reduced haplotypic diversity in domestic animal populations to gain insight into the genomic interactions underlying complex phenotypes. White face and leg markings are examples of complex traits in horses where little is known of the underlying genetics. In this study, Franches-Montagnes (FM) horses were scored for the occurrence of white facial and leg markings using a standardized scoring system. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed for several white patterning traits in 1,077 FM horses. Seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting the white marking score with p-values p≤10(-4) were identified. Three loci, MC1R and the known white spotting genes, KIT and MITF, were identified as the major loci underlying the extent of white patterning in this breed. Together, the seven loci explain 54% of the genetic variance in total white marking score, while MITF and KIT alone account for 26%. Although MITF and KIT are the major loci controlling white patterning, their influence varies according to the basic coat color of the horse and the specific body location of the white patterning. Fine mapping across the MITF and KIT loci was used to characterize haplotypes present. Phylogenetic relationships among haplotypes were calculated to assess their selective and evolutionary influences on the extent of white patterning. This novel approach shows that KIT and MITF act in an additive manner and that accumulating mutations at these loci progressively increase the extent of white markings.

  6. Interactions between Glu-1 and Glu-3 loci and associations of selected molecular markers with quality traits in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) DH lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystkowiak, Karolina; Langner, Monika; Adamski, Tadeusz; Salmanowicz, Bolesław P; Kaczmarek, Zygmunt; Krajewski, Paweł; Surma, Maria

    2017-02-01

    The quality of wheat depends on a large complex of genes and environmental factors. The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci controlling technological quality traits and their stability across environments, and to assess the impact of interaction between alleles at loci Glu-1 and Glu-3 on grain quality. DH lines were evaluated in field experiments over a period of 4 years, and genotyped using simple sequence repeat markers. Lines were analysed for grain yield (GY), thousand grain weight (TGW), protein content (PC), starch content (SC), wet gluten content (WG), Zeleny sedimentation value (ZS), alveograph parameter W (APW), hectolitre weight (HW), and grain hardness (GH). A number of QTLs for these traits were identified in all chromosome groups. The Glu-D1 locus influenced TGW, PC, SC, WG, ZS, APW, GH, while locus Glu-B1 affected only PC, ZS, and WG. Most important marker-trait associations were found on chromosomes 1D and 5D. Significant effects of interaction between Glu-1 and Glu-3 loci on technological properties were recorded, and in all types of this interaction positive effects of Glu-D1 locus on grain quality were observed, whereas effects of Glu-B1 locus depended on alleles at Glu-3 loci. Effects of Glu-A3 and Glu-D3 loci per se were not significant, while their interaction with alleles present at other loci encoding HMW and LMW were important. These results indicate that selection of wheat genotypes with predicted good bread-making properties should be based on the allelic composition both in Glu-1 and Glu-3 loci, and confirm the predominant effect of Glu-D1d allele on technological properties of wheat grains.

  7. Genetic variability and phylogenetic analysis of Han population from Guanzhong region of China based on 21 non-CODIS STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Dang; Tang, Xiao-Li; Meng, Hao-Tian; Wang, Hong-Dan; Jin, Rui; Yang, Chun-Hua; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Yang, Guang; Liu, Wen-Juan; Shen, Chun-Mei; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we presented the population genetic data and their forensic parameters of 21 non-CODIS autosomal STR loci in Chinese Guanzhong Han population. A total of 166 alleles were observed with corresponding allelic frequencies ranging from 0.0018 to 0.5564. No STR locus was observed to deviate from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and linkage disequilibriums after applying Bonferroni correction. The cumulative power of discrimination and probability of exclusion of all the 21 STR loci were 0.99999999999999999993814 and 0.999998184, respectively. The results of genetic distances, phylogenetic trees and principal component analysis revealed that the Guanzhong Han population had a closer relationship with Ningxia Han, Tujia and Bai groups than other populations tested. In summary, these 21 STR loci showed a high level of genetic polymorphisms for the Guanzhong Han population and could be used for forensic applications and the studies of population genetics.

  8. Nine Loci for Ocular Axial Length Identified through Genome-wide Association Studies, Including Shared Loci with Refractive Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M. Kamran; Young, Terri L.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Wilson, James F.; Pennell, Craig E.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; de Jong, Paulus T.V.M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Delcourt, Cécile; Maubaret, Cecilia; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Northstone, Kate; Ring, Susan M.; Davey-Smith, George; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; MacGregor, Stuart; Lu, Yi; Jonas, Jost B.; Xu, Liang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.; Rochtchina, Elena; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Jonas, Jost B.; Nangia, Vinay; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Vitart, Veronique; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Vitart, Veronique; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Young, Terri L.; Feng, Sheng; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Metspalu, Andres; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Wojciechowski, Robert; Baird, Paul N.; Schache, Maria; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Höhn, René; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Peng; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Wegner, Aharon; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Pärssinen, Olavi; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W.H.; Pirastu, Mario; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Biino, Genevra; Wilson, James F.; Fleck, Brian; Vitart, Veronique; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Hewitt, Alex W.; Ang, Wei; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tai, E-Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Mackey, David A.; MacGregor, Stuart; Hammond, Christopher J.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Reinhart, William; Belin, Michael W.; Schultze, Robert L.; Morason, Todd; Sugar, Alan; Mian, Shahzad; Soong, Hunson Kaz; Colby, Kathryn; Jurkunas, Ula; Yee, Richard; Vital, Mark; Alfonso, Eduardo; Karp, Carol; Lee, Yunhee; Yoo, Sonia; Hammersmith, Kristin; Cohen, Elisabeth; Laibson, Peter; Rapuano, Christopher; Ayres, Brandon; Croasdale, Christopher; Caudill, James; Patel, Sanjay; Baratz, Keith; Bourne, William; Maguire, Leo; Sugar, Joel; Tu, Elmer; Djalilian, Ali; Mootha, Vinod; McCulley, James; Bowman, Wayne; Cavanaugh, H. Dwight; Verity, Steven; Verdier, David; Renucci, Ann; Oliva, Matt; Rotkis, Walter; Hardten, David R.; Fahmy, Ahmad; Brown, Marlene; Reeves, Sherman; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Lindstrom, Richard; Hauswirth, Scott; Hamilton, Stephen; Lee, W. Barry; Price, Francis; Price, Marianne; Kelly, Kathleen; Peters, Faye; Shaughnessy, Michael; Steinemann, Thomas; Dupps, B.J.; Meisler, David M.; Mifflin, Mark; Olson, Randal; Aldave, Anthony; Holland, Gary; Mondino, Bartly J.; Rosenwasser, George; Gorovoy, Mark; Dunn, Steven P.; Heidemann, David G.; Terry, Mark; Shamie, Neda; Rosenfeld, Steven I.; Suedekum, Brandon; Hwang, David; Stone, Donald; Chodosh, James; Galentine, Paul G.; Bardenstein, David; Goddard, Katrina; Chin, Hemin; Mannis, Mark; Varma, Rohit; Borecki, Ingrid; Chew, Emily Y.; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Wedenoja, Juho; Simpson, Claire L.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lackner, Karl J.; Donnelly, Peter; Barroso, Ines; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Hellenthal, Garrett; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Pirinen, Matti; Pearson, Richard; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Donnelly, Peter; Langford, Cordelia; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gwilliam, Rhian; Blackburn, Hannah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Dronov, Serge; Gillman, Matthew; Gray, Emma; Hammond, Naomi; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Potter, Simon C.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela; Barroso, Ines; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew, Christopher G.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Corvin, Aiden; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Bettecken, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Portas, Laura; Nag, Abhishek; Williams, Katie M.; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Paterson, Andrew D.; Genuth, S.; Nathan, D.M.; Zinman, B.; Crofford, O.; Crandall, J.; Reid, M.; Brown-Friday, J.; Engel, S.; Sheindlin, J.; Martinez, H.; Shamoon, H.; Engel, H.; Phillips, M.; Gubitosi-Klug, R.; Mayer, L.; Pendegast, S.; Zegarra, H.; Miller, D.; Singerman, L.; Smith-Brewer, S.; Novak, M.; Quin, J.; Dahms, W.; Genuth, Saul; Palmert, M.; Brillon, D.; Lackaye, M.E.; Kiss, S.; Chan, R.; Reppucci, V.; Lee, T.; Heinemann, M.; Whitehouse, F.; Kruger, D.; Jones, J.K.; McLellan, M.; Carey, J.D.; Angus, E.; Thomas, A.; Galprin, A.; Bergenstal, R.; Johnson, M.; Spencer, M.; Morgan, K.; Etzwiler, D.; Kendall, D.; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Golden, E.; Jacobson, A.; Beaser, R.; Ganda, O.; Hamdy, O.; Wolpert, H.; Sharuk, G.; Arrigg, P.; Schlossman, D.; Rosenzwieg, J.; Rand, L.; Nathan, D.M.; Larkin, M.; Ong, M.; Godine, J.; Cagliero, E.; Lou, P.; Folino, K.; Fritz, S.; Crowell, S.; Hansen, K.; Gauthier-Kelly, C.; Service, J.; Ziegler, G.; Luttrell, L.; Caulder, S.; Lopes-Virella, M.; Colwell, J.; Soule, J.; Fernandes, J.; Hermayer, K.; Kwon, S.; Brabham, M.; Blevins, A.; Parker, J.; Lee, D.; Patel, N.; Pittman, C.; Lindsey, P.; Bracey, M.; Lee, K.; Nutaitis, M.; Farr, A.; Elsing, S.; Thompson, T.; Selby, J.; Lyons, T.; Yacoub-Wasef, S.; Szpiech, M.; Wood, D.; Mayfield, R.; Molitch, M.; Schaefer, B.; Jampol, L.; Lyon, A.; Gill, M.; Strugula, Z.; Kaminski, L.; Mirza, R.; Simjanoski, E.; Ryan, D.; Kolterman, O.; Lorenzi, G.; Goldbaum, M.; Sivitz, W.; Bayless, M.; Counts, D.; Johnsonbaugh, S.; Hebdon, M.; Salemi, P.; Liss, R.; Donner, T.; Gordon, J.; Hemady, R.; Kowarski, A.; Ostrowski, D.; Steidl, S.; Jones, B.; Herman, W.H.; Martin, C.L.; Pop-Busui, R.; Sarma, A.; Albers, J.; Feldman, E.; Kim, K.; Elner, S.; Comer, G.; Gardner, T.; Hackel, R.; Prusak, R.; Goings, L.; Smith, A.; Gothrup, J.; Titus, P.; Lee, J.; Brandle, M.; Prosser, L.; Greene, D.A.; Stevens, M.J.; Vine, A.K.; Bantle, J.; Wimmergren, N.; Cochrane, A.; Olsen, T.; Steuer, E.; Rath, P.; Rogness, B.; Hainsworth, D.; Goldstein, D.; Hitt, S.; Giangiacomo, J.; Schade, D.S.; Canady, J.L.; Chapin, J.E.; Ketai, L.H.; Braunstein, C.S.; Bourne, P.A.; Schwartz, S.; Brucker, A.; Maschak-Carey, B.J.; Baker, L.; Orchard, T.; Silvers, N.; Ryan, C.; Songer, T.; Doft, B.; Olson, S.; Bergren, R.L.; Lobes, L.; Rath, P. Paczan; Becker, D.; Rubinstein, D.; Conrad, P.W.; Yalamanchi, S.; Drash, A.; Morrison, A.; Bernal, M.L.; Vaccaro-Kish, J.; Malone, J.; Pavan, P.R.; Grove, N.; Iyer, M.N.; Burrows, A.F.; Tanaka, E.A.; Gstalder, R.; Dagogo-Jack, S.; Wigley, C.; Ricks, H.; Kitabchi, A.; Murphy, M.B.; Moser, S.; Meyer, D.; Iannacone, A.; Chaum, E.; Yoser, S.; Bryer-Ash, M.; Schussler, S.; Lambeth, H.; Raskin, P.; Strowig, S.; Zinman, B.; Barnie, A.; Devenyi, R.; Mandelcorn, M.; Brent, M.; Rogers, S.; Gordon, A.; Palmer, J.; Catton, S.; Brunzell, J.; Wessells, H.; de Boer, I.H.; Hokanson, J.; Purnell, J.; Ginsberg, J.; Kinyoun, J.; Deeb, S.; Weiss, M.; Meekins, G.; Distad, J.; Van Ottingham, L.; Dupre, J.; Harth, J.; Nicolle, D.; Driscoll, M.; Mahon, J.; Canny, C.; May, M.; Lipps, J.; Agarwal, A.; Adkins, T.; Survant, L.; Pate, R.L.; Munn, G.E.; Lorenz, R.; Feman, S.; White, N.; Levandoski, L.; Boniuk, I.; Grand, G.; Thomas, M.; Joseph, D.D.; Blinder, K.; Shah, G.; Boniuk; Burgess; Santiago, J.; Tamborlane, W.; Gatcomb, P.; Stoessel, K.; Taylor, K.; Goldstein, J.; Novella, S.; Mojibian, H.; Cornfeld, D.; Lima, J.; Bluemke, D.; Turkbey, E.; van der Geest, R.J.; Liu, C.; Malayeri, A.; Jain, A.; Miao, C.; Chahal, H.; Jarboe, R.; Maynard, J.; Gubitosi-Klug, R.; Quin, J.; Gaston, P.; Palmert, M.; Trail, R.; Dahms, W.; Lachin, J.; Cleary, P.; Backlund, J.; Sun, W.; Braffett, B.; Klumpp, K.; Chan, K.; Diminick, L.; Rosenberg, D.; Petty, B.; Determan, A.; Kenny, D.; Rutledge, B.; Younes, Naji; Dews, L.; Hawkins, M.; Cowie, C.; Fradkin, J.; Siebert, C.; Eastman, R.; Danis, R.; Gangaputra, S.; Neill, S.; Davis, M.; Hubbard, L.; Wabers, H.; Burger, M.; Dingledine, J.; Gama, V.; Sussman, R.; Steffes, M.; Bucksa, J.; Nowicki, M.; Chavers, B.; O’Leary, D.; Polak, J.; Harrington, A.; Funk, L.; Crow, R.; Gloeb, B.; Thomas, S.; O’Donnell, C.; Soliman, E.; Zhang, Z.M.; Prineas, R.; Campbell, C.; Ryan, C.; Sandstrom, D.; Williams, T.; Geckle, M.; Cupelli, E.; Thoma, F.; Burzuk, B.; Woodfill, T.; Low, P.; Sommer, C.; Nickander, K.; Budoff, M.; Detrano, R.; Wong, N.; Fox, M.; Kim, L.; Oudiz, R.; Weir, G.; Espeland, M.; Manolio, T.; Rand, L.; Singer, D.; Stern, M.; Boulton, A.E.; Clark, C.; D’Agostino, R.; Lopes-Virella, M.; Garvey, W.T.; Lyons, T.J.; Jenkins, A.; Virella, G.; Jaffa, A.; Carter, Rickey; Lackland, D.; Brabham, M.; McGee, D.; Zheng, D.; Mayfield, R.K.; Boright, A.; Bull, S.; Sun, L.; Scherer, S.; Zinman, B.; Natarajan, R.; Miao, F.; Zhang, L.; Chen;, Z.; Nathan, D.M.; Makela, Kari-Matti; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K.H.; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Foster, Paul J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Vithana, Eranga; Tai, E-Shyong; Fan, Qiao; Xu, Liang; Campbell, Harry; Fleck, Brian; Rudan, Igor; Aung, Tin; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Bencic, Goran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Forward, Hannah; Pärssinen, Olavi; Mitchell, Paul; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hewitt, Alex W.; Williams, Cathy; Oostra, Ben A.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hammond, Christopher J.; Stambolian, Dwight; Mackey, David A.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.

    2013-01-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways. PMID:24144296

  9. Nine loci for ocular axial length identified through genome-wide association studies, including shared loci with refractive error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M Kamran; Young, Terri L; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; St Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Montgomery, Grant W; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Wilson, James F; Pennell, Craig E; van Duijn, Cornelia M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Vingerling, Johannes R; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Burdon, Kathryn P; Craig, Jamie E; Iyengar, Sudha K; Igo, Robert P; Lass, Jonathan H; Chew, Emily Y; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Wedenoja, Juho; Simpson, Claire L; Wojciechowski, Robert; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lackner, Karl J; Bettecken, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Portas, Laura; Nag, Abhishek; Williams, Katie M; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Paterson, Andrew D; Makela, Kari-Matti; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Foster, Paul J; Zhao, Jing Hua; Vithana, Eranga; Tai, E-Shyong; Fan, Qiao; Xu, Liang; Campbell, Harry; Fleck, Brian; Rudan, Igor; Aung, Tin; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Bencic, Goran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Forward, Hannah; Pärssinen, Olavi; Mitchell, Paul; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hewitt, Alex W; Williams, Cathy; Oostra, Ben A; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hammond, Christopher J; Stambolian, Dwight; Mackey, David A; Klaver, Caroline C W; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N

    2013-08-08

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiple Loci within the major histocompatibility complex confer risk of psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Jian Feng

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease characterized by thickened scaly red plaques. Previously we have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS on psoriasis with 1,359 cases and 1,400 controls, which were genotyped for 447,249 SNPs. The most significant finding was for SNP rs12191877, which is in tight linkage disequilibrium with HLA-Cw*0602, the consensus risk allele for psoriasis. However, it is not known whether there are other psoriasis loci within the MHC in addition to HLA-C. In the present study, we searched for additional susceptibility loci within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA region through in-depth analyses of the GWAS data; then, we followed up our findings in an independent Han Chinese 1,139 psoriasis cases and 1,132 controls. Using the phased CEPH dataset as a reference, we imputed the HLA-Cw*0602 in all samples with high accuracy. The association of the imputed HLA-Cw*0602 dosage with disease was much stronger than that of the most significantly associated SNP, rs12191877. Adjusting for HLA-Cw*0602, there were two remaining association signals: one demonstrated by rs2073048 (p = 2 x 10(-6, OR = 0.66, located within c6orf10, a potential downstream effecter of TNF-alpha, and one indicated by rs13437088 (p = 9 x 10(-6, OR = 1.3, located 30 kb centromeric of HLA-B and 16 kb telomeric of MICA. When HLA-Cw*0602, rs2073048, and rs13437088 were all included in a logistic regression model, each of them was significantly associated with disease (p = 3 x 10(-47, 6 x 10(-8, and 3 x 10(-7, respectively. Both putative loci were also significantly associated in the Han Chinese samples after controlling for the imputed HLA-Cw*0602. A detailed analysis of HLA-B in both populations demonstrated that HLA-B*57 was associated with an increased risk of psoriasis and HLA-B*40 a decreased risk, independently of HLA-Cw*0602 and the C6orf10 locus, suggesting the potential pathogenic involvement of HLA-B. These results demonstrate that

  11. La città storica contemporanea: genius loci e genius saeculi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Bravo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La letteratura recente mostra i limiti della moderna teoria urbanistica di fronte alla complessità di un mondo nuovo che è il risultato di trasformazioni politiche, economiche e sociali. Il genius loci nella dimensione storica della città è quello che sopravvive alle strutture funzionali in continua evoluzione e conferisce un carattere indelebile alla città e al paesaggio, attraverso diversi fenomeni urbani, tutti parte di una esperienza unica e riconoscibile. La dimensione contemporanea della città storica, vale a dire il genius saeculi, richiede un continuo aggiornamento dei temi collettivi, degli spazi pubblici e dei contenuti che sono assegnati alle forme storiche dalle persone che vivono e abitano quei luoghi, e l’inserimento di nuovi significati, nuovi valori, nuove forme di vita sociale. Questa dunque è la sfida per il nuovo Millennio: conciliare lo spirito del luogo, il genius loci, con lo spirito del tempo, il genius saeculi, recuperando i valori della storia attraverso la loro conservazione e la loro combinazione nel tempo presente secondo un modello sostenibile.

  12. Phenotypic differences among patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome linked to three different chromosome loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmi, R.; Elbedour, K. [Ben-Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva (Israel); Stone, E.M.; Sheffield, V.C. [Univ. of Iowa, IA (United States)

    1995-11-06

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of mental retardation, obesity, retinal dystrophy, polydactyly, and hypogenitalism. Renal and cardiac abnormalities are also frequent in this disorder. Previous clinical suggestions of heterogeneity of BBS were confirmed recently by the identification of four different chromosome loci linked to the disease. In this study we compared clinical manifestations of the syndrome in patients form 3 unrelated, extended Arab-Bedouin kindreds which were used for the linkage mapping of the BBS loci to chromosomes 3, 15, and 16. The observed differences included the limb distribution of the postaxial polydactyly and the extent and age-association of obesity. It appears that the chromosome 3 locus is associated with polydactyly of all four limbs, while polydactyly of the chromosome 15 type is mostly confined to the hands. On the other hand, the chromosome 15 type is associated with early-onset morbid obesity, while the chromosome 16 type appears to present the {open_quotes}leanest{close_quotes} form of BBS. Future cloning of the various BB genes will contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis of limb development and the identification of human obesity-related genes. 22 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Population data for 12 Y-chromosome STR loci in a sample from El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosa, Juan Carlos; Morales, Josefina A; Yurrebaso, Iñaki; Gusmão, Leonor; García, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Haplotype, allele frequencies and population data of 12 Y-chromosome STR loci DYS19, DYS385, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 were determined from a sample of 150 unrelated male individuals from El Salvador, Central America. A total of 131 haplotypes were identified by the 12 Y-STR loci of which 118 were unique. The haplotype diversity (99.08%) and the proportion of different haplotypes (87.33%) were estimated. R(ST) genetic distances were calculated between El Salvador and other populations from Southern and Central America, Europe and Africa. The highest R(ST) genetic distances were found when comparing El Salvador with African populations (0.334 El Salvador and Southern and Central Native groups presented a wide range of values (from 0.024 to 0.210) that can be explained by the differences in the proportion of European versus Amerindian contributions in these population groups. The Multi Dimensional Scaling (MDS) plot analysis, based on pairwise R(ST) values, showed that the general population of El Salvador is closer to the European cluster (composed by European and South American general population samples from Brazil, Argentina, Colombia and Venezuela) than to the Southern/Central American cluster of Native and Mestizo populations.

  14. Analysis of the CODIS autosomal STR loci in four main Colombian regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Manuel; Galindo, Aida; Bernal, Margarita; Avila, Sandra; Andrade, Diana; Vergara, Carlos; Rincón, Magner; Romero, Rosa Elena; Navarrete, Mayda; Cárdenas, Martha; Ortega, Janeth; Suarez, Dayana; Cifuentes, Adriana; Salas, Antonio; Carracedo, Angel

    2003-10-14

    Genotype polymorphism studies at the 13 loci STRs included in the combined DNA index system [CODIS and PCR-based short tandem repeat loci, in: Proceedings of the Second European Symposium on Human Identification, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI, 1998, pp. 73-88; J. Forensic Sci. 46 (2001) 453] (CODIS: D3S1358, HUMvWA31, HUMFGA, D8S1179 D21S11, D18S51, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, HUMTH01, HUMTPOX, HUMCSF1PO and D16S539) were carried out in a sample of 1429 unrelated Colombian individuals belonging to 25 different departments. As many other countries in Latino-America, Colombia shows an important admixture component, basically integrated by Amerindians, European-descendants and African-descendants. Due to the fact that only partial population analyses have been carried out in the country, the main aim of the present analysis is to establish a database of forensic interest based on the widely used CODIS systems covering the main Colombian regions.

  15. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping for Bacterial Blight Resistance in Rice Using Bulked Segregant Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Han

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oryza meyeriana is highly resistant to rice bacterial blight (BB and this resistance trait has been transferred to cultivated rice (O. sativa using asymmetric somatic hybridization. However, no resistance genes have yet been cloned. In the present study, a progeny of the somatic hybridization with high BB resistance was crossed with a rice cultivar with high BB susceptibility to develop an F2 population. Using bulked segregant analysis (BSA, 17 polymorphic markers that were linked to rice BB resistance were obtained through scanning a total of 186 simple sequence repeats (SSR and sequence-tagged site (STS markers, evenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. A genetic linkage map was then constructed based on the 17 linkage markers and the F2 segregating population, which was followed by mapping for quantitative trait loci (QTLs for BB resistance. Three QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1, 3 and 5, respectively, and the alleles of the resistant parent at any of the QTLs increased BB resistance. All of the three QTLs had a strong effect on resistance, explaining about 21.5%, 12.3% and 39.2% of the resistance variance, respectively. These QTLs were different from the loci of the BB resistance genes that have been identified in previous studies. The QTLs mapped in this work will facilitate the isolation of novel BB resistance genes and their utilization in rice resistance breeding.

  16. Identification of quantitative trait loci for growth and carcass composition in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, E; Keele, J W; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M; Stone, R T

    2004-02-01

    A genomic screening to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting growth, carcass composition and meat quality traits was pursued. Two hundred nineteen microsatellite markers were genotyped on 176 of 620 (28%) progeny from a Brahman x Angus sire mated to mostly MARC III dams. Selective genotyping, based on retail product yield (%) and fat yield (%), was used to select individuals to be genotyped. Traits included in the study were birth weight (kg), hot carcass weight (kg), retail product yield, fat yield, marbling score (400 = slight00 and 500 = small00), USDA yield grade, and estimated kidney, heart and pelvic fat (%). The QTL were classified as significant when the expected number of false positives (ENFP) was less than 0.05 (F-statistic greater than 17.3), and suggestive when the ENFP was carcass weight at 49 cM, and for estimated kidney, heart and pelvic fat at 62 cM on chromosome 16, and for fat yield at 35 cM on chromosome 17. Two suggestive QTL for birth weight were identified, one at 12 cM on chromosome 20 and the other at 56 cM on chromosome 21. An additional suggestive QTL was detected for retail product yield, for fat yield, and for USDA yield grade at 26 cM on chromosome 26. Results presented here represent the initial search for quantitative trait loci in this family. Validation of detected QTL in other populations will be necessary.

  17. Genetic study of 15 STRs loci of Identifiler system in Angola population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Miguel Manuel; Carvalho, Mónica; Lopes, Virgínia; Anjos, Maria João; Serra, Armando; Vieira, Duarte Nuno; Sequeiros, Jorge; Corte-Real, Francisco

    2010-10-01

    Angola is located in the African continent, in the area of southern Africa and has a population of approximately 14 million inhabitants. The Angola population has origin from Occidental and Southern Bantu people that came from the great lakes region, creating the most ever known African migration of our days. Allele frequencies for the 15 STRs loci in the AmpFlSTR Identifiler kit (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, HUMTH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, HUMVWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818, HUMFIBRA/FGA and including the segment of the X-Y homologous gene amelogenin) were studied for Angola population. The genotype frequency of the 15 STR loci showed no significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations and great values for the combined power of discrimination and combined power of a priori exclusion validate the application of these markers in forensic genetics. Comparative analyses between Angola population data and other relevant population database from Africa, Europe and American are presented.

  18. Two sex-chromosome-linked microsatellite loci show geographic variance among North American Ostrinia nubilalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad S. Coates

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available PCR-based O. nubilalis population and pedigree analysis indicated female specificity of a (GAAAATn microsatellite, and male specificity of a CAYCARCGTCACTAA repeat unit marker. These loci were respectively named Ostrinia nubilalis W-chromosome 1 (ONW1 and O. nubilalis Z-chromosome 1 (ONZ1. Intact repeats of three, four, or five GAAAAT units are present among ONW1 alleles, and biallelic variation exists at the ONZ1 locus. Screening of 493 male at ONZ1 and 448 heterogametic females at ONZ1 and ONW1 loci from eleven North American sample sites was used to construct genotypic data. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA and F-statistics indicated no female haplotype or male ONZ1 allele frequency differentiation between voltinism ecotypes. Four subpopulations from northern latitudes, Minnesota and South Dakota, showed the absence of a single female haplotype, a significant deviation of ONZ1 data from Hardy-Weinberg expectation, and low-level geographic divergence from other subpopulations. Low ONZ1 and ONW1 allele diversity could be attributed either to large repeat unit sizes, low repeat number, reduced effective population (Ne size of sex chromosomes, or the result of recent O. nubilalis introduction and population expansion, but likely could not be due to inbreeding. These sequences have been deposited in GenBank AF442958, and AY102618 to AY102620.

  19. Characterization and Exploitation of CRISPR Loci in Bifidobacterium longum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Hidalgo-Cantabrana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Diverse CRISPR-Cas systems provide adaptive immunity in many bacteria and most archaea, via a DNA-encoded, RNA-mediated, nucleic-acid targeting mechanism. Over time, CRISPR loci expand via iterative uptake of invasive DNA sequences into the CRISPR array during the adaptation process. These genetic vaccination cards thus provide insights into the exposure of strains to phages and plasmids in space and time, revealing the historical predatory exposure of a strain. These genetic loci thus constitute a unique basis for genotyping of strains, with potential of resolution at the strain-level. Here, we investigate the occurrence and diversity of CRISPR-Cas systems in the genomes of various Bifidobacterium longum strains across three sub-species. Specifically, we analyzed the genomic content of 66 genomes belonging to B. longum subsp. longum, B. longum subsp. infantis and B. longum subsp. suis, and identified 25 strains that carry 29 total CRISPR-Cas systems. We identify various Type I and Type II CRISPR-Cas systems that are widespread in this species, notably I-C, I-E, and II-C. Noteworthy, Type I-C systems showed extended CRISPR arrays, with extensive spacer diversity. We show how these hypervariable loci can be used to gain insights into strain origin, evolution and phylogeny, and can provide discriminatory sequences to distinguish even clonal isolates. By investigating CRISPR spacer sequences, we reveal their origin and implicate phages and prophages as drivers of CRISPR immunity expansion in this species, with redundant targeting of select prophages. Analysis of CRISPR spacer origin also revealed novel PAM sequences. Our results suggest that CRISPR-Cas immune systems are instrumental in mounting diversified viral resistance in B. longum, and show that these sequences are useful for typing across three subspecies.

  20. Blood pressure loci identified with a gene-centric array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R; Newhouse, Stephen J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T; Poulter, Neil R; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G; Whincup, Peter H; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Dobson, Richard J; Howard, Philip J; Mein, Charles A; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Goodall, Alison H; Fowkes, F Gerald; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S; Burton, Paul R; Nelson, Christopher P; Tobin, Martin D; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-François; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sõber, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Hastie, Claire E; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Björn; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Wells, George A; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G M; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Maris; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V; Dominiczak, Anna F; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D; Samani, Nilesh J; Caulfield, Mark J; Munroe, Patricia B

    2011-12-09

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a bespoke gene-centric array to genotype an independent discovery sample of 25,118 individuals that combined hypertensive case-control and general population samples. We followed up four SNPs associated with BP at our p < 8.56 × 10(-7) study-specific significance threshold and six suggestively associated SNPs in a further 59,349 individuals. We identified and replicated a SNP at LSP1/TNNT3, a SNP at MTHFR-NPPB independent (r(2) = 0.33) of previous reports, and replicated SNPs at AGT and ATP2B1 reported previously. An analysis of combined discovery and follow-up data identified SNPs significantly associated with BP at p < 8.56 × 10(-7) at four further loci (NPR3, HFE, NOS3, and SOX6). The high number of discoveries made with modest genotyping effort can be attributed to using a large-scale yet targeted genotyping array and to the development of a weighting scheme that maximized power when meta-analyzing results from samples ascertained with extreme phenotypes, in combination with results from nonascertained or population samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript expression data highlight potential gene regulatory mechanisms at the MTHFR and NOS3 loci. These results provide candidates for further study to help dissect mechanisms affecting BP and highlight the utility of studying SNPs and samples that are independent of those studied previously even when the sample size is smaller than that in previous studies.

  1. Investigation of population structure in Gulf of Mexico Seepiophila jonesi (Polychaeta, Siboglinidae using cross-amplified microsatellite loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunya Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Vestimentiferan tubeworms are some of the most recognizable fauna found at deep-sea cold seeps, isolated environments where hydrocarbon rich fluids fuel biological communities. Several studies have investigated tubeworm population structure; however, much is still unknown about larval dispersal patterns at Gulf of Mexico (GoM seeps. As such, researchers have applied microsatellite markers as a measure for documenting the transport of vestimentiferan individuals. In the present study, we investigate the utility of microsatellites to be cross-amplified within the escarpiid clade of seep vestimentiferans, by determining if loci originally developed for Escarpia spp. could be amplified in the GoM seep tubeworm, Seepiophila jonesi. Additionally, we determine if cross-amplified loci can reliably uncover the same signatures of high gene flow seen in a previous investigation of S. jonesi. Methods Seventy-seven S. jonesi individuals were collected from eight seep sites across the upper Louisiana slope (<1,000 m in the GoM. Forty-eight microsatellite loci that were originally developed for Escarpia laminata (18 loci and Escarpia southwardae (30 loci were tested to determine if they were homologous and polymorphic in S. jonesi. Loci found to be both polymorphic and of high quality were used to test for significant population structuring in S. jonesi. Results Microsatellite pre-screening identified 13 (27% of the Escarpia loci were homologous and polymorphic in S. jonesi, revealing that microsatellites can be amplified within the escarpiid clade of vestimentiferans. Our findings uncovered low levels of heterozygosity and a lack of genetic differentiation amongst S. jonesi from various sites and regions, in line with previous investigations that employed species-specific polymorphic loci on S. jonesi individuals retrieved from both the same and different seep sites. The lack of genetic structure identified from these populations supports the

  2. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (FST coefficients) to the present database ranged from FST = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to FST = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:21637540

  3. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Abdon da Costa Francez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (F ST coefficients to the present database ranged from F ST = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to F ST = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula.

  4. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; Dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (F(ST) coefficients) to the present database ranged from F(ST) = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to F(ST) = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula.

  5. Evaluation of shared genetic susceptibility loci between autoimmune diseases and schizophrenia based on genome-wide association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeffding, Louise K; Rosengren, Anders; Thygesen, Johan H;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have documented higher than expected comorbidity (or, in some cases, inverse comorbidity) between schizophrenia and several autoimmune disorders. It remains unknown whether this comorbidity reflects shared genetic susceptibility loci. AIMS: The present study...... aimed to investigate whether verified genome wide significant variants of autoimmune disorders confer risk of schizophrenia, which could suggest a common genetic basis. METHODS: Seven hundred and fourteen genome wide significant risk variants of 25 autoimmune disorders were extracted from the NHGRI GWAS...... catalogue and examined for association to schizophrenia in the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia GWAS samples (36,989 cases and 113,075 controls). RESULTS: Two independent loci at 4q24 and 6p21.32-33 originally identified from GWAS of autoimmune diseases were found genome wide associated...

  6. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  7. DNA polymorphism at the casein loci in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, P; Rando, A; Pieragostini, E; Masina, P

    1991-01-01

    By using seven endonucleases and four bovine cDNA probes specific for alpha S1-, alpha S2-, beta-, and kappa-casein genes, nine restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) have been found in the sheep orthologous DNA regions. In contrast to the low level of variation observed at the protein level, these DNA polymorphisms determine a high level of heterozygosity and, therefore, represent useful tools for genetic analyses since they can also be obtained without the need for gene expression. In fact, informative matings suggest that in sheep, as in cattle, the four loci are linked.

  8. Quantitative Trait Loci for Fertility Traits in Finnish Ayrshire Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulman, Nina F; Sahana, Goutam; Lund, Mogens S

    2008-01-01

    A whole genome scan was carried out to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fertility traits in Finnish Ayrshire cattle. The mapping population consisted of 12 bulls and 493 sons. Estimated breeding values for days open, fertility treatments, maternal calf mortality and paternal non-return rate...... if these effects were due to a pleiotropic QTL affecting fertility and milk yield traits or to linked QTL causing the effects. This distinction could only be made with confidence on BTA1 where a QTL affecting milk yield is linked to a pleiotropic QTL affecting days open and fertility treatments...

  9. Nine microsatellite loci developed from the octocoral, Paragorgia arborea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coykendall, Dolly K.; Morrison, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    Paragorgia arborea, or bubblegum coral, occurs in continental slope habitats worldwide, which are increasingly threatened by human activities such as energy development and fisheries practices. From 101 putative loci screened, nine microsatellite markers were developed from samples taken from Baltimore canyon in the western North Atlantic Ocean. The number of alleles ranged from two to thirteen per locus and each displayed equilibrium. These nuclear resources will help further research on population connectivity in threatened coral species where mitochondrial markers are known to lack fine-scale genetic diversity.

  10. Structures of the Mating-Type Loci of Cordyceps takaomontana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Eiji; Yamagishi, Kenzo; Hara, Akira

    2003-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the mating-type loci MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 of Cordyceps takaomontana were determined, which is the first such report for the clavicipitaceous fungi. MAT1-1 contains two mating-type genes, MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-1-2, but MAT1-1-3 could not be found. On the other hand, MAT1-2 has MAT1-2-1. A pseudogene of MAT1-1-1 is located next to MAT1-2. PMID:12902305

  11. The Isoconditioning Loci of Planar Three-DOF Parallel Manipulators

    CERN Document Server

    Chablat, Damien; Wenger, Philippe; Angeles, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a special class of parallel manipulators. First, we analyze a family of three-degree-of-freedom manipulators. Two Jacobian matrices appear in the kinematic relations between the joint-rate and the Cartesian-velocity vectors, which are called the "inverse kinematics" and the "direct kinematics" matrices. The singular configurations of these matrices are studied. The isotropic configurations are then studied based on the characteristic length of this manipulator. The isoconditioning loci of all Jacobian matrices are computed to define a global performance index to compare the different working modes.

  12. Brugada syndrome risk loci seem protective against atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Laura; Nielsen, Jonas B; Darkner, Stine;

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown an overlap between genes involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of atrial fibrillation (AF) and Brugada Syndrome (BrS). We investigated whether three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs11708996; G>C located intronic to SCN5A, rs10428132; T>G located in SCN10...... associated with BrS was lower in AF patients than in patients free of AF, suggesting a protective role of these loci in developing AF.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 26 March 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.46....

  13. Developing criteria and data to determine best options for expanding the core CODIS loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Jianye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS Core Loci Working Group established by the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI reviewed and recommended changes to the CODIS core loci. The Working Group identified 20 short tandem repeat (STR loci (composed of the original CODIS core set loci (minus TPOX, four European recommended loci, PentaE, and DYS391 plus the Amelogenin marker as the new core set. Before selecting and finalizing the core loci, some evaluations are needed to provide guidance for the best options of core selection. Method The performance of current and newly proposed CODIS core loci sets were evaluated with simplified analyses for adventitious hit rates in reasonably large datasets under single-source profile comparisons, mixture comparisons and kinship searches, and for international data sharing. Informativeness (for example, match probability, average kinship index (AKI and mutation rates of each locus were some of the criteria to consider for loci selection. However, the primary factor was performance with challenged forensic samples. Results The current battery of loci provided in already validated commercial kits meet the needs for single-source profile comparisons and international data sharing, even with relatively large databases. However, the 13 CODIS core loci are not sufficiently powerful for kinship analyses and searching potential contributors of mixtures in larger databases; 19 or more autosomal STR loci perform better. Y-chromosome STR (Y-STR loci are very useful to trace paternal lineage, deconvolve female and male mixtures, and resolve inconsistencies with Amelogenin typing. The DYS391 locus is of little theoretical or practical use. Combining five or six Y-chromosome STR loci with existing autosomal STR loci can produce better performance than the same number of autosomal loci for kinship analysis and still yield a sufficiently low match probability for single-source profile comparisons

  14. The Genetic Profile from HLA and Non-HLA Loci Allows Identification of Atypical Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Matias Fabregat; Mariana Fernandez; Gerardo Javiel; Graciela Vitarella; Adriana Mimbacas

    2015-01-01

    The complex diagnosis and treatment of diabetes highlight the need for markers to define how to monitor patients correctly during the course of their disease. Different studies demonstrate the existence of patients who cannot be clearly classified. We have previously shown that it is possible to differentiate “atypical diabetic patients” based on genotyping the HLA. In this work we show that the analysis of non-HLA related to type 1 diabetes in the INS-VNTR, SNP rs689...

  15. Fine mapping of multiple interacting quantitative trait loci using combined linkage disequilibrium and linkage information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) and their additive, dominance and epistatic effects play a critical role in complex trait variation. It is often infeasible to detect multiple interacting QTL due to main effects often being confounded by interaction effects.Positioning interacting QTL within a small region is even more difficult. We present a variance component approach nested in an empirical Bayesian method, which simultaneously takes into account additive, dominance and epistatic effects due to multiple interacting QTL. The covariance structure used in the variance component approach is based on combined linkage disequilibrium and linkage (LDL) information. In a simulation study where there are complex epistatic interactions between QTL, it is possible to simultaneously fine map interacting QTL using the proposed approach. The present method combined with LDL information can efficiently detect QTL and their dominance and epistatic effects, making it possible to simultaneously fine map main and epistatic QTL.

  16. Development of microsatellite loci in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) and cross-amplification in congeneric species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherup, Colby; Ragone, Diane; Wiesner-Hanks, Tyr; Irish, Brian; Scheffler, Brian; Simpson, Sheron; Zee, Francis; Zuberi, M Iqbal; Zerega, Nyree J C

    2013-07-01

    Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from enriched genomic libraries of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and tested in four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. The microsatellite markers provide new tools for further studies in Artocarpus. • A total of 25 microsatellite loci were evaluated across four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. Twenty-one microsatellite loci were evaluated on A. altilis (241), A. camansi (34), A. mariannensis (15), and A. altilis × mariannensis (64) samples. Nine of those loci plus four additional loci were evaluated on A. heterophyllus (jackfruit, 426) samples. All loci are polymorphic for at least one species. The average number of alleles ranges from two to nine within taxa. • These microsatellite primers will facilitate further studies on the genetic structure and evolutionary and domestication history of Artocarpus species. They will aid in cultivar identification and establishing germplasm conservation strategies for breadfruit and jackfruit.

  17. Development of microsatellite loci in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) and cross-amplification in congeneric species1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherup, Colby; Ragone, Diane; Wiesner-Hanks, Tyr; Irish, Brian; Scheffler, Brian; Simpson, Sheron; Zee, Francis; Zuberi, M. Iqbal; Zerega, Nyree J. C.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from enriched genomic libraries of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and tested in four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. The microsatellite markers provide new tools for further studies in Artocarpus. • Methods and Results: A total of 25 microsatellite loci were evaluated across four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. Twenty-one microsatellite loci were evaluated on A. altilis (241), A. camansi (34), A. mariannensis (15), and A. altilis × mariannensis (64) samples. Nine of those loci plus four additional loci were evaluated on A. heterophyllus (jackfruit, 426) samples. All loci are polymorphic for at least one species. The average number of alleles ranges from two to nine within taxa. • Conclusions: These microsatellite primers will facilitate further studies on the genetic structure and evolutionary and domestication history of Artocarpus species. They will aid in cultivar identification and establishing germplasm conservation strategies for breadfruit and jackfruit. PMID:25202565

  18. Development of Microsatellite Loci in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae and Cross-Amplification in Congeneric Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colby Witherup

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from enriched genomic libraries of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit and tested in four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. The microsatellite markers provide new tools for further studies in Artocarpus. Methods and Results: A total of 25 microsatellite loci were evaluated across four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. Twenty-one microsatellite loci were evaluated on A. altilis (241, A. camansi (34, A. mariannensis (15, and A. altilis × mariannensis (64 samples. Nine of those loci plus four additional loci were evaluated on A. heterophyllus (jackfruit, 426 samples. All loci are polymorphic for at least one species. The average number of alleles ranges from two to nine within taxa. Conclusions: These microsatellite primers will facilitate further studies on the genetic structure and evolutionary and domestication history of Artocarpus species. They will aid in cultivar identification and establishing germplasm conservation strategies for breadfruit and jackfruit.

  19. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Willer, Cristen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Monda, Keri L; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U; Lango Allen, Hana; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Weedon, Michael N; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J; Segrè, Ayellet V; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K; Absher, Devin M; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L; Goddard, Michael E; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F; Myers, Richard H; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R B; Peters, Marjolein J; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M; White, Charles C; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Matthew N; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T S; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J; Bennett, Amanda J; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Brown, Morris J; Buchanan, Thomas A; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N M; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Facheris, Maurizio F; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V; Geus, Eco J C; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Grässler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M; Groves, Christopher J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew P; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J; Nyholt, Dale R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Platou, Carl G P; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S; Smit, Jan H; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thompson, John R; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2010-11-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and ∼ 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with body mass index (P < 5 × 10⁻⁸), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (at MC4R, POMC, SH2B1 and BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one of these loci is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly associated loci may provide new insights into human body weight regulation.

  20. Genetic susceptibility loci, pesticide exposure and prostate cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Koutros

    Full Text Available Uncovering SNP (single nucleotide polymorphisms-environment interactions can generate new hypotheses about the function of poorly characterized genetic variants and environmental factors, like pesticides. We evaluated SNP-environment interactions between 30 confirmed prostate cancer susceptibility loci and 45 pesticides and prostate cancer risk in 776 cases and 1,444 controls in the Agricultural Health Study. We used unconditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Multiplicative SNP-pesticide interactions were calculated using a likelihood ratio test. After correction for multiple tests using the False Discovery Rate method, two interactions remained noteworthy. Among men carrying two T alleles at rs2710647 in EH domain binding protein 1 (EHBP1 SNP, the risk of prostate cancer in those with high malathion use was 3.43 times those with no use (95% CI: 1.44-8.15 (P-interaction= 0.003. Among men carrying two A alleles at rs7679673 in TET2, the risk of prostate cancer associated with high aldrin use was 3.67 times those with no use (95% CI: 1.43, 9.41 (P-interaction= 0.006. In contrast, associations were null for other genotypes. Although additional studies are needed and the exact mechanisms are unknown, this study suggests known genetic susceptibility loci may modify the risk between pesticide use and prostate cancer.

  1. High polymorphism at microsatellite loci in the Chinese donkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R F; Xie, W M; Zhang, T; Lei, C Z

    2016-06-24

    To reveal the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships between Chinese donkey breeds, 415 individuals representing ten breeds were investigated using ten microsatellite markers. The observed number of alleles, mean effective number of alleles (NE), mean expected heterozygosity (HE), and polymorphic information content (PIC) of each breed and polymorphic locus were analyzed. The results showed that seven (HTG7, HTG10, AHT4, HTG6, HMS6, HMS3, and HMS7) of ten microsatellite loci were polymorphic. The mean PIC, HE, and NE of seven polymorphic loci for the ten donkey breeds were 0.7679, 0.8072, and 6.0275, respectively. These results suggest that domestic Chinese donkey breeds possess higher levels of genetic diversity and heterozygosity than foreign donkeys. A neighbor-joining tree based on Nei's standard genetic distance showed that there was close genetic distance among Xinjiang, Qingyang, Xiji, and Guanzhong donkey breeds. In addition, Mongolia and Dezhou donkey breeds were placed in the same category. The phylogenetic tree revealed that the genetic relationships between Chinese donkey breeds are consistent with their geographic distribution and breeding history.

  2. Quantitative assay for TALEN activity at endogenous genomic loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hisano

    2013-02-01

    Artificially designed nucleases such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs can induce a targeted DNA double-strand break at the specific target genomic locus, leading to the frameshift-mediated gene disruption. However, the assays for their activity on the endogenous genomic loci remain limited. Herein, we describe a versatile modified lacZ assay to detect frameshifts in the nuclease target site. Short fragments of the genome DNA at the target or putative off-target loci were amplified from the genomic DNA of TALEN-treated or control embryos, and were inserted into the lacZα sequence for the conventional blue–white selection. The frequency of the frameshifts in the fragment can be estimated from the numbers of blue and white colonies. Insertions and/or deletions were easily determined by sequencing the plasmid DNAs recovered from the positive colonies. Our technique should offer broad application to the artificial nucleases for genome editing in various types of model organisms.

  3. Quantitative disease resistance and quantitative resistance Loci in breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Clair, Dina A

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative disease resistance (QDR) has been observed within many crop plants but is not as well understood as qualitative (monogenic) disease resistance and has not been used as extensively in breeding. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is a powerful tool for genetic dissection of QDR. DNA markers tightly linked to quantitative resistance loci (QRLs) controlling QDR can be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) to incorporate these valuable traits. QDR confers a reduction, rather than lack, of disease and has diverse biological and molecular bases as revealed by cloning of QRLs and identification of the candidate gene(s) underlying QRLs. Increasing our biological knowledge of QDR and QRLs will enhance understanding of how QDR differs from qualitative resistance and provide the necessary information to better deploy these resources in breeding. Application of MAS for QRLs in breeding for QDR to diverse pathogens is illustrated by examples from wheat, barley, common bean, tomato, and pepper. Strategies for optimum deployment of QRLs require research to understand effects of QDR on pathogen populations over time.

  4. Development of microsatellite loci in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) and cross-amplification in congeneric species 1

    OpenAIRE

    Colby Witherup; Diane Ragone; Tyr Wiesner-Hanks; Brian Irish; Brian Scheffler; Sheron Simpson; Francis Zee; M. Iqbal Zuberi; Zerega, Nyree J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from enriched genomic libraries of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and tested in four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. The microsatellite markers provide new tools for further studies in Artocarpus. Methods and Results: A total of 25 microsatellite loci were evaluated across four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. Twenty-one microsatellite loci were evaluated on A. altilis (241), A. camansi (34), A. mariannensis (1...

  5. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal eighteen new loci associated with body mass index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Willer, Cristen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Monda, Keri L.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Allen, Hana Lango; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W.; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R.; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J.; Segré, Ayellet V.; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K.; Absher, Devin M.; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L.; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goddard, Michael E.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Myers, Richard H.; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R.B.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M.; White, Charles C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W.; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T. S.; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M.; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D.; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N.M.; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Facheris, Maurizio F.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R.; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B.; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P.; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Gräßler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J.; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Platou, Carl G.P.; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R.; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J.; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Jan H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J.; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I. G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G. Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V.; James, Alan L.; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F.; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Ridker, Paul M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Collins, Francis S.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hayes, Richard B.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Spector, Timothy D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T.; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A.; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but the underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity-susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and ~2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals, with targeted follow-up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity-susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with BMI (Pbody weight regulation. PMID:20935630

  6. A Mixture Model Approach to the Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci in Complex Populations With an Apllication to Multiple Cattle Families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ritsert C.; Johnson, David L.; Arendonk, Johan A.M. van

    1998-01-01

    A mixture model approach is presented for the mapping of one or more quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in complex populations. In order to exploit the full power of complete linkage maps the simultaneous likelihood of phenotype and a multilocus (all markers and putative QTLs) genotype is computed. Maxi

  7. A mixture model approach to the mapping of quantitative trait loci in complex populations with an application to multiple cattle families.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.C.; Johnson, D.L.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    A mixture model approach is presented for the mapping of one or more quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in complex populations. In order to exploit the full power of complete linkage maps the simultaneous likelihood of phenotype and a multilocus (all markers and putative QTLs) genotype is computed. Maxi

  8. A Mixture Model Approach to the Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci in Complex Populations With an Application to Multiple Cattle Families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ritsert C.; Johnson, David L.; Arendonk, Johan A.M. van

    1998-01-01

    A mixture model approach is presented for the mapping of one or more quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in complex populations. In order to exploit the full power of complete linkage maps the simultaneous likelihood of phenotype and a multilocus (all markers and putative QTLs) genotype is computed. Maxi

  9. Short communication: Genome-wide scan for bovine milk-fat composition. II. Quantitative trait loci for long-chain fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schennink, A.; Stoop, W.M.; Visker, M.H.P.W.; Poel, van der J.J.; Bovenhuis, H.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a genome-wide scan to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contribute to genetic variation in long-chain milk fatty acids. Milk-fat composition phenotypes were available on 1,905 Dutch Holstein-Friesian cows. A total of 849 cows and their 7 sires were genotyped for 1

  10. Isolation of microsatellite loci in the pollinating fig wasp of Ficus hispida, Ceratosolen solmsi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yu; Tong-Xin Zhang; Hao-Yuan Hu; Li-Ming Niu; Hui Xiao; Yan-Zhou Zhang; Da-Wei Huang

    2008-01-01

    Microsatellite loci were isolated for Ceratosolen solmsi, pollinator of the dioecious Ficus hispida. We developed nine polymorphic microsatellite loci based on the method of polymerase chain reaction isolation of microsatellite arrays (PIMA). Enrichment of genomic libraries was performed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). A subset of 38 positive clones was sequenced; 15 clones showed microsatellite loci. We tested 15 designed primer pairs and nine of them produced polymorphic amplification in 48 individual wasps collected from different fruits of the dioecious host fig Ficus hispida in China. Among the 48 individuals, 49 alleles were obtained at the nine loci. The observed heterozygosity ranged between 0.357 and 0.634.

  11. Genetic analysis of 15 mtDNA SNP loci in Chinese Yi ethnic group using SNaPshot minisequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chun-Ting; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Qing-Xia; Wang, Hong-Dan; Yin, Cai-Yong; Fan, Han-Ting; Hu, Ling-Li; Shen, Chun-Mei; Meng, Hao-Tian; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2016-01-15

    SNaPshot minisequencing is a rapid and robust methodology based on a single base extension with a labeled ddNTP. The present study detected 15 selected SNPs in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control and coding regions by minisequencing methodology using SNaPshot for forensic purpose. The samples were collected from 99 unrelated individuals of the Yi ethnic minority group in Yunnan Province. We have predominantly found high-frequency transitions (91.7%) and a significantly lower frequency of transversions (8.3%). The nt152, 489, 8701, 10,398, 16,183, and 16,362 loci were highly polymorphic, while the nt231, 473 and 581 loci were not polymorphic in the studied population. Based on these 15 SNPs, a total of 28 mtDNA haplotypes were defined in 99 individuals with the haplotype diversity of 0.9136. Also, we compared the mtDNA sequences of Yi group and other 9 populations worldwide and drew a Neighbor-Joining tree based on the shared 12 mtDNA SNP loci, which demonstrated a close relationship between Yi and Bai groups. In conclusion, the analysis of the 15 selected SNPs increases considerably the discrimination power of mtDNA. Moreover, the SNaPshot minisequencing method could quickly detect mtDNA SNPs, and is economical and sensitive. The set of selected 15 SNPs is highly informative and is capable for anthropology genetic analysis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Argyres-Douglas Loci, Singularity Structures and Wall-Crossings in Pure N=2 Gauge Theories with Classical Gauge Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, Jihye

    2012-01-01

    N=2 Seiberg-Witten theories allow an interesting interplay between the Argyres-Douglas loci, singularity structures and wall-crossing formulae. In this paper we investigate this connection by first studying the singularity structures of hyper-elliptic Seiberg-Witten curves for pure N=2 gauge theories with SU(r+1) and Sp(2r) gauge groups, and propose new methods to locate the Argyres-Douglas loci in the moduli space, where multiple mutually non-local BPS states become massless. In a region of the moduli space, we compute dyon charges for all 2r+2 and 2r+1 massless dyons for SU(r+1) and Sp(2r) gauge groups respectively for rank r>1. From here we elucidate the connection to the wall-crossing phenomena for pure Sp(4) Seiberg-Witten theory near the Argyres-Douglas loci, despite our emphasis being only at the massless sector of the BPS spectra. We also present 2r-1 candidates for the maximal Argyres-Douglas points for pure SO(2r+1) Seiberg-Witten theory.

  13. Characterization of TCF21 Downstream Target Regions Identifies a Transcriptional Network Linking Multiple Independent Coronary Artery Disease Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Olga; Zhao, Yuqi; Nürnberg, Sylvia; Miller, Clint; Pjanic, Milos; Castano, Victor G; Kim, Juyong B; Salfati, Elias L; Kundaje, Anshul B; Bejerano, Gill; Assimes, Themistocles; Yang, Xia; Quertermous, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    To functionally link coronary artery disease (CAD) causal genes identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS), and to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis, we have used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) with the CAD associated transcription factor TCF21 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Analysis of identified TCF21 target genes for enrichment of molecular and cellular annotation terms identified processes relevant to CAD pathophysiology, including "growth factor binding," "matrix interaction," and "smooth muscle contraction." We characterized the canonical binding sequence for TCF21 as CAGCTG, identified AP-1 binding sites in TCF21 peaks, and by conducting ChIP-Seq for JUN and JUND in HCASMC confirmed that there is significant overlap between TCF21 and AP-1 binding loci in this cell type. Expression quantitative trait variation mapped to target genes of TCF21 was significantly enriched among variants with low P-values in the GWAS analyses, suggesting a possible functional interaction between TCF21 binding and causal variants in other CAD disease loci. Separate enrichment analyses found over-representation of TCF21 target genes among CAD associated genes, and linkage disequilibrium between TCF21 peak variation and that found in GWAS loci, consistent with the hypothesis that TCF21 may affect disease risk through interaction with other disease associated loci. Interestingly, enrichment for TCF21 target genes was also found among other genome wide association phenotypes, including height and inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting a functional profile important for basic cellular processes in non-vascular tissues. Thus, data and analyses presented here suggest that study of GWAS transcription factors may be a highly useful approach to identifying disease gene interactions and thus pathways that may be relevant to complex disease etiology.

  14. Characterization of TCF21 Downstream Target Regions Identifies a Transcriptional Network Linking Multiple Independent Coronary Artery Disease Loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Sazonova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To functionally link coronary artery disease (CAD causal genes identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS, and to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis, we have used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq with the CAD associated transcription factor TCF21 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC. Analysis of identified TCF21 target genes for enrichment of molecular and cellular annotation terms identified processes relevant to CAD pathophysiology, including "growth factor binding," "matrix interaction," and "smooth muscle contraction." We characterized the canonical binding sequence for TCF21 as CAGCTG, identified AP-1 binding sites in TCF21 peaks, and by conducting ChIP-Seq for JUN and JUND in HCASMC confirmed that there is significant overlap between TCF21 and AP-1 binding loci in this cell type. Expression quantitative trait variation mapped to target genes of TCF21 was significantly enriched among variants with low P-values in the GWAS analyses, suggesting a possible functional interaction between TCF21 binding and causal variants in other CAD disease loci. Separate enrichment analyses found over-representation of TCF21 target genes among CAD associated genes, and linkage disequilibrium between TCF21 peak variation and that found in GWAS loci, consistent with the hypothesis that TCF21 may affect disease risk through interaction with other disease associated loci. Interestingly, enrichment for TCF21 target genes was also found among other genome wide association phenotypes, including height and inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting a functional profile important for basic cellular processes in non-vascular tissues. Thus, data and analyses presented here suggest that study of GWAS transcription factors may be a highly useful approach to identifying disease gene interactions and thus pathways that may be relevant to complex disease etiology.

  15. Novel loci for non-syndromic coarctation of the aorta in sporadic and familial cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Moosmann

    Full Text Available Coarctation of the aorta (CoA accounts for 5-8% of all congenital heart defects. CoA can be detected in up to 20% of patients with Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS, in which a part or all of one of the X chromosomes is absent. The etiology of non-syndromic CoA is poorly understood. In the present work, we test the hypothesis that rare copy number variation (CNV especially on the gonosomes, contribute to the etiology of non-syndromic CoA.We performed high-resolution genome-wide CNV analysis using the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarray platform for 70 individuals with sporadic CoA, 3 families with inherited CoA (n=13 and 605 controls. Our analysis comprised genome wide association, CNV burden and linkage. CNV was validated by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification.We identified a significant abundance of large (>100 kb CNVs on the X chromosome in males with CoA (p=0.005. 11 out of 51 (~ 22% male cases had these large CNVs. Association analysis in the sporadic cohort revealed 14 novel loci for CoA. The locus on 21q22.3 in the sporadic CoA cohort overlapped with a gene locus identified in all familial cases of CoA (candidate gene TRPM2. We identified one CNV locus within a locus with high multipoint LOD score from a linkage analysis of the familial cases (SEPT9; another locus overlapped with a region implicated in Kabuki syndrome. In the familial cases, we identified a total of 7 CNV loci that were exclusively present in cases but not in unaffected family members.Of all candidate loci identified, the TRPM2 locus was the most frequently implicated autosomal locus in sporadic and familial cases. However, the abundance of large CNVs on the X chromosome of affected males suggests that gonosomal aberrations are not only responsible for syndromic CoA but also involved in the development of sporadic and non-syndromic CoA and their male dominance.

  16. Recombinant protein expression by targeting pre-selected chromosomal loci

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    Krömer Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells is mostly achieved by stable integration of transgenes into the chromosomal DNA of established cell lines. The chromosomal surroundings have strong influences on the expression of transgenes. The exploitation of defined loci by targeting expression constructs with different regulatory elements is an approach to design high level expression systems. Further, this allows to evaluate the impact of chromosomal surroundings on distinct vector constructs. Results We explored antibody expression upon targeting diverse expression constructs into previously tagged loci in CHO-K1 and HEK293 cells that exhibit high reporter gene expression. These loci were selected by random transfer of reporter cassettes and subsequent screening. Both, retroviral infection and plasmid transfection with eGFP or antibody expression cassettes were employed for tagging. The tagged cell clones were screened for expression and single copy integration. Cell clones producing > 20 pg/cell in 24 hours could be identified. Selected integration sites that had been flanked with heterologous recombinase target sites (FRTs were targeted by Flp recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE. The results give proof of principle for consistent protein expression upon RMCE. Upon targeting antibody expression cassettes 90-100% of all resulting cell clones showed correct integration. Antibody production was found to be highly consistent within the individual cell clones as expected from their isogenic nature. However, the nature and orientation of expression control elements revealed to be critical. The impact of different promoters was examined with the tag-and-targeting approach. For each of the chosen promoters high expression sites were identified. However, each site supported the chosen promoters to a different extent, indicating that the strength of a particular promoter is dominantly defined by its chromosomal context

  17. Multiple loci are associated with white blood cell phenotypes.

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    Michael A Nalls

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available White blood cell (WBC count is a common clinical measure from complete blood count assays, and it varies widely among healthy individuals. Total WBC count and its constituent subtypes have been shown to be moderately heritable, with the heritability estimates varying across cell types. We studied 19,509 subjects from seven cohorts in a discovery analysis, and 11,823 subjects from ten cohorts for replication analyses, to determine genetic factors influencing variability within the normal hematological range for total WBC count and five WBC subtype measures. Cohort specific data was supplied by the CHARGE, HeamGen, and INGI consortia, as well as independent collaborative studies. We identified and replicated ten associations with total WBC count and five WBC subtypes at seven different genomic loci (total WBC count-6p21 in the HLA region, 17q21 near ORMDL3, and CSF3; neutrophil count-17q21; basophil count- 3p21 near RPN1 and C3orf27; lymphocyte count-6p21, 19p13 at EPS15L1; monocyte count-2q31 at ITGA4, 3q21, 8q24 an intergenic region, 9q31 near EDG2, including three previously reported associations and seven novel associations. To investigate functional relationships among variants contributing to variability in the six WBC traits, we utilized gene expression- and pathways-based analyses. We implemented gene-clustering algorithms to evaluate functional connectivity among implicated loci and showed functional relationships across cell types. Gene expression data from whole blood was utilized to show that significant biological consequences can be extracted from our genome-wide analyses, with effect estimates for significant loci from the meta-analyses being highly corellated with the proximal gene expression. In addition, collaborative efforts between the groups contributing to this study and related studies conducted by the COGENT and RIKEN groups allowed for the examination of effect homogeneity for genome-wide significant associations across

  18. Quantitative trait loci pyramiding can improve the nutritional potential of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigano, Maria Manuela; Raiola, Assunta; Tenore, Gian Carlo; Monti, Daria Maria; Del Giudice, Rita; Frusciante, Luigi; Barone, Amalia

    2014-11-26

    Solanum lycopersicum represents an important source of antioxidants and other bioactive compounds. Previously two Solanum pennellii introgression lines (IL 7-3 and IL 12-4) were identified as carrying quantitative trait loci (QTL) increasing fruit ascorbic acid and phenolics content. Novel tomato lines were obtained by pyramiding these selected QTLs in the genetic background of the cultivated line M82. Pyramided lines revealed significant increases of total phenolics, phenolic acids, ascorbic acid, and total antioxidant activity compared to parental lines IL 7-3 and IL 12-4 and the cultivated line M82. In addition, tomato extracts obtained from the pyramided lines had no cytotoxic effect on normal human cells while exhibiting a selective cytotoxic effect on aggressive cancer cells. Therefore, the present study demonstrates that it is possible to incorporate favorable wild-species QTLs in the cultivated genetic background to obtain genotypes with higher nutritional value.

  19. Mapping and Analysis of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Seed Dormancy in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ling; ZHANG Wen-wei; ZHAI Hu-qu; WAN Jian-min

    2005-01-01

    Seed dormancy is one of the most important traits related to the rice grain quality and seeds application, because it is associated with pre-harvest sprouting, resulting in a downgrading of quality and severe limitations in end-use application.The recent development of DNA markers and linkage maps of rice has made possible mapping of individual genes associated with complex seed dormancy traits, analyzing the genetics effects of individual genes and genotype-byenvironment interactions. Up to now, numerous quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed dormancy in rice have been identified and mapped in the molecular genetic map by different populations. In this review, we focus on the genetic base of seed dormancy in rice, especially compare QTLs controlling seed dormancy reported up to now, analyze the expression and stability of QTLs controlling seed dormancy, and discuss the present problems. Finally we show a new pathway to further research on seed dormancy.

  20. Multiplex agarose gel electrophoresis system for variable number of tandem repeats genotyping: analysis example using Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takayuki; Maeda, Shinji

    2013-04-01

    As one genotyping method for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) is a promising tool to trace the undefined transmission of tuberculosis, but it often requires large equipment such as a genetic analyzer for DNA fragment analysis or CE system to conduct systematic analyses. For convenient genotyping at low cost in laboratories, we designed a multiplex PCR system that is applicable to agarose gel electrophoresis using fluorescent PCR primers. For tuberculosis genotyping by VNTR, the copy quantities of minisatellite DNA must be determined in more than 12 loci. The system can halve laborious electrophoresis processes by presenting an image of two VNTR amplicons on a single lane. No expensive equipment is necessary for this method. Therefore, it is useful even in developing countries. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Characterization of WAP2 gene in Aegilops tauschii and comparison with homoeologous loci in wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Zong NING; Qi-Jiao CHEN; Zhong-Wei YUAN; Lian-Quan ZHANG; Ze-Hong YAN; You-Liang ZHENG; Deng-Cai LIU

    2009-01-01

    The Q/q gene, also known as WAP2, is an important gene for wheat domestication and is a member of the AP2 (APETALA2) class of transcription factors. In the present study, we first isolated the W~t AP2 allele (where the superscript "t" refers to the speciese source, in this case "tauschii") on chromosome 5D from Aegilops tauschii Coss., the D-genome donor species of common wheat. We found that W~t AP2 and the AP2 gene from Arabidopsis share a central core of the AP2 polypeptide, a highly basic 10-amino acid domain, and an AASSGF box, although there are many differences in the 37-amino acid serine-rich acidic domain and the remaining regions. In addition, W~t AP2 was highly homologous to the homoeologous loci on 5A and 5B of wheat at both the nucleotide and amino acid level. However, there were some variations that are probably related to gene function. In the first AP2 domain, the amino acids VYL on the 5D and 5A loci were replaced with LLR on 5B. In the 37-amino acid serine-rich acidic domain, W~t AP2 on 5D had an extra amino acid insertion. There was also a variation at the 329 amino acid position, which is thought to be related to the appearance of free-threshing wheat. At this position, the amino acid is isoleucine on 5A for the Q allele and valine for the q allele, whereas the amino acid is leucine on 5D and 5B. Furthermore, a Stowaway miniature terminal inverted repeat element (MITE) insertion was present in the ninth intron of WAP2 on 5B of all common wheats and partial tetraploid Triticum turgidum wheats. These results provide new clues for studies into the evolutionary biology of WAP2 and the origin of common wheat.

  2. Identification of shared risk loci and pathways for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Andrea; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Leber, Markus; Strohmaier, Jana; Degenhardt, Franziska; Treutlein, Jens; Mattheisen, Manuel; Schumacher, Johannes; Meier, Sandra; Hoffmann, Per; Lacour, André; Reif, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lucae, Susanne; Maier, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Markus; Vedder, Helmut; Kammerer-Ciernioch, Jutta; Pfennig, Andrea; Bauer, Michael; Hautzinger, Martin; Moebus, Susanne; Schenk, Lorena M.; Czerski, Piotr M.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.; Wright, Adam; Fullerton, Janice M.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Krasnov, Valery; Chuchalin, Alexander; Babadjanova, Gulja; Pantelejeva, Galina; Abramova, Lilia I.; Tiganov, Alexander S.; Polonikov, Alexey; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Rouleau, Guy A.; Turecki, Gustavo; Laprise, Catherine; Rivas, Fabio; Kogevinas, Manolis; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, Maria; Becker, Tim; Schulze, Thomas G.; Cichon, Sven; Fier, Heide; Nöthen, Markus M.

    2017-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a highly heritable neuropsychiatric disease characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. BD shows substantial clinical and genetic overlap with other psychiatric disorders, in particular schizophrenia (SCZ). The genes underlying this etiological overlap remain largely unknown. A recent SCZ genome wide association study (GWAS) by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium identified 128 independent genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The present study investigated whether these SCZ-associated SNPs also contribute to BD development through the performance of association testing in a large BD GWAS dataset (9747 patients, 14278 controls). After re-imputation and correction for sample overlap, 22 of 107 investigated SCZ SNPs showed nominal association with BD. The number of shared SCZ-BD SNPs was significantly higher than expected (p = 1.46x10-8). This provides further evidence that SCZ-associated loci contribute to the development of BD. Two SNPs remained significant after Bonferroni correction. The most strongly associated SNP was located near TRANK1, which is a reported genome-wide significant risk gene for BD. Pathway analyses for all shared SCZ-BD SNPs revealed 25 nominally enriched gene-sets, which showed partial overlap in terms of the underlying genes. The enriched gene-sets included calcium- and glutamate signaling, neuropathic pain signaling in dorsal horn neurons, and calmodulin binding. The present data provide further insights into shared risk loci and disease-associated pathways for BD and SCZ. This may suggest new research directions for the treatment and prevention of these two major psychiatric disorders. PMID:28166306

  3. GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF STR LOCI IN CHINESE DRUNGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To study the STR polymorphism in Chinese Drungs.Methods:The genetic distributions of 15 STR loci and Amelogenin locus were generated through coamplification,genescan and genotype from 65 Drungs Results:There were 144 STR and 2 Amelogenin alleles in Drung nationality,with their frequencies ranging from 0.0077 to 0.7846,H0.3723-0.8639,DP0.5567-0.9548,EPP0.2738-0.8358,and PIC 0.3461-0.8456,the accumulative DP 0.9999998and EPP 0.9999894,Conclusion:The study founded a basis for the genetic structure of Chinese ethnic groups ,which is useful for the application to anthropology and forensic science.

  4. Comparing Quantitative Trait Loci and Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Han

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop methods to compare the positions of quantitative trait loci (QTL with a set of genes selected by other methods, such as microarray experiments, from a sequenced genome. We apply our methods to QTL for addictive behavior in mouse, and a set of genes upregulated in a region of the brain associated with addictive behavior, the nucleus accumbens (NA. The association between the QTL and NA genes is not significantly stronger than expected by chance. However, chromosomes 2 and 16 do show strong associations suggesting that genes on these chromosomes might be associated with addictive behavior. The statistical methodology developed for this study can be applied to similar studies to assess the mutual information in microarray and QTL analyses.

  5. Procedures for listing loci and alleles of ruminants: 1991 proposals

    OpenAIRE

    Millar P; Malher X; Levéziel H; Lauvergne JJ; Larsen B; Huston K; Hill D; Dolling CHS; Di Stasio L; Broad T; Andresen E; Rae AL; Renieri C; Tucker EM

    1992-01-01

    Au cours du premier Atelier de Nomenclature Génétique des Ruminants de Ferme organisé par le COGOVICA (Comité de Nomenclature Génétique des Ovins et Caprins) en 1991, les procédures suivantes de listage des loci chez les Ruminants ont été proposées: identification du locus, localisation sur le génome, effet du gène (24 entrées), tableau des allèles et, pour chaque allèle, outre l’identification, l’effet phénotypique, l’hérédité et les races concernées. Conçue pour être utilisée dans la p...

  6. GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF STR LOCI IN CHINESE DRUNGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖江华; 郑海波; 朱波峰; 李生斌

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the STR polymorphism in Chi nese Drungs. Methods The genetic distributions of 15 STR loci a nd Amelogenin locus were generated through coamplification, genescan and genotyp e from 65 Drungs. Results There were 144 STR and 2 Amelogenin alleles in Drung n ationality, with their frequencies ranging from 0.0077 to 0.7846, H 0.3723~0.8 639, DP 0.5567~0.9548, EPP 0.2738~0.8358, and PIC 0.3461~0.8456, the accumul ative DP 0.99999998 and EPP 0.99999894. Conclusion The study f ounded a basis for the genetic structure of Chinese ethnic group s,which is useful for the application to anthropology and forensic science.

  7. Functional mapping imprinted quantitative trait loci underlying developmental characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gengxin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imprinting, a phenomenon referring to nonequivalent expression of alleles depending on their parental origins, has been widely observed in nature. It has been shown recently that the epigenetic modification of an imprinted gene can be detected through a genetic mapping approach. Such an approach is developed based on traditional quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping focusing on single trait analysis. Recent studies have shown that most imprinted genes in mammals play an important role in controlling embryonic growth and post-natal development. For a developmental character such as growth, current approach is less efficient in dissecting the dynamic genetic effect of imprinted genes during individual ontology. Results Functional mapping has been emerging as a powerful framework for mapping quantitative trait loci underlying complex traits showing developmental characteristics. To understand the genetic architecture of dynamic imprinted traits, we propose a mapping strategy by integrating the functional mapping approach with genomic imprinting. We demonstrate the approach through mapping imprinted QTL controlling growth trajectories in an inbred F2 population. The statistical behavior of the approach is shown through simulation studies, in which the parameters can be estimated with reasonable precision under different simulation scenarios. The utility of the approach is illustrated through real data analysis in an F2 family derived from LG/J and SM/J mouse stains. Three maternally imprinted QTLs are identified as regulating the growth trajectory of mouse body weight. Conclusion The functional iQTL mapping approach developed here provides a quantitative and testable framework for assessing the interplay between imprinted genes and a developmental process, and will have important implications for elucidating the genetic architecture of imprinted traits.

  8. Genome-wide significant loci for addiction and anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, K.; Almasy, L.; Knowles, E.E.M.; Kent, J.W.; Curran, J.E.; Dyer, T.D.; Göring, H.H.H.; Olvera, R.L.; Fox, P.T.; Pearlson, G.D.; Krystal, J.H.; Duggirala, R.; Blangero, J.; Glahn, D.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Psychiatric comorbidity is common among individuals with addictive disorders, with patients frequently suffering from anxiety disorders. While the genetic architecture of comorbid addictive and anxiety disorders remains unclear, elucidating the genes involved could provide important insights into the underlying etiology. Methods Here we examine a sample of 1284 Mexican-Americans from randomly selected extended pedigrees. Variance decomposition methods were used to examine the role of genetics in addiction phenotypes (lifetime history of alcohol dependence, drug dependence or chronic smoking) and various forms of clinically relevant anxiety. Genome-wide univariate and bivariate linkage scans were conducted to localize the chromosomal regions influencing these traits. Results Addiction phenotypes and anxiety were shown to be heritable and univariate genome-wide linkage scans revealed significant quantitative trait loci for drug dependence (14q13.2–q21.2, LOD = 3.322) and a broad anxiety phenotype (12q24.32–q24.33, LOD = 2.918). Significant positive genetic correlations were observed between anxiety and each of the addiction subtypes (ρg = 0.550–0.655) and further investigation with bivariate linkage analyses identified significant pleiotropic signals for alcohol dependence-anxiety (9q33.1–q33.2, LOD = 3.054) and drug dependence-anxiety (18p11.23–p11.22, LOD = 3.425). Conclusions This study confirms the shared genetic underpinnings of addiction and anxiety and identifies genomic loci involved in the etiology of these comorbid disorders. The linkage signal for anxiety on 12q24 spans the location of TMEM132D, an emerging gene of interest from previous GWAS of anxiety traits, whilst the bivariate linkage signal identified for anxiety-alcohol on 9q33 peak coincides with a region where rare CNVs have been associated with psychiatric disorders. Other signals identified implicate novel regions of the genome in addiction genetics. PMID:27318301

  9. 抽动秽语综合征儿童的IL-1Ra基因多态性与执行功能%Relationship of IL-1Ra86bp VNTR and executive function in children with Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季卫东; 杨闯; 周家秀; 黄晓琪; 姚静; 郭田友; 郭兰婷; 刘协和

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨白介素1受体拮抗剂第2内含子86bp可重复多态性(IL-1Ra86bp VNTR)与汉族抽动秽语综合征儿童(TS)及执行功能的关系.方法:选取符合美国精神疾病诊断统计手册第4版TS诊断标准的儿童112例,健康对照71例.采用聚合酶链反应(PCR)等位基因分型技术对所有对象的IL-1Ra86bp多态位点进行测定,分析该位点与TS疾病的关联,同时采用Stroop色词测验(Stroop test)测定研究对象的执行功能.结果:全部112例TS组和54例单纯TS组的IL-1 Ra86bp位点基因型频率(54.0%,56.0% vs.55.1%)和等位基因频率(77.0%,78.0% vs.77.0%)与对照组相比差异无统计学意义(均P>0.05).48例TS共病注意缺陷多动障碍(ADHD)组的IL-1Ra86bp长(L)位点基因型频率(79.0%vs.55.1%)和等位基因频率(90.0% vs.77.0%)明显高于对照组(均P<0.05).TS共病ADHD组L/L基因型的儿童C错误数多于对照组[(5.8±14.8)vs.(2.8±12.4),P <0.05].结论:IL-1Ra86bp基因多态性与共病ADHD的抽动秽语综合征可能存在关联,携带L/L基因型的抽动秽语综合征儿童执行功能可能较差.%Objective:To investigate the association between IL-1Ra gene polymorphism and Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (TS).Methods:Totally 112 children who were diagnosed as Tourette's syndrome according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders,Fourth Edition (DSM-Ⅳ) and 71 healthy children were selected.By using Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) genotyping assay method,a polymorphism of IL-1 Ra gene was genotyped.The correlation between positive association of polymorphism of 1L-1Ra gene in TS and the executive function in patients with TS was also analyzed Results:Compared with control group,there was no significant difference in genotype frequency (54.0%,56.0% vs.55.1%) and allele frequency (77.0%,78.0% vs.77.0%) in 112 TS groups and 54 alone-TS groups

  10. Individual identification of Chinese alligator Alligator sinensis with SSR and mtVNTR molecular markers%使用SSR和mtVNTR分子标记识别扬子鳄个体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄磊; 王义权

    2005-01-01

    扬子鳄是中国特有的濒危物种,为有效避免种群衰退,最大限度地保持该物种现有的遗传多样性,有必要对种群的个体进行个体识别研究,以便重建遗传谱系,指导现有繁育工作.应用SSR (Simple sequence repeats) 与mtVNTR (Variable number tandem repeats on mitochondrial DNA) 两种分子标记对扬子鳄39个个体进行了个体识别分析,结果显示:8个SSR座位的累计个体识别率与累计父权排除率分别达0.9968、0.7697,mtVNTR的个体识别率为0.9146,联合SSR与mtVNTR两种分子标记的累计个体识别率理论值达0.9997,并在实际分析中将39个扬子鳄个体完全区分开,其区分能力较RAPD (Random amplified polymorphic DNA)、AFLP (Amplified fragment length polymorphism) 及mtDNA控制区5′端序列分析等分子标记要高.此外,SSR和mtVNTR还可对某些低频等位基因及其携带个体做有效的筛查,这对今后进行大量扬子鳄个体的分子标记识别和群体的遗传谱系建立等工作将具有一定实际意义[动物学报 51(3):501-506,2005].

  11. Establishment of Multiple Locus Variable-number Tandem Repeat Analysis Assay for Genotyping of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato Detected in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xin; HOU Xue Xia; GENG Zhen; ZHAO Rui; WAN Kang Lin; HAO Qin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Human Lyme Borreliosis (LB), which is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi), has been identified as a major arthropod-borne infectious disease in China. We aimed to develop a multiple locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) assay for the genotyping of Borrelia burgdorferi strains detected in China. Methods B. garinii PBi complete 904.246 kb chromosome and two plasmids (cp26 and lp54) were screened by using Tandem Repeats Finder program for getting potential VNTR loci, the potential VNTR loci were analyzed and identified with PCR and the VNTR loci data were analyzed and MLVA clustering tree were constrcted by using the categorical coefficient and the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means (UPGMA). Results We identified 5 new VNTR loci through analyzing 47 potential VNTR loci. We used the MLVA protocol to analyse 101 B. burgdorferi strains detected in China and finally identified 51 unique genotypes in 4 major clusters including B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (B.b.s.s), B. garinii, B. afzelii, and B. valaisiana, consistent with the current MLSA phylogeny studies. The allele numbers of VNTR-1, VNTR-2, VNTR-3, VNTR-4, and VNTR-5 were 7, 3, 9, 7, and 6. The Hunter-Gaston index (HGI) of five VNTR loci were 0.79, 0.22, 0.77, 0.71, and 0.67, respectively. The combined HGI of five VNTR loci was 0.96. Clustering of the strains of Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia and Heilongjiang was confirmed, and this situation was consistent with the close geographical distribution of those provinces. Conclusion The MLVA protocol esytablished in this study is easy and can show strains’ phylogenetic relationships to distinguish the strains of Borrelia species. It is useful for further phylogenetic and epidemiological analyses of Borrelia strains.

  12. Polymorphic microsatellite loci identified through development and cross-species amplification within shorebirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, I.; Guzzetti, B.M.; Gust, Judy R.; Sage, G.K.; Gill, R.E.; Tibbitts, T.L.; Sonsthagen, S.A.; Talbot, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed microsatellite loci for demographic assessments of shorebirds, a group with limited markers. First, we isolated five dinucleotide repeat microsatellite loci from the Black Oystercatcher (Haematopodidae: Haematopus bachmani), and three from the Bristle-thighed Curlew (Scolopacidae: Numenius tahitiensis); both species are of conservation concern. All eight loci were polymorphic in their respective target species. Hbaμ loci were characterized by two to three alleles with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.07 to 0.33, and two to nine alleles were detected for Nut loci with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.08 to 0.72. No linkage disequilibrium or departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium were observed. The eight loci were also tested for cross-species amplification in 12 other species within Charadriidae and Scolopacidae, and the results demonstrated transferability across several genera. We further tested all 14 species at 12 additional microsatellite markers developed for other shorebirds: Dunlin (Calidris alpina; four loci) and Ruff (Philomachus pugnax; eight loci). Two markers (Hbaμ4 and Ruff6) were polymorphic in 13 species, while two (Calp6 and Ruff9) were monomorphic. The remaining eight markers revealed polymorphism in one to nine species each. Our results provide further evidence that locus Ruff10 is sex-linked, contrary to the initial description. These markers can be used to enhance our understanding of shorebird biology by, for example, helping to determine migratory connectivity among breeding and wintering populations and detecting relatedness among individuals.

  13. Isolation and characterization of twelve microsatellite loci for the Japanese Devilray (Mobula japanica)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortvliet, Marloes; Galvan-Magana, Felipe; Bernardi, Giacomo; Croll, Donald A.; Olsen, Jeanine L.

    2011-01-01

    Twelve polymorphic microsatellites loci were characterized for Mobula japanica (Japanese Devilray) using an enrichment protocol. All but two loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with no evidence of linkage disequilibrium or null-alleles for a sample of 40 individuals from two populations. The num

  14. Identification and validation of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    A large number of SSR loci were screened in the genomic assemblies of 14 different isolates of Phytophthora nicotianae and primers were developed for amplification of 17 markers distributed among different contigs. These loci were highly polymorphic and amplified from genetically distant isolates of...

  15. Six new loci associated with body mass index highlight a neuronal influence on body weight regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Willer (Cristen); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); S. Li (Shengxu); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); I.M. Heid (Iris); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); A.L. Elliott (Amanda); A.U. Jackson (Anne); C. Lamina (Claudia); G. Lettre (Guillaume); N. Lim (Noha); H.N. Lyon (Helen); S.A. McCarroll (Steven); K. Papadakis (Konstantinos); L. Qi (Lu); J.C. Randall (Joshua); R.M. Roccasecca; S. Sanna (Serena); P. Scheet (Paul); M.N. Weedon (Michael); E. Wheeler (Eleanor); J.H. Zhao; L.C. Jacobs (Leonie); I. Prokopenko (Inga); N. Soranzo (Nicole); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); N. Timpson (Nicholas); P. Almgren (Peter); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R.N. Bergman (Richard); S. Bingham (Sheila); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); M.J. Brown (Morris); N.P. Burtt (Noël); P.S. Chines (Peter); L. Coin (Lachlan); F.S. Collins (Francis); J. Connell (John); C. Cooper (Charles); G.D. Smith; E.M. Dennison (Elaine); P. Deodhar (Parimal); M.R. Erdos (Michael); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); D.M. Evans (David); L. Gianniny (Lauren); C. Gieger (Christian); C.J. Gillson (Christopher); C. Guiducci (Candace); R. Hackett (Rachel); D. Hadley (David); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); J. Hebebrand (Johannes); A. Hofman (Albert); B. Isomaa (Bo); T. Johnson (Toby); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); Z. Jovanovic (Zorica); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); P. Kraft (Peter); M. Kuokkanen (Mikko); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); E. Lakatta (Edward); J. Luan; R.N. Luben (Robert); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); T. Meitinger (Thomas); A. Mulas (Antonella); P. Munroe (Patricia); N. Narisu (Narisu); A.R. Ness (Andrew); K. Northstone (Kate); S. O'Rahilly (Stephen); C. Purmann (Carolin); M.G. Rees (Matthew); M. Ridderstråle (Martin); S.M. Ring (Susan); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A. Ruokonen (Aimo); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); J. Saramies (Jouko); L.J. Scott (Laura); A. Scuteri (Angelo); K. Silander (Kaisa); M.A. Sims (Matthew); K. Song (Kijoung); J. Stephens (Jonathan); S. Stevens (Suzanne); H.M. Stringham (Heather); Y.C.L. Tung (Loraine); T.T. Valle (Timo); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); K.S. Vimaleswaran (Karani); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); C. Wallace (Chris); R.M. Watanabe (Richard); D. Waterworth (Dawn); N. Watkins (Nicholas); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); G. Zhai (Guangju); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); D. Altshuler (David); M. Caulfield (Mark); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); I.S. Farooqi (Sadaf); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); J.M. Guralnik (Jack); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F.B. Hu (Frank); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); M. Laakso (Markku); V. Mooser (Vincent); K.K. Ong (Ken); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); V. Salomaa (Veikko); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.D. Spector (Timothy); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); M. Uda (Manuela); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); N.J. Wareham (Nick); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); L. Groop (Leif); R.B. Hayes (Richard); D. Hunter (David); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); D. Schlessinger (David); D.P. Strachan (David); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); M. Boehnke (Michael); I. Barroso (Inês); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCommon variants at only two loci, FTO and MC4R, have been reproducibly associated with body mass index (BMI) in humans. To identify additional loci, we conducted meta-analysis of 15 genome-wide association studies for BMI (n > 32,000) and followed up top signals in 14 additional cohorts

  16. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Steffensen, Annette B.; Acha, Moshe Ray; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Pfeufer, Arne; Lyneh, Stacey N.; Olesen, Soren-Peter; Brunak, Soren; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Spiering, Wilko; Daly, Mark J.; Asselbergs, Ikea W.; van der Harst, Pim; Milan, David J.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Lage, Kasper; Olsen, Jesper V.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes

  17. Evaluation of 12 Y-chromosome STR loci in Western Mediterranean populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, V.; Tomas, Carmen; Sanchez, Juan J.;

    2008-01-01

    With the aim to establish a Y-STR haplotype database, a total of 554 males from seven Western Mediterranean populations were genotyped for the 12 Y-chromosome STR loci (minimal haplotype extended by loci DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439) included in the Powerplex Y System (Promega). Among the 554 males ...

  18. Enrichment of putative PAX8 target genes at serous epithelial ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kar, Siddhartha P; Adler, Emily; Tyrer, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 18 loci associated with serous ovarian cancer (SOC) susceptibility but the biological mechanisms driving these findings remain poorly characterised. Germline cancer risk loci may be enriched for target genes of transcription facto...

  19. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); G.A. Mendoza-Fandino (Gustavo A.); S. Nord (Silje); J. Lilyquist (Janna); C. Olswold (Curtis); B. Hallberg (Boubou); S. Agata (Simona); H. Ahsan (Habibul); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C.B. Ambrosone (Christine B.); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); V. Arndt (Volker); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Barile (Monica); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); L. Beckmann (Lars); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); J. Benítez (Javier); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); S.S. Buys (Saundra S.); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M.A. Caligo (Maria); F. Canzian (Federico); T.A. Carpenter (Adrian); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S.J. Chanock (Stephen J.); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); K. Czene (Kamila); M.B. Daly (Mary B.); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Devilee (Peter); O. Díez (Orland); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S.M. Domchek (Susan); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); M. Dumont (Martine); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); A.B. Ekici (Arif); H. Eliassen (Heather); S.D. Ellis (Steve); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Försti (Asta); F. Fostira (Florentia); W.D. Foulkes (William); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); M. Gabrielson (Marike); M. Gammon (Marilie); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); J. Garber (Judy); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.A. Gayther (Simon); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); G.G. Giles (Graham); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); A. González-Neira (Anna); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); J. Gronwald (Jacek); P. Guénel (Pascal); M.J. Gunter (Marc J.); L. Haeberle (Lothar); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S. Hart (Stewart); S. Healey (Sue); T. Heikkinen (Tuomas); B.E. Henderson (Brian); J. Herzog (Josef); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); R.N. Hoover (Robert); J.L. Hopper (John); K. Humphreys (Keith); D. Hunter (David); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny N.); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. James (Margaret); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); U.B. Jensen; E.M. John (Esther); M. Jones (Michael); M. Kabisch (Maria); S. Kar (Siddhartha); B.Y. Karlan (Beth Y.); S. Khan (Sofia); K.T. Khaw; M.G. Kibriya (Muhammad); J.A. Knight (Julia); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); V. Kristensen (Vessela); A. Kwong (Ava); Y. Laitman (Yael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Lazaro (Conxi); E. Lee (Eunjung); L. Le Marchand (Loic); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A. Lindblom (Annika); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); J. Liu (Jianjun); J. Long (Jirong); J. Lubinski (Jan); P.L. Mai (Phuong); E. Makalic (Enes); K.E. Malone (Kathleen E.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); S. Margolin (Sara); F. Marme (Federick); J.W.M. Martens (John); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A. Meindl (Alfons); A. Miller (Austin); R.L. Milne (Roger); P. Miron (Penelope); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); R. Nussbaum (Robert); K. Offit (Kenneth); E. Olah; O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); J.E. Olson (Janet); A. Osorio (Ana); S.K. Park (Sue K.); P.H.M. Peeters; B. Peissel (Bernard); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Peto (Julian); C. Phelan (Catherine); R. Pilarski (Robert); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Pykäs (Katri); P. Radice (Paolo); N. Rahman (Nazneen); J. Rantala (Johanna); C. Rappaport (Christine); G. Rennert (Gad); A.L. Richardson (Andrea); M. Robson (Mark); I. Romieu (Isabelle); A. Rudolph (Anja); E.J.T. Rutgers (Emiel); M.-J. Sanchez (Maria-Jose); R. Santella (Regina); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); D.F. Schmidt (Daniel); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); R.J. Scott (Rodney); L. Senter (Leigha); P. Sharma (Priyanka); J. Simard (Jacques); C.F. Singer (Christian); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); P. Soucy (Penny); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Steinemann (Doris)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCommon variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10-8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibili

  20. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Marten E.; Warren, Helen R; Cabrera, Claudia P; Verweij, Niek; Mifsud, Borbala; Haessler, Jeffrey; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A.; Fu, Yi-Ping; Weiss, Stefan; Lin, Henry J.; Grarup, Niels; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Pistis, Giorgio; Shah, Nabi; Brody, Jennifer A.; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lin, Honghuang; Mei, Hao; Smith, Albert V.; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Hall, Leanne M; van Setten, Jessica; Trompet, Stella; Prins, Bram P.; Isaacs, Aaron; Radmanesh, Farid; Marten, Jonathan; Entwistle, Aiman; Kors, Jan A.; Silva, Claudia T; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C.; de Boer, Rudolf; de Haan, Hugoline G; de Mutsert, Renee; Dedoussis, George; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Eppinga, Ruben N.; Felix, Stephan B.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hagemeijer, Yanick; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Huang, Paul L.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kahonen, Mika; Kanters, Jorgen K.; Kolcic, Ivana; Launer, Lenore J.; Li, Man; Yao, Jie; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Simin; MacFarlane, Peter W.; Mangino, Massimo; Morris, Andrew D.; Mulas, Antonella; Murray, Alison D.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Orru, Marco; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peters, Annette; Porteous, David J.; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lihong; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roselli, Carolina; Rudan, Igor; Sattar, Naveed; Sever, Peter; Sinner, Moritz F.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Taylor, Kent D.; Tobin, Martin D.; Uitterlinden, Andre; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Hoes, Arno W.; van der Meer, Peter; Voelker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Xie, Zhijun; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Tinker, Andrew; Polasek, Ozren; Rosand, Jonathan; Jamshidi, Yalda; Duijn, Cornelia Mvan; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Jukema, Wouter J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Wilson, James G.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Caulfield, Mark J.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Sanna, Serena; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Deloukas, Panos; Pedersen, Oluf; Rotter, Jerome I.; Doerr, Marcus; O'Donnell, Chris J.; Hayward, Caroline; Arking, Dan E.; Kooperberg, Charles; van der Harst, Pim; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Stricker, Bruno H.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2017-01-01

    Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This study aims to

  1. GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pharoah, Paul D P; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Ramus, Susan J

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified four susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), with another two suggestive loci reaching near genome-wide significance. We pooled data from a GWAS conducted in North America with another GWAS from the UK. We selected the top 24...

  2. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); G.A. Mendoza-Fandino (Gustavo A.); S. Nord (Silje); J. Lilyquist (Janna); C. Olswold (Curtis); B. Hallberg (Boubou); S. Agata (Simona); H. Ahsan (Habibul); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C.B. Ambrosone (Christine B.); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); V. Arndt (Volker); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Barile (Monica); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); L. Beckmann (Lars); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); J. Benítez (Javier); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); S.S. Buys (Saundra S.); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M.A. Caligo (Maria); F. Canzian (Federico); T.A. Carpenter (Adrian); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S.J. Chanock (Stephen J.); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); K. Czene (Kamila); M.B. Daly (Mary B.); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Devilee (Peter); O. Díez (Orland); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S.M. Domchek (Susan); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); M. Dumont (Martine); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); A.B. Ekici (Arif); H. Eliassen (Heather); S.D. Ellis (Steve); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Försti (Asta); F. Fostira (Florentia); W.D. Foulkes (William); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); M. Gabrielson (Marike); M. Gammon (Marilie); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); J. Garber (Judy); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.A. Gayther (Simon); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); G.G. Giles (Graham); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); A. González-Neira (Anna); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); J. Gronwald (Jacek); P. Guénel (Pascal); M.J. Gunter (Marc J.); L. Haeberle (Lothar); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S. Hart (Stewart); S. Healey (Sue); T. Heikkinen (Tuomas); B.E. Henderson (Brian); J. Herzog (Josef); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); R.N. Hoover (Robert); J.L. Hopper (John); K. Humphreys (Keith); D. Hunter (David); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny N.); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. James (Margaret); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); U.B. Jensen; E.M. John (Esther); M. Jones (Michael); M. Kabisch (Maria); S. Kar (Siddhartha); B.Y. Karlan (Beth Y.); S. Khan (Sofia); K.T. Khaw; M.G. Kibriya (Muhammad); J.A. Knight (Julia); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); V. Kristensen (Vessela); A. Kwong (Ava); Y. Laitman (Yael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Lazaro (Conxi); E. Lee (Eunjung); L. Le Marchand (Loic); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A. Lindblom (Annika); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); J. Liu (Jianjun); J. Long (Jirong); J. Lubinski (Jan); P.L. Mai (Phuong); E. Makalic (Enes); K.E. Malone (Kathleen E.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); S. Margolin (Sara); F. Marme (Federick); J.W.M. Martens (John); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A. Meindl (Alfons); A. Miller (Austin); R.L. Milne (Roger); P. Miron (Penelope); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); R. Nussbaum (Robert); K. Offit (Kenneth); E. Olah; O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); J.E. Olson (Janet); A. Osorio (Ana); S.K. Park (Sue K.); P.H.M. Peeters; B. Peissel (Bernard); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Peto (Julian); C. Phelan (Catherine); R. Pilarski (Robert); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Pykäs (Katri); P. Radice (Paolo); N. Rahman (Nazneen); J. Rantala (Johanna); C. Rappaport (Christine); G. Rennert (Gad); A.L. Richardson (Andrea); M. Robson (Mark); I. Romieu (Isabelle); A. Rudolph (Anja); E.J.T. Rutgers (Emiel); M.-J. Sanchez (Maria-Jose); R. Santella (Regina); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); D.F. Schmidt (Daniel); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); R.J. Scott (Rodney); L. Senter (Leigha); P. Sharma (Priyanka); J. Simard (Jacques); C.F. Singer (Christian); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); P. Soucy (Penny); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Steinemann (Doris); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (Marie); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); C. Szabo (Csilla); R. Tamimi (Rulla); W. Tapper (William); P.J. Teixeira; S.-H. Teo; M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); D. Thompson (Deborah); L. Tihomirova (Laima); A.E. Toland (Amanda); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); T. Truong (Thérèse); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); A. Teulé (A.); R. Tumino (Rosario); N. Tung (Nadine); C. Turnbull (Clare); G. Ursin (Giski); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); E. Weiderpass (Elisabete); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); A.S. Whittemore (Alice S.); H. Wildiers (Hans); R. Winqvist (Robert); X.R. Yang (Xiaohong R.); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); S. Yao (Song); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); W. Zheng (Wei); P. Hall (Per); P. Kraft (Peter); C. Vachon (Celine); S. Slager (Susan); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); A.A.N. Monteiro (Alvaro A. N.); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCommon variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10-8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative

  3. GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pharoah, P.D.; Tsai, Y.Y.; Ramus, S.J.; Phelan, C.M.; Goode, E.L.; Lawrenson, K.; Buckley, M.; Fridley, B.L.; Tyrer, J.P.; Shen, H.; Weber, R.; Karevan, R.; Larson, M.C.; Song, H.; Tessier, D.C.; Bacot, F.; Vincent, D.; Cunningham, J.M.; Dennis, J.; Dicks, E.; Aben, K.K.H.; Anton-Culver, H.; Antonenkova, N.; Armasu, S.M.; Baglietto, L.; Bandera, E.V.; Beckmann, M.W.; Birrer, M.J.; Bloom, G.; Bogdanova, N.; Brenton, J.D.; Brinton, L.A.; Brooks-Wilson, A.; Brown, R.; Butzow, R.; Campbell, I.; Carney, M.E.; Carvalho, R.S.; Chang-Claude, J.; Chen, Y.A.; Chen, Z.; Chow, W.H.; Cicek, M.S.; Coetzee, G.; Cook, L.S.; Cramer, D.W; Cybulski, C.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, A.; Despierre, E.; Doherty, J.A.; Dork, T.; Bois, A. du; Durst, M.; Eccles, D.; Edwards, R.; Ekici, A.B.; Fasching, P.A.; Fenstermacher, D.; Flanagan, J.; Gao, Y.T.; Garcia-Closas, M.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Giles, G.; Gjyshi, A.; Gore, M.; Gronwald, J.; Guo, Q.; Halle, M.K.; Harter, P.; Hein, A.; Heitz, F.; Hillemanns, P.; Hoatlin, M.; Hogdall, E.; Hogdall, C.K.; Hosono, S.; Jakubowska, A.; Jensen, A.; Kalli, K.R.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kelemen, L.E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Kjaer, S.K.; Konecny, G.E.; Krakstad, C.; Kupryjanczyk, J.; Lambrechts, D.; Lambrechts, S.; Le, N.D.; Lee, N.; Lee, J. van der; Leminen, A.; Lim, B.K.; Lissowska, J.; Lubinski, J.; Lundvall, L.; Lurie, G.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Altena, A.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified four susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), with another two suggestive loci reaching near genome-wide significance. We pooled data from a GWAS conducted in North America with another GWAS from the UK. We selected the top 24,55

  4. Chromosomal locations of four minor rDNA loci and a marker microsatellite sequence in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C.; Linde-Laursen, I.

    1994-01-01

    is located about 54% out on the short arm of chromosome 4 and it has not previously been reported in barley. We have designated the new locus Nor-I6. rDNA loci on homoeologous group 4 chromosomes have not yet been reported in other Triticeae species. The origin of these 4 minor rDNA loci is discussed...

  5. A method for estimating the effective number of loci affecting a quantitative character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-11-01

    A likelihood method is introduced that jointly estimates the number of loci and the additive effect of alleles that account for the genetic variance of a normally distributed quantitative character in a randomly mating population. The method assumes that measurements of the character are available from one or both parents and an arbitrary number of full siblings. The method uses the fact, first recognized by Karl Pearson in 1904, that the variance of a character among offspring depends on both the parental phenotypes and on the number of loci. Simulations show that the method performs well provided that data from a sufficient number of families (on the order of thousands) are available. This method assumes that the loci are in Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium but does not assume anything about the linkage relationships. It performs equally well if all loci are on the same non-recombining chromosome provided they are in linkage equilibrium. The method can be adapted to take account of loci already identified as being associated with the character of interest. In that case, the method estimates the number of loci not already known to affect the character. The method applied to measurements of crown-rump length in 281 family trios in a captive colony of African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiopus sabaeus) estimates the number of loci to be 112 and the additive effect to be 0.26 cm. A parametric bootstrap analysis shows that a rough confidence interval has a lower bound of 14 loci.

  6. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Marten E.; Warren, Helen R; Cabrera, Claudia P; Verweij, Niek; Mifsud, Borbala; Haessler, Jeffrey; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A.; Fu, Yi-Ping; Weiss, Stefan; Lin, Henry J.; Grarup, Niels; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Pistis, Giorgio; Shah, Nabi; Brody, Jennifer A.; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lin, Honghuang; Mei, Hao; Smith, Albert V.; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Hall, Leanne M; van Setten, Jessica; Trompet, Stella; Prins, Bram P.; Isaacs, Aaron; Radmanesh, Farid; Marten, Jonathan; Entwistle, Aiman; Kors, Jan A.; Silva, Claudia T; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C.; de Boer, Rudolf; de Haan, Hugoline G; de Mutsert, Renee; Dedoussis, George; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Eppinga, Ruben N.; Felix, Stephan B.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hagemeijer, Yanick; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Huang, Paul L.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kahonen, Mika; Kanters, Jorgen K.; Kolcic, Ivana; Launer, Lenore J.; Li, Man; Yao, Jie; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Simin; MacFarlane, Peter W.; Mangino, Massimo; Morris, Andrew D.; Mulas, Antonella; Murray, Alison D.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Orru, Marco; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peters, Annette; Porteous, David J.; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lihong; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roselli, Carolina; Rudan, Igor; Sattar, Naveed; Sever, Peter; Sinner, Moritz F.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Taylor, Kent D.; Tobin, Martin D.; Uitterlinden, Andre; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Hoes, Arno W.; van der Meer, Peter; Voelker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Xie, Zhijun; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Tinker, Andrew; Polasek, Ozren; Rosand, Jonathan; Jamshidi, Yalda; Duijn, Cornelia Mvan; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Jukema, Wouter J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Wilson, James G.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Caulfield, Mark J.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Sanna, Serena; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Deloukas, Panos; Pedersen, Oluf; Rotter, Jerome I.; Doerr, Marcus; O'Donnell, Chris J.; Hayward, Caroline; Arking, Dan E.; Kooperberg, Charles; van der Harst, Pim; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Stricker, Bruno H.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2017-01-01

    Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This study aims to disco

  7. Genetic fine mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Gaulton (Kyle); T. Ferreira (Teresa); Y. Lee (Yeji); A. Raimondo (Anne); R. Mägi (Reedik); M.E. Reschen (Michael E.); A. Mahajan (Anubha); A. Locke (Adam); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); N.R. Robertson (Neil); R.A. Scott (Robert); I. Prokopenko (Inga); L.J. Scott (Laura); T. Green (Todd); T. Sparsø (Thomas); D. Thuillier (Dorothee); L. Yengo (Loic); H. Grallert (Harald); S. Wahl (Simone); M. Frånberg (Mattias); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); H. Kestler (Hans); H. Chheda (Himanshu); L. Eisele (Lewin); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); L. Qi (Lu); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); E.M. van Leeuwen (Elisa); S.M. Willems (Sara); M. Li (Man); H. Chen (Han); C. Fuchsberger (Christian); P. Kwan (Phoenix); C. Ma (Clement); M. Linderman (Michael); Y. Lu (Yingchang); S.K. Thomsen (Soren K.); J.K. Rundle (Jana K.); N.L. Beer (Nicola L.); M. van de Bunt (Martijn); A. Chalisey (Anil); H.M. Kang (Hyun Min); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); P. Almgren (Peter); D. Baldassarre (Damiano); B. Balkau (Beverley); R. Benediktsson (Rafn); M. Blüher (Matthias); H. Boeing (Heiner); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin P.); N.P. Burtt (Noël); J. Carey (Jason); G. Charpentier (Guillaume); P.S. Chines (Peter); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); D.J. Couper (David J.); A. Crenshaw (Andrew); R.M. van Dam (Rob); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); M. Dorkhan (Mozhgan); T. Edkins (Ted); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); T. Esko (Tõnu); E. Eury (Elodie); J. Fadista (João); J. Flannick (Jason); P. Fontanillas (Pierre); C.S. Fox (Caroline); P.W. Franks (Paul W.); K. Gertow (Karl); C. Gieger (Christian); B. Gigante (Bruna); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); G.B. Grant (George); N. Grarup (Niels); C.J. Groves (Christopher J.); M. Hassinen (Maija); C.T. Have (Christian T.); C. Herder (Christian); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); A.B. Hreidarsson (Astradur); S.E. Humphries (Steve E.); D.J. Hunter (David J.); A.U. Jackson (Anne); A. Jonsson (Anna); M.E. Jørgensen (Marit E.); T. Jørgensen (Torben); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); N.D. Kerrison (Nicola D.); L. Kinnunen (Leena); N. Klopp (Norman); A. Kong (Augustine); P. Kovacs (Peter); P. Kraft (Peter); J. Kravic (Jasmina); C. Langford (Cordelia); K. Leander (Karin); L. Liang (Liming); P. Lichtner (Peter); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia M.); B. Lindholm (Bengt); A. Linneberg (Allan); C.-T. Liu (Ching-Ti); S. Lobbens (Stéphane); J. Luan (Jian'fan); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); S. Männistö (Satu); O. McLeod (Olga); J. Meyer (Jobst); E. Mihailov (Evelin); G. Mirza (Ghazala); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); C. Navarro (Carmen); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); N.N. Oskolkov (Nikolay N.); K.R. Owen (Katharine); D. Palli (Domenico); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); J.R.B. Perry (John); C.P. Platou (Carl); M. Roden (Michael); D. Ruderfer (Douglas); D. Rybin (Denis); Y.T. Van Der Schouw (Yvonne T.); B. Sennblad (Bengt); G. Sigurosson (Gunnar); A. Stancáková (Alena); D. Steinbach; P. Storm (Petter); K. Strauch (Konstantin); H.M. Stringham (Heather); Q. Sun; B. Thorand (Barbara); E. Tikkanen (Emmi); A. Tönjes (Anke); J. Trakalo (Joseph); E. Tremoli (Elena); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); R. Wennauer (Roman); S. Wiltshire (Steven); A.R. Wood (Andrew); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); I. Dunham (Ian); E. Birney (Ewan); L. Pasquali (Lorenzo); J. Ferrer (Jorge); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); J. Dupuis (Josée); J.C. Florez (Jose); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); J.S. Pankow (James); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); J.B. Meigs (James B.); F.B. Hu (Frank B.); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); T.A. Lakka (Timo); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); M. Stumvoll (Michael); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); L. Lind (Lars); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); E. Korpi-Hyövälti (Eeva); T. Saaristo (Timo); J. Saltevo (Juha); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); M. Laakso (Markku); A. Metspalu (Andres); R. Erbel (Raimund); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); S. Moebus (Susanne); S. Ripatti (Samuli); V. Salomaa (Veikko); E. Ingelsson (Erik); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); R.N. Bergman (Richard N.); F.S. Collins (Francis S.); K.L. Mohlke (Karen L.); H. Koistinen (Heikki); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); K. Hveem (Kristian); I. Njølstad (Inger); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); P.J. Donnelly (Peter J.); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); U. de Faire (Ulf); A. Hamsten (Anders); T. Illig (Thomas); A. Peters (Annette); S. Cauchi (Stephane); R. Sladek (Rob); P. Froguel (Philippe); T. Hansen (Torben); O. Pedersen (Oluf); A.D. Morris (Andrew); C.N.A. Palmer (Collin N. A.); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); O. Melander (Olle); P.M. Nilsson (Peter M.); L. Groop (Leif); I. Barroso (Inês); C. Langenberg (Claudia); N.J. Wareham (Nicholas J.); C.A. O'Callaghan (Christopher A.); A.L. Gloyn (Anna); D. Altshuler (David); M. Boehnke (Michael); T.M. Teslovich (Tanya M.); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); A.P. Morris (Andrew)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe performed fine mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in or near KCNQ1. 'Credible sets' of the variants most likely to drive each

  8. Genetic fine mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaulton, Kyle J; Ferreira, Teresa; Lee, Yeji; Raimondo, Anne; Mägi, Reedik; Reschen, Michael E; Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam; William Rayner, N; Robertson, Neil; Scott, Robert A; Prokopenko, Inga; Scott, Laura J; Green, Todd; Sparso, Thomas; Thuillier, Dorothee; Yengo, Loic; Grallert, Harald; Wahl, Simone; Frånberg, Mattias; Strawbridge, Rona J; Kestler, Hans; Chheda, Himanshu; Eisele, Lewin; Gustafsson, Stefan; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Qi, Lu; Karssen, Lennart C; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Willems, Sara M; Li, Man; Chen, Han; Fuchsberger, Christian; Kwan, Phoenix; Ma, Clement; Linderman, Michael; Lu, Yingchang; Thomsen, Soren K; Rundle, Jana K; Beer, Nicola L; van de Bunt, Martijn; Chalisey, Anil; Kang, Hyun Min; Voight, Benjamin F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Blüher, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bottinger, Erwin P; Burtt, Noël P; Carey, Jason; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Doney, Alex S F; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Edkins, Sarah; Eriksson, Johan G; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Fadista, João; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fox, Caroline; Franks, Paul W; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Gottesman, Omri; Grant, George B; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Hassinen, Maija; Have, Christian T; Herder, Christian; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Humphries, Steve E; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Anne U; Jonsson, Anna; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen-Hong L; Kerrison, Nicola D; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Liang, Liming; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; McLeod, Olga; Meyer, Julia; Mihailov, Evelin; Mirza, Ghazala; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Carmen; Nöthen, Markus M; Oskolkov, Nikolay N; Owen, Katharine R; Palli, Domenico; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peltonen, Leena; Perry, John R B; Platou, Carl G P; Roden, Michael; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rybin, Denis; van der Schouw, Yvonne T|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073449253; Sennblad, Bengt; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Stančáková, Alena; Steinbach, Gerald; Storm, Petter; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Thorand, Barbara; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tonjes, Anke; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wennauer, Roman; Wiltshire, Steven; Wood, Andrew R; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Dunham, Ian; Birney, Ewan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Ferrer, Jorge; Loos, Ruth J F; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia; Sijbrands, Eric; Meigs, James B; Hu, Frank B; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Stumvoll, Michael; Pedersen, Nancy L; Lind, Lars; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Saaristo, Timo E; Saltevo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Metspalu, Andres; Erbel, Raimund; Jöcke, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ingelsson, Erik; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Koistinen, Heikki; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hveem, Kristian; Njølstad, Inger; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Donnelly, Peter J; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Illig, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Cauchi, Stephane; Sladek, Rob; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Collin N A; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Nilsson, Peter M; Groop, Leif C; Barroso, Inês; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Gloyn, Anna L; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; Teslovich, Tanya M; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    We performed fine mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in or near KCNQ1. 'Credible sets' of the variants most likely to drive each distinct si

  9. Genetic fine mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Gaulton (Kyle); T. Ferreira (Teresa); Y. Lee (Yeji); A. Raimondo (Anne); R. Mägi (Reedik); M.E. Reschen (Michael E.); A. Mahajan (Anubha); A. Locke (Adam); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); N.R. Robertson (Neil); R.A. Scott (Robert); I. Prokopenko (Inga); L.J. Scott (Laura); T. Green (Todd); T. Sparsø (Thomas); D. Thuillier (Dorothee); L. Yengo (Loic); H. Grallert (Harald); S. Wahl (Simone); M. Frånberg (Mattias); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); H. Kestler (Hans); H. Chheda (Himanshu); L. Eisele (Lewin); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); L. Qi (Lu); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); E.M. van Leeuwen (Elisa); S.M. Willems (Sara); M. Li (Man); H. Chen (Han); C. Fuchsberger (Christian); P. Kwan (Phoenix); C. Ma (Clement); M. Linderman (Michael); Y. Lu (Yingchang); S.K. Thomsen (Soren K.); J.K. Rundle (Jana K.); N.L. Beer (Nicola L.); M. van de Bunt (Martijn); A. Chalisey (Anil); H.M. Kang (Hyun Min); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); P. Almgren (Peter); D. Baldassarre (Damiano); B. Balkau (Beverley); R. Benediktsson (Rafn); M. Blüher (Matthias); H. Boeing (Heiner); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin P.); N.P. Burtt (Noël); J. Carey (Jason); G. Charpentier (Guillaume); P.S. Chines (Peter); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); D.J. Couper (David J.); A. Crenshaw (Andrew); R.M. van Dam (Rob); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); M. Dorkhan (Mozhgan); T. Edkins (Ted); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); T. Esko (Tõnu); E. Eury (Elodie); J. Fadista (João); J. Flannick (Jason); P. Fontanillas (Pierre); C.S. Fox (Caroline); P.W. Franks (Paul W.); K. Gertow (Karl); C. Gieger (Christian); B. Gigante (Bruna); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); G.B. Grant (George); N. Grarup (Niels); C.J. Groves (Christopher J.); M. Hassinen (Maija); C.T. Have (Christian T.); C. Herder (Christian); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); A.B. Hreidarsson (Astradur); S.E. Humphries (Steve E.); D.J. Hunter (David J.); A.U. Jackson (Anne); A. Jonsson (Anna); M.E. Jørgensen (Marit E.); T. Jørgensen (Torben); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); N.D. Kerrison (Nicola D.); L. Kinnunen (Leena); N. Klopp (Norman); A. Kong (Augustine); P. Kovacs (Peter); P. Kraft (Peter); J. Kravic (Jasmina); C. Langford (Cordelia); K. Leander (Karin); L. Liang (Liming); P. Lichtner (Peter); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia M.); B. Lindholm (Bengt); A. Linneberg (Allan); C.-T. Liu (Ching-Ti); S. Lobbens (Stéphane); J. Luan (Jian'fan); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); S. Männistö (Satu); O. McLeod (Olga); J. Meyer (Jobst); E. Mihailov (Evelin); G. Mirza (Ghazala); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); C. Navarro (Carmen); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); N.N. Oskolkov (Nikolay N.); K.R. Owen (Katharine); D. Palli (Domenico); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); J.R.B. Perry (John); C.P. Platou (Carl); M. Roden (Michael); D. Ruderfer (Douglas); D. Rybin (Denis); Y.T. Van Der Schouw (Yvonne T.); B. Sennblad (Bengt); G. Sigurosson (Gunnar); A. Stancáková (Alena); D. Steinbach; P. Storm (Petter); K. Strauch (Konstantin); H.M. Stringham (Heather); Q. Sun; B. Thorand (Barbara); E. Tikkanen (Emmi); A. Tönjes (Anke); J. Trakalo (Joseph); E. Tremoli (Elena); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); R. Wennauer (Roman); S. Wiltshire (Steven); A.R. Wood (Andrew); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); I. Dunham (Ian); E. Birney (Ewan); L. Pasquali (Lorenzo); J. Ferrer (Jorge); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); J. Dupuis (Josée); J.C. Florez (Jose); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); J.S. Pankow (James); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); J.B. Meigs (James B.); F.B. Hu (Frank B.); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); T.A. Lakka (Timo); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); M. Stumvoll (Michael); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); L. Lind (Lars); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); E. Korpi-Hyövälti (Eeva); T. Saaristo (Timo); J. Saltevo (Juha); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); M. Laakso (Markku); A. Metspalu (Andres); R. Erbel (Raimund); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); S. Moebus (Susanne); S. Ripatti (Samuli); V. Salomaa (Veikko); E. Ingelsson (Erik); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); R.N. Bergman (Richard N.); F.S. Collins (Francis S.); K.L. Mohlke (Karen L.); H. Koistinen (Heikki); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); K. Hveem (Kristian); I. Njølstad (Inger); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); P.J. Donnelly (Peter J.); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); U. de Faire (Ulf); A. Hamsten (Anders); T. Illig (Thomas); A. Peters (Annette); S. Cauchi (Stephane); R. Sladek (Rob); P. Froguel (Philippe); T. Hansen (Torben); O. Pedersen (Oluf); A.D. Morris (Andrew); C.N.A. Palmer (Collin N. A.); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); O. Melander (Olle); P.M. Nilsson (Peter M.); L. Groop (Leif); I. Barroso (Inês); C. Langenberg (Claudia); N.J. Wareham (Nicholas J.); C.A. O'Callaghan (Christopher A.); A.L. Gloyn (Anna); D. Altshuler (David); M. Boehnke (Michael); T.M. Teslovich (Tanya M.); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); A.P. Morris (Andrew)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe performed fine mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in or near KCNQ1. 'Credible sets' of the variants most likely to drive each

  10. Genetic fine mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaulton, Kyle J; Ferreira, Teresa; Lee, Yeji; Raimondo, Anne; Mägi, Reedik; Reschen, Michael E; Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam; William Rayner, N; Robertson, Neil; Scott, Robert A; Prokopenko, Inga; Scott, Laura J; Green, Todd; Sparso, Thomas; Thuillier, Dorothee; Yengo, Loic; Grallert, Harald; Wahl, Simone; Frånberg, Mattias; Strawbridge, Rona J; Kestler, Hans; Chheda, Himanshu; Eisele, Lewin; Gustafsson, Stefan; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Qi, Lu; Karssen, Lennart C; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Willems, Sara M; Li, Man; Chen, Han; Fuchsberger, Christian; Kwan, Phoenix; Ma, Clement; Linderman, Michael; Lu, Yingchang; Thomsen, Soren K; Rundle, Jana K; Beer, Nicola L; van de Bunt, Martijn; Chalisey, Anil; Kang, Hyun Min; Voight, Benjamin F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Blüher, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bottinger, Erwin P; Burtt, Noël P; Carey, Jason; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Doney, Alex S F; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Edkins, Sarah; Eriksson, Johan G; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Fadista, João; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fox, Caroline; Franks, Paul W; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Gottesman, Omri; Grant, George B; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Hassinen, Maija; Have, Christian T; Herder, Christian; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Humphries, Steve E; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Anne U; Jonsson, Anna; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen-Hong L; Kerrison, Nicola D; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Liang, Liming; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; McLeod, Olga; Meyer, Julia; Mihailov, Evelin; Mirza, Ghazala; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Carmen; Nöthen, Markus M; Oskolkov, Nikolay N; Owen, Katharine R; Palli, Domenico; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peltonen, Leena; Perry, John R B; Platou, Carl G P; Roden, Michael; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rybin, Denis; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Sennblad, Bengt; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Stančáková, Alena; Steinbach, Gerald; Storm, Petter; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Thorand, Barbara; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tonjes, Anke; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wennauer, Roman; Wiltshire, Steven; Wood, Andrew R; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Dunham, Ian; Birney, Ewan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Ferrer, Jorge; Loos, Ruth J F; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia; Sijbrands, Eric; Meigs, James B; Hu, Frank B; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Stumvoll, Michael; Pedersen, Nancy L; Lind, Lars; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Saaristo, Timo E; Saltevo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Metspalu, Andres; Erbel, Raimund; Jöcke, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ingelsson, Erik; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Koistinen, Heikki; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hveem, Kristian; Njølstad, Inger; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Donnelly, Peter J; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Illig, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Cauchi, Stephane; Sladek, Rob; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Collin N A; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Nilsson, Peter M; Groop, Leif C; Barroso, Inês; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Gloyn, Anna L; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; Teslovich, Tanya M; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    We performed fine mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in or near KCNQ1. 'Credible sets' of the variants most likely to drive each distinct si

  11. Six new loci associated with body mass index highlight a neuronal influence on body weight regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Willer (Cristen); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); S. Li (Shengxu); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); I.M. Heid (Iris); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); A.L. Elliott (Amanda); A.U. Jackson (Anne); C. Lamina (Claudia); G. Lettre (Guillaume); N. Lim (Noha); H.N. Lyon (Helen); S.A. McCarroll (Steven); K. Papadakis (Konstantinos); L. Qi (Lu); J.C. Randall (Joshua); R.M. Roccasecca; S. Sanna (Serena); P. Scheet (Paul); M.N. Weedon (Michael); E. Wheeler (Eleanor); J.H. Zhao; L.C. Jacobs (Leonie); I. Prokopenko (Inga); N. Soranzo (Nicole); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); N.J. Timpson (Nicholas); P. Almgren (Peter); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R.N. Bergman (Richard); S. Bingham (Sheila); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); M.J. Brown (Morris); N.P. Burtt (Noël); P.S. Chines (Peter); L. Coin (Lachlan); F.S. Collins (Francis); J. Connell (John); C. Cooper (Charles); G.D. Smith; E.M. Dennison (Elaine); P. Deodhar (Parimal); M.R. Erdos (Michael); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); D.M. Evans (David); L. Gianniny (Lauren); C. Gieger (Christian); C.J. Gillson (Christopher); C. Guiducci (Candace); R. Hackett (Rachel); D. Hadley (David); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); J. Hebebrand (Johannes); A. Hofman (Albert); B. Isomaa (Bo); T. Johnson (Toby); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); Z. Jovanovic (Zorica); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); P. Kraft (Peter); M. Kuokkanen (Mikko); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); E. Lakatta (Edward); J. Luan; R.N. Luben (Robert); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); T. Meitinger (Thomas); A. Mulas (Antonella); P. Munroe (Patricia); N. Narisu (Narisu); A.R. Ness (Andrew); K. Northstone (Kate); S. O'Rahilly (Stephen); C. Purmann (Carolin); M.G. Rees (Matthew); M. Ridderstråle (Martin); S.M. Ring (Susan); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A. Ruokonen (Aimo); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); J. Saramies (Jouko); L.J. Scott (Laura); A. Scuteri (Angelo); K. Silander (Kaisa); M.A. Sims (Matthew); K. Song (Kijoung); J. Stephens (Jonathan); S. Stevens (Suzanne); H.M. Stringham (Heather); Y.C.L. Tung (Loraine); T.T. Valle (Timo); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); K.S. Vimaleswaran (Karani); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); C. Wallace (Chris); R.M. Watanabe (Richard); D. Waterworth (Dawn); N. Watkins (Nicholas); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); G. Zhai (Guangju); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); D. Altshuler (David); M. Caulfield (Mark); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); I.S. Farooqi (Sadaf); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); J.M. Guralnik (Jack); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F.B. Hu (Frank); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); M. Laakso (Markku); V. Mooser (Vincent); K.K. Ong (Ken); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); V. Salomaa (Veikko); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.D. Spector (Timothy); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); M. Uda (Manuela); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); N.J. Wareham (Nick); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); L. Groop (Leif); R.B. Hayes (Richard); D. Hunter (David); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); D. Schlessinger (David); D.P. Strachan (David); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); M. Boehnke (Michael); I. Barroso (Inês); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCommon variants at only two loci, FTO and MC4R, have been reproducibly associated with body mass index (BMI) in humans. To identify additional loci, we conducted meta-analysis of 15 genome-wide association studies for BMI (n > 32,000) and followed up top signals in 14 additional cohorts

  12. Mutation Rate at Commonly Used Forensic STR Loci: Paternity Testing Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Aşıcıoğlua

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Paternity tests are carried out by the analysis of hypervariable short tandem repeat DNA loci. These microsatellite sequences mutate at a higher rate than that of bulk DNA. The occurrence of germline mutations at STR loci posses problems in interpretation of resulting genetic profiles. We recently analyzed 59–159 parent/child allele transfers at 13 microsatellite loci. We identified 12 mutations in 7 microsatellite loci. No mutations were occurred in other 6 loci. The highest mutation rate was observed with 5 mutations at D8S1179 locus at different alleles. The event was always single repeat related. The mutation rate was between 0 and 1.5 x 10-2 per locus per gamete per generation. The mutation event is very crucial for forensic DNA testing and accumulation of STR mutation data is extremely important for genetic profile interpretation.

  13. Isolation and characterization of 19 polymorphic microsatellite loci from the topmouth gudgeon, Pseudorasbora parva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C; Gul, Y; Yang, K; Cui, L; Wang, W-M; Gao, Z-X

    2011-01-01

    The Asiatic topmouth gudgeon, Pseudorasbora parva, is recognized as one of the most invasive fish species in many countries outside of Asia. We isolated and characterized 19 microsatellite loci from P. parva. The polymorphism of these 19 loci was tested on 40 individuals of P. parva sampled from a wild population located in Ezhou, Hubei province of China. The loci had 5 to 11 alleles, with a mean of 7.7 at each locus; 11 loci conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.237 to 0.973 and from 0.647 to 0.914, respectively. All microsatellite loci were in linkage equilibrium. These microsatellite markers are potentially useful for the assessment of population genetic structure during invasion and dispersal of P. parva in new habitats.

  14. Meta-analysis of 375,000 individuals identifies 38 susceptibility loci for migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Padhraig; Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Palta, Priit; Esko, Tonu; Pers, Tune H.; Farh, Kai-How; Cuenca-Leon, Ester; Muona, Mikko; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Kurth, Tobias; Ingason, Andres; McMahon, George; Ligthart, Lannie; Terwindt, Gisela M; Kallela, Mikko; Freilinger, Tobias M; Ran, Caroline; Gordon, Scott G; Stam, Anine H; Steinberg, Stacy; Borck, Guntram; Koiranen, Markku; Quaye, Lydia; Adams, Hieab HH; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Wedenoja, Juho; Hinds, David A; Buring, Julie E; Schürks, Markus; Ridker, Paul M; Hrafnsdottir, Maria Gudlaug; Stefansson, Hreinn; Ring, Susan M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Färkkilä, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari; Vepsäläinen, Salli; Malik, Rainer; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kurki, Mitja I; Kals, Mart; Mägi, Reedik; Pärn, Kalle; Hämäläinen, Eija; Huang, Hailiang; Byrnes, Andrea E; Franke, Lude; Huang, Jie; Stergiakouli, Evie; Lee, Phil H; Sandor, Cynthia; Webber, Caleb; Cader, Zameel; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Eriksson, Johan G; Salomaa, Veikko; Heikkilä, Kauko; Loehrer, Elizabeth; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Cherkas, Lynn; Pedersen, Linda M.; Stubhaug, Audun; Nielsen, Christopher S; Männikkä, Minna; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Göbel, Hartmut; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Christensen, Anne Francke; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Werge, Thomas; Kaprio, Jaakko; Aromaa, Arpo J; Raitakari, Olli; Ikram, M Arfan; Spector, Tim; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Metspalu, Andres; Kubisch, Christian; Strachan, David P; Ferrari, Michel D; Belin, Andrea C; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; van den Maagdenberg, Arn MJM; Zwart, John-Anker; Boomsma, Dorret I; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Eriksson, Nicholas; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Olesen, Jes; Chasman, Daniel I; Nyholt, Dale R; Palotie, Aarno

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting around 1 in 7 people worldwide, but its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Some debate exists over whether migraine is a disease of vascular dysfunction or a result of neuronal dysfunction with secondary vascular changes. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have thus far identified 13 independent loci associated with migraine. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed the largest genetic study of migraine to date, comprising 59,674 cases and 316,078 controls from 22 GWA studies. We identified 44 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with migraine risk (P < 5 × 10−8) that map to 38 distinct genomic loci, including 28 loci not previously reported and the first locus identified on chromosome X. In subsequent computational analyses, the identified loci showed enrichment for genes expressed in vascular and smooth muscle tissues, consistent with a predominant theory of migraine that highlights vascular etiologies. PMID:27322543

  15. Genomic conservation of cattle microsatellite loci in wild gaur (Bos gaurus and current genetic status of this species in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renard Jean-Paul

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The wild gaur (Bos gaurus is an endangered wild cattle species. In Vietnam, the total number of wild gaurs is estimated at a maximum of 500 individuals. Inbreeding and genetic drift are current relevant threats to this small population size. Therefore, information about the genetic status of the Vietnamese wild gaur population is essential to develop strategies for conservation and effective long-term management for this species. In the present study, we performed cross-species amplification of 130 bovine microsatellite markers, in order to evaluate the applicability and conservation of cattle microsatellite loci in the wild gaur genome. The genetic diversity of Vietnamese wild gaur was also investigated, based on data collected from the 117 successfully amplified loci. Results One hundred-thirty cattle microsatellite markers were tested on a panel of 11 animals. Efficient amplifications were observed for 117 markers (90% with a total of 264 alleles, and of these, 68 (58.1% gave polymorphic band patterns. The number of alleles per locus among the polymorphic markers ranged from two to six. Thirteen loci (BM1314, BM2304, BM6017, BMC2228, BMS332, BMS911, CSSM023, ETH123, HAUT14, HEL11, HEL5, ILSTS005 and INRA189 distributed on nine different cattle chromosomes failed to amplify wild gaur genomic DNA. Three cattle Y-chromosome specific microsatellite markers (INRA124, INRA126 and BM861 were also highly specific in wild gaur, only displaying an amplification product in the males. Genotype data collected from the 117 successfully amplified microsatellites were used to assess the genetic diversity of this species in Vietnam. Polymorphic Information Content (PIC values varied between 0.083 and 0.767 with a mean of 0.252 while observed heterozygosities (Ho ranged from 0.091 to 0.909 (mean of 0.269. Nei's unbiased mean heterozygosity and the mean allele number across loci were 0.298 and 2.2, respectively. Conclusion Extensive

  16. Caucasian and Asian specific rheumatoid arthritis risk loci reveal limited replication and apparent allelic heterogeneity in north Indians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushplata Prasad

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies and meta-analysis indicate that several genes/loci are consistently associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA in European and Asian populations. To evaluate the transferability status of these findings to an ethnically diverse north Indian population, we performed a replication analysis. We investigated the association of 47 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at 43 of these genes/loci with RA in a north Indian cohort comprising 983 RA cases and 1007 age and gender matched controls. Genotyping was done using Infinium human 660w-quad. Association analysis by chi-square test implemented in plink was carried out in two steps. Firstly, association of the index or surrogate SNP (r2>0.8, calculated from reference GIH Hap-Map population was tested. In the second step, evidence for allelic/locus heterogeneity at aforementioned genes/loci was assessed for by testing additional flanking SNPs in linkage equilibrium with index/surrogate marker.Of the 44 European specific index SNPs, neither index nor surrogate SNPs were present for nine SNPs in the genotyping array. Of the remaining 35, associations were replicated at seven genes namely PTPN22 (rs1217407, p = 3×10(-3; IL2-21 (rs13119723, p = 0.008; HLA-DRB1 (rs660895, p = 2.56×10(-5; rs6457617, p = 1.6×10(-09; rs13192471, p = 6.7×10(-16; TNFA1P3 (rs9321637, p = 0.03; CCL21 (rs13293020, p = 0.01; IL2RA (rs2104286, p = 1.9×10(-4 and ZEB1 (rs2793108, p = 0.006. Of the three Asian specific loci tested, rs2977227 in PADI4 showed modest association (p<0.02. Further, of the 140 SNPs (in LE with index/surrogate variant tested, association was observed at 11 additional genes: PTPRC, AFF3, CD28, CTLA4, PXK, ANKRD55, TAGAP, CCR6, BLK, CD40 and IL2RB. This study indicates limited replication of European and Asian index SNPs and apparent allelic heterogeneity in RA etiology among north Indians warranting independent GWAS in this population

  17. An enhanced linkage map of the sheep genome comprising more than 1000 loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, J F; Davies, K P; Crawford, A M; Hulme, D J; Vaiman, D; Cribiu, E P; Freking, B A; Beh, K J; Cockett, N E; Kang, N; Riffkin, C D; Drinkwater, R; Moore, S S; Dodds, K G; Lumsden, J M; van Stijn, T C; Phua, S H; Adelson, D L; Burkin, H R; Broom, J E; Buitkamp, J; Cambridge, L; Cushwa, W T; Gerard, E; Galloway, S M; Harrison, B; Hawken, R J; Hiendleder, S; Henry, H M; Medrano, J F; Paterson, K A; Schibler, L; Stone, R T; van Hest, B

    2001-07-01

    A medium-density linkage map of the ovine genome has been developed. Marker data for 550 new loci were generated and merged with the previous sheep linkage map. The new map comprises 1093 markers representing 1062 unique loci (941 anonymous loci, 121 genes) and spans 3500 cM (sex-averaged) for the autosomes and 132 cM (female) on the X chromosome. There is an average spacing of 3.4 cM between autosomal loci and 8.3 cM between highly polymorphic [polymorphic information content (PIC) > or = 0.7] autosomal loci. The largest gap between markers is 32.5 cM, and the number of gaps of > 20 cM between loci, or regions where loci are missing from chromosome ends, has been reduced from 40 in the previous map to 6. Five hundred and seventy-three of the loci can be ordered on a framework map with odds of > 1000 : 1. The sheep linkage map contains strong links to both the cattle and goat maps. Five hundred and seventy-two of the loci positioned on the sheep linkage map have also been mapped by linkage analysis in cattle, and 209 of the loci mapped on the sheep linkage map have also been placed on the goat linkage map. Inspection of ruminant linkage maps indicates that the genomic coverage by the current sheep linkage map is comparable to that of the available cattle maps. The sheep map provides a valuable resource to the international sheep, cattle, and goat gene mapping community.

  18. Identification of quantitative trait loci associated with salt tolerance at seedling stage from Oryza rufipogon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Tian; Lubin Tan; Fengxia Liu; Hongwei Cai; Chuanqing Sun

    2011-01-01

    Soil salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting plant growth and crop production.In the present study,salt tolerance at rice seedling stage was evaluated using 87 introgression lines (ILs),which were derived from a cross between an elite indica cultivar Teqing and an accession of common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.).Substantial variation was observed for four traits including salt tolerance score (STS),relative root dry weight (RRW),relative shoot dry weight (RSW) and relative total dry weight (RTW).STS was significantly positively correlated with all other three traits.A total of 15 putative quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with these four traits were detected using single-point analysis,which were located on chromosomes 1,2,3,6,7,9 and 10 with 8%-26% explaining the phenotypic variance.The O.rufipogon-derived alleles at 13 QTLs (86.7%) could improve the salt tolerance in the Teqing background.Four QTL clusters affecting RRW,RSW and RTW were found on chromosomes 6,7,9 and 10,respectively.Among these four QTL clusters,a major cluster including three QTLs (qRRW10,qRSW10 and qRTW10) was found near the maker RM271 on the long arm of chromosome 10,and the O.rufipogon-derived alleles at these three loci increased RRW,RSW and RTW with additive effects of 22.7%,17.3% and 18.5%,respectively,while the phenotypic variance explained by these three individual QTLs for the three traits varied from 19% to 26%.In addition,several salt tolerant ILs were selected and could be used for identifying and utilizing favorable salt tolerant genes from common wild rice and used in the salt tolerant rice breeding program.

  19. Investigation of type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease susceptibility loci for association with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinks, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Eyre, Steve; Packham, Jon; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence suggesting that juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) shares many susceptibility loci with other autoimmune diseases. Objective To investigate variants robustly associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) or coeliac disease (CD) for association with JIA. Methods Sixteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) already identified as susceptibility loci for T1D/CD were selected for genotyping in patients with JIA (n=1054) and healthy controls (n=3129). Genotype and allele frequencies were compared using the Cochrane–Armitage trend test implemented in PLINK. Results One SNP in the LPP gene, rs1464510, showed significant association with JIA (ptrend=0.002, OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.30). A second SNP, rs653178 in ATXN2, also showed nominal evidence for association with JIA (ptrend=0.02, OR=1.13, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.25). The SNP, rs17810546, in IL12A showed subtype-specific association with enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) subtype (ptrend=0.005, OR=1.88, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.94). Conclusions Evidence for a novel JIA susceptibility locus, LPP, is presented. Association at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus, previously reported to be associated with JIA in a US series, also supports this region as contributing to JIA susceptibility. In addition, a subtype-specific association of IL12A with ERA is identified. All findings will require validation in independent JIA cohorts. PMID:20647273

  20. Quantitative trait loci mapping reveals candidate pathways regulating cell cycle duration in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwo Geoffrey

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated parasite biomass in the human red blood cells can lead to increased malaria morbidity. The genes and mechanisms regulating growth and development of Plasmodium falciparum through its erythrocytic cycle are not well understood. We previously showed that strains HB3 and Dd2 diverge in their proliferation rates, and here use quantitative trait loci mapping in 34 progeny from a cross between these parent clones along with integrative bioinformatics to identify genetic loci and candidate genes that control divergences in cell cycle duration. Results Genetic mapping of cell cycle duration revealed a four-locus genetic model, including a major genetic effect on chromosome 12, which accounts for 75% of the inherited phenotype variation. These QTL span 165 genes, the majority of which have no predicted function based on homology. We present a method to systematically prioritize candidate genes using the extensive sequence and transcriptional information available for the parent lines. Putative functions were assigned to the prioritized genes based on protein interaction networks and expression eQTL from our earlier study. DNA metabolism or antigenic variation functional categories were enriched among our prioritized candidate genes. Genes were then analyzed to determine if they interact with cyclins or other proteins known to be involved in the regulation of cell cycle. Conclusions We show that the divergent proliferation rate between a drug resistant and drug sensitive parent clone is under genetic regulation and is segregating as a complex trait in 34 progeny. We map a major locus along with additional secondary effects, and use the wealth of genome data to identify key candidate genes. Of particular interest are a nucleosome assembly protein (PFL0185c, a Zinc finger transcription factor (PFL0465c both on chromosome 12 and a ribosomal protein L7Ae-related on chromosome 4 (PFD0960c.

  1. Exon-primed, intron-crossing (EPIC) loci for five nuclear genes in deep-sea protobranch bivalves: primer design, PCR protocols and locus utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Robert M; Etter, R J

    2011-11-01

    We describe PCR primers and amplification protocols developed to obtain introns from conserved nuclear genes in deep-sea protobranch bivalves. Because almost no sequence data for protobranchs are publically available, mollusk and other protostome sequences from GenBank were used to design degenerate primers, making these loci potentially useful in other invertebrate taxa. Amplification and sequencing success varied across the test group of 30 species, and we present five loci spanning this range of outcomes. Intron presence in the targeted regions also varied across genes and species, often within single genera; for instance, the calmodulin and β-tubulin loci contained introns with high frequency, whereas the triose phosphate isomerase locus never contained an intron. In introns for which we were able to obtain preliminary estimates of polymorphism levels in single species, polymorphism was greater than traditional mitochondrial loci. These markers will greatly increase the ability to assess population structure in the ecologically important protobranchs, and may prove useful in other taxa as well.

  2. Dynamics of genetic variation at gliadin-coding loci in bread wheat cultivars developed in small grains research center (Kragujevac during last 35 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novosljska-Dragovič Aleksandra

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple alleles of gliadin-coding loci are well-known genetic markers of common wheat genotypes. Based on analysis of gliadin patterns in common wheat cultivars developed at the Small Grains Research Center in Kragujevac dynamics of genetic variability at gliadin-coding loci has been surveyed for the period of 35 years. It was shown that long-term breeding of the wheat cultivars involved gradual replacement of ancient alleles for those widely spread in some regions in the world, which belong to well-known cultivars-donor of some important traits. Developing cultivars whose pedigree involved much new foreign genetic material has increased genetic diversity as well as has changed frequency of alleles of gliadin-coding loci. So we can conclude that the genetic profile of modern Serbian cultivars has changed considerably. Genetic formula of gliadin was made for each the cultivar studied. The most frequent alleles of gliadin-coding loci among modern cultivars should be of great interest of breeders because these alleles are probably linked with genes that confer advantage to their carriers at present.

  3. Comparative analysis of methods for detecting interacting loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Xiguo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions among genetic loci are believed to play an important role in disease risk. While many methods have been proposed for detecting such interactions, their relative performance remains largely unclear, mainly because different data sources, detection performance criteria, and experimental protocols were used in the papers introducing these methods and in subsequent studies. Moreover, there have been very few studies strictly focused on comparison of existing methods. Given the importance of detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, a rigorous, comprehensive comparison of performance and limitations of available interaction detection methods is warranted. Results We report a comparison of eight representative methods, of which seven were specifically designed to detect interactions among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, with the last a popular main-effect testing method used as a baseline for performance evaluation. The selected methods, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR, full interaction model (FIM, information gain (IG, Bayesian epistasis association mapping (BEAM, SNP harvester (SH, maximum entropy conditional probability modeling (MECPM, logistic regression with an interaction term (LRIT, and logistic regression (LR were compared on a large number of simulated data sets, each, consistent with complex disease models, embedding multiple sets of interacting SNPs, under different interaction models. The assessment criteria included several relevant detection power measures, family-wise type I error rate, and computational complexity. There are several important results from this study. First, while some SNPs in interactions with strong effects are successfully detected, most of the methods miss many interacting SNPs at an acceptable rate of false positives. In this study, the best-performing method was MECPM. Second, the statistical significance assessment criteria, used by some of the

  4. Identification of 19 loci for reproductive traits in a local Chinese chicken by genome-wide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Q C; Wu, P F; Dai, G J; Zhang, G X; Zhang, T; Xue, Q; Shi, H Q; Wang, J Y

    2017-03-22

    Reproductive traits have long been studied and have an important influence on chicken breeding. To identify quantitative trait loci affecting reproductive traits, a genome-wide analysis of a Chinese chicken breed was performed to analyze age at first egg body weight at first egg, first egg weight, egg weight at the age of 300 days, egg weight at the age of 462 days, egg number at the age of 300 days, egg number between the ages of 300 and 462 days and egg number at the age of 462 days. Nineteen SNPs related to reproductive traits were presented (P breeding programs, especially in Jinghai Yellow Chicken.

  5. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.I. Berndt (Sonja); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); R. Mägi (Reedik); A. Ganna (Andrea); E. Wheeler (Eleanor); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); A.E. Justice (Anne); K.L. Monda (Keri); D.C. Croteau-Chonka (Damien); F.R. Day (Felix); T. Esko (Tõnu); M. Fall (Magnus); T. Ferreira (Teresa); D. Gentilini (Davide); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Luan; J.C. Randall (Joshua); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); C.J. Willer (Cristen); T.W. Winkler (Thomas); A.R. Wood (Andrew); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); Y.-J. Hu (Yi-Juan); S.H. Lee (Sang Hong); L. Liang (Liming); D.Y. Lin (Dan); J. Min (Josine); B.M. Neale (Benjamin); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); J. Yang (Jian); E. Albrecht (Eva); N. Amin (Najaf); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); G. Cadby (Gemma); M. den Heijer (Martin); N. Eklund (Niina); K. Fischer (Krista); A. Goel (Anuj); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); I. Jarick (Ivonne); A. Johansson (Åsa); T. Johnson (Toby); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); I.R. König (Inke); K. Kristiansson (Kati); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); C. Lamina (Claudia); C. Lecoeur (Cécile); G. Li (Guo); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); J.S. Ngwa; I.M. Nolte (Ilja); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); M. Perola (Markus); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); M. Preuss (Michael); L.M. Rose (Lynda); J. Shi (Jianxin); D. Shungin (Dmitry); G.D. Smith; R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); I. Surakka (Ida); A. Teumer (Alexander); M.D. Trip (Mieke); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); L. Waite (Lindsay); J.H. Zhao (Jing); D. Absher (Devin); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); M. Atalay (Mustafa); A.P. Attwood (Antony); A.J. Balmforth (Anthony); D.C.G. Basart (Dick); J.P. Beilby (John); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); P. Brambilla (Paolo); M. Bruinenberg (M.); H. Campbell (Harry); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); P.S. Chines (Peter); F.S. Collins (Francis); J. Connell (John); W. O Cookson (William); U. de Faire (Ulf); F. de Vegt (Femmie); M. Dei (Mariano); M. Dimitriou (Maria); T. Edkins (Ted); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); D.M. Evans (David); M. Farrall (Martin); F. Ferrario (Franco); J. Ferrières (Jean); L. Franke (Lude); F. Frau (Francesca); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); H. Grallert (Harald); H. Grönberg (Henrik); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Hall (Anne); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.L. Hartikainen; C. Hayward (Caroline); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); A.C. Heath (Andrew); J. Hebebrand (Johannes); G. Homuth (Georg); F.B. Hu (Frank); S.E. Hunt (Sarah); E. Hyppönen (Elina); C. Iribarren (Carlos); K.B. Jacobs (Kevin); J.-O. Jansson (John-Olov); A. Jula (Antti); M. Kähönen (Mika); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); F. Kee (F.); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); M. Kivimaki (Mika); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); A. Kraja (Aldi); M. Kumari (Meena); K. Kuulasmaa (Kari); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); T.A. Lakka (Timo); C. Langenberg (Claudia); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L. Lind (Lars); J. Lindstrom (Jaana); J. Liu (Jianjun); A. Liuzzi (Antonio); M.L. Lokki; M. Lorentzon (Mattias); P.A. Madden (Pamela); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); P. Manunta (Paolo); D. Marek (Diana); W. März (Winfried); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); B. McKnight (Barbara); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); V. Mooser (Vincent); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); P. Munroe (Patricia); A.W. Musk (Arthur); N. Narisu (Narisu); G. Navis (Gerjan); G. Nicholson (Ggeorge); C. Nohr (Christian); K. Ong (Ken); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); A. Palotie (Aarno); J. Peden (John); N. Pedersen; A. Peters (Annette); O. Polasek (Ozren); A. Pouta (Anneli); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); I. Prokopenko (Inga); C. Pütter (Carolin); A. Radhakrishnan (Aparna); O. Raitakari (Olli); A. Rendon (Augusto); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); I. Rudan (Igor); T. Saaristo (Timo); J.G. Sambrook (Jennifer); A.R. Sanders (Alan); S. Sanna (Serena); J. Saramies (Jouko); S. Schipf (Sabine); S. Schreiber (Stefan); H. Schunkert (Heribert); S.-Y. Shin; S. Signorini (Stefano); J. Sinisalo (Juha); B. Skrobek (Boris); N. Soranzo (Nicole); A. Stancáková (Alena); K. Stark (Klaus); J. Stephens (Jonathan); K. Stirrups (Kathy); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); M. Stumvoll (Michael); A.J. Swift (Amy); E.V. Theodoraki (Eirini); B. Thorand (Barbara); D.-A. Tregouet (David-Alexandre); E. Tremoli (Elena); M.M. van der Klauw (Melanie); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); J. Viikari (Jorma); J. Virtamo (Jarmo); V. Vitart (Veronique); G. Waeber (Gérard); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); E. Widen (Elisabeth); S.H. Wild (Sarah); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); B. Winkelmann; J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce); A. Wong (Andrew); A.F. Wright (Alan); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); P. Amouyel (Philippe); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); M. Caulfield (Mark); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); D. Cusi (Daniele); G.V. Dedoussis (George); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); J.G. Eriksson (Johan); P.W. Franks (Paul); P. Froguel (Philippe); C. Gieger (Christian); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); A. Hamsten (Anders); T.B. Harris (Tamara); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A. Hingorani (Aroon); A. Hinney (Anke); A. Hofman (Albert); G.K. Hovingh (Kees); K. Hveem (Kristian); T. Illig (Thomas); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laakso (Markku); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); D.F. Levinson (Douglas); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A. Metspalu (Andres); A.D. Morris (Andrew); M.S. Nieminen (Markku); I. Njølstad (Inger); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); C. Palmer (Cameron); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); C. Power (Christopher); M.A. Province (Mike); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); L. Qi (Lu); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); P.M. Ridker (Paul); S. Ripatti (Samuli); V. Salomaa (Veikko); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); H. Snieder (Harold); H.G. Sorensen; T.D. Spector (Timothy); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A. Tönjes (Anke); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Uusitupa (Matti); P. van der Harst (Pim); P. Vollenweider (Peter); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); J.F. Wilson (James F); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); I. Barroso (Inês); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); C. Fox (Craig); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); L. Groop (Leif); T. Haritunian (Talin); I.M. Heid (Iris); D. Hunter (David); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); F. Karpe (Fredrik); M.F. Moffatt (Miriam); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); J.R. O´Connell; Y. Pawitan (Yudi); E.E. Schadt (Eric); D. Schlessinger (David); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); D.P. Strachan (David); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); P.M. Visscher (Peter); A.M. Di Blasio (Anna Maria); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); A.D. Morris (Andrew); D. Meyre (David); A. Scherag (Andre); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); K.E. North (Kari); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); E. Ingelsson (Erik)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractApproaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of b

  6. Meta-analyses identify 13 loci associated with age at menopause and highlight DNA repair and immune pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Lisette; Perry, John R. B.; Chasman, Daniel I.; He, Chunyan; Mangino, Massimo; Sulem, Patrick; Barbalic, Maja; Broer, Linda; Byrne, Enda M.; Ernst, Florian; Esko, Tonu; Franceschini, Nora; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kraft, Peter; McArdle, Patrick F.; Porcu, Eleonora; Shin, So-Youn; Smith, Albert V.; van Wingerden, Sophie; Zhai, Guangju; Zhuang, Wei V.; Albrecht, Eva; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Aspelund, Thor; Bandinelli, Stefania; Lauc, Lovorka Barac; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boban, Mladen; Boerwinkle, Eric; Broekmans, Frank J.; Burri, Andrea; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Constance; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Corre, Tanguy; Coviello, Andrea D.; d'Adamo, Pio; Davies, Gail; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George V. Z.; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Ebrahim, Shah; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Emilsson, Valur; Eriksson, Johan G.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; Ferreli, Liana; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Krista; Folsom, Aaron R.; Garcia, Melissa E.; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Glazer, Nicole; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hass, Merli; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C.; Hofman, Albert; Ingelsson, Erik; Janssens, A. Cecile J. W.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Karasik, David; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Keyzer, Jules; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lahti, Jari; Lai, Sandra; Laisk, Triin; Laven, Joop S. E.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Liu, Jianjun; Lopez, Lorna M.; Louwers, Yvonne V.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Marongiu, Mara; Martin, Nicholas G.; Klaric, Irena Martinovic; Masciullo, Corrado; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E.; Melzer, David; Mooser, Vincent; Navarro, Pau; Newman, Anne B.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Palotie, Aarno; Pare, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Pistis, Giorgio; Plump, Andrew S.; Polasek, Ozren; Pop, Victor J. M.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Raikkonen, Katri; Rehnberg, Emil; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Salumets, Andres; Scuteri, Angelo; Singleton, Andrew; Smith, Jennifer A.; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Stacey, Simon N.; Starr, John M.; Stathopoulou, Maria G.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Sun, Yan V.; Tenesa, Albert; Thorand, Barbara; Toniolo, Daniela; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tsui, Kim; Ulivi, Sheila; van Dam, Rob M.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; van Gils, Carla H.; van Nierop, Peter; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Visscher, Peter M.; Voorhuis, Marlies; Waeber, Gerard; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wichmann, H. Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Wijnands-van Gent, Colette J. M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Wright, Alan F.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zygmunt, Marek; Arnold, Alice M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Buring, Julie E.; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B.; Hu, Frank B.; Hunter, David J.; Launer, Lenore J.; Metspalu, Andres; Montgomery, Grant W.; Oostra, Ben A.; Ridker, Paul M.; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Voelzke, Henry; Murray, Anna; Murabito, Joanne M.; Visser, Jenny A.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.

    To newly identify loci for age at natural menopause, we carried out a meta-analysis of 22 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 38,968 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,435 women. In addition to four known loci, we identified 13 loci newly associated with age at natural

  7. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik

    2013-01-01

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass ...

  8. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F; Justice, Anne E; Monda, Keri L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U; Luan, Jian'an; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J; Winkler, Thomas W; Wood, Andrew R; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L; Neale, Benjamin M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; König, Inke R; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P; Balmforth, Anthony J; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I; Chines, Peter S; Collins, Francis S; Connell, John M; Cookson, William O; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Heath, Andrew C; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B; Hunt, Sarah E; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimäki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A; Magnusson, Patrik K; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Mateo Leach, Irene; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Munroe, Patricia B; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin N A; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Sanders, Alan R; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J; Theodoraki, Eirini V; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vermeulen, Sita H; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zillikens, M Carola; Amouyel, Philippe; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George V; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Gieger, Christian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, Kees G; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Levinson, Douglas F; Martin, Nicholas G; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew D; Nieminen, Markku S; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ouwehand, Willem H; Palmer, Lyle J; Penninx, Brenda; Power, Chris; Province, Michael A; Psaty, Bruce M; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Timothy D; Stefansson, Kari; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Assimes, Themistocles L; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C; Haritunian, Talin; Heid, Iris M; Hunter, David; Kaplan, Robert C; Karpe, Fredrik; Moffatt, Miriam F; Mohlke, Karen L; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Pawitan, Yudi; Schadt, Eric E; Schlessinger, David; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strachan, David P; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Visscher, Peter M; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Meyre, David; Scherag, André; McCarthy, Mark I; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; North, Kari E; Loos, Ruth J F; Ingelsson, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass ind

  9. Meta-analyses identify 13 loci associated with age at menopause and highlight DNA repair and immune pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Lisette; Perry, John R B; Chasman, Daniel I; He, Chunyan; Mangino, Massimo; Sulem, Patrick; Barbalic, Maja; Broer, Linda; Byrne, Enda M; Ernst, Florian; Esko, Tõnu; Franceschini, Nora; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kraft, Peter; McArdle, Patrick F; Porcu, Eleonora; Shin, So-Youn; Smith, Albert V; van Wingerden, Sophie; Zhai, Guangju; Zhuang, Wei V; Albrecht, Eva; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Aspelund, Thor; Bandinelli, Stefania; Lauc, Lovorka Barac; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boban, Mladen; Boerwinkle, Eric; Broekmans, Frank J; Burri, Andrea; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Constance; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Corre, Tanguy; Coviello, Andrea D; d'Adamo, Pio; Davies, Gail; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George V Z; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Ebrahim, Shah; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Emilsson, Valur; Eriksson, Johan G; Fauser, Bart C J M; Ferreli, Liana; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Krista; Folsom, Aaron R; Garcia, Melissa E; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Glazer, Nicole; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hankinson, Susan E; Hass, Merli; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Ingelsson, Erik; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Johnson, Andrew D; Karasik, David; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keyzer, Jules; Kiel, Douglas P; Kolcic, Ivana; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Lai, Sandra; Laisk, Triin; Laven, Joop S E; Lawlor, Debbie A; Liu, Jianjun; Lopez, Lorna M; Louwers, Yvonne V; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Marongiu, Mara; Martin, Nicholas G; Klaric, Irena Martinovic; Masciullo, Corrado; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E; Melzer, David; Mooser, Vincent; Navarro, Pau; Newman, Anne B; Nyholt, Dale R; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Palotie, Aarno; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peeters, Petra H M; Pistis, Giorgio; Plump, Andrew S; Polasek, Ozren; Pop, Victor J M; Psaty, Bruce M; Räikkönen, Katri; Rehnberg, Emil; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Salumets, Andres; Scuteri, Angelo; Singleton, Andrew; Smith, Jennifer A; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Stacey, Simon N; Starr, John M; Stathopoulou, Maria G; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Sun, Yan V; Tenesa, Albert; Thorand, Barbara; Toniolo, Daniela; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tsui, Kim; Ulivi, Sheila; van Dam, Rob M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; van Gils, Carla H; van Nierop, Peter; Vink, Jacqueline M; Visscher, Peter M; Voorhuis, Marlies; Waeber, Gérard; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wichmann, H Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Wijnands-van Gent, Colette J M; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wright, Alan F; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Zillikens, M Carola; Zygmunt, Marek; Arnold, Alice M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Buring, Julie E; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Launer, Lenore J; Metspalu, Andres; Montgomery, Grant W; Oostra, Ben A; Ridker, Paul M; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Völzke, Henry; Murray, Anna; Murabito, Joanne M; Visser, Jenny A; Lunetta, Kathryn L

    2012-01-01

    To newly identify loci for age at natural menopause, we carried out a meta-analysis of 22 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 38,968 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,435 women. In addition to four known loci, we identified 13 loci newly associated with age at natural men

  10. Meta-analyses identify 13 loci associated with age at menopause and highlight DNA repair and immune pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Stolk (Lisette); J.R.B. Perry (John); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); C. He (Chunyan); M. Mangino (Massimo); P. Sulem (Patrick); M. Barbalic (maja); L. Broer (Linda); E.M. Byrne (Enda); F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); T. Esko (Tõnu); N. Franceschini (Nora); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); P. Kraft (Peter); P.F. McArdle (Patrick); E. Porcu (Eleonora); S.-Y. Shin; G.D. Smith; S. van Wingerden (Sophie); G. Zhai (Guangju); W.V. Zhuang; E. Albrecht (Eva); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); T. Aspelund (Thor); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); G. Lauc (Gordan); J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); M. Boban (Mladen); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); F.J.M. Broekmans (Frank); A. Burri (Andrea); H. Campbell (Harry); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); C. Chen (Constance); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); T. Corre (Tanguy); A.D. Coviello (Andrea); P. d' Adamo (Pio); G. Davies (Gail); U. de Faire (Ulf); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); I.J. Deary (Ian); G.V. Dedoussis (George); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); S. Ebrahim (Shanil); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); V. Emilsson (Valur); J.G. Eriksson (Johan); B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); L. Ferreli (Liana); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); K. Fischer (Krista); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); M. Garcia (Melissa); P. Gasparini (Paolo); C. Gieger (Christian); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); P. Hall (Per); T. Haller (Toomas); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); M. Hass (Merli); C. Hayward (Caroline); A.C. Heath (Andrew); A. Hofman (Albert); E. Ingelsson (Erik); A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); D. Karasik (David); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); J.J. de Keyzer (Jules); D.P. Kiel (Douglas); I. Kolcic (Ivana); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); J. Lahti (Jari); S. Lai (Sandra); T. Laisk (Triin); J.S.E. Laven (Joop); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); J. Liu (Jianjun); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); Y.V. Louwers (Yvonne); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); M. Marongiu (Mara); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); I.M. Klaric (Irena Martinovic); C. Masciullo (Corrado); B. McKnight (Barbara); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); D. Melzer (David); V. Mooser (Vincent); P. Navarro (Pau); A.B. Newman (Anne); D.R. Nyholt (Dale); N.C. Onland-Moret (Charlotte); A. Palotie (Aarno); G. Paré (Guillaume); A.N. Parker (Alex); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); P.H.M. Peeters (Petra); G. Pistis (Giorgio); A.S. Plump (Andrew); O. Polasek (Ozren); V. Pop (Victor); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); K. R Currency Signikkönen (Katri); E. Rehnberg (Emil); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); I. Rudan (Igor); C. Sala (Cinzia); A. Salumets (Andres); A. Scuteri (Angelo); A. Singleton (Andrew); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); H. Snieder (Harold); N. Soranzo (Nicole); S.N. Stacey (Simon); J.M. Starr (John); M.G. Stathopoulou (Maria G); K. Stirrups (Kathy); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); Y.V. Sun (Yan); A. Tenesa (Albert); B. Thorand (Barbara); D. Toniolo (Daniela); L. Tryggvadottir (Laufey); K. Tsui (Kim); S. Ulivi (Shelia); R.M. van Dam (Rob); Y.T. van der Schouw (Yvonne); C.H. van Gils (Carla); P.W.M. van Nierop (Peter); J.M. Vink (Jacqueline); P.M. Visscher (Peter); M. Voorhuis (Marlies); G. Waeber (Gérard); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); E. Widen (Elisabeth); C.J.M. Wijnands-Van Gent (Colette J M); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); J.F. Wilson (James); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce); A.F. Wright (Alan); L.M. Yerges-Armstrong (Laura); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); L. Zgaga (Lina); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); M. Zygmunt (Marek); A.M. Arnold (Alice); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); J.E. Buring (Julie); L. Crisponi (Laura); E.W. Demerath (Ellen); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); T.B. Harris (Tamara); F.B. Hu (Frank); D. Hunter (David); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A. Metspalu (Andres); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); B.A. Oostra (Ben); P.M. Ridker (Paul); S. Sanna (Serena); D. Schlessinger (David); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); M. Uda (Manuela); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); H. Völzke (Henry); A. Murray (Anna); J. Murabito (Joanne); J.A. Visser (Jenny); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTo newly identify loci for age at natural menopause, we carried out a meta-analysis of 22 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 38,968 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,435 women. In addition to four known loci, we identified 13 loci newly associated with age at

  11. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F; Justice, Anne E; Monda, Keri L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U; Luan, Jian'an; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J; Winkler, Thomas W; Wood, Andrew R; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L; Neale, Benjamin M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; König, Inke R; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P; Balmforth, Anthony J; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I; Chines, Peter S; Collins, Francis S; Connell, John M; Cookson, William O; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Heath, Andrew C; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B; Hunt, Sarah E; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimäki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A; Magnusson, Patrik K; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Mateo Leach, Irene; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Munroe, Patricia B; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin N A; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Sanders, Alan R; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J; Theodoraki, Eirini V; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vermeulen, Sita H; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zillikens, M Carola; Amouyel, Philippe; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George V; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Gieger, Christian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, Kees G; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Levinson, Douglas F; Martin, Nicholas G; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew D; Nieminen, Markku S; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ouwehand, Willem H; Palmer, Lyle J; Penninx, Brenda; Power, Chris; Province, Michael A; Psaty, Bruce M; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Timothy D; Stefansson, Kari; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Assimes, Themistocles L; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C; Haritunian, Talin; Heid, Iris M; Hunter, David; Kaplan, Robert C; Karpe, Fredrik; Moffatt, Miriam F; Mohlke, Karen L; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Pawitan, Yudi; Schadt, Eric E; Schlessinger, David; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strachan, David P; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Visscher, Peter M; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Meyre, David; Scherag, André; McCarthy, Mark I; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; North, Kari E; Loos, Ruth J F; Ingelsson, Erik

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass

  12. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.I. Berndt (Sonja); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); R. Mägi (Reedik); A. Ganna (Andrea); E. Wheeler (Eleanor); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); A.E. Justice (Anne); K.L. Monda (Keri); D.C. Croteau-Chonka (Damien); F.R. Day (Felix); T. Esko (Tõnu); M. Fall (Magnus); T. Ferreira (Teresa); D. Gentilini (Davide); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Luan; J.C. Randall (Joshua); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); C.J. Willer (Cristen); T.W. Winkler (Thomas); A.R. Wood (Andrew); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); Y.-J. Hu (Yi-Juan); S.H. Lee (Sang Hong); L. Liang (Liming); D.Y. Lin (Dan); J. Min (Josine); B.M. Neale (Benjamin); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); J. Yang (Jian); E. Albrecht (Eva); N. Amin (Najaf); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); G. Cadby (Gemma); M. den Heijer (Martin); N. Eklund (Niina); K. Fischer (Krista); A. Goel (Anuj); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); I. Jarick (Ivonne); A. Johansson (Åsa); T. Johnson (Toby); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); I.R. König (Inke); K. Kristiansson (Kati); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); C. Lamina (Claudia); C. Lecoeur (Cécile); G. Li (Guo); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); J.S. Ngwa; I.M. Nolte (Ilja); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); M. Perola (Markus); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); M. Preuss (Michael); L.M. Rose (Lynda); J. Shi (Jianxin); D. Shungin (Dmitry); G.D. Smith; R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); I. Surakka (Ida); A. Teumer (Alexander); M.D. Trip (Mieke); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); L. Waite (Lindsay); J.H. Zhao (Jing); D. Absher (Devin); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); M. Atalay (Mustafa); A.P. Attwood (Antony); A.J. Balmforth (Anthony); D.C.G. Basart (Dick); J.P. Beilby (John); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); P. Brambilla (Paolo); M. Bruinenberg (M.); H. Campbell (Harry); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); P.S. Chines (Peter); F.S. Collins (Francis); J. Connell (John); W. O Cookson (William); U. de Faire (Ulf); F. de Vegt (Femmie); M. Dei (Mariano); M. Dimitriou (Maria); T. Edkins (Ted); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); D.M. Evans (David); M. Farrall (Martin); F. Ferrario (Franco); J. Ferrières (Jean); L. Franke (Lude); F. Frau (Francesca); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); H. Grallert (Harald); H. Grönberg (Henrik); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Hall (Anne); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.L. Hartikainen; C. Hayward (Caroline); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); A.C. Heath (Andrew); J. Hebebrand (Johannes); G. Homuth (Georg); F.B. Hu (Frank); S.E. Hunt (Sarah); E. Hyppönen (Elina); C. Iribarren (Carlos); K.B. Jacobs (Kevin); J.-O. Jansson (John-Olov); A. Jula (Antti); M. Kähönen (Mika); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); F. Kee (F.); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); M. Kivimaki (Mika); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); A. Kraja (Aldi); M. Kumari (Meena); K. Kuulasmaa (Kari); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); T.A. Lakka (Timo); C. Langenberg (Claudia); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L. Lind (Lars); J. Lindstrom (Jaana); J. Liu (Jianjun); A. Liuzzi (Antonio); M.L. Lokki; M. Lorentzon (Mattias); P.A. Madden (Pamela); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); P. Manunta (Paolo); D. Marek (Diana); W. März (Winfried); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); B. McKnight (Barbara); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); V. Mooser (Vincent); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); P. Munroe (Patricia); A.W. Musk (Arthur); N. Narisu (Narisu); G. Navis (Gerjan); G. Nicholson (Ggeorge); C. Nohr (Christian); K. Ong (Ken); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); A. Palotie (Aarno); J. Peden (John); N. Pedersen; A. Peters (Annette); O. Polasek (Ozren); A. Pouta (Anneli); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); I. Prokopenko (Inga); C. Pütter (Carolin); A. Radhakrishnan (Aparna); O. Raitakari (Olli); A. Rendon (Augusto); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); I. Rudan (Igor); T. Saaristo (Timo); J.G. Sambrook (Jennifer); A.R. Sanders (Alan); S. Sanna (Serena); J. Saramies (Jouko); S. Schipf (Sabine); S. Schreiber (Stefan); H. Schunkert (Heribert); S.-Y. Shin; S. Signorini (Stefano); J. Sinisalo (Juha); B. Skrobek (Boris); N. Soranzo (Nicole); A. Stancáková (Alena); K. Stark (Klaus); J. Stephens (Jonathan); K. Stirrups (Kathy); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); M. Stumvoll (Michael); A.J. Swift (Amy); E.V. Theodoraki (Eirini); B. Thorand (Barbara); D.-A. Tregouet (David-Alexandre); E. Tremoli (Elena); M.M. van der Klauw (Melanie); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); J. Viikari (Jorma); J. Virtamo (Jarmo); V. Vitart (Veronique); G. Waeber (Gérard); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); E. Widen (Elisabeth); S.H. Wild (Sarah); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); B. Winkelmann; J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce); A. Wong (Andrew); A.F. Wright (Alan); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); P. Amouyel (Philippe); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); M. Caulfield (Mark); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); D. Cusi (Daniele); G.V. Dedoussis (George); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); J.G. Eriksson (Johan); P.W. Franks (Paul); P. Froguel (Philippe); C. Gieger (Christian); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); A. Hamsten (Anders); T.B. Harris (Tamara); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A. Hingorani (Aroon); A. Hinney (Anke); A. Hofman (Albert); G.K. Hovingh (Kees); K. Hveem (Kristian); T. Illig (Thomas); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laakso (Markku); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); D.F. Levinson (Douglas); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A. Metspalu (Andres); A.D. Morris (Andrew); M.S. Nieminen (Markku); I. Njølstad (Inger); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); C. Palmer (Cameron); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); C. Power (Christopher); M.A. Province (Mike); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); L. Qi (Lu); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); P.M. Ridker (Paul); S. Ripatti (Samuli); V. Salomaa (Veikko); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); H. Snieder (Harold); H.G. Sorensen; T.D. Spector (Timothy); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A. Tönjes (Anke); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Uusitupa (Matti); P. van der Harst (Pim); P. Vollenweider (Peter); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); J.F. Wilson (James F); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); I. Barroso (Inês); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); C. Fox (Craig); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); L. Groop (Leif); T. Haritunian (Talin); I.M. Heid (Iris); D. Hunter (David); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); F. Karpe (Fredrik); M.F. Moffatt (Miriam); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); J.R. O´Connell; Y. Pawitan (Yudi); E.E. Schadt (Eric); D. Schlessinger (David); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); D.P. Strachan (David); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); P.M. Visscher (Peter); A.M. Di Blasio (Anna Maria); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); A.D. Morris (Andrew); D. Meyre (David); A. Scherag (Andre); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); K.E. North (Kari); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); E. Ingelsson (Erik)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractApproaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of

  13. Genetic localization of diuron- and mucidin-resistant mutants relative to a group of loci of the mitochondrial DNA controlling coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, A M; Slonimski, P P

    1979-01-02

    Diuron-resistance, DIU (Colson et al., 1977), antimycin-resistance, ANA (Michaelis, 1976; Burger et al., 1976), funiculosin-resistance, FUN (Pratje and Michaelis, 1977; Burger et al., 1977) and mucidin-resistance, MUC (Subik et al., 1977) are each coded by a pair of genetic loci on the mit DNA of S. cerevisiae. In the present paper, these respiratiory-competent, drug-resistant loci are localized relative to respiratory-deficient BOX mutants deficient in coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase (Kotylak and Slonimski, 1976, 1977) using deletion and recombination mapping. Three drug-resistant loci possessing distinct mutated allelic forms are distinguished. DIU1 is allelic or closely linked to ANA2, FUN1 and BOX1; DIU2 is allelic or closely linked to ANA1, MUC1 and BOX4/5; MUC2 is allelic to BOX6. The high recombinant frequencies observed between the three loci (13% on the average for 33 various combinations analyzed) suggest the existence of either three genes coding for three distinct polypeptides or of a single gene coding for a single polypeptide but subdivided into three easily separable segments. The resistance of the respiratory-chain observed in vitro in the drug-resistant mutants and the allelism relationships between respiratory-competent, drug-resistant loci and coQH2-cyt c reductase deficient, BOX, loci strongly suggest that each of the three drug-resistant loci codes for a structural gene-product which is essential for the normal coQH2-cyt c reductase activity and is obviously a good candidate for a gene product of the drug-resistant loci mapped in this paper. Polypeptide length modifications of cytochrome b were observed in mutants deficient in the coQH2-cyt c red and localized at the BOX1, BOX4 and BOX6 genetic loci (Claisse et al., 1977, 1978) which are precisely the loci allelic to drug resistant mutants as shown in the present work. Taken together these two sets of data provide a strong evidence in favor of the idea that there exist three non contiguous

  14. High density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I.; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E.M.; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Summary Using the Immunochip custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, designed for dense genotyping of 186 genome wide association study (GWAS) confirmed loci we analysed 11,475 rheumatoid arthritis cases of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. The data were combined in meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n=2,363) and controls (n=17,872). We identified fourteen novel loci; nine were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and 5 specifically in anti-citrillunated peptide antibody positive disease, bringing the number of confirmed European ancestry rheumatoid arthritis loci to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at six loci and association to low frequency variants (minor allele frequency <0.05) at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analysis of the data generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  15. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-04-27

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction.

  16. New CODIS core loci allele frequencies for 96,400 Brazilian individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Vitor R C; de Castro, Amanda M; Almeida, Vanessa C O; Malta, Frederico S V; Ferreira, Alessandro C S; Louro, Iúri D

    2014-11-01

    We have reported the allele frequencies of 15 STR loci, including the original 13 CODIS core loci, in over 100,000 Brazilian individuals. A new CODIS core loci has been proposed, but the recently established Brazilian Integrated Network of DNA Databases made a decision in 2010 to postpone the implementation of this new set of loci due to the lack of allele frequency data for the Brazilian population. We aimed to report allele frequencies of 20 loci, estimated from 96,400 Brazilian individuals undergoing paternity testing during 2011-2013. The percentage of missing data was less than 0.6% for all loci, except for CSF1PO (3.15%) and D7S820 (2.5%). The dropout rates estimated by the MicroDrop software were 0.013 for CSF1PO, 0.000037 for D7S820 and less than 0.000001 for other loci. Small missing data percentages and dropout rates reflect the high quality of the data.

  17. [Genetic polymorphisms of X-STR loci in Chinese Yugur ethnic group and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Jiong; Chen, Feng; Xin, Na; Zhang, Hong Bo; Zheng, Hai Bo; Yu, Bing; Li, Sheng-Bin; Chen, Teng

    2008-09-01

    To study the genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeats (STRs) loci (DXS7130, DXS7132, DXS6804, DXS7423, DXS7424, DXS6789, DXS6799, DXS8378, and HPRTB) on X chromosome in Chinese Yugur ethnic group. The allele and genotype frequency of nine X-STR loci among 120 unrelated individuals (55 female, 65 male) from Yugur ethnic group were analyzed using PCR and followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The numbers of alleles in the nine X-STR loci were 8, 6, 6, 5, 6, 7, 6, 4, and 6, respectively; the numbers of genotypes in the nine loci were 16, 14, 13, 6, 13, 20, 11, 6, and 12, respectively. The genotype frequencies in females were in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05). The nine X-STR loci were relatively abundant in polymorphic information for individual identification, paternity testing and population genetics. A total of 15 haplotypes were detected in DXS7130 and DXS8378 loci, and 55 haplotypes were detected in DXS6789, DXS6799, DXS7424, and DXS6804 loci. The haplotype diversity reached 0.8212 and 0.9947, respectively. Phylogeny tree and cluster analysis based on X-STR allele frequencies in genesis showed that Yugur ethnic group share a close relationship with Mongolian ethnic group and Chinese Han, Tibetan population and far from Hui and Uygur ethnic group, who dwell in the northwest of China.

  18. Meta-analysis of loci associated with age at natural menopause in African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christina T L; Liu, Ching-Ti; Chen, Gary K; Andrews, Jeanette S; Arnold, Alice M; Dreyfus, Jill; Franceschini, Nora; Garcia, Melissa E; Kerr, Kathleen F; Li, Guo; Lohman, Kurt K; Musani, Solomon K; Nalls, Michael A; Raffel, Leslie J; Smith, Jennifer; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; Bernstein, Leslie; Britton, Angela; Brzyski, Robert G; Cappola, Anne; Carlson, Christopher S; Couper, David; Deming, Sandra L; Goodarzi, Mark O; Heiss, Gerardo; John, Esther M; Lu, Xiaoning; Le Marchand, Loic; Marciante, Kristin; Mcknight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert; Nock, Nora L; Olshan, Andrew F; Press, Michael F; Vaiyda, Dhananjay; Woods, Nancy F; Taylor, Herman A; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Evans, Michele K; Harris, Tamara B; Henderson, Brian E; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kooperberg, Charles; Liu, Yongmei; Mosley, Thomas H; Psaty, Bruce; Wellons, Melissa; Windham, Beverly G; Zonderman, Alan B; Cupples, L Adrienne; Demerath, Ellen W; Haiman, Christopher; Murabito, Joanne M; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2014-06-15

    Age at menopause marks the end of a woman's reproductive life and its timing associates with risks for cancer, cardiovascular and bone disorders. GWAS and candidate gene studies conducted in women of European ancestry have identified 27 loci associated with age at menopause. The relevance of these loci to women of African ancestry has not been previously studied. We therefore sought to uncover additional menopause loci and investigate the relevance of European menopause loci by performing a GWAS meta-analysis in 6510 women with African ancestry derived from 11 studies across the USA. We did not identify any additional loci significantly associated with age at menopause in African Americans. We replicated the associations between six loci and age at menopause (P-value < 0.05): AMHR2, RHBLD2, PRIM1, HK3/UMC1, BRSK1/TMEM150B and MCM8. In addition, associations of 14 loci are directionally consistent with previous reports. We provide evidence that genetic variants influencing reproductive traits identified in European populations are also important in women of African ancestry residing in USA.

  19. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A.; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V.; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C.; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gayther, Simon A.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y.; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Knight, Julia A.; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W. M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L.; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M.; Muranen, Taru A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K.; Peeters, Petra H.; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B.; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Monteiro, Alvaro A. N.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  20. New genetic loci implicated in fasting glucose homeostasis and their impact on type 2 diabetes risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Josée; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga; Saxena, Richa; Soranzo, Nicole; Jackson, Anne U; Wheeler, Eleanor; Glazer, Nicole L; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Gloyn, Anna L; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mägi, Reedik; Morris, Andrew P; Randall, Joshua; Johnson, Toby; Elliott, Paul; Rybin, Denis; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Henneman, Peter; Grallert, Harald; Dehghan, Abbas; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Franklin, Christopher S; Navarro, Pau; Song, Kijoung; Goel, Anuj; Perry, John R B; Egan, Josephine M; Lajunen, Taina; Grarup, Niels; Sparsø, Thomas; Doney, Alex; Voight, Benjamin F; Stringham, Heather M; Li, Man; Kanoni, Stavroula; Shrader, Peter; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Kumari, Meena; Qi, Lu; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gieger, Christian; Zabena, Carina; Rocheleau, Ghislain; Ingelsson, Erik; An, Ping; O’Connell, Jeffrey; Luan, Jian'an; Elliott, Amanda; McCarroll, Steven A; Payne, Felicity; Roccasecca, Rosa Maria; Pattou, François; Sethupathy, Praveen; Ardlie, Kristin; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Balkau, Beverley; Barter, Philip; Beilby, John P; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bennett, Amanda J; Bergmann, Sven; Bochud, Murielle; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Böttcher, Yvonne; Brunner, Eric; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan J M; Cooper, Matthew N; Cornelis, Marilyn; Crawford, Gabe; Crisponi, Laura; Day, Ian N M; de Geus, Eco; Delplanque, Jerome; Dina, Christian; Erdos, Michael R; Fedson, Annette C; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Forouhi, Nita G; Fox, Caroline S; Frants, Rune; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Galan, Pilar; Goodarzi, Mark O; Graessler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher J; Grundy, Scott; Gwilliam, Rhian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hadjadj, Samy; Hallmans, Göran; Hammond, Naomi; Han, Xijing; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon C; Hercberg, Serge; Herder, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hillman, David R; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joe; Isomaa, Bo; Johnson, Paul R V; Jørgensen, Torben; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesaniemi, Y Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Knight, Beatrice; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Lathrop, G Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A; Le Bacquer, Olivier; Lecoeur, Cécile; Li, Yun; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mahley, Robert; Mangino, Massimo; Manning, Alisa K; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; McAteer, Jarred B; McCulloch, Laura J; McPherson, Ruth; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Meyre, David; Mitchell, Braxton D; Morken, Mario A; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Naitza, Silvia; Narisu, Narisu; Neville, Matthew J; Oostra, Ben A; Orrù, Marco; Pakyz, Ruth; Palmer, Colin N A; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Pattaro, Cristian; Pearson, Daniel; Peden, John F; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Perola, Markus; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Pichler, Irene; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Potter, Simon C; Pouta, Anneli; Province, Michael A; Psaty, Bruce M; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rayner, Nigel W; Rice, Kenneth; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Sandbaek, Annelli; Sandhu, Manjinder; Sanna, Serena; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Scheet, Paul; Scott, Laura J; Seedorf, Udo; Sharp, Stephen J; Shields, Beverley; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Sijbrands, Erik J G; Silveira, Angela; Simpson, Laila; Singleton, Andrew; Smith, Nicholas L; Sovio, Ulla; Swift, Amy; Syddall, Holly; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thorand, Barbara; Tichet, Jean; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uitterlinden, André G; van Dijk, Ko Willems; van Hoek, Mandy; Varma, Dhiraj; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Waeber, Gérard; Wagner, Peter J; Walley, Andrew; Walters, G Bragi; Ward, Kim L; Watkins, Hugh; Weedon, Michael N; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witteman, Jaqueline C M; Yarnell, John W G; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zelenika, Diana; Zethelius, Björn; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zillikens, M Carola; Borecki, Ingrid B; Loos, Ruth J F; Meneton, Pierre; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Nathan, David M; Williams, Gordon H; Hattersley, Andrew T; Silander, Kaisa; Salomaa, Veikko; Smith, George Davey; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter; Spranger, Joachim; Karpe, Fredrik; Shuldiner, Alan R; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George V; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Morris, Andrew D; Lind, Lars; Palmer, Lyle J; Hu, Frank B.; Franks, Paul W; Ebrahim, Shah; Marmot, Michael; Kao, W H Linda; Pankow, James S; Sampson, Michael J; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Pramstaller, Peter Paul; Wichmann, H Erich; Illig, Thomas; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F

    2010-01-01

    Circulating glucose levels are tightly regulated. To identify novel glycemic loci, we performed meta-analyses of 21 genome-wide associations studies informative for fasting glucose (FG), fasting insulin (FI) and indices of β-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in up to 46,186 non-diabetic participants. Follow-up of 25 loci in up to 76,558 additional subjects identified 16 loci associated with FG/HOMA-B and two associated with FI/HOMA-IR. These include nine new FG loci (in or near ADCY5, MADD, ADRA2A, CRY2, FADS1, GLIS3, SLC2A2, PROX1 and FAM148B) and one influencing FI/HOMA-IR (near IGF1). We also demonstrated association of ADCY5, PROX1, GCK, GCKR and DGKB/TMEM195 with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Within these loci, likely biological candidate genes influence signal transduction, cell proliferation, development, glucose-sensing and circadian regulation. Our results demonstrate that genetic studies of glycemic traits can identify T2D risk loci, as well as loci that elevate FG modestly, but do not cause overt diabetes. PMID:20081858

  1. Meta-analysis of loci associated with age at natural menopause in African-American women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christina T.L.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Chen, Gary K.; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Arnold, Alice M.; Dreyfus, Jill; Franceschini, Nora; Garcia, Melissa E.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Li, Guo; Lohman, Kurt K.; Musani, Solomon K.; Nalls, Michael A.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Smith, Jennifer; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bernstein, Leslie; Britton, Angela; Brzyski, Robert G.; Cappola, Anne; Carlson, Christopher S.; Couper, David; Deming, Sandra L.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Heiss, Gerardo; John, Esther M.; Lu, Xiaoning; Le Marchand, Loic; Marciante, Kristin; Mcknight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert; Nock, Nora L.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Press, Michael F.; Vaiyda, Dhananjay; Woods, Nancy F.; Taylor, Herman A.; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Evans, Michele K.; Harris, Tamara B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kooperberg, Charles; Liu, Yongmei; Mosley, Thomas H.; Psaty, Bruce; Wellons, Melissa; Windham, Beverly G.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Demerath, Ellen W.; Haiman, Christopher; Murabito, Joanne M.; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Age at menopause marks the end of a woman's reproductive life and its timing associates with risks for cancer, cardiovascular and bone disorders. GWAS and candidate gene studies conducted in women of European ancestry have identified 27 loci associated with age at menopause. The relevance of these loci to women of African ancestry has not been previously studied. We therefore sought to uncover additional menopause loci and investigate the relevance of European menopause loci by performing a GWAS meta-analysis in 6510 women with African ancestry derived from 11 studies across the USA. We did not identify any additional loci significantly associated with age at menopause in African Americans. We replicated the associations between six loci and age at menopause (P-value < 0.05): AMHR2, RHBLD2, PRIM1, HK3/UMC1, BRSK1/TMEM150B and MCM8. In addition, associations of 14 loci are directionally consistent with previous reports. We provide evidence that genetic variants influencing reproductive traits identified in European populations are also important in women of African ancestry residing in USA. PMID:24493794

  2. Differential pre-amplification of STR loci for fragmented forensic DNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Seon-Kyu; Kim, Se-Yong; Seo, Bo Young; Woo, Kwang-Man; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2016-11-01

    DNA profiling of short tandem repeats (STR) has been successfully used for the identification of individuals in forensic samples, accidents and natural disasters. However, STR profiling of DNA isolated from old crime scenes and damaged biological samples is difficult due to DNA degradation and fragmentation. Here, we show that pre-amplification of STR loci using biotinylated primers for the STR loci is an efficient strategy to obtain STR profiling results from fragmented forensic samples. Analysis of STR loci with longer amplicon sizes is generally hampered, since these relatively long loci are vulnerable to DNA fragmentation. This problem was overcome by using reduced or increased primer concentrations for loci with shorter or longer amplicon sizes, respectively, in our pre-amplification strategy. In addition, pre-amplification of STR loci into two groups of short or long amplicon size increases the efficiency of STR profiling from highly fragmented forensic DNA samples. Therefore, differential pre-amplification of STR loci is an effective way to obtain DNA profiling results from fragmented forensic samples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Biological Insights From 108 Schizophrenia-Associated Genetic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James TR; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B; Black, Donald W; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G; Buckner, Randy L; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M; Carr, Vaughan J; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V; Chambert, Kimberley D; Chan, Raymond CK; Chan, Ronald YL; Chen, Eric YH; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric FC; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H; Farrell, Martilias S; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodríguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M; Henskens, Frans A; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V; Hougaard, David M; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C; Kennedy, James L; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K; Laurent, Claudine; Lee, Jimmy; Lee, S Hong; Legge, Sophie E; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M; Lubinski, Jan; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Maher, Brion S; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W; Mors, Ole; Murphy, Kieran C; Murray, Robin M; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O’Callaghan, Eadbhard; O’Dushlaine, Colm; O’Neill, F Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O; Pietiläinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E; Purcell, Shaun M; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A; Richards, Alexander L; Roffman, Joshua L; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R; Schulze, Thomas G; Schwab, Sibylle G; Scolnick, Edward M; Scott, Rodney J; Seidman, Larry J; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C A; Stahl, Eli A; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Söderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B; Williams, Nigel M; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H; Wolen, Aaron R; Wong, Emily HM; Wormley, Brandon K; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A; Blackwood, Douglas HR; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Børglum, Anders D; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tõnu; Gejman, Pablo V; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V; Jönsson, Erik G; Kendler, Kenneth S; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F; Li, Qingqin S; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K; McCarroll, Steven A; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L; Mortensen, Preben B; Mowry, Bryan J; Nöthen, Markus M; Ophoff, Roel A; Owen, Michael J; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N; Petryshen, Tracey L; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R; Wendland, Jens R; Werge, Thomas; Daly, Mark J; Sullivan, Patrick F; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Summary Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder. Genetic risk is conferred by a large number of alleles, including common alleles of small effect that might be detected by genome-wide association studies. Here, we report a multi-stage schizophrenia genome-wide association study of up to 36,989 cases and 113,075 controls. We identify 128 independent associations spanning 108 conservatively defined loci that meet genome-wide significance, 83 of which have not been previously reported. Associations were enriched among genes expressed in brain providing biological plausibility for the findings. Many findings have the potential to provide entirely novel insights into aetiology, but associations at DRD2 and multiple genes involved in glutamatergic neurotransmission highlight molecules of known and potential therapeutic relevance to schizophrenia, and are consistent with leading pathophysiological hypotheses. Independent of genes expressed in brain, associations were enriched among genes expressed in tissues that play important roles in immunity, providing support for the hypothesized link between the immune system and schizophrenia. PMID:25056061

  4. Quantitative Trait Loci for Mercury Tolerance in Rice Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-qing WANG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg is one of the most toxic heavy metals to living organisms and its conspicuous effect is the inhibition of root growth. However, little is known about the molecular genetic basis for root growth under excess Hg2+ stress. To map quantitative trait loci (QTLs in rice for Hg2+ tolerance, a population of 120 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between two japonica cultivars Yuefu and IRAT109 was grown in 0.5 mmol/L CaCl2 solution. Relative root length (RRL, percentage of the seminal root length in +HgCl2 to –HgCl2, was used for assessing Hg2+ tolerance. In a dose-response experiment, Yuefu had a higher RRL than IRAT109 and showed the most significant difference at the Hg2+ concentration of 1.5 μmol/L. Three putative QTLs for RRL were detected on chromosomes 1, 2 and 5, and totally explained about 35.7% of the phenotypic variance in Hg2+ tolerance. The identified QTLs for RRL might be useful for improving Hg2+ tolerance of rice by molecular marker-assisted selection.

  5. Tissue-specific tagging of endogenous loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Koles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein tags have revolutionized cell and developmental biology, and in combination with binary expression systems they enable diverse tissue-specific studies of protein function. However these binary expression systems often do not recapitulate endogenous protein expression levels, localization, binding partners and/or developmental windows of gene expression. To address these limitations, we have developed a method called T-STEP (tissue-specific tagging of endogenous proteins that allows endogenous loci to be tagged in a tissue specific manner. T-STEP uses a combination of efficient CRISPR/Cas9-enhanced gene targeting and tissue-specific recombinase-mediated tag swapping to temporally and spatially label endogenous proteins. We have employed this method to GFP tag OCRL (a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase in the endocytic pathway and Vps35 (a Parkinson's disease-implicated component of the endosomal retromer complex in diverse Drosophila tissues including neurons, glia, muscles and hemocytes. Selective tagging of endogenous proteins allows, for the first time, cell type-specific live imaging and proteomics in complex tissues.

  6. Nucleolus organizer regions (Nor loci) of Chinese wheats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cedric E.May; 辛志勇

    1996-01-01

    Nucleolus organizer regions (Nor loci) of a range of Chinese wheat landraces and cultivars (Triticum aestivum L. em Thell.) were analysed using genomic DNA extracted from leaves. Only two allelic variants of the Nor-B1 locus were found on chromosome 1B (Nor-B1a and Nor-B1g), while Nor-B1g was probably introduced from North America in the early 1960s. The even more recent introduction of the rye allele Nor-R1 in the early 1980s was also revealed. Eight allelic variants of the Nor-B2 locus on chromosome 6B (Nor-B2a, b, d, f, h, o, p and s) were identified. A Chinese origin for the a, d, f, o, p and s alkies is evident although the d allele was successfully introduced into Australian wheats in the early 1900s. Nor-B2h and Nor-B2b are again very recent introductions into Chinese wheat breeding programs, the former from CIMMYT wheats and the latter in association with the introduction of the 1RS/1BL translocation from Europe. On the basis of the presence of different combinations of Nor-B1 and Nor-B2 alleles

  7. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci for Palatability of Milled Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling palatability in rice were identified using a set of 98 backcross inbred lines (BILs) population derived from a cross between a japonica variety Nipponbare and an indica variety Kasalath. The palatability scores of the population measured by RQ1/Plus Rice Analyzer, showed a continuous and transgressive segregative distribution with a range from 66 to 92. Four putative QTLs for palatability, qPAL-5, qPAL-7, qPAL-8a and qPAL-8b, were detected on chromosome 5, 7 and 8, and they accounted 7.83, 7.03, 11.58 and 7.19% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. Three alleles qPAL-5, qPAL-7 and qPAL-8b from Kasalath increased the palatability score, whereas only one Nipponbare allele qPAL-8a increased the score. Eight transgressive lines in palatability were selected to make a comparison between phenotypic and genotypic classes. The result explained the possibility of positive QTLs pyramiding through marker-assisted selection of highly palatable rice.

  8. SSR Cluster and Fertility Loci Analysis of GC13

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NONG Bao-xuan; XIA Xiu-zhong; LIANG Yao-mao; LU Gang; ZHANG Zong-qiong; LI Dan-ting

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The research aimed to clarify the genetic mechanism of special wide compatibility of GC13.[Method] The clustering analyses of GC13,five indica,five japonica and five wide compatibility varieties were carried out by using 70 SSR primers.[Result] GC13 was clustered into japonica group and had far genetic relationship with indica and wide compatibility variety.Two fertility loci were detected in GC13,in which one closely linked to RM225 on chromosome 6.According to the position on the chromosome,it speculated that this locus was allelic to S5.GC13 carried the allelic gene S5-n at this locus.The other locus closely linked to RM408 on chromosome 8 and was provisionally designated as Sg(t).At this locus,GC13 carried Sg(t)-i allelic gene,which was consistent with IR36.The effect of S5 locus was stronger than that of Sg(t).[Conclusion] The research laid the good foundation for using the wide compatibility line GC13 to breed the hybrid between subspecies.%[Objective] The research aimed to clarify the genetic mechanism of special wide compatibility of GC13.[Method] The clustering analyses of GC13,five indica,five japonica and five wide compatibility varieties were carried out by using 70 SSR primers.[Result

  9. Arthropod phylogeny based on eight molecular loci and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giribet, G.; Edgecombe, G. D.; Wheeler, W. C.

    2001-01-01

    The interrelationships of major clades within the Arthropoda remain one of the most contentious issues in systematics, which has traditionally been the domain of morphologists. A growing body of DNA sequences and other types of molecular data has revitalized study of arthropod phylogeny and has inspired new considerations of character evolution. Novel hypotheses such as a crustacean-hexapod affinity were based on analyses of single or few genes and limited taxon sampling, but have received recent support from mitochondrial gene order, and eye and brain ultrastructure and neurogenesis. Here we assess relationships within Arthropoda based on a synthesis of all well sampled molecular loci together with a comprehensive data set of morphological, developmental, ultrastructural and gene-order characters. The molecular data include sequences of three nuclear ribosomal genes, three nuclear protein-coding genes, and two mitochondrial genes (one protein coding, one ribosomal). We devised new optimization procedures and constructed a parallel computer cluster with 256 central processing units to analyse molecular data on a scale not previously possible. The optimal 'total evidence' cladogram supports the crustacean-hexapod clade, recognizes pycnogonids as sister to other euarthropods, and indicates monophyly of Myriapoda and Mandibulata.

  10. Linkage disequilibrium interval mapping of quantitative trait loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Rochambeau Hubert

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many years gene mapping studies have been performed through linkage analyses based on pedigree data. Recently, linkage disequilibrium methods based on unrelated individuals have been advocated as powerful tools to refine estimates of gene location. Many strategies have been proposed to deal with simply inherited disease traits. However, locating quantitative trait loci is statistically more challenging and considerable research is needed to provide robust and computationally efficient methods. Results Under a three-locus Wright-Fisher model, we derived approximate expressions for the expected haplotype frequencies in a population. We considered haplotypes comprising one trait locus and two flanking markers. Using these theoretical expressions, we built a likelihood-maximization method, called HAPim, for estimating the location of a quantitative trait locus. For each postulated position, the method only requires information from the two flanking markers. Over a wide range of simulation scenarios it was found to be more accurate than a two-marker composite likelihood method. It also performed as well as identity by descent methods, whilst being valuable in a wider range of populations. Conclusion Our method makes efficient use of marker information, and can be valuable for fine mapping purposes. Its performance is increased if multiallelic markers are available. Several improvements can be developed to account for more complex evolution scenarios or provide robust confidence intervals for the location estimates.

  11. Genetic evidence of multiple loci in dystocia - difficult labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westgren Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dystocia, difficult labour, is a common but also complex problem during childbirth. It can be attributed to either weak contractions of the uterus, a large infant, reduced capacity of the pelvis or combinations of these. Previous studies have indicated that there is a genetic component in the susceptibility of experiencing dystocia. The purpose of this study was to identify susceptibility genes in dystocia. Methods A total of 104 women in 47 families were included where at least two sisters had undergone caesarean section at a gestational length of 286 days or more at their first delivery. Study of medical records and a telephone interview was performed to identify subjects with dystocia. Whole-genome scanning using Affymetrix genotyping-arrays and non-parametric linkage (NPL analysis was made in 39 women exhibiting the phenotype of dystocia from 19 families. In 68 women re-sequencing was performed of candidate genes showing suggestive linkage: oxytocin (OXT on chromosome 20 and oxytocin-receptor (OXTR on chromosome 3. Results We found a trend towards linkage with suggestive NPL-score (3.15 on chromosome 12p12. Suggestive linkage peaks were observed on chromosomes 3, 4, 6, 10, 20. Re-sequencing of OXT and OXTR did not reveal any causal variants. Conclusions Dystocia is likely to have a genetic component with variations in multiple genes affecting the patient outcome. We found 6 loci that could be re-evaluated in larger patient cohorts.

  12. Quantitative Trait Loci for Mercury Tolerance in Rice Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chong-qing; WANG Tao; MU Ping; LI Zi-chao; YANG Ling

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic heavy metals to living organisms and its conspicuous effect is the inhibition of root growth.However,little is known about the molecular genetic basis for root growth under excess Hg2+ stress.To map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in rice for Hg2+ tolerance,a population of 120 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between two japonica cultivars Yuefu and IRAT109 was grown in 0.5 mmol/L CaCl2 solution.Relative root length (RRL),percentage of the seminal root length in +HgCl2 to -HgCl2,was used for assessing Hg2+ tolerance.In a dose-response experiment,Yuefu had a higher RRL than IRAT109 and showed the most significant difference at the Hg2+ concentration of 1.5 μmol/L.Three putative QTLs for RRL were detected on chromosomes 1,2 and 5,and totally explained about 35.7% of the phenotypic variance in Hg2+ tolerance.The identified QTLs for RRL might be useful for improving Hg2+ tolerance of rice by molecular marker-assisted selection.

  13. PEMETAAN QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI UNTUK SIFAT BERSKALA KATEGORIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farit Mochamad Afendi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Genes or regions on chromosome underlying a quantitative trait are called quantitative trait loci (QTL. Characterizing genes controlling quantitative trait on their position in chromosome and their effect on trait is through a process called QTL mapping. In estimating the QTL position and its effect, QTL mapping utilizes the association between QTL and DNA makers. However, many important traits are ob