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Sample records for vmip-ii inhibits virus-induced

  1. Inhibition of Pim1 kinase, new therapeutic approach in virus-induced asthma exacerbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Maaike; Bedke, Nicole; Smithers, Natalie P.; Loxham, Matthew; Howarth, Peter H.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Davies, Donna E.

    Therapeutic options to treat virus-induced asthma exacerbations are limited and urgently needed. Therefore, we tested Pim1 kinase as potential therapeutic target in human rhinovirus (HRV) infections. We hypothesised that inhibition of Pim1 kinase reduces HRV replication by augmenting the

  2. Virus-induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in the guinea-pig is inhibited by levodropropizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkerts, G; van der Linde, H J; Omini, C; Nijkamp, F P

    1993-08-01

    Intratracheal Parainfluenza type 3 (PI-3) virus inoculation of guinea pigs leads to a non-specific airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo and in vitro which coincides with a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells in the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (90% increase, 4 days after inoculation). The activity of the bronchoalveolar cells, as measured by the chemiluminescence production of infected animals is significantly diminished (34.2%, 4 days after inoculation) after renewed stimulation with PI-3 virus in vitro as compared to the chemiluminescence production by bronchoalveolar cells obtained from control guinea pigs. Pretreatment of the guinea-pigs with the antitussive agent levodropropizine, administered intra-peritoneally twice a day for five successive days at a dose of 10 mg/kg, prevents the virus-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo and in vitro, and inhibits the influx of broncho-alveolar cells. Levodropropizine at a dose of 1 mg/kg did not modulate these responses. Further, the decrease in chemiluminescence production of broncho-alveolar cells obtained from virus-infected animals after PI-3 virus stimulation in vitro was inhibited by levodropropizine (10 mg/kg). These data demonstrate the ability of levodropropizine to counteract the hyperresponsiveness phenomenon and the associated inflammatory event induced by PI-3 virus, an effect which may be due to its capacity to act on the peptidergic system or may be due to the anti-allergic/bronchoconstrictor property of this compound.

  3. Well-tolerated Spirulina extract inhibits influenza virus replication and reduces virus-induced mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hsiang; Chang, Gi-Kung; Kuo, Shu-Ming; Huang, Sheng-Yu; Hu, I-Chen; Lo, Yu-Lun; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-04-12

    Influenza is one of the most common human respiratory diseases, and represents a serious public health concern. However, the high mutability of influenza viruses has hampered vaccine development, and resistant strains to existing anti-viral drugs have also emerged. Novel anti-influenza therapies are urgently needed, and in this study, we describe the anti-viral properties of a Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) cold water extract. Anti-viral effects have previously been reported for extracts and specific substances derived from Spirulina, and here we show that this Spirulina cold water extract has low cellular toxicity, and is well-tolerated in animal models at one dose as high as 5,000 mg/kg, or 3,000 mg/kg/day for 14 successive days. Anti-flu efficacy studies revealed that the Spirulina extract inhibited viral plaque formation in a broad range of influenza viruses, including oseltamivir-resistant strains. Spirulina extract was found to act at an early stage of infection to reduce virus yields in cells and improve survival in influenza-infected mice, with inhibition of influenza hemagglutination identified as one of the mechanisms involved. Together, these results suggest that the cold water extract of Spirulina might serve as a safe and effective therapeutic agent to manage influenza outbreaks, and further clinical investigation may be warranted.

  4. Well-tolerated Spirulina extract inhibits influenza virus replication and reduces virus-induced mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hsiang; Chang, Gi-Kung; Kuo, Shu-Ming; Huang, Sheng-Yu; Hu, I-Chen; Lo, Yu-Lun; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is one of the most common human respiratory diseases, and represents a serious public health concern. However, the high mutability of influenza viruses has hampered vaccine development, and resistant strains to existing anti-viral drugs have also emerged. Novel anti-influenza therapies are urgently needed, and in this study, we describe the anti-viral properties of a Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) cold water extract. Anti-viral effects have previously been reported for extracts and specific substances derived from Spirulina, and here we show that this Spirulina cold water extract has low cellular toxicity, and is well-tolerated in animal models at one dose as high as 5,000 mg/kg, or 3,000 mg/kg/day for 14 successive days. Anti-flu efficacy studies revealed that the Spirulina extract inhibited viral plaque formation in a broad range of influenza viruses, including oseltamivir-resistant strains. Spirulina extract was found to act at an early stage of infection to reduce virus yields in cells and improve survival in influenza-infected mice, with inhibition of influenza hemagglutination identified as one of the mechanisms involved. Together, these results suggest that the cold water extract of Spirulina might serve as a safe and effective therapeutic agent to manage influenza outbreaks, and further clinical investigation may be warranted. PMID:27067133

  5. Monocytes inhibit hepatitis C virus-induced TRAIL expression on CD56bright NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Dalila; Mantovani, Stefania; Oliviero, Barbara; Grossi, Giulia; Lombardi, Andrea; Mondelli, Mario U; Varchetta, Stefania

    2017-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We have previously shown that culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) enhance tumor necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) expression on healthy NK cells, but not on those from patients infected with HCV, which was likely dependent on accessory cells. Here we sought to elucidate the mechanisms involved in altered TRAIL upregulation in this setting. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from controls and patients infected with HCV were exposed to HCVcc. Cell depletions were performed to identify cells responsible for NK cell activation. Flow cytometry and ELISA were used to identify the cytokines involved in the NK activation process. In patients infected with HCV, soluble factors secreted by control PBMC restored the ability of NK cells to express TRAIL. Of note, CD14+ cell depletion had identical effects upon virus exposure and promoted increased degranulation. Moreover, increased concentrations of interleukin (IL)-18 binding protein a (IL-18BPa) and IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36RA) were observed after PBMC exposure to HCVcc in patients with HCV. HCVcc-induced NK cell TRAIL expression was inhibited by IL-18BPa and IL-36RA in control subjects. There were statistically significant correlations between IL-18BPa and indices of liver inflammation and fibrosis, supporting a role for this protein in the pathogenesis of chronic HCV infection. During chronic HCV infection, monocytes play a key role in negative regulation of NK cell activation, predominantly via secretion of inhibitors of IL-18 and IL-36. Coordination and collaboration between immune cells are essential to fight pathogens. Herein we show that during HCV infection monocytes secrete IL-18 and IL-36 inhibitory proteins, reducing NK cell activation, and consequently inhibiting their ability to express TRAIL and kill target cells. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the

  6. Identification of novel compounds inhibiting chikungunya virus-induced cell death by high throughput screening of a kinase inhibitor library.

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    Deu John M Cruz

    CHIKV having a novel antiviral activity--inhibition of virus-induced CPE--likely by targeting kinases involved in apoptosis.

  7. Virus induced inflammation and cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Scott A; Douglas, Mark W

    2014-04-10

    Chronic inflammation as a result of viral infection significantly increases the likelihood of cancer development. A handful of diverse viruses have confirmed roles in cancer development and progression, but the list of suspected oncogenic viruses is continually growing. Viruses induce cancer directly and indirectly, by activating inflammatory signalling pathways and cytokines, stimulating growth of infected cells and inhibiting apoptosis. Although oncogenic viruses induce inflammation by various mechanisms, it is generally mediated by the MAPK, NFκB and STAT3 signalling pathways. This review will explore the unique mechanisms by which different oncogenic viruses induce inflammation to promote cancer initiation and progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The virus-encoded chemokine vMIP-II inhibits virus-induced Tc1-driven inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Nansen, Anneline; Bartholdy, Christina

    2003-01-01

    The human herpesvirus 8-encoded protein vMIP-II is a potent in vitro antagonist of many chemokine receptors believed to be associated with attraction of T cells with a type 1 cytokine profile. For the present report we have studied the in vivo potential of this viral chemokine antagonist to inhibit....... Consistent with these in vitro findings treatment with vMIP-II inhibited the adoptive transfer of a virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response in vivo, but only when antigen-primed donor cells were transferred via the intravenous route and required to migrate actively, not when the cells were......-induced signals are pivotal in directing antiviral effector cells toward virus-infected organ sites and that vMIP-II is a potent inhibitor of type 1 T-cell-mediated inflammation....

  9. Interleukin-10 blocks in vitro replication of human cytomegalovirus by inhibiting the virus-induced autophagy in MRC5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Huiping; Qian, Jihong; Wang, Kanqing; Zhu, Jianxing

    2014-06-13

    Interleukin-10 is an important cytokine that regulates immune response. Previous studies have shown that human cytomegalovirus can trigger cell autophagy during the early stages of infection. To our knowledge, whether IL-10 inhibits HCMV-induced autophagy and virus replication has not been studied previously. We investigated whether IL-10 affects cell viability and autophagy under the conditions of starvation and HCMV infection by using the MRC5 cell line. We also explored the role of IL-10-mediated autophagy on HCMV replication. Our data showed that IL-10 inhibited the autophagic flux of the MRC5 cells irrespective of starvation or HCMV infection, and suppressed HCMV replication. The promotion of autophagy with either a pharmacological inducer (rapamycin), or a technique to over-express the BECN1 gene reversed the effect of IL-10 on virus replication. Furthermore, the PI3K/Akt signal pathway was activated when the cells were pretreated with IL-10. Our results indicated that IL-10 can suppress HCMV replication by inhibiting autophagy in host cells during the early stages of infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Xijiao Dihuang Decoction combined with Yinqiao Powder reverses influenza virus-induced F-actin reorganization in PMVECs by inhibiting ERM phosphorylation

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    Zinan Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: These results show that XDY-CS inhibited influenza-induced F-actin reorganization in PMVECs by down-regulating p-ERM expression via inhibition of the Rho/ROCK, p38 MAPK, and PKC pathways. In conclusion, XDY could reduce the damage to endothelial cytoskeleton induced by IV infection, thus protecting the barriers of PMVECs.

  11. Dengue virus induces expression of CXC chemokine ligand 10/IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10, which competitively inhibits viral binding to cell surface heparan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Perng; Lu, Hsin-Lin; Lai, Szu-Liang; Campanella, Gabriele S; Sung, Jui-Ming; Lu, Mei-Yi; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A; Lin, Yi-Ling; Lane, Thomas E; Luster, Andrew D; Liao, Fang

    2006-09-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne flavivirus that causes a mild febrile illness, dengue fever, or a potentially fatal syndrome, dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Chemokines primarily orchestrate leukocyte recruitment to the areas of viral infection, which makes them critical mediators of immune and inflammatory responses. In the present study, we investigated the induction and function of chemokines in mice early after infection with dengue virus in vivo. We found that CXCL10/IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) expression was rapidly and transiently induced in liver following infection. The expressed CXCL10/IP-10 likely mediates the recruitment of activated NK cells, given that anti-CXCL10/IP-10-treated mice showed diminished NK cell infiltration and reduced hepatic expression of effector molecules in activated NK cells after dengue virus infection. Of particular interest, we found that CXCL10/IP-10 also was able to inhibit viral binding to target cells in vitro. Further investigation revealed that various CXCL10/IP-10 mutants, in which the residues that mediate the interaction between the chemokine and heparan sulfate were substituted, failed to exert the inhibitory effect on dengue binding, which suggests that CXCL10/IP-10 competes with dengue virus for binding to heparan sulfate on the cell surface. Moreover, subsequent plaque assays showed that this inhibition of dengue binding blocked viral uptake and replication. The inhibitory effect of CXCL10/IP-10 on the binding of dengue virus to cells may represent a novel contribution of this chemokine to the host defense against viral infection.

  12. Nutrigenomics Therapy of Hepatisis C Virus Induced-hepatosteatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Nutrigenomics is a relatively new branch of nutrition science, which aim is to study the impact of the foods we eat on the function of our genes. Hepatosteatosis is strongly associated with hepatitis C virus infection, which is known to increase the risk of the disease progression and reduce the likelihood of responding to anti- virus treatment. It is well documented that hepatitis C virus can directly alter host cell lipid metabolism through nuclear transcription factors. To date, only a limited number of studies have been on the effect of human foods on the nuclear transcription factors of hepatitis C virus -induced hepatosteatosis. Three nutrients, selected among 46 different nutrients: β-carotene, vitamin D2, and linoleic acid were found in a cell culture system to inhibit hepatitis C virus RNA replication. In addition, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) especially arachidonic acid (AA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have been demonstrated to inhibit hepatitis C virus RNA replication. These PUFAs, in particular the highly unsaturated n-3 fatty acids change the gene expression of PPARa and SREBP, suppress the expression of mRNAs encoding key metabolic enzymes and hereby suppress hepatic lipogenesis and triglyceride synthesis, as well as secretion and accumulation in tissues. A recent prospective clinical trial of 1,084 chronic hepatitis C patients compared to 2,326 healthy subjects suggests that chronic hepatitis C patients may benefit from strict dietary instructions. Increasing evidence suggest that some crucial nuclear transcription factors related to hepatitis C virus -associated hepatosteatosis and hepatitis C virus RNA itself can be controlled by specific anti- hepatitis C virus nutrition. It seems important that these findings are taken into account and specific nutritional supplements developed to be used in combination with interferon as adjunctive therapy with the aim to improve both the early as well as the sustained

  13. Nutrigenomics therapy of hepatisis C virus induced-hepatosteatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Bengmark, Stig; Qu, Shen

    2010-05-20

    Nutrigenomics is a relatively new branch of nutrition science, which aim is to study the impact of the foods we eat on the function of our genes. Hepatosteatosis is strongly associated with hepatitis C virus infection, which is known to increase the risk of the disease progression and reduce the likelihood of responding to anti- virus treatment. It is well documented that hepatitis C virus can directly alter host cell lipid metabolism through nuclear transcription factors. To date, only a limited number of studies have been on the effect of human foods on the nuclear transcription factors of hepatitis C virus -induced hepatosteatosis.Three nutrients, selected among 46 different nutrients: beta-carotene, vitamin D2, and linoleic acid were found in a cell culture system to inhibit hepatitis C virus RNA replication. In addition, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) especially arachidonic acid (AA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have been demonstrated to inhibit hepatitis C virus RNA replication. These PUFAs, in particular the highly unsaturated n-3 fatty acids change the gene expression of PPARa and SREBP, suppress the expression of mRNAs encoding key metabolic enzymes and hereby suppress hepatic lipogenesis and triglyceride synthesis, as well as secretion and accumulation in tissues. A recent prospective clinical trial of 1,084 chronic hepatitis C patients compared to 2,326 healthy subjects suggests that chronic hepatitis C patients may benefit from strict dietary instructions.Increasing evidence suggest that some crucial nuclear transcription factors related to hepatitis C virus -associated hepatosteatosis and hepatitis C virus RNA itself can be controlled by specific anti- hepatitis C virus nutrition. It seems important that these findings are taken into account and specific nutritional supplements developed to be used in combination with interferon as adjunctive therapy with the aim to improve both the early as well as the sustained

  14. Establishment of a highly efficient virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhan-Qi; Chen, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Nan; Cao, Ming-Ya; Dong, Fei-Fan; Jiang, Ya-Ming; Chen, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Pan, Min-Hui

    2016-06-01

    Although current antiviral strategies can inhibit baculovirus infection and decrease viral DNA replication to a certain extent, novel tools are required for specific and accurate elimination of baculovirus genomes from infected insects. Using the newly developed clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) technology, we disrupted a viral genome in infected insect cells in vitro as a defense against viral infection. We optimized the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit foreign and viral genome in insect cells. Using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) as a model, we found that the CRISPR/Cas9 system was capable of cleaving the replication key factor ie-1 in BmNPV thus effectively inhibiting virus proliferation. Furthermore, we constructed a virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 editing system, which minimized the probability of off-target effects and was rapidly activated after viral infection. This is the first report describing the application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect antiviral research. Establishment of a highly efficient virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect cells provides insights to produce virus-resistant transgenic strains for future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular epidemiology of respiratory viruses in virus-induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Ishioka, Taisei; Noda, Masahiro; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2013-09-12

    Acute respiratory illness (ARI) due to various viruses is not only the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in humans but is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality, leading to diseases such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human rhinovirus (HRV), human metapneumovirus (HMPV), human parainfluenza virus (HPIV), and human enterovirus infections may be associated with virus-induced asthma. For example, it has been suggested that HRV infection is detected in the acute exacerbation of asthma and infection is prolonged. Thus it is believed that the main etiological cause of asthma is ARI viruses. Furthermore, the number of asthma patients in most industrial countries has greatly increased, resulting in a morbidity rate of around 10-15% of the population. However, the relationships between viral infections, host immune response, and host factors in the pathophysiology of asthma remain unclear. To gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of virus-induced asthma, it is important to assess both the characteristics of the viruses and the host defense mechanisms. Molecular epidemiology enables us to understand the pathogenesis of microorganisms by identifying specific pathways, molecules, and genes that influence the risk of developing a disease. However, the epidemiology of various respiratory viruses associated with virus-induced asthma is not fully understood. Therefore, in this article, we review molecular epidemiological studies of RSV, HRV, HPIV, and HMPV infection associated with virus-induced asthma.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of respiratory viruses in virus-induced asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eTsukagoshi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory illness (ARI due to various viruses is not only the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in humans but is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality, leading to diseases such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, human rhinovirus (HRV, human metapneumovirus (HMPV, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV, and human enterovirus (HEV infections may be associated with virus-induced asthma. For example, it has been suggested that HRV infection is detected in the acute exacerbation of asthma and infection is prolonged. Thus it is believed that the main etiological cause of asthma is ARI viruses. Furthermore, the number of asthma patients in most industrial countries has greatly increased, resulting in a morbidity rate of around 10-15% of the population. However, the relationships between viral infections, host immune response, and host factors in the pathophysiology of asthma remain unclear. To gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of virus-induced asthma, it is important to assess both the characteristics of the viruses and the host defense mechanisms. Molecular epidemiology enables us to understand the pathogenesis of microorganisms by identifying specific pathways, molecules, and genes that influence the risk of developing a disease. However, the epidemiology of various respiratory viruses associated with virus-induced asthma is not fully understood. Therefore, in this article, we review molecular epidemiological studies of RSV, HRV, HPIV, and HMPV infection associated with virus-induced asthma.

  17. Salicylate prevents virus-induced type 1 diabetes in the BBDR rat.

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    Chaoxing Yang

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that virus infection plays an important role in human type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. We used the virus-inducible BioBreeding Diabetes Resistant (BBDR rat to investigate the ability of sodium salicylate, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, to modulate development of type 1 diabetes. BBDR rats treated with Kilham rat virus (KRV and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (pIC, a TLR3 agonist develop diabetes at nearly 100% incidence by ~2 weeks. We found distinct temporal profiles of the proinflammatory serum cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-12, and haptoglobin (an acute phase protein in KRV+pIC treated rats. Significant elevations of IL-1β and IL-12, coupled with sustained elevations of haptoglobin, were specific to KRV+pIC and not found in rats co-treated with pIC and H1, a non-diabetogenic virus. Salicylate administered concurrently with KRV+pIC inhibited the elevations in IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ and haptoglobin almost completely, and reduced IL-12 levels significantly. Salicylate prevented diabetes in a dose-dependent manner, and diabetes-free animals had no evidence of insulitis. Our data support an important role for innate immunity in virus-induced type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. The ability of salicylate to prevent diabetes in this robust animal model demonstrates its potential use to prevent or attenuate human autoimmune diabetes.

  18. Virus-induced Systemic Vasculitides: New Therapeutic Approaches

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    Loïc Guillevin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The best therapeutic strategy in virus-induced vasculitides should take into account the etiology of the disease and be adapted to the pathogenesis. The combination of antiviral treatments and plasma exchanges has been proven effective in polyarteritis nodosa (PAN. In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-related vasculitis this strategy is also effective and does not jeopardize, like cytotoxic agents, the outcome of AIDS. In vasculitis related to HCV-associated cryoglobulinemia, plasma exchanges improve the outcome but the poor effectiveness of antiviral drugs is not able to favor, usually, a definite recovery of the patients and relapses are frequent.

  19. Myxoma virus induces apoptosis in cultured feline carcinoma cells.

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    MacNeill, A L; Moldenhauer, T; Doty, R; Mann, T

    2012-10-01

    There is growing interest in utilizing replicating oncolytic viruses as cancer therapeutics agents. The effectiveness of myxoma virus-induced oncolysis was evaluated in two feline cancer cell cultures. Although myxoma virus is a rabbit-specific pathogen, protein expression driven by myxoma virus and production of infectious viral particles were detected. Cell death occurred in primary feline cancer cells within 48 h of inoculation with myxoma virus. Future studies to determine if other feline neoplasms are susceptible to myxoma virus infection are warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Virus -induced plankton dynamic and sea spray oragnics

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    Facchini, Maria Cristina; O'Dowd, Colin; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The processes that link phytoplankton biomass and productivity to the organic matter enrichment in sea spray aerosol are far from being understood and modelling predictions remain highly uncertain at the moment. While some studies have asserted that the enrichment of OM in sea spray aerosol is independent on marine productivity, others, on the contrary, have shown significant correlation with phytoplankton biomass and productivity (Chl-a retrieved by satellites). Here we show that viral infection of prokaryotes and phytoplankton, by inducing the release of large quantities of surfaceactive organic matter (cell debris, exudates and other colloidal gel-forming material), in part due to cell lysis and plankton defence reactions, and in part from rapid virus multiplication, triggers the organic matter (OM) enrichment in the sea-spray particles during blooms. We show that virus-induced bloom dynamics may explain the contrasting results present in literature on the link between primary productivity and OM sea spray enrichment.

  1. Treatment of Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease with teriflunomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilli, Francesca; Li, Libin; Royce, Darlene B; DiSano, Krista D; Pachner, Andrew R

    2017-12-01

    Teriflunomide is an oral therapy approved for the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), showing both anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties. Currently, it is uncertain whether one or both of these properties may explain teriflunomide's beneficial effect in MS. Thus, to learn more about its mechanisms of action, we evaluated the effect of teriflunomide in the Theiler's encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) model, which is both a viral infection and an excellent model of the progressive disability of MS. We assessed the effects of the treatment on central nervous system (CNS) viral load, intrathecal immune response, and progressive neurological disability in mice intracranially infected with TMEV. In the TMEV-IDD model, we showed that teriflunomide has both anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties, but there seemed to be no impact on disability progression and intrathecal antibody production. Notably, benefits in TMEV-IDD were mostly mediated by effects on various cytokines produced in the CNS. Perhaps the most interesting result of the study has been teriflunomide's antiviral activity in the CNS, indicating it may have a role as an antiviral prophylactic and therapeutic compound for CNS viral infections.

  2. Infection with influenza virus induces IL-33 in murine lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goffic, Ronan; Arshad, Muhammad Imran; Rauch, Michel; L'Helgoualc'h, Annie; Delmas, Bernard; Piquet-Pellorce, Claire; Samson, Michel

    2011-12-01

    IL-33, a novel IL-1 family member, is crucially expressed and involved in pulmonary diseases, but its regulation in viral diseases such as influenza A virus (IAV) remains unclear. This study aimed to characterize the expression and release of IL-33 in lungs of IAV-infected mice in vivo and in murine respiratory epithelial cells (MLE-15) in vitro. Our results provide evidence of up-regulation of IL-33 mRNA in IAV-infected murine lungs, compared with noninfected control mice. The overexpression of IL-33 was positively correlated with a significant increase in mRNA encoding the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-6, and was also associated with an increase in IFN-β mRNA. A profound overexpression of IL-33 protein was evident in IAV-infected murine lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages of influenza-infected mice, compared with low concentrations in naive lungs in vivo. Immunolocalization highlighted the cellular expression of IL-33 in alveolar epithelial and endothelial cells, along with increased infiltrate cells in virus-infected lungs. Further in vitro experiments showed an induction of IL-33 transcript-in MLE-15 cells and human epithelial cells (A549) infected with different strains of IAV in comparison with noninfected cells. In conclusion, our findings evidenced a profound expression of IL-33 in lungs during both in vivo and in vitro IAV infections, suggesting a role for IL-33 in virus-induced lung infections.

  3. Efficient Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Solanum rostratum

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    Meng, Lan-Huan; Wang, Rui-Heng; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Luo, Yun-Bo; Fu, Da-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Solanum rostratum is a “super weed” that grows fast, is widespread, and produces the toxin solanine, which is harmful to both humans and other animals. To our knowledge, no study has focused on its molecular biology owing to the lack of available transgenic methods and sequence information for S. rostratum. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful tool for the study of gene function in plants; therefore, in the present study, we aimed to establish tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-derived VIGS in S. rostratum. The genes for phytoene desaturase (PDS) and Chlorophyll H subunit (ChlH) of magnesium protoporphyrin chelatase were cloned from S. rostratum and used as reporters of gene silencing. It was shown that high-efficiency VIGS can be achieved in the leaves, flowers, and fruit of S. rostratum. Moreover, based on our comparison of three different types of infection methods, true leaf infection was found to be more efficient than cotyledon and sprout infiltration in long-term VIGS in multiple plant organs. In conclusion, the VIGS technology and tomato genomic sequences can be used in the future to study gene function in S. rostratum. PMID:27258320

  4. Efficient Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Solanum rostratum.

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    Lan-Huan Meng

    Full Text Available Solanum rostratum is a "super weed" that grows fast, is widespread, and produces the toxin solanine, which is harmful to both humans and other animals. To our knowledge, no study has focused on its molecular biology owing to the lack of available transgenic methods and sequence information for S. rostratum. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS is a powerful tool for the study of gene function in plants; therefore, in the present study, we aimed to establish tobacco rattle virus (TRV-derived VIGS in S. rostratum. The genes for phytoene desaturase (PDS and Chlorophyll H subunit (ChlH of magnesium protoporphyrin chelatase were cloned from S. rostratum and used as reporters of gene silencing. It was shown that high-efficiency VIGS can be achieved in the leaves, flowers, and fruit of S. rostratum. Moreover, based on our comparison of three different types of infection methods, true leaf infection was found to be more efficient than cotyledon and sprout infiltration in long-term VIGS in multiple plant organs. In conclusion, the VIGS technology and tomato genomic sequences can be used in the future to study gene function in S. rostratum.

  5. Virus-induced exacerbations in asthma and COPD

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    Daisuke eKurai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by chronic airway inflammation and/or airflow limitation due to pulmonary emphysema. Chronic bronchitis, pulmonary emphysema, and bronchial asthma may all be associated with airflow limitation; therefore, exacerbation of asthma may be associated with the pathophysiology of COPD. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that the exacerbation of asthma, namely virus-induced asthma, may be associated with a wide variety of respiratory viruses.COPD and asthma have different underlying pathophysiological processes and thus require individual therapies. Exacerbation of both COPD and asthma, which are basically defined and diagnosed by clinical symptoms, is associated with a rapid decline in lung function and increased mortality. Similar pathogens, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and coronavirus, are also frequently detected during exacerbation of asthma and/or COPD. Immune response to respiratory viral infections, which may be related to the severity of exacerbation in each disease, varies in patients with both COPD and asthma. In this regard, it is crucial to recognize and understand both the similarities and differences of clinical features in patients with COPD and/or asthma associated with respiratory viral infections, especially in the exacerbative stage.In relation to definition, epidemiology, and pathophysiology, this review aims to summarize current knowledge concerning exacerbation of both COPD and asthma by focusing on the clinical significance of associated respiratory virus infections.

  6. Dimethyl fumarate suppresses Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease by modifying the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway.

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    Kobayashi, Kunitoshi; Tomiki, Hiroki; Inaba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Motoki; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2015-07-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a modifier of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-2 (Nrf2)-kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway. DMF treatment in the effector phase significantly suppressed the development of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) both clinically and histologically. DMF treatment leads to an enhanced Nrf2 antioxidant response in TMEV-IDD mice. DMF treatment in the effector phase significantly suppressed the level of IL-17A mRNA. DMF is known to inhibit differentiation of T helper 17 (Th17) cells via suppressing NF-κB. Taken together, our data suggest that DMF treatment in the effector phase may suppress TMEV-IDD not only via enhancing the antioxidant response but also via suppressing IL-17A. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. CLEC5A regulates Japanese encephalitis virus-induced neuroinflammation and lethality.

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    Szu-Ting Chen

    Full Text Available CLEC5A/MDL-1, a member of the myeloid C-type lectin family expressed on macrophages and neutrophils, is critical for dengue virus (DV-induced hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome in Stat1⁻/⁻ mice and ConA-treated wild type mice. However, whether CLEC5A is involved in the pathogenesis of viral encephalitis has not yet been investigated. To investigate the role of CLEC5A to regulate JEV-induced neuroinflammation, antagonistic anti-CLEC5A mAb and CLEC5A-deficient mice were generated. We find that Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV directly interacts with CLEC5A and induces DAP12 phosphorylation in macrophages. In addition, JEV activates macrophages to secrete proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which are dramatically reduced in JEV-infected Clec5a⁻/⁻ macrophages. Although blockade of CLEC5A cannot inhibit JEV infection of neurons and astrocytes, anti-CLEC5A mAb inhibits JEV-induced proinflammatory cytokine release from microglia and prevents bystander damage to neuronal cells. Moreover, JEV causes blood-brain barrier (BBB disintegrity and lethality in STAT1-deficient (Stat1⁻/⁻ mice, whereas peripheral administration of anti-CLEC5A mAb reduces infiltration of virus-harboring leukocytes into the central nervous system (CNS, restores BBB integrity, attenuates neuroinflammation, and protects mice from JEV-induced lethality. Moreover, all surviving mice develop protective humoral and cellular immunity against JEV infection. These observations demonstrate the critical role of CLEC5A in the pathogenesis of Japanese encephalitis, and identify CLEC5A as a target for the development of new treatments to reduce virus-induced brain damage.

  8. Polyoma virus-induced osteosarcomas in inbred strains of mice: host determinants of metastasis.

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    Palanivel Velupillai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mouse polyoma virus induces a broad array of solid tumors in mice of many inbred strains. In most strains tumors grow rapidly but fail to metastasize. An exception has been found in the Czech-II/Ei mouse in which bone tumors metastasize regularly to the lung. These tumors resemble human osteosarcoma in their propensity for pulmonary metastasis. Cell lines established from these metastatic tumors have been compared with ones from non-metastatic osteosarcomas arising in C3H/BiDa mice. Osteopontin, a chemokine implicated in migration and metastasis, is known to be transcriptionally induced by the viral middle T antigen. Czech-II/Ei and C3H/BiDa tumor cells expressed middle T and secreted osteopontin at comparable levels as the major chemoattractant. The tumor cell lines migrated equally well in response to recombinant osteopontin as the sole attractant. An important difference emerged in assays for invasion in which tumor cells from Czech-II/Ei mice were able to invade across an extracellular matrix barrier while those from C3H/BiDa mice were unable to invade. Invasive behavior was linked to elevated levels of the metalloproteinase MMP-2 and of the transcription factor NFAT. Inhibition of either MMP-2 or NFAT inhibited invasion by Czech-II/Ei osteosarcoma cells. The metastatic phenotype is dominant in F1 mice. Osteosarcoma cell lines from F1 mice expressed intermediate levels of MMP-2 and NFAT and were invasive. Osteosarcomas in Czech-II/Ei mice retain functional p53. This virus-host model of metastasis differs from engineered models targeting p53 or pRb and provides a system for investigating the genetic and molecular basis of bone tumor metastasis in the absence of p53 loss.

  9. Cellular and humoral immunity of virus-induced asthma

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    Yoshimichi eOkayama

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Asthma inception is associated with respiratory viral infection, especially infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and/or human rhinovirus (HRV, in the vast majority of cases. However, the reason why RSV and HRV induce the majority of bronchiolitis cases during early childhood and why only a small percentage of children with RSV- and HRV-induced bronchiolitis later develop asthma remains unclear. A genetic association study has revealed the important interaction between viral illness and genetic variants in patients with asthma. Severe RSV- and HRV-induced bronchiolitis may be associated with a deficiency in the innate immune response to RSV and HRV. RSV and HRV infections in infants with deficient innate immune response and the dysfunction of regulatory T cells are considered to be a risk factor for the development of asthma. Sensitization to aeroallergens, beginning in the first year of life, consistently predisposes children to HRV-induced wheezing illnesses, but the converse is not true. Some evidence of virus specificity exists, in that allergic sensitization specifically increased the risk of wheezing in individuals infected with HRV, but not RSV. Administration of Palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the A antigenic site of the Fusion-protein of RSV, decreases the risk of hospitalization in high-risk infants and the risk of recurrent of wheezing. However, palivizumab did not have any effect on subsequent recurrent wheezing in children with a family history of atopy. These findings suggest that infection with RSV and infection with HRV might predispose individuals to recurrent wheezing through an atopy-independent and an atopy-dependent mechanism, respectively. Respiratory virus-induced wheezing illnesses may encompass multiple sub-phenotypes that relate to asthma in different ways.

  10. Canine distemper virus induces apoptosis in cervical tumor derived cell lines

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    Rajão Daniela S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Apoptosis can be induced or inhibited by viral proteins, it can form part of the host defense against virus infection, or it can be a mechanism for viral spread to neighboring cells. Canine distemper virus (CDV induces apoptotic cells in lymphoid tissues and in the cerebellum of dogs naturally infected. CDV also produces a cytopathologic effect, leading to apoptosis in Vero cells in tissue culture. We tested canine distemper virus, a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, for the ability to trigger apoptosis in HeLa cells, derived from cervical cancer cells resistant to apoptosis. To study the effect of CDV infection in HeLa cells, we examined apoptotic markers 24 h post infection (pi, by flow cytometry assay for DNA fragmentation, real-time PCR assay for caspase-3 and caspase-8 mRNA expression, and by caspase-3 and -8 immunocytochemistry. Flow cytometry showed that DNA fragmentation was induced in HeLa cells infected by CDV, and immunocytochemistry revealed a significant increase in the levels of the cleaved active form of caspase-3 protein, but did not show any difference in expression of caspase-8, indicating an intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Confirming this observation, expression of caspase-3 mRNA was higher in CDV infected HeLa cells than control cells; however, there was no statistically significant change in caspase-8 mRNA expression profile. Our data suggest that canine distemper virus induced apoptosis in HeLa cells, triggering apoptosis by the intrinsic pathway, with no participation of the initiator caspase -8 from the extrinsic pathway. In conclusion, the cellular stress caused by CDV infection of HeLa cells, leading to apoptosis, can be used as a tool in future research for cervical cancer treatment and control.

  11. NK cell activation in human hantavirus infection explained by virus-induced IL-15/IL15Rα expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Monika; Björkström, Niklas K; Gupta, Shawon; Sundström, Karin; Ahlm, Clas; Klingström, Jonas; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf

    2014-11-01

    Clinical infection with hantaviruses cause two severe acute diseases, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). These diseases are characterized by strong immune activation, increased vascular permeability, and up to 50% case-fatality rates. One prominent feature observed in clinical hantavirus infection is rapid expansion of natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood of affected individuals. We here describe an unusually high state of activation of such expanding NK cells in the acute phase of clinical Puumala hantavirus infection. Expanding NK cells expressed markedly increased levels of activating NK cell receptors and cytotoxic effector molecules. In search for possible mechanisms behind this NK cell activation, we observed virus-induced IL-15 and IL-15Rα on infected endothelial and epithelial cells. Hantavirus-infected cells were shown to strongly activate NK cells in a cell-cell contact-dependent way, and this response was blocked with anti-IL-15 antibodies. Surprisingly, the strength of the IL-15-dependent NK cell response was such that it led to killing of uninfected endothelial cells despite expression of normal levels of HLA class I. In contrast, hantavirus-infected cells were resistant to NK cell lysis, due to a combination of virus-induced increase in HLA class I expression levels and hantavirus-mediated inhibition of apoptosis induction. In summary, we here describe a possible mechanism explaining the massive NK cell activation and proliferation observed in HFRS patients caused by Puumala hantavirus infection. The results add further insights into mechanisms behind the immunopathogenesis of hantavirus infections in humans and identify new possible targets for intervention.

  12. The herpes simplex virus UL20 protein functions in glycoprotein K (gK intracellular transport and virus-induced cell fusion are independent of UL20 functions in cytoplasmic virion envelopment

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    Kousoulas Konstantin G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The HSV-1 UL20 protein (UL20p and glycoprotein K (gK are both important determinants of cytoplasmic virion morphogenesis and virus-induced cell fusion. In this manuscript, we examined the effect of UL20 mutations on the coordinate transport and Trans Golgi Network (TGN localization of UL20p and gK, virus-induced cell fusion and infectious virus production. Deletion of 18 amino acids from the UL20p carboxyl terminus (UL20 mutant 204t inhibited intracellular transport and cell-surface expression of both gK and UL20, resulting in accumulation of UL20p and gK in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER in agreement with the inability of 204t to complement UL20-null virus replication and virus-induced cell fusion. In contrast, less severe carboxyl terminal deletions of either 11 or six amino acids (UL20 mutants 211t and 216t, respectively allowed efficient UL20p and gK intracellular transport, cell-surface expression and TGN colocalization. However, while both 211t and 216t failed to complement for infectious virus production, 216t complemented for virus-induced cell fusion, but 211t did not. These results indicated that the carboxyl terminal six amino acids of UL20p were crucial for infectious virus production, but not involved in intracellular localization of UL20p/gK and concomitant virus-induced cell fusion. In the amino terminus of UL20, UL20p mutants were produced changing one or both of the Y38 and Y49 residues found within putative phosphorylation sites. UL20p tyrosine-modified mutants with both tyrosine residues changed enabled efficient intracellular transport and TGN localization of UL20p and gK, but failed to complement for either infectious virus production, or virus-induced cell fusion. These results show that UL20p functions in cytoplasmic envelopment are separable from UL20 functions in UL20p intracellular transport, cell surface expression and virus-induced cell fusion.

  13. Ligand Modulation of the Epstein-Barr Virus-induced Seven-transmembrane Receptor EBI2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Smethurst, Christopher; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2011-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus-induced receptor 2 (EBI2) is a constitutively active seven-transmembrane receptor, which was recently shown to orchestrate the positioning of B cells in the follicle. To date, no ligands, endogenously or synthetic, have been identified that modulate EBI2 activity. Here we...

  14. CD154 Blockade Results in Transient Reduction in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Laurence M.; Neville, Katherine L.; Haynes, Lia M.; Dal Canto, Mauro C.; Miller, Stephen D

    2003-01-01

    Transient CD154 blockade at the onset of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease ameliorated disease progression for 80 days, reduced immune cell infiltration, and transiently increased viral loads in the central nervous system. Peripheral antiviral and autoimmune T-cell responses were normal, and disease severity returned to control levels by day 120.

  15. Ecotropic murine leukemia virus-induced fusion of murine cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinter, A.; Chen, T.; Lowy, A.; Cortez, N.G.; Silagi, S.

    1986-03-01

    Extensive fusion occurs upon cocultivation of murine fibroblasts producing ecotropic murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) with a large variety of murine cell lines in the presence of the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B, the active component of the antifungal agent Fungizone. The resulting polykaryocytes contain nuclei from both infected and uninfected cells, as evidenced by autoradiographic labeling experiments in which one or the other parent cell type was separately labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine and fused with an unlabeled parent. This cell fusion specifically requires the presence of an ecotropic MuLV-producing parent and is not observed for cells producing xenotropic, amphotropic, or dualtropic viruses. Mouse cells infected with nonecotropic viruses retain their sensitivity toward fusion, whereas infection with ecotropic viruses abrogates the fusion of these cells upon cocultivation with other ecotropic MuLV-producing cells. Nonmurine cells lacking the ecotropic gp70 receptor are not fused under similar conditions. Fusion is effectively inhibited by monospecific antisera to gp70, but not by antisera to p15(E), and studies with monoclonal antibodies identify distinct amino- and carboxy-terminal gp70 regions which play a role in the fusion reaction. The enhanced fusion which occurs in the presence of amphotericin B provides a rapid and sensitive assay for the expression of ecotropic MuLVs and should facilitate further mechanistic studies of MuLV-induced fusion of murine cells.

  16. Systemic virus-induced gene silencing allows functional characterization of maize genes during biotrophic interaction with Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Kastner, Christine; Kumlehn, Jochen; Kahmann, Regine; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Infection of maize (Zea mays) plants with the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis leads to the formation of large tumors on the stem, leaves and inflorescences. In this biotrophic interaction, plant defense responses are actively suppressed by the pathogen, and previous transcriptome analyses of infected maize plants showed massive and stage-specific changes in host gene expression during disease progression. To identify maize genes that are functionally involved in the interaction with U. maydis, we adapted a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system based on the brome mosaic virus (BMV) for maize. Conditions were established that allowed successful U. maydis infection of BMV-preinfected maize plants. This set-up enabled quantification of VIGS and its impact on U. maydis infection using a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR)-based readout. In proof-of-principle experiments, an U. maydis-induced terpene synthase was shown to negatively regulate disease development while a protein involved in cell death inhibition was required for full virulence of U. maydis. The results suggest that this system is a versatile tool for the rapid identification of maize genes that determine compatibility with U. maydis. © (2010) Max Planck Society. Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  17. Heparin prevents Zika virus induced-cytopathic effects in human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, Silvia; Cooper, Lynsay; Rubio, Alicia; Pagani, Isabel; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Pelletier, Julien; Meneghetti, Maria Cecilia Z; Lima, Marcelo A; Skidmore, Mark A; Broccoli, Vania; Yates, Edwin A; Vicenzi, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak, which mainly affected Brazil and neighbouring states, demonstrated the paucity of information concerning the epidemiology of several flaviruses, but also highlighted the lack of available agents with which to treat such emerging diseases. Here, we show that heparin, a widely used anticoagulant, while exerting a modest inhibitory effect on Zika Virus replication, fully prevents virus-induced cell death of human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

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    Gefei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i. but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy.

  19. The role of myeloid cell activation and arginine metabolism in the pathogenesis of virus-induced diseases

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    Kristina S. Burrack

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available When an antiviral immune response is generated, a balance must be reached between two opposing pathways: the production of proinflammatory and cytotoxic effectors that drive a robust antiviral immune response to control the infection and regulators that function to limit or blunt an excessive immune response to minimize immune-mediated pathology and repair tissue damage. Myeloid cells, including monocytes and macrophages, play an important role in this balance, particularly through the activities of the arginine-hydrolyzing enzymes nitric oxide synthase 2 (Nos2; iNOS and arginase 1 (Arg1. Nitric oxide (NO production by iNOS is an important proinflammatory mediator, whereas Arg1-expressing macrophages contribute to the resolution of inflammation and wound repair. In the context of viral infections, expression of these enzymes can result in a variety of outcomes for the host. NO has direct antiviral properties against some viruses, whereas during other virus infections NO can mediate immunopathology and/or inhibit the antiviral immune response to promote chronic infection. Arg1 activity has important wound healing functions but can also inhibit the antiviral immune response during some viral infections. Thus, depending on the specific virus and the tissue(s involved, the activity of both of these arginine-hydrolyzing enzymes can either exacerbate or limit the severity of virus-induced disease. In this review, we will discuss a variety of viral infections, including HIV, SARS-CoV, LCMV, HCV, RSV, and others, where myeloid cells influence the control and clearance of the virus from the host, as well as the severity and resolution of tissue damage, via the activities of iNOS and/or Arg1. Clearly, monocyte/macrophage activation and arginine metabolism will continue to be important areas of investigation in the context of viral infections.

  20. Virus-induced gene silencing of Mlo genes induces powdery mildew resistance in Triticum aestivum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Várallyay, Eva; Giczey, Gábor; Burgyán, József

    2012-07-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most important cereal diseases worldwide. Genetic analysis has revealed that mutant alleles of the Mlo gene cause broad-spectrum resistance against this pathogen in barley. In this study, the possibility of inducing broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance against this pathogen by RNAi of the barley Mlo ortholog in wheat was examined using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A clear correlation was found between resistance and accumulation of Mlo-specific siRNAs, raising the possibility of designing powdery mildew resistance in wheat by RNA silencing using both transgenic and non-transgenic approaches.

  1. Protocol: using virus-induced gene silencing to study the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Mette; Olsen, Anne; Johansen, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an alternative reverse genetics tool for silencing of genes in some plants, which are difficult to transform. The pea early-browning virus (PEBV) has been developed as a VIGS vector and used in pea for functional analysis of several genes. However......, the available PEBV-VIGS protocols are inadequate for studying genes involved in the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Here we describe a PEBV-VIGS protocol suitable for reverse genetics studies in pea of genes involved in the symbiosis with AMF and show its effectiveness in silencing genes...

  2. Nuclear marginalization of host cell chromatin associated with expansion of two discrete virus-induced subnuclear compartments during baculovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Toshihiro; Kawasaki, Yu; Abe, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2008-07-01

    Chromatin structure is strictly regulated during the cell cycle. DNA viruses occasionally disturb the spatial organization of the host cell chromatin due to formation of the viral DNA replication compartment. To examine chromatin behavior in baculovirus-infected cells, we constructed recombinant plasmids expressing fluorescent protein-tagged histone H4 molecules and visualized the intracellular localization of chromatin by their transient expression in live infected cells. Similar to other DNA viruses, the baculovirus Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus induced marginal relocation of chromatin within the nuclei of BmN cells, simultaneously with expansion of the viral DNA replication compartment, the virogenic stroma (VS). In the late stage of infection, however, the peristromal region (PR), another virus-induced subnuclear compartment, was also excluded from the chromatin-localizing area. Provided that late-gene products such as PR proteins (e.g., envelope proteins of the occlusion-derived virus) were expressed, blockage of viral DNA synthesis failed to inhibit chromatin relocation, despite abrogation of VS expansion. Instead, chromatin became marginalized concomitantly with PR expansion, suggesting that the PR contributes directly to chromatin replacement. In addition, chromatin was excluded from relatively large subnuclear structures that were induced in uninfected cells by cotransfection with four baculovirus genes, ie1, lef3, p143, and hr. Omission of any of the four genes, however, failed to result in formation of the large structures or chromatin exclusion. This correlation between compartmentalization and chromatin exclusion suggests the possibility that a chromatin-exclusive property of viral molecules, at least in part, supports nuclear compartmentalization of virus-infected cells.

  3. Nuclear Marginalization of Host Cell Chromatin Associated with Expansion of Two Discrete Virus-Induced Subnuclear Compartments during Baculovirus Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Toshihiro; Kawasaki, Yu; Abe, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2008-01-01

    Chromatin structure is strictly regulated during the cell cycle. DNA viruses occasionally disturb the spatial organization of the host cell chromatin due to formation of the viral DNA replication compartment. To examine chromatin behavior in baculovirus-infected cells, we constructed recombinant plasmids expressing fluorescent protein-tagged histone H4 molecules and visualized the intracellular localization of chromatin by their transient expression in live infected cells. Similar to other DNA viruses, the baculovirus Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus induced marginal relocation of chromatin within the nuclei of BmN cells, simultaneously with expansion of the viral DNA replication compartment, the virogenic stroma (VS). In the late stage of infection, however, the peristromal region (PR), another virus-induced subnuclear compartment, was also excluded from the chromatin-localizing area. Provided that late-gene products such as PR proteins (e.g., envelope proteins of the occlusion-derived virus) were expressed, blockage of viral DNA synthesis failed to inhibit chromatin relocation, despite abrogation of VS expansion. Instead, chromatin became marginalized concomitantly with PR expansion, suggesting that the PR contributes directly to chromatin replacement. In addition, chromatin was excluded from relatively large subnuclear structures that were induced in uninfected cells by cotransfection with four baculovirus genes, ie1, lef3, p143, and hr. Omission of any of the four genes, however, failed to result in formation of the large structures or chromatin exclusion. This correlation between compartmentalization and chromatin exclusion suggests the possibility that a chromatin-exclusive property of viral molecules, at least in part, supports nuclear compartmentalization of virus-infected cells. PMID:18434402

  4. Animal Models of Virus-Induced Neurobehavioral Sequelae: Recent Advances, Methodological Issues, and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bortolato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Converging lines of clinical and epidemiological evidence suggest that viral infections in early developmental stages may be a causal factor in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism-spectrum disorders. This etiological link, however, remains controversial in view of the lack of consistent and reproducible associations between viruses and mental illness. Animal models of virus-induced neurobehavioral disturbances afford powerful tools to test etiological hypotheses and explore pathophysiological mechanisms. Prenatal or neonatal inoculations of neurotropic agents (such as herpes-, influenza-, and retroviruses in rodents result in a broad spectrum of long-term alterations reminiscent of psychiatric abnormalities. Nevertheless, the complexity of these sequelae often poses methodological and interpretational challenges and thwarts their characterization. The recent conceptual advancements in psychiatric nosology and behavioral science may help determine new heuristic criteria to enhance the translational value of these models. A particularly critical issue is the identification of intermediate phenotypes, defined as quantifiable factors representing single neurochemical, neuropsychological, or neuroanatomical aspects of a diagnostic category. In this paper, we examine how the employment of these novel concepts may lead to new methodological refinements in the study of virus-induced neurobehavioral sequelae through animal models.

  5. Characteristics associated with clinical severity and inflammatory phenotype of naturally occurring virus-induced exacerbations of asthma in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Asger; Laing, Ingrid A; Poulsen, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In experimental studies viral infections have been shown to induce type 2 inflammation in asthmatics, but whether this is a feature of naturally occurring virus-induced asthma exacerbations is unknown. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) released from the airway epithelium in response...... occurring virus-induced exacerbations of asthma and whether TSLP is associated with this type 2 inflammation. METHODS: Patients presenting to hospital with acute asthma were examined during the exacerbation, and after 4 weeks recovery. The assessments included spirometry, FeNO and induced sputum...

  6. Stability of Barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Rasmussen, Marianne; Madsen, Christian Toft; Jessing, Stine

    2007-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) can be used as a powerful tool for functional genomics studies in plants. With this approach, it is possible to target most genes and downregulate the messenger (m)RNA in a sequence-specific manner. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is an established VIGS vector...... for barley and wheat; however, silencing using this vector is generally transient, with efficient silencing often being confined to the first two or three systemically infected leaves. To investigate this further, part of the barley Phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene was inserted into BSMV and the resulting...... photobleaching in infected barley plants was used as a reporter for silencing. In addition, downregulation of PDS mRNA was measured by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Using fragments of PDS ranging from 128 to 584 nucleotides in BSMV, we observed that insert length...

  7. DNA Oncogenic Virus-Induced Oxidative Stress, Genomic Damage, and Aberrant Epigenetic Alterations

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    Mankgopo Magdeline Kgatle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of human cancers is attributable to DNA oncogenic viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Unrepaired DNA damage is the most common and overlapping feature of these DNA oncogenic viruses and a source of genomic instability and tumour development. Sustained DNA damage results from unceasing production of reactive oxygen species and activation of inflammasome cascades that trigger genomic changes and increased propensity of epigenetic alterations. Accumulation of epigenetic alterations may interfere with genome-wide cellular signalling machineries and promote malignant transformation leading to cancer development. Untangling and understanding the underlying mechanisms that promote these detrimental effects remain the major objectives for ongoing research and hope for effective virus-induced cancer therapy. Here, we review current literature with an emphasis on how DNA damage influences HPV, HVB, and EBV replication and epigenetic alterations that are associated with carcinogenesis.

  8. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize with a Foxtail mosaic virus Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yu; Whitham, Steven A

    2018-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful technology for rapidly and transiently knocking down the expression of plant genes to study their functions. A VIGS vector for maize derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus, was recently developed. A cloning site created near the 3' end of the FoMV genome enables insertion of 200-400 nucleotide fragments of maize genes targeted for silencing. The recombinant FoMV clones are inoculated into leaves of maize seedlings by biolistic particle delivery, and silencing is typically observed within 2 weeks after inoculation. This chapter provides a protocol for constructing FoMV VIGS clones and inoculating them into maize seedlings.

  9. The IFITMs Inhibit Zika Virus Replication

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    George Savidis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus has emerged as a severe health threat with a rapidly expanding range. The IFITM family of restriction factors inhibits the replication of a broad range of viruses, including the closely related flaviruses West Nile virus and dengue virus. Here, we show that IFITM1 and IFITM3 inhibit Zika virus infection early in the viral life cycle. Moreover, IFITM3 can prevent Zika-virus-induced cell death. These results suggest that strategies to boost the actions and/or levels of the IFITMs might be useful for inhibiting a broad range of emerging viruses.

  10. Fulminant lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced inflammation of the CNS involves a cytokine-chemokine-cytokine-chemokine cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Simonsen, Stine; Fenger, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of immunocompetent mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) normally results in fatal CD8+ T cell mediated meningoencephalitis. However, in CXCL10-deficient mice, the virus-induced CD8+ T cell accumulation in the neural parenchyma is impaired, and only 30...

  11. Small molecule antagonism of oxysterol-induced Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Madsen, Christian M; Arfelt, Kristine N

    2013-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) was recently identified as the first oxysterol-activated 7TM receptor. EBI2 is essential for B cell trafficking within lymphoid tissues and thus the humoral immune response in general. Here we characterize the antagonism of the non-peptide molecule GSK...

  12. Molecular characterization of oxysterol binding to the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (GPR183)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Norn, Christoffer; Laurent, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    , the family of G protein-coupled seven transmembrane-spanning receptors (7TM receptors) was added to this group. Specifically, the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2 or GPR183) was shown to be activated by several oxysterols, most potently by 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC). Nothing is known about...

  13. Fulminant lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced inflammation of the CNS involves a cytokine-chemokine-cytokine-chemokine cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette E; Simonsen, Stine; Fenger, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of immunocompetent mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) normally results in fatal CD8+ T cell mediated meningoencephalitis. However, in CXCL10-deficient mice, the virus-induced CD8+ T cell accumulation in the neural parenchyma is impaired, and only 30-50% ...

  14. Virus-induced gene silencing in diverse maize lines using the Brome Mosaic virus-based silencing vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a widely used tool for gene function studies in many plant species, though its use in monocots has been limited. Using a Brome mosaic virus (BMV) vector designed to silence the maize phytoene desaturase gene, a genetically diverse set of maize inbred lines was ...

  15. Virus-induced gene silencing in Medicago truncatula and Lathyrus odorata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Mette; Kjær, Gabriela Didina Constantin; Piednoir, Elodie

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has become an important reverse genetics tool for functional genomics. VIGS vectors based on Pea early browning virus (PEBV, genus Tobravirus) and Bean pod mottle virus (genus Comovirus) are available for the legume species Pisum sativum and Glycine max...

  16. A New Mechanism of Vitamin C Effects on A/FM/1/47(H1N1 Virus-Induced Pneumonia in Restraint-Stressed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that vitamin C could protect against influenza infection, but little is known about the mechanisms. This study aimed to investigate the influence and possible mechanisms of vitamin C on pneumonia induced by influenza virus in stressed mice. Results showed that restraint stress significantly increased the mortality and the severity of pneumonia in mice caused by A/FM/1/47(H1N1 virus infection, which was attenuated by oral administration of vitamin C (125 and 250 mg/kg. Moreover, vitamin C administration significantly decreased expression of susceptibility genes, including mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3, and increased expression of NF-κB. These work in conjunction to induce type I interferons (IFNs and elicit innate antiviral response as key factors in RIG-I-mediated signal transduction pathway. The above effects of vitamin C were further found to relate with inhibition of excess CORT synthesis by regulating steroid hydroxylating enzymes in adrenal gland. In conclusion, the protective effects of vitamin C on influenza virus-caused pneumonia might be related to its inhibition of CORT synthesis, which reduces the susceptibility to influenza viral infection in restraint-stressed mice. These findings provide a new mechanism for the effects of vitamin C on influenza virus-induced pneumonia in restraint-stressed mice.

  17. Graft-accelerated virus-induced gene silencing facilitates functional genomics in rose flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huijun; Shi, Shaochuan; Ma, Nan; Cao, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Hao; Qiu, Xianqin; Wang, Qigang; Jian, Hongying; Zhou, Ningning; Zhang, Zhao; Tang, Kaixue

    2018-01-01

    Rose has emerged as a model ornamental plant for studies of flower development, senescence, and morphology, as well as the metabolism of floral fragrances and colors. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has long been used in functional genomics studies of rose by vacuum infiltration of cuttings or seedlings with an Agrobacterium suspension carrying TRV-derived vectors. However, VIGS in rose flowers remains a challenge because of its low efficiency and long time to establish silencing. Here we present a novel and rapid VIGS method that can be used to analyze gene function in rose, called 'graft-accelerated VIGS', where axillary sprouts are cut from the rose plant and vacuum infiltrated with Agrobacterium. The inoculated scions are then grafted back onto the plants to flower and silencing phenotypes can be observed within 5 weeks, post-infiltration. Using this new method, we successfully silenced expression of the RhDFR1, RhAG, and RhNUDX1 in rose flowers, and affected their color, petal number, as well as fragrance, respectively. This grafting method will facilitate high-throughput functional analysis of genes in rose flowers. Importantly, it may also be applied to other woody species that are not currently amenable to VIGS by conventional leaf or plantlet/seedling infiltration methods. © 2017 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. A CRISPR-Based Screen Identifies Genes Essential for West-Nile-Virus-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongming; Dang, Ying; Wu, Yonggan; Jia, Gengxiang; Anaya, Edgar; Zhang, Junli; Abraham, Sojan; Choi, Jang-Gi; Shi, Guojun; Qi, Ling; Manjunath, N; Wu, Haoquan

    2015-07-28

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes an acute neurological infection attended by massive neuronal cell death. However, the mechanism(s) behind the virus-induced cell death is poorly understood. Using a library containing 77,406 sgRNAs targeting 20,121 genes, we performed a genome-wide screen followed by a second screen with a sub-library. Among the genes identified, seven genes, EMC2, EMC3, SEL1L, DERL2, UBE2G2, UBE2J1, and HRD1, stood out as having the strongest phenotype, whose knockout conferred strong protection against WNV-induced cell death with two different WNV strains and in three cell lines. Interestingly, knockout of these genes did not block WNV replication. Thus, these appear to be essential genes that link WNV replication to downstream cell death pathway(s). In addition, the fact that all of these genes belong to the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggests that this might be the primary driver of WNV-induced cell death. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A virus-induced gene silencing approach to understanding alkaloid metabolism in Catharanthus roseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscombe, David K.; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    The anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine are bisindole alkaloids derived from coupling vindoline and catharanthine, monoterpenoid indole alkaloids produced exclusively by Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) plants. Industrial production of vinblastine and vincristine currently relies on isolation from C. roseus leaves, a process that affords these compounds in 0.0003–0.01% yields. Metabolic engineering efforts to improve alkaloid content or provide alternative sources of the bisindole alkaloids ultimately rely on the isolation and characterization of the genes involved. Several vindoline biosynthetic genes have been isolated, and the cellular and subcellular organization of the corresponding enzymes has been well studied. However, due to the leaf-specific localization of vindoline biosynthesis, and the lack of production of this precursor in cell suspension and hairy root cultures of C. roseus, further elucidation of this pathway demands the development of reverse genetics approaches to assay gene function in planta. The bipartite pTRV vector system is a Tobacco Rattle Virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) platform that has provided efficient and effective means to assay gene function in diverse plant systems. We have developed a VIGS method to investigate gene function in C. roseus plants using the pTRV vector system. The utility of this approach in understanding gene function in C. roseus leaves is demonstrated by silencing known vindoline biosynthetic genes previously characterized in vitro. PMID:21802100

  20. Outer nuclear membrane fusion of adjacent nuclei in varicella-zoster virus-induced syncytia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Lianwei; Huang, Xiumin; Fu, Wenkun; Pan, Dequan; Cai, Linli; Ye, Jianghui; Liu, Jian; Xia, Ningshao; Cheng, Tong; Zhu, Hua

    2017-12-01

    Syncytia formation has been considered important for cell-to-cell spread and pathogenesis of many viruses. As a syncytium forms, individual nuclei often congregate together, allowing close contact of nuclear membranes and possibly fusion to occur. However, there is currently no reported evidence of nuclear membrane fusion between adjacent nuclei in wild-type virus-induced syncytia. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is one typical syncytia-inducing virus that causes chickenpox and shingles in humans. Here, we report, for the first time, an interesting observation of apparent fusion of the outer nuclear membranes from juxtaposed nuclei that comprise VZV syncytia both in ARPE-19 human epithelial cells in vitro and in human skin xenografts in the SCID-hu mouse model in vivo. This work reveals a novel aspect of VZV-related cytopathic effect in the context of multinucleated syncytia. Additionally, the information provided by this study could be helpful for future studies on interactions of viruses with host cell nuclei. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inflammatory cytokine-mediated evasion of virus-induced tumors from NK cell control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rabinarayan; Polic, Bojan; Welsh, Raymond M; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2013-07-15

    Infections with DNA tumor viruses, including members of the polyomavirus family, often result in tumor formation in immune-deficient hosts. The complex control involved in antiviral and antitumor immune responses during these infections can be studied in murine polyomavirus (PyV)-infected mice as a model. We found that NK cells efficiently kill cells derived from PyV-induced salivary gland tumors in vitro in an NKG2D (effector cell)-RAE-1 (target cell)-dependent manner; but in T cell-deficient mice, NK cells only delay but do not prevent the development of PyV-induced tumors. In this article, we show that the PyV-induced tumors have infiltrating functional NK cells. The freshly removed tumors, however, lack surface RAE-1 expression, and the tumor tissues produce soluble factors that downregulate RAE-1. These factors include the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-33, and TNF. Each of these cytokines downregulates RAE-1 expression and susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. CD11b(+)F4/80(+) macrophages infiltrating the PyV-induced tumors produce high amounts of IL-1β and TNF. Thus, our data suggest a new mechanism whereby inflammatory cytokines generated in the tumor environment lead to evasion of NK cell-mediated control of virus-induced tumors.

  2. Mouse models of multiple sclerosis: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Derrick P; Richards, Maureen H; Miller, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler's Murine Encephalitis Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease (TMEV-IDD) are two clinically relevant murine models of multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, both are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the CNS and demyelination. EAE is induced by either the administration of myelin protein or peptide in adjuvant or by the adoptive transfer of encephalitogenic T cell blasts into naïve recipients. The relative merits of each of these protocols are compared. Depending on the type of question being asked, different mouse strains and peptides are used. Different disease courses are observed with different strains and different peptides in active EAE. These variations are also addressed. Additionally, issues relevant to clinical grading of EAE in mice are discussed. In addition to EAE induction, useful references for other disease indicators such as DTH, in vitro proliferation, and immunohistochemistry are provided. TMEV-IDD is a useful model for understanding the possible viral etiology of MS. This section provides detailed information on the preparation of viral stocks and subsequent intracerebral infection of mice. Additionally, virus plaque assay and clinical disease assessment are discussed. Recently, recombinant TMEV strains have been created for the study of molecular mimicry which incorporate various 30 amino acid myelin epitopes within the leader region of TMEV.

  3. Cure of Chronic Viral Infection and Virus-Induced Type 1 Diabetes by Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Ejrnaes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of neutralizing antibodies is one of the most successful methods to interfere with receptor-ligand interactions in vivo. In particular blockade of soluble inflammatory mediators or their corresponding cellular receptors was proven an effective way to regulate inflammation and/or prevent its negative consequences. However, one problem that comes along with an effective neutralization of inflammatory mediators is the general systemic immunomodulatory effect. It is therefore important to design a treatment regimen in a way to strike at the right place and at the right time in order to achieve maximal effects with minimal duration of immunosuppression or hyperactivation. In this review we reflect on two examples of how short time administration of such neutralizing antibodies can block two distinct inflammatory consequences of viral infection. First, we review recent findings that blockade of IL-10/IL-10R interaction can resolve chronic viral infection and second, we reflect on how neutralization of the chemokine CXCL10 can abrogate virus-induced type 1 diabetes.

  4. Method: low-cost delivery of the cotton leaf crumple virus-induced gene silencing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuttle John

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously developed a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS vector for cotton from the bipartite geminivirusCotton leaf crumple virus (CLCrV. The original CLCrV VIGS vector was designed for biolistic delivery by a gene gun. This prerequisite limited the use of the system to labs with access to biolistic equipment. Here we describe the adaptation of this system for delivery by Agrobacterium (Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We also describe the construction of two low-cost particle inflow guns. Results The biolistic CLCrV vector was transferred into two Agrobacterium binary plasmids. Agroinoculation of the binary plasmids into cotton resulted in silencing and GFP expression comparable to the biolistic vector. Two homemade low-cost gene guns were used to successfully inoculate cotton (G. hirsutum and N. benthamiana with either the CLCrV VIGS vector or the Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV VIGS vector respectively. Conclusions These innovations extend the versatility of CLCrV-based VIGS for analyzing gene function in cotton. The two low-cost gene guns make VIGS experiments affordable for both research and teaching labs by providing a working alternative to expensive commercial gene guns.

  5. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH) gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana.

  6. Virus-induced gene silencing in Catharanthus roseus by biolistic inoculation of tobacco rattle virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carqueijeiro, I; Masini, E; Foureau, E; Sepúlveda, L J; Marais, E; Lanoue, A; Besseau, S; Papon, N; Clastre, M; Dugé de Bernonville, T; Glévarec, G; Atehortùa, L; Oudin, A; Courdavault, V

    2015-11-01

    Catharanthus roseus constitutes the unique source of several valuable monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, including the antineoplastics vinblastine and vincristine. These alkaloids result from a complex biosynthetic pathway encompassing between 30 and 50 enzymatic steps whose characterisation is still underway. The most recent identifications of genes from this pathway relied on a tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach, involving an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of plasmids encoding the two genomic components of the virus. As an alternative, we developed a biolistic-mediated approach of inoculation of virus-encoding plasmids that can be easily performed by a simple bombardment of young C. roseus plants. After optimisation of the transformation conditions, we showed that this approach efficiently silenced the phytoene desaturase gene, leading to strong and reproducible photobleaching of leaves. This biolistic transformation was also used to silence a previously characterised gene from the alkaloid biosynthetic pathway, encoding iridoid oxidase. Plant bombardment caused down-regulation of the targeted gene (70%), accompanied by a correlated decreased in MIA biosynthesis (45-90%), similar to results obtained via agro-transformation. Thus, the biolistic-based VIGS approach developed for C. roseus appears suitable for gene function elucidation and can readily be used instead of the Agrobacterium-based approach, e.g. when difficulties arise with agro-inoculations or when Agrobacterium-free procedures are required to avoid plant defence responses. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  7. A virus-induced gene silencing approach to understanding alkaloid metabolism in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscombe, David K; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2011-11-01

    The anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine are bisindole alkaloids derived from coupling vindoline and catharanthine, monoterpenoid indole alkaloids produced exclusively by the Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus). Industrial production of vinblastine and vincristine currently relies on isolation from C. roseus leaves, a process that affords these compounds in 0.0003-0.01% yields. Metabolic engineering efforts to either improve alkaloid content or provide alternative sources of the bisindole alkaloids ultimately rely on the isolation and characterization of the genes involved. Several vindoline biosynthetic genes have been isolated, and the cellular and subcellular organization of the corresponding enzymes has been well studied. However, due to the leaf-specific localization of vindoline biosynthesis, and the lack of production of this precursor in cell suspension and hairy root cultures of C. roseus, further elucidation of this pathway demands the development of reverse genetics approaches to assay gene function in planta. The bipartite pTRV vector system is a Tobacco Rattle Virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) platform that has provided efficient and effective means to assay gene function in diverse plant systems. A VIGS method was developed herein to investigate gene function in C. roseus plants using the pTRV vector system. The utility of this approach in understanding gene function in C. roseus leaves is demonstrated by silencing known vindoline biosynthetic genes previously characterized in vitro. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Virus-induced asthma attack: The importance of allergic inflammation in response to viral antigen in an animal model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skappak, Christopher; Ilarraza, Ramses; Wu, Ying-Qi; Drake, Matthew G; Adamko, Darryl J

    2017-01-01

    Asthma exacerbation can be a life-threatening condition, and is most often triggered by common respiratory viruses. Poor asthma control and worsening of respiratory function is associated with increased airway inflammation, including eosinophilia. Prevention of asthma exacerbation relies on treatment with corticosteroids, which preferentially inhibit allergic inflammation like eosinophils. Human studies demonstrate that inactivated virus can trigger eosinophil activation in vitro through antigen presentation and memory CD4+ lymphocytes. We hypothesized that animals with immunologic memory to a respiratory virus would also develop airway hyperresponsiveness in response to a UV-inactivated form of the virus if they have pre-existing allergic airway inflammation. Guinea pigs were ovalbumin-sensitized, infected with live parainfluenza virus (PIV), aerosol-challenged with ovalbumin, and then re-inoculated 60 days later with live or UV-inactivated PIV. Some animals were either treated with dexamethasone prior to the second viral exposure. Lymphocytes were isolated from parabronchial lymph nodes to confirm immunologic memory to the virus. Airway reactivity was measured and inflammation was assessed using bronchoalveolar lavage and lung histology. The induction of viral immunologic memory was confirmed in infected animals. Allergen sensitized and challenged animals developed airway hyperreactivity with eosinophilic airway inflammation when re-exposed to UV-inactivated PIV, while non-sensitized animals did not. Airway hyperreactivity in the sensitized animals was inhibited by pre-treatment with dexamethasone. We suggest that the response of allergic inflammation to virus antigen is a significant factor causing asthma exacerbation. We propose that this is one mechanism explaining how corticosteroids prevent virus-induced asthma attack.

  9. Latitudinal variation in virus-induced mortality of phytoplankton across the North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Kristina D A; Huisman, Jef; Wilhelm, Steven W; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2016-02-01

    Viral lysis of phytoplankton constrains marine primary production, food web dynamics and biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. Yet, little is known about the biogeographical distribution of viral lysis rates across the global ocean. To address this, we investigated phytoplankton group-specific viral lysis rates along a latitudinal gradient within the North Atlantic Ocean. The data show large-scale distribution patterns of different virus groups across the North Atlantic that are associated with the biogeographical distributions of their potential microbial hosts. Average virus-mediated lysis rates of the picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus were lower than those of the picoeukaryotic and nanoeukaryotic phytoplankton (that is, 0.14 per day compared with 0.19 and 0.23 per day, respectively). Total phytoplankton mortality (virus plus grazer-mediated) was comparable to the gross growth rate, demonstrating high turnover rates of phytoplankton populations. Virus-induced mortality was an important loss process at low and mid latitudes, whereas phytoplankton mortality was dominated by microzooplankton grazing at higher latitudes (>56°N). This shift from a viral-lysis-dominated to a grazing-dominated phytoplankton community was associated with a decrease in temperature and salinity, and the decrease in viral lysis rates was also associated with increased vertical mixing at higher latitudes. Ocean-climate models predict that surface warming will lead to an expansion of the stratified and oligotrophic regions of the world's oceans. Our findings suggest that these future shifts in the regional climate of the ocean surface layer are likely to increase the contribution of viral lysis to phytoplankton mortality in the higher-latitude waters of the North Atlantic, which may potentially reduce transfer of matter and energy up the food chain and thus affect the capacity of the northern North Atlantic to act as a long-term sink for CO2.

  10. Virus-induced enhancement of arachidonate metabolism by bovine alveolar macrophages in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laegreid, W.W.; Taylor, S.M.; Leid, R.W.; Silflow, R.M.; Evermann, J.R.; Breeze, R.G.; Liggitt, H.D.

    1989-04-01

    Virus infection of alveolar macrophages both in vivo and in vitro has been associated with a variety of changes in cellular function. Some of these changes are identical to the effects that arachidonate-derived mediators, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, have on macrophage function. Virus infection of macrophages has been previously shown to increase the output of some arachidonate metabolites, most notably PGE2. However, the effect of virus infection on arachidonate metabolism in general has not been well described. In our experiments, primary cultures of alveolar macrophages obtained from normal cattle by bronchoalveolar lavage, were infected in vitro with parainfluenza type 3 virus. At days 0 to 4 post-infection (p.i.) these cells were labelled with 3H-arachidonic acid and stimulated with either serum-coated zymosan, the calcium ionophore A23187, or phorbol myristate acetate. The complete spectrum of arachidonate-derived metabolites was determined by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography with UV and on-line radiometric monitoring of column eluant. The total output of metabolites of arachidonic acid by virus-infected alveolar macrophages was increased over that of noninfected controls (with all stimuli tested) by day 4 p.i. (P less than or equal to 0.05). The production of metabolites by the cyclooxygenase, 12- and 5-lipoxygenase enzyme systems was significantly increased, as was the release of 3H-arachidonate. The lack of stimulus specificity and the increases in arachidonate release suggest that greater substrate availability, due either to increased phospholipase activity or direct virus-membrane interaction, may be responsible for the virus-induced enhancement of metabolite output.

  11. Woodchuck hepatitis virus-induced carcinoma as a relevant natural model for therapy of human hepatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouillat, C; Manganas, D; Zoulim, F; Vitrey, D; Saguier, G; Guillaud, M; Ain, J F; Duque-Campos, R; Jamard, C; Praves, M; Trepo, C

    1997-06-01

    Eastern American woodchuck (Marmota monax), naturally infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus, a virus similar to human hepatitis B virus, develops liver cancer with a high prevalence. The aim of this work was to assess Marmota monax as a model of human hepatocellular carcinoma, especially to assess new potential adjuvant therapies after surgical resection. Forty-four woodchuck hepatitis virus-infected animals were regularly screened by ultrasound examination from the age of 18 months and for a 30-month period. One or more liver tumors were diagnosed in 31 animals (70%). Five of them with multifocal tumor or poor general status were considered unsuitable for surgery. The other 26 were operated on. At laparotomy no tumor was found in three. The 18 liver tumors studied were hepatocellular carcinomas, grossly and microscopically similar to human hepatocellular carcinoma. Peritumoral parenchyma studied in 13 specimens was always non-cirrhotic but adequate staining demonstrated patterns of fibrosis in four cases. Clear evidence of chronic active hepatitis, periportal hepatitis and steatosis were demonstrated in five, seven and one of the 13 specimens, respectively. Tumors were treated by tumorectomy in eight animals, by alcoholization in seven and by laser photocoagulation in one. A simple tumor biopsy was performed in the other seven. Ten animals died postoperatively. All the survivors in the tumorectomy group died from tumor recurrence within 10-18 months after surgery. It is concluded that woodchuck hepatitis virus-induced liver carcinoma is a natural model of human hepatocellular carcinoma with similar pathology and natural history, including early ultrasonic detection and tumor recurrence after resection. Tumor excision is feasible in this animal model, which now provides the basis for assessment of new potential adjuvant therapies for human hepatocellular carcinoma in an attempt to reduce the high recurrence rate after surgical resection in humans.

  12. High rates of virus-induced gene silencing by tobacco rattle virus in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zedan; Sun, Jian; Yao, Jun; Wang, Shaojie; Ding, Mingquan; Zhang, Huilong; Qian, Zeyong; Zhao, Nan; Sa, Gang; Zhao, Rui; Shen, Xin; Polle, Andrea; Chen, Shaoliang

    2015-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been shown to be an effective tool for investigating gene functions in herbaceous plant species, but has rarely been tested in trees. The establishment of a fast and reliable transformation system is especially important for woody plants, many of which are recalcitrant to transformation. In this study, we established a tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based VIGS system for two Populus species, Populus euphratica and P. × canescens. Here, TRV constructs carrying a 266 bp or a 558 bp fragment of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene were Agrobacterium-infiltrated into leaves of the two poplar species. Agrobacterium-mediated delivery of the shorter insert, TRV2-PePDS266, into the host poplars resulted in expected photobleaching in both tree species, but not the longer insert, PePDS558. The efficiency of VIGS was temperature-dependent, increasing by raising the temperature from 18 to 28 °C. The optimized TRV-VIGS system at 28 °C resulted in a high silencing frequency and efficiency up to 65-73 and 83-94%, respectively, in the two tested poplars. Moreover, syringe inoculation of Agrobacterium in 100 mM acetosyringone induced a more efficient silencing in the two poplar species, compared with other agroinfiltration methods, e.g., direct injection, misting and agrodrench. There were plant species-related differences in the response to VIGS because the photobleaching symptoms were more severe in P. × canescens than in P. euphratica. Furthermore, VIGS-treated P. euphratica exhibited a higher recovery rate (50%) after several weeks of the virus infection, compared with TRV-infected P. × canescens plants (20%). Expression stability of reference genes was screened to assess the relative abundance of PePDS mRNA in VIGS-treated P. euphratica and P. × canescens. PeACT7 was stably expressed in P. euphratica and UBQ-L was selected as the most suitable reference gene for P. × canescens using three different

  13. Optimized cDNA libraries for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS using tobacco rattle virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Jonathan E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS has emerged as a method for performing rapid loss-of-function experiments in plants. Despite its expanding use, the effect of host gene insert length and other properties on silencing efficiency have not been systematically tested. In this study, we probed the optimal properties of cDNA fragments of the phytoene desaturase (PDS gene for efficient VIGS in Nicotiana benthamiana using tobacco rattle virus (TRV. Results NbPDS inserts of between 192 bp and 1304 bp led to efficient silencing as determined by analysis of leaf chlorophyll a levels. The region of the NbPDS cDNA used for silencing had a small effect on silencing efficiency with 5' and 3' located inserts performing more poorly than those from the middle. Silencing efficiency was reduced by the inclusion of a 24 bp poly(A or poly(G homopolymeric region. We developed a method for constructing cDNA libraries for use as a source of VIGS-ready constructs. Library construction involved the synthesis of cDNA on a solid phase support, digestion with RsaI to yield short cDNA fragments lacking poly(A tails and suppression subtractive hybridization to enrich for differentially expressed transcripts. We constructed two cDNA libraries from methyl-jasmonate treated N. benthamiana roots and obtained 2948 ESTs. Thirty percent of the cDNA inserts were 401–500 bp in length and 99.5% lacked poly(A tails. To test the efficiency of constructs derived from the VIGS-cDNA libraries, we silenced the nicotine biosynthetic enzyme, putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT, with ten different VIGS-NbPMT constructs ranging from 122 bp to 517 bp. Leaf nicotine levels were reduced by more than 90% in all plants infected with the NbPMT constructs. Conclusion Based on the silencing of NbPDS and NbPMT, we suggest the following design guidelines for constructs in TRV vectors: (1 Insert lengths should be in the range of ~200 bp to ~1300 bp, (2 they should be positioned in

  14. Impact of caspase-1/11, -3, -7, or IL-1β/IL-18 deficiency on rabies virus-induced macrophage cell death and onset of disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, E; Nazé, F; Suin, V; Vanden Berghe, T; Francart, A; Lamoral, S; Vandenabeele, P; Beyaert, R; Van Gucht, S; Kalai, M

    2017-01-01

    Rabies virus is a highly neurovirulent RNA virus, which causes about 59000 deaths in humans each year. Previously, we described macrophage cytotoxicity upon infection with rabies virus. Here we examined the type of cell death and the role of specific caspases in cell death and disease development upon infection with two laboratory strains of rabies virus: Challenge Virus Standard strain-11 (CVS-11) is highly neurotropic and lethal for mice, while the attenuated Evelyn–Rotnycki–Abelseth (ERA) strain has a broader cell tropism, is non-lethal and has been used as an oral vaccine for animals. Infection of Mf4/4 macrophages with both strains led to caspase-1 activation and IL-1β and IL-18 production, as well as activation of caspases-3, -7, -8, and -9. Moreover, absence of caspase-3, but not of caspase-1 and -11 or -7, partially inhibited virus-induced cell death of bone marrow-derived macrophages. Intranasal inoculation with CVS-11 of mice deficient for either caspase-1 and -11 or -7 or both IL-1β and IL-18 led to general brain infection and lethal disease similar to wild-type mice. Deficiency of caspase-3, on the other hand, significantly delayed the onset of disease, but did not prevent final lethal outcome. Interestingly, deficiency of caspase-1/11, the key executioner of pyroptosis, aggravated disease severity caused by ERA virus, whereas wild-type mice or mice deficient for either caspase-3, -7, or both IL-1β and IL-18 presented the typical mild symptoms associated with ERA virus. In conclusion, rabies virus infection of macrophages induces caspase-1- and caspase-3-dependent cell death. In vivo caspase-1/11 and caspase-3 differently affect disease development in response to infection with the attenuated ERA strain or the virulent CVS-11 strain, respectively. Inflammatory caspases seem to control attenuated rabies virus infection, while caspase-3 aggravates virulent rabies virus infection. PMID:28280602

  15. A conserved virus-induced cytoplasmic TRAMP-like complex recruits the exosome to target viral RNA for degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molleston, Jerome M.; Sabin, Leah R.; Moy, Ryan H.; Menghani, Sanjay V.; Rausch, Keiko; Gordesky-Gold, Beth; Hopkins, Kaycie C.; Zhou, Rui; Jensen, Torben Heick; Wilusz, Jeremy E.; Cherry, Sara

    2016-01-01

    RNA degradation is tightly regulated to selectively target aberrant RNAs, including viral RNA, but this regulation is incompletely understood. Through RNAi screening in Drosophila cells, we identified the 3′-to-5′ RNA exosome and two components of the exosome cofactor TRAMP (Trf4/5–Air1/2–Mtr4 polyadenylation) complex, dMtr4 and dZcchc7, as antiviral against a panel of RNA viruses. We extended our studies to human orthologs and found that the exosome as well as TRAMP components hMTR4 and hZCCHC7 are antiviral. While hMTR4 and hZCCHC7 are normally nuclear, infection by cytoplasmic RNA viruses induces their export, forming a cytoplasmic complex that specifically recognizes and induces degradation of viral mRNAs. Furthermore, the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of bunyaviral mRNA is sufficient to confer virus-induced exosomal degradation. Altogether, our results reveal that signals from viral infection repurpose TRAMP components to a cytoplasmic surveillance role where they selectively engage viral RNAs for degradation to restrict a broad range of viruses. PMID:27474443

  16. Tissue-specific deletion of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor protects mice from virus-induced pancreatitis and myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallewaard, Nicole L; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Jin-Wen; Guttenberg, Marta; Sanchez, Melissa D; Bergelson, Jeffrey M

    2009-07-23

    In cultured cells, infection by group B coxsackievirus (CVB) is mediated by the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), but the importance of this molecule in CVB-induced disease has not been determined. We generated mice with tissue-specific ablation of CAR within each of two major CVB target organs, the pancreas and heart. In the pancreas, deletion of CAR resulted in a significant reduction in both virus titers and virus-induced tissue damage. Similarly, cardiomyocyte-specific CAR deletion resulted in a marked reduction in virus titer, infection-associated cytokine production, and histopathology within the heart. Consistent with the in vivo phenotype, CAR-deficient cardiomyocytes resisted infection in vitro. These results demonstrate a critical function for CAR in the pathogenesis of CVB infection in vivo and in virus tropism for the heart and pancreas.

  17. Tissue-specific deletion of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) protects mice from virus-induced pancreatitis and myocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallewaard, Nicole L.; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Jin-Wen; Guttenberg, Marta; Sanchez, Melissa D.; Bergelson, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In cultured cells, infection by Group B coxsackieviruses (CVB) is mediated by the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), but the importance of this molecule in CVB disease has not been determined. We used tissue-specific CAR gene deletion to generate mice that lacked CAR within each of two major CVB target organs, the pancreas and heart. Deletion of CAR from the pancreas resulted in a 1000-fold reduction in virus titers within the pancreas during infection, and a significant reduction in virus-induced tissue damage and inflammation. Similarly, cardiomyocyte-specific CAR deletion resulted in a 100-fold reduction in virus titer within the heart, and a marked reduction in cytokine production and histopathology. Although primary cardiomyocytes from control animals were susceptible to virus infection, CAR-deficient cardiomyocytes resisted infection in vitro. These results demonstrate a critical function for CAR in the pathogenesis of CVB infection in vivo, and in virus tropism for the heart and pancreas. PMID:19616768

  18. [Observation of cells tolerant of tobacco mosaic virus in virus-induced local lesions in Datura stramonium L. leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunov, A V; Lega, S N; Nagorskaia, V P; Lapshina, L A

    2011-01-01

    Ultrastructural examination of tobacco mosaic virus-induced local lesions developing in leaves of Datura stramonium plants demonstrated that, in the central area of the lesions, the cell response to viral invasion was not uniform. Most cells exhibited an acute hypersensitive reaction and underwent rapid and complete necrosis. However, some cells, despite considerable virus accumulation and immediate contact with completely collapsed cells, maintained a certain degree of structural integrity. Analysis performed showed that the proportion of collapsed and uncollapsed cells in the lesion centre 3 to 5 days after infection did not change essentially. These data suggest that the absence of hypersensitive response in some cells in the lesion centre is not due to an early stage of infection but is likely caused by cell tolerance of the virus.

  19. Inactivated Sendai virus induces apoptosis mediated by reactive oxygen species in murine melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Li, Ling Yu; Zhang, Man; Zhang, Quan

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to investigate the apoptotic effect of inactivated Sendai virus (hemagglutinating virus of Japan-enveloped, HVJ-E) on murine melanoma cells (B16F10) and the possible mechanisms involved in the putative apoptotic reactions. B16F10 cells were treated with HVJ-E at various multiplicities of infection (MOI), and the reactive oxygen species (ROS), cell viability, and apoptosis were measured. Next, the roles of ROS in the regulation of Bcl-2/Bax and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in HVJ-E-treated B16F10 cells were analyzed. To further evaluate the cytotoxic effect of HVJ-E-generated ROS on B16F10 cells, HVJ-E was intratumorally injected, both with and without N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), into melanoma tumors on BALB/c mice. Tumor volume was then monitored for 3 weeks, and the tumor proteins were separated for immunoblot assay. Treatment of B16F10 cells with HVJ-E resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell-viability and an induction of apoptosis. The latter effect was associated with the generation of ROS. Inhibition of ROS generation by NAC resulted in a significant reduction of HVJ-E-induced Erk1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK activation. Additionally, ROS inhibition caused a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio as well as promoting activation of apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that HVJ-E possesses potential anticancer activity in B16F10 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction involving the MAPK pathway. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  20. Hepatitis C virus-induced NK cell activation causes metzincin-mediated CD16 cleavage and impaired antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, Barbara; Mantovani, Stefania; Varchetta, Stefania; Mele, Dalila; Grossi, Giulia; Ludovisi, Serena; Nuti, Elisa; Rossello, Armando; Mondelli, Mario U

    2017-06-01

    The Fc receptor family for immunoglobulin (Ig)G type III (FcγRIII, CD16) is an activating receptor on natural killer (NK) cells and an essential mediator of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). There is only limited information on its role during chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We studied CD16 expression in relation to NK cell functional activity in HCV-infected patients and sought mechanistic insights into virus-induced modulation. NK cell CD16 expression and activation status were evaluated ex vivo by flow cytometry in HCV-infected patients and healthy controls (HC) as well as in vitro after co-culture with HCV-infected HuH7.5 cells. Rituximab-mediated ADCC was assessed in HC and HCV-infected patients using Daudi cells as a target. The role of metzincins in CD16 down-modulation was assessed using specific inhibitory molecules and by evaluating intracellular mRNA levels. HCV-infected patients exhibited increased frequencies of ex vivo activated NK cells and a concomitantly decreased NK CD16 expression, which resulted in impaired ADCC activity. Moreover, exposure of NK cells to culture-derived HCV recapitulated the ex vivo findings of decreased CD16 expression and increased NK cell activation. Importantly, blockade of metzincin-mediated shedding activity, including selective a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM-17) inhibition, restored NK CD16 expression. Successful treatment with direct-acting antivirals partially improved NK ADCC function despite delayed CD16 reconstitution. Chronic HCV infection induces NK cell activation resulting in ADAM-17-dependent CD16 shedding and consequent impaired ADCC function. Altered ADCC may contribute to failure to eradicate HCV-infected hepatocytes. We show here that hepatitis C virus (HCV) activates natural killer (NK) lymphocytes which, as a consequence, loose their Fc receptor for IgG (CD16), an essential molecule for antibody binding. We show that this occurs through the action of enzymes named

  1. The involvement of survival signaling pathways in rubella-virus induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooray Samantha

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rubella virus (RV causes severe congenital defects when acquired during the first trimester of pregnancy. RV cytopathic effect has been shown to be due to caspase-dependent apoptosis in a number of susceptible cell lines, and it has been suggested that this apoptotic induction could be a causal factor in the development of such defects. Often the outcome of apoptotic stimuli is dependent on apoptotic, proliferative and survival signaling mechanisms in the cell. Therefore we investigated the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K-Akt survival signaling and Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK proliferative signaling during RV-induced apoptosis in RK13 cells. Increasing levels of phosphorylated ERK, Akt and GSK3β were detected from 24–96 hours post-infection, concomitant with RV-induced apoptotic signals. Inhibition of PI3K-Akt signaling reduced cell viability, and increased the speed and magnitude of RV-induced apoptosis, suggesting that this pathway contributes to cell survival during RV infection. In contrast, inhibition of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK pathway impaired RV replication and growth and reduced RV-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the normal cellular growth is required for efficient virus production.

  2. Studies on virus-induced cell fusion. Progress report, July 1, 1978-July 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Person, S.

    1979-08-01

    We have determined the extent of fusion in mixed Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) cell populations. Labeled, sparse, infected cells were surrounded by unlabeled, excess, uninfected (or infected) cells to determine if fusion inhibition is active when present in the same cell as fusion factor, when present in cells that do not contain fusion factor, or in both situations. We found that wild type infected cells fuse to the same extent with each other as with uninfected cells. Therefore fusion inhibitor is active when present in the same cell as fusion factor. Other experiments indicate that the inhibition activity can also cause a small decrease of fusion when fusion factor and fusion inhibitor are present in different, but neighboring, cells. Marked variations are found in the capacity of different cell types, such as human embryonic lung (HEDL) and HEp-2 to support fusion by particular syn mutants. The difference in fusion capacity of the two cell types may be due to a difference in a cellular factor affecting the activity of viral, fusion-associated molecules, and not to cell surface differences of the uninfected cells. (PCS)

  3. Hepatitis-C-virus-induced microRNAs dampen interferon-mediated antiviral signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarret, Abigail; McFarland, Adelle P; Horner, Stacy M; Kell, Alison; Schwerk, Johannes; Hong, MeeAe; Badil, Samantha; Joslyn, Rochelle C; Baker, Darren P; Carrington, Mary; Hagedorn, Curt H; Gale, Michael; Savan, Ram

    2016-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 200 million people globally, and 60-80% of cases persist as a chronic infection that will progress to cirrhosis and liver cancer in 2-10% of patients. We recently demonstrated that HCV induces aberrant expression of two host microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-208b and miR-499a-5p, encoded by myosin genes in infected hepatocytes. These miRNAs, along with AU-rich-element-mediated decay, suppress IFNL2 and IFNL3, members of the type III interferon (IFN) gene family, to support viral persistence. In this study, we show that miR-208b and miR-499a-5p also dampen type I IFN signaling in HCV-infected hepatocytes by directly down-regulating expression of the type I IFN receptor chain, IFNAR1. Inhibition of these miRNAs by using miRNA inhibitors during HCV infection increased expression of IFNAR1. Additionally, inhibition rescued the antiviral response to exogenous type I IFN, as measured by a marked increase in IFN-stimulated genes and a decrease in HCV load. Treatment of HCV-infected hepatocytes with type I IFN increased expression of myosins over HCV infection alone. Since these miRNAs can suppress type III IFN family members, these data collectively define a novel cross-regulation between type I and III IFNs during HCV infection.

  4. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hashimoto

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR. MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3 via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1 mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection.

  5. Dengue virus induces mitochondrial elongation through impairment of Drp1-triggered mitochondrial fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Vincent; Lang, Diane; Valois, Sierra; Rothman, Alan L; Medin, Carey L

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that undergo continuous cycles of fission and fusion to maintain essential cellular functions. An imbalance between these two processes can result in many pathophysiological outcomes. Dengue virus (DENV) interacts with cellular organelles, including mitochondria, to successfully replicate in cells. This study used live-cell imaging and found an increase in mitochondrial length and respiration during DENV infection. The level of mitochondrial fission protein, Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), was decreased on mitochondria during DENV infection, as well as Drp1 phosphorylated on serine 616, which is important for mitochondrial fission. DENV proteins NS4b and NS3 were also associated with subcellular fractions of mitochondria. Induction of fission through uncoupling of mitochondria or overexpression of Drp1 wild-type and Drp1 with a phosphomimetic mutation (S616D) significantly reduced viral replication. These results demonstrate that DENV infection causes an imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics by inhibiting Drp1-triggered mitochondrial fission, which promotes viral replication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Watsonianone A from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Fruit Attenuates Respiratory-Syncytial-Virus-Induced Inflammation In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ling; Chen, Li-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Bo; Liu, Zhong; Xiao, Xu-Hui; Tang, Wei; Wang, Guo-Cai; Song, Wen-Jun; Li, Yao-Lan; Li, Man-Mei

    2017-05-03

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most common respiratory pathogens. Immoderate inflammation plays a great role in causing RSV-induced diseases. In the present study, watsonianone A, isolated from the fruit of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Ait.) Hassk, was found to show a good inhibitory effect on RSV-induced NO production, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 37.2 ± 1.6 μM. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses indicated that watsonianone A markedly reduced both mRNA and protein levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in RSV-infected RAW264.7 cells. Mechanistically, watsonianone A inhibited nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation by suppressing IκBα phosphorylation. Further analysis revealed that watsonianone A activated the thioredoxin system and decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, which are closely associated with NF-κB activation in RSV-infected cells. These results reveal that watsonianone A can attenuate RSV-induced inflammation via the suppression of ROS-sensitive inflammatory signaling.

  7. iTRAQ and virus-induced gene silencing revealed three proteins involved in cold response in bread wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Lingran; Zhao, Lei; Ren, Yan; Cui, Dangqun; Chen, Jianhui; Wang, Yongyan; Yu, Pengbo; Chen, Feng

    2017-08-08

    By comparing the differentially accumulated proteins from the derivatives (UC 1110 × PI 610750) in the F10 recombinant inbred line population which differed in cold-tolerance, altogether 223 proteins with significantly altered abundance were identified. The comparison of 10 cold-sensitive descendant lines with 10 cold-tolerant descendant lines identified 140 proteins that showed decreased protein abundance, such as the components of the photosynthesis apparatus and cell-wall metabolism. The identified proteins were classified into the following main groups: protein metabolism, stress/defense, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, sulfur metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, RNA metabolism, energy production, cell-wall metabolism, membrane and transportation, and signal transduction. Results of quantitative real-time PCR of 20 differentially accumulated proteins indicated that the transcriptional expression patterns of 10 genes were consistent with their protein expression models. Virus-induced gene silencing of Hsp90, BBI, and REP14 genes indicated that virus-silenced plants subjected to cold stress had more severe drooping and wilting, an increased rate of relative electrolyte leakage, and reduced relative water content compared to viral control plants. Furthermore, ultrastructural changes of virus-silenced plants were destroyed more severely than those of viral control plants. These results indicate that Hsp90, BBI, and REP14 potentially play vital roles in conferring cold tolerance in bread wheat.

  8. Decreased Diversity of the Oral Microbiota of Patients with Hepatitis B Virus-Induced Chronic Liver Disease: A Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Cheng, Yiwen; Jiang, Xiawei; Jiang, Haiyin; Wang, Yuezhu; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered gut microbiota is implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus-induced chronic liver disease (HBV-CLD). However, the structure and composition of the oral microbiota of patients with HBV-CLD remains unclear. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that decreased oral bacterial diversity was found in patients with HBV-CLD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly, which indicated that dysbiosis of the oral microbiota participated in the process of HBV-CLD development. However, the changing patterns of the oral microbiota in patients with HBV-induced liver cirrhosis (LC) were almost similar to patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). HBV infection resulted in an increase in potential H2S- and CH3SH-producing phylotypes such as Fusobacterium, Filifactor, Eubacterium, Parvimonas and Treponema, which might contribute to the increased oral malodor. These key oral-derived phylotypes might invade into the gut as opportunistic pathogens and contribute to altering the composition of the gut microbiota. This study provided important clues that dysbiosis of the oral microbiota might be involved in the development of HBV-CLD. Greater understanding of the relationships between the dysbiosis of oral microbiota and the development of HBV-CLD might facilitate the development of non-invasive differential diagnostic procedures and targeted treatments of HBV-CLD patients harbouring specific oral phylotypes. PMID:26606973

  9. Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) polymorphisms and expression are associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruijuan; Liu, Haipeng; Song, Peng; Feng, Yonghong; Qin, Lianhua; Huang, Xiaochen; Chen, Jianxia; Yang, Hua; Liu, Zhonghua; Cui, Zhenglin; Hu, Zhongyi; Ge, Baoxue

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health problem and host genetic factors play a critical role in susceptibility and resistance to TB. The aim of this study was to identify novel candidate genes associated with TB susceptibility. We performed a population-based case-control study to genotype 13 tag SNPs spanning Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3), colony stimulating factor 2 (CSF2), IL-4, interferon beta 1 (IFNB1), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 14 (CXCL14) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (Myd88) genes in 435 pulmonary TB patients and 375 health donors from China. We observed that EBI3 gene rs4740 polymorphism was associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and the allele G was associated with a protective effect against PTB. Furthermore, EBI3 deficiency led to reduced bacterial burden and histopathological impairment in the lung of mice infected with Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Meanwhile, higher abundance of EBI3 was observed in the granuloma of PTB patients and in the lung tissue of BCG-infected mice. Of note, the expression of EBI3 in macrophages was remarkably induced by mycobacteria infection at both mRNA and protein level. In conclusion, EBI3 gene rs4740 polymorphism is closely associated with susceptibility to PTB and the elevation and enrichment of EBI3 in the lung which at least partially derived from macrophages may contribute to the exacerbation of mycobacterial infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Critical Role for the Type I Interferon Receptor in Virus-Induced Autoimmune Diabetes in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaisar, Natasha; Lin, Suvana; Ryan, Glennice; Yang, Chaoxing; Oikemus, Sarah R.; Brodsky, Michael H.; Bortell, Rita; Mordes, John P.

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis of human type 1 diabetes, characterized by immune-mediated damage of insulin-producing β-cells of pancreatic islets, may involve viral infection. Essential components of the innate immune antiviral response, including type I interferon (IFN) and IFN receptor–mediated signaling pathways, are candidates for determining susceptibility to human type 1 diabetes. Numerous aspects of human type 1 diabetes pathogenesis are recapitulated in the LEW.1WR1 rat model. Diabetes can be induced in LEW.1WR1 weanling rats challenged with virus or with the viral mimetic polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C). We hypothesized that disrupting the cognate type I IFN receptor (type I IFN α/β receptor [IFNAR]) to interrupt IFN signaling would prevent or delay the development of virus-induced diabetes. We generated IFNAR1 subunit–deficient LEW.1WR1 rats using CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–associated protein 9) genome editing and confirmed functional disruption of the Ifnar1 gene. IFNAR1 deficiency significantly delayed the onset and frequency of diabetes and greatly reduced the intensity of insulitis after poly I:C treatment. The occurrence of Kilham rat virus–induced diabetes was also diminished in IFNAR1-deficient animals. These findings firmly establish that alterations in innate immunity influence the course of autoimmune diabetes and support the use of targeted strategies to limit or prevent the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27999109

  11. Virus-induced gene silencing unravels multiple transcription factors involved in floral growth and development in Phalaenopsis orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Lai, Pei-Han; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chung, Mei-Chu; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2013-09-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest angiosperm families, has significant commercial value. Isolation of genes involved in orchid floral development and morphogenesis, scent production, and colouration will advance knowledge of orchid flower formation and facilitate breeding new varieties to increase the commercial value. With high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), this study identified five transcription factors involved in various aspects of flower morphogenesis in the orchid Phalaenopsis equestris. These genes are PeMADS1, PeMADS7, PeHB, PebHLH, and PeZIP. Silencing PeMADS1 and PebHLH resulted in reduced flower size together with a pelaloid column containing petal-like epidermal cells and alterations of epidermal cell arrangement in lip lateral lobes, respectively. Silencing PeMADS7, PeHB, and PeZIP alone resulted in abortion of the first three fully developed flower buds of an inflorescence, which indicates the roles of the genes in late flower development. Furthermore, double silencing PeMADS1 and PeMADS6, C- and B-class MADS-box genes, respectively, produced a combinatorial phenotype with two genes cloned in separate vectors. Both PeMADS1 and PeMADS6 are required to ensure the normal development of the lip and column as well as the cuticle formation on the floral epidermal cell surface. Thus, VIGS allows for unravelling the interaction between two classes of MADS transcription factors for dictating orchid floral morphogenesis.

  12. Therapeutic effect of anti-αv integrin mAb on Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiki, Hiroki; Kaneyama, Tomoki; Kobayashi, Kunitoshi; Inaba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Motoki; Yagita, Hideo; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2014-03-15

    We examined the regulatory role of αv integrins in the development of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD), a model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Blockade of αv integrins by anti-αv integrin monoclonal antibody (mAb) in the effector phase significantly suppressed the development of TMEV-IDD both clinically and histologically. The number of infiltrating mononuclear cells (MNCs) in the CNS was significantly decreased in mice treated with anti-αv integrin mAb. Flow cytometric analysis of cytokine staining revealed that absolute numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing CD4+ and IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells were significantly decreased in the CNS of mice treated with anti-αv integrin mAb. These data suggest that αv integrins may play important roles in the development of TMEV-IDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mouse Models of Multiple Sclerosis: Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Theiler’s Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Derrick P.; Richards, Maureen H.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler’s Murine Encephalitis Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease (TMEV-IDD) are two clinically relevant murine models of multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, both are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the CNS and demyelination. EAE is induced by either the administration of myelin protein or peptide in adjuvant or by the adoptive transfer of encephalitogenic T cell blasts into naïve recipients. The relative merits of each of these protocols are compared. Depending on the type of question being asked, different mouse strains and peptides are used. Different disease courses are observed with different strains and different peptides in active EAE. These variations are also addressed. Additionally, issues relevant to clinical grading of EAE in mice are discussed. In addition to EAE induction, useful references for other disease indicators such as DTH, in vitro proliferation, and immunohistochemistry are provided. TMEV-IDD is a useful model for understanding the possible viral etiology of MS. This section provides detailed information on the preparation of viral stocks and subsequent intracerebral infection of mice. Additionally, virus plaque assay and clinical disease assessment are discussed. Recently, recombinant TMEV strains have been created for the study of molecular mimicry which incorporate various 30 amino acid myelin epitopes within the leader region of TMEV. PMID:22933080

  14. A high throughput barley stripe mosaic virus vector for virus induced gene silencing in monocots and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yuan

    Full Text Available Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV is a single-stranded RNA virus with three genome components designated alpha, beta, and gamma. BSMV vectors have previously been shown to be efficient virus induced gene silencing (VIGS vehicles in barley and wheat and have provided important information about host genes functioning during pathogenesis as well as various aspects of genes functioning in development. To permit more effective use of BSMV VIGS for functional genomics experiments, we have developed an Agrobacterium delivery system for BSMV and have coupled this with a ligation independent cloning (LIC strategy to mediate efficient cloning of host genes. Infiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves provided excellent sources of virus for secondary BSMV infections and VIGS in cereals. The Agro/LIC BSMV VIGS vectors were able to function in high efficiency down regulation of phytoene desaturase (PDS, magnesium chelatase subunit H (ChlH, and plastid transketolase (TK gene silencing in N. benthamiana and in the monocots, wheat, barley, and the model grass, Brachypodium distachyon. Suppression of an Arabidopsis orthologue cloned from wheat (TaPMR5 also interfered with wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici infections in a manner similar to that of the A. thaliana PMR5 loss-of-function allele. These results imply that the PMR5 gene has maintained similar functions across monocot and dicot families. Our BSMV VIGS system provides substantial advantages in expense, cloning efficiency, ease of manipulation and ability to apply VIGS for high throughput genomics studies.

  15. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Considerations Regarding the Use of Virus-Induced Carcinogenesis and Oncolytic Viral Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephanie D; Hickman-Davis, Judy M; Bergdall, Valerie K

    2016-01-01

    The use of virus-induced carcinogenesis and oncologic experimental animal models is essential in understanding the mechanisms of cancer development to advance prevention, diagnosis, and treatment methods. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is responsible for both the complex philosophical and practical considerations associated with animal models of cancer. Animal models of cancer carry their own unique issues that require special consideration from the IACUC. Many of the considerations to be discussed apply to cancer models in general; specific issues related to viral carcinogenesis or oncolytic viruses will be specifically discussed as they arise. Responsible animal use integrates good science, humane care, and regulatory compliance. To meet those standards, the IACUC, in conjunction with the research investigator and attending veterinarian, must address a wide range of issues, including animal model selection, cancer model selection, humane end point considerations, experimental considerations, postapproval monitoring, reporting requirements, and animal management and personnel safety considerations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Wild-type rabies virus induces autophagy in human and mouse neuroblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiaojiao; Zhu, Shenghe; Hu, Lili; Ye, Pingping; Wang, Yifei; Tian, Qin; Mei, Mingzhu; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-10-02

    Different rabies virus (RABV) strains have their own biological characteristics, but little is known about their respective impact on autophagy. Therefore, we evaluated whether attenuated RABV HEP-Flury and wild-type RABV GD-SH-01 strains triggered autophagy. We found that GD-SH-01 infection significantly increased the number of autophagy-like vesicles, the accumulation of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-LC3 fluorescence puncta and the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, while HEP-Flury was not able to induce this phenomenon. When evaluating autophagic flux, we found that GD-SH-01 infection triggers a complete autophagic response in the human neuroblastoma cell line (SK), while autophagosome fusion with lysosomes was inhibited in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line (NA). In these cells, GD-SH-01 led to apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction while triggering autophagy, and apoptosis could be decreased by enhancing autophagy. To further identify the virus constituent causing autophagy, 5 chimeric recombinant viruses carrying single genes of HEP-Flury instead of those of GD-SH-01 were rescued. While the HEP-Flury virus carrying the wild-type matrix protein (M) gene of RABV triggered LC3-I to LC3-II conversion in SK and NA cells, replacement of genes of nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P) and glycoprotein (G) produced only minor autophagy. But no one single structural protein of GD-SH-01 induced autophagy. Moreover, the AMPK signaling pathway was activated by GD-SH-01 in SK. Therefore, our data provide strong evidence that autophagy is induced by GD-SH-01 and can decrease apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, the M gene of GD-SH-01 may cooperatively induce autophagy.

  17. Vaccinia virus induces rapid necrosis in keratinocytes by a STAT3-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong He

    Full Text Available Humans with a dominant negative mutation in STAT3 are susceptible to severe skin infections, suggesting an essential role for STAT3 signaling in defense against cutaneous pathogens.To focus on innate antiviral defenses in keratinocytes, we used a standard model of cutaneous infection of severe combined immunodeficient mice with the current smallpox vaccine, ACAM-2000. In parallel, early events post-infection with the smallpox vaccine ACAM-2000 were investigated in cultured keratinocytes of human and mouse origin.Mice treated topically with a STAT3 inhibitor (Stattic developed larger vaccinia lesions with higher virus titers and died more rapidly than untreated controls. Cultured human and murine keratinocytes infected with ACAM-2000 underwent rapid necrosis, but when treated with Stattic or with inhibitors of RIP1 kinase or caspase-1, they survived longer, produced higher titers of virus, and showed reduced activation of type I interferon responses and inflammatory cytokines release. Treatment with inhibitors of RIP1 kinase and STAT3, but not caspase-1, also reduced the inflammatory response of keratinocytes to TLR ligands. Vaccinia growth properties in Vero cells, which are known to be defective in some antiviral responses, were unaffected by inhibition of RIP1K, caspase-1, or STAT3.Our findings indicate that keratinocytes suppress the replication and spread of vaccinia virus by undergoing rapid programmed cell death, in a process requiring STAT3. These data offer a new framework for understanding susceptibility to skin infection in patients with STAT3 mutations. Interventions which promote prompt necroptosis/pyroptosis of infected keratinocytes may reduce risks associated with vaccination with live vaccinia virus.

  18. Histone Deacetylase 2 Is a Component of Influenza A Virus-Induced Host Antiviral Response

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    Prashanth T. Nagesh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Host cells produce variety of antiviral factors that create an antiviral state and target various stages of influenza A virus (IAV life cycle to inhibit infection. However, IAV has evolved various strategies to antagonize those antiviral factors. Recently, we reported that a member of class I host histone deacetylases (HDACs, HDAC1 possesses an anti-IAV function. Herein, we provide evidence that HDAC2, another class I member and closely related to HDAC1 in structure and function, also possesses anti-IAV properties. In turn, IAV, like HDAC1, dysregulates HDAC2, mainly at the polypeptide level through proteasomal degradation to potentially minimize its antiviral effect. We found that IAV downregulated the HDAC2 polypeptide level in A549 cells in an H1N1 strain-independent manner by up to 47%, which was recovered to almost 100% level in the presence of proteasome-inhibitor MG132. A further knockdown in HDAC2 expression by up to 90% via RNA interference augmented the growth kinetics of IAV in A549 cells by more than four-fold after 24 h of infection. Furthermore, the knockdown of HDAC2 expression decreased the IAV-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor, Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription I (STAT1 and the expression of interferon-stimulated gene, viperin in infected cells by 41 and 53%, respectively. The role of HDAC2 in viperin expression was analogous to that of HDAC1, but it was not in the phosphorylation of STAT1. This indicated that, like HDAC1, HDAC2 is a component of IAV-induced host innate antiviral response and performs both redundant and non-redundant functions vis-a-vis HDAC1; however, IAV dysregulates them both in a redundant manner.

  19. Characterization of the Zika virus induced small RNA response in Aedes aegypti cells.

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    Margus Varjak

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi controls arbovirus infections in mosquitoes. Two different RNAi pathways are involved in antiviral responses: the PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA and exogenous short interfering RNA (exo-siRNA pathways, which are characterized by the production of virus-derived small RNAs of 25-29 and 21 nucleotides, respectively. The exo-siRNA pathway is considered to be the key mosquito antiviral response mechanism. In Aedes aegypti-derived cells, Zika virus (ZIKV-specific siRNAs were produced and loaded into the exo-siRNA pathway effector protein Argonaute 2 (Ago2; although the knockdown of Ago2 did not enhance virus replication. Enhanced ZIKV replication was observed in a Dcr2-knockout cell line suggesting that the exo-siRNA pathway is implicated in the antiviral response. Although ZIKV-specific piRNA-sized small RNAs were detected, these lacked the characteristic piRNA ping-pong signature motif and were bound to Ago3 but not Piwi5 or Piwi6. Silencing of PIWI proteins indicated that the knockdown of Ago3, Piwi5 or Piwi6 did not enhance ZIKV replication and only Piwi4 displayed antiviral activity. We also report that the expression of ZIKV capsid (C protein amplified the replication of a reporter alphavirus; although, unlike yellow fever virus C protein, it does not inhibit the exo-siRNA pathway. Our findings elucidate ZIKV-mosquito RNAi interactions that are important for understanding its spread.

  20. Possible therapeutic effect of orally administered ribavirin for respiratory syncytial virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome in an immunocompetent patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Byung Woo; Lee, Seung Hyeun

    2017-12-20

    Human respiratory syncytial virus usually causes self-limiting upper respiratory infection and occasionally causes pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts. Respiratory syncytial virus-induced severe pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome in immunocompetent adults has been rarely described. Unfortunately, optimal treatment has not been established for this potentially fatal condition. We report a case of respiratory syncytial virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome occurring in a previously healthy man successfully treated with orally administered ribavirin. An 81-year-old previously healthy Korean man presented with cough, dyspnea, and febrile sensation. He had hypoxemia with diffuse ground glass opacity evident on chest radiography, which progressed and required mechanical ventilation. All microbiological tests were negative except multiplex real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using respiratory specimen, which was positive for human adenovirus. Under the diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome, orally administered ribavirin was administered and he recuperated completely without complications. This case demonstrates the potential usefulness of orally administered ribavirin as a therapeutic option for severe respiratory syncytial virus infection, at least in an immunocompetent host.

  1. Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains function as nuclear protein quality control centers during HSV-1 infection.

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    Christine M Livingston

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains form adjacent to nuclear viral replication compartments (RC during the early stages of HSV-1 infection. Between 2 and 3 hours post infection at a MOI of 10, host protein quality control machinery such as molecular chaperones (e.g. Hsc70, the 20S proteasome and ubiquitin are reorganized from a diffuse nuclear distribution pattern to sequestration in VICE domains. The observation that VICE domains contain putative misfolded proteins suggests that they may be similar to nuclear inclusion bodies that form under conditions in which the protein quality control machinery is overwhelmed by the presence of misfolded proteins. The detection of Hsc70 in VICE domains, but not in nuclear inclusion bodies, indicates that Hsc70 is specifically reorganized by HSV-1 infection. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of nuclear protein quality control centers to remodel or degrade aberrant nuclear proteins that would otherwise interfere with productive infection. Detection of proteolytic activity in VICE domains suggests that substrates may be degraded by the 20S proteasome in VICE domains. FRAP analysis reveals that GFP-Hsc70 is dynamically associated with VICE domains, suggesting a role for Hsc70 in scanning the infected nucleus for misfolded proteins. During 42 degrees C heat shock, Hsc70 is redistributed from VICE domains into RC perhaps to remodel viral replication and regulatory proteins that have become insoluble in these compartments. The experiments presented in this paper suggest that VICE domains are nuclear protein quality control centers that are modified by HSV-1 to promote productive infection.

  2. Development of Agrobacterium-mediated virus-induced gene silencing and performance evaluation of four marker genes in Gossypium barbadense.

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    Jinhuan Pang

    Full Text Available Gossypiumbarbadense is a cultivated cotton species and possesses many desirable traits, including high fiber quality and resistance to pathogens, especially Verticilliumdahliae (a devastating pathogen of Gossypium hirsutum, the main cultivated species. These elite traits are difficult to be introduced into G. hirsutum through classical breeding methods. In addition, genetic transformation of G. barbadense has not been successfully performed. It is therefore important to develop methods for evaluating the function and molecular mechanism of genes in G. barbadense. In this study, we had successfully introduced a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS system into three cultivars of G. barbadense by inserting marker genes into the tobacco rattle virus (TRV vector. After we optimized the VIGS conditions, including light intensity, photoperiod, seedling age and Agrobacterium strain, 100% of plants agroinfiltrated with the GaPDS silencing vector showed white colored leaves. Three other marker genes, GaCLA1, GaANS and GaANR, were employed to further test this VIGS system in G. barbadense. The transcript levels of the endogenous genes in the silenced plants were reduced by more than 99% compared to control plants; these plants presented phenotypic symptoms 2 weeks after inoculation. We introduced a fusing sequence fragment of GaPDS and GaANR gene silencing vectors into a single plant, which resulted in both photobleaching and brownish coloration. The extent of silencing in plants agroinfiltrated with fusing two-gene-silencing vector was consistent with plants harboring a single gene silencing vector. The development of this VIGS system should promote analysis of gene function in G. barbadense, and help to contribute desirable traits for breeding of G. barbadense and G. hirsutum.

  3. Virus-Induced Silencing of Key Genes Leads to Differential Impact on Withanolide Biosynthesis in Medicinal Plant, Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aditya Vikram; Singh, Deeksha; Dhar, Yogeshwar Vikram; Michael, Rahul; Gupta, Parul; Chandra, Deepak; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2017-11-20

    Withanolides are a collection of naturally occurring, pharmacologically active, secondary metabolites synthesised in medicinally important plant, Withania somnifera. These bioactive molecules are C28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids and their synthesis is proposed to take place via the mevalonate (MVA) and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathways through the sterol pathway using 24-methylene cholesterol as substrate flux. Although the phytochemical profiles as well as pharmaceutical activities of Withania extracts have been well studied, limited genomic information and difficult genetic transformation have been major bottleneck towards understanding the participation of specific genes in withanolide biosynthesis. In this study, we used Tobacco Rattle Virus (TRV)-mediated Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) approach to study the participation of key genes from MVA, MEP and triterpenoid biosynthesis for their involvement in withanolide biosynthesis. TRV-infected W. somnifera plants displayed unique phenotypic characteristics and differential accumulation of total chlorophyll as well as carotenoid content for each silenced gene apprehending a reduction in overall isoprenoid synthesis. Comprehensive expression analysis of putative genes of withanolide biosynthesis revealed transcriptional modulations conferring the presence of a complex regulatory mechanisms leading to withanolide biosynthesis. In addition, silencing of genes exhibited modulated total and specific withanolide accumulation, at different levels, as compared to control plants. Comparative analysis also suggests major role of MVA pathway as compared to MEP pathway in providing substrate flux for withanolide biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of selected Withania genes of the triterpenoid biosynthetic pathway critically affects withanolide biosynthesis providing new horizons to further explore this process, in planta. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford

  4. Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5 Is Critical for Protection against Theiler's Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Young-Hee; Kim, Seung Jae; So, Eui Young; Meng, Liping; Colonna, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Infection of dendritic and glial cells with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces various cytokines via Toll-like receptor- and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5)-dependent pathways. However, the involvement and role of MDA5 in cytokine gene activation and the pathogenesis of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that MDA5 plays a critical role in the production of TMEV-induced alpha interferon (IFN-α) during early viral infection and in protection against the development of virus-induced demyelinating disease. Our results indicate that MDA5-deficient 129SvJ mice display significantly higher viral loads and apparent demyelinating lesions in the central nerve system (CNS) accompanied by clinical symptoms compared with wild-type 129SvJ mice. During acute viral infection, MDA5-deficient mice produced elevated levels of chemokines, consistent with increased cellular infiltration, but reduced levels of IFN-α, known to control T cell responses and cellular infiltration. Additional studies with isolated CNS glial cells from these mice suggest that cells from MDA5-deficient mice are severely compromised in the production of IFN-α upon viral infection, which results in increased cellular infiltration and viral loads in the CNS. Despite inadequate stimulation, the overall T cell responses to the viral determinants were significantly elevated in MDA5-deficient mice, reflecting the increased cellular infiltration. Therefore, the lack of MDA5-mediated IFN-α production may facilitate a massive viral load and elevated cellular infiltration in the CNS during early viral infection, leading to the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. PMID:22090123

  5. Bioinformatics analysis of the factors controlling type I IFN gene expression in autoimmune disease and virus-induced immunity

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    Di eFeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS display increased levels of type I IFN-induced genes. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs are natural interferon producing cells and considered to be a primary source of IFN-α in these two diseases. Differential expression patterns of type I IFN inducible transcripts can be found in different immune cell subsets and in patients with both active and inactive autoimmune disease. A type I IFN gene signature generally consists of three groups of IFN-induced genes - those regulated in response to virus-induced type I IFN, those regulated by the IFN-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, and those by the IFN-induced phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K pathway. These three groups of type I IFN-regulated genes control important cellular processes such as apoptosis, survival, adhesion, and chemotaxis, that when dysregulated, contribute to autoimmunity. With the recent generation of large datasets in the public domain from next-generation sequencing and DNA microarray experiments, one can perform detailed analyses of cell type-specific gene signatures as well as identify distinct transcription factors that differentially regulate these gene signatures. We have performed bioinformatics analysis of data in the public domain and experimental data from our lab to gain insight into the regulation of type I IFN gene expression. We have found that the genetic landscape of the IFNA and IFNB genes are occupied by transcription factors, such as insulators CTCF and cohesin, that negatively regulate transcription, as well as IRF5 and IRF7, that positively and distinctly regulate IFNA subtypes. A detailed understanding of the factors controlling type I IFN gene transcription will significantly aid in the identification and development of new therapeutic strategies targeting the IFN pathway in autoimmune disease.

  6. Virus-induced gene silencing-based functional characterization of genes associated with powdery mildew resistance in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Ingo; Barciszewska-Pacak, Maria; Hrubikova, Katarina; Williamson, Sandie; Dinesen, Malene; Soenderby, Ida E; Sundar, Suresh; Jarmolowski, Artur; Shirasu, Ken; Lacomme, Christophe

    2005-08-01

    We successfully implemented virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in barley (Hordeum vulgare) for the functional characterization of genes required for Mla13-mediated resistance toward the biotrophic barley pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Initially, barley cultivars were screened for their ability to host the barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV)-VIGS vector by allowing its replication and systemic movement without causing excessive symptoms. Phytoene desaturase silencing leading to photobleaching was used as a phenotypic marker alongside reverse transcription-PCR data to characterize the silencing response at the molecular level. Barley cultivar Clansman, harboring the Mla13 resistance gene, was chosen as the most suitable host for BSMV-VIGS-based functional characterization of Rar1, Sgt1, and Hsp90 in the Mla-mediated resistance toward powdery mildew. BSMV-induced gene silencing of these candidate genes, which are associated in many but not all race-specific pathways, proved to be robust and could be detected at both mRNA and protein levels for up to 21 d postinoculation. Systemic silencing was observed not only in the newly developed leaves from the main stem but also in axillary shoots. By examining fungal development from an incompatible mildew strain carrying the cognate Avr13 gene on plants BSMV silenced for Rar1, Sgt1, and Hsp90, a resistance-breaking phenotype was observed, while plants infected with BSMV control constructs remained resistant. We demonstrate that Hsp90 is a required component for Mla13-mediated race-specific resistance and that BSMV-induced VIGS is a powerful tool to characterize genes involved in pathogen resistance in barley.

  7. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Characterization of Genes Associated with Powdery Mildew Resistance in Barley1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Ingo; Barciszewska-Pacak, Maria; Hrubikova, Katarina; Williamson, Sandie; Dinesen, Malene; Soenderby, Ida E.; Sundar, Suresh; Jarmolowski, Artur; Shirasu, Ken; Lacomme, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    We successfully implemented virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in barley (Hordeum vulgare) for the functional characterization of genes required for Mla13-mediated resistance toward the biotrophic barley pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Initially, barley cultivars were screened for their ability to host the barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV)-VIGS vector by allowing its replication and systemic movement without causing excessive symptoms. Phytoene desaturase silencing leading to photobleaching was used as a phenotypic marker alongside reverse transcription-PCR data to characterize the silencing response at the molecular level. Barley cultivar Clansman, harboring the Mla13 resistance gene, was chosen as the most suitable host for BSMV-VIGS-based functional characterization of Rar1, Sgt1, and Hsp90 in the Mla-mediated resistance toward powdery mildew. BSMV-induced gene silencing of these candidate genes, which are associated in many but not all race-specific pathways, proved to be robust and could be detected at both mRNA and protein levels for up to 21 d postinoculation. Systemic silencing was observed not only in the newly developed leaves from the main stem but also in axillary shoots. By examining fungal development from an incompatible mildew strain carrying the cognate Avr13 gene on plants BSMV silenced for Rar1, Sgt1, and Hsp90, a resistance-breaking phenotype was observed, while plants infected with BSMV control constructs remained resistant. We demonstrate that Hsp90 is a required component for Mla13-mediated race-specific resistance and that BSMV-induced VIGS is a powerful tool to characterize genes involved in pathogen resistance in barley. PMID:16040663

  8. Incidence, clinical outcome, and management of virus-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in children and adolescents after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczynska, Ewa; Turkiewicz, Dominik; Rybka, Katarzyna; Toporski, Jacek; Kalwak, Krzysztof; Dyla, Agnieszka; Szczyra, Zofia; Chybicka, Alicja

    2005-10-01

    We analyzed the incidence, etiology, risk factors, and clinical management of hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) in 102 children who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation: 28 from matched siblings, 57 from unrelated donors, and 17 from mismatched relatives. Conditioning regimens consisted of high-dose chemotherapy (n=83) or total body irradiation (n=19). In all children, urine and plasma were prospectively screened for human polyomavirus (HPV; BK virus [BKV] and JC virus [JCV]) or adenovirus (AdV) DNA with a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. Viral DNA was detected in the urine of 56 children (54.9%): BKV in 48 (47%), JCV in 4 (3.9%), and AdV in 4 (3.9%). HC occurred in 26 children (25.5%), and viruria was detected in all of them: BKV in 21 (80.8%), AdV in 4 (14.4%), and JCV in 1 (3.8%). All patients with AdV viruria developed HC. The cumulative incidence of HC in patients with HPV viruria was 0.43. The only significant risk factor for HC in patients with HPV-positive urine was conditioning with high-dose chemotherapy. Twenty-two children were treated with cidofovir, with no significant toxicity. In all treated patients but 1, the clinical symptoms were moderate, and no HC-related death was observed. We conclude that virus-induced HC is a frequent complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Treatment with cidofovir is feasible, and further studies are warranted to evaluate its activity in HC mediated by BKV or JCV.

  9. Induction of cell-cell fusion by ectromelia virus is not inhibited by its fusion inhibitory complex

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    Fuchs Pinhas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ectromelia virus, a member of the Orthopox genus, is the causative agent of the highly infectious mousepox disease. Previous studies have shown that different poxviruses induce cell-cell fusion which is manifested by the formation of multinucleated-giant cells (polykaryocytes. This phenomenon has been widely studied with vaccinia virus in conditions which require artificial acidification of the medium. Results We show that Ectromelia virus induces cell-cell fusion under neutral pH conditions and requires the presence of a sufficient amount of viral particles on the plasma membrane of infected cells. This could be achieved by infection with a replicating virus and its propagation in infected cells (fusion "from within" or by infection with a high amount of virus particles per cell (fusion "from without". Inhibition of virus maturation or inhibition of virus transport on microtubules towards the plasma membrane resulted in a complete inhibition of syncytia formation. We show that in contrast to vaccinia virus, Ectromelia virus induces cell-cell fusion irrespectively of its hemagglutination properties and cell-surface expression of the orthologs of the fusion inhibitory complex, A56 and K2. Additionally, cell-cell fusion was also detected in mice lungs following lethal respiratory infection. Conclusion Ectromelia virus induces spontaneous cell-cell fusion in-vitro and in-vivo although expressing an A56/K2 fusion inhibitory complex. This syncytia formation property cannot be attributed to the 37 amino acid deletion in ECTV A56.

  10. Virus-induced chalazion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A M; Chan, C-C; Crawford, M A; Tabbarah, Z A; Shen, D; Haddad, W F; Salti, I; Ghazi, N G

    2006-02-01

    To investigate a viral etiology in certain chalazia. A prospective study over 7.5 years of all newly presenting chalazia associated with diffuse follicular conjunctivitis but without any other aetiological factors. Patients were investigated for ocular or systemic infections by history, physical exam, slit-lamp exam, and/or histology of conjunctival biopsy (including transmission electron microscopy). A total of 27 patients developed follicular conjunctivitis without meibomian gland dysfunction, blepharitis, or sexually transmitted diseases. Evidence for a viral aetiology included: recent systemic viral illness (15/27), recent contact with subjects with chalazia or follicular conjunctivitis (5/27), preauricular lymphadenopathy (4/27), viral corneal disease (4/27), or viral particles by ultrastructure (4/4). Chalazia may be associated with viral conjunctivitis. Intralesional corticosteroids should be considered with great caution for viral-induced chalazia.

  11. A rapid virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) method for assessing resistance and susceptibility to cassava mosaic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Getu; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Taylor, Nigel J

    2017-03-07

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) is a major constraint to cassava production in sub-Saharan Africa. Under field conditions, evaluation for resistance to CMD takes 12-18 months, often conducted across multiple years and locations under pressure from whitefly-mediated transmission. Under greenhouse or laboratory settings, evaluation for resistance or susceptibility to CMD involves transmission of the causal viruses from an infected source to healthy plants through grafting, or by using Agrobacterium-mediated or biolistic delivery of infectious clones. Following inoculation, visual assessment for CMD symptom development and recovery requires 12-22 weeks. Here we report a rapid screening system for determining resistance and susceptibility to CMD based on virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of an endogenous cassava gene. A VIGS vector was developed based on an infectious clone of the virulent strain of East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-K201). A sequence from the cassava (Manihot esculenta) ortholog of Arabidopsis SPINDLY (SPY) was cloned into the CP position of the DNA-A genomic component and used to inoculate cassava plants by Helios® Gene Gun microparticle bombardment. Silencing of Manihot esculenta SPY (MeSPY) using MeSPY1-VIGS resulted in shoot-tip necrosis followed by death of the whole plant in CMD susceptible cassava plants within 2-4 weeks. CMD resistant cultivars were not affected and remained healthy after challenge with MeSPY1-VIGS. Significantly higher virus titers were detected in CMD-susceptible cassava lines compared to resistant controls and were correlated with a concomitant reduction in MeSPY expression in susceptible plants. A rapid VIGS-based screening system was developed for assessing resistance and susceptibility to CMD. The method is space and resource efficient, reducing the time required to perform CMD screening to as little as 2-4 weeks. It can be employed as a high throughput rapid screening system to assess new cassava cultivars and for

  12. MAVS-mediated apoptosis and its inhibition by viral proteins.

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    Yu Lei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Host responses to viral infection include both immune activation and programmed cell death. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling adaptor, MAVS (IPS-1, VISA or Cardif is critical for host defenses to viral infection by inducing type-1 interferons (IFN-I, however its role in virus-induced apoptotic responses has not been elucidated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that MAVS causes apoptosis independent of its function in initiating IFN-I production. MAVS-induced cell death requires mitochondrial localization, is caspase dependent, and displays hallmarks of apoptosis. Furthermore, MAVS(-/- fibroblasts are resistant to Sendai virus-induced apoptosis. A functional screen identifies the hepatitis C virus NS3/4A and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV nonstructural protein (NSP15 as inhibitors of MAVS-induced apoptosis, possibly as a method of immune evasion. SIGNIFICANCE: This study describes a novel role for MAVS in controlling viral infections through the induction of apoptosis, and identifies viral proteins which inhibit this host response.

  13. High fractional exhaled nitric oxide and sputum eosinophils are associated with an increased risk of future virus-induced exacerbations -NDASH- a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Asger; Laing, Ingrid A; Backer, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The major trigger of asthma exacerbations is infection with a respiratory virus, most commonly rhinovirus. Type 2 inflammation is known to be associated with an increased risk of exacerbations in general. Whether type 2 inflammation at baseline increases the risk of future virus...... the follow-up period. Of these, 15 (68%) had a respiratory virus detected at exacerbation. Sputum eosinophils > 1% at baseline increased the risk of having a subsequent virus-induced exacerbation (HR 7.6 95% CI 1.6-35.2, p=0.010), as did having FeNO > 25 ppb (HR 3.4 95% CI 1.1-10.4, p=0.033). This article...... is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  14. Suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3 are up-regulated in brain resident cells in response to virus induced inflammation of the CNS via at least two distinctive pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Fenger, Christina; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo

    2014-01-01

    underlie a virus induced up-regulation of SOCS in the CNS. We found that i.c. infection with either lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) or yellow fever virus (YF) results in gradual up-regulation of SOCS1/3 mRNA expression peaking at day 7 post infection (p.i.). In the LCMV model, SOCS m...

  15. Multiple granulomatous lung lesions in a patient with Epstein-Barr-virus-induced mononucleosis and new-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report

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    Sakurai Aki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Granulomatous lesions are commonly encountered abnormalities in pulmonary pathology, and often pose a diagnostic challenge. We report an unusual case of granulomatous lung disease with uncommon characteristics, which developed following Epstein-Barr-virus-induced mononucleosis and new-onset systemic lupus erythematosus. We aim to highlight a diagnostic approach for the condition and to raise awareness of the possibility of it being related to the immunological reaction caused by Epstein-Barr virus infection. Case presentation A 36-year-old Japanese man, who had been diagnosed with Epstein-Barr-virus-induced infectious mononucleosis, new-onset systemic lupus erythematosus, and secondary Sjögren’s syndrome three weeks previously, presented to our facility with fever and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed multiple small nodules in both lungs. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage revealed lymphocytosis with predominance of T lymphocytes. A histological examination of a lung biopsy taken during video-assisted thoracic surgery showed randomly distributed tiny granulomatous lesions with infiltration of eosinophils. The differential diagnoses included hypersensitivity pneumonitis, sarcoidosis, and pulmonary involvement of Crohn’s disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjögren’s syndrome, but the clinical and pathological findings were not consistent with any of these. Our patient’s condition did not improve; therefore, prednisolone therapy was started because of the possibility of specific immunological reactions associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection. After steroid treatment, our patient showed radiological and clinical improvement. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient developing randomly distributed multiple granulomatous lung lesions with eosinophilic infiltrates after Epstein-Barr virus infection and systemic

  16. Inoculation of Swine with Foot-and-Mouth Disease SAP-Mutant Virus Induces Early Protection against Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Weiss, Marcelo; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Dias, Camila C.; Grubman, Marvin J.; de los Santos, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) leader proteinase (Lpro) cleaves itself from the viral polyprotein and cleaves the translation initiation factor eIF4G. As a result, host cell translation is inhibited, affecting the host innate immune response. We have demonstrated that Lpro is also associated with degradation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), a process that requires Lpro nuclear localization. Additionally, we reported that disruption of a conserved protein domain within the Lpro coding sequen...

  17. Hepatitis C virus-induced cytoplasmic organelles use the nuclear transport machinery to establish an environment conducive to virus replication.

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    Christopher J Neufeldt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection induces formation of a membranous web structure in the host cell cytoplasm where the viral genome replicates and virions assemble. The membranous web is thought to concentrate viral components and hide viral RNA from pattern recognition receptors. We have uncovered a role for nuclear pore complex proteins (Nups and nuclear transport factors (NTFs in the membranous web. We show that HCV infection leads to increased levels of cytoplasmic Nups that accumulate at sites enriched for HCV proteins. Moreover, we detected interactions between specific HCV proteins and both Nups and NTFs. We hypothesize that cytoplasmically positioned Nups facilitate formation of the membranous web and contribute to the compartmentalization of viral replication. Accordingly, we show that transport cargo proteins normally targeted to the nucleus are capable of entering regions of the membranous web, and that depletion of specific Nups or Kaps inhibits HCV replication and assembly.

  18. Singapore grouper iridovirus, a large DNA virus, induces nonapoptotic cell death by a cell type dependent fashion and evokes ERK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Ouyang, Zhengliang; Xu, Lixiao; Yan, Yang; Cui, Huachun; Han, Xin; Qin, Qiwei

    2011-08-01

    Virus induced cell death, including apoptosis and nonapoptotic cell death, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of viral diseases. Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), a novel iridovirus of genus Ranavirus, causes high mortality and heavy economic losses in grouper aquaculture. Here, using fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy and biochemical assays, we found that SGIV infection in host (grouper spleen, EAGS) cells evoked nonapoptotic programmed cell death (PCD), characterized by appearance of cytoplasmic vacuoles and distended endoplasmic reticulum, in the absence of DNA fragmentation, apoptotic bodies and caspase activation. In contrast, SGIV induced typical apoptosis in non-host (fathead minnow, FHM) cells, as evidenced by caspase activation and DNA fragmentation, suggesting that SGIV infection induced nonapoptotic cell death by a cell type dependent fashion. Furthermore, viral replication was essential for SGIV induced nonapoptotic cell death, but not for apoptosis. Notably, the disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) were not detected in EAGS cells but in FHM cells after SGIV infection. Moreover, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling was involved in SGIV infection induced nonapoptotic cell death and viral replication. This is a first demonstration of ERK-mediated nonapoptotic cell death induced by a DNA virus. These findings contribute to understanding the mechanisms of iridovirus pathogenesis.

  19. Exon level transcriptomic profiling of HIV-1-infected CD4(+ T cells reveals virus-induced genes and host environment favorable for viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Imbeault

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is extremely specialized since, even amongst CD4(+ T lymphocytes (its major natural reservoir in peripheral blood, the virus productively infects only a small proportion of cells under an activated state. As the percentage of HIV-1-infected cells is very low, most studies have so far failed to capture the precise transcriptomic profile at the whole-genome scale of cells highly susceptible to virus infection. Using Affymetrix Exon array technology and a reporter virus allowing the magnetic isolation of HIV-1-infected cells, we describe the host cell factors most favorable for virus establishment and replication along with an overview of virus-induced changes in host gene expression occurring exclusively in target cells productively infected with HIV-1. We also establish that within a population of activated CD4(+ T cells, HIV-1 has no detectable effect on the transcriptome of uninfected bystander cells at early time points following infection. The data gathered in this study provides unique insights into the biology of HIV-1-infected CD4(+ T cells and identifies genes thought to play a determinant role in the interplay between the virus and its host. Furthermore, it provides the first catalogue of alternative splicing events found in primary human CD4(+ T cells productively infected with HIV-1.

  20. Aquaporin-mediated long-distance polyphosphate translocation directed towards the host in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis: application of virus-induced gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yusuke; Hijikata, Nowaki; Ohtomo, Ryo; Handa, Yoshihiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Saito, Katsuharu; Masuta, Chikara; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi translocate polyphosphate through hyphae over a long distance to deliver to the host. More than three decades ago, suppression of host transpiration was found to decelerate phosphate delivery of the fungal symbiont, leading us to hypothesize that transpiration provides a primary driving force for polyphosphate translocation, probably via creating hyphal water flow in which fungal aquaporin(s) may be involved. The impact of transpiration suppression on polyphosphate translocation through hyphae of Rhizophagus clarus was evaluated. An aquaporin gene expressed in intraradical mycelia was characterized and knocked down by virus-induced gene silencing to investigate the involvement of the gene in polyphosphate translocation. Rhizophagus clarus aquaporin 3 (RcAQP3) that was most highly expressed in intraradical mycelia encodes an aquaglyceroporin responsible for water transport across the plasma membrane. Knockdown of RcAQP3 as well as the suppression of host transpiration decelerated polyphosphate translocation in proportion to the levels of knockdown and suppression, respectively. These results provide the first insight into the mechanism underlying long-distance polyphosphate translocation in mycorrhizal associations at the molecular level, in which host transpiration and the fungal aquaporin play key roles. A hypothetical model of the translocation is proposed for further elucidation of the mechanism. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Utilizing virus-induced gene silencing for the functional characterization of maize genes during infection with the fungal pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2013-01-01

    While in dicotyledonous plants virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is well established to study plant-pathogen interaction, in monocots only few examples of efficient VIGS have been reported so far. One of the available systems is based on the brome mosaic virus (BMV) which allows gene silencing in different cereals including barley (Hordeum vulgare), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and maize (Zea mays).Infection of maize plants by the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis leads to the formation of large tumors on stem, leaves, and inflorescences. During this biotrophic interaction, plant defense responses are actively suppressed by the pathogen, and previous transcriptome analyses of infected maize plants showed comprehensive and stage-specific changes in host gene expression during disease progression.To identify maize genes that are functionally involved in the interaction with U. maydis, we adapted a VIGS system based on the Brome mosaic virus (BMV) to maize at conditions that allow successful U. maydis infection of BMV pre-infected maize plants. This setup enables quantification of VIGS and its impact on U. maydis infection using a quantitative real-time PCR (q(RT)-PCR)-based readout.

  2. The immune response in the CNS in Theiler's virus induced demyelinating disease switches from an early adaptive response to a chronic innate-like response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilli, Francesca; Li, Libin; Pachner, Andrew R

    2016-02-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) is an important model of the progressive disability caused by irreversible CNS tissue injury, and provides an example of how a CNS pathogen can cause inflammation, demyelination, and neuronal damage. We were interested in which molecules, especially inflammatory mediators, might be upregulated in the CNS throughout TMEV-IDD. We quantitated by a real-time RT-PCR multi-gene system the expression of a pathway-focused panel of genes at 30 and 165 days post infection, characterizing both the early inflammatory and the late neurodegenerative stages of TMEV-IDD. Also, we measured 32 cytokines/chemokines by multiplex Luminex analysis in CSF specimens from early and late TMEV-IDD as well as sham-treated mice. Results indicate that, in the later stage of TMEV-IDD, activation of the innate immune response is most prominent: TLRs, type I IFN response genes, and innate immunity-associated cytokines were highly expressed in late TMEV-IDD compared to sham (p ≤ 0.0001) and early TMEV-IDD (p disease to different extents. CSF provides an optimal source of biomarkers of CNS neuroinflammation.

  3. Virus-induced gene silencing identifies Catharanthus roseus 7-deoxyloganic acid-7-hydroxylase, a step in iridoid and monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Vonny; Yu, Fang; Altarejos, Joaquín; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-12-01

    Iridoids are a major group of biologically active molecules that are present in thousands of plant species, and one versatile iridoid, secologanin, is a precursor for the assembly of thousands of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) as well as a number of quinoline alkaloids. This study uses bioinformatics to screen large databases of annotated transcripts from various MIA-producing plant species to select candidate genes that may be involved in iridoid biosynthesis. Virus-induced gene silencing of the selected genes combined with metabolite analyses of silenced plants was then used to identify the 7-deoxyloganic acid 7-hydroxylase (CrDL7H) that is involved in the 3rd to last step in secologanin biosynthesis. Silencing of CrDL7H reduced secologanin levels by at least 70%, and increased the levels of 7-deoxyloganic acid to over 4 mg g(-1) fresh leaf weight compared to control plants in which this iridoid is not detected. Functional expression of this CrDL7H in yeast confirmed its biochemical activity, and substrate specificity studies showed its preference for 7-deoxyloganic acid over other closely related substrates. Together, these results suggest that hydroxylation precedes carboxy-O-methylation in the secologanin pathway in Catharanthus roseus. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Role of T Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin Domains 1 and 4 in a Herpes Simplex Virus-Induced Behçet’s Disease Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju A. Shim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The T cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM proteins regulate T cell activation and tolerance. TIM-1 plays an important role in the regulation of immune responses and the development of autoimmune diseases. TIM-4 is a natural ligand of TIM-1, and the interaction of TIM-1 and TIM-4 is involved in the regulation of T helper (Th cell responses and modulation of the Th1/Th2 cytokine balance. Behçet’s disease (BD is a chronic, multisystemic inflammatory disorder with arthritic, intestinal, mucocutaneous, ocular, vascular, and central nervous system involvement. Tim-1 expression was lower in a herpes simplex virus-induced BD mouse model compared to that in asymptomatic BD normal (BDN mice. Tim-4 expression was higher in BD mice than that in BDN mice. In this study, we investigated the Tim expression in a BD mouse model with BD-like symptoms. Tim-1 and Tim-4 expression was regulated by an expression vector or siRNA injected into the BD mouse model. The Tim-1 vector injected into BD mice resulted in changes in BD-like symptoms and decreased the severity score. Treatment with Tim-4 siRNA also improved BD-like symptoms and decreased the severity score accompanied by upregulation of regulatory T cells. We showed that regulating Tim-1 or Tim-4 affected BD-like symptoms in mice.

  5. Optimization of automated segmentation of monkeypox virus-induced lung lesions from normal lung CT images using hard C-means algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Thomasson, David; Avila, Nilo A.; Hufton, Jennifer; Senseney, Justin; Johnson, Reed F.; Dyall, Julie

    2013-03-01

    Monkeypox virus is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that results in up to 10% mortality in humans. Knowledge of clinical manifestations and temporal progression of monkeypox disease is limited to data collected from rare outbreaks in remote regions of Central and West Africa. Clinical observations show that monkeypox infection resembles variola infection. Given the limited capability to study monkeypox disease in humans, characterization of the disease in animal models is required. A previous work focused on the identification of inflammatory patterns using PET/CT image modality in two non-human primates previously inoculated with the virus. In this work we extended techniques used in computer-aided detection of lung tumors to identify inflammatory lesions from monkeypox virus infection and their progression using CT images. Accurate estimation of partial volumes of lung lesions via segmentation is difficult because of poor discrimination between blood vessels, diseased regions, and outer structures. We used hard C-means algorithm in conjunction with landmark based registration to estimate the extent of monkeypox virus induced disease before inoculation and after disease progression. Automated estimation is in close agreement with manual segmentation.

  6. Development of tobacco ringspot virus-based vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing in a variety of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fumei; Lim, Seungmo; Igori, Davaajargal; Yoo, Ran Hee; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-05-01

    We report here the development of tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV)-based vectors for the transient expression of foreign genes and for the analysis of endogenous gene function in plants using virus-induced gene silencing. The jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was inserted between the TRSV movement protein (MP) and coat protein (CP) regions, resulting in high in-frame expression of the RNA2-encoded viral polyprotein. GFP was released from the polyprotein via an N-terminal homologous MP-CP cleavage site and a C-terminal foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2 A catalytic peptide in Nicotiana benthamiana. The VIGS target gene was introduced in the sense and antisense orientations into a SnaBI site, which was created by mutating the sequence following the CP stop codon. VIGS of phytoene desaturase (PDS) in N. benthamiana, Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0, cucurbits and legumes led to obvious photo-bleaching phenotypes. A significant reduction in PDS mRNA levels in silenced plants was confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Allicin Alleviates Reticuloendotheliosis Virus-Induced ImmunosuppressionviaERK/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in Specific Pathogen-Free Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyuan; Jiao, Hongchao; Zhao, Jingpeng; Wang, Xiaojuan; Sun, Shuhong; Lin, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), a gammaretrovirus in the Retroviridae family, causes an immunosuppressive, oncogenic, and runting-stunting syndrome in multiple avian hosts. Allicin, the main effective component of garlic, has a broad spectrum of pharmacological properties. The hypothesis that allicin could relieve REV-induced immune dysfunction was investigated in vivo and in vitro in the present study. The results showed that dietary allicin supplementation ameliorated REV-induced dysplasia and immune dysfunction in REV-infected chickens. Compared with the control groups, REV infection promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon (IFN)- γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α ) , whereas, allicin reversed these changes induced by REV infection. The decreased levels of IFN- α, IFN- β, and IL-2 were observed in REV-infected chickens, which were significantly improved by allicin. Allicin suppressed the REV-induced high expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) as well as melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the nuclear factor kappa B p65. REV stimulated the phosphorylation of JNK, ERK, and p38, the downstream key signaling molecules of MAPK pathway, while allicin retarded the augmented phosphorylation level induced by REV infection. The decreased phosphorylation level of ERK was associated with REV replication, suggesting that ERK signaling is involved in REV replication, and allicin can alleviate the REV-induced immune dysfunction by inhibiting the activation of ERK. In addition, REV infection induced oxidative damage in thymus and spleen, whereas allicin treatment significantly decreased the oxidative stress induced by REV infection, suggesting that the antioxidant effect of allicin should be at least partially responsible for the harmful effect of REV infection. In conclusion, the findings suggest that allicin alleviates

  8. West nile virus-induced activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 supports viral growth and viral protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shives, Katherine D; Beatman, Erica L; Chamanian, Mastooreh; O'Brien, Caitlin; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Beckham, J David

    2014-08-01

    Since its introduction in New York City, NY, in 1999, West Nile virus (WNV) has spread to all 48 contiguous states of the United States and is now the leading cause of epidemic encephalitis in North America. As a member of the family Flaviviridae, WNV is part of a group of clinically important human pathogens, including dengue virus and Japanese encephalitis virus. The members of this family of positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses have limited coding capacity and are therefore obligated to co-opt a significant amount of cellular factors to translate their genomes effectively. Our previous work has shown that WNV growth was independent of macroautophagy activation, but the role of the evolutionarily conserved mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway during WNV infection was not well understood. mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that acts as a central cellular censor of nutrient status and exercises control of vital anabolic and catabolic cellular responses such as protein synthesis and autophagy, respectively. We now show that WNV activates mTOR and cognate downstream activators of cap-dependent protein synthesis at early time points postinfection and that pharmacologic inhibition of mTOR (KU0063794) significantly reduced WNV growth. We used an inducible Raptor and Rictor knockout mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) system to further define the role of mTOR complexes 1 and 2 in WNV growth and viral protein synthesis. Following inducible genetic knockout of the major mTOR cofactors raptor (TOR complex 1 [TORC1]) and rictor (TORC2), we now show that TORC1 supports flavivirus protein synthesis via cap-dependent protein synthesis pathways and supports subsequent WNV growth. Since its introduction in New York City, NY, in 1999, West Nile virus (WNV) has spread to all 48 contiguous states in the United States and is now the leading cause of epidemic encephalitis in North America. Currently, the mechanism by which flaviviruses such as WNV translate their genomes in

  9. Biased agonism and allosteric modulation of G protein-coupled receptor 183 - a 7TM receptor also known as Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugvilaite, Viktorija; Madsen, Christian Medom; Lückmann, Michael; Echeverria, Clara Castello; Sailer, Andreas Walter; Frimurer, Thomas Michael; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie; Benned-Jensen, Tau

    2017-07-01

    The GPCR Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2, also known as GPR183) is activated by oxysterols and plays a pivotal role in the regulation of B cell migration during immune responses. While the molecular basis of agonist binding has been addressed in several studies, the concept of biased agonism of the EBI2 receptor has not been explored. We investigated the effects of the EBI2 endogenous agonist 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC) on G protein-dependent and -independent pathways as well as sodium ion allosterism using site-directed mutagenesis and functional studies. Moreover, we generated a homology model of the EBI2 receptor to investigate the structural basis of the allosteric modulation by sodium. Residue N114, located in the middle of transmembrane-III at position III:11/3.35, was found to function as an efficacy switch. Thus, substituting N114 with an alanine (N114A) completely abolished heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gi α activation by 7α,25-OHC even though the specific binding of [3 H]-7α,25-OHC increased. In contrast, the N114A mutant was still able to recruit β-arrestin and even had an enhanced potency (18.7-fold) compared with EBI2 wild type. Sodium had a negative allosteric effect on oxysterol binding that was mediated via N114, verifying the key role of N114. This was further supported by molecular modelling of the ion binding site based on a EBI2 receptor homology model. Collectively, our data point to N114 as a key residue for EBI2 signalling controlling the balance between G protein-dependent and -independent pathways and facilitating sodium binding. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Baculovirus vectors expressing F proteins in combination with virus-induced signaling adaptor (VISA) molecules confer protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Qiao, Lei; Hu, Xiao; Zhao, Kang; Zhang, Yanwen; Chai, Feng; Pan, Zishu

    2016-01-04

    Baculovirus has been exploited for use as a novel vaccine vector. To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of recombinant baculoviruses (rBVs) expressing respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) proteins, four constructs (Bac-tF/64, Bac-CF, Bac-CF/tF64 and Bac-CF/tF64-VISA) were generated. Bac-tF64 displays the F ectodomain (tF) on the envelope of rBVs, whereas Bac-CF expresses full-length F protein in transduced mammalian cells. Bac-CF/tF64 not only displays tF on the envelope but also expresses F in cells. Bac-CF/tF64-VISA comprises Bac-CF/tF64 harboring the virus-induced signaling adaptor (VISA) gene. After administration to BALB/c mice, all four vectors elicited RSV neutralizing antibody (Ab), systemic Ab (IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a), and cytokine responses. Compared with Bac-tF64, mice inoculated with Bac-CF and Bac-CF/tF64 exhibited an increased mixed Th1/Th2 cytokine response, increased ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 antibody responses, and reduced immunopathology upon RSV challenge. Intriguingly, co-expression of VISA reduced Th2 cytokine (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) production induced by Bac-CF/tF64, thus relieving lung pathology upon a subsequent RSV challenge. Our results indicated that the Bac-CF/tF64 vector incorporated with the VISA molecule may provide an effective vaccine strategy for protection against RSV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Virus-induced gene silencing of Withania somnifera squalene synthase negatively regulates sterol and defence-related genes resulting in reduced withanolides and biotic stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anup Kumar; Dwivedi, Varun; Rai, Avanish; Pal, Shaifali; Reddy, Sajjalavarahalli Gangireddy Eswara; Rao, Dodaghatta Krishnarao Venkata; Shasany, Ajit Kumar; Nagegowda, Dinesh A

    2015-12-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal is an important Indian medicinal plant that produces withanolides, which are triterpenoid steroidal lactones having diverse biological activities. To enable fast and efficient functional characterization of genes in this slow-growing and difficult-to-transform plant, a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) was established by silencing phytoene desaturase (PDS) and squalene synthase (SQS). VIGS of the gene encoding SQS, which provides precursors for triterpenoids, resulted in significant reduction of squalene and withanolides, demonstrating its application in studying withanolides biosynthesis in W. somnifera leaves. A comprehensive analysis of gene expression and sterol pathway intermediates in WsSQS-vigs plants revealed transcriptional modulation with positive feedback regulation of mevalonate pathway genes, and negative feed-forward regulation of downstream sterol pathway genes including DWF1 (delta-24-sterol reductase) and CYP710A1 (C-22-sterol desaturase), resulting in significant reduction of sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol. However, there was little effect of SQS silencing on cholesterol, indicating the contribution of sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol, but not of cholesterol, towards withanolides formation. Branch-point oxidosqualene synthases in WsSQS-vigs plants exhibited differential regulation with reduced CAS (cycloartenol synthase) and cycloartenol, and induced BAS (β-amyrin synthase) and β-amyrin. Moreover, SQS silencing also led to the down-regulation of brassinosteroid-6-oxidase-2 (BR6OX2), pathogenesis-related (PR) and nonexpressor of PR (NPR) genes, resulting in reduced tolerance to bacterial and fungal infection as well as to insect feeding. Taken together, SQS silencing negatively regulated sterol and defence-related genes leading to reduced phytosterols, withanolides and biotic stress tolerance, thus implicating the application of VIGS for functional analysis of genes related to withanolides

  12. Proteomic and Virus-induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) Analyses Reveal That Gossypol, Brassinosteroids, and Jasmonic acid Contribute to the Resistance of Cotton to Verticillium dahliae *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Long, Lu; Zhu, Long-Fu; Xu, Li; Gao, Wen-Hui; Sun, Long-Qing; Liu, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Xian-Long

    2013-01-01

    Verticillium wilt causes massive annual losses of cotton yield, but the mechanism of cotton resistance to Verticillium dahliae is complex and poorly understood. In this study, a comparative proteomic analysis was performed in resistant cotton (Gossypium barbadense cv7124) on infection with V. dahliae. A total of 188 differentially expressed proteins were identified by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) analysis and could be classified into 17 biological processes based on Gene Ontology annotation. Most of these proteins were implicated in stimulus response, cellular processes and metabolic processes. Based on the proteomic analysis, several genes involved in secondary metabolism, reactive oxygen burst and phytohormone signaling pathways were identified for further physiological and molecular analysis. The roles of the corresponding genes were further characterized by employing virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Based on the results, we suggest that the production of gossypol is sufficient to affect the cotton resistance to V. dahliae. Silencing of GbCAD1, a key enzyme involving in gossypol biosynthesis, compromised cotton resistance to V. dahliae. Reactive oxygen species and salicylic acid signaling may be also implicated as regulators in cotton responsive to V. dahliae according to the analysis of GbSSI2, an important regulator in the crosstalk between salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signal pathways. Moreover, brassinosteroids and jasmonic acid signaling may play essential roles in the cotton disease resistance to V. dahliae. The brassinosteroids signaling was activated in cotton on inoculation with V. dahliae and the disease resistance of cotton was enhanced after exogenous application of brassinolide. Meanwhile, jasmonic acid signaling was also activated in cotton after inoculation with V. dahliae and brassinolide application. These data provide highlights in the molecular basis of cotton resistance to V. dahliae. PMID:24019146

  13. Proteomic and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) Analyses reveal that gossypol, brassinosteroids, and jasmonic acid contribute to the resistance of cotton to Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Long, Lu; Zhu, Long-Fu; Xu, Li; Gao, Wen-Hui; Sun, Long-Qing; Liu, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Xian-Long

    2013-12-01

    Verticillium wilt causes massive annual losses of cotton yield, but the mechanism of cotton resistance to Verticillium dahliae is complex and poorly understood. In this study, a comparative proteomic analysis was performed in resistant cotton (Gossypium barbadense cv7124) on infection with V. dahliae. A total of 188 differentially expressed proteins were identified by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) analysis and could be classified into 17 biological processes based on Gene Ontology annotation. Most of these proteins were implicated in stimulus response, cellular processes and metabolic processes. Based on the proteomic analysis, several genes involved in secondary metabolism, reactive oxygen burst and phytohormone signaling pathways were identified for further physiological and molecular analysis. The roles of the corresponding genes were further characterized by employing virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Based on the results, we suggest that the production of gossypol is sufficient to affect the cotton resistance to V. dahliae. Silencing of GbCAD1, a key enzyme involving in gossypol biosynthesis, compromised cotton resistance to V. dahliae. Reactive oxygen species and salicylic acid signaling may be also implicated as regulators in cotton responsive to V. dahliae according to the analysis of GbSSI2, an important regulator in the crosstalk between salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signal pathways. Moreover, brassinosteroids and jasmonic acid signaling may play essential roles in the cotton disease resistance to V. dahliae. The brassinosteroids signaling was activated in cotton on inoculation with V. dahliae and the disease resistance of cotton was enhanced after exogenous application of brassinolide. Meanwhile, jasmonic acid signaling was also activated in cotton after inoculation with V. dahliae and brassinolide application. These data provide highlights in the molecular basis of cotton resistance to V. dahliae.

  14. Central nervous system Toll-like receptor expression in response to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination disease in resistant and susceptible mouse strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turrin Nicolas P

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In immunopathological diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS, genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the initiation and progression of the disease are often discussed. The Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination disease (TMEV-IDD model used to study MS reflects this: genetically susceptible mice infected intra-cerebrally with TMEV develop a chronic demyelination disease. TMEV-IDD can be induced in resistant mouse strains by inducing innate immunity with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Interestingly, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is the cognate receptor for LPS and its activation can induces up-regulation of other TLRs, such as TLR7 (the receptor for TMEV and 9, known to be involved in autoimmunity. Up-regulation of TLRs could be involved in precipitating an autoimmune susceptible state. Consequently, we looked at TLR expression in the susceptible (SJL/J and resistant (C57BL/6 strains of mice infected with TMEV. The resistant mice were induced to develop TMEV-IDD by two LPS injections following TMEV infection. Results Both strains were found to up-regulate multiple TLRs (TLR2, 7 and 9 following the TMEV infection. Expression of these TLRs and of viral mRNA was significantly greater in infected SJL/J mice. The susceptible SJL/J mice showed up-regulation of TLR3, 6 and 8, which was not seen in C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion Expression of TLRs by susceptible mice and the up-regulation of the TLRs in resistant mice could participate in priming the mice toward an autoimmune state and develop TMEV-IDD. This could have implications on therapies that target TLRs to prevent the emergence of conditions such as MS in patients at risk for the disease.

  15. Corrosion inhibition..

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 3% de-aerated NaCl acidic solution with amine—fatty acid corrosion inhibitor, KI384, .... reduction reaction causing no decrease in the limiting current density of that process. On the .... value when compared to the base solution. This provides a support to the physical ...

  16. 4-Methoxycinnamaldehyde inhibited human respiratory syncytial virus in a human larynx carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuo Chih; Chang, Jung San; Chiang, Lien Chai; Lin, Chun Ching

    2009-09-01

    4-Methoxycinnamaldehyde, an active constituent of Agastache rugosa, was examined for its cytoprotective activity against RSV by XTT method in human larynx carcinoma cell line. 4-Methoxycinnamaldehyde could effectively inhibit cytopathic effect of RSV (p<0.0001) with an estimated IC(50) of 0.055microg/ml and a selectivity index (SI) of 898.2. 4-Methoxycinnamaldehyde (0.03microg/ml) could inhibit viral entrance by interfering viral attachment (IC(50) of 0.06microg/ml; p<0.0001) and internalization (IC(50) of 0.01microg/ml; p<0.0001). 4-Methoxycinnamaldehyde significantly increased the basal production of IFN (p=0.0015), but not the virus-induced IFN production. Therefore, its cytoprotective activity against RSV was not mediated by interferon. In conclusion, 4-methoxycinnamaldehyde might be helpful to manage the disease induced by RSV infection.

  17. TIP60 represses telomerase expression by inhibiting Sp1 binding to the TERT promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Rajagopalan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV1-TAT interactive protein (TIP60 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor. However, the potential mechanisms endowing its tumor suppressor ability remain incompletely understood. It plays a vital role in virus-induced cancers where TIP60 down-regulates the expression of human papillomavirus (HPV oncoprotein E6 which in turn destabilizes TIP60. This intrigued us to identify the role of TIP60, in the context of a viral infection, where it is targeted by oncoproteins. Through an array of molecular biology techniques such as Chromatin immunoprecipitation, expression analysis and mass spectrometry, we establish the hitherto unknown role of TIP60 in repressing the expression of the catalytic subunit of the human telomerase complex, TERT, a key driver for immortalization. TIP60 acetylates Sp1 at K639, thus inhibiting Sp1 binding to the TERT promoter. We identified that TIP60-mediated growth suppression of HPV-induced cervical cancer is mediated in part due to TERT repression through Sp1 acetylation. In summary, our study has identified a novel substrate for TIP60 catalytic activity and a unique repressive mechanism acting at the TERT promoter in virus-induced malignancies.

  18. Myxoma Virus Induces Type I Interferon Production in Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells via a TLR9/MyD88-, IRF5/IRF7-, and IFNAR-Dependent Pathway▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peihong; Cao, Hua; Merghoub, Taha; Avogadri, Francesca; Wang, Weiyi; Parikh, Tanvi; Fang, Chee-Mun; Pitha, Paula M.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; McFadden, Grant; Hu, Xiaoyu; Houghton, Alan N.; Shuman, Stewart; Deng, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Poxviruses are large DNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Myxoma virus is a rabbit poxvirus that belongs to the Leporipoxvirus genus. It causes a lethal disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits but cannot sustain any detectable infection in nonlagomorphs. Vaccinia virus is a prototypal orthopoxvirus that was used as a vaccine to eradicate smallpox. Myxoma virus is nonpathogenic in mice, whereas systemic infection with vaccinia virus can be lethal even in immunocompetent mice. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are potent type I interferon (IFN)-producing cells that play important roles in antiviral innate immunity. How poxviruses are sensed by pDCs to induce type I IFN production is not well understood. Here we report that infection of primary murine pDCs with myxoma virus, but not with vaccinia virus, induces IFN-α, IFN-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70) production. Using pDCs derived from genetic knockout mice, we show that the myxoma virus-induced innate immune response requires the endosomal DNA sensor TLR9 and its adaptor MyD88, transcription factors IRF5 and IRF7, and the type I IFN positive-feedback loop mediated by IFNAR1. It is independent of the cytoplasmic RNA sensing pathway mediated by the mitochondrial adaptor molecule MAVS, the TLR3 adaptor TRIF, or the transcription factor IRF3. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we demonstrate that myxoma virus-induced type I IFN and IL-12p70 production in murine pDCs is also dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. Furthermore, our results reveal that the N-terminal Z-DNA/RNA binding domain of vaccinia virulence factor E3, which is missing in the orthologous M029 protein expressed by myxoma virus, plays an inhibitory role in poxvirus sensing and innate cytokine production by murine pDCs. PMID:21835795

  19. Myxoma virus induces type I interferon production in murine plasmacytoid dendritic cells via a TLR9/MyD88-, IRF5/IRF7-, and IFNAR-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peihong; Cao, Hua; Merghoub, Taha; Avogadri, Francesca; Wang, Weiyi; Parikh, Tanvi; Fang, Chee-Mun; Pitha, Paula M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Hu, Xiaoyu; Houghton, Alan N; Shuman, Stewart; Deng, Liang

    2011-10-01

    Poxviruses are large DNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Myxoma virus is a rabbit poxvirus that belongs to the Leporipoxvirus genus. It causes a lethal disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits but cannot sustain any detectable infection in nonlagomorphs. Vaccinia virus is a prototypal orthopoxvirus that was used as a vaccine to eradicate smallpox. Myxoma virus is nonpathogenic in mice, whereas systemic infection with vaccinia virus can be lethal even in immunocompetent mice. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are potent type I interferon (IFN)-producing cells that play important roles in antiviral innate immunity. How poxviruses are sensed by pDCs to induce type I IFN production is not well understood. Here we report that infection of primary murine pDCs with myxoma virus, but not with vaccinia virus, induces IFN-α, IFN-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70) production. Using pDCs derived from genetic knockout mice, we show that the myxoma virus-induced innate immune response requires the endosomal DNA sensor TLR9 and its adaptor MyD88, transcription factors IRF5 and IRF7, and the type I IFN positive-feedback loop mediated by IFNAR1. It is independent of the cytoplasmic RNA sensing pathway mediated by the mitochondrial adaptor molecule MAVS, the TLR3 adaptor TRIF, or the transcription factor IRF3. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we demonstrate that myxoma virus-induced type I IFN and IL-12p70 production in murine pDCs is also dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. Furthermore, our results reveal that the N-terminal Z-DNA/RNA binding domain of vaccinia virulence factor E3, which is missing in the orthologous M029 protein expressed by myxoma virus, plays an inhibitory role in poxvirus sensing and innate cytokine production by murine pDCs.

  20. Replication and virus-induced transcriptome of HAdV-5 in normal host cells versus cancer cells--differences of relevance for adenoviral oncolysis.

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    Dominik E Dorer

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (Ads, especially HAdV-5, have been genetically equipped with tumor-restricted replication potential to enable applications in oncolytic cancer therapy. Such oncolytic adenoviruses have been well tolerated in cancer patients, but their anti-tumor efficacy needs to be enhanced. In this regard, it should be considered that cancer cells, dependent on their tissue of origin, can differ substantially from the normal host cells to which Ads are adapted by complex virus-host interactions. Consequently, viral replication efficiency, a key determinant of oncolytic activity, might be suboptimal in cancer cells. Therefore, we have analyzed both the replication kinetics of HAdV-5 and the virus-induced transcriptome in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC in comparison to cancer cells. This is the first report on genome-wide expression profiling of Ads in their native host cells. We found that E1A expression and onset of viral genome replication are most rapid in HBEC and considerably delayed in melanoma cells. In squamous cell lung carcinoma cells, we observed intermediate HAdV-5 replication kinetics. Infectious particle production, viral spread and lytic activity of HAdV-5 were attenuated in melanoma cells versus HBEC. Expression profiling at the onset of viral genome replication revealed that HAdV-5 induced the strongest changes in the cellular transcriptome in HBEC, followed by lung cancer and melanoma cells. We identified prominent regulation of genes involved in cell cycle and DNA metabolism, replication and packaging in HBEC, which is in accord with the necessity to induce S phase for viral replication. Strikingly, in melanoma cells HAdV-5 triggered opposing regulation of said genes and, in contrast to lung cancer cells, no weak S phase induction was detected when using the E2F promoter as reporter. Our results provide a rationale for improving oncolytic adenoviruses either by adaptation of viral infection to target tumor cells or by

  1. Immune- and Nonimmune-Compartment-Specific Interferon Responses Are Critical Determinants of Herpes Simplex Virus-Induced Generalized Infections and Acute Liver Failure.

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    Parker, Zachary M; Pasieka, Tracy Jo; Parker, George A; Leib, David A

    2016-12-01

    blindness-inducing herpetic stromal keratitis, highly debilitating and lethal herpes simplex encephalitis, and generalized infections that can lead to herpes simplex virus-induced acute liver failure. While immune compromise is a known factor, the precise mechanisms that lead to generalized HSV infections are unknown. In this study, we used and developed a mouse model system in combination with real-time bioluminescence imaging to demonstrate the relative importance of the immune and nonimmune compartments for containing viral spread and promoting host survival after corneal infection. Our results shed light on the pathogenesis of HSV infections that lead to generalized infection and acute liver failure. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Virus-induced gene-silencing in wheat spikes and grains and its application in functional analysis of HMW-GS-encoding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Meng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV-based vector has been developed and used for gene silencing in barley and wheat seedlings to assess gene functions in pathogen- or insect-resistance, but conditions for gene silencing in spikes and grains have not been evaluated. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using BSMV for gene silencing in wheat spikes or grains. Results Apparent photobleaching on the spikes infected with BSMV:PDS at heading stage was observed after13 days post inoculation (dpi, and persisted until 30dpi, while the spikes inoculated with BSMV:00 remained green during the same period. Grains of BSMV:PDS infected spikes also exhibited photobleaching. Molecular analysis indicated that photobleached spikes or grains resulted from the reduction of endogenous PDS transcript abundances, suggesting that BSMV:PDS was able to induce PDS silencing in wheat spikes and grains. Inoculation onto wheat spikes from heading to flowering stage was optimal for efficient silencing of PDS in wheat spikes. Furthermore, we used the BSMV-based system to reduce the transcript level of 1Bx14, a gene encoding for High-molecular-weight glutenin subunit 1Bx14 (HMW-GS 1Bx14, by 97 % in the grains of the BSMV:1Bx14 infected spikes at 15dpi, compared with that in BSMV:00 infected spikes, and the reduction persisted until at least 25 dpi. The amount of the HMW-GS 1Bx14 was also detectably decreased. The percentage of glutenin macropolymeric proteins in total proteins was significantly reduced in the grains of 1Bx14-silenced plants as compared with that in the grains of BSMV:00 infected control plants, indicating that HMW-GS 1Bx14 is one of major components participating in the formation of glutenin macropolymers in wheat grains. Conclusion This is one of the first reports of successful application of BSMV-based virus-induced-gene-silencing (VIGS for gene knockdown in wheat spikes and grains and its application in functional analysis of

  3. M011L-deficient oncolytic myxoma virus induces apoptosis in brain tumor-initiating cells and enhances survival in a novel immunocompetent mouse model of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisklakova, Alexandra; McKenzie, Brienne; Zemp, Franz; Lun, Xueqing; Kenchappa, Rajappa S; Etame, Arnold B; Rahman, Masmudur M; Reilly, Karlyne; Pilon-Thomas, Shari; McFadden, Grant; Kurz, Ebba; Forsyth, Peter A

    2016-03-08

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a promising oncolytic agent and is highly effective against immortalized glioma cells but less effective against brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), which are believed to mediate glioma development/recurrence. MYXV encodes various proteins to attenuate host cell apoptosis, including an antiapoptotic Bcl-2 homologue known as M011L. Such proteins may limit the ability of MYXV to kill BTICs, which have heightened resistance to apoptosis. We hypothesized that infecting BTICs with an M011L-deficient MYXV construct would overcome BTIC resistance to MYXV. We used patient-derived BTICs to evaluate the efficacy of M011L knockout virus (vMyx-M011L-KO) versus wild-type MYXV (vMyx-WT) and characterized the mechanism of virus-induced cell death in vitro. To extend our findings in a novel immunocompetent animal model, we derived, cultured, and characterized a C57Bl/6J murine BTIC (mBTIC0309) from a spontaneous murine glioma and evaluated vMyx-M011L-KO efficacy with and without temozolomide (TMZ) in mBTIC0309-bearing mice. We demonstrated that vMyx-M011L-KO induces apoptosis in BTICs, dramatically increasing sensitivity to the virus. vMyx-WT failed to induce apoptosis as M011L protein prevented Bax activation and cytochrome c release. In vivo, intracranial implantation of mBTIC0309 generated tumors that closely recapitulated the pathological and molecular profile of human gliomas. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with vMyx-M011L-KO significantly prolonged survival in immunocompetent-but not immunodeficient-mouse models, an effect that is significantly enhanced in combination with TMZ. Our data suggest that vMyx-M011L-KO is an effective, well-tolerated, proapoptotic oncolytic virus and a strong candidate for clinical translation. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Inhibition of catecholamine degradation ameliorates while chemical sympathectomy aggravates the severity of acute Friend retrovirus infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemker, Dominique; Mollerus, Sina; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dittmer, Ulf; Del Rey, Adriana; Schedlowski, Manfred; Engler, Harald

    2016-05-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) might be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of retroviral infections. However, experimental data are scarce and findings inconsistent. Here, we investigated the role of the SNS during acute infection with Friend virus (FV), a pathogenic murine retrovirus that causes polyclonal proliferation of erythroid precursor cells and splenomegaly in adult mice. Experimental animals were infected with FV complex, and viral load, spleen weight, and splenic noradrenaline (NA) concentration was analyzed until 25 days post infection. Results show that FV infection caused a massive but transient depletion in splenic NA during the acute phase of the disease. At the peak of the virus-induced splenomegaly, splenic NA concentration was reduced by about 90% compared to naïve uninfected mice. Concurrently, expression of the catecholamine degrading enzymes monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) was significantly upregulated in immune cells of the spleen. Pharmacological inhibition of MAO-A and COMT by the selective inhibitors clorgyline and 3,5-dinitrocatechol, respectively, efficiently blocked NA degradation and significantly reduced viral load and virus-induced splenomegaly. In contrast, chemical sympathectomy prior to FV inoculation aggravated the acute infection and extended the duration of the disease. Together these findings demonstrate that catecholamine availability at the site of viral replication is an important factor affecting the course of retroviral infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An alpha-helical domain within the carboxyl terminus of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB) is associated with cell fusion and resistance to heparin inhibition of cell fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, T P; Melancon, J M; Kousoulas, K G

    2001-08-15

    Previous studies from our laboratory indicated that a 28-amino-acid carboxyl-terminal truncation of gB caused extensive virus-induced cell fusion (Baghian et al., 1993, J Virol 67, 2396-2401). We tested the ability of additional truncations and mutations within gB to cause cell fusion in the recently established virus-free cell fusion assay (Turner et al., 1998, J. Virol. 72, 873-875). Deletion of the carboxyl-terminal 28 amino acids of gB (gBDelta28), which removed part of the predicted alpha-helical structure H17b, caused extensive cell fusion. A gB truncation specified by gBDelta36, which removed the entire H17b domain, caused as much cell fusion as the gBDelta28 truncation. Similarly, gB(A874P) containing a substitution of an Ala with Pro within H17b caused cell fusion. Heparin, a gB-specific inhibitor of virus-induced cell fusion, inhibited both wild-type gB and gB(syn3)-mediated cell fusion. In contrast, fusion of cells transfected with gB(Delta28), gB(Delta36), or gB(A874P) was resistant to heparin inhibition of cell fusion. We concluded the following: (1) The predicted alpha-helical structure of H17b within the carboxyl terminus of gB is involved in both virus-induced and virus-free cell fusion. (2) Heparin is a specific inhibitor of gB-mediated fusion in both systems. (3) Resistance to heparin inhibition of gB-mediated cell fusion is associated with the predicted alpha-helical structure H17b within the carboxyl terminus of gB. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  6. Foot-and-mouth disease virus induces lysosomal degradation of host protein kinase PKR by 3C proteinase to facilitate virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuntian; Zhu, Zixiang; Du, Xiaoli; Cao, Weijun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Xiangle; Feng, Huanhuan; Li, Dan; Zhang, Keshan; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2017-09-01

    The interferon-induced double-strand RNA activated protein kinase (PKR) plays important roles in host defense against viral infection. Here we demonstrate the significant antiviral role of PKR against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and report that FMDV infection inhibits PKR expression and activation in porcine kidney (PK-15) cells. The viral nonstructural protein 3C proteinase (3Cpro) is identified to be responsible for this inhibition. However, it is independent of the well-known proteinase activity of 3Cpro or 3Cpro-induced shutoff of host protein synthesis. We show that 3Cpro induces PKR degradation by lysosomal pathway and no interaction is determined between 3Cpro and PKR. Together, our results indicate that PKR acts an important antiviral factor during FMDV infection, and FMDV has evolved a strategy to overcome PKR-mediated antiviral role by downregulation of PKR protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Ustilago maydis effector Pep1 suppresses plant immunity by inhibition of host peroxidase activity.

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    Christoph Hemetsberger

    Full Text Available The corn smut Ustilago maydis establishes a biotrophic interaction with its host plant maize. This interaction requires efficient suppression of plant immune responses, which is attributed to secreted effector proteins. Previously we identified Pep1 (Protein essential during penetration-1 as a secreted effector with an essential role for U. maydis virulence. pep1 deletion mutants induce strong defense responses leading to an early block in pathogenic development of the fungus. Using cytological and functional assays we show that Pep1 functions as an inhibitor of plant peroxidases. At sites of Δpep1 mutant penetrations, H₂O₂ strongly accumulated in the cell walls, coinciding with a transcriptional induction of the secreted maize peroxidase POX12. Pep1 protein effectively inhibited the peroxidase driven oxidative burst and thereby suppresses the early immune responses of maize. Moreover, Pep1 directly inhibits peroxidases in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Using fluorescence complementation assays, we observed a direct interaction of Pep1 and the maize peroxidase POX12 in vivo. Functional relevance of this interaction was demonstrated by partial complementation of the Δpep1 mutant defect by virus induced gene silencing of maize POX12. We conclude that Pep1 acts as a potent suppressor of early plant defenses by inhibition of peroxidase activity. Thus, it represents a novel strategy for establishing a biotrophic interaction.

  8. TNF-α and Macrophages Are Critical for Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced Exacerbations in a Mouse Model of Allergic Airways Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Hiep; Maltby, Steven; Simpson, Jodie L; Eyers, Fiona; Baines, Katherine J; Gibson, Peter G; Foster, Paul S; Yang, Ming

    2016-05-01

    Viral respiratory infections trigger severe exacerbations of asthma, worsen disease symptoms, and impair lung function. To investigate the mechanisms underlying viral exacerbation, we established a mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced exacerbation after allergen sensitization and challenge. RSV infection of OVA-sensitized/challenged BALB/c mice resulted in significantly increased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and macrophage and neutrophil lung infiltration. Exacerbation was accompanied by increased levels of inflammatory cytokines (including TNF-α, MCP-1, and keratinocyte-derived protein chemokine [KC]) compared with uninfected OVA-treated mice or OVA-treated mice exposed to UV-inactivated RSV. Dexamethasone treatment completely inhibited all features of allergic disease, including AHR and eosinophil infiltration, in uninfected OVA-sensitized/challenged mice. Conversely, dexamethasone treatment following RSV-induced exacerbation only partially suppressed AHR and failed to dampen macrophage and neutrophil infiltration or inflammatory cytokine production (TNF-α, MCP-1, and KC). This mimics clinical observations in patients with exacerbations, which is associated with increased neutrophils and often poorly responds to corticosteroid therapy. Interestingly, we also observed increased TNF-α levels in sputum samples from patients with neutrophilic asthma. Although RSV-induced exacerbation was resistant to steroid treatment, inhibition of TNF-α and MCP-1 function or depletion of macrophages suppressed features of disease, including AHR and macrophage and neutrophil infiltration. Our findings highlight critical roles for macrophages and inflammatory cytokines (including TNF-α and MCP-1) in viral-induced exacerbation of asthma and suggest examination of these pathways as novel therapeutic approaches for disease management. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  10. Interferon Beta and Interferon Alpha 2a Differentially Protect Head and Neck Cancer Cells from Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Induced Oncolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Marlena M; Liu, Jingfang; Rajani, Karishma; D'Agostino, Ralph; Lyles, Douglas S; Porosnicu, Mercedes

    2015-08-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) preferentially kill cancer cells due in part to defects in their antiviral responses upon exposure to type I interferons (IFNs). However, IFN responsiveness of some tumor cells confers resistance to OV treatment. The human type I IFNs include one IFN-β and multiple IFN-α subtypes that share the same receptor but are capable of differentially inducing biological responses. The role of individual IFN subtypes in promoting tumor cell resistance to OV is addressed here. Two human IFNs which have been produced for clinical use, IFN-α2a and IFN-β, were compared for activity in protecting human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) lines from oncolysis by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Susceptibility of HNSCC lines to killing by VSV varied. VSV infection induced increased production of IFN-β in resistant HNSCC cells. When added exogenously, IFN-β was significantly more effective at protecting HNSCC cells from VSV oncolysis than was IFN-α2a. In contrast, normal keratinocytes and endothelial cells were protected equivalently by both IFN subtypes. Differential responsiveness of tumor cells to IFN-α and -β was further supported by the finding that autocrine IFN-β but not IFN-α promoted survival of HNSCC cells during persistent VSV infection. Therefore, IFN-α and -β differentially affect VSV oncolysis, justifying the evaluation and comparison of IFN subtypes for use in combination with VSV therapy. Pairing VSV with IFN-α2a may enhance selectivity of oncolytic VSV therapy for HNSCC by inhibiting VSV replication in normal cells without a corresponding inhibition in cancer cells. There has been a great deal of progress in the development of oncolytic viruses. However, a major problem is that individual cancers vary in their sensitivity to oncolytic viruses. In many cases this is due to differences in their production and response to interferons (IFNs). The experiments described here compared the responses of head and neck squamous

  11. Hepatitis B virus induces G1 phase arrest by regulating cell cycle genes in HepG2.2.15 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effect of HBV on the proliferative ability of host cells and explore the potential mechanism. Methods MTT, colony formation assay and tumourigenicity in nude mice were performed to investigate the effect of HBV on the proliferative capability of host cells. In order to explore the potential mechanism, cell cycle and apoptosis were analysed. The cell cycle genes controlling the G1/S phase transition were detected by immunohistochemistry, westernblot and RT-PCR. Results HepG2.2.15 cells showed decreased proliferation ability compared to HepG2 cells. G1 phase arrest was the main cause but was not associated with apoptosis. p53, p21 and total retinoblastoma (Rb were determined to be up-regulated, whereas cyclinE was down-regulated at both the protein and mRNA levels in HepG2.2.15 cells. The phosphorylated Rb in HepG2.2.15 cells was decreased. Conclusions Our results suggested that HBV inhibited the capability of proliferation of HepG2.2.15 cells by regulating cell cycle genes expression and inducing G1 arrest.

  12. Interleukin-18, Interferon-γ, IP-10, and Mig Expression in Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Infectious Mononucleosis and Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setsuda, Joyce; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Harris, Nancy L.; Ferry, Judith A.; Sorbara, Lynn; Gupta, Ghanshyam; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Tosato, Giovanna

    1999-01-01

    T cell immunodeficiency plays an important role in the pathogenesis of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) by permitting the unbridled expansion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B lymphocytes. However, factors other than T cell function may contribute to PTLD pathogenesis because PTLD infrequently develops even in the context of severe T cell immunodeficiency, and athymic mice that are T-cell-immunodeficient can reject EBV-immortalized cells. Here we report that PTLD tissues express significantly lower levels of IL-18, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), Mig, and RANTES compared to lymphoid tissues diagnosed with acute EBV-induced infectious mononucleosis, as assessed by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis. Other cytokines and chemokines are expressed at similar levels. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that PTLD tissues contain less IL-18 and Mig protein than tissues with infectious mononucleosis. IL-18, primarily a monocyte product, promotes the secretion of IFN-γ, which stimulates Mig and RANTES expression. Both IL-18 and Mig display antitumor activity in mice involving inhibition of angiogenesis. These results document greater expression of IL-18, IFN-γ, Mig, and RANTES in lymphoid tissues with acute EBV-induced infectious mononucleosis compared to tissues with PTLD and raise the possibility that these mediators participate in critical host responses to EBV infection. PMID:10393857

  13. Activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase is required for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus-induced apoptosis but not for virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shutao; Huo, Yazhen; Dong, Yinhui; Fan, Lihong; Yang, Hanchun; Wang, Leyuan; Ning, Yibao; Hu, Hongbo

    2012-06-01

    Apoptosis of host cells plays a critical role in pathogenesis of virus infection. MAPK kinases especially stress-activated protein kinases c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) and p38 are often involved in virus-mediated apoptosis. It has been shown that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection resulted in apoptosis of the host cells both in vitro and in vivo. The current investigation was initiated to determine whether stress-activated protein kinases JNK and p38 play a role in apoptosis induction by PRRSV infection. We examined phosphorylation of JNK and p38, and found that JNK but not p38 was activated in response to PRRSV infection. We then examined effects of this kinase on apoptosis induction and virus replication by using specific inhibitor. We found that JNK inhibition by its inhibitor SP600125 led to the abolishment of PRRSV-mediated apoptosis, but did not suppress virus replication. Further studies demonstrated that ROS generation was involved in JNK activation, and Bcl-2 family anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-xl were downstream targets of JNK to mediate apoptosis. We conclude that activation of JNK signaling pathway is essential for PRRSV-mediated apoptosis but not for virus replication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Stress-activated protein kinases are involved in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection and modulate virus-induced cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Lee, Changhee

    2012-06-05

    The present study examined the role of the p38 MAPK and JNK pathways during PRRSV infection in immortalized porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM) cells. Infection with PRRSV was found to progressively activate p38 and JNK1/2 up to 36 h postinfection and then their phosphorylation levels dramatically decreased to baseline at 48 h postinfection. In contrast, UV-inactivated PRRSV failed to trigger phosphorylation of these SAPKs, indicating that the post-entry process is responsible for their activation. Independent treatment of cells with a selective p38 or JNK inhibitor markedly impaired PRRSV infection, resulting in significant reduction in synthesis of viral genomic and subgenomic RNAs, viral protein expression, and progeny virus production. Notably, cytokine production in PAM cells infected with PRRSV was shown to be altered by inhibiting these SAPKs. Altogether, our data suggest that the p38 and JNK signaling pathways play pivotal roles in PRRSV replication and may regulate immune responses during virus infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Down-regulation of osmotin (PR5) gene by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) leads to susceptibility of resistant Piper colubrinum Link. to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici Leonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, K; Jessymol, K K; Chidambareswaren, M; Gayathri, G S; Manjula, S

    2015-06-01

    Piper colubrinum Link., a distant relative of Piper nigrum L., is immune to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici Leonian that causes 'quick wilt' in cultivated black pepper (P. nigrum). The osmotin, PR5 gene homologue, earlier identified from P. colubrinum, showed significant overexpression in response to pathogen and defense signalling molecules. The present study focuses on the functional validation of P. colubrinum osmotin (PcOSM) by virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) using Tobacco Rattle Virus (TRV)-based vector. P. colubrinum plants maintained under controlled growth conditions in a growth chamber were infiltrated with Agrobacterium carrying TRV empty vector (control) and TRV vector carrying PcOSM. Three weeks post infiltration, viral movement was confirmed in newly emerged leaves of infiltrated plants by RT-PCR using TRV RNA1 and TRV RNA2 primers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed significant down-regulation of PcOSM gene in TRV-PcOSM infiltrated plant compared with the control plants. The control and silenced plants were challenged with Phytophthora capsici which demonstrated that knock-down of PcOSM in P. colubrinum leads to increased fungal mycelial growth in silenced plants compared to control plants, which was accompanied by decreased accumulation of H2O2 as indicated by 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining. Thus, in this study, we demonstrated that Piper colubrinum osmotin gene is required for resisting P. capsici infection and has possible role in hypersensitive cell death response and oxidative burst signaling during infection.

  16. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Suppress NK Cell IFN-γ Production by Altering Cellular Metabolism via Arginase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Celeste C; Roggerson, Krystal M; Lee, Hai-Chon; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Rosen, Hugo R; Hahn, Young S

    2016-03-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects ∼ 200 million people worldwide. The majority of infected individuals develop persistent infection, resulting in chronic inflammation and liver disease, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The ability of HCV to establish persistent infection is partly due to its ability to evade the immune response through multiple mechanisms, including suppression of NK cells. NK cells control HCV replication during the early phase of infection and regulate the progression to chronic disease. In particular, IFN-γ produced by NK cells limits viral replication in hepatocytes and is important for the initiation of adaptive immune responses. However, NK cell function is significantly impaired in chronic HCV patients. The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for impaired NK cell function in HCV infection are not well defined. In this study, we analyzed the interaction of human NK cells with CD33(+) PBMCs that were exposed to HCV. We found that NK cells cocultured with HCV-conditioned CD33(+) PBMCs produced lower amounts of IFN-γ, with no effect on granzyme B production or cell viability. Importantly, this suppression of NK cell-derived IFN-γ production was mediated by CD33(+)CD11b(lo)HLA-DR(lo) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) via an arginase-1-dependent inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin activation. Suppression of IFN-γ production was reversed by l-arginine supplementation, consistent with increased MDSC arginase-1 activity. These novel results identify the induction of MDSCs in HCV infection as a potent immune evasion strategy that suppresses antiviral NK cell responses, further indicating that blockade of MDSCs may be a potential therapeutic approach to ameliorate chronic viral infections in the liver. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Allicin Alleviates Reticuloendotheliosis Virus-Induced Immunosuppression via ERK/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in Specific Pathogen-Free Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyuan Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV, a gammaretrovirus in the Retroviridae family, causes an immunosuppressive, oncogenic, and runting–stunting syndrome in multiple avian hosts. Allicin, the main effective component of garlic, has a broad spectrum of pharmacological properties. The hypothesis that allicin could relieve REV-induced immune dysfunction was investigated in vivo and in vitro in the present study. The results showed that dietary allicin supplementation ameliorated REV-induced dysplasia and immune dysfunction in REV-infected chickens. Compared with the control groups, REV infection promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon (IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, whereas, allicin reversed these changes induced by REV infection. The decreased levels of IFN-α, IFN-β, and IL-2 were observed in REV-infected chickens, which were significantly improved by allicin. Allicin suppressed the REV-induced high expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs as well as melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5 and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and the nuclear factor kappa B p65. REV stimulated the phosphorylation of JNK, ERK, and p38, the downstream key signaling molecules of MAPK pathway, while allicin retarded the augmented phosphorylation level induced by REV infection. The decreased phosphorylation level of ERK was associated with REV replication, suggesting that ERK signaling is involved in REV replication, and allicin can alleviate the REV-induced immune dysfunction by inhibiting the activation of ERK. In addition, REV infection induced oxidative damage in thymus and spleen, whereas allicin treatment significantly decreased the oxidative stress induced by REV infection, suggesting that the antioxidant effect of allicin should be at least partially responsible for the harmful effect of REV infection. In conclusion, the findings suggest that allicin

  18. Reduced frequencies and heightened CD103 expression among virus-induced CD8(+) T cells in the respiratory tract airways of vitamin A-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudraraju, Rajeev; Surman, Sherri L; Jones, Bart G; Sealy, Robert; Woodland, David L; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2012-05-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) has profound effects on immune responses in the gut, but its effect on other mucosal responses is less well understood. Sendai virus (SeV) is a candidate human parainfluenza virus type 1 (hPIV-1) vaccine and a candidate vaccine vector for other respiratory viruses. A single intranasal dose of SeV elicits a protective immune response against hPIV-1 within days after vaccination. To define the effect of VAD on acute responses toward SeV, we monitored both antibodies and CD8(+) T cells in mice. On day 10 following SeV infection, there was a trend toward lower antibody activities in the nasal washes of VAD mice than in those of controls, while bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and serum antibodies were not reduced. In contrast, there was a dramatic reduction of immunodominant CD8(+) T cell frequencies in the lower respiratory tract (LRT) airways of VAD animals. These T cells also showed unusually high CD103 (the αE subunit of αEβ7) expression patterns. In both VAD and control mice, E-cadherin (the ligand for αEβ7) was better expressed among epithelial cells lining the upper respiratory tract (URT) than in LRT airways. The results support a working hypothesis that the high CD103 expression among T cell populations in VAD mice alters mechanisms of T cell cross talk with URT and LRT epithelial cells, thereby inhibiting T cell migration and egress into the lower airway. Our data emphasize that the consequences of VAD are not limited to gut-resident cells and characterize VAD influences on an immune response to a respiratory virus vaccine.

  19. Daclatasvir-like inhibitors of NS5A block early biogenesis of hepatitis C virus-induced membranous replication factories, independent of RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Carola; Romero-Brey, Inés; Radujkovic, Danijela; Terreux, Raphael; Zayas, Margarita; Paul, David; Harak, Christian; Hoppe, Simone; Gao, Min; Penin, Francois; Lohmann, Volker; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    Direct-acting antivirals that target nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A), such as daclatasvir, have high potency against the hepatitis C virus (HCV). They are promising clinical candidates, yet little is known about their antiviral mechanisms. We investigated the mechanisms of daclatasvir derivatives. We used a combination of biochemical assays, in silico docking models, and high-resolution imaging to investigate inhibitor-induced changes in properties of NS5A, including its interaction with phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase IIIα and induction of the membranous web, which is the site of HCV replication. Analyses were conducted with replicons, infectious virus, and human hepatoma cells that express a HCV polyprotein. Studies included a set of daclatasvir derivatives and HCV variants with the NS5A inhibitor class-defining resistance mutation Y93H. NS5A inhibitors did not affect NS5A stability or dimerization. A daclatasvir derivative interacted with NS5A and molecular docking studies revealed a plausible mode by which the inhibitor bound to NS5A dimers. This interaction was impaired in mutant forms of NS5A that are resistant to daclatavir, providing a possible explanation for the reduced sensitivity of the HCV variants to this drug. Potent NS5A inhibitors were found to block HCV replication by preventing formation of the membranous web, which was not linked to an inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase IIIα. Correlative light-electron microscopy revealed unequivocally that NS5A inhibitors had no overall effect on the subcellular distribution of NS5A, but completely prevented biogenesis of the membranous web. Highly potent inhibitors of NS5A, such as daclatasvir, block replication of HCV RNA at the stage of membranous web biogenesis-a new paradigm in antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of a novel mutation in NS1 protein of influenza A virus induced by a chemical substance for the attenuation of pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Sasaki

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV has the potential for use as a vaccination against flu. In this study, we demonstrated the nature of an influenza A virus (IAV mutant induced by treating the IAV with a stable furan derivative, (1R,2R-1-(5'-methylfur-3'-ylpropane-1,2,3-triol (MFPT, which had been isolated from Streptomyces sp. strain FV60 with the objective of it being an LAIV candidate. The resulting MFPT-resistant (MFPTr IAVs possessed attenuated pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo when compared with that of the parent virus (H1N1 subtype, NWS strain. Sequencing analysis revealed that a novel mutation, C490U in ns gene (P164S in NS1, was detected in all MFPTr virus clones tested. Therefore, NS1 might be a main target of MFPT, and it was suggested that the P164S mutation contributed to the attenuated pathogenicity of the mutants. Although the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is one of the targets of NS1, the MFPTr virus suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt when compared with the wild-type (WT virus. It was suggested that this might lead to the subsequent inhibition of the cleavage of PARP-1 and caspase-3, which is important for the progression of apoptosis. At the same time, nucleoprotein (NP was found to be retained in the nuclei in MFPTr virus-infected cells while nuclear export of NP was detected in WT virus-infected cells. In addition, the expression levels of interferon-β transcripts were significantly decreased in MFPTr virus-infected cells. From these results it can be shown that the mutation, NS1P164S, might be one of the key residues to control NS1 function concerning the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, MFPT induced favorable mutation in the ns gene for the attenuation of IAV, and therefore might provide the novel methodology for preparing LAIVs.

  1. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA)

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  2. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birke Bartosch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C is characterized by metabolic disorders and a microenvironment in the liver dominated by oxidative stress, inflammation and regeneration processes that lead in the long term to hepatocellular carcinoma. Many lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunctions, including modification of metabolic fluxes, generation and elimination of oxidative stress, Ca2+ signaling and apoptosis, play a central role in these processes. However, how these dysfunctions are induced by the virus and whether they play a role in disease progression and neoplastic transformation remains to be determined. Most in vitro studies performed so far have shown that several of the hepatitis C virus (HCV proteins localize to mitochondria, but the consequences of these interactions on mitochondrial functions remain contradictory, probably due to the use of artificial expression and replication systems. In vivo studies are hampered by the fact that innate and adaptive immune responses will overlay mitochondrial dysfunctions induced directly in the hepatocyte by HCV. Thus, the molecular aspects underlying HCV-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions and their roles in viral replication and the associated pathology need yet to be confirmed in the context of productively replicating virus and physiologically relevant in vitro and in vivo model systems.

  3. A Mechanism of Virus-Induced Demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri Das Sarma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin forms an insulating sheath surrounding axons in the central and peripheral nervous systems and is essential for rapid propagation of neuronal action potentials. Demyelination is an acquired disorder in which normally formed myelin degenerates, exposing axons to the extracellular environment. The result is dysfunction of normal neuron-to-neuron communication and in many cases, varying degrees of axonal degeneration. Numerous central nervous system demyelinating disorders exist, including multiple sclerosis. Although demyelination is the major manifestation of most of the demyelinating diseases, recent studies have clearly documented concomitant axonal loss to varying degrees resulting in long-term disability. Axonal injury may occur secondary to myelin damage (outside-in model or myelin damage may occur secondary to axonal injury (inside-out model. Viral induced demyelination models, has provided unique imminent into the cellular mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS. In this review we will discuss potential cellular and molecular mechanism of central nervous system axonal loss and demyelination in a viral induced mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

  4. Deletion of fucose residues in plant N-glycans by repression of the GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase gene using virus-induced gene silencing and RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kouki; Matsumura, Takeshi

    2011-02-01

    Production of pharmaceutical glycoproteins in plants has many advantages in terms of safety and reduced costs. However, plant-produced glycoproteins have N-glycans with plant-specific sugar residues (core β-1,2-xylose and α-1,3-fucose) and a Lewis a (Le(a) ) epitope, i.e., Galβ(1-3)[Fucα(1-4)]GlcNAc. Because these sugar residues and glycan structures seemed to be immunogenic, several attempts have been made to delete them by repressing their respective glycosyltransferase genes. However, until date, such deletions have not been successful in completely eliminating the fucose residues. In this study, we simultaneously reduced the plant-specific core α-1,3-fucose and α-1,4-fucose residues in the Le(a) epitopes by repressing the Guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) gene, which is associated with GDP-L-fucose biosynthesis, in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Repression of GMD was achieved using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and RNA interference (RNAi). The proportion of fucose-free N-glycans found in total soluble protein from GMD gene-repressed plants increased by 80% and 95% following VIGS and RNAi, respectively, compared to wild-type plants. A small amount of putative galactose substitution in N-glycans from the NbGMD gene-repressed plants was observed, similar to what has been previously reported GMD-knockout Arabidopsis mutant. On the other hand, the recombinant mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with fucose-deleted N-glycans was successfully produced in NbGMD-RNAi transgenic N. benthamiana plants. Thus, repression of the GMD gene is thus very useful for deleting immunogenic total fucose residues and facilitating the production of pharmaceutical glycoproteins in plants. © 2010 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2010 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Virus-induced Gene Silencing-based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g. salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and a precursor of ethylene. Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4 or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7 or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7 and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato.

  6. Inhibition of ERK and proliferation in NK cell lines by soluble HLA-E released from Japanese encephalitis virus infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwetank; Date, Onkar Sanjay; Carbone, Ennio; Manjunath, Ramanathapuram

    2014-11-01

    Productive infection of human endothelial cells with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a single stranded RNA virus induces shedding of sHLA-E. We show here that sHLA-E that is released upon infection with this flavivirus can inhibit IL-2 and PMA mediated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation in two NK cell lines, Nishi and NKL. Virus infected or IFN-γ treated cell culture supernatants containing sHLA-E were found to partially inhibit IL-2 mediated induction of CD25 molecules on NKL cells. It was also found that sHLA-E could inhibit IL-2 induced [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation suggesting that, similar to cell surface expressed HLA-E, sHLA-E could also inhibit NK cell responses. Hence JEV-induced shedding of sHLA-E needs further investigation to better understand immune responses in JEV infections since it may have a role in viral evasion of NK cell responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Azacytidine Treatment Inhibits the Progression of Herpes Stromal Keratitis by Enhancing Regulatory T Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanasi, Siva Karthik; Reddy, Pradeep B J; Bhela, Siddheshvar; Jaggi, Ujjaldeep; Gimenez, Fernanda; Rouse, Barry T

    2017-04-01

    Ocular infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) sets off an inflammatory reaction in the cornea which leads to both virus clearance and chronic lesions that are orchestrated by CD4 T cells. Approaches that enhance the function of regulatory T cells (Treg) and dampen effector T cells can be effective to limit stromal keratitis (SK) lesion severity. In this report, we explore the novel approach of inhibiting DNA methyltransferase activity using 5-azacytidine (Aza; a cytosine analog) to limit HSV-1-induced ocular lesions. We show that therapy begun after infection when virus was no longer actively replicating resulted in a pronounced reduction in lesion severity, with markedly diminished numbers of T cells and nonlymphoid inflammatory cells, along with reduced cytokine mediators. The remaining inflammatory reactions had a change in the ratio of CD4 Foxp3+ Treg to effector Th1 CD4 T cells in ocular lesions and lymphoid tissues, with Treg becoming predominant over the effectors. In addition, compared to those from control mice, Treg from Aza-treated mice showed more suppressor activity in vitro and expressed higher levels of activation molecules. Additionally, cells induced in vitro in the presence of Aza showed epigenetic differences in the Treg-specific demethylated region (TSDR) of Foxp3 and were more stable when exposed to inflammatory cytokines. Our results show that therapy with Aza is an effective means of controlling a virus-induced inflammatory reaction and may act mainly by the effects on Treg.IMPORTANCE HSV-1 infection has been shown to initiate an inflammatory reaction in the cornea that leads to tissue damage and loss of vision. The inflammatory reaction is orchestrated by gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting Th1 cells, and regulatory T cells play a protective role. Hence, novel therapeutics that can rebalance the ratio of regulatory T cells to effectors are a relevant issue. This study opens up a new avenue in treating HSV-induced SK lesions by

  8. Inhibition of influenza virus replication by nitric oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); M.M.J.W. Baars (Marianne); P. de Lijster; R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractNitric oxide (NO) has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of influenza virus-induced pneumonia in mouse models. Here we show that replication of influenza A and B viruses in Mabin Darby canine kidney cells is severely impaired by the NO donor,

  9. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  10. Antiviral Potential of a Novel Compound CW-33 against Enterovirus A71 via Inhibition of Viral 2A Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ying Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71 in the Picornaviridae family causes hand-foot-and-mouth disease, aseptic meningitis, severe central nervous system disease, even death. EV-A71 2A protease cleaves Type I interferon (IFN-α/β receptor 1 (IFNAR1 to block IFN-induced Jak/STAT signaling. This study investigated anti-EV-A7l activity and synergistic mechanism(s of a novel furoquinoline alkaloid compound CW-33 alone and in combination with IFN-β Anti-EV-A71 activities of CW-33 alone and in combination with IFN-β were evaluated by inhibitory assays of virus-induced apoptosis, plaque formation, and virus yield. CW-33 showed antiviral activities with an IC50 of near 200 µM in EV-A71 plaque reduction and virus yield inhibition assays. While, anti-EV-A71 activities of CW-33 combined with 100 U/mL IFN-β exhibited a synergistic potency with an IC50 of approximate 1 µM in plaque reduction and virus yield inhibition assays. Molecular docking revealed CW-33 binding to EV-A71 2A protease active sites, correlating with an inhibitory effect of CW33 on in vitro enzymatic activity of recombinant 2A protease IC50 = 53.1 µM. Western blotting demonstrated CW-33 specifically inhibiting 2A protease-mediated cleavage of IFNAR1. CW-33 also recovered Type I IFN-induced Tyk2 and STAT1 phosphorylation as well as 2',5'-OAS upregulation in EV-A71 infected cells. The results demonstrated CW-33 inhibiting viral 2A protease activity to reduce Type I IFN antagonism of EV-A71. Therefore, CW-33 combined with a low-dose of Type I IFN could be applied in developing alternative approaches to treat EV-A71 infection.

  11. Plastics for corrosion inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Goldade, Victor A; Makarevich, Anna V; Kestelman, Vladimir N

    2005-01-01

    The development of polymer composites containing inhibitors of metal corrosion is an important endeavour in modern materials science and technology. Corrosion inhibitors can be located in a polymer matrix in the solid, liquid or gaseous phase. This book details the thermodynamic principles for selecting these components, their compatibility and their effectiveness. The various mechanisms of metal protection – barrier, inhibiting and electromechanical – are considered, as are the conflicting requirements placed on the structure of the combined material. Two main classes of inhibited materials (structural and films/coatings) are described in detail. Examples are given of structural plastics used in friction units subjected to mechano-chemical wear and of polymer films/coatings for protecting metal objects against corrosion.

  12. Dunaliella salina alga extract inhibits the production of interleukin-6, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species by regulating nuclear factor-κB/Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription in virus-infected RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Liu, Cheng-Wei; Yang, Deng-Jye; Chen, Ching-Chung; Chen, Shih-Yin; Tseng, Jung-Kai; Chang, Tien-Jye; Chang, Yuan-Yen

    2017-10-01

    Recent investigations have demonstrated that carotenoid extract of Dunaliella salina alga (Alga) contains abundant β-carotene and has good anti-inflammatory activities. Murine macrophage (RAW264.7 cells) was used to establish as an in vitro model of pseudorabies virus-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) response. In this study, antioxidant activities of Alga were measured based on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assays, reducing power, and virus-induced ROS formation in RAW264.7 cells. Anti-inflammatory activities of Alga were assessed by its ability to inhibit the production of interleukin-6 and nitric oxide (NO) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, then the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway was investigated by measuring the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nuclear factor-κB (p50 and p65), JAK, STAT-1/3, and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) by Western blotting. In addition, Alga inhibited virus replication by plaque assay. Our results showed that the Alga had high antioxidant activity, significantly reduced the virus-induced accumulation of ROS, and inhibited the levels of nitric oxide and interleukin-6. Further studies revealed that Alga also downregulated the gene and protein expressions of iNOS, COX-2, nuclear factor-κB (p50 and p65), and the JAK/STAT pathway. The inhibitory effects of Alga were similar to pretreatment with specific inhibitors of JAK and STAT-3 in pseudorabies virus -infected RAW264.7 cells. Alga enhanced the expression of SOCS3 to suppress the activity of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in pseudorabies virus-infected RAW264.7 cells. In addition, Alga has decreased viral replication (p < 0.005) at an early stage. Therefore, our results demonstrate that Alga inhibits ROS, interleukin6, and nitric oxide production via suppression of the JAK/STAT pathways and enhanced the

  13. Selective inhibition of enzyme synthesis under conditions of respiratory inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavell, R B; Woodward, D O

    1971-09-01

    When Neurospora mycelium is transferred from a medium containing sucrose to one containing acetate as sole source of carbon, a preferential synthesis of many Krebs cycle, glyoxylate cycle, and associated enzymes occurs. Respiration was inhibited during preferential enzyme synthesis in the following ways. (i) The amount of aeration (shaking) was reduced, (ii) cyanide was added to the culture, (iii) the carbon source, acetate, was removed, (iv) a mutant strain was starved of its Krebs cycle intermediates, and (v) respiration was inhibited by mutation. The effect of this respiratory inhibition on the synthesis of a number of enzymes was measured. It was found that the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-linked glutamate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was significantly less inhibited under conditions of respiratory inhibition than was the synthesis of Krebs cycle, glyoxylate cycle, and most other cell proteins synthesized during the adaptation period. This differential inhibition of enzyme synthesis was almost certainly not due to differential repression by regulatory metabolic end product effectors. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration under these conditions most likely results in a limitation of the energy supply of the cell. Thus, it is suggested that the inhibition of synthesis of most proteins after inhibition of mitochondrial respiration results from a lack of energy in a utilizable form. Possible reasons to account for the relative insensitivity of NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase to inhibition under these conditions are discussed.

  14. Pharmacological inhibition of FTO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona McMurray

    Full Text Available In 2007, a genome wide association study identified a SNP in intron one of the gene encoding human FTO that was associated with increased body mass index. Homozygous risk allele carriers are on average three kg heavier than those homozygous for the protective allele. FTO is a DNA/RNA demethylase, however, how this function affects body weight, if at all, is unknown. Here we aimed to pharmacologically inhibit FTO to examine the effect of its demethylase function in vitro and in vivo as a first step in evaluating the therapeutic potential of FTO. We showed that IOX3, a known inhibitor of the HIF prolyl hydroxylases, decreased protein expression of FTO (in C2C12 cells and reduced maximal respiration rate in vitro. However, FTO protein levels were not significantly altered by treatment of mice with IOX3 at 60 mg/kg every two days. This treatment did not affect body weight, or RER, but did significantly reduce bone mineral density and content and alter adipose tissue distribution. Future compounds designed to selectively inhibit FTO's demethylase activity could be therapeutically useful for the treatment of obesity.

  15. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Bernard J.; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R.; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M.; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny. PMID:26933816

  16. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Bernard J; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E

    2016-03-15

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny.

  17. [Penicillium-inhibiting yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez Ahrendts, M R; Carrillo, L

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work was to establish the in vitro and in vivo inhibition of post-harvest pathogenic moulds by yeasts in order to make a biocontrol product. Post-harvest pathogenic moulds Penicillium digitatum, P. italicum, P. ulaiense, Phyllosticta sp., Galactomyces geotrichum and yeasts belonging to genera Brettanomyces, Candida, Cryptococcus, Kloeckera, Pichia, Rhodotorula were isolated from citrus fruits. Some yeasts strains were also isolated from other sources. The yeasts were identified by their macro and micro-morphology and physiological tests. The in vitro and in vivo activities against P. digitatum or P. ulaiense were different. Candida cantarellii and one strain of Pichia subpelliculosa produced a significant reduction of the lesion area caused by the pathogenic moulds P. digitatum and P. ulaiense, and could be used in a biocontrol product formulation.

  18. Propolis inhibits osteoclast maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileggi, Roberta; Antony, Kathryn; Johnson, Kristie; Zuo, Jian; Shannon Holliday, L

    2009-12-01

    Propolis, a natural product produced by the honey bee, has been successfully used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial agent. Traumatic injuries to the teeth, especially avulsion injuries, present a challenging situation for the clinician because of post-treatment complications, such as inflammatory and/or replacement resorption. Agents that reduce osteoclast numbers and activity may be useful in the treatment of traumatic injuries to the teeth. In this study, we evaluated propolis as an anti-resorptive agent. Calcitriol-stimulated mouse marrow cultures, which contain both osteoclasts and osteoblasts, were exposed to the ethanol extracts of propolis or vehicle control and stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-activity to identify osteoclasts. A significant, dose-dependent reduction in multinuclear TRAP+ cells was demonstrated, although the propolis treatment accommodated cell growth and survival (P Propolis also reduced the formation of actin rings in pure cultures of RAW 264.7 osteoclast-like cells, suggesting that it exerts direct actions on osteoclast maturation. In summary, our data suggest that propolis inhibits late stages of osteoclast maturation including fusion of osteoclasts precursors to form giant cells and formation of actin rings. This supports the hypothesis that it may prove useful as a medicament to reduce resorption associated with traumatic injuries to the teeth.

  19. Can Arousal Modulate Response Inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbach, Noam; Kalanthroff, Eyal; Avnit, Amir; Henik, Avishai

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine if and how arousal can modulate response inhibition. Two competing hypotheses can be drawn from previous literature. One holds that alerting cues that elevate arousal should result in an impulsive response and therefore impair response inhibition. The other suggests that alerting enhances processing of…

  20. [Cabergoline for inhibition of lactation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Topete, Enrique Gómez; Mendoza-Hernández, Freddy; Cejudo-Alvarez, José; Briones-Garduño, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Despite advances in prevention inhibition of lactation, only administration of estrogens or these combined with androgens show variable effectiveness and are indirectly associated with high percentage for lactation rebound, thrombosis, or pulmonary embolism or both of the later during puerperium; in addition, bromocriptine, also used indirectly for inhibition of lactation, is associated with lactation, rebound in 18-40%. Cabergolin is a new ergoline with efficient and durable prolactin reducer effect with fewer adverse effects. Which will the smallest cabergolin dosage be to inhibit lactation? To demonstrate clinical effectiveness with smallest cabergolina dosage in lactation inhibition. We carried on a the Service Clinical test on patients hospitalization with an indication to inhibit lactation as the Hospital of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Infantil Maternal Institute of the State of Mexico (IMIEM). The study was done 80 patients to who we administered oral 0.5 mg cabergoline to 40 patients and another group of 40 whom we administered 1.0 mg of cabergoline orally at random and blinded by means of out-patient consultation. We studied correlation between dose and inhibition of lactation as well as presence of adverse effects. In the group of patients to whom administered 0.5 mg, we found 65% (n = 26) with lactation inhibition; adverse effects in this group appeared in 32.5% (n = 13) the second group with a dose of 1.0 mg; 95% with adverse effects in 25% P < 0.001. Inhibition of lactation with unique dose of 1.0 has satisfactory clinical effectiveness, this being the smaller dose to inhibit lactation at a suitable percentage.

  1. Japanese encephalitis virus induces matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression via a ROS/c-Src/PDGFR/PI3K/Akt/MAPKs-dependent AP-1 pathway in rat brain astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chuen-Mao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV infection is a major cause of acute encephalopathy in children, which destroys central nervous system (CNS cells, including astrocytes and neurons. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 has been shown to degrade components of the basal lamina, leading to disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB and to contribute to neuroinflammatory responses in many neurological diseases. However, the detailed mechanisms of JEV-induced MMP-9 expression in rat brain astrocytes (RBA-1 cells are largely unclear. Methods In this study, the effect of JEV on expression of MMP-9 was determined by gelatin zymography, western blot analysis, RT-PCR, and promoter assay. The involvement of AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos, c-Src, PDGFR, PI3K/Akt, and MAPKs in these responses were investigated by using the selective pharmacological inhibitors and transfection with siRNAs. Results Here, we demonstrate that JEV induces expression of pro-form MMP-9 via ROS/c-Src/PDGFR/PI3K/Akt/MAPKs-dependent, AP-1 activation in RBA-1 cells. JEV-induced MMP-9 expression and promoter activity were inhibited by pretreatment with inhibitors of AP-1 (tanshinone, c-Src (PP1, PDGFR (AG1296, and PI3K (LY294002, and by transfection with siRNAs of c-Jun, c-Fos, PDGFR, and Akt. Moreover, JEV-stimulated AP-1 activation was inhibited by pretreatment with the inhibitors of c-Src, PDGFR, PI3K, and MAPKs. Conclusion From these results, we conclude that JEV activates the ROS/c-Src/PDGFR/PI3K/Akt/MAPKs pathway, which in turn triggers AP-1 activation and ultimately induces MMP-9 expression in RBA-1 cells. These findings concerning JEV-induced MMP-9 expression in RBA-1 cells imply that JEV might play an important role in CNS inflammation and diseases.

  2. Japanese encephalitis virus induces matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression via a ROS/c-Src/PDGFR/PI3K/Akt/MAPKs-dependent AP-1 pathway in rat brain astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuen-Mao; Lin, Chih-Chung; Lee, I-Ta; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Yang, Caleb M; Chen, Wei-June; Jou, Mei-Jie; Hsiao, Li-Der

    2012-01-18

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection is a major cause of acute encephalopathy in children, which destroys central nervous system (CNS) cells, including astrocytes and neurons. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 has been shown to degrade components of the basal lamina, leading to disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to contribute to neuroinflammatory responses in many neurological diseases. However, the detailed mechanisms of JEV-induced MMP-9 expression in rat brain astrocytes (RBA-1 cells) are largely unclear. In this study, the effect of JEV on expression of MMP-9 was determined by gelatin zymography, western blot analysis, RT-PCR, and promoter assay. The involvement of AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), c-Src, PDGFR, PI3K/Akt, and MAPKs in these responses were investigated by using the selective pharmacological inhibitors and transfection with siRNAs. Here, we demonstrate that JEV induces expression of pro-form MMP-9 via ROS/c-Src/PDGFR/PI3K/Akt/MAPKs-dependent, AP-1 activation in RBA-1 cells. JEV-induced MMP-9 expression and promoter activity were inhibited by pretreatment with inhibitors of AP-1 (tanshinone), c-Src (PP1), PDGFR (AG1296), and PI3K (LY294002), and by transfection with siRNAs of c-Jun, c-Fos, PDGFR, and Akt. Moreover, JEV-stimulated AP-1 activation was inhibited by pretreatment with the inhibitors of c-Src, PDGFR, PI3K, and MAPKs. From these results, we conclude that JEV activates the ROS/c-Src/PDGFR/PI3K/Akt/MAPKs pathway, which in turn triggers AP-1 activation and ultimately induces MMP-9 expression in RBA-1 cells. These findings concerning JEV-induced MMP-9 expression in RBA-1 cells imply that JEV might play an important role in CNS inflammation and diseases.

  3. Hepatitis B virus induces cell proliferation via HBx-induced microRNA-21 in hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting programmed cell death protein4 (PDCD4 and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Damania

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B viral infection-induced hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the major problems in the developing countries. One of the HBV proteins, HBx, modulates the host cell machinery via several mechanisms. In this study we hypothesized that HBV enhances cell proliferation via HBx-induced microRNA-21 in hepatocellular carcinoma. HBx gene was over-expressed, and miRNA-21 expression and cell proliferation were measured in Huh 7 and Hep G2 cells. miRNA-21 was over-expressed in these cells, cell proliferation and the target proteins were analyzed. To confirm the role of miRNA-21 in HBx-induced proliferation, Hep G 2.2.1.5 cells (a cell line that expresses HBV stably were used for miRNA-21 inhibition studies. HBx over-expression enhanced proliferation (3.7- and 4.5-fold increase; n = 3; p<0.01 and miRNA-21 expression (24- and 36-fold increase, normalized with 5S rRNA; p<0.001 in Huh 7 and Hep G2 cells respectively. HBx also resulted in the inhibition of miRNA-21 target proteins, PDCD4 and PTEN. miRNA-21 resulted in a significant increase in proliferation (2- and 2.3-fold increase over control cells; p<0.05 in Huh 7 and Hep G2 cells respectively and decreased target proteins, PDCD4 and PTEN expression. Anti-miR-21 resulted in a significant decrease in proliferation (p<0.05 and increased miRNA-21 target protein expression. We conclude that HBV infection enhances cell proliferation, at least in part, via HBx-induced miRNA-21 expression during hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

  4. Memory inhibition across the lifespan

    OpenAIRE

    Teale, Julia C.

    2015-01-01

    Age can affect memory performance. This statement is so often heard that it has become almost a truism. When research surrounding memory inhibition – the ability to ignore irrelevant material to aid in the retrieval of a target memory – is examined specifically, a more mixed picture of findings emerges. Whilst some previous work has found evidence of an age-related deficit, other research has rather found intact memory inhibition in older adults. Less often discussed, too, are the effects of ...

  5. Inhibition of MMPs by alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Agee, Kelli A.; Hoshika, Tomohiro; Uchiyama, Toshikazu; Tjäderhane, Leo; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Thompson, Jeremy M.; McCracken, Courtney E.; Looney, Stephen W.; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives While screening the activity of potential inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), due to the limited water solubility of some of the compounds, they had to be solubilized in ethanol. When ethanol solvent controls were run, they were found to partially inhibit MMPs. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the MMP-inhibitory activity of a series of alcohols. Methods The possible inhibitory activity of a series of alcohols was measured against soluble rhMMP-9 and insoluble matrix-bound endogenous MMPs of dentin in completely demineralized dentin. Increasing concentrations (0.17, 0.86, 1.71 and 4.28 moles/L) of a homologous series of alcohols (i.e. methanol, ethanol, propanols, butanols, pentanols, hexanols, the ethanol ester of methacrylic acid, heptanols and octanol) were compared to ethanediol, and propanediol by regression analysis to calculate the molar concentration required to inhibit MMPs by 50% (i.e. the IC50). Results Using two different MMP models, alcohols were shown to inhibit rhMMP-9 and the endogenous proteases of dentin matrix in a dose-dependent manner. The degree of MMP inhibition by alcohols increased with chain length up to 4 methylene groups. Based on the molar concentration required to inhibit rhMMP-9 fifty percent, 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), 3-hexanol, 3-heptanol and 1-octanol gave the strongest inhibition. Significance The results indicate that alcohols with 4 methylene groups inhibit MMPs more effectively than methanol or ethanol. MMP inhibition was inversely related to the Hoy's solubility parameter for hydrogen bonding forces of the alcohols (i.e. to their hydrophilicity). PMID:21676453

  6. Inactivated Sendai virus induces apoptosis and autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Zhu, Huixia; Xu, Xiaoshuang; Li, Lingyu; Tan, Haiming; Cai, Xiaoyao

    2015-09-11

    Inactivated Sendai virus (HVJ-E) has shown potential anticancer efficacy in various cancer cells. However, the ability of HVJ-E to regulate cancer cell survival and death remains largely unknown. In the present study we first found that HVJ-E exhibited cytotoxic effects in the non-small cell lung cancer cell (NSCLC) line A549 and cisplatin-resistant A549 cells (A549/DDP). The suppression of cell viability was due to both the activation of caspases and the JNK and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in A549 and A549/DDP human lung cancer cells. In addition, we demonstrated that HVJ-E could induce autophagy in NSCLC cells via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway for the first time. Inhibiting autophagy in A549/DDP cells and inducing autophagy in A549 cells enhanced HVJ-E-induced apoptosis. These findings provide a molecular basis of HVJ-E-mediated cell death and support the notion that combination treatment with autophagy modulators is an effective strategy to augment the cytotoxic effects of HVJ-E in NSCLC cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Herpes simplex virus induces the marked up-regulation of the zinc finger transcriptional factor INSM1, which modulates the expression and localization of the immediate early protein ICP0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs rapidly shut off macromolecular synthesis in host cells. In contrast, global microarray analyses have shown that HSV infection markedly up-regulates a number of host cell genes that may play important roles in HSV-host cell interactions. To understand the regulatory mechanisms involved, we initiated studies focusing on the zinc finger transcription factor insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1, a host cell protein markedly up-regulated by HSV infection. Results INSM1 gene expression in HSV-1-infected normal human epidermal keratinocytes increased at least 400-fold 9 h after infection; INSM1 promoter activity was also markedly stimulated. Expression and subcellular localization of the immediate early HSV protein ICP0 was affected by INSM1 expression, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed binding of INSM1 to the ICP0 promoter. Moreover, the role of INSM1 in HSV-1 infection was further clarified by inhibition of HSV-1 replication by INSM1-specific siRNA. Conclusions The results suggest that INSM1 up-regulation plays a positive role in HSV-1 replication, probably by binding to the ICP0 promoter.

  8. Predicted protein interactions of IFITMs may shed light on mechanisms of Zika virus-induced microcephaly and host invasion [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations, 1 not approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi K. Ganapathiraju

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available After the first reported case of Zika virus (ZIKV in Brazil, in 2015, a significant increase in the reported cases of microcephaly was observed. Microcephaly is a neurological condition in which the infant’s head is significantly smaller with complications in brain development. Recently, two small membrane-associated interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITM1 and IFITM3 have been shown to repress members of the flaviviridae family which includes ZIKV. However, the exact mechanisms leading to the inhibition of the virus are yet unknown. Here, we assembled an interactome of IFITM1 and IFITM3 with known protein-protein interactions (PPIs collected from publicly available databases and novel PPIs predicted using the High-confidence Protein-Protein Interaction Prediction (HiPPIP model. We analyzed the functional and pathway associations of the interacting proteins, and found that there are several immunity pathways (toll-like receptor signaling, cd28 signaling in T-helper cells, crosstalk between dendritic cells and natural killer cells, neuronal pathways (axonal guidance signaling, neural tube closure and actin cytoskeleton signaling and developmental pathways (neural tube closure, embryonic skeletal system development that are associated with these interactors. Our novel PPIs associate cilia dysfunction in ependymal cells to microcephaly, and may also shed light on potential targets of ZIKV for host invasion by immunosuppression and cytoskeletal rearrangements. These results could help direct future research in elucidating the mechanisms underlying host defense to ZIKV and other flaviviruses.

  9. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the hemagglutinin of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus induces cross-protective immunity against Eurasian 'avian-like' H1N1 swine viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrucci, Maria R; Facchini, Marzia; Di Mario, Giuseppina; Garulli, Bruno; Sciaraffia, Ester; Meola, Monica; Fabiani, Concetta; De Marco, Maria A; Cordioli, Paolo; Siccardi, Antonio; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Donatelli, Isabella

    2014-05-01

    To examine cross-reactivity between hemagglutinin (HA) derived from A/California/7/09 (CA/09) virus and that derived from representative Eurasian "avian-like" (EA) H1N1 swine viruses isolated in Italy between 1999 and 2008 during virological surveillance in pigs. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing the HA gene of CA/09 virus (MVA-HA-CA/09) was used as a vaccine to investigate cross-protective immunity against H1N1 swine viruses in mice. Two classical swine H1N1 (CS) viruses and four representative EA-like H1N1 swine viruses previously isolated during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pigs on farms in Northern Italy were used in this study. Female C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with MVA/HA/CA/09 and then challenged intranasally with H1N1 swine viruses. Cross-reactive antibody responses were determined by hemagglutination- inhibition (HI) and virus microneutralizing (MN) assays of sera from MVA-vaccinated mice. The extent of protective immunity against infection with H1N1 swine viruses was determined by measuring lung viral load on days 2 and 4 post-challenge. Systemic immunization of mice with CA/09-derived HA, vectored by MVA, elicited cross-protective immunity against recent EA-like swine viruses. This immune protection was related to the levels of cross-reactive HI antibodies in the sera of the immunized mice and was dependent on the similarity of the antigenic site Sa of H1 HAs. Our findings suggest that the herd immunity elicited in humans by the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus could limit the transmission of recent EA-like swine HA genes into the influenza A virus gene pool in humans. © 2013 The Authors Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the hemagglutinin of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus induces cross-protective immunity against Eurasian ‘avian-like’ H1N1 swine viruses in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrucci, Maria R; Facchini, Marzia; Di Mario, Giuseppina; Garulli, Bruno; Sciaraffia, Ester; Meola, Monica; Fabiani, Concetta; De Marco, Maria A; Cordioli, Paolo; Siccardi, Antonio; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Donatelli, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine cross-reactivity between hemagglutinin (HA) derived from A/California/7/09 (CA/09) virus and that derived from representative Eurasian “avian-like” (EA) H1N1 swine viruses isolated in Italy between 1999 and 2008 during virological surveillance in pigs. Design Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing the HA gene of CA/09 virus (MVA-HA-CA/09) was used as a vaccine to investigate cross-protective immunity against H1N1 swine viruses in mice. Sample Two classical swine H1N1 (CS) viruses and four representative EA-like H1N1 swine viruses previously isolated during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pigs on farms in Northern Italy were used in this study. Setting Female C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with MVA/HA/CA/09 and then challenged intranasally with H1N1 swine viruses. Main outcome measures Cross-reactive antibody responses were determined by hemagglutination- inhibition (HI) and virus microneutralizing (MN) assays of sera from MVA-vaccinated mice. The extent of protective immunity against infection with H1N1 swine viruses was determined by measuring lung viral load on days 2 and 4 post-challenge. Results and Conclusions Systemic immunization of mice with CA/09-derived HA, vectored by MVA, elicited cross-protective immunity against recent EA-like swine viruses. This immune protection was related to the levels of cross-reactive HI antibodies in the sera of the immunized mice and was dependent on the similarity of the antigenic site Sa of H1 HAs. Our findings suggest that the herd immunity elicited in humans by the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus could limit the transmission of recent EA-like swine HA genes into the influenza A virus gene pool in humans. PMID:24373385

  11. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway by Ly294002 does not prevent establishment of persistent Junín virus infection in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linero, Florencia N; Fernández Bell-Fano, Pablo M; Cuervo, Eugenia; Castilla, Viviana; Scolaro, Luis A

    2015-02-01

    In previous work, we demonstrated that the arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV) is able to activate Akt by means of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) survival pathway during virus entry. This work extends our study, emphasizing the relevance of this pathway in the establishment and maintenance of persistent infection in vitro. During the course of infection, JUNV-infected Vero cells showed a typical cytopathic effect that may be ascribed to apoptotic cell death. Treatment of infected cultures with Ly294002, an inhibitor of the PI3K/Akt pathway, produced an apoptotic response similar to that observed for uninfected cells treated with the drug. This result suggests that virus-induced activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway does not deliver a strong enough anti-apoptotic signal to explain the low proportion of apoptotic cells observed during infection. Also, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway during the acute stage of infection did not prevent the establishment of persistence. Furthermore, treatment of persistently JUNV-infected cells with Ly294002 did not alter viral protein expression. These findings indicate that despite the positive modulation of the PI3/Akt pathway during Junín virus entry, this would not play a critical role in the establishment and maintenance of JUNV persistence in Vero cells.

  12. Dengue virus infection of SK Hep1 cells: inhibition of in vitro angiogenesis and altered cytomorphology by expressed viral envelope glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Atanu; Jain, Preksha; Sarkar, Payel; Gangodkar, Shobha; Deshpande, Divija; Ganti, Ketaki; Shetty, Shrimati; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2011-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection of human endothelial cells has been implicated in the pathobiology of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. However, the mechanisms by which DENV infections alter the functional physiology of endothelial cells remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we examined the susceptibility of a human liver sinusoidal endothelial cell line SK Hep1 to all four serotypes of DENV and studied the effect of the virus on in vitro angiogenesis. All four serotypes of DENV could infect the SK Hep1 cells, but showed variable cytopathic effects, the most pronounced being that of DENV-2. Electron microscopy of the infected cells showed significant ultrastructural changes. In vitro angiogenesis assays on DENV-2 exposed SK Hep1 cells in the matrigel system showed inhibition compared with the controls. Importantly, transfection and transient expression of the DENV-2 envelope glycoprotein (E) in these cells showed drastic alterations in cell shapes and the E protein could be localized by fluorescence microscopy in terminal knob-like structures. Therefore, SK Hep1, a human hepatic sinusoid-derived endothelial cell line, may constitute a potential model to study DENV-endothelial cell interactions in vitro, especially towards understanding the possible virus-induced changes in hepatic endothelium and its role in disease pathogenesis. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dihydroxyoctadecamonoenoate esters inhibit the neutrophil ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    inhibited by methyl 9,10-/12,13-DiHOME. Neutrophil activation is characterized by a wide variety of signal transduction events. Assembly of the multiprotein. NADPH oxidase complex is required for superoxide production and is preceded by the phosphorylation of p47phox and translocation of p47phox to the membrane.

  14. Testing of Biologically Inhibiting Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill Madsen, Thomas; Larsen, Erup

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this course is to examine a newly developed biologically inhibiting material with regards to galvanic corrosion and electrochemical properties. More in detail, the concern was how the material would react when exposed to cleaning agents, here under CIP cleaning (Cleaning...

  15. The "one-step" Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV)-derived vector is a functional genomics tool for efficient overexpression of heterologous protein, virus-induced gene silencing and genetic mapping of BPMV R-gene in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflieger, Stéphanie; Blanchet, Sophie; Meziadi, Chouaib; Richard, Manon M S; Thareau, Vincent; Mary, Fanny; Mazoyer, Céline; Geffroy, Valérie

    2014-08-29

    Over the last two years, considerable advances have been made in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genomics, especially with the completion of the genome sequence and the availability of RNAseq data. However, as common bean is recalcitrant to stable genetic transformation, much work remains to be done for the development of functional genomics tools adapted to large-scale studies. Here we report the successful implementation of an efficient viral vector system for foreign gene expression, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and genetic mapping of a BPMV resistance gene in common bean, using a "one-step" BPMV vector originally developed in soybean. With the goal of developing this vector for high-throughput VIGS studies in common bean, we optimized the conditions for rub-inoculation of infectious BPMV-derived plasmids in common bean cv. Black Valentine. We then tested the susceptibility to BPMV of six cultivars, and found that only Black Valentine and JaloEEP558 were susceptible to BPMV. We used a BPMV-GFP construct to detect the spatial and temporal infection patterns of BPMV in vegetative and reproductive tissues. VIGS of the PHYTOENE DESATURASE (PvPDS) marker gene was successfully achieved with recombinant BPMV vectors carrying fragments ranging from 132 to 391 bp. Finally, we mapped a gene for resistance to BPMV (R-BPMV) at one end of linkage group 2, in the vicinity of a locus (I locus) previously shown to be involved in virus resistance. The "one-step" BPMV vector system therefore enables rapid and simple functional studies in common bean, and could be suitable for large-scale analyses. In the post-genomic era, these advances are timely for the common bean research community.

  16. DETECTION OF HAEMAGGLUTINATION—INHIBITION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of haemagglutination inhibition lHl) antibodies against influenza A virus was carried out on pigs sera collected at Bodija abattoir, Ibadan between December, 2001 and August 2002. Out of the 107 sera tested, 101. 94.39%) had ill antibodies to influenza A (IhNi) human strain while the remaining 6 (5.61%) were ...

  17. Threat interferes with response inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartikainen, Kaisa M; Siiskonen, Anna R; Ogawa, Keith H

    2012-05-09

    A potential threat, such as a spider, captures attention and engages executive functions to adjust ongoing behavior and avoid danger. We and many others have reported slowed responses to neutral targets in the context of emotional distractors. This behavioral slowing has been explained in the framework of attentional competition for limited resources with emotional stimuli prioritized. Alternatively, slowed performance could reflect the activation of avoidance/freezing-type motor behaviors associated with threat. Although the interaction of attention and emotion has been widely studied, little is known on the interaction between emotion and executive functions. We studied how threat-related stimuli (spiders) interact with executive performance and whether the interaction profile fits with a resource competition model or avoidance/freezing-type motor behaviors. Twenty-one young healthy individuals performed a Go-NoGo visual discrimination reaction time (RT) task engaging several executive functions with threat-related and emotionally neutral distractors. The threat-related distractors had no effect on the RT or the error rate in the Go trials. The NoGo error rate, reflecting failure in response inhibition, increased significantly because of threat-related distractors in contrast to neutral distractors, P less than 0.05. Thus, threat-related distractors temporarily impaired response inhibition. Threat-related distractors associated with increased commission errors and no effect on RT does not suggest engagement of avoidance/freezing-type motor behaviors. The results fit in the framework of the resource competition model. A potential threat calls for evaluation of affective significance as well as inhibition of undue emotional reactivity. We suggest that these functions tax executive resources and may render other executive functions, such as response inhibition, temporarily compromised when the demands for resources exceed availability.

  18. Th2 cytokines inhibit lymphangiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira L Savetsky

    Full Text Available Lymphangiogenesis is the process by which new lymphatic vessels grow in response to pathologic stimuli such as wound healing, inflammation, and tumor metastasis. It is well-recognized that growth factors and cytokines regulate lymphangiogenesis by promoting or inhibiting lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC proliferation, migration and differentiation. Our group has shown that the expression of T-helper 2 (Th2 cytokines is markedly increased in lymphedema, and that these cytokines inhibit lymphatic function by increasing fibrosis and promoting changes in the extracellular matrix. However, while the evidence supporting a role for T cells and Th2 cytokines as negative regulators of lymphatic function is clear, the direct effects of Th2 cytokines on isolated LECs remains poorly understood. Using in vitro and in vivo studies, we show that physiologic doses of interleukin-4 (IL-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13 have profound anti-lymphangiogenic effects and potently impair LEC survival, proliferation, migration, and tubule formation. Inhibition of these cytokines with targeted monoclonal antibodies in the cornea suture model specifically increases inflammatory lymphangiogenesis without concomitant changes in angiogenesis. These findings suggest that manipulation of anti-lymphangiogenic pathways may represent a novel and potent means of improving lymphangiogenesis.

  19. Combined autophagy and proteasome inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Dan T; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Tan, Kay-See; Heitjan, Daniel F; Davis, Lisa E; Pontiggia, Laura; Rangwala, Reshma; Piao, Shengfu; Chang, Yunyoung C; Scott, Emma C; Paul, Thomas M; Nichols, Charles W; Porter, David L; Kaplan, Janeen; Mallon, Gayle; Bradner, James E; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of proteasome inhibition for myeloma is limited by therapeutic resistance, which may be mediated by activation of the autophagy pathway as an alternative mechanism of protein degradation. Preclinical studies demonstrate that autophagy inhibition with hydroxychloroquine augments the antimyeloma efficacy of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. We conducted a phase I trial combining bortezomib and hydroxychloroquine for relapsed or refractory myeloma. We enrolled 25 patients, including 11 (44%) refractory to prior bortezomib. No protocol-defined dose-limiting toxicities occurred, and we identified a recommended phase 2 dose of hydroxychloroquine 600 mg twice daily with standard doses of bortezomib, at which we observed dose-related gastrointestinal toxicity and cytopenias. Of 22 patients evaluable for response, 3 (14%) had very good partial responses, 3 (14%) had minor responses, and 10 (45%) had a period of stable disease. Electron micrographs of bone marrow plasma cells collected at baseline, after a hydroxychloroquine run-in, and after combined therapy showed therapy-associated increases in autophagic vacuoles, consistent with the combined effects of increased trafficking of misfolded proteins to autophagic vacuoles and inhibition of their degradative capacity. Combined targeting of proteasomal and autophagic protein degradation using bortezomib and hydroxychloroquine is therefore feasible and a potentially useful strategy for improving outcomes in myeloma therapy. PMID:24991834

  20. RAAS inhibition and cardiorenal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi C

    2014-01-01

    The consensus conference on cardio-renal syndromes (2008) defined 'cardio-renal syndromes' as 'disorders of the heart and kidneys whereby acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction of the other' and identified five subtypes of the syndromes. Various pathophysiologic mechanisms underlie cardiorenal syndrome including hemodynamic derangements, reduced cardiac output leading to impaired renal perfusion, reduced stroke volume, raised atrial filling pressures, elevated atrial pressures, sodium and water retention, venous congestion, right ventricular dysfunction and venous hypertension causing increased renal venous pressure, intra-abdominal hypertension, various neurohormonal adaptations including activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, adaptive activation of the sympathetic nervous system, cytokine release and oxidative stress. Although there are standardized clinical guidelines for the management of heart failure, and chronic kidney disease, respectively, there are no similar consensus clinical guidelines for the management of the cardiorenal syndromes. RAAS inhibition is advocated in treating systolic heart failure. There is evidence that RAAS inhibition is also useful in cardiorenal syndrome. However, RAAS inhibition, while potentially useful in the management of cardiorenal syndrome, is not the 'magic bullet', is sometimes limited by adverse renal events, is not applicable to all patients, and must be applied by physicians with due diligence and caution. Nevertheless, a more comprehensive multidisciplinary multipronged approach to managing patients with cardiorenal syndrome is even more pragmatic and commonsense given the multiple mechanisms and pathogenetic pathways implicated in the causation and perpetuation of cardiorenal syndrome.

  1. Self-regulation, ego depletion, and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Roy F

    2014-12-01

    Inhibition is a major form of self-regulation. As such, it depends on self-awareness and comparing oneself to standards and is also susceptible to fluctuations in willpower resources. Ego depletion is the state of reduced willpower caused by prior exertion of self-control. Ego depletion undermines inhibition both because restraints are weaker and because urges are felt more intensely than usual. Conscious inhibition of desires is a pervasive feature of everyday life and may be a requirement of life in civilized, cultural society, and in that sense it goes to the evolved core of human nature. Intentional inhibition not only restrains antisocial impulses but can also facilitate optimal performance, such as during test taking. Self-regulation and ego depletion- may also affect less intentional forms of inhibition, even chronic tendencies to inhibit. Broadly stated, inhibition is necessary for human social life and nearly all societies encourage and enforce it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of Ebola Virus Infection With a Recombinant Inhibitor of Factor Vlla/Tissue Factor: A Study in Rhesus Monkeys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Geisbert, Thomas W; Hensley, Lisa E; Jahrling, Peter B; Larsen, Tom; Geisbert, Joan B

    2003-01-01

    Infection with the Ebola virus induces overexpression of the procoagulant tissue factor in primate monocytes and macrophages, suggesting that inhibition of the tissue-factor pathway could ameliorate...

  3. Action inhibition in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganos, Christos; Kühn, Simone; Kahl, Ursula; Schunke, Odette; Feldheim, Jan; Gerloff, Christian; Roessner, Veit; Bäumer, Tobias; Thomalla, Götz; Haggard, Patrick; Münchau, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by tics. Tic generation is often linked to dysfunction of inhibitory brain networks. Some previous behavioral studies found deficiencies in inhibitory motor control in Tourette syndrome, but others suggested normal or even better-than-normal performance. Furthermore, neural correlates of action inhibition in these patients are poorly understood. We performed event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging during a stop-signal reaction-time task in 14 uncomplicated adult Tourette patients and 15 healthy controls. In patients, we correlated activations in stop-signal reaction-time task with their individual motor tic frequency. Task performance was similar in both groups. Activation of dorsal premotor cortex was stronger in the StopSuccess than in the Go condition in healthy controls. This pattern was reversed in Tourette patients. A significant positive correlation was present between motor tic frequency and activations in the supplementary motor area during StopSuccess versus Go in patients. Inhibitory brain networks differ between healthy controls and Tourette patients. In the latter the supplementary motor area is probably a key relay of inhibitory processes mediating both suppression of tics and inhibition of voluntary action. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  5. RAGE deficiency predisposes mice to virus-induced paucigranulocytic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, Md Ashik; Short, Kirsty Renfree; Zhang, Vivan; Gan, Wan Jun; Loh, Zhixuan; Werder, Rhiannon B; Simpson, Jennifer; Sly, Peter D; Mazzone, Stuart B; Spann, Kirsten M; Ferreira, Manuel Ar; Upham, John W; Sukkar, Maria B; Phipps, Simon

    2017-01-18

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease. Although many patients with asthma develop type-2 dominated eosinophilic inflammation, a number of individuals develop paucigranulocytic asthma, which occurs in the absence of eosinophilia or neutrophilia. The aetiology of paucigranulocytic asthma is unknown. However, both respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and mutations in the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) are risk factors for asthma development. Here, we show that RAGE deficiency impairs anti-viral immunity during an early-life infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; a murine analogue of RSV). The elevated viral load was associated with the release of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) which triggered airway smooth muscle remodelling in early-life. Re-infection with PVM in later-life induced many of the cardinal features of asthma in the absence of eosinophilic or neutrophilic inflammation. Anti-HMGB1 mitigated both early-life viral disease and asthma-like features, highlighting HMGB1 as a possible novel therapeutic target.

  6. Influenza Virus Induces Apoptosis via BAD-Mediated Mitochondrial Dysregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Anh T; Cortens, John P.; Du, Qiujiang; Wilkins, John A.; Coombs, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus infection results in host cell death and major tissue damage. Specific components of the apoptotic pathway, a signaling cascade that ultimately leads to cell death, are implicated in promoting influenza virus replication. BAD is a cell death regulator that constitutes a critical control point in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, which occurs through the dysregulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and the subsequent activation of downstream apoptogenic factors...

  7. Influenza Virus Induces Bacterial and Nonbacterial Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Short, Kirsty R.; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A.; Thornton, Ruth; Pedersen, John; Richard A. Strugnell; Wise, Andrew K.; Reading, Patrick C.; Wijburg, Odilia L.

    2011-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common childhood diseases. OM can arise when a viral infection enables bacteria to disseminate from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Here, we provide the first infant murine model for disease. Mice coinfected with Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza virus had high bacterial load in the middle ear, middle ear inflammation, and hearing loss. In contrast, mice colonized with S. pneumoniae alone had significantly less bacteria in the ear, minimal hearing ...

  8. RAGE deficiency predisposes mice to virus-induced paucigranulocytic asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, Md Ashik; Short, Kirsty Renfree; Zhang, Vivan; Gan, Wan Jun; Loh, Zhixuan; Werder, Rhiannon B; Simpson, Jennifer; Sly, Peter D; Mazzone, Stuart B; Spann, Kirsten M; Ferreira, Manuel AR; Upham, John W; Sukkar, Maria B; Phipps, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease. Although many patients with asthma develop type-2 dominated eosinophilic inflammation, a number of individuals develop paucigranulocytic asthma, which occurs in the absence of eosinophilia or neutrophilia. The aetiology of paucigranulocytic asthma is unknown. However, both respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and mutations in the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) are risk factors for asthma development. Here, we show that RAGE deficiency impairs anti-viral immunity during an early-life infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; a murine analogue of RSV). The elevated viral load was associated with the release of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) which triggered airway smooth muscle remodelling in early-life. Re-infection with PVM in later-life induced many of the cardinal features of asthma in the absence of eosinophilic or neutrophilic inflammation. Anti-HMGB1 mitigated both early-life viral disease and asthma-like features, highlighting HMGB1 as a possible novel therapeutic target. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21199.001 PMID:28099113

  9. Virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma with special emphasis on HBV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Xi, Dong; Ning, Qin

    2017-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignant tumor with high lethality, and the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a chief cause. HBV can accelerate HCC via multiple mechanisms. First, HBV induces immune reactions that lead to repeated hepatic inflammation, fibrosis and a deficient immune microenvironment. Subsequently, HBV can modify host genes near the insertion point through DNA integration to cause host cell genome instability and to generate carcinogenic fusion proteins. Additionally, HBV expresses diverse active proteins, especially HBx and HBs, which have a range of transactivation functions such as regulation of apoptosis, interference with intracellular signaling pathways, and alteration of epigenetics. Currently, primary prevention measures for HBV-induced HCC focus on vaccination and antiviral treatment. Here, we report the epidemiology, the molecular mechanism and the progress in therapeutic strategies for controlling HBV-induced HCC.

  10. Influenza virus induces bacterial and nonbacterial otitis media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Short, K.R.; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Thornton, R.; Pedersen, J.; Strugnell, R.A.; Wise, A.K.; Reading, P.C.; Wijburg, O.L.

    2011-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common childhood diseases. OM can arise when a viral infection enables bacteria to disseminate from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Here, we provide the first infant murine model for disease. Mice coinfected with Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza virus

  11. Mechanisms of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced hemopoietic dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Pisa, P; Bro-Jørgensen, K

    1986-01-01

    Results of this study showed that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection causes a marked activation of natural killer (NK) cells not only in the spleen but also in the bone marrow. This activity reached its peak at about day 3 of infection and declined after days 6 to 7. Enhanced NK cell...... the receptivity for syngeneic hemopoietic cells. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that NK cell activation causes rejection of syngeneic stem cells, thus resulting in hemopoietic depression. To understand the mechanisms behind the prolonged decrease in bone marrow receptivity (and bone marrow....... It seems, therefore, that as NK cell activity declines, the spleen regains the ability to support growth of hemopoietic cells and the bone marrow resumes an elevated export of stem cells to the spleen. This diversion of hemopoiesis could explain both the long-standing deficiencies of the bone marrow...

  12. Oxidative Lung Injury in Virus-Induced Wheezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    predominantly in skeletal muscle, heart, brain , and thymus [23,24], we first investigated the role of HDAC class I proteins, specifically HDAC1, 2, and 3, in RSV...acute respiratory tract illness through adulthood [2]. Several recent studies have directly or indirectly indicated an important role of ROS produced...of total cell lysates. The membrane was stripped and reprobed for -actin to determine equal loading of the samples (A, middle ). Densitometric

  13. Contribution of dendritic cells to measles virus induced immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Melissa M; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2013-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) remains an important pathogen in children worldwide. The morbidity and mortality of MV is associated with severe immune suppression. Dendritic cells (DCs) were identified as initial target cells in vivo, and DCs were efficiently infected by MV in vitro. MV infection of DCs likely contributes to functional deficiency in these cells; therefore playing a role in MV-induced immunosuppression. DCs appeared to mature phenotypically; however, the ability of infected cells to stimulate T cells was compromised. Phenotypic maturation of infected immature DCs was partially controlled by IFN production; however, infected DCs also maintained markers of an immature phenotype such as the continued uptake of antigen and lack of expression of chemokine receptor CCR7. Furthermore, mature DCs did not appear to maintain phenotypic maturation following infection demonstrated by decreased MHC and co-stimulatory molecule expression. Several mechanisms of MV-induced DC dysfunction have been suggested, each likely contributing to the immunosuppressive effect of MV-infected DCs. Infected DCs responded aberrantly to secondary maturation stimuli such as CD40L or TLR4 stimulation. MV infection resulted in apoptosis in DC/T-cell cocultures, which may contribute to a reduced T-cell response. Additionally, the immunological synapse between infected DCs and T cells was compromised resulting in reduced T-cell interaction times and activation signaling. The mechanisms of MV contribution to DC dysfunction appear multifaceted and central to MV-induced immunosuppression. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Mechanisms of Virus-Induced Neural Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    of Guillain -Barr6 syndrome , absence of BZLF1 transcription. The absence of both 450 acute demyelinating encephalitis, transverse myelitis, and and...43 W 1,904 nd CVID/IVIG GCV Improved 28 Guillain -Barr1 M 55 W 2,000 nd A NONE ACV Stable EBV = Epstein- Barr virus; CSF = cerebrospinal fluid; CNSL... Guillain -Barr6 syndrome , acute demy- 6 - elinating encephalitis, polyradiculomyelitis, or trans- verse myelitis (see Table). T -CSF examinations showed

  15. Epstein-Barr virus-induced systemic lupus erythematosus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6d. on bachelors above 18, to assist in covering the expenses of the small-pox epidemic. It may bring in cash, but we doubt the ulterior effect. It is cheap at that. . A death from chloroform is reported from the New. Somerset Hospital. It is regrettable, but no more an indication of the danger attending the administration than a.

  16. Lethal Mutagenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Induced by Favipiravir.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I de Ávila

    Full Text Available Lethal mutagenesis is an antiviral approach that consists in extinguishing a virus by an excess of mutations acquired during replication in the presence of a mutagen. Here we show that favipiravir (T-705 is a potent mutagenic agent for hepatitis C virus (HCV during its replication in human hepatoma cells. T-705 leads to an excess of G → A and C → U transitions in the mutant spectrum of preextinction HCV populations. Infectivity decreased significantly in the presence of concentrations of T-705 which are 2- to 8-fold lower than its cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50. Passaging the virus five times in the presence of 400 μM T-705 resulted in virus extinction. Since T-705 has undergone advanced clinical trials for approval for human use, the results open a new approach based on lethal mutagenesis to treat hepatitis C virus infections. If proven effective for HCV in vivo, this new anti-HCV agent may be useful in patient groups that fail current therapeutic regimens.

  17. Oxidative Lung Injury in Virus-Induced Wheezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    in other disease models, such as cardiac hypertrophy and ischemia-reperfusion injury, as well as rheumathoid arthritis (20, 43). HDAC1 and 2 activity...model we will determine by established clinical-like parameters and pathophysiologic endpoints of airway dysfunction the effect of such pharmacologic...synthesis.  There are no studies investigating the role of H2S generation in pathophysiology of viral infections or the use of H2S donors as

  18. Mechanisms of Virus-Induced Neural Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    K. K. Wang. Mattmann, and J. Tschopp. 1999. Equine herpesvirus-2 Eli) gene product, 1999. Procaspase-3 and poly(ADP)ribose polymerase (PARP) are...manifestations. The drocyte nuclei of 12 (80%) of 15 brain pression, hypersensitivity syndromes, and next most common presentation is with specimens

  19. [Haemorrhagic exanthema due to dengue virus induced by acetylsalicylic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, L; de Balanzó, X; Jiménez, O; Pedro-Bolet, M L

    2006-01-01

    Dengue fever, a viral infectious disease characteristic of tropical climates, is considered to be a re-emergent pathology responsible for several serious outbreaks in the last decade. Some factors have been involved in the spread of the virus and its vectorial mosquito carrier: human alteration of the ecosystems, improvement and speed in the transit of goods and people and climate changes. As a reflection of this, an increase in imported cases is probable, especially in tourists coming from endemic areas, considering its short period of incubation (7-10 days). The recognition of personal antecedents of journeys, the main symptoms of the disease and the potential presence of complications (haemorrhagic dengue) should be included in the examination of fever of unknown origin or feverish exanthema. The case of a patient is presented whose clinical picture of classic dengue fever was worsened by self-treatment with acetylsalicylic acid.

  20. Oxidative Lung Injury in Virus-Induced Wheezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Flavonoids are a ubiquitous group of polyphenolic substances present in seeds, fruit skin or peel, and flowers of most plants. Among them, quercetin and...study investigating the effect of di- etary flavonoids , including quercetin and catechins, on the infectivity and replication of RSV. In this study... flavonoids quercetin and EGCG, the nonflavonoids curcumin and re- sveratrol, and the phenolic acid and diterpens rosmarinic and carnosic (carnasol) acids

  1. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Induces Autophagy to Benefit Its Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Guo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The new porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED has caused devastating economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Despite extensive research on the relationship between autophagy and virus infection, the concrete role of autophagy in porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV infection has not been reported. In this study, autophagy was demonstrated to be triggered by the effective replication of PEDV through transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blot analysis. Moreover, autophagy was confirmed to benefit PEDV replication by using autophagy regulators and RNA interference. Furthermore, autophagy might be associated with the expression of inflammatory cytokines and have a positive feedback loop with the NF-κB signaling pathway during PEDV infection. This work is the first attempt to explore the complex interplay between autophagy and PEDV infection. Our findings might accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of PEDV infection and provide new insights into the development of effective therapeutic strategies.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus-induced systemic lupus erythematosus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and anorexia; the adenopathy persisted. The week after this she developed vasculitic lesions on the palms and soles, arthritis of the right knee and moderate hypertension. Urinary dipstick testing showed proteinuria + + and haematuria + +. A screen for auto-immune diseases revealed that antinuclear antibodies were ...

  3. Greener Approach towards Corrosion Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Patni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion control of metals is technically, economically, environmentally, and aesthetically important. The best option is to use inhibitors for protecting metals and alloys against corrosion. As organic corrosion inhibitors are toxic in nature, so green inhibitors which are biodegradable, without any heavy metals and other toxic compounds, are promoted. Also plant products are inexpensive, renewable, and readily available. Tannins, organic amino acids, alkaloids, and organic dyes of plant origin have good corrosion-inhibiting abilities. Plant extracts contain many organic compounds, having polar atoms such as O, P, S, and N. These are adsorbed on the metal surface by these polar atoms, and protective films are formed, and various adsorption isotherms are obeyed. Various types of green inhibitors and their effect on different metals are mentioned in the paper.

  4. Survival Processing Eliminates Collaborative Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reysen, Matthew B; Bliss, Heather; Baker, Melissa A

    2017-04-11

    The present experiments examined the effect of processing words for their survival value, relevance to moving, and pleasantness on participants' free recall scores in both nominal groups (non-redundant pooled individual scores) and collaborative dyads. Overall, participants recalled more words in the survival processing conditions than in the moving and pleasantness processing conditions. Furthermore, nominal groups in both the pleasantness condition (Experiment 1) and the moving and pleasantness conditions (Experiment 2) recalled more words than collaborative groups, thereby replicating the oft-observed effect of collaborative inhibition. However, processing words for their survival value appeared to eliminate the deleterious effects of collaborative remembering in both Experiments 1 and 2. These results are discussed in the context of the retrieval strategy disruption hypothesis and the effects of both expertise and collaborative skill on group remembering.

  5. Mood stabilizers inhibit cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornaghi, Sara; Davis, John N; Gorres, Kelly L; Miller, George; Paidas, Michael J; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2016-12-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection can generate debilitating disease in immunocompromised individuals and neonates. It is also the most common infectious cause of congenital birth defects in infected fetuses. Available anti-CMV drugs are partially effective but are limited by some toxicity, potential viral resistance, and are not recommended for fetal exposure. Valproate, valpromide, and valnoctamide have been used for many years to treat epilepsy and mood disorders. We report for the first time that, in contrast to the virus-enhancing actions of valproate, structurally related valpromide and valnoctamide evoke a substantial and specific inhibition of mouse and human CMV in vitro. In vivo, both drugs safely attenuate mouse CMV, improving survival, body weight, and developmental maturation of infected newborns. The compounds appear to act by a novel mechanism that interferes with CMV attachment to the cell. Our work provides a novel potential direction for CMV therapeutics through repositioning of agents already approved for use in psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reduced surround inhibition in musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hae-Won; Kang, Suk Y; Hallett, Mark; Sohn, Young H

    2012-06-01

    To investigate whether surround inhibition (SI) in the motor system is altered in professional musicians, we performed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study in 10 professional musicians and 15 age-matched healthy non-musicians. TMS was set to be triggered by self-initiated flexion of the index finger at different intervals ranging from 3 to 1,000 ms. Average motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes obtained from self-triggered TMS were normalized to average MEPs of the control TMS at rest and expressed as a percentage. Normalized MEP amplitudes of the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles were compared between the musicians and non-musicians with the primary analysis being the intervals between 3 and 80 ms (during the movement). A mixed-design ANOVA revealed a significant difference in normalized ADM MEPs during the index finger flexion between groups, with less SI in the musicians. This study demonstrated that the functional operation of SI is less strong in musicians than non-musicians, perhaps due to practice of movement synergies involving both muscles. Reduced SI, however, could lead susceptible musicians to be prone to develop task-specific dystonia.

  7. The pharmacology of visuospatial attention and inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logemann, H.N.A.

    2013-01-01

    Attention and inhibition are of vital importance in everyday functioning. Problems of attention and inhibition are central to disorders such as Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Both bias and disengagement key components of visuospatial attention. Bias refers to neuronal signals that

  8. Optimal Decision Making in Neural Inhibition Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ravenzwaaij, Don; van der Maas, Han L. J.; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2012-01-01

    In their influential "Psychological Review" article, Bogacz, Brown, Moehlis, Holmes, and Cohen (2006) discussed optimal decision making as accomplished by the drift diffusion model (DDM). The authors showed that neural inhibition models, such as the leaky competing accumulator model (LCA) and the feedforward inhibition model (FFI), can mimic the…

  9. Methanol Extract of Myelophycus caespitosus Inhibits the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanol Extract of Myelophycus caespitosus Inhibits the Inflammatory Response in Lipopolysaccharidestimulated BV2 Microglial Cells by Downregulating NF-kB via Inhibition of the Akt Signaling Pathway. ... The level of NO production was analyzed using Griess reaction. The release of PGE2 was determined using ...

  10. Factors Impacting the Child with Behavioral Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbuckle, Suzanne R.

    2010-01-01

    Various factors influence the developmental course of the behaviorally inhibited child. These factors include reciprocating, contextual factors, such as the child's own traits, the environment, the maternal characteristics, and the environment. Behaviorally inhibited children show physiological and behavioral signs of fear and anxiety when…

  11. CORROSION INHIBITION BY CASHEW NUT SHELL LIQUID

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF CARBON STEEL. CORROSION INHIBITION BY CASHEW NUT SHELL. LIQUID. JYN Philip, J Buchweishaija and LL Mkayula. Department of Chemistry, University of Dar es Salaam,. P. O. Box 35061, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ABSTRACT. The inhibition mechanism of the Cashew Nut Shell ...

  12. Adsorptive, Kinetic, Thermodynamic and Inhibitive Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption of Cissus populnea stem extract and its subsequent corrosion inhibition properties on aluminum in 0.5 M HCl solutions have been investigated using weight loss measurements. Inhibition efficiency of the plant extract increased with concentration but decreased with rise in temperature. The adsorption of the ...

  13. Cortisol involvement in mechanisms of behavioral inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, Mattie; Boksem, Maarten A. S.

    We studied whether baseline cortisol is associated with post-error slowing, a measure that depends upon brain areas involved in behavioral inhibition. Moreover, we studied whether this association holds after controlling for positive associations with behavioral inhibition scores and error-related

  14. Inhibition: Mental Control Process or Mental Resource?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im-Bolter, Nancie; Johnson, Janice; Ling, Daphne; Pascual-Leone, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The current study tested 2 models of inhibition in 45 children with language impairment and 45 children with normally developing language; children were aged 7 to 12 years. Of interest was whether a model of inhibition as a mental-control process (i.e., executive function) or as a mental resource would more accurately reflect the relations among…

  15. A Qualitative Approach to Enzyme Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Grover L.

    2009-01-01

    Most general biochemistry textbooks present enzyme inhibition by showing how the basic Michaelis-Menten parameters K[subscript m] and V[subscript max] are affected mathematically by a particular type of inhibitor. This approach, while mathematically rigorous, does not lend itself to understanding how inhibition patterns are used to determine the…

  16. Amiodarone Inhibits Apamin-Sensitive Potassium Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Isik; Yu, Chih-Chieh; Chang, Po-Cheng; Chen, Zhenhui; Sohma, Yoshiro; Lin, Shien-Fong; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Ai, Tomohiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Apamin sensitive potassium current (IKAS), carried by the type 2 small conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (SK2) channels, plays an important role in post-shock action potential duration (APD) shortening and recurrent spontaneous ventricular fibrillation (VF) in failing ventricles. Objective To test the hypothesis that amiodarone inhibits IKAS in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells. Methods We used the patch-clamp technique to study IKAS in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing human SK2 before and after amiodarone administration. Results Amiodarone inhibited IKAS in a dose-dependent manner (IC50, 2.67±0.25 µM with 1 µM intrapipette Ca2+). Maximal inhibition was observed with 50 µM amiodarone which inhibited 85.6±3.1% of IKAS induced with 1 µM intrapipette Ca2+ (n = 3). IKAS inhibition by amiodarone was not voltage-dependent, but was Ca2+-dependent: 30 µM amiodarone inhibited 81.5±1.9% of IKAS induced with 1 µM Ca2+ (n = 4), and 16.4±4.9% with 250 nM Ca2+ (n = 5). Desethylamiodarone, a major metabolite of amiodarone, also exerts voltage-independent but Ca2+ dependent inhibition of IKAS. Conclusion Both amiodarone and desethylamiodarone inhibit IKAS at therapeutic concentrations. The inhibition is independent of time and voltage, but is dependent on the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. SK2 current inhibition may in part underlie amiodarone's effects in preventing electrical storm in failing ventricles. PMID:23922993

  17. Amiodarone inhibits apamin-sensitive potassium currents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isik Turker

    Full Text Available Apamin sensitive potassium current (I KAS, carried by the type 2 small conductance Ca(2+-activated potassium (SK2 channels, plays an important role in post-shock action potential duration (APD shortening and recurrent spontaneous ventricular fibrillation (VF in failing ventricles.To test the hypothesis that amiodarone inhibits I KAS in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293 cells.We used the patch-clamp technique to study I KAS in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing human SK2 before and after amiodarone administration.Amiodarone inhibited IKAS in a dose-dependent manner (IC50, 2.67 ± 0.25 µM with 1 µM intrapipette Ca(2+. Maximal inhibition was observed with 50 µM amiodarone which inhibited 85.6 ± 3.1% of IKAS induced with 1 µM intrapipette Ca(2+ (n = 3. IKAS inhibition by amiodarone was not voltage-dependent, but was Ca(2+-dependent: 30 µM amiodarone inhibited 81.5±1.9% of I KAS induced with 1 µM Ca(2+ (n = 4, and 16.4±4.9% with 250 nM Ca(2+ (n = 5. Desethylamiodarone, a major metabolite of amiodarone, also exerts voltage-independent but Ca(2+ dependent inhibition of I KAS.Both amiodarone and desethylamiodarone inhibit I KAS at therapeutic concentrations. The inhibition is independent of time and voltage, but is dependent on the intracellular Ca(2+ concentration. SK2 current inhibition may in part underlie amiodarone's effects in preventing electrical storm in failing ventricles.

  18. BST2/Tetherin Inhibition of Alphavirus Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw Shin Ooi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses such as chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Semliki Forest virus (SFV are small enveloped RNA viruses that bud from the plasma membrane. Tetherin/BST2 is an interferon-induced host membrane protein that inhibits the release of many enveloped viruses via direct tethering of budded particles to the cell surface. Alphaviruses have highly organized structures and exclude host membrane proteins from the site of budding, suggesting that their release might be insensitive to tetherin inhibition. Here, we demonstrated that exogenously-expressed tetherin efficiently inhibited the release of SFV and CHIKV particles from host cells without affecting virus entry and infection. Alphavirus release was also inhibited by the endogenous levels of tetherin in HeLa cells. While rubella virus (RuV and dengue virus (DENV have structural similarities to alphaviruses, tetherin inhibited the release of RuV but not DENV. We found that two recently identified tetherin isoforms differing in length at the N-terminus exhibited distinct capabilities in restricting alphavirus release. SFV exit was efficiently inhibited by the long isoform but not the short isoform of tetherin, while both isoforms inhibited vesicular stomatitis virus exit. Thus, in spite of the organized structure of the virus particle, tetherin specifically blocks alphavirus release and shows an interesting isoform requirement.

  19. Angiotensin inhibition in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John JV Mcmurray

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Survival in patients with heart failure remains very poor, and is worse than that for most common cancers, including bowel cancer in men and breast cancer in women. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is not completely blocked by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibition. Blockade of the RAAS at the AT1-receptor has the theoretical benefit of more effective blockade of the actions of angiotensin II. ACE inhibitors (ACE-Is prevent the breakdown of bradykinin: this has been blamed for some of the unwanted effects of ACE-Is although bradykinin may have advantageous effects in heart failure. Consequently, ACE-Is and ARBs might be complementary or even additive treatments; recent trials have tested these hypotheses. The Candesartan in Heart failure Assessment of Reduction in Mortality and morbidity (CHARM programme compared the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB candesartan (target dose 32 mg once daily to placebo in three distinct but complementary populations of patients with symptomatic heart failure. These were: patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF who were ACE-I-intolerant (CHARM-Alternative; patients with reduced LVEF who were being treated with ACE-Is (CHARM-Added; and patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function (CHARM-Preserved. There were substantial and statistically significant reductions in the primary composite end point (risk of cardiovascular death or hospital admission for heart failure in CHARM-Alternative. This was also the case in CHARM-Added, supporting and extending the findings of Val-HeFT. In CHARM-Preserved, the effect of candesartan on the primary end point did not reach conventional statistical significance though hospital admission for heart failure was reduced significantly with candesartan. In the CHARM-Overall programme there was a statistically borderline reduction in all-cause mortality with a clear reduction in cardiovascular mortality. All-cause mortality was

  20. Angiotensin inhibition in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John JV McMurray

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Survival in patients with heart failure remains very poor, and is worse than that for most common cancers, including bowel cancer in men and breast cancer in women. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is not completely blocked by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibition. Blockade of the RAAS at the AT1-receptor has the theoretical benefit of more effective blockade of the actions of angiotensin II. ACE inhibitors (ACE-Is prevent the breakdown of bradykinin: this has been blamed for some of the unwanted effects of ACE-Is although bradykinin may have advantageous effects in heart failure. Consequently, ACE-Is and ARBs might be complementary or even additive treatments; recent trials have tested these hypotheses.The Candesartan in Heart failure Assessment of Reduction in Mortality and morbidity (CHARM programme compared the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB candesartan (target dose 32 mg once daily to placebo in three distinct but complementary populations of patients with symptomatic heart failure. These were: patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF who were ACE-I-intolerant (CHARM-Alternative; patients with reduced LVEF who were being treated with ACE-Is (CHARM-Added; and patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function (CHARM-Preserved.There were substantial and statistically significant reductions in the primary composite end point (risk of cardiovascular death or hospital admission for heart failure in CHARM-Alternative. This was also the case in CHARM-Added, supporting and extending the findings of Val-HeFT. In CHARM-Preserved, the effect of candesartan on the primary end point did not reach conventional statistical significance though hospital admission for heart failure was reduced significantly with candesartan. In the CHARM-Overall programme there was a statistically borderline reduction in all-cause mortality with a clear reduction in cardiovascular mortality. All-cause mortality was

  1. Cellulase Inhibition by High Concentrations of Monosaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsieh, Chia-Wen; Cannella, David; Jørgensen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    that low free water availability contributes to cellulase inhibition. Of the hydrolytic enzymes involved, those acting on the cellulose substrate, that is, exo- and endoglucanases, were the most inhibited. The β -glucosidases were shown to be less sensitive to high monosaccharide concentrations except......Biological degradation of biomass on an industrial scale culminates in high concentrations of end products. It is known that the accumulation of glucose and cellobiose, end products of hydrolysis, inhibit cellulases and decrease glucose yields. Aside from these end products, however, other...

  2. Studies of Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inesi, Giuseppe; Hua, Suming; Xu, Cheng; Ma, Hailun; Seth, Malini; Prasad, Anand M; Sumbilla, Carlota

    2005-12-01

    The Ca(2+) transport ATPase of intracellular membranes (SERCA) can be inhibited by a series of chemical compounds such as Thapsigargin (TG), 2,5-di(tert-butyl)hydroquinone (DBHQ) and 1,3-dibromo-2,4,6-tris (methyl-isothio-uronium) benzene (Br(2)-TITU). These compounds have specific binding sites in the ATPase protein, and different mechanisms of inhibition. On the other hand, SERCA gene silencing offers a convenient and specific method for suppression of SERCA activity in cells. The physiological and pharmacological implications of SERCA inhibition are discussed.

  3. Should We Stop Thinking About Inhibition? Searching for Individual and Age Differences in Inhibition Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Mermet, Alodie; Gade, Miriam; Oberauer, Klaus

    2017-09-28

    Inhibition is often conceptualized as a unitary construct reflecting the ability to ignore and suppress irrelevant information. At the same time, it has been subdivided into inhibition of prepotent responses (i.e., the ability to stop dominant responses) and resistance to distracter interference (i.e., the ability to ignore distracting information). The present study investigated the unity and diversity of inhibition as a psychometric construct, and tested the hypothesis of an inhibition deficit in older age. We measured inhibition in young and old adults with 11 established laboratory tasks: antisaccade, stop-signal, color Stroop, number Stroop, arrow flanker, letter flanker, Simon, global-local, positive and negative compatibility tasks, and n-2 repetition costs in task switching. In both age groups, the inhibition measures from individual tasks had good reliabilities, but correlated only weakly among each other. Structural equation modeling identified a 2-factor model with factors for inhibition of prepotent responses and resistance to distracter interference. Older adults scored worse in the inhibition of prepotent response, but better in the resistance to distracter interference. However, the model had low explanatory power. Together, these findings call into question inhibition as a psychometric construct and the hypothesis of an inhibition deficit in older age. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family...

  5. Glycerol inhibition of ruminal lipolysis in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental glycerol inhibits rumen lipolysis, a prerequisite for rumen biohydrogenation, which is responsible for the saturation of dietary fatty acids consumed by ruminant animals. Feeding excess glycerol, however, adversely affects dry matter digestibility. To more clearly define the effect of...

  6. Piperine, a dietary phytochemical, inhibits angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Doucette, Carolyn D.; Hilchie, Ashley L.; Liwski, Robert; Hoskin, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor progression. Piperine, a major alkaloid constituent of black pepper, has diverse physiological actions including killing of cancer cells; however, the effect of piperine on angiogenesis is not known. Here we show that piperine inhibited the proliferation and G1/S transition of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) without causing cell death. Piperine also inhibited HUVEC migration and tubule formation in vitro, as well as collagen-induce...

  7. Aurantiogliocladin inhibits biofilm formation at subtoxic concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Tomoko Yuyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections where pathogens are organized in biofilms are difficult to treat due to increased antibiotic resistances in biofilms. To overcome this limitation new approaches are needed to control biofilms. One way is to screen natural products from organisms living in a wet environment. The rational is that these organisms are preferentially threatened by biofilm formation and may have developed strategies to control pathogens in these biofilms. In a screen of fungal isolates obtained from the Harz mountains in Germany several strains have been found producing compounds for the inhibition of biofilms. One of these strains has been identified as Clonostachys candelabrumproducing aurantiogliocladin. Biological tests showed aurantiogliocladin as a weak antibiotic which was active against Staphylococcus epidermidisbut not S. aureus. Aurantiogliocladin could also inhibit biofilm formation of several of the tested bacterial strains. This inhibition, however, was never complete but biofilm inhibition activity was also found at concentrations below the minimal inhibitory concentrations, e. g. Bacillus cereuswith a MIC of 128 μg mL–1showed at 32 μg mL–1still 37% biofilm inhibition. In agreement with this finding was the observation that aurantiogliocladin was bacteriostatic for the tested bacteria but not bactericidal. Because several closely related toluquinones with different antibiotic activities have been reported from various fungi screening of a chemical library of toluquinones is suggested for the improvement of biofilm inhibition activities.

  8. Inhibition of COX isoforms by nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaver, Ben; Smith, Jerry Robert

    2004-01-01

    Humans have two isoforms of Prostaglandin H Synthase or cyclooxygenase: COX-1 and COX-2. COX-1 is cytoprotective. COX-2 inhibitors reduce inflammation without the risk of ulceration and kidney damage. The ideal nutraceutical would inhibit COX-2 synthesis while preserving COX-1 synthesis. The hypothesis for this research was that COX inhibitors would fall primarily into three categories: COX-2 specific inhibition, non-specific inhibition (COX-1 and COX-2), and minimal inhibition. The human Cayman COX inhibitor screening assay was used to determine the inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) of COX-1/ COX-2 activity of each nutraceutical. The assay was run, in duplicate, with three concentrations of a suspected inhibitor, a standard curve of eight concentrations, a non-specific binding sample, and a maximum binding sample. The inhibition and concentration of each sample was then put on a multiple regression best-fit line and the IC50 determined. For comparison, ibuprofen, rofecoxib, naproxen, and indomethacin were used. Positive results were seen for ipriflavone, resveratrol, MSV-60, amentoflavone, ruscus extract and notoginseng. Glucosamine, nexrutine, and berberine did not inhibit either isoform.

  9. Inhibition of Heme Peroxidases by Melamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattaraporn Vanachayangkul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2008 melamine-contaminated infant formula and dairy products in China led to over 50,000 hospitalizations of children due to renal injuries. In North America during 2007 and in Asia during 2004, melamine-contaminated pet food products resulted in numerous pet deaths due to renal failure. Animal studies have confirmed the potent renal toxicity of melamine combined with cyanuric acid. We showed previously that the solubility of melamine cyanurate is low at physiologic pH and ionic strength, provoking us to speculate how toxic levels of these compounds could be transported through the circulation without crystallizing until passing into the renal filtrate. We hypothesized that melamine might be sequestered by heme proteins, which could interfere with heme enzyme activity. Four heme peroxidase enzymes were selected for study: horseradish peroxidase (HRP, lactoperoxidase (LPO, and cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and -2. Melamine exhibited noncompetitive inhibition of HRP (9.5±0.7mM, and LPO showed a mixed model of inhibition (14.5±4.7mM. The inhibition of HRP and LPO was confirmed using a chemiluminescent peroxidase assay. Melamine also exhibited COX-1 inhibition, but inhibition of COX-2 was not detected. Thus, our results demonstrate that melamine inhibits the activity of three heme peroxidases.

  10. Inhibition of 2-methoxyestradiol glucuronidation by probenecid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuli; Sherbini, Ahmad; Matin, Bahar; Zhao, Yanli; Castellot, John; Greenblatt, David J

    2015-11-01

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2), a metabolite of estradiol, has antitumour activity in vitro. However, potential clinical applicability has been limited by low oral bioavailability. Probenecid was evaluated in vitro as an inhibitor of 2ME2 glucuronidation for purposes of enhancing 2ME2 oral bioavailability. Human liver microsomes were used to determine kinetic parameters for transformation of 2ME2 to its glucuronide metabolites (M1, M2) and inhibition of the reactions by probenecid. M1 and M2 formation from 2ME2 proceeded with features of substrate inhibition. Probenecid inhibited metabolite formation, with mean inhibition constant (Ki ) values of 0.9 and 2.6 mM, respectively. Inhibition was reversible, with mixed competitive-non-competitive characteristics. The Ki values for probenecid inhibition of 2ME2 glucuronide formation, when compared to maximum probenecid plasma concentrations anticipated clinically, indicate that probenecid co-administration has the potential to augment systemic plasma levels of 2ME2 after oral dosage in humans. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Piperine, a dietary phytochemical, inhibits angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Carolyn D.; Hilchie, Ashley L.; Liwski, Robert; Hoskin, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor progression. Piperine, a major alkaloid constituent of black pepper, has diverse physiological actions including killing of cancer cells; however, the effect of piperine on angiogenesis is not known. Here we show that piperine inhibited the proliferation and G1/S transition of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) without causing cell death. Piperine also inhibited HUVEC migration and tubule formation in vitro, as well as collagen-induced angiogenic activity by rat aorta explants and breast cancer cell-induced angiogenesis in chick embryos. Although piperine binds to and activates the cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), its effects on endothelial cells did not involve TRPV1 since the antiproliferative effect of piperine was not affected by TRPV1-selective antagonists, nor did HUVECs express detectable TRPV1 mRNA. Importantly, piperine inhibited phosphorylation of Ser 473 and Thr 308 residues of Akt (protein kinase B), which is a key regulator of endothelial cell function and angiogenesis. Consistent with Akt inhibition as the basis of piperine’s action on HUVECs, inhibition of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway with LY-294002 also inhibited HUVEC proliferation and collagen-induced angiogenesis. Taken together, these data support the further investigation of piperine as an angiogenesis inhibitor for use in cancer treatment. PMID:22902327

  12. Inhibition in the Human Auditory Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Inui

    Full Text Available Despite their indispensable roles in sensory processing, little is known about inhibitory interneurons in humans. Inhibitory postsynaptic potentials cannot be recorded non-invasively, at least in a pure form, in humans. We herein sought to clarify whether prepulse inhibition (PPI in the auditory cortex reflected inhibition via interneurons using magnetoencephalography. An abrupt increase in sound pressure by 10 dB in a continuous sound was used to evoke the test response, and PPI was observed by inserting a weak (5 dB increase for 1 ms prepulse. The time course of the inhibition evaluated by prepulses presented at 10-800 ms before the test stimulus showed at least two temporally distinct inhibitions peaking at approximately 20-60 and 600 ms that presumably reflected IPSPs by fast spiking, parvalbumin-positive cells and somatostatin-positive, Martinotti cells, respectively. In another experiment, we confirmed that the degree of the inhibition depended on the strength of the prepulse, but not on the amplitude of the prepulse-evoked cortical response, indicating that the prepulse-evoked excitatory response and prepulse-evoked inhibition reflected activation in two different pathways. Although many diseases such as schizophrenia may involve deficits in the inhibitory system, we do not have appropriate methods to evaluate them; therefore, the easy and non-invasive method described herein may be clinically useful.

  13. CMP substitutions preferentially inhibit polysialic acid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Angata, Kiyohiko; Seeberger, Peter H; Hindsgaul, Ole; Fukuda, Minoru

    2008-02-01

    It is widely reported that derivatives of sugar moieties can be used to metabolically label cell surface carbohydrates or inhibit a particular glycosylation. However, few studies address the effect of substitution of the cytidylmonophosphate (CMP) portion on sialyltransferase activities. Here we first synthesized 2'-O-methyl CMP and 5-methyl CMP and then asked if these CMP derivatives are recognized by alpha2,3-sialyltransferases (ST3Gal-III and ST3Gal-IV), alpha2,6-sialyltransferase (ST6Gal-I), and alpha2,8-sialyltransferase (ST8Sia-II, ST8Sia-III, and ST8Sia-IV). We found that ST3Gal-III and ST3Gal-IV but not ST6Gal-I was inhibited by 2'-O-methyl CMP as potently as by CMP, while ST3Gal-III, ST3Gal-IV, and ST6Gal-I were moderately inhibited by 5-methyl CMP. Previously, it was reported that polysialyltransferase ST8Sia-II but not ST8Sia-IV was inhibited by CMP N-butylneuraminic acid. We found that ST8Sia-IV as well as ST8Sia-II and ST8Sia-III are inhibited by 2'-O-methyl CMP as robustly as by CMP and moderately by 5-methyl CMP. Moreover, the addition of CMP, 2'-O-methyl CMP, and 5-methyl CMP to the culture medium resulted in the decrease of polysialic acid expression on the cell surface and NCAM of Chinese hamster ovary cells. These results suggest that 2'-O-methyl CMP and 5-methyl CMP can be used to preferentially inhibit sialyltransferases, in particular, polysialyltransferases in vitro and in vivo. Such inhibition may be useful to determine the function of a carbohydrate synthesized by a specific sialyltransferase such as polysialyltransferase.

  14. Characterization of acetylcholinesterase-inhibition by itopride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Y; Kimura, T; Miyashita, N; Morikawa, K; Nagata, O; Itoh, Z; Kondo, Y

    1994-11-01

    Itopride is a gastroprokinetic benzamide derivative. This agent inhibited both electric eel acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and horse serum butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). The IC50 of itopride with AChE (2.04 +/- 0.27 microM) was, however, 100-fold less than that with BuChE, whereas in the case of neostigmine with AChE (11.3 +/- 3.4 nM), it was 10-fold less. The recovery of AChE activity inhibited by 10(-7) M neostigmine was partial, but that inhibited by up to 3 x 10(-5) M itopride was complete when the reaction mixture was subjected to ultrafiltration. Double reciprocal plots of the experimental data showed that both Km and Vmax were affected by itopride, suggesting that the inhibition is a "mixed" type, although primarily being an uncompetitive one. The inhibitory effect of itopride on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in guinea pig gastrointestine was much weaker than that on pure AChE. However, in the presence of a low dose of diisopropyl fluorophosphate, just enough to inhibit BuChE but not AChE, the IC50s of itopride against ChE activities were found to be about 0.5 microM. In conclusion, itopride exerts reversible and a "mixed" type of inhibition preferably against AChE. The IC50 of itopride for electric eel and guinea pig gastrointestinal AChE inhibition was 200 times and 50 times as large as that of neostigmine, respectively.

  15. The Influence of Inhibiting Angiopoietin-2 on the Biological Characteristics of 
Bronchogenic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailing LI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It is well-known that angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2 plays an important role in the formation of the blood vascular system. Angiopoietin is involved in many diseases about angiogenesis such as tumor, so may have great prospects for the treatment of these diseases. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of inhibiting Ang-2 via adeno-associated virus induced RNA interference (RNAi on the biological characteristics of bronchogenic adenocarcinoma. Methods AAV-Ang-2shRNA driven by H1 promoter was constructed to transfect A549 cell line. Normal and AAV-Null cell line were utilized in the control groups. The influence of RNAi on Ang-2 expression as well as the growth rate, tumorigenic efficiency, proliferation rate, apoptosis, and microvessel density of A549 cell line were analyzed. Results In vitro experiment indicated that the Ang-2 expression level (P<0.001 and growth rate (P<0.001 of A549 cell line 48 h transfected with AAV-Ang-2shRNA were significantly lower than those in the normal and AAV-Null cell lines. Cell cycle analysis showed the proliferation index (PI of normal, AAV-Null, and AAV-Ang-2shRNA transfected A549 cell line were 0.51±0.43, 0.48±0.29, and 0.26±0.31, respectively, which indicated the PI of AAV-Ang-2shRNA transfected cell line was significantly lower, compared with the normal and AAV-Null cell lines. In vivo experiment exhibited that AAV-Ang-2shRNA transfected cell line possessed a lower mass and volumn of tumor relative to two control groups. In addition, the apoptosis index (AI of AAV-Ang-2shRNA transfected, normal, and AAV-Null cell lines were (5.98±3.11%, (7.51±4.42% and (17.06±7.43% respectively, which manifested that AAV-Ang-2shRNA transfected cell line possessed a higher AI (P=0.005, P=0.007. A lower percentage of PCNA-positive cell was observed in AAV-Ang-2shRNA transfected cell line (92.75±9.7% as well, compared with the normal (85.8±11.8% and AAV-Null (69.8±16.5% cell lines

  16. Chunking in task sequences modulates task inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Iring; Philipp, Andrea M; Gade, Miriam

    2006-04-01

    In a study of the formation of representations of task sequences and its influence on task inhibition, participants first performed tasks in a predictable sequence (e.g., ABACBC) and then performed the tasks in a random sequence. Half of the participants were explicitly instructed about the predictable sequence, whereas the other participants did not receive these instructions. Task-sequence learning was inferred from shorter reaction times (RTs) in predictable relative to random sequences. Persisting inhibition of competing tasks was indicated by increased RTs in n- 2 task repetitions (e.g., ABA) compared with n- 2 nonrepetitions (e.g., CBA). The results show task-sequence learning for both groups. However, task inhibition was reduced in predictable relative to random sequences among instructed-learning participants who formed an explicit representation of the task sequence, whereas sequence learning and task inhibition were independent in the noninstructed group. We hypothesize that the explicit instructions led to chunking of the task sequence, and that n- 2 repetitions served as chunk points (ABA-CBC), so that within-chunk facilitation modulated the inhibition effect.

  17. Collaborative inhibition in spatial memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjolund, Lori A; Erdman, Matthew; Kelly, Jonathan W

    2014-08-01

    Collaborative inhibition refers to the finding that pairs of people working together to retrieve information from memory-a collaborative group-often retrieve fewer unique items than do nominal pairs, who retrieve individually but whose performance is pooled. Two experiments were designed to explore whether collaborative inhibition, which has heretofore been studied using traditional memory stimuli such as word lists, also characterizes spatial memory retrieval. In the present study, participants learned a layout of objects and then reconstructed the layout from memory, either individually or in pairs. The layouts created by collaborative pairs were more accurate than those created by individuals, but less accurate than those of nominal pairs, providing evidence for collaborative inhibition in spatial memory retrieval. Collaborative inhibition occurred when participants were allowed to dictate the order of object placement during reconstruction (Exp. 1), and also when object order was imposed by the experimenter (Exp. 2), which was intended to disrupt the retrieval processes of pairs as well as of individuals. Individual tests of perspective taking indicated that the underlying representations of pair members were no different than those of individuals; in all cases, spatial memories were organized around a reference frame aligned with the studied perspective. These results suggest that inhibition is caused by the product of group recall (i.e., seeing a partner's object placement), not by the process of group recall (i.e., taking turns choosing an object to place). The present study has implications for how group performance on a collaborative spatial memory task may be optimized.

  18. ROCK inhibition activates MCF-7 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwon Yang

    Full Text Available Dormant carcinoma cancer cells showing epithelial characteristics can be activated to dissipate into the surrounding tissue or organs through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. However, the molecular details underlying the activation of dormant cancer cells have been less explored. In this study, we examined the molecular pathway to activate dormant breast cancer cells. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK inhibition disrupted cell junction, promoted cell proliferation and migration / invasion in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional substrates. The disintegration of cell junction upon ROCK inhibition, coupled with the loss of E-cadherin and b-catenin from the cell membrane, was associated with the activation of Rac1 upon ROCK inhibition. Migration / invasion also increased upon ROCK inhibition. However, the activation of MCF-7 cells upon ROCK inhibition was not associated with the up-regulation of typical EMT markers, such as snail and slug. Based on these results, we suggest the potential risk for dormant cancer cells to dissipate through non-typical EMT when ROCK activity is down-regulated.

  19. Inhibition of arylesterase by aliphatic alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debord, J; Dantoine, T; Bollinger, J C; Abraham, M H; Verneuil, B; Merle, L

    1998-05-15

    The inhibition of arylesterase (EC 3.1.8.1) by 11 aliphatic alcohols (one to seven carbon atoms) was studied in blood serum from healthy donors. Inhibition curves were described by the Hill equation, with a Hill coefficient (n) close to unity, except for some alcohols, mainly the lowest. The inhibiting activity of the alcohols was highly dependent on their structure, since the C50 values covered about three orders of magnitude. The least active compound was methanol (C50 approximately 1 M) and the most active was heptanol (C50 approximately 7.4 x 10(-4) M). The A and B isozymes (differing by the amino acid at position 191) had similar inhibition parameters with the alcohols tested. Quantitative structure-activity relationships were computed with either the experimental solvation parameters of Abraham [6] or the theoretical parameters of Wilson and Famini [11]. Both methods gave similar results, with a slight advantage to the empirical parameters in terms of simplicity and statistical significance. The two main determinants of inhibition were identified as molecular volume and lack of polarity. The effect of volume was non-linear, tending to a maximum when the length of the alcohol increased. For a given number of carbon atoms, the best inhibitor was the least polar compound. These results point to a binding site consisting mainly of nonpolar aliphatic amino acids, and located in the depth of the protein molecule.

  20. The role of (dis)inhibition in creativity: decreased inhibition improves idea generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radel, Rémi; Davranche, Karen; Fournier, Marion; Dietrich, Arne

    2015-01-01

    There is now a large body of evidence showing that many different conditions related to impaired fronto-executive functioning are associated with the enhancement of some types of creativity. In this paper, we pursue the possibility that the central mechanism associated with this effect might be a reduced capacity to exert inhibition. We tested this hypothesis by exhausting the inhibition efficiency through prolonged and intensive practice of either the Simon or the Eriksen Flanker task. Performance on another inhibition task indicated that only the cognitive resources for inhibition of participants facing high inhibition demands were impaired. Subsequent creativity tests revealed that exposure to high inhibition demands led to enhanced fluency in a divergent thinking task (Alternate Uses Task), but no such changes occurred in a convergent task (Remote Associate Task; studies 1a and 1b). The same manipulation also led to a hyper-priming effect for weakly related primes in a Lexical Decision Task (Study 2). Together, these findings suggest that inhibition selectively affects some types of creative processes and that, when resources for inhibition are lacking, the frequency and the originality of ideas was facilitated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of ethylene production by putrescine alleviates aluminium-induced root inhibition in wheat plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Jin, Chongwei; Sun, Chengliang; Wang, Jinghong; Ye, Yiquan; Zhou, Weiwei; Lu, Lingli; Lin, Xianyong

    2016-01-08

    Inhibition of root elongation is one of the most distinct symptoms of aluminium (Al) toxicity. Although putrescine (Put) has been identified as an important signaling molecule involved in Al tolerance, it is yet unknown how Put mitigates Al-induced root inhibition. Here, the possible mechanism was investigated by using two wheat genotypes differing in Al resistance: Al-tolerant Xi Aimai-1 and Al-sensitive Yangmai-5. Aluminium caused more root inhibition in Yangmai-5 and increased ethylene production at the root apices compared to Xi Aimai-1, whereas the effects were significantly reversed by ethylene biosynthesis inhibitors. The simultaneous exposure of wheat seedlings to Al and ethylene donor, ethephon, or ethylene biosynthesis precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), increased ethylene production and aggravated root inhibition, which was more pronounced in Xi Aimai-1. In contrast, Put treatment decreased ethylene production and alleviated Al-induced root inhibition in both genotypes, and the effects were more conspicuous in Yangmai-5. Furthermore, our results indicated that Al-induced ethylene production was mediated by ACC synthase (ACS) and ACC oxidase, and that Put decreased ethylene production by inhibiting ACS. Altogether, these findings indicate that ethylene is involved in Al-induced root inhibition and this process could be alleviated by Put through inhibiting ACS activity.

  2. Checkpoint kinase 1 inhibition sensitises transformed cells to dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Arnould, Stéphanie; Rodier, Geneviève; Matar, Gisèle; Vincent, Charles; Pirot, Nelly; Delorme, Yoann; Berthet, Charlène; Buscail, Yoan; Noël, Jean Yohan; Lachambre, Simon; Jarlier, Marta; Bernex, Florence; Delpech, Hélène; Vidalain, Pierre Olivier; Janin, Yves L.

    2017-01-01

    Reduction in nucleotide pools through the inhibition of mitochondrial enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) has been demonstrated to effectively reduce cancer cell proliferation and tumour growth. The current study sought to investigate whether this antiproliferative effect could be enhanced by combining Chk1 kinase inhibition. The pharmacological activity of DHODH inhibitor teriflunomide was more selective towards transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts than their primary or immortalis...

  3. Anticancer Alkaloid Lamellarins Inhibit Protein Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Meijer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lamellarins, a family of hexacyclic pyrrole alkaloids originally isolated from marine invertebrates, display promising anti-tumor activity. They induce apoptotic cell death through multi-target mechanisms, including inhibition of topoisomerase I, interaction with DNA and direct effects on mitochondria. We here report that lamellarins inhibit several protein kinases relevant to cancer such as cyclin-dependent kinases, dualspecificity tyrosine phosphorylation activated kinase 1A, casein kinase 1, glycogen synthase kinase-3 and PIM-1. A good correlation is observed between the effects of lamellarins on protein kinases and their action on cell death, suggesting that inhibition of specific kinases may contribute to the cytotoxicity of lamellarins. Structure/activity relationship suggests several paths for the optimization of lamellarins as kinase inhibitors.

  4. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles inhibit cellular respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhimin; Morrow, Matthew P; Asefa, Tewodros; Sharma, Krishna K; Duncan, Cole; Anan, Abhishek; Penefsky, Harvey S; Goodisman, Jerry; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effect of two types of mesoporous silica nanoparticles, MCM-41 and SBA-15, on mitochondrial O 2 consumption (respiration) in HL-60 (myeloid) cells, Jurkat (lymphoid) cells, and isolated mitochondria. SBA-15 inhibited cellular respiration at 25-500 microg/mL; the inhibition was concentration-dependent and time-dependent. The cellular ATP profile paralleled that of respiration. MCM-41 had no noticeable effect on respiration rate. In cells depleted of metabolic fuels, 50 microg/mL SBA-15 delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration by 12 min and 200 microg/mL SBA-15 by 34 min; MCM-41 also delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration. Neither SBA-15 nor MCM-41 affected cellular glutathione. Both nanoparticles inhibited respiration of isolated mitochondria and submitochondrial particles.

  5. Silver-Palladium Surfaces Inhibit Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Schroll, Casper; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    Undesired biofilm formation is a major concern in many areas. In the present study, we investigated biofilm-inhibiting properties of a silver-palladium surface that kills bacteria by generating microelectric fields and electrochemical redox processes. For evaluation of the biofilm inhibition...... efficacy and study of the biofilm inhibition mechanism, the silver-sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and the silver-resistant E. coli J53[pMG101] strains were used as model organisms, and batch and flow chamber setups were used as model systems. In the case of the silver-sensitive strain, the silver......-palladium surfaces killed the bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low or high bacterial load. In the case of the silver-resistant strain, the silver-palladium surfaces killed surface-associated bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low bacterial load, whereas under...

  6. The inhibition of monoamine oxidase by esomeprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzer, A; Pienaar, A; Petzer, J P

    2013-09-01

    Virtual screening of a library of drugs has suggested that esomeprazole, the S-enantiomer of omeprazole, may possess binding affinities for the active sites of the monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B enzymes. Based on this finding, the current study examines the MAO inhibitory properties of esomeprazole. Using recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B, IC50 values for the inhibition of these enzymes by esomeprazole were experimentally determined. To examine the reversibility of MAO inhibition by esomeprazole, the recoveries of the enzymatic activities after dilution of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes were evaluated. In addition, reversibility of inhibition was also examined by measuring the recoveries of enzyme activities after dialysis of enzyme-inhibitor mixtures. Lineweaver-Burk plots were constructed to evaluate the mode of MAO inhibition and to measure Ki values. The results document that esomeprazole inhibits both MAO-A and MAO-B with IC50 values of 23 µM and 48 µM, respectively. The interactions of esomeprazole with MAO-A and MAO-B are reversible and most likely competitive with Ki values for the inhibition of the respective enzymes of 8.99 µM and 31.7 µM. Considering the available pharmacokinetic data and typical therapeutic doses of esomeprazole, these inhibitory potencies are unlikely to be of pharmacological relevance in humans. The MAO inhibitory effects of esomeprazole should however be taken into consideration when using this drug in animal experiments where higher doses are often administered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Nanostructured Block Copolymer Coatings for Biofouling Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    Office of Naval Research 875 North Randolph St. Arlington, VA, 22203-1995 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ONR 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER...we hoped. Inhibition, but not highly tunable by change of MW ratio The inhibition of diatoms by the diblocks was not significant (See figure 13). M...OH O a. £ o EC o a. in £ 0 Cu Figure 13 - The initial attachment density of the diatom Navicula on PS-b-PMMA coatings after gentle

  8. Inhibition of spinach bolting by growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Borkowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. plants must be harvested during a short period of time because they bolt just after producing some edible leaves. Maleic hydrazide (MH and its commercial preparation "Antyrost" were found to inhibit bolting very strongly. The preparation Off-shoot-O showed very weak activity in suppressing bolting but diminished markedly the resistance of spinach plants to fungus diseases. Triiodobenzoic acid stimulated bolting, and the retardant succinic acid-2-2-dimethylhydrazide (SADH did not affect bolting. Application of MH to inhibit spinach bolting cannot be recommended in practice before investigating the residues of this compound in leaves.

  9. Halenaquinone inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Sachiko; Takeuchi, Tomoharu; Kawabata, Tetsuro; Kato, Hikaru; Yamakuma, Michiko; Matsuo, Kanae; El-Desoky, Ahmed H; Losung, Fitje; Mangindaan, Remy E P; de Voogd, Nicole J; Arata, Yoichiro; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi

    2014-11-15

    Halenaquinone was isolated from the marine sponge Petrosia alfiani as an inhibitor of osteoclastogenic differentiation of murine RAW264 cells. It inhibited the RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand)-induced upregulation of TRAP (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase) activity as well as the formation of multinuclear osteoclasts. In addition, halenaquinone substantially suppressed RANKL-induced IκB degradation and Akt phosphorylation. Thus, these results suggest that halenaquinone inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis at least by suppressing the NF-κB and Akt signaling pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Many Putative Endocrine Disruptors Inhibit Prostaglandin Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, David M.; Skalkam, Maria L.; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure

    2011-01-01

    Background: Prostaglandins (PGs) play key roles in development and maintenance of homeostasis of the adult body. Despite these important roles, it remains unclear whether the PG pathway is a target for endocrine disruption. However, several known endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) share a high...... of endocrine disruption. Results: We found that many known EDCs inhibit the PG pathway in a mouse Sertoli cell line and in human primary mast cells. The EDCs also reduced PG synthesis in ex vivo rat testis and it was correlated with a reduced testosterone production. The inhibition of PG synthesis occurs...

  11. Proton pump inhibitors inhibit pancreatic secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Barbuskaite, Dagne; Tozzi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    +/K+-ATPases are expressed and functional in human pancreatic ducts and whether proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have effect on those. Here we show that the gastric HKα1 and HKβ subunits (ATP4A; ATP4B) and non-gastric HKα2 subunits (ATP12A) of H+/K+-ATPases are expressed in human pancreatic cells. Pumps have similar...... localizations in duct cell monolayers (Capan-1) and human pancreas, and notably the gastric pumps are localized on the luminal membranes. In Capan-1 cells, PPIs inhibited recovery of intracellular pH from acidosis. Furthermore, in rats treated with PPIs, pancreatic secretion was inhibited but concentrations...

  12. Peptide inhibition of human cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Cindy A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the most prevalent congenital viral infection in the United States and Europe causing significant morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. HCMV is also an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV- infected patients with AIDS, and solid organ and allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. Current treatments for HCMV-associated diseases are insufficient due to the emergence of drug-induced resistance and cytotoxicity, necessitating novel approaches to limit HCMV infection. The aim of this study was to develop therapeutic peptides targeting glycoprotein B (gB, a major glycoprotein of HCMV that is highly conserved across the Herpesviridae family, that specifically inhibit fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane preventing HCMV entry and infection. Results Using the Wimley-White Interfacial Hydrophobicity Scale (WWIHS, several regions within gB were identified that display a high potential to interact with lipid bilayers of cell membranes and hydrophobic surfaces within proteins. The ability of synthetic peptides analogous to WWIHS-positive sequences of HCMV gB to inhibit viral infectivity was evaluated. Human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF were infected with the Towne-GFP strain of HCMV (0.5 MOI, preincubated with peptides at a range of concentrations (78 nm to 100 μM, and GFP-positive cells were visualized 48 hours post-infection by fluorescence microscopy and analyzed quantitatively by flow cytometry. Peptides that inhibited HCMV infection demonstrated different inhibitory concentration curves indicating that each peptide possesses distinct biophysical properties. Peptide 174-200 showed 80% inhibition of viral infection at a concentration of 100 μM, and 51% and 62% inhibition at concentrations of 5 μM and 2.5 μM, respectively. Peptide 233-263 inhibited infection by 97% and 92% at concentrations of 100

  13. Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides inhibit TLR3-mediated responses in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and in vivo in cynomolgus macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sköld, A.; Hasan, M.; Vargas, L.; Saidi, H.; Bosquet, N.; Grand, R. le; Smith, C.I.; Spetz, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    TLR3 is a key receptor for recognition of double-stranded RNA and initiation of immune responses against viral infections. However, hyperactive responses can have adverse effects, such as virus-induced asthma. Strategies to prevent TLR3-mediated pathology are therefore desired. We investigated the

  14. Investigation of antihemolytic, xanthine oxidase inhibition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Material and methods: To investigate SVEs antihemolytic activity, the 2,2,-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) was used to induce erythrocyte oxidative hemolysis. In XO inhibition test, xanthine was used as substrate and cytochrome c for generating superoxide anions. The antioxidant activity of SVEs was ...

  15. Detection Of Haemagglutination–Inhibition Antibodies Against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibodies against influenza A virus was carried out on pigs sera collected at Bodija abattoir, Ibadan between December, 2001 and August 2002. Out of the 107 sera tested, 101 (94.39%) had HI antibodies to influenza A (H1N1) human strain while the remaining 6 (5.61%) were ...

  16. Nobiletin Inhibits Expression of Inflammatory Mediators and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multi-fold increases in the level of NO were seen. Moreover, increased levels of inflammatory cytokine,. Figure 2: Nobiletin inhibited IL-1β- induced apoptosis of ..... TNF-alpha stimulate. VEGF production by dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Osteoarthritis and. Cartilage 2004; 12: 683-691. 6. Sinkov V, Cymet T. Osteoarthritis: ...

  17. Challenges Inhibiting the Transformation of Subsistence Farming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Challenges Inhibiting the Transformation of Subsistence Farming into Thriving Agri-business in Rural Uganda. ... Ghana Journal of Development Studies ... The aim of the study was to find out why there is a difficult transition from subsistence farming to a properly functioning agri-business in rural communities even when ...

  18. Inhibiting Translation One Protein at a Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Matthew D

    2017-06-01

    Historically, translational inhibitors have been confined to anti-bacterials that globally affect translation. Lintner et al. demonstrate that small molecules can specifically inhibit translation of a single disease-associated protein by stalling the ribosome's nascent chain [1], opening up a new therapeutic strategy for 'undruggable' proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation mediated by indolizines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasir, AI; Gundersen, LL; Rise, F; Antonsen, O; Kristensen, T; Langhelle, B; Bast, A; Custers, [No Value; Haenen, GRMM; Wikstrom, H

    1998-01-01

    Esters, ethers, carbonates and carbamates of 1-indolizinols and azaindolizinols exhibit a profound inhibition of lipid peroxidation in vitro. The antioxidants were prepared by cyclization of pyridines and diazines with diphenylcyclopropenone followed by introduction of the O-substituent. (C) 1998

  20. An historic perspective of proteasome inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Mulligan, George

    2012-07-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and associated signaling pathways are regarded today as an exciting area of development for novel therapeutics. However, two decades ago, following the discovery and elucidation of ubiquitin and the 26S proteasome as key mediators of protein turnover, the concept of inhibiting the UPS was not even considered a feasible therapeutic approach due to the assumption that inhibition of this pathway would have widespread deleterious effects. Subsequent clinical developments with the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib have radically overturned that view, with the proteasome now recognized as a validated target and proteasome inhibition demonstrated to be a highly successful treatment for a number of hematologic malignancies. Here we provide a historic perspective on the emergence of proteasome inhibition, sharing some of the lessons learned along the way. We describe the development of bortezomib and the elucidation of the effects of its novel mechanism of action, and place the cutting-edge work described elsewhere in this issue in the context of these historic developments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Probenazole treatment inhibits anthocyanins biosynthesis via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been found that anthocyanins were accumulated in Arabidopsis under drought or salt stress. In this study, such accumulation was found to be inhibited by external applied probenazole (3-allyloxy-1, 2-benzisothiazole-1,1-dioxide, PBZ), which is the active ingredient in oryzemate used for the protection of rice from ...

  2. Product inhibition of five Hypocrea jecorina cellulases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Leigh; Westh, Peter; Bohlin, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Product inhibition of cellulolytic enzymes has been deemed a critical factor in the industrial saccharification of cellulosic biomass. Several investigations have addressed this problem using crude enzyme preparations or commercial (mixed) cellulase products, but quantitative information on indiv......Product inhibition of cellulolytic enzymes has been deemed a critical factor in the industrial saccharification of cellulosic biomass. Several investigations have addressed this problem using crude enzyme preparations or commercial (mixed) cellulase products, but quantitative information...... cellulose may be monitored by calorimetry. The key advantage of this approach is that it directly measures the rate of hydrolysis while being essentially blind to the background of added product. We investigated the five major cellulases from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph: Tricoderma reesei), Cel7A (formerly...... CBH1), Cel6A (CBH2), Cel7B (EG1), Cel5A (EG2) and Cel12A (EG3), for their sensitivity to the products glucose and cellobiose. The strongest inhibition was found for Cel7A, which showed a 50% activity-loss in 19 mM cellobiose (IC50 = 19 mM). The other exoglucanase, Cel6A, was much less inhibited...

  3. Inhibiting Intuitive Thinking in Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael O. J.

    2015-01-01

    The papers in this issue describe recent collaborative research into the role of inhibition of intuitive thinking in mathematics education. This commentary reflects on this research from a mathematics education perspective and draws attention to some of the challenges that arise in collaboration between research fields with different cultures,…

  4. Targeted inhibition of cancer-inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes Coimbra, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The new paradigm in cancer treatment that aims to inhibit the smoldering inflammatory response in tumors is explored to develop new anticancer treatments. It appears that targeted drug delivery is essential in this concept as high local levels of anti-inflammatory agents are needed to observe the

  5. Osthole inhibits bone metastasis of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunyu; Sun, Zhenping; Guo, Baofeng; Ye, Yiyi; Han, Xianghui; Qin, Yuenong; Liu, Sheng

    2017-08-29

    Bone is one of the most common sites for breast cancer metastasis, which greatly contributes to patient morbidity and mortality. Osthole, a major extract from Cnidium monnieri (L.), exhibits many biological and pharmacological activities, however, its potential as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of breast cancer bone metastases remain poorly understood. In this study, we set out to investigate whether osthole could inhibit breast cancer metastasis to bone in mice and clarified the potential mechanism of this inhibition. In the murine model of breast cancer osseous metastasis, mice that received osthole developed significantly less bone metastases and displayed decreased tumor burden when compared with mice in the control group. Osthole inhibited breast cancer cell growth, migration, and invasion, and induced apoptosis of breast cancer cells. Additionally, it also regulated OPG/RANKL signals in the interactions between bone cells (osteoblasts and osteoclasts) and cancer cells. Besides, it also inhibited TGF-β/Smads signaling in breast cancer metastasis to bone in MDA-231BO cells. The results of this study suggest that osthole has real potential as a therapeutic candidate in the treatment of breast cancer patients with bone metastases.

  6. Linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stine N.; Mayer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Recently, high-quality data were published on the algal growth inhibition caused by 50 non-polar narcotic compounds, of which 39 were liquid compounds with defined water solubility. In the present study, the toxicity data for these liquids were applied to challenge the chemical activity range...

  7. Cortisol inhibits apoptosis in carp neutrophilic granulocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weyts, F.A.A.; Flik, G.; Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The direct effect of cortisol treatment on carp neutrophil viability was examined in vitro. Cortisol treatment caused an inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis. The effect was blocked by glucocorticoid receptor blocker RU486, showing that rescue from apoptosis was receptor mediated. Using binding

  8. Temporal Preparation, Response Inhibition and Impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Angel; Trivino, Monica; Perez-Duenas, Carolina; Acosta, Alberto; Lupianez, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Temporal preparation and impulsivity involve overlapping neural structures (prefrontal cortex) and cognitive functions (response inhibition and time perception), however, their interrelations had not been investigated. We studied such interrelations by comparing the performance of groups with low vs. high non-clinical trait impulsivity during a…

  9. Hemagglutinin inhibition assay with swine sera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemagglutination is based on the ability of certain viruses to agglutinate red blood cells (RBC) of certain animal species by formation of cross-linking lattices between RBC. Antibodies that have the ability to inhibit the hemagglutination property of influenza A viruses are generally thought to pro...

  10. Inhibition of Corneal Neovascularization by Hydrazinocurcumin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article previously published in Volume 15 Issue 2 of this journal in February 2016 has been retracted in line with the guidelines from the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE, http://publicationethics.org/resources/guidelines). Retracted: Zhan W, Zhu J, Zhang Y. Inhibition of corneal neovascularization by ...

  11. Retracted: Inhibition of Corneal Neovascularization by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article previously published in Volume 15 Issue 2 of this journal in February 2016 has been retracted in line with the guidelines from the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE, http://publicationethics.org/resources/guidelines). Retracted: Zhan W, Zhu J, Zhang Y. Inhibition of corneal neovascularization by ...

  12. The Mechanism Underlying Inhibition of Saccadic Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Casimir J. H.; Farrell, Simon; Ellis, Lucy A.; Gilchrist, Iain D.

    2009-01-01

    Human observers take longer to re-direct gaze to a previously fixated location. Although there has been some exploration of the characteristics of inhibition of saccadic return (ISR), the exact mechanisms by which ISR operates are currently unknown. In the framework of accumulation models of response times, in which evidence is integrated over…

  13. Product inhibition in native-state proteolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Kasper

    Full Text Available The proteolysis kinetics of intact proteins by nonspecific proteases provides valuable information on transient partial unfolding of proteins under native conditions. Native-state proteolysis is an approach to utilize the proteolysis kinetics to assess the energetics of partial unfolding in a quantitative manner. In native-state proteolysis, folded proteins are incubated with nonspecific proteases, and the rate of proteolysis is determined from the disappearance of the intact protein. We report here that proteolysis of intact proteins by nonspecific proteases, thermolysin and subtilisin deviates from first-order kinetics. First-order kinetics has been assumed for the analysis of native-state proteolysis. By analyzing the kinetics of proteolysis with varying concentrations of substrate proteins and also with cleavage products, we found that the deviation from first-order kinetics results from product inhibition. A kinetic model including competitive product inhibition agrees well with the proteolysis time course and allows us to determine the uninhibited rate constant for proteolysis as well as the apparent inhibition constant. Our finding suggests that the likelihood of product inhibition must be considered for quantitative assessment of proteolysis kinetics.

  14. Epoxygenated Fatty Acids Inhibit Retinal Vascular Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Megan E; Hammer, Sandra S; McCollum, Gary W; Penn, John S

    2016-12-14

    The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of elevating epoxygenated fatty acids on retinal vascular inflammation. To stimulate inflammation we utilized TNFα, a potent pro-inflammatory mediator that is elevated in the serum and vitreous of diabetic patients. In TNFα-stimulated primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells, total levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), but not epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), were significantly decreased. Exogenous addition of 11,12-EET or 19,20-EDP when combined with 12-(3-adamantane-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA), an inhibitor of epoxide hydrolysis, inhibited VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression and protein levels; conversely the diol product of 19,20-EDP hydrolysis, 19,20-DHDP, induced VCAM1 and ICAM1 expression. 11,12-EET and 19,20-EDP also inhibited leukocyte adherence to human retinal microvascular endothelial cell monolayers and leukostasis in an acute mouse model of retinal inflammation. Our results indicate that this inhibition may be mediated through an indirect effect on NFκB activation. This is the first study demonstrating a direct comparison of EET and EDP on vascular inflammatory endpoints, and we have confirmed a comparable efficacy from each isomer, suggesting a similar mechanism of action. Taken together, these data establish that epoxygenated fatty acid elevation will inhibit early pathology related to TNFα-induced inflammation in retinal vascular diseases.

  15. Illustrating Enzyme Inhibition Using Gibbs Energy Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearne, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Gibbs energy profiles have great utility as teaching and learning tools because they present students with a visual representation of the energy changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. Unfortunately, most textbooks divorce discussions of traditional kinetic topics, such as enzyme inhibition, from discussions of these same topics in terms of…

  16. Sultam Thiourea Inhibition of West Nile Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barklis, Eric; Still, Amelia; Sabri, Mohammad I.; Hirsch, Alec J.; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko; Brien, James; Dhenub, Tenzin Choesang; Scholz, Isabel; Alfadhli, Ayna

    2007-01-01

    We have identified sultam thioureas as novel inhibitors of West Nile virus (WNV) replication. One such compound inhibited WNV, with a 50% effective concentration of 0.7 μM, and reduced reporter expression from cells that harbored a WNV-based replicon. Our results demonstrate that sultam thioureas can block a postentry, preassembly step of WNV replication. PMID:17452483

  17. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophoric antibiotic, inhibits adipogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szkudlarek-Mikho, Maria; Saunders, Rudel A. [Department of Medicine, Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Research, College of Medicine, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Yap, Sook Fan [Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Pre-Clinical Sciences, University of Tunku Abdul Rahman (Malaysia); Ngeow, Yun Fong [Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Chin, Khew-Voon, E-mail: khew-voon.chin@utoledo.edu [Department of Medicine, Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Research, College of Medicine, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salinomycin inhibits preadipocyte differentiation into adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salinomycin inhibits transcriptional regulation of adipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmacological effects of salinomycin suggest toxicity in cancer therapy. -- Abstract: The polyether ionophoric antibiotics including monensin, salinomycin, and narasin, are widely used in veterinary medicine and as food additives and growth promoters in animal husbandry including poultry farming. Their effects on human health, however, are not fully understood. Recent studies showed that salinomycin is a cancer stem cell inhibitor. Since poultry consumption has risen sharply in the last three decades, we asked whether the consumption of meat tainted with growth promoting antibiotics might have effects on adipose cells. We showed in this report that the ionophoric antibiotics inhibit the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. The block of differentiation is not due to the induction of apoptosis nor the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, salinomycin also suppresses the transcriptional activity of the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}. These results suggest that the ionophoric antibiotics can be exploited as novel anti-obesity therapeutics and as pharmacological probes for the study of adipose biology. Further, the pharmacological effects of salinomycin could be a harbinger of its toxicity on the adipose tissue and other susceptible target cells in cancer therapy.

  18. Gold Nanoparticles Inhibit Matrix Metalloproteases without Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M; Sasaki, J I; Yamaguchi, S; Kawai, K; Kawakami, H; Iwasaki, Y; Imazato, S

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are currently the focus of considerable attention for dental applications; however, their biological effects have not been fully elucidated. The long-term, slow release of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) digests collagen fibrils within resin-dentin bonds. Therefore, MMP inhibitors can prolong the durability of resin-dentin bonds. However, there have been few reports evaluating the combined effect of MMP inhibition and the cytotoxic effects of NPs for dentin bonding. The aim of this study was to evaluate MMP inhibition and cytotoxic responses to gold (AuNPs) and platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in cultured murine macrophages (RAW264) by using MMP inhibition assays, measuring cell viability and inflammatory responses (quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction [RT-qPCR]), and conducting a micromorphological analysis by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Cultured RAW264 cells were exposed to metal NPs at various concentrations (1, 10, 100, and 400 µg/mL). AuNPs and PtNPs markedly inhibited MMP-8 and MMP-9 activity. Although PtNPs were cytotoxic at high concentrations (100 and 400 µg/mL), no cytotoxic effects were observed for AuNPs at any concentration. Transmission electron microscopy images showed a significant nonrandom intercellular distribution for AuNPs and PtNPs, which were mostly observed to be localized in lysosomes but not in the nucleus. RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated inflammatory responses were not induced in RAW264 cells by AuNPs or PtNPs. The cytotoxicity of nanoparticles might depend on the core metal composition and arise from a "Trojan horse" effect; thus, MMP inhibition could be attributed to the surface charge of PVP, which forms the outer coating of NPs. The negative charge of the surface coating of PVP binds to Zn(2+) from the active center of MMPs by chelate binding and results in MMP inhibition. In summary, AuNPs are attractive NPs that effectively

  19. Polysulfonate suramin inhibits Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Wah; Sam, I-Ching; Chong, Wei Lim; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2017-07-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne flavivirus that causes newborn microcephaly and Guillian-Barré syndrome in adults. No therapeutics are available to treat ZIKV infection or other flaviviruses. In this study, we explored the inhibitory effect of glycosaminoglycans and analogues against ZIKV infection. Highly sulfated heparin, dextran sulfate and suramin significantly inhibited ZIKV infection in Vero cells. De-sulfated heparin analogues lose inhibitory effect, implying that sulfonate groups are critical for viral inhibition. Suramin, an FDA-approved anti-parasitic drug, inhibits ZIKV infection with 3-5 log 10  PFU viral reduction with IC 50 value of ∼2.5-5 μg/ml (1.93 μM-3.85 μM). A time-of-drug-addition study revealed that suramin remains potent even when administrated at 1-24 hpi. Suramin inhibits ZIKV infection by preventing viral adsorption, entry and replication. Molecular dynamics simulation revealed stronger interaction of suramin with ZIKV NS3 helicase than with the envelope protein. Suramin warrants further investigation as a potential antiviral candidate for ZIKV infection. Heparan sulfate (HS) is a cellular attachment receptor for multiple flaviviruses. However, no direct ZIKV-heparin interaction was observed in heparin-binding analysis, and downregulate or removal of cellular HS with sodium chlorate or heparinase I/III did not inhibit ZIKV infection. This indicates that cell surface HS is not utilized by ZIKV as an attachment receptor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Neural synchrony during response production and inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Müller

    Full Text Available Inhibition of irrelevant information (conflict monitoring and/or of prepotent actions is an essential component of adaptive self-organized behavior. Neural dynamics underlying these functions has been studied in humans using event-related brain potentials (ERPs elicited in Go/NoGo tasks that require a speeded motor response to the Go stimuli and withholding a prepotent response when a NoGo stimulus is presented. However, averaged ERP waveforms provide only limited information about the neuronal mechanisms underlying stimulus processing, motor preparation, and response production or inhibition. In this study, we examine the cortical representation of conflict monitoring and response inhibition using time-frequency analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG recordings during continuous performance Go/NoGo task in 50 young adult females. We hypothesized that response inhibition would be associated with a transient boost in both temporal and spatial synchronization of prefrontal cortical activity, consistent with the role of the anterior cingulate and lateral prefrontal cortices in cognitive control. Overall, phase synchronization across trials measured by Phase Locking Index and phase synchronization between electrode sites measured by Phase Coherence were the highest in the Go and NoGo conditions, intermediate in the Warning condition, and the lowest under Neutral condition. The NoGo condition was characterized by significantly higher fronto-central synchronization in the 300-600 ms window, whereas in the Go condition, delta- and theta-band synchronization was higher in centro-parietal regions in the first 300 ms after the stimulus onset. The present findings suggest that response production and inhibition is supported by dynamic functional networks characterized by distinct patterns of temporal and spatial synchronization of brain oscillations.

  1. Mullerian Inhibiting Substances (MIS) Augments IFN-gamma Mediated Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Vandana

    2006-01-01

    MIS is a member of the TGF family. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that MIS and IFN-gamma might be more effective in the inhibition of breast cancer cell growth than either agent alone...

  2. Structural requirements of alloxan and ninhydrin for glucokinase inhibition and of glucose for protection against inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzen, S.; Brand, F. H.; Panten, U.

    1988-01-01

    1. In order to elucidate the mechanism underlying the interactions between glucose and alloxan when competing for the sugar binding site of glucokinase from pancreatic B-cells or liver, the structural requirements of the enzyme for inhibition by alloxan and for protection by glucose were determined. 2. With a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 5 microM, alloxan was the most potent pyrimidine derivative inhibitor of glucokinase. Uramil was a less potent enzyme inhibitor. A variety of other pyrimidine derivatives and related substances were ineffective. 3. Ninhydrin also inhibited glucokinase with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 5 microM. Isatin was a slightly less potent enzyme inhibitor. Several other indoline derivatives were ineffective. 4. Only glucose derivatives with a sufficiently bulky substituent in position C-2, such as the glucokinase substrates glucose and mannose and the inhibitors mannoheptulose, glucosamine, and N-acetylglucosamine, protected glucokinase against inhibition by alloxan by binding to the active site of the enzyme. Glucose epimers which differed in other positions did not protect the enzyme against alloxan inhibition. 5. DTT (dithiothreitol) protected glucokinase against inhibition by alloxan and reversed the inhibition of the enzyme induced by alloxan. Thus the mechanism of glucokinase inhibition by alloxan and other inhibitors, such as uramil and ninhydrin, is an oxidation of functionally essential SH groups of the enzyme, where the most reactive keto group of the inhibitor acts as the hydrogen acceptor. The protective action of glucose and several C-2 epimers demonstrates that these functionally essential SH groups are situated in the sugar binding site of the glucokinase. 6. The present results support our contention, that the pancreatic B-cell glucokinase is the major target mediating the inhibition of insulin secretion by alloxan. PMID:3207996

  3. Crocetinic acid inhibits hedgehog signaling to inhibit pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Parthasarathy; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Paul, Santanu; Kwatra, Deep; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Islam, Shamima; Harihar, Sitaram; Ramalingam, Satish; Gutheil, William; Putty, Sandeep; Pradhan, Rohan; Padhye, Subhash; Welch, Danny R; Anant, Shrikant; Dhar, Animesh

    2015-09-29

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and no significant treatment is currently available. Here, we describe the effect of crocetinic acid, which we purified from commercial saffron compound crocetin using high performance liquid chromatography. Crocetinic acid inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, it induced apoptosis. Moreover, the compound significantly inhibited epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, crocetinic acid decreased the number and size of the pancospheres in a dose-dependent manner, and suppressed the expression of the marker protein DCLK-1 (Doublecortin Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase-1) suggesting that crocetinic acid targets cancer stem cells (CSC). To understand the mechanism of CSC inhibition, the signaling pathways affected by purified crocetinic acid were dissected. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) upon binding to its cognate receptor patched, allows smoothened to accumulate and activate Gli transcription factor. Crocetinic acid inhibited the expression of both Shh and smoothened. Finally, these data were confirmed in vivo where the compound at a dose of 0.5 mg/Kg bw suppressed growth of tumor xenografts. Collectively, these data suggest that purified crocetinic acid inhibits pancreatic CSC, thereby inhibiting pancreatic tumorigenesis.

  4. Measurement and Reliability of Response Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza eCongdon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Response inhibition plays a critical role in adaptive functioning and can be assessed with the Stop-signal task, which requires participants to suppress prepotent motor responses. Evidence suggests that this ability to inhibit a motor response that has already been initiated (reflected as Stop-signal reaction time (SSRT is a quantitative and heritable measure of interindividual variation in brain function. In order to examine the reliability of this measure, we pooled data across three separate studies and examined the influence of multiple SSRT calculation methods and outlier calling on reliability (using Intra-class correlation. Our results suggest that an approach which uses the average of all available sessions, all trials of each session, and excludes outliers based on predetermined lenient criteria yields reliable SSRT estimates, while not excluding too many participants. Our findings support the reliability of SSRT as an index of inhibitory control, and provide support for its continued use as a neurocognitive phenotype.

  5. Direct renin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter; Parving, Hans-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    that renin inhibition could hold potential for improved treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease, with diabetic nephropathy as an obvious group of patients to investigate, as the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is enhanced in these patients and as there is an unmet need...... early as a beneficial effect was unlikely and there was an increased frequency of side effects. Also in non-diabetic kidney disease a few intervention studies have been carried out, but there is no ongoing hard outcome study. In this review we provide the current evidence for renin inhibition in chronic...... kidney disease by reporting of the studies published so far as well as perspective on the future possibilites....

  6. Transcriptional inhibition by the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattaey, A; Helin, K; Harlow, E

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein, pRB, appears to play a key role in coordinating the regulation of cell cycle position and transcriptional events. pRB undergoes specific cell-cycle-dependent phosphorylation, being underphosphorylated in G1 and heavily phosphorylated in S, G2, and M....... The underphosphorylated form is able to interact with the E2F transcription factor. Recently, we have cloned a cDNA for E2F-1. By using this clone and a series of non-pRB binding mutants, we have been able to show that the binding of pRB to E2F-1 causes inhibition of E2F-mediated transactivation. pRB's inhibition of E2F......-mediated transcription would be lost by mutation in the retinoblastoma gene in human tumours, by pRB's interaction with DNA tumour virus oncoproteins, or by phosphorylation during the cell cycle....

  7. The Kinetics of Carrier Transport Inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, T.; Wilbrandt, Robert Walter

    1962-01-01

    The kinetical treatment of enzymatic carrier transports as given in previous communications has been extended to conditions of inhibition. Various possible types of inhibitors have been considered differing in the site of attack (enzyme or carrier), in the mode of action (competing...... and polyphloretinephosphate. The results of the analysis for these inhibitors indicate a substrate competitive mode of action. The effect of reversing the transport direction by interchanging the substrate concentration has been treated for the case of a non-penetrating substrate competitive inhibitor in the external medium...... with the substrate for the enzyme or the carrier or for both, competing with the carrier for the enzyme, or non-competitive) and in the ability of penetrating the membrane. Experiments are reported on the inhibition of glucose and fructose transport across the human red cell membrane by phlorizine, phloretine...

  8. Progressive inhibition of neuromuscular structures (PINS) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, D J

    2000-05-01

    Progressive inhibition of neuromuscular structures (PINS) is a technique that can be included in the osteopathic manipulative treatment repertoire. It relies on knowledge of anatomy and neuromuscular physiologic features as well as on standard forms of osteopathic palpatory diagnosis and treatment. It is a variant of the inhibition technique that has been taught as an osteopathic manipulative technique for many years, and it bears some resemblance to other manual medicine techniques. The emphasis of the approach is the determination of the alteration of the tissues due to dysfunction, delivering treatment based on palpatory evaluation and patient feedback. Two related points are initially chosen, followed by a progression from one to the other. Relationships to similar techniques are also discussed. Theoretical as well as selected practical applications are presented.

  9. Structural analysis of kasugamycin inhibition of translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuwirth, Barbara S; Day, J Michael; Hau, Cathy W; Janssen, Gary R; Dahlberg, Albert E; Cate, Jamie H Doudna; Vila-Sanjurjo, Antón

    2006-10-01

    The prokaryotic ribosome is an important target of antibiotic action. We determined the X-ray structure of the aminoglycoside kasugamycin (Ksg) in complex with the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome at 3.5-A resolution. The structure reveals that the drug binds within the messenger RNA channel of the 30S subunit between the universally conserved G926 and A794 nucleotides in 16S ribosomal RNA, which are sites of Ksg resistance. To our surprise, Ksg resistance mutations do not inhibit binding of the drug to the ribosome. The present structural and biochemical results indicate that inhibition by Ksg and Ksg resistance are closely linked to the structure of the mRNA at the junction of the peptidyl-tRNA and exit-tRNA sites (P and E sites).

  10. Theobromine inhibits sensory nerve activation and cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Omar S; Belvisi, Maria G; Patel, Hema J; Crispino, Natascia; Birrell, Mark A; Korbonits, Márta; Korbonits, Dezso; Barnes, Peter J

    2005-02-01

    Cough is a common and protective reflex, but persistent coughing is debilitating and impairs quality of life. Antitussive treatment using opioids is limited by unacceptable side effects, and there is a great need for more effective remedies. The present study demonstrates that theobromine, a methylxanthine derivative present in cocoa, effectively inhibits citric acid-induced cough in guinea-pigs in vivo. Furthermore, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in man, theobromine suppresses capsaicin-induced cough with no adverse effects. We also demonstrate that theobromine directly inhibits capsaicin-induced sensory nerve depolarization of guinea-pig and human vagus nerve suggestive of an inhibitory effect on afferent nerve activation. These data indicate the actions of theobromine appear to be peripherally mediated. We conclude theobromine is a novel and promising treatment, which may form the basis for a new class of antitussive drugs.

  11. Inhibition of Plasmodium Liver Infection by Ivermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, António M; Albuquerque, Inês S; Machado, Marta; Pissarra, Joana; Meireles, Patrícia; Prudêncio, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    Avermectins are powerful endectocides with an established potential to reduce the incidence of vector-borne diseases. Here, we show that several avermectins inhibit the hepatic stage of Plasmodium infection in vitro Notably, ivermectin potently inhibits liver infection in vivo by impairing parasite development inside hepatocytes. This impairment has a clear impact on the ensuing blood stage parasitemia, reducing disease severity and enhancing host survival. Ivermectin has been proposed as a tool to control malaria transmission because of its effects on the mosquito vector. Our study extends the effect of ivermectin to the early stages of mammalian host infection and supports the inclusion of this multipurpose drug in malaria control strategies. Copyright © 2017 Mendes et al.

  12. [Inhibition of cytochrome b2 by acrylamide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Iu Iu; Shvirmitskas, G Iu; Antanavichius, V S; Vaitkiavichius, R K

    1982-04-01

    Acrylamide (0.4--0.9 M) irreversibly inhibits reduced (Ered) cytochrome b2 (L (+) -lactate: cytochrome c oxidoreductase) from the yeast Hansenula anomala (ki = 1,67 min-1 at 35 degrees in 0.73 M solution of acrylamide). Changes in fluorescence of FMN, which reflect the changes in protein structure occur symbatically to the inactivation. The rate of inactivation depends on concentration of acrylamide in a degree of 6.4. The inactivation of the oxidized enzyme occurs faster than that of th reduced one at concentrations less than 0.5 M. The inactivation of Ered by acrylonitrile and acrylic acid occurs 10 times slower and does not correlate with the rate of mercaptoethanol binding to the monomers. The inhibition of Ered is caused by specific effects of carylamide and modification of the enzyme active center.

  13. Caffeine Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase, But Not Butyrylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Dobes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is an alkaloid with a stimulant effect in the body. It can interfere in transmissions based on acetylcholine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine and glutamate. Clinical studies indicate that it can be involved in the slowing of Alzheimer disease pathology and some other effects. The effects are not well understood. In the present work, we focused on the question whether caffeine can inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE and/or, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, the two enzymes participating in cholinergic neurotransmission. A standard Ellman test with human AChE and BChE was done for altering concentrations of caffeine. The test was supported by an in silico examination as well. Donepezil and tacrine were used as standards. In compliance with Dixon’s plot, caffeine was proved to be a non-competitive inhibitor of AChE and BChE. However, inhibition of BChE was quite weak, as the inhibition constant, Ki, was 13.9 ± 7.4 mol/L. Inhibition of AChE was more relevant, as Ki was found to be 175 ± 9 µmol/L. The predicted free energy of binding was −6.7 kcal/mol. The proposed binding orientation of caffeine can interact with Trp86, and it can be stabilize by Tyr337 in comparison to the smaller Ala328 in the case of human BChE; thus, it can explain the lower binding affinity of caffeine for BChE with reference to AChE. The biological relevance of the findings is discussed.

  14. Osthole inhibits bone metastasis of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chunyu; Sun, Zhenping; Guo, Baofeng; Ye, Yiyi; Han, Xianghui; Qin, Yuenong; Liu, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites for breast cancer metastasis, which greatly contributes to patient morbidity and mortality. Osthole, a major extract from Cnidium monnieri (L.), exhibits many biological and pharmacological activities, however, its potential as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of breast cancer bone metastases remain poorly understood. In this study, we set out to investigate whether osthole could inhibit breast cancer metastasis to bone in mice and clarified the potent...

  15. Voriconazole Inhibits Melanization in Cryptococcus neoformans▿

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Luis R.; Ntiamoah, Patricia; Gácser, Attila; Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2007-01-01

    Voriconazole is a triazole antifungal drug that inhibits ergosterol synthesis and has broad activity against yeast and molds. While studying the interaction of voriconazole and Cryptococcus neoformans, we noted that cells grown in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of voriconazole reduced melanin pigmentation. We investigated this effect systematically by assessing melanin production in the presence of voriconazole, amphotericin B, caspofungin, itraconazole, and fluconazole. Only vo...

  16. Fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates: Inhibition and detoxification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmqvist, E.

    1998-02-01

    The ethanol yield and productivity obtained during fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates is decreased due to the presence of inhibiting compounds, such as weak acids, furans and phenolic compounds produced during hydrolysis. Evaluation of the effect of various biological, physical and chemical detoxification treatments by fermentation assays using Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to characterise inhibitors. Inhibition of fermentation was decreased after removal of the non-volatile compounds, pre-fermentation by the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei, treatment with the lignolytic enzyme laccase, extraction with ether, and treatment with alkali. Yeast growth in lignocellulosic hydrolysates was inhibited below a certain fermentation pH, most likely due to high concentrations of undissociated weak acids. The effect of individual compounds were studied in model fermentations. Furfural is reduced to furfuryl alcohol by yeast dehydrogenases, thereby affecting the intracellular redox balance. As a result, acetaldehyde accumulated during furfural reduction, which most likely contributed to inhibition of growth. Acetic acid (10 g 1{sup -1}) and furfural (3 g 1{sup -1}) interacted antagonistically causing decreased specific growth rate, whereas no significant individual or interaction effects were detected by the lignin-derived compound 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (2 g 1{sup -1}). By maintaining a high cell mass density in the fermentor, the process was less sensitive to inhibitors affecting growth and to fluctuations in fermentation pH, and in addition the depletion rate of bioconvertible inhibitors was increased. A theoretical ethanol yield and high productivity was obtained in continuous fermentation of spruce hydrolysate when the cell mass concentration was maintained at a high level by applying cell recirculation 164 refs, 16 figs, 5 tabs

  17. Evidence of dopaminergic processing of executive inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra D Badgaiyan

    Full Text Available Inhibition of unwanted response is an important function of the executive system. Since the inhibitory system is impaired in patients with dysregulated dopamine system, we examined dopamine neurotransmission in the human brain during processing of a task of executive inhibition. The experiment used a recently developed dynamic molecular imaging technique to detect and map dopamine released during performance of a modified Eriksen's flanker task. In this study, young healthy volunteers received an intravenous injection of a dopamine receptor ligand ((11C-raclopride after they were positioned in the PET camera. After the injection, volunteers performed the flanker task under Congruent and Incongruent conditions in a single scan session. They were required to inhibit competing options to select an appropriate response in the Incongruent but not in the Congruent condition. The PET data were dynamically acquired during the experiment and analyzed using two variants of the simplified reference region model. The analysis included estimation of a number of receptor kinetic parameters before and after initiation of the Incongruent condition. We found increase in the rate of ligand displacement (from receptor sites and decrease in the ligand binding potential in the Incongruent condition, suggesting dopamine release during task performance. These changes were observed in small areas of the putamen and caudate bilaterally but were most significant on the dorsal aspect of the body of left caudate. The results provide evidence of dopaminergic processing of executive inhibition and demonstrate that neurochemical changes associated with cognitive processing can be detected and mapped in a single scan session using dynamic molecular imaging.

  18. Physiological functions of glucose-inhibited neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdakov, D; González, J A

    2009-01-01

    Glucose-inhibited neurones are an integral part of neurocircuits regulating cognitive arousal, body weight and vital adaptive behaviours. Their firing is directly suppressed by extracellular glucose through poorly understood signalling cascades culminating in opening of post-synaptic K(+) or possibly Cl(-) channels. In mammalian brains, two groups of glucose-inhibited neurones are best understood at present: neurones of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) that express peptide transmitters NPY and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neurones of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) that express peptide transmitters orexins/hypocretins. The activity of ARC NPY/AgRP neurones promotes food intake and suppresses energy expenditure, and their destruction causes a severe reduction in food intake and body weight. The physiological actions of ARC NPY/AgRP cells are mediated by projections to numerous hypothalamic areas, as well as extrahypothalamic sites such as the thalamus and ventral tegmental area. Orexin/hypocretin neurones of the LH are critical for normal wakefulness, energy expenditure and reward-seeking, and their destruction causes narcolepsy. Orexin actions are mediated by highly widespread central projections to virtually all brain areas except the cerebellum, including monosynaptic innervation of the cerebral cortex and autonomic pre-ganglionic neurones. There, orexins act on two specific G-protein-coupled receptors generally linked to neuronal excitation. In addition to sensing physiological changes in sugar levels, the firing of both NPY/AgRP and orexin neurones is inhibited by the 'satiety' hormone leptin and stimulated by the 'hunger' hormone ghrelin. Glucose-inhibited neurones are thus well placed to coordinate diverse brain states and behaviours based on energy levels.

  19. VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION INHIBITS CORTICAL SPREADING DEPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; de Morais, Andreia Lopes; Qin, Tao; Zheng,Yi; Sadhegian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura, and a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its anti-migraine effect. Vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either non-invasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the vagus nerve unilaterally. Systemic physiology was monito...

  20. The system neurophysiological basis of backward inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Fischer, Rico; Beste, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Task switching is regularly required in our everyday life. To succeed in switching, it is important to inhibit the most recently performed task and instead activate the currently relevant task. The process that inhibits a recently performed task when a new task is to be performed is referred to as 'backward inhibition' (BI). While the BI effect has been subject to intense research in cognitive psychology, little is known about the neuronal mechanisms that are related to the BI effect and those that relate to differences in the magnitude of the BI effect. In the current study, we examined the system neurophysiological basis of BI processes using event-related potentials (ERPs) and sLORETA by also taking inter-individual differences in the magnitude of the BI into account. The results suggest that BI processes and inter-individual differences in them strongly depend upon attentional selection mechanisms (reflected by N1-ERP modulations in the current task/trial) mediated via networks consisting of extrastriate occipital areas, the temporo-parietal junction and the inferior frontal gyrus. Other processes and mechanisms related to conflict monitoring, response selection, or the updating, organization and implementation of a new task-set (i.e. N2 and P3 processes) were not shown to be modulated by BI processes and differences in their magnitude, as evoked with a common BI paradigm.

  1. Inhibition of cathelicidin activity by bacterial exopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foschiatti, Michela; Cescutti, Paola; Tossi, Alessandro; Rizzo, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    The interaction of bacterial exopolysaccharides, produced by opportunistic lung pathogens, with antimicrobial peptides of the innate primate immune system was investigated. The exopolysaccharides were produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Inquilinus limosus and clinical isolates of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, bacteria that are all involved in lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. The effects of the biological activities of three orthologous cathelicidins from Homo sapiens sapiens, Pongo pygmaeus (orangutan) and Presbitys obscurus (dusky leaf monkey) were examined. Inhibition of the antimicrobial activity of peptides was assessed using minimum inhibitory concentration assays on a reference Escherichia coli strain in the presence and absence of exopolysaccharides, whereas complex formation between peptides and exopolysaccharides was investigated by means of circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Biological assays revealed that the higher the negative charge of exopolysaccharides the stronger was their inhibiting effect. Spectroscopic studies indicated the formation of molecular complexes of varying stability between peptides and exopolysaccharides, explaining the inhibition. Atomic force microscopy provided a direct visualization of the molecular complexes. A model is proposed where peptides with an alpha-helical conformation interact with exopolysaccharides through electrostatic and other non-covalent interactions.

  2. Ormeloxifene efficiently inhibits ovarian cancer growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Diane M; Khan, Sheema; Nordquist, Jordan L; Ebeling, Mara C; Bauer, Nichole A; Kopel, Lucas; Singh, Man Mohan; Halaweish, Fathi; Bell, Maria C; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2015-01-28

    Ovarian cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer related deaths for women. Anticancer agents effective against chemo-resistant cells are greatly needed for ovarian cancer treatment. Repurposing drugs currently in human use is an attractive strategy for developing novel cancer treatments with expedited translation into clinical trials. Therefore, we examined whether ormeloxifene (ORM), a non-steroidal Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) currently used for contraception, is therapeutically effective at inhibiting ovarian cancer growth. We report that ORM treatment inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cell lines, including cell lines resistant to cisplatin. Furthermore, ORM treatment decreases Akt phosphorylation, increases p53 phosphorylation, and modulates the expression and localization patterns of p27, cyclin E, cyclin D1, and CDK2. In a pre-clinical xenograft mouse ORM treatment significantly reduces tumorigenesis and metastasis. These results indicate that ORM effectively inhibits the growth of cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. ORM is currently in human use and has an established record of patient safety. Our encouraging in vitro and pre-clinical in vivo findings indicate that ORM is a promising candidate for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tiotropium bromide inhibits human monocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurai M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Tiotropium bromide (Spiriva® is used as a bronchodilator in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, clinical evidence suggests that tiotropium bromide may improve COPD by mechanisms beyond bronchodilation. We hypothesized that tiotropium bromide may act as an anti-inflammatory agent by inhibiting monocyte chemotaxis, a process that plays an important role in the lung inflammation of COPD. To test this hypothesis monocytes were pretreated with tiotropium bromide prior to exposure to chemotactic agents and monocyte chemotactic activity (MCA was evaluated with a blind chamber technique. Tiotropium bromide inhibited MCA in a dose- and time- dependent manner (respectively, p< 0.01 by directly acting on the monocyte. Acetylcholine (ACh challenge increased MCA (p< 0.01, and tiotropium bromide effectively reduced (p< 0.01 the increase in MCA by ACh. The inhibition of MCA by tiotropium bromide was reversed by a muscarinic type 3 (M3-muscarinic receptor antagonist (p< 0.01, and was not effected by an M2 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, a selective M3 receptor agonist, cevimeline, and Gq protein stimulator, Pasteurella multocida toxin, significantly increased MCA (P < 0.01, and tiotropium bromide pretreatment reduced (p< 0.01 the increase in MCA induced by these agents. These results suggest that tiotropium might regulate monocyte chemotaxis, in part, by interfering with M3-muscarinic receptor coupled Gq protein signal transduction. These results provide new insight that an anti-cholinergic therapeutic may provide anti-inflammatory action in the pulmonary system.

  4. Imitation inhibition in children with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Valerie Cathérine; Moczydlowski, Agnes; Jonas, Melanie; Boelmans, Kai; Bäumer, Tobias; Brass, Marcel; Münchau, Alexander

    2017-08-12

    Echopraxia, that is, the open and automatic imitation of other peoples' actions, is common in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, and also those with frontal lobe lesions. While systematic reaction time tasks have confirmed increased automatic imitation in the latter two groups, adult patients with Tourette syndrome appear to compensate for automatic imitation tendencies by an overall slowing in response times. However, whether children with Tourette syndrome are already able to inhibit automatic imitation tendencies has not been investigated. Fifteen children with Tourette syndrome and 15 healthy children (aged 7-12 years) performed an imitation inhibition paradigm. Participants were asked to respond to an auditory cue by lifting their index finger or their little finger. Participants were simultaneously presented with either compatible or incompatible visual stimuli. Overall responses in children with Tourette syndrome were slower than in healthy children. Although responses were faster in compatible than in incompatible trials in both groups, this 'interference effect' was smaller in children with Tourette syndrome. Children with Tourette syndrome have a smaller interference effect than healthy children, indicating an enhanced ability to behaviourally control automatic imitation tendencies at the cost of reacting slower. The results suggest that children with Tourette syndrome already employ different or additional inhibition strategies compared to healthy children. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Inhibition of enveloped viruses infectivity by curcumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Yen Chen

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a natural compound and ingredient in curry, has antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic properties. Previously, we reported that curcumin abrogated influenza virus infectivity by inhibiting hemagglutination (HA activity. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which curcumin inhibits the infectivity of enveloped viruses. In all analyzed enveloped viruses, including the influenza virus, curcumin inhibited plaque formation. In contrast, the nonenveloped enterovirus 71 remained unaffected by curcumin treatment. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the membrane structure using fluorescent dye (sulforhodamine B; SRB-containing liposomes that mimic the viral envelope. Curcumin treatment induced the leakage of SRB from these liposomes and the addition of the influenza virus reduced the leakage, indicating that curcumin disrupts the integrity of the membranes of viral envelopes and of liposomes. When testing liposomes of various diameters, we detected higher levels of SRB leakage from the smaller-sized liposomes than from the larger liposomes. Interestingly, the curcumin concentration required to reduce plaque formation was lower for the influenza virus (approximately 100 nm in diameter than for the pseudorabies virus (approximately 180 nm and the vaccinia virus (roughly 335 × 200 × 200 nm. These data provide insights on the molecular antiviral mechanisms of curcumin and its potential use as an antiviral agent for enveloped viruses.

  6. Lead inhibition of enzyme synthesis in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, M A

    1977-02-01

    Addition of 2 mg of Pb2+/g of soil concident with or after amendment with starch or maltose resulted in 75 and 50% decreases in net synthesis of amylase and alpha-glucosidase, respectively. Invertase synthesis in sucrose-amended soil was transiently reduced after Pb2+ addition. Amylase activity was several times less sensitive to Pb2+ inhibition than was enzyme synthesis. In most cases, the rate of enzyme synthesis returned to control (Pb2+) values 24 to 48 h after the addition of Pb. The decrease in amylase synthesis was paralleled by a decrease in the number of Pb-sensitive, amylase-producing bacteria, whereas recovery of synthesis was associated with an increase in the number of amylase-producing bacteria. The degree of inhibition of enzyme synthesis was related to the quantity of Pb added and to the specific form of lead. PbSO4 decreased amylase synthesis at concentrations of 10.2 mg of Pb2+/g of soil or more, whereas PbO did not inhibit amylase synthesis at 13 mg of Pb2+/g of soil. Lead acetate, PbCl2, and PbS reduced amylase synthesis at total Pb2+ concentrations of 0.45 mg of Pb2+/g of soil or higher. The results indicated that lead is a potent but somewhat selective inhibitor of enzyme synthesis in soil, and that highly insoluble lead compounds, such as PbS, may be potent modifiers of soil biological activity.

  7. In Vivo Pharmacodynamic Imaging of Proteasome Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin A. Kimbrel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Inhibiting the proteolytic activity of the 26S proteasome has been shown to have selective apoptotic effects on cancer cells and to be clinically efficacious in certain malignancies. There is an unmet medical need for additional proteasome inhibitors, and their development will be facilitated by surrogate markers of proteasome function. Toward this end, ectopic fusion of the destruction domain from ornithine decarboxylase (ODC to reporter proteins is often used for assessing proteasome function. For luciferase-based reporters, we hypothesized that the oxygen-dependent destruction domain (ODD from hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α may provide improved sensitivity over luciferase-ODC, owing to its extremely rapid turnover by the proteasome (HIF-1α has a half-life of less than 5 minutes. In the current study, we show that ODD-luciferase affords a greater dynamic range and faster kinetics than luciferase-ODC in sensing proteasome inhibition in vitro. Importantly, ODD-luciferase also serves as an effective in vivo marker of proteasome function in xenograft tumor models, with inhibition being detected by noninvasive imaging within 3 hours of bortezomib administration. These data establish ODD-luciferase as a surrogate marker of proteasome function that can be used both in vitro and in vivo for the development of novel proteasome inhibitors.

  8. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  9. Inhibition of Enterococcus faecalis by Calcium Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yong Liang; Wang, Xiao Yan

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the inhibition of Enterococcus faecalis by calcium peroxide (CaO₂). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of Enterococcus faecalis by CaO₂ and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)₂) were determined by direct exposure tests (n = 10). The inhibition zone of E. faecalis mycoderm treated with CaO₂ and Ca(OH)₂ paste (53% w/w) was observed using agar diffusion tests (n = 20). The inhibition of E. faecalis biofilms by CaO₂/phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and Ca(OH)₂/PBS suspensions were observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy and the percentages of live bacteria in the biofilms calculated. The MIC of Ca(OH)₂ (4.5 to 5.5 mg/ml) was higher than the MIC of CaO₂ (2.0 to 2.5 mg/ml) (P faecalis biofilms after treatment (P faecalis by CaO₂ was greater than that by Ca(OH)₂.

  10. Bioassays for the determination of nitrification inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunditz, Camilla

    1999-07-01

    Requirements for nitrogen reduction in wastewater treatment plants were introduced in Sweden in the early 1990's. This was a governmental move to reduce the nitrogen discharges to the Baltic and Kattegat in order to prevent eutrophication. The nitrification process in wastewater treatment plants is performed by nitrifying bacteria. These are susceptible to inhibition and it is of great importance that the influent water does not contain toxic compounds. Therefore, there is a need for assays for the determination of nitrification inhibition. This thesis describes the development and applications of such bioassays. Pure cultures of Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrobacter sp. were isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. These cultures were used as test organisms in the development of bioassays for nitrification inhibition measurements. The assays are based on two different principles; cell suspensions of the bacteria, performed in test tubes, and mediated amperometric biosensors with the bacteria immobilised. Ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation are studied separately without interference from other organisms, which makes it easier to interpret the results. The cell suspension assays were applied to samples of industrial and municipal wastewater. The Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter assays showed to have different inhibition patterns. A large percentage of the Swedish municipal wastewater treatment plants were found to receive inhibitory influent water, but the inhibition level was generally low. Compared to an assay based on activated sludge, the screening method, the pure culture assays found more samples of influent water strongly inhibitory or stimulating. The highest correlation was found between the screening method and the Nitrosomonas assay. The Nitrobacter assay was found to be the most sensitive method. Assessment of toxicity of a number of chemical substances was studied using the biosensors, together with the cell suspension assays

  11. Assessment of the inhibition risk of shikonin on cytochrome P450 via cocktail inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shuowen; Chen, Ang; Zhou, Xiaojing; Zeng, Li; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Xin

    2017-11-05

    Shikonin is a naphthoquinone pigment extracted from roots of Lithospermum erythrorhizon Sieb. et Zucc. (Boraginaceae), and possesses various pharmaceutical activities, such as anti-inflammation and anti-cancer effects. In addition, shikonin as a natural red colorant for food garnishment and cosmetics ingredient is widely used in the world. However, the inhibition risk of shikonin on cytochrome P450 (CYP) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential inhibition of shikonin against CYP1A2, CYP2B1/6, CYP2C9/11, CYP2D1/6, CYP2E1 and CYP3A2/4 activities in human and rat liver microsomes through cocktail approach in vitro. The results demonstrated that shikonin exhibited no time-dependent inhibition of CYP activities. In human liver microsomes, shikonin was not only a mixed inhibitor of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4, but also a competitive inhibitor of CYP2E1, with Ki values no more than 7.72μM. In rat liver microsomes, shikonin also exhibited the mixed inhibition on CYP1A2, CYP2B1, CYP2C11, CYP2D1, and the competitive inhibition on CYP2E1. Interestingly, shikonin presented an atypical kinetic inhibition of CYP3A2-mediated midazolam 1-hydroxylation in rats. In conclusion, the relatively low Ki values of shikonin would have a high risk potential to cause the possible toxicity, especially drug-drug or food-drug interactions based on the potent inhibition of CYP enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Methanol Extract of Hydroclathrus clathratus Inhibits Production of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanol Extract of Hydroclathrus clathratus Inhibits Production of Nitric Oxide, Prostaglandin E 2 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α in Lipopolysaccharidestimulated BV2 Microglial Cells via Inhibition of NF-κB Activity.

  13. The development of children’s inhibition: Does parenting matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Stievenart, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Whereas a large body of research has investigated the maturation of inhibition in relation to the prefrontal cortex, far less research has been devoted to environmental factors that could contribute to inhibition improvement. The aim of the current study was to test whether and to what extent parenting matters for inhibition development from 2 to 8 years of age. Data were collected from 421 families, with 348 mother–child dyads and 342 father–child dyads participating. Children’s inhibition c...

  14. The development of children's inhibition: Does parenting matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Roskam, I.; Stievenart, Marie; Meunier, J.-C.; Noël, M.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Whereas a large body of research has investigated the maturation of inhibition in relation to the prefrontal cortex, far less research has been devoted to environmental factors that could contribute to inhibition improvement. The aim of the current study was to test whether and to what extent parenting matters for inhibition development from 2 to 8. years of age. Data were collected from 421 families, with 348 mother-child dyads and 342 father-child dyads participating. Children's inhibition ...

  15. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (thrombin (>150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  16. A fusion-inhibiting peptide against Rift Valley fever virus inhibits multiple, diverse viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Koehler

    Full Text Available For enveloped viruses, fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is critical for a productive infection to occur. This fusion process is mediated by at least three classes of fusion proteins (Class I, II, and III based on the protein sequence and structure. For Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, the glycoprotein Gc (Class II fusion protein mediates this fusion event following entry into the endocytic pathway, allowing the viral genome access to the cell cytoplasm. Here, we show that peptides analogous to the RVFV Gc stem region inhibited RVFV infectivity in cell culture by inhibiting the fusion process. Further, we show that infectivity can be inhibited for diverse, unrelated RNA viruses that have Class I (Ebola virus, Class II (Andes virus, or Class III (vesicular stomatitis virus fusion proteins using this single peptide. Our findings are consistent with an inhibition mechanism similar to that proposed for stem peptide fusion inhibitors of dengue virus in which the RVFV inhibitory peptide first binds to both the virion and cell membranes, allowing it to traffic with the virus into the endocytic pathway. Upon acidification and rearrangement of Gc, the peptide is then able to specifically bind to Gc and prevent fusion of the viral and endocytic membranes, thus inhibiting viral infection. These results could provide novel insights into conserved features among the three classes of viral fusion proteins and offer direction for the future development of broadly active fusion inhibitors.

  17. Cellobionic acid inhibition of cellobiohydrolase I and cellobiose dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    End-product inhibition by cellobiose and glucose is a rate-limiting factor in cellulose hydrolysis by cellulases. While cellobiose and glucose inhibition have been extensively investigated, cellobionate inhibition has been minimally studied despite the discovery that accessory proteins such as cello...

  18. Inhibition and Adsorption impact of Leave Extracts of Cnidoscolus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrosion inhibition in the presence of alokaloid and non alkaloid extracts of Cnidoscolus aconitifolius in 1M HCl was studied using the weight loss and hydrogen evolution techniques at 303, 313 and 333 K. The results obtained revealed that the inhibition efficiency decreased with increase in temperature. Inhibition ...

  19. Inhibition of Fungal Aflatoxin B1 Biosynthesis by Diverse Botanically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Neither the tea-derived polyphenol mixture nor individual polyphenol compound, except quercetin, inhibited A. flavus growth. Quercetin detectably inhibited growth at 800 μg/mL; none of the remaining polyphenols inhibited fungal proliferation, even at 1,000 μg/mL. However, catechin mixture and all individual ...

  20. Inhibition of respiration of Escherichia coli by thioglycerol.

    OpenAIRE

    Javor, G T

    1983-01-01

    Anaerobic growth on glucose significantly protected Escherichia coli from growth inhibition by thioglycerol. Methionine and anaerobiosis completely overcame growth inhibition by 2 to 90 mM thioglycerol. The respiration of aerobically growing cells was partially inhibited by 20 to 90 mM thioglycerol.

  1. Inhibition of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, Cycleooxygenase-2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, Cycleooxygenase-2 and Lipid Peroxidation by Methanol Extract of Pericarpium Zanthoxyli. ... Production of iNOS induced by LPS was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited by the extract, suggesting that the extract inhibits nitric oxide (NO) production by suppressing iNOS expression.

  2. Zinc ions bind to and inhibit activated protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Tianqing; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Nickolaus, Noëlle

    2010-01-01

    Zn2+ ions were found to efficiently inhibit activated protein C (APC), suggesting a potential regulatory function for such inhibition. APC activity assays employing a chromogenic peptide substrate demonstrated that the inhibition was reversible and the apparent K I was 13 +/- 2 microM. k cat was ...

  3. Contour detection based on nonclassical receptive field inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorescu, Cosmin; Petkov, Nicolai; Westenberg, Michel A.

    We propose a biologically motivated computational step, called nonclassical receptive field (non-CRF) inhibition, more generally surround inhibition or suppression, to improve contour detection in machine vision. Non-CRF inhibition is exhibited by 80% of the orientation-selective neurons in the

  4. Cannabidiol inhibits angiogenesis by multiple mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solinas, M; Massi, P; Cantelmo, AR; Cattaneo, MG; Cammarota, R; Bartolini, D; Cinquina, V; Valenti, M; Vicentini, LM; Noonan, DM; Albini, A; Parolaro, D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Several studies have demonstrated anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic actions of cannabinoids on various tumours, together with their anti-angiogenic properties. The non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) effectively inhibits the growth of different types of tumours in vitro and in vivo and down-regulates some pro-angiogenic signals produced by glioma cells. As its anti-angiogenic properties have not been thoroughly investigated to date, and given its very favourable pharmacological and toxicological profile, here, we evaluated the ability of CBD to modulate tumour angiogenesis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Firstly, we evaluated the effect of CBD on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation and viability – through [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and FACS analysis – and in vitro motility – both in a classical Boyden chamber test and in a wound-healing assay. We next investigated CBD effects on different angiogenesis-related proteins released by HUVECs, using an angiogenesis array kit and an ELISA directed at MMP2. Then we evaluated its effects on in vitro angiogenesis in treated HUVECs invading a Matrigel layer and in HUVEC spheroids embedded into collagen gels, and further characterized its effects in vivo using a Matrigel sponge model of angiogenesis in C57/BL6 mice. KEY RESULTS CBD induced HUVEC cytostasis without inducing apoptosis, inhibited HUVEC migration, invasion and sprouting in vitro, and angiogenesis in vivo in Matrigel sponges. These effects were associated with the down-modulation of several angiogenesis-related molecules. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study reveals that CBD inhibits angiogenesis by multiple mechanisms. Its dual effect on both tumour and endothelial cells supports the hypothesis that CBD has potential as an effective agent in cancer therapy. PMID:22624859

  5. Myeloperoxidase Inhibition Increases Neurogenesis after Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HyeonJu; Wei, Ying; Lee, Ji Yong; Wu, Yue; Zheng, Yi; Moskowitz, Michael A; Chen, John W

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between inflammation and neurogenesis in stroke is currently not well understood. Focal ischemia enhances cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the neurogenic regions, including the subventricular zone (SVZ), dentate gyrus, as well as the non-neurogenic striatum, and cortex in the ischemic hemisphere. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a potent oxidizing enzyme secreted during inflammation by activated leukocytes, and its enzymatic activity is highly elevated after stroke. In this study, we investigated whether the inhibition of MPO activity by a specific irreversible inhibitor, 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide (ABAH) (MPO(-/-) mice) can increase neurogenesis after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. ABAH administration increased the number of proliferating bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells expressing markers for neural stems cells, astrocytes, neuroprogenitor cells (Nestin), and neuroblasts (doublecortin) in the ischemic SVZ, anterior SVZ, striatum, and cortex. MPO inhibition also increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (Ser133), acetylated H3, and NeuN to promote neurogenesis in the ischemic SVZ. ABAH treatment also increased chemokine CXC receptor 4 expression in the ischemic SVZ. MPO-deficient mice treated with vehicle or ABAH both showed similar effects on the number of BrdU(+) cells in the ischemic hemisphere, demonstrating that ABAH is specific to MPO. Taken together, our results underscore a detrimental role of MPO activity to postischemia neurogenesis and that a strategy to inhibit MPO activity can increase cell proliferation and improve neurogenesis after ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A Rhein

    Full Text Available Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks.

  7. Research on inhibition of corneal neovascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Hui Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Corneal transparency is the basis of the normal physiological functions.However, corneal neovascularization(CNVmay occur in the infection, mechanical and chemical injury or under other pathological conditions,which make the cornea lose original transparency and severe visual impairment. In recent years, along with the development of immunology, molecular biology, biochemistry and other disciplines, there is more in-depth understanding on the CNV, and clinical treatment of CNV has made new breakthroughs. This article provides an overview of the inhibition of CNV.

  8. Saw palmetto ethanol extract inhibits adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Nicole; Galvis, Adriana; Marcano, Adriana; Priestap, Horacio A; Bennett, Bradley C; Barbieri, M Alejandro

    2013-07-01

    The fruits of saw palmetto have been used for the treatment of a variety of urinary and reproductive system problems. In this study we investigated whether the fruit extracts affect in vitro adipogenesis. Saw palmetto ethanol extract inhibited the lipid droplet accumulation by induction media in a dose-dependent manner, and it also attenuated the protein expressions of C-EBPα and PPARγ. Phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt1 were also decreased by saw palmetto ethanol extract. This report suggests that saw palmetto extracts selectively affect the adipocyte differentiation through the modulation of several key factors that play a critical role during adipogenesis.

  9. CMP substitutions preferentially inhibit polysialic acid synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Angata, Kiyohiko; Seeberger, Peter H.; Hindsgaul, Ole; Fukuda, Minoru

    2007-01-01

    It is widely reported that derivatives of sugar moieties can be used to metabolically label cell surface carbohydrates or inhibit a particular glycosylation. However, few studies address the effect of substitution of the cytidylmonophosphate (CMP) portion on sialyltransferase activities. Here we first synthesized 2′-O-methyl CMP and 5-methyl CMP and then asked if these CMP derivatives are recognized by α2,3-sialyltransferases (ST3Gal-III and ST3Gal-IV), α2,6-sialyltransferase (ST6Gal-I), and ...

  10. Linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stine N.; Mayer, Philipp

    to chemical activity, as opposed to e.g. the total concentration. Baseline toxicity (narcosis) for neutral hydrophobic organic compounds has been shown to initiate in the narrow chemical activity range of 0.01 to 0.1. This presentation focuses on linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity...... of the presentation focuses on extending the utilisation of the chemical activity concept. More specifically, the chemical activity concept is applied to a much larger range of algal toxicity data, including a wide range of solids and liquids, covering several expected modes of action and also several algal species...

  11. Aminopeptidase from Brevibacterium linens: activation and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foissy, H

    1978-04-18

    Activation and inhibition of a purified aminopeptidase from Brevibacterium linens was investigated using L-alpha-leucyl-4-nitroanilide and L-leucyl-L-leucine as substrates. The enzyme was activated by cobalt, provided that the enzyme was preincubated with the metal. Strong inhibitory effects were derived from heavy metals, metal-complexing compounds, reducing agents, the modification of aromatic amino acids, and the presence of hydrophobic substances or certain amino acids in the test mixtures. Supposing that this B. linens aminopeptidase plays a part during surface-ripening of cheeses, possible consequences of specific technological conditions for its activity are discussed.

  12. LOX1 inhibition with small molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gousiadou, Chryssoula; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene

    2016-01-01

    the attention as targets and great effort has been made for the discovery and design of suitable inhibitors, to which end both pharmacological and computational methods have been employed. In the present work, using pharmacophore modeling and docking, we attempt to elucidate the inhibition of LOX1 with a new...... inhibitor, albidoside, an iridoid glucoside isolated from plants of the Scutellaria genus. Through a pharmacophore approach, complementarities between the ligand and the binding site are explored and a plausible mode of binding with the protein is suggested for albidoside....

  13. Inhibition of human aromatase complex (CYP19) by antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Halling-Sørensen, Bent; Birkved, Franziska Maria A Kramer

    2008-01-01

    of 1.4-49.7 mM. Carbamazepine, gabapentin, primidone, topiramate and vigabatrin showed no inhibition. Additionally, binary drug combinations were tested to investigate if combination therapy could potentiate the aromatase inhibition. Additive inhibition was seen in combination experiments...... with valproate and phenobarbital. When adding carbamazepine to a range of valproate concentrations no additional inhibition was seen. The data for some of the AEDs show that side effects on steroid synthesis in humans due to inhibition of aromatase should be considered....

  14. Inhibition control and working memory capacity in children with SLI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Klara; Kelmenson, Lyudmyla; Pinkhasova, Milana

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the "inefficient inhibition hypothesis" (IIH; Bjorklund & Harnishfeger, 1990; Wilson & Kipp, 1998) in three groups: children with specific language impairment (SLI), age-matched and language-matched controls. The IIH suggests that individuals with efficient inhibition skills perform better on working memory tasks because they are able to keep out irrelevant information from working memory. Children with SLI show processing capacity limitations. This study examined whether the working memory limitations are impacted by inhibition problems in this population. Working memory capacity was measured with a listening span task and children's inhibition errors were categorized. These errors reflected either immediate or delayed inhibition problems and they indicated either contextual distractions or perseverations. Children with SLI produced more inhibition errors than their peers in most categories. The results show an association between inhibition control and working memory capacity, but the direction of causality is not clear.

  15. Soluble Aβ aggregates can inhibit prion propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarell, Claire J; Quarterman, Emma; Yip, Daniel C-M; Terry, Cassandra; Nicoll, Andrew J; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Farrow, Mark A; Walsh, Dominic M; Collinge, John

    2017-11-01

    Mammalian prions cause lethal neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and consist of multi-chain assemblies of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrPC). Ligands that bind to PrPC can inhibit prion propagation and neurotoxicity. Extensive prior work established that certain soluble assemblies of the Alzheimer's disease (AD)-associated amyloid β-protein (Aβ) can tightly bind to PrPC, and that this interaction may be relevant to their toxicity in AD. Here, we investigated whether such soluble Aβ assemblies might, conversely, have an inhibitory effect on prion propagation. Using cellular models of prion infection and propagation and distinct Aβ preparations, we found that the form of Aβ assemblies which most avidly bound to PrP in vitro also inhibited prion infection and propagation. By contrast, forms of Aβ which exhibit little or no binding to PrP were unable to attenuate prion propagation. These data suggest that soluble aggregates of Aβ can compete with prions for binding to PrPC and emphasize the bidirectional nature of the interplay between Aβ and PrPC in Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Such inhibitory effects of Aβ on prion propagation may contribute to the apparent fall-off in the incidence of sporadic CJD at advanced age where cerebral Aβ deposition is common. © 2017 The Authors.

  16. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophoric antibiotic, inhibits adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkudlarek-Mikho, Maria; Saunders, Rudel A; Yap, Sook Fan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Chin, Khew-Voon

    2012-11-30

    The polyether ionophoric antibiotics including monensin, salinomycin, and narasin, are widely used in veterinary medicine and as food additives and growth promoters in animal husbandry including poultry farming. Their effects on human health, however, are not fully understood. Recent studies showed that salinomycin is a cancer stem cell inhibitor. Since poultry consumption has risen sharply in the last three decades, we asked whether the consumption of meat tainted with growth promoting antibiotics might have effects on adipose cells. We showed in this report that the ionophoric antibiotics inhibit the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. The block of differentiation is not due to the induction of apoptosis nor the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, salinomycin also suppresses the transcriptional activity of the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. These results suggest that the ionophoric antibiotics can be exploited as novel anti-obesity therapeutics and as pharmacological probes for the study of adipose biology. Further, the pharmacological effects of salinomycin could be a harbinger of its toxicity on the adipose tissue and other susceptible target cells in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Erythrocyte membrane skeleton inhibits nanoparticle endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xinli; Yue, Tongtao; Tian, Falin; Liu, Zhiping; Zhang, Xianren

    2017-06-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs), also called erythrocytes, have been experimentally proposed in recent decades as the biological drug delivery systems through entrapping certain drugs by endocytosis. However, the internalization pathway of endocytosis seems to conflict with the robust mechanical properties of RBCs that is induced by the spectrin-actin network of erythrocyte membrane skeleton. In this work, we employed a minimum realistic model and the dissipative particle dynamics method to investigate the influence of the spectrin-actin membrane skeleton on the internalization of nanoparticles (NPs). Our simulations show that the existence of skeleton meshwork indeed induces an inhibiting effect that effectively prevents NPs from internalization. The inhibiting effect is found to depend on the membrane-NP attraction, skeleton tension and relative size of the NP to the membrane skeleton mesh. However, our simulations also demonstrate that there are two possibilities for successful internalization of NPs in the presence of the membrane skeleton. The first case is for NPs that has a much smaller size than the dimension of skeleton meshes, and the other is that the skeleton tension is rather weak so that the formed vesicle can still move inward for NP internalization.

  18. Targeting Sphingosine Kinase-1 To Inhibit Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V.; Hengst, Jeremy; Gowda, Raghavendra; Fox, Todd E.; Yun, Jong K; Robertson, Gavin P.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Resistance to therapies develops rapidly for melanoma leading to more aggressive disease. Therefore, agents are needed that specifically inhibit proteins or pathways controlling the development of this disease, which can be combined, dependent on genes deregulated in a particular patient’s tumors. This study shows that elevated sphingosine-1-phosphate (S-1-P) levels resulting from increased activity of sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK1) occur in advanced melanomas. Targeting SPHK1 using siRNA decreased anchorage dependent and independent growth as well as sensitized melanoma cells to apoptosis inducing agents. Pharmacological SPHK1 inhibitors SKI-I but not SKI-II decreased S-1-P content, elevated ceramide levels, caused a G2-M block and induced apoptotic cell death in melanomas. Targeting SPHK1 using siRNA or the pharmacological agent called SKI-I, decreased the levels of pAKT. Furthermore, SKI-I inhibited the expression of CYCLIN D1 protein and increased the activity of caspase-3/7, which in turn led to the degradation of PARP. In animals, SKI-I but not SKI-II retarded melanoma growth by 25-40%. Thus, targeting SPHK1 using siRNAs or SKI-I has therapeutic potential for melanoma treatment either alone or in combination with other targeted agents. PMID:22236408

  19. Silkworm Apolipophorin Protein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Virulence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    Silkworm hemolymph inhibits hemolysin production by Staphylococcus aureus. We purified a factor in the silkworm hemolymph responsible for this inhibitory activity. The final fraction with the greatest specific activity contained 220- and 74-kDa proteins. Determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence revealed that the 220- and 74-kDa proteins were apolipophorin I and apolipophorin II, respectively, indicating that the factor was apolipophorin (ApoLp). The purified ApoLp fraction showed decreased expression of S. aureus hla encoding α-hemolysin, hlb encoding β-hemolysin, saeRS, and RNAIII, which activate the expression of these hemolysin genes. Injection of an anti-ApoLp antibody into the hemolymph increased the sensitivity of silkworms to the lethal effect of S. aureus. Hog gastric mucin, a mammalian homologue of ApoLp, decreased the expression of S. aureus hla and hlb. These findings suggest that ApoLp in the silkworm hemolymph inhibits S. aureus virulence and contributes to defense against S. aureus infection and that its activity is conserved in mammalian mucin. PMID:21937431

  20. Neuroprotective Mechanisms Mediated by CDK5 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Gohar; Greig, Nigel H; Anwar, Firoz; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Zamzami, Mazin A; Al-Talhi, Hasan A; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase belonging to the family of cyclin-dependent kinases. In addition to maintaining the neuronal architecture, CDK5 plays an important role in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, neurotransmitter release, neuron migration and neurite outgrowth. Although various reports have shown links between neurodegeneration and deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases, the specific role of CDK5 inhibition in causing neuroprotection in cases of neuronal insult or in neurodegenerative diseases is not wellunderstood. This article discusses current evidence for the involvement of CDK5 deregulation in neurodegenerative disorders and neurodegeneration associated with stroke through various mechanisms. These include upregulation of cyclin D1 and overactivation of CDK5 mediated neuronal cell death pathways, aberrant hyperphosphorylation of human tau proteins and/or neurofilament proteins, formation of neurofibrillary lesions, excitotoxicity, cytoskeletal disruption, motor neuron death (due to abnormally high levels of CDK5/p25) and colchicine- induced apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons. A better understanding of the role of CDK5 inhibition in neuroprotective mechanisms will help scientists and researchers to develop selective, safe and efficacious pharmacological inhibitors of CDK5 for therapeutic use against human neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and neuronal loss associated with stroke.

  1. Understanding biocatalyst inhibition by carboxylic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R Jarboe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical in terms of their flexibility and usage as precursors for a variety of industrial chemicals. It has been demonstrated that such carboxylic acids can be fermentatively produced using engineered microbes, such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, like many other attractive biorenewable fuels and chemicals, carboxylic acids become inhibitory to these microbes at concentrations below the desired yield and titer. In fact, their potency as microbial inhibitors is highlighted by the fact that many of these carboxylic acids are routinely used as food preservatives. This review highlights the current knowledge regarding the impact that saturated, straight-chain carboxylic acids, such as hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic and lauric acids can have on E. coli and S. cerevisiae, with the goal of identifying metabolic engineering strategies to increase robustness. Key effects of these carboxylic acids include damage to the cell membrane and a decrease of the microbial internal pH. Certain changes in cell membrane properties, such as composition, fluidity, integrity and hydrophobicity, and intracellular pH are often associated with increased tolerance. The availability of appropriate exporters, such as Pdr12, can also increase tolerance. The effect on metabolic processes, such as maintaining appropriate respiratory function, regulation of Lrp activity and inhibition of production of key metabolites such as methionine, are also considered. Understanding the mechanisms of biocatalyst inhibition by these desirable products can aid in the engineering of robust strains with improved industrial performance.

  2. Inhibition of saccades elicits attentional suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Saurabh; Deubel, Heiner; Jonikaitis, Donatas

    2013-05-17

    Visuospatial attention has been shown to have a central role in planning and generation of saccades but what role, if any, it plays in inhibition of saccades remains unclear. In this study, we used an oculomotor delayed match- or nonmatch-to-sample task in which a cued location has to be encoded and memorized for one of two very different goals-to plan a saccade to it or to avoid making a saccade to it. We measured the spatial allocation of attention during the delay and found that while marking a location as a future saccade target resulted in an attentional benefit at that location, marking it as forbidden to saccades led to an attentional cost. Additionally, saccade trajectories were found to deviate away more from the "don't look" location than from a saccade-irrelevant distractor confirming greater inhibition of an actively forbidden location in oculomotor programming. Our finding that attention is suppressed at locations forbidden to saccades confirms and complements the claim of a selective and obligatory coupling between saccades and attention-saccades at the memorized location could neither be planned nor suppressed independent of a corresponding effect on attentional performance.

  3. Stanniocalcin-2 Inhibits Mammalian Growth by Proteolytic Inhibition of the Insulin-like Growth Factor Axis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Malene R.; Kløverpris, Søren; Mikkelsen, Jakob H.; Pedersen, Josefine H.; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Laursen, Lisbeth S.; Oxvig, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian stanniocalcin-2 (STC2) is a secreted polypeptide widely expressed in developing and adult tissues. However, although transgenic expression in mice is known to cause severe dwarfism, and targeted deletion of STC2 causes increased postnatal growth, its precise biological role is still unknown. We found that STC2 potently inhibits the proteolytic activity of the growth-promoting metalloproteinase, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A). Proteolytic inhibition requires covalent binding of STC2 to PAPP-A and is mediated by a disulfide bond, which involves Cys-120 of STC2. Binding of STC2 prevents PAPP-A cleavage of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-4 and hence release within tissues of bioactive IGF, required for normal growth. Concordantly, we show that STC2 efficiently inhibits PAPP-A-mediated IGF receptor signaling in vitro and that transgenic mice expressing a mutated variant of STC2, STC2(C120A), which is unable to inhibit PAPP-A, grow like wild-type mice. Our work identifies STC2 as a novel proteinase inhibitor and a previously unrecognized extracellular component of the IGF system. PMID:25533459

  4. Stachytarpheta cayennensis extract inhibits promastigote and amastigote growth in Leishmania amazonensis via parasite arginase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquiaveli, Claudia do Carmo; Oliveira E Sá, Amanda Maria; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; da Silva, Edson Roberto

    2016-11-04

    Stachytarpheta cayennensis is a plant that is traditionally used to treat tegumentary leishmaniasis and as an anti-inflammatory agent. This study aimed to evaluate the action of S. cayennensis extracts on the Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis arginase enzyme. S. cayennensis was collected from the Brazilian Amazon region. Aqueous extracts were fractionated with n-butanol. The leishmanicidal effects of the n-butanolic fraction (BUF) were evaluated in L. (L.) amazonensis promastigotes and amastigotes. BUF was tested against recombinant arginase from both L. (L.) amazonensis and macrophage arginase. Promastigote cultures and infected macrophage cultures were supplemented with L-ornithine to verify arginase inhibition. NMR analysis was used to identify the major components of BUF. BUF showed an EC50 of 51 and 32µg/mL against promastigotes and amastigotes of L. (L.) amazonensis, respectively. BUF contains a mixture of verbascoside and isoverbascoside (7:3 ratio) and is a potent L. (L.) amazonensis arginase inhibitor (IC50=1.2µg/mL), while macrophage arginase was weakly inhibited (IC50>1000µg/mL). The inhibition of arginase by BUF in promastigotes and amastigotes could be demonstrated by culture media supplementation with L-ornithine, a product of the hydrolysis of L-arginine by arginase. Leishmanicidal effects of the S. cayennensis BUF fraction on L. (L.) amazonensis are associated with selective parasite arginase inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition in language switching: what is inhibited when switching between languages in naming tasks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Andrea M; Koch, Iring

    2009-09-01

    When people switch between languages, inhibition of currently irrelevant languages is assumed to occur. The authors examined inhibition of irrelevant languages with a cued language-switching paradigm. A cue indicated in which of 3 languages (German, English, or French) a visual stimulus was to be named. In 2 experiments, the authors found that naming latencies were increased in n-2 language repetitions (e.g., German/English/German) compared with in n-2 language nonrepetitions (e.g., French/English/German). This difference (n-2 repetition costs) indicates persisting inhibition of abandoned languages. It is important to note that n-2 language-repetition costs also occurred in conditions in which the language but not the cue (Experiment 1) or the stimulus/response set (Experiment 2) repeated from trial n-2 to trial n. These data demonstrate that inhibition is not restricted to a specific cue or stimulus/response set. Rather, the data suggest more global inhibitory processes that affect the mental representation of competing languages. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Ketoconazole inhibits the cellular uptake of anandamide via inhibition of FAAH at pharmacologically relevant concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmelie Björklund

    Full Text Available The antifungal compound ketoconazole has, in addition to its ability to interfere with fungal ergosterol synthesis, effects upon other enzymes including human CYP3A4, CYP17, lipoxygenase and thromboxane synthetase. In the present study, we have investigated whether ketoconazole affects the cellular uptake and hydrolysis of the endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand anandamide (AEA.The effects of ketoconazole upon endocannabinoid uptake were investigated using HepG2, CaCo2, PC-3 and C6 cell lines. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH activity was measured in HepG2 cell lysates and in intact C6 cells. Ketoconazole inhibited the uptake of AEA by HepG2 cells and CaCo2 cells with IC50 values of 17 and 18 µM, respectively. In contrast, it had modest effects upon AEA uptake in PC-3 cells, which have a low expression of FAAH. In cell-free HepG2 lysates, ketoconazole inhibited FAAH activity with an IC50 value (for the inhibitable component of 34 µM.The present study indicates that ketoconazole can inhibit the cellular uptake of AEA at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, primarily due to its effects upon FAAH. Ketoconazole may be useful as a template for the design of dual-action FAAH/CYP17 inhibitors as a novel strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  7. Checkpoint kinase 1 inhibition sensitises transformed cells to dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, Stéphanie; Rodier, Geneviève; Matar, Gisèle; Vincent, Charles; Pirot, Nelly; Delorme, Yoann; Berthet, Charlène; Buscail, Yoan; Noël, Jean Yohan; Lachambre, Simon; Jarlier, Marta; Bernex, Florence; Delpech, Hélène; Vidalain, Pierre Olivier; Janin, Yves L; Theillet, Charles; Sardet, Claude

    2017-11-10

    Reduction in nucleotide pools through the inhibition of mitochondrial enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) has been demonstrated to effectively reduce cancer cell proliferation and tumour growth. The current study sought to investigate whether this antiproliferative effect could be enhanced by combining Chk1 kinase inhibition. The pharmacological activity of DHODH inhibitor teriflunomide was more selective towards transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts than their primary or immortalised counterparts, and this effect was amplified when cells were subsequently exposed to PF477736 Chk1 inhibitor. Flow cytometry analyses revealed substantial accumulations of cells in S and G2/M phases, followed by increased cytotoxicity which was characterised by caspase 3-dependent induction of cell death. Associating PF477736 with teriflunomide also significantly sensitised SUM159 and HCC1937 human triple negative breast cancer cell lines to dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibition. The main characteristic of this effect was the sustained accumulation of teriflunomide-induced DNA damage as cells displayed increased phospho serine 139 H2AX (γH2AX) levels and concentration-dependent phosphorylation of Chk1 on serine 345 upon exposure to the combination as compared with either inhibitor alone. Importantly a similar significant increase in cell death was observed upon dual siRNA mediated depletion of Chk1 and DHODH in both murine and human cancer cell models. Altogether these results suggest that combining DHODH and Chk1 inhibitions may be a strategy worth considering as a potential alternative to conventional chemotherapies.

  8. Effects of lorazepam on short latency afferent inhibition and short latency intracortical inhibition in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, V; Oliviero, A; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Pilato, F; Nardone, R; Ranieri, F; Musumeci, G; Fiorilla, T; Tonali, P

    2005-04-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the GABAergic system modulates acetylcholine release and, through GABA(A) receptors, tonically inhibits cholinergic activity. Little is known about the effects of GABA on the cholinergic activity in the human central nervous system. In vivo evaluation of some cholinergic circuits of the human brain has recently been introduced using a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol based on coupling peripheral nerve stimulation with TMS of the motor cortex. Peripheral nerve inputs have an inhibitory effect on motor cortex excitability at short intervals (short latency afferent inhibition, SAI). We investigated whether GABA(A) activity enhancement by lorazepam modifies SAI. We also evaluated the effects produced by lorazepam on a different TMS protocol of cortical inhibition, the short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), which is believed to be directly related to GABA(A) activity. In 10 healthy volunteers, the effects of lorazepam were compared with those produced by quetiapine, a psychotropic drug with sedative effects with no appreciable affinity at cholinergic muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors, and with those of a placebo using a randomized double-blind study design. Administration of lorazepam produced a significant increase in SICI (F(3,9) = 3.19, P = 0.039). In contrast to SICI, SAI was significantly reduced by lorazepam (F(3,9) = 9.39, P = 0.0002). Our findings demonstrate that GABA(A) activity enhancement determines a suppression of SAI and an increase of SICI.

  9. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Sharada; Gao, Liying; Gonnering, Marni; Helferich, William; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-03-15

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, and 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Doxycycline inhibits leukemic cell migration via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, CHUNHUAI; XIANG, RU; ZHANG, XIANGZHONG; CHEN, YUNXIAN

    2015-01-01

    Doxycycline, a tetracycline-based antibiotic, has been reported to attenuate melanoma cell migration through inhibiting the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. However, it remains to be elucidated whether doxycycline exerts this effect on leukemia cell migration. The present study aimed to examine the role of doxycycline in leukemia cell migration. The invasion capacities of the human leukemia cell lines KG1a (acute myelogenous leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia) were evaluated using Matrigel® matrix-coated Transwell® chamber assays; leukemic cell lines treated with doxycycline (1 µg/ml) or anti-β1-integrin antibodies were added to the upper chamber, while untreated cells were included as controls. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to further understand the influence of doxycycline treatment on the expression of FAK and gelatinases in the KG1a and K562 leukemic cell lines. In addition, FAK protein expression and phosphorylation were determined using western blot analysis in order to investigate the mechanism by which doxycycline inhibited leukemic cell migration. The results revealed that doxycycline treatment significantly attenuated the migration of KG1a and K562 cells, which was demonstrated to be associated with inhibition of the expression and phosphorylation of FAK. In addition, doxycycline treatment inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression. Furthermore, incubation with blocking anti-β1-integrin antibodies had an analogous inhibitory effect on leukemic cell migration to that of doxycycline. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that doxycycline attenuated leukemic cell migration through inhibiting the FAK signaling pathway. Therefore, doxycycline may have potential for use as a novel strategy for the treatment of leukemia. PMID:26004127

  11. Temporal Dynamics of Proactive and Reactive Motor Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike M. Krämer

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Proactive motor inhibition refers to endogenous preparatory mechanisms facilitating action inhibition, whereas reactive motor inhibition is considered to be a sudden stopping process triggered by external signals. Previous studies were inconclusive about the temporal dynamics of involved neurocognitive processes during proactive and reactive motor control. Using electroencephalography (EEG, we investigated the time-course of proactive and reactive inhibition, measuring event-related oscillations and event-related potentials (ERPs. Participants performed in a cued go/nogo paradigm with cues indicating whether the motor response might or might not have to be inhibited. Based on the dual mechanisms of control (DMC framework by Braver, we investigated the role of attentional effects, motor preparation in the sensorimotor cortex and prefrontal cognitive control mechanisms, separating effects before and after target onset. In the cue-target interval, proactive motor inhibition was associated with increased attention, reflected in reduced visual alpha power and an increased contingent negative variation (CNV. At the same time, motor inhibition was modulated by reduced sensorimotor beta power. After target onset, proactive inhibition resulted in an increased N1, indicating allocation of attention towards relevant stimuli, increased prefrontal beta power and a modulation of sensorimotor mu activity. As in previous studies, reactive stopping of motor actions was associated with increased prefrontal beta power and increased sensorimotor beta activity. The results stress the relevance of attentional mechanisms for proactive inhibition and speak for different neurocognitive mechanisms being involved in the early preparation for and in later implementation of motor inhibition.

  12. Inhibition effect of food preservatives on endoproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esimbekova, Elena N; Asanova, Anastasiya A; Deeva, Anna A; Kratasyuk, Valentina A

    2017-11-15

    The present manuscript proposes a novel approach to assess the impact of food additives on human metabolism by analysing their effect on biomarker enzyme activity. Alterations in the activity of pancreatic enzymes, such as chymotrypsin and trypsin, which are affected by the most common food preservatives, sodium benzoate (E211), potassium sorbate (E202) and sorbic acid (E200), have been evaluated. The proteinase activity was analysed with a bioluminescent method using the light intensity decay constant. Our study revealed that the preservatives reduce proteinase activity by 50% (EC50) at a much lower concentration than their acceptable daily intake (ADI). Thus, sodium benzoate and sorbic acid have an inhibition effect on chymotrypsin at concentrations 14 times lower and 70 times lower than their ADI and this increases with exposure time. Food preservative consumption impacts negatively on protein digestion, which is especially dangerous for patients with pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ACAT inhibition and amyloid beta reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Raja; Kovacs, Dora M

    2010-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Accumulation and deposition of the beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide generated from its larger amyloid precursor protein (APP) is one of the pathophysiological hallmarks of AD. Intracellular cholesterol was shown to regulate Abeta production. Recent genetic and biochemical studies indicate that not only the amount, but also the distribution of intracellular cholesterol is critical to regulate Abeta generation. Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyl-transferase (ACAT) is a family of enzymes that regulates the cellular distribution of cholesterol by converting membrane cholesterol into hydrophobic cholesteryl esters for cholesterol storage and transport. Using pharmacological inhibitors and transgenic animal models, we and others have identified ACAT1 as a potential therapeutic target to lower Abeta generation and accumulation. Here we discuss data focusing on ACAT inhibition as an effective strategy for the prevention and treatment of AD. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ubiquitylation of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase inhibits its activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Maezawa

    Full Text Available Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT, which template-independently synthesizes DNA during V(DJ recombination in lymphoid cells, is ubiquitylated by a BPOZ-2/Cul3 complex, as the ubiquitin ligase, and then degraded by the 26 S proteasome. We show here that TdT is ubiquitylated by the Cul3-based ubiquitylation system in vitro. Because TdT could also be ubiquitylated in the absence of Cul/BPOZ-2, we determined that it could also be directly ubiquitylated by the E2 proteins UbcH5a/b/c and UbcH6, E3-independently. Furthermore, the ubiquitylated TdT inhibited its nucleotidyltransferase activity.

  15. Inhibition shapes the organization of hippocampal representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Sam

    2017-09-16

    Hippocampal neurons become tuned to stimuli that predict behaviorally salient outcomes. This plasticity suggests that memory formation depends upon shifts in how different anatomical inputs can drive hippocampal activity. Here, I present evidence that inhibitory neurons can provide such a mechanism for learning-related changes in the tuning of pyramidal cells. Inhibitory currents arriving on the dendrites of pyramidal cells determine whether an excitatory input can drive action potential output. Specificity and plasticity of this dendritic modulation allows for precise, modifiable changes in how afferent inputs are integrated, a process that defines a neuron's receptive field. In addition, feedback inhibition plays a fundamental role in biasing which excitatory neurons may be co-active. By defining the rules of synchrony and the rules of input integration, interneurons likely play an important role in the organization of memory representation within the hippocampus. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Inhibition of gene expression by RNase P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Eirik Wasmuth; Altman, Sidney

    2010-07-31

    The ability to interfere with gene expression is of crucial importance to unravel the function of genes and is also a promising therapeutic strategy. Here we discuss methodologies for inhibition of target RNAs based on the cleavage activity of the essential enzyme, Ribonuclease P (RNase P). RNase P-mediated cleavage of target RNAs can be directed by external guide sequences (EGSs) or by the use of the catalytic M1 RNA from E. coli linked to a guide sequence (M1GSs). These are not only basic tools for functional genetic studies in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells but also promising antibacterial, anticancer and antiviral agents. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Behavioral inhibition and PTSD symptoms in veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Catherine E.; VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI), a temperamental bias to respond to novel stimuli with avoidance behaviors, is a risk factor for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is unclear whether BI accounts for additional variance in PTSD symptom severity beyond that accounted for by general anxiety. Here, 109 veterans (mean age 50.4 years, 9.2% female) provided self-assessment of PTSD symptoms, state and trait anxiety, combat exposure, and current (adult) and retrospective (childhood) BI. Adult BI was correlated with anxiety and PTSD symptom severity, especially cluster C (avoidance) symptoms, but not with combat exposure. A regression model including adult BI, state and trait anxiety, and combat exposure was able to correctly classify over 80% of participants according to presence or absence of severe PTSD symptoms. Because avoidance behaviors are a core component of PTSD, self-assessments of BI may be an important tool in understanding PTSD and potentially assessing vulnerability to the disorder. PMID:22397911

  18. Method of inhibiting corrosion in acidizing wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.A.; Holifield, P.K.; Looney, J.R.; McDougall, L.A.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes improvement in a method of acidizing a subterranean formation penetrated by a borehole which has metal pipe positioned therein wherein an aqueous acid solution is pumped down the pipe and into the formation. The improvement comprises introducing components of a nonacetylenic corrosion inhibitor directly into the aqueous acid solution to form the corrosion inhibitor in the acid solution at a concentration to inhibit corrosion of the metal, the components consisting essentially of: an antimony compound which provides from 0.04 to 2.0 wt % of antimony ions in the aqueous acid; from 0.2 to 10 wt % of a quaternary ammonium compound capable of forming a complex with the antimony ions; and from 0.1 to 25 wt % of a surfactant capable of water wetting the pipe.

  19. Covalent inhibition of the lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Vanessa F; Bottini, Nunzio; Barrios, Amy M

    2014-02-01

    Covalent inhibitors of lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (LYP) were identified from a screen of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecules Repository (MLSMR). Both of the two lead compounds identified have phosphotyrosine-mimetic benzoic acid moieties as well as electrophilic acrylonitrile groups. Inhibition kinetics of both compounds are consistent with covalent modification of the enzyme, with nanomolar KI and reciprocal millisecond kinact values, representing the best efficiency ratios (kinact /KI ) among currently reported covalent LYP inhibitors. Covalent inhibitors can provide longer efficacy and better selectivity than more conventional noncovalent inhibitors, and these lead compounds are an important step toward the development of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-targeted covalent therapeutic compounds. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Inhibition of Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackman, Gilles; Coenye, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive, facultative anaerobic coccus-shaped bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus are among the most important causative agents of acute and chronic bacterial infections in humans as well as in animals. Treatment of Staphylococcus infections has become increasingly challenging due to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. For this reason innovative antimicrobials with novel targets and modes of action are needed. Since the discovery that QS is used by Staphylococcus spp. to coordinate the expression of several genes involved in virulence, biofilm formation and pathogenicity, QS inhibition has gained increasing attention as an alternative anti-pathogenic strategy. A major advantage compared with antibiotic therapy is that QSIs are used in concentrations that do not affect bacterial growth. For this reason, it is expected that these compounds would exert less pressure towards the development of resistance. However, some important points still need to be addressed. Although several inhibitors have proven to be active antipathogenic agents in vitro and in several in vivo models, it is still unknown whether these compounds will also be useful in humans. Furthermore, several fundamental mechanisms by which the different QS systems in Staphylococcus spp. exert their regulatory functions and how they are inhibited by QSIs are still poorly understood. In order to achieve real-life applications with QSIs, these challenges should be addressed and more research will be needed. In this article, we will discuss the different QS systems present in Staphylococcus spp., how they are used to control virulence and biofilm formation and how they can be blocked.

  1. Rhabdoid tumor growth is inhibited by flavopiridol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melissa E; Cimica, Velasco; Chinni, Srinivasa; Challagulla, Kavitha; Mani, Sridhar; Kalpana, Ganjam V

    2008-01-15

    Rhabdoid tumors are aggressive and incurable pediatric malignancies. INI1/hSNF5, a tumor suppressor biallelically deleted/inactivated in rhabdoid tumors, directly represses cyclin D1. Rhabdoid tumors and cells are exquisitely dependent on cyclin D1 for genesis and survival, suggesting that targeting the cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) axis may be an effective therapeutic strategy for these tumors. Because cdk inhibitors have not been used for preclinical or clinical testing on rhabdoid tumors, we investigated the effect of flavopiridol, a pan-cdk inhibitor with promising clinical activity, on rhabdoid tumors. The effect of flavopiridol on rhabdoid cells was tested in vitro using survival, cell cycle, and apoptosis assays. Its effect was assessed in vivo using xenografted rhabdoid tumor models. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analysis was used to assess the effect of flavopiridol on cyclin D1 and p21 expression in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Nanomolar concentrations of flavopiridol inhibited rhabdoid cell growth (IC(50) approximately 200 nmol/L), induced G(1) and G(2) arrest, and apoptosis in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects were correlated with the down-modulation of cyclin D1, up-regulation of p21, and induction of caspase 3/7 activities. Flavopiridol (at 7.5 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the growth of xenografted rhabdoid tumors, and its effect was correlated with the induction of p21 and down-modulation of cyclin D1. Flavopiridol is effective in inducing cell cycle arrest and cytotoxicity in rhabdoid tumors. Its effects are correlated with the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and the up-regulation of p21. Flavopiridol is potentially a novel chemotherapeutic agent for rhabdoid tumors.

  2. Primary proteasome inhibition results in cardiac dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Joerg; Wohlert, Christine; Saguner, Ardan M.; Flores, Ana; Nesbitt, Lisa L.; Chade, Alejandro; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Aims The proteasome prevents the intracellular accumulation of proteins and its impairment can lead to structural and functional alterations, as noted for the coronary vasculature in a previous study. Utilizing the same model, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that chronic proteasome inhibition (PSI) also leads to structural and functional changes of the heart. Methods and results Female domestic pigs were randomized to a normal diet without (N) or with twice-weekly subcutaneous injections of the proteasome inhibitor MLN-273 (0.08 mg/kg, N + PSI, n = 5 each group). In vivo data on cardiac structure and function as well as myocardial perfusion and microvascular permeability response to adenosine and dobutamine were obtained by electron beam computed tomography after 11 weeks. Subsequent ex vivo myocardial analyses included immunoblotting, immunostaining, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling), Masson trichrome, and Congo red staining. Compared with N, an increase in LV mass was observed in N + PSI (106.5 ± 16.4 g vs. 183.1 ± 24.2 g, P < 0.05). The early to late diastolic filling ratio was increased in N + PSI vs. N (3.5 ± 0.6 vs. 1.8 ± 0.1, P < 0.05). The EF tended to be lower (46 ± 12% and 53 ± 9%, respectively) and cardiac output was significantly lower in N + PSI than in N (2.9 ± 1.1 vs. 4.7 ± 1.1 L/min, P < 0.05). Tissue analyses demonstrated an accumulation of proteasome substrates, apoptosis, and fibrosis in the PSI group. Compared with N, the myocardial perfusion response was reduced and microvascular permeability was increased in N + PSI. Conclusion The current study demonstrates that chronic proeasome inhibition affects the cardiovascular system, leading to functional and structural alteration of the heart consistent with a hypertrophic–restrictive cardiomyopathy phenotype. PMID:23616520

  3. Mechanisms of hop inhibition: hop ionophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2009-07-22

    In this work, the mechanism of hop inhibition toward (beer spoiling) bacteria is revised. The mode of action of iso-alpha-acids was investigated via bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) measurements and growth challenges of hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of uncouplers of class I and II or a H(+)/Mn(2+) exchanger. The antibacterial action of iso-alpha-acids as proton ionophores could be confirmed by the BLM measurements; however, the reported ionophore properties, as electroneutral H(+)/Mn(2+) exchangers, could not be verified. Potentiometric measurements indicated the manganese-dependent enhancement of transmembrane charge permeation. The origin of high membrane potentials in the presence of manganese, as well as the strongly elevated membrane conductivity with concomitant increase in effectiveness of an uncoupler, suggest a different origin of charge transfer under these conditions. The mode of antibacterial action of hop ionophores can be described as proton ionophores of class I/II, which are capable transporting protons within a wide range of pH due to their inherent complexity of chemical composition. However, growth challenges in the presence of both types of ionophore classes in combination with the measured unusual high BLM potentials in the presence of manganese and at low pH indicate an additional mechanism of inhibition by hop compounds. The latter may be due to the nature/properties of hop compounds, which are known to be highly reactive substances. As a consequence, hop resistance of bacteria can be described as multiple resistance to a heterogeneous mixture of compounds comprising different known and yet unknown charge transport mechanisms, which were dependent on several factors, for example, compound concentrations, cation composition, and pH value. Thus, only specialists such as some L. brevis strains, which can cope with unusually low intracellular manganese levels, can survive hop stress. Accordingly, cross

  4. Enoxacin directly inhibits osteoclastogenesis without inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Edgardo J; Zuo, Jian; Ostrov, David A; Catalfamo, Dana; Bradaschia-Correa, Vivian; Arana-Chavez, Victor; Caridad, Aliana R; Neubert, John K; Wronski, Thomas J; Wallet, Shannon M; Holliday, L Shannon

    2012-05-18

    Enoxacin has been identified as a small molecule inhibitor of binding between the B2-subunit of vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) and microfilaments. It inhibits bone resorption by calcitriol-stimulated mouse marrow cultures. We hypothesized that enoxacin acts directly and specifically on osteoclasts by disrupting the interaction between plasma membrane-directed V-ATPases, which contain the osteoclast-selective a3-subunit of V-ATPase, and microfilaments. Consistent with this hypothesis, enoxacin dose-dependently reduced the number of multinuclear cells expressing tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity produced by RANK-L-stimulated osteoclast precursors. Enoxacin (50 μM) did not induce apoptosis as measured by TUNEL and caspase-3 assays. V-ATPases containing the a3-subunit, but not the "housekeeping" a1-subunit, were isolated bound to actin. Treatment with enoxacin reduced the association of V-ATPase subunits with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton. Quantitative PCR revealed that enoxacin triggered significant reductions in several osteoclast-selective mRNAs, but levels of various osteoclast proteins were not reduced, as determined by quantitative immunoblots, even when their mRNA levels were reduced. Immunoblots demonstrated that proteolytic processing of TRAP5b and the cytoskeletal protein L-plastin was altered in cells treated with 50 μM enoxacin. Flow cytometry revealed that enoxacin treatment favored the expression of high levels of DC-STAMP on the surface of osteoclasts. Our data show that enoxacin directly inhibits osteoclast formation without affecting cell viability by a novel mechanism that involves changes in posttranslational processing and trafficking of several proteins with known roles in osteoclast function. We propose that these effects are downstream to blocking the binding interaction between a3-containing V-ATPases and microfilaments.

  5. Enoxacin Directly Inhibits Osteoclastogenesis without Inducing Apoptosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Edgardo J.; Zuo, Jian; Ostrov, David A.; Catalfamo, Dana; Bradaschia-Correa, Vivian; Arana-Chavez, Victor; Caridad, Aliana R.; Neubert, John K.; Wronski, Thomas J.; Wallet, Shannon M.; Holliday, L. Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Enoxacin has been identified as a small molecule inhibitor of binding between the B2-subunit of vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) and microfilaments. It inhibits bone resorption by calcitriol-stimulated mouse marrow cultures. We hypothesized that enoxacin acts directly and specifically on osteoclasts by disrupting the interaction between plasma membrane-directed V-ATPases, which contain the osteoclast-selective a3-subunit of V-ATPase, and microfilaments. Consistent with this hypothesis, enoxacin dose-dependently reduced the number of multinuclear cells expressing tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity produced by RANK-L-stimulated osteoclast precursors. Enoxacin (50 μm) did not induce apoptosis as measured by TUNEL and caspase-3 assays. V-ATPases containing the a3-subunit, but not the “housekeeping” a1-subunit, were isolated bound to actin. Treatment with enoxacin reduced the association of V-ATPase subunits with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton. Quantitative PCR revealed that enoxacin triggered significant reductions in several osteoclast-selective mRNAs, but levels of various osteoclast proteins were not reduced, as determined by quantitative immunoblots, even when their mRNA levels were reduced. Immunoblots demonstrated that proteolytic processing of TRAP5b and the cytoskeletal protein l-plastin was altered in cells treated with 50 μm enoxacin. Flow cytometry revealed that enoxacin treatment favored the expression of high levels of DC-STAMP on the surface of osteoclasts. Our data show that enoxacin directly inhibits osteoclast formation without affecting cell viability by a novel mechanism that involves changes in posttranslational processing and trafficking of several proteins with known roles in osteoclast function. We propose that these effects are downstream to blocking the binding interaction between a3-containing V-ATPases and microfilaments. PMID:22474295

  6. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by diisocyanates and its spontaneous reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewair, M; Baur, X; Mauermayer, R

    1983-01-01

    The inhibition of human acetylcholinesterase (AchE) by 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) is determined and compared with the previously described inhibition of this enzyme by two other industrially used diisocyanates: toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI). The inhibition potency of these three diisocyanates is found to be in the oder HDI greater than TDI greater than MDI. The spontaneous reactivation of inhibited AchE is reanalysed with the help of a computer program designed to fit the reactivation data to the exponential rate equation Vt = Vinf (1 - e-Kobs X (t - to) ). The enzyme inhibited by HDI and MDI undergoes very slow and limited spontaneous reactivation. The rate of delivery of diisocyanates into the respiratory tract of an exposed worker may be faster than the rate of spontaneous reactivation of the inhibited enzyme. These results are discussed in connection with the obstructive lung disease observed in approximately 5% of the workers employed in the isocyanate industry.

  7. Non Parametric Estimation of Inhibition for Point Process Data

    OpenAIRE

    Beyor, Alexa Lake

    2015-01-01

    For a single geyser one eruption may inhibit another eruption. The objective is to estimate the inhibition function of geyser eruptions using a non parametric algorithm by extending the non parametric estimation method of Marsan and Lenglin?(2008) for clustered Hawkes processes to the case where there may be inhibition. The proposed method is tested using simulated geyser eruption data from known densities: Exponential, Pareto, Normal, and Uniform. The method is then applied ot the actual dat...

  8. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konowalchuk, Thomas W

    2014-01-14

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods on inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  9. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konowalchuk, Thomas W.; Konowalchuk, Jack

    2017-07-18

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods of inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further includes methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  10. Inhibition of Human Vascular NADPH Oxidase by Apocynin Derived Oligophenols

    OpenAIRE

    Mora-Pale, Mauricio; Weïwer, Michel; Yu, Jingjing; Linhardt, Robert J.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2009-01-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of apocynin, which may mimic in vivo metabolism, affords a large number of oligomers (apocynin oxidation products, AOP) that inhibit vascular NADPH oxidase. In vitro studies of NADPH oxidase activity were performed to identify active inhibitors, resulting in a trimer hydroxylated quinone (IIIHyQ) that inhibited NADPH oxidase with an IC50 = 31 nM. Apocynin itself possessed minimal inhibitory activity. NADPH oxidase is believed to be inhibited through prevention of the inter...

  11. Timing of growth inhibition following shoot inversion in Pharbitis nil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, A. M.; Cline, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    Shoot inversion in Pharbitis nil results in the enhancement of ethylene production and in the inhibition of elongation in the growth zone of the inverted shoot. The initial increase in ethylene production previously was detected within 2 to 2.75 hours after inversion. In the present study, the initial inhibition of shoot elongation was detected within 1.5 to 4 hours with a weighted mean of 2.4 hours. Ethylene treatment of upright shoots inhibited elongation in 1.5 hours. A cause and effect relationship between shoot inversion-enhanced ethylene production and inhibition of elongation cannot be excluded.

  12. Selective and nonselective inhibition of competitors in picture naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zeshu; Meyer, Antje S; Roelofs, Ardi

    2013-11-01

    The present study examined the relation between nonselective inhibition and selective inhibition in picture naming performance. Nonselective inhibition refers to the ability to suppress any unwanted response, whereas selective inhibition refers to the ability to suppress specific competing responses. The degree of competition in picture naming was manipulated by presenting targets along with distractor words that could be semantically related (e.g., a picture of a dog combined with the word cat) or unrelated (tree) to the picture name. The mean naming response time (RT) was longer in the related than in the unrelated condition, reflecting semantic interference. Delta plot analyses showed that participants with small mean semantic interference effects employed selective inhibition more effectively than did participants with larger semantic interference effects. The participants were also tested on the stop-signal task, which taps nonselective inhibition. Their performance on this task was correlated with their mean naming RT but, importantly, not with the selective inhibition indexed by the delta plot analyses and the magnitude of the semantic interference effect. These results indicate that nonselective inhibition ability and selective inhibition of competitors in picture naming are separable to some extent.

  13. Obesity, Cardiovascular Fitness, and Inhibition Function: An Electrophysiological Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Song, Tai-Fen; Chi, Lin; Chu, Chien-Heng; Chen, Feng-Tzu; Zhou, Chenglin; Chang, Yu-Kai

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how obesity and cardiovascular fitness are associated with the inhibition aspect of executive function from behavioral and electrophysiological perspectives...

  14. Cognitive inhibition in students with and without dyslexia and dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chih; Tasi, Hung-Ju; Yang, Hsien-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The present study presents a comparison of the cognitive inhibition abilities of dyslexic, dyscalculic, and control students. The participants were 45 dyslexic students, 45 dyscalculic students, and 45 age-, gender-, and IQ-matched control students. The major evaluation tools included six cognitive inhibition tasks which were restructured during principal component analysis into three categories: graph inhibition, number inhibition, and word inhibition. Comparisons of the 3 groups of students revealed that in graph inhibition, dyscalculic students performed worst of the 3 groups, with dyslexic students also performing worse than control students in this category. For number inhibition, the control students' performances were equal to those of dyslexic students, with both groups performing better than dyscalculic students. For word inhibition, control students' performances were equal to those of dyscalculic students; both groups had shorter response times and lower incorrect rates than dyslexic students. These results suggest the complexity of the different cognitive inhibition abilities displayed by dyslexic, dyscalculic, and control students. However, some regular patterns occurred. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Allosteric inhibition of SHP2 phosphatase inhibits cancers driven by receptor tyrosine kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying-Nan P.; LaMarche, Matthew J.; Chan, Ho Man; Fekkes, Peter; Garcia-Fortanet, Jorge; Acker, Michael G.; Antonakos, Brandon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Chen, Zhouliang; Cooke, Vesselina G.; Dobson, Jason R.; Deng, Zhan; Fei, Feng; Firestone, Brant; Fodor, Michelle; Fridrich, Cary; Gao, Hui; Grunenfelder, Denise; Hao, Huai-Xiang; Jacob, Jaison; Ho, Samuel; Hsiao, Kathy; Kang, Zhao B.; Karki, Rajesh; Kato, Mitsunori; Larrow, Jay; La Bonte, Laura R.; Lenoir, Francois; Liu, Gang; Liu, Shumei; Majumdar, Dyuti; Meyer, Matthew J.; Palermo, Mark; Perez, Lawrence; Pu, Minying; Price, Edmund; Quinn, Christopher; Shakya, Subarna; Shultz, Michael D.; Slisz, Joanna; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Wang, Ping; Warmuth, Markus; Williams, Sarah; Yang, Guizhi; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Zhu, Ping; Ramsey, Timothy; Keen, Nicholas J.; Sellers, William R.; Stams, Travis; Fortin, Pascal D.

    2016-06-29

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, encoded by PTPN11, has an important role in signal transduction downstream of growth factor receptor signalling and was the first reported oncogenic tyrosine phosphatase1. Activating mutations of SHP2 have been associated with developmental pathologies such as Noonan syndrome and are found in multiple cancer types, including leukaemia, lung and breast cancer and neuroblastoma1, 2, 3, 4, 5. SHP2 is ubiquitously expressed and regulates cell survival and proliferation primarily through activation of the RAS–ERK signalling pathway2, 3. It is also a key mediator of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) immune checkpoint pathways6, 7. Reduction of SHP2 activity suppresses tumour cell growth and is a potential target of cancer therapy8, 9. Here we report the discovery of a highly potent (IC50 = 0.071 μM), selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule SHP2 inhibitor, SHP099, that stabilizes SHP2 in an auto-inhibited conformation. SHP099 concurrently binds to the interface of the N-terminal SH2, C-terminal SH2, and protein tyrosine phosphatase domains, thus inhibiting SHP2 activity through an allosteric mechanism. SHP099 suppresses RAS–ERK signalling to inhibit the proliferation of receptor-tyrosine-kinase-driven human cancer cells in vitro and is efficacious in mouse tumour xenograft models. Together, these data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of SHP2 is a valid therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers.

  16. Picrorhiza kurroa Inhibits Experimental Arthritis Through Inhibition of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines, Angiogenesis and MMPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Singh, Surender; Arunraja, S

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the anti-arthritic activity of Picrorhiza kurroa (PK), on formaldehyde and adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rat. Administration of Picrorhiza kurroa rhizome extract (PKRE) significantly inhibited joint inflammation in both animal models. In AIA-induced arthritic rat, treatment with PKRE considerably decreased synovial expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNF-R1) and vascular endothelial growth factor as compared with control. The anti-arthritic activity was found to be well substantiated with significant suppression of oxidative and inflammatory markers as there was decreased malonaldehyde, Nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor alpha levels accompanied with increased glutathione and superoxide dismutase, catalase activities. Additionally, PKRE significantly inhibited the expression of degrading enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases-3 and matrix metalloproteinases-9 in AIA-induced arthritic rat. Histopathology of paw tissue displayed decreased inflammatory cell infiltration as compared with control. Taken together, these results demonstrated the anti-arthritic activity of PKRE against experimental arthritis, and the underlying mechanism behind this efficacy might be mediated by inhibition of inflammatory mediators and angiogenesis, improvement of the synovium redox status and decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinases. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Downregulation of SIRT2 Inhibits Invasion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inhibiting Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common neoplasms, and metastasis is the most important feature for HCC-related deaths. Mounting evidence implies the dynamic regulatory role of SIRT2, a histone deacetylase, in cancer cells. Unfortunately, the role of SIRT2 and the antitumor activity of its inhibition are not known in HCC. The present study aims to evaluate the biological function of SIRT2 in HCC and identify the target of SIRT2 as well as evaluate its therapeutic efficacy. We found that SIRT2 was upregulated in HCC tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues, and this was correlated with reduced patient survival. Although CCK8 and colony-formation assays showed that SIRT2 inhibiton marginally promotes proliferation in HCC cell lines, SIRT2 knockdown decreased the invasion of HCC cells. We demonstrated that downregulation of SIRT2 could inhibit its downstream target phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 and glutaminase, which is related to mitochondrial metabolism and the E-Cadherin pathway. These results demonstrate, for the first time that downregulation of SIRT2 decreases migration as well as invasion in human HCC cells, indicating that inhibiting SIRT2 may be an effective therapeutic strategy for treating HCC.

  18. PAC-1 and its derivative WF-210 Inhibit Angiogenesis by inhibiting VEGF/VEGFR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangyang; Wang, Lihui; Li, Yi; Wang, Nannan; Wang, Yating; Cao, Qi; Gong, Ping; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Chunfu

    2017-12-19

    Procaspase Activating Compound-1 (PAC-1) and its derivative WF-210 induce apoptosis in cancer cells by activating procaspase-3 to caspase-3. The aim of this study was to extend current knowledge about the mechanisms of PAC-1 and WF-210, particularly about their effects on tumor angiogenesis. PAC-1 and WF-210 restrained VEGF-induced human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) proliferation, invasion, and tube formation. PAC-1 and WF-210 abrogated VEGF-induced vessel sprouting from rat aortic rings and inhibited vascular formation in the Matrigel plug assay. PAC-1 and WF-210 suppressed phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinases c-Src, FAK, and AKT in both HUVECs and U-87 cells. When given to mice bearing subcutaneous or orthotopic xenograft, PAC-1 and WF-210 inhibited the tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis. Further tests showed that PAC-1 and WF-210 inhibited stemness and induced autophagy flux of U-87 cells. This study revealed mechanisms of PAC-1 and WF-210 other than inducing apoptosis, which provides additional support for their using in the clinic. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Desflurane inhibits endothelium-dependent vasodilation more than sevoflurane with inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuma, Satoshi; Tokinaga, Yasuyuki; Takada, Yukimasa; Azumaguchi, Ryu; Kimizuka, Motonobu; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2018-01-01

    The effects of desflurane on endothelium-dependent vasodilation remain uncertain, whereas sevoflurane is known to inhibit it. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation is mainly mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase. The effects of desflurane on endothelium-dependent vasodilation were compared with those of sevoflurane, and inhibition mechanisms, including phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and the calcium pathway, were evaluated for the two anesthetics. We hypothesized that desflurane would inhibit endothelium-dependent vasodilation in a concentration-dependent manner more than sevoflurane, with inhibition of a calcium pathway. Isolated rat aortic rings were randomly assigned to treatment with desflurane or sevoflurane for measurements of the vasodilation ratio. To determine NO production with desflurane and sevoflurane, an in vitro assay was performed with cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. These cells were also used for measurement of intracellular calcium or Western blotting. For endothelium-dependent vasodilation, the ratio of vasodilation was more significantly inhibited by 11.4% desflurane than by 4.8% sevoflurane. Inhibition did not between 5.7% desflurane and 2.4% sevoflurane. No inhibitory effect of desflurane or sevoflurane was observed in endothelium-denuded aorta. Desflurane inhibited nitric oxide production caused by stimulation of bradykinin significantly more than sevoflurane. Desflurane had a greater suppressive effect on the bradykinin-induced increase in intracellular calcium concentration than did sevoflurane. Sevoflurane, but not desflurane, inhibited phosphorylation of the serine 1177 residue by bradykinin stimulation. Desflurane inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation more than sevoflurane through inhibition of a calcium pathway. Sevoflurane inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation by inhibition of phosphorylation of the serine 1177 residue of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  20. An alternative inhibition method for determining cross-reactive allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hieltjes, Yvonne; Teodorowicz, Malgorzata; Jansen, Ad; den Hartog, Gerco; Elfvering-Berendsen, Lisette; de Jong, Nicolette W; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Ruinemans-Koerts, Janneke

    2017-02-01

    Inhibition assays are an useful tool to identify the allergen of primary sensitization of cross-reactive allergens. Classical ELISA-based inhibition assays are limited by both the availability of commercial standardized allergen extracts and the experience and knowledge needed for making home-made extracts. Moreover the direct comparison of the inhibition ELISAs outcomes between different laboratories is difficult because of different sources of used allergen extracts and a number of methodological variations. Therefore, we propose a novel ImmunoCap (Phadia, Thermofisher Scientific) based immunoinhibition method with the use of commercially available Caps as the allergen source. The novel ImmunoCap based immunoinhibition method was developed and tested with sera from patients with a well-known cross-reactive sensitization for fig (Ficus carica) and ficus (Ficus benjamina). Results were compared with a classically applied inhibition method, i.e. addition of homemade allergen extract to patient serum. The amount of allergens (fig and ficus extracts) needed to reach a similar degree of inhibition was comparable for both inhibition methods. The ImmunoCap based inhibition assay, in addition to classical inhibition methods, is a valuable tool as the ImmunoCap analyzer and commercial allergens (Caps) are more widely available which makes the outcomes of inhibition tests comparable between different laboratories. Furthermore, in the ImmunoCap inhibition method the same protein source is used for both the inhibition of sIgE and sIgE measurement, which might be even more relevant when multiple cross-reactive allergens are tested.

  1. Paraquat inhibits progesterone synthesis in human placental mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milczarek, Ryszard; Sokołowska, Ewa; Rybakowska, Iwona; Kaletha, Krystian; Klimek, Jerzy

    2016-07-01

    Human placenta mitochondria produces huge amounts of progesterone necessary for maintaining the pregnancy. Lipid peroxidation in human placental mitochondria inhibits progesterone synthesis and that inhibition can be reversed by superoxide dismutase and other antioxidants. Paraquat (PQ) a highly toxic herbicide generates superoxide radical inside cells and induces lipid peroxidation. Hence, it is supposed to stimulate lipid peroxidation in human placental mitochondria and in consequence to inhibit a placental mitochondrial steroidogenesis. Placentas were obtained from normal pregnancies. All experiments were done using isolated human placental mitochondria. Mitochondrial lipid peroxidation was determined as tiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). A conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone or pregnenolone to progesterone was measured using radiolabeled steroids and thin layer chromatography. PQ enhanced the iron-dependent lipid peroxidation as also PQ heightened the inhibitory action of this process on progesterone synthesis in isolated human placental mitochondria. Paradoxically, a superoxide dismutase (SOD) reversed the inhibition of progesterone synthesis only minimally although it strongly inhibited PQ stimulated iron-dependent lipid peroxidation. When iron was absent, PQ stimulated only negligible lipid peroxidation but strongly inhibited progesterone synthesis. SOD had no effect on inhibition of progesterone synthesis by PQ. PQ strongly inhibited of the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone but had not got any influence on the enzymatic activity of mitochondrial 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. PQ strongly decreased the efficiency of NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reduction as well as it promoted the rapid oxidation of the pre-reduced mitochondrial cytochrome P450. However PQ has not inhibited combined activity of adrenodoxin reductase and adrenodoxin. We conclude that the most important reason of the inhibition of progesterone synthesis by PQ

  2. Stathmin potentiates vinflunine and inhibits Paclitaxel activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soazig Malesinski

    Full Text Available Cell biology and crystallographic studies have suggested a functional link between stathmin and microtubule targeting agents (MTAs. In a previous study we showed that stathmin increases vinblastine (VLB binding to tubulin, and that conversely VLB increases stathmin binding to tubulin. This constituted the first biochemical evidence of the direct relationship between stathmin and an antimitotic drug, and revealed a new mechanism of action for VLB. The question remained if the observed interaction was specific for this drug or represented a general phenomenon for all MTAs. In the present study we investigated the binding of recombinant stathmin to purified tubulin in the presence of paclitaxel or another Vinca alkaloid, vinflunine, using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC. These experiments revealed that stathmin binding to tubulin is increased in the presence of vinflunine, whereas no signal is observed in the presence of paclitaxel. Further investigation using turbidity and co-sedimentation showed that stathmin inhibited paclitaxel microtubule-stabilizing activity. Taken together with the previous study using vinblastine, our results suggest that stathmin can be seen as a modulator of MTA activity and binding to tubulin, providing molecular explanation for multiple previous cellular and in vivo studies showing that stathmin expression level affects MTAs efficiency.

  3. IL-18-producing Salmonella inhibit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Markus; Le'Negrate, Gaelle; Krajewska, Maryla; Reed, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that intravenously applied bacteria can accumulate in tumors and lead to sporadic tumor regression. Recently, systemic administration of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium was demonstrated to generate no significant side effects in humans, but also no anti-tumor responses. We report the enhanced antitumor activity in preclinical mouse cancer models of non-virulent S. typhimurium engineered to synthesize the cytokine, Interleukin-18 (IL-18). IL-18-producing bacteria (but not control bacteria) inhibit the growth of primary subcutaneous tumors as well as pulmonary metastases in immunocompetent mice challenged with syngeneic multi-drug resistant clones of murine carcinoma cell lines, without overt toxicity to normal tissues. Anti-tumor activity was associated with increased accumulation of T-lymphocytes and NK cells in tumors, and massive infiltration of granulocytes, as well as increased intra-tumoral production of several cytokines. In summary, these findings provide evidence of promising preclinical anti-tumor activity of IL-18-expressing, attenuated S. typhimurium, suggesting a novel strategy for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:18654612

  4. [Inhibition of lactation with lisuride. CLinical evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno Coló, J A; Navarrete Horta, M T

    1994-01-01

    Lactation in humans requires the collaboration of neural and endocrine systems. During pregnancy and after parturition prolactin and also sex steroids, corticoids, growth hormone and human placental lactogen are necessary for lactogenesis. In an open, simple and prospective study, 50 women with normal delivery or cesarean section, between 34 and 41 weeks of gestation, were treated with lisuride, 0.2 mg t.i.d. for 14 days in order to inhibit lactation. The arrest of lactation was mandatory for medical reasons and the results were evaluated by changes in breast related with shape, volume, symmetry, coloring, temperature, turgescence, venous appearance, nipple condition, colostrum and lymph nodes increase. Lactation that was already present in 87% of patients in the first exploration 24 hours after delivery was satisfactorily suppressed and also breast pain, engorgement and discomfort caused by milk leakage. None had rebound lactation. 5 patients had light nausea. The dopamine agonist lisuride can be used for primary arrest of lactation with clinical effectiveness and without potential dangerous side effects of hormonal compounds.

  5. Inhibiting p53 Acetylation Reduces Cancer Chemotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shunsheng; Koh, Xin Yu; Goh, Hui Chin; Rahmat, Siti Aishah B; Hwang, Le-Ann; Lane, David P

    2017-08-15

    Chemotoxicity due to unwanted p53 activation in the bone marrow remains an unmet clinical challenge. Doxorubicin, a first-line chemotherapy drug, often causes myelosuppression in patients, thus limiting its effectiveness. In this study, we discovered that C646, a reversible p300 inhibitor, downregulates p53 transcription and selectively protects noncancerous cells from p53-dependent apoptosis. C646 treatment blocked acetylation of specific lysine residues that regulate p53 activity. Exploitation of differential p53 genetic backgrounds between human hematopoietic and colorectal cancer cells improved the therapeutic index of doxorubicin with C646 cotreatment. C646 administration in mice afflicted with p53-mutant tumors protected them from doxorubicin-induced neutropenia and anemia while retaining antitumor efficacy. We deduce that temporary and reversible inhibition of p53 acetylation in cancer subjects, especially those with p53-mutant tumors, may protect them from severe chemotoxicity while allowing treatment regimens to effectively proceed. Cancer Res; 77(16); 4342-54. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. [Mutual inhibition between positive and negative emotions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, A

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between positive and negative emotions. In study 1, 62 emotional items were selected in order to measure subjective emotional experiences. In study 2, comics, photos and poems were randomly presented to 1,220 college students to induce emotion. Subjects were asked to rate their momentary emotional intensity on two set of 5-point scales (general emotional intensity scale and 62 specific emotional intensity scale). In analysis 1, positive correlations were suggested between general emotional intensity scale and some of the specific emotional intensity scales which were activated by stimuli. In analysis 2, 10 positive and 10 negative emotional items were extracted from 62 items by factor analysis. In analysis 3, 4 and 5, it became clear that the distribution of frequency of correlations of 10 positive x 10 negative items changed according to the general emotional intensity scale. That is, from low to moderate levels of GEIS, the two kinds of emotion had no or slightly positive correlation, but at high level they became to be negatively correlated. From the facts described above, it is concluded that positive and negative emotions is not always independent, but show mutual inhibition in case of high intensity level of one of each emotions.

  7. Inhibition of glioblastoma malignancy by Lgl1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gont, Alexander; Hanson, Jennifer E L; Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Nicholas, Garth; Woulfe, John; Kassam, Amin; Da Silva, Vasco F; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2014-11-30

    lethal giant larvae (lgl) was first identified as a tumor suppressor in Drosophila, where its loss repressed the differentiation and promoted the invasion of neuroblasts, the Drosophila equivalent of the neural stem cell. Recently we have shown that a human homolog of Lgl, Lgl1 (LLGL1), is constitutively phosphorylated and inactivated in glioblastoma cells; this occurs as a downstream consequence of PTEN loss, one of the most frequent genetic events in glioblastoma. Here we have investigated the consequences of this loss of functional Lgl1 in glioblastoma in vivo. We used a doxycycline-inducible system to express a non-phosphorylatable, constitutively active version of Lgl1 (Lgl3SA) in either a glioblastoma cell line or primary glioblastoma cells isolated under neural stem cell culture conditions from patients. In both types of cells, expression of Lgl3SA, but not wild type Lgl1, inhibited cell motility in vitro. Induction of Lgl3SA in intracerebral xenografts markedly reduced the in vivo invasion of primary glioblastoma cells. Lgl3SA expression also induced the differentiation of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo along the neuronal lineage. Thus the central features of Lgl function as a tumor suppressor in Drosophila are conserved in human glioblastoma.

  8. Inhibition of RAS in diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoub R

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rabi Yacoub, Kirk N Campbell Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Diabetic kidney disease (DKD is a progressive proteinuric renal disorder in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is a common cause of end-stage kidney disease worldwide, particularly in developed countries. Therapeutic targeting of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS is the most validated clinical strategy for slowing disease progression. DKD is paradoxically a low systematic renin state with an increased intrarenal RAS activity implicated in its pathogenesis. Angiotensin II (AngII, the main peptide of RAS, is not only a vasoactive peptide but functions as a growth factor, activating interstitial fibroblasts and mesangial and tubular cells, while promoting the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. AngII also promotes podocyte injury through increased calcium influx and the generation of reactive oxygen species. Blockade of the RAS using either angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers can attenuate progressive glomerulosclerosis in animal models, and slows disease progression in humans with DKD. In this review, we summarize the role of intrarenal RAS activation in the pathogenesis and progression of DKD and the rationale for RAS inhibition in this population. Keywords: renin–angiotensin system, diabetic kidney disease, angiotensin II, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers

  9. Motor inhibition in hysterical conversion paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojan, Yann; Waber, Lakshmi; Carruzzo, Alain; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2009-09-01

    Brain mechanisms underlying hysterical conversion symptoms are still poorly known. Recent hypotheses suggested that activation of motor pathways might be suppressed by inhibitory signals based on particular emotional situations. To assess motor and inhibitory brain circuits during conversion paralysis, we designed a go-nogo task while a patient underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Preparatory activation arose in right motor cortex despite left paralysis, indicating preserved motor intentions, but with concomitant increases in vmPFC regions that normally mediate motivational and affective processing. Failure to execute movement on go trials with the affected left hand was associated with activations in precuneus and ventrolateral frontal gyrus. However, right frontal areas normally subserving inhibition were activated by nogo trials for the right (normal) hand, but not during go trials for the left hand (affected by conversion paralysis). By contrast, a group of healthy controls who were asked to feign paralysis showed similar activation on nogo trials and left-go trials with simulated weakness, suggesting that distinct inhibitory mechanisms are implicated in simulation and conversion paralysis. In the patient, right motor cortex also showed enhanced functional connectivity with the posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, and vmPFC. These results suggest that conversion symptoms do not act through cognitive inhibitory circuits, but involve selective activations in midline brain regions associated with self-related representations and emotion regulation.

  10. Merlin inhibits neurite outgrowth in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Alexander; Geissler, Katja J; Kumar, Sujeet; Leichsenring, Gregor; Morrison, Helen; Baader, Stephan L

    2010-07-28

    The neurofibromatosis type 2 gene product merlin is known to provoke gliogenic tumors as a result of its mutagenic loss. Merlin's physiological anti-mitogenic function makes it unique among its ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family members. Although ERM proteins and merlin are known to be expressed in glial cells of the peripheral nervous system and CNS, the neuronal expression pattern and function of merlin have been less well investigated. We report here expression of merlin in developing and mature neurons of the murine CNS. Within cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs), merlin was localized in the soma, sprouting dendrites and axons. Merlin expression in PCs was high during the period of initial dendrite regression and declined during later phases of dendrite elongation. Consistently, merlin expression in vivo was increased in Engrailed-2-overexpressing PCs, which are characterized by a reduced dendritic extension. Furthermore, overexpression of merlin in dissociated cerebellar cultures and in neurogenic P19 cells caused a significant decline in neurite outgrowth, while, conversely, inhibition of merlin expression increased process formation. This effect was dependent on phosphorylation of serine 518 and involved the inactivation of the growth-promoting GTPase Rac. We thus provide evidence that merlin plays a pivotal role in controlling the neuronal wiring in the developing CNS.

  11. Inhibition of Midkine Augments Osteoporotic Fracture Healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Haffner-Luntzer

    Full Text Available The heparin-binding growth and differentiation factor midkine (Mdk is proposed to negatively regulate osteoblast activity and bone formation in the adult skeleton. As Mdk-deficient mice were protected from ovariectomy (OVX-induced bone loss, this factor may also play a role in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We have previously demonstrated that Mdk negatively influences bone regeneration during fracture healing. Here, we investigated whether the inhibition of Mdk using an Mdk-antibody (Mdk-Ab improves compromised bone healing in osteoporotic OVX-mice. Using a standardized femur osteotomy model, we demonstrated that Mdk serum levels were significantly enhanced after fracture in both non-OVX and OVX-mice, however, the increase was considerably greater in osteoporotic mice. Systemic treatment with the Mdk-Ab significantly improved bone healing in osteoporotic mice by increasing bone formation in the fracture callus. On the molecular level, we demonstrated that the OVX-induced reduction of the osteoanabolic beta-catenin signaling in the bony callus was abolished by Mdk-Ab treatment. Furthermore, the injection of the Mdk-Ab increased trabecular bone mass in the skeleton of the osteoporotic mice. These results implicate that antagonizing Mdk may be useful for the therapy of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture-healing complications.

  12. Polyspermy inhibition in the oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliegro, M C; Wright, D A

    1983-07-01

    Inhibition of polyspermy is a critical response during fertilization which ensures that only one sperm nucleus will fuse with the female pronucleus to restore the diploid state. Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) eggs prevent polyspermy by a process occurring at the cell surface. However, 5 min after fertilization, there are still functional sperm receptor sites available for penetration by supernumerary sperm. Reinsemination experiments indicate that there is no decrease in the number of penetration sites during this interval. Yet, the number of sperm entering eggs is restricted to one per fertilized egg at a sperm:egg ratio of 1000:1. At a sperm:egg ratio of 10(5):1, an average of only six sperm were able to penetrate each egg. Gamete binding experiments indicate that there is a gradual decrease in the number of sperm bound to eggs starting at approximately 75 sec and continuing until all sperm are detached. Since eggs are fertilized within seconds of insemination and this process takes at least 12 min, it is considered an unlikely mechanism for the polyspermy block. There are no ultrastructural correlates to the polyspermy block nor to the unbinding of sperm, such as secretion of cortical granules or fertilization envelope formation. Based on reinsemination experiments, kinetic data, and ultrastructural observations, we suggest a physiological block to polyspermy which prevents fusion of gamete plasma membranes, and is mediated by an inhibitory effect directly upon the sperm.

  13. Arthropod venom citrate inhibits phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, A W; West, P R; Odell, G V; Hudiburg, S M; Ownby, C L; Mills, J N; Scroggins, B T; Shannon, S B

    1995-06-01

    Citrate has been identified as a major component of honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom by gas liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A citrate concentration of 9% was found for dried bee venom by a coupled enzyme assay, aconitase-isocitric dehydrogenase. A liquid honey bee venom would contain 140 mM citrate concentration (if the solids content were 30%). Bee venom phospholipase was inhibited at a 43% level with a citrate concentration of 20 mM and calcium ion at 3 mM with the enzyme assay. Citrate was also found in the venoms of bumble bee, Bombus fervidus, 7%; yellow jacket, Vespula maculifrons, 4%; scorpion, Centruroides sculpturatus, 8%; tarantula, Grammastola cala, 8% and brown recluse spider venom gland extract, Loxoceles reclusa, 1.5% based on dried venom solids. Citrate may serve as an endogenous inhibitor of divalent metal ion-dependent enzymes in arthropod venoms as described by Francis et al. (1992, Toxicon 30, 1239-1246). Many arthropod venoms contain calcium-dependent phospholipases. A direct effect of citrate as a venom component may be possible. The presence of citrate in venoms must be considered in research on receptors, ion channels and divalent ion-dependent toxins.

  14. Inhibition of osteoblast activity by zoledronic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Gonçalves Basso

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients treated with nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates, such as zoledronic acid (ZA, have frequently shown oral bone exposure areas, termed osteonecrosis. In addition, these patients may also present low repair and regeneration potential, mainly after tooth extractions. These side-effects caused by bisphosphonates may be due to their inhibitory effects on oral mucosa and local bone cells. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of ZA on the mineralization capacity of cultured osteoblasts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human immortalized osteoblasts (SaOs-2 were grown in plain culture medium (Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium [DMEM] + 10% fetal bovine serum [FBS] in wells of 24-well plates. After 48-hour incubation, the plain DMEM was replaced by a solution with ZA at 5 µM which was maintained in contact with cells for seven, 14 or 21 days. After these periods, cells were evaluated regarding alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and mineral nodule formation (alizarin red. Data were statistically analyzed by Mann-Whitney test, at 5% of significance level. RESULTS: ZA caused significant reduction on ALP activity and mineral nodules formation by cultured osteoblasts in all evaluated periods (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that ZA causes inhibition on the osteogenic phenotype of cultured human osteoblasts, which, in turn, may reduce bone repair in patients subjected to ZA therapy.

  15. ODAM Expression Inhibits Human Breast Cancer Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestler, Daniel P.; Foster, James S.; Bruker, Charles T.; Prenshaw, John W.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.; Weiss, Deborah T.; Solomon, Alan

    2011-01-01

    We have posited that Odontogenic Ameloblast Associated Protein (ODAM) serves as a novel prognostic biomarker in breast cancer and now have investigated its potential role in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with a recombinant ODAM plasmid construct (or, as a control, the plasmid vector alone). ODAM expression increased adhesion and apoptosis of the transfected MDA-MB-231 cells and suppressed their growth rate, migratory activity, and capability to invade extracellular matrix-coated membranes. Implantation of such cells into mouse mammary fat pads resulted in significantly smaller tumors than occurred in animals that received control cells; furthermore, ODAM-expressing cells, when injected intravenously into mice, failed to metastasize, whereas the control-transfected counterparts produced extensive lung lesions. Our finding that induction of ODAM expression in human breast cancer cells markedly inhibited their neoplastic properties provides further evidence for the regulatory role of this molecule in tumorigenesis and, consequently, is of potential clinical import. PMID:21603257

  16. Insulin-Inducible SMILE Inhibits Hepatic Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Min; Seo, Woo-Young; Han, Hye-Sook; Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Don-Kyu; Choi, Seri; Choi, Byeong Hun; Harris, Robert A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The role of a glucagon/cAMP-dependent protein kinase-inducible coactivator PGC-1α signaling pathway is well characterized in hepatic gluconeogenesis. However, an opposing protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt-inducible corepressor signaling pathway is unknown. A previous report has demonstrated that small heterodimer partner-interacting leucine zipper protein (SMILE) regulates the nuclear receptors and transcriptional factors that control hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we show that hepatic SMILE expression was induced by feeding in normal mice but not in db/db and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Interestingly, SMILE expression was induced by insulin in mouse primary hepatocyte and liver. Hepatic SMILE expression was not altered by refeeding in liver-specific insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) or PKB β-deficient (PKBβ(-/-)) mice. At the molecular level, SMILE inhibited hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-mediated transcriptional activity via direct competition with PGC-1α. Moreover, ablation of SMILE augmented gluconeogenesis and increased blood glucose levels in mice. Conversely, overexpression of SMILE reduced hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and ameliorated hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in db/db and HFD-fed mice. Therefore, SMILE is an insulin-inducible corepressor that suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. Small molecules that enhance SMILE expression would have potential for treating hyperglycemia in diabetes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  17. Inhibition of Oxidation in Nuclear Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phil Winston; James W. Sterbentz; William E. Windes

    2013-10-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off normal design basis event where an oxidizing atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postualed air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B4C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900°C. The proposed addition of B4C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimize B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed.

  18. Inhibition of carcinogenesis by retinoids. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nettesheim, P.

    1979-01-01

    Progress made in recent years in the search for retinoids with anticarcinogenic activity is reviewed. There are many studies to be found in the literature which show no substantial effect of retinoids on carcinogenesis or tumor growth. Some of these negative findings may be related to the carcinogen dose used, the type of retinoid used, the dose, dose schedule or mode of administration of the retinoid. Others may indicate that the particular type of tumor or tumor system is, indeed, refractory to retinoids in general or to those retinoids that were tested. A great gap still exists in our knowledge concerning the pharmake-kinetics of most retinoids their availability to various normal and cancerous tissues, and the role and existence of transport and binding proteins. There are studies which indicate that under certain conditions, particularly conditions of topical application, some retinoids may even enhance carcinogenesis. It seems, however, indisputable by now that some retinoids are effective inhibitors of carcinogenesis in some organ systems and can even inhibit the growth of some established tumors. While the mechanisms of these inhibitory effects are presently not understood, it does seem clear that they are not mediated via the cytotoxic mechanisms typical of chemotherapeutic agents. The hope that retinoids might become an effective tool to halt the progression of some neoplastic diseases, seems to be justified.

  19. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; de Morais, Andreia Lopes; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura and is a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its antimigraine effect. Unilateral vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either noninvasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the nerve. Systemic physiology was monitored throughout the study. Both noninvasive transcutaneous and invasive direct vagus nerve stimulations significantly suppressed spreading depression susceptibility in the occipital cortex in rats. The electrical stimulation threshold to evoke a spreading depression was elevated by more than 2-fold, the frequency of spreading depressions during continuous topical 1 M KCl was reduced by ∼40%, and propagation speed of spreading depression was reduced by ∼15%. This effect developed within 30 minutes after vagus nerve stimulation and persisted for more than 3 hours. Noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation was as efficacious as direct invasive vagus nerve stimulation, and the efficacy did not differ between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Our findings provide a potential mechanism by which vagus nerve stimulation may be efficacious in migraine and suggest that susceptibility to spreading depression is a suitable platform to optimize its efficacy.

  20. In vitro screening of soil bacteria for inhibiting phytopathogenic fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum could highly inhibit the mycelial growth of five moulds (Botrytis cinerea, Phoma medicaginis, Fusarium verticilloides, Rhizoctonia solani and Phytophtora infestans) with a growth inhibition varying between 12.38 and 37.61%. 12 Bacillus strains and five Pseudomonas strains were antagonistic to ...

  1. DNA damage protection and 5-lipoxygenase inhibiting activity of areca

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... inhibiting activity on 5-lipoxygenase of areca inflorescence extracts were studied in vitro. The results show that the boiling ... degradation, inhibit the activity of tyrosinase and has protective effect on human serum .... inhibitory activity towards soybean lipoxygenase, 10 µl of different phenolic compounds at ...

  2. Inhibition of Fungal Aflatoxin B1 Biosynthesis by Diverse Botanically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research April 2015; 14 (4): 605-609. ISSN: 1596-5996 (print); 1596-9827 ... Results: Neither the tea-derived polyphenol mixture nor individual polyphenol compound, except quercetin, inhibited A. flavus ... compound that also inhibits fungal proliferation. Botanically-derived polyphenols ...

  3. Probe substrate and enzyme source-dependent inhibition of UDP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) inhibition based drug-drug interaction and herb-drug interaction severely challenge the R&D process of drugs or herbal ingredients. Objective: To evaluate the inhibition potential of wogonin (an important flavonoid isolated from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis) towards ...

  4. An alternative inhibition method for determining cross-reactive allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt-Hieltjes, Yvonne; Teodorowicz, Gosia; Jansen, Ad; Hartog, Den Gerco; Elfvering-Berendsen, Lisette; Jong, De Nicolette W.; Savelkoul, Huub F.J.; Ruinemans-Koerts, Janneke

    2017-01-01

    Inhibition assays are an useful tool to identify the allergen of primary sensitization of cross-reactive allergens. Classical ELISA-based inhibition assays are limited by both the availability of commercial standardized allergen extracts and the experience and knowledge needed for making home-made

  5. Attention Inhibition Training Can Reduce Betel-Nut Chewing Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chou Ho

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Betel nut (or areca is the fourth most commonly used drug worldwide after tobacco, alcohol, and caffeine. Many chemical ingredients of betel nut are carcinogenic. We examined whether the manipulation of attentional inhibition toward the areca-related stimuli could affect betel-nut chewing time. Three matched groups of habitual chewers were recruited: inhibit-areca, inhibit-non-areca, and control. This study consisted of a Go/No-Go task for inhibition training, followed by a taste test for observing chewing behavior. The Go/No-Go task constituted three phases (pretest, training and posttest. In the taste test, the habitual chewers were asked to rate the flavors of one betel nut and one gum. The purpose (blind to the chewers of this taste test was to observe whether their picking order and chewing time were affected by experimental manipulation. Results from the Go/No-Go task showed successful training. Further, the training groups (the inhibit-areca and inhibit-non-areca groups showed a significant reduction in betel nut chewing time, in comparison to the control group. Since both training groups showed reduced chewing time, the inhibition training may affect general control ability, in regardless of the stimulus (areca or not to be inhibited. Reduced chewing time is important for reducing areca-related diseases.

  6. Effect of lisuride on inhibition of lactation and serum prolactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cecco, L; Venturini, P L; Ragni, N; Rossato, P; Maganza, C; Gaggero, G; Horowski, R

    1979-11-01

    Lisuride, a new semisynthetic ergot derivative, was given to 53 women to inhibit lactation; 26 women had 300 micrograms daily and 27 had 600 micrograms daily for seven days. Eight lactating women acted as controls. Lisuride effectively inhibited lactation and also suppressed the serum prolactin levels; the latter effect was dose related. Lisuride produced no untoward side effects.

  7. Social inhibition sense of belonging and vulnerability to internalizing problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Moor, E.L.; Denollet, J.; Laceulle, O.M.

    2018-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to provide a conceptual test of how social inhibition, sense of belonging and internalizing problems are related, and whether sense of belonging moderates or mediates the relation between social inhibition and internalizing problems. Methods Data were used from

  8. On the dependence of response inhibition processes on sensory modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodmer, Benjamin; Beste, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The ability to inhibit responses is a central sensorimotor function but only recently the importance of sensory processes for motor inhibition mechanisms went more into the research focus. In this regard it is elusive, whether there are differences between sensory modalities to trigger response inhibition processes. Due to functional neuroanatomical considerations strong differences may exist, for example, between the visual and the tactile modality. In the current study we examine what neurophysiological mechanisms as well as functional neuroanatomical networks are modulated during response inhibition. Therefore, a Go/NoGo-paradigm employing a novel combination of visual, tactile, and visuotactile stimuli was used. The data show that the tactile modality is more powerful than the visual modality to trigger response inhibition processes. However, the tactile modality loses its efficacy to trigger response inhibition processes when being combined with the visual modality. This may be due to competitive mechanisms leading to a suppression of certain sensory stimuli and the response selection level. Variations in sensory modalities specifically affected conflict monitoring processes during response inhibition by modulating activity in a frontal parietal network including the right inferior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex and the temporoparietal junction. Attentional selection processes are not modulated. The results suggest that the functional neuroanatomical networks involved in response inhibition critically depends on the nature of the sensory input. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1941-1951, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Inhibition of nitrification and carbon dioxide evolution as rapid tools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition of nitrite formation and CO2 evolution displayed similar levels of sensitivities at 95% confidence levels. These results indicate that monitoring inhibition of metabolic processes rather than mortality was a more rapid and sensitive tool for ecotoxicological evaluation of chemicals employed in the petroleum industry in ...

  10. A Subinhibitory Concentration of Clarithromycin Inhibits Mycobacterium avium Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, George; Young, Lowell S.; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes disseminated infection in immunosuppressed individuals and lung infection in patients with chronic lung diseases. M. avium forms biofilm in the environment and possibly in human airways. Antibiotics with activity against the bacterium could inhibit biofilm formation. Clarithromycin inhibits biofilm formation but has no activity against established biofilm.

  11. Social Anxiety and Dating Inhibitions: Assessment and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkowitz, Hal

    Recent research on the behavioral assessment and treatment of social anxiety and inhibition is reviewed. Subjects for the studies were college men and women selected on the basis of heterosexual anxiety and inhibition. The first part of the paper is concerned with assessment. The behavioral assessment procedures developed include: (1) direct…

  12. Experimental and quantum chemical studies on corrosion inhibition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The corrosion inhibition effect of fluconazole (FLU) was investigated on steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Weight loss measurements and atomic force microscope analysis were utilized to investigate the corrosion inhibition properties and film formation behaviour of FLU. Quantum chemical approach was also ...

  13. Experimental and quantum chemical studies on corrosion inhibition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The corrosion inhibition effect of fluconazole (FLU) was investigated on steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Weight loss measurements and atomic force microscope analysis were utilized to investigate the corrosion inhibition properties and film formation behaviour of FLU. Quantum chemical approach was also used to ...

  14. INHIBITION OF THE CORROSION OF MILD STEEL IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The inhibition of corrosion of mild steel in hydrochloric acid by isatin glycine (ING) and isatin (IN) at 30-60 oC and concentrations of 0.0001 M to 0.0005 M was studied via weight loss method. At the highest inhibitor concentration studied ING exhibited inhibition efficiency of 87% while IN exhibited 84% at 60 oC.

  15. INHIBITION OF CORROSION OF ZINC IN (HNO3 + HCl) ACID ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-01

    May 1, 2015 ... ABSTRACT. Corrosion of Zinc metal in (HNO3 + HCl) binary acid mixture and inhibition efficiency of aniline has been studied by weight loss method and polarization technique. Corrosion rate increases with the concentration of acid mixture and the temperature. Inhibition efficiency. (I.E.) of aniline increases ...

  16. Comparative study of the inhibition effects of alkaloid and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Alkaloid and Non- alkaloid fractions of the ethanolic extracts from Costus afer (AECA and NAECA) were comparatively studied for their inhibitive properties on the corrosion of mild steel in 5 M HCl solution using Gravimetric and Gasometric techniques. The results revealed that both extracts inhibited the corrosion of ...

  17. Inhibitive and Synergistic Properties of Ethanolic Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The higher the corrodent (HCl) concentration the higher the corrosion rate, while lower inhibition efficiency was observed in the absence and presence of the inhibitor and halides. The decrease in inhibition efficiency (and increase in reaction number values) was found to be in the order I− > Br− > Cl− which clearly indicates ...

  18. Inhibition of eye blinking reveals subjective perceptions of stimulus salience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Sarah; Klin, Ami; Jones, Warren

    2011-12-27

    Spontaneous eye blinking serves a critical physiological function, but it also interrupts incoming visual information. This tradeoff suggests that the inhibition of eye blinks might constitute an adaptive reaction to minimize the loss of visual information, particularly information that a viewer perceives to be important. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether the timing of blink inhibition, during natural viewing, is modulated between as well as within tasks, and also whether the timing of blink inhibition varies as a function of viewer engagement and stimulus event type. While viewing video scenes, we measured the timing of blinks and blink inhibition, as well as visual scanning, in a group of typical two-year-olds, and in a group of two-year-olds known for attenuated reactivity to affective stimuli: toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Although both groups dynamically adjusted the timing of their blink inhibition at levels greater than expected by chance, they inhibited their blinking and shifted visual fixation differentially with respect to salient onscreen events. Moreover, typical toddlers inhibited their blinking earlier than toddlers with ASD, indicating active anticipation of the unfolding of those events. These findings indicate that measures of blink inhibition can serve as temporally precise markers of perceived stimulus salience and are useful quantifiers of atypical processing of social affective signals in toddlers with ASD.

  19. Inhibiting Aspergillus flavus growth and degrading aflatoxin B1 by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl2

    2012-08-14

    Aug 14, 2012 ... of this study was to select the most effective method and products for inhibiting A. flavus growth and ... The supernatants were filtered to remove microbes with 0.20 μm Minisart High-flow filter (Sartorius Stedim .... pseudoplanturum 371 could inhibit mold growth and aflatoxin production, and the inhibitory ...

  20. Inhibition of growth of some phytopathogenic and mycotoxigenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aqueous extract of C. imberbe wood ash exhibited significant capacity to inhibit growth of all the test fungi, with the exception of A. alternata. Arrest of fungal growth by the extract involved inhibition of glucomamylase. Investigation of the chemistry of the ash using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Xray ...

  1. Forgetting the Literal: The Role of Inhibition in Metaphor Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Tim; Wiley, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In order for a person to comprehend metaphoric expressions, do metaphor-irrelevant aspects of literal information need to be inhibited? Previous research using sentence-verification paradigms has found that literal associates take longer to process after reading metaphorical sentences; however, it is problematic to infer inhibition from this…

  2. Sticky Plans: Inhibition and Binding during Serial-Task Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests substantial response-time costs associated with lag-2 repetitions of tasks within explicitly controlled task sequences [Koch, I., Philipp, A. M., Gade, M. (2006). Chunking in task sequences modulates task inhibition. "Psychological Science," 17, 346-350; Schneider, D. W. (2007). Task-set inhibition in chunked task…

  3. Emodin inhibits proliferation and invasion, and induces apoptosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emodin inhibits proliferation and invasion, and induces apoptosis in human esophageal cancer cell line ECA109. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Conclusion: These results suggest that emodin inhibits cell proliferation and cell invasion, but induces cell apoptosis in human esophageal cancer cell line ...

  4. Inhibition effects of acetyl coumarines and thiazole derivatives on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The corrosion inhibition characteristics of acetyl coumarine (AC), bromo acetyl coumarine (BAC) and thiazole derivatives (BTMQ and BTCQ) on the corrosion of zinc in 0.1 M HCl solution were investigated by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and impedance techniques. The inhibition efficiency increased with ...

  5. Comparison of the inhibition capability of oleanolic acid and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acid towards drug-metabolizing enzymes. Wei Xiao ... Results: The inhibition of capability of oleanolic acid towards UGT1A6 and UGT1A8 were higher than betulinic acid. However, no significant ... Furthermore, concentration-dependent behaviour was determined for the inhibition of oleanolic acid and betulinic acid towards ...

  6. In vitro inhibition of the paraoxonase from human serum with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... The purified PON1 enzyme was stored at 4oCin the presence of 2. mM calcium chloride in order to maintain activity. In vitro inhibition kinetic studies. For the inhibition studies, different concentrations of sulfonamide were added to the each enzyme activity. Paraoxonase and aryle- sterase activities with ...

  7. Belief Inhibition in Children's Reasoning: Memory-Based Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steegen, Sara; Neys, Wim De

    2012-01-01

    Adult reasoning has been shown as mediated by the inhibition of intuitive beliefs that are in conflict with logic. The current study introduces a classic procedure from the memory field to investigate belief inhibition in 12- to 17-year-old reasoners. A lexical decision task was used to probe the memory accessibility of beliefs that were cued…

  8. Improved contour detection by non-classical receptive field inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorescu, C; Petkov, N; Westenberg, MA; Bulthoff, HH; Lee, SW; Poggio, TA; Wallraven, C

    2002-01-01

    We propose a biologically motivated computational step, called non-classical receptive field (non-CRF) inhibition, to improve the performance of contour detectors. We introduce a Gabor energy operator augmented with non-CRF inhibition, which we call the bar cell operator. We use natural images with

  9. Study of electroplated silver-palladium biofouling inhibiting coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Schroll, Casper

    2008-01-01

    Biofouling can cause many undesirable effects in industrial and medical settings. In this study, a new biofouling inhibiting Ag-Pd surface was designed to form an inhibiting effect by itself. This design was based on silver combined with nobler palladium, both with catalytic properties. Owing to ...

  10. Cognitive Inhibition in Students with and without Dyslexia and Dyscalculia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chih; Tasi, Hung-Ju; Yang, Hsien-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The present study presents a comparison of the cognitive inhibition abilities of dyslexic, dyscalculic, and control students. The participants were 45 dyslexic students, 45 dyscalculic students, and 45 age-, gender-, and IQ-matched control students. The major evaluation tools included six cognitive inhibition tasks which were restructured during…

  11. Stuttering Inhibition via Altered Auditory Feedback during Scripted Telephone Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudock, Daniel; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background: Overt stuttering is inhibited by approximately 80% when people who stutter read aloud as they hear an altered form of their speech feedback to them. However, levels of stuttering inhibition vary from 60% to 100% depending on speaking situation and signal presentation. For example, binaural presentations of delayed auditory feedback…

  12. Leukotriene inhibition in hamster periodontitis. A histochemical and morphometric study

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    B. Baroukh

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of leukotriene (LT inhibition on gingival and adjacent bone compartments were assessed by using phenidone (100 mg/kg/d and ketoconazole (50 mg/kg/d given for 4 weeks to periodontitis-affected hamsters. In the gingiva the two agents significantly decreased PMNL recruitment and migration and increased the vascular lumen. At the bone level, they reduced significantly preosteoclast and osteoclast numbers but did not affect osteoclast activity. Phenidone had no action on periodontitis induced inhibition of bone formation; in contrast ketoconazole enhanced formation. As both phenidone and ketoconazole are unspecific LT inhibitors it cannot be ascertained that the effects observed were actually due to LT inhibition. However, phenidone and ketoconazole induced changes different from indomethacin used in previous studies to inhibit the cyclooxygenase pathway. These discrepancies suggest that LT inhibition occurred in the present study and that they participate in gingival inflammation and osteoclastic destruction during hamster periodontitis.

  13. Associative learning phenomena in the snail (Helix aspersa): conditioned inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acebes, Félix; Solar, Patricia; Moris, Joaquín; Loy, Ignacio

    2012-03-01

    Two experiments using garden snails (Helix aspersa) showed conditioned inhibition using both retardation and summation tests. Conditioned inhibition is a procedure by which a stimulus becomes a predictor of the absence of a relevant event--the unconditioned stimulus (US). Typically, conditioned inhibition consists of pairings between an initially neutral conditioned stimulus, CS(2), and an effective excitatory conditioned stimulus, CS(1), in the absence of the US. Retardation and summation tests are required in order to confirm that CS(2) has acquired inhibitory properties. Conditioned inhibition has previously been found in invertebrates; however, these demonstrations did not use the retardation and summation tests required for an unambiguous demonstration of inhibition, allowing for alternative explanations. The implications of our results for the fields of comparative cognition and invertebrate physiological models of learning are discussed.

  14. . Psychological predictors of inhibition development in educational environments

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    Symanyuk, Elvira E.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines psychological predictors of inhibition in educational environments as well as various aspects of pedagogical communication, including facilitation, which is aimed at enhancing educational effectiveness and developing students by means of using a particular communication style and the teacher’s personality. The need to study inhibition (the deterioration of teacher-children interactions; the negation of a student’s individuality; the inability to understand and accept students’ viewpoints; teacher-provoked conflicts; and emotional callousness is substantiated. The essence of psychological predictors as independent variables, changes in which lead to changes in other dependent variables, allowing the prediction of inhibition development, is explained. The research objective was to identify psychological predictors of the development of inhibition in pedagogical communication. An empirical study was conducted using standardized techniques for diagnosing communicative attitudes (V. Boyko, developing general communicative tolerance (V. Boyko, identifying aggressiveness (A. Asinger, identifying the level of empathy (V. Boyko, and identifying the degree of pedagogical inhibition (L. Polosova. The sample contained 375 teachers from Yekaterinburg educational institutions, with participant selection made using stratified sampling. The teacher’s personality features (a negative communicative attitude, low communicative tolerance and empathy, and higher levels of aggression were shown to be key predictors of inhibition, which itself was found to depend on the length of teaching experience. At the beginning of one’s professional teaching career, the level of inhibition is minimal. However, the level of inhibition reaches its maximum level after 5-10 years of teaching, and after 20 years, there is a sharp decrease in the level of inhibition. The conclusion of this study stresses the importance of developing strategies to

  15. Inhibition of inflammatory arthritis using fullerene nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, Anthony L; Cunin, Pierre; Lee, David; Kung, Andrew L; Brooks, D Bradford; Zhou, Zhiguo; Nigrovic, Peter A; Kepley, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA) is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC). Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA) were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis.

  16. Inhibition of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Reversine

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    Mohamed Jemaà

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The A3 adenosine receptor antagonist reversine (2-(4-morpholinoanilino-6-cyclohexylaminopurine influences cellular differentiation, inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell-cycle arrest, triggers apoptosis, causes cell swelling with polyploidy and stimulates autophagy. The effect on apoptosis involves mitochondria and caspases. Erythrocytes are lacking mitochondria but express caspases and are, similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells, able to enter suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis. Stimulators of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, energy depletion and oxidative stress. The present study explored, whether reversine influences eryptosis. Methods: Flow cytometry was employed to quantify phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface from annexin-V-binding and cell volume from forward scatter. Measurements were made without or with energy depletion (glucose deprivation for 48 hours, Ca2+ loading (30 minutes treatment with 1 µM Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin, or oxidative stress (15 min exposure to 0.3 mM tert-butylhydroperoxide. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to reversine (1-10 µM did not significantly modify the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells and forward scatter. Energy depletion, Ca2+ loading, and oxidative stress were each followed by profound and significant increase of the percentage annexin-V-binding erythrocytes and a significant decrease of forward scatter. The effects of each, Ca2+ loading, energy depletion and oxidative stress on annexin-V-binding were significantly blunted in the presence of reversine (1-10 µM. The effect of ionomycin, but not the effects of energy depletion and oxidative stress on forward scatter were again significantly blunted in the presence of reversine (≥1 µM]. Conclusions: Reversine is a powerful inhibitor of cell membrane scrambling following energy depletion, Ca2+ loading and oxidative stress.

  17. Dopamine inhibits mitochondrial motility in hippocampal neurons.

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    Sigeng Chen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The trafficking of mitochondria within neurons is a highly regulated process. In an earlier study, we found that serotonin (5-HT, acting through the 5-HT1A receptor subtype, promotes axonal transport of mitochondria in cultured hippocampal neurons by increasing Akt activity, and consequently decreasing glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3beta activity. This finding suggests a critical role for neuromodulators in the regulation of mitochondrial trafficking in neurons. In the present study, we investigate the effects of a second important neuromodulator, dopamine, on mitochondrial transport in hippocampal neurons.Here, we show that dopamine, like 5-HT, regulates mitochondrial motility in cultured hippocampal neurons through the Akt-GSK3beta signaling cascade. But, in contrast to the stimulatory effect of 5-HT, administration of exogenous dopamine or bromocriptine, a dopamine 2 receptor (D2R agonist, caused an inhibition of mitochondrial movement. Moreover, pretreatment with bromocriptine blocked the stimulatory effect of 5-HT on mitochondrial movement. Conversely, in cells pretreated with 5-HT, no further increases in movement were observed after administration of haloperidol, a D2R antagonist. In contrast to the effect of the D2R agonist, addition of SKF38393, a dopamine 1 receptor (D1R agonist, promoted mitochondrial transport, indicating that the inhibitory effect of dopamine was actually the net summation of opposing influences of the two receptor subtypes. The most pronounced effect of dopamine signals was on mitochondria that were already moving directionally. Western blot analysis revealed that treatment with either a D2R agonist or a D1R antagonist decreased Akt activity, and conversely, treatment with either a D2R antagonist or a D1R agonist increased Akt activity.Our observations strongly suggest a role for both dopamine and 5-HT in regulating mitochondrial movement, and indicate that the integrated effects of these two neuromodulators may be

  18. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation

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    Angela eSherry

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5-nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene and xylenes were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12-nC34 and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 µmol CH4/g sediment/day with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12-nC34. For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 µmol CH4/g sediment/day. This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers.

  19. Inhibition of inflammatory arthritis using fullerene nanomaterials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L Dellinger

    Full Text Available Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC. Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis.

  20. Contingent Involuntary Motoric Inhibition: The Involuntary Inhibition of a Motor Response Contingent on Top-Down Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian A.; Folk, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Effective motor control involves both the execution of appropriate responses and the inhibition of inappropriate responses that are evoked by response-associated stimuli. The inhibition of a motor response has traditionally been characterized as either a voluntary act of cognitive control or a low-level perceptual bias arising from processes such…

  1. Flavonoids from Citrus unshiu Marc. inhibit cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells by selective inhibition of VCAM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hana; Lee, Won Sup; Yun, Jeong Won; Jung, Ji Hyun; Yi, Sang Mi; Kim, Hye Jung; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gonsup; Jung, Jin-Myung; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Hong, Soon Chan

    2013-11-01

    Citrus fruits have been used as edible fruit and a component of traditional medicine for various diseases including cancer since ancient times. Herein, we investigated the anticancer activity of flavonoids of Citrus unshiu Marc. (FCM) focusing on anti-metastatic effects. We prepared FCM and performed experiments using MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. FCM inhibited TNF-induced cancer cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) without showing any toxicity. FCM inhibited the expression of VCAM-1, but not of ICAM-1, on MDA-MB-231 cells as well as HUVECs. FCM inhibited protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation, but not Akt phosphorylation. FCM also inhibited cancer cell invasion in a dose-dependent manner, but not MMP-9 expression. In conclusion, this study suggested that FCM inhibits TNF-induced cancer cell adhesion to HUVECs by inhibiting VCAM-1 through inhibition of PKC, providing evidence that FCM have anti-metastatic activity by inhibiting adhesion molecules and invasion on human breast cancer cells.

  2. Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloy 3SR in HCl by Polyvinylpyrrolidone and Polyacrylamide:. Effect of Molecular Structure on Inhibition Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoren, S. A.

    The inhibitive performance of two water soluble polymers-polyacrylamide (PA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on the corrosion behavior of aluminum alloy 3SR in HCl solution was investigated using weight loss, hydrogen evolution, and thermometric methods at 30-60°C. Results obtained indicate that both polymers inhibited acid-induced corrosion of aluminum at the temperatures studied. PVP was found to be a better corrosion inhibitor than PA. All measurements from the three techniques show that inhibition efficiencies increase with increase in inhibitor concentration and decrease with increase in temperature. This indicates that the inhibitive actions of the polymers were mainly due to adsorption. Adsorption of these inhibitors follows Temkin and El-Awady adsorption isotherm models. Kinetic/thermodynamic parameters (Ea, Kads, Δ G{ o}{ ads}) of adsorption of the studied inhibitors reveal that the adsorption was physical in nature and spontaneous. Differences in inhibition efficiency of the two polymers could be linked to their differences in molecular structure.

  3. The mechanism of chondrogenesis inhibition by X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jong Yeol; Lim, Young Bin; Lee, Yoon Ae; Sonn, Jong Kyung [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon Il [Taegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanism of inhibition of chondrogenic differentiation by X-irradiation. Cultures of chick limb bud mesenchymal cells were exposed to various dose of X-ray and chondrogenesis was examined. X-irradiation inhibited accumulation of proteoglycan based on the observation of alcian blue staining and expression of chondorcyte specific-type II collagen. X-irradiation also inhibited expression of protein kinase Ca while expression of PKC{lambda}({iota}, {epsilon} was not altered. Expression of Erk-1 was not changed by X-irradiation but phosphorylation of Erk-1 was increased. In addition, inhibition of Erk-1 phosphorylation by PD98059 overcame inhibitory effect of X-irradiation on the chondrogenic differentiation. PNA staining data showed that X-irradiation inhibited cellular aggregation. Taken together, these results suggest that X-irradiation inhibits chondrogenic differentiation by inhibiting cellular aggregation and suppressing expression of PKCa and promoting phosphorylation of Erk-1. In addition to above pathway, our results also suggest that X-irradiation may exerts its inhibitory effect by another signaling pathways.

  4. Cadmium ion inhibition of quorum signalling in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, Starla G; Kumar, Manish; Vega, Leticia M; McLean, Robert J C

    2017-10-01

    Single-celled bacteria are capable of acting as a community by sensing and responding to population density via quorum signalling. Quorum signalling in Chromobacterium violaceum, mediated by the luxI/R homologue, cviI/R, regulates a variety of phenotypes including violacein pigmentation, virulence and biofilm formation. A number of biological and organic molecules have been described as quorum signalling inhibitors but, to date, metal-based inhibitors have not been widely tested. In this study, we show that quorum sensing is inhibited in C. violaceum in the presence of sub-lethal concentrations of cadmium salts. Notable Cd2+-inhibition was seen against pigmentation, motility, chitinase production and biofilm formation. Cd-inhibition of quorum-signalling genes occurred at the level of transcription. There was no direct inhibition of chitinase activity by Cd2+ at the concentrations tested. Addition of the cognate quorum signals, N-hexanoyl homoserine lactone or N-decanoyl homoserine lactone, even at concentrations in excess of physiological levels, did not reverse the inhibition, suggesting that Cd-inhibition of quorum signaling is irreversible. This study represents the first description of heavy metal-based quorum inhibition in C. violaceum.

  5. Neural correlates of central inhibition during physical fatigue.

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    Masaaki Tanaka

    Full Text Available Central inhibition plays a pivotal role in determining physical performance during physical fatigue. Classical conditioning of central inhibition is believed to be associated with the pathophysiology of chronic fatigue. We tried to determine whether classical conditioning of central inhibition can really occur and to clarify the neural mechanisms of central inhibition related to classical conditioning during physical fatigue using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Eight right-handed volunteers participated in this study. We used metronome sounds as conditioned stimuli and maximum handgrip trials as unconditioned stimuli to cause central inhibition. Participants underwent MEG recording during imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by metronome sounds for 10 min. Thereafter, fatigue-inducing maximum handgrip trials were performed for 10 min; the metronome sounds were started 5 min after the beginning of the handgrip trials. The next day, neural activities during imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by metronome sounds were measured for 10 min. Levels of fatigue sensation and sympathetic nerve activity on the second day were significantly higher relative to those of the first day. Equivalent current dipoles (ECDs in the posterior cingulated cortex (PCC, with latencies of approximately 460 ms, were observed in all the participants on the second day, although ECDs were not identified in any of the participants on the first day. We demonstrated that classical conditioning of central inhibition can occur and that the PCC is involved in the neural substrates of central inhibition related to classical conditioning during physical fatigue.

  6. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-09-24

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases.

  7. The development of children's inhibition: does parenting matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, Isabelle; Stievenart, Marie; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Noël, Marie-Pascale

    2014-06-01

    Whereas a large body of research has investigated the maturation of inhibition in relation to the prefrontal cortex, far less research has been devoted to environmental factors that could contribute to inhibition improvement. The aim of the current study was to test whether and to what extent parenting matters for inhibition development from 2 to 8years of age. Data were collected from 421 families, with 348 mother-child dyads and 342 father-child dyads participating. Children's inhibition capacities and parenting behaviors were assessed in a three-wave longitudinal data collection. The main analyses examined the impact of parenting on the development of children's inhibition capacities. They were conducted using a multilevel modeling (MLM) framework. The results lead to the conclusion that both mothers and fathers contribute through their child-rearing behavior to their children's executive functioning, even when controlling for age-related improvement (maturation) and important covariates such as gender, verbal IQ, and place of enrollment. More significant relations between children's inhibition development and parenting were displayed for mothers than for fathers. More precisely, parenting behaviors that involve higher monitoring, lower discipline, inconsistency and negative controlling, and a positive parenting style are associated with good development of inhibition capacities in children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Caries inhibition around gallium alloy by fluoride releasing resin cement

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    Nasman Nur'alim

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride-releasing materials inhibit secondary caries. Gallium alloy has been developed to replace mercury-based amalgam. The purpose of this study was to test a new F releasing resin-ionomer cement for inhibition of 24 extracted human premolars. The experimental cavity (ARG were filled using etching, priming, and F releasing resin-ionomer cement (All-bond 2 & Presinomer, Bisco followed by condensation of gallium alloy (G Tokuriki Honten, Japan. Three different controls were used: gallium alloy only (G, no etching, Presinomer, gallium alloy (RG, etching, priming, non-F cement (All-bond C&B, Bisco and gallium alloy (ACG The teeth were thermocycled 500x, stored in humidor 28 days, then exposed to artificial caries for 21 days using a strep. mutans culture. Next, they were sectioned and examined by microradiography. The microradiographs were examined for the presence of a caries inhibition zone near the restoration and classified as strongly inhibited (SI, moderately inhibited (MI or not inhibited (N at the enamel and dentin wall. A Chi-square analysis showed that G is different from ARG, ACG is different from ARG, and RG is different from ACG (p<0.05. The results show that the fluoride-releasing resin-ionomer cement provided caries inhibition with or without etching and bonding and that etching and bonding alone is not as effective as fluoride release.

  9. BET bromodomain inhibition promotes neurogenesis while inhibiting gliogenesis in neural progenitor cells

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    Jingjun Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells and progenitor cells (NPCs are increasingly appreciated to hold great promise for regenerative medicine to treat CNS injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. However, evidence for effective stimulation of neuronal production from endogenous or transplanted NPCs for neuron replacement with small molecules remains limited. To identify novel chemical entities/targets for neurogenesis, we had established a NPC phenotypic screen assay and validated it using known small-molecule neurogenesis inducers. Through screening small molecule libraries with annotated targets, we identified BET bromodomain inhibition as a novel mechanism for enhancing neurogenesis. BET bromodomain proteins, Brd2, Brd3, and Brd4 were found to be downregulated in NPCs upon differentiation, while their levels remain unaltered in proliferating NPCs. Consistent with the pharmacological study using bromodomain selective inhibitor (+-JQ-1, knockdown of each BET protein resulted in an increase in the number of neurons with simultaneous reduction in both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Gene expression profiling analysis demonstrated that BET bromodomain inhibition induced a broad but specific transcription program enhancing directed differentiation of NPCs into neurons while suppressing cell cycle progression and gliogenesis. Together, these results highlight a crucial role of BET proteins as epigenetic regulators in NPC development and suggest a therapeutic potential of BET inhibitors in treating brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Resveratrol Inhibited Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Through Inhibiting STAT-3 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Dan; Zhao, Qing Chun; Shi, Tao; Chen, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Resveratrol has demonstrated many beneficial effects against cancers; however, the mechanism remains unclear. Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for 80% of lung cancers. The present study was designed to observe the effects and related mechanisms of resveratrol on non-small cell lung cancer in in vitro A549 cells. The anticancer effects of resveratrol were analyzed on cell viability, migration and invasion, proliferation and apoptosis. Cell viability was determined by sulphorhodamine B assays. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry and migration and invasion by transwell chamber analysis. Expression of STAT-3 was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. Overexpressing vector of STAT-3 was also constructed and transfected into A549 cells to observe the effects of resveratrol on STAT-3 signaling. The results showed that resveratrol displayed a dose-dependent and time-dependent cytotoxicity action on A549 cell viability. Resveratrol also inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion and promoted apoptosis in a time-dependent manner from 0-72 hours. Further study showed that resveratrol inhibited the messenger RNA and protein expression of STAT-3, and overexpressed STAT-3 abolished the effects of resveratrol on proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion totally or in part. These results suggest that the anticancer effects of resveratrol are mediated by STAT-3 signaling. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition factors and Kinetic model for ammonium inhibition on the anammox process of the SNAD biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaoming; Li, Jun; Ma, Jing; Du, Jia; Wang, Fan; Bian, Wei; Zhang, Yanzhuo; Zhao, Baihang

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity of simultaneous partial nitrification, anammox and denitrification (SNAD) biofilm with different substrate concentrations and pH values. Kaldnes rings taken from the SNAD biofilm reactor were incubated in batch tests to determine the anammox activity. Haldane model was applied to investigate the ammonium inhibition on anammox process. As for nitrite inhibition, the NH 4 + -N removal rate of anammox process remained 87.4% of the maximum rate with the NO 2 - -N concentration of 100mg/L. Based on the results of Haldane model, no obvious difference in kinetic coefficients was observed under high or low free ammonia (FA) conditions, indicating that ammonium rather than FA was the true inhibitor for anammox process of SNAD biofilm. With the pH value of 7.0, the r max , Ks and K I of ammonium were 0.209kg NO 2 - -N/kg VSS/day, 9.5mg/L and 422mg/L, respectively. The suitable pH ranges for anammox process were 5.0 to 9.0. These results indicate that the SNAD biofilm performs excellent tolerance to adverse conditions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Synthesis of novel benzimidazole acrylonitriles for inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum growth by dual target inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kalicharan; Shrivastava, Apeksha; Mehra, Ram N; Deora, Girdhar S; Alam, Mohammad M; Zaman, Mohammad S; Akhter, Mymoona

    2017-12-11

    Antimalarial drug resistance has emerged as a threat for treating malaria, generating a need to design and develop newer, more efficient antimalarial agents. This research aimed to identify novel leads as antimalarials. Dual receptor mechanism could be a good strategy to combat developing drug resistance. A series of benzimidazole acrylonitriles containing 18 compounds were designed, synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxicity, heme binding, ferriprotoporphyrin IX biomineralisation inhibition, and falcipain-2 enzyme assay. Furthermore, in silico docking and MD simulation studies were also performed.The tests revealed quite encouraging results. Three compounds, viz. R-01 (0.69 μM), R-04 (1.60 μM), and R-08 (1.61 μM), were found to have high antimalarial activity. These compounds were found to be in bearable cytotoxicity limits and their biological assay suggested that they had inhibitory activity against falcipain-2 and hemozoin formation. The docking revealed the binding mode of benzimidazole acrylonitrile derivatives and MD simulation studies revealed that the protein-ligand complex was stable. The agents exhibit good hemozoin formation inhibition activity and, hence, may be utilized as leads to design a newer drug class to overcome the drug resistance of hemozoin formation inhibitors such as chloroquine. © 2017 Deutsche Pharmazeutische Gesellschaft.

  13. Inhibition of auxin movement from the shoot into the root inhibits lateral root development in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. C.; Brady, S. R.; Muday, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    In roots two distinct polar movements of auxin have been reported that may control different developmental and growth events. To test the hypothesis that auxin derived from the shoot and transported toward the root controls lateral root development, the two polarities of auxin transport were uncoupled in Arabidopsis. Local application of the auxin-transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) at the root-shoot junction decreased the number and density of lateral roots and reduced the free indoleacetic acid (IAA) levels in the root and [3H]IAA transport into the root. Application of NPA to the basal half of or at several positions along the root only reduced lateral root density in regions that were in contact with NPA or in regions apical to the site of application. Lateral root development was restored by application of IAA apical to NPA application. Lateral root development in Arabidopsis roots was also inhibited by excision of the shoot or dark growth and this inhibition was reversible by IAA. Together, these results are consistent with auxin transport from the shoot into the root controlling lateral root development.

  14. Sex differences in emotional contexts modulation on response inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Loyo, Julieta; Angulo-Chavira, Armando; Llamas-Alonso, Luis A; González-Garrido, Andrés A

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore sex differences in the effects that emotional contexts exert on the temporal course of response inhibition using event-related potentials (ERP). Participants performed a Go-NoGo response inhibition task under 3 context conditions: with 1) neutral background stimuli, and 2) pleasant, and 3) unpleasant emotional contexts. No sex differences were found in relation to accuracy. Women showed higher N2NoGo amplitudes than men in both emotional contexts; whereas during inhibition men tended to show higher P3NoGo amplitudes than women in the unpleasant context. Both groups experienced a relevant effect of the presence of the unpleasant context during inhibition processing, as shown by the enhancement of the N2NoGo amplitudes in frontal regions compared to results from the neutral and pleasant conditions. In addition, women showed differences between the pleasant and unpleasant contexts, with the latter inducing higher amplitude values. Only in men did inhibition accuracy correlate with higher N2NoGo and lower P3NoGo amplitudes in the emotional context conditions. These findings suggest that when an inhibition task is performed in an emotionally-neutral background context no sex differences are observed in either accuracy or ERP components. However, when the emotional context was introduced -especially the unpleasant one- some gender differences did become evident. The higher N2NoGo amplitude at the presence of the unpleasant context may reflect an effect on attention and conflict monitoring. In addition, results suggest that during earlier processing stages, women invested more resources to process inhibition than men. Furthermore, men who invested more neural resources during earlier stages showed better response inhibition than those who did it during later processing stages, more closely-related to cognitive and motor inhibition processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanism of Inhibition of Estrogen Biosynthesis by Azole Fungicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbuta, Chinaza; Lo, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Biosynthesis of estrogens from androgens is catalyzed by cytochrome P450 aromatase. Aromatase inhibition by the triazole compounds letrozole (LTZ) and anastrozole is a prevalent therapy for estrogen-dependent postmenopausal breast cancer. Azoles are widely used as agricultural fungicides and antimycotic drugs that target 14α-demethylase. Some were previously shown to inhibit aromatase, thereby raising the possibility of endocrine disruptive effects. However, mechanistic analysis of their inhibition has never been undertaken. We have evaluated the inhibitory effects of 3 common fungicides, bifonazole, imazalil, and flusilazole, in human aromatase purified from placenta and compared them with LTZ, the most potent inhibitor of aromatase. Bifonazole exhibits strong inhibitory effects with an IC50 of 270nM and Ki (Michaeles-Menten inhibition constant) of 68nM, compared with 10nM and 13nM, respectively, for LTZ. The IC50 and Ki are 1100nM and 278nM for imazilil and 3200nM and 547nM for flusilazole, respectively. Analyses of inhibition kinetics suggest that the modes of inhibition by azole fungicides are mixed or competitive, whereas LTZ inhibition could be noncompetitive or mixed. We interpret the inhibition mechanism in the context of the x-ray structure of aromatase-androstenedione complex. Structural data show that aromatase has 3 binding pockets in relation to the heme. The substrate-binding cavity at the heme-distal site closely compliments the structures of the natural substrate, androstenedione, and steroidal aromatase inhibitors. Because the structures of LTZ and the azole fungicides are entirely dissimilar to the androstenedione backbone, the azoles possibly inhibit by binding to a structurally rearranged active site, the 2 other catalytically important sites, or both, in agreement with the kinetics data. PMID:25243857

  16. Inhibition of the cooperative adhesion of Streptococcus sanguis to hydroxylapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X H; Rosenberg, M; Doyle, R J

    1990-09-15

    The adhesion of Streptococcus sanguis to hydroxylapatite is a process involving several adhesins and receptors. Binding isotherms and Scatchard plots of the adhesion suggest that cooperative interactions occur at low cell densities. It was found that sulfolane, a hydrophobic-bond diluent, was capable of inhibiting the cooperative adhesion of S. sanguis to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite beads. Sodium thiocyanate, a chaotropic agent, inhibited not only cooperative adhesion, but also the adhesion thought to result from noncooperative interactions. It is suggested that strong chaotropic agents may not only inhibit adhesin-receptor complexes, but also may influence the secondary/tertiary structures of interacting species.

  17. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibits TREK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kréneisz, Orsolya; Benoit, Justin P; Bayliss, Douglas A; Mulkey, Daniel K

    2009-12-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase activated by conditions that increase the AMP : ATP ratio. In carotid body glomus cells, AMPK is thought to link changes in arterial O(2) with activation of glomus cells by inhibition of unidentified background K(+) channels. Modulation by AMPK of individual background K(+) channels has not been described. Here, we characterize effects of activated AMPK on recombinant TASK-1, TASK-3, TREK-1 and TREK-2 background K(+) channels expressed in HEK293 cells. We found that TREK-1 and TREK-2 channels but not TASK-1 or TASK-3 channels are inhibited by AMPK. AMPK-mediated inhibition of TREK involves key serine residues in the C-terminus that are also known to be important for PKA and PKC channel modulation; inhibition of TREK-1 requires Ser-300 and Ser-333 and inhibition of TREK-2 requires Ser-326 and Ser-359. Metabolic inhibition by sodium azide can also inhibit both TREK and TASK channels. The effects of azide on TREK occlude subsequent channel inhibition by AMPK and are attenuated by expression of a dominant negative catalytic subunit of AMPK (dnAMPK), suggesting that metabolic stress modulates TREK channels by an AMPK mechanism. By contrast, inhibition of TASK channels by azide was unaffected by expression of dnAMPK, suggesting an AMPK-independent mechanism. In addition, prolonged exposure (6-7 min) to hypoxia ( = 11 +/- 1 mmHg) inhibits TREK channels and this response was blocked by expression of dnAMPK. Our results identify a novel modulation of TREK channels by AMPK and indicate that select residues in the C-terminus of TREK are points of convergence for multiple signalling cascades including AMPK, PKA and PKC. To the extent that carotid body O(2) sensitivity is dependent on AMPK, our finding that TREK-1 and TREK-2 channels are inhibited by AMPK suggests that TREK channels may represent the AMPK-inhibited background K(+) channels that mediate activation of glomus cells by hypoxia.

  18. Complement inhibiting properties of dragon's blood from Croton draco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsacheva, Ivanka; Rostan, Joerg; Iossifova, Tania; Vogler, Bernhard; Odjakova, Mariela; Navas, Hernan; Kostova, Ivanka; Kojouharova, Michaela; Kraus, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    The latex of Croton draco, its extracts and several latex components have been investigated for their influence on both classical (CP) and alternative (AP) activation pathways of the complement system using a hemolytic assay. The best inhibition was found for the classical pathway. The latex, ethyl acetate and ethyl ether extracts exhibited extremely high inhibition on the CP (94, 90 and 77%, respectively) at a concentration of 1 mg/ml. The flavonoid myricitrin, the alkaloid taspine and the cyclopeptides P1 and P2 showed high inhibition on CP (83, 91, 78 and 63%, respectively) at a concentration of 0.9 mM.

  19. Quercetin inhibits hexose transport in a human diploid fibroblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salter, D.W.; Custead-Jones, S.; Cook, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    The flavonol quercetin, a phloretin analog, inhibits transport of 2-deoxyglucose and 3-O-methylglucose in a cultured human diploid fibroblast. This inhibition is related to transport itself and not to the reported effects of flavonoids on membrane-bound ATPases. From concentration-inhibition curves at several pH's we conclude that uncharged (acid) quercetin (pH = 7.65) is the inhibitory form of the molecule (K/sub I/ = 10 ..mu..m). Quercetin, unlike phloretin, is rapidly degraded in 0.1 N NaOH; the degradation products are weakly inhibitory to hexose transport.

  20. Cytochalasins inhibit arachidonic acid metabolism in thrombin-stimulated platelets.

    OpenAIRE

    Siess, W; Lapetina, E G; Cuatrecasas, P

    1982-01-01

    Low concentrations (0.5-1 microM) of cytochalasins inhibit the thrombin-stimulated polymerization of monomeric actin to filamentous actin in platelets. Similar concentrations of cytochalasin B inhibit the formation and metabolism of arachidonic acid in horse platelets stimulated by low concentrations of thrombin (0.1-0.5 unit/ml). However, the release of serotonin is not inhibited by cytochalasin B. Cytochalasins B and D (0.5-1 microM) markedly reduce, in thrombin-stimulated human or horse pl...

  1. Antibody inhibition of protein activity in starfish oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Eiichi; Hara, Masatoshi; Kishimoto, Takeo

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are widely utilized in cell and molecule biology for immunoblots, immunostaining, immunoprecipitation, immunoaffinity purification, and immunoassay. Some antibodies can be used for in vivo inhibition experiments. These antibodies bind to their target molecules and neutralize their functions, providing functional information in the study of their biological role. Here, we describe our methods for obtaining inhibitory antibodies against desired proteins. We then describe in the starfish oocyte system how to inhibit a target protein, even in the nucleus, by injection of antibody into the cytoplasm, and how to evaluate antibody inhibition of cell cycle regulators in small numbers of oocytes.

  2. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  3. Inhibiting prenylation augments chemotherapy efficacy in renal cell carcinoma through dual inhibition on mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiangrong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Peng, Xiaochun; Huang, Wei

    2017-11-18

    Prenylation is a posttranslational lipid modification required for the proper functions of a number of proteins involved in cell regulation. Here, we show that prenylation inhibition is important for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) growth, survival and response to chemotherapy, and its underlying mechanism may be contributed to mitochondrial dysfunction. We first demonstrated that a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor pitavastatin inhibited mevalonate pathway and thereby prenylation in RCC cells. In addition, pitavastatin is effective in inhibiting growth and inducing apoptosis in a panel of RCC cell lines. Combination of pitavastatin and paclitaxel is significantly more effective than pitavastatin or paclitaxel alone as shown by both in vitro cell culture system and in vivo RCC xenograft model. Importantly, pitavastatin treatment inhibits mitochondrial respiration via suppressing mitochondrial complex I and II enzyme activities. Interestingly, different from mitochondrial inhibitor phenformin that inhibits mitochondrial respiration but activates glycolytic rate in RCC cells, pitavastatin significantly decreases glycolytic rate. The dual inhibitory action of pitavastatin on mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis results in remarkable energy depletion and oxidative stress in RCC cells. In addition, inhibition of prenylation by depleting Isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase (Icmt) also mimics the inhibitory effects of pitavastatin in RCC cells. Our work demonstrates the previously unappreciated association between prenylation inhibition and energy metabolism in RCC, which can be therapeutically exploited, likely in tumors that largely rely on energy metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Irreversible inhibition of RANK expression as a possible mechanism for IL-3 inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khapli, Shruti M.; Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Gupta, Navita; Yogesha, S.D.; Pote, Satish T. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} IL-3 inhibits receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. {yields} IL-3 inhibits RANKL-induced JNK activation. {yields} IL-3 down-regulates expression of c-Fos and NFATc1 transcription factors. {yields} IL-3 down-regulates RANK expression posttranscriptionally and irreversibly. {yields} IL-3 inhibits in vivo RANK expression. -- Abstract: IL-3, a cytokine secreted by activated T lymphocytes, stimulates the proliferation, differentiation and survival of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of inhibitory action of IL-3 on osteoclast differentiation. We show here that IL-3 significantly inhibits receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK) ligand (RANKL)-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). IL-3 down-regulates expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1) transcription factors. In addition, IL-3 down-regulates RANK expression posttranscriptionally in both purified osteoclast precursors and whole bone marrow cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of IL-3 on RANK expression was irreversible. Interestingly, IL-3 inhibits in vivo RANK expression in mice. Thus, we provide the first evidence that IL-3 irreversibly inhibits RANK expression that results in inhibition of important signaling molecules induced by RANKL.

  5. Inhibiting multiple mode vibration in controlled flexible systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, James M.; Chang, Kenneth W.; Seering, Warren P.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on inhibiting multiple mode vibration in controlled flexible systems are presented. Topics covered include: input pre-shaping background; developing multiple-mode shapers; Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) test article; and tests and results.

  6. Inhibition of cholera toxin by human milk fractions and sialyllactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idota, T; Kawakami, H; Murakami, Y; Sugawara, M

    1995-03-01

    The effects of human milk fractions on clolera toxin B subunit binding to monosialoganglioside 1 (GM1) were investigated. Human milk, human defatted milk, whey, and a low-molecular-weight fraction of human milk inhibited the binding, but casein did not inhibit it. The inhibitory activity of whey from bovine-milk-based infant formula was less than that of whey from human milk. Differences in composition between human and bovine whey seemed to influence the extent of the inhibitory activity. Sialylated oligosaccharides were considered to be the possible components that inhibited cholera toxin. The effects of sialyllactose, a predominant sialylated component of human milk, on cholera toxin-induced diarrhea were investigated by the rabbit intestinal loop method. Sialyllactose inhibited the cholera toxin inducing fluid accumulation, although neither sialic acid nor lactose had an effect on it. The results suggest that sialyllactose is responsible for the inhibitory activity of milk on cholera toxin.

  7. Rofecoxib inhibits heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, H.J. van der; Koorevaar, R.C.; Lemmens, J.A.M.; Kampen, A. van; Schreurs, B.W.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) prevent heterotopic ossification but gastrointestinal complaints are frequently. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibiting NSAID produce less gastrointestinal side effects. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective two-stage study design for

  8. In vitro inhibition of pathogenic Verticillium dahliae , causal agent of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro inhibition of pathogenic Verticillium dahliae, causal agent of potato wilt disease in China by Trichoderma isolates. C Xiaojun, S Wongkaew, Y Jie, Y Xuehui, H Haiyong, W Shiping, T Qigqun, W Lishuang, D Athinuwat, N Buensanteai ...

  9. Melanogenesis inhibition activity of floralginsenoside A from Panax ginseng berry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Young Lee

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: FGA showed the most potent inhibition of melanogenesis in both in vitro and in vivo studies. This study suggests that FGA purified from P. ginseng may be an effective melanogenesis inhibitor.

  10. Overcoming heat shock protein inhibition at critical temperature vital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Overcoming heat shock protein inhibition at critical temperature vital for survival in Solanum tuberosum L. in vivo condition. Bengyella Louis, Pranab Roy, Tamgue Ousman, Sayanika Waikhom Devi, Narayan Chandra Talukdar ...

  11. Functional mechanisms involved in the internal inhibition of taboo words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severens, Els; Kühn, Simone; Hartsuiker, Robert J; Brass, Marcel

    2012-04-01

    The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate brain processes associated with the inhibition of socially undesirable speech. It is tested whether the inhibition of undesirable speech is solely related to brain areas associated with classical stop signal tasks or rather also involves brain areas involved in endogenous self-control. During the experiment, subjects had to do a SLIP task, which was designed to elicit taboo or neutral spoonerisms. Here we show that the internal inhibition of taboo words activates the right inferior frontal gyrus, an area that has previously been associated with externally triggered inhibition. This finding strongly suggests that external social rules become internalized and act as a stop-signal.

  12. Somatosensory Integration Controlled by Dynamic Thalamocortical Feed-Forward Inhibition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gabernet, Laetitia; Jadhav, Shantanu P; Feldman, Daniel E; Carandini, Matteo; Scanziani, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    .... Here, we show that in the rodent barrel cortex, the temporal window for integration of thalamic inputs is under the control of thalamocortical feed-forward inhibition and can vary from 1 to 10 ms...

  13. synthesis, DNA interaction and comparison of lipase inhibition propert

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GÜNAY KAYA KANTAR

    obesity agent acting locally in the gastrointestinal tract by reversibly inhibiting pancreatic and gastric lipases. Pancreatic and gastric lipases are involved in the disruption of long chain triglycerides. Controlling obesity with orlistat is limited because.

  14. Growth Inhibition of Grain Spoilage Fungi by Selected Herbs and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) and Thymus schimperi (thymus) were found to be the most effective. However piper nigrum (black pepper) had no effect on the test organisms. In MIC, spore germination inhibition and grain protection assay, cinnamon essential oil was found ...

  15. Inhibiting DNA Polymerases as a Therapeutic Intervention against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Berdis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibiting DNA synthesis is an important therapeutic strategy that is widely used to treat a number of hyperproliferative diseases including viral infections, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. This chapter describes two major categories of therapeutic agents used to inhibit DNA synthesis. The first category includes purine and pyrmidine nucleoside analogs that directly inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The second category includes DNA damaging agents including cisplatin and chlorambucil that modify the composition and structure of the nucleic acid substrate to indirectly inhibit DNA synthesis. Special emphasis is placed on describing the molecular mechanisms of these inhibitory effects against chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA polymerases. Discussions are also provided on the mechanisms associated with resistance to these therapeutic agents. A primary focus is toward understanding the roles of specialized DNA polymerases that by-pass DNA lesions produced by DNA damaging agents. Finally, a section is provided that describes emerging areas in developing new therapeutic strategies targeting specialized DNA polymerases.

  16. Inhibition of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E 2 Expression by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E 2 Expression by Methanol Extract of Polyopes affinis in Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 Microglial Cells through Suppression of Akt-dependent NF-kB Activity and MAPK Pathway.

  17. Acute Simvastatin Inhibits KATP Channels of Porcine Coronary Artery Myocytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seto, Sai Wang; Au, Alice Lai Shan; Poon, Christina Chui Wa; Zhang, Qian; Li, Rachel Wai Sum; Yeung, John Hok Keung; Kong, Siu Kai; Ngai, Sai Ming; Wan, Song; Ho, Ho Pui; Lee, Simon Ming Yuen; Hoi, Maggie Pui Man; Chan, Shun Wan; Leung, George Pak Heng; Kwan, Yiu Wa

    2013-01-01

    ...]o uptake measurements. Results The cromakalim (10 nM to 10 µM)- and pinacidil (10 nM to 10 µM)-induced concentration-dependent relaxation of porcine coronary artery was inhibited by simvastatin...

  18. Nitric oxide inhibits glycogen synthesis in isolated rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, F.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Romijn, J. A.; van Woerkom, G. M.; Meijer, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the existence of intrahepatic regulation of glucose metabolism by Kupffer cell products. Nitric oxide (NO) is known to inhibit gluconeogenic flux through pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. However, NO may also influence glucose metabolism at

  19. Behavioural inhibition: is it a risk factor for anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahat, Ayelet; Hong, Melanie; Fox, Nathan A

    2011-06-01

    Behavioural inhibition is a stable temperamental trait that is identifiable during infancy and toddlerhood and is characterized by fearful reactivity to novelty. Children identified as behaviourally inhibited have been shown to be at increased risk for developing anxiety disorders such as social phobia. The current review addresses the link between behavioural inhibition and the risk for developing anxiety disorders. Research suggests that this risk may be modulated by a number of extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Extrinsic factors include particular parental beliefs, parenting styles, and childrearing contexts. Intrinsic factors include executive function capacities such as attention bias, attention shifting, inhibitory control, and self-monitoring. In the present paper we review the contribution of these factors to the development of anxiety in behaviourally inhibited children.

  20. Serum factors affecting the cell migration inhibition response to lepromin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliess, E L; Ruibal-Ares, B; Braun, M

    1975-01-01

    Cell migration inhibition of white blood cells in the presence of total protein lepromin (TPL) was studied in ten lepromatous patients, six tuberculoid patients, and ten normal controls; adding normal, tuberculoid, lepromatous, or no serum to the culture medium. Using normal or no serum, lepromatous patients and skin negative controls gave negative reactions, while tuberculoid patients and skin positive controls gave positive cell migration inhibitions. The addition of lepromatous serum gave a very significant overall increase of migration indices in all groups of subjects, turning to negative the positive reactions of lepromatous patients and positive controls. On the contrary, the addition of tuberculoid serum gave a decrease of migration index in all groups of subjects, turning to positive the reactions in lepromatous patients. The significance of these circulating factors, able to enhance or inhibit cell migration inhibition responses in patients and controls, is discussed.